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Sample records for white matter anisotropy

  1. White matter fractional anisotropy predicts balance performance in older adults.

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    Van Impe, Annouchka; Coxon, James P; Goble, Daniel J; Doumas, Mihail; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2012-09-01

    Aging is characterized by brain structural changes that may compromise motor functions. In the context of postural control, white matter integrity is crucial for the efficient transfer of visual, proprioceptive and vestibular feedback in the brain. To determine the role of age-related white matter decline as a function of the sensory feedback necessary to correct posture, we acquired diffusion weighted images in young and old subjects. A force platform was used to measure changes in body posture under conditions of compromised proprioceptive and/or visual feedback. In the young group, no significant brain structure-balance relations were found. In the elderly however, the integrity of a cluster in the frontal forceps explained 21% of the variance in postural control when proprioceptive information was compromised. Additionally, when only the vestibular system supplied reliable information, the occipital forceps was the best predictor of balance performance (42%). Age-related white matter decline may thus be predictive of balance performance in the elderly when sensory systems start to degrade. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vestibular loss and balance training cause similar changes in human cerebral white matter fractional anisotropy.

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    Nadine Hummel

    Full Text Available Patients with bilateral vestibular loss suffer from severe balance deficits during normal everyday movements. Ballet dancers, figure skaters, or slackliners, in contrast, are extraordinarily well trained in maintaining balance for the extreme balance situations that they are exposed to. Both training and disease can lead to changes in the diffusion properties of white matter that are related to skill level or disease progression respectively. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to compare white matter diffusivity between these two study groups and their age- and sex-matched controls. We found that vestibular patients and balance-trained subjects show a reduction of fractional anisotropy in similar white matter tracts, due to a relative increase in radial diffusivity (perpendicular to the main diffusion direction. Reduced fractional anisotropy was not only found in sensory and motor areas, but in a widespread network including long-range connections, limbic and association pathways. The reduced fractional anisotropy did not correlate with any cognitive, disease-related or skill-related factors. The similarity in FA between the two study groups, together with the absence of a relationship between skill or disease factors and white matter changes, suggests a common mechanism for these white matter differences. We propose that both study groups must exert increased effort to meet their respective usual balance requirements. Since balance training has been shown to effectively reduce the symptoms of vestibular failure, the changes in white matter shown here may represent a neuronal mechanism for rehabilitation.

  3. Vestibular loss and balance training cause similar changes in human cerebral white matter fractional anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Nadine; Hüfner, Katharina; Stephan, Thomas; Linn, Jennifer; Kremmyda, Olympia; Brandt, Thomas; Flanagin, Virginia L

    2014-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss suffer from severe balance deficits during normal everyday movements. Ballet dancers, figure skaters, or slackliners, in contrast, are extraordinarily well trained in maintaining balance for the extreme balance situations that they are exposed to. Both training and disease can lead to changes in the diffusion properties of white matter that are related to skill level or disease progression respectively. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to compare white matter diffusivity between these two study groups and their age- and sex-matched controls. We found that vestibular patients and balance-trained subjects show a reduction of fractional anisotropy in similar white matter tracts, due to a relative increase in radial diffusivity (perpendicular to the main diffusion direction). Reduced fractional anisotropy was not only found in sensory and motor areas, but in a widespread network including long-range connections, limbic and association pathways. The reduced fractional anisotropy did not correlate with any cognitive, disease-related or skill-related factors. The similarity in FA between the two study groups, together with the absence of a relationship between skill or disease factors and white matter changes, suggests a common mechanism for these white matter differences. We propose that both study groups must exert increased effort to meet their respective usual balance requirements. Since balance training has been shown to effectively reduce the symptoms of vestibular failure, the changes in white matter shown here may represent a neuronal mechanism for rehabilitation.

  4. The brain subcortical white matter and aging: A quantitative fractional anisotropy analysis

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    Eliasz Engelhardt

    Full Text Available Abstract To study the integrity of hemispheric subcortical white matter by comparing normal young and elderly subjects using quantitative fractional anisotropy (DTI-FA. Methods: Subjects of two different age groups (young=12, elderly=12 were included. MR - GE Signa Horizon - 1.5T scans were performed. Cases with Fazekas scores £3 were assessed on FLAIR sequence. Standard parameters for DTI-FA were used. ROIs were placed at various sites of the subcortical white matter, and the genu and splenium of the midline corpus callosum. Analysis was performed using Functool. Statistics for anterior and posterior white matter, as well as the genu and splenium were compared between the groups. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of IPUB-UFRJ and informed consent obtained. Results: DTI-FA showed lower anisotropy values in the anterior region (subcortical white matter and genu, but not in the posterior region (subcortical white matter and splenium, in elderly normal subjects compared to young subjects. Conclusion: The results may represent loss of integrity of anterior (frontal white matter fibers in the elderly subjects. These fibers constitute important intra- and inter-hemispheric tracts, components of neural networks that provide cognitive, behavioral, motor and sensory integration. The loss of integrity of the anterior segments of the studied fiber systems with ageing, represents a disconnection process that may underlie clinical manifestations found in elderly subjects such as executive dysfunction.

  5. A torque balance measurement of anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility in white matter.

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    van Gelderen, Peter; Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A; Duyn, Jeff H

    2015-11-01

    Recent MRI studies have suggested that the magnetic susceptibility of white matter (WM) in the human brain is anisotropic, providing a new contrast mechanism for the visualization of fiber bundles and allowing the extraction of cellular compartment-specific information. This study provides an independent confirmation and quantification of this anisotropy. Anisotropic magnetic susceptibility results in a torque exerted on WM when placed in a uniform magnetic field, tending to align the WM fibers with the field. To quantify the effect, excised spinal cord samples were placed in a torque balance inside the magnet of a 7 T MRI system and the magnetic torque was measured as function of orientation. All tissue samples (n = 5) showed orienting effects, confirming the presence of anisotropic susceptibility. Analysis of the magnetic torque resulted in reproducible values for the WM volume anisotropy that ranged from 13.6 to 19.2 ppb. The independently determined anisotropy values confirm estimates inferred from MRI experiments and validate the use of anisotropy to extract novel information about brain fiber structure and myelination. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Alterations of white matter fractional anisotropy in unmedicated obsessive–compulsive disorder

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    Tao J

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jiong Tao,1,2 Xianglan Wang,2 Zhiyong Zhong,1,2 Hongying Han,2 Sha Liu,3 Shenglin Wen,4 Nianhong Guan,2 Lingjiang Li1 1Mental Health Institute of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 2Department of Psychiatry, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, 3Department of Radiology, Guangzhou Huiai Hospital, Guangzhou, 4Department of Psychiatry, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai, People’s Republic of China Background: Abnormalities in white matter (WM have previously been reported in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD. However, there was some inconsistency in the results obtained for altered regions of WM. The aim of this study was to investigate fractional anisotropy (FA in the WM of the whole brain in patients with OCD by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI.Methods: In total, 28 unmedicated patients with OCD and 28 healthy volunteers underwent DTI scan. A voxel-based analysis was used to compare FA values in WM of the two groups at a voxel threshold of P<0.005 with an extent threshold of k>72 voxels (P<0.05; Alphasim correction. Subsequently, correlation analysis was conducted in order to find the correlation between the mean FA values in significantly altered brain regions and Yale–Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS scores of the OCD patients.Results: Compared with healthy volunteers, the OCD patients had lower FA value in the left lingual gyrus, right midbrain, and right precuneus. There were no regions with significantly higher FA values in OCD patients compared with healthy volunteers. The mean FA values in the above regions (left lingual, r=0.019, P=0.923; right midbrain, r=-0.208, P=0.289; and right precuneus, r=-0.273, P=0.161 had no significant correlation with the Y-BOCS scores of the OCD patients.Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that alterations in WM of the left lingual gyrus, right midbrain, and right precuneus are associated

  7. White matter anisotropy in the ventral language pathway predicts sound-to-word learning success.

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    Wong, Francis C K; Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Garibaldi, Kyla; Wong, Patrick C M

    2011-06-15

    According to the dual stream model of auditory language processing, the dorsal stream is responsible for mapping sound to articulation and the ventral stream plays the role of mapping sound to meaning. Most researchers agree that the arcuate fasciculus (AF) is the neuroanatomical correlate of the dorsal steam; however, less is known about what constitutes the ventral one. Nevertheless, two hypotheses exist: one suggests that the segment of the AF that terminates in middle temporal gyrus corresponds to the ventral stream, and the other suggests that it is the extreme capsule that underlies this sound-to-meaning pathway. The goal of this study was to evaluate these two competing hypotheses. We trained participants with a sound-to-word learning paradigm in which they learned to use a foreign phonetic contrast for signaling word meaning. Using diffusion tensor imaging, a brain-imaging tool to investigate white matter connectivity in humans, we found that fractional anisotropy in the left parietal-temporal region positively correlated with the performance in sound-to-word learning. In addition, fiber tracking revealed a ventral pathway, composed of the extreme capsule and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, that mediated auditory comprehension. Our findings provide converging evidence supporting the importance of the ventral steam, an extreme capsule system, in the frontal-temporal language network. Implications for current models of speech processing are also discussed.

  8. Decreased and Increased Anisotropy along Major Cerebral White Matter Tracts in Preterm Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Travis, Katherine E.; Adams, Jenna N.; Ben-Shachar, Michal; Feldman, Heidi M.

    2015-01-01

    Premature birth is highly prevalent and associated with neurodevelopmental delays and disorders. Adverse outcomes, particularly in children born before 32 weeks of gestation, have been attributed in large part to white matter injuries, often found in periventricular regions using conventional imaging. To date, tractography studies of white matter pathways in children and adolescents born preterm have evaluated only a limited number of tracts simultaneously. The current study compares diffusio...

  9. Decreased and Increased Anisotropy along Major Cerebral White Matter Tracts in Preterm Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Katherine E; Adams, Jenna N; Ben-Shachar, Michal; Feldman, Heidi M

    2015-01-01

    Premature birth is highly prevalent and associated with neurodevelopmental delays and disorders. Adverse outcomes, particularly in children born before 32 weeks of gestation, have been attributed in large part to white matter injuries, often found in periventricular regions using conventional imaging. To date, tractography studies of white matter pathways in children and adolescents born preterm have evaluated only a limited number of tracts simultaneously. The current study compares diffusion properties along 18 major cerebral white matter pathways in children and adolescents born preterm (n = 27) and full term (n = 19), using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and tractography. We found that compared to the full term group, the preterm group had significantly decreased FA in segments of the bilateral uncinate fasciculus and anterior segments of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Additionally, the preterm group had significantly increased FA in segments of the right and left anterior thalamic radiations, posterior segments of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and the right and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Increased FA in the preterm group was generally associated with decreased radial diffusivity. These findings indicate that prematurity-related white matter differences in later childhood and adolescence do not affect all tracts in the periventricular zone and can involve both decreased and increased FA. Differences in the patterns of radial diffusivity and axial diffusivity suggest that the tissue properties underlying group FA differences may vary within and across white matter tracts. Distinctive diffusion properties may relate to variations in the timing of injury in the neonatal period, extent of white matter dysmaturity and/or compensatory processes in childhood.

  10. Decreased and Increased Anisotropy along Major Cerebral White Matter Tracts in Preterm Children and Adolescents.

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    Katherine E Travis

    Full Text Available Premature birth is highly prevalent and associated with neurodevelopmental delays and disorders. Adverse outcomes, particularly in children born before 32 weeks of gestation, have been attributed in large part to white matter injuries, often found in periventricular regions using conventional imaging. To date, tractography studies of white matter pathways in children and adolescents born preterm have evaluated only a limited number of tracts simultaneously. The current study compares diffusion properties along 18 major cerebral white matter pathways in children and adolescents born preterm (n = 27 and full term (n = 19, using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and tractography. We found that compared to the full term group, the preterm group had significantly decreased FA in segments of the bilateral uncinate fasciculus and anterior segments of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Additionally, the preterm group had significantly increased FA in segments of the right and left anterior thalamic radiations, posterior segments of the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and the right and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Increased FA in the preterm group was generally associated with decreased radial diffusivity. These findings indicate that prematurity-related white matter differences in later childhood and adolescence do not affect all tracts in the periventricular zone and can involve both decreased and increased FA. Differences in the patterns of radial diffusivity and axial diffusivity suggest that the tissue properties underlying group FA differences may vary within and across white matter tracts. Distinctive diffusion properties may relate to variations in the timing of injury in the neonatal period, extent of white matter dysmaturity and/or compensatory processes in childhood.

  11. Fractional anisotropy in white matter tracts of very-low-birth-weight infants

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    Dudink, Jeroen; Lequin, Maarten; van Pul, Carola; Buijs, Jan; Conneman, Nikk; van Goudoever, Johannes; Govaert, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Advances in neonatal intensive care have not yet reduced the high incidence of neurodevelopmental disability among very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants. As neurological deficits are related to white-matter injury, early detection is important. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) could be an excellent

  12. Simultaneous changes in gray matter volume and white matter fractional anisotropy in Alzheimer's disease revealed by multimodal CCA and joint ICA.

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    Ouyang, X; Chen, K; Yao, L; Hu, B; Wu, X; Ye, Q; Guo, X

    2015-08-20

    The prominent morphometric alterations of Alzheimer's disease (AD) occur both in gray matter and in white matter. Multimodal fusion can examine joint information by combining multiple neuroimaging datasets to identify the covariant morphometric alterations in AD in greater detail. In the current study, we conducted a multimodal canonical correlation analysis and joint independent component analysis to identify the covariance patterns of the gray and white matter by fusing structural magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data of 39 AD patients (23 males and 16 females, mean age: 74.91±8.13years) and 41 normal controls (NCs) (20 males and 21 females, mean age: 73.97±6.34years) derived from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. The results revealed 25 joint independent components (ICs), of which three joint ICs exhibited strong links between the gray matter volume and the white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) and significant differences between the AD and NC group. The joint IC maps revealed that the simultaneous changes in the gray matter and FA values primarily involved the following areas: (1) the temporal lobe/hippocampus-cingulum, (2) the frontal/cingulate gyrus-corpus callosum, and (3) the temporal/occipital/parietal lobe-corpus callosum/corona radiata. Our findings suggest that gray matter atrophy is associated with reduced white matter fiber integrity in AD and possibly expand the understanding of the neuropathological mechanisms in AD. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Diffusion anisotropy color-coded map of cerebral white matter: quantitative comparison between orthogonal anisotropic diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging.

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    Uwano, Ikuko; Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Yamaguchi, Mao; Saito, Ayumi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ogawa, Akira

    2013-04-01

    Diffusion anisotropy color-coded maps of cerebral white matter can be generated from orthogonal anisotropic diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) using the three-dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) technique, but its precision has not been fully validated. Hence, we attempted to determine whether 3DAC is comparable to a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) color map. We examined 15 healthy individuals and generated color-coded maps using 3DAC as well as using primary eigenvector (e1) and fractional anisotropy (FA) from identical DTI datasets. The difference in the direction of the 3DAC vector from e1 (θ) in cerebral white matter was evaluated. Correlations between θ and FA or obliqueness of e1 were also examined. In cerebral white matter, θ had significantly negative and positive correlations with FA values and e1 obliqueness, respectively. Among white matter tracts, the pyramidal tract, cingulum, and corpus callosum, which had significantly high FA and/or low obliqueness, exhibited similar coloration and significantly smaller θ (4.4° ± 1.6°, 9.3° ± 2.8°, and 11.2° ± 1.1°, respectively) than the entire white matter (13.9° ± 1.1°). The 3DAC could visualize directional information of white matter tracts as precisely DTI-based color maps did, particularly when FA was large and/or e1 directions were orthogonal. Copyright © 2012 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  14. Heritability of Fractional Anisotropy in Human White Matter: A Comparison of Human Connectome Project and ENIGMA-DTI Data

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    Kochunov, Peter; Jahanshad, Neda; Marcus, Daniel; Winkler, Anderson; Sprooten, Emma; Nichols, Thomas E.; Wright, Susan N; Hong, L Elliot; Patel, Binish; Behrens, Timothy; Jbabdi, Saad; Andersson, Jesper; Lenglet, Christophe; Yacoub, Essa; Moeller, Steen; Auerbach, Eddie; Ugurbil, Kamil; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Landman, Bennett; Lemaitre, Hervé; den Braber, Anouk; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Ritchie, Stuart; vanHulzen, Kimm; Almasy, Laura; Curran, Joanne; deZubicaray, Greig I; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter; Martin, Nicholas G.; McMahon, Katie L.; Mitchell, Braxton; Olvera, Rene L; Peterson, Charles; Starr, John; Sussmann, Jessika; Wardlaw, Joanna; Wright, Margie; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Kahn, Rene; de Geus, Eco JC; Williamson, Douglas E; Hariri, Ahmad; van t Ent, Dennis; Bastin, Mark E.; McIntosh, Andrew; Deary, Ian J.; Hulshoff pol, Hilleke E.; Blangero, John; Thompson, Paul M.; Glahn, David C.; Van Essen, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The degree to which genetic factors influence brain connectivity is beginning to be understood. Large-scale efforts are underway to map the profile of genetic effects in various brain regions. The NIH-funded Human Connectome Project (HCP) is providing data valuable for analyzing the degree of genetic influence underlying brain connectivity revealed by state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods. We calculated the heritability of the fractional anisotropy (FA) measure derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) reconstruction in 481 HCP subjects (194/287 M/F) consisting of 57/60 pairs of mono- and dizygotic twins, and 246 siblings. FA measurements were derived using (Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis) ENIGMA DTI protocols and heritability estimates were calculated using the SOLAR-Eclipse imaging genetic analysis package. We compared heritability estimates derived from HCP data to those publicly available through the ENIGMA-DTI consortium, which were pooled together from five-family based studies across the US, Europe, and Australia. FA measurements from the HCP cohort for eleven major white matter tracts were highly heritable (h2=0.53–0.90, p<10−5), and were significantly correlated with the joint-analytical estimates from the ENIGMA cohort on the tract and voxel-wise levels. The similarity in regional heritability suggests that the additive genetic contribution to white matter microstructure is consistent across populations and imaging acquisition parameters. It also suggests the overarching genetic influence provides an opportunity to define a common genetic search space for future gene-discovery studies. Uniquely, the measurements of additive genetic contribution performed in this study can be repeated using online genetic analysis tools provided by the HCP ConnectomeDB web application. PMID:25747917

  15. Mapping measures of microscopic diffusion anisotropy in human brain white matter in vivo with double-wave-vector diffusion-weighted imaging.

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    Lawrenz, Marco; Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate that rotationally invariant measures of the diffusion anisotropy on a microscopic scale can be mapped in human brain white matter in vivo. Echo-planar imaging experiments (resolution 3.0 × 3.0 × 3.0 mm(3) ) involving two diffusion-weighting periods (δ = 22 ms, Δ = 25 ms) in the same acquisition, so-called double-wave-vector or double-pulsed-field-gradient diffusion-weighting experiments, were performed on a 3 T whole-body magnetic resonance system with a long mixing time ( τm=45 ms) between the two diffusion weightings. The disturbing influences of background gradient fields, eddy currents, and the finite mixing time can be minimized using 84 direction combinations based on nine directions and their antipodes. In healthy volunteers, measures of the microscopic diffusion anisotropy ( IMA and MA indexes) could be mapped in white matter across the human brain. The measures were independent (i) of the absolute orientation of the head and of the diffusion directions and (ii) of the predominant fiber orientation. Compared to the fractional anisotropy derived from the conventional diffusion tensor, the double-wave-vector indexes exhibit a narrower distribution, which could reflect their independence of the fiber orientation distribution. Mapping measures of the microscopic diffusion anisotropy in human brain white matter is feasible in vivo and could help to characterize tissue microstructure in the healthy and pathological brain. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cerebral White Matter Maturation Patterns in Preterm Infants: An MRI T2 Relaxation Anisotropy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study.

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    Knight, Michael J; Smith-Collins, Adam; Newell, Sarah; Denbow, Mark; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2018-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with worse neurodevelopmental outcome, but brain maturation in preterm infants is poorly characterized with standard methods. We evaluated white matter (WM) of infant brains at term-equivalent age, as a function of gestational age at birth, using multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Infants born very preterm (preterm (33-36 weeks gestation) were scanned at 3 T at term-equivalent age using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and T2 relaxometry. MRI data were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics, and anisotropy of T2 relaxation was also determined. Principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis were applied to seek the variables best distinguishing very preterm and late preterm groups. Across widespread regions of WM, T2 is longer in very preterm infants than in late preterm ones. These effects are more prevalent in regions of WM that myelinate earlier and faster. Similar effects are obtained from DTI, showing that fractional anisotropy (FA) is lower and radial diffusivity higher in the very preterm group, with a bias toward earlier myelinating regions. Discriminant analysis shows high sensitivity and specificity of combined T2 relaxometry and DTI for the detection of a distinct WM development pathway in very preterm infants. T2 relaxation is anisotropic, depending on the angle between WM fiber and magnetic field, and this effect is modulated by FA. Combined T2 relaxometry and DTI characterizes specific patterns of retarded WM maturation, at term equivalent age, in infants born very preterm relative to late preterm. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  17. Associations between autistic traits and fractional anisotropy values in white matter tracts in a nonclinical sample of young adults.

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    Bradstreet, Lauren E; Hecht, Erin E; King, Tricia Z; Turner, Jessica L; Robins, Diana L

    2017-01-01

    Whereas a number of studies have examined relationships among brain activity, social cognitive skills, and autistic traits, fewer studies have evaluated whether structural connections among brain regions relate to these traits and skills. Uncinate fasciculus (UF) and inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) are white matter tracts that may underpin the behavioral expression of these skills because they connect regions within or provide sensory information to brain areas implicated in social cognition, and structural differences in these tracts have been associated with autistic traits. We examined relationships among self-reported autistic traits, mentalizing, and water diffusivity in UF and ILF in a nonclinical sample of 24 young adults (mean age = 21.92 years, SD = 4.72 years; 15 women). We measured autistic traits using the Autism-Spectrum Quotient, and we measured mentalizing using the Dynamic Interactive Shapes Clips task. We used Tract-Based Spatial Statistics and randomize to examine relationships among fractional anisotropy (FA) values in bilateral ILF and UF, age, cognitive abilities, autistic traits, and mentalizing. Autistic traits were positively related to FA values in left ILF. No other relationships between FA values and other variables were significant. Results suggest that left ILF may be involved in the expression of autistic traits in individuals without clinical diagnoses.

  18. Neurocognitive outcome and white matter anisotropy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors treated with different protocols.

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    ElAlfy, Mohsen; Ragab, Iman; Azab, Inas; Amin, Shaimaa; Abdel-Maguid, Marwa

    2014-03-01

    Neurocognitive outcome affects the quality of life of ALL survivors. This study is aimed to assess the prevalence of neurocognitive dysfunction by psychometric and imaging tools in survivors of childhood ALL, treated with 3 different protocols and the effect of time elapsed since the end of chemotherapy. Sixty-two ALL survivors aged 6-18 years and treated in the period 1997-2007 and 60 healthy age and sex matched controls were subjected to neurocognitive testing using Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Benton visual retention (BVRT) and Trail Making test (TMT), followed by diffusion weighed and diffusion tensor MRI for calculation of fraction anisotropy (FA). Survivors underwent revision of protocol and type of CNS therapy. Three different protocols were used: modified BFM 83, BFM 90, and CCG. Survivors treated with modified CCG protocol showed a significant decrease in all cognitive tests compared to control (ptests between BFM 83 and control group. Frontal FA was lower in CCG treated group compared to control, BFM 90 and BFM 83 groups (pchildhood ALL survivors.

  19. Evidence for fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity white matter abnormalities in the internal capsule and cingulum in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder

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    Lochner, Christine; Fouché, Jean-Paul; du Plessis, Stefan; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Seedat, Soraya; (Psych), MMed; Fineberg, Naomi; Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Stein, Dan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is evidence to suggest that obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is associated with structural abnormalities in cortico–striato–thalamic circuits, yet the extent of white matter abnormalities is not well established. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine white matter integrity in specific regions of interest (ROIs) in patients with OCD. Methods Patients with OCD and sex-, age- and IQ-matched healthy controls underwent DTI. The primary objective was to explore whether patients with OCD had white matter abnormalities in the anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC), the uncinate fasciculus, the genu of the corpus callosum and the cingulum. The secondary objective was to evaluate the relation between fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity in these ROIs and other clinical variables (including age at onset of OCD, OCD severity and levels of depressive and anxiety symptomatology) in patients with OCD. Results There were 15 patients and 17 controls enrolled in our study. Compared with healthy controls, patients with OCD showed increased fractional anisotropy in bilateral regions of the ALIC adjacent to the body of the caudate, as well as decreased fractional anisotropy in the right anterior limb near the head of the caudate. Patients also had decreased mean diffusivity in the body of the right cingulum and the left anterior cingulum compared with controls. Correlational analyses revealed significant associations of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity in select circuits with OCD, depression and anxiety severity scores. Limitations Inclusion of patients with OCD receiving pharmacotherapy may have been a limitation. In addition, the patients were heterogeneous in terms of their obsessive–compulsive symptom profiles; we did not distinguish between different obsessive–compulsive symptom dimensions. Conclusion The study results provide further evidence for OCD-related white matter abnormalities in the ALIC and

  20. Shared white matter alterations across emotional disorders: A voxel-based meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy.

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    Jenkins, Lisanne Michelle; Barba, Alyssa; Campbell, Miranda; Lamar, Melissa; Shankman, Stewart A; Leow, Alex D; Ajilore, Olusola; Langenecker, Scott Aaron

    2016-01-01

    White matter (WM) integrity may represent a shared biomarker for emotional disorders (ED). Aims: To identify transdiagnostic biomarkers of reduced WM by meta-analysis of findings across multiple EDs. Web of Science was searched systematically for studies of whole brain analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) in adults with major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder compared with a healthy control (HC) group. Peak MNI coordinates were extracted from 37 studies of voxel-based analysis (892 HC and 962 with ED) and meta-analyzed using seed-based d Mapping (SDM) Version 4.31. Separate meta-analyses were also conducted for each disorder. In the transdiagnostic meta-analysis, reduced FA was identified in ED studies compared to HCs in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, forceps minor, uncinate fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation, superior corona radiata, bilateral superior longitudinal fasciculi, and cerebellum. Disorder-specific meta-analyses revealed the OCD group had the most similarities in reduced FA to other EDs, with every cluster of reduced FA overlapping with at least one other diagnosis. The PTSD group was the most distinct, with no clusters of reduced FA overlapping with any other diagnosis. The BD group were the only disorder to show increased FA in any region, and showed a more bilateral pattern of WM changes, compared to the other groups which tended to demonstrate a left lateralized pattern of FA reductions. Distinct diagnostic categories of ED show commonalities in WM tracts with reduced FA when compared to HC, which links brain networks involved in cognitive and affective processing. This meta-analysis facilitates an increased understanding of the biological markers that are shared by these ED.

  1. White matter fractional anisotropy is related to processing speed in metabolic syndrome patients: a case-control study

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    Bargalló Núria

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic Syndrome (MetSd is a cluster of vascular risk factors that may influence cerebrovascular pathology during aging. Recently, microstructural white matter (WM changes detected by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and processing speed deficits have been reported in MetSd patients. We aimed to test the relationship between WM alteration and cognitive impairment in these patients. Methods The sample comprised 38 subjects (19 patients aged between 50 and 80 years old, and 19 controls. All patients fulfilled National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP-III criteria for MetSd. Speed of information processing was measured by the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT and reaction time (RT on the Continuous Performance Test (CPT-II and the Grooved Pegboard Test (GPT. DTI images were acquired in a 3 Tesla Siemens Trio scanner. Voxelwise statistical analysis of the fractional anisotropy (FA data was performed using the Tract-Based Spatial Statistics part of the FMRIB Software Library. A correlation analysis was performed between processing speed variables and FA values. Results There was a larger proportion of slow subjects (percentile below 25th in the patient group (Chi2 = 7.125 p = 0.008. FA values correlated positively with SDMT in anterior and posterior parts of the corpus callosum, and RT CPT-II correlated negatively with FA values in the anterior corpus callosum (p Conclusion We found significant correlations between WM alterations and cognitive impairment in MetSd patients, especially in the frontal lobe. These findings highlight the importance of MetSd prevention and control due to its association with structural and functional damage in the central nervous system.

  2. White Matter Development in Early Puberty: A Longitudinal Volumetric and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Twin Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, R.M.; Mandl, R.C.W.; Schnack, H.G.; van Soelen, I.L.C.; van Baal, G.C.M.; Peper, J.S.; Kahn, R.S.; Boomsma, D.I.; Hulshoff Pol, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    White matter microstructure and volume show synchronous developmental patterns in children. White matter volume increases considerably during development. Fractional anisotropy, a measure for white matter microstructural directionality, also increases with age. Development of white matter volume and

  3. Vanishing White Matter Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In Memory Of Obituaries Contact Us Donate Vanishing White Matter Disease What is Vanishing White Matter Disease? ... of the genetic basis of VWM was a great step forward. First of all, it allows genetic ...

  4. Heritability of Fractional Anisotropy in Human White Matter: A Comparison of Human Connectome Project and ENIGMA-DTI Data

    OpenAIRE

    Kochunov, Peter; Jahanshad, Neda; Marcus, Daniel; Winkler, Anderson; Sprooten, Emma; Nichols, Thomas E.; Wright, Susan N; Hong, L Elliot; Patel, Binish; Behrens, Timothy; Jbabdi, Saad; Andersson, Jesper; Lenglet, Christophe; Yacoub, Essa; Moeller, Steen

    2015-01-01

    The degree to which genetic factors influence brain connectivity is beginning to be understood. Large-scale efforts are underway to map the profile of genetic effects in various brain regions. The NIH-funded Human Connectome Project (HCP) is providing data valuable for analyzing the degree of genetic influence underlying brain connectivity revealed by state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods. We calculated the heritability of the fractional anisotropy (FA) measure derived from diffusion tensor i...

  5. White matter fractional anisotropy over two time points in early onset schizophrenia and adolescent cannabis use disorder: A naturalistic diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Katherine A; Kumra, Sanjiv

    2015-04-30

    Recurrent exposure to cannabis in adolescence increases the risk for later development of psychosis, but there are sparse data regarding the impact of cannabis use on brain structure during adolescence. This pilot study investigated the effect of cannabis use disorder (CUD) upon white matter fractional anisotropy (WM FA) values in non-psychotic treatment-seeking adolescents relative to adolescents with early onset schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (EOSS) and to healthy control (HC) participants. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography methods were used to examine fractional anisotropy (FA) of the cingulum bundle, superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), corticospinal tract (CST), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) and uncinate fasciculus in adolescents with EOSS (n=34), CUD (n=19) and HC (n=29). Participants received DTI and substance use assessments at baseline and at 18-month follow-up. Using multivariate analysis of variance, a significant main effect of diagnostic group was observed. Post-hoc testing revealed that adolescents with CUD showed an altered change in FA values in the left ILF and in the left IFOF (trend level) compared with HC adolescents. Greater consumption of cannabis during the inter-scan interval predicted a greater decrease in left ILF FA in CUD. These preliminary longitudinal data suggest that heavy cannabis use during adolescence, or some factor associated with cannabis use, is associated with an altered change in WM FA values in a fiber bundle that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of EOSS (i.e., the left ILF). Additional studies are needed to clarify the clinical significance of these findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging of normal white matter maturation from late childhood to young adulthood: voxel-wise evaluation of mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, radial and axial diffusivities, and correlation with reading development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Deqiang; Tan, Li-Hai; Zhou, Ke; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2008-06-01

    Using diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) and advanced voxel-wise analysis tools, we study diffusivity and anisotropy changes of white matter from late childhood to young adulthood, and correlate quantitative diffusion indices with Chinese and English reading performance scores. Seventy-five normal healthy school going ethnic Chinese students and young adults of three age groups were recruited (group 1, n=24, mean+/-SD=7.4+/-0.3 years; group 2, n=27, mean+/-SD=10.3+/-0.5 years; group 3, n=24, mean+/-SD=22.8+/-2.3 years). DTI was performed with 3 mm isotropic resolution to cover the entire brain. Voxel-wise analysis was performed using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) to localize regions of white matter showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), and axial and radial diffusivities between groups. We found increased FA and decreased MD with increasing age in regions of cerebellar white matter, right temporal white matter, and a large portion of the superior frontal and parietal white matter driven by both the reduction of radial diffusivity and axial diffusivity with the former to a greater extent. Changes were continual from late childhood to young adulthood. Findings were confirmed by region-of-interest analysis in specific white matter tracts. After controlling for the effect of age, significant correlation was found between diffusion indices of the anterior limb of the left internal capsule and Chinese reading score (p=0.05), and of the corona radiata and English reading score (p=0.026 and p=0.029 for left and right, respectively). These DTI indices likely reflect the multiple biological processes that occur during brain development which provide the neural substrate for ongoing functional connectivity including for reading development.

  7. Postoperative increase in cerebral white matter fractional anisotropy on diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging is associated with cognitive improvement after uncomplicated carotid endarterectomy: tract-based spatial statistics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuiko; Ito, Kenji; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke; Murakami, Toshiyuki; Nanba, Takamasa; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Yoshida, Kenji; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Kubo, Yoshitaka; Mase, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Akira

    2013-10-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) might improve cognitive function. Fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the cerebral white matter derived from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) correlate with cognitive function in patients with various central nervous system diseases. To use tract-based spatial statistics to determine whether postoperative changes of FA values in the cerebral white matter derived from DTI are associated with cognitive improvement after uncomplicated CEA. In 80 patients undergoing CEA for ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis (≥70%), FA values in the cerebral white matter were derived from DTI before and 1 month after surgery and were analyzed by using tract-based spatial statistics. Neuropsychological testing, consisting of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised, the Wechsler Memory Scale and the Rey-Osterreith Complex Figure test, was also performed preoperatively and after the first postoperative month. Based on the neuropsychological assessments, 11 (14%) patients were defined as having postoperatively improved cognition. The difference between the 2 mean FA values (postoperative values minus preoperative values) in the cerebral hemisphere ipsilateral to surgery was significantly associated with postoperative cognitive improvement (95% confidence intervals, 2.632-9.877; P = .008). White matter FA values in patients with postoperative cognitive improvement were significantly increased after surgery in the whole ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere, in the contralateral anterior cerebral artery territory, and in the watershed zone between the contralateral anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Postoperative increase in cerebral white matter FA on DTI is associated with cognitive improvement after uncomplicated CEA.

  8. White matter lesion progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofer, Edith; Cavalieri, Margherita; Bis, Joshua C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter lesion (WML) progression on magnetic resonance imaging is related to cognitive decline and stroke, but its determinants besides baseline WML burden are largely unknown. Here, we estimated heritability of WML progression, and sought common genetic variants asso...

  9. Correlation between white matter damage and gray matter lesions in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xue-Mei; Tian, Hong-Ji; Han, Zheng; Zhang, Ce; Liu, Ying; Gu, Jie-Bing; Bakshi, Rohit; Cao, Xia

    2017-05-01

    We observed the characteristics of white matter fibers and gray matter in multiple sclerosis patients, to identify changes in diffusion tensor imaging fractional anisotropy values following white matter fiber injury. We analyzed the correlation between fractional anisotropy values and changes in whole-brain gray matter volume. The participants included 20 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 20 healthy volunteers as controls. All subjects underwent head magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Our results revealed that fractional anisotropy values decreased and gray matter volumes were reduced in the genu and splenium of corpus callosum, left anterior thalamic radiation, hippocampus, uncinate fasciculus, right corticospinal tract, bilateral cingulate gyri, and inferior longitudinal fasciculus in multiple sclerosis patients. Gray matter volumes were significantly different between the two groups in the right frontal lobe (superior frontal, middle frontal, precentral, and orbital gyri), right parietal lobe (postcentral and inferior parietal gyri), right temporal lobe (caudate nucleus), right occipital lobe (middle occipital gyrus), right insula, right parahippocampal gyrus, and left cingulate gyrus. The voxel sizes of atrophic gray matter positively correlated with fractional anisotropy values in white matter association fibers in the patient group. These findings suggest that white matter fiber bundles are extensively injured in multiple sclerosis patients. The main areas of gray matter atrophy in multiple sclerosis are the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, caudate nucleus, parahippocampal gyrus, and cingulate gyrus. Gray matter atrophy is strongly associated with white matter injury in multiple sclerosis patients, particularly with injury to association fibers.

  10. Spaceflight Effect on White Matter Structural Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica K.; Kopplemans, Vincent; Paternack, Ofer; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2017-01-01

    Recent reports of elevated brain white matter hyperintensity (WMH) counts and volume in postflight astronaut MRIs suggest that further examination of spaceflight's impact on the microstructure of brain white matter is warranted. To this end, retrospective longitudinal diffusion-weighted MRI scans obtained from 15 astronauts were evaluated. In light of the recent reports of microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift and gray matter atrophy seen in astronauts, we applied a technique to estimate diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics corrected for free water contamination. This approach enabled the analysis of white matter tissue-specific alterations that are unrelated to fluid shifts, occurring from before spaceflight to after landing. After spaceflight, decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values were detected in an area encompassing the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. Increased radial diffusivity (RD) and decreased axial diffusivity (AD) were also detected within overlapping regions. In addition, FA values in the corticospinal tract decreased and RD measures in the precentral gyrus white matter increased from before to after flight. The results show disrupted structural connectivity of white matter in tracts involved in visuospatial processing, vestibular function, and movement control as a result of spaceflight. The findings may help us understand the structural underpinnings of the extensive spaceflight-induced sensorimotor remodeling. Prospective longitudinal assessment of the white matter integrity in astronauts is needed to characterize the evolution of white matter microstructural changes associated with spaceflight, their behavioral consequences, and the time course of recovery. Supported by a grant from the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, NASA NCC 9-58.

  11. Associations between T1 white matter lesion volume and regional white matter microstructure in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leritz, Elizabeth C; Shepel, Juli; Williams, Victoria J; Lipsitz, Lewis A; McGlinchey, Regina E; Milberg, William P; Salat, David H

    2014-03-01

    White matter lesions, typically manifesting as regions of signal intensity abnormality (WMSA) on MRI, increase in frequency with age. However, the role of this damage in cognitive decline and disease is still not clear, as lesion volume has only loosely been associated with clinical status. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used to examine the quantitative microstructural integrity of white matter, and has applications in the examination of subtle changes to tissue that appear visually normal on conventional imaging. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether major macrostructural white matter damage, (total WMSA volume), is associated with microstructural integrity of normal appearing white matter, and if these macrostructural changes fully account for microstructural changes. Imaging was performed in 126 nondemented individuals, ages 43-85 years, with no history of cerebrovascular disease. Controlling for age, greater WMSA volume was associated with decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in widespread brain regions. Patterns were similar for FA and radial diffusivity but in contrast, WMSA was associated with axial diffusivity in fewer areas. Age was associated with FA in several regions, and many of these effects remained even when controlling for WMSA volume, suggesting the etiology of WMSAs does not fully account for all age-associated white matter deterioration. These results provide evidence that WMSA volume is associated with the integrity of normal-appearing white matter. In addition, our results suggest that overt lesions may not account for the association of increasing age with decreased white matter tissue integrity. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Accelerated Gray and White Matter Deterioration With Age in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropley, Vanessa L; Klauser, Paul; Lenroot, Rhoshel K; Bruggemann, Jason; Sundram, Suresh; Bousman, Chad; Pereira, Avril; Di Biase, Maria A; Weickert, Thomas W; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon; Pantelis, Christos; Zalesky, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    Although brain changes in schizophrenia have been proposed to mirror those found with advancing age, the trajectory of gray matter and white matter changes during the disease course remains unclear. The authors sought to measure whether these changes in individuals with schizophrenia remain stable, are accelerated, or are diminished with age. Gray matter volume and fractional anisotropy were mapped in 326 individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and in 197 healthy comparison subjects aged 20-65 years. Polynomial regression was used to model the influence of age on gray matter volume and fractional anisotropy at a whole-brain and voxel level. Between-group differences in gray matter volume and fractional anisotropy were regionally localized across the lifespan using permutation testing and cluster-based inference. Significant loss of gray matter volume was evident in schizophrenia, progressively worsening with age to a maximal loss of 8% in the seventh decade of life. The inferred rate of gray matter volume loss was significantly accelerated in schizophrenia up to middle age and plateaued thereafter. In contrast, significant reductions in fractional anisotropy emerged in schizophrenia only after age 35, and the rate of fractional anisotropy deterioration with age was constant and best modeled with a straight line. The slope of this line was 60% steeper in schizophrenia relative to comparison subjects, indicating a significantly faster rate of white matter deterioration with age. The rates of reduction of gray matter volume and fractional anisotropy were significantly faster in males than in females, but an interaction between sex and diagnosis was not evident. The findings suggest that schizophrenia is characterized by an initial, rapid rate of gray matter loss that slows in middle life, followed by the emergence of a deficit in white matter that progressively worsens with age at a constant rate.

  13. White matter tract integrity in treatment-resistant gambling disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Derbyshire, Katherine; Daws, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gambling disorder is a relatively common psychiatric disorder recently re-classified within the DSM-5 under the category of ‘substance-related and addictive disorders’. Aims: To compare white matter integrity in patients with gambling disorder with healthy controls; to explore...... relationships between white matter integrity and disease severity in gambling disorder. Method: In total, 16 participants with treatment-resistant gambling disorder and 15 healthy controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). White matter integrity was analysed using tract-based spatial statistics....... Results: Gambling disorder was associated with reduced fractional anisotropy in the corpus callosum and superior longitudinal fasciculus. Fractional anisotropy in distributed white matter tracts elsewhere correlated positively with disease severity. Conclusions: Reduced corpus callosum fractional...

  14. White matter of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Clinical Applications. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 9. Ransom BR, Goldberg MP, Arai K, Baltan S. White matter pathophysiology. In: Grotta JC, Albers GW, Broderick ...

  15. White matter abnormalities of microstructure and physiological noise in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hu; Newman, Sharlene D; Kent, Jerillyn S; Bolbecker, Amanda; Klaunig, Mallory J; O'Donnell, Brian F; Puce, Aina; Hetrick, William P

    2015-12-01

    White matter abnormalities in schizophrenia have been revealed by many imaging techniques and analysis methods. One of the findings by diffusion tensor imaging is a decrease in fractional anisotropy (FA), which is an indicator of white matter integrity. On the other hand, elevation of metabolic rate in white matter was observed from positron emission tomography (PET) studies. In this report, we aim to compare the two structural and functional effects on the same subjects. Our comparison is based on the hypothesis that signal fluctuation in white matter is associated with white matter functional activity. We examined the variance of the signal in resting state fMRI and found significant differences between individuals with schizophrenia and non-psychiatric controls specifically in white matter tissue. Controls showed higher temporal signal-to-noise ratios clustered in regions including temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes, cerebellum, corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and other major white matter tracts. These regions with higher temporal signal-to-noise ratio agree well with those showing higher metabolic activity reported by studies using PET. The results suggest that individuals with schizophrenia tend to have higher functional activity in white matter in certain brain regions relative to healthy controls. Despite some overlaps, the distinct regions for physiological noise are different from those for FA derived from diffusion tensor imaging, and therefore provide a unique angle to explore potential mechanisms to white matter abnormality.

  16. Reduced white matter integrity in amateur boxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herweh, Christian; Hess, Klaus; Meyding-Lamadé, Uta; Bartsch, Andreas J; Stippich, Christoph; Jost, Joachim; Friedmann-Bette, Birgit; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Hähnel, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Professional boxing can lead to chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a variant of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Its occurrence in amateur boxers is a matter of debate since amateur boxing is considered to be less harmful due to more strict regulations. However, several studies using different methodological approaches have revealed subtle signs of TBI even in amateurs. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to microscopic white matter changes and has been proven useful in TBI when routine MR imaging often is unrevealing. DTI, with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) together with neuropsychological examination of executive functions and memory, was used to investigate a collective of 31 male amateur boxers and 31 age-matched controls as well as a subgroup of 19 individuals, respectively, who were additionally matched for intellectual performance (IQ). All participants had normal findings in neurological examination and conventional MR. Amateur boxers did not show deficits in neuropsychological tests when their IQ was taken into account. Fractional anisotropy was significantly reduced, while diffusivity measures were increased along central white matter tracts in the boxers group. These changes were in part associated with the number of fights. TBSS revealed widespread white matter disturbance partially related to the individual fighting history in amateur boxers. These findings closely resemble those in patients with accidental TBI and indicate similar histological changes in amateur boxers.

  17. Bootstrapping white matter segmentation, Eve++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plassard, Andrew; Hinton, Kendra E.; Venkatraman, Vijay; Gonzalez, Christopher; Resnick, Susan M.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-atlas labeling has come in wide spread use for whole brain labeling on magnetic resonance imaging. Recent challenges have shown that leading techniques are near (or at) human expert reproducibility for cortical gray matter labels. However, these approaches tend to treat white matter as essentially homogeneous (as white matter exhibits isointense signal on structural MRI). The state-of-the-art for white matter atlas is the single-subject Johns Hopkins Eve atlas. Numerous approaches have attempted to use tractography and/or orientation information to identify homologous white matter structures across subjects. Despite success with large tracts, these approaches have been plagued by difficulties in with subtle differences in course, low signal to noise, and complex structural relationships for smaller tracts. Here, we investigate use of atlas-based labeling to propagate the Eve atlas to unlabeled datasets. We evaluate single atlas labeling and multi-atlas labeling using synthetic atlases derived from the single manually labeled atlas. On 5 representative tracts for 10 subjects, we demonstrate that (1) single atlas labeling generally provides segmentations within 2mm mean surface distance, (2) morphologically constraining DTI labels within structural MRI white matter reduces variability, and (3) multi-atlas labeling did not improve accuracy. These efforts present a preliminary indication that single atlas labels with correction is reasonable, but caution should be applied. To purse multi-atlas labeling and more fully characterize overall performance, more labeled datasets would be necessary.

  18. White dots do matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soeken, Mathias; Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal

    2013-01-01

    Toffoli circuits. We also show how to use these rules to derive more complex formulas. The major difference compared to existing approaches is the use of negative controls (white dots), which significantly increases the algebraic strength. We show how existing optimisation approaches can be adapted...

  19. White matter involvement in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caverzasi, Eduardo; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; DeArmond, Stephen J; Hess, Christopher P; Vitali, Paolo; Papinutto, Nico; Oehler, Abby; Miller, Bruce L; Lobach, Irina V; Bastianello, Stefano; Geschwind, Michael D; Henry, Roland G

    2014-12-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is considered primarily a disease of grey matter, although the extent of white matter involvement has not been well described. We used diffusion tensor imaging to study the white matter in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease compared to healthy control subjects and to correlated magnetic resonance imaging findings with histopathology. Twenty-six patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and nine age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects underwent volumetric T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging. Six patients had post-mortem brain analysis available for assessment of neuropathological findings associated with prion disease. Parcellation of the subcortical white matter was performed on 3D T1-weighted volumes using Freesurfer. Diffusion tensor imaging maps were calculated and transformed to the 3D-T1 space; the average value for each diffusion metric was calculated in the total white matter and in regional volumes of interest. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis was also performed to investigate the deeper white matter tracts. There was a significant reduction of mean (P=0.002), axial (P=0.0003) and radial (P=0.0134) diffusivities in the total white matter in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Mean diffusivity was significantly lower in most white matter volumes of interest (Pchanges in white matter anisotropy. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis showed significant reductions of mean diffusivity within the white matter of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, mainly in the left hemisphere, with a strong trend (P=0.06) towards reduced mean diffusivity in most of the white matter bilaterally. In contrast, by visual assessment there was no white matter abnormality either on T2-weighted or diffusion-weighted images. Widespread reduction in white matter mean diffusivity, however, was apparent visibly on the quantitative attenuation coefficient maps compared to healthy control subjects

  20. Evaluation of white matter lesions by diffusion tensor MR imaging. Preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Ohtomo, Kuni [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Aoki, Shigeki; Ishigame, Keiichi; Araki, Tsutomu; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki

    2000-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) represents diffusion anisotropy or directional difference of water diffusion. We preliminarily studied normal volunteers and patients with DTI using single-shot echo planar imaging. DTI was performed easily within a few minutes in all examinations. Fractional anisotropy of white matter lesions was decreased in pathological conditions. DTI is considered to be useful to estimate white matter of the brain, especially in diagnosis of myelination, secondary degeneration, and demyelinating and degenerative disease. (author)

  1. Tryptophan Metabolism and White Matter Integrity in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappelli, Joshua; Postolache, Teodor T; Kochunov, Peter; Rowland, Laura M; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Shukla, Dinesh K; Tagamets, Malle; Du, Xiaoming; Savransky, Anya; Lowry, Christopher A; Can, Adem; Fuchs, Dietmar; Hong, L Elliot

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with abnormalities in the structure and functioning of white matter, but the underlying neuropathology is unclear. We hypothesized that increased tryptophan degradation in the kynurenine pathway could be associated with white matter microstructure and biochemistry, potentially contributing to white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. To test this, fasting plasma samples were obtained from 37 schizophrenia patients and 38 healthy controls and levels of total tryptophan and its metabolite kynurenine were assessed. The ratio of kynurenine to tryptophan was used as an index of tryptophan catabolic activity in this pathway. White matter structure and function were assessed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Tryptophan levels were significantly lower (ptryptophan ratios were correspondingly higher (p=0.018) in patients compared with controls. In patients, lower plasma tryptophan levels corresponded to lower structural integrity (DTI fractional anisotropy) (r=0.347, p=0.038). In both patients and controls, the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio was inversely correlated with frontal white matter glutamate level (r=-0.391 and -0.350 respectively, p=0.024 and 0.036). These results provide initial evidence implicating abnormal tryptophan/kynurenine pathway activity in changes to white matter integrity and white matter glutamate in schizophrenia.

  2. Dark matter electron anisotropy. A universal upper limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borriello, Enrico [Universita ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche; INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Cuoco, Alessandro [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    Indirect searches of particle Dark Matter (DM) with high energy Cosmic Rays (CR) are affected by large uncertainties, coming both from the DM side, and from poor understanding of the astrophysical backgrounds. We show that, on the contrary, the DM intrinsic degree of anisotropy in the arrival directions of high energy CR electrons and positrons does not suffer from these unknowns. Furthermore, if contributions from possible local sources are neglected, the intrinsic DM anisotropy sets the maximum degree of total anisotropy. As a consequence, if some anisotropy larger than the DM upper bound is detected, its origin could not be ascribed to DM, and would constitute an unambiguous evidence for the presence of astrophysical local discrete sources of high energy electrons and positrons. The Fermi-LAT will be able to probe such scenarios in the next years. (orig.)

  3. Abnormal white matter properties in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Travis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is a serious eating disorder that typically emerges during adolescence and occurs most frequently in females. To date, very few studies have investigated the possible impact of AN on white matter tissue properties during adolescence, when white matter is still developing. The present study evaluated white matter tissue properties in adolescent girls with AN using diffusion MRI with tractography and T1 relaxometry to measure R1 (1/T1, an index of myelin content. Fifteen adolescent girls with AN (mean age = 16.6 years ± 1.4 were compared to fifteen age-matched girls with normal weight and eating behaviors (mean age = 17.1 years ± 1.3. We identified and segmented 9 bilateral cerebral tracts (18 and 8 callosal fiber tracts in each participant's brain (26 total. Tract profiles were generated by computing measures for fractional anisotropy (FA and R1 along the trajectory of each tract. Compared to controls, FA in the AN group was significantly decreased in 4 of 26 white matter tracts and significantly increased in 2 of 26 white matter tracts. R1 was significantly decreased in the AN group compared to controls in 11 of 26 white matter tracts. Reduced FA in combination with reduced R1 suggests that the observed white matter differences in AN are likely due to reductions in myelin content. For the majority of tracts, group differences in FA and R1 did not occur within the same tract. The present findings have important implications for understanding the neurobiological factors underlying white matter changes associated with AN and invite further investigations examining associations between white matter properties and specific physiological, cognitive, social, or emotional functions affected in AN.

  4. Connecting CMB anisotropy and cold dark matter phenomenology via reheating

    OpenAIRE

    Maity, Debaprasad; Saha, Pankaj

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the properties of dark matter has been proved to be one of the most challenging problems of particle phenomenology. In this paper, we tried to understand the phenomenology of dark matter in light of very well understood properties of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy. To connect these two, inflation and its subsequent evolution known as reheating phase play the important role. Following previous analysis, we first established one to one correspondence between the CMB ...

  5. Microstructural White Matter Changes in Primary Torsion Dystonia

    OpenAIRE

    Carbon, Maren; Kingsley, Peter B.; Tang, Chengke; Bressman, Susan; Eidelberg, David

    2008-01-01

    Primary torsion dystonia (PTD) has been conceptualized as a disorder of the basal ganglia. However, recent data suggest a widespread pathology involving motor control pathways. In this report, we explored whether PTD is associated with abnormal anatomical connectivity within motor control pathways. We used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) to assess the microstructure of white matter. We found that fractional anisotropy, a measure of axonal integrity and coherence, was sign...

  6. Extent of altered white matter in unilateral and bilateral periventricular white matter lesions in children with unilateral cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheck, Simon M; Fripp, Jurgen; Reid, Lee; Pannek, Kerstin; Fiori, Simona; Boyd, Roslyn N; Rose, Stephen E

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the extent of white matter damage in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP) caused by periventricular white matter lesions comparing between unilateral and bilateral lesions; and to investigate a relationship between white matter microstructure and hand function. Diffusion MRI images from 46 children with UCP and 18 children with typical development (CTD) were included. Subjects were grouped by side of hemiparesis and unilateral or bilateral lesions. A voxel-wise white matter analysis was performed to identify regions where fractional anisotropy (FA) was significantly different between UCP groups and CTD; and where FA correlated with either dominant or impaired hand function (using Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test). Children with unilateral lesions had reduced FA in the corticospinal tract of the affected hemisphere. Children with bilateral lesions had widespread reduced FA extending into all lobes. In children with left hemiparesis, impaired hand function correlated with FA in the contralateral corticospinal tract. Dominant hand function correlated with FA in the posterior thalamic radiations as well as multiple other regions in both left and right hemiparesis groups. Periventricular white matter lesions consist of focal and diffuse components. Focal lesions may cause direct motor fibre insult resulting in motor impairment. Diffuse white matter injury is heterogeneous, and may contribute to more global dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Frontal white matter microstructure, aggression, and impulsivity in men with schizophrenia: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoptman, Matthew J; Volavka, Jan; Johnson, Glyn; Weiss, Elisabeth; Bilder, Robert M; Lim, Kelvin O

    2002-07-01

    Aggression and impulsivity may involve altered frontal white matter. Axial diffusion tensor images were acquired in 14 men with schizophrenia using a pulsed gradient, double spin echo, echo planar imaging method. White matter microstructural measures (fractional anisotropy and trace) were calculated from these data. Regions of interest were placed in frontal white matter on four slices. Impulsivity was measured using the Motor Impulsiveness factor of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. Aggressiveness was measured using the Assaultiveness scale of the Buss Durkee Hostility Inventory and the Aggression scale of the Life History of Aggression. Lower fractional anisotropy in right inferior frontal white matter was associated with higher motor impulsiveness. Higher trace in these regions was associated with aggressiveness. Inferior frontal white matter microstructure was associated with impulsivity and aggression in men with schizophrenia. These results implicate frontal lobe dysfunction in aggression and certain aspects of impulsivity.

  8. Aging of cerebral white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Yang, Yuanyuan; Xia, Yuguo; Zhu, Wen; Leak, Rehana K; Wei, Zhishuo; Wang, Jianyi; Hu, Xiaoming

    2017-03-01

    White matter (WM) occupies a large volume of the human cerebrum and is mainly composed of myelinated axons and myelin-producing glial cells. The myelinated axons within WM are the structural foundation for efficient neurotransmission between cortical and subcortical areas. Similar to neuron-enriched gray matter areas, WM undergoes a series of changes during the process of aging. WM malfunction can induce serious neurobehavioral and cognitive impairments. Thus, age-related changes in WM may contribute to the functional decline observed in the elderly. In addition, aged WM becomes more susceptible to neurological disorders, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the structural and functional alterations of WM in natural aging and speculate on the underlying mechanisms. We also discuss how age-related WM changes influence the progression of various brain disorders, including ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, TBI, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Although the physiology of WM is still poorly understood relative to gray matter, WM is a rational therapeutic target for a number of neurological and psychiatric conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Framework for shape analysis of white matter fiber bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glozman, Tanya; Bruckert, Lisa; Pestilli, Franco; Yecies, Derek W; Guibas, Leonidas J; Yeom, Kristen W

    2017-12-02

    Diffusion imaging coupled with tractography algorithms allows researchers to image human white matter fiber bundles in-vivo. These bundles are three-dimensional structures with shapes that change over time during the course of development as well as in pathologic states. While most studies on white matter variability focus on analysis of tissue properties estimated from the diffusion data, e.g. fractional anisotropy, the shape variability of white matter fiber bundle is much less explored. In this paper, we present a set of tools for shape analysis of white matter fiber bundles, namely: (1) a concise geometric model of bundle shapes; (2) a method for bundle registration between subjects; (3) a method for deformation estimation. Our framework is useful for analysis of shape variability in white matter fiber bundles. We demonstrate our framework by applying our methods on two datasets: one consisting of data for 6 normal adults and another consisting of data for 38 normal children of age 11 days to 8.5 years. We suggest a robust and reproducible method to measure changes in the shape of white matter fiber bundles. We demonstrate how this method can be used to create a model to assess age-dependent changes in the shape of specific fiber bundles. We derive such models for an ensemble of white matter fiber bundles on our pediatric dataset and show that our results agree with normative human head and brain growth data. Creating these models for a large pediatric longitudinal dataset may improve understanding of both normal development and pathologic states and propose novel parameters for the examination of the pediatric brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Guangyao Jiang; Xuntao Yin; Chuanming Li; Lei Li; Lu Zhao; Evans, Alan C.; Tianzi Jiang; Jixiang Wu; Jian Wang

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter (WM) were investiga...

  11. Longitudinal changes in microstructural white matter metrics in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Chantel D; Mazerolle, Erin L; Ritchie, Lesley; Fisk, John D; Gawryluk, Jodie R

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Current avenues of AD research focus on pre-symptomatic biomarkers that will assist with early diagnosis of AD. The majority of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based biomarker research to date has focused on neuronal loss in grey matter and there is a paucity of research on white matter. Longitudinal DTI data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2 database were used to examine 1) the within-group microstructural white matter changes in individuals with AD and healthy controls at baseline and year one; and 2) the between-group microstructural differences in individuals with AD and healthy controls at both time points. 1) Within-group: longitudinal Tract-Based Spatial Statistics revealed that individuals with AD and healthy controls both had widespread reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased mean diffusivity (MD) with changes in the hippocampal cingulum exclusive to the AD group. 2) Between-group: relative to healthy controls, individuals with AD had lower FA and higher MD in the hippocampal cingulum, as well as the corpus callosum, internal and external capsule; corona radiata; posterior thalamic radiation; superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus; fronto-occipital fasciculus; cingulate gyri; fornix; uncinate fasciculus; and tapetum. The current results indicate that sensitivity to white matter microstructure is a promising avenue for AD biomarker research. Additional longitudinal studies on both white and grey matter are warranted to further evaluate potential clinical utility.

  12. Long-term white matter tract reorganization following prolonged febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujar, Suresh S; Seunarine, Kiran K; Martinos, Marina M; Neville, Brian G R; Scott, Rod C; Chin, Richard F M; Clark, Chris A

    2017-05-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have demonstrated acute white matter changes following prolonged febrile seizures (PFS), but their longer-term evolution is unknown. We investigated a population-based cohort to determine white matter diffusion properties 8 years after PFS. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and applied Tract-Based Spatial Statistics for voxel-wise comparison of white matter microstructure between 26 children with PFS and 27 age-matched healthy controls. Age, gender, handedness, and hippocampal volumes were entered as covariates for voxel-wise analysis. Mean duration between the episode of PFS and follow-up was 8.2 years (range 6.7-9.6). All children were neurologically normal, and had normal conventional neuroimaging. On voxel-wise analysis, compared to controls, the PFS group had (1) increased fractional anisotropy in early maturing central white matter tracts, (2) increased mean and axial diffusivity in several peripheral white matter tracts and late-maturing central white matter tracts, and (3) increased radial diffusivity in peripheral white matter tracts. None of the tracts had reduced fractional anisotropy or diffusivity indices in the PFS group. In this homogeneous, population-based sample, we found increased fractional anisotropy in early maturing central white matter tracts and increased mean and axial diffusivity with/without increased radial diffusivity in several late-maturing peripheral white matter tracts 8 years post-PFS. We propose disruption in white matter maturation secondary to seizure-induced axonal injury, with subsequent neuroplasticity and microstructural reorganization as a plausible explanation. © 2017 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Traumatic white matter injury and toxic leukoencephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hasani, Omer Hussain; Smith, Colin

    2011-09-01

    White matter injury may be secondary to a range of neurodegenerative disorders, such as the common dementing disorders of the elderly, or may be a consequence of specific white matter disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and the rare leukodystrophies. This article will focus on two relatively common primary groups of disorders of the white matter, traumatic white matter injury and toxic leukoencephalopathies. Traumatic axonal injury may be focal or diffuse, and is associated with a clinical spectrum ranging from concussion through to coma and death. The molecular mechanisms underlying axonal degeneration secondary to traumatic axonal degeneration are being elucidated and may give an insight into potential therapeutic targets. Toxic leukoencephalopathy may be secondary to exposure to a wide range of compounds, including chemotherapeutic drugs. These toxins may produce white matter injury through a range of mechanisms, and the potential toxic effects of compounds need to be considered when assessing a patient with a nonspecific leukoencephalopathy.

  14. Neurotransmitter signaling in white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Arthur M; Fern, Robert F; Matute, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    White matter (WM) tracts are bundles of myelinated axons that provide for rapid communication throughout the CNS and integration in grey matter (GM). The main cells in myelinated tracts are oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, with small populations of microglia and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. The prominence of neurotransmitter signaling in WM, which largely exclude neuronal cell bodies, indicates it must have physiological functions other than neuron-to-neuron communication. A surprising aspect is the diversity of neurotransmitter signaling in WM, with evidence for glutamatergic, purinergic (ATP and adenosine), GABAergic, glycinergic, adrenergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic signaling, acting via a wide range of ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Both axons and glia are potential sources of neurotransmitters and may express the respective receptors. The physiological functions of neurotransmitter signaling in WM are subject to debate, but glutamate and ATP-mediated signaling have been shown to evoke Ca(2+) signals in glia and modulate axonal conduction. Experimental findings support a model of neurotransmitters being released from axons during action potential propagation acting on glial receptors to regulate the homeostatic functions of astrocytes and myelination by oligodendrocytes. Astrocytes also release neurotransmitters, which act on axonal receptors to strengthen action potential propagation, maintaining signaling along potentially long axon tracts. The co-existence of multiple neurotransmitters in WM tracts suggests they may have diverse functions that are important for information processing. Furthermore, the neurotransmitter signaling phenomena described in WM most likely apply to myelinated axons of the cerebral cortex and GM areas, where they are doubtless important for higher cognitive function. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. White matter abnormalities in adolescents with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessette, Katie L; Nave, Andrea M; Caprihan, Arvind; Stevens, Michael C

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify areas of abnormal white matter microstructure in adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Fractional anisotropy (FA) values representing preferential diffusivity along major tracts were examined using tract-based spatial statistics across the whole brain in adolescents ages 13-19 with MDD (n = 31) compared with demographically-matched healthy controls (n = 31). We not only examined frontal lobe tracts that have been most frequently identified as abnormal in previous DTI studies of older depressed patients, but also tested for FA group differences across the whole brain to determine if adolescent depression was related to any other regional white matter abnormality. MDD-diagnosed adolescents had significantly lower FA in many regions concentrated predominantly in the frontal lobe. There also was strong evidence for lower FA in bilateral anterior/posterior limbs of the internal capsules, as well as tracts through the midbrain, left external capsule, right thalamic radiation and left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Consistent with previous findings in depressed young and elderly adults, the current study found evidence for abnormal microstructure in white matter connections of the frontal lobe in MDD adolescents. There also was strong evidence for FA abnormalities in corpus callosum genu, internal and external capsule tracts, thalamus and midbrain, notable for both the relative magnitude of these effects and absence from most previous white matter studies of depression. These abnormalities might represent important markers of early life-onset depression.

  16. White matter microstructure correlates of mathematical giftedness and intelligence quotient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Sánchez, Francisco J; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Sánchez-Gonzalez, Javier; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan A; Franco, Carolina; Robles, Olalla; Arango, Celso; Desco, Manuel

    2014-06-01

    Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown differences in brain activation between mathematically gifted adolescents and controls. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between mathematical giftedness, intelligent quotient (IQ), and the microstructure of white matter tracts in a sample composed of math-gifted adolescents and aged-matched controls. Math-gifted subjects were selected through a national program based on detecting enhanced visuospatial abilities and creative thinking. We used diffusion tensor imaging to assess white matter microstructure in neuroanatomical connectivity. The processing included voxel-wise and region of interest-based analyses of the fractional anisotropy (FA), a parameter which is purportedly related to white matter microstructure. In a whole-sample analysis, IQ showed a significant positive correlation with FA, mainly in the corpus callosum, supporting the idea that efficient information transfer between hemispheres is crucial for higher intellectual capabilities. In addition, math-gifted adolescents showed increased FA (adjusted for IQ) in white matter tracts connecting frontal lobes with basal ganglia and parietal regions. The enhanced anatomical connectivity observed in the forceps minor and splenium may underlie the greater fluid reasoning, visuospatial working memory, and creative capabilities of these children. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter is a progressive disorder that mainly affects ...

  18. Microstructural white matter changes in primary torsion dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Maren; Kingsley, Peter B; Tang, Chengke; Bressman, Susan; Eidelberg, David

    2008-01-30

    Primary torsion dystonia (PTD) has been conceptualized as a disorder of the basal ganglia. However, recent data suggest a widespread pathology involving motor control pathways. In this report, we explored whether PTD is associated with abnormal anatomical connectivity within motor control pathways. We used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) to assess the microstructure of white matter. We found that fractional anisotropy, a measure of axonal integrity and coherence, was significantly reduced in PTD patients in the pontine brainstem in the vicinity of the left superior cerebellar peduncle and bilaterally in the white matter of the sensorimotor region. Our data thus support the possibility of a disturbance in cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways as a cause of the clinical manifestations of PTD. 2007 Movement Disorder Society

  19. White matter injury detection in neonatal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Irene; Hajari, Nasim; Firouzmanesh, Amirhossein; Shen, Rui; Miller, Steven; Poskitt, Ken; Basu, Anup

    2013-02-01

    Early detection of white matter injury in premature newborns can facilitate timely clinical treatments reducing the potential risk of later developmental deficits. It was reported that there were more than 5% premature newborns in British Columbia, Canada, among which 5-10% exhibited major motor deficits and 25-50% exhibited significant developmental and visual deficits. With the advancement of computer assisted detection systems, it is possible to automatically identify white matter injuries, which are found inside the grey matter region of the brain. Atlas registration has been suggested in the literature to distinguish grey matter from the soft tissues inside the skull. However, our subjects are premature newborns delivered at 24 to 32 weeks of gestation. During this period, the grey matter undergoes rapid changes and differs significantly from one to another. Besides, not all detected white spots represent injuries. Additional neighborhood information and expert input are required for verification. In this paper, we propose a white matter feature identification system for premature newborns, which is composed of several steps: (1) Candidate white matter segmentation; (2) Feature extraction from candidates; (3) Validation with data obtained at a later stage on the children; and (4) Feature confirmation for automated detection. The main challenge of this work lies in segmenting white matter injuries from noisy and low resolution data. Our approach integrates image fusion and contrast enhancement together with a fuzzy segmentation technique to achieve promising results. Other applications, such as brain tumor and intra-ventricular haemorrhage detection can also benefit from our approach.

  20. Financial literacy is associated with white matter integrity in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S Duke; Boyle, Patricia A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Fleischman, Debra; Yu, Lei; James, Bryan D; Bennett, David A

    2016-04-15

    Financial literacy, the ability to understand, access, and utilize information in ways that contribute to optimal financial outcomes, is important for independence and wellbeing in old age. We previously reported that financial literacy is associated with greater functional connectivity between brain regions in old age. Here, we tested the hypothesis that higher financial literacy would be associated with greater white matter integrity in old age. Participants included 346 persons without dementia (mean age=81.36, mean education=15.39, male/female=79/267, mean MMSE=28.52) from the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Financial literacy was assessed using a series of questions imbedded as part of an ongoing decision making study. White matter integrity was assessed with diffusion anisotropy measured with diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI). We tested the hypothesis that higher financial literacy is associated with higher diffusion anisotropy in white matter, adjusting for the effects of age, education, sex, and white matter hyperintense lesions. We then repeated the analysis also adjusting for cognitive function. Analyses revealed regions with significant positive associations between financial literacy and diffusion anisotropy, and many remained significant after accounting for cognitive function. White matter tracts connecting right hemisphere temporal-parietal brain regions were particularly implicated. Greater financial literacy is associated with higher diffusion anisotropy in white matter of nondemented older adults after adjusting for important covariates. These results suggest that financial literacy is positively associated with white matter integrity in old age. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An advanced white matter tract analysis in frontotemporal dementia and early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daianu, Madelaine; Mendez, Mario F; Baboyan, Vatche G; Jin, Yan; Melrose, Rebecca J; Jimenez, Elvira E; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-12-01

    Cortical and subcortical nuclei degenerate in the dementias, but less is known about changes in the white matter tracts that connect them. To better understand white matter changes in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), we used a novel approach to extract full 3D profiles of fiber bundles from diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and map white matter abnormalities onto detailed models of each pathway. The result is a spatially complex picture of tract-by-tract microstructural changes. Our atlas of tracts for each disease consists of 21 anatomically clustered and recognizable white matter tracts generated from whole-brain tractography in 20 patients with bvFTD, 23 with age-matched EOAD, and 33 healthy elderly controls. To analyze the landscape of white matter abnormalities, we used a point-wise tract correspondence method along the 3D profiles of the tracts and quantified the pathway disruptions using common diffusion metrics - fractional anisotropy, mean, radial, and axial diffusivity. We tested the hypothesis that bvFTD and EOAD are associated with preferential degeneration in specific neural networks. We mapped axonal tract damage that was best detected with mean and radial diffusivity metrics, supporting our network hypothesis, highly statistically significant and more sensitive than widely studied fractional anisotropy reductions. From white matter diffusivity, we identified abnormalities in bvFTD in all 21 tracts of interest but especially in the bilateral uncinate fasciculus, frontal callosum, anterior thalamic radiations, cingulum bundles and left superior longitudinal fasciculus. This network of white matter alterations extends beyond the most commonly studied tracts, showing greater white matter abnormalities in bvFTD versus controls and EOAD patients. In EOAD, network alterations involved more posterior white matter - the parietal sector of the corpus callosum and parahipoccampal cingulum bilaterally

  2. The white matter query language: a novel approach for describing human white matter anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, Demian; Makris, Nikos; Rathi, Yogesh; Shenton, Martha; Kikinis, Ron; Kubicki, Marek; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a novel method to describe human white matter anatomy using an approach that is both intuitive and simple to use, and which automatically extracts white matter tracts from diffusion MRI volumes. Further, our method simplifies the quantification and statistical analysis of white matter tracts on large diffusion MRI databases. This work reflects the careful syntactical definition of major white matter fiber tracts in the human brain based on a neuroanatomist's expert knowledge. The framework is based on a novel query language with a near-to-English textual syntax. This query language makes it possible to construct a dictionary of anatomical definitions that describe white matter tracts. The definitions include adjacent gray and white matter regions, and rules for spatial relations. This novel method makes it possible to automatically label white matter anatomy across subjects. After describing this method, we provide an example of its implementation where we encode anatomical knowledge in human white matter for ten association and 15 projection tracts per hemisphere, along with seven commissural tracts. Importantly, this novel method is comparable in accuracy to manual labeling. Finally, we present results applying this method to create a white matter atlas from 77 healthy subjects, and we use this atlas in a small proof-of-concept study to detect changes in association tracts that characterize schizophrenia.

  3. Differential development of human brain white matter tracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Imperati

    Full Text Available Neuroscience is increasingly focusing on developmental factors related to human structural and functional connectivity. Unfortunately, to date, diffusion-based imaging approaches have only contributed modestly to these broad objectives, despite the promise of diffusion-based tractography. Here, we report a novel data-driven approach to detect similarities and differences among white matter tracts with respect to their developmental trajectories, using 64-direction diffusion tensor imaging. Specifically, using a cross-sectional sample comprising 144 healthy individuals (7 to 48 years old, we applied k-means cluster analysis to separate white matter voxels based on their age-related trajectories of fractional anisotropy. Optimal solutions included 5-, 9- and 14-clusters. Our results recapitulate well-established tracts (e.g., internal and external capsule, optic radiations, corpus callosum, cingulum bundle, cerebral peduncles and subdivisions within tracts (e.g., corpus callosum, internal capsule. For all but one tract identified, age-related trajectories were curvilinear (i.e., inverted 'U-shape', with age-related increases during childhood and adolescence followed by decreases in middle adulthood. Identification of peaks in the trajectories suggests that age-related losses in fractional anisotropy occur as early as 23 years of age, with mean onset at 30 years of age. Our findings demonstrate that data-driven analytic techniques may be fruitfully applied to extant diffusion tensor imaging datasets in normative and neuropsychiatric samples.

  4. Usefulness of Diffusion Tensor Imaging of White Matter in Alzheimer Disease and Vascular Dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, S.; Kinoshita, T.; Matsusue, E.; Fujii, S.; Ogawa, T. [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of diffusion tensor imaging in detecting the water diffusivity caused by neuro pathological change in Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with Alzheimer disease, 20 with vascular dementia, and 10 control subjects were examined. Diffusion tensor imaging applied diffusion gradient encoding in six non-collinear directions. Fractional anisotropy values were compared in the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, and anterior and posterior white matter among the three groups. Results: In the patients with Alzheimer disease, fractional anisotropy values of the posterior white matter were significantly lower than those of controls. In patients with vascular dementia, fractional anisotropy values of the anterior white matter tended to be lower than those of the posterior white matter (P=0.07). Conclusion: Diffusion tensor imaging reflects the neuro pathological changes in the white matter, and may be useful in the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia. Keywords: Alzheimer disease, .; diffusion tensor imaging, .; vascular dementia.

  5. Alterations in white matter pathways in Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sarika U; Kaufmann, Walter E; Bacino, Carlos A; Anderson, Adam W; Adapa, Pavani; Chu, Zili; Yallampalli, Ragini; Traipe, Elfrides; Hunter, Jill V; Wilde, Elisabeth A

    2011-04-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability, absent speech, seizures, and outbursts of laughter. The aim of this study was to utilize diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine alterations in white matter pathways in Angelman syndrome, with an emphasis on correlations with clinical severity. DTI was used to examine the arcuate fasciculus (AF), uncinate fasciculus (UF), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), and the corpus callosum (CC). We enrolled 14 children aged 8 to 17 years (mean age 10y 8mo; SD 2y 7mo) with Angelman syndrome (seven male; seven female) and 13 typically developing children, aged 8 to 17 years, for comparison (five male; eight female; mean age 12y; SD 2y 9mo). Individuals with Angelman syndrome were assessed using standardized measures of development, language, and behaviour. The children with Angelman syndrome exhibited lower fractional anisotropy and increased radial diffusivity values than the comparison group for the AF, UF, ILF, and CC (p Angelman syndrome had significantly higher apparent diffusion coefficient values in the AF, CC, ILF, and the left IFOF (p Angelman syndrome suggest decreased/delayed myelination, decreased axonal density or diameter, or aberrant axonal organization. Our findings suggest a generalized white matter alteration throughout the brain in those with Angelman syndrome; however, only the alterations in temporal white matter pathways were associated with language and cognitive and social functioning. © The Authors. Journal compilation © Mac Keith Press 2010.

  6. Organising white matter in a brain without corpus callosum fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénézit, Audrey; Hertz-Pannier, Lucie; Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine; Monzalvo, Karla; Germanaud, David; Duclap, Delphine; Guevara, Pamela; Mangin, Jean-François; Poupon, Cyril; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Dubois, Jessica

    2015-02-01

    Isolated corpus callosum dysgenesis (CCD) is a congenital malformation which occurs during early development of the brain. In this study, we aimed to identify and describe its consequences beyond the lack of callosal fibres, on the morphology, microstructure and asymmetries of the main white matter bundles with diffusion imaging and fibre tractography. Seven children aged between 9 and 13 years old and seven age- and gender-matched control children were studied. First, we focused on bundles within the mesial region of the cerebral hemispheres: the corpus callosum, Probst bundles and cingulum which were selected using a conventional region-based approach. We demonstrated that the Probst bundles have a wider connectivity than the previously described rostrocaudal direction, and a microstructure rather distinct from the cingulum but relatively close to callosal remnant fibres. A sigmoid bundle was found in two partial ageneses. Second, the corticospinal tract, thalamic radiations and association bundles were extracted automatically via an atlas of adult white matter bundles to overcome bias resulting from a priori knowledge of the bundles' anatomical morphology and trajectory. Despite the lack of callosal fibres and the colpocephaly observed in CCD, all major white matter bundles were identified with a relatively normal morphology, and preserved microstructure (i.e. fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity) and asymmetries. Consequently the bundles' organisation seems well conserved in brains with CCD. These results await further investigations with functional imaging before apprehending the cognition variability in children with isolated dysgenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. White matter and cognition in adults who were born preterm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P G Allin

    Full Text Available Individuals born very preterm (before 33 weeks of gestation, VPT are at risk of damage to developing white matter, which may affect later cognition and behaviour.We used diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI to assess white matter microstructure (fractional anisotropy; FA in 80 VPT and 41 term-born individuals (mean age 19.1 years, range 17-22, and 18.5 years, range 17-22 years, respectively. VPT individuals were part of a 1982-1984 birth cohort which had been followed up since birth; term individuals were recruited by local press advertisement. General intellectual function, executive function and memory were assessed.The VPT group had reduced FA in four clusters, and increased FA in four clusters relative to the Term group, involving several association tracts of both hemispheres. Clusters of increased FA were associated with more severe neonatal brain injury in the VPT group. Clusters of reduced FA were associated with lower birth weight and perinatal hypoxia, and with reduced adult cognitive performance in the VPT group only.Alterations of white matter microstructure persist into adulthood in VPT individuals and are associated with cognitive function.

  8. The effects of puberty on white matter development in boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Menzies

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies demonstrate considerable changes in white matter volume and microstructure during adolescence. Most studies have focused on age-related effects, whilst puberty-related changes are not well understood. Using diffusion tensor imaging and tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated the effects of pubertal status on white matter mean diffusivity (MD and fractional anisotropy (FA in 61 males aged 12.7–16.0 years. Participants were grouped into early-mid puberty (≤Tanner Stage 3 in pubic hair and gonadal development; n = 22 and late-post puberty (≥Tanner Stage 4 in pubic hair or gonadal development; n = 39. Salivary levels of pubertal hormones (testosterone, DHEA and oestradiol were also measured. Pubertal stage was significantly related to MD in diverse white matter regions. No relationship was observed between pubertal status and FA. Regression modelling of MD in the significant regions demonstrated that an interaction model incorporating puberty, age and puberty × age best explained our findings. In addition, testosterone was correlated with MD in these pubertally significant regions. No relationship was observed between oestradiol or DHEA and MD. In conclusion, pubertal status was significantly related to MD, but not FA, and this relationship cannot be explained by changes in chronological age alone.

  9. White matter involvement in mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Watemberg, Nathan; Luckman, Yehudit; Lev, Dorit

    2005-02-01

    White matter involvement is recently being realized as a common finding in mitochondrial disorders. It is considered an inherent part of the classical mitochondrial syndromes which are usually associated with alterations in the mitochondrial DNA such as: Leigh disease, Kearns-Sayre syndrome, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy lactic acidosis, and stroke like episodes, mitochondrial neuro-gastro-intestinal encephalomyopathy and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. White matter involvement is also described in mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in the nuclear DNA which are transmitted in an autosomal pattern. MRI findings suggestive of a mitochondrial disease are: small cyst-like lesions in abnormal white matter, involvement of both cerebral and cerebellar white matter, and a combination of a leukoencephalopathy with bilateral basal ganglia lesions. The clinical manifestations may be disproportionate to the extent of white matter involvement. Other organs may frequently be involved. The onset is often in infancy with a neurodegenerative course. The finding of a leukoencephalopathy in a patient with a complex neurologic picture and multisystem involvement should prompt a thorough mitochondrial evaluation.

  10. Structural Integrity of Normal Appearing White Matter and Sex-Specific Outcomes After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etherton, Mark R; Wu, Ona; Cougo, Pedro; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Cloonan, Lisa; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin M; Kanakis, Allison S; Boulouis, Gregoire; Karadeli, Hasan H; Lauer, Arne; Rosand, Jonathan; Furie, Karen L; Rost, Natalia S

    2017-12-01

    Women have worse poststroke outcomes than men. We evaluated sex-specific clinical and neuroimaging characteristics of white matter in association with functional recovery after acute ischemic stroke. We performed a retrospective analysis of acute ischemic stroke patients with admission brain MRI and 3- to 6-month modified Rankin Scale score. White matter hyperintensity and acute infarct volume were quantified on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion tensor imaging MRI, respectively. Diffusivity anisotropy metrics were calculated in normal appearing white matter contralateral to the acute ischemia. Among 319 patients with acute ischemic stroke, women were older (68.0 versus 62.7 years; P =0.004), had increased incidence of atrial fibrillation (21.4% versus 12.2%; P =0.04), and lower rate of tobacco use (21.1% versus 35.9%; P =0.03). There was no sex-specific difference in white matter hyperintensity volume, acute infarct volume, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, prestroke modified Rankin Scale score, or normal appearing white matter diffusivity anisotropy metrics. However, women were less likely to have an excellent outcome (modified Rankin Scale score stroke. The correlation between markers of white matter integrity and functional outcomes in women, but not men, suggests a potential sex-specific mechanism. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. White matter deficits in psychopathic offenders and correlation with factor structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylco S Hoppenbrouwers

    Full Text Available Psychopathic offenders show a persistent pattern of emotional unresponsivity to the often horrendous crimes they perpetrate. Recent studies have related psychopathy to alterations in white matter. Therefore, diffusion tensor imaging followed by tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS analysis in 11 psychopathic offenders matched to 11 healthy controls was completed. Fractional anisotropy was calculated within each voxel and comparisons were made between groups using a permutation test. Any clusters of white matter voxels different between groups were submitted to probabilistic tractography. Significant differences in fractional anisotropy were found between psychopathic offenders and healthy controls in three main white matter clusters. These three clusters represented two major networks: an amygdalo-prefrontal network, and a striato-thalamo-frontal network. The interpersonal/affective component of the PCL-R correlated with white matter deficits in the orbitofrontal cortex and frontal pole whereas the antisocial component correlated with deficits in the striato-thalamo-frontal network. In addition to replicating earlier work concerning disruption of an amygdala-prefrontal network, we show for the first time that white matter integrity in a striato-thalamo-frontal network is disrupted in psychopathic offenders. The novelty of our findings lies in the two dissociable white matter networks that map directly onto the two major factors of psychopathy.

  12. The relationship between uncinate fasciculus white matter integrity and verbal memory proficiency in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, David J; Krafft, Cynthia E; Schwarz, Nicolette F; Chi, Lingxi; Rodrigue, Amanda L; Pierce, Jordan E; Allison, Jerry D; Yanasak, Nathan E; Liu, Tianming; Davis, Catherine L; McDowell, Jennifer E

    2014-08-20

    During childhood, verbal learning and memory are important for academic performance. Recent functional MRI studies have reported on the functional correlates of verbal memory proficiency, but few have reported the underlying structural correlates. The present study sought to test the relationship between fronto-temporal white matter integrity and verbal memory proficiency in children. Diffusion weighted images were collected from 17 Black children (age 8-11 years) who also completed the California Verbal Learning Test. To index white matter integrity, fractional anisotropy values were calculated for bilateral uncinate fasciculus. The results revealed that low anisotropy values corresponded to poor verbal memory, whereas high anisotropy values corresponded to significantly better verbal memory scores. These findings suggest that a greater degree of myelination and cohesiveness of axonal fibers in uncinate fasciculus underlie better verbal memory proficiency in children.

  13. Microstructural white matter brain abnormalities in patients with idiopathic fecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muthulingam, J; Haas, S; Hansen, T M

    2018-01-01

    ) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). METHODS: In 21 female patients with IFI and 15 female healthy controls, whole-brain structural differences in gray matter volume (GMV), cortical thickness, and white matter tracts fractional anisotropy (FA) were quantified. For this purpose, we used voxel-based morphometry...... reduced FA values, reflecting reduced white matter tract integrity, in the left hemisphere superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), posterior thalamic radiation, and middle frontal gyrus (MFG), all P... processing. The clinical relevance of this finding is supported by its correlations with prolonged latencies of cortical potentials evoked by rectal stimulation. This supports the theories of central nervous system changes as part of the pathogenesis in IFI patients....

  14. Episodic memory function is associated with multiple measures of white matter integrity in cognitive aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Neal Lockhart

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous neuroimaging research indicates that white matter injury and integrity, measured respectively by white matter hyperintensities (WMH and fractional anisotropy (FA obtained from diffusion tensor imaging, differ with aging and cerebrovascular disease and are associated with episodic memory deficits in cognitively normal older adults. However, knowledge about tract-specific relationships between WMH, FA, and episodic memory in aging remains limited. We hypothesized that white matter connections between frontal cortex and subcortical structures as well as connections between frontal and temporo-parietal cortex would be most affected. In the current study, we examined relationships between WMH, FA and episodic memory in 15 young adults, 13 elders with minimal WMH and 15 elders with extensive WMH, using an episodic recognition memory test for object-color associations. Voxel-based statistics were used to identify voxel clusters where white matter measures were specifically associated with variations in episodic memory performance, and white matter tracts intersecting these clusters were analyzed to examine white matter-memory relationships. White matter injury and integrity measures were significantly associated with episodic memory in extensive regions of white matter, located predominantly in frontal, parietal, and subcortical regions. Template based tractography indicated that white matter injury, as measured by WMH, in the uncinate and inferior longitudinal fasciculi were significantly negatively associated with episodic memory performance. Other tracts such as thalamo-frontal projections, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and dorsal cingulum bundle demonstrated strong negative associations as well. The results suggest that white matter injury to multiple pathways, including connections of frontal and temporal cortex and frontal-subcortical white matter tracts, plays a critical role in memory differences seen in older individuals.

  15. White matter microstructure degenerates in patients with postherpetic neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fuxiang; Chen, Fuyong; Shang, Zhanfang; Shui, Yuan; Wu, Guorong; Liu, Chen; Lin, Zhangya; Lin, Yuanxiang; Yu, Lianghong; Kang, Dezhi; Tao, Wei; Li, Yongjie

    2017-08-24

    The central mechanisms underlying postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) pain remains unknown. The primary purpose of this study was to identify microstructural white matter changes closely related to the PHN pain by means of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis. DTI data of the brains were obtained from 8 PHN patients and 8 healthy controls (HC) that were matched in age, gender, and educational level. DTI metrics, including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD), were separately compared between the two groups using TBSS analysis to detect subtle microstructural changes. Partial correlation analyses were also conducted to evaluate the association between the altered DTI measures and clinical features. Average diffusion indices of white matter skeletons in the whole-brain showed no significant difference between the two groups. However, compared to the HC group, patients with PHN pain revealed reductions in localized FA and AD values in white matter underlying insula, occipital lobe, cerebellum, precentral gyrus, and many other regions, but without distinct change in regional MD and RD levels. In addition, decline of FA and AD values in patients represented significant negative correlations with PHN pain duration when the effect of VAS scores were excluded. The current study suggest that there exists altered microstructure integrity of white matter in multiple brain regions in patients with PHN, and these changes increase in size as the duration of the pain increases. These findings might provide a new insight into the mechanism of PHN pain in brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. White matter correlates of sensory processing in autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. Pryweller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD has been characterized by atypical socio-communicative behavior, sensorimotor impairment and abnormal neurodevelopmental trajectories. DTI has been used to determine the presence and nature of abnormality in white matter integrity that may contribute to the behavioral phenomena that characterize ASD. Although atypical patterns of sensory responding in ASD are well documented in the behavioral literature, much less is known about the neural networks associated with aberrant sensory processing. To address the roles of basic sensory, sensory association and early attentional processes in sensory responsiveness in ASD, our investigation focused on five white matter fiber tracts known to be involved in these various stages of sensory processing: superior corona radiata, centrum semiovale, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, posterior limb of the internal capsule, and splenium. We acquired high angular resolution diffusion images from 32 children with ASD and 26 typically developing children between the ages of 5 and 8. We also administered sensory assessments to examine brain-behavior relationships between white matter integrity and sensory variables. Our findings suggest a modulatory role of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus and splenium in atypical sensorimotor and early attention processes in ASD. Increased tactile defensiveness was found to be related to reduced fractional anisotropy in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, which may reflect an aberrant connection between limbic structures in the temporal lobe and the inferior parietal cortex. Our findings also corroborate the modulatory role of the splenium in attentional orienting, but suggest the possibility of a more diffuse or separable network for social orienting in ASD. Future investigation should consider the use of whole brain analyses for a more robust assessment of white matter microstructure.

  17. White matter correlates of sensory processing in autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryweller, Jennifer R.; Schauder, Kimberly B.; Anderson, Adam W.; Heacock, Jessica L.; Foss-Feig, Jennifer H.; Newsom, Cassandra R.; Loring, Whitney A.; Cascio, Carissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been characterized by atypical socio-communicative behavior, sensorimotor impairment and abnormal neurodevelopmental trajectories. DTI has been used to determine the presence and nature of abnormality in white matter integrity that may contribute to the behavioral phenomena that characterize ASD. Although atypical patterns of sensory responding in ASD are well documented in the behavioral literature, much less is known about the neural networks associated with aberrant sensory processing. To address the roles of basic sensory, sensory association and early attentional processes in sensory responsiveness in ASD, our investigation focused on five white matter fiber tracts known to be involved in these various stages of sensory processing: superior corona radiata, centrum semiovale, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, posterior limb of the internal capsule, and splenium. We acquired high angular resolution diffusion images from 32 children with ASD and 26 typically developing children between the ages of 5 and 8. We also administered sensory assessments to examine brain-behavior relationships between white matter integrity and sensory variables. Our findings suggest a modulatory role of the inferior longitudinal fasciculus and splenium in atypical sensorimotor and early attention processes in ASD. Increased tactile defensiveness was found to be related to reduced fractional anisotropy in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, which may reflect an aberrant connection between limbic structures in the temporal lobe and the inferior parietal cortex. Our findings also corroborate the modulatory role of the splenium in attentional orienting, but suggest the possibility of a more diffuse or separable network for social orienting in ASD. Future investigation should consider the use of whole brain analyses for a more robust assessment of white matter microstructure. PMID:25379451

  18. Sleep Duration and White Matter Quality in Middle-Aged Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Kristine; Nasrallah, Ilya; Hoang, Tina D; Lauderdale, Diane S; Knutson, Kristen L; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Launer, Lenore J; Lewis, Cora E; Sidney, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Sleep duration has been associated with risk of dementia and stroke, but few studies have investigated the relationship between sleep duration and brain MRI measures, particularly in middle age. In a prospective cohort of 613 black and white adults (mean age = 45.4 years) enrolled in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, participants reported typical sleep duration, dichotomized into moderate sleep duration (> 6 to ≤ 8 h) and short sleep duration (≤ 6 h) at baseline (2005-2006). Five years later, we obtained brain MRI markers of white matter including fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and white matter hyperintensities. Compared to moderate sleepers, short sleepers had an elevated ratio of white matter hyperintensities to normal tissue in the parietal region (OR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.47, 3.61) adjusted for age, race/sex, education, hypertension, stroke/TIA, depression, smoking status, and physical activity. White matter diffusivity was also higher, approximately a 0.2 standard deviation difference, in frontal, parietal, and temporal white matter regions, among those reporting shorter sleep duration in (P sleep duration was associated with worse markers of white matter integrity in midlife. These mid-life differences in white matter may underlie the link between poor sleep and risk of dementia and stroke. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  19. Vesicular monoamine transporter 1 gene polymorphism and white matter integrity in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Eunsoo; Han, Kyu-Man; Kang, June; Kim, Aram; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Chang, Hun Soo; Park, Ji-Young; Lee, Min-Soo; Greenberg, Tsafrir; Tae, Woo-Suk; Ham, Byung-Joo

    2017-07-03

    The genetic variant of the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 gene (VMAT1) has been suggested to be associated with monoaminergic signaling and neural circuit activity related to emotion processing. We aimed to investigate microstructural changes in white matter tracts of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and examined the interaction effect between VMAT1 Thr136Ile (rs1390938) polymorphism and MDD on white matter integrity. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and VMAT1 Thr136Ile (rs1390938) genotyping were performed on 103 patients diagnosed with MDD and 83 healthy control participants. DTI was used to investigate microstructural changes in white matter tracts in patients compared to healthy controls. The possible interaction effect between rs1390938 and MDD on white matter integrity was also assessed. Patients with MDD exhibited lower fractional anisotropy (FA) values of the forceps major (pdepression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of anesthesia on resting state BOLD signals in white matter of non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tung-Lin; Wang, Feng; Anderson, Adam W; Chen, Li Min; Ding, Zhaohua; Gore, John C

    2016-11-01

    Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) has been widely used to measure functional connectivity between cortical regions of the brain. However, there have been minimal reports of bold oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals in white matter, and even fewer attempts to detect resting state connectivity. Recently, there has been growing evidence that suggests that reliable detection of white matter BOLD signals may be possible. We have previously shown that nearest neighbor inter-voxel correlations of resting state BOLD signal fluctuations in white matter are anisotropic and can be represented by a functional correlation tensor, but the biophysical origins of these signal variations are not clear. We aimed to assess whether MRI signal fluctuations in white matter vary for different baseline levels of neural activity. We performed imaging studies on live squirrel monkeys under different levels of isoflurane anesthesia at 9.4T. We found 1) the fractional power (0.01-0.08Hz) in white matter was between 60 to 75% of the level in gray matter; 2) the power in both gray and white matter low frequencies decreased monotonically in similar manner with increasing levels of anesthesia; 3) the distribution of fractional anisotropy values of the functional tensors in white matter were significantly higher than those in gray matter; and 4) the functional tensor eigenvalues decreased with increasing level of anesthesia. Our results suggest that as anesthesia level changes baseline neural activity, white matter signal fluctuations behave similarly to those in gray matter, and functional tensors in white matter are affected in parallel. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Canavan Disease: A White Matter Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shalini; Mattan, Natalia S.; de Vellis, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Breakdown of oligodendrocyte-neuron interactions in white matter (WM), such as the loss of myelin, results in axonal dysfunction and hence a disruption of information processing between brain regions. The major feature of leukodystrophies is the lack of proper myelin formation during early development or the onset of myelin loss late in life.…

  2. Exploring the multiple-hit hypothesis of preterm white matter damage using diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Madeleine L; Tusor, Nora; Ball, Gareth; Chew, Andrew; Falconer, Shona; Aljabar, Paul; Kimpton, Jessica A; Kennea, Nigel; Rutherford, Mary; David Edwards, A; Counsell, Serena J

    2018-01-01

    Preterm infants are at high risk of diffuse white matter injury and adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. The multiple hit hypothesis suggests that the risk of white matter injury increases with cumulative exposure to multiple perinatal risk factors. Our aim was to test this hypothesis in a large cohort of preterm infants using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI). We studied 491 infants (52% male) without focal destructive brain lesions born at hypothesis that increased exposure to perinatal risk factors was associated with lower fractional anisotropy (FA), and higher radial, axial and mean diffusivity (RD, AD, MD) in white matter. Neurodevelopmental performance was investigated using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (BSITD-III) in a subset of 381 infants at 20 months corrected age. We tested the hypothesis that lower FA and higher RD, AD and MD in white matter were associated with poorer neurodevelopmental performance. Identified risk factors for diffuse white matter injury were lower GA at birth, fetal growth restriction, increased number of days requiring ventilation and parenteral nutrition, necrotizing enterocolitis and male sex. Clinical chorioamnionitis and patent ductus arteriosus were not associated with white matter injury. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that fetal growth restriction, increased number of days requiring ventilation and parenteral nutrition were independently associated with lower FA values. Exposure to cumulative risk factors was associated with reduced white matter FA and FA values at term equivalent age were associated with subsequent neurodevelopmental performance. This study suggests multiple perinatal risk factors have an independent association with diffuse white matter injury at term equivalent age and exposure to multiple perinatal risk factors exacerbates dMRI defined, clinically significant white matter injury. Our findings support the multiple hit hypothesis for preterm white

  3. Whole brain white matter changes revealed by multiple diffusion metrics in multiple sclerosis: A TBSS study

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    Liu, Yaou, E-mail: asiaeurope80@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Duan, Yunyun, E-mail: xiaoyun81.love@163.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); He, Yong, E-mail: yong.h.he@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Yu, Chunshui, E-mail: csyuster@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Wang, Jun, E-mail: jun_wang@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Huang, Jing, E-mail: sainthj@126.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Ye, Jing, E-mail: jingye.2007@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Parizel, Paul M., E-mail: paul.parizel@ua.ac.be [Department of Radiology, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, 8 Belgium (Belgium); Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli55@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Shu, Ni, E-mail: nshu55@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To investigate whole brain white matter changes in multiple sclerosis (MS) by multiple diffusion indices, we examined patients with diffusion tensor imaging and utilized tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method to analyze the data. Methods: Forty-one relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients and 41 age- and gender-matched normal controls were included in this study. Diffusion weighted images were acquired by employing a single-shot echo planar imaging sequence on a 1.5 T MR scanner. Voxel-wise analyses of multiple diffusion metrics, including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD) were performed with TBSS. Results: The MS patients had significantly decreased FA (9.11%), increased MD (8.26%), AD (3.48%) and RD (13.17%) in their white matter skeletons compared with the controls. Through TBSS analyses, we found abnormal diffusion changes in widespread white matter regions in MS patients. Specifically, decreased FA, increased MD and increased RD were involved in whole-brain white matter, while several regions exhibited increased AD. Furthermore, white matter regions with significant correlations between the diffusion metrics and the clinical variables (the EDSS scores, disease durations and white matter lesion loads) in MS patients were identified. Conclusion: Widespread white matter abnormalities were observed in MS patients revealed by multiple diffusion metrics. The diffusion changes and correlations with clinical variables were mainly attributed to increased RD, implying the predominant role of RD in reflecting the subtle pathological changes in MS.

  4. Early-stage psychotherapy produces elevated frontal white matter integrity in adult major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychotherapy has demonstrated comparable efficacy to antidepressant medication in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Metabolic alterations in the MDD state and in response to treatment have been detected by functional imaging methods, but the underlying white matter microstructural changes remain unknown. The goal of this study is to apply diffusion tensor imaging techniques to investigate psychotherapy-specific responses in the white matter. METHODS: Twenty-one of forty-five outpatients diagnosed with major depression underwent diffusion tensor imaging before and after a four-week course of guided imagery psychotherapy. We compared fractional anisotropy in depressed patients (n = 21 with healthy controls (n = 22, and before-after treatment, using whole brain voxel-wise analysis. RESULTS: Post-treatment, depressed subjects showed a significant reduction in the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. As compared to healthy controls, depressed subjects demonstrated significantly increased fractional anisotropy in the right thalamus. Psychopathological changes did not recover post-treatment, but a novel region of increased fractional anisotropy was discovered in the frontal lobe. CONCLUSIONS: At an early stage of psychotherapy, higher fractional anisotropy was detected in the frontal emotional regulation-associated region. This finding reveals that psychotherapy may induce white matter changes in the frontal lobe. This remodeling of frontal connections within mood regulation networks positively contributes to the "top-down" mechanism of psychotherapy.

  5. Associations Between T1 White Matter Lesion Volume and Regional White Matter Microstructure in Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Leritz, Elizabeth C.; Shepel, Juli; Williams, Victoria J.; Lipsitz, Lewis A; McGlinchey, Regina E.; Milberg, William P.; Salat, David H.

    2013-01-01

    White matter lesions, typically manifesting as regions of signal intensity abnormality (WMSA) on MRI, increase in frequency with age. However, the role of this damage in cognitive decline and disease is still not clear, as lesion volume has only loosely been associated with clinical status. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used to examine the quantitative microstructural integrity of white matter, and has applications in the examination of subtle changes to tissue that appear visually ...

  6. Age-related white matter integrity differences in oldest-old without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ilana J; Greenia, Dana E; Maillard, Pauline; Sajjadi, S Ahmad; DeCarli, Charles; Corrada, Maria M; Kawas, Claudia H

    2017-08-01

    Aging is known to have deleterious effects on cerebral white matter, yet little is known about these white matter alterations in advanced age. In this study, 94 oldest-old adults without dementia (90-103 years) underwent diffusion tensor imaging to assess relationships between chronological age and multiple measures of integrity in 18 white matter regions across the brain. Results revealed significant age-related declines in integrity in regions previously identified as being sensitive to aging in younger-old adults (corpus callosum, fornix, cingulum, external capsule). For the corpus callosum, the effect of age on genu fractional anisotropy was significantly weaker than the relationship between age and splenium fractional anisotropy. Importantly, age-related declines in white matter integrity did not differ in cognitively normal and cognitively impaired not demented oldest-old, suggesting that they were not solely driven by cognitive dysfunction or preclinical dementia in this advanced age group. Instead, white matter in these regions appears to remain vulnerable to normal aging processes through the 10th decade of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. White matter pathology in Parkinson's disease: The effect of imaging protocol differences and relevance to executive function

    OpenAIRE

    Rae, Charlotte L; Correia, Marta M.; Altena, Ellemarije; Hughes, Laura E.; Barker, Roger A.; Rowe, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used as a non-invasive method to investigate white matter structure in neurological and neuropsychiatric disease. However, many options are available for the acquisition sequence and analysis method. Here we used Parkinson's disease as a model neurodegenerative disorder to compare imaging protocols and analysis options. We investigated fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity of white matter in patients and age-matched controls, comparing...

  8. Testing the white matter retrogenesis hypothesis of cognitive aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickman, Adam M; Meier, Irene B; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S; Provenzano, Frank A; Grieve, Stuart M; Siedlecki, Karen L; Wasserman, Ben T; Williams, Leanne M; Zimmerman, Molly E

    2012-08-01

    The retrogenesis hypothesis postulates that late-myelinated white matter fibers are most vulnerable to age- and disease-related degeneration, which in turn mediate cognitive decline. While recent evidence supports this hypothesis in the context of Alzheimer's disease, it has not been tested systematically in normal cognitive aging. In the current study, we examined the retrogenesis hypothesis in a group (n = 282) of cognitively normal individuals, ranging in age from 7 to 87 years, from the Brain Resource International Database. Participants were evaluated with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery and were imaged with diffusion tensor imaging. Fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (DA), measures of white matter coherence, were computed in 2 prototypical early-myelinated fiber tracts (posterior limb of the internal capsule, cerebral peduncles) and 2 prototypical late-myelinated fiber tracts (superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus) chosen to parallel previous studies; mean summary values were also computed for other early- and late-myelinated fiber tracts. We examined age-associated differences in FA, RD, and DA in the developmental trajectory (ages 7-30 years) and degenerative trajectory (ages 31-87 years), and tested whether the measures of white matter coherence mediated age-related cognitive decline in the older group. FA and DA values were greater for early-myelinated fibers than for late-myelinated fibers, and RD values were lower for early-myelinated than late-myelinated fibers. There were age-associated differences in FA, RD, and DA across early- and late-myelinated fiber tracts in the younger group, but the magnitude of differences did not vary as a function of early or late myelinating status. FA and RD in most fiber tracts showed reliable age-associated differences in the older age group, but the magnitudes were greatest for the late-myelinated tract summary measure, inferior

  9. White Matter Changes and Confrontation Naming in Retired Aging National Football League Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Jeremy F; Didehbani, Nyaz; Spence, Jeffrey; Conover, Heather; Bartz, Elizabeth K; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Jeroudi, Myrtle K; Rao, Neena K; Fields, Lindy M; Kraut, Michael A; Cullum, C Munro; Hart, John; Womack, Kyle B

    2017-01-15

    Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), we assessed the relationship of white matter integrity and performance on the Boston Naming Test (BNT) in a group of retired professional football players and a control group. We examined correlations between fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) with BNT T-scores in an unbiased voxelwise analysis processed with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). We also analyzed the DTI data by grouping voxels together as white matter tracts and testing each tract's association with BNT T-scores. Significant voxelwise correlations between FA and BNT performance were only seen in the retired football players (p brain injuries, but not in controls without such exposure.

  10. Brain White Matter Impairment in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It remains unknown whether spinal cord injury (SCI could indirectly impair or reshape the white matter (WM of human brain and whether these changes are correlated with injury severity, duration, or clinical performance. We choose tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS to investigate the possible changes in whole-brain white matter integrity and their associations with clinical variables in fifteen patients with SCI. Compared with the healthy controls, the patients exhibited significant decreases in WM fractional anisotropy (FA in the left angular gyrus (AG, right cerebellum (CB, left precentral gyrus (PreCG, left lateral occipital region (LOC, left superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF, left supramarginal gyrus (SMG, and left postcentral gyrus (PostCG (p<0.01, TFCE corrected. No significant differences were found in all diffusion indices between the complete and incomplete SCI. However, significantly negative correlation was shown between the increased radial diffusivity (RD of left AG and total motor scores (uncorrected p<0.05. Our findings provide evidence that SCI can cause not only direct degeneration but also transneuronal degeneration of brain WM, and these changes may be irrespective of the injury severity. The affection of left AG on rehabilitation therapies need to be further researched in the future.

  11. White Matter Integrity Deficit Associated with Betel Quid Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulai Yuan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Betel quid (BQ is a commonly consumed psychoactive substance, which has been regarded as a human carcinogen. Long-term BQ chewing may cause Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV dependence symptoms, which can lead to decreased cognitive functions, such as attention and inhibition control. Although betel quid dependence (BQD individuals have been reported with altered brain structure and function, there is little evidence showing white matter microstructure alternation in BQD individuals. The present study aimed to investigate altered white matter microstructure in BQD individuals using diffusion tensor imaging. Tract-based spatial statistics was used to analyze the data. Compared with healthy controls, BQD individuals exhibited higher mean diffusivity (MD in anterior thalamic radiation (ATR. Further analysis revealed that the ATR in BQD individuals showed less fractional anisotropy (FA than that in healthy controls. Correlation analysis showed that both the increase of MD and reduction of FA in BQD individuals were associated with severity of BQ dependence. These results suggested that BQD would disrupt the balance between prefrontal cortex and subcortical areas, causing declined inhibition control.

  12. White Matter Glial Pathology in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0302 TITLE: White Matter Glial Pathology in Autism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory A. Ordway, Ph.D. CONTRACTING... Pathology in Autism 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0302 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Gregory A. Ordway, Ph.D...imaging in living patients and pathology studies using postmortem brain tissues from deceased autism spectrum disorder (ASD) donors. These methods

  13. White matter microstructure alterations: a study of alcoholics with and without post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin A Durkee

    Full Text Available Many brain imaging studies have demonstrated reductions in gray and white matter volumes in alcoholism, with fewer investigators using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to examine the integrity of white matter pathways. Among various medical conditions, alcoholism and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD are two comorbid diseases that have similar degenerative effects on the white matter integrity. Therefore, understanding and differentiating these effects would be very important in characterizing alcoholism and PTSD. Alcoholics are known to have neurocognitive deficits in decision-making, particularly in decisions related to emotionally-motivated behavior, while individuals with PTSD have deficits in emotional regulation and enhanced fear response. It is widely believed that these types of abnormalities in both alcoholism and PTSD are related to fronto-limbic dysfunction. In addition, previous studies have shown cortico-limbic fiber degradation through fiber tracking in alcoholism. DTI was used to measure white matter fractional anisotropy (FA, which provides information about tissue microstructure, possibly indicating white matter integrity. We quantitatively investigated the microstructure of white matter through whole brain DTI analysis in healthy volunteers (HV and alcohol dependent subjects without PTSD (ALC and with PTSD (ALC+PTSD. These data show significant differences in FA between alcoholics and non-alcoholic HVs, with no significant differences in FA between ALC and ALC+PTSD in any white matter structure. We performed a post-hoc region of interest analysis that allowed us to incorporate multiple covariates into the analysis and found similar results. HV had higher FA in several areas implicated in the reward circuit, emotion, and executive functioning, suggesting that there may be microstructural abnormalities in white matter pathways that contribute to neurocognitive and executive functioning deficits observed in alcoholics. Furthermore

  14. Reduced cerebral gray matter and altered white matter in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorenweerd, Nathalie; Straathof, Chiara S; Dumas, Eve M; Spitali, Pietro; Ginjaar, Ieke B; Wokke, Beatrijs H; Schrans, Debby G; van den Bergen, Janneke C; van Zwet, Erik W; Webb, Andrew; van Buchem, Mark A; Verschuuren, Jan J; Hendriksen, Jos G; Niks, Erik H; Kan, Hermien E

    2014-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness caused by DMD gene mutations leading to absence of the full-length dystrophin protein in muscle. Multiple dystrophin isoforms are expressed in brain, but little is known about their function. DMD is associated with specific learning and behavioral disabilities that are more prominent in patients with mutations in the distal part of the DMD gene, predicted to affect expression of shorter protein isoforms. We used quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to study brain microstructure in DMD. T1-weighted and diffusion tensor images were obtained on a 3T MR scanner from 30 patients and 22 age-matched controls (age = 8-18 years). All subjects underwent neuropsychological examination. Group comparisons on tissue volume and diffusion tensor imaging parameters were made between DMD patients and controls, and between 2 DMD subgroups that were classified according to predicted Dp140 isoform expression (DMD_Dp140(+) and DMD_Dp140(-) ). DMD patients had smaller total brain volume, smaller gray matter volume, lower white matter fractional anisotropy, and higher white matter mean and radial diffusivity than healthy controls. DMD patients also performed worse on neuropsychological examination. Subgroup analyses showed that DMD_Dp140(-) subjects contributed most to the gray matter volume differences and performed worse on information processing. Both gray and white matter is affected in boys with DMD at a whole brain level. Differences between the DMD_Dp140(-) subgroup and controls indicate an important role for the Dp140 dystrophin isoform in cerebral development. © 2014 American Neurological Association.

  15. White matter hyperintensities and changes in white matter integrity in patients with Alzheimer's disease

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    Wang, Liya; Mao, Hui [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Emory University School of Medicine, Center for Systems Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Goldstein, Felicia C.; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J. [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Meltzer, Carolyn C. [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Emory University School of Medicine, Center for Systems Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Holder, Chad A. [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2011-05-15

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated the relationship between WMHs and white matter changes in AD using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the sensitivity of each DTI index in distinguishing AD with WMHs. Forty-four subjects with WMHs were included. Subjects were classified into three groups based on the Scheltens rating scale: 15 AD patients with mild WMHs, 12 AD patients with severe WMHs, and 17 controls with mild WMHs. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusivity (D{sub R}), and axial diffusivity (D{sub A}) were analyzed using the region of interest and tract-based spatial statistics methods. Sensitivity and specificity of DTI indices in distinguishing AD groups from the controls were evaluated. AD patients with mild WMHs exhibited differences from control subjects in most DTI indices in the medial temporal and frontal areas; however, differences in DTI indices from AD patients with mild WMHs and AD patients with severe WMHs were found in the parietal and occipital areas. FA and D{sub R} were more sensitive measurements than MD and D{sub A} in differentiating AD patients from controls, while MD was a more sensitive measurement in distinguishing AD patients with severe WMHs from those with mild WMHs. WMHs may contribute to the white matter changes in AD brains, specifically in temporal and frontal areas. Changes in parietal and occipital lobes may be related to the severity of WMHs. D{sub R} may serve as an imaging marker of myelin deficits associated with AD. (orig.)

  16. Experience-dependent plasticity in white matter microstructure: Reasoning training alters structural connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson P Mackey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI techniques have made it possible to investigate white matter plasticity in humans. Changes in DTI measures, principally increases in fractional anisotropy (FA, have been observed following training programs as diverse as juggling, meditation, and working memory. Here, we sought to test whether three months of reasoning training could alter white matter microstructure. We recruited participants (n=23 who were enrolled in a course to prepare for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT, a test that places strong demands on reasoning skills, as well as age- and IQ-matched controls planning to take the LSAT in the future (n=22. DTI data were collected at two scan sessions scheduled three months apart. In trained participants but not controls, we observed decreases in radial diffusivity (RD in white matter connecting frontal cortices, and in mean diffusivity (MD within frontal and parietal lobe white matter. Further, participants exhibiting larger gains on the LSAT exhibited greater decreases in MD in the right internal capsule. In summary, reasoning training altered multiple measures of white matter structure in young adults. While the cellular underpinnings are unknown, these results provide evidence of experience-dependent white matter changes that may not be limited to myelination.

  17. ApoE influences regional white-matter axonal density loss in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Catherine F; Zhang, Jiaying; Paterson, Ross W; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Carton, Amelia; Macpherson, Kirsty; Mancini, Laura; Thomas, David L; Modat, Marc; Toussaint, Nicolas; Cash, David M; Thornton, John S; Henley, Susie M D; Crutch, Sebastian J; Alexander, Daniel C; Ourselin, Sebastien; Fox, Nick C; Zhang, Hui; Schott, Jonathan M

    2017-09-01

    Mechanisms underlying phenotypic heterogeneity in young onset Alzheimer disease (YOAD) are poorly understood. We used diffusion tensor imaging and neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) with tract-based spatial statistics to investigate apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 modulation of white-matter damage in 37 patients with YOAD (22, 59% APOE ε4 positive) and 23 age-matched controls. Correlation between neurite density index (NDI) and neuropsychological performance was assessed in 4 white-matter regions of interest. White-matter disruption was more widespread in ε4+ individuals but more focal (posterior predominant) in the absence of an ε4 allele. NODDI metrics indicate fractional anisotropy changes are underpinned by combinations of axonal loss and morphological change. Regional NDI in parieto-occipital white matter correlated with visual object and spatial perception battery performance (right and left, both p = 0.02), and performance (nonverbal) intelligence (WASI matrices, right, p = 0.04). NODDI provides tissue-specific microstructural metrics of white-matter tract damage in YOAD, including NDI which correlates with focal cognitive deficits, and APOEε4 status is associated with different patterns of white-matter neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Altered White Matter Integrity in the Congenital and Late Blind People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The blind subjects have experienced a series of brain structural and functional alterations due to the visual deprivation. It remains unclear as to whether white matter changes differ between blind subjects with visual deprivation before and after a critical developmental period. The present study offered a direct comparison in changes of white matter fractional anisotropy (FA between congenital blind (CB and late blind (LB individuals. Twenty CB, 21 LB (blindness onset after 18 years old, and 40 sight control (SC subjects were recruited. Both the tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS and voxel-based analysis (VBA showed lower FA in the bilateral optic radiations in both blind groups, suggesting that the loss of white matter integrity was the prominent hallmark in the blind people. The LB group showed more extensive white matter impairment than the CB group, indicating the mechanisms of white matter FA changes are different between the CB and LB groups. Using a loose threshold, a trend of an increased FA was found in the bilateral corticospinal tracts in the LB but with a smaller spatial extent relative to the CB. These results suggest that white matter FA changes in the blind subjects are the reflection of multiple mechanisms, including the axonal degeneration, deafferentation, and plasticity.

  19. White Matter Diffusion of Major Fiber Tracts Implicated in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libero, Lauren E; Burge, Wesley K; Deshpande, Hrishikesh D; Pestilli, Franco; Kana, Rajesh K

    2016-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder found to have widespread alterations in the function and synchrony of brain regions. These differences may underlie alterations in microstructural organization, such as in white matter pathways. To investigate the diffusion of major white matter tracts, the current study examined multiple indices of white matter diffusion in 42 children and adults with ASD and 44 typically developing (TD) age- and IQ-matched peers using diffusion tensor imaging. Diffusivity measures were compared between groups for the following tracts: bilateral cingulum bundle, corpus callosum, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and uncinate fasciculus. Results indicate a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy (FA) for the left superior longitudinal fasciculus (LSLF) in ASD children and adults compared with TD peers. A significant increase in radial diffusivity for ASD participants was also found in the same cluster along the LSLF. In addition, a significant positive correlation emerged for all subjects between FA for the LSLF and age, with FA increasing with age. These findings point to a significant alteration in long-distance white matter connectivity in children and adults with ASD, potentially underscoring the relationship between alterations in white matter diffusion and the ASD phenotype. These results also suggest that the white matter alterations in autism may be subtle and related to the developmental trajectory.

  20. Gray matter and white matter abnormalities in online game addiction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Chuan-Bo, E-mail: send007@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Anhui Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Anhui Medical University, 17 Lujiang Road, Hefei, Ahui Province 230001 (China); School of Neurosurgery, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishang Road, Hefei, Anhui Province 230032 (China); Qian, Ruo-Bing, E-mail: rehomail@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Anhui Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Anhui Medical University, 17 Lujiang Road, Hefei, Ahui Province 230001 (China); Anhui Provincial Institute of Stereotactic Neurosurgery, 9 Lujiang Road, Hefei, Ahui Province 230001 (China); Fu, Xian-Ming, E-mail: 506537677@qq.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Anhui Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Anhui Medical University, 17 Lujiang Road, Hefei, Ahui Province 230001 (China); Anhui Provincial Institute of Stereotactic Neurosurgery, 9 Lujiang Road, Hefei, Ahui Province 230001 (China); Lin, Bin, E-mail: 274722758@qq.com [School of Neurosurgery, Anhui Medical University, 81 Meishang Road, Hefei, Anhui Province 230032 (China); Han, Xiao-Peng, E-mail: hanxiaopeng@163.com [Department of Psychology, Anhui Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Anhui Medical University, 17 Lujiang Road, Hefei, Ahui Province 230001 (China); Niu, Chao-Shi, E-mail: niuchaoshi@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Anhui Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Anhui Medical University, 17 Lujiang Road, Hefei, Ahui Province 230001 (China); Anhui Provincial Institute of Stereotactic Neurosurgery, 9 Lujiang Road, Hefei, Ahui Province 230001 (China); Wang, Ye-Han, E-mail: wangyehan@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Anhui Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Anhui Medical University, 17 Lujiang Road, Hefei, Ahui Province 230001 (China); Anhui Provincial Institute of Stereotactic Neurosurgery, 9 Lujiang Road, Hefei, Ahui Province 230001 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Online game addiction (OGA) has attracted greater attention as a serious public mental health issue. However, there are only a few brain magnetic resonance imaging studies on brain structure about OGA. In the current study, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to investigate the microstructural changes in OGA and assessed the relationship between these morphology changes and the Young's Internet Addiction Scale (YIAS) scores within the OGA group. Compared with healthy subjects, OGA individuals showed significant gray matter atrophy in the right orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral insula, and right supplementary motor area. According to TBSS analysis, OGA subjects had significantly reduced FA in the right genu of corpus callosum, bilateral frontal lobe white matter, and right external capsule. Gray matter volumes (GMV) of the right orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral insula and FA values of the right external capsule were significantly positively correlated with the YIAS scores in the OGA subjects. Our findings suggested that microstructure abnormalities of gray and white matter were present in OGA subjects. This finding may provide more insights into the understanding of the underlying neural mechanisms of OGA.

  1. Gray matter and white matter abnormalities in online game addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chuan-Bo; Qian, Ruo-Bing; Fu, Xian-Ming; Lin, Bin; Han, Xiao-Peng; Niu, Chao-Shi; Wang, Ye-Han

    2013-08-01

    Online game addiction (OGA) has attracted greater attention as a serious public mental health issue. However, there are only a few brain magnetic resonance imaging studies on brain structure about OGA. In the current study, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to investigate the microstructural changes in OGA and assessed the relationship between these morphology changes and the Young's Internet Addiction Scale (YIAS) scores within the OGA group. Compared with healthy subjects, OGA individuals showed significant gray matter atrophy in the right orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral insula, and right supplementary motor area. According to TBSS analysis, OGA subjects had significantly reduced FA in the right genu of corpus callosum, bilateral frontal lobe white matter, and right external capsule. Gray matter volumes (GMV) of the right orbitofrontal cortex, bilateral insula and FA values of the right external capsule were significantly positively correlated with the YIAS scores in the OGA subjects. Our findings suggested that microstructure abnormalities of gray and white matter were present in OGA subjects. This finding may provide more insights into the understanding of the underlying neural mechanisms of OGA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Endothelial Function Is Associated with White Matter Microstructure and Executive Function in Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan F. Johnson; Brian T. Gold; Brown, Christopher A.; Anggelis, Emily F.; Bailey, Alison L.; Clasey, Jody L.; Powell, David K.

    2017-01-01

    Age-related declines in endothelial function can lead to cognitive decline. However, little is known about the relationships between endothelial function and specific neurocognitive functions. This study explored the relationship between measures of endothelial function (reactive hyperemia index; RHI), white matter (WM) health (fractional anisotropy, FA, and WM hyperintensity volume, WMH), and executive function (Trail Making Test (TMT); Trail B − Trail A). Participants were 36 older adults b...

  3. White Matter Changes in Bipolar Disorder, Alzheimer Disease, and Mild Cognitive Impairment: New Insights from DTI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Xekardaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathological and neuroimaging studies have reported significant changes in white matter in psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, a recently developed technique, enables the detection of microstructural changes in white matter. It is a noninvasive in vivo technique that assesses water molecules' diffusion in brain tissues. The most commonly used parameters are axial and radial diffusivity reflecting diffusion along and perpendicular to the axons, as well as mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy representing global diffusion. Although the combination of these parameters provides valuable information about the integrity of brain circuits, their physiological meaning still remains controversial. After reviewing the basic principles of DTI, we report on recent contributions that used this technique to explore subtle structural changes in white matter occurring in elderly patients with bipolar disorder and Alzheimer disease.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging of brain white matter in Huntington gene mutation individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Arb Saba

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the role of the involvement of white matter tracts in huntingtin gene mutation patients as a potential biomarker of the progression of the disease. Methods We evaluated 34 participants (11 symptomatic huntingtin gene mutation, 12 presymptomatic huntingtin gene mutation, and 11 controls. We performed brain magnetic resonance imaging to assess white matter integrity using diffusion tensor imaging, with measurement of fractional anisotropy. Results We observed a significant decrease of fractional anisotropy in the cortical spinal tracts, corona radiate, corpus callosum, external capsule, thalamic radiations, superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus in the Huntington disease group compared to the control and presymptomatic groups. Reduction of fractional anisotropy is indicative of a degenerative process and axonal loss. There was no statistically significant difference between the presymptomatic and control groups. Conclusion White matter integrity is affected in huntingtin gene mutation symptomatic individuals, but other studies with larger samples are required to assess its usefulness in the progression of the neurodegenerative process.

  5. White matter changes in paediatric multiple sclerosis and monophasic demyelinating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoni, Giulia; Brown, Robert A; MomayyezSiahkal, Parya; Elliott, Colm; Narayanan, Sridar; Bar-Or, Amit; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Yeh, E Ann; Filippi, Massimo; Banwell, Brenda; Arnold, Douglas L

    2017-05-01

    See Hacohen et al. (doi:10.1093/awx075) for a scientific commentary on this article. Most children who experience an acquired demyelinating syndrome of the central nervous system will have a monophasic disease course, with no further clinical or radiological symptoms. A subset will be diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a life-long disorder. Using linear mixed effects models we examined longitudinal diffusion properties of normal-appearing white matter in 505 serial scans of 132 paediatric participants with acquired demyelinating syndromes followed for a median of 4.4 years, many from first clinical presentation, and 106 scans of 80 healthy paediatric participants. Fifty-three participants with demyelinating syndromes eventually received a diagnosis of paediatric-onset multiple sclerosis. Diffusion tensor imaging measures properties of water diffusion through tissue, which normally becomes increasingly restricted and anisotropic in the brain during childhood and adolescence, as fibre bundles develop and myelinate. In the healthy paediatric participants, our data demonstrate the expected trajectory of more restricted and anisotropic white matter diffusivity with increasing age. However, in participants with multiple sclerosis, fractional anisotropy decreased and mean diffusivity of non-lesional, normal-appearing white matter progressively increased after clinical presentation, suggesting not only a failure of age-expected white matter development but also a progressive loss of tissue integrity. Surprisingly, patients with monophasic disease failed to show age-expected changes in diffusion parameters in normal-appearing white matter, although they did not show progressive loss of integrity over time. Further analysis demonstrated that participants with monophasic disease experienced different post-onset trajectories in normal-appearing white matter depending on their presenting phenotype: those with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis demonstrated abnormal

  6. Disruption of White Matter Integrity in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors: Correlates with Long-Term Intellectual Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Tricia Z; Wang, Liya; Mao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Although chemotherapy and radiation treatment have contributed to increased survivorship, treatment-induced brain injury has been a concern when examining long-term intellectual outcomes of survivors. Specifically, disruption of brain white matter integrity and its relationship to intellectual outcomes in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors needs to be better understood. Fifty-four participants underwent diffusion tensor imaging in addition to structural MRI and an intelligence test (IQ). Voxel-wise group comparisons of fractional anisotropy calculated from DTI data were performed using Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) on 27 survivors (14 treated with radiation with and without chemotherapy and 13 treated without radiation treatment on average over 13 years since diagnosis) and 27 healthy comparison participants. Whole brain white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) differences were explored between each group. The relationships between IQ and FA in the regions where statistically lower FA values were found in survivors were examined, as well as the role of cumulative neurological factors. The group of survivors treated with radiation with and without chemotherapy had lower IQ relative to the group of survivors without radiation treatment and the healthy comparison group. TBSS identified white matter regions with significantly different mean fractional anisotropy between the three different groups. A lower level of white matter integrity was found in the radiation with or without chemotherapy treated group compared to the group without radiation treatment and also the healthy control group. The group without radiation treatment had a lower mean FA relative to healthy controls. The white matter disruption of the radiation with or without chemotherapy treated survivors was positively correlated with IQ and cumulative neurological factors. Lower long-term intellectual outcomes of childhood brain tumor survivors are associated with lower white matter integrity

  7. Disruption of White Matter Integrity in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors: Correlates with Long-Term Intellectual Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tricia Z King

    Full Text Available Although chemotherapy and radiation treatment have contributed to increased survivorship, treatment-induced brain injury has been a concern when examining long-term intellectual outcomes of survivors. Specifically, disruption of brain white matter integrity and its relationship to intellectual outcomes in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors needs to be better understood.Fifty-four participants underwent diffusion tensor imaging in addition to structural MRI and an intelligence test (IQ. Voxel-wise group comparisons of fractional anisotropy calculated from DTI data were performed using Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS on 27 survivors (14 treated with radiation with and without chemotherapy and 13 treated without radiation treatment on average over 13 years since diagnosis and 27 healthy comparison participants. Whole brain white matter fractional anisotropy (FA differences were explored between each group. The relationships between IQ and FA in the regions where statistically lower FA values were found in survivors were examined, as well as the role of cumulative neurological factors.The group of survivors treated with radiation with and without chemotherapy had lower IQ relative to the group of survivors without radiation treatment and the healthy comparison group. TBSS identified white matter regions with significantly different mean fractional anisotropy between the three different groups. A lower level of white matter integrity was found in the radiation with or without chemotherapy treated group compared to the group without radiation treatment and also the healthy control group. The group without radiation treatment had a lower mean FA relative to healthy controls. The white matter disruption of the radiation with or without chemotherapy treated survivors was positively correlated with IQ and cumulative neurological factors.Lower long-term intellectual outcomes of childhood brain tumor survivors are associated with lower white

  8. Alterations of white matter integrity related to the season of birth in schizophrenia: a DTI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Giezendanner

    Full Text Available In schizophrenia there is a consistent epidemiological finding of a birth excess in winter and spring. Season of birth is thought to act as a proxy indicator for harmful environmental factors during foetal maturation. There is evidence that prenatal exposure to harmful environmental factors may trigger pathologic processes in the neurodevelopment, which subsequently increase the risk of schizophrenia. Since brain white matter alterations have repeatedly been found in schizophrenia, the objective of this study was to investigate whether white matter integrity was related to the season of birth in patients with schizophrenia. Thirty-four patients with schizophrenia and 33 healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging. Differences in the fractional anisotropy maps of schizophrenia patients and healthy controls born in different seasons were analysed with tract-based spatial statistics. A significant main effect of season of birth and an interaction of group and season of birth showed that patients born in summer had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in widespread white matter regions than those born in the remainder of the year. Additionally, later age of schizophrenia onset was found in patients born in winter months. The current findings indicate a relationship of season of birth and white matter alterations in schizophrenia and consequently support the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of early pathological mechanisms in schizophrenia.

  9. White Matter Disruptions in Schizophrenia Are Spatially Widespread and Topologically Converge on Brain Network Hubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauser, Paul; Baker, Simon T; Cropley, Vanessa L; Bousman, Chad; Fornito, Alex; Cocchi, Luca; Fullerton, Janice M; Rasser, Paul; Schall, Ulrich; Henskens, Frans; Michie, Patricia T; Loughland, Carmel; Catts, Stanley V; Mowry, Bryan; Weickert, Thomas W; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia; Carr, Vaughan; Lenroot, Rhoshel; Pantelis, Christos; Zalesky, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    White matter abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have been widely reported, although the consistency of findings across studies is moderate. In this study, neuroimaging was used to investigate white matter pathology and its impact on whole-brain white matter connectivity in one of the largest samples of patients with schizophrenia. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were compared between patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (n = 326) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 197). Between-group differences in FA and MD were assessed using voxel-based analysis and permutation testing. Automated whole-brain white matter fiber tracking and the network-based statistic were used to characterize the impact of white matter pathology on the connectome and its rich club. Significant reductions in FA associated with schizophrenia were widespread, encompassing more than 40% (234ml) of cerebral white matter by volume and involving all cerebral lobes. Significant increases in MD were also widespread and distributed similarly. The corpus callosum, cingulum, and thalamic radiations exhibited the most extensive pathology according to effect size. More than 50% of cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical white matter fiber bundles comprising the connectome were disrupted in schizophrenia. Connections between hub regions comprising the rich club were disproportionately affected. Pathology did not differ between patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder and was not mediated by medication. In conclusion, although connectivity between cerebral hubs is most extensively disturbed in schizophrenia, white matter pathology is widespread, affecting all cerebral lobes and the cerebellum, leading to disruptions in the majority of the brain's fiber bundles. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. White matter microstructure of patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 and its relation to inhibitory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koini, M; Rombouts, S A R B; Veer, I M; Van Buchem, M A; Huijbregts, S C J

    2017-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is commonly associated with deficits in executive functions such as working memory and inhibitory control. A valid biomarker to describe the pathological basis of these deficits in NF1 is not available. The aim of this study was to investigate whether any abnormalities in white matter integrity of the executive function related anterior thalamic radiation (ATR), cingulate bundle (CB), and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) may be regarded as a pathological basis for inhibitory control deficits in adolescents with NF1. Sixteen NF1 patients and 32 healthy controls underwent 3 T DTI MRI scanning. Whole brain-, ATR-, CB-, and SLF-white matter integrity were studied using fractional anisotropy, mean (MD), radial, and axial (DA) diffusivity. Correlation analyses between white matter metrics and inhibitory control (as measured with a computerized task) were performed. Also, verbal and performance abilities (IQ-estimates) were assessed and correlated with white matter metrics. Patients showed significant whole brain- and local microstructural pathology when compared to healthy controls in all measures. In NF1-patients, whole-brain (MD: r = .646 and DA: r = .673) and ATR- (r-range: -.405-.771), but not the CB- (r-range: -.307-.472) and SLF- (r-range: -.187-.406) white matter integrity, were correlated with inhibitory control. Verbal and performance abilities were not associated with white matter pathology. In NF1, white matter abnormalities are observed throughout the brain, but damage to the ATR seems specifically, or at least most strongly related to inhibitory control. Future studies should examine whether reduced white matter integrity in other brain regions or tracts is (more strongly) associated with different aspects of the cognitive-behavioral phenotype associated with NF1.

  11. Age-Related White Matter Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Yun Xiong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related white matter changes (WMC are considered manifestation of arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease and are related to age and vascular risk factors. Most recent studies have shown that WMC are associated with a host of poor outcomes, including cognitive impairment, dementia, urinary incontinence, gait disturbances, depression, and increased risk of stroke and death. Although the clinical relevance of WMC has been extensively studied, to date, only very few clinical trials have evaluated potential symptomatic or preventive treatments for WMC. In this paper, we reviewed the current understanding in the pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical importance, chemical biomarkers, and treatments of age-related WMC.

  12. Probabilistic White Matter Atlases of Human Auditory, Basal Ganglia, Language, Precuneus, Sensorimotor, Visual and Visuospatial Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figley, Teresa D; Mortazavi Moghadam, Behnoush; Bhullar, Navdeep; Kornelsen, Jennifer; Courtney, Susan M; Figley, Chase R

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite the popularity of functional connectivity analyses and the well-known topology of several intrinsic cortical networks, relatively little is known about the white matter regions (i.e., structural connectivity) underlying these networks. In the current study, we have therefore performed fMRI-guided diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography to create probabilistic white matter atlases for eight previously identified functional brain networks, including the Auditory, Basal Ganglia, Language, Precuneus, Sensorimotor, Primary Visual, Higher Visual and Visuospatial Networks. Methods: Whole-brain diffusion imaging data were acquired from a cohort of 32 healthy volunteers, and were warped to the ICBM template using a two-stage, high-dimensional, non-linear spatial normalization procedure. Deterministic tractography, with fractional anisotropy (FA) ≥0.15 and deviation angle matter atlases (i.e., for each tract and each network as a whole) were saved as NIFTI images in stereotaxic ICBM coordinates, and have been added to the UManitoba-JHU Functionally-Defined Human White Matter Atlas (http://www.nitrc.org/projects/uofm_jhu_atlas/). Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first attempt to comprehensively identify and map white matter connectomes for the Auditory, Basal Ganglia, Language, Precuneus, Sensorimotor, Primary Visual, Higher Visual and Visuospatial Networks. Therefore, the resulting probabilistic atlases represent a unique tool for future neuroimaging studies wishing to ascribe voxel-wise or ROI-based changes (i.e., in DTI or other quantitative white matter imaging signals) to these functional brain networks.

  13. Cortical Gray and Adjacent White Matter Demonstrate Synchronous Maturation in Very Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyser, Tara A; Smyser, Christopher D; Rogers, Cynthia E; Gillespie, Sarah K; Inder, Terrie E; Neil, Jeffrey J

    2016-08-01

    Spatial and functional gradients of development have been described for the maturation of cerebral gray and white matter using histological and radiological approaches. We evaluated these patterns in very preterm (VPT) infants using diffusion tensor imaging. Data were obtained from 3 groups: 1) 22 VPT infants without white matter injury (WMI), of whom all had serial MRI studies during the neonatal period, 2) 19 VPT infants with WMI, of whom 3 had serial MRI studies and 3) 12 healthy, term-born infants. Regions of interest were placed in the cortical gray and adjacent white matter in primary motor, primary visual, visual association, and prefrontal regions. From the MRI data at term-equivalent postmenstrual age, differences in mean diffusivity were found in all areas between VPT infants with WMI and the other 2 groups. In contrast, minimal differences in fractional anisotropy were found between the 3 groups. These findings suggest that cortical maturation is delayed in VPT infants with WMI when compared with term control infants and VPT infants without WMI. From the serial MRI data from VPT infants, synchronous development between gray and white matter was evident in all areas and all groups, with maturation in primary motor and sensory regions preceding that of association areas. This finding highlights the regionally varying but locally synchronous nature of the development of cortical gray matter and its adjacent white matter. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Gray- and white-matter anatomy of absolute pitch possessors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Anders; Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Hansen, Mads; Lerch, Jason P; Vuust, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Absolute pitch (AP), the ability to identify a musical pitch without a reference, has been examined behaviorally in numerous studies for more than a century, yet only a few studies have examined the neuroanatomical correlates of AP. Here, we used MRI and diffusion tensor imaging to investigate structural differences in brains of musicians with and without AP, by means of whole-brain vertex-wise cortical thickness (CT) analysis and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis. APs displayed increased CT in a number of areas including the bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG), the left inferior frontal gyrus, and the right supramarginal gyrus. Furthermore, we found higher fractional anisotropy in APs within the path of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the uncinate fasciculus, and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. The findings in gray matter support previous studies indicating an increased left lateralized posterior STG in APs, yet they differ from previous findings of thinner cortex for a number of areas in APs. Finally, we found a relation between the white-matter results and the CT in the right parahippocampal gyrus. In this study, we present novel findings in AP research that may have implications for the understanding of the neuroanatomical underpinnings of AP ability. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Evidence for Functional Networks within the Human Brain's White Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Michael; Nitzan, Mor; Bick, Atira S; Levin, Netta; Arzy, Shahar

    2017-07-05

    Investigation of the functional macro-scale organization of the human cortex is fundamental in modern neuroscience. Although numerous studies have identified networks of interacting functional modules in the gray-matter, limited research was directed to the functional organization of the white-matter. Recent studies have demonstrated that the white-matter exhibits blood oxygen level-dependent signal fluctuations similar to those of the gray-matter. Here we used these signal fluctuations to investigate whether the white-matter is organized as functional networks by applying a clustering analysis on resting-state functional MRI (RSfMRI) data from white-matter voxels, in 176 subjects (of both sexes). This analysis indicated the existence of 12 symmetrical white-matter functional networks, corresponding to combinations of white-matter tracts identified by diffusion tensor imaging. Six of the networks included interhemispheric commissural bridges traversing the corpus callosum. Signals in white-matter networks correlated with signals from functional gray-matter networks, providing missing knowledge on how these distributed networks communicate across large distances. These findings were replicated in an independent subject group and were corroborated by seed-based analysis in small groups and individual subjects. The identified white-matter functional atlases and analysis codes are available at http://mind.huji.ac.il/white-matter.aspx Our results demonstrate that the white-matter manifests an intrinsic functional organization as interacting networks of functional modules, similarly to the gray-matter, which can be investigated using RSfMRI. The discovery of functional networks within the white-matter may open new avenues of research in cognitive neuroscience and clinical neuropsychiatry.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In recent years, functional MRI (fMRI) has revolutionized all fields of neuroscience, enabling identifications of functional modules and networks in the human

  16. Subcortical White Matter Changes with Normal Aging Detected by Multi-Shot High Resolution Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Xie

    Full Text Available Subcortical white matter builds neural connections between cortical and subcortical regions and constitutes the basis of neural networks. It plays a very important role in normal brain function. Various studies have shown that white matter deteriorates with aging. However, due to the limited spatial resolution provided by traditional diffusion imaging techniques, microstructural information from subcortical white matter with normal aging has not been comprehensively assessed. This study aims to investigate the deterioration effect with aging in the subcortical white matter and provide a baseline standard for pathological disorder diagnosis. We apply our newly developed multi-shot high resolution diffusion tensor imaging, using self-feeding multiplexed sensitivity-encoding, to measure subcortical white matter changes in regions of interest of healthy persons with a wide age range. Results show significant fractional anisotropy decline and radial diffusivity increasing with age, especially in the anterior part of the brain. We also find that subcortical white matter has more prominent changes than white matter close to the central brain. The observed changes in the subcortical white matter may be indicative of a mild demyelination and a loss of myelinated axons, which may contribute to normal age-related functional decline.

  17. Subcortical White Matter Changes with Normal Aging Detected by Multi-Shot High Resolution Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sheng; Zhang, Zhe; Chang, Feiyan; Wang, Yishi; Zhang, Zhenxia; Zhou, Zhenyu; Guo, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Subcortical white matter builds neural connections between cortical and subcortical regions and constitutes the basis of neural networks. It plays a very important role in normal brain function. Various studies have shown that white matter deteriorates with aging. However, due to the limited spatial resolution provided by traditional diffusion imaging techniques, microstructural information from subcortical white matter with normal aging has not been comprehensively assessed. This study aims to investigate the deterioration effect with aging in the subcortical white matter and provide a baseline standard for pathological disorder diagnosis. We apply our newly developed multi-shot high resolution diffusion tensor imaging, using self-feeding multiplexed sensitivity-encoding, to measure subcortical white matter changes in regions of interest of healthy persons with a wide age range. Results show significant fractional anisotropy decline and radial diffusivity increasing with age, especially in the anterior part of the brain. We also find that subcortical white matter has more prominent changes than white matter close to the central brain. The observed changes in the subcortical white matter may be indicative of a mild demyelination and a loss of myelinated axons, which may contribute to normal age-related functional decline.

  18. White Matter Changes Associated with Resting Sympathetic Tone in Frontotemporal Dementia vs. Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario F Mendez

    Full Text Available Resting sympathetic tone, a measure of physiological arousal, is decreased in patients with apathy and inertia, such as those with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD and other frontally-predominant disorders.To identify the neuroanatomical correlates of skin conductance levels (SCLs, an index of resting sympathetic tone and apathy, among patients with bvFTD, where SCLs is decreased, compared to those with Alzheimer's disease (AD, where it is not.This study analyzed bvFTD (n = 14 patients and a comparison group with early-onset AD (n = 19. We compared their resting SCLs with gray matter and white matter regions of interest and white matter measures of fiber integrity on magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging.As expected, bvFTD patients, compared to AD patients, had lower SCLs, which correlated with an apathy measure, and more gray matter loss and abnormalities of fiber integrity (fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity in frontal-anterior temporal regions. After controlling for group membership, the SCLs were significantly correlated with white matter volumes in the cingulum and inferior parietal region in the right hemisphere.Among dementia patients, SCLs, and resting sympathetic tone, may correlate with quantity of white matter, rather than with gray matter or with white matter fiber integrity. Loss of white matter volumes, especially involving a right frontoparietal network, may reflect chronic loss of cortical axons that mediate frontal control of resting sympathetic tone, changes that could contribute to the apathy and inertia of bvFTD and related disorders.

  19. White Matter Development in Adolescence: A DTI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Asato, M. R.; Terwilliger, R.; Woo, J.; B. Luna

    2010-01-01

    Adolescence is a unique period of physical and cognitive development that includes concurrent pubertal changes and sex-based vulnerabilities. While diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies show white matter maturation throughout the lifespan, the state of white matter integrity specific to adolescence is not well understood as are the contributions of puberty and sex. We performed whole-brain DTI studies of 114 children, adolescents, and adults to identify age-related changes in white matter in...

  20. Cognitive processing speed in older adults: relationship with white matter integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey A Kerchner

    Full Text Available Cognitive processing slows with age. We sought to determine the importance of white matter integrity, assessed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, at influencing cognitive processing speed among normal older adults, assessed using a novel battery of computerized, non-verbal, choice reaction time tasks. We studied 131 cognitively normal adults aged 55-87 using a cross-sectional design. Each participant underwent our test battery, as well as MRI with DTI. We carried out cross-subject comparisons using tract-based spatial statistics. As expected, reaction time slowed significantly with age. In diffuse areas of frontal and parietal white matter, especially the anterior corpus callosum, fractional anisotropy values correlated negatively with reaction time. The genu and body of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus were among the areas most involved. This relationship was not explained by gray or white matter atrophy or by white matter lesion volume. In a statistical mediation analysis, loss of white matter integrity mediated the relationship between age and cognitive processing speed.

  1. White matter integrity in Asperger syndrome: a preliminary diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, Oswald J N; Deeley, Quinton; Sundram, Fred; Daly, Eileen M; Barker, Gareth J; Jones, Derek K; van Amelsvoort, Therese A M J; Schmitz, Nicole; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Kieran C; Murphy, Declan G M

    2010-10-01

    Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD), including Asperger syndrome and autism, is a highly genetic neurodevelopmental disorder. There is a consensus that ASD has a biological basis, and it has been proposed that it is a "connectivity" disorder. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DT-MRI) allows measurement of the microstructural integrity of white matter (a proxy measure of "connectivity"). However, nobody has investigated the microstructural integrity of whole brain white matter in people with Asperger syndrome. We measured the fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD) and radial diffusivity (RD) of white matter, using DT-MRI, in 13 adults with Asperger syndrome and 13 controls. The groups did not differ significantly in overall intelligence and age. FA, MD and RD were assessed using whole brain voxel-based techniques. Adults with Asperger syndrome had a significantly lower FA than controls in 13 clusters. These were largely bilateral and included white matter in the internal capsule, frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes, cingulum and corpus callosum. Adults with Asperger syndrome have widespread significant differences from controls in white matter microstructural integrity.

  2. Tract-based analysis of white matter integrity in psychotic and nonpsychotic bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Andrew; Godwin, Douglass; Rutlin, Jerrel; Kandala, Sridhar; Shimony, Joshua S; Mamah, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    At least 50% of individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) present with psychosis during their lifetime. Psychotic symptoms have sometimes been linked to specific genetic and phenotypic markers. This study aims to explore potential differences between bipolar disorder subtypes by measuring white matter integrity of the brain and relationships with clinical measures. Diffusion tensor imaging and clinical measures were acquired from 102 participants, grouped as psychotic bipolar disorder (PBD) (n=48), non-psychotic bipolar disorder (NBD) (n=24), and healthy controls (n=30). We utilized a powerful, automated tool (TRACULA: Tracts Constrained by Underlying Anatomy) to analyze the fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of 18 white matter tracts. Decreased FA in numerous tracts was observed in bipolar disorder groups compared to healthy controls: bilateral cingulum-cingulate gyrus bundles, corticospinal tracts, and superior longitudinal fasciculi as well as the right hemisphere cingulum-angular bundle. Only left uncinate fasciculus FA differed between PBD and NPBD groups. We found no group differences in MD. Positive symptoms correlated with FA in the superior (inversely) and inferior (directly) longitudinal fasciculi. Negative symptoms directly correlated with mean FA of the corticospinal tract and cingulum-angular bundle. Neurotropic, mood-stabilizing medication prescribed for individuals with BD may interact with measures of white matter integrity in our BD participants. Our results indicate decreased white matter coherence in BD. Minimal differences in white matter FA between PBD and NPBD participants suggest related underlying neurobiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Extensive White Matter Alterations and Its Correlations with Ataxia Severity in SCA 2 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R.; Galvez, Victor; Mercadillo, Roberto; Diaz, Rosalinda; Campos-Romo, Aurelio; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies of SCA2 have revealed significant degeneration of white matter tracts in cerebellar and cerebral regions. The motor deficit in these patients may be attributable to the degradation of projection fibers associated with the underlying neurodegenerative process. However, this relationship remains unclear. Statistical analysis of diffusion tensor imaging enables an unbiased whole-brain quantitative comparison of the diffusion proprieties of white matter tracts in vivo. Methods Fourteen genetically confirmed SCA2 patients and aged-matched healthy controls participated in the study. Tract-based spatial statistics were performed to analyze structural white matter damage using two different measurements: fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Significant diffusion differences were correlated with the patient's ataxia impairment. Results Our analysis revealed decreased FA mainly in the inferior/middle/superior cerebellar peduncles, the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule and the bilateral superior corona radiata. Increases in MD were found mainly in cerebellar white matter, medial lemniscus, and middle cerebellar peduncle, among other regions. Clinical impairment measured with the SARA score correlated with FA in superior parietal white matter and bilateral anterior corona radiata. Correlations with MD were found in cerebellar white matter and the middle cerebellar peduncle. Conclusion Our findings show significant correlations between diffusion measurements in key areas affected in SCA2 and measures of motor impairment, suggesting a disruption of information flow between motor and sensory-integration areas. These findings result in a more comprehensive view of the clinical impact of the white matter degeneration in SCA2. PMID:26263162

  4. Extensive White Matter Alterations and Its Correlations with Ataxia Severity in SCA 2 Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R Hernandez-Castillo

    Full Text Available Previous studies of SCA2 have revealed significant degeneration of white matter tracts in cerebellar and cerebral regions. The motor deficit in these patients may be attributable to the degradation of projection fibers associated with the underlying neurodegenerative process. However, this relationship remains unclear. Statistical analysis of diffusion tensor imaging enables an unbiased whole-brain quantitative comparison of the diffusion proprieties of white matter tracts in vivo.Fourteen genetically confirmed SCA2 patients and aged-matched healthy controls participated in the study. Tract-based spatial statistics were performed to analyze structural white matter damage using two different measurements: fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD. Significant diffusion differences were correlated with the patient's ataxia impairment.Our analysis revealed decreased FA mainly in the inferior/middle/superior cerebellar peduncles, the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule and the bilateral superior corona radiata. Increases in MD were found mainly in cerebellar white matter, medial lemniscus, and middle cerebellar peduncle, among other regions. Clinical impairment measured with the SARA score correlated with FA in superior parietal white matter and bilateral anterior corona radiata. Correlations with MD were found in cerebellar white matter and the middle cerebellar peduncle.Our findings show significant correlations between diffusion measurements in key areas affected in SCA2 and measures of motor impairment, suggesting a disruption of information flow between motor and sensory-integration areas. These findings result in a more comprehensive view of the clinical impact of the white matter degeneration in SCA2.

  5. Whole brain white matter connectivity analysis using machine learning: An application to autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Savadjiev, Peter; Cai, Weidong; Song, Yang; Rathi, Yogesh; Tunç, Birkan; Parker, Drew; Kapur, Tina; Schultz, Robert T; Makris, Nikos; Verma, Ragini; O'Donnell, Lauren J

    2017-10-25

    In this paper, we propose an automated white matter connectivity analysis method for machine learning classification and characterization of white matter abnormality via identification of discriminative fiber tracts. The proposed method uses diffusion MRI tractography and a data-driven approach to find fiber clusters corresponding to subdivisions of the white matter anatomy. Features extracted from each fiber cluster describe its diffusion properties and are used for machine learning. The method is demonstrated by application to a pediatric neuroimaging dataset from 149 individuals, including 70 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 79 typically developing controls (TDC). A classification accuracy of 78.33% is achieved in this cross-validation study. We investigate the discriminative diffusion features based on a two-tensor fiber tracking model. We observe that the mean fractional anisotropy from the second tensor (associated with crossing fibers) is most affected in ASD. We also find that local along-tract (central cores and endpoint regions) differences between ASD and TDC are helpful in differentiating the two groups. These altered diffusion properties in ASD are associated with multiple robustly discriminative fiber clusters, which belong to several major white matter tracts including the corpus callosum, arcuate fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus and aslant tract; and the white matter structures related to the cerebellum, brain stem, and ventral diencephalon. These discriminative fiber clusters, a small part of the whole brain tractography, represent the white matter connections that could be most affected in ASD. Our results indicate the potential of a machine learning pipeline based on white matter fiber clustering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. White matter tracts of speech and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Marion; Jiskoot, Lize C; Papma, Janne M

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used to investigate the white matter (WM) tracts underlying the perisylvian cortical regions known to be associated with language function. The arcuate fasciculus is composed of 3 segments (1 long and 2 short) whose separate functions correlate with traditional models of conductive and transcortical motor or sensory aphasia, respectively. DTI mapping of language fibers is useful in presurgical planning for patients with dominant hemisphere tumors, particularly when combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging. DTI has found damage to language networks in stroke patients and has the potential to influence poststroke rehabilitation and treatment. Assessment of the WM tracts involved in the default mode network has been found to correlate with mild cognitive impairment, potentially explaining language deficits in patients with apparently mild small vessel ischemic disease. Different patterns of involvement of language-related WM structures appear to correlate with different clinical subtypes of primary progressive aphasias. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. White Matter Lesion Progression in LADIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Reinhold; Berghold, Andrea; Jokinen, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter lesion (WML) progression has been advocated as a surrogate marker in intervention trials on cerebral small vessel disease. We assessed the rate of visually rated WML progression, studied correlations between lesion progression and cognition, and estimated sample...... grade on the Rotterdam Progression Scale. RESULTS: WML progression related to deterioration in cognitive functioning. This relationship was less pronounced in subjects with early confluent and confluent lesions. Consequently, studies in which the outcome is cognitive change resulting from treatment...... effects on lesion progression will need between 1809 subjects per treatment arm when using executive tests and up to 18 853 subjects when using the Vascular Dementia Assessment Scale score. Studies having WML progression as the sole outcome will need only 58 or 70 individuals per treatment arm...

  8. Brain white matter structure and COMT gene are linked to second-language learning in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamiya, Ping C; Richards, Todd L; Coe, Bradley P; Eichler, Evan E; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2016-06-28

    Adult human brains retain the capacity to undergo tissue reorganization during second-language learning. Brain-imaging studies show a relationship between neuroanatomical properties and learning for adults exposed to a second language. However, the role of genetic factors in this relationship has not been investigated. The goal of the current study was twofold: (i) to characterize the relationship between brain white matter fiber-tract properties and second-language immersion using diffusion tensor imaging, and (ii) to determine whether polymorphisms in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene affect the relationship. We recruited incoming Chinese students enrolled in the University of Washington and scanned their brains one time. We measured the diffusion properties of the white matter fiber tracts and correlated them with the number of days each student had been in the immersion program at the time of the brain scan. We found that higher numbers of days in the English immersion program correlated with higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. We show that fractional anisotropy declined once the subjects finished the immersion program. The relationship between brain white matter fiber-tract properties and immersion varied in subjects with different COMT genotypes. Subjects with the Methionine (Met)/Valine (Val) and Val/Val genotypes showed higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity during immersion, which reversed immediately after immersion ended, whereas those with the Met/Met genotype did not show these relationships. Statistical modeling revealed that subjects' grades in the language immersion program were best predicted by fractional anisotropy and COMT genotype.

  9. Vulnerability of white matter to insult during childhood: evidence from patients treated for medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxon-Emre, Iska; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D; Laperriere, Normand; Sharpe, Michael B; Laughlin, Suzanne; Bartels, Ute; Scantlebury, Nadia; Law, Nicole; Malkin, David; Skocic, Jovanka; Richard, Logan; Mabbott, Donald J

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Craniospinal irradiation damages the white matter in children treated for medulloblastoma, but the treatment-intensity effects are unclear. In a cross-sectional retrospective study, the effects of treatment with the least intensive radiation protocol versus protocols that delivered more radiation to the brain, in addition to the effects of continuous radiation dose, on white matter architecture were evaluated. METHODS Diffusion tensor imaging was used to assess fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity. First, regional white matter analyses and tract-based spatial statistics were conducted in 34 medulloblastoma patients and 38 healthy controls. Patients were stratified according to those treated with 1) the least intensive radiation protocol, specifically reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation plus a boost to the tumor bed only (n = 17), or 2) any other dose and boost combination that delivered more radiation to the brain, which was also termed the "all-other-treatments" group (n = 17), and comprised patients treated with standard-dose craniospinal irradiation plus a posterior fossa boost, standard-dose craniospinal irradiation plus a tumor bed boost, or reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation plus a posterior fossa boost. Second, voxel-wise dose-distribution analyses were conducted on a separate cohort of medulloblastoma patients (n = 15). RESULTS The all-other-treatments group, but not the reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation plus tumor bed group, had lower fractional anisotropy and higher radial diffusivity than controls in all brain regions (all p 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Together, the results show that white matter damage has a clear association with increasing radiation dose, and that treatment with reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation plus tumor bed boost appears to preserve white matter in some brain regions.

  10. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  11. Altered gray matter volume and white matter integrity in college students with mobile phone dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming eWang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phone dependence (MPD is a behavioral addiction that has become an increasing public mental health issue. While previous research has explored some of the factors that may predict MPD, the underlying neural mechanisms of MPD have not been investigated yet. The current study aimed to explore the microstructural variations associated with MPD as measured with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI. Gray matter volume (GMV and white matter (WM integrity (four indexes: fractional anisotropy, FA; mean diffusivity, MD; axial diffusivity, AD; and radial diffusivity, RD were calculated via voxel-based morphometry (VBM and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS analysis, respectively. Sixty-eight college students (42 female were enrolled and separated into two groups (MPD group, N=34; control group, N=34 based on Mobile Phone Addiction Index (MPAI scale score. Trait impulsivity was also measured using the Barrett Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11. In light of underlying trait impulsivity, results revealed decreased GMV in the MPD group relative to controls in regions such as the right superior frontal gyrus (sFG, right inferior frontal gyrus (iFG, and bilateral thalamus (Thal. In the MPD group, GMV in the above mentioned regions was negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. Results also showed significantly less FA and AD measures of white matter integrity in the MPD group relative to controls in bilateral hippocampal cingulum bundle fibers (CgH. Additionally, in the MPD group, FA of the CgH was also negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. These findings provide the first morphological evidence of altered brain structure with phone-overuse, and may help to better understand the neural mechanisms of MPD in relation with other behavioral and substance addiction disorders.

  12. White matter compromise in veterans exposed to primary blast forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Katherine H; Hurley, Robin A; Haswell, Courtney C; Rowland, Jared A; Hurt, Susan D; Lamar, Cory D; Morey, Rajendra A

    2015-01-01

    Use diffusion tensor imaging to investigate white matter alterations associated with blast exposure with or without acute symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Forty-five veterans of the recent military conflicts included 23 exposed to primary blast without TBI symptoms, 6 having primary blast with mild TBI, and 16 unexposed to blast. Cross-sectional case-control study. Neuropsychological testing and diffusion tensor imaging metrics that quantified the number of voxel clusters with altered fractional anisotropy (FA) radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity, regardless of their spatial location. Significantly lower FA and higher radial diffusivity were observed in veterans exposed to primary blast with and without mild TBI relative to blast-unexposed veterans. Voxel clusters of lower FA were spatially dispersed and heterogeneous across affected individuals. These results suggest that lack of clear TBI symptoms following primary blast exposure may not accurately reflect the extent of brain injury. If confirmed, our findings would argue for supplementing the established approach of making diagnoses based purely on clinical history and observable acute symptoms with novel neuroimaging-based diagnostic criteria that "look below the surface" for pathology.

  13. Cognitive Intraindividual Variability and White Matter Integrity in Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Mella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The intraindividual variability (IIV of cognitive performance has been shown to increase with aging. While brain research has generally focused on mean performance, little is known about neural correlates of cognitive IIV. Nevertheless, some studies suggest that IIV relates more strongly than mean level of performance to the quality of white matter (WM. Our study aims to explore the relation between WM integrity and cognitive IIV by combining functional (fMRI and structural (diffusion tensor imaging, DTI imaging. Twelve young adults (aged 18–30 years and thirteen older adults (61–82 years underwent a battery of neuropsychological tasks, along with fMRI and DTI imaging. Their behavioral data were analyzed and correlated with the imaging data at WM regions of interest defined on the basis of (1 the fMRI-activated areas and (2 the Johns Hopkins University (JHU WM tractography atlas. For both methods, fractional anisotropy, along with the mean, radial, and axial diffusivity parameters, was computed. In accord with previous studies, our results showed that the DTI parameters were more related to IIV than to mean performance. Results also indicated that age differences in the DTI parameters were more pronounced in the regions activated primarily by young adults during a choice reaction-time task than in those also activated in older adults.

  14. Cerebral white matter lesions and depressive symptoms in elderly adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. de Groot (Jan Cees); H.F. de Leeuw (Frank); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs); J. Jolles (Jellemer); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: There is evidence for a vascular cause of late-life depression. Cerebral white matter lesions are thought to represent vascular abnormalities. White matter lesions have been related to affective disorders and a history of late-onset depression in

  15. White Matter Injury and Recovery after Hypertensive Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Shilun; Pan, Pengyu; Li, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) could very probably trigger white matter injury in patients. Through the continuous study of white matter injury after hypertensive ICH, we achieve a more profound understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism of its occurrence and development. At the same time, we found a series of drugs and treatment methods for the white matter repair. In the current reality, the research paradigm of white matter injury after hypertensive ICH is relatively obsolete or incomplete, and there are still lots of deficiencies in the research. In the face of the profound changes of stroke research perspective, we believe that the combination of the lenticulostriate artery, nerve nuclei of the hypothalamus-thalamus-basal ganglia, and the white matter fibers located within the capsula interna will be beneficial to the research of white matter injury and repair. This paper has classified and analyzed the study of white matter injury and repair after hypertensive ICH and also rethought the shortcomings of the current research. We hope that it could help researchers further explore and study white matter injury and repair after hypertensive ICH. PMID:28680884

  16. Aortic stiffness is associated with white matter integrity in patients with type 1 diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjeerdema, Nathanja; Schinkel, Linda D. van [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology and General Internal Medicine (C7-Q), Albinusdreef 2, PO Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Westenberg, Jos J.; Elderen, Saskia G. van; Buchem, Mark A. van; Grond, Jeroen van der; Roos, Albert de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Smit, Johannes W. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology and General Internal Medicine (C7-Q), Albinusdreef 2, PO Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); University Medical Center Nijmegen, Department of General Internal Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    To assess the association between aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a marker of arterial stiffness and diffusion tensor imaging of brain white matter integrity in patients with type 1 diabetes using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. Forty-one patients with type 1 diabetes (23 men, mean age 44 ± 12 years, mean diabetes duration 24 ± 13 years) were included. Aortic PWV was assessed using through-plane velocity-encoded MRI. Brain diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements were performed on 3-T MRI. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated for white and grey matter integrity. Pearson correlation and multivariable linear regression analyses including cardiovascular risk factors as covariates were assessed. Multivariable linear regression analyses revealed that aortic PWV is independently associated with white matter integrity FA (β = -0.777, p = 0.008) in patients with type 1 diabetes. This effect was independent of age, gender, mean arterial pressure, body mass index, smoking, duration of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin levels. Aortic PWV was not significantly related to grey matter integrity. Our data suggest that aortic stiffness is independently associated with reduced white matter integrity in patients with type 1 diabetes. (orig.)

  17. Automated measurement of local white matter lesion volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Lijn, Fedde; Verhaaren, Benjamin F. J.; Ikram, M. Arfan

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that white matter lesions at different locations may have different etiology and clinical consequences. Several approaches for the quantification of local white matter lesion load have been proposed in the literature, most of which rely on a distinction between lesions...... in a periventricular region close to the ventricles and a subcortical zone further away. In this work we present a novel automated method for local white matter lesion volume quantification in magnetic resonance images. The method segments and measures the white matter lesion volume in 43 regions defined...... by orientation and distance to the ventricles, which allows a more spatially detailed study of lesion load. The potential of the method was demonstrated by analyzing the effect of blood pressure on the regional white matter lesion volume in 490 elderly subjects taken from a longitudinal population study...

  18. Dark matter indirect searches: Multi-wavelength and anisotropies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ando, S.

    2016-01-01

    If dark matter is made of particles governed by weak-scale physics, they may annihilate or decay to leave observable signatures in high-energy gamma-ray sky. In addition, any charged particles produced by the same process will also give low-frequency photons through successive electromagnetic

  19. Cortex Parcellation Associated Whole White Matter Parcellation in Individual Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Schiffler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of specific white matter areas is a growing field in neurological research and is typically achieved through the use of atlases. However, the definition of anatomically based regions remains challenging for the white matter and thus hinders region-specific analysis in individual subjects. In this article, we focus on creating a whole white matter parcellation method for individual subjects where these areas can be associated to cortex regions. This is done by combining cortex parcellation and fiber tracking data. By tracking fibers out of each cortex region and labeling the fibers according to their origin, we populate a candidate image. We then derive the white matter parcellation by classifying each white matter voxel according to the distribution of labels in the corresponding voxel from the candidate image. The parcellation of the white matter with the presented method is highly reliable and is not as dependent on registration as with white matter atlases. This method allows for the parcellation of the whole white matter into individual cortex region associated areas and, therefore, associates white matter alterations to cortex regions. In addition, we compare the results from the presented method to existing atlases. The areas generated by the presented method are not as sharply defined as the areas in most existing atlases; however, they are computed directly in the DWI space of the subject and, therefore, do not suffer from distortion caused by registration. The presented approach might be a promising tool for clinical and basic research to investigate modalities or system specific micro structural alterations of white matter areas in a quantitative manner.

  20. White matter microstructure throughout the brain correlates with visual imagery in grapheme-color synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Kirstie J; Kang, Xiaojian; Herron, Timothy J; Woods, David L; Robertson, Lynn C; Alvarez, Bryan D

    2014-04-15

    In this study we show, for the first time, a correlation between the neuroanatomy of the synesthetic brain and a metric that measures behavior not exclusive to the synesthetic experience. Grapheme-color synesthetes (n=20), who experience colors triggered by viewing or thinking of specific letters or numbers, showed altered white matter microstructure, as measured using diffusion tensor imaging, compared with carefully matched non-synesthetic controls. Synesthetes had lower fractional anisotropy and higher perpendicular diffusivity when compared to non-synesthetic controls. An analysis of the mode of anisotropy suggested that these differences were likely due to the presence of more crossing pathways in the brains of synesthetes. Additionally, these differences in white matter microstructure correlated negatively, and only for synesthetes, with a measure of the vividness of their visual imagery. Synesthetes who reported the most vivid visual imagery had the lowest fractional anisotropy and highest perpendicular diffusivity. We conclude that synesthetes as a population vary along a continuum while showing categorical differences in neuroanatomy and behavior compared to non-synesthetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Body mass and white matter integrity: the influence of vascular and inflammatory markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianne Magouirk Bettcher

    Full Text Available High adiposity is deleteriously associated with brain health, and may disproportionately affect white matter integrity; however, limited information exists regarding the mechanisms underlying the association between body mass (BMI and white matter integrity. The present study evaluated whether vascular and inflammatory markers influence the relationship between BMI and white matter in healthy aging. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of white matter integrity, BMI, and vascular/inflammatory factors in a cohort of 138 healthy older adults (mean age: 71.3 years. Participants underwent diffusion tensor imaging, provided blood samples, and participated in a health evaluation. Vascular risk factors and vascular/inflammatory blood markers were assessed. The primary outcome measure was fractional anisotropy (FA of the genu, body, and splenium (corpus callosum; exploratory measures included additional white matter regions, based on significant associations with BMI. Regression analyses indicated that higher BMI was associated with lower FA in the corpus callosum, cingulate, and fornix (p<.001. Vascular and inflammatory factors influenced the association between BMI and FA. Specifically, BMI was independently associated with the genu [β=-.21; B=-.0024; 95% CI, -.0048 to -.0000; p=.05] and cingulate fibers [β=-.39; B=-.0035; 95% CI,-.0056 to -.0015; p<.001], even after controlling for vascular/inflammatory risk factors and blood markers. In contrast, BMI was no longer significantly associated with the fornix and middle/posterior regions of the corpus callosum after controlling for these markers. Results partially support a vascular/inflammatory hypothesis, but also suggest a more complex relationship between BMI and white matter characterized by potentially different neuroanatomic vulnerability.

  2. Effects of Surgery and Proton Therapy on Cerebral White Matter of Craniopharyngioma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uh, Jinsoo, E-mail: jinsoo.uh@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sabin, Noah D. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Ogg, Robert J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Boop, Frederick A. [Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Jane, John A. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Hua, Chiaho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine radiation dose effect on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in craniopharyngioma patients receiving surgery and proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients (2.1-19.3 years of age) with craniopharyngioma underwent surgery and proton therapy in a prospective therapeutic trial. Anatomical magnetic resonance images acquired after surgery but before proton therapy were inspected to identify white matter structures intersected by surgical corridors and catheter tracks. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to measure microstructural integrity changes in cerebral white matter. Fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from DTI was statistically analyzed for 51 atlas-based white matter structures of the brain to determine radiation dose effect. FA in surgery-affected regions in the corpus callosum was compared to that in its intact counterpart to determine whether surgical defects affect radiation dose effect. Results: Surgical defects were seen most frequently in the corpus callosum because of transcallosal resection of tumors and insertion of ventricular or cyst catheters. Longitudinal DTI data indicated reductions in FA 3 months after therapy, which was followed by a recovery in most white matter structures. A greater FA reduction was correlated with a higher radiation dose in 20 white matter structures, indicating a radiation dose effect. The average FA in the surgery-affected regions before proton therapy was smaller (P=.0001) than that in their non–surgery-affected counterparts with more intensified subsequent reduction of FA (P=.0083) after therapy, suggesting that surgery accentuated the radiation dose effect. Conclusions: DTI data suggest that mild radiation dose effects occur in patients with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy. Surgical defects present at the time of proton therapy appear to accentuate the radiation dose effect longitudinally

  3. White-matter tract integrity in late-life depression: associations with severity and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, R A; Lamar, M; Zhang, A; Yang, S; Ajilore, O; Kumar, A

    2014-05-01

    Although significant changes in both gray and white matter have been noted in late-life depression (LLD), the pathophysiology of implicated white-matter tracts has not been fully described. In this study we examined the integrity of specific white-matter tracts in LLD versus healthy controls (HC). Participants aged ⩾60 years were recruited from the community. The sample included 23 clinically diagnosed individuals with LLD and 23 HC. White-matter integrity metrics [fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD)] were calculated in the bilateral cingulum and uncinate fasciculus. Depression severity was measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESD). Composite scores for learning and memory and executive function were created using standardized neuropsychological assessments. White-matter integrity was lower in LLD versus HC in the bilateral cingulum and right uncinate fasciculus (p⩽0.05). In the whole sample, depression severity correlated with integrity in the bilateral cingulum and right uncinate fasciculus (p ⩽0.05). In patients, depression severity correlated with the integrity of the left uncinate fasciculus (p = 0.03); this tract also correlated with executive function (p = 0.02). Among HC, tract integrity did not correlate with depression scores; however, learning and memory correlated with integrity of the bilateral uncinate fasciculus and bilateral cingulum; executive function correlated with the right uncinate and left cingulum (p ⩽0.05). White-matter tract integrity was lower in LLD than in HC and was associated with depression severity across all participants. Tract integrity was associated with cognition in both groups but more robustly among HC.

  4. Quantifying the effects of normal ageing on white matter structure using unsupervised tract shape modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Mark E; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Ferguson, Karen J; Brown, Laura J; Wardlaw, Joanna M; MacLullich, Alasdair M J; Clayden, Jonathan D

    2010-05-15

    Quantitative tractography may provide insights into regional heterogeneity of changes in white matter structure in normal ageing. Here we examine how brain atrophy and white matter lesions affect correlations between tract shape, tract integrity and age in a range of frontal and non-frontal tracts in 90 non-demented subjects aged over 65 years using an enhanced version of probabilistic neighbourhood tractography. This novel method for automatic single seed point placement employs unsupervised learning and streamline selection to provide reliable and accurate tract segmentation, whilst also indicating how the shape of an individual tract compares to that of a predefined reference tract. There were significant negative correlations between tract shape similarity to reference tracts derived from a young brain white matter atlas and age in genu and splenium of corpus callosum. Controlling for intracranial and lateral ventricle volume, the latter of which increased significantly with age, attenuated these correlations by 40% and 84%, respectively, indicating that this age-related change in callosal tract topology is significantly mediated by global atrophy and ventricular enlargement. In accordance with the "frontal ageing" hypothesis, there was a significant positive correlation between mean diffusivity (D) and age, and a significant negative correlation between fractional anisotropy (FA) and age in corpus callosum genu; correlations not seen in splenium. Significant positive correlations were also observed between D and age in bilateral cingulum cingulate gyri, uncinate fasciculi and right corticospinal tract. This pattern of correlations was not, however, reproduced when those subjects with significant white matter lesion load were analyzed separately from those without. These data therefore suggest that brain atrophy and white matter lesions play a significant role in driving regional patterns of age-related changes in white matter tract shape and integrity

  5. Deficits in Neurite Density Underlie White Matter Structure Abnormalities in First-Episode Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Charlotte L; Davies, Geoff; Garfinkel, Sarah N; Gabel, Matt C; Dowell, Nicholas G; Cercignani, Mara; Seth, Anil K; Greenwood, Kathryn E; Medford, Nick; Critchley, Hugo D

    2017-11-15

    Structural abnormalities across multiple white matter tracts are recognized in people with early psychosis, consistent with dysconnectivity as a neuropathological account of symptom expression. We applied advanced neuroimaging techniques to characterize microstructural white matter abnormalities for a deeper understanding of the developmental etiology of psychosis. Thirty-five first-episode psychosis patients, and 19 healthy controls, participated in a quantitative neuroimaging study using neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging, a multishell diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique that distinguishes white matter fiber arrangement and geometry from changes in neurite density. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity images were also derived. Tract-based spatial statistics compared white matter structure between patients and control subjects and tested associations with age, symptom severity, and medication. Patients with first-episode psychosis had lower regional FA in multiple commissural, corticospinal, and association tracts. These abnormalities predominantly colocalized with regions of reduced neurite density, rather than aberrant fiber bundle arrangement (orientation dispersion index). There was no direct relationship with active symptoms. FA decreased and orientation dispersion index increased with age in patients, but not control subjects, suggesting accelerated effects of white matter geometry change. Deficits in neurite density appear fundamental to abnormalities in white matter integrity in early psychosis. In the first application of neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging in psychosis, we found that processes compromising axonal fiber number, density, and myelination, rather than processes leading to spatial disruption of fiber organization, are implicated in the etiology of psychosis. This accords with a neurodevelopmental origin of aberrant brain-wide structural connectivity predisposing individuals to

  6. White matter integrity mediates decline in age-related inhibitory control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peipei; Tsapanou, Angeliki; Qolamreza, Razlighi R; Gazes, Yunglin

    2018-02-26

    Previous DTI studies have reported associations between white matter integrity and performance on the Stroop interference task. The current study aimed to add to these studies of inhibitory control by investigating how the differences in age and in white matter integrity relate to Stroop performance, and to examine whether the effect of age on Stroop performance is mediated by white matter integrity. 179 healthy adults from 20 to 80 years old were recruited in the study. DTI data were processed through TRACULA and the mean fractional anisotropy (FA) of 18 major white matter tracts were extracted and used for statistical analysis. Correlation analysis showed a strong negative relationship between age and the Stroop interference score (IG). Higher IG indicated better inhibitory control. Simple linear regression analyses indicated that most of the tracts showed negative relationships with age, and positive relationships with IG. Moderation effect of age on the relationship between FA and IG was tested on tracts that significantly predicted IG after multiple comparison corrections, but none of these moderations were significant. Then we tested if these tracts mediated the effect of age on IG and found significant indirect effects of age on IG through the FA of the left corticospinal tract and through the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Our results highlight the role of a number of major white matter tracts in the processes supporting the Stroop inhibitory performance and further pinpointed the lower white matter integrity of specific tracts as contributors to the decrease in inhibitory control ability associated with the Stroop test in older age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo characterization of cortical and white matter neuroaxonal pathology in early multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Tobias; Fan, Qiuyun; Treaba, Constantina Andrada; Ouellette, Russell; Herranz, Elena; Mangeat, Gabriel; Louapre, Céline; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Klawiter, Eric C; Sloane, Jacob A; Mainero, Caterina

    2017-11-01

    Neuroaxonal pathology is a main determinant of disease progression in multiple sclerosis; however, its underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, including its link to inflammatory demyelination and temporal occurrence in the disease course are still unknown. We used ultra-high field (7 T), ultra-high gradient strength diffusion and T1/T2-weighted myelin-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging to characterize microstructural changes in myelin and neuroaxonal integrity in the cortex and white matter in early stage multiple sclerosis, their distribution in lesional and normal-appearing tissue, and their correlations with neurological disability. Twenty-six early stage multiple sclerosis subjects (disease duration ≤5 years) and 24 age-matched healthy controls underwent 7 T T2*-weighted imaging for cortical lesion segmentation and 3 T T1/T2-weighted myelin-sensitive imaging and neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging for assessing microstructural myelin, axonal and dendrite integrity in lesional and normal-appearing tissue of the cortex and the white matter. Conventional mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy metrics were also assessed for comparison. Cortical lesions were identified in 92% of early multiple sclerosis subjects and they were characterized by lower intracellular volume fraction (P = 0.015 by paired t-test), lower myelin-sensitive contrast (P = 0.030 by related-samples Wilcoxon signed-rank test) and higher mean diffusivity (P = 0.022 by related-samples Wilcoxon signed-rank test) relative to the contralateral normal-appearing cortex. Similar findings were observed in white matter lesions relative to normal-appearing white matter (all P multiple sclerosis subjects had diffusely lower intracellular volume fractions than the white matter in controls (P = 0.029 by unpaired t-test). Cortical thickness did not differ significantly between multiple sclerosis subjects and controls. Higher orientation dispersion in the left primary motor

  8. Cold dark matter and degree-scale cosmic microwave background anisotropy statistics after COBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Stompor, Radoslaw; Juszkiewicz, Roman

    1993-01-01

    We conduct a Monte Carlo simulation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy in the UCSB South Pole 1991 degree-scale experiment. We examine cold dark matter cosmology with large-scale structure seeded by the Harrison-Zel'dovich hierarchy of Gaussian-distributed primordial inhomogeneities normalized to the COBE-DMR measurement of large-angle CMB anisotropy. We find it statistically implausible (in the sense of low cumulative probability F lower than 5 percent, of not measuring a cosmological delta-T/T signal) that the degree-scale cosmological CMB anisotropy predicted in such models could have escaped a detection at the level of sensitivity achieved in the South Pole 1991 experiment.

  9. Accelerated cerebral white matter development in preterm infants: a voxel-based morphometry study with diffusion tensor MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giménez, Mónica; Miranda, Maria J; Born, A Peter

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-seven preterm infants were compared to 10 full-term infants at term equivalent age using a voxel-based analysis of diffusion tensor imaging of the brain. Preterm infants exhibited higher fractional anisotropy values, which may suggest accelerated maturation, in the location of the sagittal...... to suggest that the increased intensity of stimulation associated with preterm birth may advance the process of white matter maturation in the human brain. Questions remain about whether these findings reflect acceleration of the process of white matter maturation generally, or localized alterations induced...

  10. Sex differences in the IQ-white matter microstructure relationship: A DTI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Beate; Benedek, Mathias; Koschutnig, Karl; Jauk, Emanuel; Neubauer, Aljoscha C.

    2014-01-01

    Sex differences in the relationship between general intelligence and brain structure are a topic of increasing research interest. Early studies focused mainly on gray and white matter differences using voxel-based morphometry, while more recent studies investigated neural fiber tracts using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to analyze the white matter microstructure. In this study we used tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) on DTI to test how intelligence is associated with brain diffusion indices and to see whether this relationship differs between men and women. 63 Men and women divided into groups of lower and higher intelligence were selected. Whole-brain DTI scans were analyzed using TBSS calculating maps of fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD). The results reveal that the white matter microstructure differs between individuals as a function of intelligence and sex. In men, higher intelligence was related to higher FA and lower RD in the corpus callosum. In women, in contrast, intelligence was not related to the white matter microstructure. The higher values of FA and lower values of RD suggest that intelligence is associated with higher myelination and/or a higher number of axons particularly in men. This microstructural difference in the corpus callosum may increase cognitive functioning by reducing inter-hemispheric transfer time and thus account for more efficient brain functioning in men. PMID:25238623

  11. Unraveling pathology in juvenile Alexander disease: serial quantitative MR imaging and spectroscopy of white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voorn, J Patrick; Pouwels, Petra J W; Salomons, Gajja S; Barkhof, Frederik; van der Knaap, Marjo S

    2009-10-01

    Alexander disease is a rare disorder of the central nervous system with characteristic symmetric white matter abnormalities with frontal predominance on magnetic resonance (MR) images. Histopathology shows a lack of myelin in the affected white matter, variably interpreted as hypomyelination or demyelination. To increase our insight into the nature of the pathology leading to the MR imaging findings in Alexander disease, we applied serial MR imaging, spectroscopy, magnetization transfer (MT) imaging (MTI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in six patients with juvenile Alexander disease. The MR imaging protocol comprised T1- and T2-weighted spin echo images and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and MT ratio (MTR) maps were generated, and MR spectroscopy concentrations were quantified for several metabolites. MR imaging showed similar cerebral white matter abnormalities in all patients, with only minor increase on prolonged follow-up, despite sometimes serious clinical progression. MR spectroscopy showed highly elevated levels of myo-inositol, lactate, and choline-containing compounds and decreased total N-acetyl-aspartate and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate levels in the abnormal white matter. High values of ADC were observed, and both FA and MTR were attenuated. The sequential MR imaging findings in Alexander disease provide strong evidence against active demyelination as sole explanation for the underlying pathology. An alternative explanation for our spectroscopic, DTI, and MTI findings-which would suggest demyelination-could be hyperplasia and hypertrophy of astrocytes, as seen in low grade gliomas.

  12. MRI of paraventricular white matter lesions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Analysis by diffusion-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segawa, Fuminori; Kinoshita, Masao (Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Ohashi Hospital); Kishibayashi, Jun; Kamada, Kazuhiko; Sunohara, Nobuhiko

    1994-09-01

    Magnetic resonance images in some cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) revealed abnormal signals in both the paraventriculer white matter and in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule. We examined T[sub 2]- and diffusion-weighted MR images of these lesions in 18 cases of ALS. There were symmetrical high-signal areas in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule in all of the cases. The high-signal areas in the internal capsule corresponded to the pyramidal tracts in the anatomical atlas by Talairach. In 5 of the cases of ALS, T[sub 2]-weighted MR images showed discrete paraventricular white matter lesions as well. The mean age of the ALS patients with paraventricular white matter lesions was higher than that of the ALS patients without such lesions. Proton densities calculated from the conventional MR images were higher in both the capsular and paraventricular lesions. The diffusion coefficients perpendicular to the pyramidal tract in the internal capsular lesions were within the normal range, where as the diffusion coefficients in the paraventricular lesions were increased in all directions. Thus, diffusion anisotropy was lost in the paraventricular lesions. These findings are similar to those observed in the white matter lesions of cerebro-vascular origin. As a result, the pathology of the paraventricular lesions in ALS was confirmed to be different from that of the internal capsular lesions. (author).

  13. Regional susceptibility to dose-dependent white matter damage after brain radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Michael; Karunamuni, Roshan; McDonald, Carrie; Seibert, Tyler; White, Nathan; Moiseenko, Vitali; Bartsch, Hauke; Farid, Nikdokht; Kuperman, Joshua; Krishnan, Anitha; Dale, Anders; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A

    2017-05-01

    Regional differences in sensitivity to white matter damage after brain radiotherapy (RT) are not well-described. We characterized the spatial heterogeneity of dose-response across white matter tracts using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Forty-nine patients with primary brain tumors underwent MRI with DTI before and 9-12months after partial-brain RT. Maps of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) were generated. Atlas-based white matter tracts were identified. A secondary analysis using skeletonized tracts was also performed. Linear mixed-model analysis of the relationship between mean and max dose and percent change in DTI metrics was performed. Tracts with the strongest correlation of FA change with mean dose were the fornix (-0.46 percent/Gy), cingulum bundle (-0.44 percent/Gy), and body of corpus callosum (-0.23 percent/Gy), pchanges in MD and RD. In the skeletonized analysis, the fornix and cingulum bundle remained highly dose-sensitive. Maximum and mean dose were similarly predictive of DTI change. The corpus callosum, cingulum bundle, and fornix show the most prominent dose-dependent changes following RT. Future studies examining correlation with cognitive functioning and potential avoidance of critical white matter regions are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prenatal methamphetamine exposure is associated with corticostriatal white matter changes in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warton, Fleur L; Taylor, Paul A; Warton, Christopher M R; Molteno, Christopher D; Wintermark, Pia; Lindinger, Nadine M; Zöllei, Lilla; van der Kouwe, Andre; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W; Meintjes, Ernesta M

    2017-10-23

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have shown that prenatal exposure to methamphetamine is associated with alterations in white matter microstructure, but to date no tractography studies have been performed in neonates. The striato-thalamo-orbitofrontal circuit and its associated limbic-striatal areas, the primary circuit responsible for reinforcement, has been postulated to be dysfunctional in drug addiction. This study investigated potential white matter changes in the striatal-orbitofrontal circuit in neonates with prenatal methamphetamine exposure. Mothers were recruited antenatally and interviewed regarding methamphetamine use during pregnancy, and DTI sequences were acquired in the first postnatal month. Target regions of interest were manually delineated, white matter bundles connecting pairs of targets were determined using probabilistic tractography in AFNI-FATCAT, and fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusion measures were determined in white matter connections. Regression analysis showed that increasing methamphetamine exposure was associated with reduced FA in several connections between the striatum and midbrain, orbitofrontal cortex, and associated limbic structures, following adjustment for potential confounding variables. Our results are consistent with previous findings in older children and extend them to show that these changes are already evident in neonates. The observed alterations are likely to play a role in the deficits in attention and inhibitory control frequently seen in children with prenatal methamphetamine exposure.

  15. Sex differences in white matter development during adolescence: a DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingying; Adamson, Chris; Yuan, Weihong; Altaye, Mekibib; Rajagopal, Akila; Byars, Anna W; Holland, Scott K

    2012-10-10

    Adolescence is a complex transitional period in human development, composing physical maturation, cognitive and social behavioral changes. The objective of this study is to investigate sex differences in white matter development and the associations between intelligence and white matter microstructure in the adolescent brain using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). In a cohort of 16 typically-developing adolescents aged 13 to 17 years, longitudinal DTI data were recorded from each subject at two time points that were one year apart. We used TBSS to analyze the diffusion indices including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD). Our results suggest that boys (13-18 years) continued to demonstrate white matter maturation, whereas girls appeared to reach mature levels earlier. In addition, we identified significant positive correlations between FA and full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) in the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus when both sexes were looked at together. Only girls showed significant positive correlations between FA and verbal IQ in the left cortico-spinal tract and superior longitudinal fasciculus. The preliminary evidence presented in this study supports that boys and girls have different developmental trajectories in white matter microstructure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rey Visual Design Learning Test performance correlates with white matter structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begré, Stefan; Kiefer, Claus; von Känel, Roland; Frommer, Angela; Federspiel, Andrea

    2009-04-01

    Studies exploring relation of visual memory to white matter are extensively lacking. The Rey Visual Design Learning Test (RVDLT) is an elementary motion, colour and word independent visual memory test. It avoids a significant contribution from as many additional higher order visual brain functions as possible to visual performance, such as three-dimensional, colour, motion or word-dependent brain operations. Based on previous results, we hypothesised that test performance would be related with white matter of dorsal hippocampal commissure, corpus callosum, posterior cingulate, superior longitudinal fascicle and internal capsule. In 14 healthy subjects, we measured intervoxel coherence (IC) by diffusion tensor imaging as an indication of connectivity and visual memory performance measured by the RVDLT. IC considers the orientation of the adjacent voxels and has a better signal-to-noise ratio than the commonly used fractional anisotropy index. Using voxelwise linear regression analyses of the IC values, we found a significant and direct relationship between 11 clusters and visual memory test performance. The fact that memory performance correlated with white matter structure in left and right dorsal hippocampal commissure, left and right posterior cingulate, right callosal splenium, left and right superior longitudinal fascicle, right medial orbitofrontal region, left anterior cingulate, and left and right anterior limb of internal capsule emphasises our hypothesis. Our observations in healthy subjects suggest that individual differences in brain function related to the performance of a task of higher cognitive demands might partially be associated with structural variation of white matter regions.

  17. White matter integrity, creativity, and psychopathology: disentangling constructs with diffusion tensor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex E Jung

    Full Text Available That creativity and psychopathology are somehow linked remains a popular but controversial idea in neuroscience research. Brain regions implicated in both psychosis-proneness and creative cognition include frontal projection zones and association fibers. In normal subjects, we have previously demonstrated that a composite measure of divergent thinking (DT ability exhibited significant inverse relationships in frontal lobe areas with both cortical thickness and metabolite concentration of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA. These findings support the idea that creativity may reside upon a continuum with psychopathology. Here we examine whether white matter integrity, assessed by Fractional Anisotropy (FA, is related to two measures of creativity (Divergent Thinking and Openness to Experience. Based on previous findings, we hypothesize inverse correlations within fronto-striatal circuits. Seventy-two healthy, young adult (18-29 years subjects were scanned on a 3 Tesla scanner with Diffusion Tensor Imaging. DT measures were scored by four raters (alpha = .81 using the Consensual Assessment Technique, from which a composite creativity index (CCI was derived. We found that the CCI was significantly inversely related to FA within the left inferior frontal white matter (t = 5.36, p = .01, and Openness was inversely related to FA within the right inferior frontal white matter (t = 4.61, p = .04. These findings demonstrate an apparent overlap in specific white matter architecture underlying the normal variance of divergent thinking, openness, and psychotic-spectrum traits, consistent with the idea of a continuum.

  18. Serial diffusion tensor imaging detects white matter changes that correlate with motor outcome in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander; Bregman, Joanne; Storey, Pippa; Meyer, Joel; Prasad, P V; Derrick, Matthew; MacKendrick, William; Tan, Sidhartha

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess predictive value of serial diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) for the white matter injury and neurodevelopmental outcome in a cohort of premature infants. Twenty-four infants less than 32 weeks' gestation were stratified to a control group (n = 11), mild brain injury with grades 1-2 of intraventricular hemorrhage (n = 6) and severe brain injury with grades 3-4 intraventricular hemorrhage (n = 4). Serial DTI studies were performed at around 30 and 36 weeks' gestation. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient were calculated. Twelve infants were followed up for developmental outcome. Developmental testing was performed with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development to obtain psychomotor index (Performance Developmental Index). Apparent diffusion coefficient was higher in the severe injury group at the second MRI in the central and occipital white matter, and corona radiata; FA was lower in optic radiation compared to controls. Performance Developmental Index score correlated with FA on the scan taken at the 30th week and inversely with the change of FA between scans in internal capsule and occipital white matter. A low value of FA at 30 weeks and a higher change of FA predicted less favorable motor outcome at 2 years and suggests that early subtle white matter injury can be detected in premature infants even without obvious signs of injury. 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. White matter integrity, creativity, and psychopathology: disentangling constructs with diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Rex E; Grazioplene, Rachael; Caprihan, Arvind; Chavez, Robert S; Haier, Richard J

    2010-03-22

    That creativity and psychopathology are somehow linked remains a popular but controversial idea in neuroscience research. Brain regions implicated in both psychosis-proneness and creative cognition include frontal projection zones and association fibers. In normal subjects, we have previously demonstrated that a composite measure of divergent thinking (DT) ability exhibited significant inverse relationships in frontal lobe areas with both cortical thickness and metabolite concentration of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA). These findings support the idea that creativity may reside upon a continuum with psychopathology. Here we examine whether white matter integrity, assessed by Fractional Anisotropy (FA), is related to two measures of creativity (Divergent Thinking and Openness to Experience). Based on previous findings, we hypothesize inverse correlations within fronto-striatal circuits. Seventy-two healthy, young adult (18-29 years) subjects were scanned on a 3 Tesla scanner with Diffusion Tensor Imaging. DT measures were scored by four raters (alpha = .81) using the Consensual Assessment Technique, from which a composite creativity index (CCI) was derived. We found that the CCI was significantly inversely related to FA within the left inferior frontal white matter (t = 5.36, p = .01), and Openness was inversely related to FA within the right inferior frontal white matter (t = 4.61, p = .04). These findings demonstrate an apparent overlap in specific white matter architecture underlying the normal variance of divergent thinking, openness, and psychotic-spectrum traits, consistent with the idea of a continuum.

  20. Sex differences in the IQ-white matter microstructure relationship: a DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Beate; Benedek, Mathias; Koschutnig, Karl; Jauk, Emanuel; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2014-11-01

    Sex differences in the relationship between general intelligence and brain structure are a topic of increasing research interest. Early studies focused mainly on gray and white matter differences using voxel-based morphometry, while more recent studies investigated neural fiber tracts using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to analyze the white matter microstructure. In this study we used tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) on DTI to test how intelligence is associated with brain diffusion indices and to see whether this relationship differs between men and women. 63 Men and women divided into groups of lower and higher intelligence were selected. Whole-brain DTI scans were analyzed using TBSS calculating maps of fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD). The results reveal that the white matter microstructure differs between individuals as a function of intelligence and sex. In men, higher intelligence was related to higher FA and lower RD in the corpus callosum. In women, in contrast, intelligence was not related to the white matter microstructure. The higher values of FA and lower values of RD suggest that intelligence is associated with higher myelination and/or a higher number of axons particularly in men. This microstructural difference in the corpus callosum may increase cognitive functioning by reducing inter-hemispheric transfer time and thus account for more efficient brain functioning in men. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. White matter correlates of cognitive domains in normal aging with diffusion tensor imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat eSasson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to perform complex as well as simple cognitive tasks engages a network of brain regions that is mediated by the white matter fiber bundles connecting them. Different cognitive tasks employ distinctive white matter fiber bundles. The temporal lobe and its projections subserve a variety of key functions known to deteriorate during aging. In a cohort of 52 healthy subjects (ages 25-82 years, we performed voxel-wise regression analysis correlating performance in higher-order cognitive domains (executive function, information processing speed, and memory with white matter integrity, as measured by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI fiber tracking in the temporal lobe projections (uncinate fasciculus (UF, fornix, cingulum, inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF, and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF. The fiber tracts were spatially registered and statistical parametric maps were produced to spatially localize the significant correlations. Results showed that performance in the executive function domain is correlated with DTI parameters in the left SLF and right UF; performance in the information processing speed domain is correlated with fractional anisotropy (FA in the left cingulum, left fornix, right and left ILF and SLF; and the memory domain shows significant correlations with DTI parameters in the right fornix, right cingulum, left ILF, left SLF and right UF. These findings suggest that DTI tractography enables anatomical definition of region of interest for correlation of behavioral parameters with diffusion indices, and functionality can be correlated with white matter integrity.

  2. Diffusion tensor MR imaging of white matter integrity in HIV-positive patients with planning deficit

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    Correa, Diogo Goulart; Doring, Thomas M.; Wilner, Nina Ventura; Cabral, Rafael Ferracini; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zimmermann, Nicolle; Fonseca, Rochele Paz [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Department of Psychology, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Leite, Sarah C.B.; Bahia, Paulo R.V. [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether normal controls and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients with and without planning deficits differ on white matter integrity. A total of 34 HIV-positive patients with planning deficits were compared with 13 HIV-positive patients without planning deficits and 19 gender-, age-, and education-matched control subjects. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed along 30 noncolinear directions in a 1.5-T scanner. For tract-based spatial statistics analysis, a white matter skeleton was created, and a permutation-based inference with 5000 permutations with a threshold of p < 0.05 was used to identify abnormalities in fractional anisotropy (FA). The median, radial, and axial diffusivities were also projected onto the mean FA skeleton. Compared with controls, HIV-positive patients with planning deficits had decreased FA in bilateral anterior thalamic radiations, bilateral inferior fronto-occiptal fasciculi, genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, bilateral superior longitudinal fascicule, and bilateral uncinate fasciculi. Compared to HIV-positive patients without planning deficits, patients with planning deficits had decreased FA in bilateral anterior thalamic radiations, bilateral inferior fronto-occiptal fasciculi, genu of the corpus callosum, bilateral superior longitudinal fascicule, and right uncinate fascicule. DTI can detect extensive white matter abnormalities in the normal-appearing white matter of HIV-positive patients with planning deficits compared with controls and HIV-positive patients without planning deficits. (orig.)

  3. White matter changes in primary dystonia determined by 2D distribution analysis of diffusion tensor images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, An; Eidelberg, David; Uluǧ, Aziz M

    2013-01-01

    To determine brain tissue affected by dystonia by making group comparison of parameter-based diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) distributions of patients with control subjects. A 2D distribution analysis of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy index was used for modeling brain tissues according to the inherent diffusion characteristics. Seven affected carriers of the DYT1 dystonia mutation and eight healthy control subjects were imaged for a previous study. We employed a 2D distribution analysis of all the diffusion voxels and a four compartmental brain model for group comparison of the dystonia subjects and controls. Our analysis showed disease involvement in the white matter of the patients. Excellent tissue characterization was achieved automatically using the 2D distribution analysis based on a physical brain model. This 2D analysis implicated white matter in dystonia and could be useful as a screening tool in diseases with unknown pathologies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. White matter and development in children with an autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak-Fan, Kathleen M; Morris, Drew; Vidal, Julie; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Roberts, Wendy; Taylor, Margot J

    2013-09-01

    Recent research suggests that brain development follows an abnormal trajectory in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The current study examined changes in diffusivity with age within defined white matter tracts in a group of typically developing children and a group of children with an ASD, aged 6 to 14 years. Age by group interactions were observed for frontal, long distant, interhemispheric and posterior tracts, for longitudinal, radial and mean diffusivity, but not for fractional anisotropy. In all cases, these measures of diffusivity decreased with age in the typically developing group, but showed little or no change in the ASD group. This supports the hypothesis of an abnormal developmental trajectory of white matter in this population, which could have profound effects on the development of neural connectivity and contribute to atypical cognitive development in children with ASD.

  5. Superficial white matter damage in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Owen Robert; Joshi, Shantanu H; Narr, Katherine L; Shattuck, David W; Singh, Manpreet; Di Paola, Margherita; Ploner, Christoph J; Prüss, Harald; Paul, Friedemann; Finke, Carsten

    2017-11-03

    Clinical brain MRI is normal in the majority of patients with anti- N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. However, extensive deep white matter damage wasrecently identifiedin these patients using diffusion weighted imaging. Here, our aim was to study a particularly vulnerable brain compartment, the late myelinating superficial white matter. Forty-six patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis were included. Ten out of these were considered neurologically recovered (modified Rankin scale of zero), while 36 patients were non-recovered. In addition, 30 healthy controls were studied. MRI data were collected from all subjects and superficial white matter mean diffusivity derived from diffusion tensor imaging was compared between groups in whole brain, lobar and vertex-based analyses. Patients underwent comprehensive cognitive testing, and correlation analyses were performed between cognitive performance and superficial white matter integrity. Non-recovered patients showed widespread superficial white matter damage in comparison to recovered patients and healthy controls. Vertex-based analyses revealed that damage predominated in frontal and temporal lobes. In contrast, the superficial white matter was intact in recovered patients. Importantly, persistent cognitive impairments in working memory, verbal memory, visuospatial memory and attention significantly correlated with damage of the superficial white matter in patients. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is associated with extensive superficial white matter damage in patients with incomplete recovery. The strong association with impairment in several cognitive domains highlights the clinical relevance of white matter damage in this disorder and warrants investigations of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Spatial patterns of whole brain grey and white matter injury in patients with occult spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

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    Mu, Xuetao; Nie, Binbin; Wang, Hong; Duan, Shaofeng; Zhang, Zan; Dai, Guanghui; Ma, Qiaozhi; Shan, Baoci; Ma, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (SDCP) is a common type of cerebral palsy (CP), which presents as a group of motor-impairment syndromes. Previous conventional MRI studies have reported abnormal structural changes in SDCP, such as periventricular leucomalacia. However, there are roughly 27.8% SDCP patients presenting normal appearance in conventional MRI, which were considered as occult SDCP. In this study, sixteen patients with occult SDCP and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects were collected and the data were acquired on a 3T MR system. We applied voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis to investigate whole brain grey and white matter injury in occult SDCP. By using VBM method, the grey matter volume reduction was revealed in the bilateral basal ganglia regions, thalamus, insula, and left cerebral peduncle, whereas the white matter atrophy was found to be located in the posterior part of corpus callosum and right posterior corona radiata in the occult SDCP patients. By using TBSS, reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) values were detected in multiple white matter regions, including bilateral white matter tracts in prefrontal lobe, temporal lobe, internal and external capsule, corpus callosum, cingulum, thalamus, brainstem and cerebellum. Additionally, several regions of white matter tracts injury were found to be significantly correlated with motor dysfunction. These results collectively revealed the spatial patterns of whole brain grey and white matter injury in occult SDCP.

  7. Gray and white matter imaging: A biomarker for cognitive impairment in early Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gordon W; Firbank, Michael J; Yarnall, Alison J; Khoo, Tien K; Brooks, David J; Barker, Roger A; Burn, David J; O'Brien, John T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the cortical and white matter changes that underlie cognitive impairment in patients with incident Parkinson's disease (PD) disease using voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging. Newly diagnosed nondemented PD (n = 125) and control subjects (n = 50) were recruited from the Incidence of Cognitive Impairment in Cohorts with Longitudinal Evaluation in Parkinson's Disease Study and completed cognitive assessments and 3T structural and diffusion tensor MR imaging. Voxel-based morphometry was performed to investigate the relationship between gray matter volume and cognitive ability. Microstructural white matter changes were assessed with diffusion tensor imaging measures of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity using tract-based spatial statistics. Increased mean diffusivity was observed bilaterally in subjects with PD, relative to controls (P = 0.019). Increased mean diffusivity was associated with performance on the semantic fluency and Tower of London tasks in frontal and parietal white matter tracts, including the cingulum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus. There was no difference in total gray matter volume between groups; however, bilateral reductions in frontal and parietal gray matter volume were associated with reduced performance on measures of executive function in PD subjects. At the earliest stages of PD, regionally specific increases in central white matter mean diffusivity are present and suggest early axonal damage. Such changes are not accompanied by significant gray matter volume loss and are consistent with proposed models of pathological progression of the disease. Structural MRI, especially diffusion tensor imaging analysis, offers potential as a noninvasive biomarker reflecting cognitive impairment in PD. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Accelerated changes in white matter microstructure during aging: a longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Claire E; Walhovd, Kristine B; Storsve, Andreas B; Tamnes, Christian K; Westlye, Lars T; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Fjell, Anders M

    2014-11-12

    It is well established that human brain white matter structure changes with aging, but the timescale and spatial distribution of this change remain uncertain. Cross-sectional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies indicate that, after a period of relative stability during adulthood, there is an accelerated decline in anisotropy and increase in diffusivity values during senescence; and, spatially, results have been discussed within the context of several anatomical frameworks. However, inferring trajectories of change from cross-sectional data can be challenging; and, as yet, there have been no longitudinal reports of the timescale and spatial distribution of age-related white matter change in healthy adults across the adult lifespan. In a longitudinal DTI study of 203 adults between 20 and 84 years of age, we used tract-based spatial statistics to characterize the pattern of annual change in fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and mean diffusivity and examined whether there was an acceleration of change with age. We found extensive and overlapping significant annual decreases in fractional anisotropy, and increases in axial diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and mean diffusivity. Spatially, results were consistent with inferior-to-superior gradients of lesser-to-greater vulnerability. Annual change increased with age, particularly within superior regions, with age-related decline estimated to begin in the fifth decade. Charting white matter microstructural changes in healthy aging provides essential context to clinical studies, and future studies should compare age trajectories between healthy participants and at-risk populations and also explore the relationship between DTI rates of change and cognitive decline. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3415425-12$15.00/0.

  9. Shared genetic variance between obesity and white matter integrity in Mexican-americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A Spieker

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder that may also lead to reduced white matter integrity, potentially due to shared genetic risk factors. Genetic correlation analyses were conducted in a large cohort of Mexican American families in San Antonio (N=761, 58% females, ages 18-81y; 41.3±14.5 from the Genetics of Brain Structure and Function Study. Shared genetic variance was calculated between measures of adiposity ((body mass index (BMI; kg/m2 and waist circumference (WC; in and whole-brain and regional measurements of cerebral white matter integrity (fractional anisotropy. Whole-brain average and regional fractional anisotropy values for ten major white matter tracts were calculated from high angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging data (DTI; 1.7×1.7×3 mm; 55 directions. Additive genetic factors explained intersubject variance in BMI (heritability, h2=0.58, WC (h2=0.57, and FA (h2=0.49. FA shared significant portions of genetic variance with BMI in the genu (ρG = -0.25, body (ρG = -0.30, and splenium (ρG = -0.26 of the corpus callosum, internal capsule (ρG = -0.29, and thalamic radiation (ρG = -0.31 (all p’s = .043. The strongest evidence of shared variance was between BMI/WC and FA in the superior fronto-occipital fasciculus (ρG = -0.39, p = .020; ρG = -0.39, p = .030, which highlights region-specific variation in neural correlates of obesity. This may suggest that increase in obesity and reduced white matter integrity share common genetic risk factors.

  10. White matter pathways associated with working memory in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Rebecca A; Barrick, Thomas R; Lawes, I Nigel C; Markus, Hugh S; Morris, Robin G

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies by our group have found that white matter integrity as determined by Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is associated with working memory decline. It has been proposed that subtle white matter integrity loss may lead to the disruption of working memory in particular because it relies on the dynamic and reiterative activity of cortico-cortical pathways. DTI and working memory measurement were acquired for 99 adults from our GENIE study of healthy middle aged and elderly individuals. Voxel-based statistics were used to identify clusters of voxels in mean diffusivity images specifically associated with variations in working memory performance. Tractography then identified the cortico-cortical white matter pathways passing through these clusters, between the temporal, parietal and frontal cortices. Significant clusters were identified which were associated with working memory in the white matter of the temporal and frontal lobes, the cingulate gyrus, and in the thalamus. The tracts that passed through these clusters included the superior parietal lobule pathway, the medial temporo-frontal pathway, the uncinate fasciculus, the fronto-parietal fasciculus, and the cingulum. Significant clusters were identified in the white matter that were associated with working memory performance. Tractography performed through these clusters identified white matter fiber tracts which pass between grey matter regions known to be activated by working memory tasks and also mirror working memory pathways suggested by previous functional connectivity imaging. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  11. White matter damage in primary progressive aphasias: a diffusion tensor tractography study.

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    Galantucci, Sebastiano; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Wilson, Stephen M; Henry, Maya L; Filippi, Massimo; Agosta, Federica; Dronkers, Nina F; Henry, Roland G; Ogar, Jennifer M; Miller, Bruce L; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2011-10-01

    Primary progressive aphasia is a clinical syndrome that encompasses three major phenotypes: non-fluent/agrammatic, semantic and logopenic. These clinical entities have been associated with characteristic patterns of focal grey matter atrophy in left posterior frontoinsular, anterior temporal and left temporoparietal regions, respectively. Recently, network-level dysfunction has been hypothesized but research to date has focused largely on studying grey matter damage. The aim of this study was to assess the integrity of white matter tracts in the different primary progressive aphasia subtypes. We used diffusion tensor imaging in 48 individuals: nine non-fluent, nine semantic, nine logopenic and 21 age-matched controls. Probabilistic tractography was used to identify bilateral inferior longitudinal (anterior, middle, posterior) and uncinate fasciculi (referred to as the ventral pathway); and the superior longitudinal fasciculus segmented into its frontosupramarginal, frontoangular, frontotemporal and temporoparietal components, (referred to as the dorsal pathway). We compared the tracts' mean fractional anisotropy, axial, radial and mean diffusivities for each tract in the different diagnostic categories. The most prominent white matter changes were found in the dorsal pathways in non-fluent patients, in the two ventral pathways and the temporal components of the dorsal pathways in semantic variant, and in the temporoparietal component of the dorsal bundles in logopenic patients. Each of the primary progressive aphasia variants showed different patterns of diffusion tensor metrics alterations: non-fluent patients showed the greatest changes in fractional anisotropy and radial and mean diffusivities; semantic variant patients had severe changes in all metrics; and logopenic patients had the least white matter damage, mainly involving diffusivity, with fractional anisotropy altered only in the temporoparietal component of the dorsal pathway. This study demonstrates

  12. A holistic view of unstable dark matter. Spectral and anisotropy signatures in astrophysical backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Le

    2010-11-15

    The nature of dark matter is one of the key outstanding problems in both particle and astrophysics. If dark matter decays or annihilates into electrons and positrons, it can affect diffuse radiation backgrounds observed in astrophysics. In this thesis, we propose a new, more general analysis of constraints on dark matter models. For any decaying dark matter model, constraints on mass and lifetime can be obtained by folding the specific dark matter decay spectrum with a response function. We derive these response functions from full-sky radio surveys and Fermi-LAT gamma-ray observations as well as from the local positron fluxes measured by the PAMELA satellite experiment and apply them to place constraints on some specific dark matter decay models. We also discuss the influence of astrophysical uncertainties on the response function, such as the uncertainties from propagation models and from the spatial distribution of the dark matter. Moreover, an anisotropy analysis of full-sky emission gamma-ray and radio maps is performed to identify possible signatures of annihilating dark matter. We calculate angular power spectra of the cosmological background of synchrotron emission from dark matter annihilations into electron positron pairs. We compare the power spectra with the anisotropy of astrophysical and cosmological radio backgrounds, from normal galaxies, radio-galaxies, galaxy cluster accretion shocks, the cosmic microwave background and Galactic foregrounds. In addition, we develop a numerical tool to compute gamma-ray emission from such electrons and positrons diffusing in the smooth host halo and in substructure halos with masses down to 10{sup -6}M{sub s}un. We show that, unlike the total gamma-ray angular power spectrum observed by Fermi-LAT, the angular power spectrum from the inverse Compton scattering is exponentially suppressed below an angular scale determined by the diffusion length of electrons and positrons. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of white matter diseases of prematurity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Mary A.; Supramaniam, Veena; Ederies, Ashraf; Chew, Andrew; Anjari, Mustafa; Counsell, Serena [Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, Robert Steiner MR Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); Bassi, Laura; Groppo, Michela; Ramenghi, Luca A. [University of Milan, NICU, Institute of Pediatrics and Neonatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mangiagalli e Regina Elena, Milan (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Periventricular leucomalacia (PVL) and parenchymal venous infarction complicating germinal matrix/intraventricular haemorrhage have long been recognised as the two significant white matter diseases responsible for the majority of cases of cerebral palsy in survivors of preterm birth. However, more recent studies using magnetic resonance imaging to assess the preterm brain have documented two new appearances, adding to the spectrum of white matter disease of prematurity: punctate white matter lesions, and diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI). These appear to be more common than PVL but less significant in terms of their impact on individual neurodevelopment. They may, however, be associated with later cognitive and behavioural disorders known to be common following preterm birth. It remains unclear whether PVL, punctate lesions, and DEHSI represent a continuum of disorders occurring as a result of a similar injurious process to the developing white matter. This review discusses the role of MR imaging in investigating these three disorders in terms of aetiology, pathology, and outcome. (orig.)

  14. Hemodynamic and metabolic correlates of perinatal white matter injury severity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riddle, Art; Maire, Jennifer; Cai, Victor; Nguyen, Thuan; Gong, Xi; Hansen, Kelly; Grafe, Marjorie R; Hohimer, A Roger; Back, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    Although the spectrum of perinatal white matter injury (WMI) in preterm infants is shifting from cystic encephalomalacia to milder forms of WMI, the factors that contribute to this changing spectrum are unclear...

  15. Fiber tracking of brain white matter based on graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Brain white matter tractography is reconstructed via diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images. Due to the complex structure of brain white matter fiber bundles, fiber crossing and fiber branching are abundant in human brain. And regular methods with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can't accurately handle this problem. the biggest problems of the brain tractography. Therefore, this paper presented a novel brain white matter tractography method based on graph theory, so the fiber tracking between two voxels is transformed into locating the shortest path in a graph. Besides, the presented method uses Q-ball imaging (QBI) as the source data instead of DTI, because QBI can provide accurate information about multiple fiber crossing and branching in one voxel using orientation distribution function (ODF). Experiments showed that the presented method can accurately handle the problem of brain white matter fiber crossing and branching, and reconstruct brain tractograhpy both in phantom data and real brain data.

  16. Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairments: White matter pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsos, A; Loomes, M; Zhou, I; Macmillan, E; Sabel, I; Rotziokos, E; Beckwith, W; Johnston, I N

    2017-12-01

    Whilst chemotherapeutic agents show promising results in the amelioration of cancerous tumors, patients often experience cognitive disturbances associated with chemotherapy long after treatment has ceased. Research has suggested that the structural integrity of white matter fibres in the brain are susceptible to the harmful effects of chemotherapy. Post-chemotherapy, white matter tracts often display altered morphology with a reduction in glial cells such as oligodendrocytes. Demyelination, gliosis and leukoencephalopathy during or post chemotherapy is associated with changes in processing speed and IQ. Thus, understanding the relationship between chemotherapy, white matter damage and cognition is warranted. This review presents evidence for chemotherapy induced white matter damage highlighting the importance of implementing behavioral and pharmological strategies to prevent or reverse such acute toxicity in the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential relationships between apathy and depression with white matter microstructural changes and functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollocks, Matthew J; Lawrence, Andrew J; Brookes, Rebecca L; Barrick, Thomas R; Morris, Robin G; Husain, Masud; Markus, Hugh S

    2015-12-01

    Small vessel disease is a stroke subtype characterized by pathology of the small perforating arteries, which supply the sub-cortical structures of the brain. Small vessel disease is associated with high rates of apathy and depression, thought to be caused by a disruption of white matter cortical-subcortical pathways important for emotion regulation. It provides an important biological model to investigate mechanisms underlying these key neuropsychiatric disorders. This study investigated whether apathy and depression can be distinguished in small vessel disease both in terms of their relative relationship with white matter microstructure, and secondly whether they can independently predict functional outcomes. Participants with small vessel disease (n = 118; mean age = 68.9 years; 65% male) defined as a clinical and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed lacunar stroke with radiological leukoaraiosis were recruited and completed cognitive testing, measures of apathy, depression, quality of life and diffusion tensor imaging. Healthy controls (n = 398; mean age = 64.3 years; 52% male) were also studied in order to interpret the degree of apathy and depression found within the small vessel disease group. Firstly, a multilevel structural equation modelling approach was used to identify: (i) the relationships between median fractional anisotropy and apathy, depression and cognitive impairment; and (ii) if apathy and depression make independent contributions to quality of life in patients with small vessel disease. Secondly, we applied a whole-brain voxel-based analysis to investigate which regions of white matter were associated with apathy and depression, controlling for age, gender and cognitive functioning. Structural equation modelling results indicated both apathy (r = -0.23, P ≤ 0.001) and depression (r = -0.41, P ≤ 0.001) were independent predictors of quality of life. A reduced median fractional anisotropy was significantly associated with apathy (r = -0.38, P

  18. White matter disease and an incomplete circle of Willis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Daniel James; Byrne, Susan; Dunne, Ruth; Harmon, Mark; Harbison, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    White matter disease occurs as a consequence of small vessel disease; however, hypoperfusion may also play a role. We investigated whether patients with less cerebral vessel anastomosis may develop more white matter disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (1.5t) with intracranial magnetic resonance angiography data was collected on a convenience sample between July 2008 and January 2009. All patients were independently assessed for circle of Willis variants by two researchers and categorized into two groups: those with a complete circle of Willis and those with an incomplete circle of Willis (absent vessels). The complete group was sub-divided into a classical group (entirely normal circle of Willis) and a hypoplastic group (hypoplasia but no absent vessels). White matter disease assessment was conducted for these groups, by two researchers blind to magnetic resonance angiography findings, on all patients over 50 years old. The circle of Willis was characterized in 163 patients, while 90 (>50 years) underwent white matter disease assessment. The kappa inter-rater reliability between both circle of Willis assessors and between both white matter disease assessors was 0.57 and 0.63, respectively. The prevalence of circle of Willis variants strongly correlated with the seminal paper by Riggs and Rupp. Independent of age and gender, those with an incomplete circle of Willis (n = 68) exhibited 58% more white matter disease than those with a complete circle of Willis (n = 22) (white matter disease score 6.52 vs. 4.11, respectively, P = 0.03). Patients with absent anterior vessels exhibited more frontal white matter disease than those with intact anterior vessels (3.7 vs. 1.72, P < 0.001). Patients with absent posterior vessels exhibited more occipital white matter disease than those with intact posterior vessels (2.52 vs. 1.34, P = 0.014). These data suggest that congenital absence of anastomotic capacity correlates with incident white matter disease, thus

  19. Links between white matter microstructure and cortisol reactivity to stress in early childhood: Evidence for moderation by parenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon I. Sheikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis (measured via cortisol reactivity may be a biological marker of risk for depression and anxiety, possibly even early in development. However, the structural neural correlates of early cortisol reactivity are not well known, although these would potentially inform broader models of mechanisms of risk, especially if the early environment further shapes these relationships. Therefore, we examined links between white matter architecture and young girls' cortisol reactivity and whether early caregiving moderated these links. We recruited 45 6-year-old girls based on whether they had previously shown high or low cortisol reactivity to a stress task at age 3. White matter integrity was assessed by calculating fractional anisotropy (FA of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans. Parenting styles were measured via a standardized parent–child interaction task. Significant associations were found between FA in white matter regions adjacent to the left thalamus, the right anterior cingulate cortex, and the right superior frontal gyrus (all ps < .001. Further, positive early caregiving moderated the effect of high cortisol reactivity on white matter FA (all ps ≤ .05, with high stress reactive girls who received greater parent positive affect showing white matter structure more similar to that of low stress reactive girls. Results show associations between white matter integrity of various limbic regions of the brain and early cortisol reactivity to stress and provide preliminary support for the notion that parenting may moderate associations.

  20. Prefrontal cortex white matter tracts in prodromal Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Joy T; Vaidya, Jatin G; Wassermann, Demian; Kim, Regina Eunyoung; Magnotta, Vincent A; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-10-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is most widely known for its selective degeneration of striatal neurons but there is also growing evidence for white matter (WM) deterioration. The primary objective of this research was to conduct a large-scale analysis using multisite diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tractography data to quantify diffusivity properties along major prefrontal cortex WM tracts in prodromal HD. Fifteen international sites participating in the PREDICT-HD study collected imaging and neuropsychological data on gene-positive HD participants without a clinical diagnosis (i.e., prodromal) and gene-negative control participants. The anatomical prefrontal WM tracts of the corpus callosum (PFCC), anterior thalamic radiations (ATRs), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (IFO), and uncinate fasciculi (UNC) were identified using streamline tractography of DWI. Within each of these tracts, tensor scalars for fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity coefficients were calculated. We divided prodromal HD subjects into three CAG-age product (CAP) groups having Low, Medium, or High probabilities of onset indexed by genetic exposure. We observed significant differences in WM properties for each of the four anatomical tracts for the High CAP group in comparison to controls. Additionally, the Medium CAP group presented differences in the ATR and IFO in comparison to controls. Furthermore, WM alterations in the PFCC, ATR, and IFO showed robust associations with neuropsychological measures of executive functioning. These results suggest long-range tracts essential for cross-region information transfer show early vulnerability in HD and may explain cognitive problems often present in the prodromal stage. Hum Brain Mapp 36:3717-3732, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. White matter lesion segmentation using robust parameter estimation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Faguo; Zhu, Litao; Jiang, Tianzi

    2003-05-01

    White matter lesions are common brain abnormalities. In this paper, we introduce an automatic algorithm for segmentation of white matter lesions from brain MRI images. The intensities of each tissue is assumed to be Gaussian distributed, whose parameters (mean vector and covariance matrix) are estimated using a tissue distribution model. And then a measure is defined to indicate in how much content a voxel belongs to the lesions. Experimental results demonstrate that our algorithm works well.

  2. Diminished white matter integrity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Schmidt-Wilcke

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Our data suggest that changes in regional white matter integrity, in terms of a decrease in FA, are present not only in NPSLE patients, but also in non-NPSLE patients, though to a lesser degree. We also demonstrate that the way statistical maps are corrected for multiple comparisons has a profound influence on whether alterations in white matter integrity in non-NPSLE patients are deemed significant.

  3. Shape anisotropy: tensor distance to anisotropy measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; El-Hilo, Saba; Atkins, M. S.

    2011-03-01

    Fractional anisotropy, defined as the distance of a diffusion tensor from its closest isotropic tensor, has been extensively studied as quantitative anisotropy measure for diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images (DT-MRI). It has been used to reveal the white matter profile of brain images, as guiding feature for seeding and stopping in fiber tractography and for the diagnosis and assessment of degenerative brain diseases. Despite its extensive use in DT-MRI community, however, not much attention has been given to the mathematical correctness of its derivation from diffusion tensors which is achieved using Euclidean dot product in 9D space. But, recent progress in DT-MRI has shown that the space of diffusion tensors does not form a Euclidean vector space and thus Euclidean dot product is not appropriate for tensors. In this paper, we propose a novel and robust rotationally invariant diffusion anisotropy measure derived using the recently proposed Log-Euclidean and J-divergence tensor distance measures. An interesting finding of our work is that given a diffusion tensor, its closest isotropic tensor is different for different tensor distance metrics used. We demonstrate qualitatively that our new anisotropy measure reveals superior white matter profile of DT-MR brain images and analytically show that it has a higher signal to noise ratio than fractional anisotropy.

  4. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangyao; Yin, Xuntao; Li, Chuanming; Li, Lei; Zhao, Lu; Evans, Alan C; Jiang, Tianzi; Wu, Jixiang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter (WM) were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC). Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections.

  5. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyao Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA of white matter (WM were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC. Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections.

  6. White matter development in adolescence: a DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asato, M R; Terwilliger, R; Woo, J; Luna, B

    2010-09-01

    Adolescence is a unique period of physical and cognitive development that includes concurrent pubertal changes and sex-based vulnerabilities. While diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies show white matter maturation throughout the lifespan, the state of white matter integrity specific to adolescence is not well understood as are the contributions of puberty and sex. We performed whole-brain DTI studies of 114 children, adolescents, and adults to identify age-related changes in white matter integrity that characterize adolescence. A distinct set of regions across the brain were found to have decreasing radial diffusivity across age groups. Region of interest analyses revealed that maturation was attained by adolescence in broadly distributed association and projection fibers, including those supporting cortical and brain stem integration that may underlie known enhancements in reaction time during this period. Maturation after adolescence included association and projection tracts, including prefrontal-striatal connections, known to support top-down executive control of behavior and interhemispheric connectivity. Maturation proceeded in parallel with pubertal changes to the postpubertal stage, suggesting hormonal influences on white matter development. Females showed earlier maturation of white matter integrity compared with males. Together, these findings suggest that white matter connectivity supporting executive control of behavior is still immature in adolescence.

  7. Factors involved in inflammation-induced developmental white matter damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolp, Helen B; Ek, C Joakim; Johansson, Pia A; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Bethge, Nicole; Wheaton, Benjamin J; Potter, Ann M; Saunders, Norman R

    2009-02-27

    Developmental white matter damage is a brain pathology associated with several long-term neurological disorders. An inflammatory insult has been suggested as the major instigating event. This study investigated the relative influence of inflammation, blood-brain barrier permeability and glial ontogeny in white matter damage. Systemic inflammation was induced in Monodelphis domestica (opossum) by serial intraperitoneal injections of lipopolysaccharide at different stages of brain development. Volume of white matter was estimated for the external capsule. Blood-brain barrier permeability was assessed immunocytochemically. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure relative levels of mRNA for IL-1beta, IL-6 and COX-2. Developmental changes in numbers and appearance of microglia and astrocytes were estimated. Results showed that in response to systemic inflammation, white matter was reduced in the external capsule during a circumscribed period only. At the same developmental stage blood-brain barrier permeability was altered, cerebral inflammatory response was present and numbers of microglia increased. However, the periods of altered blood-brain barrier permeability and the cerebral inflammatory response were longer than the period of the external capsule's susceptibility to white matter damage, which coincided with the developmental increase in the number of astrocytes in this tract. Thus, the mechanism of white matter damage following systemic inflammation is multifactorial, including cerebral inflammation and breakdown of brain barriers occurring simultaneously at specific stages of glial cell development.

  8. Slow gait, white matter characteristics, and prior 10-year interleukin-6 levels in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Neelesh K; Boudreau, Robert M; Studenski, Stephanie A; Lopez, Oscar L; Liu, Ge; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Yaffe, Kristine; Newman, Anne B; Rosano, Caterina

    2016-11-08

    To examine the relationship between gait speed and prior 10 years interleukin-6 (IL-6) burden in older adults. We then assessed whether white matter characteristics influence this relationship. In 179 community-dwelling older adults, gait speed was assessed on an automated walkway and serum IL-6 was assayed on ELISA. Concurrently, white matter characteristics were assessed on MRI by quantifying volume of white matter hyperintensities (WMH), a marker of small vessel disease, and normal-appearing white matter on fractional anisotropy (NAWM-FA), a marker of axonal integrity. IL-6 was assayed at regular intervals at gait assessment and over the prior 10 years and estimates of sustained 10-year IL-6 exposure and the rate of change in IL-6 over 10 years were obtained. Multivariate linear regressions were used to examine the relationships among sustained IL-6 exposure, rate of change in IL-6, gait speed, and white matter characteristics. In this sample (age 83 years, 58% female, 41% black, gait speed 0.9 m/s), higher sustained IL-6 levels, but not the rate of change in IL-6 or IL-6 at gait assessment, was significantly related to slower gait (β = -0.27, p < 0.001) and to higher WMH (β = 0.23, p = 0.002), but not NAWM-FA, withstanding covariate adjustments. WMH accounted for 30% attenuation in the relationship between higher sustained IL-6 levels and slower gait speed (p = 0.043) in the mediation analyses. Sustained exposure to high IL-6 over 10 years rather than the rate of change in IL-6 or an isolated high IL-6 level may adversely affect gait speed by influencing cerebral WMH. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Haplotypes of catechol-O-methyltransferase modulate intelligence-related brain white matter integrity.

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    Liu, Bing; Li, Jun; Yu, Chunshui; Li, Yonghui; Liu, Yong; Song, Ming; Fan, Ming; Li, Kuncheng; Jiang, Tianzi

    2010-03-01

    Twin studies have indicated a common genetic origin for intelligence and for variations in brain morphology. Our previous diffusion tensor imaging studies found an association between intelligence and white matter integrity of specific brain regions or tracts. However, specific genetic determinants of the white matter integrity of these brain regions and tracts are still unclear. In this study, we assess whether and how catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphisms affect brain white matter integrity. We genotyped twelve single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the COMT gene and performed haplotype analyses on data from 79 healthy subjects. Our subjects had the same three major COMT haplotypes (termed the HPS, APS and LPS haplotypes) as previous studies have reported as regulating significantly different levels of enzymatic activity and dopamine. We used the mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values from four regions and five tracts of interest to assess the effect of COMT polymorphisms, including the well-studied val158met SNP and the three main haplotypes that we had identified, on intelligence-related white matter integrity. We identified an association between the mean FA values of two regions in the bilateral prefrontal lobes and the COMT haplotypes, rather than between them and val158met. The haplotype-FA value associations modulated nonlinearly and fit an inverted U-model. Our findings suggest that COMT haplotypes can nonlinearly modulate the intelligence-related white matter integrity of the prefrontal lobes by more significantly influencing prefrontal dopamine variations than does val158met. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. White Matter Integrity Pre- and Post Marijuana and Alcohol Initiation in Adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay M. Squeglia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the effects of alcohol and marijuana use on adolescent brain development is important for understanding potential alterations in neurodevelopment. Several cross sectional studies have identified group differences in white matter integrity after initiation of heavy alcohol and marijuana use, however none have explored white matter trajectories in adolescents pre- and post initiation of use, particularly for marijuana users. This study followed 16 adolescents with minimal alcohol and marijuana use at ages 16–18 over three years. At follow-up, teens were 19–22 years old; half of the participants initiated heavy alcohol use and half initiated heavy alcohol and marijuana use. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed 20 clusters in association and projection fibers tracts (p < 0.01 in which a group by time interaction was found. Most consistently, white matter integrity (i.e., fractional anisotropy decreased for those who initiated both heavy alcohol and marijuana use over the follow-up interval. No effect of time or change in white matter integrity was seen for those who initiated alcohol use only in the majority of clusters. In most regions, at the baseline time point, teens who would later initiate both alcohol and marijuana use demonstrated white matter integrity greater than or equal to teens that initiated alcohol use only. Findings suggest poorer tissue integrity associated with combined initiation of heavy alcohol and marijuana use in late adolescence. While pre-existing differences may also be related to likelihood of substance use, the present data suggest an effect on tissue integrity for these teens transitioning to combined alcohol and marijuana use in later adolescence.

  11. Disrupted White Matter Microstructure and Mood Disorders after Traumatic Brain Injury.

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    Spitz, Gershon; Alway, Yvette; Gould, Kate Rachel; Ponsford, Jennie L

    2017-02-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with an elevated frequency of mood disorders that may, in part, be explained by changes in white-matter microstructure. This study is the first to examine the relationship between mood disorders and white-matter pathology in a sample of patients with mild to severe TBI using a standardized psychiatric interview. This study reports on a sub-sample of 29 individuals recruited from a large prospective study that examined the evolution of psychiatric disorders following complicated, mild to severe TBI. Individuals with TBI were also compared with 23 healthy control participants. Individuals were invited to complete the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID) to diagnose psychiatric disorders. Participants who developed a mood disorder within the first 3 years were categorized into a TBI-Mood group. Diffusion tensor tractography assessed white matter microstructure using atlas-based tract-averaged and along-tract approaches. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was used as the measure of white-matter microstructure. TBI participants with and without a mood disorder did not differ in regard to injury severity and other background factors. Nevertheless, TBI participants diagnosed with a mood disorder displayed significantly lower tract-averaged FA values for the right arcuate fasciculus (p = 0.011), right inferior longitudinal fasciculus (p = 0.009), and anterior segments I (p = 0.0004) and II (p = 0.007) of the corpus callosum, as well as the left (p = 0.014) and right (p = 0.015) fronto-occipital longitudinal fasciculi. The pattern of white matter disruption identified in the current study provides further support for a neurobiological basis of post-TBI mood disorders. Greater understanding of individuals' underlying neuropathology may enable better characterization and prediction of mood disorders. Integration of neuropathology may also inform the potential efficacy of pharmacological and

  12. Anisotropy of Doppler spectral parameters in the VHF radar observations at MU and White Sands

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    G. D. Nastrom

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Significant differences are found between the mean spectral widths from beams in the meridional plane and in the zonal plane at both the MU and the White Sands VHF radars. The spectral width in the beam directed perpendicular to the prevailing wind is greater than that in the beam parallel to the wind. The magnitudes of the differences in spectral width show a linear relationship with wind speed, with the greatest differences at the greatest wind speeds. The differences in spectral width show a positive correlation with the differences in backscattered power. The anisotropy in backscattered power is well-known and is usually attributed to aspect sensitivity effects. However, the anisotropy in spectral width does not appear to be due to the same mechanism, and while several hypotheses to account for this are considered, including finite range-volume effects, effects from the tilting of isentropic layers, and anisotropic turbulence effects, it is seen that each of these suggestions has its shortcomings.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques

  13. Anisotropy of Doppler spectral parameters in the VHF radar observations at MU and White Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Nastrom

    Full Text Available Significant differences are found between the mean spectral widths from beams in the meridional plane and in the zonal plane at both the MU and the White Sands VHF radars. The spectral width in the beam directed perpendicular to the prevailing wind is greater than that in the beam parallel to the wind. The magnitudes of the differences in spectral width show a linear relationship with wind speed, with the greatest differences at the greatest wind speeds. The differences in spectral width show a positive correlation with the differences in backscattered power. The anisotropy in backscattered power is well-known and is usually attributed to aspect sensitivity effects. However, the anisotropy in spectral width does not appear to be due to the same mechanism, and while several hypotheses to account for this are considered, including finite range-volume effects, effects from the tilting of isentropic layers, and anisotropic turbulence effects, it is seen that each of these suggestions has its shortcomings.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques

  14. The nature of white matter abnormalities in blast-related mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jasmeet P; Miller, Danielle R; Lafleche, Ginette; Salat, David H; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    spatially heterogeneous white matter abnormalities. Region-specific reduction in fractional anisotropy (FA) in the left retrolenticular part of the internal capsule was observed in the mTBI + LOC group as the number of blast exposures increased. A mediation analysis revealed that mTBI + LOC indirectly influenced verbal memory performance through its effect on white matter integrity. PTSD was not associated with spatially heterogeneous white matter abnormalities. However, there was a suggestion that at higher levels of PTSD symptom severity, LOC was associated with reduced FA in the left retrolenticular part of the internal capsule. These results support postmortem reports of diffuse axonal injury following mTBI and suggest that injuries with LOC involvement may be particularly detrimental to white matter integrity. Furthermore, these results suggest that LOC-associated white matter abnormalities in turn influence neurocognitive function.

  15. The nature of white matter abnormalities in blast-related mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmeet P. Hayes

    2015-01-01

    having spatially heterogeneous white matter abnormalities. Region-specific reduction in fractional anisotropy (FA in the left retrolenticular part of the internal capsule was observed in the mTBI + LOC group as the number of blast exposures increased. A mediation analysis revealed that mTBI + LOC indirectly influenced verbal memory performance through its effect on white matter integrity. PTSD was not associated with spatially heterogeneous white matter abnormalities. However, there was a suggestion that at higher levels of PTSD symptom severity, LOC was associated with reduced FA in the left retrolenticular part of the internal capsule. These results support postmortem reports of diffuse axonal injury following mTBI and suggest that injuries with LOC involvement may be particularly detrimental to white matter integrity. Furthermore, these results suggest that LOC-associated white matter abnormalities in turn influence neurocognitive function.

  16. Epigenetic Age Acceleration Assessed with Human White-Matter Images.

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    Hodgson, Karen; Carless, Melanie A; Kulkarni, Hemant; Curran, Joanne E; Sprooten, Emma; Knowles, Emma E; Mathias, Samuel; Göring, Harald H H; Yao, Nailin; Olvera, Rene L; Fox, Peter T; Almasy, Laura; Duggirala, Ravi; Blangero, John; Glahn, David C

    2017-05-03

    The accurate estimation of age using methylation data has proved a useful and heritable biomarker, with acceleration in epigenetic age predicting a number of age-related phenotypes. Measures of white matter integrity in the brain are also heritable and highly sensitive to both normal and pathological aging processes across adulthood. We consider the phenotypic and genetic interrelationships between epigenetic age acceleration and white matter integrity in humans. Our goal was to investigate processes that underlie interindividual variability in age-related changes in the brain. Using blood taken from a Mexican-American extended pedigree sample (n = 628; age = 23.28-93.11 years), epigenetic age was estimated using the method developed by Horvath (2013). For n = 376 individuals, diffusion tensor imaging scans were also available. The interrelationship between epigenetic age acceleration and global white matter integrity was investigated with variance decomposition methods. To test for neuroanatomical specificity, 16 specific tracts were additionally considered. We observed negative phenotypic correlations between epigenetic age acceleration and global white matter tract integrity (ρpheno = -0.119, p = 0.028), with evidence of shared genetic (ρgene = -0.463, p = 0.013) but not environmental influences. Negative phenotypic and genetic correlations with age acceleration were also seen for a number of specific white matter tracts, along with additional negative phenotypic correlations between granulocyte abundance and white matter integrity. These findings (i.e., increased acceleration in epigenetic age in peripheral blood correlates with reduced white matter integrity in the brain and shares common genetic influences) provide a window into the neurobiology of aging processes within the brain and a potential biomarker of normal and pathological brain aging.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Epigenetic measures can be used to predict age with a high degree of accuracy and so

  17. Association of White Matter With Core Cognitive Deficits in Patients With Schizophrenia.

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    Kochunov, Peter; Coyle, Thomas R; Rowland, Laura M; Jahanshad, Neda; Thompson, Paul M; Kelly, Sinead; Du, Xiaoming; Sampath, Hemalatha; Bruce, Heather; Chiappelli, Joshua; Ryan, Meghann; Fisseha, Feven; Savransky, Anya; Adhikari, Bhim; Chen, Shuo; Paciga, Sara A; Whelan, Christopher D; Xie, Zhiyong; Hyde, Craig L; Chen, Xing; Schubert, Christian R; O'Donnell, Patricio; Hong, L Elliot

    2017-09-01

    Efforts to remediate the multiple cognitive function impairments in schizophrenia should consider white matter as one of the underlying neural mechanisms. To determine whether altered structural brain connectivity is responsible for 2 of the core cognitive deficits in schizophrenia- reduced information processing speed and impaired working memory. This cross-sectional study design took place in outpatient clinics from August 1, 2004, to August 31, 2015. Participants included 166 patients with schizophrenia and 213 healthy control individuals. These participants were from 3 independent cohorts, each of which had its own healthy control group. No participant had current or past neurological conditions or major medical conditions. Patients were diagnosed with either schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder as defined by the DSM-IV. Controls had no Axis I psychiatric disorder. Mediation analyses and structural equation modeling were used to analyze the associations among processing speed, working memory, and white matter microstructures. Whole-brain and regional diffusion tensor imaging fractional anisotropy were used to measure white matter microstructures. Of the study participants, the 166 patients with schizophrenia had a mean (SD) age of 38.2 (13.3) years and the 213 healthy controls had a mean (SD) age of 39.2 (14.0) years. There were significantly more male patients than controls in each of the 3 cohorts (117 [70%] vs 91 [43%]), but there were no significant differences in sex composition among the 3 cohorts. Patients had significantly reduced processing speed (Cohen d = 1.24; P = 6.91 × 10-30) and working memory deficits (Cohen d = 0.83; P = 1.10 × 10-14) as well as a significant whole-brain fractional anisotropy deficit (Cohen d = 0.63; P = 2.20 × 10-9). In schizophrenia, working memory deficit was mostly accounted for by processing speed deficit, but this deficit remained when accounting for working memory (Cohen d

  18. Diffuse white matter tract abnormalities in clinically normal ageing retired athletes with a history of sports-related concussions.

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    Tremblay, Sebastien; Henry, Luke C; Bedetti, Christophe; Larson-Dupuis, Camille; Gagnon, Jean-François; Evans, Alan C; Théoret, Hugo; Lassonde, Maryse; De Beaumont, Louis

    2014-11-01

    Sports-related concussions have been shown to lead to persistent subclinical anomalies of the motor and cognitive systems in young asymptomatic athletes. In advancing age, these latent alterations correlate with detectable motor and cognitive function decline. Until now, the interacting effects of concussions and the normal ageing process on white matter tract integrity remain unknown. Here we used a tract-based spatial statistical method to uncover potential white matter tissue damage in 15 retired athletes with a history of concussions, free of comorbid medical conditions. We also investigated potential associations between white matter integrity and declines in cognitive and motor functions. Compared to an age- and education-matched control group of 15 retired athletes without concussions, former athletes with concussions exhibited widespread white matter anomalies along many major association, interhemispheric, and projection tracts. Group contrasts revealed decreases in fractional anisotropy, as well as increases in mean and radial diffusivity measures in the concussed group. These differences were primarily apparent in fronto-parietal networks as well as in the frontal aspect of the corpus callosum. The white matter anomalies uncovered in concussed athletes were significantly associated with a decline in episodic memory and lateral ventricle expansion. Finally, the expected association between frontal white matter integrity and motor learning found in former non-concussed athletes was absent in concussed participants. Together, these results show that advancing age in retired athletes presenting with a history of sports-related concussions is linked to diffuse white matter abnormalities that are consistent with the effects of traumatic axonal injury and exacerbated demyelination. These changes in white matter integrity might explain the cognitive and motor function declines documented in this population. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University

  19. MRI markers for mild cognitive impairment: comparisons between white matter integrity and gray matter volume measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the value of assessing white matter integrity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI for classification of mild cognitive impairment (MCI and prediction of cognitive impairments in comparison to brain atrophy measurements using structural MRI. Fifty-one patients with MCI and 66 cognitive normal controls (CN underwent DTI and T1-weighted structural MRI. DTI measures included fractional anisotropy (FA and radial diffusivity (DR from 20 predetermined regions-of-interest (ROIs in the commissural, limbic and association tracts, which are thought to be involved in Alzheimer's disease; measures of regional gray matter (GM volume included 21 ROIs in medial temporal lobe, parietal cortex, and subcortical regions. Significant group differences between MCI and CN were detected by each MRI modality: In particular, reduced FA was found in splenium, left isthmus cingulum and fornix; increased DR was found in splenium, left isthmus cingulum and bilateral uncinate fasciculi; reduced GM volume was found in bilateral hippocampi, left entorhinal cortex, right amygdala and bilateral thalamus; and thinner cortex was found in the left entorhinal cortex. Group classifications based on FA or DR was significant and better than classifications based on GM volume. Using either DR or FA together with GM volume improved classification accuracy. Furthermore, all three measures, FA, DR and GM volume were similarly accurate in predicting cognitive performance in MCI patients. Taken together, the results imply that DTI measures are as accurate as measures of GM volume in detecting brain alterations that are associated with cognitive impairment. Furthermore, a combination of DTI and structural MRI measurements improves classification accuracy.

  20. Altered Gray Matter Volume and White Matter Integrity in College Students with Mobile Phone Dependence.

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    Wang, Yongming; Zou, Zhiling; Song, Hongwen; Xu, Xiaodan; Wang, Huijun; d'Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Huang, Xiting

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone dependence (MPD) is a behavioral addiction that has become an increasing public mental health issue. While previous research has explored some of the factors that may predict MPD, the underlying neural mechanisms of MPD have not been investigated yet. The current study aimed to explore the microstructural variations associated with MPD as measured with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Gray matter volume (GMV) and white matter (WM) integrity [four indices: fractional anisotropy (FA); mean diffusivity (MD); axial diffusivity (AD); and radial diffusivity (RD)] were calculated via voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis, respectively. Sixty-eight college students (42 female) were enrolled and separated into two groups [MPD group, N = 34; control group (CG), N = 34] based on Mobile Phone Addiction Index (MPAI) scale score. Trait impulsivity was also measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). In light of underlying trait impulsivity, results revealed decreased GMV in the MPD group relative to controls in regions such as the right superior frontal gyrus (sFG), right inferior frontal gyrus (iFG), and bilateral thalamus (Thal). In the MPD group, GMV in the above mentioned regions was negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. Results also showed significantly less FA and AD measures of WM integrity in the MPD group relative to controls in bilateral hippocampal cingulum bundle fibers (CgH). Additionally, in the MPD group, FA of the CgH was also negatively correlated with scores on the MPAI. These findings provide the first morphological evidence of altered brain structure with mobile phone overuse, and may help to better understand the neural mechanisms of MPD in relation to other behavioral and substance addiction disorders.

  1. White matter alterations in temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Diniz, P. B.; Salmon, C. E.; Velasco, T. R.; Sakamoto, A. C.; Leite, J. P.; Santos, A. C.

    2011-03-01

    In This study, we used Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (D), parallel diffusivity (D//) and perpendicular diffusivity (D), to localize the regions where occur axonal lesion and demyelization. TBSS was applied to analyze the FA data. After, the regions with alteration were studied with D, D// and D maps. Patients exhibited widespread degradation of FA. With D, D// and D maps analysis we found alterations in corpus callosum, corticospinal tract, fornix, internal capsule, corona radiate, Sagittal stratum, cingulum, fronto-occipital fasciculus and uncinate fasciculus. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that exist demyelization and axonal damage in patients with TLE.

  2. Progressive volume loss and white matter degeneration in cstb-deficient mice: a diffusion tensor and longitudinal volumetry MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Otto; Laitinen, Teemu; Lehtimäki, Kimmo K; Tegelberg, Saara; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Gröhn, Olli; Kopra, Outi

    2014-01-01

    Unverricht-Lundborg type progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1, OMIM 254800) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset at the age of 6 to 16 years, incapacitating stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding cystatin B. Previously, widespread white matter changes and atrophy has been detected both in adult EPM1 patients and in 6-month-old cystatin B-deficient mice, a mouse model for the EPM1 disease. In order to elucidate the spatiotemporal dynamics of the brain atrophy and white matter changes in EPM1, we conducted longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging accompanied with tract-based spatial statistics analysis to compare volumetric changes and fractional anisotropy in the brains of 1 to 6 months of age cystatin B-deficient and control mice. The results reveal progressive but non-uniform volume loss of the cystatin B-deficient mouse brains, indicating that different neuronal populations possess distinct sensitivity to the damage caused by cystatin B deficiency. The diffusion tensor imaging data reveal early and progressive white matter alterations in cystatin B-deficient mice affecting all major tracts. The results also indicate that the white matter damage in the cystatin B-deficient brain is most likely secondary to glial activation and neurodegenerative events rather than a primary result of CSTB deficiency. The data also show that diffusion tensor imaging combined with TBSS analysis provides a feasible approach not only to follow white matter damage in neurodegenerative mouse models but also to detect fractional anisotropy changes related to normal white matter maturation and reorganisation.

  3. Perilesional and contralateral white matter evolution and integrity in patients with periventricular nodular heterotopia and epilepsy: a longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Yan, B; An, D; Niu, R; Tang, Y; Tong, X; Gong, Q; Zhou, D

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the evolution of perinodular and contralateral white matter abnormalities in patients with periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) and epilepsy. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) (64 directions) and 3 T structural magnetic resonance imaging were performed in 29 PNH patients (mean age 27.3 years), and 16 patients underwent a second scan (average time between the two scans 1.1 years). Fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity were measured within the perilesional and contralateral white matter. Longitudinal analysis showed that white matter located 10 mm from the focal nodule displayed characteristics intermediate to tissue 5 mm away, and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) also established evolution profiles of perinodular white matter in different cortical lobes. Compared to 29 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, significant decreased fractional anisotropy and elevated mean diffusivity values were observed in regions 5 and 10 mm from nodules (P matter and the extent decreases with increasing distance from the nodule. In the homologous contralateral region, white matter diffusion metrics were unchanged in unilateral PNH. These findings have clinical implications with respect to the medical and surgical interventions of PNH-related epilepsy. © 2017 EAN.

  4. White matter integrity and cognition in mild traumatic brain injury following motor vehicle accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Kunlin; Zhu, Yongshan; Zhang, Yulong; Yin, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jingna; Qiu, Mingguo; Zhang, Weiguo

    2014-12-03

    The aim of this study is to explore the white matter structure integrity in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and to analyze the relationship between the white matter structure integrity and cognitive impairment of patients with mTBI. Twenty-five patients with mTBI and 25 healthy control subjects were studied with conventional MR imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps of patients with mTBI were calculated and compared, with these control maps using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Significantly lower fractional anisotropy was found in patients in the uncinate fasciculus, superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and internal capsule. Mean diffusivity was significantly elevated in the body of corpus callosum, uncinate fasciculus, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and internal capsule in the mTBI group compared with the control group (PMental State Examination (MMSE) in the mTBI patient group (R(2)=0.36, P<0.05). TBSS analysis of DTI suggests that patients with mTBI have focal axonal injury, and the pathophysiology is significantly related to the MMSE and IQ of mTBI patients. Diffusion tensor imaging can be a powerful technique for in vivo detection of mTBI, and can help in the diagnosis of patients with mTBI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased White Matter Inflammation in Aging- and Alzheimer's Disease Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Divya; Yin, Zhuoran; Breur, Marjolein; Doorduin, Janine; Holtman, Inge R; Olah, Marta; Mantingh-Otter, Ietje J; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter P; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Eggen, Bart J L; Amor, Sandra; Boddeke, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Chronic neuroinflammation, which is primarily mediated by microglia, plays an essential role in aging and neurodegeneration. It is still unclear whether this microglia-induced neuroinflammation occurs globally or is confined to distinct brain regions. In this study, we investigated microglia activity in various brain regions upon healthy aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathology in both human and mouse samples. In purified microglia isolated from aging mouse brains, we found a profound gene expression pattern related to pro-inflammatory processes, phagocytosis, and lipid homeostasis. Particularly in white matter microglia of 24-month-old mice, abundant expression of phagocytic markers including Mac-2, Axl, CD16/32, Dectin1, CD11c, and CD36 was detected. Interestingly, in white matter of human brain tissue the first signs of inflammatory activity were already detected during middle age. Thus quantification of microglial proteins, such as CD68 (commonly associated with phagocytosis) and HLA-DR (associated with antigen presentation), in postmortem human white matter brain tissue showed an age-dependent increase in immunoreactivity already in middle-aged people (53.2 ± 2.0 years). This early inflammation was also detectable by non-invasive positron emission tomography imaging using [11C]-(R)-PK11195, a ligand that binds to activated microglia. Increased microglia activity was also prominently present in the white matter of human postmortem early-onset AD (EOAD) brain tissue. Interestingly, microglia activity in the white matter of late-onset AD (LOAD) CNS was similar to that of the aged clinically silent AD cases. These data indicate that microglia-induced neuroinflammation is predominant in the white matter of aging mice and humans as well as in EOAD brains. This white matter inflammation may contribute to the progression of neurodegeneration, and have prognostic value for detecting the onset and progression of aging and neurodegeneration.

  6. Automatic identification of gray matter structures from MRI to improve the segmentation of white matter lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfield, S; Dengler, J; Zaers, J; Guttmann, C R; Wells, W M; Ettinger, G J; Hiller, J; Kikinis, R

    1995-01-01

    The segmentation of MRI scans of patients with white matter lesions (WML) is difficult because the MRI characteristics of WML are similar to those of gray matter. Intensity-based statistical classification techniques misclassify some WML as gray matter and some gray matter as WML. We developed a fast elastic matching algorithm that warps a reference data set containing information about the location of the gray matter into the approximate shape of the patient's brain. The region of white matter was segmented after segmenting the cortex and deep gray matter structures. The cortex was identified by using a three-dimensional, region-growing algorithm that was constrained by anatomical, intensity gradient, and tissue class parameters. White matter and WML were then segmented without interference from gray matter by using a two-class minimum-distance classifier. Analysis of double-echo spin-echo MRI scans of 16 patients with clinically determined multiple sclerosis (MS) was carried out. The segmentation of the cortex and deep gray matter structures provided anatomical context. This was found to improve the segmentation of MS lesions by allowing correct classification of the white matter region despite the overlapping tissue class distributions of gray matter and MS lesion.

  7. Whole-brain white matter disruption in semantic and nonfluent variants of primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Graeme C; Graham, Naida L; Rochon, Elizabeth; Tang-Wai, David F; Lobaugh, Nancy J; Chow, Tiffany W; Black, Sandra E

    2013-04-01

    Semantic (svPPA) and nonfluent (nfPPA) variants of primary progressive aphasia are associated with distinct patterns of cortical atrophy and underlying pathology. Little is known, however, about their contrasting spread of white matter disruption and how this relates to grey matter (GM) loss. We undertook a structural MRI study to investigate this relationship. We used diffusion tensor imaging, tract-based spatial statistics, and voxel-based morphometry to examine fractional anisotropy (FA) and directional diffusivities in nine patients with svPPA and nine patients with nfPPA, and compared them to 16 matched controls after accounting for global GM atrophy. Significant differences in topography of white matter changes were found, with more ventral involvement in svPPA patients and more widespread frontal involvement in nfPPA individuals. However, each group had both ventral and dorsal tract changes, and both showed spread of diffusion abnormalities beyond sites of local atrophy. There was a clear dissociation in sensitivity of diffusion tensor imaging measures between groups. SvPPA patients showed widespread changes in FA and radial diffusivity, whereas changes in axial diffusivity were more restricted and proximal to sites of GM atrophy. NfPPA patients showed isolated changes in FA, but widespread axial and radial diffusivity changes. These findings reveal the extent of white matter disruption in these variants of PPA after accounting for GM loss. Further, they suggest that differences in the relative sensitivity of diffusion metrics may reflect differences in the nature of underlying white matter pathology in these two subtypes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Integrity of the hippocampus and surrounding white matter is correlated with language training success in aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Marcus; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Kugel, Harald; Schiffbauer, Hagen; Flöel, Agnes; Albers, Johannes; Kramer, Kira; Menke, Ricarda; Baumgärtner, Annette; Knecht, Stefan; Breitenstein, Caterina; Deppe, Michael

    2010-10-15

    Aphasia after middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke shows highly variable degrees of recovery. One possible explanation may be offered by the variability of the occlusion location. Branches from the proximal portion of the MCA often supply the mesial temporal lobe including parts of the hippocampus, a structure known to be involved in language learning. Therefore, we assessed whether language recovery in chronic aphasia is dependent on the proximity of the MCA infarct and correlated with the integrity of the hippocampus and its surrounding white matter. Language reacquisition capability was determined after 2weeks of intensive language therapy and 8months after treatment in ten chronic aphasia patients. Proximity of MCA occlusion relative to the internal carotid artery was determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based on the most proximal anatomical region infarcted. Structural damage to the hippocampus was assessed by MRI-based volumetry, regional microstructural integrity of hippocampus adjacent white matter by fractional anisotropy. Language learning success for trained materials was correlated with the proximity of MCA occlusion, microstructural integrity of the left hippocampus and its surrounding white matter, but not with lesion size, overall microstructural brain integrity and a control region outside of the MCA territory. No correlations were found for untrained language materials, underlining the specificity of our results for training-induced recovery. Our results suggest that intensive language therapy success in chronic aphasia after MCA stroke is critically dependent on damage to the hippocampus and its surrounding structures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. HYPERTENSION-RELATED ALTERATIONS IN WHITE MATTER MICROSTRUCTURE DETECTABLE IN MIDDLE AGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Linda K.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Eyler, Lisa T.; Franz, Carol; Hagler, Donald J.; Lyons, Michael J.; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Rinker, Daniel A; Dale, Anders M.; Kremen, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Most studies examining associations between hypertension and brain white matter microstructure have focused on older adults or on cohorts with a large age range. Since hypertension effects on the brain may vary with age it is important to focus on middle age, when hypertension becomes more prevalent. We used linear mixed effect models to examine differences in white matter diffusion metrics as a function of hypertension in a well-characterized cohort of middle-aged men (N=316, mean 61.8 years; range 56.7–65.6). Diffusion metrics were examined in nine tracts reported to be sensitive to hypertension in older adults. Relative to normotensive individuals, individuals with longstanding hypertension (> 5.6 years) showed reduced fractional anisotropy or increased diffusivity in most tracts. Effects were stronger among carriers than non-carriers of the apolipoprotein E ε4 allele for two tracts connecting frontal regions with other brain areas. Significant differences were observed even after adjustment for potentially-related lifestyle and cardiovascular risk factors. Shorter duration of hypertension or better blood pressure control among hypertensive individuals did not lessen the adverse effects. These findings suggest that microstructural white matter alterations appear early in the course of hypertension and may persist despite adequate treatment. Although longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these findings, the results suggest that prevention—rather than management—of hypertension may be vital to preserving brain health in aging. PMID:26056337

  10. Changes in White-Matter Connectivity in Late Second Language Learners: Evidence from Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Eleonora; Cheng, Hu; Kroll, Judith F; Diaz, Michele T; Newman, Sharlene D

    2017-01-01

    Morphological brain changes as a consequence of new learning have been widely established. Learning a second language (L2) is one such experience that can lead to rapid structural neural changes. However, still relatively little is known about how levels of proficiency in the L2 and the age at which the L2 is learned influence brain neuroplasticity. The goal of this study is to provide novel evidence for the effect of bilingualism on white matter structure in relatively proficient but late L2 learners who acquired the second language after early childhood. Overall, the results demonstrate a significant effect on white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) as a function of L2 learning. Higher FA values were found in a broad white matter network including the anterior thalamic radiation (ATR), the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), the Uncinate Fasciculus (UF), and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF). Moreover, FA values were correlated with age of L2 acquisition, suggesting that learning an L2, even past childhood, induces neural changes. Finally, these results provide some initial evidence that variability in the age of L2 acquisition has important consequences for neural plasticity.

  11. Delay discounting behavior and white matter microstructure abnormalities in youth with a family history of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herting, Megan M; Schwartz, Daniel; Mitchell, Suzanne H; Nagel, Bonnie J

    2010-09-01

    Youth with family history of alcohol abuse have a greater risk of developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD). Brain and behavior differences may underlie this increased vulnerability. The current study examined delay discounting behavior and white matter microstructure in youth at high risk for alcohol abuse, as determined by a family history of alcoholism (FH+), and youth without such family history (FH-). Thirty-three healthy youth (FH+ = 15, FH- = 18), ages 11 to 15 years, completed a delay discounting task and underwent diffusion tensor imaging. Tract-based spatial statistics (Smith et al., 2006), as well as follow-up region-of-interest analyses, were performed to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) between FH+ and FH- youth. FH+ youth showed a trend toward increased discounting behavior and had significantly slower reaction times (RTs) on the delay discounting paradigm compared to FH- youth. Group differences in FA were seen in several white matter tracts. Furthermore, lower FA in the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus and the right optic radiation statistically mediated the relationship between FH status and slower RTs on the delay discounting task. Youth with a family history of substance abuse have disrupted white matter microstructure, which likely contributes to less efficient cortical processing and may act as an intrinsic risk factor contributing to an increased susceptibility of developing AUD. In addition, FHP youth showed a trend toward greater impulsive decision making, possibly representing an inherent personal characteristic that may facilitate substance use onset and abuse in high-risk youth.

  12. White matter tracts in first-episode psychosis: A DTI tractography study of the uncinate fasciculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gary; Cercignani, Mara; Parker, Geoffrey J.M.; Altmann, Daniel R.; Barnes, Thomas R.E.; Barker, Gareth J.; Joyce, Eileen M.; Ron, Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    A model of disconnectivity involving abnormalities in the cortex and connecting white matter pathways may explain the symptoms and cognitive abnormalities of schizophrenia. Recently, diffusion imaging tractography has made it possible to study white matter pathways in detail, and we present here a study of patients with first-episode psychosis using this technique. We studied the uncinate fasciculus (UF), the largest white matter tract that connects the frontal and temporal lobes, two brain regions significantly implicated in schizophrenia. Nineteen patients with first-episode schizophrenia and 23 controls were studied using a probabilistic tractography algorithm (PICo). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and probability of connection were obtained for every voxel in the tract, and the group means and distributions of these variables were compared. The spread of the FA distribution in the upper tail, as measured by the squared coefficient of variance (SCV), was reduced in the left UF in the patient group, indicating that the number of voxels with high FA values was reduced in the core of the tract and suggesting the presence of changes in fibre alignment and tract coherence in the patient group. The SCV of FA was lower in females across both groups and there was no correlation between the SCV of FA and clinical ratings. PMID:17988894

  13. Changes in White-Matter Connectivity in Late Second Language Learners: Evidence from Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Rossi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Morphological brain changes as a consequence of new learning have been widely established. Learning a second language (L2 is one such experience that can lead to rapid structural neural changes. However, still relatively little is known about how levels of proficiency in the L2 and the age at which the L2 is learned influence brain neuroplasticity. The goal of this study is to provide novel evidence for the effect of bilingualism on white matter structure in relatively proficient but late L2 learners who acquired the second language after early childhood. Overall, the results demonstrate a significant effect on white matter fractional anisotropy (FA as a function of L2 learning. Higher FA values were found in a broad white matter network including the anterior thalamic radiation (ATR, the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF, the Uncinate Fasciculus (UF, and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF. Moreover, FA values were correlated with age of L2 acquisition, suggesting that learning an L2, even past childhood, induces neural changes. Finally, these results provide some initial evidence that variability in the age of L2 acquisition has important consequences for neural plasticity.

  14. White matter properties differ in 6-year old Readers and Pre-readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Katherine E; Adams, Jenna N; Kovachy, Vanessa N; Ben-Shachar, Michal; Feldman, Heidi M

    2017-05-01

    Reading, an essential life skill in modern society, is typically learned during childhood. Adults who can read show white matter differences compared to adults who never learned to read. Studies have not established whether children who can read show similar white matter differences compared to children who cannot read. We compared 6-year old children who could decode written English words and pseudowords (n = 31; Readers) and 6-year old children who could not decode pseudowords and had a standard score readers). We employed diffusion MRI and tractography to extract fractional anisotropy (FA) along the trajectory of six bilateral intra-hemispheric tracts and two posterior subdivisions of the corpus callosum. Readers demonstrated significantly increased FA within the left anterior segment of the superior longitudinal fasciculus (aSLF-L) and the right uncinate fasciculus (UF-R) compared to Pre-readers. FA in the aSLF-L was significantly correlated with phonological awareness; FA in the UF-R was significantly correlated with language. Correlations in the UF-R but not the aSLF-L remained significant after controlling for reading ability, revealing that UF-R group differences were related to both children's language and reading abilities. Taken together, these findings demonstrate new evidence showing that individual differences in white matter structure relate to whether children have begun to read.

  15. Test-retest reliability of diffusion measures in cerebral white matter: A multiband diffusion MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Fei; Zhao, Tengda; He, Yong; Shu, Ni

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the test-retest (TRT) reliability of the diffusion measures in cerebral white matter obtained from the diffusion MRI dataset acquired with multiband acceleration. With the multiband diffusion MRI dataset with two repeated scanning sessions, the TRT reliability of diffusion measures (fractional anisotropy [FA], mean diffusivity [MD], primary diffusivity [PD] and transverse diffusivity [TD]) was investigated through several fully automated analysis methods, including two voxel-level analyses (voxel-based analysis [VBA] and tract-based spatial statistics [TBSS]) and an atlas ROI-based analysis. The reproducibility was assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Our results demonstrated moderate to high reproducibility (ICC > 0.4) of diffusion measures from the multiband EPI sequence with different analysis approaches. Across different measures, FA exhibited the highest reproducibility (mean ICC = 0.70), while MD showed the lowest reliability (mean ICC = 0.55) (P = 0.006). Additionally, ICCs varied across different tract ROIs: Commissural tracts showed higher reproducibility than other categories of tracts (projection, association and brainstem), while the brainstem tracts exhibited the poorest reliability (P = 0.004). Our findings suggest a potential utility of the multiband EPI sequence for exploring individual differences of cerebral white matter and provide reference for future white matter studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Widespread changes in white matter microstructure after a day of waking and sleep deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbjørn Elvsåshagen

    Full Text Available Elucidating the neurobiological effects of sleep and waking remains an important goal of the neurosciences. Recently, animal studies indicated that sleep is important for cell membrane and myelin maintenance in the brain and that these structures are particularly susceptible to insufficient sleep. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a day of waking and sleep deprivation would be associated with changes in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI indices of white matter microstructure sensitive to axonal membrane and myelin alterations.Twenty-one healthy adult males underwent DTI in the morning [7:30AM; time point (TP1], after 14 hours of waking (TP2, and then after another 9 hours of waking (TP3. Whole brain voxel-wise analysis was performed with tract based spatial statistics.A day of waking was associated with widespread increases in white matter fractional anisotropy, which were mainly driven by radial diffusivity reductions, and sleep deprivation was associated with widespread fractional anisotropy decreases, which were mainly explained by reductions in axial diffusivity. In addition, larger decreases in axial diffusivity after sleep deprivation were associated with greater sleepiness. All DTI changes remained significant after adjusting for hydration measures.This is the first DTI study of sleep deprivation in humans. Although previous studies have observed localized changes in DTI indices of cerebral microstructure over the course of a few hours, further studies are needed to confirm widespread DTI changes within hours of waking and to clarify whether such changes in white matter microstructure serve as neurobiological substrates of sleepiness.

  17. White matter structures associated with creativity: evidence from diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Fukushima, Ai; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2010-05-15

    Creativity has been essential to the development of human civilization and plays a crucial role in cultural life. However, despite literature that has proposed the importance of structural connectivity in the brain for creativity, the relationship between regional white matter integrity and creativity has never been directly investigated. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging and a behavioral creativity test of divergent thinking to investigate the relationship between creativity and structural connectivity. We examined associations between creativity and fractional anisotropy across the brain in healthy young adult (mean age, 21.7 years old; [SD]=1.44) men (n=42) and women (n=13). After controlling for age, sex, and score on Raven's advanced progressive matrices, a test for psychometric measures of intelligence, significant positive relationships between fractional anisotropy and individual creativity as measured by the divergent thinking test were observed in the white matter in or adjacent to the bilateral prefrontal cortices, the body of the corpus callosum, the bilateral basal ganglia, the bilateral temporo-parietal junction and the right inferior parietal lobule. As a whole, these findings indicate that integrated white matter tracts underlie creativity. These pathways involve the association cortices and the corpus callosum, which connect information in distant brain regions and underlie diverse cognitive functions that support creativity. Thus, our results are congruent with the ideas that creativity is associated with the integration of conceptually distant ideas held in different brain domains and architectures and that creativity is supported by diverse high-level cognitive functions, particularly those of the frontal lobe. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. White matter integrity, substance use, and risk taking in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobus, Joanna; Thayer, Rachel E; Trim, Ryan S; Bava, Sunita; Frank, Lawrence R; Tapert, Susan F

    2013-06-01

    White matter development is important for efficient communication between brain regions, higher order cognitive functioning, and complex behaviors. Adolescents have a higher propensity for engaging in risky behaviors, yet few studies have explored associations between white matter integrity and risk taking directly. Altered white matter integrity in mid-adolescence was hypothesized to predict subsequent risk taking behaviors 1.5 years later. Adolescent substance users (predominantly alcohol and marijuana, n = 47) and demographically similar nonusers (n = 49) received diffusion tensor imaging at baseline (ages 16-19), and risk taking measures at both baseline and an 18-month follow-up (i.e., at ages 17-20). Brain regions of interest were the fornix, superior corona radiata, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and superior fronto-occipital fasciculus. In substance-using youth (n = 47), lower white matter integrity at baseline in the fornix and superior corona radiata predicted follow-up substance use (ΔR2 = 10-12%, ps behaviors (ΔR2 = 10%, p risk taking behaviors among youth who initiated heavy substance use by mid-adolescence. Most notable were relationships between projection and limbic-system fibers and future substance-use frequency. Subcortical white matter coherence, along with an imbalance between the maturation levels in cognitive control and reward systems, may disadvantage the resistance to engage in risk taking behaviors during adolescence. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  19. White matter predicts functional connectivity in premanifest Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColgan, Peter; Gregory, Sarah; Razi, Adeel; Seunarine, Kiran K; Gargouri, Fatma; Durr, Alexandra; Roos, Raymund A C; Leavitt, Blair R; Scahill, Rachael I; Clark, Chris A; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Rees, Geraint; Coleman, A; Decolongon, J; Fan, M; Petkau, T; Jauffret, C; Justo, D; Lehericy, S; Nigaud, K; Valabrègue, R; Choonderbeek, A; Hart, E P T; Hensman Moss, D J; Crawford, H; Johnson, E; Papoutsi, M; Berna, C; Reilmann, R; Weber, N; Stout, J; Labuschagne, I; Landwehrmeyer, B; Orth, M; Johnson, H

    2017-02-01

    The distribution of pathology in neurodegenerative disease can be predicted by the organizational characteristics of white matter in healthy brains. However, we have very little evidence for the impact these pathological changes have on brain function. Understanding any such link between structure and function is critical for understanding how underlying brain pathology influences the progressive behavioral changes associated with neurodegeneration. Here, we demonstrate such a link between structure and function in individuals with premanifest Huntington's. Using diffusion tractography and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging to characterize white matter organization and functional connectivity, we investigate whether characteristic patterns of white matter organization in the healthy human brain shape the changes in functional coupling between brain regions in premanifest Huntington's disease. We find changes in functional connectivity in premanifest Huntington's disease that link directly to underlying patterns of white matter organization in healthy brains. Specifically, brain areas with strong structural connectivity show decreases in functional connectivity in premanifest Huntington's disease relative to controls, while regions with weak structural connectivity show increases in functional connectivity. Furthermore, we identify a pattern of dissociation in the strongest functional connections between anterior and posterior brain regions such that anterior functional connectivity increases in strength in premanifest Huntington's disease, while posterior functional connectivity decreases. Our findings demonstrate that organizational principles of white matter underlie changes in functional connectivity in premanifest Huntington's disease. Furthermore, we demonstrate functional antero-posterior dissociation that is in keeping with the caudo-rostral gradient of striatal pathology in HD.

  20. Essential hypertension, cerebral white matter pathology and ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, C

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most-frequent causes of death and the first cause of disability worldwide. Different mechanisms are related to the pathogenesis of stroke, involving multiple biological systems, which are often inter-connected. Besides age, hypertension is the most important risk factor for stroke and may also predispose to the development of more subtle cerebral damage based on arteriolar narrowing or pathological microvascular changes. Age and high blood pressure are responsible for silent structural and functional cerebral changes leading to white matter lesions and cognitive impairment. The clinical significance and pathological substrate of white matter lesions are not fully understood. Hypertensive patients have more white matter lesions, which are an important prognostic factor for the development of stroke, cognitive impairment, dementia and death, than normotensive people. Over the past 10 years, strong evidence has emerged that cerebral white matter lesions in hypertensive patients should be considered a silent early marker of brain damage. The mechanisms that would explain all these relationships remain to be elucidated, but available data suggest that arteriosclerosis of the penetrating brain vessels is the main factor in the pathogenesis of ischemic white matter lesions.

  1. White matter microstructure integrity in relation to reading proficiency☆.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikki Arrington, C; Kulesz, Paulina A; Juranek, Jenifer; Cirino, Paul T; Fletcher, Jack M

    2017-11-01

    Components of reading proficiency such asaccuracy, fluency, and comprehension require the successful coordination of numerous, yet distinct, cortical regions. Underlying white matter tracts allow for communication among these regions. This study utilized unique residualized tract - based spatial statistics methodology to identify the relations of white matter microstructure integrity to three components of reading proficiency in 49 school - aged children with typically developing phonological decoding skills and 27 readers with poor decoders. Results indicated that measures of white matter integrity were differentially associated with components of reading proficiency. In both typical and poor decoders, reading comprehension correlated with measures of integrity of the right uncinate fasciculus; reading comprehension was also related to the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus in poor decoders. Also in poor decoders, word reading fluency was related to the right uncinate and left inferior fronto - occipital fasciculi. Word reading was unrelated to white matter integrity in either group. These findings expand our knowledge of the association between white matter integrity and different elements of reading proficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Astrocytes in oligodendrocyte lineage development and white matter pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiasi eLi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in grey matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica. In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  3. Anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background in nonstandard cold dark matter models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittorio, Nicola; Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Small angular scale cosmic microwave anisotropies in flat, vacuum-dominated, cold dark matter cosmological models which fit large-scale structure observations and are consistent with a high value for the Hubble constant are reexamined. New predictions for CDM models in which the large-scale power is boosted via a high baryon content and low H(0) are presented. Both classes of models are consistent with current limits: an improvement in sensitivity by a factor of about 3 for experiments which probe angular scales between 7 arcmin and 1 deg is required, in the absence of very early reionization, to test boosted CDM models for large-scale structure formation.

  4. Effects of low-level sarin and cyclosarin exposure on white matter integrity in Gulf War Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Linda L; Zhang, Yu; Buckley, Shannon

    2015-05-01

    We previously found evidence of reduced gray and white matter volume in Gulf War (GW) veterans with predicted low-level exposure to sarin (GB) and cyclosarin (GF). Because loss of white matter tissue integrity has been linked to both gray and white matter atrophy, the current study sought to test the hypothesis that GW veterans with predicted GB/GF exposure have evidence of disrupted white matter microstructural integrity. Measures of fractional anisotropy and directional (i.e., axial and radial) diffusivity were assessed from the 4T diffusion tensor images (DTI) of 59 GW veterans with predicted GB/GF exposure and 59 "matched" unexposed GW veterans (mean age: 48 ± 7 years). The DTI data were analyzed using regions of interest (ROI) analyses that accounted for age, sex, total brain gray and white matter volume, trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder, current major depression, and chronic multisymptom illness status. There were no significant group differences in fractional anisotropy or radial diffusivity. However, there was increased axial diffusivity in GW veterans with predicted GB/GF exposure compared to matched, unexposed veterans throughout the brain, including the temporal stem, corona radiata, superior and inferior (hippocampal) cingulum, inferior and superior fronto-occipital fasciculus, internal and external capsule, and superficial cortical white matter blades. Post hoc analysis revealed significant correlations between higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial diffusivity with better neurobehavioral performance in unexposed GW veterans. In contrast, only increased axial diffusivity in posterior limb of the internal capsule was associated with better psychomotor function in GW veterans with predicted GB/GF exposure. The finding that increased axial diffusivity in a region of the brain that contains descending corticospinal fibers was associated with better psychomotor function and the lack of significant neurobehavioral deficits in veterans

  5. Altered white matter microstructure underlies listening difficulties in children suspected of auditory processing disorders: a DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Rola; Schmithorst, Vincent J; Keith, Robert W; Holland, Scott K

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify biomarkers of listening difficulties by investigating white matter microstructure in children suspected of auditory processing disorder (APD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Behavioral studies have suggested that impaired cognitive and/or attention abilities rather than a pure sensory processing deficit underlie listening difficulties and auditory processing disorder (APD) in children. However, the neural signature of listening difficulties has not been investigated. Twelve children with listening difficulties and atypical left ear advantage (LEA) in dichotic listening and twelve age- and gender-matched typically developing children with typical right ear advantage (REA) were tested. Using voxel-based analysis, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean, axial and radial diffusivity (MD, AD, RD) maps were computed and contrasted between the groups. Listening difficulties were associated with altered white matter microstructure, reflected by decreased FA in frontal multifocal white matter regions centered in prefrontal cortex bilaterally and left anterior cingulate. Increased RD and decreased AD accounted for the decreased FA, suggesting delayed myelination in frontal white matter tracts and disrupted fiber organization in the LEA group. Furthermore, listening difficulties were associated with increased MD (with increase in both RD and AD) in the posterior limb of the internal capsule (sublenticular part) at the auditory radiations where auditory input is transmitted between the thalamus and the auditory cortex. Our results provide direct evidence that listening difficulties in children are associated with altered white matter microstructure and that both sensory and supramodal deficits underlie the differences between the groups.

  6. Links between white matter microstructure and cortisol reactivity to stress in early childhood: evidence for moderation by parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Haroon I; Joanisse, Marc F; Mackrell, Sarah M; Kryski, Katie R; Smith, Heather J; Singh, Shiva M; Hayden, Elizabeth P

    2014-01-01

    Activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (measured via cortisol reactivity) may be a biological marker of risk for depression and anxiety, possibly even early in development. However, the structural neural correlates of early cortisol reactivity are not well known, although these would potentially inform broader models of mechanisms of risk, especially if the early environment further shapes these relationships. Therefore, we examined links between white matter architecture and young girls' cortisol reactivity and whether early caregiving moderated these links. We recruited 45 6-year-old girls based on whether they had previously shown high or low cortisol reactivity to a stress task at age 3. White matter integrity was assessed by calculating fractional anisotropy (FA) of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans. Parenting styles were measured via a standardized parent-child interaction task. Significant associations were found between FA in white matter regions adjacent to the left thalamus, the right anterior cingulate cortex, and the right superior frontal gyrus (all ps parent positive affect showing white matter structure more similar to that of low stress reactive girls. Results show associations between white matter integrity of various limbic regions of the brain and early cortisol reactivity to stress and provide preliminary support for the notion that parenting may moderate associations.

  7. Links between white matter microstructure and cortisol reactivity to stress in early childhood: Evidence for moderation by parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Haroon I.; Joanisse, Marc F.; Mackrell, Sarah M.; Kryski, Katie R.; Smith, Heather J.; Singh, Shiva M.; Hayden, Elizabeth P.

    2014-01-01

    Activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis (measured via cortisol reactivity) may be a biological marker of risk for depression and anxiety, possibly even early in development. However, the structural neural correlates of early cortisol reactivity are not well known, although these would potentially inform broader models of mechanisms of risk, especially if the early environment further shapes these relationships. Therefore, we examined links between white matter architecture and young girls' cortisol reactivity and whether early caregiving moderated these links. We recruited 45 6-year-old girls based on whether they had previously shown high or low cortisol reactivity to a stress task at age 3. White matter integrity was assessed by calculating fractional anisotropy (FA) of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans. Parenting styles were measured via a standardized parent–child interaction task. Significant associations were found between FA in white matter regions adjacent to the left thalamus, the right anterior cingulate cortex, and the right superior frontal gyrus (all ps parent positive affect showing white matter structure more similar to that of low stress reactive girls. Results show associations between white matter integrity of various limbic regions of the brain and early cortisol reactivity to stress and provide preliminary support for the notion that parenting may moderate associations. PMID:25379418

  8. ADAPTIVE CUTS FOR EXTRACTING SPECIFIC WHITE MATTER TRACTS.

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    Adluru, Nagesh; Singh, Vikas; Alexander, Andrew L

    2012-05-05

    Extracting specific white matter tracts (e.g., uncinate fasciculus) from whole brain tractography has numerous applications in studying individual differences in white matter. Typically specific tracts are extracted manually, following replicable protocols which can be prohibitively expensive for large scale studies. A tract clustering framework is a suitable computational framework but from a neuroanatomical point of view, one of the key challenges is that it is very hard to design a universal similarity function for different types of white matter tracts (e.g., projection, association, commissural tracts). In this paper, we propose an adaptive cuts framework in which, using normalized cuts motivated objective function, we adaptively learn tract-tract similarity for each specific tract class using atlas based training data. Using the learnt similarity function we train an ensemble of binary support vector machines to extract specific tracts from unlabeled whole-brain tractography sets.

  9. White matter morphometric changes uniquely predict children's reading acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Chelsea A; Vandermosten, Maaike; Farris, Emily A; Hancock, Roeland; Gimenez, Paul; Black, Jessica M; Casto, Brandi; Drahos, Miroslav; Tumber, Mandeep; Hendren, Robert L; Hulme, Charles; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2014-10-01

    This study examined whether variations in brain development between kindergarten and Grade 3 predicted individual differences in reading ability at Grade 3. Structural MRI measurements indicated that increases in the volume of two left temporo-parietal white matter clusters are unique predictors of reading outcomes above and beyond family history, socioeconomic status, and cognitive and preliteracy measures at baseline. Using diffusion MRI, we identified the left arcuate fasciculus and superior corona radiata as key fibers within the two clusters. Bias-free regression analyses using regions of interest from prior literature revealed that volume changes in temporo-parietal white matter, together with preliteracy measures, predicted 56% of the variance in reading outcomes. Our findings demonstrate the important contribution of developmental differences in areas of left dorsal white matter, often implicated in phonological processing, as a sensitive early biomarker for later reading abilities, and by extension, reading difficulties. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Axonal disruption in white matter underlying cortical sulcus tau pathology in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

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    Holleran, Laurena; Kim, Joong Hee; Gangolli, Mihika; Stein, Thor; Alvarez, Victor; McKee, Ann; Brody, David L

    2017-03-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive degenerative disorder associated with repetitive traumatic brain injury. One of the primary defining neuropathological lesions in CTE, based on the first consensus conference, is the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in gray matter sulcal depths. Post-mortem CTE studies have also reported myelin loss, axonal injury and white matter degeneration. Currently, the diagnosis of CTE is restricted to post-mortem neuropathological analysis. We hypothesized that high spatial resolution advanced diffusion MRI might be useful for detecting white matter microstructural changes directly adjacent to gray matter tau pathology. To test this hypothesis, formalin-fixed post-mortem tissue blocks from the superior frontal cortex of ten individuals with an established diagnosis of CTE were obtained from the Veterans Affairs-Boston University-Concussion Legacy Foundation brain bank. Advanced diffusion MRI data was acquired using an 11.74 T MRI scanner at Washington University with 250 × 250 × 500 µm3 spatial resolution. Diffusion tensor imaging, diffusion kurtosis imaging and generalized q-sampling imaging analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. Following MRI acquisition, tissue sections were tested for phosphorylated tau immunoreactivity in gray matter sulcal depths. Axonal disruption in underlying white matter was assessed using two-dimensional Fourier transform analysis of myelin black gold staining. A robust image co-registration method was applied to accurately quantify the relationship between diffusion MRI parameters and histopathology. We found that white matter underlying sulci with high levels of tau pathology had substantially impaired myelin black gold Fourier transform power coherence, indicating axonal microstructural disruption (r = -0.55, p = 0.0015). Using diffusion tensor MRI, we found that fractional anisotropy (FA) was modestly (r = 0.53) but significantly (p = 0.0012) correlated with

  11. Minocycline protects the immature white matter against hyperoxia.

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    Schmitz, Thomas; Krabbe, Grietje; Weikert, Georg; Scheuer, Till; Matheus, Friederike; Wang, Yan; Mueller, Susanne; Kettenmann, Helmut; Matyash, Vitali; Bührer, Christoph; Endesfelder, Stefanie

    2014-04-01

    Poor neurological outcome in preterm infants is associated with periventricular white matter damage and hypomyelination, often caused by perinatal inflammation, hypoxia-ischemia, and hyperoxia. Minocycline has been demonstrated in animal models to protect the immature brain against inflammation and hypoxia-ischemia by microglial inhibition. Here we studied the effect of minocycline on white matter damage caused by hyperoxia. To mimic the 3- to 4-fold increase of oxygen tension caused by preterm birth, we have used the hyperoxia model in neonatal rats providing 24h exposure to 4-fold increased oxygen concentration (80% instead of 21% O2) from P6 to P7. We analyzed whether minocycline prevents activation of microglia and damage of oligodendroglial precursor cell development, and whether acute treatment of hyperoxia-exposed rats with minocycline improves long term white matter integrity. Minocycline administration during exposure to hyperoxia resulted in decreased apoptotic cell death and in improved proliferation and maturation of oligodendroglial precursor cells (OPC). Minocycline blocked changes in microglial morphology and IL-1β release induced by hyperoxia. In primary microglial cell cultures, minocycline inhibited cytokine release while in mono-cultures of OPCs, it improved survival and proliferation. Long term impairment of white matter diffusivity in MRI/DTI in P30 and P60 animals after neonatal hyperoxia was attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline protects white matter development against oxygen toxicity through direct protection of oligodendroglia and by microglial inhibition. This study moreover demonstrates long term benefits of minocycline on white matter integrity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Compensatory shift of subcallosal area and paraterminal gyrus white matter parameters on DTI in patients with Alzheimer disease.

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    Kuchtova, Barbora; Wurst, Zdenek; Mrzílkova, Jana; Ibrahim, Ibrahim; Tintera, Jaroslav; Bartos, Ales; Musil, Vladimir; Kieslich, Karel; Zach, Petr

    2017-12-27

    Alzheimer disease is traditionally conceptualized as a disease of brain gray matter, however, studies with diffusion tensor imaging have demonstrated that Alzheimer disease also involves alterations in white matter integrity. We measured number of tracts, tracts length, tract volume, quantitative anisotropy and general fractional anisotropy of neuronal tracts in subcallosal area, paraterminal gyrus and fornix in patients with Alzheimer disease and healthy age-matched controls. Our hypothesis was that patients with Alzheimer disease should exhibit decrease in the integrity of these white matter structures that are crucial for semantic memory function. For our study were selected 24 patients with confirmed Alzheimer disease diagnosis and 24 healthy controls (AD center, Department of Neurology, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic). Statistically significant differences between the patients with Alzheimer disease and the control group were found both on the left and right fornices but only concerning the tract numbers and tract length. The subcallosal area and paraterminal gyrus showed statistically significant differences between the patients with Alzheimer disease and the control group, but only on the left side and only associated with the tract volume and quantitative anisotropy. Our explanation for these findings lies in the severe hippocampal atrophy (and subsequent loss of function) with compensatory hypertrophy of the subcallosal area and paraterminal gyrus neuronal fibers that occurs in Alzheimer´s disease, as an adaptation to the loss of projection from the hippocampal formation via fornix. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Grey and white matter changes at different stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Laura; Cercignani, Mara; Lenzi, Delia; Perri, Roberta; Fadda, Lucia; Caltagirone, Carlo; Macaluso, Emiliano; Bozzali, Marco

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates abnormalities of grey (GM) and white matter (WM) in Alzheimer's disease (AD), by modeling the AD pathological process as a continuous course between normal aging and fully developed dementia, with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) as an intermediate stage. All subjects (9 AD, 16 aMCI patients, and 13 healthy controls) underwent a full neuropsychological assessment and an MRI examination at 3 Tesla, including a volumetric scan and diffusion tensor (DT)-MRI. The volumes were processed to perform a voxel-based morphometric analysis of GM and WM volume, while DT-MRI data were analyzed using tract based spatial statistics, to estimate changes in fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity data. GM and WM volume and mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were compared across the three groups, and their correlation with cognitive functions was investigated. While AD presented a pattern of widespread GM atrophy, tissue loss was more subtle in patients with aMCI. WM atrophy was mainly located in the temporal lobe, but evidence of WM microscopic damage, assessed by DT-MRI, was also observable in the thalamic radiations and in the corpus callosum. Memory and executive functions correlated with either GM volume or fractional anisotropy in fronto-temporal areas. In conclusion, this study shows a comprehensive assessment of the brain tissue damage across AD evolution, providing insights on different pathophysiological mechanisms (GM atrophy, Wallerian degeneration, and brain disconnection) and their possible association with clinical aspects of cognitive decline.

  14. Gray and White Matter Abnormalities in Treated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease and Their Relationship to Cognitive Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Jonathan; Cole, James H; Caan, Matthan; De Francesco, Davide; Leech, Robert; van Zoest, Rosan A; Su, Tanja; Geurtsen, Gert J; Schmand, Ben A; Portegies, Peter; Prins, Maria; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Sabin, Caroline A; Majoie, Charles; Reiss, Peter; Winston, Alan; Sharp, David J

    2017-08-01

    Long-term comorbidities such as cognitive impairment remain prevalent in otherwise effectively treated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We investigate the relationship between cognitive impairment and brain structure in successfully treated patients using multimodal neuroimaging from the Comorbidity in Relation to AIDS (COBRA) cohort. Cognitive function, brain tissue volumes, and white matter microstructure were assessed in 134 HIV-infected patients and 79 controls. All patients had suppressed plasma HIV RNA at cohort entry. In addition to comprehensive voxelwise analyses of volumetric and diffusion tensor imaging, we used an unsupervised machine learning approach to combine cognitive, diffusion, and volumetric data, taking advantage of the complementary information they provide. Compared to the highly comparable control group, cognitive function was impaired in 4 of the 6 cognitive domains tested (median global T-scores: 50.8 vs 54.2; P function. Widespread abnormalities in white matter microstructure were also seen, including reduced fractional anisotropy with increased mean and radial diffusivity. In contrast to the gray matter, these diffusion abnormalities correlated with cognitive function. Multivariate neuroimaging analysis identified a neuroimaging phenotype associated with poorer cognitive function, HIV infection, and systemic immune activation. Cognitive impairment, lower gray matter volume, and white matter microstructural abnormalities were evident in HIV-infected individuals despite fully suppressive antiretroviral therapy. White matter abnormalities appear to be a particularly important determinant of cognitive dysfunction seen in well-treated HIV-infected individuals.

  15. White matter correlates of anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder.

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    Kim, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Borah; Kiu Choi, Tai; Lee, Sang-Hyuk

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity (AS) refers to a fear of anxiety-related sensations and is a dispositional variable especially elevated in patients with panic disorder (PD). Although several functional imaging studies of AS in patients with PD have suggested the presence of altered neural activity in paralimbic areas such as the insula, no study has investigated white matter (WM) alterations in patients with PD in relation to AS. The objective of this study was to investigate the WM correlates of AS in patients with PD. One-hundred and twelve right-handed patients with PD and 48 healthy control (HC) subjects were enrolled in this study. The Anxiety Sensitivity Inventory-Revised (ASI-R), the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS), the Albany Panic and Phobia Questionnaire (APPQ), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered. Tract-based spatial statistics were used for diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging analysis. Among the patients with PD, the ASI-R total scores were significantly correlated with the fractional anisotropy values of the WM regions near the insula, the splenium of the corpus callosum, the tapetum, the fornix/stria terminalis, the posterior limb of the internal capsule, the retrolenticular part of the internal capsule, the posterior thalamic radiation, the sagittal striatum, and the posterior corona radiata located in temporo-parieto-limbic regions and are involved in interoceptive processing (p<0.01; threshold-free cluster enhancement [TFCE]-corrected). These WM regions were also significantly correlated with the APPQ interoceptive avoidance subscale and BDI scores in patients with PD (p<0.01, TFCE-corrected). Correlation analysis among the HC subjects revealed no significant findings. There has been no comparative study on the structural neural correlates of AS in PD. The current study suggests that the WM correlates of AS in patients with PD may be associated with the insula and the adjacent temporo

  16. Focal central white matter lesions in Alexander disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreau, Pauline; Prust, Morgan J; Crane, Jeremy; Loewenstein, Johanna; Kadom, Nadja; Vanderver, Adeline

    2011-11-01

    Alexander disease is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central white matter caused by dominant mutations in GFAP, the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein. Magnetic resonance imaging pattern recognition studies have established characteristic radiologic phenotypes for this disorder. In some cases, however, genetically confirmed cases do not express these features, and several reports have identified "atypical" radiologic findings in Alexander disease patients. Here, the authors report 3 genetically confirmed Alexander disease cases with focal central white matter lesions that, upon longitudinal clinical and radiologic evaluation, appear to reflect an atypical Alexander disease magnetic resonance imaging phenotype and not another pathophysiologic process such as encephalitis, infarction, or neoplasm.

  17. Scalable brain network construction on white matter fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Moo K.; Adluru, Nagesh; Dalton, Kim M.; Alexander, Andrew L.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2011-03-01

    DTI offers a unique opportunity to characterize the structural connectivity of the human brain non-invasively by tracing white matter fiber tracts. Whole brain tractography studies routinely generate up to half million tracts per brain, which serves as edges in an extremely large 3D graph with up to half million edges. Currently there is no agreed-upon method for constructing the brain structural network graphs out of large number of white matter tracts. In this paper, we present a scalable iterative framework called the ɛ-neighbor method for building a network graph and apply it to testing abnormal connectivity in autism.

  18. Regional white matter volumes correlate with delay discounting.

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    Rongjun Yu

    Full Text Available A preference for immediate gratification is a central feature in addictive processes. However, the neural structures underlying reward delay tolerance are still unclear. Healthy participants (n = 121 completed a delay discounting questionnaire assessing the extent to which they prefer smaller immediate rewards to larger delayed reward after undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanning. Whole brain voxel-based morphometric analysis shows that delay discounting severity was negatively correlated with right prefrontal subgyral white matter volume and positively correlated with white matter volume in parahippocampus/hippocampus, after whole brain correction. This study might better our understanding of the neural basis of impulsivity and addiction.

  19. White matter tracts critical for recognition of sarcasm.

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    Davis, Cameron L; Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V; Hsu, John; Gomez, Yessenia; Mori, Susumu; Hillis, Argye E

    2016-01-01

    Failure to recognize sarcasm can lead to important miscommunications. Few previous studies have identified brain lesions associated with impaired recognition of sarcasm. We tested the hypothesis that percent damage to specific white matter tracts, age, and education together predict accuracy in sarcasm recognition. Using multivariable linear regression, with age, education, and percent damage to each of eight white matter tracts as independent variables, and percent accuracy on sarcasm recognition as the dependent variable, we developed a model for predicting sarcasm recognition. Percent damage to the sagittal stratum had the greatest weight and was the only independent predictor of sarcasm recognition.

  20. White matter correlates of cognitive inhibition during development: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

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    Treit, S; Chen, Z; Rasmussen, C; Beaulieu, C

    2014-09-12

    Inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility are two key executive functions that develop in childhood and adolescence, increasing one's capacity to respond dynamically to changing external demands and refrain from impulsive behaviors. These gains evolve in concert with significant brain development. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have identified numerous frontal and cingulate cortical areas associated with performance on inhibition tasks, but less is known about the involvement of the underlying anatomical connectivity, namely white matter. Here we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine correlations between a DTI-derived parameter, fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter, and performance on the NEPSY-II Inhibition test (Naming, Inhibition and Switching conditions) in 49 healthy children aged 5-16years (20 females; 29 males). First, whole brain voxel-based analysis revealed several clusters in the frontal projections of the corpus callosum, where higher FA was associated with worse inhibitory performance, as well as several clusters in posterior brain regions and one in the brainstem where higher FA was associated with better cognitive flexibility (in the Switching task), suggesting a dichotomous relationship between FA and these two aspects of cognitive control. Tractography through these clusters identified several white matter tracts, which were then manual traced in native space. Pearson's correlations confirmed associations between higher FA of frontal projections of the corpus callosum with poorer inhibitory performance (independent of age), though associations with Switching were not significant. Post-hoc evaluation suggested that FA of orbital and anterior frontal projections of the corpus callosum also mediated performance differences across conditions, which may reflect differences in self-monitoring or strategy use. These findings suggest a link between the development of inhibition and cognitive control with that of the underlying white

  1. Cerebral White Matter and Slow Gait: Contribution of Hyperintensities and Normal-appearing Parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Bedda L; Rosso, Andrea L; Aizenstein, Howard J; Harris, Tamara; Newman, Anne B; Satterfield, Suzanne; Studenski, Stephanie A; Yaffe, Kristine; Rosano, Caterina

    2016-07-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH), a common marker of cerebral small vessel disease, and lower microstructural integrity of normal-appearing white matter are associated with slower gait. How these cerebral measures interact in relation to slower gait is unknown. We assessed whether microstructural integrity of normal-appearing white matter, measured by fractional anisotropy (FA), moderates the association of higher WMH with slower gait. WMH, FA, and gait speed were acquired for 265 community-dwelling older adults (average age = 82.9 years). The inverse association between WMH and gait was robust to adjustment for age, gender, muscle strength, obesity, stroke, and hypertension (fully adjusted model: βs = -0.19, p = .001). The interaction between WMH and FA was significant; analyses stratified by FA showed that the inverse association between WMH and gait speed was significant only for those with low FA (FA < median, fully adjusted model: βs = -0.28, p = .001). Voxel-based results were similar for participants with FA less than median, there was an inverse association between gait speed and WMH which extended throughout the white matter (genu and body of corpus callosum, anterior limb of internal capsule, corona radiata, and superior longitudinal and fronto-occipital fasciculus). In contrast, for participants with FA ≥ median, the association was limited to the genu of corpus callosum, the cingulum, and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Microstructural integrity is a moderating factor in the association between WMH and gait. Future studies should examine whether higher microstructural integrity represents a source of compensation in those with greater WMH burden to maintain function in late life. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. White Matter Changes of Neurite Density and Fiber Orientation Dispersion during Human Brain Maturation.

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    Yi Shin Chang

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies of human brain development have consistently shown widespread, but nonlinear increases in white matter anisotropy through childhood, adolescence, and into adulthood. However, despite its sensitivity to changes in tissue microstructure, DTI lacks the specificity to disentangle distinct microstructural features of white and gray matter. Neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI is a recently proposed multi-compartment biophysical model of brain microstructure that can estimate non-collinear properties of white matter, such as neurite orientation dispersion index (ODI and neurite density index (NDI. In this study, we apply NODDI to 66 healthy controls aged 7-63 years to investigate changes of ODI and NDI with brain maturation, with comparison to standard DTI metrics. Using both region-of-interest and voxel-wise analyses, we find that NDI exhibits striking increases over the studied age range following a logarithmic growth pattern, while ODI rises following an exponential growth pattern. This novel finding is consistent with well-established age-related changes of FA over the lifespan that show growth during childhood and adolescence, plateau during early adulthood, and accelerating decay after the fourth decade of life. Our results suggest that the rise of FA during the first two decades of life is dominated by increasing NDI, while the fall in FA after the fourth decade is driven by the exponential rise of ODI that overcomes the slower increases of NDI. Using partial least squares regression, we further demonstrate that NODDI better predicts chronological age than DTI. Finally, we show excellent test-retest reliability of NODDI metrics, with coefficients of variation below 5% in all measured regions of interest. Our results support the conclusion that NODDI reveals biologically specific characteristics of brain development that are more closely linked to the microstructural features of white

  3. White matter in temporal lobe epilepsy: clinico-pathological correlates of water diffusion abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cruces, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Using magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to measure the behavior of diffusing water molecules, and the metrics derived can be used as indirect markers of tissue micro-architectural properties. Numerous reports have demonstrated that patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) have water diffusion abnormalities in several white matter structures located within and beyond the epileptogenic temporal lobe, showing that TLE is not a focal disorder, but rather a brain network disease. Differences in severity and spatial extent between patients with or without mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), as well as differences related to hemispheric seizure onset, are suggestive of different pathophysiological mechanisms behind different forms of TLE, which in turn result in specific cognitive disabilities. The biological interpretation of diffusion abnormalities is based on a wealth of information from animal models of white matter damage, and is supported by recent reports that directly correlate diffusion metrics with histological characteristics of surgical specimens of TLE patients. Thus, there is now more evidence showing that the increased mean diffusivity (MD) and concomitant reductions of diffusion anisotropy that are frequently observed in several white matter bundles in TLE patients reflect reduced axonal density (increased extra-axonal space) due to smaller-caliber axons, and abnormalities in the myelin sheaths of the remaining axons. Whether these histological and diffusion features are a predisposing factor for epilepsy or secondary to seizures is still uncertain; some reports suggest the latter. This article summarizes recent findings in this field and provides a synopsis of the histological features seen most frequently in post-surgical specimens of TLE patients in an effort to aid the interpretation of white matter diffusion abnormalities. PMID:25853084

  4. Perinatal clinical antecedents of white matter microstructural abnormalities on diffusion tensor imaging in extremely preterm infants.

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    Ulana Pogribna

    Full Text Available To identify perinatal clinical antecedents of white matter microstructural abnormalities in extremely preterm infants.A prospective cohort of extremely preterm infants (N = 86 and healthy term controls (N = 16 underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI at term equivalent age. Region of interest-based measures of white matter microstructure - fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity - were quantified in seven vulnerable cerebral regions and group differences assessed. In the preterm cohort, multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted to identify independent clinical factors associated with microstructural abnormalities.Preterm infants had a mean (standard deviation gestational age of 26.1 (1.7 weeks and birth weight of 824 (182 grams. Compared to term controls, the preterm cohort exhibited widespread microstructural abnormalities in 9 of 14 regional measures. Chorioamnionitis, necrotizing enterocolitis, white matter injury on cranial ultrasound, and increasing duration of mechanical ventilation were adversely correlated with regional microstructure. Conversely, antenatal steroids, female sex, longer duration of caffeine therapy, and greater duration of human milk use were independent favorable factors. White matter injury on cranial ultrasound was associated with a five weeks or greater delayed maturation of the corpus callosum; every additional 10 days of human milk use were associated with a three weeks or greater advanced maturation of the corpus callosum.Diffusion tensor imaging is sensitive in detecting the widespread cerebral delayed maturation and/or damage increasingly observed in extremely preterm infants. In our cohort, it also aided identification of several previously known or suspected perinatal clinical antecedents of brain injury, aberrant development, and neurodevelopmental impairments.

  5. White matter integrity and its association with affective and interpersonal symptoms in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Heather C; Nickson, Thomas; Pope, Merrick; Nicol, Katie; Romaniuk, Liana; Bastin, Mark E; Semple, Scott I; McIntosh, Andrew M; Hall, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe psychiatric disorder involving a range of symptoms including marked affective instability and disturbances in interpersonal interactions. Neuroimaging studies are beginning to provide evidence of altered processing in fronto-limbic network deficits in the disorder, however, few studies directly examine structural connections within this circuitry together with their relation to proposed causative processes and clinical features. In the current study, we investigated whether individuals with BPD (n = 20) have deficits in white matter integrity compared to a matched group of healthy controls (n = 18) using diffusion tensor MRI (DTI). We hypothesized that the BPD group would have decreased fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure of white matter integrity, compared to the controls in white matter tracts connecting frontal and limbic regions, primarily the cingulum, fornix and uncinate fasciculus. We also investigated the extent to which any such deficits related to childhood adversity, as measured by the childhood trauma questionnaire, and symptom severity as measured by the Zanarini rating scale for BPD. We report decreased white matter integrity in BPD versus controls in the cingulum and fornix. There were no significant relationships between FA and measures of childhood trauma. There were, however, significant associations between FA in the cingulum and clinical symptoms of anger, and in the fornix with affective instability, and measures of avoidance of abandonment from the Zanarini rating scale. We report deficits within fronto-limbic connections in individuals with BPD. Abnormalities within the fornix and cingulum were related to severity of symptoms and highlight the importance of these tracts in the pathogenesis of the disorder.

  6. Severe retinopathy of prematurity predicts delayed white matter maturation and poorer neurodevelopment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Torin J A; Chau, Vann; Gardiner, Jane; Foong, Justin; Vinall, Jillian; Zwicker, Jill G; Grunau, Ruth E; Synnes, Anne; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Miller, Steven P

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is associated with (1) abnormal white matter maturation and (2) neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18 months' corrected age (CA) compared with neonates without severe ROP. We conducted a prospective longitudinal cohort of extremely preterm neonates born 24-28 weeks' gestational age recruited between 2006 and 2013 with brain MRIs obtained both early in life and at term-equivalent age. Severe ROP was defined as ROP treated with retinal laser photocoagulation. Using diffusion tensor imaging and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS), white matter maturation was assessed by mean fractional anisotropy (FA) in seven predefined regions of interest. Neurodevelopmental outcomes were assessed with Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III (Bayley-III) composite scores at 18 months' CA. Subjects were compared using Fisher's exact, Kruskal-Wallis and generalised estimating equations. Families were recruited from the neonatal intensive care unit at BC Women's Hospital. Of 98 extremely preterm neonates (median: 26.0 weeks) assessed locally for ROP, 19 (19%) had severe ROP and 83 (85%) were assessed at 18 months' CA. Severe ROP was associated with lower FA in the posterior white matter, and with decreased measures of brain maturation in the optic radiations, posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) and external capsule on TBSS. Bayley-III cognitive and motor scores were lower in infants with severe ROP. Severe ROP is associated with maturational delay in the optic radiations, PLIC, external capsule and posterior white matter, housing the primary visual and motor pathways, and is associated with poorer cognitive and motor outcomes at 18 months' CA. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Disrupted Gamma Synchrony after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Its Correlation with White Matter Abnormality

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    Chao Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI has been firmly associated with disrupted white matter integrity due to induced white matter damage and degeneration. However, comparatively less is known about the changes of the intrinsic functional connectivity mediated via neural synchronization in the brain after mTBI. Moreover, despite the presumed link between structural and functional connectivity, no existing studies in mTBI have demonstrated clear association between the structural abnormality of white matter axons and the disruption of neural synchronization. To investigate these questions, we recorded resting state EEG and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI from a cohort of military service members. A newly developed synchronization measure, the weighted phase lag index was applied on the EEG data for estimating neural synchronization. Fractional anisotropy was computed from the DTI data for estimating white matter integrity. Fifteen service members with a history of mTBI within the past 3 years were compared to 22 demographically similar controls who reported no history of head injury. We observed that synchronization at low-gamma frequency band (25–40 Hz across scalp regions was significantly decreased in mTBI cases compared with controls. The synchronization in theta (4–7 Hz, alpha (8–13 Hz, and beta (15–23 Hz frequency bands were not significantly different between the two groups. In addition, we found that across mTBI cases, the disrupted synchronization at low-gamma frequency was significantly correlated with the white matter integrity of the inferior cerebellar peduncle, which was also significantly reduced in the mTBI group. These findings demonstrate an initial correlation between the impairment of white matter integrity and alterations in EEG synchronization in the brain after mTBI. The results also suggest that disruption of intrinsic neural synchronization at low-gamma frequency may be a characteristic functional pathology

  8. Automatic segmentation of brain white matter and white matter lesions in normal aging: comparison of five multispectral techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés Hernández, Maria Del C; Gallacher, Peter J; Bastin, Mark E; Royle, Natalie A; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Deary, Ian J; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2012-02-01

    White matter loss, ventricular enlargement and white matter lesions are common findings on brain scans of older subjects. Accurate assessment of these different features is therefore essential for normal aging research. Recently, we developed a novel unsupervised classification method, named 'Multispectral Coloring Modulation and Variance Identification' (MCMxxxVI), that fuses two different structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences in red/green color space and uses Minimum Variance Quantization (MVQ) as the clustering technique to segment different tissue types. Here we investigate how this method performs compared with several commonly used supervised image classifiers in segmenting normal-appearing white matter, white matter lesions and cerebrospinal fluid in the brains of 20 older subjects with a wide range of white matter lesion load and brain atrophy. The three tissue classes were segmented from T(1)-, T(2)-, T(2)⁎- and fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR)-weighted structural MRI data using MCMxxxVI and the four supervised multispectral classifiers available in the Analyze package, namely, Back-Propagated Neural Networks, Gaussian classifier, Nearest Neighbor and Parzen Windows. Bland-Altman analysis and Jaccard index values indicated that, in general, MCMxxxVI performed better than the supervised multispectral classifiers in identifying the three tissue classes, although final manual editing was still required to deliver radiologically acceptable results. These analyses show that MVQ, as implemented in MCMxxxVI, has the potential to provide quick and accurate white matter segmentations in the aging brain, although further methodological developments are still required to automate fully this technique. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Linking white matter and deep gray matter alterations in premanifest Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Andreia V; Ratnanather, J Tilak; Tward, Daniel J; Lee, David Soobin; van den Noort, Frieda; Wu, Dan; Brown, Timothy; Johnson, Hans; Paulsen, Jane S; Ross, Christopher A; Younes, Laurent; Miller, Michael I

    2016-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which only symptomatic treatment is available. A better understanding of the pathology, and identification of biomarkers will facilitate the development of disease-modifying treatments. HD is potentially a good model of a neurodegenerative disease for development of biomarkers because it is an autosomal-dominant disease with complete penetrance, caused by a single gene mutation, in which the neurodegenerative process can be assessed many years before onset of signs and symptoms of manifest disease. Previous MRI studies have detected abnormalities in gray and white matter starting in premanifest stages. However, the understanding of how these abnormalities are related, both in time and space, is still incomplete. In this study, we combined deep gray matter shape diffeomorphometry and white matter DTI analysis in order to provide a better mapping of pathology in the deep gray matter and subcortical white matter in premanifest HD. We used 296 MRI scans from the PREDICT-HD database. Atrophy in the deep gray matter, thalamus, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens was analyzed by surface based morphometry, and while white matter abnormalities were analyzed in (i) regions of interest surrounding these structures, using (ii) tractography-based analysis, and using (iii) whole brain atlas-based analysis. We detected atrophy in the deep gray matter, particularly in putamen, from early premanifest stages. The atrophy was greater both in extent and effect size in cases with longer exposure to the effects of the CAG expansion mutation (as assessed by greater CAP-scores), and preceded detectible abnormalities in the white matter. Near the predicted onset of manifest HD, the MD increase was widespread, with highest indices in the deep and posterior white matter. This type of in-vivo macroscopic mapping of HD brain abnormalities can potentially indicate when and where therapeutics could be targeted to delay

  10. Linking white matter and deep gray matter alterations in premanifest Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia V. Faria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder for which only symptomatic treatment is available. A better understanding of the pathology, and identification of biomarkers will facilitate the development of disease-modifying treatments. HD is potentially a good model of a neurodegenerative disease for development of biomarkers because it is an autosomal-dominant disease with complete penetrance, caused by a single gene mutation, in which the neurodegenerative process can be assessed many years before onset of signs and symptoms of manifest disease. Previous MRI studies have detected abnormalities in gray and white matter starting in premanifest stages. However, the understanding of how these abnormalities are related, both in time and space, is still incomplete. In this study, we combined deep gray matter shape diffeomorphometry and white matter DTI analysis in order to provide a better mapping of pathology in the deep gray matter and subcortical white matter in premanifest HD. We used 296 MRI scans from the PREDICT-HD database. Atrophy in the deep gray matter, thalamus, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens was analyzed by surface based morphometry, and while white matter abnormalities were analyzed in (i regions of interest surrounding these structures, using (ii tractography-based analysis, and using (iii whole brain atlas-based analysis. We detected atrophy in the deep gray matter, particularly in putamen, from early premanifest stages. The atrophy was greater both in extent and effect size in cases with longer exposure to the effects of the CAG expansion mutation (as assessed by greater CAP-scores, and preceded detectible abnormalities in the white matter. Near the predicted onset of manifest HD, the MD increase was widespread, with highest indices in the deep and posterior white matter. This type of in-vivo macroscopic mapping of HD brain abnormalities can potentially indicate when and where therapeutics could be

  11. Connecting Cerebral White Matter Lesions and Hypertensive Target Organ Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Sierra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hypertension leads to concomitant remodeling of the cardiac and vascular systems and various organs, especially the brain, kidney, and retina. The brain is an early target of organ damage due to high blood pressure, which is the major modifiable risk factor for stroke and small vessel disease. Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the number one cause of disability worldwide and over 80% of strokes occur in the elderly. Preclinical hypertensive lesions in most target organs are clearly identified: left ventricular hypertrophy for the heart, microalbuminuria for the kidney, fundus abnormalities for the eye, and intima-media thickness and pulse wave velocity for the vessels. However, early hypertensive brain damage is not fully studied due to difficulties in access and the expense of techniques. After age, hypertension is the most-important risk factor for cerebral white matter lesions, which are an important prognostic factor for stroke, cognitive impairment, dementia, and death. Studies have shown an association between white matter lesions and a number of extracranial systems affected by high BP and also suggest that correct antihypertensive treatment could slow white matter lesions progression. There is strong evidence that cerebral white matter lesions in hypertensive patients should be considered a silent early marker of brain damage.

  12. MRI white Matter Lesions in a Stroke Clinic Population: Correlation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral white matter lesions (WML) on MRI have been related not only to age but also to cerebrovascular disorders. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of WML in a population of patients attending a stroke clinic and relate it to the presence of carotid atherosclerosis as determined by increased carotid ...

  13. White matter tract alterations in Parkinson's disease patients with punding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canu, Elisa; Agosta, Federica; Markovic, Vladana; Petrovic, Igor; Stankovic, Iva; Imperiale, Francesca; Stojkovic, Tanja; Copetti, Massimiliano; Kostic, Vladimir S; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    To assess brain white matter tract alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease and punding (PD-punding) compared with controls and PD cases without any impulsive-compulsive behaviour. Forty-nine PD patients (21 PD-punding and 28 PD with no impulsive-compulsive behaviours) and 28 controls were consecutively recruited. Clinical, cognitive and psychopathological evaluations were performed. Diffusion tensor MRI metrics of the main white matter tracts were assessed using a tractography approach. Compared with controls, both PD groups showed white matter microstructural alterations of the left pedunculopontine tract and splenium of the corpus callosum. PD-punding patients showed a further damage to the right pedunculopontine tract and uncinate fasciculus, genu of the corpus callosum, and left parahippocampal tract relative to controls. When adjusting for depression and/or apathy severity, a greater damage of the genu of the corpus callosum and the left pedunculopontine tract was found in PD-punding compared with patients with no impulsive-compulsive behaviours. PD-punding is associated with a disconnection between midbrain, limbic and white matter tracts projecting to the frontal cortices. These alterations are at least partially independent of their psychopathological changes. Diffusion tensor MRI is a powerful tool for understanding the neural substrates underlying punding in PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Periventricular cerebral white matter lesions predict rate of cognitive decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, JC; de Leeuw, FE; Oudkerk, M; van Gijn, J; Hofman, A; Jolles, J; Breteler, MMB

    The prospect of declining cognitive functions is a major fear for many elderly persons. Cerebral white matter lesions, as commonly found with magnetic resonance imaging, have been associated with cognitive dysfunction in cross-sectional studies. Only a few longitudinal studies using small cohorts

  15. White Matter Volume Predicts Language Development in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Caitlin K; Asaro, Lisa A; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Kussman, Barry D; Rivkin, Michael J; Bellinger, David C; Warfield, Simon K; Wypij, David; Newburger, Jane W; Soul, Janet S

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether brain volume is reduced at 1 year of age and whether these volumes are associated with neurodevelopment in biventricular congenital heart disease (CHD) repaired in infancy. Infants with biventricular CHD (n = 48) underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurodevelopmental testing with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II and the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories at 1 year of age. A multitemplate based probabilistic segmentation algorithm was applied to volumetric MRI data. We compared volumes with those of 13 healthy control infants of comparable ages. In the group with CHD, we measured Spearman correlations between neurodevelopmental outcomes and the residuals from linear regression of the volumes on corrected chronological age at MRI and sex. Compared with controls, infants with CHD had reductions of 54 mL in total brain (P = .009), 40 mL in cerebral white matter (P Development-II scores but did correlate positively with MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory language development. Infants with biventricular CHD show total brain volume reductions at 1 year of age, driven by differences in cerebral white matter. White matter volume correlates with language development, but not broader developmental indices. These findings suggest that abnormalities in white matter development detected months after corrective heart surgery may contribute to language impairment. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00006183. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Early dynamics of white matter deficits in children developing dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolijn Vanderauwera

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural anomalies have been demonstrated in dyslexia. Recent studies in pre-readers at risk for dyslexia and in pre-readers developing poor reading suggest that these anomalies might be a cause of their reading impairment. Our study goes one step further by exploring the neurodevelopmental trajectory of white matter anomalies in pre-readers with and without a familial risk for dyslexia (n = 61 of whom a strictly selected sample develops dyslexia later on (n = 15. We collected longitudinal diffusion MRI and behavioural data until grade 3. The results provide evidence that children with dyslexia exhibit pre-reading white matter anomalies in left and right long segment of the arcuate fasciculus (AF, with predictive power of the left segment above traditional cognitive measures and familial risk. Whereas white matter differences in the left AF seem most strongly related to the development of dyslexia, differences in the left IFOF and in the right AF seem driven by both familial risk and later reading ability. Moreover, differences in the left AF appeared to be dynamic. This study supports and expands recent insights into the neural basis of dyslexia, pointing towards pre-reading anomalies related to dyslexia, as well as underpinning the dynamic character of white matter.

  17. White matter hyperintensities and working memory : An explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Harten, Barbera; Weinstein, Henry C.; Scheltens, Philip; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Scherder, Erik J. A.; Oosterman, J

    2008-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are commonly observed in elderly people and may have the most profound effect on executive functions, including working memory. Surprisingly, the Digit Span backward, a frequently employed working memory task, reveals no association with WMH. In the present study,

  18. White Matter Damage and Cognitive Impairment after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Kirsi Maria; Greenwood, Richard; Powell, Jane Hilary; Leech, Robert; Hawkins, Peter Charlie; Bonnelle, Valerie; Patel, Maneesh Chandrakant; Counsell, Serena Jane; Sharp, David James

    2011-01-01

    White matter disruption is an important determinant of cognitive impairment after brain injury, but conventional neuroimaging underestimates its extent. In contrast, diffusion tensor imaging provides a validated and sensitive way of identifying the impact of axonal injury. The relationship between cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury…

  19. Anomalous White Matter Morphology in Adults Who Stutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, Matthew; Ingham, Rojer J.; Ingham, Janis C.; Grafton, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Developmental stuttering is now generally considered to arise from genetic determinants interacting with neurologic function. Changes within speech-motor white matter (WM) connections may also be implicated. These connections can now be studied in great detail by high-angular-resolution diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. Therefore,…

  20. White matter involvement in idiopathic Parkinson disease: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattellaro, G; Minati, L; Grisoli, M; Mariani, C; Carella, F; Osio, M; Ciceri, E; Albanese, A; Bruzzone, M G

    2009-06-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) offers a unique window on the connectivity changes, extending beyond the basal ganglia, which accompany the cognitive symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD). The primary purpose of this study was to assess the microstructural damage to cerebral white matter occurring in idiopathic PD. Our sample included patients with PD without dementia (n = 10; Hoehn and Yahr stages I and II; Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, 20.5 +/- 8.3; and Mini-Mental State Examination, 28.3 +/- 1.5) and age-matched healthy control subjects (n = 10). DTI was performed on a 1.5T scanner, and mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were obtained. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on the major fiber bundles as well as on gray matter nuclei. In patients, the MD was increased at borderline significance in the substantia nigra but was unaltered in the thalamus, globus pallidus, putamen, and in the head of the caudate nucleus. The FA and MD were unaltered in the corticospinal tract in the midbrain and at the level of the internal capsule, and in the splenium of the corpus callosum. By contrast, the MD was increased and the FA was decreased in the genu of the corpus callosum and in the superior longitudinal fasciculus; in the cingulum, only the MD was altered. The observed changes were not significantly lateralized. Widespread microstructural damage to frontal and parietal white matter occurs already in the early stages of PD.

  1. Cold dark matter confronts the cosmic microwave background - Large-angular-scale anisotropies in Omega sub 0 + lambda 1 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Silk, Joseph; Vittorio, Nicola

    1992-01-01

    A new technique is used to compute the correlation function for large-angle cosmic microwave background anisotropies resulting from both the space and time variations in the gravitational potential in flat, vacuum-dominated, cold dark matter cosmological models. Such models with Omega sub 0 of about 0.2, fit the excess power, relative to the standard cold dark matter model, observed in the large-scale galaxy distribution and allow a high value for the Hubble constant. The low order multipoles and quadrupole anisotropy that are potentially observable by COBE and other ongoing experiments should definitively test these models.

  2. White matter disruption at the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease: Relationships with hippocampal atrophy and episodic memory performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Rémy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available White matter tract alterations have been consistently described in Alzheimer's disease (AD. In particular, limbic fronto-temporal connections, which are critical to episodic memory function, may degenerate early in the course of the disease. However the relation between white matter tract degeneration, hippocampal atrophy and episodic memory impairment at the earliest stages of AD is still unclear. In this magnetic resonance imaging study, white matter integrity and hippocampal volumes were evaluated in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment due to AD (Albert et al., 2011 (n = 22 and healthy controls (n = 15. Performance in various episodic memory tasks was also evaluated in each participant. Relative to controls, patients showed a significant reduction of white matter fractional anisotropy (FA and increase of radial diffusivity (RD in the bilateral uncinate fasciculus, parahippocampal cingulum and fornix. Within the patient group, significant intra-hemispheric correlations were notably found between hippocampal grey matter volume and FA in the uncinate fasciculus, suggesting a relationship between atrophy and disconnection of the hippocampus. Moreover, episodic recognition scores were related with uncinate fasciculus FA across patients. These results indicate that fronto-hippocampal connectivity is reduced from the earliest pre-demential stages of AD. Disruption of fronto-hippocampal connections may occur progressively, in parallel with hippocampal atrophy, and may specifically contribute to early initial impairment in episodic memory.

  3. White matter development and early cognition in babies and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Dean, Douglas C; Ginestet, Cedric E; Walker, Lindsay; Waskiewicz, Nicole; Lehman, Katie; Dirks, Holly; Piryatinsky, Irene; Deoni, Sean C L

    2014-09-01

    The normal myelination of neuronal axons is essential to neurodevelopment, allowing fast inter-neuronal communication. The most dynamic period of myelination occurs in the first few years of life, in concert with a dramatic increase in cognitive abilities. How these processes relate, however, is still unclear. Here we aimed to use a data-driven technique to parcellate developing white matter into regions with consistent white matter growth trajectories and investigate how these regions related to cognitive development. In a large sample of 183 children aged 3 months to 4 years, we calculated whole brain myelin volume fraction (VFM ) maps using quantitative multicomponent relaxometry. We used spatial independent component analysis (ICA) to blindly segment these quantitative VFM images into anatomically meaningful parcels with distinct developmental trajectories. We further investigated the relationship of these trajectories with standardized cognitive scores in the same children. The resulting components represented a mix of unilateral and bilateral white matter regions (e.g., cortico-spinal tract, genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, white matter underlying the inferior frontal gyrus) as well as structured noise (misregistration, image artifact). The trajectories of these regions were associated with individual differences in cognitive abilities. Specifically, components in white matter underlying frontal and temporal cortices showed significant relationships to expressive and receptive language abilities. Many of these relationships had a significant interaction with age, with VFM becoming more strongly associated with language skills with age. These data provide evidence for a changing coupling between developing myelin and cognitive development. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Strength of Temporal White Matter Pathways Predicts Semantic Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripollés, Pablo; Biel, Davina; Peñaloza, Claudia; Kaufmann, Jörn; Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Noesselt, Toemme; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2017-11-15

    Learning the associations between words and meanings is a fundamental human ability. Although the language network is cortically well defined, the role of the white matter pathways supporting novel word-to-meaning mappings remains unclear. Here, by using contextual and cross-situational word learning, we tested whether learning the meaning of a new word is related to the integrity of the language-related white matter pathways in 40 adults (18 women). The arcuate, uncinate, inferior-fronto-occipital and inferior-longitudinal fasciculi were virtually dissected using manual and automatic deterministic fiber tracking. Critically, the automatic method allowed assessing the white matter microstructure along the tract. Results demonstrate that the microstructural properties of the left inferior-longitudinal fasciculus predict contextual learning, whereas the left uncinate was associated with cross-situational learning. In addition, we identified regions of special importance within these pathways: the posterior middle temporal gyrus, thought to serve as a lexical interface and specifically related to contextual learning; the anterior temporal lobe, known to be an amodal hub for semantic processing and related to cross-situational learning; and the white matter near the hippocampus, a structure fundamental for the initial stages of new-word learning and, remarkably, related to both types of word learning. No significant associations were found for the inferior-fronto-occipital fasciculus or the arcuate. While previous results suggest that learning new phonological word forms is mediated by the arcuate fasciculus, these findings show that the temporal pathways are the crucial neural substrate supporting one of the most striking human abilities: our capacity to identify correct associations between words and meanings under referential indeterminacy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The language-processing network is cortically (i.e., gray matter) well defined. However, the role of the

  5. White matter structure changes as adults learn a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Alexander A; Rudelson, Justin J; Tse, Peter U

    2012-08-01

    Traditional models hold that the plastic reorganization of brain structures occurs mainly during childhood and adolescence, leaving adults with limited means to learn new knowledge and skills. Research within the last decade has begun to overturn this belief, documenting changes in the brain's gray and white matter as healthy adults learn simple motor and cognitive skills [Lövdén, M., Bodammer, N. C., Kühn, S., Kaufmann, J., Schütze, H., Tempelmann, C., et al. Experience-dependent plasticity of white-matter microstructure extends into old age. Neuropsychologia, 48, 3878-3883, 2010; Taubert, M., Draganski, B., Anwander, A., Müller, K., Horstmann, A., Villringer, A., et al. Dynamic properties of human brain structure: Learning-related changes in cortical areas and associated fiber connections. The Journal of Neuroscience, 30, 11670-11677, 2010; Scholz, J., Klein, M. C., Behrens, T. E. J., & Johansen-Berg, H. Training induces changes in white-matter architecture. Nature Neuroscience, 12, 1370-1371, 2009; Draganski, B., Gaser, C., Busch, V., Schuirer, G., Bogdahn, U., & May, A. Changes in grey matter induced by training. Nature, 427, 311-312, 2004]. Although the significance of these changes is not fully understood, they reveal a brain that remains plastic well beyond early developmental periods. Here we investigate the role of adult structural plasticity in the complex, long-term learning process of foreign language acquisition. We collected monthly diffusion tensor imaging scans of 11 English speakers who took a 9-month intensive course in written and spoken Modern Standard Chinese as well as from 16 control participants who did not study a language. We show that white matter reorganizes progressively across multiple sites as adults study a new language. Language learners exhibited progressive changes in white matter tracts associated with traditional left hemisphere language areas and their right hemisphere analogs. Surprisingly, the most significant changes

  6. White matter biomarkers from fast protocols using axially symmetric diffusion kurtosis imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Brian; Shemesh, Noam; Lund, Torben E; Sangill, Ryan; Østergaard, Leif; Jespersen, Sune N

    2016-01-01

    White matter tract integrity (WMTI) can be used to characterize tissue microstructure in areas with axisymmetric fiber bundles. Several WMTI biomarkers have now been validated against microscopy and provided promising results in studies of brain development and aging, as well as in a number of brain disorders. In a clinical setting, however, the diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) protocol utilized as part of WMTI imaging may be prohibitively long. Consequently, the diagnostic value of the WMTI parameters is rarely explored outside of dedicated animal studies and clinical studies of slowly progressing diseases. Here, we evaluate WMTI based on recently introduced axially symmetric DKI which has lower data demand than conventional DKI. We compare WMTI parameters derived from conventional DKI to those from axially symmetric DKI and to parameters calculated analytically from the axially symmetric tensors. We also assess the effect of the imposed symmetry on the kurtosis fractional anisotropy (KFA). We employ numeric...

  7. Alterations in white matter integrity in first-episode, treatment-naive patients with somatization disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Muliang; Yao, Dapeng; Dai, Yi; Long, Liling; Yu, Miaoyu; Liu, Jianrong; Zhang, Zhikun; Xiao, Changqing; Guo, Wenbin

    2015-07-10

    White matter (WM) abnormality in somatization disorder (SD) has not been reported yet. This study was designed to elucidate the alterations in WM integrity in SD. A total of 25 patients with SD and 28 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. WM integrity was analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics. No differences were found between the patients and the controls for fractional anisotropy (FA) values, mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity values at the corrected pSomatization severity was correlated with the FA values of the cingulum and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus in the patients. The patients exhibit suggestive alterations in WM integrity in the cingulum, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation, and corticospinal tract. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. The effects of bilingualism on the white matter structure of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliatsikas, Christos; Moschopoulou, Elisavet; Saddy, James Douglas

    2015-02-03

    Recent studies suggest that learning and using a second language (L2) can affect brain structure, including the structure of white matter (WM) tracts. This observation comes from research looking at early and older bilingual individuals who have been using both their first and second languages on an everyday basis for many years. This study investigated whether young, highly immersed late bilinguals would also show structural effects in the WM that can be attributed to everyday L2 use, irrespective of critical periods or the length of L2 learning. Our Tract-Based Spatial Statistics analysis revealed higher fractional anisotropy values for bilinguals vs. monolinguals in several WM tracts that have been linked to language processing and in a pattern closely resembling the results reported for older and early bilinguals. We propose that learning and actively using an L2 after childhood can have rapid dynamic effects on WM structure, which in turn may assist in preserving WM integrity in older age.

  9. White matter maturation during 12 months in individuals at ultra-high-risk for psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, K; Nordentoft, M; Glenthøj, B Y

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of psychosis suggests that disrupted white matter (WM) maturation underlies disease onset. In this longitudinal study, we investigated WM connectivity and compared WM changes between individuals at ultra-high-risk for psychosis (UHR) and healthy controls...... of the UHR individuals transitioned to psychosis. Both UHR individuals and HCs increased significantly in fractional anisotropy (FA). UHR individuals showed significant FA increases predominantly in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) (P = 0.01), and HCs showed significant FA increases...... in the left uncinate fasciculus (P = 0.03). Within UHR individuals, a significant positive correlation between FA change and age was observed predominantly in the left SLF (P = 0.02). Within HCs, no significant correlation between FA change and age was observed. No significant correlations between baseline FA...

  10. Autism and sensory processing disorders: shared white matter disruption in sensory pathways but divergent connectivity in social-emotional pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Shin Chang

    Full Text Available Over 90% of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD demonstrate atypical sensory behaviors. In fact, hyper- or hyporeactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment is now included in the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. However, there are children with sensory processing differences who do not meet an ASD diagnosis but do show atypical sensory behaviors to the same or greater degree as ASD children. We previously demonstrated that children with Sensory Processing Disorders (SPD have impaired white matter microstructure, and that this white matter microstructural pathology correlates with atypical sensory behavior. In this study, we use diffusion tensor imaging (DTI fiber tractography to evaluate the structural connectivity of specific white matter tracts in boys with ASD (n = 15 and boys with SPD (n = 16, relative to typically developing children (n = 23. We define white matter tracts using probabilistic streamline tractography and assess the strength of tract connectivity using mean fractional anisotropy. Both the SPD and ASD cohorts demonstrate decreased connectivity relative to controls in parieto-occipital tracts involved in sensory perception and multisensory integration. However, the ASD group alone shows impaired connectivity, relative to controls, in temporal tracts thought to subserve social-emotional processing. In addition to these group difference analyses, we take a dimensional approach to assessing the relationship between white matter connectivity and participant function. These correlational analyses reveal significant associations of white matter connectivity with auditory processing, working memory, social skills, and inattention across our three study groups. These findings help elucidate the roles of specific neural circuits in neurodevelopmental disorders, and begin to explore the dimensional relationship between critical cognitive functions and structural connectivity across

  11. Patterns of white matter damage are non-random and associated with cognitive function in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, K A; Cercignani, M; Muhlert, N; Sethi, V; Chard, D; Geurts, J J G; Ciccarelli, O

    2016-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), white matter damage is thought to contribute to cognitive dysfunction, which is especially prominent in secondary progressive MS (SPMS). While studies in healthy subjects have revealed patterns of correlated fractional anisotropy (FA) across white matter tracts, little is known about the underlying patterns of white matter damage in MS. In the present study, we aimed to map the SPMS-related covariance patterns of microstructural white matter changes, and investigated whether or not these patterns were associated with cognitive dysfunction. Diffusion MRI was acquired from 30 SPMS patients and 32 healthy controls (HC). A tensor model was fitted and FA maps were processed using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) in order to obtain a skeletonised map for each subject. The skeletonised FA maps of patients only were decomposed into 18 spatially independent components (ICs) using independent component analysis. Comprehensive cognitive assessment was conducted to evaluate five cognitive domains. Correlations between cognitive performance and (1) severity of FA abnormalities of the extracted ICs (i.e. z-scores relative to FA values of HC) and (2) IC load (i.e. FA covariance of a particular IC) were examined. SPMS patients showed lower FA values of all examined patterns of correlated FA (i.e. spatially independent components) than HC (p memory and verbal memory. Despite the presence of white matter damage, it was possible to reveal patterns of FA covariance across SPMS patients. This could indicate that white matter tracts belonging to the same cluster, and thus with similar characteristics, tend to follow similar trends during neurodegeneration. Furthermore, these underlying FA patterns might help to explain cognitive dysfunction in SPMS.

  12. Abnormal White Matter Integrity in Adolescents with Internet Addiction Disorder: A Tract-Based Spatial Statistics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lindi; Zhao, Zhimin; Xu, Jianrong; Lei, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Background Internet addiction disorder (IAD) is currently becoming a serious mental health issue around the globe. Previous studies regarding IAD were mainly focused on associated psychological examinations. However, there are few studies on brain structure and function about IAD. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate white matter integrity in adolescents with IAD. Methodology/Principal Findings Seventeen IAD subjects and sixteen healthy controls without IAD participated in this study. Whole brain voxel-wise analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) was performed by tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to localize abnormal white matter regions between groups. TBSS demonstrated that IAD had significantly lower FA than controls throughout the brain, including the orbito-frontal white matter, corpus callosum, cingulum, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and corona radiation, internal and external capsules, while exhibiting no areas of higher FA. Volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis was used to detect changes of diffusivity indices in the regions showing FA abnormalities. In most VOIs, FA reductions were caused by an increase in radial diffusivity while no changes in axial diffusivity. Correlation analysis was performed to assess the relationship between FA and behavioral measures within the IAD group. Significantly negative correlations were found between FA values in the left genu of the corpus callosum and the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders, and between FA values in the left external capsule and the Young's Internet addiction scale. Conclusions Our findings suggest that IAD demonstrated widespread reductions of FA in major white matter pathways and such abnormal white matter structure may be linked to some behavioral impairments. In addition, white matter integrity may serve as a potential new treatment target and FA may be as a qualified biomarker to understand the underlying neural mechanisms of injury or to

  13. Associations between self‐reported sleep quality and white matter in community‐dwelling older adults: A prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsoldos, Enikő; Filippini, Nicola; Griffanti, Ludovica; Winkler, Anderson; Mahmood, Abda; Allan, Charlotte L.; Topiwala, Anya; Kyle, Simon D.; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Singh‐Manoux, Archana; Kivimaki, Mika; Mackay, Clare E.; Johansen‐Berg, Heidi; Ebmeier, Klaus P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Both sleep disturbances and decline in white matter microstructure are commonly observed in ageing populations, as well as in age‐related psychiatric and neurological illnesses. A relationship between sleep and white matter microstructure may underlie such relationships, but few imaging studies have directly examined this hypothesis. In a study of 448 community‐dwelling members of the Whitehall II Imaging Sub‐Study aged between 60 and 82 years (90 female, mean age 69.2 ± 5.1 years), we used the magnetic resonance imaging technique diffusion tensor imaging to examine the relationship between self‐reported sleep quality and white matter microstructure. Poor sleep quality at the time of the diffusion tensor imaging scan was associated with reduced global fractional anisotropy and increased global axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity values, with small effect sizes. Voxel‐wise analysis showed that widespread frontal‐subcortical tracts, encompassing regions previously reported as altered in insomnia, were affected. Radial diffusivity findings remained significant after additional correction for demographics, general cognition, health, and lifestyle measures. No significant differences in general cognitive function, executive function, memory, or processing speed were detected between good and poor sleep quality groups. The number of times participants reported poor sleep quality over five time‐points spanning a 16‐year period was not associated with white matter measures. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that current sleep quality is linked to white matter microstructure. Small effect sizes may limit the extent to which poor sleep is a promising modifiable factor that may maintain, or even improve, white matter microstructure in ageing. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5465–5473, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:28745016

  14. Autism and sensory processing disorders: shared white matter disruption in sensory pathways but divergent connectivity in social-emotional pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Shin; Owen, Julia P; Desai, Shivani S; Hill, Susanna S; Arnett, Anne B; Harris, Julia; Marco, Elysa J; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2014-01-01

    Over 90% of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) demonstrate atypical sensory behaviors. In fact, hyper- or hyporeactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment is now included in the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. However, there are children with sensory processing differences who do not meet an ASD diagnosis but do show atypical sensory behaviors to the same or greater degree as ASD children. We previously demonstrated that children with Sensory Processing Disorders (SPD) have impaired white matter microstructure, and that this white matter microstructural pathology correlates with atypical sensory behavior. In this study, we use diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) fiber tractography to evaluate the structural connectivity of specific white matter tracts in boys with ASD (n = 15) and boys with SPD (n = 16), relative to typically developing children (n = 23). We define white matter tracts using probabilistic streamline tractography and assess the strength of tract connectivity using mean fractional anisotropy. Both the SPD and ASD cohorts demonstrate decreased connectivity relative to controls in parieto-occipital tracts involved in sensory perception and multisensory integration. However, the ASD group alone shows impaired connectivity, relative to controls, in temporal tracts thought to subserve social-emotional processing. In addition to these group difference analyses, we take a dimensional approach to assessing the relationship between white matter connectivity and participant function. These correlational analyses reveal significant associations of white matter connectivity with auditory processing, working memory, social skills, and inattention across our three study groups. These findings help elucidate the roles of specific neural circuits in neurodevelopmental disorders, and begin to explore the dimensional relationship between critical cognitive functions and structural connectivity across affected and

  15. White Matter Microstructure is Associated with Auditory and Tactile Processing in Children with and without Sensory Processing Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Shin; Gratiot, Mathilde; Owen, Julia P; Brandes-Aitken, Anne; Desai, Shivani S; Hill, Susanna S; Arnett, Anne B; Harris, Julia; Marco, Elysa J; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2015-01-01

    Sensory processing disorders (SPDs) affect up to 16% of school-aged children, and contribute to cognitive and behavioral deficits impacting affected individuals and their families. While sensory processing differences are now widely recognized in children with autism, children with sensory-based dysfunction who do not meet autism criteria based on social communication deficits remain virtually unstudied. In a previous pilot diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study, we demonstrated that boys with SPD have altered white matter microstructure primarily affecting the posterior cerebral tracts, which subserve sensory processing and integration. This disrupted microstructural integrity, measured as reduced white matter fractional anisotropy (FA), correlated with parent report measures of atypical sensory behavior. In this present study, we investigate white matter microstructure as it relates to tactile and auditory function in depth with a larger, mixed-gender cohort of children 8-12 years of age. We continue to find robust alterations of posterior white matter microstructure in children with SPD relative to typically developing children (TDC), along with more spatially distributed alterations. We find strong correlations of FA with both parent report and direct measures of tactile and auditory processing across children, with the direct assessment measures of tactile and auditory processing showing a stronger and more continuous mapping to the underlying white matter integrity than the corresponding parent report measures. Based on these findings of microstructure as a neural correlate of sensory processing ability, diffusion MRI merits further investigation as a tool to find biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment response in children with SPD. To our knowledge, this work is the first to demonstrate associations of directly measured tactile and non-linguistic auditory function with white matter microstructural integrity - not just in children with SPD, but also

  16. White matter microstructure is associated with auditory and tactile processing in children with and without sensory processing disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Shin Chang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory processing disorders (SPD affect up to 16% of school-aged children, and contribute to cognitive and behavioral deficits impacting affected individuals and their families. While sensory processing differences are now widely recognized in children with autism, children with sensory-based dysfunction who do not meet autism criteria based on social communication deficits remain virtually unstudied. In a previous pilot diffusion tensor imaging (DTI study, we demonstrated that boys with SPD have altered white matter microstructure primarily affecting the posterior cerebral tracts, which subserve sensory processing and integration. This disrupted microstructural integrity, measured as reduced white matter fractional anisotropy (FA, correlated with parent report measures of atypical sensory behavior. In this present study, we investigate white matter microstructure as it relates to tactile and auditory function in depth with a larger, mixed-gender cohort of children 8 to 12 years of age. We continue to find robust alterations of posterior white matter microstructure in children with SPD relative to typically developing children, along with more spatially distributed alterations. We find strong correlations of FA with both parent report and direct measures of tactile and auditory processing across children, with the direct assessment measures of tactile and auditory processing showing a stronger and more continuous mapping to the underlying white matter integrity than the corresponding parent report measures. Based on these findings of microstructure as a neural correlate of sensory processing ability, diffusion MRI merits further investigation as a tool to find biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment response in children with SPD. To our knowledge, this work is the first to demonstrate associations of directly measured tactile and non-linguistic auditory function with white matter microstructural integrity -- not just in children with

  17. The impact of subcortical white matter disease on mood in euthymic older adults: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, Melissa; Charlton, Rebecca A; Morris, Robin G; Markus, Hugh S

    2010-07-01

    Clinical depression in the elderly is associated with cerebral small vessel disease. It is less certain whether the endorsement of depressive symptoms in the absence of clinical depression, relatively common in euthymic older adults, is also associated with white matter damage. The majority of studies exploring this issue have produced mixed results, perhaps due, in part, to differences in defining the threshold for depression, notating vascular risk factors, and/or the neuroimaging tools used to quantify white matter damage. We aimed to address these issues with non-demented euthymic older adults. We performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a population based cohort of 79 individuals (mean age = 68 years). In addition to neuroimaging, the authors report assessments of overall cognition, executive functioning, and depression. Scores on the Geriatric Depression Scale 15-item (GDS-15) correlated with DTI measures of mean diffusivity (r [77] = 0.23, p = 0.039) and fractional anisotropy (r [77] = -0.22, p = 0.045) but only approached significance for T2-weighted MRI measures of white matter hyperintensities (WMH; r [77] = 0.21, p = 0.053). After adjusting for factors known to influence the development of WMH and depression, including age and vascular risks, DTI-derived indices of white matter integrity remained significantly associated with GDS-15 scores. Furthermore, only DTI-derived measures of white matter integrity contributed to the variance in GDS-15 scores in logistical regression modeling. These findings demonstrate an association between white matter damage and the endorsement of depressive symptoms in euthymic older adults and suggest that DTI may be more sensitive to this damage than T2-WMH in an aging cohort with multiple vascular risk factors.

  18. Relationship between progression of brain white matter changes and late-life depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firbank, Michael J; Teodorczuk, Andrew; van der Flier, Wiesje M

    2012-01-01

    Brain white matter changes (WMC) and depressive symptoms are linked, but the directionality of this association remains unclear.......Brain white matter changes (WMC) and depressive symptoms are linked, but the directionality of this association remains unclear....

  19. The effects of white matter hyperintensities and amyloid deposition on Alzheimer dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The amount of amyloid deposition and white matter damage independently predicts cognitive impairment. This suggests a diagnostic utility of qualitative white matter scales in addition to measuring amyloid levels.

  20. A general factor of brain white matter integrity predicts information processing speed in healthy older people

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Penke, Lars; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Murray, Catherine; Gow, Alan J; Hernández, Maria C Valdés; Clayden, Jonathan D; Starr, John M; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Bastin, Mark E; Deary, Ian J

    2010-01-01

    Human white matter integrity has been related to information processing speed, but it is unknown whether impaired integrity results from localized processes or is a general property shared across white matter tracts...

  1. Loss of white matter integrity is associated with gait disorders in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, K.F. de; Tuladhar, A.M.; Norden, A.G.W. van; Norris, D.G.; Zwiers, M.P.; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2011-01-01

    Gait disturbances are common in the elderly. Cerebral small vessel disease, including white matter lesions and lacunars infarcts, is thought to disrupt white matter tracts that connect important motor regions, hence resulting in gait disturbances. Pathological studies have demonstrated abnormalities

  2. Development of superficial white matter and its structural interplay with cortical gray matter in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minjie; Lu, Lisa H; Lowes, Allison; Yang, Shaolin; Passarotti, Alessandra M; Zhou, Xiaohong J; Pavuluri, Mani N

    2014-06-01

    Healthy human brain undergoes significant changes during development. The developmental trajectory of superficial white matter (SWM) is less understood relative to cortical gray matter (GM) and deep white matter. In this study, a multimodal imaging strategy was applied to vertexwise map SWM microstructure and cortical thickness to characterize their developmental pattern and elucidate SWM-GM associations in children and adolescents. Microscopic changes in SWM were evaluated with water diffusion parameters including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) in 133 healthy subjects aged 10-18 years. Results demonstrated distinct maturational patterns in SWM and GM. SWM showed increasing FA and decreasing MD and RD underneath bilateral motor sensory cortices and superior temporal auditory cortex, suggesting increasing myelination. A second developmental pattern in SWM was increasing FA and AD in bilateral orbitofrontal regions and insula, suggesting improved axonal coherence. These SWM patterns diverge from the more widespread GM maturation, suggesting that cortical thickness changes in adolescence are not explained by the encroachment of SWM myelin into the GM-WM boundary. Interestingly, age-independent intrinsic association between SWM and cortical GM seems to follow functional organization of polymodal and unimodal brain regions. Unimodal sensory areas showed positive correlation between GM thickness and FA whereas polymodal regions showed negative correlation. Axonal coherence and differences in interstitial neuron composition between unimodal and polymodal regions may account for these SWM-GM association patterns. Intrinsic SWM-GM relationships unveiled by neuroimaging in vivo can be useful for examining psychiatric disorders with known WM/GM disturbances. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Subcortical volume and white matter integrity abnormalities in major depressive disorder: findings from UK Biobank imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xueyi; Reus, Lianne M; Cox, Simon R; Adams, Mark J; Liewald, David C; Bastin, Mark E; Smith, Daniel J; Deary, Ian J; Whalley, Heather C; McIntosh, Andrew M

    2017-07-17

    Previous reports of altered grey and white matter structure in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) have been inconsistent. Recent meta-analyses have, however, reported reduced hippocampal grey matter volume in MDD and reduced white matter integrity in several brain regions. The use of different diagnostic criteria, scanners and imaging sequences may, however, obscure further anatomical differences. In this study, we tested for differences in subcortical grey matter volume (n = 1157) and white matter integrity (n = 1089) between depressed individuals and controls in the subset of 8590 UK Biobank Imaging study participants who had undergone depression assessments. Whilst we found no significant differences in subcortical volumes, significant reductions were found in depressed individuals versus controls in global white matter integrity, as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) (β = -0.182, p = 0.005). We also found reductions in FA in association/commissural fibres (β = -0.184, pcorrected = 0.010) and thalamic radiations (β = -0.159, pcorrected = 0.020). Tract-specific FA reductions were also found in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus (β = -0.194, pcorrected = 0.025), superior thalamic radiation (β = -0.224, pcorrected = 0.009) and forceps major (β = -0.193, pcorrected = 0.025) in depression (all betas standardised). Our findings provide further evidence for disrupted white matter integrity in MDD.

  4. A case of Jacobsen syndrome with multifocal white matter lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; Carter, John E; Bazan, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome is a rare disorder caused by partial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 11. The phenotype is variable with involvement of multiple organ systems, resulting in congenital heart defects, blood dyscrasias, and impaired growth. We describe a case of a 30-year-old man with multiple ophthalmic manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that was remarkable for multiple T2-hyperintense subcortical white matter lesions. It is important to be aware that patients with Jacobsen syndrome may have nonspecific white changes seen on MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Considerations for the optimization of induced white matter injury preclinical models

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Shafique Ahmad; Irawan eSatriotomo; Jawad eFazal; Stephen eNadeau; Sylvain eDoré

    2015-01-01

    The white matter injury in relation to acute neurologic conditions, especially stroke, has remained obscure until recently. Current advances in the imaging technologies in the field of stroke have confirmed that white matter injury plays an important role in the prognosis of stroke and suggest that white matter protection is essential for functional recovery and post-stroke rehabilitation. However, due to the lack of a reproducible animal model of white matter injury, the pathophysiology and ...

  6. Altered white matter integrity in whole brain and segments of corpus callosum, in young social drinkers with binge drinking pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathleen W; Gierski, Fabien; Andre, Judith; Dowell, Nicholas G; Cercignani, Mara; Naassila, Mickaël; Duka, Theodora

    2017-03-01

    Binge drinking is associated with impaired cognitive functioning, but the relationship of cognitive impairments and white matter integrity is less known. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate the relationships of binge drinking, whole brain white matter integrity and cognitive performance during young adulthood (18 to 25 years), a period of continued brain development in two sessions 1 year apart. Binge drinkers (n = 20) and non-binge drinkers (n = 20) underwent DTI and completed measures of spatial working memory and motor impulsivity. Fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure derived from DTI, was estimated from whole brain and from five segments of the corpus callosum (CC): prefrontal, premotor/supplementary motor, motor, (SMA) sensory and parietal/temporal/occipital (PTO). FA was lower for binge than for non-binge men but not women at Session 1 and 2 for all measurements except for FA in the motor segment, which was significantly increased from Session 1 to Session 2. Lower FA in the prefrontal and PTO CC segments was associated with higher binge score, whereas lower FA in all five segments was associated with greater drug use in men and worse spatial working memory both in men and women. These findings extend the literature by showing that in early adulthood, binge drinking and drug use are linked with degradations in neural white matter and that compromised white matter at this period of brain development is linked with impaired cognitive functioning. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. Lower Orbital Frontal White Matter Integrity in Adolescents with Bipolar I Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafantaris, Vivian; Kingsley, Peter; Ardekani, Babak; Saito, Ema; Lencz, Todd; Lim, Kelvin; Szeszko, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Patients with bipolar I disorder demonstrated white matter abnormalities in white matter regions as seen through the use of diffusion tensor imaging. The findings suggest that white matter abnormalities in pediatric bipolar disorder may be useful in constructing neurobiological models of the disorder.

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  12. APPLICATION OF STEREOLOGICAL METHODS TO STUDY THE WHITE MATTER AND MYELINATED FIBERS THEREIN OF RAT BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and unbiased stereological method was applied to estimate the white matter volume, the total volume, total length and mean diameter of the myelinated fibers in the white matter and the total volume of the myelin sheaths in the white matter of rat brain. The white matter volume was obtained with the Cavalieri principle. Four tissue blocks were sampled from the entire white matter in a uniform random fashion. The length density of the myelinated fibers in the white matter was obtained from the isotropic, uniform, random sections ensured by the isector. The volume density of the myelinated fibers in the white matter was estimated by point counting. The total length and the total volume of the myelinated fibers in the white matter were estimated by multiplying the white matter volume and the length density and the volume density of the myelinated fibers in the white matter, respectively. The size of nerve fibers was derived by measuring the profile diameter perpendicular to its longest axis. The results were satisfactory in the sense that the sampling variance introduced by the stereological estimation procedure was a minor fraction of the observed variance. The comparison of the white matter and the myelinated fibers in the white matter between rat brain and human brain was also made in the present study.

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  17. Brain white matter microstructure in deficit and non-deficit subtypes of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalletta, Gianfranco; De Rossi, Pietro; Piras, Fabrizio; Iorio, Mariangela; Dacquino, Claudia; Scanu, Francesca; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Kirkpatrick, Brian; Chiapponi, Chiara

    2015-03-30

    Dividing schizophrenia into its deficit (SZD) and nondeficit (SZND) subtypes may help to identify specific and more homogeneous pathophysiological characteristics. Our aim was to define a whole brain voxelwise map specifically characterizing white matter tracts of schizophrenia patients with and without the deficit syndrome. We compared microstructural diffusion-related parameters as measured by diffusion tensor imaging in 21 SZD patients, 21 SZND patients, and 21 healthy controls, age- and gender-matched. Results showed that fractional anisotropy was reduced in the right precentral area in SZND patients, and in the left corona radiata of the schizophrenia group as a whole. Axial diffusivity was reduced in the left postcentral area of SZD patients and in the left cerebellum of the whole schizophrenia group. Radial diffusivity was increased in the left forceps minor of SZD patients, in the left internal capsule of SZND patients, and in the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus in the whole schizophrenia group. Mean diffusivity was increased from healthy controls to SZD patients to SZND patients in the right occipital lobe. In conclusion, SZD patients are not simply at the extreme end of a severity continuum of white matter disruption. Rather, the SZD and SZND subtypes are associated with distinct and specific brain microstructural anomalies that are consistent with their peculiar psychopathological dimensions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. State-dependent microstructural white matter changes in bipolar I depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Marcus V.; Jackowski, Marcel P.; Versace, Amelia; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Hassel, Stefanie; Duran, Fábio L. S.; Kupfer, David J.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in fronto-limbic-striatal white matter (WM) have been reported in bipolar disorder (BD), but results have been inconsistent across studies. Furthermore, there have been no detailed investigations as to whether acute mood states contribute to microstructural changes in WM tracts. In order to compare fiber density and structural integrity within WM tracts between BD depression and remission, whole-brain fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were assessed in 37 bipolar I disorder (BD-I) patients (16 depressed and 21 remitted), and 26 healthy individuals with diffusion tensor imaging. Significantly decreased FA and increased MD in bilateral prefronto-limbic-striatal white matter and right inferior fronto-occipital, superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi were shown in all BD-I patients versus controls, as well as in depressed BD-I patients compared to both controls and remitted BD-I patients. Depressed BD-I patients also exhibited increased FA in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Remitted BD-I patients did not differ from controls in FA or MD. These findings suggest that BD-I depression may be associated with acute microstructural WM changes. PMID:19255710

  19. Increased white matter connectivity in traumatized children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Jae-Won; Kwon, Hunki; Cho, Soo-Chul; Han, Doug Hyun; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Kim, Bung-Nyun

    2016-01-30

    To distinguish between the consequences of trauma exposure and those of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), we compared brain diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of children according to the diagnosis and the presence of a potentially traumatic event (PTE). The Early Trauma Inventory Self Report-Short Form (ETISR-SF) was used for the assessment of PTEs. Subjects who experienced any traumatic event were placed in the PTE group, and subjects who did not experience such a traumatic event were placed in the non-PTE group. We examined the interactions between ADHD and PTEs in brain [fractional anisotropy (FA) values and mean diffusivity (MD) values] in 54 children with ADHD (29 with PTEs and 25 without PTEs) and 41 controls (18 with PTEs and 23 without PTEs). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) revealed main effects of ADHD for FA and MD values in several white matter tracts in the absence of main effects for PTEs. In addition, there was a significant ADHD-PTEs interaction in relation to FA and MD values in several white matter tracts. Further longitudinal studies in a larger sample are warranted to evaluate the neurobiological sequelae related to childhood trauma, ADHD, and interaction between the two. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. White-matter changes correlate with cognitive functioning in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J Theilmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI findings from emerging studies of cortical white-matter integrity in Parkinson’s disease (PD without dementia are inconclusive. When white-matter changes have been found, their relationship to cognitive functioning in PD has not been carefully investigated. To better characterize changes in tissue diffusivity and to understand their functional significance, the present study conducted DTI in 25 PD patients without dementia and 26 controls of similar ages. An automated tract-based DTI method was used. Fractional anisotropy (FA, mean diffusivity (MD, axial diffusivity (AD, and radial diffusivity (RD were analyzed. Neuropsychological measures of executive functioning (working memory, verbal fluency, cognitive flexibility, inhibitory control and visuospatial ability were then correlated with regions of interest that showed abnormal diffusivity in the PD group. We found widespread reductions in FA and increases in MD in the PD group relative to controls. These changes were predominantly related to an increase in RD. Increased AD in the PD group was limited to specific frontal tracks of the right hemisphere, possibly signifying more significant tissue changes. Motor-symptom severity did not correlate with FA. However, different measures of executive functioning and visuospatial ability correlated with FA in different segments of tracts, which contain fiber pathways to cortical regions that are thought to support specific cognitive processes. The findings suggest that abnormal tissue diffusivity may be sensitive to subtle cognitive changes in PD, some of which may be prognostic of future cognitive decline.

  1. White matter changes in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment detected by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Liu

    Full Text Available Compared to normal aging adults, individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI have significantly increased risk for progressing into Alzheimer's disease (AD. Autopsy studies found that most of the brains of aMCI cases showed anatomical features associated with AD pathology. The recent development of non-invasive neuroimaging technique, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, makes it possible to investigate the microstructures of the cerebral white matter in vivo. We hypothesized that disrupted white matter (WM integrity existed in aMCI. So we used DTI technique, by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD, to test the brain structures involved in patients with aMCI. DTI scans were collected from 40 patients with aMCI, and 28 normal controls (NC. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS analyses of whole-brain FA and MD images in each individual and group comparisons were carried out. Compared to NC, aMCI patients showed significant FA reduction bilaterally, in the association and projection fibers of frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes, corpus callosum, bilateral corona radiation, right posterior thalamic radiation and right sagittal stratum. aMCI patients also showed significantly increased MD widespreadly in the association and projection fibers of frontal, parietal and temporal lobes, and corpus callosum. Assessment of the WM integrity of the frontal, parietal, temporal lobes, and corpus callosum by using DTI measures may aid early diagnosis of aMCI.

  2. A diffusion-tensor-based white matter atlas for rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Zakszewski

    Full Text Available Atlases of key white matter (WM structures in humans are widely available, and are very useful for region of interest (ROI-based analyses of WM properties. There are histology-based atlases of cortical areas in the rhesus macaque, but none currently of specific WM structures. Since ROI-based analysis of WM pathways is also useful in studies using rhesus diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data, we have here created an atlas based on a publicly available DTI-based template of young rhesus macaques. The atlas was constructed to mimic the structure of an existing human atlas that is widely used, making results translatable between species. Parcellations were carefully hand-drawn on a principle-direction color-coded fractional anisotropy image of the population template. The resulting atlas can be used as a reference to which registration of individual rhesus data can be performed for the purpose of white-matter parcellation. Alternatively, specific ROIs from the atlas may be warped into individual space to be used in ROI-based group analyses. This atlas will be made publicly available so that it may be used as a resource for DTI studies of rhesus macaques.

  3. A diffusion-tensor-based white matter atlas for rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakszewski, Elizabeth; Adluru, Nagesh; Tromp, Do P M; Kalin, Ned; Alexander, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Atlases of key white matter (WM) structures in humans are widely available, and are very useful for region of interest (ROI)-based analyses of WM properties. There are histology-based atlases of cortical areas in the rhesus macaque, but none currently of specific WM structures. Since ROI-based analysis of WM pathways is also useful in studies using rhesus diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data, we have here created an atlas based on a publicly available DTI-based template of young rhesus macaques. The atlas was constructed to mimic the structure of an existing human atlas that is widely used, making results translatable between species. Parcellations were carefully hand-drawn on a principle-direction color-coded fractional anisotropy image of the population template. The resulting atlas can be used as a reference to which registration of individual rhesus data can be performed for the purpose of white-matter parcellation. Alternatively, specific ROIs from the atlas may be warped into individual space to be used in ROI-based group analyses. This atlas will be made publicly available so that it may be used as a resource for DTI studies of rhesus macaques.

  4. Brain white matter structure and language ability in preschool-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Matthew; Dewey, Deborah; Lebel, Catherine

    2018-01-01

    Brain alterations are associated with reading and language difficulties in older children, but little research has investigated relationships between early language skills and brain white matter structure during the preschool period. We studied 68 children aged 3.0-5.6 years who underwent diffusion tensor imaging and participated in assessments of Phonological Processing and Speeded Naming. Tract-based spatial statistics and tractography revealed relationships between Phonological Processing and diffusion parameters in bilateral ventral white matter pathways and the corpus callosum. Phonological Processing was positively correlated with fractional anisotropy and negatively correlated with mean diffusivity. The relationships observed in left ventral pathways are consistent with studies in older children, and demonstrate that structural markers for language performance are apparent as young as 3 years of age. Our findings in right hemisphere areas that are not as commonly found in adult studies suggest that young children rely on a widespread network for language processing that becomes more specialized with age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Utilization behavior as a white matter disconnection syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kenji; Nishino, Hiroshi; Maki, Toshiyuki; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Murayama, Shigeo

    2002-06-01

    We report a case of utilization behavior that was examined neuropathologically. A 72-year-old right-handed male patient, who was admitted with a complaint of transient loss of consciousness, displayed utilization behavior several times. He used daily objects that were placed in front of him, such as a teacup and a toothbrush, without instructions to do so. If the examiner asked the patient not to use the objects, the patient did not use them. MRI revealed acute infarction of the left superior frontal gyrus, where decreased blood flow was revealed by SPECT. The patient died of an acute worsening of dilated cardiomyopathy. Neuropathological examination demonstrated an acute phase infarction of the subcortical white matter of the left superior frontal lobe, which correlated well with neuroradiological findings. Utilization behavior has been thought a "frontal lobe symptom". However, we propose that utilization behavior might be considered a white matter disconnection syndrome.

  6. DTI reveals structural differences in white matter tracts between bilingual and monolingual children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Seyede Ghazal; Struys, Esli; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Mondt, Katrien; Van De Craen, Piet; Luypaert, Robert

    2012-01-30

    The impact of bilingualism on the microstructure of the white matter pathways related to language processing is assessed in elementary school children by magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI). Forty children, 8-11 years old, subdivided into 3 different groups (15 simultaneous bilinguals, 15 sequential bilinguals and 10 monolinguals), were scanned. The hypothesis was that the starting age and the manner of second language acquisition would affect the characteristics of language circuitry. In each subject the mean fractional anisotropy (FA) was obtained for four major white matter pathways: 1 - the left arcuate fasciculus/superior longitudinal fasciculus (lAF/lSLF) that connects Broca's area in the opercular and triangular regions of the left inferior frontal gyrus to the posterior language zone, 2 - the left inferior occipitofrontal fasciculus (lIFOF), connecting anterior regions in the frontal lobe with posterior regions in the temporal occipital lobes, 3 - the bundle arising from the anterior part of the corpus callosum projecting to the orbital lobe (AC-OL) and 4 - the fibers emerging from the anterior midbody (AMB) of the corpus callosum that associate with the premotor and supplementary motor cortices (AMB-PMC). The three groups did not show significant differences in mean FA over the lAF/lSLF or AMB-PMC tracts. In simultaneous bilingual subjects the lIFOF tracts had higher mean FA value compared to monolinguals and also sequential bilinguals, whereas the comparison for the AC-OL fibers yielded a significantly lower mean FA value in simultaneous bilingual subjects compared to monolinguals. In both cases the FA value for sequential bilinguals was intermediate to that of the other two groups. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence of bilingualism related adaptation of white matter microstructure in the human brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic Markers of White Matter Integrity in Schizophrenia Revealed by Parallel ICA

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    Cota Navin Gupta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming a consensus that white matter integrity is compromised in schizophrenia (SZ, however the underlying genetics remains elusive. Evidence suggests a polygenic basis of the disorder, which involves various genetic variants with modest individual effect sizes. In this work, we used a multivariate approach, parallel independent component analysis (P-ICA, to explore the genetic underpinnings of white matter abnormalities in SZ. A pre-filtering step was first applied to locate 6527 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs discriminating patients from controls with a nominal uncorrected p-value of 0.01. These potential susceptibility loci were then investigated for associations with fractional anisotropy (FA images in a cohort consisting of 73 SZ patients and 87 healthy controls. A significant correlation (r=-0.37, p=1.25×E-6 was identified between one genetic factor and one FA component after controlling for scanning site, age and sex. The identified FA-SNP association remained stable in a 10-fold validation. A 5000-run permutation test yielded a p-value of 2.00×E-4. The FA component reflected decreased white matter integrity in the forceps major for SZ patients. The SNP component was overrepresented in genes whose products are involved in corpus callosum morphology (e.g., CNTNAP2, NPAS3 and NFIB as well as canonical pathways of synaptic long term depression and protein kinase A signaling. Taken together, our finding delineates a part of genetic architecture underlying SZ-related FA reduction, emphasizing the important role of genetic variants involved in neural development

  8. Evaluating the relationship between white matter integrity, cognition, and varieties of video game learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Nicholas R; O'Connell, Margaret A; Nashiro, Kaoru; Smith, Evan T; Qin, Shuo; Basak, Chandramallika

    2017-01-01

    Many studies are currently researching the effects of video games, particularly in the domain of cognitive training. Great variability exists among video games however, and few studies have attempted to compare different types of video games. Little is known, for instance, about the cognitive processes or brain structures that underlie learning of different genres of video games. To examine the cognitive and neural underpinnings of two different types of game learning in order to evaluate their common and separate correlates, with the hopes of informing future intervention research. Participants (31 younger adults and 31 older adults) completed an extensive cognitive battery and played two different genres of video games, one action game and one strategy game, for 1.5 hours each. DTI scans were acquired for each participant, and regional fractional anisotropy (FA) values were extracted using the JHU atlas. Behavioral results indicated that better performance on tasks of working memory and perceptual discrimination was related to enhanced learning in both games, even after controlling for age, whereas better performance on a perceptual speed task was uniquely related with enhanced learning of the strategy game. DTI results indicated that white matter FA in the right fornix/stria terminalis was correlated with action game learning, whereas white matter FA in the left cingulum/hippocampus was correlated with strategy game learning, even after controlling for age. Although cognition, to a large extent, was a common predictor of both types of game learning, regional white matter FA could separately predict action and strategy game learning. Given the neural and cognitive correlates of strategy game learning, strategy games may provide a more beneficial training tool for adults suffering from memory-related disorders or declines in processing speed, particularly older adults.

  9. Understanding white matter integrity stability for bilinguals on language status and reading performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummine, Jacqueline; Boliek, Carol A

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have described overall white matter integrity in bilinguals but have not related structural neural pathways to language functions. The current study examined white matter integrity and its relationship to reading skill in monolingual English and bilingual Chinese-English speakers. Eleven monolingual speakers (mean age 28.5 years) and 13 bilingual speakers (mean age 24.2 years; English as a second language was acquired post 5 years of age) participated. Behavioural response times and accuracy rates to name regular and exception words were recorded. Participants were then scanned using a standardized DTI protocol. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity values were derived from a voxelwise statistical analysis for comparisons between participant groups. Tests for relationships between response time and FA were also conducted. Our results show minimal regions of higher FA for monolinguals when compared to bilinguals and no regions of higher FA for bilinguals when compared to monolinguals, which indicates that white matter integrity may not stabilize in bilinguals until late adulthood. We do show several regions where an increase in FA is associated with faster response times. Interestingly, the FA-response time relationship varies between groups and between word types, which may reflect an increased processing demand for retrieval of difficult words (e.g., exception words). These results provide some support for the interference control and reduced frequency hypotheses outlined by Jones et al. (Cerebr Cortex 22:892-902, 2012). The current findings advance our understanding of the underlying cortical networks associated with language status and reading skill in monolingual and bilingual adults.

  10. White Matter Abnormalities in Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Following a Specific Traumatic Event

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    Lei Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD are complicated by wide variability in the intensity and duration of prior stressors in patient participants, secondary effects of chronic psychiatric illness, and a variable history of treatment with psychiatric medications. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies, patient samples have often been small, and they were not often compared to similarly stressed patients without PTSD in order to control for general stress effects. Findings from these studies have been inconsistent. The present study investigated whole-brain microstructural alterations of white matter in a large drug-naive population who survived a specific, severe traumatic event (a major 8.0-magnitude earthquake. Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, we explored group differences between 88 PTSD patients and 91 matched traumatized non-PTSD controls in fractional anisotropy (FA, as well as its component elements axial diffusivity (AD and radial diffusivity (RD, and examined these findings in relation to findings from deterministic DTI tractography. Relations between white matter alterations and psychiatric symptom severity were examined. PTSD patients, relative to similarly stressed controls, showed an FA increase as well as AD and RD changes in the white matter beneath left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and forceps major. The observation of increased FA in the PTSD group suggests that the pathophysiology of PTSD after a specific acute traumatic event is distinct from what has been reported in patients with several years duration of illness. Alterations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may be an important aspect of illness pathophysiology, possibly via the region's established role in fear extinction circuitry. Use-dependent myelination or other secondary compensatory changes in response to heightened demands for threat appraisal and emotion regulation may be involved.

  11. An allometric scaling law between gray matter and white matter of cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Jihuan [College of Science, Donghua University, Shanghai, 1882 Yan' an Xilu Road, Shanghai 200051 (China)] e-mail: jhhe@dhu.edu.cn

    2006-02-01

    An allometric scaling relationship between cortical white and gray volumes is derived from a general model that describes brain's remarkable efficiency and prodigious communications between brain areas. The model assumes that (1) a cell's metabolic rate depends upon cell's surface; (2) the overall basal metabolic rates of brain areas depend upon their fractal structures; (3) differential brain areas have same basal metabolic rate at slow wave sleep. The obtained allometric exponent scaling white matter to gray matter is 1.2, which is very much close to Zhang and Sejnowski's observation data.

  12. The generation and validation of white matter connectivity importance maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuceyeski, Amy; Maruta, Jun; Niogi, Sumit N; Ghajar, Jamshid; Raj, Ashish

    2011-09-01

    Both the size and location of injury in the brain influences the type and severity of cognitive or sensorimotor dysfunction. However, even with advances in MR imaging and analysis, the correspondence between lesion location and clinical deficit remains poorly understood. Here, structural and diffusion images from 14 healthy subjects are used to create spatially unbiased white matter connectivity importance maps that quantify the amount of disruption to the overall brain network that would be incurred if that region were compromised. Some regions in the white matter that were identified as highly important by such maps have been implicated in strategic infarct dementia and linked to various attention tasks in previous studies. Validation of the maps is performed by investigating the correlations of the importance maps' predicted cognitive deficits in a group of 15 traumatic brain injury patients with their cognitive test scores measuring attention and memory. While no correlation was found between amount of white matter injury and cognitive test scores, significant correlations (r>0.68, pimprove surgical planning, diagnosis, and assessment of disease severity in a variety of pathologies like multiple sclerosis, trauma, and stroke. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. White matter sexual dimorphism of the adult human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourisly Ali K.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sex-biased psychophysiology, behavior, brain function, and conditions are extensive, yet underlying structural brain mechanisms remain unclear. There is contradicting evidence regarding sexual dimorphism when it comes to brain structure, and there is still no consensus on whether or not there exists such a dimorphism for brain white matter. Therefore, we conducted a voxel-based morphometry (VBM analysis along with global volume analysis for white matter across sex. We analyzed 384 T1-weighted MRI brain images (192 male, 192 female to investigate any differences in white matter (WM between males and females. In the VBM analysis, we found males to have larger WM, compared to females, in occipital, temporal, insular, parietal, and frontal brain regions. In contrast, females showed only one WM region to be significantly larger than males: the right postcentral gyrus in the parietal lobe region. Although, on average, males showed larger global WM volume, we did not find any significant difference in global WM volume between males and females.

  14. Stochastic process for white matter injury detection in preterm neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Irene; Miller, Steven P; Duerden, Emma G; Sun, Kaiyu; Chau, Vann; Adams, Elysia; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Branson, Helen M; Basu, Anup

    2015-01-01

    Preterm births are rising in Canada and worldwide. As clinicians strive to identify preterm neonates at greatest risk of significant developmental or motor problems, accurate predictive tools are required. Infants at highest risk will be able to receive early developmental interventions, and will also enable clinicians to implement and evaluate new methods to improve outcomes. While severe white matter injury (WMI) is associated with adverse developmental outcome, more subtle injuries are difficult to identify and the association with later impairments remains unknown. Thus, our goal was to develop an automated method for detection and visualization of brain abnormalities in MR images acquired in very preterm born neonates. We have developed a technique to detect WMI in T1-weighted images acquired in 177 very preterm born infants (24-32 weeks gestation). Our approach uses a stochastic process that estimates the likelihood of intensity variations in nearby pixels; with small variations being more likely than large variations. We first detect the boundaries between normal and injured regions of the white matter. Following this we use a measure of pixel similarity to identify WMI regions. Our algorithm is able to detect WMI in all of the images in the ground truth dataset with some false positives in situations where the white matter region is not segmented accurately.

  15. White matter microstructural organization and gait stability in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd M. Bruijn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding age-related decline in gait stability and the role of alterations in brain structure is crucial. Here, we studied the relationship between white matter microstructural organization using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI and advanced gait stability measures in 15 healthy young adults (range 18-30 years and 25 healthy older adults (range 62-82 years.Among the different gait stability measures, only stride time and the maximum Lyapunov exponent (which quantifies how well participants are able to attenuate small perturbations were found to decline with age. White matter microstructural organization (FA was lower throughout the brain in older adults. We found a strong correlation between FA in the left anterior thalamic radiation and left corticospinal tract on the one hand, and step width and safety margin (indicative of how close participants are to falling over on the other. These findings suggest that white matter FA in tracts connecting subcortical and prefrontal areas is associated with the implementation of an effective stabilization strategy during gait.

  16. White matter microstructural organization and gait stability in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Van Impe, Annouchka; Duysens, Jacques; Swinnen, Stephan P.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding age-related decline in gait stability and the role of alterations in brain structure is crucial. Here, we studied the relationship between white matter microstructural organization using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and advanced gait stability measures in 15 healthy young adults (range 18–30 years) and 25 healthy older adults (range 62–82 years). Among the different gait stability measures, only stride time and the maximum Lyapunov exponent (which quantifies how well participants are able to attenuate small perturbations) were found to decline with age. White matter microstructural organization (FA) was lower throughout the brain in older adults. We found a strong correlation between FA in the left anterior thalamic radiation and left corticospinal tract on the one hand, and step width and safety margin (indicative of how close participants are to falling over) on the other. These findings suggest that white matter FA in tracts connecting subcortical and prefrontal areas is associated with the implementation of an effective stabilization strategy during gait. PMID:24959139

  17. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples. PMID:21997909

  18. Reduced Structural Connectivity in Frontostriatal White Matter Tracts in the Associative Loop in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, James J; Nestor, Paul G; Levin, Laura; Pelavin, Paula; Lin, Pan; Kubicki, Marek; McCarley, Robert W; Shenton, Martha E; Rathi, Yogesh

    2017-11-01

    The striatum receives segregated and integrative white matter tracts from the cortex facilitating information processing in the cortico-basal ganglia network. The authors examined both types of input tracts in the striatal associative loop in chronic schizophrenia patients and healthy control subjects. Structural and diffusion MRI scans were acquired on a 3-T system from 26 chronic schizophrenia patients and 26 matched healthy control subjects. Using FreeSurfer, the associative cortex was parcellated into ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex subregions. The striatum was manually parcellated into its associative and sensorimotor functional subregions. Fractional anisotropy and normalized streamlines, an estimate of fiber counts, were assessed in four frontostriatal tracts (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex-associative striatum, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex-sensorimotor striatum, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex-associative striatum, and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex-sensorimotor striatum). Furthermore, these measures were correlated with a measure of cognitive control, the Trail-Making Test, Part B. Results showed reduced fractional anisotropy and fewer streamlines in chronic schizophrenia patients for all four tracts, both segregated and integrative. Post hoc t tests showed reduced fractional anisotropy in the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex-associative striatum and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex-sensorimotor striatum and fewer normalized streamlines in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex-sensorimotor striatum and in the left and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex-sensorimotor striatum in chronic schizophrenia patients. Furthermore, normalized streamlines in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex-sensorimotor striatum negatively correlated with Trail-Making Test, Part B, time spent in healthy control subjects but not in chronic schizophrenia patients. These findings demonstrated that structural connectivity is

  19. Habitual sleep durations and subjective sleep quality predict white matter differences in the human brain

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    Sakh Khalsa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-imposed short sleep durations are increasingly commonplace in society, and have considerable health and performance implications for individuals. Reduced sleep duration over multiple nights has similar behavioural effects to those observed following acute total sleep deprivation, suggesting that lack of sleep affects brain function cumulatively. A link between habitual sleep patterns and functional connectivity has previously been observed, and the effect of sleep duration on the brain's intrinsic functional architecture may provide a link between sleep status and cognition. However, it is currently not known whether differences in habitual sleep patterns across individuals are related to changes in the brain's white matter, which underlies structural connectivity. In the present study we use diffusion–weighted imaging and a group comparison application of tract based spatial statistics (TBSS to investigate changes to fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD in relation to sleep duration and quality, hypothesising that white matter metrics would be positively associated with sleep duration and quality. Diffusion weighted imaging data was acquired from a final cohort of 33 (23–29 years, 10 female, mean 25.4 years participants. Sleep patterns were assessed for a 14 day period using wrist actigraphs and sleep diaries, and subjective sleep quality with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Median splits based on total sleep time and PSQI were used to create groups of shorter/longer and poorer/better sleepers, whose imaging data was compared using TBSS followed by post-hoc correlation analysis in regions identified as significantly different between the groups. There were significant positive correlations between sleep duration and FA in the left orbito-frontal region and the right superior corona radiata, and significant negative correlations between sleep duration and MD in right orbito-frontal white matter and the right

  20. Relation of white-matter microstructure to reading ability and disability in beginning readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Joanna A; Murtagh, Jack; Cyr, Abigail; Perrachione, Tyler K; Chang, Patricia; Halverson, Kelly; Hook, Pamela; Yendiki, Anastasia; Ghosh, Satrajit; Gabrieli, John D E

    2017-07-01

    abilities. Diffusion-weighted images were collected and TRACULA was used to extract fractional anisotropy measures from the left arcuate fasciculus. White-matter microstructure was altered in children with reading disability, who exhibited significantly reduced fractional anisotropy in the left arcuate fasciculus. Among typically reading children, lower fractional anisotropy of the left arcuate fasciculus was associated with superior pseudoword reading performance. Both the group differences and variation in reading scores among the children with reading disability were associated with radial diffusivity (but not axial diffusivity), whereas variation in reading scores among typically reading children was associated with axial diffusivity (but not radial diffusivity). The paradoxical findings that lower fractional anisotropy was associated both with reading disability and also with better phonological awareness in typical reading development suggest that there are different maturational trajectories of white-matter microstructure in typical readers and children with reading disability, and that this difference is unique to the beginning stages of reading acquisition. The finding that reading disability was associated with radial diffusivity, but that variation in ability among typically developing readers was associated with axial diffusivity, suggests that different neural mechanisms may be associated with reading development in children with or without reading disability. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Anisotropies in the diffuse gamma-ray background from dark matter with Fermi LAT: a closer look

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuoco, Alessandro; Sellerholm, A.; Conrad, J.

    2011-01-01

    We perform a detailed study of the sensitivity to the anisotropies related to dark matter (DM) annihilation in the isotropic gamma-ray background (IGRB) as measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi LAT). For the first time, we take into account the effects of the Galactic foregrounds...... and use a realistic representation of the Fermi LAT. We implement an analysis pipeline which simulates Fermi LAT data sets starting from model maps of the Galactic foregrounds, the Fermi-resolved point sources, the extragalactic diffuse emission and the signal from DM annihilation. The effects...... of the detector are taken into account by convolving the model maps with the Fermi LAT instrumental response. We then use the angular power spectrum to characterize the anisotropy properties of the simulated data and to study the sensitivity to DM. We consider DM anisotropies of extragalactic origin...

  2. Uniformity and Deviation of Intra-axonal Cross-sectional Area Coverage of the Gray-to-White Matter Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Sommer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI is a compelling tool for investigating the structure and geometry of brain tissue based on indirect measurement of the diffusion anisotropy of water. Recent developments in global top-down tractogram optimizations enable the estimation of streamline weights, which characterize the connection between gray matter areas. In this work, the intra-axonal cross-sectional area coverage of the gray-to-white matter interface was examined by intersecting tractography streamlines with cortical regions of interest. The area coverage is the ratio of streamline weights divided by the surface area at the gray-to-white matter interface and assesses the estimated percentage which is covered by intra-axonal space. A high correlation (r = 0.935 between streamline weights and the cortical surface area was found across all regions of interest in all subjects. The variance across different cortical regions exhibits similarities to myelin maps. Additionally, we examined the effect of different diffusion gradient subsets at a lower, clinically feasible spatial resolution. Subsampling of the initial high-resolution diffusion dataset did not alter the tendency of the area coverage at the gray-to-white matter interface across cortical areas and subjects. However, single-shell acquisition schemes with lower b-values lead to a steady increase in area coverage in comparison to the full acquisition scheme at high resolution.

  3. Diffusion measures indicate fight exposure-related damage to cerebral white matter in boxers and mixed martial arts fighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, W; Mahmoud, S Y; Sakaie, K; Banks, S J; Lowe, M J; Phillips, M; Modic, M T; Bernick, C

    2014-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury is common in fighting athletes such as boxers, given the frequency of blows to the head. Because DTI is sensitive to microstructural changes in white matter, this technique is often used to investigate white matter integrity in patients with traumatic brain injury. We hypothesized that previous fight exposure would predict DTI abnormalities in fighting athletes after controlling for individual variation. A total of 74 boxers and 81 mixed martial arts fighters were included in the analysis and scanned by use of DTI. Individual information and data on fight exposures, including number of fights and knockouts, were collected. A multiple hierarchical linear regression model was used in region-of-interest analysis to test the hypothesis that fight-related exposure could predict DTI values separately in boxers and mixed martial arts fighters. Age, weight, and years of education were controlled to ensure that these factors would not account for the hypothesized effects. We found that the number of knockouts among boxers predicted increased longitudinal diffusivity and transversal diffusivity in white matter and subcortical gray matter regions, including corpus callosum, isthmus cingulate, pericalcarine, precuneus, and amygdala, leading to increased mean diffusivity and decreased fractional anisotropy in the corresponding regions. The mixed martial arts fighters had increased transversal diffusivity in the posterior cingulate. The number of fights did not predict any DTI measures in either group. These findings suggest that the history of fight exposure in a fighter population can be used to predict microstructural brain damage.

  4. Regional variation in brain white matter diffusion index changes following chemoradiotherapy: a prospective study using tract-based spatial statistics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher H Chapman

    Full Text Available There is little known about how brain white matter structures differ in their response to radiation, which may have implications for radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to examine regional variation in white matter changes following chemoradiotherapy.Fourteen patients receiving two or three weeks of whole-brain radiation therapy (RT ± chemotherapy underwent DTI pre-RT, at end-RT, and one month post-RT. Three diffusion indices were measured: fractional anisotropy (FA, radial diffusivity (RD, and axial diffusivity (AD. We determined significant individual voxel changes of diffusion indices using tract-based spatial statistics, and mean changes of the indices within fourteen white matter structures of interest.Voxels of significant FA decreases and RD increases were seen in all structures (p<0.05, with the largest changes (20-50% in the fornix, cingula, and corpus callosum. There were highly significant between-structure differences in pre-RT to end-RT mean FA changes (p<0.001. The inferior cingula had a mean FA decrease from pre-RT to end-RT significantly greater than 11 of the 13 other structures (p<0.00385.Brain white matter structures varied greatly in their response to chemoradiotherapy as measured by DTI changes. Changes in FA and RD related to white matter demyelination were prominent in the cingula and fornix, structures relevant to radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment. Future research should evaluate DTI as a predictive biomarker of brain chemoradiotherapy adverse effects.

  5. White matter changes in early phase schizophrenia and cannabis use: an update and systematic review of diffusion tensor imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookey, Jacob; Bernier, Denise; Tibbo, Philip G

    2014-07-01

    The impact of cannabis use on the brain tissue is still unclear, both in the healthy developing brain and in people with schizophrenia. The focus of this review is on white matter, the primary connective infrastructure of the brain. We systematically reviewed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies of early phase schizophrenia (illness effect), of cannabis use in otherwise healthy brains (drug effect), and of early phase schizophrenia with cannabis use (combined effects). Studies had to include a healthy, non-cannabis using, control group as well as report on fractional anisotropy as it is the most commonly used DTI index. We excluded cohorts with heavy alcohol or illicit drug use and studies with a sample size of less than 20 in the clinical group. We retained 17 studies of early phase schizophrenia, which together indicate deficits in white matter integrity observed in all fiber tract families, but most frequently in association, callosal and projection fibers. In otherwise healthy cannabis users (2 studies), deficits in white matter tracts were reported mainly in callosal fibers, but also in projection and limbic fibers. In cannabis users with early phase schizophrenia (1 study), deficits in white matter integrity were also observed in all fiber tract families, except for limbic fibers. The current literature points to several families of white matter tracts being differentially affected in early phase schizophrenia. Further work is required to reveal the impact of cannabis use in otherwise healthy people as well as those with schizophrenia. Paucity of available studies as well as restricting analysis to FA values represent the main limitations of this review. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Individual differences in reasoning and visuospatial attention are associated with prefrontal and parietal white matter tracts in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, Zachary A; Greenwood, Pamela M; Parasuraman, Raja; Strenziok, Maren

    2016-07-01

    Although reasoning and attention are 2 cognitive processes necessary for ensuring the efficiency of many everyday activities in older adults, the role of white matter integrity in these processes has been little studied. This is an important question due to the role of white matter integrity as a neural substrate of cognitive aging. Here, we sought to examine the white matter tracts subserving reasoning and visuospatial attention in healthy older adults. Sixty-one adults ages 60 and older completed a battery of cognitive tests to assess reasoning and visuospatial attention. In addition, diffusion tensor images were collected to assess fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure of white matter integrity. A principle components analysis of the test scores yielded 2 components: reasoning and visuospatial attention. Whole-brain correlations between FA and the cognitive components were submitted to probabilistic tractography analyses for visualization of cortical targets of tracts. For reasoning, bilateral thalamo-anterior prefrontal, anterior corpus callosum, and corpus callosum body tracts interconnecting the superior frontal cortices and right cingulum bundle were found. For visuospatial attention, a right inferior fronto-parietal tract and bilateral parietal and temporal connections were found. We conclude that in older adults, prefrontal cortex white matter tracts and interhemispheric communication are important in higher order cognitive functioning. On the other hand, right-sided fronto-parietal tracts appear to be critical for supporting control of cognitive processes, such as redirecting attention. Researchers may use our results to develop neuroscience-based interventions for older adults targeting brain mechanisms involved in cognitive plasticity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Cortico-cortical white matter motor pathway microstructure is related to psychomotor retardation in major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bracht

    Full Text Available Alterations of brain structure and function have been associated with psychomotor retardation in major depressive disorder (MDD. However, the association of motor behaviour and white matter integrity of motor pathways in MDD is unclear. The aim of the present study was to first investigate structural connectivity of white matter motor pathways in MDD. Second, we explore the relation of objectively measured motor activity and white matter integrity of motor pathways in MDD. Therefore, 21 patients with MDD and 21 healthy controls matched for age, gender, education and body mass index underwent diffusion tensor imaging and 24 hour actigraphy (measure of the activity level the same day. Applying a probabilistic fibre tracking approach we extracted connection pathways between the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC, the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC, the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA, the SMA-proper, the primary motor cortex (M1, the caudate nucleus, the putamen, the pallidum and the thalamus. Patients had lower activity levels and demonstrated increased mean diffusivity (MD in pathways linking left pre-SMA and SMA-proper, and right SMA-proper and M1. Exploratory analyses point to a positive association of activity level and mean-fractional anisotropy in the right rACC-pre-SMA connection in MDD. Only MDD patients with low activity levels had a negative linear association of activity level and mean-MD in the left dlPFC-pre-SMA connection. Our results point to structural alterations of cortico-cortical white matter motor pathways in MDD. Altered white matter organisation of rACC-pre-SMA and dlPFC-pre-SMA pathways may contribute to movement initiation in MDD.

  8. White Matter Integrity Dissociates Verbal Memory and Auditory Attention Span in Emerging Adults with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Ryan C; King, Tricia Z; Burns, Thomas G; Drossner, David M; Mahle, William T

    2015-01-01

    White matter disruptions have been identified in individuals with congenital heart disease (CHD). However, no specific theory-driven relationships between microstructural white matter disruptions and cognition have been established in CHD. We conducted a two-part study. First, we identified significant differences in fractional anisotropy (FA) of emerging adults with CHD using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS). TBSS analyses between 22 participants with CHD and 18 demographically similar controls identified five regions of normal appearing white matter with significantly lower FA in CHD, and two higher. Next, two regions of lower FA in CHD were selected to examine theory-driven differential relationships with cognition: voxels along the left uncinate fasciculus (UF; a tract theorized to contribute to verbal memory) and voxels along the right middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP; a tract previously linked to attention). In CHD, a significant positive correlation between UF FA and memory was found, r(20)=.42, p=.049 (uncorrected). There was no correlation between UF and auditory attention span. A positive correlation between MCP FA and auditory attention span was found, r(20)=.47, p=.027 (uncorrected). There was no correlation between MCP and memory. In controls, no significant relationships were identified. These results are consistent with previous literature demonstrating lower FA in younger CHD samples, and provide novel evidence for disrupted white matter integrity in emerging adults with CHD. Furthermore, a correlational double dissociation established distinct white matter circuitry (UF and MCP) and differential cognitive correlates (memory and attention span, respectively) in young adults with CHD.

  9. Exploring white matter microstructure and olfaction dysfunction in early parkinson disease: diffusion MRI reveals new insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Soheila; Rahmani, Farzaneh; Aarabi, Mohammad Hadi; Sadr, Alireza Vafaei

    2017-11-13

    Olfaction dysfunction is considered as a robust marker of prodromal Parkinson disease (PD). Measurement of olfaction function as a screening test is unsatisfactory due to long lead time interval and low specificity for detection of PD. Use of imaging markers might yield more accurate predictive values and provide bases for combined use of imaging and clinical markers for early PD. Diffusion MRI connectometry was conducted on 85 de novo PD patients in and 36 healthy controls to find: first, white matter tracts with significant difference in quantitative anisotropy between PD groups with various degrees of olfaction dysfunction and second, second fibers with correlation with University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) score in each group using a multiple regression analysis considering age, sex, GDS and MoCA score. Local connectomes were determined in seven of all the possible comparisons, correcting for false discovery rate (FDR). PD patients with anosmia and normal olfaction had the highest number of fibers with decreased connectivity in left inferior longitudinal fasciculus, bilateral fornix, bilateral middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP), bilateral cingulum, bilateral corticospinal tract (CST) and body, genu and splenium of corpus callosum (CC) (FDR = 0.0013). In multiple regression analysis, connectivity in the body, genu and splenium of CC and bilateral fornix had significant negative correlation (FDR between 0.019 and 0.083), and bilateral cingulum and MCP had significant positive correlation (FDR between 0.022 and 0.092) with UPSIT score. White matter connectivity in healthy controls could not be predicted by UPSIT score using the same model. The results of this study provide compelling evidence that microstructural degenerative changes in these areas underlie the clinical phenotype of prodromal olfaction dysfunction in PD and that diffusion parameters of these areas might be able to serve as signature markers for early detection of PD. This

  10. Fully Automatic Segmentation of White Matter Lesions from Multispectral Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Shenshen

    2010-01-01

    A fully automatic white matter lesion segmentation method has been developed and evaluated. The method uses multispectral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data (T1,T2 and Proton Density). First fuzzy c means (FCM) was used to segment normal brain tissues (white matter,grey matter, and cerebrospinal fluid). The holes in normal white matter were used to sample the WML intensities in the different images. The segmentation of WML was optimized by a graph cut approach. The method was trained by us...

  11. Automated detection of Lupus white matter lesions in MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Roura Perez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML. In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM, gray matter (GM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection (True Positive Rate (62% and Positive Prediction Value (80% respectively as well as segmentation accuracy (Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration.

  12. Automated Detection of Lupus White Matter Lesions in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roura, Eloy; Sarbu, Nicolae; Oliver, Arnau; Valverde, Sergi; González-Villà, Sandra; Cervera, Ricard; Bargalló, Núria; Lladó, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML). In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative, and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection [True Positive Rate (62%) and Positive Prediction Value (80%), respectively] as well as segmentation accuracy [Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%)]. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration.

  13. Abnormal white matter integrity in chronic users of codeine-containing cough syrups: a tract-based spatial statistics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Y-W; Su, H-H; Lv, X-F; Jiang, G-H

    2015-01-01

    Codeine-containing cough syrups have become one of the most popular drugs of abuse in young people in the world. Chronic codeine-containing cough syrup abuse is related to impairments in a broad range of cognitive functions. However, the potential brain white matter impairment caused by chronic codeine-containing cough syrup abuse has not been reported previously. Our aim was to investigate abnormalities in the microstructure of brain white matter in chronic users of codeine-containing syrups and to determine whether these WM abnormalities are related to the duration of the use these syrups and clinical impulsivity. Thirty chronic codeine-containing syrup users and 30 matched controls were evaluated. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed by using a single-shot spin-echo-planar sequence. Whole-brain voxelwise analysis of fractional anisotropy was performed by using tract-based spatial statistics to localize abnormal WM regions. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale 11 was surveyed to assess participants' impulsivity. Volume-of-interest analysis was used to detect changes of diffusivity indices in regions with fractional anisotropy abnormalities. Abnormal fractional anisotropy was extracted and correlated with clinical impulsivity and the duration of codeine-containing syrup use. Chronic codeine-containing syrup users had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus of the bilateral temporo-occipital regions, right frontal region, and the right corona radiata WM than controls. There were significant negative correlations among fractional anisotropy values of the right frontal region of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and the right superior corona radiata WM and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale total scores, and between the right frontal region of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and nonplan impulsivity scores in chronic codeine-containing syrup users. There was also a significant negative correlation between fractional

  14. Memory binding and white matter integrity in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Mario A; Saarimäki, Heini; Bastin, Mark E; Londoño, Ana C; Pettit, Lewis; Lopera, Francisco; Della Sala, Sergio; Abrahams, Sharon

    2015-05-01

    Binding information in short-term and long-term memory are functions sensitive to Alzheimer's disease. They have been found to be affected in patients who meet criteria for familial Alzheimer's disease due to the mutation E280A of the PSEN1 gene. However, only short-term memory binding has been found to be affected in asymptomatic carriers of this mutation. The neural correlates of this dissociation are poorly understood. The present study used diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether the integrity of white matter structures could offer an account. A sample of 19 patients with familial Alzheimer's disease, 18 asymptomatic carriers and 21 non-carrier controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging, neuropsychological and memory binding assessment. The short-term memory binding task required participants to detect changes across two consecutive screens displaying arrays of shapes, colours, or shape-colour bindings. The long-term memory binding task was a Paired Associates Learning Test. Performance on these tasks were entered into regression models. Relative to controls, patients with familial Alzheimer's disease performed poorly on both memory binding tasks. Asymptomatic carriers differed from controls only in the short-term memory binding task. White matter integrity explained poor memory binding performance only in patients with familial Alzheimer's disease. White matter water diffusion metrics from the frontal lobe accounted for poor performance on both memory binding tasks. Dissociations were found in the genu of corpus callosum which accounted for short-term memory binding impairments and in the hippocampal part of cingulum bundle which accounted for long-term memory binding deficits. The results indicate that white matter structures in the frontal and temporal lobes are vulnerable to the early stages of familial Alzheimer's disease and their damage is associated with impairments in two memory binding functions known to

  15. Exploring the role of white matter connectivity in cortex maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia L Friedrichs-Maeder

    Full Text Available The maturation of the cortical gray matter (GM and white matter (WM are described as sequential processes following multiple, but distinct rules. However, neither the mechanisms driving brain maturation processes, nor the relationship between GM and WM maturation are well understood. Here we use connectomics and two MRI measures reflecting maturation related changes in cerebral microstructure, namely the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC and the T1 relaxation time (T1, to study brain development. We report that the advancement of GM and WM maturation are inter-related and depend on the underlying brain connectivity architecture. Particularly, GM regions and their incident WM connections show corresponding maturation levels, which is also observed for GM regions connected through a WM tract. Based on these observations, we propose a simple computational model supporting a key role for the connectome in propagating maturation signals sequentially from external stimuli, through primary sensory structures to higher order functional cortices.

  16. Evaluation of deep gray matter volume, cortical thickness and white matter integrity in patients with typical absence epilepsy: a study using voxelwise-based techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, D.G.; Ventura, N.; Tukamoto, G.; Gasparetto, E.L. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Zimmermann, N. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Department of Psychology, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Doring, T.M. [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Leme, J.; Pereira, M. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Andrea, I. d' ; Rego, C.; Alves-Leon, S.V. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Center, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the cortical thickness and the volume of deep gray matter structures, measured from 3D T1-weighted gradient echo imaging, and white matter integrity, by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in patients with typical absence epilepsy (AE). Patients (n = 19) with typical childhood AE and juvenile AE, currently taking antiepileptic medication, were compared with control subjects (n = 19), matched for gender and age. 3D T1 magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo-weighted imaging and DTI along 30 noncolinear directions were performed using a 1.5-T MR scanner. FreeSurfer was used to perform cortical volumetric reconstruction and segmentation of deep gray matter structures. For tract-based spatial statistics analysis of DTI, a white matter skeleton was created, along with a permutation-based inference with 5000 permutations. A threshold of p < 0.05 was used to identify abnormalities in fractional anisotropy (FA). The mean, radial, and axial diffusivities were also projected onto the mean FA skeleton. Patients with AE presented decreased FA and increased mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity values in the genu and the body of the corpus callosum and right anterior corona radiata, as well as decreased axial diffusivity in the left posterior thalamic radiation, inferior cerebellar peduncle, right cerebral peduncle, and right corticospinal tract. However, there were no significant differences in cortical thickness or deep gray matter structure volumes between patients with AE and controls. Abnormalities found in white matter integrity may help to better understand the pathophysiology of AE and optimize diagnosis and treatment strategies. (orig.)

  17. Blue-Light Therapy following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects on White Matter Water Diffusion in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Bajaj

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is a common and often inconspicuous wound that is frequently associated with chronic low-grade symptoms and cognitive dysfunction. Previous evidence suggests that daily blue wavelength light therapy may be effective at reducing fatigue and improving sleep in patients recovering from mTBI. However, the effects of light therapy on recovering brain structure remain unexplored. In this study, we analyzed white matter diffusion properties, including generalized fractional anisotropy, and the quantity of water diffusion in isotropic (i.e., isotropic diffusion and anisotropic fashion (i.e., quantitative anisotropy, QA for fibers crossing 11 brain areas known to be significantly affected following mTBI. Specifically, we investigated how 6 weeks of daily morning blue light exposure therapy (compared to an amber-light placebo condition impacted changes in white matter diffusion in individuals with mTBI. We observed a significant impact of the blue light treatment (relative to the placebo on the amount of water diffusion (QA for multiple brain areas, including the corpus callosum, anterior corona radiata, and thalamus. Moreover, many of these changes were associated with improvements in sleep latency and delayed memory. These findings suggest that blue wavelength light exposure may serve as one of the potential non-pharmacological treatments for facilitating structural and functional recovery following mTBI; they also support the use of QA as a reliable neuro-biomarker for mTBI therapies.

  18. Reduced parietooccipital white matter glutamine measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in treated graves' disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Else Rubæk; Elberling, T.V.; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2008-01-01

    and a battery of biochemical, affective, and cognitive tests were used. RESULTS: Previously reported findings of reduced choline and myo-inositol in acute Graves' disease were confirmed and reversibility was demonstrated. Parieto-occipital white matter glutamine was and remained significantly reduced (P ....01). Acute phase parieto-occipital white matter total choline correlated significantly (r = -0.57; P glutamine (r = -0.52; P ....01) and parietooccipital white matter glutamate (r = -0.54; P glutamine in white matter, the decreasing glutamate in occipital gray matter...

  19. Increased white matter metabolic rates in autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitelman, Serge A; Buchsbaum, Monte S; Young, Derek S; Haznedar, M Mehmet; Hollander, Eric; Shihabuddin, Lina; Hazlett, Erin A; Bralet, Marie-Cecile

    2017-11-22

    Both autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia are often characterized as disorders of white matter integrity. Multimodal investigations have reported elevated metabolic rates, cerebral perfusion and basal activity in various white matter regions in schizophrenia, but none of these functions has previously been studied in ASD. We used 18fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to compare white matter metabolic rates in subjects with ASD (n = 25) to those with schizophrenia (n = 41) and healthy controls (n = 55) across a wide range of stereotaxically placed regions-of-interest. Both subjects with ASD and schizophrenia showed increased metabolic rates across the white matter regions assessed, including internal capsule, corpus callosum, and white matter in the frontal and temporal lobes. These increases were more pronounced, more widespread and more asymmetrical in subjects with ASD than in those with schizophrenia. The highest metabolic increases in both disorders were seen in the prefrontal white matter and anterior limb of the internal capsule. Compared to normal controls, differences in gray matter metabolism were less prominent and differences in adjacent white matter metabolism were more prominent in subjects with ASD than in those with schizophrenia. Autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia are associated with heightened metabolic activity throughout the white matter. Unlike in the gray matter, the vector of white matter metabolic abnormalities appears to be similar in ASD and schizophrenia, may reflect inefficient functional connectivity with compensatory hypermetabolism, and may be a common feature of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  20. Longitudinal white matter change in frontotemporal dementia subtypes and sporadic late onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Fanny M; Marx, Gabe; Cobigo, Yann; Staffaroni, Adam M; Kornak, John; Tosun, Duygu; Boxer, Adam L; Kramer, Joel H; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard J

    2017-01-01

    Degradation of white matter microstructure has been demonstrated in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In preparation for clinical trials, ongoing studies are investigating the utility of longitudinal brain imaging for quantification of disease progression. To date only one study has examined sample size calculations based on longitudinal changes in white matter integrity in FTLD. To quantify longitudinal changes in white matter microstructural integrity in the three canonical subtypes of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and AD using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). 60 patients with clinical diagnoses of FTD, including 27 with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 14 with non-fluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA), and 19 with semantic variant PPA (svPPA), as well as 19 patients with AD and 69 healthy controls were studied. We used a voxel-wise approach to calculate annual rate of change in fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) in each group using two time points approximately one year apart. Mean rates of change in FA and MD in 48 atlas-based regions-of-interest, as well as global measures of cognitive function were used to calculate sample sizes for clinical trials (80% power, alpha of 5%). All FTD groups showed statistically significant baseline and longitudinal white matter degeneration, with predominant involvement of frontal tracts in the bvFTD group, frontal and temporal tracts in the PPA groups and posterior tracts in the AD group. Longitudinal change in MD yielded a larger number of regions with sample sizes below 100 participants per therapeutic arm in comparison with FA. SvPPA had the smallest sample size based on change in MD in the fornix (n = 41 participants per study arm to detect a 40% effect of drug), and nfvPPA and AD had their smallest sample sizes based on rate of change in MD within the left superior longitudinal fasciculus (n = 49 for nfvPPA, and n = 23 for AD). Bv

  1. Lifelong bilingualism contributes to cognitive reserve against white matter integrity declines in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Brian T; Johnson, Nathan F; Powell, David K

    2013-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that lifelong bilingualism may contribute to cognitive reserve (CR) in normal aging. However, there is currently no neuroimaging evidence to suggest that lifelong bilinguals can retain normal cognitive functioning in the face of age-related neurodegeneration. Here we explored this issue by comparing white matter (WM) integrity and gray matter (GM) volumetric patterns of older adult lifelong bilinguals (N=20) and monolinguals (N=20). The groups were matched on a range of relevant cognitive test scores and on the established CR variables of education, socioeconomic status and intelligence. Participants underwent high-resolution structural imaging for assessment of GM volume and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for assessment of WM integrity. Results indicated significantly lower microstructural integrity in the bilingual group in several WM tracts. In particular, compared to their monolingual peers, the bilingual group showed lower fractional anisotropy and/or higher radial diffusivity in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus/inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus bilaterally, the fornix, and multiple portions of the corpus callosum. There were no group differences in GM volume. Our results suggest that lifelong bilingualism contributes to CR against WM integrity declines in aging. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Life-span changes of the human brain white matter: diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and volumetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlye, Lars T; Walhovd, Kristine B; Dale, Anders M; Bjørnerud, Atle; Due-Tønnessen, Paulina; Engvig, Andreas; Grydeland, Håkon; Tamnes, Christian K; Ostby, Ylva; Fjell, Anders M

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging volumetry studies report inverted U-patterns with increasing white-matter (WM) volume into middle age suggesting protracted WM maturation compared with the cortical gray matter. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to degree and direction of water permeability in biological tissues, providing in vivo indices of WM microstructure. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to delineate age trajectories of WM volume and DTI indices in 430 healthy subjects ranging 8-85 years of age. We used automated regional brain volume segmentation and tract-based statistics of fractional anisotropy, mean, and radial diffusivity as markers of WM integrity. Nonparametric regressions were used to fit the age trajectories and to estimate the timing of maximum development and deterioration in aging. Although the volumetric data supported protracted growth into the sixth decade, DTI indices plateaued early in the fourth decade across all tested regions and then declined slowly into late adulthood followed by an accelerating decrease in senescence. Tractwise and voxel-based analyses yielded regional differences in development and aging but did not provide ample evidence in support of a simple last-in-first-out hypothesis of life-span changes.

  3. Different scaling of white matter volume, cortical connectivity, and gyrification across rodent and primate brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Antunes, Lissa; Mota, Bruno; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2013-01-01

    Expansion of the cortical gray matter in evolution has been accompanied by an even faster expansion of the subcortical white matter volume and by folding of the gray matter surface, events traditionally considered to occur homogeneously across mammalian species. Here we investigate how white matter expansion and cortical folding scale across species of rodents and primates as the gray matter gains neurons. We find very different scaling rules of white matter expansion across the two orders, favoring volume conservation and smaller propagation times in primates. For a similar number of cortical neurons, primates have a smaller connectivity fraction and less white matter volume than rodents; moreover, as the cortex gains neurons, there is a much faster increase in white matter volume and in its ratio to gray matter volume in rodents than in primates. Order-specific scaling of the white matter can be attributed to different scaling of average fiber caliber and neuronal connectivity in rodents and primates. Finally, cortical folding increases as different functions of the number of cortical neurons in rodents and primates, scaling faster in the latter than in the former. While the neuronal rules that govern gray and white matter scaling are different across rodents and primates, we find that they can be explained by the same unifying model, with order-specific exponents. The different scaling of the white matter has implications for the scaling of propagation time and computational capacity in evolution, and calls for a reappraisal of developmental models of cortical expansion in evolution. PMID:23576961

  4. Vanishing White Matter Disease in a Spanish Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eulàlia Turón-Viñas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanishing white matter (VWM leukoencephalopathy is one of the most prevalent hereditary white matter diseases. It has been associated with mutations in genes encoding eukaryotic translation initiation factor ( eIF2B . We have compiled a list of all the patients diagnosed with VWM in Spain; we found 21 children. The first clinical manifestation in all of them was spasticity, with severe ataxia in six patients, hemiparesis in one child, and dystonic movements in another. They suffered from progressive cognitive deterioration and nine of them had epilepsy too. In four children, we observed optic atrophy and three also had progressive macrocephaly, which is not common in VWM disease. The first two cases were diagnosed before the 1980s. Therefore, they were diagnosed by necropsy studies. The last 16 patients were diagnosed according to genetics: we found mutations in the genes eIF2B5 (13 cases, eIF2B3 (2 cases, and eIF2B4 (1 case. In our report, the second mutation in frequency was c.318A>T; patients with this mutation all followed a slow chronic course, both in homozygous and heterozygous states. Previously, there were no other reports to confirm this fact. We also found some mutations not described in previous reports: c.1090C>T in eIF2B4 , c.314A>G in eIF2B5 , and c.877C>T in eIF2B5.

  5. White matter pathways mediate parental effects on children's reading precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermosten, Maaike; Cuynen, Lieselore; Vanderauwera, Jolijn; Wouters, Jan; Ghesquière, Pol

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the link between parental and offspring's reading is mediated by the cognitive system of the offspring, yet information about the mediating role of the neurobiological system is missing. This family study includes cognitive and diffusion MRI (dMRI) data collected in 71 pre-readers as well as parental reading and environmental data. Using sequential path analyses, which take into account the interrelationships between the different components, we observed mediating effects of the neurobiological system. More specifically, fathers' reading skills predicted reading of the child by operating through a child's left ventral white matter pathway. For mothers no clear mediating role of the neural system was observed. Given that our study involves children who have not yet learned to read and that environmental measures were taken into account, the paternal effect on a child's white matter pathway is unlikely to be only driven by environmental factors. Future intergenerational studies focusing on the genetic, neurobiological and cognitive level of parents and offspring will provide more insight in the relative contribution of parental environment and genes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Laboratory Manual for Stepwise Cerebral White Matter Fiber Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsarnakis, Christos; Liakos, Faidon; Kalyvas, Aristotelis V; Sakas, Damianos E; Stranjalis, George

    2015-08-01

    White matter fiber dissection is an important method in acquiring a thorough neuroanatomic knowledge for surgical practice. Previous studies have definitely improved our understanding of intrinsic brain anatomy and emphasized on the significance of this technique in modern neurosurgery. However, current literature lacks a complete and concentrated laboratory guide about the entire dissection procedure. Hence, our primary objective is to introduce a detailed laboratory manual for cerebral white matter dissection by highlighting consecutive dissection steps, and to stress important technical comments facilitating this complex procedure. Twenty adult, formalin-fixed cerebral hemispheres were included in the study. Ten specimens were dissected in the lateromedial and 10 in the mediolateral direction, respectively, using the fiber dissection technique and the microscope. Eleven and 8 consecutive and distinctive dissection steps are recommended for the lateromedial and mediolateral dissection procedures, respectively. Photographs highlighting various anatomic landmarks accompany every step. Technical recommendations, facilitating the dissection process, are also indicated. The fiber dissection technique, although complex and time consuming, offers a three-dimensional knowledge of intrinsic brain anatomy and architecture, thus improving both the quality of microneurosurgery and the patient's standard of care. The present anatomic study provides a thorough dissection manual to those who study brain anatomy using this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Statistical estimation of white matter microstructure from conventional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah H Suttner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI has become the predominant modality for studying white matter integrity in multiple sclerosis (MS and other neurological disorders. Unfortunately, the use of DTI-based biomarkers in large multi-center studies is hindered by systematic biases that confound the study of disease-related changes. Furthermore, the site-to-site variability in multi-center studies is significantly higher for DTI than that for conventional MRI-based markers. In our study, we apply the Quantitative MR Estimation Employing Normalization (QuEEN model to estimate the four DTI measures: MD, FA, RD, and AD. QuEEN uses a voxel-wise generalized additive regression model to relate the normalized intensities of one or more conventional MRI modalities to a quantitative modality, such as DTI. We assess the accuracy of the models by comparing the prediction error of estimated DTI images to the scan-rescan error in subjects with two sets of scans. Across the four DTI measures, the performance of the models is not consistent: Both MD and RD estimations appear to be quite accurate, while AD estimation is less accurate than MD and RD; the accuracy of FA estimation is poor. Thus, in some cases when assessing white matter integrity, it may be sufficient to acquire conventional MRI sequences alone.

  8. White Matter Damage Relates to Oxygen Saturation in Children With Sickle Cell Anemia Without Silent Cerebral Infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawadler, Jamie M; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clayden, Jonathan D; Hollocks, Matthew J; Seymour, Emma L; Edey, Rosanna; Telfer, Paul; Robins, Andrew; Wilkey, Olu; Barker, Simon; Cox, Tim C S; Clark, Chris A

    2015-07-01

    Sickle cell anemia is associated with compromised oxygen-carrying capability of hemoglobin and a high incidence of overt and silent stroke. However, in children with no evidence of cerebral infarction, there are changes in brain morphometry relative to healthy controls, which may be related to chronic anemia and oxygen desaturation. A whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics analysis was carried out in 25 children with sickle cell anemia with no evidence of abnormality on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (13 male, age range: 8-18 years) and 14 age- and race-matched controls (7 male, age range: 10-19 years) to determine the extent of white matter injury. The hypotheses that white matter damage is related to daytime peripheral oxygen saturation and steady-state hemoglobin were tested. Fractional anisotropy was found to be significantly lower in patients in the subcortical white matter (corticospinal tract and cerebellum), whereas mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity were higher in patients in widespread areas. There was a significant negative relationship between radial diffusivity and oxygen saturation (Psickle cell anemia, and provides for the first time direct evidence of a relationship between brain microstructure and markers of disease severity (eg, peripheral oxygen saturation and steady-state hemoglobin). This study suggests that diffusion tensor imaging metrics may serve as a biomarker for future trials of reducing hypoxic exposure. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Three-dimensional white matter tractography by diffusion tensor imaging in ischaemic stroke involving the corticospinal tract

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    Kunimatsu, A.; Aoki, S.; Masutani, Y.; Abe, O.; Mori, H.; Ohtomo, K. [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo University, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8655, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-08-01

    Diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI) provides information on diffusion anisotropy, which can be expressed with three-dimensional (3D) white matter tractography. We used 3D white matter tractography to show the corticospinal tract in eight patients with acute or early subacute ischaemic stroke involving the posterior limb of the internal capsule or corona radiata and to assess involvement of the tract. Infarcts and the tract were shown simultaneously, providing information on their spatial relationships. In five of the eight patients, 3D fibre tract maps showed the corticospinal tract in close proximity to the infarct but not to pass through it. All these patients recovered well, with maximum improvement from the lowest score on manual muscle testing (MMT) up to the full score through rehabilitation. In the other three patients the corticospinal tract was shown running through the infarct; reduction in MMT did not necessarily improve favourably or last longer, other than in one patient. As 3D white matter tractography can show spatial relationships between the corticospinal tract and an infarct, it might be helpful in prognosis of gross motor function. (orig.)

  10. Differences in integrity of white matter and changes with training in spelling impaired children: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, D; Fink, A; Filippini, N; Johansen-Berg, H; Reishofer, G; Koschutnig, K; Kargl, R; Purgstaller, C; Fazekas, F; Enzinger, C

    2012-07-01

    While the functional correlates of spelling impairment have been rarely investigated, to our knowledge no study exists regarding the structural characteristics of spelling impairment and potential changes with interventions. Using diffusion tensor imaging at 3.0 T, we here therefore sought to investigate (a) differences between children with poor spelling abilities (training group and waiting group) and controls, and (b) the effects of a morpheme-based spelling intervention in children with poor spelling abilities on DTI parameters. A baseline comparison of white matter indices revealed significant differences between controls and spelling-impaired children, mainly located in the right hemisphere (superior corona radiata (SCR), posterior limb of internal capsule, superior longitudinal fasciculus). After 5 weeks of training, spelling ability improved in the training group, along with increases in fractional anisotropy and decreases of radial diffusivity in the right hemisphere compared to controls. In addition, significantly higher decreases of mean diffusivity in the right SCR for the spelling-impaired training group compared to the waiting group were observed. Our results suggest that spelling impairment is associated with differences in white-matter integrity in the right hemisphere. We also provide first indications that white matter changes occur during successful training, but this needs to be more specifically addressed in future research.

  11. White matter integrity in polydrug users in relation to attachment and personality: a controlled diffusion tensor imaging study.

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    Unterrainer, H F; Hiebler, M; Ragger, K; Froehlich, L; Koschutnig, K; Schoeggl, H; Kapfhammer, H P; Papousek, I; Weiss, E M; Fink, A

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between substance use disorders (SUD) and brain deficits has been studied extensively. However, there is still a lack of research focusing on the structural neural connectivity in long-term polydrug use disorder (PUD). Since a deficiency in white matter integrity has been reported as being related to various parameters of increased psychopathology, it might be considered an aggravating factor in the treatment of SUD. In this study we compared two groups of PUD inpatients (abstinent: n = 18, in maintenance treatment: n = 15) to healthy controls (n = 16) with respect to neural connectivity in white matter, and their relation to behavioral parameters of personality factors/organization and attachment styles. Diffusion Tensor Imaging was used to investigate white matter structure. Compared with healthy controls, the PUD patients showed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) mainly in the superior fasciculus longitudinalis and the superior corona radiata. These findings suggest diminished neural connectivity as a result of myelin pathology in PUD patients. In line with our assumptions, we observed FA in the biggest cluster as negatively correlated with anxious attachment (r = 0.36, p personality dysfunctioning (r = -0.41; p personality factors Openness (r = 0.34; p treatment in relation to changes in personality and attachment is recommended.

  12. Comparison of MRI white matter changes with neuropsychologic impairment in Cockayne syndrome.

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    Sugita, K; Takanashi, J; Ishii, M; Niimi, H

    1992-01-01

    The neuropsychologic function and white matter changes observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Cockayne syndrome were studied. MRI with T2-weighted sequences revealed periventricular hyperintensity and white matter hyperintensity in all 3 Cockayne syndrome patients examined; in contrast, 8 age-matched controls had no periventricular or white matter hyperintensity. MRI scans were graded according to the severity of periventricular or white matter hyperintensity using a scale applied to an elderly patient population. There was no difference in the severity of MRI white matter changes in these 3 Cockayne syndrome patients, 2 of whom had severe neuropsychologic functions and one a relatively milder one. There was no correlation between neuropsychologic impairment and MRI white matter changes.

  13. White Matter Neurons in Young Adult and Aged Rhesus Monkey

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    Farzad eMortazavi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In humans and non-human primates (NHP, white matter neurons (WMNs persist beyond early development. Their functional importance is largely unknown, but they have both corticothalamic and corticocortical connectivity and at least one subpopulation has been implicated in vascular regulation and sleep. Several other studies have reported that the density of WMNs in humans is altered in neuropathological or psychiatric conditions. The present investigation evaluates and compares the density of superficial and deep WMNs in frontal (FR, temporal (TE, and parietal (Par association regions of four young adult and four aged male rhesus monkeys. A major aim was to determine whether there was age-related neuronal loss, as might be expected given the substantial age-related changes known to occur in the surrounding white matter environment. Neurons were visualized by immunocytochemistry for Neu-N in coronal tissue sections (30μm thickness, and neuronal density was assessed by systematic random sampling. Per 0.16mm2 sampling box, this yielded about 40 neurons in the superficial WM and 10 in the deep WM. Consistent with multiple studies of cell density in the cortical gray matter of normal brains, neither the superficial nor deep WM populations showed statistically significant age-related neuronal loss, although we observed a moderate decrease with age for the deep WMNs in the frontal region. Morphometric analyses, in contrast, showed significant age effects in soma size and circularity. In specific, superficial WMNs were larger in FR and Par WM regions of the young monkeys; but in the TE, these were larger in the older monkeys. An age effect was also observed for soma circularity: superficial WMNs were more circular in FR and Par of the older monkeys. This second, morphometric result raises the question of whether other age-related morphological, connectivity, or molecular changes occur in the WMNs. These could have multiple impacts, given the wide range of

  14. Migraine-related gray matter and white matter changes at a 1-year follow-up evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jixin; Lan, Lei; Li, Guoying; Yan, Xuemei; Nan, Jiaofen; Xiong, Shiwei; Yin, Qing; von Deneen, Karen M; Gong, Qiyong; Liang, Fanrong; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-12-01

    To assess the longitudinal gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) changes between repeated observations 1 year apart in a group of the early clinical stage of migraine patients without aura, and to explore the relationship of such structural changes with headache activity, we studied patients newly diagnosed with episodic migraine lasting 8 to 14 weeks. Optimized voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistical analyses were used to evaluate changes in GM and WM by using 3-dimensional T1-weighted and diffusion-tensor imaging, respectively. At the 1-year follow-up examination, GM reduction was observed in the dorsolateral and medial part of the superior frontal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, hippocampus, precuneus, and primary and secondary somatosensory cortices. No significant differences were found in the fractional anisotropy and longitudinal, radial, and mean diffusivity of WM in migraine patients without aura within a year. Negative results were found for the association between changes in headache activity parameters and GM. Our results indicated that the GM and WM changed in different pathophysiological conditions of migraine patients without aura. The WM probably evolves slowly in the course of migraine chronicity. Our study found early involvement of GM reduction of sensory-discriminative brain regions in the pathologic process of migraine, but the WM did not exhibit significant changes in the same time interval. GM reduction in sensory-discriminative brain regions may characterize the pathophysiological features of migraine patients without aura in its early stage. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A combined VBM and DTI study of schizophrenia: bilateral decreased insula volume and cerebral white matter disintegrity corresponding to subinsular white matter projections unlinked to clinical symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onay, Aslıhan; Yapıcı Eser, Hale; Ulaşoğlu Yıldız, Çiğdem; Aslan, Selçuk; Talı, Erhan Turgut

    2017-01-01

    Grey matter and white matter changes within the brain are well defined in schizophrenia. However, most studies focused on either grey matter changes or white matter integrity separately; only in limited number of studies these changes were interpreted in the same frame. In addition, the relationship of these findings with clinical variables is not clearly established. Here, we aimed to investigate the grey matter and white matter changes in schizophrenia patients and exhibit the relation of these imaging findings with clinical variables. A total of 20 schizophrenia patients and 16 matched healthy controls underwent magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the grey matter and white matter alterations that occur in schizophrenia patients using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and whole brain voxel-wise analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters with SPM8, respectively. While the preprocessing steps of VBM were performed with the default parameters of VBM8 toolbox, the preprocessing steps of DTI were carried out using FSL. Additionally, VBM results were correlated with clinical variables. Bilateral insula showed decreased grey matter volume in schizophrenia patients compared with healthy controls (P matter volume of insula in schizophrenia patients. DTI analysis revealed a significant increase in mean, radial, and axial diffusivity, mainly of the fibers of bilateral anterior thalamic radiation and superior longitudinal fasciculus with left predominance, which intersected with bilateral subinsular white matter (P matter alterations were observed within bilateral anterior thalamic radiation and superior longitudinal fasciculus that intersects with subinsular white matter. Studies with larger sample sizes and more detailed clinical assessments are required to understand the function of insula in the neurobiology of schizophrenia.

  16. Abnormalities of white matter microstructure in unmedicated obsessive-compulsive disorder and changes after medication.

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    Qing Fan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abnormalities of myelin integrity have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD using multi-parameter maps of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. However, it was still unknown to what degree these abnormalities might be affected by pharmacological treatment. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the abnormalities of white matter microstructure including myelin integrity exist in OCD and whether they are affected by medication. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Parameter maps of DTI, including fractional anisotropy (FA, axial diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD and mean diffusivity (MD, were acquired from 27 unmedicated OCD patients (including 13 drug-naïve individuals and 23 healthy controls. Voxel-based analysis was then performed to detect regions with significant group difference. We compared the DTI-derived parameters of 15 patients before and after 12-week Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI therapies. Significant differences of DTI-derived parameters were observed between OCD and healthy groups in multiple structures, mainly within the fronto-striato-thalamo-cortical loop. An increased RD in combination with no change in AD among OCD patients was found in the left medial superior frontal gyrus, temporo-parietal lobe, occipital lobe, striatum, insula and right midbrain. There was no statistical difference in DTI-derived parameters between drug-naive and previously medicated OCD patients. After being medicated, OCD patients showed a reduction in RD of the left striatum and right midbrain, and in MD of the right midbrain. CONCLUSION: Our preliminary findings suggest that abnormalities of white matter microstructure, particularly in terms of myelin integrity, are primarily located within the fronto-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit of individuals with OCD. Some abnormalities may be partly reversed by SSRI treatment.

  17. Regionally specific white matter disruptions of fornix and cingulum in schizophrenia.

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    Muhammad Farid Abdul-Rahman

    Full Text Available Limbic circuitry disruptions have been implicated in the psychopathology and cognitive deficits of schizophrenia, which may involve white matter disruptions of the major tracts of the limbic system, including the fornix and the cingulum. Our study aimed to investigate regionally specific abnormalities of the fornix and cingulum in schizophrenia using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. We determined the fractional anisotropy (FA, radial diffusivity (RD, and axial diffusivity (AD profiles along the fornix and cingulum tracts using a fibertracking technique and a brain mapping algorithm, the large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM, in the DTI scans of 33 patients with schizophrenia and 31 age-, gender-, and handedness-matched healthy controls. We found that patients with schizophrenia showed reduction in FA and increase in RD in bilateral fornix, and increase in RD in left anterior cingulum when compared to healthy controls. In addition, tract-based analysis revealed specific loci of these white matter differences in schizophrenia, that is, FA reductions and AD and RD increases occur in the region of the left fornix further from the hippocampus, FA reductions and RD increases occur in the rostral portion of the left anterior cingulum, and RD and AD increases occur in the anterior segment of the left middle cingulum. In patients with schizophrenia, decreased FA in the specific loci of the left fornix and increased AD in the right cingulum adjoining the hippocampus correlated with greater severity of psychotic symptoms. These findings support precise disruptions of limbic-cortical integrity in schizophrenia and disruption of these structural networks may contribute towards the neural basis underlying the syndrome of schizophrenia and clinical symptomatology.

  18. Temporal Lobe White Matter Asymmetry and Language Laterality in Epilepsy Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellmore, Timothy M.; Beauchamp, Michael S.; Breier, Joshua I.; Slater, Jeremy D.; Kalamangalam, Giridhar P.; O’Neill, Thomas J.; Disano, Michael A.; Tandon, Nitin

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have advanced our knowledge of the organization of white matter subserving language function. It remains unclear, however, how DTI may be used to predict accurately a key feature of language organization: its asymmetric representation in one cerebral hemisphere. In this study of epilepsy patients with unambiguous lateralization on Wada testing (19 left and 4 right lateralized subjects; no bilateral subjects), the predictive value of DTI for classifying the dominant hemisphere for language was assessed relative to the existing standard - the intra-carotid Amytal (Wada) procedure. Our specific hypothesis is that language laterality in both unilateral left- and right-hemisphere language dominant subjects may be predicted by hemispheric asymmetry in the relative density of three white matter pathways terminating in the temporal lobe implicated in different aspects of language function: the arcuate (AF), uncinate (UF), and inferior longitudinal fasciculi (ILF). Laterality indices computed from asymmetry of high anisotropy AF pathways, but not the other pathways, classified the majority (19 of 23) of patients using the Wada results as the standard. A logistic regression model incorporating information from DTI of the AF, fMRI activity in Broca’s area, and handedness was able to classify 22 of 23 (95.6%) patients correctly according to their Wada score. We conclude that evaluation of highly anisotropic components of the AF alone has significant predictive power for determining language laterality, and that this markedly asymmetric distribution in the dominant hemisphere may reflect enhanced connectivity between frontal and temporal sites to support fluent language processes. Given the small sample reported in this preliminary study, future research should assess this method on a larger group of patients, including subjects with bihemispheric dominance. PMID:19874899

  19. Atypical functional connectivity in autism spectrum disorder is associated with disrupted white matter microstructural organisation

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    Jane eMcGrath

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of structural and functional neural connectivity has been widely reported in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD but there is a striking lack of research attempting to integrate analysis of functional and structural connectivity in the same study population, an approach that may provide key insights into the specific neurobiological underpinnings of altered functional connectivity in autism. The aims of this study were 1. to determine whether functional connectivity abnormalities were associated with structural abnormalities of white matter (WM in ASD and 2. to examine the relationships between aberrant neural connectivity and behaviour in ASD. 22 individuals with ASD and 22 age, IQ-matched controls completed a high-angular-resolution diffusion MRI scan. Structural connectivity was analysed using constrained spherical deconvolution based tractography. Regions for tractography were generated from the results of a previous study, in which 10 pairs of brain regions showed abnormal functional connectivity during visuospatial processing in ASD. WM tracts directly connected 5 of the 10 region pairs that showed abnormal functional connectivity; linking a region in the left occipital lobe (left BA19 and five paired regions: left caudate head, left caudate body, left uncus, left thalamus and left cuneus. Measures of WM microstructural organisation were extracted from these tracts. Fractional anisotropy reductions in the ASD group relative to controls were significant for WM connecting left BA19 to left caudate head and left BA19 to left thalamus. Using a multimodal imaging approach, this study has revealed aberrant white matter microstructure in tracts that directly connect brain regions that are abnormally functionally connected in ASD. These results provide novel evidence to suggest that structural brain pathology may contribute 1. to abnormal functional connectivity and 2. to atypical visuospatial processing in ASD.

  20. White matter developmental trajectories associated with persistence and recovery of childhood stuttering.

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    Chow, Ho Ming; Chang, Soo-Eun

    2017-04-08

    Stuttering affects the fundamental human ability of fluent speech production, and can have a significant negative impact on an individual's psychosocial development. While the disorder affects about 5% of all preschool children, approximately 80% of them recover naturally within a few years of stuttering onset. The pathophysiology and neuroanatomical development trajectories associated with persistence and recovery of stuttering are still largely unknown. Here, the first mixed longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study of childhood stuttering has been reported. A total of 195 high quality DTI scans from 35 children who stutter (CWS) and 43 controls between 3 and 12 years of age were acquired, with an average of three scans per child, each collected approximately a year apart. Fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure reflecting white matter structural coherence, was analyzed voxel-wise to examine group and age-related differences using a linear mixed-effects (LME) model. Results showed that CWS exhibited decreased FA relative to controls in the left arcuate fasciculus, underlying the inferior parietal and posterior temporal areas, and the mid body of corpus callosum. Further, white matter developmental trajectories reflecting growth rate of these tract regions differentiated children with persistent stuttering from those who recovered from stuttering. Specifically, a reduction in FA growth rate (i.e., slower FA growth with age) in persistent children relative to fluent controls in the left arcuate fasciculus and corpus callosum was found, which was not evident in recovered children. These findings provide first glimpses into the possible neural mechanisms of onset, persistence, and recovery of childhood stuttering. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Statistical machine learning to identify traumatic brain injury (TBI) from structural disconnections of white matter networks.

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    Mitra, Jhimli; Shen, Kai-Kai; Ghose, Soumya; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen; Salvado, Olivier; Pannek, Kerstin; Taylor, D Jamie; Mathias, Jane L; Rose, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Identifying diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) presenting with normal appearing radiological MRI presents a significant challenge. Neuroimaging methods such as diffusion MRI and probabilistic tractography, which probe the connectivity of neural networks, show significant promise. We present a machine learning approach to classify TBI participants primarily with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) based on altered structural connectivity patterns derived through the network based statistical analysis of structural connectomes generated from TBI and age-matched control groups. In this approach, higher order diffusion models were used to map white matter connections between 116 cortical and subcortical regions. Tracts between these regions were generated using probabilistic tracking and mean fractional anisotropy (FA) measures along these connections were encoded in the connectivity matrices. Network-based statistical analysis of the connectivity matrices was performed to identify the network differences between a representative subset of the two groups. The affected network connections provided the feature vectors for principal component analysis and subsequent classification by random forest. The validity of the approach was tested using data acquired from a total of 179 TBI patients and 146 controls participants. The analysis revealed altered connectivity within a number of intra- and inter-hemispheric white matter pathways associated with DAI, in consensus with existing literature. A mean classification accuracy of 68.16%±1.81% and mean sensitivity of 80.0%±2.36% were achieved in correctly classifying the TBI patients evaluated on the subset of the participants that was not used for the statistical analysis, in a 10-fold cross-validation framework. These results highlight the potential for statistical machine learning approaches applied to structural connectomes to identify patients with diffusive axonal injury. Copyright

  2. Disrupted white matter connectivity underlying developmental dyslexia: A machine learning approach.

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    Cui, Zaixu; Xia, Zhichao; Su, Mengmeng; Shu, Hua; Gong, Gaolang

    2016-04-01

    Developmental dyslexia has been hypothesized to result from multiple causes and exhibit multiple manifestations, implying a distributed multidimensional effect on human brain. The disruption of specific white-matter (WM) tracts/regions has been observed in dyslexic children. However, it remains unknown if developmental dyslexia affects the human brain WM in a multidimensional manner. Being a natural tool for evaluating this hypothesis, the multivariate machine learning approach was applied in this study to compare 28 school-aged dyslexic children with 33 age-matched controls. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging were acquired to extract five multitype WM features at a regional level: white matter volume, fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity. A linear support vector machine (LSVM) classifier achieved an accuracy of 83.61% using these MRI features to distinguish dyslexic children from controls. Notably, the most discriminative features that contributed to the classification were primarily associated with WM regions within the putative reading network/system (e.g., the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, thalamocortical projections, and corpus callosum), the limbic system (e.g., the cingulum and fornix), and the motor system (e.g., the cerebellar peduncle, corona radiata, and corticospinal tract). These results were well replicated using a logistic regression classifier. These findings provided direct evidence supporting a multidimensional effect of developmental dyslexia on WM connectivity of human brain, and highlighted the involvement of WM tracts/regions beyond the well-recognized reading system in dyslexia. Finally, the discriminating results demonstrated a potential of WM neuroimaging features as imaging markers for identifying dyslexic individuals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Clinical significance of circulating vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 to white matter disintegrity in Alzheimer's dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Wei; Tsai, Meng-Han; Chen, Nai-Ching; Chen, Wei-Hsi; Lu, Yan-Ting; Lui, Chun-Chung; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chang, Wen-Neng; Chang, Alice Y W; Chang, Chiung-Chih

    2015-11-25

    Endothelial dysfunction leads to worse cognitive performance in Alzheimer's dementia (AD). While both cerebrovascular risk factors and endothelial dysfunction lead to activation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin, it is not known whether these biomarkers extend the diagnostic repertoire in reflecting intracerebral structural damage or cognitive performance. A total of 110 AD patients and 50 age-matched controls were enrolled. Plasma levels of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin were measured and correlated with the cognitive performance, white matter macro-structural changes, and major tract-specific fractional anisotropy quantification. The AD patients were further stratified by clinical dementia rating score (mild dementia, n=60; moderate-to-severe dementia, n=50). Compared with the controls, plasma levels of VCAM-1 (p< 0.001), ICAM-1 (p=0.028) and E-selectin (p=0.016) were significantly higher in the patients, but only VCAM-1 levels significantly reflected the severity of dementia (p< 0.001). In addition, only VCAM-1 levels showed an association with macro- and micro- white matter changes especially in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (p< 0.001), posterior thalamic radiation (p=0.002), stria terminalis (p=0.002) and corpus callosum (p=0.009), and were independent of, age and cortical volume. These tracts show significant association with MMSE, short term memory and visuospatial function. Meanwhile, while VCAM-1 level correlated significantly with short-term memory (p=0.026) and drawing (p=0.025) scores in the AD patients after adjusting for age and education, the significance disappeared after adjusting for global FA. Endothelial activation, especially VCAM-1, was of clinical significance in AD that reflects macro- and micro-structural changes and poor short term memory and visuospatial function.

  4. Callosal Function in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Linked to Disrupted White Matter Integrity.

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    Dennis, Emily L; Ellis, Monica U; Marion, Sarah D; Jin, Yan; Moran, Lisa; Olsen, Alexander; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C; Thompson, Paul M; Asarnow, Robert F

    2015-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often results in traumatic axonal injury and white matter (WM) damage, particularly to the corpus callosum (CC). Damage to the CC can lead to impaired performance on neurocognitive tasks, but there is a high degree of heterogeneity in impairment following TBI. Here we examined the relation between CC microstructure and function in pediatric TBI. We used high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to evaluate the structural integrity of the CC in humans following brain injury in a sample of 32 children (23 males and 9 females) with moderate-to-severe TBI (msTBI) at 1-5 months postinjury, compared with well matched healthy control children. We assessed CC function through interhemispheric transfer time (IHTT) as measured using event-related potentials (ERPs), and related this to DWI measures of WM integrity. Finally, the relation between DWI and IHTT results was supported by additional results of neurocognitive performance assessed using a single composite performance scale. Half of the msTBI participants (16 participants) had significantly slower IHTTs than the control group. This slow IHTT group demonstrated lower CC integrity (lower fractional anisotropy and higher mean diffusivity) and poorer neurocognitive functioning than both the control group and the msTBI group with normal IHTTs. Lower fractional anisotropy-a common sign of impaired WM-and slower IHTTs also predicted poor neurocognitive function. This study reveals that there is a subset of pediatric msTBI patients during the post-acute phase of injury who have markedly impaired CC functioning and structural integrity that is associated with poor neurocognitive functioning. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the primary cause of death and disability in children and adolescents. There is considerable heterogeneity in postinjury outcome, which is only partially explained by injury severity. Imaging biomarkers may help explain some of this variance, as diffusion weighted

  5. Monotonic non-linear transformations as a tool to investigate age-related effects on brain white matter integrity: A Box-Cox investigation.

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    Morozova, Maria; Koschutnig, Karl; Klein, Elise; Wood, Guilherme

    2016-01-15

    Non-linear effects of age on white matter integrity are ubiquitous in the brain and indicate that these effects are more pronounced in certain brain regions at specific ages. Box-Cox analysis is a technique to increase the log-likelihood of linear relationships between variables by means of monotonic non-linear transformations. Here we employ Box-Cox transformations to flexibly and parsimoniously determine the degree of non-linearity of age-related effects on white matter integrity by means of model comparisons using a voxel-wise approach. Analysis of white matter integrity in a sample of adults between 20 and 89years of age (n=88) revealed that considerable portions of the white matter in the corpus callosum, cerebellum, pallidum, brainstem, superior occipito-frontal fascicle and optic radiation show non-linear effects of age. Global analyses revealed an increase in the average non-linearity from fractional anisotropy to radial diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and mean diffusivity. These results suggest that Box-Cox transformations are a useful and flexible tool to investigate more complex non-linear effects of age on white matter integrity and extend the functionality of the Box-Cox analysis in neuroimaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of exercise on capillaries in the white matter of transgenic AD mice.

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    Zhang, Yi; Chao, Feng-Lei; Zhou, Chun-Ni; Jiang, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Lin-Mu; Luo, Yan-Min; Xiao, Qian; Tang, Yong

    2017-09-12

    Previous studies have shown that exercise can prevent white matter atrophy in APP/PS1 transgenic Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice. However, the mechanism of this protective effect remains unknown. To further understand this issue, we investigated the effects of exercise on the blood supply of white matter in transgenic AD mice. Six-month-old male APP/PS1 mice were randomly divided into a control group and a running group, and age-matched non-transgenic littermates were used as a wild-type control group. Mice in the running group ran on a treadmill at low intensity for four months. Then, spatial learning and memory abilities, white matter and white matter capillaries were examined in all mice. The 10-month-old AD mice exhibited deficits in cognitive function, and 4 months of exercise improved these deficits. The white matter volume and the total length, total volume and total surface area of the white matter capillaries were decreased in the 10-month-old AD mice, and 4 months of exercise dramatically delayed the changes in these parameters in the AD mice. Our results demonstrate that even low-intensity running exercise can improve spatial learning and memory abilities, delay white matter atrophy and protect white matter capillaries in early-stage AD mice. Protecting capillaries might be an important structural basis for the exercise-induced protection of the structural integrity of white matter in AD.

  7. A multivariate pattern analysis study of the HIV-related white matter anatomical structural connections alterations

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    Tang, Zhenchao; Liu, Zhenyu; Li, Ruili; Cui, Xinwei; Li, Hongjun; Dong, Enqing; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    It's widely known that HIV infection would cause white matter integrity impairments. Nevertheless, it is still unclear that how the white matter anatomical structural connections are affected by HIV infection. In the current study, we employed a multivariate pattern analysis to explore the HIV-related white matter connections alterations. Forty antiretroviraltherapy- naïve HIV patients and thirty healthy controls were enrolled. Firstly, an Automatic Anatomical Label (AAL) atlas based white matter structural network, a 90 × 90 FA-weighted matrix, was constructed for each subject. Then, the white matter connections deprived from the structural network were entered into a lasso-logistic regression model to perform HIV-control group classification. Using leave one out cross validation, a classification accuracy (ACC) of 90% (P=0.002) and areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.96 was obtained by the classification model. This result indicated that the white matter anatomical structural connections contributed greatly to HIV-control group classification, providing solid evidence that the white matter connections were affected by HIV infection. Specially, 11 white matter connections were selected in the classification model, mainly crossing the regions of frontal lobe, Cingulum, Hippocampus, and Thalamus, which were reported to be damaged in previous HIV studies. This might suggest that the white matter connections adjacent to the HIV-related impaired regions were prone to be damaged.

  8. Abnormal gray matter and white matter volume in 'Internet gaming addicts'.

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    Lin, Xiao; Dong, Guangheng; Wang, Qiandong; Du, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Internet gaming addiction (IGA) is usually defined as the inability of an individual to control his/her use of the Internet with serious negative consequences. It is becoming a prevalent mental health concern around the world. To understand whether Internet gaming addiction contributes to cerebral structural changes, the present study examined the brain gray matter density and white matter density changes in participants suffering IGA using voxel-based morphometric analysis. Compared with the healthy controls (N=36, 22.2 ± 3.13 years), IGA participants (N=35, 22.28 ± 2.54 years) showed significant lower gray matter density in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus, left cingulate gyrus, insula, right precuneus, and right hippocampus (all p<0.05). IGA participants also showed significant lower white matter density in the inferior frontal gyrus, insula, amygdala, and anterior cingulate than healthy controls (all p<0.05). Previous studies suggest that these brain regions are involved in decision-making, behavioral inhibition and emotional regulation. Current findings might provide insight in understanding the biological underpinnings of IGA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. What does anisotropy measure? Insights from increased and decreased anisotropy in selective fiber tracts in schizophrenia.

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    Gabriel A De Erausquin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a common, severe and chronically disabling mental illness of unknown cause. Recent MRI studies have focused attention on white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Indices commonly derived from DTI include (a mean diffusivity, independent of direction, (b fractional anisotropy (FA or relative anisotropy (RA, (c axial diffusivity, and (d radial diffusivity. In cerebral white matter, contributions to these indices come from fiber arrangements, degree of myelination, and axonal integrity. Relatively pure deficits in myelin result in a modest increase in radial diffusivity, without affecting axial diffusivity and with preservation of anisotropy. Although schizophrenia is not characterized by gross abnormalities of white matter, it does involve a profound dysregulation of myelin-associated gene expression, reductions in oligodendrocyte numbers, and marked abnormalities in the ultrastructure of myelin sheaths. Since each oligodendrocyte myelinates as many as 40 axon segments, changes in the number of oligodendrocytes, and/or in the integrity of myelin sheaths, and/or axoglial contacts can have a profound impact on signal propagation and the integrity of neuronal circuits. Whereas a number of studies have revealed inconsistent decreases in anisotropy in schizophrenia, we and others have found increased fractional anisotropy in key subcortical tracts associated with the circuits underlying symptom generation in schizophrenia. We review data revealing increased anisotropy in dopaminergic tracts in the mesencephalon of schizophrenics and their unaffected relatives, and discuss the possible biological underpinnings and physiological significance of this finding.

  10. Microstructural abnormalities in white and gray matter in obese adolescents with and without type 2 diabetes

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    Arie Nouwen

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion/interpretation: Our data shows that adolescent obesity alone results in reduced gray matter volume and that adolescent type 2 diabetes is associated with both white and gray matter abnormalities.

  11. White-matter development is different in bilingual and monolingual children: a longitudinal DTI study.

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    Mohades, Seyede Ghazal; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; Rosseel, Yves; Van De Craen, Piet; Luypaert, Robert; Baeken, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous people grow up speaking more than one language, the impact of bilingualism on brain developing neuroanatomy is still poorly understood. This study aimed to determine whether the changes in the mean fractional-anisotropy (MFA) of language pathways are different between bilingual and monolingual children. Simultaneous-bilinguals, sequential-bilinguals and monolingual, male and female 10-13 years old children participated in this longitudinal study over a period of two years. We used diffusion tensor tractography to obtain mean fractional-anisotropy values of four language related pathways and one control bundle: 1-left-inferior-occipitofrontal fasciculus/lIFOF, 2-left-arcuate fasciculus/lAF/lSLF, 3-bundle arising from the anterior part of corpus-callosum and projecting to orbital lobe/AC-OL, 4-fibres emerging from anterior-midbody of corpus-callosum (CC) to motor cortices/AMB-PMC, 5- right-inferior-occipitofrontal fasciculus rIFOF as the control pathway unrelated to language. These values and their rate of change were compared between 3 groups. FA-values did not change significantly over two years for lAF/lSLF and AC-OL. Sequential-bilinguals had the highest degree of change in the MFA value of lIFOF, and AMB-PMC did not present significant group differences. The comparison of MFA of lIFOF yielded a significantly higher FA-value in simultaneous bilinguals compared to monolinguals. These findings acknowledge the existing difference of the development of the semantic processing specific pathway between children with different semantic processing procedure. These also support the hypothesis that age of second language acquisition affects the maturation and myelination of some language specific white-matter pathways.

  12. Assessment of Normal-Appearing White Matter Damage in Multiple Sclerosis Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

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    Kim, Young Joo [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    To determine any evidence of damage in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) tracts in multiple sclerosis (MS) cases using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We retrospectively analyzed anisotropy maps derived from DTI studies performed in 16 MS patients and 14 normal controls. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was measured in NAWM tracts: in the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum and at three points along the corticospinal tracts (internal capsule, cerebral peduncle, and pons). In addition, we performed lesion loads using the manual tracing method in the anterior, posterior, corona radiata, and supratentorial of each side. A FA in NAWM tracts was compared between patients and normal controls using the Student t-test. The FA values and lesion load were compared by performing a Spearman rank correlation. The mean FA values were lower in patients than the controls for the combined genu and splenium (p<0.0001), internal capsule (p=0.03), and cerebral peduncle (p=0.02). Moderate inverse correlations were found between the corpus callosum and the connecting lesion loads (r = -0.40, p = 0.02 for the genu and r= -0.63, p = 0.01 for the splenium). No correlation was found between the FA of the corticospinal tracts and any of the lesion load measurements. We found a statistically significant reduction in the FA values when comparing NAWM tracts from patients with MS those in the normal control group. However, only those in the corpus callosum corresponded with plaque burden. NAWM tract deterioration in the corpus callosum and the corticospinal tracts are likely attributed to several concerted pathologic mechanisms as well as Wallerian degeneration.

  13. Divergent Influences of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Domains on Cognition and Gray and White Matter Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Mitzi M; Ajilore, Olusola; Charlton, Rebecca C; Cohen, Jamie; Yang, Shaolin; Sieg, Erica; Bhaumik, Dulal K; Kumar, Anand; Lamar, Melissa

    2017-06-01

    Hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity are associated with preclinical alterations in cognition and brain structure; however, this often comes from studies of comprehensive risk scores or single isolated factors. We examined associations of empirically derived cardiovascular disease risk factor domains with cognition and brain structure. A total of 124 adults (age, 59.8 [13.1] years; 41% African American; 50% women) underwent neuropsychological and cardiovascular assessments and structural magnetic resonance imaging. Principal component analysis of nine cardiovascular disease risk factors resulted in a four-component solution representing 1, cholesterol; 2, glucose dysregulation; 3, metabolic dysregulation; and 4, blood pressure. Separate linear regression models for learning, memory, executive functioning, and attention/information processing were performed, with all components entered at once, adjusting for age, sex, and education. MRI analyses included whole-brain cortical thickness and tract-based fractional anisotropy adjusted for age and sex. Higher blood pressure was associated with poorer learning (B = -0.19; p = .019), memory (B = -0.22; p = .005), and executive functioning performance (B = -0.14; p = .031), and lower cortical thickness within the right lateral occipital lobe. Elevated glucose dysregulation was associated with poorer attention/information processing performance (B = -0.21; p = .006) and lower fractional anisotropy in the right inferior and bilateral superior longitudinal fasciculi. Cholesterol was associated with higher cortical thickness within left caudal middle frontal cortex. Metabolic dysfunction was positively associated with right superior parietal lobe, left inferior parietal lobe, and left precuneus cortical thickness. Cardiovascular domains were associated with distinct cognitive, gray, and white matter alterations and distinct age groups. Future longitudinal studies may assist in identifying vulnerability profiles

  14. White-matter development is different in bilingual and monolingual children: a longitudinal DTI study.

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    Seyede Ghazal Mohades

    Full Text Available Although numerous people grow up speaking more than one language, the impact of bilingualism on brain developing neuroanatomy is still poorly understood. This study aimed to determine whether the changes in the mean fractional-anisotropy (MFA of language pathways are different between bilingual and monolingual children. Simultaneous-bilinguals, sequential-bilinguals and monolingual, male and female 10-13 years old children participated in this longitudinal study over a period of two years. We used diffusion tensor tractography to obtain mean fractional-anisotropy values of four language related pathways and one control bundle: 1-left-inferior-occipitofrontal fasciculus/lIFOF, 2-left-arcuate fasciculus/lAF/lSLF, 3-bundle arising from the anterior part of corpus-callosum and projecting to orbital lobe/AC-OL, 4-fibres emerging from anterior-midbody of corpus-callosum (CC to motor cortices/AMB-PMC, 5- right-inferior-occipitofrontal fasciculus rIFOF as the control pathway unrelated to language. These values and their rate of change were compared between 3 groups. FA-values did not change significantly over two years for lAF/lSLF and AC-OL. Sequential-bilinguals had the highest degree of change in the MFA value of lIFOF, and AMB-PMC did not present significant group differences. The comparison of MFA of lIFOF yielded a significantly higher FA-value in simultaneous bilinguals compared to monolinguals. These findings acknowledge the existing difference of the development of the semantic processing specific pathway between children with different semantic processing procedure. These also support the hypothesis that age of second language acquisition affects the maturation and myelination of some language specific white-matter pathways.

  15. Distinct types of white matter changes are observed after anterior temporal lobectomy in epilepsy.

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    Dorian Pustina

    left TLE patients, despite showing more initial white matter damage, have the potential for greater adaptive changes postoperatively than right TLE patients.

  16. Adolescents with D-transposition of the great arteries repaired in early infancy demonstrate reduced white matter microstructure associated with clinical risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin, Michael J; Watson, Christopher G; Scoppettuolo, Lisa A; Wypij, David; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Bellinger, David C; DeMaso, David R; Robertson, Richard L; Newburger, Jane W

    2013-09-01

    Our objective was to use diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to compare white matter microstructure in adolescents with D-transposition of the great arteries (D-TGA) who underwent the arterial switch operation in early infancy with typically developing control adolescents. We also examined correlates between patient demographic and medical risk factors and white matter as assessed by regional fractional anisotropy (FA) values. We used with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study 49 adolescents with D-TGA and 29 control adolescents. MRI data, including whole brain DTI and conventional anatomic MRI, were acquired from each subject. Each subject's data were analyzed using random effects analysis to evaluate regional white matter differences in FA between D-TGA and control adolescents. While multifocal punctate MRI hypointensities on T1-weighted (T1W) imaging suggestive of mineralization were found, other evidence of gross white matter injury was absent. Eighteen discrete regions of significantly reduced FA in D-TGA adolescents compared with controls were observed in deep white matter of cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum, and midbrain. Among D-TGA adolescents, lower FA correlated with younger gestational age, shorter duration of intraoperative cooling, higher intraoperative minimum tympanic temperature, longer intensive care unit stay after repair, and greater total number of open cardiac operations. Despite scant white matter injury evident on conventional brain MRI, adolescents with D-TGA repaired in infancy demonstrate significant white matter FA reduction that may relate to their reported neurocognitive deficits. Among adolescents with D-TGA, FA values are associated with patient and perioperative factors, some of which are modifiable. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Altered white matter microstructure is associated with social cognition and psychotic symptoms in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome

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    Maria eJalbrzikowski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome (22q11DS is a highly penetrant genetic mutation associated with a significantly increased risk for psychosis. Aberrant neurodevelopment may lead to inappropriate neural circuit formation and cerebral dysconnectivity in 22q11DS, which may contribute to symptom development. Here we examined: 1 differences between 22q11DS participants and typically developing controls in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI measures within white matter tracts; 2 whether there is an altered age-related trajectory of white matter pathways in 22q11DS; and 3 relationships between DTI measures, social cognition task performance and positive symptoms of psychosis in 22q11DS and typically developing controls. Sixty-four direction diffusion weighted imaging data were acquired on 65 participants (36 22q11DS, 29 controls. We examined differences between 22q11DS vs. controls in measures of fractional anisotropy (FA, axial (AD and radial diffusivity (RD, using both a voxel-based and region of interest approach. Social cognition domains assessed were: Theory of Mind and emotion recognition. Positive symptoms were assessed using the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes. Compared to typically developing controls, 22q11DS participants showed significantly lower AD and RD in multiple white matter tracts, with effects of greatest magnitude for AD in the superior longitudinal fasciculus. Additionally, 22q11DS participants failed to show typical age-associated changes in FA and RD in the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Higher AD in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and left uncinate fasciculus was associated with better social cognition in 22q11DS and controls. In contrast, greater severity of positive symptoms was associated with lower AD in bilateral regions of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus in 22q11DS. White matter microstructure in tracts relevant to social cognition is disrupted in 22q11DS, and may contribute to

  18. Age-related modifications of diffusion tensor imaging parameters and white matter hyperintensities as inter-dependent processes

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    Amandine ePelletier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microstructural changes of White Matter (WM associated with aging have been widely described through Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI parameters. In parallel, White Matter Hyperintensities (WMH as observed on a T2-MRI are extremely common in older individuals. However, few studies have investigated both phenomena conjointly. The present study investigates aging effects on DTI parameters in absence and in presence of WMH. Diffusion maps were constructed based on 21 directions DTI scans of young adults (n=19, mean age=33 SD=7.4 and two age-matched groups of older adults, one presenting low-level-WMH (n=20, mean age=78, SD= 3.2 and one presenting high-level-WMH (n=20, mean age=79, SD= 5.4. Older subjects with low-level-WMH presented modifications of DTI parameters in comparison to younger subjects, fitting with the DTI pattern classically described in aging, i.e. Fractional Anisotropy (FA decrease/Radial Diffusivity (RD increase. Furthermore, older subjects with high-level-WMH showed higher DTI modifications in Normal Appearing White Matter (NAWM in comparison to those with low-level-WMH. Finally, in older subjects with high-level-WMH, FA or RD values of NAWM were associated with to WMH burden. Therefore, our findings suggest that DTI modifications and the presence of WMH would be two inter-dependent processes but occurring within different temporal windows. DTI changes would reflect the early phase of white matter changes and WMH would appear as a consequence of those changes.

  19. Changes in White Matter Integrity following Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD®) in Children with Cerebral Palsy and Motor Speech Disorders.

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    Reed, Alesha; Cummine, Jacqueline; Bakhtiari, Reyhaneh; Fox, Cynthia M; Boliek, Carol A

    2017-07-28

    Preliminary evidence suggests that intensive voice and speech treatment based on activity-dependent neuroplasticity principles holds promise for affecting positive change in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and motor speech disorders. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows researchers to make inferences about the integrity of white matter tracks and provides a sensitive measure of neuroplasticity. Previous treatment studies looking at the effects of training on white matter integrity have shown positive results, but these studies have been limited to gross motor function. Eight children with motor speech disorders and CP (3 females; age 8-16 years) and an age- and sex-matched group of typically developing (TD) children participated. Each child with CP completed a full dose of LSVT LOUD® and a 12-week maintenance program. Participants attended 3 recording sessions: before and after treatment, and after the maintenance period. TD children were tested at the same 3 time points. Recording sessions for both groups of children included measures of white matter integrity using DTI and acoustic measures of voice and speech. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was measured for 2 motor tracts and 5 association tracts. In children with CP, we observed an increase in FA in several motor and association tracts immediately following treatment and 12 weeks after treatment. Acoustic data on untrained tasks were correlated with changes in FA detected immediately following treatment and after the 12-week maintenance program. These findings suggest that long-term practice of skills attained during the treatment phase enhances white matter tract integrity in speech production networks. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Effects of a Balanced Translocation between Chromosomes 1 and 11 Disrupting the DISC1 Locus on White Matter Integrity.

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    Heather C Whalley

    Full Text Available Individuals carrying rare, but biologically informative genetic variants provide a unique opportunity to model major mental illness and inform understanding of disease mechanisms. The rarity of such variations means that their study involves small group numbers, however they are amongst the strongest known genetic risk factors for major mental illness and are likely to have large neural effects. DISC1 (Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 is a gene containing one such risk variant, identified in a single Scottish family through its disruption by a balanced translocation of chromosomes 1 and 11; t(1;11 (q42.1;q14.3.Within the original pedigree, we examined the effects of the t(1;11 translocation on white matter integrity, measured by fractional anisotropy (FA. This included family members with (n = 7 and without (n = 13 the translocation, along with a clinical control sample of patients with psychosis (n = 34, and a group of healthy controls (n = 33.We report decreased white matter integrity in five clusters in the genu of the corpus callosum, the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, acoustic radiation and fornix. Analysis of the mixed psychosis group also demonstrated decreased white matter integrity in the above regions. FA values within the corpus callosum correlated significantly with positive psychotic symptom severity.We demonstrate that the t(1;11 translocation is associated with reduced white matter integrity in frontal commissural and association fibre tracts. These findings overlap with those shown in affected patients with psychosis and in DISC1 animal models and highlight the value of rare but biologically informative mutations in modeling psychosis.

  1. Ischemic Preconditioning in White Matter: Magnitude and Mechanism.

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    Hamner, Margaret A; Ye, Zucheng; Lee, Richard V; Colman, Jamie R; Le, Thu; Gong, Davin C; Ransom, Bruce R; Weinstein, Jonathan R

    2015-11-25

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a robust neuroprotective phenomenon whereby brief ischemic exposure confers tolerance to a subsequent ischemic challenge. IPC has not been studied selectively in CNS white matter (WM), although stroke frequently involves WM. We determined whether IPC is present in WM and, if so, its mechanism. We delivered a brief in vivo preconditioning ischemic insult (unilateral common carotid artery ligation) to 12- to 14-week-old mice and determined WM ischemic vulnerability [oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)] 72 h later, using acutely isolated optic nerves (CNS WM tracts) from the preconditioned (ipsilateral) and control (contralateral) hemispheres. Functional and structural recovery was assessed by quantitative measurement of compound action potentials (CAPs) and immunofluorescent microscopy. Preconditioned mouse optic nerves (MONs) showed better functional recovery after OGD than the non-preconditioned MONs (31 ± 3 vs 17 ± 3% normalized CAP area, p IFNAR1), key receptors in innate immune response, are implicated in gray matter preconditioning. Strikingly, IPC-mediated WM protection was abolished in both TLR4(-/-) and IFNAR1(-/-) mice. In addition, IPC-mediated protection in WM was also abolished in IFNAR1(fl/fl) LysM(cre), but not in IFNAR1(fl/fl) control, mice. These findings demonstrated for the first time that IPC was robust in WM, the phenomenon being intrinsic to WM itself. Furthermore, WM IPC was dependent on innate immune cell signaling pathways. Finally, these data demonstrated that microglial-specific expression of IFNAR1 plays an indispensable role in WM IPC. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) has been studied predominantly in gray matter, but stroke in humans frequently involves white matter (WM) as well. Here we describe a novel, combined in vivo/ex vivo mouse model to determine whether IPC occurs in WM. It does. Using genetically altered mice, we identified two innate immune cell receptors, Toll-like receptor 4 and type 1

  2. A semi-automated method for measuring thickness and white matter integrity of the corpus callosum

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    S Andronikou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Diseases affecting cerebral white matter may lead to left-right asymmetries and atrophy of interhemispheric connections, i.e. the corpus callosum (CC. Our aim was to describe and test a semi-automated system that divides the midline CC into a number of segments and determines thickness at each, then performs fibre tracking from these segments. Methods. Six normal female volunteers (average age 25.8 ±6.7 years and a female patient with diagnosed multiple sclerosis (age 26 years were scanned on a 3T MRI. We performed diffusion-weighted imaging in 12 directions, and calculated diffusion tensors and fractional anisotropy (FA maps from this pre-processed data. Fibre tracking from a region-of-interest encompassing the entire CC was done. This fibre data, together with FA maps and the unweighted diffusion tensor imaging (DTI image (b = 0 s/mm2, were imported into a custom tool written in MATLAB. The midline sagittal position was carefully defined by selecting multiple midline points in coronal and axial views and rotating the image volume and fibre co-ordinates accordingly. Using the customised tool, dorsal and ventral CC contours were manually drawn on the mid-sagittal FA image, initiating automated calculation of a contour midway between these manually drawn lines. The programme was designed to then divide the midline contour into a pre-selected number of segments; from each segment border, perpendicular spokes were projected until they intersected with the dorsal and ventral contours. This technique divided the CC into a pre-set amount of segments, the number of which was limited by the spatial resolution. It was decided to set the number at 40 to ensure that each segment depicted a contiguous strip of voxels across the CC from the dorsal to the ventral contour. The system allows these segments to then be used as seeds for separate fibre tracking in each cerebral hemisphere, and various parameters are automatically plotted as a function of

  3. [Age-related white matter lesions (leukoaraiosis): an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Yukio; Sakamoto, Shinichi

    2013-07-01

    Leukoaraiosis (age-related white matter hyperintensities) is the most frequently seen lesion on brain magnetic resonance (MR) images. This lesion is a subject of much current interest, because a number of multicenter studies have revealed that it is associated with various disturbances and poor prognoses. Leukoaraiosis corresponds to various pathologies, including demyelination, apoptosis, edema, dilated perivascular spaces, axonal damage, gliosis, and infarcts. Also noted in leukoaraiosis are changes in small vessels, such as fibrohyalinosis and venous collagenosis. The main cause of leukoaraiosis is thought to be chronic ischemia; other causes include edema and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. Major risk factors for leukoaraiosis are age and hypertension. Disturbances that are related to leukoaraiosis include stroke, dementia, cognitive impairment, gait disturbance, fall, and depression. Leukoaraiosis is also a risk factor for death. Technologies, such as automatic volumetry, tissue segmentation, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization tensor imaging, diffusion kurtosis imaging, and ultra-high field MR imaging may provide further insights into leukoaraiosis.

  4. Detection of white matter lesions in cerebral small vessel disease

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    Riad, Medhat M.; Platel, Bram; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-02-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are diffuse white matter abnormalities commonly found in older subjects and are important indicators of stroke, multiple sclerosis, dementia and other disorders. We present an automated WML detection method and evaluate it on a dataset of small vessel disease (SVD) patients. In early SVD, small WMLs are expected to be of importance for the prediction of disease progression. Commonly used WML segmentation methods tend to ignore small WMLs and are mostly validated on the basis of total lesion load or a Dice coefficient for all detected WMLs. Therefore, in this paper, we present a method that is designed to detect individual lesions, large or small, and we validate the detection performance of our system with FROC (free-response ROC) analysis. For the automated detection, we use supervised classification making use of multimodal voxel based features from different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, including intensities, tissue probabilities, voxel locations and distances, neighborhood textures and others. After preprocessing, including co-registration, brain extraction, bias correction, intensity normalization, and nonlinear registration, ventricle segmentation is performed and features are calculated for each brain voxel. A gentle-boost classifier is trained using these features from 50 manually annotated subjects to give each voxel a probability of being a lesion voxel. We perform ROC analysis to illustrate the benefits of using additional features to the commonly used voxel intensities; significantly increasing the area under the curve (Az) from 0.81 to 0.96 (p<0.05). We perform the FROC analysis by testing our classifier on 50 previously unseen subjects and compare the results with manual annotations performed by two experts. Using the first annotator results as our reference, the second annotator performs at a sensitivity of 0.90 with an average of 41 false positives per subject while our automated method reached the same

  5. Hemodynamic and metabolic correlates of perinatal white matter injury severity.

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    Art Riddle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although the spectrum of perinatal white matter injury (WMI in preterm infants is shifting from cystic encephalomalacia to milder forms of WMI, the factors that contribute to this changing spectrum are unclear. We hypothesized that the variability in WMI quantified by immunohistochemical markers of inflammation could be correlated with the severity of impaired blood oxygen, glucose and lactate. METHODS: We employed a preterm fetal sheep model of in utero moderate hypoxemia and global severe but not complete cerebral ischemia that reproduces the spectrum of human WMI. Since there is small but measurable residual brain blood flow during occlusion, we sought to determine if the metabolic state of the residual arterial blood was associated with severity of WMI. Near the conclusion of hypoxia-ischemia, we recorded cephalic arterial blood pressure, blood oxygen, glucose and lactate levels. To define the spectrum of WMI, an ordinal WMI rating scale was compared against an unbiased quantitative image analysis protocol that provided continuous histo-pathological outcome measures for astrogliosis and microgliosis derived from the entire white matter. RESULTS: A spectrum of WMI was observed that ranged from diffuse non-necrotic lesions to more severe injury that comprised discrete foci of microscopic or macroscopic necrosis. Residual arterial pressure, oxygen content and blood glucose displayed a significant inverse association with WMI and lactate concentrations were directly related. Elevated glucose levels were the most significantly associated with less severe WMI. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that under conditions of hypoxemia and severe cephalic hypotension, WMI severity measured using unbiased immunohistochemical measurements correlated with several physiologic parameters, including glucose, which may be a useful marker of fetal response to hypoxia or provide protection against energy failure and more severe WMI.

  6. Hemodynamic and metabolic correlates of perinatal white matter injury severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Art; Maire, Jennifer; Cai, Victor; Nguyen, Thuan; Gong, Xi; Hansen, Kelly; Grafe, Marjorie R; Hohimer, A Roger; Back, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    Although the spectrum of perinatal white matter injury (WMI) in preterm infants is shifting from cystic encephalomalacia to milder forms of WMI, the factors that contribute to this changing spectrum are unclear. We hypothesized that the variability in WMI quantified by immunohistochemical markers of inflammation could be correlated with the severity of impaired blood oxygen, glucose and lactate. We employed a preterm fetal sheep model of in utero moderate hypoxemia and global severe but not complete cerebral ischemia that reproduces the spectrum of human WMI. Since there is small but measurable residual brain blood flow during occlusion, we sought to determine if the metabolic state of the residual arterial blood was associated with severity of WMI. Near the conclusion of hypoxia-ischemia, we recorded cephalic arterial blood pressure, blood oxygen, glucose and lactate levels. To define the spectrum of WMI, an ordinal WMI rating scale was compared against an unbiased quantitative image analysis protocol that provided continuous histo-pathological outcome measures for astrogliosis and microgliosis derived from the entire white matter. A spectrum of WMI was observed that ranged from diffuse non-necrotic lesions to more severe injury that comprised discrete foci of microscopic or macroscopic necrosis. Residual arterial pressure, oxygen content and blood glucose displayed a significant inverse association with WMI and lactate concentrations were directly related. Elevated glucose levels were the most significantly associated with less severe WMI. Our results suggest that under conditions of hypoxemia and severe cephalic hypotension, WMI severity measured using unbiased immunohistochemical measurements correlated with several physiologic parameters, including glucose, which may be a useful marker of fetal response to hypoxia or provide protection against energy failure and more severe WMI.

  7. White matter microstructure from nonparametric axon diameter distribution mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamini, Dan; Komlosh, Michal E; Holtzclaw, Lynne A; Nevo, Uri; Basser, Peter J

    2016-07-15

    We report the development of a double diffusion encoding (DDE) MRI method to estimate and map the axon diameter distribution (ADD) within an imaging volume. A variety of biological processes, ranging from development to disease and trauma, may lead to changes in the ADD in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Unlike previously proposed methods, this ADD experimental design and estimation framework employs a more general, nonparametric approach, without a priori assumptions about the underlying form of the ADD, making it suitable to analyze abnormal tissue. In the current study, this framework was used on an ex vivo ferret spinal cord, while emphasizing the way in which the ADD can be weighted by either the number or the volume of the axons. The different weightings, which result in different spatial contrasts, were considered throughout this work. DDE data were analyzed to derive spatially resolved maps of average axon diameter, ADD variance, and extra-axonal volume fraction, along with a novel sub-micron restricted structures map. The morphological information contained in these maps was then used to segment white matter into distinct domains by using a proposed k-means clustering algorithm with spatial contiguity and left-right symmetry constraints, resulting in identifiable white matter tracks. The method was validated by comparing histological measures to the estimated ADDs using a quantitative similarity metric, resulting in good agreement. With further acquisition acceleration and experimental parameters adjustments, this ADD estimation framework could be first used preclinically, and eventually clinically, enabling a wide range of neuroimaging applications for improved understanding of neurodegenerative pathologies and assessing microstructural changes resulting from trauma. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. White matter alterations in antipsychotic- and mood stabilizer-naïve individuals with bipolar II/NOS disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Sarah W; Chandler, Rebecca A; Rogers, Robert D; Mackay, Clare E; Goodwin, Guy M

    2013-01-01

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) have been inconsistent in demonstrating impairments in gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) structures in bipolar disorder (BD). This may be a consequence of significant confounding effects of medication, illness history and selection of controls in existing studies. Study of bipolar II or not-otherwise-specified (BD II/NOS) disorder provides a solution to these confounds and a bridge to unipolar cases across the affective spectrum. Thirty-eight euthymic, antipsychotic- and mood stabilizer-naïve young adults (mean age = 20.9 years) with BD II/NOS and 37 age-, cognitive ability- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs) underwent MRI. Voxel-wise and regional gray matter volume comparisons were conducted using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) were used to assess whole-brain WM, as indexed using fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), parallel and perpendicular diffusion values. No between-group differences were observed for whole-brain VBM comparisons. By contrast, in comparison to HCs, participants with BD II/NOS had significant widespread reductions in FA and increased MD and perpendicular diffusion values in virtually all the major cortical white matter tracts. These data suggest pathophysiological involvement of WM microstructures - but not GM macrostructures - in high functioning BD II/NOS patients at an early age and before significant clinical adversity has been recorded. We propose that white matter development is a valid candidate target for understanding genetic and environmental antecedents to bipolar disorder and mood disorder more generally.

  9. White matter tract signatures of the progressive aphasias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Colin J.; Malone, Ian B.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Buckley, Aisling H.; Downey, Laura E.; Golden, Hannah L.; Ryan, Natalie S.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rossor, Martin N.; Fox, Nick C.; Warren, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    The primary progressive aphasias (PPA) are a heterogeneous group of language-led neurodegenerative diseases resulting from large-scale brain network degeneration. White matter (WM) pathways bind networks together, and might therefore hold information about PPA pathogenesis. Here we used diffusion tensor imaging and tract-based spatial statistics to compare WM tract changes between PPA syndromes and with respect to Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls in 33 patients with PPA (13 nonfluent/agrammatic PPA); 10 logopenic variant PPA; and 10 semantic variant PPA. Nonfluent/agrammatic PPA was associated with predominantly left-sided and anterior tract alterations including uncinate fasciculus (UF) and subcortical projections; semantic variant PPA with bilateral alterations in inferior longitudinal fasciculus and UF; and logopenic variant PPA with bilateral but predominantly left-sided alterations in inferior longitudinal fasciculus, UF, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and subcortical projections. Tract alterations were more extensive than gray matter alterations, and the extent of alteration across tracts and PPA syndromes varied between diffusivity metrics. These WM signatures of PPA syndromes illustrate the selective vulnerability of brain language networks in these diseases and might have some pathologic specificity. PMID:23312804

  10. White Matter Hyperintensity Volume and Cerebral Perfusion in Older Individuals with Hypertension Using Arterial Spin-Labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, J. W.; Mutsaerts, H. J. M. M.; Nederveen, A. J.; Vrenken, H.; Steenwijk, M. D.; Caan, M. W. A.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; van Gool, W. A.; Richard, E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin in elderly patients with hypertension may be part of a general cerebral perfusion deficit, involving not only the white matter hyperintensities but also the surrounding normal-appearing white matter and gray matter. We

  11. Effect of dimethyl fumarate on gray and white matter pathology in subjects with relapsing multiple sclerosis: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivadinov, R; Hagemeier, J; Bergsland, N; Tavazzi, E; Weinstock-Guttman, B

    2018-03-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an oral treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) with anti-inflammatory and possible neuroprotective properties. Its effect on white matter and gray matter pathology is still not fully understood. The aim of the study was to characterize the effect of DMF on normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and thalamic pathology longitudinally. In this observational, longitudinal, 24-month magnetic resonance imaging study, 75 patients with relapsing-remitting MS treated with DMF and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals were enrolled. Regional diffusion tensor imaging metrics and tract-based spatial statistics analyses were used to assess differences between groups. Mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, radial diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were measured in the thalamus and NAWM. Baseline differences and changes over time were evaluated within and between study groups. At baseline, patients with MS showed significantly increased diffusivity and decreased fractional anisotropy in the thalamus (P < 0.001 for mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity) and NAWM (all P < 0.016) compared with healthy individuals. No significant within-group difference was found in diffusion tensor imaging measures over 24 months in either group. Healthy individuals showed a significantly greater rate of increased diffusivity parameters in the thalamus and NAWM compared with patients with MS, over 24 months (P < 0.05). The lack of changes in diffusion tensor imaging metrics in patients with MS over 24 months possibly indicates a neuroprotective role of DMF. These findings provide additional evidence of the beneficial effect of DMF on MS-related pathology. © 2018 EAN.

  12. Brain grey and white matter predictors of verbal ability traits in older age: The Lothian Birth Cohort 1936.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Paul; Cox, Simon R; Dykiert, Dominika; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Bastin, Mark E; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Deary, Ian J

    2017-08-01

    Cerebral grey and white matter MRI parameters are related to general intelligence and some specific cognitive abilities. Less is known about how structural brain measures relate specifically to verbal processing abilities. We used multi-modal structural MRI to investigate the grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) correlates of verbal ability in 556 healthy older adults (mean age = 72.68 years, s.d. = .72 years). Structural equation modelling was used to decompose verbal performance into two latent factors: a storage factor that indexed participants' ability to store representations of verbal knowledge and an executive factor that measured their ability to regulate their access to this information in a flexible and task-appropriate manner. GM volumes and WM fractional anisotropy (FA) for components of the language/semantic network were used as predictors of these verbal ability factors. Volume of the ventral temporal cortices predicted participants' storage scores (β = .12, FDR-adjusted p = .04), consistent with the theory that this region acts as a key substrate of semantic knowledge. This effect was mediated by childhood IQ, suggesting a lifelong association between ventral temporal volume and verbal knowledge, rather than an effect of cognitive decline in later life. Executive ability was predicted by FA fractional anisotropy of the arcuate fasciculus (β = .19, FDR-adjusted p = .001), a major language-related tract implicated in speech production. This result suggests that this tract plays a role in the controlled retrieval of word knowledge during speech. At a more general level, these data highlight a basic distinction between information representation, which relies on the accumulation of tissue in specialised GM regions, and executive control, which depends on long-range WM pathways for efficient communication across distributed cortical networks. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantifying Cerebellum Grey Matter and White Matter Perfusion Using Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling

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    Xiufeng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate quantification of cerebellum cerebral blood flow (CBF, studies were performed to systematically optimize arterial spin labeling (ASL parameters for measuring cerebellum perfusion, segment cerebellum to obtain separate CBF values for grey matter (GM and white matter (WM, and compare FAIR ASST to PICORE. Cerebellum GM and WM CBF were measured with optimized ASL parameters using FAIR ASST and PICORE in five subjects. Influence of volume averaging in voxels on cerebellar grey and white matter boundaries was minimized by high-probability threshold masks. Cerebellar CBF values determined by FAIR ASST were 43.8 ± 5.1 mL/100 g/min for GM and 27.6 ± 4.5 mL/100 g/min for WM. Quantitative perfusion studies indicated that CBF in cerebellum GM is 1.6 times greater than that in cerebellum WM. Compared to PICORE, FAIR ASST produced similar CBF estimations but less subtraction error and lower temporal, spatial, and intersubject variability. These are important advantages for detecting group and/or condition differences in CBF values.

  14. White matter microstructure and volitional motor activity in schizophrenia: A diffusion kurtosis imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docx, Lise; Emsell, Louise; Van Hecke, Wim; De Bondt, Timo; Parizel, Paul M; Sabbe, Bernard; Morrens, Manuel

    2017-02-28

    Avolition is a core feature of schizophrenia and may arise from altered brain connectivity. Here we used diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) to investigate the association between white matter (WM) microstructure and volitional motor activity. Multi-shell diffusion MRI and 24-h actigraphy data were obtained from 20 right-handed patients with schizophrenia and 16 right-handed age and gender matched healthy controls. We examined correlations between fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), mean kurtosis (MK), and motor activity level, as well as group differences in these measures. In the patient group, increasing motor activity level was positively correlated with MK in the inferior, medial and superior longitudinal fasciculus, the corpus callosum, the posterior fronto-occipital fasciculus and the posterior cingulum. This association was not found in control subjects or in DTI measures. These results show that a lack of volitional motor activity in schizophrenia is associated with potentially altered WM microstructure in posterior brain regions associated with cognitive function and motivation. This could reflect both illness related dysconnectivity which through altered cognition, manifests as reduced volitional motor activity, and/or the effects of reduced physical activity on brain WM. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Radiologic differences in white matter maturation between preterm and full-term infants: TBSS study

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    Lee, Ah Young; Jang, Sung Ho; Ahn, Sang Ho; Cho, Hee Kyung; Jo, Hae Min; Son, Su Min [Yeungnam University, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eunsil [Yeungnam University, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Widespread white matter (WM) pathology in preterm children has been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate maturational differences of WM between preterm infants with thinning of the corpus callosum and full-term infants. A total of 18 preterm children and 18 full-term children were divided into three subgroups according to the corrected age at the time of diffusion tensor imaging scanning. Tract-based spatial statistics was used for assessing differences in fractional anisotropy (FA) between preterm and full-term children, and between each age-related subgroup in preterm and in full-term children. In the preterm group, FA values of overall WM showed an increase with age. This trend indicates that WM maturation is a gradual occurrence during a child's first 2 years. In the full-term group, most WM structures had reached maturation at around 1 year of age; however, centrum semiovale level showed sustained maturation during the first 2 years. Results of our study demonstrate radiologic maturational differences of WM and provide evidence of the need for therapeutic intervention within 2 years of birth to prevent specific functional impairment and to improve clinical outcome in preterm children. (orig.)

  16. Longitudinal differences in white matter integrity in youth at high familial risk for bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzola, Rossana; Nickson, Thomas; Bastin, Mark E; Giles, Stephen; Macdonald, Alix; Sussmann, Jessika; McIntosh, Andrew M; Whalley, Heather C; Duchesne, Simon

    2017-05-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have reported abnormalities in white matter (WM) pathways in subjects at high familial risk of mood disorders. In the current study, we examined the trajectory of these abnormalities during the early stages of illness development using longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. Subjects (16-28 years old) were recruited in the Scottish Bipolar Family Study, a prospective longitudinal study that has examined individuals at familial risk of mood disorder on three occasions, 2 years apart. The current study concerns imaging data from the first and second assessments. We analysed DTI data for 43 controls and 69 high-risk individuals who were further subdivided into a group of 53 high-risk subjects who remained well (high-risk well) and 16 who met diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (high-risk MDD) at follow-up. Longitudinal differences in fractional anisotropy (FA) between groups based on diagnostic status were investigated using the tract-based spatial statistics technique (TBSS). We found a significant reduction in FA (Pcorr integrity detected at baseline in previous studies. Difference in WM integrity between high-risk individuals and controls could therefore occur in earlier childhood and be a necessary but not sufficient condition to develop future mood disorders. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. White matter alterations associated with suicide in patients with schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Kim, Borah; Oh, Daeyoung; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Keun-Hyang; Bang, Seong Yun; Choi, Tai Kiu; Lee, Sang-Hyuk

    2016-02-28

    The risk of suicide is disproportionately high among people diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder. Brain imaging studies have shown a few relationships between neuroanatomy and suicide. This study examines the relationship between alterations in brain white matter (WM) and suicidal behavior in people with schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder. The study participants were 56 patients with schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder, with (n=15) and without (n=41) a history of suicide attempts. Fractional anisotropy (FA) values were compared between suicide attempters and non-attempters using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS). Attempters showed significantly higher FA values than non-attempters in the left corona radiata, the superior longitudinal fasciculus, the posterior limb and retrolenticular part of the internal capsule, the external capsule, the insula, the posterior thalamic radiation, the cerebral peduncle, the sagittal stratum, and temporal lobe WM. Scores of the picture arrangement test showed a significant positive correlation with FA values of the right corona radiata, the right superior longitudinal fasciculus, the body of the corpus callosum, and the left corona radiata in attempters but not in non-attempters. These findings suggest that fronto-temporo-limbic circuits can be associated mainly with suicidal behavior in people with schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gender influence on white matter microstructure: a tract-based spatial statistics analysis.

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    Richard A Kanaan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sexual dimorphism in human brain structure is well recognised, but less is known about gender differences in white matter microstructure. We used diffusion tensor imaging to explore gender differences in fractional anisotropy (FA, an index of microstructural integrity. We previously found increased FA in the corpus callosum in women, and increased FA in the cerebellum and left superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF in men, using a whole-brain voxel-based analysis. METHODS: A whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics analysis of 120 matched subjects from the previous analysis, and 134 new subjects (147 men and 107 women in total using a 1.5T scanner, with division into tract-based regions of interest. RESULTS: Men had higher FA in the superior cerebellar peduncles and women had higher FA in corpus callosum in both the first and second samples. The higher SLF FA in men was not found in either sample. DISCUSSION: We confirmed our previous, controversial finding of increased FA in the corpus callosum in women, and increased cerebellar FA in men. The corpus callosum FA difference offers some explanation for the otherwise puzzling advantage in inter-callosal transfer time shown in women; the cerebellar FA difference may be associated with the developmental motor advantage shown in men.

  19. Endothelial Function Is Associated with White Matter Microstructure and Executive Function in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan F. Johnson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Age-related declines in endothelial function can lead to cognitive decline. However, little is known about the relationships between endothelial function and specific neurocognitive functions. This study explored the relationship between measures of endothelial function (reactive hyperemia index; RHI, white matter (WM health (fractional anisotropy, FA, and WM hyperintensity volume, WMH, and executive function (Trail Making Test (TMT; Trail B − Trail A. Participants were 36 older adults between the ages of 59 and 69 (mean age = 63.89 years, SD = 2.94. WMH volume showed no relationship with RHI or executive function. However, there was a positive relationship between RHI and FA in the genu and body of the corpus callosum. In addition, higher RHI and FA were each associated with better executive task performance. Tractography was used to localize the WM tracts associated with RHI to specific portions of cortex. Results indicated that the RHI-FA relationship observed in the corpus callosum primarily involved tracts interconnecting frontal regions, including the superior frontal gyrus (SFG and frontopolar cortex, linked with executive function. These findings suggest that superior endothelial function may help to attenuate age-related declines in WM microstructure in portions of the corpus callosum that interconnect prefrontal brain regions involved in executive function.

  20. White matter integrity in major depressive disorder: Implications of childhood trauma, 5-HTTLPR and BDNF polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, Erica L; Ramasubbu, Rajamannar; Gaxiola-Valdez, Ismael; Cortese, Filomeno; Clark, Darren; Goodyear, Bradley; Foster, Jane; Hall, Geoffrey B

    2016-07-30

    This study examined the impact of childhood neglect, serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) polymorphisms on white matter (WM) integrity in major depressive disorder (MDD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Fifty-five medication-free MDD patients and 18 controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging scanning, genotyping and completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) findings revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in the MDD group in the anterior internal capsule. 5-HTTLPR-S'L' heterozygotes in the MDD group exhibited reduced FA in the internal capsule relative to S'S' and reduced FA in corona radiata compared to L'L'. Probabilistic tractography revealed higher FA in the uncinate fasciculus (UF) for BDNF val/val genotype relative to met-carriers, particularly in individuals with high depression severity. High depression severity and experiences of childhood physical or emotional neglect predicted higher FA in the UF and superior longitudinal fasciculus. Reductions in FA were identified for subgroups of MDD patients who were 5-HTTLPR heterozygotes and BDNF-met carriers. An association between emotional/physical neglect and FA was observed in subjects with high depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that WM connectivity within frontal and limbic regions are affected by depression and influenced by experiences of neglect and genetic risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. White Matter Changes in HIV+ Women with a History of Cocaine Dependence

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    Kathryn-Mary Wakim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine use is associated with the transmission of human immunodeficiency (HIV virus through risky sexual behavior. In HIV+ individuals, cocaine use is linked with poor health outcomes, including HIV-medication non-adherence and faster disease progression. Both HIV and cocaine dependence are associated with reduced integrity of cerebral white matter (WM, but the effects of HIV during cocaine abstinence have not yet been explored. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to understand the effect of combined HIV+ serostatus and former cocaine dependence on cerebral WM integrity. DTI data obtained from 15 HIV+ women with a history of cocaine dependence (COC+/HIV+ and 21 healthy females were included in the analysis. Diffusion-based measures [fractional anisotropy (FA, radial diffusivity (RD, mean diffusivity, and axial diffusivity] were examined using tract-based spatial statistics and region-of-interest analyses. In a whole-brain analysis, COC+/HIV+ women showed significantly reduced FA and increased RD in all major WM tracts, except the left corticospinal tract for RD. The tract with greatest percentage of voxels showing significant between-group differences was the forceps minor (FA: 75.6%, RD: 59.7%. These widespread changes in diffusion measures indicate an extensive neuropathological effect of HIV and former cocaine dependence on WM.

  2. Simultaneous Assessment of White Matter Changes in Microstructure and Connectedness in the Blind Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Linde Reislev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the human brain has provided converging evidence that visual deprivation induces regional changes in white matter (WM microstructure. It remains unclear how these changes modify network connections between brain regions. Here we used diffusion-weighted MRI to relate differences in microstructure and structural connectedness of WM in individuals with congenital or late-onset blindness relative to normally sighted controls. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI provided voxel-specific microstructural features of the tissue, while anatomical connectivity mapping (ACM assessed the connectedness of each voxel with the rest of the brain. ACM yielded reduced anatomical connectivity in the corpus callosum in individuals with congenital but not late-onset blindness. ACM did not identify any brain region where blindness resulted in increased anatomical connectivity. DTI revealed widespread microstructural differences as indexed by a reduced regional fractional anisotropy (FA. Blind individuals showed lower FA in the primary visual and the ventral visual processing stream relative to sighted controls regardless of the blindness onset. The results show that visual deprivation shapes WM microstructure and anatomical connectivity, but these changes appear to be spatially dissociated as changes emerge in different WM tracts. They also indicate that regional differences in anatomical connectivity depend on the onset of blindness.

  3. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis of white matter changes in children with anisometropic amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Zhai, Liying; Jiang, Qinying; Qin, Wen; Li, Qingji; Yin, Xiaohui; Guo, Mingxia

    2015-06-15

    Amblyopia is a neurological disorder of vision that follows abnormal binocular interaction or visual deprivation during early life. Previous studies have reported multiple functional or structural cortical alterations. Although white matter was also studied, it still cannot be clarified clearly which fasciculus was affected by amblyopia. In the present study, tract-based spatial statistics analysis was applied to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate potential diffusion changes of neural tracts in anisometropic amblyopia. Fractional anisotropy (FA) value was calculated and compared between 20 amblyopic children and 18 healthy age-matched controls. In contrast to the controls, significant decreases in FA values were found in right optic radiation (OR), left inferior longitudinal fasciculus/inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (ILF/IFO) and right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) in the amblyopia. Furthermore, FA values of these identified tracts showed positive correlation with visual acuity. It can be inferred that abnormal visual input not only hinders OR from well developed, but also impairs fasciculi associated with dorsal and ventral visual pathways, which may be responsible for the amblyopic deficiency in object discrimination and stereopsis. Increased FA was detected in right posterior part of corpus callosum (CC) with a medium effect size, which may be due to compensation effect. DTI with subsequent measurement of FA is a useful tool for investigating neuronal tract involvement in amblyopia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. White matter integrity of central executive network correlates with enhanced brain reactivity to smoking cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yanzhi; Yuan, Kai; Yu, Dahua; Wang, Ruonan; Li, Min; Li, Yangding; Zhai, Jinquan; Lin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2017-12-01

    The attentional bias to smoking cues contributes to smoking cue reactivity and cognitive declines underlines smoking behaviors, which were probably associated with the central executive network (CEN). However, little is known about the implication of the structural connectivity of the CEN in smoking cue reactivity and cognitive control impairments in smokers. In the present study, the white matter structural connectivity of the CEN was quantified in 35 smokers and 26 non-smokers using the diffusion tensor imaging and deterministic fiber tractography methods. Smoking cue reactivity was evaluated using cue exposure tasks, and cognitive control performance was assessed by the Stroop task. Relative to non-smokers, smokers showed increased fractional anisotropy (FA) values of the bilateral CEN fiber tracts. The FA values of left CEN positively correlated with the smoking cue-induced activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right middle occipital cortex in smokers. Meanwhile, the FA values of left CEN positively correlated with the incongruent errors during Stroop task in smokers. Collectively, the present study highlighted the role of the structural connectivity of the CEN in smoking cue reactivity and cognitive control performance, which may underpin the attentional bias to smoking cues and cognitive deficits in smokers. The multimodal imaging method by forging links from brain structure to brain function extended the notion that structural connections can modulate the brain activity in specific projection target regions. Hum Brain Mapp 38:6239-6249, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The Left, The Better: White-Matter Brain Integrity Predicts Foreign Language Imitation Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Lucía; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Reiterer, Susanne M

    2017-08-01

    Speech imitation is crucial for language acquisition and second-language learning. Interestingly, large individual differences regarding the ability in imitating foreign-language sounds have been observed. The origin of this interindividual diversity remains unknown, although it might be partially explained by structural predispositions. Here we correlated white-matter structural properties of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) with the performance of 52 German-speakers in a Hindi sentence- and word-imitation task. First, a manual reconstruction was performed, permitting us to extract the mean values along the three branches of the AF. We found that a larger lateralization of the AF volume toward the left hemisphere predicted the performance of our participants in the imitation task. Second, an automatic reconstruction was carried out, allowing us to localize the specific region within the AF that exhibited the largest correlation with foreign language imitation. Results of this reconstruction also showed a left lateralization trend: greater fractional anisotropy values in the anterior half of the left AF correlated with the performance in the Hindi-imitation task. From the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that foreign language imitation aptitude is tested using a more ecological imitation task and correlated with DTI tractography, using both a manual and an automatic method. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Cognitive Control and White Matter Callosal Microstructure in Methamphetamine Dependent Subjects: A DTI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Ruth; Nordahl, Thomas E; Buonocore, Michael H; Natsuaki, Yutaka; Waters, Christy; Moore, Charles D; Galloway, Gantt P; Leamon, Martin H

    2009-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (MA) abuse causes damage to structures within the human cerebrum, with particular susceptibility to white matter (WM). Abnormalities have been reported in anterior regions with less evidence of changes in posterior regions. MA abusers have also shown deficits on attention tests that measure response conflict and cognitive control. Methods We examined cognitive control using a computerized measure of the Stroop selective attention task and indices of WM microstructure obtained from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in the callosal genu and splenium of 37 currently abstinent MA abusers and 17 non-substance abusing controls. Measurements of Fractional Anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of callosal fibers and diffusion tensor eigenvalues were obtained in all subjects. Results The MA abusers exhibited greater Stroop reaction time interference (i.e., reduced cognitive control) [p=.04] compared to controls. After correcting for multiple comparisons, FA within the genu correlated significantly with measures of cognitive control in the MA abusers [p=.04, bonferroni corrected] but not in controls [p=.26]. Group differences in genu, but not splenium, FA were trend significant [p=.09]. Conclusions MA abuse appears to alter anterior callosal WM microstructure with less evidence of change within posterior callosal WM microstructure. DTI indices within the genu, but not splenium, correlated with measures of cognitive control in chronic MA abusers. PMID:18814867

  7. White matter disease correlates with lexical retrieval deficits in primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, John P; McMillan, Corey T; Brun, Caroline C; Yushkevich, Paul A; Zhang, Hui; Gee, James C; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    To relate fractional anisotropy (FA) changes associated with the semantic and logopenic variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) to measures of lexical retrieval. We collected neuropsychological testing, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging on semantic variant PPA (svPPA) (n = 11) and logopenic variant PPA (lvPPA) (n = 13) patients diagnosed using published criteria. We also acquired neuroimaging data on a group of demographically comparable healthy seniors (n = 34). FA was calculated and analyzed using a white matter (WM) tract-specific analysis approach. This approach utilizes anatomically guided data reduction to increase sensitivity and localizes results within canonically defined tracts. We used non-parametric, cluster-based statistical analysis to relate language performance to FA and determine regions of reduced FA in patients. We found widespread FA reductions in WM for both variants of PPA. FA was related to both confrontation naming and category naming fluency performance in left uncinate fasciculus and corpus callosum in svPPA and left superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi in lvPPA. SvPPA and lvPPA are associated with distinct disruptions of a large-scale network implicated in lexical retrieval, and the WM disease in each phenotype may contribute to language impairments including lexical retrieval.

  8. The rate of visuomotor adaptation correlates with cerebellar white-matter microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Maggiore, Valeria; Scholz, Jan; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Paus, Tomás

    2009-12-01

    Convergent experimental evidence points to the cerebellum as a key neural structure mediating adaptation to visual and proprioceptive perturbations. In a previous study, we have shown that activity in the anterior cerebellum varies with the rate of learning, with fast learners exhibiting more activity in this region than slow learners. Here, we investigated whether this variability in behavior may partly reflect inter-individual differences in the structural properties of cerebellar white-matter output tracts. For this purpose, we used diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to estimate fractional anisotropy (FA), and correlated the FA with the rate of adaptation to an optical rotation in 11 subjects. We found that FA in a region consistent with the superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP), containing fibers connecting the cerebellar cortex with motor and premotor cortex, was positively correlated with the rate of adaptation but not with the general level of performance or the initial deviation. The same pattern was observed in a region of the lateral posterior cerebellum. In contrast, FA in the angular gyrus of the posterior parietal cortex correlated positively both with the rate of adaptation and the overall level of performance. Our results show that the rate of learning a visuomotor task is associated with FA of cerebellar pathways. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Assessing White Matter Microstructure in Brain Regions with Different Myelin Architecture Using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeschel, Samuel; Hagberg, Gisela E; Schultz, Thomas; Balla, Dávid Z; Klose, Uwe; Hauser, Till-Karsten; Nägele, Thomas; Bieri, Oliver; Prasloski, Thomas; MacKay, Alex L; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Scheffler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how known differences in myelin architecture between regions along the cortico-spinal tract and frontal white matter (WM) in 19 healthy adolescents are reflected in several quantitative MRI parameters that have been proposed to non-invasively probe WM microstructure. In a clinically feasible scan time, both conventional imaging sequences as well as microstructural MRI parameters were assessed in order to quantitatively characterise WM regions that are known to differ in the thickness of their myelin sheaths, and in the presence of crossing or parallel fibre organisation. We found that diffusion imaging, MR spectroscopy (MRS), myelin water fraction (MWF), Magnetization Transfer Imaging, and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping were myelin-sensitive in different ways, giving complementary information for characterising WM microstructure with different underlying fibre architecture. From the diffusion parameters, neurite density (NODDI) was found to be more sensitive than fractional anisotropy (FA), underlining the limitation of FA in WM crossing fibre regions. In terms of sensitivity to different myelin content, we found that MWF, the mean diffusivity and chemical-shift imaging based MRS yielded the best discrimination between areas. Multimodal assessment of WM microstructure was possible within clinically feasible scan times using a broad combination of quantitative microstructural MRI sequences. By assessing new microstructural WM parameters we were able to provide normative data and discuss their interpretation in regions with different myelin architecture, as well as their possible application as biomarker for WM disorders.

  10. Clinical prediction of fall risk and white matter abnormalities: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bang-Bon; Bergethon, Peter; Qiu, Wei Qiao; Scott, Tammy; Hussain, Mohammed; Rosenberg, Irwin; Caplan, Louis R; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A

    2012-06-01

    The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as determined by the Tinetti scale, have specific patterns of WM abnormalities on diffusion tensor imaging. Community-based cohort of 125 homebound elderly individuals. Diffusion tensor imaging scans were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics analysis to determine the location of WM abnormalities in subjects with Tinetti scale scores of 25 or higher (without risk of falls) and lower than 25 (with risk of falls).Multivariate linear least squares correlation analysis was performed to determine the association between Tinetti scale scores and local fractional anisotropy values on each skeletal voxel controlling for possible confounders. In subjects with risk of falls (Tinetti scale score Tinetti scale have WM abnormalities in specific locations on diffusion tensor imaging, some of which correlate with cognitive function scores.

  11. Endothelial Function Is Associated with White Matter Microstructure and Executive Function in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nathan F; Gold, Brian T; Brown, Christopher A; Anggelis, Emily F; Bailey, Alison L; Clasey, Jody L; Powell, David K

    2017-01-01

    Age-related declines in endothelial function can lead to cognitive decline. However, little is known about the relationships between endothelial function and specific neurocognitive functions. This study explored the relationship between measures of endothelial function (reactive hyperemia index; RHI), white matter (WM) health (fractional anisotropy, FA, and WM hyperintensity volume, WMH), and executive function (Trail Making Test (TMT); Trail B - Trail A). Participants were 36 older adults between the ages of 59 and 69 (mean age = 63.89 years, SD = 2.94). WMH volume showed no relationship with RHI or executive function. However, there was a positive relationship between RHI and FA in the genu and body of the corpus callosum. In addition, higher RHI and FA were each associated with better executive task performance. Tractography was used to localize the WM tracts associated with RHI to specific portions of cortex. Results indicated that the RHI-FA relationship observed in the corpus callosum primarily involved tracts interconnecting frontal regions, including the superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and frontopolar cortex, linked with executive function. These findings suggest that superior endothelial function may help to attenuate age-related declines in WM microstructure in portions of the corpus callosum that interconnect prefrontal brain regions involved in executive function.

  12. “The Relationship between Executive Functioning, Processing Speed and White Matter Integrity in Multiple Sclerosis”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Helen M.; DeLuca, John; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Wylie, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between performance on executive tasks and white matter integrity, assessed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). A second aim was to examine how processing speed affects the relationship between executive functioning and FA. This relationship was examined in two executive tasks that rely heavily on processing speed: the Color-Word Interference Test and Trail-Making Test (Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System). It was hypothesized that reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) is related to poor performance on executive tasks in MS, but that this relationship would be affected by the statistical correction of processing speed from the executive tasks. 15 healthy controls and 25 persons with MS participated. Regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between executive functioning and FA, both before and after processing speed was removed from the executive scores. Before processing speed was removed from the executive scores, reduced FA was associated with poor performance on Color-Word Interference Test and Trail-Making Test in a diffuse network including corpus callosum and superior longitudinal fasciculus. However, once processing speed was removed, the relationship between executive functions and FA was no longer significant on the Trail Making test, and significantly reduced and more localized on the Color-Word Interference Test. PMID:23777468

  13. Group-averaged anatomical connectivity mapping for improved human white matter pathway visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercignani, Mara; Embleton, Karl; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Bozzali, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Anatomical connectivity mapping (ACM) is a measure of anatomical connectivity obtained by initiating streamline diffusion tractography from all parenchymal voxels and then counting the number of streamlines passing through each voxel of the brain. ACM highlights WM structures that present multiple connections to the rest of the brain but not necessarily strong microstructural orientation coherence. In this study, ACM was used to develop an atlas of the human brain. The ACM template was constructed from 3 T diffusion-weighted data from 19 healthy adults. To account for multiple diffusion directions in a voxel, a high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) technique, namely Q-ball, was used to model diffusion. To bring data from different subjects into a common space, an algorithm for rotating and averaging the principal directions was implemented, which can be generalized to any application requiring algebraic operations on principal directions derived from any HARDI method. ACM from the average dataset was computed and several white matter connections of interest were identified and highlighted. Fractional anisotropy (FA) from standard diffusion tensor modelling was also derived and FA-modulated colour coded images obtained from the mean tensor were also shown for comparison, highlighting differences and similarities. The ACM template can serve for educational purposes and as future reference for studies based on the evaluation of ACM in subjects affected by neurological and psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. MRI gray and white matter measures in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Neeraj; Suppa, Antonio; Piattella, Maria Cristina; Bologna, Matteo; Di Stasio, Flavio; Formica, Alessandra; Tona, Francesca; Colosimo, Carlo; Berardelli, Alfredo; Pantano, Patrizia

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated MRI measures of gray and white matter damages in 19 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 11 with corticobasal syndrome (CBS), and 14 healthy subjects (HS) to differentiate patients with PSP from those with CBS. We calculated surface-based maps of the cortical volume, cortical thickness, surface area, and voxel level maps of sub-cortical volume, and diffusion tensor imaging parameters using automated scripts implemented in FreeSurfer and FSL toolboxes. No significant differences in cortical volume loss were observed between PSP and CBS. When cortical volume was divided into cortical thickness and surface area, cortical thickness in peri-rolandic brain regions was significantly smaller in CBS than in PSP patients, whereas surface area was significantly smaller in PSP than HS. We also found widespread volume loss in sub-cortical structures in patients with PSP and CBS in comparison to HS. Both patient groups displayed diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities: compared to HS, widespread fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity changes were observed in PSP, whereas axial and radial diffusivity changes were prominent in CBS. Mini-mental state examination positively correlated with diffusion changes in patients with PSP. In conclusion, cortical thickness, surface area, and diffusion tensor imaging parameters may be sensitive enough to help differentiate patients with PSP from those with CBS.

  15. White matter microstructure in the executive network associated with aggression in healthy adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsgodt, Katherine H; Bato, Angelica A; Blair, Melanie A; DeRosse, Pamela; Szeszko, Philip R; Malhotra, Anil K

    2015-09-01

    Predicting which individuals may engage in aggressive behavior is of interest in today's society; however, there is little data on the neural basis of aggression in healthy individuals. Here, we tested whether regional differences in white matter (WM) microstructure were associated with later reports of aggressive tendencies. We recontacted healthy young adults an average of 3 years after they underwent research MRI scans. Via electronic survey, we administered the Buss Perry Aggression Questionnaire. We divided aggression into Aggressive Thoughts (Anger and Hostility subscales) and Aggressive Acts (Verbal and Physical subscales) and used Tract-Based Spatial Statistics to test the relationship of those measures to WM microstructure. In 45 individuals age 15-30 at baseline, we observed significant relationships between Aggressive Acts and fractional anisotropy (FA) in a parietal region consistent with the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). As the SLF has an established relationship to executive function, we performed an exploratory analysis in a subset of individuals with working memory data. Decreased FA in executive network regions, as well as working memory performance, were associated with later self-reported aggressive tendencies. This has implications for our healthy behavior understanding of as well as that of patient populations known to have executive dysfunction. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Functional brain networks and white matter underlying theory-of-mind in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, Rajesh K; Libero, Lauren E; Hu, Christi P; Deshpande, Hrishikesh D; Colburn, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Human beings constantly engage in attributing causal explanations to one's own and to others' actions, and theory-of-mind (ToM) is critical in making such inferences. Although children learn causal attribution early in development, children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are known to have impairments in the development of intentional causality. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study investigated the neural correlates of physical and intentional causal attribution in people with ASDs. In the fMRI scanner, 15 adolescents and adults with ASDs and 15 age- and IQ-matched typically developing peers made causal judgments about comic strips presented randomly in an event-related design. All participants showed robust activation in bilateral posterior superior temporal sulcus at the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) in response to intentional causality. Participants with ASDs showed lower activation in TPJ, right inferior frontal gyrus and left premotor cortex. Significantly weaker functional connectivity was also found in the ASD group between TPJ and motor areas during intentional causality. DTI data revealed significantly reduced fractional anisotropy in ASD participants in white matter underlying the temporal lobe. In addition to underscoring the role of TPJ in ToM, this study found an interaction between motor simulation and mentalizing systems in intentional causal attribution and its possible discord in autism.

  17. Right lateralized white matter abnormalities in first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Zhening; Gao, Keming; Xiao, Changqing; Chen, Huafu; Zhao, Jingping

    2012-11-30

    Numerous studies in first-episode schizophrenia suggest the involvement of white matter (WM) abnormalities in multiple regions underlying the pathogenesis of this condition. However, there has never been a neuroimaging study in patients with first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia by using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method. Here, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with TBSS method to investigate the brain WM integrity in patients with first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia. Twenty patients with first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia and 26 healthy subjects matched with age, gender, and education level were scanned with DTI. An automated TBSS approach was employed to analyze the data. Voxel-wise statistics revealed that patients with paranoid schizophrenia had decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) II, the right fornix, the right internal capsule, and the right external capsule compared to healthy subjects. Patients did not have increased FA values in any brain regions compared to healthy subjects. There was no correlation between the FA values in any brain regions and patient demographics and the severity of illness. Our findings suggest right-sided alterations of WM integrity in the WM tracts of cortical and subcortical regions may play an important role in the pathogenesis of paranoid schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of reading habit on white matter structure: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Asano, Kohei; Asano, Michiko; Sassa, Yuko; Yokota, Susumu; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nouchi, Rui; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-06-01

    Psychological studies showed the quantity of reading habit affects the development of their reading skills, various language skills, and knowledge. However, despite a vast amount of literature, the effects of reading habit on the development of white matter (WM) structures critical to language and reading processes have never been investigated. In this study, we used the fractional anisotropy (FA) measure of diffusion tensor imaging to measure WM microstructural properties and examined cross-sectional and longitudinal correlations between reading habit and FA of the WM bundles in a large sample of normal children. In both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, we found that greater strength of reading habit positively affected FA in the left arcuate fasciculus (AF), in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), and in the left posterior corona radiata (PCR). Consistent with previous studies, we also confirmed the significance or a tendency for positive correlation between the strength of reading habit and the Verbal Comprehension score in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. These cross-sectional and longitudinal findings indicate that a healthy reading habit may be directly or indirectly associated with the advanced development of WM critical to reading and language processes. Future intervention studies are needed to determine the causal effects of reading habits on WM in normal children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Abnormal brain white matter network in young smokers: a graph theory analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yajuan; Li, Min; Wang, Ruonan; Bi, Yanzhi; Li, Yangding; Yi, Zhang; Liu, Jixin; Yu, Dahua; Yuan, Kai

    2017-03-13

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies had investigated the white matter (WM) integrity abnormalities in some specific fiber bundles in smokers. However, little is known about the changes in topological organization of WM structural network in young smokers. In current study, we acquired DTI datasets from 58 male young smokers and 51 matched nonsmokers and constructed the WM networks by the deterministic fiber tracking approach. Graph theoretical analysis was used to compare the topological parameters of WM network (global and nodal) and the inter-regional fractional anisotropy (FA) weighted WM connections between groups. The results demonstrated that both young smokers and nonsmokers had small-world topology in WM network. Further analysis revealed that the young smokers exhibited the abnormal topological organization, i.e., increased network strength, global efficiency, and decreased shortest path length. In addition, the increased nodal efficiency predominately was located in frontal cortex, striatum and anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG) in smokers. Moreover, based on network-based statistic (NBS) approach, the significant increased FA-weighted WM connections were mainly found in the PFC, ACG and supplementary motor area (SMA) regions. Meanwhile, the network parameters were correlated with the nicotine dependence severity (FTND) scores, and the nodal efficiency of orbitofrontal cortex was positive correlation with the cigarette per day (CPD) in young smokers. We revealed the abnormal topological organization of WM network in young smokers, which may improve our understanding of the neural mechanism of young smokers form WM topological organization level.

  20. Diffusion Imaging of Cerebral White Matter in Persons Who Stutter: Evidence for Network-Level Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanqing eCai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in brain white matter have been a main focus of recent neuroimaging studies on stuttering. However, no prior study has examined brain connectivity on the global level of the cerebral cortex in persons who stutter (PWS. In the current study, we analyzed the results from probabilistic tractography between regions comprising the cortical speech network. An anatomical parcellation scheme was used to define 28 speech production-related ROIs in each hemisphere. We used network-based statistic (NBS and graph theory to analyze the connectivity patterns obtained from tractography. At the network level, the probabilistic corticocortical connectivity from the PWS group were significantly weaker that from persons with fluent speech (PFS. NBS analysis revealed significant components in the bilateral speech networks with negative correlations with stuttering severity. To facilitate comparison with previous studies, we also performed tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS and regional fractional anisotropy (FA averaging. Results from tractography, TBSS and regional FA averaging jointly highlight the importance of several regions in the left peri-Rolandic sensorimotor and premotor areas, most notably the left ventral premotor cortex and middle primary motor cortex, in the neuroanatomical basis of stuttering.

  1. Cerebral white matter blood flow and arterial blood pressure in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børch, Klaus; Lou, Hans; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    It is generally assumed that one reason why white matter injury is common in preterm infants is the relatively poor vascular supply.......It is generally assumed that one reason why white matter injury is common in preterm infants is the relatively poor vascular supply....

  2. White matter abnormalities in major depression: a tract-based spatial statistics and rumination study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nianming Zuo

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that major depressive disorder (MDD is usually accompanied by altered white matter in the prefrontal cortex, the parietal lobe and the limbic system. As a behavioral abnormity of MDD, rumination has been believed to be a substantial indicator of the mental state of the depressive state. So far, however, no report that we are aware of has evaluated the relationship between white matter alterations and the ruminative state. In this study, we first explored the altered white matter using a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS method based on diffusion tensor imaging of 19 healthy and 16 depressive subjects. We then investigated correlations between the altered white matter microstructure in the identified altered regions and the severity of ruminations measured by the ruminative response scale. Our results demonstrated altered white matter microstructure in circuits connecting the prefrontal lobe, the parietal lobe and the limbic system (p<0.005, uncorrected, findings which support previous research. More importantly, the result also indicated that a greater alteration in the white matter is associated with a more ruminative state (p<0.05, Bonferroni corrected. The detected abnormalities in the white matter should be interpreted cautiously because of the small sample size in this study. This finding supports the psychometric significance of white matter deficits in MDD.

  3. White Matter Maturation Supports the Development of Reasoning Ability through Its Influence on Processing Speed