WorldWideScience

Sample records for white light generation

  1. White-light generation and OLED lifetime issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aaron R.

    This thesis presents experimental results and discussion regarding issues related to organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). In particular, this thesis has three main focuses: the generation of white light from Forster transfer in blends of emissive polymer and methods used to characterize the efficiency of that transfer; low temperature, conformal, thin film encapsulation for organic devices; and the effect of a pulsed driving scheme on the lifetime of OLEDs. In the first research focus, a method is proposed to measure the efficiency of Forster energy transfer. The efficiency of Forster transfer has previously been studied in biological systems, but this thesis presents a method which may be used for systems of semiconducting polymers. In addition, this thesis presents a theoretical basis for comparing the efficiency of a Forster-blend-based white light emitter to a similar emitter with no Forster energy transfer in order to show that white light generation from Forster transfer does, indeed, increase emission efficiency. The latter two research efforts examine the effect of encapsulation and driving scheme on the growth rate of non-emissive dark regions in OLEDs and, as such, share similar experimental apparatus. The formation and growth of non-emissive dark regions have been a persistent problem in OLED fabrication. The results presented in this thesis show that the combination of proper encapsulation and driving method can effectively slow the growth of these non-emissive regions.

  2. White light continuum generation in sapphire using two-coloured femtosecond laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Čepėnas, Augustas

    2017-01-01

    A wide spectrum of laser radiation is useful for two reasons: wider spectrum allows generation of shorter laser pulses, meanwhile, in pump-probe spectroscopy it is prefered to cover the largest possible spectral range with the same source. This work explores white light continuum generation using two-colored (wavelength of 1030 nm and 515 nm) femtosecond laser pulses. Combining these two white light continuums should expand radiation spectrum. However, this research shows that white light con...

  3. Simulation of white light generation and near light bullets using a novel numerical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Haider

    2018-01-01

    An accurate and efficient simulation has been devised, employing a new numerical technique to simulate the derivative generalised non-linear Schrödinger equation in all three spatial dimensions and time. The simulation models all pertinent effects such as self-steepening and plasma for the non-linear propagation of ultrafast optical radiation in bulk material. Simulation results are compared to published experimental spectral data of an example ytterbium aluminum garnet system at 3.1 μm radiation and fits to within a factor of 5. The simulation shows that there is a stability point near the end of the 2 mm crystal where a quasi-light bullet (spatial temporal soliton) is present. Within this region, the pulse is collimated at a reduced diameter (factor of ∼2) and there exists a near temporal soliton at the spatial center. The temporal intensity within this stable region is compressed by a factor of ∼4 compared to the input. This study shows that the simulation highlights new physical phenomena based on the interplay of various linear, non-linear and plasma effects that go beyond the experiment and is thus integral to achieving accurate designs of white light generation systems for optical applications. An adaptive error reduction algorithm tailor made for this simulation will also be presented in appendix.

  4. Efficient White-Light Generation from Ionically Self-Assembled Triply-Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Susmita; Debnath, Tanay; Basu, Amrita; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit Kumar; Baker, Gary A; Patra, Amitava

    2016-06-20

    Low cost, simple, and environmentally friendly strategies for white-light generation which do not require rare-earth phosphors or other toxic or elementally scare species remain an essentially unmet challenge. Progress in the area of all-organic approaches is highly sought, single molecular systems remaining a particular challenge. Taking inspiration from the designer nature of ionic-liquid chemistry, we now introduce a new strategy toward white-light emission based on the facile generation of nanoparticles comprising three different fluorophores assembled in a well-defined stoichiometry purely through electrostatic interactions. The building blocks consist of the fluorophores aminopyrene, fluorescein, and rhodamine 6G which represent blue, green, and red-emitting species, respectively. Spherical nanoparticles 16(±5) nm in size were prepared which display bright white-light emission with high fluorescence quantum efficiency (26 %) and color coordinate at (0.29, 0.38) which lie in close proximity to pure white light (0.33, 0.33). It is noteworthy that this same fluorophore mixture in free solution yields only blue emission. Density functional theory calculations reveal H-bond and ground-state proton transfer mediated absolute non-parallel orientation of the constituent units which result in frustrated energy transfer, giving rise to emission from the individual centers and concomitant white-light emission. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Investigation of white light continuum generated using two-wavelength femtosecond laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Nemuraitė, Indrė

    2016-01-01

    White light continuum generation is a process which occurs when an intense ultrashort laser pulse is focused into a nonlinear medium. Because of the light matter interaction pump pulse undergoes significant spectral broadening. Main mechanisms causing this is self focusing and self phase modulation. Supercontinuum spectrum has both spatial and temporal coherence, because of these properties it has a wide variety of applications in microscopy, spectroscopy and metrology. Broad supercontinuum s...

  6. White light generation using photonic crystal fiber with sub-micron circular lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghaei, Hamed; Ghanbari, Ashkan

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we study a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with circular lattice and engineer linear and nonlinear parameters by varying the diameter of air-holes. It helps us obtain low and high zero dispersion wavelengths in the visible and nearinfrared regions. We numerically demonstrate that by launching 100 fs input pulses of 1, 2, and 5 kW peak powers with center wavelength of 532 nm from an unamplified Ti:sapphire laser into a 100 mm length of the engineered PCF, supercontinua as wide as 290, 440 and 830 nm can be obtained, respectively. The spectral broadening is due to the combined action of self-phase modulation, stimulated Raman scattering and parametric four-wave-mixing generation of the pump pulses. The third and the widest spectrum covers the entire visible range and a part of near infrared region making it a suitable source for both white light applications and optical coherence tomography to measure retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation.

  7. Synthesis of fluorescent core-shell nanomaterials and strategies to generate white light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amandeep; Kaur, Ramanjot; Pandey, O. P.; Wei, Xueyong; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-07-01

    In this work, cadmium free core-shell ZnS:X/ZnS (X = Mn, Cu) nanoparticles have been synthesized and used for white light generation. First, the doping concentration of Manganese (Mn) was varied from 1% to 4% to optimize the dopant related emission and its optimal value was found to be 1%. Then, ZnS shell was grown over ZnS:Mn(1%) core to passivate the surface defects. Similarly, the optimal concentration of Copper (Cu) was found to be 0.8% in the range varied from 0.6% to 1.2%. In order to obtain an emission in the whole visible spectrum, dual doping of Mn and Cu was done in the core and the shell, respectively. A solid-solid mixing in different ratios of separately doped quantum dots (QDs) emitting in the blue green and the orange region was performed. Results show that the optimum mixture of QDs excited at 300 nm gives Commission Internationale del'Éclairage color coordinates of (0.35, 0.36), high color rendering index of 88, and correlated color temperature of 4704 K with minimum self-absorption.

  8. Entangled light from white noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenio, M B; Huelga, S F

    2002-05-13

    An atom that couples to two distinct leaky optical cavities is driven by an external optical white noise field. We describe how entanglement between the light fields sustained by two optical cavities arises in such a situation. The entanglement is maximized for intermediate values of the cavity damping rates and the intensity of the white noise field, vanishing both for small and for large values of these parameters and thus exhibiting a stochastic-resonancelike behavior. This example illustrates the possibility of generating entanglement by exclusively incoherent means and sheds new light on the constructive role noise may play in certain tasks of interest for quantum information processing.

  9. Phosphors for near UV-Emitting LED's for Efficacious Generation of White Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKittrick, Joanna [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    1) We studied phosphors for near-UV (nUV) LED application as an alternative to blue LEDs currently being used in SSL systems. We have shown that nUV light sources could be very efficient at high current and will have significantly less binning at both the chip and phosphor levels. We identified phosphor blends that could yield 4100K lamps with a CRI of approximately 80 and LPWnUV,opt equal to 179 for the best performing phosphor blend. Considering the fact that the lamps were not optimized for light coupling, the results are quite impressive. The main bottleneck is an optimum blue phosphor with a peak near 440 nm with a full width half maximum of about 25 nm and a quantum efficiency of >95%. Unfortunately, that may be a very difficult task when we want to excite a phosphor at ~400 nm with a very small margin for Stokes shift. Another way is to have all the phosphors in the blend having the excitation peak at 400 nm or slightly shorter wavelength. This could lead to a white light source with no body color and optimum efficacy due to no self-absorption effects by phosphors in the blend. This is even harder than finding an ideal blue phosphor, but not necessarily impossible. 2) With the phosphor blends identified, light sources using nUV LEDs at high current could be designed with comparable efficacy to those using blue LEDs. It will allow us to design light sources with multiple wattages using the same chips and phosphor blends simply by varying the input current. In the case of blue LEDs, this is not currently possible because varying the current will lower the efficacy at high current and alter the color point. With improvement of phosphor blends, control over CRI could improve. Less binning at the chip level and also at the phosphor blend level could reduce the cost of SSL light sources. 3) This study provided a deeper understanding of phosphor characteristics needed for LEDs in general and nUV LEDs in particular. Two students received Ph.D. degrees and three

  10. Energy transfer and colour tunability in UV light induced Tm3 +/Tb3 +/Eu3 +: ZnB glasses generating white light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, V.; Gupta, Kiran; Parthasaradhi Reddy, C.; Ham, Byoung S.

    2017-03-01

    A promising energy transfer (Tm3 + → Tb3 + → Eu3 +) approach is brought forward to generate white light emission under ultraviolet (UV) light excitation for solid state lightening. Tm3 +/Tb3 +/Eu3 + ions are combinedly doped in zinc borate glass system in view of understanding energy transfer process resulting in white light emission. Zinc borate (host) glass displayed optical and luminescence properties due to formation of Zn(II)x-[O(- II)]y centres in the ZnB glass matrix. At 360 nm (UV) excitation, triply doped Tm3 +/Tb3 +/Eu3 +: ZnB glasses simultaneously shown their characteristic emission bands in blue (454 nm: 1D2 → 3F4), green (547 nm: 5D4 → 7F5) and red (616 nm: 5D0 → 7F2) regions. In triple ions doped glasses, energy transfer dynamics is discussed in terms of Forster-Dexter theory, excitation & emission profiles, lifetime curves and from partial energy level diagram of three ions. The role of Tb3 + in ET from Tm3 + → Eu3 + was discussed using branch model. From emission decay analysis, energy transfer probability (P) and efficiency (η) were evaluated. Colour tunability from blue to white on varying (Tb3 +, Eu3 +) content is demonstrated from Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates. Based on chromaticity coordinates, other colour related parameters like correlated colour temperature (CCT) and colour purity are also computed for the studied glass samples. An appropriate blending of such combination of rare earth ions could show better suitability as potential candidates in achieving multi-colour and warm/cold white light emission for white LEDs application in the field of solid state lightening.

  11. Energy transfer and colour tunability in UV light induced Tm(3+)/Tb(3+)/Eu(3+): ZnB glasses generating white light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, V; Gupta, Kiran; Parthasaradhi Reddy, C; Ham, Byoung S

    2017-03-15

    A promising energy transfer (Tm(3+)→Tb(3+)→Eu(3+)) approach is brought forward to generate white light emission under ultraviolet (UV) light excitation for solid state lightening. Tm(3+)/Tb(3+)/Eu(3+) ions are combinedly doped in zinc borate glass system in view of understanding energy transfer process resulting in white light emission. Zinc borate (host) glass displayed optical and luminescence properties due to formation of Zn(II)x-[O(-II)]y centres in the ZnB glass matrix. At 360nm (UV) excitation, triply doped Tm(3+)/Tb(3+)/Eu(3+): ZnB glasses simultaneously shown their characteristic emission bands in blue (454nm: (1)D2→(3)F4), green (547nm: (5)D4→(7)F5) and red (616nm: (5)D0→(7)F2) regions. In triple ions doped glasses, energy transfer dynamics is discussed in terms of Forster-Dexter theory, excitation & emission profiles, lifetime curves and from partial energy level diagram of three ions. The role of Tb(3+) in ET from Tm(3+)→Eu(3+) was discussed using branch model. From emission decay analysis, energy transfer probability (P) and efficiency (η) were evaluated. Colour tunability from blue to white on varying (Tb(3+), Eu(3+)) content is demonstrated from Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates. Based on chromaticity coordinates, other colour related parameters like correlated colour temperature (CCT) and colour purity are also computed for the studied glass samples. An appropriate blending of such combination of rare earth ions could show better suitability as potential candidates in achieving multi-colour and warm/cold white light emission for white LEDs application in the field of solid state lightening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. White light generation via up-conversion and blue tone in Er3+/Tm3+/Yb3+-doped zinc-tellurite glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, V. A. G.; Ferri, F. A.; Nunes, L. A. O.; Marega, E.

    2017-05-01

    Yb3+, Er3+ and Tm3+ triply doped zinc-tellurite glass have been prepared containing up to 3.23 wt% of rare-earth ion oxides, were characterized by absorption spectroscopy, excitation, emission and up-conversion spectra. Transparent and homogeneous glasses have been produced, managing the red, green and blue emission bands, in order to generate white light considering the human eye perception. The energy transfer (resonant or non-resonant) between those rare-earth ions provides a color balancing mechanism that maintains the operating point in the white region, generating warm white light, cool white light and artificial daylight through the increase of the 976/980 nm diode laser excitation power from 4 to 470 mW. A light source at 4000 K is obtained under the excitation at 980 nm with 15 mW, providing a white light environment that is comfortable to the human eye vision. The spectroscopic study presented in this work describes the white light generation by the triply-doped zinc-tellurite glass, ranging from blue, green and red, by controlling the laser excitation power and wavelength at 976/980 nm. Such white tuning provokes healthy effects on human health throughout the day, especially the circadian system.

  13. Quantum dots and photonic crystals for white light generation and extraction in gallium nitride-based LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Frederic Stephane

    This thesis investigates the possibility to use two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals (PhCs) fabricated by nano-imprint lithography (NIL) to increase the extraction of multiple-wavelength guided modes (or guided white-light) outside of semiconductor or hybrid inorganic/organic (polymer) planar layers with refraction indices > 1 containing light-emissive components, pumped optically (such as colloidal quantum dots (QDs)) or electrically (such as GaN/InGaN quantum wells (QWs)). The optical properties of InGaP colloidal QDs into different matrices were studied. These efficient light-emitting species are prone to oxidation and methods to improve their passivation are presented. White-light was generated by combining red and green-emitting CdSe/ZnS core/shell colloidal QDs in PMMA polymer films simultaneously pumped by blue-emitting GaN LEDs. Numerical simulations were used to show that when positioned in or in the vicinity of planar layers or optical cavities, a large part of the light emitted from horizontal or vertical oscillating dipole sources is propagating only inside the layers, and is progressively attenuated there when absorbing layers are present. Other numerical simulations demonstrated the potential of 2D PhCs to extract most if not all of the guided modes. Processing steps used for the fabrication of large-area 2D PhCs making use of NIL and dry-etching are described. Results collected from a broad set of samples including 2D PhCs, both photoluminescent (PL) and electroluminescent (EL), are presented. Angular-resolved PL and EL measurements demonstrate that 2D PhCs etched into MOCVD-grown GaN layers on sapphire substrates can efficiently extract guided modes emitted from GaN/InGaN QWs and from colloidal QDs. Damage-free 2D PhCs integration was proposed and implemented using the self-assembly property of TiO2 sol-gel precursors onto polymer layers patterned by NIL on MOCVD-grown GaN layers on sapphire. This allowed to demonstrate an enhancement in light

  14. White Light Generation and Anisotropic Damage in Gold Films near Percolation Threshold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikov, Sergey M.; Frydendahl, Christian; Beermann, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    damage with TPL images being sensitive to both wavelength and polarization of illuminating light. We relate these effects to thermally induced morphological changes observed with scanning electron microscopy images. Exciting physics involved in light interaction with near-percolation metal films along...... with their straightforward and scalable one-step fabrication procedure promises a wide range of fascinating developments and technological applications within diverse areas of modern nanotechnology, from biomolecule optical sensing to ultradense optical data storage....

  15. Concept of white light in stage lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Mauricio R.

    2002-06-01

    In perceiving objects, generally we see them in a white light situation. But, actually, there is not an absolute white, in such a manner that the different light sources have a determined kind of white, what it is known as color temperature. Even the white light may be of different kinds (different color temperature), the individual mind tends to perceive it as the same kind of white, that is to say, there is in our mind a psychological function by which we operate an integration in the perception in order to do the object perceptually invariable. On the other hand, it is a common practice in stage lighting to use color light sources. It is a well known phenomenon that a color of light produces a change in the object color perception. However, when we go to theater, we see the objects as having their real color, even if the lighting is not white. In this paper the concept of white light in stage lighting is presented, showing its possibilities of aesthetical expression.

  16. WHITE CELLS AS LIGHT GATHERERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of White cells (J. V. White . ’Long optical paths at large aperture’, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 32:285 (1942)) as light gatherers is analyzed in this...unobservable. It is evident, therefore, that White cells and the sources used with them must be properly designed and applied to be effective. (Author)

  17. White light generation from Dy3+-doped ZnO-B2O3-P2O5 glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasimhadri, M.; Jang, Kiwan; Lee, Ho Sueb; Chen, Baojiu; Yi, Soung-Soo; Jeong, Jung-Hyun

    2009-07-01

    Dysprosium doped ZnO-B2O3-P2O5 (ZBP) glasses were prepared by a conventional melt quenching technique in order to study the luminescent properties and their utility for white light emitting diodes (LEDs). X-ray diffraction spectra revealed the amorphous nature of the glass sample. The present glasses were characterized by infrared and Raman spectra to evaluate the vibrational features of the samples. The emission and excitation spectra were reported for the ZBP glasses. Strong blue (484 nm) and yellow (574 nm) emission bands were observed upon various excitations. These two emissions correspond to the F49/2→H615/2 and F49/2→H613/2 transitions of Dy3+ ions, respectively. Combination of these blue and yellow bands gives white light to the naked eye. First time, it was found that ZnO-B2O3-P2O5 glasses efficiently emit white light under 400 and 454 nm excitations, which are nearly match with the emissions of commercial GaN blue LEDs and InGaN LED, respectively. CIE chromaticity coordinates also calculated for Dy3+: ZBP glasses to evaluate the white light emission.

  18. Maximum Spectral Luminous Efficacy of White Light

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy Jr., T. W.

    2013-01-01

    As lighting efficiency improves, it is useful to understand the theoretical limits to luminous efficacy for light that we perceive as white. Independent of the efficiency with which photons are generated, there exists a spectrally-imposed limit to the luminous efficacy of any source of photons. We find that, depending on the acceptable bandpass and---to a lesser extent---the color temperature of the light, the ideal white light source achieves a spectral luminous efficacy of 250--370 lm/W. Th...

  19. Generation of White Light from Dysprosium-Doped Strontium Aluminate Phosphor by a Solid-State Reaction Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Ishwar Prasad; Bisen, D. P.; Brahme, N.; Tamrakar, Raunak Kumar

    2016-04-01

    A single-host lattice, white light-emitting SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure of prepared SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was in a monoclinic phase with space group P21. The chemical composition of the sintered SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was confirmed by the energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy technique. Under ultra-violet excitation, the characteristic emissions of Dy3+ are peaking at 475 nm, 573 nm and 660 nm, originating from the transitions of 4F9/2 → 6H15/2, 4F9/2 →&!nbsp; 6H13/2 and 4F9/2 → 6H11/2 in the 4f9 configuration of Dy3+ ions. Commission International de I'Eclairage color coordinates of SrAl2O4:Dy3+ are suitable for white light-emitting phosphor. In order to investigate the suitability of the samples as white color light sources for industrial uses, correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI) values were calculated. Values of CCT and CRI were found well within the defined acceptable range. Mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity of SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor increased linearly with increasing impact velocity of the moving piston. Thus, the present investigation indicates piezo-electricity was responsible for producing ML in sintered SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor. Decay rates of the exponential decaying period of the ML curves do not change significantly with impact velocity. The photoluminescence and ML results suggest that the synthesized SrAl2O4:Dy3+ phosphor was useful for the white light-emitting diodes and stress sensor respectively.

  20. Maximum Spectral Luminous Efficacy of White Light

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, T W

    2013-01-01

    As lighting efficiency improves, it is useful to understand the theoretical limits to luminous efficacy for light that we perceive as white. Independent of the efficiency with which photons are generated, there exists a spectrally-imposed limit to the luminous efficacy of any source of photons. We find that, depending on the acceptable bandpass and---to a lesser extent---the color temperature of the light, the ideal white light source achieves a spectral luminous efficacy of 250--370 lm/W. This is consistent with previous calculations, but here we explore the maximum luminous efficacy as a function of photopic sensitivity threshold, color temperature, and color rendering index; deriving peak performance as a function of all three parameters. We also present example experimental spectra from a variety of light sources, quantifying the intrinsic efficacy of their spectral distributions.

  1. Maximum spectral luminous efficacy of white light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Thomas W.

    2012-05-01

    As lighting efficiency improves, it is useful to understand the theoretical limits to luminous efficacy for light that we perceive as white. Independent of the efficiency with which photons are generated, there exists a spectrally imposed limit to the luminous efficacy of any source of photons. We find that, depending on the acceptable bandpass and—to a lesser extent—the color temperature of the light, the ideal white light source achieves a spectral luminous efficacy of 250-370 lm/W. This is consistent with previous calculations, but here we explore the maximum luminous efficacy as a function of photopic sensitivity threshold, color temperature, and color rendering index; deriving peak performance as a function of all three parameters. We also present example experimental spectra from a variety of light sources, quantifying the intrinsic efficacy of their spectral distributions.

  2. Perceived Whiteness under Different Lighting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oota, Akiko; Kanaya, Sueko; Ayama, Miyoshi; Mukai, Kenji

    Many white and nearly white objects are in our living and working areas, such as documents written on white paper, white curtains, white clothes, white walls, and white furniture. The perceived whiteness of these objects is important to the impression of the lighting in these areas. To investigate the perceived whiteness in living areas, a series of experiments were conducted using four different fluorescent lamps in three different environments. It was found that the areas of perceived whiteness in the living area environments were larger than the areas of perceived whiteness under achromatic conditions. Based on these results, a perceived whiteness index is proposed for these experimental conditions.

  3. Transport of Light Through White-LED Phosphor Plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meretska, Maryna; Thyrrestrup Nielsen, Henri; Lagendijk, Aart; Tukker, Teus; Mosk, Allard; IJzerman, Wilbert; Vos, Willem L.; Di Bartolo, Baldassare; Collins, John; Silvestri, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    Energy efficient generation of white light has become an important societal issue in recent years. The technology of white-light emitting diodes (LEDs) is one of the main directions (Akasaki I, Amano H, Nakamura S, Blue LEDs – filling the world with new light, http://www.nobelprize.org/, 2014;

  4. Studying Light Color using White LED Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Misako; Yamaba, Kazuo; Nagata, Manori; Kubo, Chiho; Nokura, Kunihiro

    Recently, white Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are receiving attention worldwide as new lighting devices. This study examined effects of a lighting application on performance using white LEDs. The light color—the correlated color temperature (CCT) —was assessed. It affected to psychological states and physiological conditions. Three CCT conditions were respectively set for the experiment: 2500 K, 5000 K, and 8200 K. In all, 20 younger subjects (20-30 years old), 15 middle-aged to elderly subjects (45-60 years old) and 12 elderly subjects (over 65 years-old) participated. They were presented a Numerical Verification (NV) task for performance measurement. The psychological states on performance were evaluated using the lighting assessment questionnaire. The physiological conditions were recorded using an electrocardiograph. Results show that the effects of CCT differ among age groups. Especially, the performance of younger subjects might differ from CCT conditions; elderly subjects are affected by CCT condition because of their visual acuity or response to contrast of objects.

  5. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  6. Light Converting Inorganic Phosphors for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao-Wen Yeh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs have matched the emission efficiency of florescent lights and will rapidly spread as light source for homes and offices in the next 5 to 10 years. WLEDs provide a light element having a semiconductor light emitting layer (blue or near-ultraviolet (nUV LEDs and photoluminescence phosphors. These solid-state LED lamps, rather than organic light emitting diode (OLED or polymer light-emitting diode (PLED, have a number of advantages over conventional incandescent bulbs and halogen lamps, such as high efficiency to convert electrical energy into light, reliability and long operating lifetime. To meet with the further requirement of high color rendering index, warm light with low color temperature, high thermal stability and higher energy efficiency for WLEDs, new phosphors that can absorb excitation energy from blue or nUV LEDs and generate visible emissions efficiently are desired. The criteria of choosing the best phosphors, for blue (450-480 nm and nUV (380-400 nm LEDs, strongly depends on the absorption and emission of the phosphors. Moreover, the balance of light between the emission from blue-nUV LEDs and the emissions from phosphors (such as yellow from Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ is important to obtain white light with proper color rendering index and color temperature. Here, we will review the status of phosphors for LEDs and prospect the future development.

  7. White light generation in Dy{sup 3+}-and Ce{sup 3+}/Dy{sup 3+}-doped zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldiño, U., E-mail: cald@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, 09340 México, D.F. (Mexico); Lira, A. [Departamento de Física , Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del estado de México, C.P. 50000 Toluca (Mexico); Meza-Rocha, A.N. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, 09340 México, D.F. (Mexico); Pasquini, E. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Pelli, S. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Speghini, A. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Dipartimento di Biotecnologie, Università di Verona, and INSTM, UdR Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, I-37314 Verona (Italy); Bettinelli, M. [Dipartimento di Biotecnologie, Università di Verona, and INSTM, UdR Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, I-37314 Verona (Italy); Righini, G.C. [Istituto di Fisica Applicata Nello Carrara, C.N.R., Via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Firenze (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “Enrico Fermi”, Piazza del Viminale 2, 00184 Roma (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    A spectroscopic investigation of 1% Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}-singly doped and 0.5% Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3}-1.0% Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}-codoped zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate glasses was performed by analyzing their absorption and photoluminescence spectra, and decay times. Warm white yellow light emission, with (0.419, 0.440) CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates and 3579 K color temperature, is obtained in the Dy{sup 3+}-singly doped glass excited at 399 nm, which fits to the requirements of GaN LEDs. A quantum efficiency of 74% and a very high optical gain (38.7×10{sup −25} cm{sup 2} s) were estimated for the dysprosium {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level luminescence, which might also make the Dy{sup 3+}-doped glass a promising gain medium for solid state yellow laser pumped by GaN LEDs. In the Ce{sup 3+}/Dy{sup 3+}-codoped glass a radiative energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} is observed upon UV excitation (310–365 nm), with a Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} interaction distance that could be greater than 6–12 Å. The emission color from the codoped glass can be tuned with the excitation wavelength from blue light (0.247, 0.245), upon 310 nm excitation, to cold white light (0.284, 0.300), with a 9052 K color temperature, upon 365 nm excitation. - Highlights: • Zinc–sodium–aluminosilicate (ZN) glasses are optically activated with Dy{sup 3+} (ZNDy). • ZN glasses are optically activated with Ce{sup 3+}/Dy{sup 3+} (ZNCeDy). • Dy{sup 3+} is sensitized by Ce{sup 3+} through a radiative energy transfer. • ZNDy glass can generate 3579 K warm white yellow light emission. • ZNCeDy glass can generate 9052 K cold white light emission.

  8. Light Sterile Neutrinos: A White Paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abazajian, K. N.; Acero, M. A.; Agarwalla, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    This white paper addresses the hypothesis of light sterile neutrinos based on recent anomalies observed in neutrino experiments and the latest astrophysical data.......This white paper addresses the hypothesis of light sterile neutrinos based on recent anomalies observed in neutrino experiments and the latest astrophysical data....

  9. White light signal simulator microcontroller design | Haghighi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    White light signal simulator microcontroller design. ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences ... signals associated with the light white from human retina cells were digitized, then the digital data were calculated and the resulted mathematical equation was programmed on a microcontroller, and by designing a circuit, ...

  10. Optogenetic light pulses generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erofeev, A. I.; Matveev, M. V.; Zakharova, O. A.; Terekhin, S. G.; Kilimnik, V. A.; Bezprozvanny, I. B.; Vlasova, O. L.

    2017-11-01

    To date, optogenetics is one of the most popular methods in the world in neuroscience. There are new equipment and devices created to keep the progress of this method. This article describes a light pulse generator developed at the Laboratory of Molecular Neurodegeneration, designed for optogenetic experiments.

  11. Light Beam Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a set of controllable light beams by provision of a system for synthesizing a set of light beams, comprising a spatially modulated light source for generation of electromagnetic radiation with a set of replicas of a predetermined...... symbol, s, positioned at respective desired positions (xs, ys) in an object plane o(x, y) intersecting, preferably perpendicular to, the direction of propagation of the electromagnetic radiation, and having spatial amplitudes a(x-xs, y-ys), spatial phases f(x-xs, y-ys)> and spatial polarisation vectors p......(x-xs, y-ys), a Fourier transforming lens for Fourier transforming the electromagnetic radiation, a first spatial light modulator for phase shifting the Fourier transformed electromagnetic radiation with the phase -F(u, v) of S*, S* is the complex conjugate of the Fourier transformed symbol s, a Fourier...

  12. White LED visible light communication technology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao

    2017-03-01

    Visible light communication is a new type of wireless optical communication technology. White LED to the success of development, the LED lighting technology is facing a new revolution. Because the LED has high sensitivity, modulation, the advantages of good performance, large transmission power, can make it in light transmission light signal at the same time. Use white LED light-emitting characteristics, on the modulation signals to the visible light transmission, can constitute a LED visible light communication system. We built a small visible optical communication system. The system composition and structure has certain value in the field of practical application, and we also research the key technology of transmitters and receivers, the key problem has been resolved. By studying on the optical and LED the characteristics of a high speed modulation driving circuit and a high sensitive receiving circuit was designed. And information transmission through the single chip microcomputer test, a preliminary verification has realized the data transmission function.

  13. White-light Quantitative Phase Imaging Unit

    CERN Document Server

    Baek, YoonSeok; Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the white light quantitative phase imaging unit (WQPIU) as a practical realization of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) on standard microscope platforms. The WQPIU is a compact stand-alone unit which measures sample induced phase delay under white-light illumination. It does not require any modification of the microscope or additional accessories for its use. The principle of the WQPIU based on lateral shearing interferometry and phase shifting interferometry provides a cost-effective and user-friendly use of QPI. The validity and capacity of the presented method are demonstrated by measuring quantitative phase images of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, HeLa cells and mouse white blood cells. With speckle-free imaging capability due to the use of white-light illumination, the WQPIU is expected to expand the scope of QPI in biological sciences as a powerful but simple imaging tool.

  14. The Whiteness of Things and Light Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, L. M.; Lopez-Arias, T.; Calza, G.; Oss, S.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss some simple experiments dealing with intriguing properties of light and its interaction with matter. In particular, we show how to emphasize that light reflection, refraction and scattering can provide a proper, physical description of human perception of the "colour" white. These experiments can be used in the classroom with an enquiry…

  15. Dy{sup 3+}-doped nano-glass ceramics comprising NaAlSiO{sub 4} and NaY{sub 9}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26} nanocrystals for white light generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagga, Ruchika [Department of Physics, Kanya Maha Vidyalaya, Jalandhar (India); Achanta, Venu Gopal [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, TIFR, Mumbai (India); Goel, Ashutosh [R and D Sterlite Technologies Ltd., Aurangabad 431136, Maharashtra (India); Ferreira, Jose M.F. [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Singh, Narinder Pal [Punjab Technical University, Jalandhar (India); Singh, Davinder Paul [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar (India); Falconieri, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.falconieri@enea.it [ENEA C. R. Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Sharma, Gopi [Department of Physics, Kanya Maha Vidyalaya, Jalandhar (India)

    2013-02-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environment safe glass ceramics were fabricated via heat treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical and structural properties were studied before and after heat treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer White light generation with single RE{sup 3+} ion-doping was observed under UV excitation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Emission color temperature was between fluorescent tube and daylight values. - Abstract: The radiative emission properties of the Dy{sup 3+} ions in oxyfluoride glasses and glass ceramics have been investigated for the generation of white light. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the glass ceramics reveals the presence of NaAlSiO{sub 4} nanocrystals along with secondary phase of NaY{sub 9}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26} in the glass matrix after a suitable thermal treatment of the pristine glasses. Intense white light emission has been observed when the samples are excited with 350 nm light. Yellow to blue emission intensity ratios and chromaticity color coordinates have been determined from the visible luminescence spectra. All color coordinates are found to lie in the white region of the chromaticity color diagram proposing the suitability of the present studied materials for color display devices.

  16. Spectral response measurements with white light bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaney, W.; Lorenz, S.; Meakin, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The spectral response of solar cells such as the CdS/Cu2S cell is non-linear with distinct quenching and enhancement bands. One possible technique to produce standardized solar efficiencies is to fold in spectral response with a standard solar spectrum. The spectral response of a cell was measured in a way which matched cell behavior under white light illumination. A technique was developed to measure the response of a cell to low intensity chopped monochromatic light while the cell is also illuminated with a white light bias corresponding to AMI.

  17. Next Generation Light Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    Light Robotics is a new field of research where ingredients from photonics, nanotechnology and biotechnology are put together in new ways to realize light-driven robotics at the smallest scales to solve major challenges primarily within the nanobio-domain but not limited hereto. Exploring the full...... potential of this new ‘drone-like’ light-printed, light-driven, light-actuated micro- and nano-robotics in challenging geometries requires a versatile and real-time reconfigurable light addressing that can dynamically track a plurality of tiny tools in 3D to ensure real-time continuous light...

  18. White Light Coronagraph - Skylab Experiment S052

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    This 1970 photograph shows the flight unit for Skylab's White Light Coronagraph, an Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) facility that photographed the solar corona in the visible light spectrum. A TV camera in the instrument provided real-time pictures of the occulted Sun to the astronauts at the control console and also transmitted the images to the ground. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  19. Polymer OLED White Light Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homer Antoniadis; Vi-En Choong; Stelios Choulis; Brian Cumpston; Rahul Gupta; Mathew Mathai; Michael Moyer; Franky So

    2005-12-19

    OSRAM Opto Semiconductors (OSRAM) successfully completed development, fabrication and characterization of the large area, polymer based white light OLED prototype at their OLED Research and Development (R&D) facility in San Jose, CA. The program, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), consisted of three key objectives: (1) Develop new polymer materials and device architectures--in order to improve the performance of organic light emitters. (2) Develop processing techniques--in order to demonstrate and enable the manufacturing of large area, white light and color tunable, solid state light sources. (3) Develop new electronics and driving schemes for organic light sources, including color-tunable light sources. The key performance goals are listed. A world record efficiency of 25 lm/W was established for the solution processed white organic device from the significant improvements made during the project. However, the challenges to transfer this technology from an R&D level to a large tile format such as, the robustness of the device and the coating uniformity of large area panels, remain. In this regard, the purity and the blend nature of the materials are two factors that need to be addressed in future work. During the first year, OSRAM's Materials and Device group (M&D) worked closely with the major polymer material suppliers to develop the polymer emissive technology. M&D was successful in demonstrating a 7-8 lm/W white light source which was based on fluorescent materials. However, it became apparent that the major gains in efficiency could only be made if phosphorescent materials were utilized. Thus, in order to improve the performance of the resulting devices, the focus of the project shifted towards development of solution-processable phosphorescent light emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) and device architectures. The result is a higher efficiency than the outlined project milestone.

  20. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William G.; Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2009-01-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric analysis. The white light lasers used in this study were integrated into a commercial flow cytometry platform, and a series of high-transmission bandpass filters used to select wavelength ranges from the blue (~480 nm) to the long red (>700 nm). Cells labeled with a variety of fluorescent probes or expressing fluorescent proteins were then analyzed, in comparison with traditional lasers emitting at wavelengths similar to the filtered SC source. Based on a standard sensitivity metric, the white light laser bandwidths produced similar excitation levels to traditional lasers for a wide variety of fluorescent probes and expressible proteins. Sensitivity assessment using fluorescent bead arrays confirmed that the SC laser and traditional sources resulted in similar levels of detection sensitivity. Supercontinuum white light laser sources therefore have the potential to remove a significant barrier in flow cytometric analysis, namely the limitation of excitation wavelengths. Almost any visible wavelength range can be made available for excitation, allowing access to virtually any fluorescent probe, and permitting “fine-tuning” of excitation wavelength to particular probes. PMID:19072836

  1. Multicolor white light-emitting diodes for illumination applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Solomon W. S.; Chen, Tzer-Perng; Tu, Chuan-Cheng; Chang, Chih-Sung; Tsai, Tzong-Liang; Hsieh, Mario C. C.

    2004-01-01

    Semiconductor light emitting diode (LED) has become a promising device for general-purpose illumination applications. LED has the features of excellent durability, long operation life, low power consumption, no mercury containing and potentially high efficiency. Several white LED technologies appear capable of meeting the technical requirements of illumination. In this paper we present a new multi-color white (MCW) LED as a high luminous efficacy, high color rendering index and low cost white illuminator. The device consists of two LED chips, one is AlInGaN LED for emitting shorter visible spectra, another is AlInGaP LED for emitting longer visible spectra. At least one chip in the MCW-LED has two or more transition energy levels used for emitting two or more colored lights. The multiple colored lights generated from the MCW-LED can be mixed into a full-spectral white light. Besides, there is no phosphors conversion layer used in the MCW-LED structure. Therefore, its color rendering property and illumination efficiency are excellent. The Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) of the MCW-LED may range from 2,500 K to over 10,000 K. The theoretical General Color Rendering Index (Ra) could be as high as 94, which is close to the incandescent and halogen sources, while the Ra of binary complementary white (BCW) LED is about 30 ~ 45. Moreover, compared to the expensive ternary RGB (Red AlInGaP + Green AlInGaN + Blue AlInGaN) white LED sources, the MCW-LED uses only one AlInGaN chip in combination with one cheap AlInGaP chip, to form a low cost, high luminous performance white light source. The MCW-LED is an ideal light source for general-purpose illumination applications.

  2. Ball bearing measurement with white light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Joanna; Han, Sen; Novak, Erik

    2009-06-01

    Requirements on high-performance of ball bearings in terms of the loads they experience and their reliability are increasing as the automotive, aerospace, and power generation industries look to cut costs, reduce emissions, and improve efficiency. Most bearings are evaluated with a stylus profiler or with a bright field scopes or microscopes for form, roughness, and defect classification. Two-dimensional stylus measurements captures only very localized surface profiles unless multiple scans are performed which slow the measurement time unacceptably; this leads to inadequate sampling and sometimes greatly varying results based on location and directionality of the line scan. Bright field microscopes deliver only the lateral information about defects but not their depth, volume or surface roughness. White light interferometry can be very successfully utilized in the measurement of full field form, roughness and defect detection and is gaining adoption. They provide rapid, accurate, three-dimensional imaging compatible with the newly developed ISO 3D surface parameters which are expected to rapidly displace traditional 2D metrics. These surface parameters allow for better characterization of surface structure and better understanding of the production process and bearing and race wear. New 3D filtering techniques allow effective separation of form, waviness, and roughness for highly accurate and repeatable bearing qualification.

  3. Rare-earth doped YF{sub 3} nanocrystals embedded in sol-gel silica glass matrix for white light generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez-Ramos, J. [Departamento Fisica Fundamental y Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Santana-Alonso, A. [Departamento Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Yanes, A.C., E-mail: ayanesh@ull.e [Departamento Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Castillo, J. del [Departamento Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Rodriguez, V.D. [Departamento Fisica Fundamental y Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    YF{sub 3} nanocrystals triply-doped with Yb{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} ions embedded in amorphous silica matrix have been successfully obtained by heat treatment of precursor sol-gel glasses for the first time to our knowledge and confirmed by X-ray diffraction and luminescence measurements. Simultaneous UV and visible efficient up-conversion emissions, with well-resolved Stark structure, under 980 nm infrared pump are observed, indicating the effective partition of rare-earth ions into a crystalline-like environment of the YF{sub 3} nanocrystals. Corresponding energy transfer mechanisms have been analyzed and overall colour emission has been quantified in terms of standard chromaticity diagram. By an adequate doping level and heat treatment temperature of precursor sol-gel glasses, a bright white colour has been accomplished, close to the standard equal energy white light illumination point, with potential applications in photo-electronic devices and information processing.

  4. Continuous generation of delayed light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smartsev, Slava; Eger, David; Davidson, Nir; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2017-11-01

    We use a four-wave mixing process to read-out light from atomic coherence which is continuously written. The light is continuously generated after an effective delay, allowing the atomic coherence to evolve during the process. Contrary to slow-light delay, which depends on the medium optical depth, here the generation delay is determined solely by the intensive properties of the system, approaching the atomic coherence lifetime at the weak driving limit. The atomic evolution during the generation delay is further manifested in the spatial profile of the generated light due to atomic diffusion. Continuous generation of light with a long intrinsic delay can replace discrete write–read procedures when the atomic evolution is the subject of interest.

  5. White light emission from engineered silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide indirect bandgap semiconductor. The light emission efficiency is low in nature. But this material has very unique physical properties like good thermal conductivity, high break down field etc in addition to its abundance. Therefore it is interesting to engineer its...... is demonstrated. After optimizing the passivation conditions, strong blue-green emission from porous SiC is demonstrated as well. When combining the yellow emission from co-doped SiC and blue-green from porous SiC, a high color rendering index white light source is achieved....

  6. X-ray analysis and optical studies of Dy{sup 3+} doped NaSrB{sub 5}O{sub 9} microstructures for white light generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillip, G.R. [School of Mechanical Engineering and Technology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ramesh, B.; Madhukar Reddy, C.; Mallikarjuna, K.; Ravi, O. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502 (India); Dhoble, S.J. [Department of Physics, RTM Nagpur University, Nagpur 440 033 (India); Joo, S.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering and Technology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Raju, B. Deva Prasad, E-mail: drdevaprasadraju@gmail.com [Department of Future Studies, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502 (India)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • NaSrB{sub 5}O{sub 9}:Dy{sup 3+} microstructures were synthesized by solid state reaction. • Crystallite size and lattice strain was estimated by W–H analysis. • Plate-like morphology with monoclinic structure is identified by SEM images. • Highest lifetimes of 931 μS were obtained for this system. - Abstract: A white light emitting phosphor NaSrB{sub 5}O{sub 9}:Dy{sup 3+} was synthesized by a conventional solid state reaction method. The structure of the phosphors was analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), revealing that the phosphors crystallized in monoclinic crystal structure with the space group (P2{sub 1}/c). Williamson–Hall (W–H) analysis was used to study the individual contributions of crystallite sizes and lattice strain on the peak broadening of NaSrB{sub 5}O{sub 9}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors. Monoclinic microstructures of nearly plate-like morphologies were observed in the FE-SEM images. Upon near-UV excitation wavelength (390 nm), the blue emission at ∼482 nm ({sup 6}H{sub 15/2}) and yellow emission at ∼584 nm ({sup 6}H{sub 13/2}) were observed in the phosphors. The critical quenching concentration of Dy{sup 3+} in NaSrB{sub 5}O{sub 9} phosphor was found to be 3 at.% with the critical distance (R{sub c}) of ∼22.30 Å and the corresponding concentration quenching mechanism was testified to be the exchange interaction between the dopant Dy{sup 3+} ions. In order to investigate the application in white LEDs, the Commission International de l’Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates, color temperature and decay curve measurements of Dy{sup 3+} ions doped NaSrB{sub 5}O{sub 9} phosphors were carried out. The yellow to blue (Y/B) emission integrated intensity ratio is maximum (∼0.9) for all the concentrations, suggesting that the phosphors favor for white illumination.

  7. Fourier phase microscopy with white light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, Basanta; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Laser-based Fourier phase microscopy (FPM) works on the principle of decomposition of an image field in two spatial components that can be controllably shifted in phase with respect to each other. However, due to the coherent illumination, the contrast in phase images is degraded by speckles. In this paper we present FPM with spatially coherent white light (wFPM), which offers high spatial phase sensitivity due to the low temporal coherence and high temporal phase stability due to common path geometry. Further, by using a fast spatial light modulator (SLM) and a fast scientific-grade complementary metal oxide semiconductor (sCMOS) camera, we report imaging at a maximum rate of 12.5 quantitative phase frames per second with 5.5 mega pixels image size. We illustrate the utility of wFPM as a contrast enhancement as well as dynamic phase measurement method by imaging section of benign colonic glands and red blood cell membrane fluctuation.

  8. White light generation controlled by changing the concentration of silver nanoparticles hosted by Ho{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} doped GeO{sub 2}–PbO glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilo, Mauricio E. [Faculdade de Tecnologia de São Paulo (FATEC-SP), CEETEPS/UNESP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia de Sistemas Eletrônicos, Escola Politécnica da USP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Silva, Elton de O.; Kassab, Luciana R.P. [Faculdade de Tecnologia de São Paulo (FATEC-SP), CEETEPS/UNESP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Garcia, José A.M. [Faculdade de Tecnologia de São Paulo (FATEC-SP), CEETEPS/UNESP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia de Sistemas Eletrônicos, Escola Politécnica da USP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Araújo, Cid B. de, E-mail: cid@df.ufpe.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • Successful fabrication of Ho{sup 3+}–Tm{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} doped lead–germanate glasses containing silver nanoparticles. • Efficient color control of Ho{sup 3+}–Tm{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} doped glass by changing the concentration of silver nanoparticles. • Surface plasmon enhanced multicolor upconversion emission in Ho{sup 3+}–Tm{sup 3+}–Yb{sup 3+} doped lead–germanate glass. • White light generation due to the presence of silver nanoparticles. - Abstract: Frequency upconversion (UC) experiments were performed with GeO{sub 2}–PbO glasses, containing silver nanoparticles (NPs), doped with holmium (Ho{sup 3+}), thulium (Tm{sup 3+}) and ytterbium (Yb{sup 3+}) ions. The samples were excited using a continuous-wave diode laser operating at 980 nm. The UC intensities and the colors of the samples were controlled by changing the concentrations of the rare-earth ions (REI) and the silver NPs nucleated inside the samples. The colors observed spanned the visible range from the red–yellow to the blue. For a particular combination of silver NPs and REI concentrations it was obtained white light generation corresponding to the CIE coordinates X = 0.33 and Y = 0.33.

  9. White Light Emission from Vegetable Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vikram; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2015-06-01

    A mixture of extracts from two common vegetables, red pomegranate and turmeric, when photoexcited at 380 nm, produced almost pure white light emission (WLE) with Commission Internationale d’Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity index (0.35, 0.33) in acidic ethanol. It was also possible to obtain WLE in polyvinyl alcohol film (0.32, 0.25), and in gelatin gel (0.26, 0.33) using the same extract mixture. The colour temperature of the WLE was conveniently tunable by simply adjusting the concentrations of the component emitters. The primary emitting pigments responsible for contributing to WLE were polyphenols and anthocyanins from pomegranate, and curcumin from turmeric. It was observed that a cascade of Forster resonance energy transfer involving polyphenolics, curcumin and anthocyanins played a crucial role in obtaining a CIE index close to pure white light. The optimized methods of extraction of the two primary emitting pigments from their corresponding plant sources are simple, cheap and fairly green.

  10. A new type of white light-emitting diode light source basing on fluorescent SiC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Lu, Weifang

    Most of the commercial white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources are made from phosphor coated blue-emitting gallium nitride (GaN) chips. This type white LED light source always has tradeoff between luminous efficacy and color rendering index (CRI). Furthermore, yellow-emitting phosphor decays...... much faster than the semiconductor chip, so the white color will turn into bluish over the time. This paper will propose a new type white LED light source: using fluorescent silicon carbide (SiC) to take the place of phosphor. This new type LED has the following advantages: a) SiC is a wide bandgap...... semiconductor material , so it is stable; b) Fluorescent SiC has very wide emission spectrum, and it could generate white light with very high CRI; c) It is a better substrate than sapphire for the GaN growth in terms of lattice match and thermal conductivity. This paper will cover: the growth of fluorescent Si...

  11. White light generation in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+}:Tb{sup 3+}:Mn{sup 2+} films deposited by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Martinez, R. [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Tecnologica de la Mixteca, Carretera a Acatlima, Km. 2.5, Huajuapan de Leon, Oaxaca 69000 (Mexico); Alvarez, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora (UNISON), Boulevard Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000 (Mexico); Speghini, A. [DiSTeMeV, Universita di Verona, and INSTM, UdR Verona, Via della Pieve 70, I-37029 San Floriano, Verona (Italy); Falcony, C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, PO Box 55-534, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico); Caldino, U., E-mail: cald@xanum.uam.m [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, PO Box 55-534, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico)

    2010-08-02

    Aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films doped with CeCl{sub 3}, TbCl{sub 3} and MnCl{sub 2} were deposited at 300 {sup o}C with the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technique. The films were analysed using the X-ray diffraction technique and they exhibited a very broad band without any indication of crystallinity, typical of amorphous materials. Sensitization of Tb{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} ions by Ce{sup 3+} ions gives rise to blue, green and red simultaneous emission when the film activated by such ions is excited with UV radiation. The overall efficiency of such energy transfer results to be about 85% upon excitation at 312 nm. Energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+} ions through an electric dipole-quadrupole interaction mechanism appears to be more probable than the electric dipole-dipole one. A strong white light emission for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+}(1.3 at.%):Tb{sup 3+}(0.2 at.%):Mn{sup 2+}(0.3 at.%) film under UV excitation is observed. The high efficiency of energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} ions, resulting in cold white light emission (x = 0.30 and y = 0.32 chromaticity coordinates) makes the Ce{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} triply doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film an interesting material for the design of efficient UV pumped phosphors for white light generation.

  12. White light interferometer: applications in research and industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sujit

    2015-06-01

    Applications of interferometer are countless both in the research and commercial world. Laser sources offer precise measurements of relative path difference between two interfering beams. An exciting example is LIGO (laser Interferometer for Gravitational Observatory), which is aiming to resolve length change as small as 10-19 m over a 4 km length for detection of gravitational waves. However, laser is a disadvantage for microscopic imaging and surface topography applications usually required in semiconductor industry. A different approach for microscopy is to use white light in place of laser. White light due to its limited temporal coherence offers a multitude of benefits for imaging applications. An immediate benefit from white light is the sharp localisation of interference fringe that makes the 3D topography construction or OCT (Optical Coherence Topography) realisable using a Scanning White Light Interferometer (SWLI) imager. In Mirau Mode, SWLI performs high resolution imaging; whereas in Michelson mode Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTS) is realised. SWLI can easily be modified into PUPS (Pupil Plane SWLI) for Ellipsometry. Superimposing Michelson Interferometer known as VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any reflector) can form interference fringes even in presence of wide angle light scattered from a moving illuminated object. This paper describes work undertaken at Nanometrics (UK) on simulation of SWLI fringes including high Numerical Aperture (NA) applications, thin film characterisation, OCT generation and Zemax modelling of compact dispersion-free vibration-immune Fourier-Transformed spectrometer. VISAR as a modified Mach-Zehnder Interferometer is also discussed based on the work at Rutherford-Appleton laboratory (UK).

  13. Achromatic optical correlator for white light pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Liu, Hua-Kuang; Chen, Ming; Cai, Luzhong

    1987-01-01

    An achromatic optical correlator using spatially multiplexed achromatic matched spatial filters (MSFs) for white light optical pattern recognition is presented. The MSF array is synthesizd using a monochromatic laser and its achromaticity is achieved by adjusting the scale and spatial carrier frequency of each MSF to accommodate the wavelength variations in white light correlation detections. Systems analysis and several experimental results showing the correlation peak intensity using white-light illumination are presented.

  14. Determination of illuminants representing typical white light emitting diodes sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jost, S.; Ngo, M.; Ferrero, A.

    2017-01-01

    Solid-state lighting (SSL) products are already in use by consumers and are rapidly gaining the lighting market. Especially, white Light Emitting Diode (LED) sources are replacing banned incandescent lamps and other lighting technologies in most general lighting applications. The aim of this work...

  15. Highly efficient charge generation and electron injection of m-MTDATA/m-MTDATA:HAT-CN/HAT-CN organic heterojunction on ITO cathode for high efficiency inverted white organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Shi, Changsheng; Guo, Qingxun; Chen, Jiangshan; Qiao, Xianfeng; Ma, Dongge; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.; Bae, Sang Soon

    2017-09-01

    The charge generation and electron injection characteristics of m-MTDATA/m-MTDATA:HAT-CN/HAT-CN organic heterojunction made of 4,4',4″-tris(N-3-methylphenyl-N-phenylamino)triphenylamine (m-MTDATA) p-type organic semiconductor and 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) n-type semiconductor were well studied. It was found that m-MTDATA/m-MTDATA:HAT-CN/HAT-CN organic heterojunction showed better charge generation ability than m-MTDATA/HAT-CN organic heterojuntion, and realized highly efficient electron injection when using it as charge generator on indium tin oxide (ITO) cathode. The investigations of capacitance-frequency and current density-voltage characteristics of the electron-only devices based on m-MTDATA/m-MTDATA:HAT-CN/HAT-CN organic heterojunction demonstrated that the amounts of the injected electrons were dependent on the properties of the used n-doping electron transporting layer (n-ETL). Therefore, by optimization, high efficiency inverted white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with ITO as cathode were successfully fabricated using m-MTDATA/m-MTDATA:HAT-CN/HAT-CN organic heterojunction as charge injector and lithium carbonate (Li2CO3) doped bathophenanthroline (BPhen) as n-ETL. The resulting inverted white OLEDs achieved the maximum external quantum efficiency of 12.9%, current efficiency of 42.6 cd/A and power efficiency of 50.5 lm/W, and still remained 12.5%, 41.0 cd/A and 45.0 lm/W at the luminance of 1000 cd/m2, respectively, exhibiting extremely low efficiency roll-off.

  16. White-light ellipsometer with geometric phase shifter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Lionel R; Derbois, Maxime

    2012-07-20

    We describe a simple spectroscopic ellipsometer that uses a geometric phase shifter and a white-light source to generate a small number of phase-stepped intensities I(λ), which are recorded by a spectrometer. The ellipsometric angles ψ and Δ are easily calculated from these intensities at each wavelength simultaneously. We show that errors in Δ due to the nonideal behavior of the achromatic quarter-wave plate in the phase shifter can be made small by suitably adjusting the azimuth of the linearly polarized light incident on the sample. Two silicon dioxide films were measured with this instrument between 450 and 850 nm and yielded best fit film thicknesses of 1000.6±0.1 Å and 20.6±0.1 Å, in excellent agreement with those obtained using a commercial ellipsometer.

  17. White LEDs for lighting remote communities in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, Stewart; Irvine-Halliday, Dave

    2001-12-01

    Over the past 5 years, the application of white LEDs for ambient lighting has been investigated in the remote villages of Nepal. Currently, lighting is often met using kerosene wick lamps, which emit unhealthy levels of fumes, or by burning sap-filled pine sticks, which are worse than the kerosene lamps. A team of students from Calgary University developed some LED lamps that could easily be fabricated in Nepal using local materials and personnel. To generate power, a pedal DC generator was developed to charge batteries, as well as a simple wind turbine. The Nepal Light Project implemented a series of many projects over the last 2 years in several villages across Nepal, using several different power generating systems. A total of 142 households, two schools and a temple were fitted with lamps in 2000, and more will follow in 2001. A research project has also been undertaken in Nepal for the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA) to investigate the potential for energy efficient lamps in the micro hydro industry. The R&D project was very small, and conducted basic testing on locally available compact fluorescent lamps and LED lamps. The report concluded that encouraging the use of CFLs would decrease costs by 30-50%, and that they should be included in the subsidy policy, along with power factor correcting capacitors. LED lamps should not be overly encouraged as the development of the diodes was advancing very rapidly. The real advantage of LED lamps lies in extremely low maintenance costs due to the low power requirements and long life, which is just as important for remote villages as it is for traffic lights and exit signs. It is estimated that these low ongoing costs could be as low as $3/household/year for a rural lighting project. Pilot projects should be encouraged to demonstrate and investigate the potential of WLEDs for lighting in remote communities in developing countries. With 2 billion people without access to electricity, and lighting being

  18. White polymer light-emitting devices for solid-state lighting: materials, devices, and recent progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Lei; Ho, Cheuk-Lam; Wu, Hongbin; Cao, Yong; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2014-04-23

    White polymer light-emitting devices (WPLEDs) have become a field of immense interest in both scientific and industrial communities. They have unique advantages such as low cost, light weight, ease of device fabrication, and large area manufacturing. Applications of WPLEDs for solid-state lighting are of special interest because about 20% of the generated electricity on the earth is consumed by lighting. To date, incandescent light bulbs (with a typical power efficiency of 12-17 lm W(-1) ) and fluorescent lamps (about 40-70 lm W(-1) ) are the most widely used lighting sources. However, incandescent light bulbs convert 90% of their consumed power into heat while fluorescent lamps contain a small but significant amount of toxic mercury in the tube, which complicates an environmentally friendly disposal. Remarkably, the device performances of WPLEDs have recently been demonstrated to be as efficient as those of fluorescent lamps. Here, we summarize the recent advances in WPLEDs with special attention paid to the design of novel luminescent dopants and device structures. Such advancements minimize the gap (for both efficiency and stability) from other lighting sources such as fluorescent lamps, light-emitting diodes based on inorganic semiconductors, and vacuum-deposited small-molecular devices, thus rendering WPLEDs equally competitive as these counterparts currently in use for illumination purposes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Electrical-thermal-luminous-chromatic model of phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, H.; Koh, S.W.; Yuan, C.; Zeijl, H. van; Gielen, A.W.J.; Lee, S.W.R.; Zhang, G.

    2014-01-01

    The drive of increased electrical currents to achieve high luminous output for phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes (PW-LED) has led to a series of thermal problems. The light performance of PW-LED is affected by the heat generated by the two major sources in a package/module: chip(s) and

  20. Redefining White Light Chromaticity Boundaries for Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-05

    Several aspects are involved in the recognition of an aviation signal light's color, including its chromaticity, layout on the airfield, and the chromaticity of other light sources in view. The LRC conducted a human factors investigation of the bound...

  1. GaN doped with beryllium—An effective light converter for white light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teisseyre, Henryk; Bockowski, Michal; Grzegory, Izabella; Kozanecki, Adrian; Damilano, Benjamin; Zhydachevskii, Yaroslav; Kunzer, Michael; Holc, Katarzyna; Schwarz, Ulrich T.

    2013-07-01

    So far, most of the studies on GaN doped with beryllium have mainly concentrated on possible p-type doping. Unfortunately, realization of p-type conductivity in such a way appeared to be very difficult. It seems, however, that bulk crystals doped with beryllium can be used as white light converters in the monolithic white light emitting diodes. To realize monolithic white light emitting diode, we used blue light emitting diodes and a single GaN:Be crystal as converter. High value of the Color Rendering Index gives hope for obtaining an effective light converter based on gallium nitride doped with beryllium.

  2. Color-stable and efficient tandem white organic light-emitting devices using a LiF n-doping layer and a MoO{sub x} p-doping layer as charge generating unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu; Wu, Qingyang; Zhang, Zhensong; Yue, Shouzhen; Guo, Runda; Wang, Peng; Wu, Mingzhu; Gou, Changhua; Zhao, Yi, E-mail: yizhao@jlu.edu.cn; Liu, Shiyong

    2013-10-31

    We have demonstrated color-stable and efficient tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) using 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen):LiF/4,4′,4″-tris(N-3-methylphenyl-N-phenyl-amino)triphenylamine (m-MTDATA):molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub x}) as charge generating unit (CGU), which has the advantages of air stability and ease of fabrication; the working mechanism of Bphen:LiF/m-MTDATA:MoO{sub x} is also discussed through analysis of the electrical and spectral emission properties of tandem devices with different CGUs. The performance of tandem white OLED, comprising blue and yellow phosphorescent EL units, can be improved by optimizing the thickness of Bphen:LiF layer. The device comprised of 30 nm Bphen:LiF layer has a maximum current efficiency of 38.7 cd/A and it can still maintain 24.6 cd/A at the luminance of 10,370 cd/m{sup 2}. Moreover, the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the device are rather stable and the variation is only (± 0.003, ± 0.007) over a wide range of luminance (100–13,000 cd/m{sup 2}). - Highlights: • LiF n-doping layer and MoO{sub x} p-doping layer were used as charge generating units. • The device performance was improved by optimizing the thickness of n-doping layer. • High luminance and efficiency were both achieved at a very low current density. • The device showed rather stable spectra over a wide range of luminance.

  3. Newly patented process enables low-cost solution for increasing white light spectrum of LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanard, Jan-Marie

    2017-10-01

    A newly patented process for completing the spectral light array emitted by LED bulbs provides a low-cost method for producing better human centered lighting (HCL). This process uses non-luminescent colorant filters, filling out the jagged LED spectral emission into a full, white light array. While LED bulbs have the distinct economic advantages of using less energy, producing less heat and lasting years longer than traditional incandescent bulbs, the persistent metameric failure of LED bulbs has resulted in slower, and sometimes reluctant, adoption of LED lighting by the residential, retail and architectural markets. Adding missing wavelengths to LED generated bulbs via colorant filters increases the aesthetic appeal of the light by decreasing current levels of metameric failure, reducing the `flatness', `harshness', and `dullness' of LED generated light reported by consumers. LED phosphor-converted light can be successfully tuned to "whiter" white light with selective color filtering using permanent, durable transparent pigments. These transparent pigments are selectively applied in combination with existing manufacturing technologies and utilized as a final color-tuning step in bulb design. The quantity of emitted light chosen for color filtering can be adjusted from 1% to 100% of emitted light, creating a custom balance of light quantity with light quality. This invention recognizes that "better light" is frequently chosen over "more light" in the consumer marketplace.

  4. White organic light-emitting diodes with fluorescent tube efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, Sebastian; Lindner, Frank; Schwartz, Gregor; Seidler, Nico; Walzer, Karsten; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl

    2009-05-14

    The development of white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) holds great promise for the production of highly efficient large-area light sources. High internal quantum efficiencies for the conversion of electrical energy to light have been realized. Nevertheless, the overall device power efficiencies are still considerably below the 60-70 lumens per watt of fluorescent tubes, which is the current benchmark for novel light sources. Although some reports about highly power-efficient white OLEDs exist, details about structure and the measurement conditions of these structures have not been fully disclosed: the highest power efficiency reported in the scientific literature is 44 lm W(-1) (ref. 7). Here we report an improved OLED structure which reaches fluorescent tube efficiency. By combining a carefully chosen emitter layer with high-refractive-index substrates, and using a periodic outcoupling structure, we achieve a device power efficiency of 90 lm W(-1) at 1,000 candelas per square metre. This efficiency has the potential to be raised to 124 lm W(-1) if the light outcoupling can be further improved. Besides approaching internal quantum efficiency values of one, we have also focused on reducing energetic and ohmic losses that occur during electron-photon conversion. We anticipate that our results will be a starting point for further research, leading to white OLEDs having efficiencies beyond 100 lm W(-1). This could make white-light OLEDs, with their soft area light and high colour-rendering qualities, the light sources of choice for the future.

  5. Tuning the colour of white polymer light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.M. de; Sarfert, W.; Paetzold, R.

    2010-01-01

    Colour tuning of white polymer light emitting diode (LED) light sources can be attained by various methods at various stages in the production process of the lamps and/or by the design of the active material incorporated in the LEDs. In this contribution we will describe the methods and discuss the

  6. White light transverse cooling of a helium beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasel, E.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.; Saverio Pavone, F.; Perales, F.; Unnikrishnan, C.S.; Leduc, M. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (France). Dept. de Phys.

    1999-11-01

    We report a study of transverse laser cooling on a metastable helium beam using spectrally broadened diode lasers (''white light'') to increase its flux. For this purpose, beam profile and atomic flux versus laser power and other parameters have been characterized. We have performed experiments to compare this technique with other transverse cooling methods using monochromatic light. Best results are obtained with a ''ziz-zag'' configuration using ''white light''. (orig.)

  7. Blue and white light emission from zinc oxide nanoforests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafisa Noor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Blue and white light emission is observed when high voltage stress is applied using micrometer-separated tungsten probes across a nanoforest formed of ZnO nanorods. The optical spectrum of the emitted light consistently shows three fine peaks with very high amplitude in the 465–485 nm (blue range, corresponding to atomic transitions of zinc. Additional peaks with smaller amplitudes in the 330–650 nm range and broad spectrum white light is observed depending on the excitation conditions. The spatial and spectral distribution of the emitted light, with pink–orange regions identifying percolation paths in some cases and high intensity blue and white light with center to edge variations in others, indicate that multiple mechanisms lead to light emission. Under certain conditions, the tungsten probe tips used to make electrical contact with the ZnO structures melt during the excitation, indicating that the local temperature can exceed 3422 °C, which is the melting temperature of tungsten. The distinct and narrow peaks in the optical spectra and the abrupt increase in current at high electric fields suggest that a plasma is formed by application of the electrical bias, giving rise to light emission via atomic transitions in gaseous zinc and oxygen. The broad spectrum, white light emission is possibly due to the free electron transitions in the plasma and blackbody radiation from molten silicon. The white light may also arise from the recombination through multiple defect levels in ZnO or due to the optical excitation from solid ZnO. The electrical measurements performed at different ambient pressures result in light emission with distinguishable differences in the emission properties and I–V curves, which also indicate that the dielectric breakdown of ZnO, sublimation, and plasma formation processes are the underlying mechanisms.

  8. Warm-White-Light-Emitting Diode Based on a Dye-Loaded Metal-Organic Framework for Fast White-Light Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiye; Wang, Zi; Lin, Bangjiang; Hu, XueFu; Wei, YunFeng; Zhang, Cankun; An, Bing; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Wenbin

    2017-10-11

    A dye@metal-organic framework (MOF) hybrid was used as a fluorophore in a white-light-emitting diode (WLED) for fast visible-light communication (VLC). The white light was generated from a combination of blue emission of the 9,10-dibenzoate anthracene (DBA) linkers and yellow emission of the encapsulated Rhodamine B molecules. The MOF structure not only prevents dye molecules from aggregation-induced quenching but also efficiently transfers energy to the dye for dual emission. This light-emitting material shows emission lifetimes of 1.8 and 5.3 ns for the blue and yellow components, respectively, which are significantly shorter than the 200 ns lifetime of Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ in commercial WLEDs. The MOF-WLED device exhibited a modulating frequency of 3.6 MHz for VLC, six times that of commercial WLEDs.

  9. Tunable white light source for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaszczak, Urszula J.; Gryko, Lukasz; Zajac, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    Development of light-emitting diodes has brought new possibilities in many applications, especially in terms of flexible adjustment of light spectra. This feature is very useful in construction of many devices, for example for medical diagnosis and treatment. It was proved, that in some cases LEDs can easily replace lasers during therapy of cancer without reduction of efficiency of this process. On the other hand during diagnosis process LED-based constructions can provide unique ability to adjust the color temperature of the output light while maintaining high color rendering. It allows for optimum surface contrast and enhanced tissue differentiation at the operator site. In the paper we describe the construction of the tunable LED-based source designed for application in endoscopy. It was optimized from the point of view of the color rendition for 5 different correlated color temperatures (illuminant A, D55, D65, 3500K and 4500K) with the restriction of very high (>90) values of general and specific color rendering indexes (according to Ra method). The source is composed of 13 light-emitting diodes from visible region mounted on the common radiator and controlled by dedicated system. Spectra of the components are mixed and the spectra of output light is analyzed. On the basis of obtained spectra colorimetric parameters are calculated and compared with the results of theoretical analysis.

  10. Solution processed, white emitting tandem organic light-emitting diodes with inverted device architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfle, Stefan; Schienle, Alexander; Bernhard, Christoph; Bruns, Michael; Lemmer, Uli; Colsmann, Alexander

    2014-08-13

    Fully solution processed monochromatic and white-light emitting tandem or multi-photon polymer OLEDs with an inverted device architecture have been realized by employing WO3 /PEDOT:PSS/ZnO/PEI charge carrier generation layers. The luminance of the sub-OLEDs adds up in the stacked device indicating multi-photon emission. The white OLEDs exhibit a CRI of 75. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Structured white-light illumination for diagnostic investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schau, P.; Brandes, A.; Frenner, K.; Kienle, A.; Osten, W.

    2013-04-01

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an important technology for non-invasive, in vivo medical diagnostics. It enables the high-resolution recording of two-dimensional tomograms or three-dimensional volumes of biological tissue. Two mechanisms help separating the signal from the scattering background. First, reflected or backscattered light from outside the focal spot is suppressed by confocal discrimination. Additionally, the signal modulation is enhanced due to identical optical path lengths of both branches of the white light interferometry setup. Since the OCT relies on the interference between reference light and scattered light, this method cannot be readily extended for fluorescence measurements. An alternative approach is the confocal fluorescence microscopy, which uses confocal microscopy to suppress the fluorescent light from outside the focal spot. Hence, only the fluorescent light in the focal plane, which is 3 to 4 magnitudes lower in intensity than the excitation light, is detected. However, the surrounding area is illuminated with full intensity, which might cause photo-bleaching. There are also other promising approaches such as the two-photon excitation microscopy or fluorescence lifetime microscopy, which we will not cover in more detail. For fluorescence measurements of strongly-scattering samples such as biological tissue but also for technical surfaces, we propose a structured white-light illumination. We present two different approaches for the sample illumination utilizing a white light laser or a white light LED, respectively. We show first simulations of the individual illumination setups and their impact on the scattering within the sample. Furthermore, we investigated the distribution of the fluorescent light that reaches the detection part of the device when excited within a scattering medium, for this purpose we implemented a novel fast-converging algorithm for conditional fluence rate in our Monte Carlo algorithm.

  12. Colour tuning in white hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckbauer, Jochen; Brasser, Catherine; Findlay, Neil J.; Edwards, Paul R.; Wallis, David J.; Skabara, Peter J.; Martin, Robert W.

    2016-10-01

    White hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were fabricated by combining a novel organic colour converter with a blue inorganic LED. An organic small molecule was specifically synthesised to act as down-converter. The characteristics of the white colour were controlled by changing the concentration of the organic molecule based on the BODIPY unit, which was embedded in a transparent matrix, and volume of the molecule and encapsulant mixture. The concentration has a critical effect on the conversion efficiency, i.e. how much of the absorbed blue light is converted into yellow light. With increasing concentration the conversion efficiency decreases. This quenching effect is due to aggregation of the organic molecule at higher concentrations. Increasing the deposited amount of the converter does not increase the yellow emission despite more blue light being absorbed. Degradation of the organic converter was also observed during a period of 15 months from LED fabrication. Angular-dependent measurements revealed slight deviation from a Lambertian profile for the blue and yellow emission peaks leading to a small change in ‘whiteness’ with emission angle. Warm white and cool white light with correlated colour temperatures of 2770 K and 7680 K, respectively, were achieved using different concentrations of the converter molecule. Although further work is needed to improve the lifetime and poor colour rendering, these hybrid LEDs show promising results as an alternative approach for generating white LEDs compared with phosphor-based white LEDs.

  13. White-Light Emission from Layered Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew D; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2018-02-20

    With nearly 20% of global electricity consumed by lighting, more efficient illumination sources can enable massive energy savings. However, effectively creating the high-quality white light required for indoor illumination remains a challenge. To accurately represent color, the illumination source must provide photons with all the energies visible to our eye. Such a broad emission is difficult to achieve from a single material. In commercial white-light sources, one or more light-emitting diodes, coated by one or more phosphors, yield a combined emission that appears white. However, combining emitters leads to changes in the emission color over time due to the unequal degradation rates of the emitters and efficiency losses due to overlapping absorption and emission energies of the different components. A single material that emits broadband white light (a continuous emission spanning 400-700 nm) would obviate these problems. In 2014, we described broadband white-light emission upon near-UV excitation from three new layered perovskites. To date, nine white-light-emitting perovskites have been reported by us and others, making this a burgeoning field of study. This Account outlines our work on understanding how a bulk material, with no obvious emissive sites, can emit every color of the visible spectrum. Although the initial discoveries were fortuitous, our understanding of the emission mechanism and identification of structural parameters that correlate with the broad emission have now positioned us to design white-light emitters. Layered hybrid halide perovskites feature anionic layers of corner-sharing metal-halide octahedra partitioned by organic cations. The narrow, room-temperature photoluminescence of lead-halide perovskites has been studied for several decades, and attributed to the radiative recombination of free excitons (excited electron-hole pairs). We proposed that the broad white emission we observed primarily stems from exciton self-trapping. Here, the

  14. White-Light Phase-Conjugate Mirrors as Distortion Correctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Donald; Smith, W. Scott; Abdeldayem, Hossin; Banerjee, Partha

    2010-01-01

    White-light phase-conjugate mirrors would be incorporated into some optical systems, according to a proposal, as means of correcting for wavefront distortions caused by imperfections in large optical components. The proposal was given impetus by a recent demonstration that white, incoherent light can be made to undergo phase conjugation, whereas previously, only coherent light was known to undergo phase conjugation. This proposal, which is potentially applicable to almost any optical system, was motivated by a need to correct optical aberrations of the primary mirror of the Hubble Space telescope. It is difficult to fabricate large optical components like the Hubble primary mirror and to ensure the high precision typically required of such components. In most cases, despite best efforts, the components as fabricated have small imperfections that introduce optical aberrations that adversely affect imaging quality. Correcting for such aberrations is difficult and costly. The proposed use of white-light phase conjugate mirrors offers a relatively simple and inexpensive solution of the aberration-correction problem. Indeed, it should be possible to simplify the entire approach to making large optical components because there would be no need to fabricate those components with extremely high precision in the first place: A white-light phase-conjugate mirror could correct for all the distortions and aberrations in an optical system. The use of white-light phase-conjugate mirrors would be essential for ensuring high performance in optical systems containing lightweight membrane mirrors, which are highly deformable. As used here, "phase-conjugate mirror" signifies, more specifically, an optical component in which incident light undergoes time-reversal phase conjugation. In practice, a phase-conjugate mirror would typically be implemented by use of a suitably positioned and oriented photorefractive crystal. In the case of a telescope comprising a primary and secondary

  15. Blue and white light electroluminescence in a multilayer OLED using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 122; Issue 6. Blue and white light electroluminescence in a multilayer OLED using a new aluminium complex. Pabitra K Nayak Neeraj Agarwal Farman Ali Meghan P Patankar K L Narasimhan N Periasamy. Full Papers Volume 122 Issue 6 November 2010 pp 847-855 ...

  16. Device Physics of White Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, Herman T.; Hof, Andre; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2012-01-01

    The charge transport and recombination in white-emitting polymer light- emitting diodes (PLEDs) are studied. The PLED investigated has a single emissive layer consisting of a copolymer in which a green and red dye are incorporated in a blue backbone. From single-carrier devices the effect of the

  17. Device physics of white polymer light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H.T.; Hof, A.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    The charge transport and recombination in white-emitting polymer light- emitting diodes (PLEDs) are studied. The PLED investigated has a single emissive layer consisting of a copolymer in which a green and red dye are incorporated in a blue backbone. From single-carrier devices the effect of the

  18. White light wavefront control with a spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Spangenberg, D-M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available , 335–342 (2011). 3. D. Grier, “A revolution in optical manipulation,” Nature 424, 810–816 (2003). 4. A. Jesacher, C. Maurer, A. Schwaighofer, S. Bernet and M. Ritsch-Marte, “Full phase and amplitude control of holographic optical tweezers with high... by the use of a phase checkerboard pattern in computer generated holograms,” Appl. Opt. 47(4), 602 (2008). 10. S. Furhapter, A. Jesacher, S. Bernet and M. Ritsch-Marte,“Spiral phase contrast imaging in microscopy,” Opt. Express 13, 689–694 (2005). 11. T...

  19. Human Adolescent Phase Response Curves to Bright White Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Eastman, Charmane I

    2017-08-01

    Older adolescents are particularly vulnerable to circadian misalignment and sleep restriction, primarily due to early school start times. Light can shift the circadian system and could help attenuate circadian misalignment; however, a phase response curve (PRC) to determine the optimal time for receiving light and avoiding light is not available for adolescents. We constructed light PRCs for late pubertal to postpubertal adolescents aged 14 to 17 years. Participants completed 2 counterbalanced 5-day laboratory sessions after 8 or 9 days of scheduled sleep at home. Each session included phase assessments to measure the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light-dark (wake-sleep) cycle (2 h dim [~20 lux] light, 2 h dark). In one session, intermittent bright white light (~5000 lux; four 20-min exposures) was alternated with 10 min of dim room light once per day for 3 consecutive days. The time of light varied among participants to cover the 24-h day. For each individual, the phase shift to bright light was corrected for the free-run derived from the other laboratory session with no bright light. One PRC showed phase shifts in response to light start time relative to the DLMO and another relative to home sleep. Phase delay shifts occurred around the hours corresponding to home bedtime. Phase advances occurred during the hours surrounding wake time and later in the afternoon. The transition from delays to advances occurred at the midpoint of home sleep. The adolescent PRCs presented here provide a valuable tool to time bright light in adolescents.

  20. Cold white light generation through the simultaneous emission from Ce{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} in 90Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2CeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}3DyCl{sub 3}{center_dot}5MnCl{sub 2} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, W. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Alvarez, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora (UNISON), Boulevard Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000 (Mexico); Martinez-Martinez, R.; Yescas-Mendoza, E. [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Tecnologica de la Mixteca, Carretera a Acatlima Km. 2.5, Huajuapan de Leon, Oaxaca 69000 (Mexico); Camarillo, I. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Caldino, U., E-mail: cald@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico)

    2012-08-15

    The photoluminescence of a CeCl{sub 3}, DyCl{sub 3} and MnCl{sub 2} doped aluminum oxide film deposited by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis was characterized by excitation, emission and decay time spectroscopy. A nonradiative energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} is observed upon UV excitation at 278 nm (peak emission wavelength of AlGaN-based LEDs). Such energy transfer leads to a simultaneous emission of these ions in the blue, green, yellow and red regions, resulting in white light emission with CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, x=0.34 and y=0.23, which correspond to cold white light with a color temperature of 4900 K. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 90Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2CeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}3DyCl{sub 3}{center_dot}5MnCl{sub 2} thin film (AOCDM) could be prepared by spray pyrolysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-radiative energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} takes place in AOCDM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AOCDM (pumped with 278 nm-UV light) can generate 4900 K cold white light.

  1. Light extraction efficiency enhancement for fluorescent SiC based white light-emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Argyraki, Aikaterini

    Fluorescent SiC based white light-emitting diodes(LEDs) light source, as an innovative energy-efficient light source, would even have longer lifetime, better light quality and eliminated blue-tone effect, compared to the current phosphor based white LED light source. In this paper, the yellow....... At a device level, the focus is on improving the light extraction efficiency due to the rather high refractive index of SiC by nanostructuring the surface of SiC. Both periodic nanostructures made by e-beam lithography and nanosphere lithography and random nanostructures made by self-assembled Au nanosphere...... fluorescent Boron-Nitrogen co-doped 6H SiC is optimized in terms of source material, growth condition, dopant concentration, and carrier lifetime by using photoluminescence, pump-probe spectroscopy etc. The internal quantum efficiency is measured and the methods to increase the efficiency have been explored...

  2. White light source with laser-excited phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullaev, O. R.; Aluev, A. V.; Akhmerov, Yu. L.; Kourova, N. V.; Mezhennyi, M. V.; Chelny, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    The principles of operation of a white light source based on a remote phosphor, made of cerium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG : Ce3+), whose luminescence is excited by a blue laser diode, are considered. The colorimetric and photometric characteristics of phosphors of different types are analysed as functions of the phosphor film thickness. The following parameters are obtained at an output power of 1 W and a wavelength of 445±3 nm in the cw regime: luminous flux of 165 lm, correlated colour temperature of 5595 K, colour rendering index of 66, colour coordinates x = 0.3303 and y = 0.3427, luminous efficiency of 165 lm W‑1, and light efficacy of 30 lm W‑1. These characteristics are comparable with similar parameters of commercial white LEDs.

  3. Signal-to-noise limitations in white light holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribak, Erez; Breckinridge, James B.; Roddier, Claude; Roddier, Francois

    1988-01-01

    A simple derivation is given for the SNR in images reconstructed from incoherent holograms. Dependence is shown to be on the hologram SNR, object complexity, and the number of pixels in the detector. Reconstruction of involved objects becomes possible with high-dynamic-range detectors such as CCDs. White-light holograms have been produced by means of a rotational shear interferometer combined with a chromatic corrector. A digital inverse transform recreated the object.

  4. An organic white light-emitting dye: very small molecular architecture displays panchromatic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Heagy, Michael D

    2010-11-14

    The synthesis and photophysical characterization of a new white-light fluorophore is described. The optimization of excitation wavelengths allows the naphthalimide (NI) dyes to display blue, green or white light emission depending on the excitation wavelength.

  5. Development of Key Technologies for White Lighting Based on Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner Goetz; Bill Imler; James Kim; Junko Kobayashi; Andrew Kim; Mike Krames; Rick Mann; Gerd Mueller-Mach; Anneli Munkholm; Jonathan Wierer

    2004-03-31

    This program was organized to focus on materials development issues critical to the acceleration of solid-state lighting, and was split into three major thrust areas: (1) study of dislocation density reduction for GaN grown on sapphire using 'cantilever epitaxy', and the impact of dislocation density on the performance of state-of-the-art high-power LEDs; (2) the evaluation of in situ techniques for monitoring gas phase chemistry and the properties of GaN-based layers during metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD), and (3) feasibility for using semiconductor nanoparticles ('quantum dots') for the down-conversion of blue or ultraviolet light to generate white light. The program included a partnership between Lumileds Lighting (epitaxy and device fabrication for high power LEDs) and Sandia National Laboratories (cantilever epitaxy, gas phase chemistry, and quantum dot synthesis). Key findings included: (1) cantilever epitaxy can provide dislocation density reduction comparable to that of more complicated approaches, but all in one epitaxial growth step; however, further improvements are required to realize significant gains in LED performance at high drive currents, (2) in situ tools can provide detailed knowledge about gas phase chemistry, and can be used to monitor and control epitaxial layer composition and temperature to provide improved yields (e.g., a fivefold increase in color targeting is demonstrated for 540nm LEDs), and (3) quantum efficiency for quantum dots is improved and maintained up to 70% in epoxy thin films, but further work is necessary to increase densification (absorption) and robustness before practical application to LEDs.

  6. White light Sagnac interferometer—a common (path) tale of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Eyal

    2017-11-01

    White or polychromatic light sources are vastly abundant in nature and lie in our most basic understanding of the theory of light, beginning from stars like our Sun and extending to every common household light bulb or street lamp. In this paper, I present concepts of white light interferometery using a common-path Sagnac interferometer, manifested in a straightforward laboratory experiment. I further show the use of this as a Fourier transform spectrometer while presenting a basic overview of the theoretical concepts and spectrum of different light sources obtained experimentally. This work, both experimentally and analytically, is suitable for upper-level undergraduate physics or engineering courses where electromagnetic theory and optics are discussed. The experiment and theory presents important deep concepts and aspects in modern optics and physics that every science student should acquire.

  7. The High-Temperature Synthesis of the Nanoscaled White-Light Phosphors Applied in the White-Light LEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Ying Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The white-light phosphors consisting of Dy3+ doped YPO4 and Dy3+ doped YP1-XVXO4 were prepared by the chemical coprecipitation method. After the 1200°C thermal treatment in the air atmosphere, the white-light phosphors with particle sizes around 90 nm can be obtained. In order to reduce the average particle size of phosphors, the alkaline washing method was applied to the original synthesis process, which reduces the particle sizes to 65 nm. From the PLE spectra, four absorption peaks locating at 325, 352, 366, and 390 nm can be observed in the YPO4-based phosphors. These peaks appear due to the following electron transitions: 6H15/2→4K15/2, 6H15/2→4M15/2+6P7/2, 6H15/2→4I11/2, and 6H15/2→4M19/2. Besides, the emission peaks of wavelengths 484 nm and 576 nm can be observed in the PL spectra. In order to obtain the white-light phosphors, the vanadium ions were applied to substitute the phosphorus ions to compose the YP1-XVXO4 phosphors. From the PL spectra, the strongest PL intensity can be obtained with 30% vanadium ions. As the concentration of vanadium ions increases to 40%, the phosphors with the CIE coordinates locating at the white-light area can be obtained.

  8. Red for LED : New narrow band red phosphors for white light emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senden, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/37060217X

    2018-01-01

    White light emitting diodes (LEDs) are nowadays widely applied in general lighting and consumer electronics. Due to their superior energy efficiency and long operation lifetime, white LEDs are considered to be the light sources of the future, and it is anticipated that white LEDs will largely

  9. Surface measurements by white light spatial-phase-shift imaging interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieli, Yoel; Epshtein, Shlomi; Yakubov, Igor; Weitzman, Yosi; Locketz, Garrett; Harris, Alon

    2014-06-30

    A novel method of common-path imaging interferometry, the White Light Spatial-Phase-Shift (WLSPS) for object surface measurements, is discussed here. Compared to standard White Light Interferometry (WLI), which uses a reference mirror, the interferometry of WLSPS is obtained by creating manipulations to the light wavefront reflected from an object's surface. Using this approach, surface measurements can be obtained from any real object image, and do not need to be taken directly from the object itself. This creates the ability for a surface measurement tool to be attached to any optical system that generates a real image of an object. Further, as this method does not require a reference beam, the surface measurement system contains inherent vibration cancelation.

  10. The White Noise Generator programed on the Raspberry Pi

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ken; Ham, Katie; Schock, Kris; Dowling, Patrick; Kuzell, Chaz

    2014-03-01

    A Raspberry Pi computer, running a Linux based operating system, was programmed for use as a white noise generator. The program was written to output sine waves at a specific frequency with a randomly generated phase. This function generator was programmed specifically for an ongoing undergraduate research project. This research project involves the calculation of the speed of flow through a cylindrical pipe with 128 transducers equally spaced by 0.4 inches down the length of the pipe. The inputted white noise generated serves as an effective technique to induce multiple sine waves of a given frequency to the pipe, as the sine waves are generated at a random phase. Our research group would like to thank Dr. Ken McGill for all of his help, guidance, and time with this research project. We would also like to thank Georgia College and State University for providing the materials used in this experiment.

  11. Recent Progress in Quantum Dot Based White Light-Emitting Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yu; Rogach, Andrey L

    2016-08-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been widely employed as components of white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) due to their excellent optical properties (highly saturated emission color, high luminescence quantum yield) as well as thermal and chemical stability. Much effort has been devoted to realize efficient QD-based WLEDs, including the synthesis of superior luminescent nanomaterials with excellent stabilities, and the design of advanced devices structures. In this paper, after introducing photometric parameters of the contemporary QD-based WLEDs, we highlight the recent progress in these devices grouped according to three main mechanisms for white light generation: optical excitation, direct charge carrier injection, and Förster resonance energy transfer. The methods to generate white light, the design of QD emitters and QD-based devices, as well as their fabrication techniques are considered, and the key scientific and technological challenges in the QD-based WLEDs are highlighted. Novel light-emitting materials for WLEDs such as carbon-based nanoparticles are also considered.

  12. Fast and accurate line scanner based on white light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambelet, Patrick; Moosburger, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    White-light interferometry is a highly accurate technology for 3D measurements. The principle is widely utilized in surface metrology instruments but rarely adopted for in-line inspection systems. The main challenges for rolling out inspection systems based on white-light interferometry to the production floor are its sensitivity to environmental vibrations and relatively long measurement times: a large quantity of data needs to be acquired and processed in order to obtain a single topographic measurement. Heliotis developed a smart-pixel CMOS camera (lock-in camera) which is specially suited for white-light interferometry. The demodulation of the interference signal is treated at the level of the pixel which typically reduces the acquisition data by one orders of magnitude. Along with the high bandwidth of the dedicated lock-in camera, vertical scan-speeds of more than 40mm/s are reachable. The high scan speed allows for the realization of inspection systems that are rugged against external vibrations as present on the production floor. For many industrial applications such as the inspection of wafer-bumps, surface of mechanical parts and solar-panel, large areas need to be measured. In this case either the instrument or the sample are displaced laterally and several measurements are stitched together. The cycle time of such a system is mostly limited by the stepping time for multiple lateral displacements. A line-scanner based on white light interferometry would eliminate most of the stepping time while maintaining robustness and accuracy. A. Olszak proposed a simple geometry to realize such a lateral scanning interferometer. We demonstrate that such inclined interferometers can benefit significantly from the fast in-pixel demodulation capabilities of the lock-in camera. One drawback of an inclined observation perspective is that its application is limited to objects with scattering surfaces. We therefore propose an alternate geometry where the incident light is

  13. Laser Based Phosphor Converted Solid State White Light Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantore, Michael

    Artificial lighting and as a consequence the ability to be productive when the sun does not shine may be a profound achievement in society that is largely taken for granted. As concerns arise due to our dependence on energy sources with finite lifespan or environmentally negative effects, efforts to reduce energy consumption and create clean renewable alternatives has become highly valued. In the scope of artificial lighting, the use of incandescent lamps has shifted to more efficient light sources. Fluorescent lighting made the first big gains in efficiency over incandescent lamps with peak efficiency for mature designs reaching luminous efficacy of approximately 90 lm/W; more than three times as efficient as an incandescent lamp. Lamps based on light emitting diodes (LEDs) which can produce light at even greater efficiency, color quality and without the potential for hazardous chemical release from lamp failure. There is a significant challenge with LED based light sources. Their peak efficiency occurs at low current densities and then droops as the current density increases. Laser diodes (LDs) do not suffer from decreasing efficiency due to increased current. An alternative solid state light source using LDs has potential to make further gains in efficiency as well as allow novel illuminant designs which may be impractical or even impossible even with LED or other conventional sources. While similar to LEDS, the use of LDs does present new challenges largely due to the increased optical power density which must be accommodated in optics and phosphor materials. Single crystal YAG:Ce has been shown to be capable of enduring this more extreme operating environment while retaining the optical and fluorescing qualities desired for use as a wavelength converter in phosphor converted LD based white emitting systems. The incorporation of this single crystal phosphor in a system with a commercial laser diode with peak wall plug efficiency of 31% resulted in emission of

  14. Capturing triplet emission in white organic light emitting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [Faculty of EHSE, School of Engineering and IT, B-purple-12, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)

    2011-08-15

    The state-of-the art in the white organic light emitting devices (WOLEDs) is reviewed for further developments with a view to enhance the capture of triplet emission. In particular, applying the new exciton-spin-orbit-photon interaction operator as a perturbation, rates of spontaneous emission are calculated in a few phosphorescent materials and compared with experimental results. For iridium based phosphorescent materials the rates agree quite well with the experimental results. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Molecular-scale simulation of electroluminescence in a multilayer white organic light-emitting diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mesta, Murat; Carvelli, Marco; de Vries, Rein J

    2013-01-01

    In multilayer white organic light-emitting diodes the electronic processes in the various layers--injection and motion of charges as well as generation, diffusion and radiative decay of excitons--should be concerted such that efficient, stable and colour-balanced electroluminescence can occur. Here...... we show that it is feasible to carry out Monte Carlo simulations including all of these molecular-scale processes for a hybrid multilayer organic light-emitting diode combining red and green phosphorescent layers with a blue fluorescent layer. The simulated current density and emission profile...

  16. Steering and filtering white light with resonant waveguide gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Giorgio; Basset, Guillaume; Martin, Olivier J. F.; Gallinet, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    A novel thin-film single-layer structure based on resonant waveguide gratings (RWGs) allows to engineer selective color filtering and steering of white light. The unit cell of the structure consists of two adjacent finite-length and cross-talking RWGs, where the former acts as in-coupler and the latter acts as out-coupler. The structure is made by only one nano-imprint lithography replication and one thin film layer deposition, making it fully compatible with up-scalable fabrication processes. We characterize a fabricated optical security element designed to work with the flash and the camera of a smartphone in off-axis light steering configuration, where the pattern is revealed only by placing the smartphone in the proper position. Widespread applications are foreseen in a variety of fields, such as multifocal or monochromatic lenses, solar cells, biosensors, security devices and seethrough optical combiners for near-eye displays.

  17. 4-Gbit/s visible light communication link based on 16-QAM OFDM transmission over remote phosphor-film converted white light by using blue laser diode

    KAUST Repository

    Duran Retamal, Jose Ramon

    2015-12-21

    Visible Light Communication (VLC) as a new technology for ultrahigh-speed communication is still limited when using slow modulation light-emitting diode (LED). Alternatively, we present a 4-Gbit/s VLC system using coherent blue-laser diode (LD) via 16-quadrature amplitude modulation orthogonal frequency division multiplexing. By changing the composition and the optical-configuration of a remote phosphor-film the generated white light is tuned from cool day to neutral, and the bit error rate is optimized from 1.9 × 10-2 to 2.8 × 10-5 in a blue filter-free link due to enhanced blue light transmission in forward direction. Briefly, blue-LD is an alternative to LED for generating white light and boosting the data rate of VLC. © 2015 Optical Society of America.

  18. Imaging Slit Pores Under Delaminated Splats by White Light Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Gao, Li-li; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2018-01-01

    The slit pores under delaminated films significantly contribute to the properties of the film and the coating. In the present study, a novel and practical technique, the white light interference method, is proposed to characterize the slit pores covered by the 8YSZ and LZ splats. In this method, only an ordinary optical microscopy (OM) is used. Interestingly, colorful Newton's rings and parabolic shapes of the slit pores were clearly observed by OM. The crack spacing and the shapes of the slit pores captured by OM were in good agreement with those obtained by scanning electron microscopy and focus ion beam. Moreover, this is the first time when successful quantitative imaging of the slit pores under the thermal spray splats is achieved. Besides, mechanical analyses were carried out, and the results were consistent with those obtained by OM. In addition, the essential fact that the slit pores were mainly caused by transverse cracking/delamination in the thermal spray coatings was clarified. These results indicate that white light interference is an excellent method to characterize the slit pores under smooth and transparent films.

  19. GaN nanophosphors for white-light applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mirgender; Singh, V. P.; Dubey, Sarvesh; Suh, Youngsuk; Park, Si-Hyun

    2018-01-01

    GaN nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by carbothermal reduction combined with nitridation, using Ga2O3 powder and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) as precursors. Characterization of the NPs was performed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and room-temperature photoluminescence measurements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was also performed to detect the chemical states of the different species. A universal yellow luminescence (YL) band was observed from complexes of Ga vacancies with O anti-sites and of O anti-sites with C. Further increments in the C content were observed with continued growth and induced an additional blue luminescence (BL) band. Tuning of the YL and BL bands resulted in white-light emission under certain experimental conditions, thus offering a new way of employing GaN nanophosphors for solid-state white lighting. Calculations of the correlated color temperature and color-quality scale parameters confirmed the utility of the experimental process for different applications.

  20. Effects of white light-emitting diode (LED) light exposure with different correlated color temperatures (CCTs) on human lens epithelial cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chen; Li, Xiuyi; Tong, Jianping; Gu, Yangshun; Shen, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Cataract is the major cause for legal blindness in the world. Oxidative stress on the lens epithelial cells (hLECs) is the most important factor in cataract formation. Cumulative light-exposure from widely used light-emitting diodes (LEDs) may pose a potential oxidative threat to the lens epithelium, due to the high-energy blue light component in the white-light emission from diodes. In the interest of perfecting biosafety standards for LED domestic lighting, this study analyzed the photobiological effect of white LED light with different correlated color temperatures (CCTs) on cultured hLECs. The hLECs were cultured and cumulatively exposed to multichromatic white LED light with CCTs of 2954, 5624, and 7378 K. Cell viability of hLECs was measured by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. DNA damage was determined by alkaline comet assay. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were quantified by flow cytometry. Compared with 2954 and 5624 K LED light, LED light having a CCT of 7378 K caused overproduction of intracellular ROS and severe DNA damage, which triggered G2 /M arrest and apoptosis. These results indicate that white LEDs with a high CCT could cause significant photobiological damage to hLECs. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  1. Light generated bubble for microparticle propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Ido; Niv, Avi

    2017-06-06

    Light activated motion of micron-sized particles with effective forces in the range of micro-Newtons is hereby proposed and demonstrated. Our investigation shows that this exceptional amount of force results from accumulation of light-generated heat by a micron-sized particle that translates into motion due to a phase transition in the nearby water. High-speed imagery indicates the role of bubble expansion and later collapse in this event. Comparing observations with known models reveals a dynamic behavior controlled by polytropic trapped vapor and the inertia of the surrounding liquid. The potential of the proposed approach is demonstrated by realization of disordered optical media with binary light-activated switching from opacity to high transparency.

  2. Tuning the white light spectrum of light emitting diode lamps to reduce attraction of nocturnal arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longcore, Travis; Aldern, Hannah L; Eggers, John F; Flores, Steve; Franco, Lesly; Hirshfield-Yamanishi, Eric; Petrinec, Laina N; Yan, Wilson A; Barroso, André M

    2015-05-05

    Artificial lighting allows humans to be active at night, but has many unintended consequences, including interference with ecological processes, disruption of circadian rhythms and increased exposure to insect vectors of diseases. Although ultraviolet and blue light are usually most attractive to arthropods, degree of attraction varies among orders. With a focus on future indoor lighting applications, we manipulated the spectrum of white lamps to investigate the influence of spectral composition on number of arthropods attracted. We compared numbers of arthropods captured at three customizable light-emitting diode (LED) lamps (3510, 2704 and 2728 K), two commercial LED lamps (2700 K), two commercial compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs; 2700 K) and a control. We configured the three custom LEDs to minimize invertebrate attraction based on published attraction curves for honeybees and moths. Lamps were placed with pan traps at an urban and two rural study sites in Los Angeles, California. For all invertebrate orders combined, our custom LED configurations were less attractive than the commercial LED lamps or CFLs of similar colour temperatures. Thus, adjusting spectral composition of white light to minimize attracting nocturnal arthropods is feasible; not all lights with the same colour temperature are equally attractive to arthropods. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Surface recovery algorithm in white light interferometry based on combined white light phase shifting and fast Fourier transform algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Quangsang; Fang, Fengzhou; Zhang, Xiaodong; Gao, Huimin

    2017-10-10

    Quality control of micro-nano structured and freeform surfaces is becoming increasingly important, which leads to challenging requirements in the measurement and characterization of rough and highly reflective surfaces. As an important measurement technique, white light scanning interferometry (WLSI) is a fast noncontact method to measure three-dimensional (3D) surface profiles. Nevertheless, the existing WLSI 3D surface reconstruction algorithms are prone to environmental vibrations and phase changes caused by reflections on the tested surface. A novel peak detecting algorithm that combines the white light phase-shifting interferometry (WLPSI) method and fast Fourier transform (FFT) coherence-peak-sensing technique is proposed in this paper, which can accurately determine the local fringe peak and improve the vertical resolution of the measurement. A microcomponent (10 μm standard step height) and a spherical surface were used as test specimens to evaluate the proposed method. Both simulated and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm improves the precision and anti-interference ability of the WLPSI and FFT methods, which can effectively reduce the batwing effects at the edges and solve the problem of positioning error in the maximum modulation.

  4. High-flux focusable color-tunable and efficient white-light-emitting diode light engine for stage lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, Maumita; Pedersen, Henrik Chresten; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    colors through a microlens array(MA) at the gate of ∅50 mm. Hence, it produces homogeneous color-mixed tunable white light from 3000 to6000 K that can be adjustable from flood to spot position providing 10% translational loss, whereas the correspondingloss from the halogen–Fresnel spotlight is 37......% and a luminous efficacy of 33 lm∕W are achieved, which is three times higherthan the 2-kW halogen–Fresnel spotlight. In addition to having color rendering of color rendering indexRa > 85 and television lighting consistency index 12 > 70, the dimmable and tunable white light can becolor controlled during......A color mixing light-emitting diode (LED) light engine that can replace 2-kW halogen–Fresnel spotlightwith high-luminous flux in excess of 20,000 lm is reported for applications in professional stage and studio lighting.The light engine focuses and mixes the light from 210 LEDs of five different...

  5. Transforming White Light into Rainbows: Segmentation Strategies for Successful School Tax Elections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senden, J. Bradford; Lifto, Don E.

    2009-01-01

    In the late 1600s, British physicist Sir Isaac Newton first demonstrated refraction and dispersion in a triangular prism. He discovered that a prism could decompose white light into a spectrum. Hold a prism up to the light at the correct angle and white light magically splits into vivid colors of the rainbow! So what do prisms and rainbows have to…

  6. Ultraviolet light induced white light emission in Ag and Eu3+ co-doped oxyfluoride glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hai; Wang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jindeng; Li, Fang

    2010-08-30

    Transparent Ag and Eu(3+) co-doped oxyfluoride glasses with composition 50SiO(2)-20Al(2)O(3)-30CaF(2) were prepared by melt-quenching technique. The structural and luminescent properties of glasses, energy transfer mechanism between luminescent centers were systematically investigated. The missing nanoparticles signals in absorption spectra, XRD patterns and TEM images, the additional broad excitation band at 325-375 nm indicate that the broad emission band at 400-700 nm is originated from very small molecule-like, non-plasmonic Ag particles (ML-Ag-particles). A perfect white light emission was realized by combining intense red emission of Eu(3+) with broad band emission of ML-Ag-particles. These results suggest that Ag and Eu(3+) co-doped oxyfluoride glasses could be potentially applied as white light-emitting phosphors for ultra-violet LED chips.

  7. Rationally Designed Carbon Nanodots towards Pure White-Light Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcudi, Francesca; Đorđević, Luka; Prato, Maurizio

    2017-04-03

    We report a rational synthesis of carbon nanodots (CNDs) aimed at tailoring their emission, starting from a reasoned choice of organic precursors. To showcase the potential of this approach in a field such as optoelectronics, we designed experiments aimed at preparing materials that emit across the entire visible spectrum. Specifically, using precursors such as arginine, ethylenediamine, naphthalene dianhydride, and 2,6-dibromonaphtalene dianhydride, in appropriate ratios, it was possible to obtain pure white-light (0.33, 0.33; CIE coordinates) emitting carbon nanodots (WCNDs) through a one-step microwave-assisted synthesis and facile purification. The characterization and properties of this novel nanomaterial is discussed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Solar corona/prominence seen through the White Light Coronograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The solar corona and a solar prominence as seen through the White Light Coronograph, Skylab Experiment S052, on January 17, 1974. This view was reproduced from a television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The bright spot is a burn in the vidicon. The solar corona is the halo around the Sun which is normally visible only at the time of solar eclipse by the Moon. The Skylab coronography uses an externally-mounted disk system which occults the brilliant solar surface while allowing the fainter radiation of the corona to enter an annulus and be photographed. A mirror system allows either TV viewing of the corona or photographic recording of the image.

  9. Polaron self-localization in white-light emitting hybrid perovskites

    KAUST Repository

    Cortecchia, Daniele

    2017-02-03

    Two-dimensional (2D) perovskites with the general formula APbX are attracting increasing interest as solution processable, white-light emissive materials. Recent studies have shown that their broadband emission is related to the formation of intra-gap colour centres. Here, we provide an in-depth description of the charge localization sites underlying the generation of such radiative centres and their corresponding decay dynamics, highlighting the formation of small polarons trapped within their lattice distortion field. Using a combination of spectroscopic techniques and first-principles calculations to study the white-light emitting 2D perovskites (EDBE)PbCl and (EDBE)PbBr, we infer the formation of Pb , Pb, and X (where X = Cl or Br) species confined within the inorganic perovskite framework. Due to strong Coulombic interactions, these species retain their original excitonic character and form self-trapped polaron-excitons acting as radiative colour centres. These findings are expected to be relevant for a broad class of white-light emitting perovskites with large polaron relaxation energy.

  10. Noise analysis of a white-light supercontinuum light source for multiple wavelength confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Gail [Centre for Biophotonics, Strathclyde Institute for Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 27 Taylor Street, Glasgow, G4 0NR (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-07

    Intensity correlations of a Ti : sapphire, Kr/Ar and a white-light supercontinuum were performed to quantify the typical signal amplitude fluctuations and hence ascertain the comparative output stability of the white-light supercontinuum source for confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Intensity correlations across a two-pixel sample (n = 1000) of up to 98%, 95% and 94% were measured for the Ti : sapphire, Kr/Ar and white-light supercontinuum source, respectively. The white-light supercontinuum noise level is therefore acceptable for CLSM, with the added advantage of wider wavelength flexibility over traditional CLSM excitation sources. The relatively low-noise white-light supercontinuum was then used to perform multiple wavelength sequential CLSM of guinea pig detrusor to confirm the reliability of the system and to demonstrate system flexibility.

  11. Transmission of digital images consisting of white-light dark solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuanmei; Liu, Simin; Guo, Ru; Liu, Zhaohong; Song, Tao

    2005-11-10

    A distortion-free digital image is transmitted through parallel propagation of white-light photovoltaic dark solitons. The waveguide channels induced by white-light dark solitons can guide both the laser beam and the white-light beam well. We determine experimentally the critical separations of the dark solitons in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the crystalline c axis for the given crystal thickness.

  12. Second Harmonic Generation of Unpolarized Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Changqin; Ulcickas, James R. W.; Deng, Fengyuan; Simpson, Garth J.

    2017-11-01

    A Mueller tensor mathematical framework was applied for predicting and interpreting the second harmonic generation (SHG) produced with an unpolarized fundamental beam. In deep tissue imaging through SHG and multiphoton fluorescence, partial or complete depolarization of the incident light complicates polarization analysis. The proposed framework has the distinct advantage of seamlessly merging the purely polarized theory based on the Jones or Cartesian susceptibility tensors with a more general Mueller tensor framework capable of handling partial depolarized fundamental and/or SHG produced. The predictions of the model are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements of z -cut quartz and mouse tail tendon obtained with polarized and depolarized incident light. The polarization-dependent SHG produced with unpolarized fundamental allowed determination of collagen fiber orientation in agreement with orthogonal methods based on image analysis. This method has the distinct advantage of being immune to birefringence or depolarization of the fundamental beam for structural analysis of tissues.

  13. White Light-Activated Antimicrobial Paint using Crystal Violet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gi Byoung; Allan, Elaine; Parkin, Ivan P

    2016-06-22

    Crystal violet (CV) was incorporated into acrylic latex to produce white-light-activated antimicrobial paint (WLAAP). Measurement of the water contact angle of the WLAAP showed that the water contact angle increased with increasing CV concentration. In a leaching test over 120 h, the amount of CV that leached from the WLAAPs was close to the detection limit (coli, which is a key causative agent of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). A reduction in the numbers of viable bacteria was observed on the painted coated polyurethane after 6 h in the dark, and the bactericidal activity increased with increasing CV concentration (P antimicrobial activity between the materials in the light and dark was 0.48 log at CV 250 ppm, and it increased by 0.43 log at each increment of CV 250 ppm. The difference was the highest (>1.8 log) at the highest CV concentration (1000 ppm). These WLAAPs are promising candidates for use in healthcare facilities to reduce HAIs.

  14. Handheld White Light Interferometer for Measuring Defect Depth in Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Simmons, Stephen; Cox, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Accurate quantification of defects (scratches and impacts) is vital to the certification of flight hardware and other critical components. The amount of damage to a particular component contributes to the performance, reliability, and safety of a system, which ultimately affects the success or failure of a mission or test. The launch-commit criteria on a Space Shuttle Orbiter window are governed by the depth of the defects that are identified by a visual inspection. This measurement of a defect is not easy to obtain given the environment, size of the defect, and location of the window(s). The determination of depth has typically been performed by taking a mold impression and measuring the impression with an optical profiling instrument. Another method of obtaining an estimate of the depth is by using a refocus microscope. To use a refocus microscope, the surface of the glass and bottom of the defect are, in turn, brought into focus by the operator. The amount of movement between the two points corresponds to the depth of the defect. The refocus microscope requires a skilled operator and has been proven to be unreliable when used on Orbiter windows. White light interferometry was chosen as a candidate to replace the refocus microscope. The White Light Interferometer (WLI) was developed to replace the refocus microscope as the instrument used for measuring the depth of defects in Orbiter windows. The WLI consists of a broadband illumination source, interferometer, detector, motion control, displacement sensor, mechanical housing, and support electronics. The illumination source for the WLI is typically a visible light emitting diode (LED) or a near-infrared superluminescent diode (SLD) with power levels of less than a milliwatt. The interferometer is a Michelson configuration consisting of a 1-in. (2.5-cm) cube beam splitter, a 0.5-in. (1.3-cm) optical window as a movable leg (used to closely match the return intensity of the fixed leg from the window), and a

  15. Generating Selected Color using RGB, Auxiliary Lights, and Simplex Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim HyungTae

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A mixed light source generates various colors, with the potential to adjust intensities of multiple LEDs, which makes it possible to generate arbitrary colors. Currently, PCs and OSs provide color selection windows that can obtain the RGB or HSL color coordinates of a user’s selection. Mixed light sources are usually composed of LEDs in the primary colors, with LEDs in auxiliary colors such as white and yellow used in a few cases. When using auxiliary color LEDs, the number of LED inputs, the dimming levels, is larger than the number of elements in the color coordinate, which causes an under-determined problem. This study proposed how to determine the dimming levels of LEDs based on the selected color. Commercial LEDs have di_erent optical power values and impure color coordinates, even if they are RGB. Hence, the characteristics of the LEDs were described using a linear model derived from the tri-stimulus values (an XYZ color coordinate model and dimming levels. Color mixing models were derived for the arbitrary number of auxiliary color LEDs. The under-determined problem was solved using a simplex search method without an inverse matrix operation. The proposed method can be applied to a machine vision system and an RGBW light mixer for semiconductor inspection. The dimming levels, obtained using the proposed method were better than derived using other methods.

  16. Wideband perfect coherent absorber based on white-light cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlicki, Omer; Scheuer, Jacob

    2015-03-01

    Coherent Perfect Absorbers (CPAs) are optical cavities which can be described as time-reversed lasers where light waves that enter the cavity, coherently interfere and react with the intra-cavity losses to yield perfect absorption. In contrast to lasers, which benefit from high coherency and narrow spectral linewidths, for absorbers these properties are often undesirable as absorption at a single frequency is highly susceptible to spectral noise and inappropriate for most practical applications. Recently, a new class of cavities, characterized by a spectrally wide resonance has been proposed. Such resonators, often referred to as White Light Cavities (WLCs), include an intra-cavity superluminal phase element, designed to provide a phase response with a slope that is opposite in sign and equal in magnitude to that of light propagation through the empty cavity. Consequently, the resonance phase condition in WLCs is satisfied over a band of frequencies providing a spectrally wide resonance. WLCs have drawn much attention due to their attractiveness for various applications such as ultra-sensitive sensors and optical buffering components. Nevertheless, WLCs exhibit inherent losses that are often undesirable. Here we introduce a simple wideband CPA device that is based on the WLC concept along with a complete analytical analysis. We present analytical and FDTD simulations of a practical, highly compact (12µm), Silicon based WLC-CPA that exhibits a flat and wide absorption profile (40nm) and demonstrate its usefulness as an optical pulse terminator (>35db isolation) and an all optical modulator that span the entire C-Band and exhibit high immunity to spectral noise.

  17. Numerical Simulation on Light Output of UV-based White Light-Emitting Diodes with Multicolor Phosphor Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kunio; Mitsuishi, Iwao; Hattori, Yasushi; Nunoue, Shinya

    2008-08-01

    We developed a new simulation method for designing the luminescence profiles of phophor-based white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). By combining the rate equations for absorption/emission processes by phosphors with a differential equation for spatial distribution of light intensity, we take into account the cascade process of phosphor emission due to the reabsorption of photons. We found that our model is suitable for a systematic design method of white light sources with multicolor phosphor blends.

  18. Real and virtual propagation dynamics of angular accelerating white light beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vetter, C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available manipulation and laser plasma interactions. Here we create angular accelerating light beams with a potentially unlimited acceleration rate. By employing wavelength independent digital holograms for the creation and propagation of white light beams, we are able...

  19. Spectra Analysis in Sunset Color Demonstrations with a White-Color LED as a Light Source

    OpenAIRE

    Makoto Hasegawa; Seika Tokumitsu

    2016-01-01

    Spectra of light beams emitted from white-color LED torches are different from those of conventional electric torches. In order to confirm if white-color LED torches can be used as light sources for popular sunset color demonstrations in spite of such differences, spectra of travelled light beams and scattered light beams with each of a white-color LED torch (composed of a blue LED and yellow-color fluorescent material) and a conventional electric torch as a light source were measured and com...

  20. Developing a new supplemental lighting device with ultra-bright white LED for vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongguang; Li, Pingping; Jiang, Jianghai

    2007-02-01

    It has been proved that monochromatic or compound light-emitting diode (LED) or laser diode (LD) can promote the photosynthesis of horticultural crops, but the promotion of polychromatic light like white LED is unclear. A new type of ultra-bright white LED (LUW56843, InGaN, \

  1. Development of a Code to Analyze the Solar White-Light Images ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the focal plane a green color filter is used to improve the quality of the solar image. More detailed ... The solar white-light images were stored on the photographic plates of size 25.4 sq. cm till 1975. From Jan. ... image and then. Figure 1. Digitized white-light image of the Sun obtained from Kodaikanal Solar Observatory.

  2. Flexible fluorescent white organic light emitting diodes with ALD encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Sheng; Chittawanij, Apisit; Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Lin, Pen-Chu; Hong, Lin-Ann; Tsai, Feng-Yu; Tseng, Ming-Hong; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Lin, Kung-Liang; Chen, Szu-Hao

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the flexible white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLED) was fabricated on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) with structure of ITO/EHI608 (75 nm)/HTG-1 (10 nm)/3% EB502:0.8% EY53 (5 nm)/3% EB502 (35 nm)/Alq3 (10 nm)/LiF (0.8 nm)/Al (150 nm) and was compared with glass substrate the same structure. It was seen that the performances of flexible and glass substrate are almost the same. The luminance, current efficiency, and CIE coordinates of flexible device is 6351 cd/m2, 12.7 cd/A, and (0.31, 0.38) at 50 mA/cm2, respectively. Then, an Al2O3/HfO2 film on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a thin film encapsulation layer have been described and compared, such as the characteristics of water permeability and lifetime of flexible WOLED. The results show that the PET/ALD film low value of about 0.04 g/m2d, and the PET film shows WVTR of about 3.8 g/m2/d. The lifetimes of PET/ALD and PET encapsulations are 840 min and 140 min, respectively. Simultaneous deposition of ALD film on PET film gave the lifetime of flexible WOLED is six times longer than device without ALD encapsulation.

  3. Strategies to Achieve High-Performance White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most promising technologies for next-generation lighting and displays, white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs have received enormous worldwide interest due to their outstanding properties, including high efficiency, bright luminance, wide viewing angle, fast switching, lower power consumption, ultralight and ultrathin characteristics, and flexibility. In this invited review, the main parameters which are used to characterize the performance of WOLEDs are introduced. Subsequently, the state-of-the-art strategies to achieve high-performance WOLEDs in recent years are summarized. Specifically, the manipulation of charges and excitons distribution in the four types of WOLEDs (fluorescent WOLEDs, phosphorescent WOLEDs, thermally activated delayed fluorescent WOLEDs, and fluorescent/phosphorescent hybrid WOLEDs are comprehensively highlighted. Moreover, doping-free WOLEDs are described. Finally, issues and ways to further enhance the performance of WOLEDs are briefly clarified.

  4. Suppression of stray interference peaks of optical joint in white light interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yongqing; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Yonggui; Zhang, Haoliang; Yang, Zhe; Lv, Yan; Yuan, Libo

    2017-04-01

    The stray interference peaks (SIPs) are an important factor resulting in the misjudgment of measurement information in white light interferometer (WLI). SIPs are generated by the residual reflected light beams. We theoretically analyze the interference conditions of the SIP. The analysis shows that these SIPs are discrete main interference peak outside and have different orders. We present a stagger optical path (SOP) method for suppressing or eliminating these SIP which will appear in the interference pattern. The SOP means that there is an appropriate fiber length determined by the delay amount of delay line between each joint. Moreover, an experiment with two joints, for simplicity, is given as an example. Experimental results show that the high-order SIP from the joints can be suppressed by the SOP to obtain a clean interference pattern.

  5. Luminescent carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as a single white converter for white light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X. T.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, X. G., E-mail: liuxuguang@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, F.; Wang, Y. L.; Yang, Y. Z., E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2015-11-23

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with high quantum yield (51.4%) were synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal method using thiosalicylic acid and ethylenediamine as precursor. The CQDs have the average diameter of 2.3 nm and possess excitation-independent emission wavelength in the range from 320 to 440 nm excitation. Under an ultraviolet (UV) excitation, the CQDs aqueous solutions emit bright blue fluorescence directly and exhibit broad emission with a high spectral component ratio of 67.4% (blue to red intensity to total intensity). We applied the CQDs as a single white-light converter for white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) using a UV-LED chip as the excitation light source. The resulted WLED shows superior performance with corresponding color temperature of 5227 K and the color coordinates of (0.34, 0.38) belonging to the white gamut.

  6. Application of white LED lighting to energy-saving-type street lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Tsunemasa; Uchida, Yuji; Setomoto, Tatsumi; Kobashi, Katsuya

    2001-05-01

    We describe the lighting characteristics and systems of the power energy-saving type street lamp which consists of white light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and a solar-cell and battery system. The prototype street lamp has been constructed by two LED light sources, each of which includes a total of 700 units of 10 cd-class white LEDs. The white LED lighting system is mainly divided into three components which are the control, the electric-power supply and LED lighting divisions. The illuminance is normally 80 lx. When a person approaches within 2 m near the lamp, the body sensor catches the situation. The illuminance then increases to about 660 lx, which is about 50 times brighter than that of a white incandescent lamp. The color rendering index is estimated to be 85 which is similar to that of three color fluorescent tube. The illuminance distribution can be analyzed by our recently developed 'multi sources of LED light' theory.

  7. Suction generation in white-spotted bamboo sharks Chiloscyllium plagiosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilga, Cheryl D; Sanford, Christopher P

    2008-10-01

    After the divergence of chondrichthyans and teleostomes, the structure of the feeding apparatus also diverged leading to alterations in the suction mechanism. In this study we investigated the mechanism for suction generation during feeding in white-spotted bamboo sharks, Chiloscyllium plagiosum and compared it with that in teleosts. The internal movement of cranial elements and pressure in the buccal, hyoid and pharyngeal cavities that are directly responsible for suction generation was quantified using sonomicrometry and pressure transducers. Backward stepwise multiple linear regressions were used to explore the relationship between expansion and pressure, accounting for 60-96% of the variation in pressure among capture events. The progression of anterior to posterior expansion in the buccal, hyoid and pharyngeal cavities is accompanied by the sequential onset of subambient pressure in these cavities as prey is drawn into the mouth. Gape opening triggers the onset of subambient pressure in the oropharyngeal cavities. Peak gape area coincides with peak subambient buccal pressure. Increased velocity of hyoid area expansion is primarily responsible for generating peak subambient pressure in the buccal and hyoid regions. Pharyngeal expansion appears to function as a sink to receive water influx from the mouth, much like that of compensatory suction in bidirectional aquatic feeders. Interestingly, C. plagiosum generates large suction pressures while paradoxically compressing the buccal cavity laterally, delaying the time to peak pressure. This represents a fundamental difference from the mechanism used to generate suction in teleost fishes. Interestingly, pressure in the three cavities peaks in the posterior to anterior direction. The complex shape changes that the buccal cavity undergoes indicate that, as in teleosts, unsteady flow predominates during suction feeding. Several kinematic variables function together, with great variation over long gape cycles to

  8. White light and red-green-blue (RGB)electroluminescence by light color-conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niko, A.; Tasch, S.; Meghdadi, F.; Brandstätter, C.; Leising, G.

    1998-01-01

    We present methods which provide color-conversion of light emission from organic LED's using a multilayer structure, for the purpose of spectral color control. These devices with multicolor emission are suitable for applications in flat panel color display technology. The LED's produced using an active layer of para-hexa-phenyl (PHP), a bright, stable source of blue light as a pump source can be efficiently combined with color-converting layers consisting of green (Coumarin) and red (Lumogen F300) dyes in PMMA matrices. By controlling the absorption and reflection mechanisms of multilayer device structures we are able to demonstrate the production of multicolor light (RGB emission) and in addition, the color-mixing required to produce white light. By designing the color-converting films with a specific thickness or concentration of the dye (thus tailoring the optical density of the converter layers), the spectral emission can thus be controlled. By investigating the color-conversion process in a multilayer stack RGB device, a method of maximizing the brightness by improved coupling between the multilayers is presented.

  9. Narrow line-width phosphors for phosphor-converted white light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Aloka

    The luminous efficacy of present day phosphor-converted white LEDs is limited by phosphors with broad spectral emission in the long wavelength visible range (600-700 nm). The light output from the cool-white LEDs that do not use a red phosphor is 30-35% higher than the warm white LEDs fabricated with a red phosphor in addition to the yellow phosphor. However, the CRI of cool-white LEDs is significantly lower (~60-70) than the CRI of the warm white LEDs (~80-95) due to lack of the red photons in the emission spectrum. Therefore, a trade-off exists between luminous efficacy and color rendering capability of light generated by phosphor-converted white LEDs. In order to solve this problem, an efficient red phosphor with considerably narrow full width of half maxima (~5-10 nm) and emission in the 600-650 nm wavelength range is required. The narrow spectral line-width can be achieved by introducing trivalent lanthanide ions like Eu3+, Pr3+ and Sm3+ (λpeak- 615 nm, 650 nm, 655 nm) in oxide host lattices although the high energy gaps of these hosts makes these phosphors unsuitable for excitation with near-UV/Blue (380-470 nm) LED sources. Therefore, the goal of this project is two-fold- to develop new material systems which can serve as potential hosts for trivalent lanthanide ions like Eu3+, Pr3+ and Sm3+ (λpeak- 615 nm, 650 nm, 655 nm) with strong excitation bands in the near-UV/blue wavelength region (380-470 nm) and improve the efficiency of the known oxide phosphors doped with trivalent lanthanide ions and the novel phosphors via crystal growth processes. Moreover, phosphors in the green-yellow wavelength region with a narrow emission line-width have the potential of improving the luminous efficacy of the phosphor-converted LEDs as the human eye sensitivity curve peaks at 555 nm. Thus, in parallel with the narrow line-width red phosphor research, new compositions doped with Tb3+ (550 nm), Dy3+ (575 nm), etc. are being explored with strong excitation bands in near

  10. Electrophoretic Deposition of Highly Efficient Phosphors for White Solid State Lighting using near UV-Emitting LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Ik

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is a method to deposit particles dispersed in a liquid onto a substrate under the force of an applied electric field, and has been applied for depositing phosphors for application in solid state lighting. The objective is to deposit phosphors in a "remote phosphor" configuration for a UV-LED-based light source for improved white light extraction efficiency. It is demonstrated that EPD can be used to deposit red-, green-, blue-, yellow- and orange-emitting phosphors to generate white light using a near UV-emitting LED by either depositing a phosphor blend or sequentially individual phosphor compositions. The phosphor coverage was excellent, demonstrating that EPD is a viable method to produce phosphor layers for the "remote phosphor" white light design. The deposition rates of the individual phosphor films were ˜1-5 mum/min. The blend depositions composed of both three and four phosphor compositions emit white light located on or near the black body locus on the CIE chromaticity diagram. Phosphor films were also prepared by sequential deposition of red/orange and green/blue compositions, to generate white light. The layered films were flipped over and illuminated in this orientation, which showed approximately the same luminescence characteristics. No change in the reabsorption ratio of green/blue emission by the red/orange phosphor was found regardless of the deposited order of the layered films. These applications of EPD of phosphor for white solid state lighting are promising and effective due to easy tuning of emissive color by varying the phosphor blend compositions. Although nanoparticles of a variety of materials have been coated by EPD, there have been few direct comparisons of EPD of nano- and micron-sized particles of the same material. Another field of the study was to compare EPD of nano-, nano core/SiO2 shell and micron-sized (Ba0.97 Eu0.03)2SiO4 phosphor particles for application in a near-UV LED-based light source

  11. Fluorescent SiC for white light-emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Kamiyama, S.

    2012-01-01

    The strong photoluminescence from f-SiC was achieved after the optimization of the B and N concentrations. Surface nanostructures were successfully applied to enhance the extraction efficiency. f-SiC is a promising wavelength convertor for white LEDs.......The strong photoluminescence from f-SiC was achieved after the optimization of the B and N concentrations. Surface nanostructures were successfully applied to enhance the extraction efficiency. f-SiC is a promising wavelength convertor for white LEDs....

  12. White-Light-Induced Collective Heating of Gold Nanocomposite/Bombyx mori Silk Thin Films with Ultrahigh Broadband Absorbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Shao Hsuan; Wan, Dehui; Lai, Yu-Sheng; Chang, Ho-Ming; Yu, Chen-Chieh; Lin, Keng-Te; Chen, Hsuen-Li

    2015-12-22

    This paper describes a systematic investigation of the phenomenon of white-light-induced heating in silk fibroin films embedded with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The Au NPs functioned to develop an ultrahigh broadband absorber, allowing white light to be used as a source for photothermal generation. With an increase of the Au content in the composite films, the absorbance was enhanced significantly around the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength, while non-LSPR wavelengths were also increased dramatically. The greater amount of absorbed light increased the rate of photoheating. The optimized composite film exhibited ultrahigh absorbances of approximately 95% over the spectral range from 350 to 750 nm, with moderate absorbances (>60%) at longer wavelengths (750-1000 nm). As a result, the composite film absorbed almost all of the incident light and, accordingly, converted this optical energy to local heat. Therefore, significant temperature increases (ca. 100 °C) were readily obtained when we irradiated the composite film under a light-emitting diode or halogen lamp. Moreover, such composite films displayed linear light-to-heat responses with respect to the light intensity, as well as great photothermal stability. A broadband absorptive film coated on a simple Al/Si Schottky diode displayed a linear, significant, stable photo-thermo-electronic effect in response to varying the light intensity.

  13. White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lee, Li-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) deliver higher levels of blue light to the retina than do conventional domestic light sources. Chronic exposure to high-intensity light (2,000-10,000 lux) has previously been found to result in light-induced retinal injury, but chronic exposure to relatively low-intensity (750 lux) light has not been previously assessed with LEDs in a rodent model. We examined LED-induced retinal neuronal cell damage in the Sprague-Dawley rat using functional, histological, and biochemical measurements. We used blue LEDs (460 nm) and full-spectrum white LEDs, coupled with matching compact fluorescent lights, for exposures. Pathological examinations included electroretinogram, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also measured free radical production in the retina to determine the oxidative stress level. H&E staining and TEM revealed apoptosis and necrosis of photoreceptors, which indicated blue-light induced photochemical injury of the retina. Free radical production in the retina was increased in LED-exposed groups. IHC staining demonstrated that oxidative stress was associated with retinal injury. Although we found serious retinal light injury in LED groups, the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) groups showed moderate to mild injury. Our results raise questions about adverse effects on the retina from chronic exposure to LED light compared with other light sources that have less blue light. Thus, we suggest a precautionary approach with regard to the use of blue-rich "white" LEDs for general lighting. Shang YM, Wang GS, Sliney D, Yang CH, Lee LL. 2014. White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model. Environ Health Perspect 122:269-276; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307294.

  14. Statistical Analyses of White-Light Flares: Two Main Results about Flare Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal, Hasan Ali

    2012-08-01

    We present two main results, based on models and the statistical analyses of 1672 U-band flares. We also discuss the behaviour of white-light flares. In addition, the parameters of the flares detected from two years of observations on CR Dra are presented. By comparing with flare parameters obtained from other UV Ceti-type stars, we examine the behaviour of the optical flare processes along with the spectral types. Moreover, we aimed, using large white-light flare data, to analyse the flare time-scales with respect to some results obtained from X-ray observations. Using SPSS V17.0 and GraphPad Prism V5.02 software, the flares detected from CR Dra were modelled with the OPEA function, and analysed with the t-Test method to compare similar flare events in other stars. In addition, using some regression calculations in order to derive the best histograms, the time-scales of white-light flares were analysed. Firstly, CR Dra flares have revealed that white-light flares behave in a similar way as their counterparts observed in X-rays. As can be seen in X-ray observations, the electron density seems to be a dominant parameter in white-light flare process, too. Secondly, the distributions of the flare time-scales demonstrate that the number of observed flares reaches a maximum value in some particular ratios, which are 0.5, or its multiples, and especially positive integers. The thermal processes might be dominant for these white-light flares, while non-thermal processes might be dominant in the others. To obtain better results for the behaviour of the white-light flare process along with the spectral types, much more stars in a wide spectral range, from spectral type dK5e to dM6e, must be observed in white-light flare patrols.

  15. Surface Topology Reconstruction From The White Light Interferogram By Means Of Prony Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoma Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new method of surface topology reconstruction from a white light interferogram. The method is based on interferogram modelling by complex exponents (Prony method. The compatibility of white light interferogram and Prony models has already been proven. Effectiveness of the method was tested by modelling and examining reconstruction of tilted and spherical surfaces, and by estimating the reconstruction accuracy.

  16. Development of White-Light Emitting Active Layers in Nitride Based Heterostructures for Phosphorless Solid State Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan Talbot; Kailash Mishra

    2007-12-31

    This report provides a summary of research activities carried out at the University of California, San Diego and Central Research of OSRAM SYLVANIA in Beverly, MA partially supported by a research contract from US Department of Energy, DE-FC26-04NT422274. The main objective of this project was to develop III-V nitrides activated by rare earth ions, RE{sup 3+}, which could eliminate the need for phosphors in nitride-based solid state light sources. The main idea was to convert electron-hole pairs injected into the active layer in a LED die to white light directly through transitions within the energy levels of the 4f{sup n}-manifold of RE{sup 3+}. We focused on the following materials: Eu{sup 3+}(red), Tb{sup 3+}(green), Er{sup 3+}(green), Dy{sup 3+}(yellow) and Tm{sup 3+}(blue) in AlN, GaN and alloys of AlN and GaN. Our strategy was to explore candidate materials in powder form first, and then study their behavior in thin films. Thin films of these materials were to be deposited on sapphire substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The photo- and cathode-luminescence measurements of these materials were used to investigate their suitability for white light generation. The project proceeded along this route with minor modifications needed to produce better materials and to expedite our progress towards the final goal. The project made the following accomplishments: (1) red emission from Eu{sup 3+}, green from Tb{sup 3+}, yellow from Dy{sup 3+} and blue from Tm{sup 3+} in AlN powders; (2) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} and green emission from Tb{sup 3+} in GaN powder; (3) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} in alloys of GaN and AlN; (4) green emission from Tb{sup 3+} in GaN thin films by PLD; (5) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} in GaN thin films deposited by MOVPE; (6) energy transfer from host to RE{sup 3+}; (7) energy transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} in AlN powders; (8) emission from AlN powder samples

  17. Light-induced changes in bottled white wine and underlying photochemical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant-Preece, Paris; Barril, Celia; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Scollary, Geoffrey R; Clark, Andrew C

    2017-03-04

    Bottled white wine may be exposed to UV-visible light for considerable periods of time before it is consumed. Light exposure may induce an off-flavor known as "sunlight" flavor, bleach the color of the wine, and/or increase browning and deplete sulfur dioxide. The changes that occur in bottled white wine exposed to light depend on the wine composition, the irradiation conditions, and the light exposure time. The light-induced changes in the aroma, volatile composition, color, and concentrations of oxygen and sulfur dioxide in bottled white wine are reviewed. In addition, the photochemical reactions thought to have a role in these changes are described. These include the riboflavin-sensitized oxidation of methionine, resulting in the formation of methanethiol and dimethyl disulfide, and the photodegradation of iron(III) tartrate, which gives rise to glyoxylic acid, an aldehyde known to react with flavan-3-ols to form yellow xanthylium cation pigments.

  18. .pi.-conjugated heavy-metal polymers for organic white-light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vardeny, Zeev Valentine; Wojcik, Leonard; Drori, Tomer

    2016-09-13

    A polymer mixture emits a broad spectrum of visible light that appears white or near-white in the aggregate. The polymer mixture comprises two (or more) components in the active layer. A heavy atom, such as platinum and/or iridium, present in the backbone of the mixture acts via a spin-orbit coupling mechanism to cause the ratio of fluorescent to phosphorescent light emission bands to be of approximately equal strength. These two broad emissions overlap, resulting in an emission spectrum that appears to the eye to be white.

  19. Polarized white light from LEDs using remote-phosphor layer sandwiched between reflective polarizer and light-recycling dichroic filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Hye; Yang, Su Ji; Do, Young Rag

    2013-09-09

    This study introduces an efficient polarized, white phosphor-converted, light-emitting diode (pc-LED) using a remote phosphor film sandwiched between a reflective polarizer film (RPF) and a short-wavelength pass dichroic filter (SPDF). The on-axis brightness of polarized white light emission of a RPF/SPDF-sandwiched phosphor film over a blue LED, showed greater recovery than that of a conventional unpolarized remote phosphor film over blue LED, due to the recycling effect of yellow light from an SPDF. The relative luminous efficacy of an RPF/SPDF-sandwiched phosphor film was made 1.40 times better by adding an SPDF on the backside of an RPF-capped phosphor film. A polarization ratio of 0.84 was demonstrated for a white LED with an RPF/SPDF-sandwiched phosphor film, in good agreement with the measured results from the RPF-only sample.

  20. Laser driven white light source for BRDF measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Thorseth, Anders; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    source (UV-VIS-NIR), spectroradiometer and sample holder stepper motor in a dark UV-protected environment. Here, we introduced a special kind of light source which has a bright, stable, broad spectral range and well collimated light output to give a very good angular resolution. The experimental results...

  1. Spectral optimization simulation of white light based on the photopic eye-sensitivity curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Qi, E-mail: qidai@tongji.edu.cn [College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Institute for Advanced Study, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Key Laboratory of Ecology and Energy-saving Study of Dense Habitat (Tongji University), Ministry of Education, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Hao, Luoxi; Lin, Yi; Cui, Zhe [College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Key Laboratory of Ecology and Energy-saving Study of Dense Habitat (Tongji University), Ministry of Education, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2016-02-07

    Spectral optimization simulation of white light is studied to boost maximum attainable luminous efficacy of radiation at high color-rendering index (CRI) and various color temperatures. The photopic eye-sensitivity curve V(λ) is utilized as the dominant portion of white light spectra. Emission spectra of a blue InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) and a red AlInGaP LED are added to the spectrum of V(λ) to match white color coordinates. It is demonstrated that at the condition of color temperature from 2500 K to 6500 K and CRI above 90, such white sources can achieve spectral efficacy of 330–390 lm/W, which is higher than the previously reported theoretical maximum values. We show that this eye-sensitivity-based approach also has advantages on component energy conversion efficiency compared with previously reported optimization solutions.

  2. Using light and melatonin in the management of New Zealand White ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lighting system is a stimulant for reproduction in some species (Horses) and an inhibitor for others (Sheep). This study started on September 1st and planned to study the effects of different lighting regimes and melatonin treatment on the receptivity and performance of 78 (60-does and 18-bucks) New Zealand White rabbits, ...

  3. Simulataneous Formation of InGaN Nanostructures with Varying Shapes for White Light Source Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Gasim, Anwar A.

    2012-01-01

    Varying shapes of InGaN nanostructures were simultaneously formed on silicon epitaxially. The nanowires and nanomushrooms emit violet-blue light, and broad yellow-orange-red luminescence, respectively. The combination of which is promising for white light emission.

  4. Output blue light evaluation for phosphor based smart white LED wafer level packages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolahdouz Esfahani, Z.; Rostamian, Ali; Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza; Ma, Teng; van Zeijl, H.W.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a blue light detector for evaluating the output light of phosphor based white LED package. It is composed of a silicon stripe-shaped photodiode designed and implemented in a 2 μm BiCMOS process which can be used for wafer level integration of different passive and active devices

  5. Iranian Light Source Facility, A third generation light source laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rahighi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF project is the first large scale accelerator facility which is currently under planning in Iran. On the basis of the present design, circumference of the 3 GeV storage ring is 528 m. Beam current and natural beam emittance are 400 mA and 0.477 nm.rad, respectively. Some prototype accelerator components such as high power solid state radio frequency amplifiers, low level RF system, thermionic RF gun, H-type dipole and quadruple magnets, magnetic measurement laboratory and highly stable magnet power supplies have been constructed at ILSF R&D laboratory

  6. Novel concepts for high-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Gregor

    2007-07-01

    This work deals with novel concepts to realize high efficiency white OLEDs by combining fluorescent blue and phosphorescent green and orange emitters. A key point determining the maximum efficiency possible, as well as the device structure to be chosen to reach high efficiency, is the triplet exciton energy of the fluorescent blue emitter. If its triplet state is lower than that of the phosphorescent emitters, mutual exciton quenching can occur. This problem is solved by the first concept with spatial separation of the fluorescent blue from the phosphorescent emitters by a large-gap exciton blocking layer. To still realize exciton generation on both sides, the interlayer has to be ambipolar. On the other hand, if the triplet exciton energy of the fluorescent blue is higher than that of at least one of the phosphorescent emitters, appropriate arrangement of the emission layers makes a separation layer obsolete, since phosphorescence quenching does not occur anymore. Moreover, the intrinsically non-radiative triplet excitons of the fluorescent blue emitter may be harvested by the phosphor for light emission, which means that even 100% internal quantum efficiency is possible. The last chapter 6 deals with this second concept, where the main issue is to simultaneously achieve exciton harvesting as complete as possible and a balanced white emission spectrum by appropriately distributing singlet and triplet excitons to the used emitters. All emitters used in this work are commercially available and their molecular structure is disclosed in order to make the results transparent. (orig.)

  7. Spatial-phase-shift imaging interferometry using a spectrally modulated white light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epshtein, Shlomi; Harris, Alon; Yaacobovitz, Igor; Locketz, Garrett; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Arieli, Yoel

    2014-12-15

    An extension of the white light spatial-phase-shift (WLSPS) for object surface measurements is described. Using WLSPS, surface measurements can be obtained from any real object image without the need of a reference beam, thus achieving inherent vibration cancellation. The surface topography is obtained by acquiring multiple images of an object illuminated by a spectrally modulated white light source and using an appropriate algorithm. The modulation of the light source obviates the need for the continuous phase delay to obtain the interferograms.

  8. Fabrication of Flexible White Light-Emitting Diodes from Photoluminescent Polymer Materials with Excellent Color Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huang-Yu; Sher, Chin-Wei; Lin, Chih-Hao; Tu, Hsien-Hao; Chen, Xin Yin; Lai, Yi-Chun; Lin, Chien-Chung; Chen, Huang-Ming; Yu, Peichen; Meng, Hsin-Fei; Chi, Gou-Chung; Honjo, Keiji; Chen, Teng-Ming; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2017-10-11

    This study developed flexible light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with warm white and neutral white light. A simple ultraviolet flip-chip sticking process was adopted for the pumping source and combined with polymer and quantum dot (QD) films technology to yield white light. The polymer-blended flexible LEDs exhibited higher luminous efficiency than the QD-blended flexible LEDs. Moreover, the polymer-blended LEDs achieved excellent color-rendering index (CRI) values (Ra = 96 and R9 = 96), with high reliability, demonstrating high suitability for special applications like accent, down, or retrofit lights in the future. In places such as a museum, kitchen, or surgery room, its high R9 and high CRI characteristics can provide high-quality services.

  9. Fluorescent Silicon Carbide and its Applications in White Light-Emitting Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu

    This thesis focuses on the optical properties analysis of Donor-Acceptor-Pair (DAP) co-doped Fluorescent Silicon Carbide (f-SiC) as a wavelengthconversion material in white Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs). Different methods of fabricating surface Antireflective Structures (ARS) on f-SiC to enhance its...... light extraction efficiency are presented. White LEDs are the most promising techniques to replace the conventional lighting sources. A typical white LED consists of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) blue or Ultraviolet (UV) LED stack and a wavelengthconversion material. Silicon Carbide (SiC) has a wide optical...... bandgap and could be tailored to emit light at different wavelength by introducing different dopants. Combined emitting spectra of two types of DAP co-doped f-SiC could cover the whole visible spectral range and make f-SiC as a good candidate of wavelength-conversion material. It has a better color...

  10. White light emitting silicon nano-crystals-polymeric hybrid films prepared by single batch solution based method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balci, Mustafa H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, NTNU, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Aas, Lars Martin Sandvik; Kildemo, Morten; Sæterli, Ragnhild; Holmestad, Randi; Lindgren, Mikael [Department of Physics, NTNU, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Grande, Tor [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, NTNU, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Einarsrud, Mari-Ann, E-mail: Mari-Ann.Einarsrud@ntnu.no [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, NTNU, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-03-31

    Silicon nano-crystals have been studied intensively due to their photoluminescence properties and possible applications in new generation opto-electronic devices. Their importance in lightning and display technologies is increasing due to the abundance and non-toxicity of silicon. Here we report a single batch solution based synthesis route to silicon nano-crystal organic hybrid films exhibiting white light photoluminescence at room temperature upon excitation by ultraviolet light. Films prepared by ethylene glycol terminated Si nano-crystals showed maximum 240 nm red shift in photoluminescence response upon excitation at 350 nm. The shift was found to decrease in order for hybrid films fabricated using acrylic acid, 1-octanol acid and oleic acid terminated Si nano-crystals. The mean size of the Si nano-crystals (~ 2–10 nm) estimated by Raman spectroscopy were smallest for the ethylene glycol capped Si nano-crystal films. The calculated Tauc bandgaps of the hybrid films varied between 1.51 and 2.35 eV. - Highlights: • White light emitting Si nanocrystal hybrid films were synthesized at low temperature • The effect of the surface termination of the Si nano-crystals is reported • A red shift in photoluminescence response was observed • The hybrid films are new candidate white light emitting diodes • The hybrid films can be used in solar cell applications for spectral-shifting control.

  11. GATEWAY Report Brief: Tunable-White Lighting at the ACC Care Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-09-30

    Summary of a GATEWAY program report that documented the performance of tunable-white LED lighting systems installed in several spaces within the ACC Care Center, a senior-care facility in Sacramento, CA. The project results included energy savings and improved lighting quality, as well as other possible health-related benefits that may have been attributable, at least in part, to the lighting changes.

  12. Characteristics that Produce White-light Enhancements in Solar Flares Observed by Hinode/SOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kyoko; Kitagawa, Jun; Masuda, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    To understand the conditions that produce white-light (WL) enhancements in solar flares, a statistical analysis of visible continuum data as observed by Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) was performed. In this study, approximately 100 flare events from M- and X-class flares were selected. The time period during which the data were recorded spans from 2011 January to 2016 February. Of these events, approximately half are classified as white-light flares (WLFs), whereas the remaining events do not show any enhancements of the visible continuum (non-WLF; NWL). To determine the existence of WL emission, running difference images of not only the Hinode/SOT WL (G-band, blue, green, and red filter) data, but also the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager continuum data are used. A comparison between these two groups of WL data in terms of duration, temperature, emission measure of GOES soft X-rays, distance between EUV flare ribbons, strength of hard X-rays, and photospheric magnetic field strength was undertaken. In this statistical study, WLF events are characterized by a shorter timescale and shorter ribbon distance compared with NWL events. From the scatter plots of the duration of soft X-rays and the energy of non-thermal electrons, a clear distinction between WLF and NWL events can be made. It is found that the precipitation of large amounts of accelerated electrons within a short time period plays a key role in generating WL enhancements. Finally, it was demonstrated that the coronal magnetic field strength in the flare region is one of the most important factors that allow the individual identification of WLF events from NWL events.

  13. Response of bats to light with different spectra: light-shy and agile bat presence is affected by white and green, but not red light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; van Grunsven, Roy H A; Ramakers, Jip J C; Ferguson, Kim B; Raap, Thomas; Donners, Maurice; Veenendaal, Elmar M; Visser, Marcel E

    2017-05-31

    Artificial light at night has shown a remarkable increase over the past decades. Effects are reported for many species groups, and include changes in presence, behaviour, physiology and life-history traits. Among these, bats are strongly affected, and how bat species react to light is likely to vary with light colour. Different spectra may therefore be applied to reduce negative impacts. We used a unique set-up of eight field sites to study the response of bats to three different experimental light spectra in an otherwise dark and undisturbed natural habitat. We measured activity of three bat species groups around transects with light posts emitting white, green and red light with an intensity commonly used to illuminate countryside roads. The results reveal a strong and spectrum-dependent response for the slow-flying Myotis and Plecotus and more agile Pipistrellus species, but not for Nyctalus and Eptesicus species. Plecotus and Myotis species avoided white and green light, but were equally abundant in red light and darkness. The agile, opportunistically feeding Pipistrellus species were significantly more abundant around white and green light, most likely because of accumulation of insects, but equally abundant in red illuminated transects compared to dark control. Forest-dwelling Myotis and Plecotus species and more synanthropic Pipistrellus species are thus least disturbed by red light. Hence, in order to limit the negative impact of light at night on bats, white and green light should be avoided in or close to natural habitat, but red lights may be used if illumination is needed. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Optimized Phosphors for Warm White LED Light Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlur, Anant; Brewster, Megan; Garcia, Florencio; Hill, M. Christine; Lyons, Robert; Murphy, James; Stecher, Tom; Stoklosa, Stan; Weaver, Stan; Happek, Uwe; Aesram, Danny; Deshpande, Anirudha

    2012-07-30

    The objective of this program is to develop phosphor systems and LED light engines that have steady-state LED efficacies (using LEDs with a 60% wall-plug efficiency) of 105–120 lm/W with correlated color temperatures (CCT) ~3000 K, color rendering indices (CRI) >85, <0.003 distance from the blackbody curve (dbb), and <2% loss in phosphor efficiency under high temperature, high humidity conditions. In order to reach these goals, this involves the composition and processing optimization of phosphors previously developed by GE in combination with light engine package modification.

  15. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavriyev, Anton [MagiQ Technologies, Inc., Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-03-27

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  16. Next Generation Accelerator-Based Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwyn Williams

    2005-06-26

    We discuss the physics which is driving the evolution of new sources for microscopy and spectroscopy. A new generation of sources, called energy recovery linacs or ERL’s, will be described and reviewed with particular emphasis on the examples of imaging and spectroscopic applications enabled by them.

  17. Color stable white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with red emissive electron transport layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wook Kim, Jin; Yoo, Seung Il; Sung Kang, Jin [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Eun Lee, Song; Kwan Kim, Young [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwa Yu, Hyeong; Turak, Ayse [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Young Kim, Woo, E-mail: wykim@hoseo.edu [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2015-06-28

    We analyzed the performance of multi-emissive white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) in relation to various red emitting sites of hole and electron transport layers (HTL and ETL). The shift of the recombination zone producing stable white emission in PHOLEDs was utilized as luminance was increased with red emission in its electron transport layer. Multi-emissive white PHOLEDs including the red light emitting electron transport layer yielded maximum external quantum efficiency of 17.4% with CIE color coordinates (−0.030, +0.001) shifting only from 1000 to 10 000 cd/m{sup 2}. Additionally, we observed a reduction of energy loss in the white PHOLED via Ir(piq){sub 3} as phosphorescent red dopant in electron transport layer.

  18. KEPLER FLARES. II. THE TEMPORAL MORPHOLOGY OF WHITE-LIGHT FLARES ON GJ 1243

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Johnson, Emily C.; Peraza, Jesus; Jansen, Tiffany C.; Larsen, Daniel M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hebb, Leslie [Department of Physics, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 300 Pulteney Street, Geneva, NY 14456 (United States); Wisniewski, John P.; Malatesta, Michael; Keil, Marcus; Silverberg, Steven M.; Scheffler, Matthew S.; Berdis, Jodi R. [HL Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Kowalski, Adam F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hilton, Eric J., E-mail: jrad@astro.washington.edu [Universe Sandbox, 911 E. Pike Street #333, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We present the largest sample of flares ever compiled for a single M dwarf, the active M4 star GJ 1243. Over 6100 individual flare events, with energies ranging from 10{sup 29} to 10{sup 33} erg, are found in 11 months of 1 minute cadence data from Kepler. This sample is unique for its completeness and dynamic range. We have developed automated tools for finding flares in short-cadence Kepler light curves, and performed extensive validation and classification of the sample by eye. From this pristine sample of flares we generate a median flare template. This template shows that two exponential cooling phases are present during the white-light flare decay, providing fundamental constraints for models of flare physics. The template is also used as a basis function to decompose complex multi-peaked flares, allowing us to study the energy distribution of these events. Only a small number of flare events are not well fit by our template. We find that complex, multi-peaked flares occur in over 80% of flares with a duration of 50 minutes or greater. The underlying distribution of flare durations for events 10 minutes and longer appears to follow a broken power law. Our results support the idea that sympathetic flaring may be responsible for some complex flare events.

  19. Online multispectral fluorescence lifetime values estimation and overlay onto tissue white-light video frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Marcu, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging has been shown to be a robust technique for biochemical and functional characterization of tissues and to present great potential for intraoperative tissue diagnosis and guidance of surgical procedures. We report a technique for real-time mapping of fluorescence parameters (i.e. lifetime values) onto the location from where the fluorescence measurements were taken. This is achieved by merging a 450 nm aiming beam generated by a diode laser with the excitation light in a single delivery/collection fiber and by continuously imaging the region of interest with a color CMOS camera. The interrogated locations are then extracted from the acquired frames via color-based segmentation of the aiming beam. Assuming a Gaussian profile of the imaged aiming beam, the segmentation results are fitted to ellipses that are dynamically scaled at the full width of three automatically estimated thresholds (50%, 75%, 90%) of the Gaussian distribution's maximum value. This enables the dynamic augmentation of the white-light video frames with the corresponding fluorescence decay parameters. A fluorescence phantom and fresh tissue samples were used to evaluate this method with motorized and hand-held scanning measurements. At 640x512 pixels resolution the area of interest augmented with fluorescence decay parameters can be imaged at an average 34 frames per second. The developed method has the potential to become a valuable tool for real-time display of optical spectroscopy data during continuous scanning applications that subsequently can be used for tissue characterization and diagnosis.

  20. Uniform and scalable light-sheets generated by extended focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Kevin M; Fiolka, Reto

    2014-10-20

    Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) affords highly parallelized 3D imaging with optical sectioning capability and minimal light exposure. However, using Gaussian beams for light-sheet generation results in a trade-off between beam waist thickness and the area over which the beam can approximate a light-sheet. Here, we present a novel form of LSFM that uses incoherent extended focusing to produce divergence free light-sheets with near diffraction-limited resolution and uniform intensity distribution along the propagation direction. We demonstrate the imaging performance of the new technique by volumetric imaging of beads, collagen fibers, and melanoma cancer cells with sub-cellular resolution.

  1. Appropriate indices for color rendition and their recommended values for UHDTV production using white LED lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Tetsuya; Iwasaki, Hiroaki; Masaoka, Kenichiro; Shimizu, Masanori; Yamashita, Takayuki; Iwai, Wataru

    2017-06-26

    We selected appropriate indices for color rendition and determined their recommended values for ultra-high-definition television (UHDTV) production using white LED lighting. Since the spectral sensitivities of UHDTV cameras can be designed to approximate the ideal spectral sensitivities of UHDTV colorimetry, they have more accurate color reproduction than HDTV cameras, and thus the color-rendering properties of the lighting are critical. Comparing images taken under white LEDs with conventional color rendering indices (R a , R 9-14 ) and recently proposed methods for evaluating color rendition of CQS, TM-30, Q a , and SSI, we found the combination of R a and R 9 appropriate. For white LED lighting, R a ≥ 90 and R 9 ≥ 80 are recommended for UHDTV production.

  2. Colour-crafted phosphor-free white light emitters via in-situ nanostructure engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Daehong; Park, Donghwy; Lee, Kyuseung; Nam, Okhyun

    2017-03-01

    Colour-temperature (Tc) is a crucial specification of white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) used in a variety of smart-lighting applications. Commonly, Tc is controlled by distributing various phosphors on top of the blue or ultra violet LED chip in conventional phosphor-conversion WLEDs (PC-WLEDs). Unfortunately, the high cost of phosphors, additional packaging processes required, and phosphor degradation by internal thermal damage must be resolved to obtain higher-quality PC-WLEDs. Here, we suggest a practical in-situ nanostructure engineering strategy for fabricating Tc-controlled phosphor-free white light-emitting diodes (PF-WLEDs) using metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. The dimension controls of in-situ nanofacets on gallium nitride nanostructures, and the growth temperature of quantum wells on these materials, were key factors for Tc control. Warm, true, and cold white emissions were successfully demonstrated in this study without any external processing.

  3. Phosphor-Free InGaN White Light Emitting Diodes Using Flip-Chip Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Chang; Chang, Liann-Be; Chen, Hou-Jen; Yen, Chia-Yi; Pan, Ke-Wei; Huang, Bohr-Ran; Kuo, Wen-Yu; Chow, Lee; Zhou, Dan; Popko, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    Monolithic phosphor-free two-color gallium nitride (GaN)-based white light emitting diodes (LED) have the potential to replace current phosphor-based GaN white LEDs due to their low cost and long life cycle. Unfortunately, the growth of high indium content indium gallium nitride (InGaN)/GaN quantum dot and reported LED’s color rendering index (CRI) are still problematic. Here, we use flip-chip technology to fabricate an upside down monolithic two-color phosphor-free LED with four grown layers of high indium quantum dots on top of the three grown layers of lower indium quantum wells separated by a GaN tunneling barrier layer. The photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) spectra of this white LED reveal a broad spectrum ranging from 475 to 675 nm which is close to an ideal white-light source. The corresponding color temperature and color rendering index (CRI) of the fabricated white LED, operated at 350, 500, and 750 mA, are comparable to that of the conventional phosphor-based LEDs. Insights of the epitaxial structure and the transport mechanism were revealed through the TEM and temperature dependent PL and EL measurements. Our results show true potential in the Epi-ready GaN white LEDs for future solid state lighting applications. PMID:28772792

  4. Phosphor-Free InGaN White Light Emitting Diodes Using Flip-Chip Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chang Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic phosphor-free two-color gallium nitride (GaN-based white light emitting diodes (LED have the potential to replace current phosphor-based GaN white LEDs due to their low cost and long life cycle. Unfortunately, the growth of high indium content indium gallium nitride (InGaN/GaN quantum dot and reported LED’s color rendering index (CRI are still problematic. Here, we use flip-chip technology to fabricate an upside down monolithic two-color phosphor-free LED with four grown layers of high indium quantum dots on top of the three grown layers of lower indium quantum wells separated by a GaN tunneling barrier layer. The photoluminescence (PL and electroluminescence (EL spectra of this white LED reveal a broad spectrum ranging from 475 to 675 nm which is close to an ideal white-light source. The corresponding color temperature and color rendering index (CRI of the fabricated white LED, operated at 350, 500, and 750 mA, are comparable to that of the conventional phosphor-based LEDs. Insights of the epitaxial structure and the transport mechanism were revealed through the TEM and temperature dependent PL and EL measurements. Our results show true potential in the Epi-ready GaN white LEDs for future solid state lighting applications.

  5. Critical red Components for Next-Generation White LEDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Chun; Meijerink, A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986; Liu, R.-S.

    2016-01-01

    Warm white LEDs with a high color rendering index and a low correlated color temperature have undergone rapid development. In this regard, red-emitting materials-such as fluoride phosphors, namely, A2MF6:Mn(4+) (A = K, Na, and Cs; M = Si, Ge, Zr, Sn, and Ti) and XSiF6:Mn(4+) (X = Ba or Zn),

  6. A rapid excitation-emission matrix fluorometer utilizing supercontinuum white light and acousto-optic tunable filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenbo [Imaging Unit, Integrative Oncology Department, BC Cancer Agency Research Center, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, 835 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E8 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of British Columbia, KAIS 5500, 2332 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Wu, Zhenguo; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan, E-mail: hzeng@bccrc.ca [Imaging Unit, Integrative Oncology Department, BC Cancer Agency Research Center, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, University of British Columbia, 835 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E8 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Scanning speed and coupling efficiency of excitation light to optic fibres are two major technical challenges that limit the potential of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectrometer for on-line applications and in vivo studies. In this paper, a novel EEM system, utilizing a supercontinuum white light source and acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs), was introduced and evaluated. The supercontinuum white light, generated by pumping a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber with an 800 nm femtosecond laser, was efficiently coupled into a bifurcated optic fiber bundle. High speed EEM spectral scanning was achieved using AOTFs both for selecting excitation wavelength and scanning emission spectra. Using calibration lamps (neon and mercury argon), wavelength deviations were determined to vary from 0.18 nm to −0.70 nm within the spectral range of 500–850 nm. Spectral bandwidth for filtered excitation light broadened by twofold compared to that measured with monochromatic light between 650 nm and 750 nm. The EEM spectra for methanol solutions of laser dyes were successfully acquired with this rapid fluorometer using an integration time of 5 s.

  7. Electrical generation of stationary light in random scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, S. M.; Armstrong, G. L.; Chan, H.-Y.; Mattson, E.; Mock, A.; Li, B.; Potts, J. R.; Cui, M.; Rand, S. C.; Oliveira, S. L.; Marchal, J.; Hinklin, T.; Laine, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years there has been great interest in controlling the speed of propagation of electromagnetic waves. In gases and crystals, coherent techniques have been applied to alter the speed of light without changing the physical or chemical structure of the medium. Also, light transmitted by highly disordered solids has exhibited signatures of Anderson localization, indicating the existence of a regime of ``stopped'' light that is mediated by random elastic scattering. However, to date, light has not been generated in a random medium as a pointlike excitation that is fixed in space from the outset. Here we report experimental evidence for the electrical generation and confinement of light within nanosized volumes of a random dielectric scattering medium in which a population inversion has been established, and discuss the properties of these novel light sources.

  8. Effects of white light-emitting diode (LED) exposure on retinal pigment epithelium in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaadane, Imene; Villalpando Rodriguez, Gloria Elisa; Boulenguez, Pierre; Chahory, Sabine; Carré, Samuel; Savoldelli, Michèle; Jonet, Laurent; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Martinsons, Christophe; Torriglia, Alicia

    2017-12-01

    Ageing and alteration of the functions of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are at the origin of lost of vision seen in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The RPE is known to be vulnerable to high-energy blue light. The white light-emitting diodes (LED) commercially available have relatively high content of blue light, a feature that suggest that they could be deleterious for this retinal cell layer. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of "white LED" exposure on RPE. For this, commercially available white LEDs were used for exposure experiments on Wistar rats. Immunohistochemical stain on RPE flat mount, transmission electron microscopy and Western blot were used to exam the RPE. LED-induced RPE damage was evaluated by studying oxidative stress, stress response pathways and cell death pathways as well as the integrity of the outer blood-retinal barrier (BRB). We show that white LED light caused structural alterations leading to the disruption of the outer blood-retinal barrier. We observed an increase in oxidized molecules, disturbance of basal autophagy and cell death by necrosis. We conclude that white LEDs induced strong damages in rat RPE characterized by the breakdown of the BRB and the induction of necrotic cell death. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  9. Ultrabroad linewidth orange-emitting nanowires LED for high CRI laser-based white lighting and gigahertz communications

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2016-08-10

    Group-III-nitride laser diode (LD)-based solid-state lighting device has been demonstrated to be droop-free compared to light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and highly energy-efficient compared to that of the traditional incandescent and fluorescent white light systems. The YAG:Ce3+ phosphor used in LD-based solid-state lighting, however, is associated with rapid degradation issue. An alternate phosphor/LD architecture, which is capable of sustaining high temperature, high power density, while still intensity- and bandwidth-tunable for high color-quality remained unexplored. In this paper, we present for the first time, the proof-of-concept of the generation of high-quality white light using an InGaN-based orange nanowires (NWs) LED grown on silicon, in conjunction with a blue LD, and in place of the compound-phosphor. By changing the relative intensities of the ultrabroad linewidth orange and narrow-linewidth blue components, our LED/LD device architecture achieved correlated color temperature (CCT) ranging from 3000 K to above 6000K with color rendering index (CRI) values reaching 83.1, a value unsurpassed by the YAG-phosphor/blue-LD counterpart. The white-light wireless communications was implemented using the blue LD through on-off keying (OOK) modulation to obtain a data rate of 1.06 Gbps. We therefore achieved the best of both worlds when orange-emitting NWs LED are utilized as “active-phosphor”, while blue LD is used for both color mixing and optical wireless communications.

  10. Virtual 3D bladder reconstruction for augmented medical records from white light cystoscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Kristen L.; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Angst, Roland; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate that necessitates lifelong surveillance to detect mucosal lesions. Examination with white light cystoscopy (WLC), the standard of care, is inherently subjective and data storage limited to clinical notes, diagrams, and still images. A visual history of the bladder wall can enhance clinical and surgical management. To address this clinical need, we developed a tool to transform in vivo WLC videos into virtual 3-dimensional (3D) bladder models using advanced computer vision techniques. WLC videos from rigid cystoscopies (1280 x 720 pixels) were recorded at 30 Hz followed by immediate camera calibration to control for image distortions. Video data were fed into an automated structure-from-motion algorithm that generated a 3D point cloud followed by a 3D mesh to approximate the bladder surface. The highest quality cystoscopic images were projected onto the approximated bladder surface to generate a virtual 3D bladder reconstruction. In intraoperative WLC videos from 36 patients undergoing transurethral resection of suspected bladder tumors, optimal reconstruction was achieved from frames depicting well-focused vasculature, when the bladder was maintained at constant volume with minimal debris, and when regions of the bladder wall were imaged multiple times. A significant innovation of this work is the ability to perform the reconstruction using video from a clinical procedure collected with standard equipment, thereby facilitating rapid clinical translation, application to other forms of endoscopy and new opportunities for longitudinal studies of cancer recurrence.

  11. Solution-processed white phosphorescent tandem organic light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Takayuki; Pu, Yong-Jin; Kido, Junji

    2015-08-26

    Solution-processed phosphorescent tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) exhibit extremely high efficiencies (94 cd A(-1) ) and 26% external quantum efficiency (EQE) at 5000 cd m(-2) for green phosphorescent devices and 69 cd A(-1) and 28% EQE at 5000 cd m(-2) for white phosphorescent devices. Development of these highly efficient solution-processed tandem-OLEDs with inverted device structure paves the way to printable, low-cost, and large-area white lighting. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. R/G/B/natural white light thin colloidal quantum dot-based light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Wan Ki; Lim, Jaehoon; Lee, Donggu; Park, Myeongjin; Lee, Hyunkoo; Kwak, Jeonghun; Char, Kookheon; Lee, Changhee; Lee, Seonghoon

    2014-10-08

    Bright, low-voltage driven colloidal quantum dot (QD)-based white light-emitting devices (LEDs) with practicable device performances are enabled by the direct exciton formation within quantum-dot active layers in a hybrid device structure. Detailed device characterization reveals that white-QLEDs can be rationalized as a parallel circuit, in which different QDs are connected through the same set of electrically common organic and inorganic charge transport layers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Ag nanocluster-based color converters for white organic light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikitani, Yoshinori; Takizawa, Daisuke; Uchida, Soichi; Lu, Yue; Nishimura, Suzushi; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    The authors present Ag nanocluster-based color converters (Ag NC color converters), which convert part of the blue light from a light source to yellow light so as to create white organic light-emitting devices that could be suitable for lighting systems. Ag NCs synthesized by poly(methacrylic acid) template methods have a statistical size distribution with a mean diameter of around 4.5 nm, which is larger than the Fermi wavelength of around 2 nm. Hence, like free electrons in metals, the Ag NC electrons are thought to form a continuous energy band, leading to the formation of surface plasmons by photoexcitation. As for the fluorescence emission mechanism, the fact that the photoluminescence is excitation wavelength dependent suggests that the fluorescence originates from surface plasmons in Ag NCs of different sizes. By using Ag NC color converters and suitable blue light sources, white organic light-emitting devices can be fabricated based on the concept of light-mixing. For our blue light sources, we used polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells (PLECs), which, like organic light-emitting diodes, are area light sources. The PLECs were fabricated with a blue fluorescent π-conjugated polymer, poly[(9,9-dihexylfluoren-2,7-diyl)-co-(anthracen-9,10-diyl)] (PDHFA), and a polymeric solid electrolyte composed of poly(ethylene oxide) and KCF3SO3. In this device structure, the Ag NC color converter absorbs blue light from the PDHFA-based PLEC (PDHFA-PLEC) and then emits yellow light. When the PDHFA-PLEC is turned on by applying an external voltage, pure white light emission can be produced with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (x = 0.32, y = 0.33) and a color rendering index of 93.6. This study shows that utilization of Ag NC color converters and blue PLECs is a very promising and highly effective method for realizing white organic light-emitting devices.

  14. Vacuum-Compatible Wideband White Light and Laser Combiner Source System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Alineza; Ryan, Daniel J.; Tang, Hong; Demers, Richard T.; Kadogawa, Hiroshi; An, Xin; Sun, George Y.

    2010-01-01

    For the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) Spectrum Calibration Development Unit (SCDU) testbed, wideband white light is used to simulate starlight. The white light source mount requires extremely stable pointing accuracy (light from a single-mode fiber was combined, through a beam splitter window with special coating from broadband wavelengths, with light from multimode fiber. Both lights were coupled to a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). In many optical systems, simulating a point star with broadband spectrum with stability of microradians for white light interferometry is a challenge. In this case, the cameras use the white light interference to balance two optical paths, and to maintain close tracking. In order to coarse align the optical paths, a laser light is sent into the system to allow tracking of fringes because a narrow band laser has a great range of interference. The design requirements forced the innovators to use a new type of optical fiber, and to take a large amount of care in aligning the input sources. The testbed required better than 1% throughput, or enough output power on the lowest spectrum to be detectable by the CCD camera (6 nW at camera). The system needed to be vacuum-compatible and to have the capability for combining a visible laser light at any time for calibration purposes. The red laser is a commercially produced 635-nm laser 5-mW diode, and the white light source is a commercially produced tungsten halogen lamp that gives a broad spectrum of about 525 to 800 nm full width at half maximum (FWHM), with about 1.4 mW of power at 630 nm. A custom-made beam splitter window with special coating for broadband wavelengths is used with the white light input via a 50-mm multi-mode fiber. The large mode area PCF is an LMA-8 made by Crystal Fibre (core diameter of 8.5 mm, mode field diameter of 6 mm, and numerical aperture at 625 nm of 0.083). Any science interferometer that needs a tracking laser fringe to assist in alignment can use this system.

  15. Possibility of cost effective and energy efficient high-quality natural white light sources with new nano-phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Dilip K.; Olukunle, Olawole C.; Iorkyaa, Ahemen; Willoughby, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we present results authors published initially on the white light emission with broad band (330-465 nm) excitation of the specially prepared nano-phosphor: Eu3+: ZnS which is capped with sodium methyl carboxylate and on pure red-light emission from the nano-phosphor when capped with alpha methyl acrylic acid and prepared in a different method. Then we discuss possible methods of future improvement of the white light emission from the nano-phosphor. We then present the cost effective and energy efficient method of obtaining highest quality natural white light sources using such nano-phosphor and blue or near UV blue light emitting diodes. The latter discussion includes the driving circuit for the white LED and powering the LED by concentrated solar photovoltaics for both lighting and waste heat energy storage for completely clean energy natural white lighting sources.

  16. Students’ conceptions on white light and implications for teaching and learning about colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagen-Schützenhöfer, Claudia

    2017-07-01

    The quality of learning processes is mainly determined by the extent to which students’ conceptions are addressed and thus conceptual change is triggered. Colour phenomena are a topic within initial instruction of optics which is challenging. A physically adequate concept of white light is crucial for being able to grasp the processes underlying colour formation. Our previous research suggests that misconceptions on white light may influence the conceptual understanding of colour phenomena. For the design of a learning environment on light and colours, the literature was reviewed. Then an explorative interview study with participants (N  =  32), with and without instruction in introductory optics, was carried out. In addition, the representations used for white light in Austrian physics schoolbooks were analysed. Based on the results of the literature review, the interview study and the schoolbook analysis, a learning environment was designed and tested in teaching experiments. The results indicate that learners often lack an adequate concept of white light even after instruction in introductory optics. This seems to cause learning difficulties concerning colour phenomena. On the other hand, the evaluation of our learning environment showed that students are able to gain a good conceptual understanding of colour phenomena if instruction takes these content specific learning difficulties into account.

  17. Optimization of Multiband White-Light Illuminants for Specified Color Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snjezana Soltic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an effective approach for the optimization of multiband spectra to produce prospective white-light spectra having specific color temperatures. The optimization process employs a genetic algorithm known as differential evolution, which aims to minimize the color rendering differences between a prospective white-light spectrum and its corresponding reference illuminant. Color rendering is assessed by calculating the CIEDE2000 color difference (ΔE00 for 14 CIE test colors under the two sources. Optimized white-light spectra were matched to three CIE standard illuminants, that is, A (2856 K, D50 (5003 K, and D65 (6504 K. Optimal solutions for three- and four-band 25 and 50 nm Gaussian spectra are presented and analyzed, together with mixed 4-LED spectra that were optimized in the same way. In all cases, the simulated sources were shown to provide color rendering of such quality that ΔE00av ≤ 2.24 units. Such white-light sources would likely find wide acceptance in numerous lighting applications.

  18. Warm white LED light by frequency down-conversion of mixed yellow and red Lumogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Mauro; Caruso, Fulvio; Zambito, Leandro; Seminara, Biagio; Macaluso, Roberto; Calı, Claudio; Feltin, Eric

    2013-05-01

    This work reports on the benefits and promising opportunities offered by white LED hybrid technology, based on a mixing perylene-based dyes in order to obtain a warm white light for frequency-down conversion. In a standard Ce:YAG-based white LED, the white light appears cold due to the weakness of red wavelength components in the emission spectrum. In order to obtain a warmer white, one possible solution is to add a red phosphor to the yellow one to move the chromatic coordinates properly, though the luminous efficiency drastically decreases due to the increased light absorption of the coating layer. It is generally believed that the low efficiency of warm white LEDs is the main issue today for LED-based lighting. Using photoluminescence of Lumogen® F Yellow 083, a perylene-based polymer dye commercialized by BASF, and adding a small quantity of another perylene-based dye, Lumogen® F Red 305 (BASF), we obtained high-efficiency warm white LEDs by yellow and red conversion from a standard 450 nm GaN/InGaN royal blue LED. Different weight proportions of dyes were dissolved in solutions with equal amounts of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) in ethyl acetate, then the LEDs were dip-coated in each solution and optically characterized. Record values of 8.03 lm of luminous flux and 116.11 lm/W of optical efficiency were achieved. Finally, the effects of both driving current, and pump wavelength on LED performances - such as chromatic coordinates, correlated color temperature, color rendering index (CRI), and optical efficiency - were investigated.

  19. Color Rendering Index Thermal Stability Improvement of Glass-Based Phosphor-Converted White Light-Emitting Diodes for Solid-State Lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chin Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High color rendering index performance has been required for phosphor-converted warm-white light-emitting diodes (PC-WWLEDs in lighting industry. The characteristics of low-temperature fabricated phosphor (yellow: Ce3+:YAG, green: Tb3+:YAG, and red: CaAlClSiN3:Eu2+ doped glass were presented for applications to high color rendering index warm-white-light-emitting diodes. Color coordinates (x, y = (0.36, 0.29, quantum yield (QY = 55.6%, color rending index (CRI = 85.3, and correlated color temperature (CCT = 3923 K were characterized. Glass-based PC-WWLEDs was found able to maintain good thermal stability for long-time high-temperature operation. QY decay, CRI remenance, and chromaticity shift were also analyzed for glass- and silicone-based high-power PC-WLEDs by thermal aging at 150°C and 250°C for industrial test standard’s aging time 1008 hours. Better than the silicone’s, thermal stability of glass-based PC-WLEDs has been improved. The resulted high color rendering index (CRI glass phosphor potentially can be used as a phosphor layer for high-performance and low-cost PC-WLEDs used in next-generation indoor solid-state lighting applications.

  20. The generation and validation of white matter connectivity importance maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuceyeski, Amy; Maruta, Jun; Niogi, Sumit N; Ghajar, Jamshid; Raj, Ashish

    2011-09-01

    Both the size and location of injury in the brain influences the type and severity of cognitive or sensorimotor dysfunction. However, even with advances in MR imaging and analysis, the correspondence between lesion location and clinical deficit remains poorly understood. Here, structural and diffusion images from 14 healthy subjects are used to create spatially unbiased white matter connectivity importance maps that quantify the amount of disruption to the overall brain network that would be incurred if that region were compromised. Some regions in the white matter that were identified as highly important by such maps have been implicated in strategic infarct dementia and linked to various attention tasks in previous studies. Validation of the maps is performed by investigating the correlations of the importance maps' predicted cognitive deficits in a group of 15 traumatic brain injury patients with their cognitive test scores measuring attention and memory. While no correlation was found between amount of white matter injury and cognitive test scores, significant correlations (r>0.68, pimprove surgical planning, diagnosis, and assessment of disease severity in a variety of pathologies like multiple sclerosis, trauma, and stroke. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Albert Grippo; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Shukui Zhang; Gwyn Williams

    2007-04-25

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  2. Generating light with a specified spectral power distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farup, Ivar; Wold, Jan Henrik; Seim, Thorstein; Søndrol, Torkjel

    2007-05-01

    A particular version of a spectral integrator has been designed. It consists of a xenon lamp whose light is dispersed into a color spectrum by dispersing prisms. Using a transmissive LCD panel controlled by a computer, certain fractions of the light in different parts of the spectrum are masked out. The remaining transmitted light is integrated and projected onto a translucent diffusing plate. A spectroradiometer that measures the generated light is also attached to the computer, thus making the spectral integrator a closed-loop system. An algorithm for generating the light of a specified spectral power distribution has been developed. The resulting measured spectra differ from the specified ones with relative rms errors in the range of 1%-20% depending on the shape of the spectral power distribution.

  3. 2 Gbit/s data transmission from an unfiltered laser-based phosphor-converted white lighting communication system

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Changmin

    2015-11-05

    We demonstrate data transmission of unfiltered white light generated by direct modulation of a blue gallium nitride (GaN) laser diode (LD) exciting YAG:Ce phosphors. 1.1 GHz of modulation bandwidth was measured without a limitation from the slow 3.8 MHz phosphor response. A high data transmission rate of 2 Gbit/s was achieved without an optical blue-filter using a non-return-to-zero on-off keying (NRZ-OOK) modulation scheme. The measured bit error rate (BER) of 3.50 × 10−3 was less than the forward error correction (FEC) limit of 3.8 × 10−3. The generated white light exhibits CIE 1931 chromaticity coordinates of (0.3628, 0.4310) with a color rendering index (CRI) of 58 and a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4740 K when the LD was operated at 300 mA. The demonstrated laser-based lighting system can be used simultaneously for indoor broadband access and illumination applications with good color stability.

  4. 2 Gbit/s data transmission from an unfiltered laser-based phosphor-converted white lighting communication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changmin; Shen, Chao; Oubei, Hassan M; Cantore, Michael; Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien Khee; Farrell, Robert M; El-Desouki, Munir M; Speck, James S; Nakamura, Shuji; Ooi, Boon S; DenBaars, Steven P

    2015-11-16

    We demonstrate data transmission of unfiltered white light generated by direct modulation of a blue gallium nitride (GaN) laser diode (LD) exciting YAG:Ce phosphors. 1.1 GHz of modulation bandwidth was measured without a limitation from the slow 3.8 MHz phosphor response. A high data transmission rate of 2 Gbit/s was achieved without an optical blue-filter using a non-return-to-zero on-off keying (NRZ-OOK) modulation scheme. The measured bit error rate (BER) of 3.50 × 10(-3) was less than the forward error correction (FEC) limit of 3.8 × 10(-3). The generated white light exhibits CIE 1931 chromaticity coordinates of (0.3628, 0.4310) with a color rendering index (CRI) of 58 and a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4740 K when the LD was operated at 300 mA. The demonstrated laser-based lighting system can be used simultaneously for indoor broadband access and illumination applications with good color stability.

  5. Aligned energy-level design for decreasing operation voltage of tandem white organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chih-Hao, E-mail: chc@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wu, Zih-Jyun; Liang, Yi-Hu; Chang, Yu-Shuo; Chiu, Chuan-Hao; Tai, Cheng-Wei [Department of Photonics Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Hsin-Hua, E-mail: hhua3@mail.vnu.edu.tw [Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, Vanung University, Chung-Li 32061, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-12-02

    In general, organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) need to operate at higher current density levels to ensure an ample light flux. However, stressed operation will result in poor performance and limited device lifetime. Recently, a tandem structure has been proposed as a pivotal technique to meet the stringent lighting requirements for OLED commercialization, with a research focus on decreasing the concomitant higher operation voltage. Driving two connected emission units (EMUs) in a tandem structure often requires more than twice the driving voltage for a single EMU. This study investigates bipolar host materials and their effective employment in fabricating tandem white phosphorescent OLEDs (PhOLEDs). In addition, the design of a mechanism to align the energy level between the hole transport layer/emitting layer is shown to effectively mitigate operational voltages. In sharp contrast to devices using a unipolar host material, we demonstrate that the turn-on voltage of blue PhOLEDs could be decreased from 3.8 V to 2.7 V through utilizing a bipolar host. Furthermore, applying the proposed techniques to tandem white PhOLEDs produces a luminance of 10{sup 3} cd/m{sup 2} by a 10.1 V driving voltage. - Highlights: • The matched energy level between the hole transport/emitting layer lowers voltages. • Multiple conduction dopants were used to investigate charge generation layer. • Two-color emitters were used to quantify the charge generation strength.

  6. Blue-enriched white light in the workplace improves self-reported alertness, performance and sleep quality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antoine U Viola; Lynette M James; Luc JM Schlangen; Derk-Jan Dijk

    2008-01-01

    ... the recently discovered melanopsin-based, blue-light-sensitive photoreceptive system. The authors investigated the effects of exposure to blueenriched white light during daytime workhours in an office setting...

  7. Blue-enriched white light in the workplace improves self-reported alertness, performance and sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Antoine U; James, Lynette M; Schlangen, Luc J M; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2008-08-01

    Specifications and standards for lighting installations in occupational settings are based on the spectral sensitivity of the classical visual system and do not take into account the recently discovered melanopsin-based, blue-light-sensitive photoreceptive system. The authors investigated the effects of exposure to blue-enriched white light during daytime workhours in an office setting. The experiment was conducted on 104 white-collar workers on two office floors. After baseline assessments under existing lighting conditions, every participant was exposed to two new lighting conditions, each lasting 4 weeks. One consisted of blue-enriched white light (17 000 K) and the other of white light (4000 K). The order was balanced between the floors. Questionnaire and rating scales were used to assess alertness, mood, sleep quality, performance, mental effort, headache and eye strain, and mood throughout the 8-week intervention. Altogether 94 participants [mean age 36.4 (SD 10.2) years] were included in the analysis. Compared with white light (4000 K), blue-enriched white light (17 000 K) improved the subjective measures of alertness (Plight. When the participants' expectation about the effect of the light treatments was entered into the analysis as a covariate, significant effects persisted for performance, alertness, evening fatigue, irritability, difficulty focusing, concentrating, and blurred vision. Exposure to blue-enriched white light during daytime workhours improves subjective alertness, performance, and evening fatigue.

  8. White Electroluminescence Using ZnO Nanotubes/GaN Heterostructure Light-Emitting Diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaf, J R; Israr, Mq; Kishwar, S; Nur, O; Willander, M

    2010-04-04

    We report the fabrication of heterostructure white light-emitting diode (LED) comprised of n-ZnO nanotubes (NTs) aqueous chemically synthesized on p-GaN substrate. Room temperature electroluminescence (EL) of the LED demonstrates strong broadband white emission spectrum consisting of predominating peak centred at 560 nm and relatively weak violet-blue emission peak at 450 nm under forward bias. The broadband EL emission covering the whole visible spectrum has been attributed to the large surface area and high surface states of ZnO NTs produced during the etching process. In addition, comparison of the EL emission colour quality shows that ZnO nanotubes have much better quality than that of the ZnO nanorods. The colour-rendering index of the white light obtained from the nanotubes was 87, while the nanorods-based LED emit yellowish colour.

  9. Prophylactic treatment of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) by using light visors : Bright white or infrared light?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, Y; Beersma, DGM; Bouhuys, AL; van den Hoofdakker, RH

    1999-01-01

    Background: Thirty-eight patients with SAD participated in a light visor study addressing two questions. 1. Can the development of a depressive episode be prevent ed by daily exposure to bright light started before symptom onset in early fall and continued throughout the winter? 2. Does the light

  10. How to distinguish scattered and absorbed light from re-emitted light for white LEDs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meretska, Maryna; Lagendijk, Aart; Thyrrestrup Nielsen, Henri; Mosk, Allard; IJzerman, Wilbert; Vos, Willem L.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the light transport through phosphor diffuser plates that are used in commercial solid-state lighting modules (Fortimo). These polymer plates contain YAG:Ce+3 phosphor particles that scatter, absorb and re-emit incident light in the visible wavelength range (400-700 nm). To

  11. Four-Parameter white blood cell differential counting based on light scattering measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; de Grooth, B.G.; Visscher, K.; Kouterik, F.A.; Greve, Jan

    1988-01-01

    Measurement of the depolarized orthogonal light scattering in flow cytometry enables one to discriminate human eosinephilic granulocytes from neutrophilic granulocytes. We use this method to perform a four-parameter differential white blood cell analysis. A simple flow cytometer was built equipped

  12. White light emission from Er2O3 nano-powder excited by infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabanli, Sevcan; Eryurek, Gonul; Di Bartolo, Baldassare

    2017-07-01

    Phosphors of Er2O3 nano-crystalline powders were synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. The structural properties of the nano-powders were investigated with XRD and HRTEM measurements. The cubic phase with a = 10.540 Å was the only phase observed. The average crystalline sizes and the widths of the grain size distribution curves were determined to be 27.2, 18.7 and 9.7 nm, respectively. The spectroscopic properties of the Er2O3 nano-powder were studied by measuring the luminescence, decay and rise patterns under 808 and 975 nm diode laser excitations. A peculiar effect of the pressure was observed since an optically active ion (Er) is part of the complex and not a dopant. A broad band of the white light emission combined with blue, green and red up-conversion emission bands of Er3+ ions were observed at 0.03 mbar pressure under both excitation wavelengths. Only, an intense broad band white light emission was observed from these nanocrystals at atmospheric pressure. Rising patterns show that the white light intensity reaches its maximum value more rapidly under 975 nm excitation although it decays slower than that of 808 nm excitation. The color quality parameters such as the color coordinate (CRI), correlated color temperature and the color rendering index were found to vary with both the excitation wavelength and the ambient pressure indicating that these nanocrystals could be considered good white light emitting source under the infrared excitations.

  13. Students' Conceptions on White Light and Implications for Teaching and Learning about Colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagen-Schützenhöfer, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The quality of learning processes is mainly determined by the extent to which students' conceptions are addressed and thus conceptual change is triggered. Colour phenomena are a topic within initial instruction of optics which is challenging. A physically adequate concept of white light is crucial for being able to grasp the processes underlying…

  14. Development of a Code to Analyze the Solar White-Light Images ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 37; Issue 1. Development of a Code to Analyze the Solar White-Light Images from the Kodaikanal Observatory: Detection of Sunspots, Computation of Heliographic Coordinates and Area. Ragadeepika Pucha K. M. Hiremath Shashanka R. Gurumath. Volume ...

  15. White light emission of Eu3+-based hybrid xerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, L. D.; Sá Ferreira, R. A.; de Zea Bermudez, V.; Molina, Celso; Bueno, Luciano A.; Ribeiro, Sidney J. L.

    1999-10-01

    The luminescence spectra and extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) measurements of a series of Eu3+-based organic/inorganic xerogels were reported and related to the local coordination of the lanthanide cations. The hybrid matrix of these organically modified silicates, classed as U(2000) ureasils, is a siliceous network to which short organic chains containing oxyethylene units are covalently grafted by means of urea bridges. The luminescent centers were incorporated as europium triflate, Eu(CF3SO3)3, and europium bromide, EuBr3, with concentrations 200>=n>=20 and n=80, 40, and 30, respectively-where n is the number of ether oxygens in the polymer chains per Eu3+ cation. EXAFS measurements were carried out in some of the U(2000)nEu(CF3SO3)3 xerogels (n=200, 80, 60, and 40). The obtained coordination numbers N ranging from 12.8, n=200, to 9.7, n=40, whereas the average Eu3+ first neighbors distance R is 2.48-2.49 Å. The emission spectra of these multiwavelength phosphors superpose a broad green-blue band to a series of yellow-red narrow 5D0-->7F0-4 Eu3+ lines and to the eye the hybrids appeared to be white, even at room temperature. The ability to tune the emission of the xerogels to colors across the chromaticity diagram is achieved by changing the excitation wavelength and the amount of salt incorporated in the hybrid host. The local environment of Eu3+ is described as a continuous distribution of closely similar low-symmetry network sites. The cations are coordinated by the carbonyl groups of the urea moieties, water molecules, and, for U(2000)nEu(CF3SO3)3, by the SO3 end groups of the triflate anions. No spectral evidences have been found for the coordination by the ether oxygens of the polyether chains. A mean radius for the first coordination shell of Eu3+ is calculated on the basis of the emission energy assignments. The results obtained for U(2000)nEu(CF3SO3)3, 2.4 Å for 90>=n>=40 and 2.6 and 2.5 Å for n=30 and 20, respectively, are in good

  16. Highly efficient tandem organic light-emitting devices employing an easily fabricated charge generation unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huishan; Yu, Yaoyao; Wu, Lishuang; Qu, Biao; Lin, Wenyan; Yu, Ye; Wu, Zhijun; Xie, Wenfa

    2018-02-01

    We have realized highly efficient tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) employing an easily fabricated charge generation unit (CGU) combining 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile with ultrathin bilayers of CsN3 and Al. The charge generation and separation processes of the CGU have been demonstrated by studying the differences in the current density–voltage characteristics of external-carrier-excluding devices. At high luminances of 1000 and 10000 cd/m2, the current efficiencies of the phosphorescent tandem device are about 2.2- and 2.3-fold those of the corresponding single-unit device, respectively. Simultaneously, an efficient tandem white OLED exhibiting high color stability and warm white emission has also been fabricated.

  17. White LED compared with other light sources: age-dependent photobiological effects and parameters for evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebec, Katja Malovrh; Klanjšek-Gunde, Marta; Bizjak, Grega; Kobav, Matej B

    2015-01-01

    Ergonomic science at work and living places should appraise human factors concerning the photobiological effects of lighting. Thorough knowledge on this subject has been gained in the past; however, few attempts have been made to propose suitable evaluation parameters. The blue light hazard and its influence on melatonin secretion in age-dependent observers is considered in this paper and parameters for its evaluation are proposed. New parameters were applied to analyse the effects of white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources and to compare them with the currently applied light sources. The photobiological effects of light sources with the same illuminance but different spectral power distribution were determined for healthy 4-76-year-old observers. The suitability of new parameters is discussed. Correlated colour temperature, the only parameter currently used to assess photobiological effects, is evaluated and compared to new parameters.

  18. Novel core-shell structure microspheres based on lanthanide complexes for white-light emission and fluorescence sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xiao; Yan, Bing

    2016-02-14

    A series of new core-shell structure materials based on lanthanide complexes [H2NMe2]3[Ln(dpa)3] (Ln = Eu, Tb, Sm, Dy, Nd, and Yb; [H2NMe2](+) = dimethylamino cation; dpa = 2-dipicolinate) and silica microspheres has been prepared under solvothermal conditions. Electron microscopy reveals that the nanosized materials SiO2@Ln-dpa are spherical with a narrow size distribution and a [H2NMe2]3[Ln(L)3] coating was generated on the surface of silica microspheres successfully. The core-shell structure materials exhibit excellent optical performance. The white-light-emitting material SiO2@(Dy:Eu)-dpa has a potential application in the development of a white-light device, as a result of the fact that its CIE chromaticity coordinate is very close to that of pure white. Then, we selected SiO2@Eu-dpa as a representative sample for sensing experiments. Eventually, we found that the core-shell structure sensors are highly selective and sensitive for acetone and Cu(2+) cations. The detection of Cu(2+) in the human body is an important issue. Interestingly, the core-shell structure materials display better selectivity and higher sensitivity than the pure lanthanide complexes in sensing Cu(2+) and the value of the quenching effect coefficient has increased by more than 20%.

  19. Origin of White Electroluminescence in Graphene Quantum Dots Embedded Host/Guest Polymer Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyu Kim, Jung; Bae, Sukang; Yi, Yeonjin; Jin Park, Myung; Jin Kim, Sang; Myoung, Nosoung; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Hee Hong, Byung; Hyeok Park, Jong

    2015-06-01

    Polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) using quantum dots (QDs) as emissive materials have received much attention as promising components for next-generation displays. Despite their outstanding properties, toxic and hazardous nature of QDs is a serious impediment to their use in future eco-friendly opto-electronic device applications. Owing to the desires to develop new types of nano-material without health and environmental effects but with strong opto-electrical properties similar to QDs, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted great interest as promising luminophores. However, the origin of electroluminescence from GQDs incorporated PLEDs is unclear. Herein, we synthesized graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) using a modified hydrothermal deoxidization method and characterized the PLED performance using GOQDs blended poly(N-vinyl carbazole) (PVK) as emissive layer. Simple device structure was used to reveal the origin of EL by excluding the contribution of and contamination from other layers. The energy transfer and interaction between the PVK host and GOQDs guest were investigated using steady-state PL, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Experiments revealed that white EL emission from the PLED originated from the hybridized GOQD-PVK complex emission with the contributions from the individual GOQDs and PVK emissions.

  20. Large-optics white light interferometer using double-shearing structure for laser wavefront testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Zhu; Liu, Liren; Zhang, Lei; Teng, Shuyun; Liu, De'an

    2004-10-01

    There is often large optics of several hundreds millimeters aperture in the laser communications transceiver which is nearly diffraction-limited laser beam at the same time. A revised Mach-Zehnder double-shearing interferometer is designed with 300 millimeters aperture which can be used for wave front analysis. Compare to the aperture-divided double lateral-shearing interferometer presented before, which is based on Jamin interferometer, this structure is easy to achieve for large aperture measurement without thick Jamin plates. In this paper, the interferometer with six same size plates is explained. One plate of them occupied as reflection is aperture-divided. Three changeable schemes are attained to get different wave front measurement ranges through adjusting angle between half-aperture plates. The interferometer is a white light interferometer. The interferometer is so designed that the equal optical path interference is hold though the shear is changing. It is useful for the short coherent length such as laser diode. The wave front aberration is deduced from the interferogram. The calibration is important especially for the Mach-Zehnder structure. Here two interferometers are adopted. One is Fisuea type used for parallel or angle adjustment, another generates plane wave better than 0.2λ with the laser and the high-quality plates. The method to use these apparatus is also explained in detail.

  1. Origin of White Electroluminescence in Graphene Quantum Dots Embedded Host/Guest Polymer Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyu Kim, Jung; Bae, Sukang; Yi, Yeonjin; Jin Park, Myung; Jin Kim, Sang; Myoung, NoSoung; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Hee Hong, Byung; Hyeok Park, Jong

    2015-01-01

    Polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) using quantum dots (QDs) as emissive materials have received much attention as promising components for next-generation displays. Despite their outstanding properties, toxic and hazardous nature of QDs is a serious impediment to their use in future eco-friendly opto-electronic device applications. Owing to the desires to develop new types of nano-material without health and environmental effects but with strong opto-electrical properties similar to QDs, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted great interest as promising luminophores. However, the origin of electroluminescence from GQDs incorporated PLEDs is unclear. Herein, we synthesized graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) using a modified hydrothermal deoxidization method and characterized the PLED performance using GOQDs blended poly(N-vinyl carbazole) (PVK) as emissive layer. Simple device structure was used to reveal the origin of EL by excluding the contribution of and contamination from other layers. The energy transfer and interaction between the PVK host and GOQDs guest were investigated using steady-state PL, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Experiments revealed that white EL emission from the PLED originated from the hybridized GOQD-PVK complex emission with the contributions from the individual GOQDs and PVK emissions. PMID:26067060

  2. A nearly ideal phosphor-converted white light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Steven C.; Steckl, Andrew J.

    2008-04-01

    A phosphor-converted light-emitting diode was obtained with nearly ideal blue-to-white conversion loss of only 1%. This is achieved using internal reflection to steer phosphor emission away from lossy surfaces, a reflector material with high reflectivity, and a remotely located organic phosphor having (1) unity quantum efficiency (ηq), (2) homogeneous refractive index to minimize scattering, and (3) refractive index-matched to the encapsulation to eliminate total internal reflection. An inorganic composite phosphor is also reported with a nearly homogeneous refractive index to minimize diffuse scattering of emitted light, thereby maximizing the effective phosphor ηq and light extraction.

  3. InP/ZnS nanocrystals for colour conversion in white light emitting diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirazi, Roza

    In this work a comprehensive study of a colloidal InP/ZnS nanocrystals (NC) as the colour conversion material for white light emitting diodes (WLED) is shown. Studied nanocrystals were synthesised by wet chemistry using one pot, hot injection method. A quantum efficiency (QE) of photoluminescence...... joined with a time resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements of NCs covering the visible light spectrum range revealed a presence of a population of NCs that does not emit light upon photon absorption and it is significantly higher for a larger particles. By modifying local density of optical states...

  4. High luminous flux from single crystal phosphor-converted laser-based white lighting system

    KAUST Repository

    Cantore, Michael

    2015-12-14

    The efficiency droop of light emitting diodes (LEDs) with increasing current density limits the amount of light emitted per wafer area. Since low current densities are required for high efficiency operation, many LED die are needed for high power white light illumination systems. In contrast, the carrier density of laser diodes (LDs) clamps at threshold, so the efficiency of LDs does not droop above threshold and high efficiencies can be achieved at very high current densities. The use of a high power blue GaN-based LD coupled with a single crystal Ce-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce) sample was investigated for white light illumination applications. Under CW operation, a single phosphor-converted LD (pc-LD) die produced a peak luminous efficacy of 86.7 lm/W at 1.4 A and 4.24 V and a peak luminous flux of 1100 lm at 3.0 A and 4.85 V with a luminous efficacy of 75.6 lm/W. Simulations of a pc-LD confirm that the single crystal YAG:Ce sample did not experience thermal quenching at peak LD operating efficiency. These results show that a single pc-LD die is capable of emitting enough luminous flux for use in a high power white light illumination system.

  5. White light emission from fluorescent SiC with porous surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta Maria

    2017-01-01

    We report for the frst time a NUV light to white light conversion in a N-B co-doped 6H-SiC (fuorescent SiC) layer containing a hybrid structure. The surface of fuorescent SiC sample contains porous structures fabricated by anodic oxidation method. After passivation by 20nm thick Al2O3, the photol......We report for the frst time a NUV light to white light conversion in a N-B co-doped 6H-SiC (fuorescent SiC) layer containing a hybrid structure. The surface of fuorescent SiC sample contains porous structures fabricated by anodic oxidation method. After passivation by 20nm thick Al2O3......, the photoluminescence intensity from the porous layer was signifcant enhanced by a factor of more than 12. Using a porous layer of moderate thickness (~10µm), high-quality white light emission was realized by combining the independent emissions of blue-green emission from the porous layer and yellow emission from...... the bulk fuorescent SiC layer. A high color rendering index of 81.1 has been achieved. Photoluminescence spectra in porous layers fabricated in both commercial n-type and lab grown N-B co-doped 6H-SiC show two emission peaks centered approximately at 460nm and 530nm. Such bluegreen emission phenomenon can...

  6. How to produce white light in a single-phase host?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Mengmeng; Li, Chunxia; Lin, Jun

    2014-03-07

    White light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) as new solid-state light sources have a greatly promising application in the field of lighting and display. So far much effort has been devoted to exploring novel luminescent materials for WLEDs. Currently the major challenges in WLEDs are to achieve high luminous efficacy, high chromatic stability, brilliant color-rending properties, and price competitiveness against fluorescent lamps, which rely critically on the phosphor properties. In recent years, numerous efforts have been made to develop single-phase white-light-emitting phosphors for near-ultraviolet or ultraviolet excitation to solve the above challenges with certain achievements. This review article highlights the current methods to realize the white light emission in a single-phase host, including: (1) doping a single rare earth ion (Eu(3+), Eu(2+) or Dy(3+)) into appropriate single-phase hosts; (2) co-doping various luminescent ions with different emissions into a single matrix simultaneously, such as Tm(3+)/Tb(3+)/Eu(3+), Tm(3+)/Dy(3+), Yb(3+)/Er(3+)/Tm(3+)etc.; (3) codoping different ions in one host to control emission color via energy transfer processes; and (4) controlling the concentration of the defect and reaction conditions of defect-related luminescent materials.

  7. Device Engineering and Degradation Mechanism Study of All-Phosphorescent White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lisong

    As a possible next-generation solid-state lighting source, white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have the advantages in high power efficiency, large area and flat panel form factor applications. Phosphorescent emitters and multiple emitting layer structures are typically used in high efficiency WOLEDs. However due to the complexity of the device structure comprising a stack of multiple layers of organic thin films, ten or more organic materials are usually required, and each of the layers in the stack has to be optimized to produce the desired electrical and optical functions such that collectively a WOLED of the highest possible efficiency can be achieved. Moreover, device degradation mechanisms are still unclear for most OLED systems, especially blue phosphorescent OLEDs. Such challenges require a deep understanding of the device operating principles and materials/device degradation mechanisms. This thesis will focus on achieving high-efficiency and color-stable all-phosphorescent WOLEDs through optimization of the device structures and material compositions. The operating principles and the degradation mechanisms specific to all-phosphorescent WOLED will be studied. First, we investigated a WOLED where a blue emitter was based on a doped mix-host system with the archetypal bis(4,6-difluorophenyl-pyridinato-N,C2) picolinate iridium(III), FIrpic, as the blue dopant. In forming the WOLED, the red and green components were incorporated in a single layer adjacent to the blue layer. The WOLED efficiency and color were optimized through variations of the mixed-host compositions to control the electron-hole recombination zone and the dopant concentrations of the green-red layers to achieve a balanced white emission. Second, a WOLED structure with two separate blue layers and an ultra-thin red and green co-doped layer was studied. Through a systematic investigation of the placement of the co-doped red and green layer between the blue layers and the material

  8. Gallium Nitride Nanowires and Heterostructures: Toward Color-Tunable and White-Light Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, Tevye R; Schwartzberg, Adam M; Aloni, Shaul

    2015-10-14

    Gallium-nitride-based light-emitting diodes have enabled the commercialization of efficient solid-state lighting devices. Nonplanar nanomaterial architectures, such as nanowires and nanowire-based heterostructures, have the potential to significantly improve the performance of light-emitting devices through defect reduction, strain relaxation, and increased junction area. In addition, relaxation of internal strain caused by indium incorporation will facilitate pushing the emission wavelength into the red. This could eliminate inefficient phosphor conversion and enable color-tunable emission or white-light emission by combining blue, green, and red sources. Utilizing the waveguiding modes of the individual nanowires will further enhance light emission, and the properties of photonic structures formed by nanowire arrays can be implemented to improve light extraction. Recent advances in synthetic methods leading to better control over GaN and InGaN nanowire synthesis are described along with new concept devices leading to efficient white-light emission. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Simple single-emitting layer hybrid white organic light emitting with high color stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C.; Lu, Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    Simultaneously achieving a high efficiency and color quality at luminance levels required for solid-state lighting has been difficult for white organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Single-emitting layer (SEL) white OLEDs, in particular, exhibit a significant tradeoff between efficiency and color stability. Furthermore, despite the simplicity of SEL white OLEDs being its main advantage, the reported device structures are often complicated by the use of multiple blocking layers. In this paper, we report a highly simplified three-layered white OLED that achieves a low turn-on voltage of 2.7 V, an external quantum efficiency of 18.9% and power efficiency of 30 lm/W at 1000 cd/cm2. This simple white OLED also shows good color quality with a color rendering index of 75, CIE coordinates (0.42, 0.46), and little color shifting at high luminance. The device consists of a SEL sandwiched between a hole transport layer and an electron transport layer. The SEL comprises a thermally activated delayer fluorescent molecule having dual functions as a blue emitter and as a host for other lower energy emitters. The improved color stability and efficiency in such a simple device structure is explained as due to the elimination of significant energy barriers at various organic-organic interfaces in the traditional devices having multiple blocking layers.

  10. Light-emitting diode-generated red light inhibits keloid fibroblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalis, Andrew; Jagdeo, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Red light is part of the visible light spectrum that does not generate DNA adducts associated with skin cancer and photoaging and may represent a safer therapeutic modality for treatment of keloid scars and other fibrotic skin diseases. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that light-emitting diode-generated red light (LED-RL) inhibits proliferation of skin fibroblasts. The effects of LED-RL on keloidal skin are not well characterized. To determine the effect of LED-RL on keloid-derived fibroblast proliferation and viability in vitro. Irradiation of primary keloid-derived human skin fibroblasts using LED-RL panels was performed in vitro, and modulation of proliferation and viability was quantified using trypan blue dye exclusion assay. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance to compare treatment arms and the Student t-test to compare each treatment arm with the paired bench control arm. Keloid fibroblasts treated with LED-RL 240, 320, and 480 J/cm demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent decreases in relative proliferation rate of 12.4%, 16.5%, and 28.9%, respectively, compared with matched nonirradiated controls (p Light-emitting diode-generated red light can inhibit keloid fibroblast proliferation in a dose-dependent manner without altering viability. Light-emitting diode-generated red light has the potential to contribute to the treatment of keloids and other fibrotic skin diseases and is worthy of further translational and clinical investigation.

  11. Light-Patterned Current Generation in a Droplet Bilayer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo Schild, Vanessa; Booth, Michael J.; Box, Stuart J.; Olof, Sam N.; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Bayley, Hagan

    2017-04-01

    We have created a 4 × 4 droplet bilayer array comprising light-activatable aqueous droplet bio-pixels. Aqueous droplets containing bacteriorhodopsin (bR), a light-driven proton pump, were arranged on a common hydrogel surface in lipid-containing oil. A separate lipid bilayer formed at the interface between each droplet and the hydrogel; each bilayer then incorporated bR. Electrodes in each droplet simultaneously measured the light-driven proton-pumping activities of each bio-pixel. The 4 × 4 array derived by this bottom-up synthetic biology approach can detect grey-scale images and patterns of light moving across the device, which are transduced as electrical current generated in each bio-pixel. We propose that synthetic biological light-activatable arrays, produced with soft materials, might be interfaced with living tissues to stimulate neuronal pathways.

  12. Permanent magnet based dipole magnets for next generation light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Watanabe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have developed permanent magnet based dipole magnets for the next generation light sources. Permanent magnets are advantageous over electromagnets in that they consume less power, are physically more compact, and there is a less risk of power supply failure. However, experience with electromagnets and permanent magnets in the field of accelerators shows that there are still challenges to replacing main magnets of accelerators for light sources with permanent magnets. These include the adjustability of the magnetic field, the temperature dependence of permanent magnets, and the issue of demagnetization. In this paper, we present a design for magnets for future light sources, supported by experimental and numerical results.

  13. White and Red Light Photoluminescence of ZnS:Eu3+ - CMC Nanophosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikorkya, Ahemen; de, Dilip; Meludu, Osita; Bruno, V.

    2015-03-01

    White and red photoluminescence based on europium-doped zinc sulfide nanocrystals capped with sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (ZnS: Eu3+ - CMC) was synthesized using precipitation technique with Eu3+ ions doping concentrations of 1 mol% and 5 mol%. Some portions of the doped samples were annealed at 300 °C in a sulfur-rich atmosphere. All samples show cubic (zinc blende) structure with crystal sizes; 2.56 nm and 2.91 nm, for the as-synthesized samples, 4.35 nm and 3.65 nm for thermally treated samples, respectively. The as-synthesized samples have equal energy band gap of 4.2 eV, but decreased to 3.76 eV and 3.81 eV after heat treatment. Photoluminescence studies indicate defect emission bands and Eu3+ ion lines for the as-synthesized samples. The as-synthesized samples gave pure orange-red emission when excited at wavelength of 394 nm and 465 nm. After thermal annealing of the samples, a broad emission band in the blue-green region assigned to defect related states emerged or were enhanced. Also enhanced were the emission lines of Eu3+ ions in the orange-red region. A combination of these two transitions gave white light of different shades depending on Eu concentration or excitation wavelength. Different shades of white light from cool white through Day-light to warm white light were recorded on the CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram. The source excitation wavelengths range from UV-330 nm through near UV - 396 nm to blue - 465 nm wavelengths which are in the range of InGaN -based LEDs emissions.

  14. Preparation of Bismuth Oxide Photocatalyst and Its Application in White-light LEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chang Chu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth oxide photocatalysts were synthesized and coated on the front surface of phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes to produce a safe and environmentally benign lighting source. Bismuth oxide photocatalyst powders were synthesized with a spray pyrolysis method at 500°C, 600°C, 700°C, and 800°C. Using the absorption spectrum in the blue and UV regions of the bismuth oxide photocatalysts, the blue light and UV leakage problems of phosphor-converted white LEDs can be significantly reduced. The experimental results showed that bismuth oxide photocatalyst synthesized at 700°C exhibited the most superior spectrum inhibiting ability. The suppressed ratio reached 52.33% in the blue and UV regions from 360 to 420 nm. Related colorimetric parameters and the photocatalyst decomposition ability of fabricated white-light LEDs were tested. The CIE chromaticity coordinates (x,y were (0.349, 0.393, and the correlated color temperature was 4991 K. In addition, the coating layer of photocatalyst can act as an air purifier and diffuser to reduce glare. A value of 66.2±0.60 ppmv of molecular formaldehyde gas can be decomposed in 120 mins.

  15. White organic light emitting diodes based on fluorene-carbazole dendrimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usluer, Özlem, E-mail: usluerozlem@yahoo.com.tr [Department of Chemistry, Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University, 48000 Muğla (Turkey); Demic, Serafettin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Izmir Katip Çelebi University, 35620 Çiğli, Izmir (Turkey); Kus, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmutkus1@gmail.com [Chemical Engineering Department and Advanced Technology R and D Center, Selçuk University, Konya (Turkey); Özel, Faruk [Chemical Engineering Department and Advanced Technology R and D Center, Selçuk University, Konya (Turkey); Serdar Sariciftci, Niyazi [Linz Institute for Organic Solar Cells (LIOS), Physical Chemistry, Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, we report on theProd. Type: FTP fabrication and characterization of blue and white light emitting devices based on two fluorene-carbazole containing dendrimers and para-sexiphenyl (6P) oligomers. Blue light emitting diodes were fabricated using 9′,9″-(9,9-dioctyl-9H-fluorene-2,7-diyl)bis-9′H-9,3′:6′,9″-tercarbazole (OFC-G2) and 9′,9″-(9,9′-spirobi[fluorene]-2,7-diyl)bis-9′H-9,3′:6′,9″-tercarbazole (SBFC-G2) dendrimers as a hole transport and emissive layer (EML) and 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) as an electron transport layer. White light emitting diodes were fabricated using 6P and these two dendrimers as an EML. OLED device with the structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS (50 nm)/OFC-G2 (40 nm)/6P (20 nm)/LiF:Al (0.5:100 nm) shows maximum luminance of nearly 1400 cd/m{sup 2} and a Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of (0.27, 0.30) at 12 V. -- Highlights: • White organic light emitting diodes have been fabricated using two fluorene-carbazole dendrimers and para-sexiphenyl (6P) oligomers. • When only these two dendrimers are used as EML, OLED devices are emitted blue light. • The emission colors of OLED devices change from blue to white when 6P is coated on dendrimer films.

  16. The Challenges, Persistence, and Success of White, Working-Class, First-Generation College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightweis, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This essay addresses persistence and success of an underrepresented group enrolled in college who are white, working-class first-generation students. The discussion examines these college students and the challenges they face. The discussion analyzes why first-generation college students persist while others do not. Additionally, the discussion…

  17. Concept of coherence aperture and pathways toward white light high-resolution correlation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchal, P.; Bouchal, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Self-interference correlation imaging is a recently discovered method that takes advantage of holographic reconstruction when using a spatially incoherent light. Although the temporal coherence of light significantly influences the resolution of the method, it has not been studied either theoretically or experimentally. We present the first systematic study of the resolution in a broadband correlation imaging based on the concept of coherence-induced diffraction. We show that the physical limits of the resolution are reached in a non-dispersive experiment and their examination can be performed by the coherence aperture whose width depends on the coherence length of light and the optical path difference of interfering waves. As the main result, the optimal configuration of the non-dispersive experimental system is found in which the sub-diffraction image resolution previously demonstrated for monochromatic light can be retained even when the white light is used. Dispersion effects that prevent reaching the physical resolution limits are discussed and the dispersion sensitivity of the currently available experiments examined. The proposed concept of the coherence aperture is verified experimentally and its generalization to the concept of the dispersion-induced aperture suggested. As a challenge for future research, possible methods of dispersion elimination are outlined that allow the design of advanced optical systems enabling implementation of the high-resolution white light correlation imaging.

  18. Color Degradation of Textiles with Natural Dyes and of Blue Scale Standards Exposed to White LED Lamps:Evaluation of White LED Lamps for Effectiveness as Museum Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Mie; Moriyama, Takayoshi; Toda, Masahiro; Kohmoto, Kohtaro; Saito, Masako

    White light-emitting diodes (LED) are well suited for museum lighting because they emit neither UV nor IR radiation, which damage artifacts. The color degradation of natural dyes and blue scale standards (JIS L 0841) by white LED lamps are examined, and the performance of white LED lamps for museum lighting is evaluated. Blue scale standard grades 1-6 and silk fabrics dyed with 22 types of natural dyes classified as mid to highly responsive in a CIE technical report (CIE157:2004) were exposed to five types of white LED lamps using different luminescence methods and color temperatures. Color changes were measured at each 15000 lx·hr (500 lx at fabric surface × 300 hr) interval ten times. The accumulated exposure totaled 150000 lx·hr. The data on conventional white LED lamps and previously reported white fluorescent (W) and museum fluorescent (NU) lamps was evaluated. All the white LED lamps showed lower fading rates compared with a W lamp on a blue scale grade 1. The fading rate of natural dyes in total was the same between an NU lamp (3000 K) and a white LED lamp (2869 K). However, yellow natural dyes showed higher fading rates with the white LED lamp. This tendency is due to the high power characteristic of the LED lamp around 400-500 nm, which possibly contributes to the photo-fading action on the dyes. The most faded yellow dyes were Ukon (Curcuma longa L.) and Kihada (Phellodendron amurense Rupr.), and these are frequently used in historic artifacts such as kimono, wood-block prints, and scrolls. From a conservation point of view, we need to continue research on white LED lamps for use in museum lighting.

  19. White Electroluminescence Using ZnO Nanotubes/GaN Heterostructure Light-Emitting Diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf JR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the fabrication of heterostructure white light–emitting diode (LED comprised of n-ZnO nanotubes (NTs aqueous chemically synthesized on p-GaN substrate. Room temperature electroluminescence (EL of the LED demonstrates strong broadband white emission spectrum consisting of predominating peak centred at 560 nm and relatively weak violet–blue emission peak at 450 nm under forward bias. The broadband EL emission covering the whole visible spectrum has been attributed to the large surface area and high surface states of ZnO NTs produced during the etching process. In addition, comparison of the EL emission colour quality shows that ZnO nanotubes have much better quality than that of the ZnO nanorods. The colour-rendering index of the white light obtained from the nanotubes was 87, while the nanorods-based LED emit yellowish colour.

  20. Development of Advanced Manufacturing Methods for Warm White LEDs for General Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Anirudha; Kolodin, Boris; Jacob, Cherian; Chowdhury, Ashfaqul; Kuenzler, Glenn; Sater, Karen; Aesram, Danny; Glaettli, Steven; Gallagher, Brian; Langer, Paul; Setlur, Anant; Beers, Bill

    2012-03-31

    GE Lighting Solutions will develop precise and efficient manufacturing techniques for the “remote phosphor” platform of warm-white LED products. In volume, this will be demonstrated to drive significant materials, labor and capital productivity to achieve a maximum possible 53% reduction in overall cost. In addition, the typical total color variation for these white LEDs in production will be well within the ANSI bins and as low as a 4-step MacAdam ellipse centered on the black body curve. Achievement of both of these objectives will be demonstrated while meeting a performance target of > 75 lm/W for a warm-white LED and a reliability target of <30% lumen drop / <2-step MacAdam ellipse shift, estimated over 50,000 hrs.

  1. The impact of bright artificial white and 'blue-enriched' light on sleep and circadian phase during the polar winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, Victoria; Middleton, Benita; Williams, Peter; Arendt, Josephine

    2011-03-01

    Delayed sleep phase (and sometimes free-run) is common in the Antarctic winter (no natural sunlight) and optimizing the artificial light conditions is desirable. This project evaluated sleep when using 17,000 K blue-enriched lamps compared with standard white lamps (5000 K) for personal and communal illumination. Base personnel, 10 males, five females, 32.5±8 years took part in the study. From 24 March to 21 September 2006 light exposure alternated between 4-5-week periods of standard white (5000 K) and blue-enriched lamps (17,000 K), with a 3-week control before and after extra light. Sleep and light exposure were assessed by actigraphy and sleep diaries. General health (RAND 36-item questionnaire) and circadian phase (urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin rhythm) were evaluated at the end of each light condition. Direct comparison (rmanova) of blue-enriched light with white light showed that sleep onset was earlier by 19 min (P=0.022), and sleep latency tended to be shorter by 4 min (P=0.065) with blue-enriched light. Analysing all light conditions, control, blue and white, again provided evidence for greater efficiency of blue-enriched light compared with white (Psleep timing, duration, efficiency and quality in control natural light conditions. Circadian phase was earlier on average in midwinter blue compared with midwinter white light by 45 min (PLight condition had no influence on general health. We conclude that the use of blue-enriched light had some beneficial effects, notably earlier sleep, compared with standard white light during the polar winter. © 2010 European Sleep Research Society.

  2. Energy Transfer between Conjugated Colloidal Ga2O3 and CdSe/CdS Core/Shell Nanocrystals for White Light Emitting Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Stanish

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing solid state materials capable of generating homogeneous white light in an energy efficient and resource-sustainable way is central to the design of new and improved devices for various lighting applications. Most currently-used phosphors depend on strategically important rare earth elements, and rely on a multicomponent approach, which produces sub-optimal quality white light. Here, we report the design and preparation of a colloidal white-light emitting nanocrystal conjugate. This conjugate is obtained by linking colloidal Ga2O3 and II–VI nanocrystals in the solution phase with a short bifunctional organic molecule (thioglycolic acid. The two types of nanocrystals are electronically coupled by Förster resonance energy transfer owing to the short separation between Ga2O3 (energy donor and core/shell CdSe/CdS (energy acceptor nanocrystals, and the spectral overlap between the photoluminescence of the donor and the absorption of the acceptor. Using steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopies, we quantified the contribution of the energy transfer to the photoluminescence spectral power distribution and the corresponding chromaticity of this nanocrystal conjugate. Quantitative understanding of this new system allows for tuning of the emission color and the design of quasi-single white light emitting inorganic phosphors without the use of rare-earth elements.

  3. High White Light Photosensitivity of SnSe Nanoplate-Graphene Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinyang; Huang, Qingqing; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Yangyang; Guo, Mingzhu; Qian, Yongqiang; Huang, Zhigao; Lai, Fachun; Lin, Limei

    2017-04-01

    The multi-functional nanomaterial constructed with more than one type of materials has gained a great attention due to its promising application. Here, a high white light photodetector prototype established with two-dimensional material (2D) and 2D nanocomposites has been fabricated. The 2D-2D nanocomposites were synthesized with SnSe nanoplate and graphene. The device shows a linear I-V characterization behavior in the dark and the resistance dramatically decreases under the white light. Furthermore, the photosensitivity of the device is as large as 1110% with a rapid response time, which is much higher than pristine SnSe nanostructure reported. The results shown here may provide a valuable guidance to design and fabricate the photodetector based on the 2D-2D nanocomposites even beyond the SnSe nanoplate-graphene nanocomposites.

  4. Color Temperature Tunable White-Light LED Cluster with Extrahigh Color Rendering Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhao Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The correlated color temperature (CCT tunable white-light LED cluster with extrahigh color rendering property has been found by simulation and fabricated, which consists of three WW LEDs (CCT = 3183 K, one red LED (634.1 nm, one green LED (513.9 nm, and one blue LED (456.2 nm. The experimental results show that this cluster can realize the CCT tunable white-lights with a color rendering index (CRI above 93, special CRI R9 for strong red above 90, average value of the special CRIs of R9 to R12 for the four saturated colors (red, yellow, green, and blue above 83, and luminous efficacies above 70 lm/W at CCTs of 2719 K to 6497 K.

  5. Color temperature tunable white-light LED cluster with extrahigh color rendering index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minhao; Chen, Yu; He, Guoxing

    2014-01-01

    The correlated color temperature (CCT) tunable white-light LED cluster with extrahigh color rendering property has been found by simulation and fabricated, which consists of three WW LEDs (CCT = 3183 K), one red LED (634.1 nm), one green LED (513.9 nm), and one blue LED (456.2 nm). The experimental results show that this cluster can realize the CCT tunable white-lights with a color rendering index (CRI) above 93, special CRI R9 for strong red above 90, average value of the special CRIs of R9 to R12 for the four saturated colors (red, yellow, green, and blue) above 83, and luminous efficacies above 70 lm/W at CCTs of 2719 K to 6497 K.

  6. Direct naked-eye detection of chiral and Faraday effects in white light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropars, G.; Le Floch, A.; Enoch, J.; Lakshminarayanan, V.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate that the human eye is able to detect the optical activity of chiral molecules and the Faraday effect, even under white-light viewing conditions, without the help of any polarizer. Indeed, we show that our eye acts as a differential analyzer and isolates the response in the blue part of the visible spectrum, thus avoiding the difficulties related to the inherent chromatic dispersion encountered in usual experiments performed under white-light conditions. Moreover the human eye enables to clearly distinguish between the fundamental reciprocal and non-reciprocal characteristics of the optical activity and the Faraday effect, respectively. Furthermore the human eye, without any specific optical dichroic axis in the retina, enables us to read, with the naked eye, hidden information encoded via different states of polarization, and suggests the possibility of direct detection of quantum entanglement effects.

  7. Fish freshness estimation using eye image processing under white and UV lightings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Katsuhiro; Shirataki, Yuri; Liao, Qiuhong; Ogawa, Yuichi; Suzuki, Tetsuhito; Kondo, Naoshi

    2017-05-01

    A non-destructive method of estimating the freshness of fish is required for appropriate price setting and food safety. In particular, for determining the possibility of eating raw fish (sashimi), freshness estimation is critical. We studied such an estimation method by capturing images of fish eyes and performing image processing using the temporal changes of the luminance of pupil and iris. To detect subtle non-visible changes of these features, we used UV (375 nm) light illumination in addition to visible white light illumination. Polarization and two-channel LED techniques were used to remove strong specular reflection from the cornea of the eye and from clear-plastic wrap used to cover the fish to maintain humidity. Pupil and iris regions were automatically detected separately by image processing after the specular reflection removal process, and two types of eye contrast were defined as the ratio of mean and median pixel values of each region. Experiments using 16 Japanese dace (Tribolodon hakonensis) at 23° and 85% humidity for 24 hours were performed. The eye contrast of raw fish increase non-linearly in the initial period and then decreased; however, that of frozen-thawed fish decreased linearly throughout 24 hours, regardless of the lighting. Interestingly, the eye contrast using UV light showed a higher correlation with time than that using white light only in the case of raw fish within the early 6- hour period postmortem. These results show the possibility of estimating fish freshness in the initial stage when fish are eaten raw using white and UV lightings.

  8. Low-intensity blue-enriched white light (750 lux) and standard bright light (10 000 lux) are equally effective in treating SAD. A randomized controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, Ybe; Dekker, Vera; Schlangen, Luc J. M.; Bos, Elske H.; Ruiter, Martine J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Photoreceptor cells containing melanopsin play a role in the phase-shifting effects of short-wavelength light. In a previous study, we compared the standard light treatment (SLT) of SAD with treatment using short-wavelength blue-enriched white light (BLT). Both treatments used the same

  9. Multimodal and multiplex spectral imaging of rat cornea ex vivo using a white-light laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Hiroki; Kaji, Yuichi; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Ozawa, Takeaki; Oshika, Tetsuro; Kano, Hideaki

    2015-09-01

    We applied our multimodal nonlinear spectral imaging microscope to the measurement of rat cornea. We successfully obtained multiple nonlinear signals of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), third-order sum frequency generation (TSFG), and second harmonic generation (SHG). Depending on the nonlinear optical processes, the cornea tissue was visualized with different image contrast mechanism simultaneously. Due to white-light laser excitation, multiplex CARS and TSFG spectra were obtained. Combined multimodal and spectral analysis clearly elucidated the layered structure of rat cornea with molecular structural information. This study indicates that our multimodal nonlinear spectral microscope is a promising bioimaging method for tissue study. Multimodal nonlinear spectral images of rat cornea at corneal epithelium and corneal stroma in the in-plane (XY) direction. With use of the combinational analysis of different nonlinear optical processes, detailed molecular structural information is available without staining or labelling. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Tuning shades of white light with multi-color quantum-dot quantum-well emitters based on onion-like CdSe ZnS heteronanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Mutlugun, Evren; Ozel, Tuncay; Sapra, Sameer; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2008-08-01

    We present white light generation controlled and tuned by multi-color quantum-dot-quantum-well emitters made of onion-like CdSe/ZnS/CdSe core/shell/shell heteronanocrystals integrated on InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We demonstrate hybrid white LEDs with (x, y) tristimulus coordinates tuned from (0.26, 0.33) to (0.37, 0.36) and correlated color temperatures from 27 413 to 4192 K by controlling the number of their integrated red-green-emitting heteronanocrystals. We investigate the modification of in-film emission from these multi-layered heteronanocrystals with respect to their in-solution emission, which plays a significant role in hybrid LED applications. Our proof-of-principle experiments indicate that these complex heteronanocrystals hold promise for use as nanoluminophors in future hybrid white LEDs.

  11. Evidence of a White-Light Flare on 10 September 1886

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, J. M.; Vázquez, M.; Sánchez Almeida, J.

    2017-02-01

    We present evidence of the occurrence of a white-light flare on 10 September 1886. It represents the third such rare event reported in the history of astronomy. The flare was mentioned by Valderrama ( L'Astronomie 5, 388, 1886). In this article we have used the original logbook of the observer, J. Valderrama y Aguilar, an amateur astronomer who lived in Madrid and Santa Cruz de Tenerife at that time.

  12. Measuring the Dispersion in Laser Cavity Mirrors using White-Light Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    how it lends itself to this application. White light is essentially incoherent, like sunlight -- unless one looks on a femtosecond time-scale. Its...dispersion, is group-velocity and the second term σ = 1 , and λ λ ω = 2πν = 2π hc = 2πhcσ . (8.2) hen substitute (8.2) into (8.1) T 2 Δφ ω( )= 1

  13. Novel Low Cost Organic Vapor Jet Printing of Striped High Efficiency Phosphorescent OLEDs for White Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Hack

    2008-12-31

    In this program, Universal Display Corporation and University of Michigan proposed to integrate three innovative concepts to meet the DOE's Solid State Lighting (SSL) goals: (1) high-efficiency phosphorescent organic light emitting device (PHOLED{trademark}) technology, (2) a white lighting design that is based on a series of red, green and blue OLED stripes, and (3) the use of a novel cost-effective, high rate, mask-less deposition process called organic vapor jet printing (OVJP). Our PHOLED technology offers up to four-times higher power efficiency than other OLED approaches for general lighting. We believe that one of the most promising approaches to maximizing the efficiency of OLED lighting sources is to produce stripes of the three primary colors at such a pitch (200-500 {mu}m) that they appear as a uniform white light to an observer greater than 1 meter (m) away from the illumination source. Earlier work from a SBIR Phase 1 entitled 'White Illumination Sources Using Striped Phosphorescent OLEDs' suggests that stripe widths of less than 500 {mu}m appear uniform from a distance of 1m without the need for an external diffuser. In this program, we intend to combine continued advances in this PHOLED technology with the striped RGB lighting design to demonstrate a high-efficiency, white lighting source. Using this background technology, the team has focused on developing and demonstrating the novel cost-effective OVJP process to fabricate these high-efficiency white PHOLED light sources. Because this groundbreaking OVJP process is a direct printing approach that enables the OLED stripes to be printed without a shadow mask, OVJP offers very high material utilization and high throughput without the costs and wastage associated with a shadow mask (i.e. the waste of material that deposits on the shadow mask itself). As a direct printing technique, OVJP also has the potential to offer ultra-high deposition rates (> 1,000 Angstroms/second) for any size or

  14. Enhanced efficiency in single-host white organic light-emitting diode by triplet exciton conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qingyang, E-mail: wqy1527@163.com [State Key laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Shiming [State Key laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Département of Chemical Engineering, École Polytechnique de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C3J7 (Canada); Yue, Shouzhen; Zhang, Zhensong [State Key laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Xie, Guohua [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universtität Dresden, Dresden 01062 (Germany); Zhao, Yi; Liu, Shiyong [State Key laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2013-11-15

    The authors observe that the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the Iridium (III) bis(4-phenylthieno [3,2-c]pyridinato-N,C{sup 2′})acetylacetonate (PO-01) based yellow organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is significantly increased by uniformly co-doping Iridium (III)bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C{sup 2−}] (FIrpic) and PO-01 into the same wide band-gap host of N,N{sup ′}-dicarbazolyl-3, 5-benzene (mCP). Detailed investigation indicates that the efficiency enhancement is ascribed to effective triplet exciton gathering by FIrpic, followed by energy transfer to PO-01. Compared to the control device, which has maximum EQE of 10.5%, an improved maximum EQE of 13.2% is obtained in the optimization white device based on FIrpic and PO-01 emission according to this principle. This work makes it easier for a single host white OLED to simultaneously harvest high efficiency in both blue and yellow units. Comprehensive experimental results show that this phenomenon can also be found and utilized in other popular hosts to realize more efficient white devices. -- Highlights: • This work makes easier for a single host white OLED to harvest high efficiency in both blue and yellow units. • Efficiency enhancement is ascribed to effective triplet exciton gathering by FIrpic, followed by energy transfer to PO-01. • This phenomenon can also be found and utilized in other popular hosts to realize more efficient white devices.

  15. Gigabit-per-second white light-based visible light communication using near-ultraviolet laser diode and red-, green-, and blue-emitting phosphors

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Changmin

    2017-07-12

    Data communication based on white light generated using a near-ultraviolet (NUV) laser diode (LD) pumping red-, green-, and blue-emitting (RGB) phosphors was demonstrated for the first time. A III-nitride laser diode (LD) on a semipolar (2021) substrate emitting at 410 nm was used for the transmitter. The measured modulation bandwidth of the LD was 1 GHz, which was limited by the avalanche photodetector. The emission from the NUV LD and the RGB phosphor combination measured a color rendering index (CRI) of 79 and correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4050 K, indicating promise of this approach for creating high quality white lighting. Using this configuration, data was successfully transmitted at a rate of more than 1 Gbps. This NUV laser-based system is expected to have lower background noise from sunlight at the LD emission wavelength than a system that uses a blue LD due to the rapid fall off in intensity of the solar spectrum in the NUV spectral region.

  16. White Light Electroluminescence by Organic-Inorganic Heterostructures with CdSe Quantum Dots as Red Light Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Oner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a white organic light-emitting diode featuring a double emission layer comprising a blue light-emitting conductive polymer as a host material for Cadmium Selenide (CdSe quantum dots as red light emitters and tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminium thin layer for green light emission. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of the emitting light of the device were found to be (0.32, 0.40 which were only slightly changed over a range of applied voltages between 5 and 10 volts. The use of CdSe nanocrystalline quantum dots (surface-stabilized with hexadecylamine/trioctylphosphine oxide ligands in the hybrid heterostructure with poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl conductive polymer was studied for a variety of CdSe concentrations developing the performance of the device in means of overcoming segregation problems in the blend. Besides, constituents' ratio was further examined for the exploration of possible energy transfer from polymer host material to the CdSe quantum dots as a key factor for well-balanced emission in the electroluminescent devices.

  17. New photic stimulating system with white light-emitting diodes to elicit electroretinograms from zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Hisashi; Matsui, Yoshitsugu; Miyata, Ryohei; Nishimura, Yuhei; Yamamoto, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Toshio; Kondo, Mineo

    2017-10-01

    The zebrafish is an established animal model commonly used in biological, neuroscience, and genetic research. We have developed a new light stimulating system using white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to elicit ERGs from zebrafish larvae. The purpose of this study was to record full-field ERGs and to evaluate the inter-trial reliability of the ERGs recorded with our system from zebrafish larvae. The stimulating device used white LEDs that were attached to a stereomicroscope, and the location of the recording electrode on the cornea could be monitored while the eye was being stimulated. Full-field scotopic and photopic ERGs were recorded from larvae at the age of 5-7 days post-fertilization (dpf). Intensity-response curves were constructed from the ERGs. Inter-trial reliability of the ERGs recorded by our system was evaluated. This stimulating system could be used for efficient and reliable ERG recordings from 5-7 dpf larvae. The amplitudes, implicit times, and the waveforms of the scotopic and photopic ERGs were similar to those reported in earlier studies. Inter-trial reliability of the amplitudes of the photopic ERG b-waves was excellent with an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.98. We conclude that this new light stimulation system using white LEDs attached to a stereomicroscope will be helpful in recording reliable ERGs from zebrafish larvae.

  18. Tunable and white light emitting AlPO4 mesoporous glass by design of inorganic/organic luminescent species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin He

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The realization of tunable and white light emitting sources employed by UV-LED with single-host phosphors has been an exciting development in the search for high luminous efficiency and excellent color rendering index white-light source. A tunable and white light emitting mesoporous glass was prepared by utilizing both inorganic/organic (Europium/coumarin luminescent species in the meso-structure. The tunable and white light emission was deliberately designed by CIE calculation based on the individual emission spectra, which was realized by tailoring the emission of Eu2+/Eu3+ ions and coumarin 535 in sol-gel AlPO4 mesoporous glass. This simple and versatile procedure is not limited in the combination of rare earth and organic dye and is therefore extendable to other luminescent species in meso-structure for color-tunable efficient solid-state lighting sources.

  19. Effects of continuous white light and 12h white-12h blue light-cycles on the expression of clock genes in diencephalon, liver, and skeletal muscle in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Kazuhisa; Kondo, Makoto; Hiramoto, Daichi; Saneyasu, Takaoki; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    The core circadian clock mechanism relies on a feedback loop comprised of clock genes, such as the brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1), chriptochrome 1 (Cry1), and period 3 (Per3). Exposure to the light-dark cycle synchronizes the master circadian clock in the brain, and which then synchronizes circadian clocks in peripheral tissues. Birds have long been used as a model for the investigation of circadian rhythm in human neurobiology. In the present study, we examined the effects of continuous light and the combination of white and blue light on the expression of clock genes (Bmal1, Cry1, and Per3) in the central and peripheral tissues in chicks. Seventy two day-old male chicks were weighed, allocated to three groups and maintained under three light schedules: 12h white light-12h dark-cycles group (control); 24h white light group (WW group); 12h white light-12h blue light-cycles group (WB group). The mRNA levels of clock genes in the diencephalon were significantly different between the control and WW groups. On the other hand, the alteration in the mRNA levels of clock genes was similar between the control and WB groups. Similar phenomena were observed in the liver and skeletal muscle (biceps femoris). These results suggest that 12h white-12h blue light-cycles did not disrupt the circadian rhythm of clock gene expression in chicks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of the galactic white dwarf population in the next generation Virgo Cluster survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantin, Nicholas

    Halo white dwarfs remain one of the least studied stellar populations in the Milky Way because of their faint luminosities. Recent work has uncovered a population of hot white dwarfs which are thought to be remnants of low-mass Population II stars. This thesis uses optical data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) and ultravoilet data from the GALEX Ultraviolet Virgo Cluster Survey (GUViCS) to select candidates which may belong to this population of recently formed halo white dwarfs. A colour selection was used to separate white dwarfs from QSOs and main-sequence stars. Photometric distances are calculated using model colour-absolute magnitude relations. Proper motions are calculated by using the difference in positions between objects from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the NGVS. The proper motions are combined with the calculated photometric distances to calculate tangential velocities, as well as approximate Galactic space velocities. White dwarf candidates are characterized as belonging to either the disk or the halo using a variety of methods, including calculated scale heights (z> 1 kpc), tangential velocities (vt >200 km/s), and their location in (V,U) space. The 20 halo white dwarf candidates which were selected using Galactic space velocities are analyzed, and their colours and temperatures suggest that these objects represent some of the youngest white dwarfs in the Galactic halo.

  1. A Heuristic Approach to Remove the Background Intensity on White-light Solar Images. I. STEREO /HI-1 Heliospheric Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenborg, Guillermo; Howard, Russell A. [Space Science Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2017-04-10

    White-light coronal and heliospheric imagers observe scattering of photospheric light from both dust particles (the F-Corona) and free electrons in the corona (the K-corona). The separation of the two coronae is thus vitally important to reveal the faint K-coronal structures (e.g., streamers, co-rotating interaction regions, coronal mass ejections, etc.). However, the separation of the two coronae is very difficult, so we are content in defining a background corona that contains the F- and as little K- as possible. For both the LASCO-C2 and LASCO-C3 coronagraphs aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory ( SOHO ) and the white-light imagers of the SECCHI suite aboard the Solar Terrestrial Relationships Observatory ( STEREO ), a time-dependent model of the background corona is generated from about a month of similar images. The creation of such models is possible because the missions carrying these instruments are orbiting the Sun at about 1 au. However, the orbit profiles for the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions are very different. These missions will have elliptic orbits with a rapidly changing radial distance, hence invalidating the techniques in use for the SOHO /LASCO and STEREO /SECCHI instruments. We have been investigating techniques to generate background models out of just single images that could be used for the Solar Orbiter Heliospheric Imager and the Wide-field Imager for the Solar Probe Plus packages on board the respective spacecraft. In this paper, we introduce a state-of-the-art, heuristic technique to create the background intensity models of STEREO /HI-1 data based solely on individual images, report on new results derived from its application, and discuss its relevance to instrumental and operational issues.

  2. Organic Light-Emitting Diode with Color Tunable between Bluish-White Daylight and Orange-White Dusk Hue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yun Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The varying color of sunlight diurnally exhibits an important effect on circadian rhythm of living organisms. The bluish-white daylight that is suitable for work shows a color temperature as high as 9,000 K, while the homey orange-white dusk hue is as low as 2,000 K. We demonstrate in this report the feasibility of using organic light-emitting diode (OLED technology to fabricate sunlight-style illumination with a very wide color temperature range. The color temperature can be tuned from 2,300 K to 9,300 K, for example, by changing the applied voltage from 3 to 11 V for the device composing red and yellow emitters in the first emissive layer and blue emitter in the second. Unlike the prior arts, the color-temperature span can be made much wider without any additional carrier modulation layer, which should enable a more cost effective fabrication. For example, the color-temperature span is 7,000 K for the above case, while it is 1,700 K upon the incorporation of a nanoscale hole modulation layer in between the two emissive layers. The reason why the present device can effectively regulate the shifting of recombination zone is because the first emissive layer itself possesses an effective hole modulation barrier of 0.2 eV. This also explains why the incorporation of an extra hole modulation layer with a 0.7 eV barrier did not help extend the desirable color-temperature span since excessive holes may be blocked.

  3. Dynamic generation of light states with discrete symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, S.; Nahmad-Achar, E.; Castaños, O.; López-Peña, R.

    2018-01-01

    A dynamic procedure is established within the generalized Tavis-Cummings model to generate light states with discrete point symmetries, given by the cyclic group Cn. We consider arbitrary dipolar coupling strengths of the atoms with a one-mode electromagnetic field in a cavity. The method uses mainly the matter-field entanglement properties of the system, which can be extended to any number of three-level atoms. An initial state constituted by the superposition of two states with definite total excitation numbers, |ψ〉 M1,and |ψ〉 M 2, is considered. It can be generated by the proper selection of the time of flight of an atom passing through the cavity. We demonstrate that the resulting Husimi function of the light is invariant under cyclic point transformations of order n =| M1-M2| .

  4. Dynamic light scattering on bioconjugated laser generated gold nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Zimbone

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs conjugated to DNA are widely used for biomedical targeting and sensing applications. DNA functionalization is easily reached on laser generated gold nanoparticles because of their unique surface chemistry, not reproducible by other methods. In this context, we present an extensive investigation concerning the attachment of DNA to the surface of laser generated nanoparticles using Dynamic Light Scattering and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The DNA conjugation is highlighted by the increase of the hydrodynamic radius and by the UV-Vis spectra behavior. Our investigation indicates that Dynamic Light Scattering is a suitable analytical tool to evidence, directly and qualitatively, the binding between a DNA molecule and a gold nanoparticle, therefore it is ideal to monitor changes in the conjugation process when experimental conditions are varied.

  5. True Yellow Light-Emitting Diodes as Phosphor for Tunable Color-Rendering Index Laser-Based White Light

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2016-10-11

    An urgent challenge for the lighting research community is the lack of efficient optical devices emitting in between 500 and 600 nm, resulting in the “green-yellow gap”. In particular, true green (∼555 nm) and true yellow (∼590 nm), along with blue and red, constitute four technologically important colors. The III-nitride material system, being the most promising choice of platform to bridge this gap, still suffers from high dislocation density and poor crystal quality in realizing high-power, efficient devices. Particularly, the high polarization fields in the active region of such 2D quantum confined structures prevent efficient recombination of carriers. Here we demonstrate a true yellow nanowire (NW) light emitting diode (LED) with peak emission of 588 nm at 29.5 A/cm2 (75 mA in a 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 device) and a low turn-on voltage of ∼2.5 V, while having an internal quantum efficiency of 39%, and without “efficiency droop” up to an injection current density of 29.5 A/cm2. By mixing yellow light from a NW LED in reflective configuration with that of a red, green, and blue laser diode (LD), white light with a correlated color temperature of ∼6000 K and color-rendering index of 87.7 was achieved. The nitride-NW-based device offers a robust, long-term stability for realizing yellow light emitters for tunable color-rendering index solid-state lighting, on a scalable, low-cost, foundry-compatible titanium/silicon substrate, suitable for industry uptake.

  6. Monte Carlo analysis of a control technique for a tunable white lighting system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, Maumita; Thorseth, Anders; Jepsen, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    table for an experimentally realized system, with a calibrated tristimulus colour sensor. A Monte Carlo simulation is used to examine the system performance concerning the variation of luminous flux and chromaticity of the light output. The inputs to the Monte Carlo simulation, are variations of the LED...... peak wavelength, the LED rated luminous flux bin, the influence of the operating conditions, ambient temperature, driving current, and the spectral response of the colour sensor. The system performance is investigated by evaluating the outputs from the Monte Carlo simulation. The outputs show......A simulated colour control mechanism for a multi-coloured LED lighting system is presented. The system achieves adjustable and stable white light output and allows for system-to-system reproducibility after application of the control mechanism. The control unit works using a pre-calibrated lookup...

  7. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  8. Luminescence properties of novel single-host white-light-emitting phosphor KBaBP2O8:Dy3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Zhang, Jie; Li, Pengju; Shi, Hengzhen

    2015-01-01

    A series of white-light-emitting KBaBP2O8:Dy3+ phosphors were synthesized by using a solid state reaction technique at high-temperature. X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements were utilized to characterize the structure and luminescence characteristics including excitation and emission spectra, decay curves, chromaticity coordinates of the assprepared phosphors. The influence of the doping concentration of Dy3+ on the relative emission intensity of Dy3+ was investigated. The critical distance as well as concentration quenching mechanism was calculated and confirmed. The as-prepared phosphors can be effectively excited with near ultraviolet, and exhibit white light emission with short decay time of milliseconds. The above work indicates these phosphors could be potential candidates as single-host white-light-emitting phosphors for application in white light-emitting-diodes.

  9. Molecular Beam Epitaxy-Grown InGaN Nanomushrooms and Nanowires for White Light Source Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Gasim, Anwar A.

    2012-01-01

    We report the observation of coexisting InGaN nanomushrooms and nanowires grown via MBE. Photoluminescence characterization shows that the nanostructures emit yellow and blue light, respectively. The combined emission is promising for white-LEDs.

  10. Chronic artificial blue-enriched white light is an effective countermeasure to delayed circadian phase and neurobehavioral decrements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond P Najjar

    Full Text Available Studies in Polar Base stations, where personnel have no access to sunlight during winter, have reported circadian misalignment, free-running of the sleep-wake rhythm, and sleep problems. Here we tested light as a countermeasure to circadian misalignment in personnel of the Concordia Polar Base station during the polar winter. We hypothesized that entrainment of the circadian pacemaker to a 24-h light-dark schedule would not occur in all crew members (n = 10 exposed to 100-300 lux of standard fluorescent white (SW light during the daytime, and that chronic non-time restricted daytime exposure to melanopsin-optimized blue-enriched white (BE light would establish an a stable circadian phase, in participants, together with increased cognitive performance and mood levels. The lighting schedule consisted of an alternation between SW lighting (2 weeks, followed by a BE lighting (2 weeks for a total of 9 weeks. Rest-activity cycles assessed by actigraphy showed a stable rest-activity pattern under both SW and BE light. No difference was found between light conditions on the intra-daily stability, variability and amplitude of activity, as assessed by non-parametric circadian analysis. As hypothesized, a significant delay of about 30 minutes in the onset of melatonin secretion occurred with SW, but not with BE light. BE light significantly enhanced well being and alertness compared to SW light. We propose that the superior efficacy of blue-enriched white light versus standard white light involves melanopsin-based mechanisms in the activation of the non-visual functions studied, and that their responses do not dampen with time (over 9-weeks. This work could lead to practical applications of light exposure in working environment where background light intensity is chronically low to moderate (polar base stations, power plants, space missions, etc., and may help design lighting strategies to maintain health, productivity, and personnel safety.

  11. Chronic artificial blue-enriched white light is an effective countermeasure to delayed circadian phase and neurobehavioral decrements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Raymond P; Wolf, Luzian; Taillard, Jacques; Schlangen, Luc J M; Salam, Alex; Cajochen, Christian; Gronfier, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Studies in Polar Base stations, where personnel have no access to sunlight during winter, have reported circadian misalignment, free-running of the sleep-wake rhythm, and sleep problems. Here we tested light as a countermeasure to circadian misalignment in personnel of the Concordia Polar Base station during the polar winter. We hypothesized that entrainment of the circadian pacemaker to a 24-h light-dark schedule would not occur in all crew members (n = 10) exposed to 100-300 lux of standard fluorescent white (SW) light during the daytime, and that chronic non-time restricted daytime exposure to melanopsin-optimized blue-enriched white (BE) light would establish an a stable circadian phase, in participants, together with increased cognitive performance and mood levels. The lighting schedule consisted of an alternation between SW lighting (2 weeks), followed by a BE lighting (2 weeks) for a total of 9 weeks. Rest-activity cycles assessed by actigraphy showed a stable rest-activity pattern under both SW and BE light. No difference was found between light conditions on the intra-daily stability, variability and amplitude of activity, as assessed by non-parametric circadian analysis. As hypothesized, a significant delay of about 30 minutes in the onset of melatonin secretion occurred with SW, but not with BE light. BE light significantly enhanced well being and alertness compared to SW light. We propose that the superior efficacy of blue-enriched white light versus standard white light involves melanopsin-based mechanisms in the activation of the non-visual functions studied, and that their responses do not dampen with time (over 9-weeks). This work could lead to practical applications of light exposure in working environment where background light intensity is chronically low to moderate (polar base stations, power plants, space missions, etc.), and may help design lighting strategies to maintain health, productivity, and personnel safety.

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Structures, Systems, and Components Safety Classification White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pete Jordan

    2010-09-01

    This white paper outlines the relevant regulatory policy and guidance for a risk-informed approach for establishing the safety classification of Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and sets forth certain facts for review and discussion in order facilitate an effective submittal leading to an NGNP Combined Operating License application under 10 CFR 52.

  13. Quantitative Light Fluorescence (QLF and Polarized White Light (PWL assessments of dental fluorosis in an epidemiological setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pretty Iain A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine if a novel dual camera imaging system employing both polarized white light (PWL and quantitative light induced fluorescence imaging (QLF is appropriate for measuring enamel fluorosis in an epidemiological setting. The use of remote and objective scoring systems is of importance in fluorosis assessments due to the potential risk of examiner bias using clinical methods. Methods Subjects were recruited from a panel previously characterized for fluorosis and caries to ensure a range of fluorosis presentation. A total of 164 children, aged 11 years (±1.3 participated following consent. Each child was examined using the novel imaging system, a traditional digital SLR camera, and clinically using the Dean’s and Thylstrup and Fejerskov (TF Indices on the upper central and lateral incisors. Polarized white light and SLR images were scored for both Dean’s and TF indices by raters and fluorescence images were automatically scored using software. Results Data from 164 children were available with a good distribution of fluorosis severity. The automated software analysis of QLF images demonstrated significant correlations with the clinical examinations for both Dean’s and TF index. Agreement (measured by weighted Kappa’s between examiners scoring clinically, from polarized photographs and from SLR images ranged from 0.56 to 0.92. Conclusions The study suggests that the use of a digital imaging system to capture images for either automated software analysis, or remote assessment by raters is suitable for epidemiological work. The use of recorded images enables study archiving, assessment by multiple examiners, remote assessment and objectivity due to the blinding of subject status.

  14. Quantitative Light Fluorescence (QLF) and Polarized White Light (PWL) assessments of dental fluorosis in an epidemiological setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine if a novel dual camera imaging system employing both polarized white light (PWL) and quantitative light induced fluorescence imaging (QLF) is appropriate for measuring enamel fluorosis in an epidemiological setting. The use of remote and objective scoring systems is of importance in fluorosis assessments due to the potential risk of examiner bias using clinical methods. Methods Subjects were recruited from a panel previously characterized for fluorosis and caries to ensure a range of fluorosis presentation. A total of 164 children, aged 11 years (±1.3) participated following consent. Each child was examined using the novel imaging system, a traditional digital SLR camera, and clinically using the Dean’s and Thylstrup and Fejerskov (TF) Indices on the upper central and lateral incisors. Polarized white light and SLR images were scored for both Dean’s and TF indices by raters and fluorescence images were automatically scored using software. Results Data from 164 children were available with a good distribution of fluorosis severity. The automated software analysis of QLF images demonstrated significant correlations with the clinical examinations for both Dean’s and TF index. Agreement (measured by weighted Kappa’s) between examiners scoring clinically, from polarized photographs and from SLR images ranged from 0.56 to 0.92. Conclusions The study suggests that the use of a digital imaging system to capture images for either automated software analysis, or remote assessment by raters is suitable for epidemiological work. The use of recorded images enables study archiving, assessment by multiple examiners, remote assessment and objectivity due to the blinding of subject status. PMID:22607363

  15. Pulsed-squeezed-light generation in a waveguide with second-subharmonic generation and periodic corrugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peřina, Jan, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum pulsed second-subharmonic generation in a planar waveguide with a small periodic corrugation at the surface is studied. Backscattering of the interacting fields on the corrugation enhances the nonlinear interaction, giving larger values of squeezing. The problem of backscattering is treated by perturbation theory, using the Fourier transform for nondispersion propagation, and by numerical approach in the general case. Optimum spectral modes for squeezed-light generation are found using the Bloch-Messiah reduction. An improvement in squeezing and increase of the numbers of generated photons are quantified for the corrugation resonating with the fundamental and second-subharmonic field. Splitting of the generated pulse by the corrugation is predicted.

  16. Hydrogen-bonded supramolecular conjugated polymer nanoparticles for white light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Yi; Wong, JenIt; Xie, Ling-Hai; Dong, Xiao-Chen; Yang, Hui Ying; Huang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Supramolecular polyfluorenol enable assembly into conjugated polymer nanoparticles (CPNs). Poly{9-[4-(octyloxy)phenyl]fluoren-9-ol-2,7-diyl} (PPFOH)-based supramolecular nanoparticles are prepared via reprecipitation. PPFOH nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 40 to 200 nm are obtained by adding different amounts of water into DMF solution. Size-dependent luminescence is observed in PPFOH-based hydrogen-bonded nanoparticles that is different from that of poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenes). Finally, white light-emitting devices using CPNs with a size of 80 nm exhibit white emission with the CIE coordinates (0.31, 0.34). Amphiphilic conjugated polymer nanoparticles are potential organic nano-inks for the fabrication of organic devices in printed electronics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Nanopatterned yttrium aluminum garnet phosphor incorporated film for high-brightness GaN-based white light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Joong-yeon; Park, Sang-Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jinho, E-mail: jhahn@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Heon, E-mail: heonlee@korea.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-03

    In this study, we fabricated high-brightness white light emitting diodes (LEDs) by developing a nanopatterned yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) phosphor-incorporated film. White light can be obtained by mixing blue light from a GaN-based LED and yellow light of the YAG phosphor-incorporated film. If white light sources can be fabricated by exciting proper yellow phosphor using blue light, then these sources can be used instead of the conventional fluorescent lamps with a UV source, for backlighting of displays. In this work, a moth-eye structure was formed on the YAG phosphor-incorporated film by direct spin-on glass (SOG) printing. The moth-eye structures have been investigated to improve light transmittance in various optoelectronic devices, including photovoltaic solar cells, light emitting diodes, and displays, because of their anti-reflection property. Direct SOG printing, which is a simple, easy, and relatively inexpensive process, can be used to fabricate nanoscale structures. After direct SOG printing, the moth-eye structure with a diameter of 220 nm was formed uniformly on the YAG phosphor-incorporated film. As a result of moth-eye patterning on the YAG phosphor-incorporated film, the light output power of a white LED with a patterned YAG phosphor-incorporated film increased to up to 13% higher than that of a white LED with a non-patterned film. - Highlights: • GaN-based high-brightness white LED was prepared using patterned YAG phosphor-incorporated films. • Direct hydrogen silsesquioxane printing was used to form moth-eye patterns on the YAG films. • The electroluminescence intensity of the white LED was enhanced by up to 14.9%.

  18. High power laser-driven ceramic phosphor plate for outstanding efficient white light conversion in application of automotive lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Hyun; Ji, Eun Kyung; Jeong, Byung Woo; Jung, Mong Kwon; Kim, Eun Young; Yoon, Dae Ho

    2016-08-09

    We report on Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) ceramic phosphor plate (CPP) using nano phosphor for high power laser diode (LD) application for white light in automotive lighting. The prepared CPP shows improved luminous properties as a function of Ce(3+) concentration. The luminous properties of the Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) CPP nano phosphor are improved when compared to the Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) CPP with bulk phosphor, and hence, the luminous emittance, luminous flux, and conversion efficiency are improved. The Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) CPP with an optimal Ce(3+) content of 0.5 mol % shows 2733 lm/mm(2) value under high power blue radiant flux density of 19.1 W/mm(2). The results indicate that Y3Al5O12: Ce(3+) CPP using nano phosphor can serve as a potential material for solid-state laser lighting in automotive applications.

  19. Morning sleep inertia in alertness and performance: effect of cognitive domain and white light conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayantara Santhi

    Full Text Available The transition from sleep to wakefulness entails a temporary period of reduced alertness and impaired performance known as sleep inertia. The extent to which its severity varies with task and cognitive processes remains unclear. We examined sleep inertia in alertness, attention, working memory and cognitive throughput with the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT, n-back and add tasks, respectively. The tasks were administered 2 hours before bedtime and at regular intervals for four hours, starting immediately after awakening in the morning, in eleven participants, in a four-way cross-over laboratory design. We also investigated whether exposure to Blue-Enhanced or Bright Blue-Enhanced white light would reduce sleep inertia. Alertness and all cognitive processes were impaired immediately upon awakening (p<0.01. However, alertness and sustained attention were more affected than cognitive throughput and working memory. Moreover, speed was more affected than accuracy of responses. The light conditions had no differential effect on performance except in the 3-back task (p<0.01, where response times (RT at the end of four hours in the two Blue-Enhanced white light conditions were faster (200 ms than at wake time. We conclude that the effect of sleep inertia varies with cognitive domain and that it's spectral/intensity response to light is different from that of sleepiness. That is, just increasing blue-wavelength in light may not be sufficient to reduce sleep inertia. These findings have implications for critical professions like medicine, law-enforcement etc., in which, personnel routinely wake up from night-time sleep to respond to emergency situations.

  20. Broad band nonlinear optical absorption measurements of the laser dye IR26 using white light continuum Z-scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Soumyodeep; Bongu, Sudhakara Reddy; Bisht, Prem Ballabh

    2017-03-01

    We study the nonlinear optical response of a standard dye IR26 using the Z-scan technique, but with the white light continuum. The continuum source of wavelength from 450 nm to 1650 nm has been generated from the photonic crystal fiber on pumping with 772 nm of Ti:Sapphire oscillator. The use of broadband incident pulse enables us to probe saturable absorption (SA) and reverse saturable absorption (RSA) over the large spectral range with a single Z-scan measurement. The system shows SA in the resonant region while it turns to RSA in the non-resonant regions. The low saturation intensity of the dye can be explained based on the simultaneous excitation from ground states to various higher energy levels with the help of composite energy level diagram. The cumulative effects of excited state absorption and thermal induced nonlinear optical effects are responsible for the observed RSA.

  1. Successful white hair removal with combined coloring and intense pulsed Light (IPL): a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijanpoor, Robabeh; Poorsattar BejehMir, Arash; Mokmeli, Soheila

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce adjunct therapy to intense pulsed light (IPL) and to assess it in terms of safety, expense, feasibility, and efficacy. Currently there is no satisfactory, efficient method for long-term white hair removal. We conducted a randomized clinical trial of hirsute patients with excessive white hair on the chin and cheeks. In addition to IPL, the patients were randomly assigned to have their white hair colored with either black eyeliner or black hair dye as an adjunct to IPL aided for of six sessions (with a 4-week interval between sessions). The primary efficacy outcome, which was defined as the outcome after six sessions of therapy, was scored as poor (60%) response to white hair removal in predefined areas. The secondary outcome was recurrence 6 months after the final therapy session. In the eyeliner group (n=31), 15 (48.4%) individuals showed a fair response, and 16 (51.6%) individuals showed a good response. In the color-dye group (n=31), 1 (3.2%), 17 (54.8%) and 13 (41.9%) participants scored poor, fair, and good, respectively. There were no differences in clinician judgment of the treatment success between the eyeliner and color-dye groups after the six therapy sessions (p=0.895). Thirty-one patients had 6 months of visits (11 in the hair dye and 20 in the eyeliner group). Three participants in the color-dye group and five participants in the eyeliner group failed to show improvement 6 months after the laser surgery. There was no distinguishable pattern of failure between the two study groups (p=1). This study supports that hair coloring is an efficient and feasible technique that can be combined with IPL to eliminate white facial hair.

  2. Clean Cities Strategic Planning White Paper: Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saulsbury, Bo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hopson, Dr Janet L [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Greene, David [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Gibson, Robert [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Increasing the energy efficiency of motor vehicles is critical to achieving national energy goals of reduced petroleum dependence, protecting the global climate, and promoting continued economic prosperity. Even with fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions standards and various economic incentives for clean and efficient vehicles, providing reliable and accurate fuel economy information to the public is important to achieving these goals. This white paper reviews the current status of light-duty vehicle fuel economy in the United States and the role of the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Cities Program in disseminating fuel economy information to the public.

  3. Visualization of superluminal pulses inside a white light cavity using plane wave spatio temporal transfer functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yum, H N; Jang, Y J; Liu, X; Shahriar, M S

    2012-08-13

    In a white light cavity (WLC), the group velocity is superluminal over a finite bandwidth. For a WLC-based data buffering system we recently proposed, it is important to visualize the behavior of pulses inside such a cavity. The conventional plane wave transfer functions, valid only over space that is translationally invariant, cannot be used for the space inside WLC or any cavity, which is translationally variant. Here, we develop the plane wave spatio temporal transfer function (PWSTTF) method to solve this problem, and produce visual representations of a Gaussian input pulse incident on a WLC, for all times and positions.

  4. Efficiency and stability of a phosphor-conversion white light source using a blue laser diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ledru

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A white light source using direct phosphor-conversion excited by a blue laser diode is presented. In this preliminary study we have investigated the influence of phosphor’s thickness and operating current of the laser diode over the (x, y chromaticity coordinates, Correlated Color Temperature (CCT and Color Rendering Index (CRI. The best values found were 4000 K and 94. A 40 lm/W luminous efficacy was achieved together with a CRI close to 90 for an operating current of 0.8 A. Those values, to the best of our knowledge, were not previously reported in the literature.

  5. Color selectivity of surface-plasmon holograms illuminated with white light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Miyu; Kato, Jun-ichi; Kawata, Satoshi

    2013-09-20

    By using the optical frequency dependence of surface-plasmon polaritons, color images can be reconstructed from holograms illuminated with white light. We report details on the color selectivity of the color holograms. The selectivity is tuned by the thickness of a dielectric film covering a plasmonic metal film. When the dielectric is SiO(2) and the metal is silver, the appropriate thicknesses are 25 and 55 nm, respectively. In terms of spatial color uniformity, holograms made of silver-film corrugations are better than holograms recorded on photographic film on a flat silver surface.

  6. Light emitting diode-generated blue light modulates fibrosis characteristics: fibroblast proliferation, migration speed, and reactive oxygen species generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalis, Andrew; Garcha, Manveer; Jagdeo, Jared

    2015-02-01

    Blue light is part of the visible light spectrum that does not generate harmful DNA adducts associated with skin cancer and photoaging, and may represent a safer therapeutic modality for treatment of keloid scars and other fibrotic skin diseases. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that light-emitting diode (LED) red and infrared light inhibits proliferation of skin fibroblasts. Moreover, different wavelengths of light can produce different biological effects. Furthermore, the effects of LED blue light (LED-BL) on human skin fibroblasts are not well characterized. This study investigated the effects of LED-BL on human skin fibroblast proliferation, viability, migration speed, and reactive oxygen-species (ROS) generation. Irradiation of adult human skin fibroblasts using commercially-available LED-BL panels was performed in vitro, and modulation of proliferation and viability was quantified using the trypan blue dye exclusion assay, migratory speed was assessed using time-lapse video microscopy, and intracellular ROS generation was measured using the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Statistical differences between groups were determined by ANOVA and Student's t-test. Human skin fibroblasts treated with LED-BL fluences of 5, 10, 15, 30, and 80 J/cm(2) demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent decreases in relative proliferation of 8.4%, 29.1%, 33.8%, 51.7%, and 55.1%, respectively, compared to temperature and environment matched bench control plates, respectively. LED-BL fluences of 5, 30, 45, and 80 J/cm(2) decreased fibroblast migration speed to 95 ± 7.0% (P = 0.64), 81.3 ± 5.5% (P = 0.021), 48.5 ± 2.7% (P < 0.0001), and 32.3 ± 1.9% (P < 0.0001), respectively, relative to matched controls. LED fluences of 5, 10, 30, and 80 J/cm(2) resulted in statistically significant increases in reactive oxygen species of 110.4%, 116.6%, 127.5%, and 130%, respectively, relative to bench controls. At the fluences

  7. Light Emitting Diode-Generated Blue Light Modulates Fibrosis Characteristics: Fibroblast Proliferation, Migration Speed, and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalis, Andrew; Garcha, Manveer; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Blue light is part of the visible light spectrum that does not generate harmful DNA adducts associated with skin cancer and photoaging, and may represent a safer therapeutic modality for treatment of keloid scars and other fibrotic skin diseases. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that light-emitting diode (LED) red and infrared light inhibits proliferation of skin fibroblasts. Moreover, different wavelengths of light can produce different biological effects. Furthermore, the effects of LED blue light (LED-BL) on human skin fibroblasts are not well characterized. This study investigated the effects of LED-BL on human skin fibroblast proliferation, viability, migration speed, and reactive oxygen-species (ROS) generation. Methods and Materials Irradiation of adult human skin fibroblasts using commercially-available LED-BL panels was performed in vitro, and modulation of proliferation and viability was quantified using the trypan blue dye exclusion assay, migratory speed was assessed using time-lapse video microscopy, and intracellular ROS generation was measured using the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Statistical differences between groups were determined by ANOVA and Student s t-test. Results Human skin fibroblasts treated with LED-BL fluences of 5, 30, 45, and 80 J/cm2 demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent decreases in relative proliferation of 8.4%, 29.1%, 33.8%, 51.7%, and 55.1%, respectively, compared to temperature and environment matched bench control plates, respectively. LED-BL fluences of 5, 30, 45 and 80 J/cm2 decreased fibroblast migration speed to 95 ± 7.0% (p = 0.64), 81.3 ± 5.5% (p = 0.021), 48.5 ± 2.7% (p < 0.0001), and 32.3 ± 1.9% (p < 0.0001), respectively, relative to matched controls. LED fluences of 5, 10, 30, and 80 J/cm2 resulted in statistically significant increases in reactive oxygen species of 110.4%, 116.6%, 127.5%, and 130%, respectively, relative to bench controls. Conclusion At

  8. White light photothermal lens spectrophotometer for the determination of absorption in scattering samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano, Aristides; Alvarado, Salvador; Meng, Junwei; Caballero, Daniel; Moares, Ernesto Marín; Edziah, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    We developed a pump-probe photothermal lens spectrophotometer that uses a broadband arc-lamp and a set of interference filters to provide tunable, nearly monochromatic radiation between 370 and 730 nm as the pump light source. This light is focused onto an absorbing sample, generating a photothermal lens of millimeter dimensions. A highly collimated monochromatic probe light from a low-power He-Ne laser interrogates the generated lens, yielding a photothermal signal proportional to the absorption of light. We measure the absorption spectra of scattering dye solutions using the device. We show that the spectra are not affected by the presence of scattering, confirming that the method only measures the absorption of light that results in generation of heat. By comparing the photothermal spectra with the usual absorption spectra determined using commercial transmission spectrophotometers, we estimate the quantum yield of scattering of the sample. We discuss applications of the device for spectroscopic characterization of samples such as blood and gold nanoparticles that exhibit a complex behavior upon interaction with light.

  9. Third-Generation Light-Driven Symmetric Molecular Motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistemaker, Jos C M; Štacko, Peter; Roke, Diederik; Wolters, Alexander T; Heideman, G Henrieke; Chang, Mu-Chieh; van der Meulen, Pieter; Visser, Johan; Otten, Edwin; Feringa, Ben L

    2017-07-19

    Symmetric molecular motors based on two overcrowded alkenes with a notable absence of a stereogenic center show potential to function as novel mechanical systems in the development of more advanced nanomachines offering controlled motion over surfaces. Elucidation of the key parameters and limitations of these third-generation motors is essential for the design of optimized molecular machines based on light-driven rotary motion. Herein we demonstrate the thermal and photochemical rotational behavior of a series of third-generation light-driven molecular motors. The steric hindrance of the core unit exerted upon the rotors proved pivotal in controlling the speed of rotation, where a smaller size results in lower barriers. The presence of a pseudo-asymmetric carbon center provides the motor with unidirectionality. Tuning of the steric effects of the substituents at the bridgehead allows for the precise control of the direction of disrotary motion, illustrated by the design of two motors which show opposite rotation with respect to a methyl substituent. A third-generation molecular motor with the potential to be the fastest based on overcrowded alkenes to date was used to visualize the equal rate of rotation of both its rotor units. The autonomous rotational behavior perfectly followed the predicted model, setting the stage for more advanced motors for functional dynamic systems.

  10. White-Light-Emitting Lanthanide Metallogels with Tunable Luminescence and Reversible Stimuli-Responsive Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pangkuan; Li, Qiaochu; Grindy, Scott; Holten-Andersen, Niels

    2015-09-16

    We have developed model light-emitting metallogels functionalized with lanthanide metal-ligand coordination complexes via a terpyridyl-end-capped four-arm poly(ethylene glycol) polymer. The optical properties of these highly luminescent polymer networks are readily modulated over a wide spectrum, including white-light emission, simply by tuning of the lanthanide metal ion stoichiometry. Furthermore, the dynamic nature of the Ln-N coordination bonding leads to a broad variety of reversible stimuli-responsive properties (mechano-, vapo-, thermo-, and chemochromism) of both sol-gel systems and solid thin films. The versatile functional performance combined with the ease of assembly suggests that this lanthanide coordination polymer design approach offers a robust pathway for future engineering of multi-stimuli-responsive polymer materials.

  11. Group dispersion measurement of a holey fiber by white-light spectral interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubina, Petr; Ciprian, Dalibor; Chlebus, Radek

    2008-04-01

    We present a white-light interferometric method for measuring the wavelength dependence of the group index of a pure silica holey fiber. The method is based on the recording of a series of the spectral interferograms in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with the fiber of known length placed in one of the interferometer arms and the other arm with adjustable path length. We measure the equalization wavelength as a function of the path length difference, or equivalently the group index dispersion. Subtracting the group dispersion of the optical components present in the interferometer along with the fiber, first we measure the wavelength dependence of the differential group index of the pure silica glass provided that that the light is guided by the outer cladding of the fiber. Second, we measure the wavelength dependence of the group effective index of the fundamental mode supported by the fiber provided that some of the recorded interferograms are also due to the mode.

  12. Loop topology based white light interferometric fiber optic sensor network for application of perimeter security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Libo; Dong, Yongtao

    2011-09-01

    A loop topology based white light interferometric sensor network for perimeter security has been designed and demonstrated. In the perimeter security sensing system, where fiber sensors are packaged in the suspended cable or buried cable, a bi-directional optical path interrogator is built by using Michelson or Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A practical implementation of this technique is presented by using an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) light source and standard single mode fiber, which are common in communication industry. The sensor loop topology is completely passive and absolute length measurements can be obtained for each sensing fiber segment so that it can be used to measure quasi-distribution strain perturbation. For the long distance perimeter monitoring, this technique not only extends the multiplexing potential, but also provides a redundancy for the sensing system. One breakdown point is allowed in the sensor loop because the sensing system will still work even if the embedded sensor loop breaks somewhere.

  13. Full phosphorescent white-light organic light-emitting diodes with improved color stability and efficiency by fine tuning primary emission contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hua

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel type of white-light organic light emitting diode (OLED with high color stability was reported, in which the yellow-light emission layer of (4,4′-N,N′-dicarbazolebiphenyl (CBP : tris(2-phenylquinoline-C2,N′iridium(III (Ir(2-phq3 was sandwiched by double blue-light emission layers of 1,1-bis-[(di-4-tolylaminopheny1]cyclohexane (TAPC : bis[4,6-(di-fluorophenyl-pyridinato-N,C2′]picolinate (FIrpic and tris[3-(3-pyridylmesityl]borane (3TPYMB:FIrpic. And, it exhibited the maximum current efficiency of 33.1 cd/A, the turn-on voltage at about 3 V and the maximum luminance in excess of 20000 cd/m2. More important, it realized very stable white-light emission, and its CIE(x, y coordinates only shift from (0.34, 0.37 to (0.33, 0.37 as applied voltage increased from 5 V to 12 V. It is believed that the new scheme in emission layer of white-light OLED can fine tune the contribution of primary emission with applied voltage changed, resulting in high quality white-light OLED.

  14. Full phosphorescent white-light organic light-emitting diodes with improved color stability and efficiency by fine tuning primary emission contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Wang, E-mail: wmsu2008@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: wanghua001@tyut.edu.cn; Du, Xiaogang [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Su, Wenming, E-mail: wmsu2008@sinano.ac.cn, E-mail: wanghua001@tyut.edu.cn; Zhang, Dongyu [Printable Electronics Research Centre, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, suzhou 215123 (China); Lin, Wenjing [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center of Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Printable Electronics Research Centre, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, suzhou 215123 (China)

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, a novel type of white-light organic light emitting diode (OLED) with high color stability was reported, in which the yellow-light emission layer of (4,4{sup ′}-N,N{sup ′}-dicarbazole)biphenyl (CBP) : tris(2-phenylquinoline-C2,N{sup ′})iridium(III) (Ir(2-phq){sub 3}) was sandwiched by double blue-light emission layers of 1,1-bis-[(di-4-tolylamino)pheny1]cyclohexane (TAPC) : bis[4,6-(di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2{sup ′}]picolinate (FIrpic) and tris[3-(3-pyridyl)mesityl]borane (3TPYMB):FIrpic. And, it exhibited the maximum current efficiency of 33.1 cd/A, the turn-on voltage at about 3 V and the maximum luminance in excess of 20000 cd/m{sup 2}. More important, it realized very stable white-light emission, and its CIE(x, y) coordinates only shift from (0.34, 0.37) to (0.33, 0.37) as applied voltage increased from 5 V to 12 V. It is believed that the new scheme in emission layer of white-light OLED can fine tune the contribution of primary emission with applied voltage changed, resulting in high quality white-light OLED.

  15. Three-Dimensional Super-Resolution Morphology by Near-Field Assisted White-Light Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; Liu, Lianqing; Yu, Peng; Liu, Zhu; Yu, Haibo; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Wen Jung

    2016-04-01

    Recent developments in far-field fluorescent microscopy have enabled nanoscale imaging of biological entities by ingenious applications of fluorescent probes. For non-fluorescence applications, however, scanning probe microscopy still remains one of the most commonly used methods to “image” nanoscale features in all three dimensions, despite its limited throughput and invasiveness to scanned samples. Here, we propose a time-efficient three-dimensional super-resolution microscopy method: near-field assisted white light interferometry (NFWLI). This method takes advantage of topography acquisition using white-light interferometry and lateral near-field imaging via a microsphere superlens. The ability to discern structures in central processing units (CPUs) with minimum feature sizes of approximately 50 nm in the lateral dimensions and approximately 10 nm in the axial dimension within 25 s (40 times faster than atomic force microscopes) was demonstrated. We elaborate in this paper the principles of NFWLI and demonstrate its potential for becoming a practical method for high-speed and non-toxic three-dimensional nanoscale imaging.

  16. 3D imaging for ballistics analysis using chromatic white light sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrushin, Andrey; Hildebrandt, Mario; Dittmann, Jana; Clausing, Eric; Fischer, Robert; Vielhauer, Claus

    2012-03-01

    The novel application of sensing technology, based on chromatic white light (CWL), gives a new insight into ballistic analysis of cartridge cases. The CWL sensor uses a beam of white light to acquire highly detailed topography and luminance data simultaneously. The proposed 3D imaging system combines advantages of 3D and 2D image processing algorithms in order to automate the extraction of firearm specific toolmarks shaped on fired specimens. The most important characteristics of a fired cartridge case are the type of the breech face marking as well as size, shape and location of extractor, ejector and firing pin marks. The feature extraction algorithm normalizes the casing surface and consistently searches for the appropriate distortions on the rim and on the primer. The location of the firing pin mark in relation to the lateral scratches on the rim provides unique rotation invariant characteristics of the firearm mechanisms. Additional characteristics are the volume and shape of the firing pin mark. The experimental evaluation relies on the data set of 15 cartridge cases fired from three 9mm firearms of different manufacturers. The results show very high potential of 3D imaging systems for casing-based computer-aided firearm identification, which is prospectively going to support human expertise.

  17. Accelerated longitudinal gray/white matter contrast decline in aging in lightly myelinated cortical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Piñeiro, Didac; Walhovd, Kristine B; Storsve, Andreas B; Grydeland, Håkon; Rohani, Darius A; Fjell, Anders M

    2016-10-01

    Highly myelinated cortical regions seem to develop early and are more robust to age-related decline. By use of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures such as contrast between T1- and T2-weighted MRI scans (T1w/T2w) it is now possible to assess correlates of myelin content in vivo. Further, previous studies indicate that gray/white matter contrast (GWC) become blurred as individuals' age, apparently reflecting age-related changes in myelin structure. Here we address whether longitudinal changes in GWC are dependent on initial myelin content within tissue as defined by baseline T1w/T2w contrast, and hypothesize that lightly myelinated regions undergo more decline longitudinally. A sample of 207 healthy adult participants (range: 20-84 years) was scanned twice (interscan interval: 3.6 years). Results showed widespread longitudinal reductions of GWC throughout the cortical surface, especially in the frontal cortices, mainly driven by intensity decay in the white matter. Annual rate of GWC blurring showed acceleration with age in temporal and medial prefrontal regions. Moreover, the anatomical distribution of increased rate of GWC decline with advancing age was strongly related to baseline levels of intracortical myelin. This study provides a first evidence of accelerated regional GWC blurring with advancing age, relates GWC patterns to cortical myeloarchitectonics and supports the hypothesis of increased age-related vulnerability of lightly myelinated areas. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3669-3684, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effect of Annealing Time of YAG:Ce3+ Phosphor on White Light Chromaticity Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd, Husnen R.; Hassan, Z.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Almessiere, Munirah Abdullah; Omar, A. F.; Alsultany, Forat H.; Sabah, Fayroz A.; Osman, Ummu Shuhada

    2018-02-01

    Yttrium and aluminium nitrate phosphors doped with cerium nitrate and mixed with urea (fuel) are prepared by using microwave-induced combustion synthesis according to the formula Y(3-0.06)Al5O12:0.06Ce3+ (YAG:Ce3+) to produce white light emitting diodes by conversion from blue indium gallium nitride-light emitting diode chips. The sintering time with fixed temperature (1050°C) for phosphor powder was optimized and found to be 5 h. The crystallinity, structure, chemical composition, luminescent properties with varying currents densities and chromaticity were characterized by x-ray diffraction, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, photoluminescence emission, electroluminescence and standard CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram, respectively. The energy levels of Ce3+ in YAG were discussed based on its absorption and excitation spectra. The results show that the obtained YAG:Ce3+ phosphor sintered for 5 h has good crystallinity with pure phase, low agglomerate with spherical shaped particles and strong yellow emission, offering cool-white LED with tuneable correlated color temperature and a good color rendering index compared to those prepared by sintering for 2 h and as-prepared phosphor powders.

  19. Colorimetry-based retardation measurement method with white-light interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montarou, Carole C.; Gaylord, Thomas K.; Villalaz, Ricardo A.; Glytsis, Elias N.

    2002-09-01

    A colorimetry-based retardation measurement (CBRM) method is presented. The specimen, between crossed polarizers, is illuminated with a white-light source. The retardation that is due to the birefringence of the specimen produces a white-light interference color. The x, y chromaticity coordinates of the color produced are measured with a spectrophotometer. The resulting x, y values are compared with a retardation x, y database that we obtained by measuring the retardation with an accurate Senarmont compensator and the x, y chromaticity values along the length of a 0-4-order quartz wedge. The technique was validated by the measurement of a variety of retardation plates. The retardation accuracy (mean error) of the CBRM method is shown to be 3.6 nm. The resolution is plus-or-minus0.2 nm, and the measurement range is 5-2150 nm. The method substitutes for a polariscope and eliminates errors associated with quarter-wave plates. The CBRM method does not utilize any moving parts and thus is fast and can be automated.

  20. Enhancing Color Purity and Stable Efficiency of White Organic Light Diodes by Using Hole-Blocking Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Jung Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The organic light-emitting diodes with triple hole-blocking layer (THBL formation sandwich structure which generate white emission were fabricated. The 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnapthacene (Rubrene, (4,4′-N,N′-dicarbazolebiphenyl (CBP, and 4,4′-bis(2,2′diphenylvinil-1,1′-biphenyl (DPVBi were used as emitting materials in the device. The function of CBP layer is not only an emitting layer but also a hole-blocking layer (HBL, and the Rubrene was doped into the CBP. The optimal configuration structure was indium tin oxide (ITO/Molybdenum trioxide (MoO3 (5 nm/[4,4-bis[N-(1-naphthyl-N-phenylamino]biphenyl (NPB (35 nm/CBP (HBL1 (5 nm/DPVBi (I (10 nm/CBP (HBL2 : Rubrene (4 : 1 (3 nm/DPVBi (II (30 nm/CBP (HBL3 (2 nm/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen (10 nm/Lithium fluoride (LiF/aluminum (Al. The result showed that the device with Rubrene doped in CBP (HBL2 exhibited a stable white emission with the color coordinates of (0.322, 0.368, and the coordinate with the slight shift of ±Δx,y = (0.001, 0.011 for applied voltage of 8–12 V was observed.

  1. Broadband white light emission from Ce:AlN ceramics: High thermal conductivity down-converters for LED and laser-driven solid state lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Wieg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN as a transparent ceramic host for Ce3+, a well-known active ion dopant. We show that the Ce:AlN ceramics have overlapping photoluminescent (PL emission peaks that cover almost the entire visible range resulting in a white appearance under 375 nm excitation without the need for color mixing. The PL is due to a combination of intrinsic AlN defect complexes and Ce3+ electronic transitions. Importantly, the peak intensities can be tuned by varying the Ce concentration and processing parameters, causing different shades of white light without the need for multiple phosphors or light sources. The Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage coordinates calculated from the measured spectra confirm white light emission. In addition, we demonstrate the viability of laser driven white light emission by coupling the Ce:AlN to a readily available frequency tripled Nd-YAG laser emitting at 355 nm. The high thermal conductivity of these ceramic down-converters holds significant promise for producing higher power white light sources than those available today.

  2. Solution-processed multilayer small-molecule light-emitting devices with high-efficiency white-light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Naoya; Pu, Yong-Jin; Watanabe, Michitake; Chiba, Takayuki; Ideta, Kazushige; Toyota, Naoki; Igarashi, Masahiro; Suzuri, Yoshiyuki; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Kido, Junji

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in the field of π-conjugated polymers have led to considerable improvements in the performance of solution-processed organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). However, further improving efficiency is still required to compete with other traditional light sources. Here we demonstrate efficient solution-processed multilayer OLEDs using small molecules. On the basis of estimates from a solvent resistance test of small host molecules, we demonstrate that covalent dimerization or trimerization instead of polymerization can afford conventional small host molecules sufficient resistance to alcohols used for processing upper layers. This allows us to construct multilayer OLEDs through subsequent solution-processing steps, achieving record-high power efficiencies of 36, 52 and 34 lm W-1 at 100 cd m-2 for solution-processed blue, green and white OLEDs, respectively, with stable electroluminescence spectra under varying current density. We also show that the composition at the resulting interface of solution-processed layers is a critical factor in determining device performance.

  3. Enhancing Lighting Performance of White LED Lamps by Green Emitting Ce,Tb Phosphor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Doan Quoc Anh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of high-efficiency and high-power Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs, it has become possible to use LEDs in lighting and illumination. In last decades, developing a new method for improving lumen output and Angular Color Uniformity (ACU is the main direction in LED technology. In this paper, an innovative approach for enhancing lighting performance (lumen output and angular color uniformity of Multi-Chip White LED lamps (MCW-LEDs was proposed and demonstrated by mixing the green Ce0.67Tb0.33MgAl11O19: Ce,Tb (CeTb phosphor into their phosphor compounding. With varying CeTb concentration, ACU and lumen output with Conformal Phosphor Package (CPP and In-cup Phosphor Package (IPP are calculated, displayed and analyzed. The results show that the lumen output and the ACU of 7000 K and 8500 K MCW-LEDs increased remarkably in comparison with the older works. Using green CeTb is a prospective method for improving lighting performance of MCW-LEDs in future.

  4. Using light and melatonin in the management of New Zealand White rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Mousa-Balabel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lighting system is a stimulant for reproduction in some species (Horses and an inhibitor for others (Sheep. This study started on September 1st and planned to study the effects of different lighting regimes and melatonin treatment on the receptivity and performance of 78 (60-does and 18-bucks New Zealand White rabbits, which were reared in a private Rabbitary in Menuofia Governorate, Egypt. These rabbits were randomly assigned to six treatment groups of 10 does and three bucks for each (8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 hours light (HL and melatonin- treated. Ejaculate traits, sexual activity of bucks, sexual receptivity and reproductive performance of does were recorded. Results revealed that exposure of rabbits to long photoperiods (14 and 16HL or treatment with melatonin improved the quantity and quality of ejaculate traits and buck sexual activity. Moreover, does sexual receptivity, feed intake, litter size and weight at birth and weaning were increased by long photoperiods (14 and 16HL or treatment with melatonin. On the other hand, gestation period and pre-weaning mortality rate were decreased. It can be concluded that application of long photoperiods is beneficial to rabbit producers and 14 HL : 10 hours dark is optimal for satisfying the biological requirements of the rabbits. Finally, the light schedules can be used for biostimulation instead of melatonin.

  5. High color rendering index white organic light-emitting diode using levofloxacin as blue emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yan-Qin; Gao, Zhi-Xiang; Zhang, Ai-Qin; Li, Yuan-Hao; Wang, Hua; Jia, Hu-Sheng; Liu, Xu-Guang; Tsuboi, Taijuf

    2015-05-01

    Levofloxacin (LOFX), which is well-known as an antibiotic medicament, was shown to be useful as a 452-nm blue emitter for white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). In this paper, the fabricated white OLED contains a 452-nm blue emitting layer (thickness of 30 nm) with 1 wt% LOFX doped in CBP (4,4’-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl) host and a 584-nm orange emitting layer (thickness of 10 nm) with 0.8 wt% DCJTB (4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tert-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidin-4-yl-vinyl)-4H-pyran) doped in CBP, which are separated by a 20-nm-thick buffer layer of TPBi (2,2’,2”-(benzene-1,3,5-triyl)-tri(1-phenyl-1H-benzimidazole). A high color rendering index (CRI) of 84.5 and CIE chromaticity coordinates of (0.33, 0.32), which is close to ideal white emission CIE (0.333, 0.333), are obtained at a bias voltage of 14 V. Taking into account that LOFX is less expensive and the synthesis and purification technologies of LOFX are mature, these results indicate that blue fluorescence emitting LOFX is useful for applications to white OLEDs although the maximum current efficiency and luminance are not high. The present paper is expected to become a milestone to using medical drug materials for OLEDs. Project supported by the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. NCET-13-0927), the International Science & Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2012DFR50460), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21101111 and 61274056), and the Shanxi Provincial Key Innovative Research Team in Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 2012041011).

  6. Polydopamine Generates Hydroxyl Free Radicals under Ultraviolet-Light Illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zehuan; Tang, Feng; Fan, Hailong; Wang, Le; Jin, Zhaoxia

    2017-06-13

    Polydopamine (PDA) generally demonstrates as an efficient free-radical scavenger. However, its free-radical chemistry under illumination is unclear, which becomes important in view of growing studies of polydopamine applications in photoprotector and photothermal therapy. In this study, for the first time, we reported an experimental investigation of the generation of hydroxyl free radicals from ultraviolet (UV)-illuminated polydopamine in an aqueous environment. By using terephthalic acid as fluorescent probe, we measured hydroxyl radicals generated from UV-illuminated polydopamine with different shapes and sizes. The morphology of PDA shows significant influence on its productions of hydroxyl free radicals. Through characterizations of UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and thermogravimetric analysis, we demonstrated the change of PDA nanomaterials brought by UV-light illumination in composition and thermal stability. We proposed a tentative mechanism for interpreting the relationship between morphology and photostability of PDA nanomaterials. These results reveal underlying complexity of polydopamine chemistry under light illumination that will deepen our understanding and benefit its further application.

  7. Note: Design and characterization of an optical light source based on mixture of white and near-ultraviolet light emitting diode spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sametoglu, Ferhat; Celikel, Oguz

    2011-04-01

    An optical light source based on a solid-state lighting technology is designed. Main components of the light source are a phosphor-converted white and a near-ultraviolet (near-UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs), the spectral power distributions (SPDs) of which are mixed using a fiber optic combiner. The near-UV LED is used for improving insufficient SPDs of the white LED at shorter wavelengths of the visible radiation. Stable direct current power supplies are also designed and used to operate each of the LED separately. Three steps of the driving current can be selected by means of serial resistors altered with a commutator at nominal current values of ˜40%, ˜50%, and ˜69%. The light source can be used for many characteristic measurements within the scope of photometry and colorimetry.

  8. Stable White Light Electroluminescence from Highly Flexible Polymer/ZnO Nanorods Hybrid Heterojunction Grown at 50 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainelabdin, A; Zaman, S; Amin, G; Nur, O; Willander, M

    2010-06-04

    Stable intrinsic white light-emitting diodes were fabricated from c-axially oriented ZnO nanorods (NRs) grown at 50 degrees C via the chemical bath deposition on top of a multi-layered poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-N-(4-butylpheneylamine)diphenylamine)/poly(9,9dioctyl-fluorene) deposited on PEDOT:PSS on highly flexible plastic substrate. The low growth temperature enables the use of a variety of flexible plastic substrates. The fabricated flexible white light-emitting diode (FWLED) demonstrated good electrical properties and a single broad white emission peak extending from 420 nm and up to 800 nm combining the blue light emission of the polyflourene (PFO) polymer layer with the deep level emission (DLEs) of ZnO NRs. The influence of the temperature variations on the FWLED white emissions characteristics was studied and the devices exhibited high operation stability. Our results are promising for the development of white lighting sources using existing lighting glass bulbs, tubes, and armature technologies.

  9. White light emission from an exciplex interface with a single emitting layer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Wilson; Perez-Gutierrez, Enrique; Agular, Andres; Barbosa G, J. Oracio C.; Maldonado, Jose L.; Meneses-Nava, Marco Antonio; Rodriguez Rivera, Mario A.; Rodriguez, Braulio

    2017-02-01

    Efficient solid state lighting devices based in inorganic emissive materials are now available in the market meanwhile for organic emissive materials still a lot of research work is in its way. [1,2] In this work a new organic emissive material based on carbazole, N-(4-Ethynylphenyl) carba-zole-d4 (6-d4), is used as electron-acceptor and commercial PEDOT:PSS as the electron-donor to obtain white emission. Besides the HOMO-LUMO levels of materials the white emission showed dependence on the films thicknesses and applied voltages. In here it is reported that by diminishing the thickness of the PEDOT:PSS layer, from 60 to 35 nm, and by keeping the derivative carbazole layer constant at 100 nm the electro-luminescence (EL) changed from emissive exciton states to the mixture of emissive exciton and exciplex states. [3] For the former thicknesses no white light was obtained meanwhile for the later the EL spectra broadened due to the emission of exciplex states. Under this condition, the best-achieved CIE coordinate was (0.31,0.33) with a driving voltage of 8 V. To lower the driving voltage of the devices a thin film of LiF was added between the derivative of carbazol and cathode but the CIE coordinates changed. The best CIE coordinates for this case were (0.29, 0.34) and (0.32, 0.37) with driving voltage of about 6.5 V. Acknowledgments: CeMie-Sol/27 (Mexico) 207450 References [1] Timothy L Dawson, Society of Dyers and Colourists, Color. Technol., 126, 1-10 (2010), doi: 10.1111/j.1478-4408.2010.00220.x [2] G. M. Farinola, R. Ragni, Journal of Solid State Lighting, 2:9 (2015), doi: 10.1186/s40539-015-0028-7. [3] E. Angioni, et al, J. Mater. Chem. C, 2016, 4, 3851, doi: 10.1039/c6tc00750c.

  10. White light emission of dysprosium doped lanthanum calcium phosphate oxide and oxyfluoride glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luewarasirikul, N.; Kim, H. J.; Meejitpaisan, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2017-04-01

    Lanthanum calcium phosphate oxide and oxyfluoride glasses doped with dysprosium oxide were prepared by melt-quenching technique with chemical composition 20La2O3:10CaO:69P2O5:1Dy2O3 and 20La2O3:10CaF2:69P2O5:1Dy2O3. The physical, optical and luminescence properties of the glass samples were studied to evaluate their potential to using as luminescence materials for solid-state lighting applications. The density, molar volume and refractive index of the glass samples were carried out. The optical and luminescence properties were studied by investigating absorption, excitation, and emission spectra of the glass samples. The absorption spectra were investigated in the UV-Vis-NIR region from 300 to 2000 nm. The excitation spectra observed under 574 nm emission wavelength showed the highest peak centered at 349 nm (6H15/2 → 6P7/2). The emission spectra, excited with 349 nm excitation wavelength showed two major peaks corresponding to 482 nm blue emission (4F9/2 → 6H15/2) and 574 nm yellow emission (4F9/2 → 6H13/2). The experimental lifetime were found to be 0.539 and 0.540 for oxide and oxyfluoride glass sample, respectively. The x,y color coordinates under 349 nm excitation wavelength were (0.38, 0.43) for both glass samples, that be plotted in white region of CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram. The CCT values obtained from the glass samples are 4204 K for oxide glass and 4228 K for oxyfluoride glass corresponding to the commercial cool white light (3100-4500 K). Judd-Ofelt theory had also been employed to obtain the J-O parameters (Ω2, Ω4 and Ω6), oscillator strength, radiative transition possibility, stimulated emission cross section and branching ratio. The Ω2 > Ω4 > Ω6 trend of J-O parameters of both glass samples may indicate the good quality of a glass host for using as optical device application. Temperature dependence of emission spectra was studied from 300 K to 10 K and found that the intensity of the emission peak was found to be increased with

  11. Dimensional metrology of smooth micro structures utilizing the spatial modulation of white-light interference fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Tang, Yan; Deng, Qinyuan; Liu, Junbo; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Lixin

    2017-08-01

    Dimensional metrology for micro structure plays an important role in addressing quality issues and observing the performance of micro-fabricated products. In white light interferometry, the proposed method is expected to measure three-dimensional topography through modulation depth in spatial frequency domain. A normalized modulation depth is first obtained in the xy plane (image plane) for each CCD image individually. After that, the modulation depth of each pixel is analyzed along the scanning direction (z-axis) to reshape the topography of micro samples. Owing to the characteristics of modulation depth in broadband light interferometry, the method could effectively suppress the negative influences caused by light fluctuations and external irradiance disturbance. Both theory and experiments are elaborated in detail to verify that the modulation depth-based method can greatly level up the stability and sensitivity with satisfied precision in the measurement system. This technique can achieve an improved robustness in a complex measurement environment with the potential to be applied in online topography measurement such as chemistry and medical domains.

  12. Morning sleep inertia in alertness and performance: effect of cognitive domain and white light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhi, Nayantara; Groeger, John A; Archer, Simon N; Gimenez, Marina; Schlangen, Luc J M; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    The transition from sleep to wakefulness entails a temporary period of reduced alertness and impaired performance known as sleep inertia. The extent to which its severity varies with task and cognitive processes remains unclear. We examined sleep inertia in alertness, attention, working memory and cognitive throughput with the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), n-back and add tasks, respectively. The tasks were administered 2 hours before bedtime and at regular intervals for four hours, starting immediately after awakening in the morning, in eleven participants, in a four-way cross-over laboratory design. We also investigated whether exposure to Blue-Enhanced or Bright Blue-Enhanced white light would reduce sleep inertia. Alertness and all cognitive processes were impaired immediately upon awakening (psleep inertia varies with cognitive domain and that it's spectral/intensity response to light is different from that of sleepiness. That is, just increasing blue-wavelength in light may not be sufficient to reduce sleep inertia. These findings have implications for critical professions like medicine, law-enforcement etc., in which, personnel routinely wake up from night-time sleep to respond to emergency situations.

  13. High fluence light emitting diode-generated red light modulates characteristics associated with skin fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalis, Andrew; Koo, Eugene; Garcha, Manveer; Murphy, William J; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-12-01

    Skin fibrosis, often referred to as skin scarring, is a significant international health problem with limited treatment options. The hallmarks of skin fibrosis are increased fibroblast proliferation, collagen production, and migration speed. Recently published clinical observations indicate that visible red light may improve skin fibrosis. In this study we hypothesize that high-fluence light-emitting diode-generated red light (HF-LED-RL) modulates the key cellular features of skin fibrosis by decreasing cellular proliferation, collagen production, and migration speed of human skin fibroblasts. Herein, we demonstrate that HF-LED-RL increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation for up to 4 hours, inhibits fibroblast proliferation without increasing apoptosis, inhibits collagen production, and inhibits migration speed through modulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. We demonstrate that HF-LED-RL is capable of inhibiting the unifying cellular processes involved in skin fibrosis including fibroblast proliferation, collagen production, and migration speed. These findings suggest that HF-LED-RL may represent a new approach to treat skin fibrosis. LED advantages include low cost, portability, and ease of use. Further characterizing the photobiomodulatory effects of HF-LED-RL on fibroblasts and investigating the anti-fibrotic effects of HF-LED-RL in human subjects may provide new insight into the utility of this therapeutic approach for skin fibrosis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Light-Emitting Diodes and Cool White Fluorescent Light Similarly Suppress Pineal Gland Melatonin and Maintain Retinal Function and Morphology in the Rat. Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Daniel C.; Heeke, D.; Mele, G.

    1999-01-01

    Currently, the light sources most commonly used in animal habitat lighting are cool white fluorescent or incandescent lamps. We evaluated a novel light-emitting diode (LED) light source for use in animal habitat lighting by comparing its effectiveness to cool white fluorescent light (CWF) in suppressing pineal gland melatonin and maintaining normal retinal physiology and morphology in the rat. Results of pineal melatonin suppression experiments showed equal suppression of pineal melatonin concentrations for LED light and CWF light at five different light illuminances (100, 40, 10, 1 and 0.1 lux). There were no significant differences in melatonin suppression between LED and CWF light when compared to unexposed controls. Retinal physiology was evaluated using electroretinography. Results show no differences in a-wave implicit times and amplitudes or b-wave implicit times and amplitudes between 100-lux LED-exposed rats and 100-lux CWF-exposed rats. Results of retinal histology assessment show no differences in retinal thickness rod outer segment length and number of rod nuclei between rats exposed to 100-lux LED and 100-lux CWF for days. Furthermore, the retinal pigmented epithelium and rod outer segments of all eyes observed were in good condition and of normal thickness. This study indicates that LED light does not cause retinal damage and can suppress pineal melatonin at similar intensities as a conventional CWF light source. These data suggest that LED light sources may be suitable replacements for conventional light sources used in the lighting of rodent vivariums while providing many mechanical and economical advantages.

  15. Enabling Lambertian-Like Warm White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with a Yellow Phosphor Embedded Flexible Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate in this report a new constructive method of fabricating white organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs with a flexible plastic film embedded with yellow phosphor. The flexible film is composed of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and fabricated by using spin coating followed by peeling technology. From the results, the resultant electroluminescent spectrum shows the white OLED to have chromatic coordinates of 0.38 and 0.54 and correlated color temperature of 4200 K. The warm white OLED exhibits the yield of 10.3 cd/A and the luminous power efficiency of 5.4 lm/W at a luminance of 1000 cd/m2. A desirable Lambertian-like far-field pattern is detected from the white OLEDs with the yellow phosphor containing PDMS film. This method is simple, reproducible, and cost-effective, proving to be a highly feasible approach to realize white OLED.

  16. Light third-generation squarks from flavour gauge messengers

    CERN Document Server

    Brümmer, Felix; Weiler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We study models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking with a gauged horizontal SU(3)_F symmetry acting on the quark superfields. If SU(3)_F is broken non-supersymmetrically by F-term vacuum expectation values, the massive gauge bosons and gauginos become messengers for SUSY breaking mediation. These gauge messenger fields induce a flavour-dependent, negative contribution to the soft masses of the squarks at one loop. In combination with the soft terms from standard gauge mediation, one obtains large and degenerate first- and second-generation squark masses, while the stops and sbottoms are light. We discuss the implications of this mechanism for the superparticle spectrum and for flavour precision observables. We also provide an explicit realization in a model with simultaneous SUSY and SU(3)_F breaking.

  17. Light bulb heat exchanger for magnetohydrodynamic generator applications - Preliminary evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. M.; Hwang, C. C.; Seikel, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    The light-bulb heat-exchanger concept is investigated as a possible means of using a combustion heat source to supply energy to an inert gas MHD power generator system. In this concept, combustion gases flow through a central passage which consists of a duct with transparent walls through which heat is transferred by radiation to a radiation receiver which in turn heats the inert gas by convection. The effects of combustion-gas emissivity, transparent-wall-transmissivity, radiation-receiver emissivity, and the use of fins in the inert gas coolant passage are studied. The results indicate that inert gas outlet temperatures of 2500 K are possible for combustion temperatures of 3200 K and that sufficient energy can be transferred from the combustion gas to reduce its temperature to approximately 2000 K. At this temperature more conventional heat exchangers can be used.

  18. Multi-solution processes of small molecule for flexible white organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yu-Sheng, E-mail: ystsai@nfu.edu.tw [Institute of Electro-optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 63201, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chittawanij, Apisit; Hong, Lin-Ann; Guo, Siou-Wei [Institute of Electro-optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 63201, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Ching-Chiun [Department of Solid State Lighting Technology, Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan, ROC (China); Juang, Fuh-Shyang [Institute of Electro-optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 63201, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lai, Shih-Hsiang [Department of Solid State Lighting Technology, Mechanical and Systems Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 31040, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Yang-Ching [Institute of Electro-optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 63201, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-04-01

    Most small molecule organic light emitting diode (SM-OLED) device structures are made in one layer using solution-based processing because the solution is usually a high dissolvent material that easily attacks the layer below it. We demonstrate a simple and reliable stamping technique for fabricating multi-solution process flexible white SM-OLEDs. The structure is anode/spin-hole injection layer/spin-emitting layer/stamping-electron transport layer/cathode. Poly(di-methyl silane) (PDMS) stamp is used for transferring electron transport layer. An intermediate ultraviolet-ozone surface treatment is introduced to temporarily modify the PDMS stamp surface. Then, the solution-based electron transport layer film can therefore be uniformly formed on top of the PDMS surface. After that the electron transport layer film on the PDMS stamp is transfer-printed onto the emitting layer with suitable heating and pressing. A solution-based processing is successfully established to efficiently fabricate flexible white SM-OLEDs. The SM-OLEDs were obtained at the current density of 20 mA/cm{sup 2}, luminance of 1062 cd/m{sup 2}, current efficiency of 5.57 cd/A, and Commission internationale de l'éclairage coordinate of (0.32, 0.35). - Highlights: • All solution-processed small molecule materials (emitting layer, electron transport layer). • Poly(di-methylsilane) (PDMS) stamp is subsequently used for stamping transfer. • The flexible white SM-OLEDs are based on solution-processes with a low-cost method.

  19. Dye-sensitized solar cells for efficient power generation under ambient lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Marina; Teuscher, Joël; Saygili, Yasemin; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Giordano, Fabrizio; Liska, Paul; Hua, Jianli; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.; Moser, Jacques-E.; Grätzel, Michael; Hagfeldt, Anders

    2017-06-01

    Solar cells that operate efficiently under indoor lighting are of great practical interest as they can serve as electric power sources for portable electronics and devices for wireless sensor networks or the Internet of Things. Here, we demonstrate a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) that achieves very high power-conversion efficiencies (PCEs) under ambient light conditions. Our photosystem combines two judiciously designed sensitizers, coded D35 and XY1, with the copper complex Cu(II/I)(tmby) as a redox shuttle (tmby, 4,4‧,6,6‧-tetramethyl-2,2‧-bipyridine), and features a high open-circuit photovoltage of 1.1 V. The DSC achieves an external quantum efficiency for photocurrent generation that exceeds 90% across the whole visible domain from 400 to 650 nm, and achieves power outputs of 15.6 and 88.5 μW cm-2 at 200 and 1,000 lux, respectively, under illumination from a model Osram 930 warm-white fluorescent light tube. This translates into a PCE of 28.9%.

  20. Direct measurement of group dispersion of optical components using white-light spectral interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlebus, R.; Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.

    2007-09-01

    We present a simple white-light spectral interferometric technique employing a low-resolution spectrometer for a direct measurement of the group dispersion of optical components over a wide wavelength range. The technique utilizes an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a component under test inserted in one arm and the other arm with adjustable path length. We record a series of spectral interferograms to measure the equalization wavelength as a function of the path length difference. We measure the absolute group refractive index as a function of wavelength for a quartz crystal of known thickness and the relative one for optical fiber. In the latter case we use a microscope objective in front and a lens behind the fiber and subtract their group dispersion, which is measured by a technique of tandem interferometry including also a Michelson interferometer.

  1. Group index dispersion of holey fibres measured by a white-light spectral interferometric technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Chlebus, R.

    2008-08-01

    We present a new white-light interferometric technique to measure the group index of holey fibres over a wide wavelength range. The technique utilizes an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fibre under test of known length placed in one of the interferometer arms and the other arm with adjustable path length. In a first step, the differential group index of the fibre is measured over a wide wavelength range. In a second step, the fibre is replaced by the reference sample of known thickness and group dispersion to determine precisely the group index of the fibre at one specific wavelength. The group index as a function of wavelength is measured for two different holey fibres, one made of pure silica glass and the other made of SK222 glass. For both fibres, the wavelength dependence of the group index of the outer cladding and modes supported by the fibre is measured.

  2. Phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes by electron transporting layer engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok Jae; Koo, Ja Ryong; Lee, Dong Hyung; Lee, Ho Won; Lee, Kum Hee; Yoon, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Kwan

    2014-10-01

    The authors describe the fabrication of white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) with dual electron transporting layers (D-ETL) using 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanhroline/ 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) and bis-(2-methyl-8-quinolinolate)-4-(phenylphenolato) aluminum/BPhen. Stepwise D-ETL easily transports electrons easily to the emitting layer and reduces the leakage of electrons. Therefore, WOLEDs with D-ETL show higher external quantum efficiency (EQE) when compared to a control WOLED with a single ETL device. The optimized WOLEDs showed a peak EQE of 13.0%, luminous efficiency of 27.4 cd/A, and Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates of (0.40, 0.39) at 1000 cd/m2.

  3. Measurement of chromatic dispersion of microstructured polymer fibers by white-light spectral interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hlubina, Petr; Ciprian, Dalibor; Frosz, Michael Henoch

    2009-01-01

    We present a white-light spectral interferometric method for measuring the chromatic dispersion of microstructured fibers made of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The method uses an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with the fiber of known length placed in one of the interferometer arms...... the chromatic dispersion for the fundamental mode supported by two different PMMA microstructured fibers, the multimode fiber and the large-mode area one....... of the method by measuring the wavelength dependence of the differential group refractive index of a pure silica fiber. We apply a five-term power series fit to the measured data and confirm by its differentiation that the chromatic dispersion of pure silica glass agrees well with theory. Second, we measure...

  4. Study of Amorphous Carbon Nitride Films Aiming at White Light Emitting Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, Yuta; Kittaka, Toshiaki; Tabuchi, Hidekazu; Soukawa, Masaya; Kunitsugu, Shinsuke; Takarabe, Kenichi; Itoh, Kunio

    2008-10-01

    The possibility for white light emitting devices using carbon nitride (CNx) thin films has been studied. Microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR)-plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and RF-sputtering apparatuses have been used for the formation of CNx thin films. In both cases, CH4 was used as the source or sub-source of carbon in order to investigate the effect of hydrogenated carbon nitride for luminescence. The cathodoluminescence (CL) measurement of the film grown by ECR-plasma CVD method showed three peaks of red, green, and blue (R/G/B). The photoluminescence (PL) measurement of the film grown by RF-sputtering also showed the red peak, which could not be observed in the film without hydrogen. Together with the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis data, we concluded that the red peak originates from the level relating to H atom and blue peak from C-N bonds.

  5. White organic light-emitting diodes with 4 nm metal electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenk, Simone; Schwab, Tobias; Schubert, Sylvio; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Leo, Karl; Reineke, Sebastian [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Gather, Malte C. [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Organic Semiconductor Centre, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-19

    We investigate metal layers with a thickness of only a few nanometers as anode replacement for indium tin oxide (ITO) in white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The ultrathin metal electrodes prove to be an excellent alternative that can, with regard to the angular dependence and efficiency of the OLED devices, outperform the ITO reference. Furthermore, unlike ITO, the thin composite metal electrodes are readily compatible with demanding architectures (e.g., top-emission or transparent OLEDs, device unit stacking, etc.) and flexible substrates. Here, we compare the sheet resistance of both types of electrodes on polyethylene terephthalate for different bending radii. The electrical performance of ITO breaks down at a radius of 10 mm, while the metal electrode remains intact even at radii smaller than 1 mm.

  6. Phase extracting algorithms analysis in the white-light spectral interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tong; Li, Bingtong; Li, Minghui; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2018-01-01

    As an optical testing method, white-light spectral interferometry has the characteristics of non-contact, high precision. The phase information can be obtained by analyzing the spectral interference signal of the tested sample, and then the absolute distance is calculated. Fourier transform method, temporal phase-shifting method, spatial phase-shifting method and envelope method can be used to extract the phase information of the spectral interference signal. In this paper, the performance of four methods to extract phase information is simulated and analyzed by using the ideal spectral interference signal. It turns out that temporal phase-shifting method has the performance of high precision, the results of Fourier transform method and envelop method are distorted at the edge of the signal, and spatial phase-shifting method has the worst precision. Adding different levels of white noise to the ideal signal, temporal phase-shifting method is most accurate, while Fourier transform method and envelope method are relatively poor. Finally, the absolute distance measurement experiment is carried out on the constructed test system, and the results are consistent with the simulation ones.

  7. White paper on perspectives of biofuels in Denmark - with focus on 2nd generation bioethanol; Hvidbog om perspektiver for biobraendstoffer i Danmark - med fokus paa 2. generations bioethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Gy.; Foghmar, J.

    2009-11-15

    The white paper presents the perspectives - both options and barriers - for a Danish focus on production and use of biomass, including sustainable 2nd generation bioethanol, for transport. The white paper presents the current knowledge of biofuels and bioethanol and recommendations for a Danish strategy. (ln)

  8. Automated determination of best focus and minimization of optical path difference in Linnik white light interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jingtao; Lu, Rongsheng; Li, Yong; Wu, Kui

    2011-10-20

    It is difficult to search for interference fringes in Linnik white light interferometry with an extremely short coherence length because of the optical path mismatch of two interference arms and the defocus of the reference mirror and the test surface. We present an automated method to tackle this problem in this paper. The determination of best foci of the reference mirror and the test surface is implemented by the astigmatic method based on a modified commercial DVD pickup head embedded in the interference system. The astigmatic method is improved by setting a threshold value in the sum signal to truncate the normalized focus error signal (NFES). The truncated NFES has a monotonic relationship with the displacement of the test surface, which removes the position ambiguity of the test surface during the autofocus process. The developed autofocus system is confirmed experimentally with a dynamic range of 190 μm, average sensitivity of 70 mV/μm, average standard deviation of 0.041 μm, displayed resolution of 4.4 nm, and accuracy of 55 nm. The minimization of the optical path difference of two interference arms is carried out by finding the maximum fringe contrast of the image captured by a CCD camera with the root mean square fringe contrast (RMSFC) function. The RMSFC function, combined with a 4×4 pixel binning of the CCD camera, is recommended to improve the computational efficiency. Experimental tests show that the automated method can be effectively utilized to search for interference fringes in Linnik white light interferometry. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  9. Smart design to resolve spectral overlapping of phosphor-in-glass for high-powered remote-type white light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Seok; Arunkumar, P; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, In Jae; Lee, Hyungeui; Im, Won Bin

    2014-02-15

    The white light-emitting diode (WLED) is a state-of-the-art solid state technology, which has replaced conventional lighting systems due to its reduced energy consumption, its reliability, and long life. However, the WLED presents acute challenges in device engineering, due to its lack of color purity, efficacy, and thermal stability of the lighting devices. The prime cause for inadequacies in color purity and luminous efficiency is the spectral overlapping of red components with yellow/green emissions when generating white light by pumping a blue InGaN chip with yellow YAG:Ce³⁺ phosphor, where red phosphor is included, to compensate for deficiencies in the red region. An innovative strategy was formulated to resolve this spectral overlapping by alternatively arranging phosphor-in-glass (PiG) through cutting and reassembling the commercial red CaAlSiN₃:Eu²⁺ and green Lu₃Al₅O₁₂:Ce³⁺ PiG. PiGs were fabricated using glass frits with a low softening temperature of 600°C, which exhibited excellent thermal stability and high transparency, improving life time even at an operating temperature of 200°C. This strategy overcomes the spectral overlapping issue more efficiently than the randomly mixed and patented stacking design of multiple phosphors for a remote-type WLED. The protocol for the current design of PiG possesses excellent thermal and chemical stability with high luminous efficiency and color purity is an attempt to make smarter solid state lighting for high-powered remote-type white light-emitting devices.

  10. All-inorganic white light emitting devices based on ZnO nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nannen, Ekaterina

    2012-09-21

    Semiconductor nanaocrystals (NCs) are very promising candidates for lightweight large-area rollable displays and light emitting devices (LEDs). They are expected to combine the efficiency, robustness and color tunability of conventional semiconductor LEDs with the flexible fabrication techniques known from OLED technology, since the NCs are compatible with solution processing and therefore can be deposited on virtually any substrates including glass and plastic. Today, NC-LEDs consist of chemically synthesized QDs embedded in organic charge injection and transport layers. The organic layers limit the robustness of the NC-LEDs and result in significant constrictions within the device fabrication procedure, such as organic evaporation steps, inert (i.e. humidity and oxygen free) atmosphere and obligatory encapsulation. These limitations during the production process as well as complex chemical synthesis route of the implemented NCs and organic components lead to high fabrication costs and low turnover. So far, only prototype devices have been introduced by several research groups and industrial companies. Still, the main concern retarding NC-LEDs from market launch is the high content of toxic heavy metals like Cd in the active nanocrystalline light emitting material. Within this work, possible environmentally safe and ambient-air-compatible alternatives to conventional QDs and organics were explored, with the main focus on design and fabrication of completely inorganic white NC-LEDs with commercial ZnO nanoparticles as an active light emitting material. While the electrical transport properties through the NC-network of the commercially available VP AdNano {sup registered} ZnO2O particles were already to some extent explored, their optical properties and therefore suitability as an active light emitter in NC-LEDs were not studied so far. (orig.)

  11. Single shot white light interference microscopy with colour fringe analysis for quantitative phase imaging of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vishal; Mehta, D. S.

    2013-02-01

    To quantitatively obtain the phase map of Onion and human red blood cell (RBC) from white light interferogram we used Hilbert transform color fringe analysis technique. The three Red, Blue and Green color components are decomposed from single white light interferogram and Refractive index profile for Red, Blue and Green colour were computed in a completely non-invasive manner for Onion and human RBC. The present technique might be useful for non-invasive determination of the refractive index variation within cells and tissues and morphological features of sample with ease of operation and low cost.

  12. Human Cognitive and Motor Performance Measures under Typical Cool White Fluorescent Illumination vs Relatively High Cool White Illuminance/Irradiance Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-31

    oral temperature was measured and plasma and saliva samples were obtained for later melatonin and cortisol assays. Subjects were allowed 2 weeks... melatonin are greatest during the sleep phase of the vertebrate circadian cycle. Orally administered melatonin is associated with sleepiness and...increased measures of fatigue (1,2). Recently, it has been shown that melatonin levels can be acutely suppressed by bright, white light in mammals including

  13. Development of Li2O-SrO-GdF3-B2O3 oxyfluoride glass for white light LED application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshad, L.; Rooh, G.; Kirdsiri, K.; Srisittipokakun, N.; Kim, H. J.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2016-12-01

    Dysprosium doped Li2O-SrO-GdF3-B2O3 (LSGB) glasses were prepared by the conventional melt quenching technique in order to study the luminescence properties and their utility for white light emitting diodes (LEDs). The glass structure was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. XRD confirmed the amorphous structure of the glass samples. The FT-IR spectra revealed the presence of BO3, BO4 and non-bridging oxygen's. The optical absorption measurement were carried out in UV-VIS-NIR region. The PL emission and excitation spectra for the LSGB glasses were investigated. From the excitation and the emission spectra the highest Dy3+ excitation and emission intensities was observed for 0.5 mol% Dy3+-doped oxyfluoride glass. Strong blue (482 nm) and yellow (575 nm) emission bands were observed upon various excitations. These two emissions corresponds to the (4F9/2 → 6H15/2) and (4F9/2 → 6H13/2) transitions of Dy3+ ions, respectively. The blending of these blue and yellow bands gives white light. The CIE 1931 chromaticity coordinates for all the as made glass samples under various excitation wavelengths lies right in white region. The calculated correlated color temperature (CCT) values for the present oxyfluoride glasses were found in the range of 4336-4299 K. These were slightly more than warm CCT (i.e., CCTfluorescent tube (3935 K) and day light (5500 K). These results reveals the possibility of the studied glasses to be used in various photonic devices for white light generation.

  14. Light absorption properties of laboratory generated tar ball particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, A.; Tóth, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2015-06-01

    Tar balls (TBs) are a specific particle type which is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g. organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter is emitted mainly during flaming conditions) from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up generating pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and total carbon (TC) analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8-3.0 m2 g-1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9) in the wavelength range 467-652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84-0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS). Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning emissions, these findings may have substantial

  15. Light absorption properties of laboratory-generated tar ball particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hoffer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tar balls (TBs are a specific particle type that is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC, which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g., organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter emitted mainly during flaming conditions from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study, we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up, which generate pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as the size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM and total carbon (TC analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory-generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8–3.0 m2 g−1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9 in the wavelength range 467–652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84 − 0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum, these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS. Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning

  16. Health-friendly high-quality white light using violet-green-red laser and InGaN nanowires-based true yellow nanowires light-emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2017-02-16

    White light based on blue laser - YAG: Ce phosphor has the advantage of implementing solid-state lighting and optical wireless communications combined-functionalities in a single lamp. However, the blue light was found to disrupt melatonin production, and therefore the human circadian rhythm in general; while the yellow phosphor is susceptible to degradation by laser irradiation and also lack tunability in color rendering index (CRI). In this investigation, by using a violet laser, which has 50% less impact on circadian response, as compared to blue light, and an InGaN-quantum-disks nanowires-based light-emitting diode (NWs-LED), we address both issues simultaneously. The white light is therefore generated using violet-green-red lasers, in conjunction with a yellow NWs-LED realized using molecular beam epitaxy technique, on titanium-coated silicon substrates. Unlike the conventional quantum-well-based LED, the NWs-LED showed efficiency-droop free behavior up to 9.8 A/cm with peak output power of 400 μW. A low turn-on voltage of ∼2.1 V was attributed to the formation of conducting titanium nitride layer at NWs nucleation site and improved fabrication process in the presence of relatively uniform height distribution. The 3D quantum confinement and the reduced band bending improve carriers-wavefunctions overlap, resulting in an IQE of ∼39 %. By changing the relative intensities of the individual color components, CRI of >85 was achieved with tunable correlated color temperature (CCT), thus covering the desired room lighting conditions. Our architecture provides important considerations in designing smart solid-state lighting while addressing the harmful effect of blue light.

  17. Health-friendly high-quality white light using violet-green-red laser and InGaN nanowires-based true yellow nanowires light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien K.; Zhao, Chao; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Prabaswara, Aditya; Consiglio, Giuseppe Bernardo; Shen, Chao; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-02-01

    White light based on blue laser - YAG: Ce3+ phosphor has the advantage of implementing solid-state lighting and optical wireless communications combined-functionalities in a single lamp. However, the blue light was found to disrupt melatonin production, and therefore the human circadian rhythm in general; while the yellow phosphor is susceptible to degradation by laser irradiation and also lack tunability in color rendering index (CRI). In this investigation, by using a violet laser, which has 50% less impact on circadian response, as compared to blue light, and an InGaN-quantum-disks nanowires-based light-emitting diode (NWs-LED), we address both issues simultaneously. The white light is therefore generated using violet-green-red lasers, in conjunction with a yellow NWs-LED realized using molecular beam epitaxy technique, on titanium-coated silicon substrates. Unlike the conventional quantum-well-based LED, the NWs-LED showed efficiency-droop free behavior up to 9.8 A/cm2 with peak output power of 400 μW. A low turn-on voltage of 2.1 V was attributed to the formation of conducting titanium nitride layer at NWs nucleation site and improved fabrication process in the presence of relatively uniform height distribution. The 3D quantum confinement and the reduced band bending improve carriers-wavefunctions overlap, resulting in an IQE of 39 %. By changing the relative intensities of the individual color components, CRI of >85 was achieved with tunable correlated color temperature (CCT), thus covering the desired room lighting conditions. Our architecture provides important considerations in designing smart solid-state lighting while addressing the harmful effect of blue light.

  18. Blue light hazard optimization for white light-emitting diode sources with high luminous efficacy of radiation and high color rendering index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Guo, Weihong; Xie, Bin; Yu, Xingjian; Luo, Xiaobing; Zhang, Tao; Yu, Zhihua; Wang, Hong; Jin, Xing

    2017-09-01

    Blue light hazard of white light-emitting diodes (LED) is a hidden risk for human's photobiological safety. Recent spectral optimization methods focus on maximizing luminous efficacy and improving color performances of LEDs, but few of them take blue hazard into account. Therefore, for healthy lighting, it's urgent to propose a spectral optimization method for white LED source to exhibit low blue light hazard, high luminous efficacy of radiation (LER) and high color performances. In this study, a genetic algorithm with penalty functions was proposed for realizing white spectra with low blue hazard, maximal LER and high color rendering index (CRI) values. By simulations, white spectra from LEDs with low blue hazard, high LER (≥297 lm/W) and high CRI (≥90) were achieved at different correlated color temperatures (CCTs) from 2013 K to 7845 K. Thus, the spectral optimization method can be used for guiding the fabrication of LED sources in line with photobiological safety. It is also found that the maximum permissible exposure duration of the optimized spectra increases by 14.9% than that of bichromatic phosphor-converted LEDs with equal CCT.

  19. Improved zero-order fringe positioning algorithms in white light interference based atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chi; Liu, Xiaojun; Yang, Wenjun; Lu, Wenlong; Yu, Nengguo; Chang, Suping

    2018-01-01

    In white light interference based atomic force microscopy (WLIAFM), the vertical displacement of the probe is obtained by zero-order fringe positioning on the probe cantilever, so the accuracy of zero-order fringe positioning will affect directly that of the WLIAFM. However, due to non-uniform distribution of light intensity and photoelectric noises, accurate zero-order fringe positioning becomes a problem. In this paper, two algorithms are proposed to improve the zero-order fringe positioning accuracy. In the first algorithm which is called improved maximum algorithm, multi-row maximum positions of the interference fringes are obtained and error theory is applied to eliminate erroneous maximum positions, then the average of remaining maximum positions is used as the zero-order fringe position. Another is called phase evaluation algorithm, in which wavelet transform is applied to eliminate effects from disturbances mentioned above and Hilbert transform is used for phase evaluation to obtain the zero-order fringe position. The practicability and accuracy of the two algorithms have been verified by series of experiments. The experiment results indicate that both two algorithms are suitable in this condition and the phase evaluation algorithm has higher accuracy while the improved maximum algorithm has higher processing speed.

  20. A low-level stress measurement method by integrating white light photoelasticity and spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Po-Chi; Wang, Wei-Chung; Hwang, Chi-Hung; Lai, Guan-Ting

    2018-01-01

    To face the increasing demand of residual stress measurement in many hi-tech industries, the integration of photoelasticity and advanced image acquisition equipment is a natural trend. With the integration of photoelasticity and spectrometry, the measurement capability of low-level stress and the stress in low birefringence materials can be enhanced. In fact, there is a significant correlation between the stress level and transmissivity spectrum. The key of the stress measurement method proposed in this paper is to find this scarcely explored correlation. By analyzing the periodic extinction phenomenon of isochromatic fringe pattern obtained from white light photoelasticity and the equation of transmissivity spectrum expressed in stress and wavelength, a three-dimensional (3D) systematic relationship of transmissivity with stress and wavelength can be established. By applying the 3D systematic transmissivity with stress and wavelength, the stress value can be determined directly from the transmissivity of the light transmitted through the polariscope. Moreover, when the proposed method is employed, the required parameters can be directly obtained from the database. There is no need to know the wavelength-dependent stress-optic coefficient beforehand. Glass, a very low birefringence material, was used to confirm the feasibility of the proposed method. Two regression approaches to search the transmissivity extremities were attempted to find the optimum systematic relationship.

  1. Performance study of an OFDM visible light communication system based on white LED array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chong-Wen; Li, Yan-Ting; Ye, Wei-Lin; Quan, Xiang-Yin; Song, Zhanwei; Zheng, Chuan-Tao

    2011-11-01

    By introducing orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) technology, a visible light communication (VLC) system using a 5×5 white LED array is studied in this paper. The OFDM transmitter and receiver are modeled through MATLAB/Simulink tool. The electrical-optical-electrical (EOE) response of the VLC channel, which is also the response of the detector, is derived based on Lambert's lighting model. Then the modeling on the overall OFDM/VLC system is established by combining the above three models together. The effects of the factors which include the digital modulation, Reed-Solomon (RS) coding, pilot form, pilot ratio (PR) and communication distance on the bit error rate (BER) of the system are discussed. The results show that through the use of RS coding, block pilot, quadrate phase shift keying (QPSK) modulation and a suitable pilot ratio about 1/3, under the communication rate about 550 kbit/s, the BER can be dropped to below 10-5, and the communication distance can reach 0.9 m.

  2. Pulsed Ultraviolet Light Reduces Immunoglobulin E Binding to Atlantic White Shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yin Chung

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV, a novel food processing and preservation technology, has been shown to reduce allergen levels in peanut and soybean samples. In this study, the efficacy of using PUV to reduce the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin (36-kDa, and to attenuate immunoglobulin E (IgE binding to shrimp extract was examined. Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus extract was treated with PUV (3 pulses/s, 10 cm from light source for 4 min. Tropomyosin was compared in the untreated, boiled, PUV-treated and [boiled+PUV]-treated samples, and changes in the tropomyosin levels were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. IgE binding of the treated extract was analyzed via immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using pooled human plasma containing IgE antibodies against shrimp allergens. Results showed that levels of tropomyosin and IgE binding were reduced following PUV treatment. However, boiling increased IgE binding, while PUV treatment could offset the increased allergen reactivity caused by boiling. In conclusion, PUV treatment reduced the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin, and decreased the IgE binding capacity of the shrimp extract.

  3. Pulsed ultraviolet light reduces immunoglobulin E binding to Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus) extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, Sandra; Yang, Wade; Chung, Si-Yin; Percival, Susan

    2011-07-01

    Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV), a novel food processing and preservation technology, has been shown to reduce allergen levels in peanut and soybean samples. In this study, the efficacy of using PUV to reduce the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin (36-kDa), and to attenuate immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to shrimp extract was examined. Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus) extract was treated with PUV (3 pulses/s, 10 cm from light source) for 4 min. Tropomyosin was compared in the untreated, boiled, PUV-treated and [boiled+PUV]-treated samples, and changes in the tropomyosin levels were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). IgE binding of the treated extract was analyzed via immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using pooled human plasma containing IgE antibodies against shrimp allergens. Results showed that levels of tropomyosin and IgE binding were reduced following PUV treatment. However, boiling increased IgE binding, while PUV treatment could offset the increased allergen reactivity caused by boiling. In conclusion, PUV treatment reduced the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin, and decreased the IgE binding capacity of the shrimp extract.

  4. Flexible white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes based on multilayered graphene/PEDOT:PSS transparent conducting film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaoxiao; Li, Fushan, E-mail: fushanli@hotmail.com; Wu, Wei; Guo, Tailiang, E-mail: gtl_fzu@hotmail.com

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • A double-layered graphene/PEDOT:PSS film was fabricated by spray-coating. • A white flexible phosphorescent OLED was fabricated based on this film. • The white flexible OLED presented pure white light emission. • The flexible OLEDs showed a stable white emission during bending test. - Abstract: A double-layered graphene/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conductive film was prepared, in which the PEDOT:PSS layer was obtained by using spray-coating technique. A flexible white phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices based on the graphene/PEDOT:PSS conductive film was fabricated. Phosphorescent material tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium (Ir(ppy){sub 3}) and the fluorescent dye 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnapthacene (Rubrene) were co-doped into 4,4′-N,N′-dicarbazole-biphenyl (CBP) host. N,N′-diphenyl-N,N′-bis(1-naphthyl)-(1,1′-biphenyl)-4,4′-diamine (NPB) and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) were used as hole-transporting and electron-transporting layer, respectively, and 4,4′-bis(2,2′-diphenylvinyl)-1,1′-biphenyl (DPVBi) was used as blue light-emitting layer. The device presented pure white light emission with a Commission Internationale De I’Eclairage coordinates of (0.31, 0.33) and exhibited an excellent light-emitting stability during the bending cycle test with a radius of curvature of 10 mm.

  5. Digital Single Lens Reflex Photometry in White Light: a New Concept Tested on Data from the High Amplitude delta Scuti Star V703 Scorpii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, R. A.

    2017-06-01

    A novel method of digital single lens reflex (DSLR) photometry is described. It derives non-transformed instrumental magnitudes from white light (green, blue, and red channels of the DSLR sensor combined), and is assessed by comparing the results with non-transformed instrumental magnitudes from the green channel alone, and with green channel magnitudes transformed to the Johnson V standard. The white light data and the non-transformed green channel data allow differential photometry only; true magnitude values cannot be calculated. The same time series images of the high amplitude delta Scuti star V703 Scorpii were processed by all three methods. The light curves from the white light data were almost identical to those from the non-transformed green channel data and to those in V magnitude, but with a slightly greater amplitude for the variable star (from highest peak to lowest trough of the light curve on each night) in the white light curves. There was also an impression, in some areas, of slightly smoother curves from the white light data, implying improved precision. The check star data in white light showed slightly smaller ranges and standard deviations for most nights, and for all nights averaged, than those for the non-transformed green channel data, and for the transformed V magnitude data, implying that the best precision was achieved by using the data in white light. For most of the peaks in the light curve, the times of maximum in white light differed little from those in V magnitude. Fourier analysis using the Lomb-Scargle method revealed identical power spectra and identical discovered frequencies in white light and in V magnitude. DSLR photometry in white light is a valid procedure, at least in those cases where the color indices of the variable and comparison stars differ by only small values. It is considered promising for the timing of maxima and minima of light curves and for Fourier analysis of those stars with more than one period.

  6. Kepler monitoring of an L dwarf I. The photometric period and white light flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizis, John E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Burgasser, Adam J. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Berger, Edo; Williams, Peter K. G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Vrba, Frederick J. [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Cruz, Kelle L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College, City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Metchev, Stanimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We report on the results of 15 months of monitoring the nearby field L1 dwarf WISEP J190648.47+401106.8 (W1906+40) with the Kepler mission. Supporting observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array and Gemini North Telescope reveal that the L dwarf is magnetically active, with quiescent radio and variable Hα emission. A preliminary trigonometric parallax shows that W1906+40 is at a distance of 16.35{sub −0.34}{sup +0.36} pc, and all observations are consistent with W1906+40 being an old disk star just above the hydrogen-burning limit. The star shows photometric variability with a period of 8.9 hr and an amplitude of 1.5%, with a consistent phase throughout the year. We infer a radius of 0.92 ± 0.07R{sub J} and sin i > 0.57 from the observed period, luminosity (10{sup –3.67} {sup ±} {sup 0.03} L {sub ☉}), effective temperature (2300 ± 75 K), and vsin i (11.2 ± 2.2 km s{sup –1}). The light curve may be modeled with a single large, high latitude dark spot. Unlike many L-type brown dwarfs, there is no evidence of other variations at the ≳ 2% level, either non-periodic or transient periodic, that mask the underlying rotation period. We suggest that the long-lived surface features may be due to starspots, but the possibility of cloud variations cannot be ruled out without further multi-wavelength observations. During the Gemini spectroscopy, we observed the most powerful flare ever seen on an L dwarf, with an estimated energy of ∼1.6 × 10{sup 32} erg in white light emission. Using the Kepler data, we identify similar flares and estimate that white light flares with optical/ultraviolet energies of 10{sup 31} erg or more occur on W1906+40 as often as 1-2 times per month.

  7. White Light–Emitting Diodes (LEDs) at Domestic Lighting Levels and Retinal Injury in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David; Lee, Li-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Background: Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) deliver higher levels of blue light to the retina than do conventional domestic light sources. Chronic exposure to high-intensity light (2,000–10,000 lux) has previously been found to result in light-induced retinal injury, but chronic exposure to relatively low-intensity (750 lux) light has not been previously assessed with LEDs in a rodent model. Objective: We examined LED-induced retinal neuronal cell damage in the Sprague-Dawley rat using functional, histological, and biochemical measurements. Methods: We used blue LEDs (460 nm) and full-spectrum white LEDs, coupled with matching compact fluorescent lights, for exposures. Pathological examinations included electroretinogram, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also measured free radical production in the retina to determine the oxidative stress level. Results: H&E staining and TEM revealed apoptosis and necrosis of photoreceptors, which indicated blue-light induced photochemical injury of the retina. Free radical production in the retina was increased in LED-exposed groups. IHC staining demonstrated that oxidative stress was associated with retinal injury. Although we found serious retinal light injury in LED groups, the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) groups showed moderate to mild injury. Conclusion: Our results raise questions about adverse effects on the retina from chronic exposure to LED light compared with other light sources that have less blue light. Thus, we suggest a precautionary approach with regard to the use of blue-rich “white” LEDs for general lighting. Citation: Shang YM, Wang GS, Sliney D, Yang CH, Lee LL. 2014. White light–emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model. Environ Health Perspect 122:269–276; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307294 PMID:24362357

  8. Settlement of reactive power compensation in the light of white certificates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajkowski, Konrad

    2017-10-01

    The article discusses the problem of the determination of savings on active energy as a result of a reactive power compensation. Statutory guidance on the required energy audit to obtain white certificates in the European Union was followed. The analysis was made on the basis of the Polish Law. The paper presents a detailed analytical method and an estimation method taking into account the impact on the line, the transformer and the generator. According to the relevant guidelines in the European Union, the reduction of CO2 emissions by calculating the saving of active power should be determined. The detailed method and an estimation method proposed for the determination of savings on active energy as a result of the reactive power compensation carried out possess some errors and inconvenience. The detailed method requires knowledge of the network topology and a determination of reactive power Q at each point of the network. The estimation method of analysis is easy in execution, especially if the consumer of energy is the main or the most significant purchaser of electricity in the network. Unfortunately, this latter method can be used only for activities that do not require high computational accuracy. The results obtained by this method are approximate values that can be used for the calculation of economic indicators. The estimation method is suitable for determining the number of white certificates when a power audit concerns a recipient of electricity, the structure of which is a large number of divisions scattered at many different locations in the power system.

  9. Comparison of the bonding strengths of second- and third-generation light-emitting diode light-curing units

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hee-Min; Kim, Sang-Cheol; Kang, Kyung-Hwa; Chang, Na-Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective With the introduction of third-generation light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in dental practice, it is necessary to compare their bracket-bonding effects, safety, and efficacy with those of the second-generation units. Methods In this study, 80 extracted human premolars were randomly divided into eight groups of 10 samples each. Metal or polycrystalline ceramic brackets were bonded on the teeth using second- or third-generation LED light-curing units (LCUs), according to the manufacturers...

  10. White noise analysis of Phycomyces light growth response system. I. Normal intensity range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, E D

    1975-10-01

    The Wiener-Lee-Schetzen method for the identification of a nonlinear system through white gaussian noise stimulation was applied to the transient light growth response of the sporangiophore of Phycomyces. In order to cover a moderate dynamic range of light intensity I, the imput variable was defined to be log I. The experiments were performed in the normal range of light intensity, centered about I0 = 10(-6) W/cm2. The kernels of the Wierner functionals were computed up to second order. Within the range of a few decades the system is reasonably linear with log I. The main nonlinear feature of the second-order kernel corresponds to the property of rectification. Power spectral analysis reveals that the slow dynamics of the system are of at least fifth order. The system can be represented approximately by a linear transfer function, including a first-order high-pass (adaptation) filter with a 4 min time constant and an underdamped fourth-order low-pass filter. Accordingly a linear electronic circuit was constructed to simulate the small scale response characteristics. In terms of the adaptation model of Delbrück and Reichardt (1956, in Cellular Mechanisms in Differentiation and Growth, Princeton University Press), kernels were deduced for the dynamic dependence of the growth velocity (output) on the "subjective intensity", a presumed internal variable. Finally the linear electronic simulator above was generalized to accommodate the large scale nonlinearity of the adaptation model and to serve as a tool for deeper test of the model.

  11. Stable White Light Electroluminescence from Highly Flexible Polymer/ZnO Nanorods Hybrid Heterojunction Grown at 50°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainelabdin A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stable intrinsic white light–emitting diodes were fabricated from c-axially oriented ZnO nanorods (NRs grown at 50°C via the chemical bath deposition on top of a multi-layered poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co–N-(4-butylpheneylaminediphenylamine/poly(9,9dioctyl-fluorene deposited on PEDOT:PSS on highly flexible plastic substrate. The low growth temperature enables the use of a variety of flexible plastic substrates. The fabricated flexible white light–emitting diode (FWLED demonstrated good electrical properties and a single broad white emission peak extending from 420 nm and up to 800 nm combining the blue light emission of the polyflourene (PFO polymer layer with the deep level emission (DLEs of ZnO NRs. The influence of the temperature variations on the FWLED white emissions characteristics was studied and the devices exhibited high operation stability. Our results are promising for the development of white lighting sources using existing lighting glass bulbs, tubes, and armature technologies.

  12. Control of a White Organic Light Emitting Diode emission parameters using a single doped RGB active layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, D. [Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais e i3N – Instituto de Nanoestruturas, Nanomodelação e Nanofabricação, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus da Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Pinto, A.; Califórnia, A.; Gomes, J. [CeNTI – Centro de Nanotecnologia, Materiais Técnicos, Funcionais e Inteligentes, Rua Fernando Mesquita 2785, 4760-034 Vila Nova de Famalicão (Portugal); Pereira, L., E-mail: luiz@ua.pt [Departmento de Física e i3N – Instituto de Nanoestruturas, Nanomodelação e Nanofabricação, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • A simple WOLED for Solid State Lighting is proposed with high color stability. • Energy transfer and electroluminescence dynamics of a single RGB layer for WOLEDs. • White shade modulation and stability over large emitting areas and applied voltages. - Abstract: Solid State Lighting technologies based on Organic Light Emitting Diodes, became an interesting focus due to their unique properties. The use of a unique RGB active layer for white emission, although simple in theory, shows difficulty to stabilize both CIE coordinates and color modulation. In this work, a WOLED using a simple RGB layer, was developed achieving a high color stability and shade modulation. The RGB matrix comprises a blue host material NPB, doped with two guests, a green (Coumarin 153) and a red (DCM1) in low concentrations. The RGB layer carrier dynamics allows for the white emission in low device complexity and high stability. This was also shown independent of the white shade, obtained through small changes in the red dopant resulting in devices ranging from warm to cool white i.e. an easy color tuning. A detailed analysis of the opto-electrical behavior is made.

  13. The effects of low-intensity narrow-band blue-light treatment compared to bright white-light treatment in sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Ybe; Winthorst, Wim H; Duijzer, Wianne B; Hommes, Vanja

    2016-02-18

    The discovery of a novel photoreceptor in the retinal ganglion cells with a highest sensitivity of 470-490 nm blue light has led to research on the effects of short-wavelength light in humans. Several studies have explored the efficacy of monochromatic blue or blue-enriched light in the treatment of SAD. In this study, a comparison has been made between the effects of broad-wavelength light without ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths compared to narrow-band blue light in the treatment of sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder (Sub-SAD). In a 15-day design, 48 participants suffering from Sub-SAD completed 20-minute sessions of light treatment on five consecutive days. 22 participants were given bright white-light treatment (BLT, broad-wavelength light without UV 10 000 lux, irradiance 31.7 Watt/m(2)) and 26 participants received narrow-band blue light (BLUE, 100 lux, irradiance 1.0 Watt/m(2)). All participants completed daily and weekly questionnaires concerning mood, activation, sleep quality, sleepiness and energy. Also, mood and energy levels were assessed by means of the SIGH-SAD, the primary outcome measure. On day 15, SIGH-SAD ratings were significantly lower than on day 1 (BLT 54.8 %, effect size 1.7 and BLUE 50.7 %, effect size 1.9). No statistically significant differences were found on the main outcome measures. Light treatment is an effective treatment for Sub-SAD. The use of narrow-band blue-light treatment is equally effective as bright white-light treatment. This study was registered in the Dutch Trial Register (Nederlands Trial Register TC =  4342 ) (20-12-2013).

  14. Fabrication and different photoelectric responses of nanocrystalline ZnO film irradiated with UV and white light in dry air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhijun; Qiu, Yang; Xie, Changsheng; Xu, Jingjing; Luo, Yongsong; Wang, Chunlei; Yan, Hailong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, nanocrystalline ZnO film with porous structure was successfully prepared on alumina substrate by the technology of screen printing and the subsequent heat treatment. The fundamental characteristics of the as-prepared sample were examined through XRD, FE-SEM, EDX and PL spectra measurements. Meanwhile, photoelectric responses of it were tested under UV and white light irradiation, respectively. Different photocurrent curves were obtained. Under UV light, the photocurrent with comparatively high amplitude of each cycle could mostly recover upon the light off. While for white light, the photocurrent with low amplitude just partially recovered when the light was turned off. This phenomenon indicated that, after the white light off, a large number of free electrons still remained within the materials. To calculate the amount of the remained free electrons, three photocurrent parameters, which are related to the density of free electrons in ZnO, were defined for the first time. Furthermore, the explanations for the different photoelectric responses of ZnO based on the double Schottky barrier model were also proposed.

  15. Tuning Light Emission towards White Light from a Naphthalenediimide-Based Entangled Metal-Organic Framework by Mixing Aromatic Guest Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Sola-Llano

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Taking advantage of the outstanding properties of a naphthalenediimide-based entangled porous coordination polymer, a simple strategy for the achievement of white light emission is herein presented. The dynamic structural transformation of the [Zn2(bdc2(dpNDI]n metal-organic framework enhances the interactions with aryl-guests giving rise to different luminescence colors upon UV (ultraviolet illumination. Thus, through the rational selection of those small aromatic guest molecules with different electron donor substituents at the appropriate proportion, the emission color was tuned by mixture ratio of guest molecules and even white light emission was achieved. Furthermore, domains in large crystals with a complementary response to linearly polarized light were noticed.

  16. Characterization and analysis of sub-micron surface roughness of injection moulded microfluidic systems using White Light Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Marinello, Francesco; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2009-01-01

    Surface topography is of great importance in polymer micro fluidics, therefore the replication capability of the process and the surface quality of the tool has to be suitably optimized. In this paper, optical profilometry (white light interferometry, WLI) is implemented for topographical...

  17. Liquid Phase Epitaxial Growth of Al-doped f-SiC for White Light-Emitting Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Kai; Ma, Xiang; can der Eijk, Casper

    efficiency, better light quality and longer lifespan, compared to the current yellow phosphor based white LEDs.Liquid phase epitaxy technology can yield a high crystalline quality in terms of structural perfection owing to the fact that it is a near equilibrium crystalline growth process. In addition...

  18. Introduction of Red-Green-Blue Fluorescent Dyes into a Metal-Organic Framework for Tunable White Light Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yuehong; Sheng, Tianlu; Zhu, Xiaoquan; Zhuo, Chao; Su, Shaodong; Li, Haoran; Hu, Shengmin; Zhu, Qi-Long; Wu, Xintao

    2017-10-01

    The unique features of the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), including ultrahigh porosities and surface areas, tunable pores, endow the MOFs with special utilizations as host matrices. In this work, various neutral and ionic guest dye molecules, such as fluorescent brighteners, coumarin derivatives, 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM), and 4-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-1-methylpyridinium (DSM), are encapsulated in a neutral MOF, yielding novel blue-, green-, and red-phosphors, respectively. Furthermore, this study introduces the red-, green-, and blue-emitting dyes into a MOF together for the first time, producing white-light materials with nearly ideal Commission International ed'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates, high color-rendering index values (up to 92%) and quantum yields (up to 26%), and moderate correlated color temperature values. The white light is tunable by changing the content or type of the three dye guests, or the excitation wavelength. Significantly, the introduction of blue-emitting guests in the methodology makes the available MOF host more extensive, and the final white-light output more tunable and high-quality. Such strategy can be widely adopted to design and prepare white-light-emitting materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Nanosecond white-light Laue diffraction measurements of dislocation microstructure in shock-compressed single-crystal copper

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suggit, Matthew J; Higginbotham, Andrew; Hawreliak, James A; Mogni, Gabriele; Kimminau, Giles; Dunne, Patrick; Comley, Andrew J; Park, Nigel; Remington, Bruce A; Wark, Justin S

    2012-01-01

    ..., and for the validation of multi-scale models of shock compression. Here we employ white-light X-ray Laue diffraction on a nanosecond timescale to make the first in situ observations of the stress relaxation mechanism in a laser-shocked crystal...

  20. Subjective quality of videos displayed with local backlight dimming at different peak white and ambient light levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Korhonen, Jari; Forchhammer, Søren

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the influence of ambient light and peak white (maximum brightness) of a display on the subjective quality of videos shown with local backlight dimming is examined. A subjective experiment investigating those factors is set-up using high contrast test sequences. The results are firstly...

  1. Do chestnut, northern red, and white oak germinant seedlings respond similary to light treatments? II. Gas exchange and chlorophyll responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanne Rebbeck; Amy Scherzer; Kurt. Gottschalk

    2012-01-01

    Understanding differences in physiological and growth strategies in low-light environments among upland oak species may help managers address the challenges of oaks' poor regeneration. Gas exchange and chlorophyll content were measured for northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), chestnut oak (Quercus prinus L.), and white oak (...

  2. Generation of powerful tungsten reductants by visible light excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Wesley; Ener, Maraia E; Blakemore, James D; Rachford, Aaron A; LaBeaume, Paul J; Thackeray, James W; Cameron, James F; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B

    2013-07-24

    The homoleptic arylisocyanide tungsten complexes, W(CNXy)6 and W(CNIph)6 (Xy = 2,6-dimethylphenyl, Iph = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl), display intense metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) absorptions in the visible region (400-550 nm). MLCT emission (λ(max) ≈ 580 nm) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution at rt is observed for W(CNXy)6 and W(CNIph)6 with lifetimes of 17 and 73 ns, respectively. Diffusion-controlled energy transfer from electronically excited W(CNIph)6 (*W) to the lowest energy triplet excited state of anthracene (anth) is the dominant quenching pathway in THF solution. Introduction of tetrabutylammonium hexafluorophosphate, [Bu(n)4N][PF6], to the THF solution promotes formation of electron transfer (ET) quenching products, [W(CNIph)6](+) and [anth](•-). ET from *W to benzophenone and cobalticenium also is observed in [Bu(n)4N][PF6]/THF solutions. The estimated reduction potential for the [W(CNIph)6](+)/*W couple is -2.8 V vs Cp2Fe(+/0), establishing W(CNIph)6 as one of the most powerful photoreductants that has been generated with visible light.

  3. Electricity generation using white and red wine lees in air cathode microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe Sciarria, Tommy; Merlino, Giuseppe; Scaglia, Barbara; D'Epifanio, Alessandra; Mecheri, Barbara; Borin, Sara; Licoccia, Silvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a useful biotechnology to produce electrical energy from different organic substrates. This work reports for the first time results of the application of single chamber MFCs to generate electrical energy from diluted white wine (WWL) and red wine (RWL) lees. Power obtained was of 8.2 W m-3 (262 mW m-2; 500 Ω) and of 3.1 W m-3 (111 mW m-2; 500Ω) using white and red wine lees, respectively. Biological processes lead to a reduction of chemical oxygen (TCOD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) of 27% and 83% for RWL and of 90% and 95% for WWL, respectively. These results depended on the degradability of organic compounds contained, as suggest by BOD5/TCOD of WWL (0.93) vs BOD5/TCOD of RWL (0.33), and to the high presence of polyphenols in RWL that inhibited the process. Coulombic efficiency (CE) of 15 ± 0%, for WWL, was in line with those reported in the literature for other substrates, i.e. CE of 14.9 ± 11.3%. Different substrates led to different microbial consortia, particularly at the anode. Bacterial species responsible for the generation of electricity, were physically connected to the electrode, where the direct electron transfer took place.

  4. Validation of a White-light 3D Body Volume Scanner to Assess Body Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Inojosa, Jose; Somers, Virend; Jenkins, Sarah; Zundel, Jennifer; Johnson, Lynne; Grimes, Chassidy; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Estimating body fat content has shown to be a better predictor of adiposity-related cardiovascular risk than the commonly used body mass index (BMI). The white-light 3D body volume index (BVI) scanner is a non-invasive device normally used in the clothing industry to assess body shapes and sizes. We assessed the hypothesis that volume obtained by BVI is comparable to the volume obtained by air displacement plethysmography (Bod-Pod) and thus capable of assessing body fat mass using the bi-compartmental principles of body composition. We compared BVI to Bod-pod, a validated bicompartmental method to assess body fat percent that uses pressure/volume relationships in isothermal conditions to estimate body volume. Volume is then used to calculate body density (BD) applying the formula density=Body Mass/Volume. Body fat mass percentage is then calculated using the Siri formula (4.95/BD - 4.50) × 100. Subjects were undergoing a wellness evaluation. Measurements from both devices were obtained the same day. A prediction model for total Bod-pod volume was developed using linear regression based on 80% of the observations (N=971), as follows: Predicted Bod-pod Volume (L)=9.498+0.805*(BVI volume, L)-0.0411*(Age, years)-3.295*(Male=0, Female=1)+0.0554*(BVI volume, L)*(Male=0, Female=1)+0.0282*(Age, years)*(Male=0, Female=1). Predictions for Bod-pod volume based on the estimated model were then calculated for the remaining 20% (N=243) and compared to the volume measured by the Bod-pod. Mean age among the 971 individuals was 41.5 ± 12.9 years, 39.4% were men, weight 81.6 ± 20.9 kg, BMI was 27.8 ± 6.3kg/m2. Average difference between volume measured by Bod-pod- predicted volume by BVI was 0.0 L, median: -0.4 L, IQR: -1.8 L to 1.5 L, R2=0.9845. Average difference between body fat measured-predicted was-1%, median: -2.7%, IQR: -13.2 to 9.9, R2=0.9236. Volume and BFM can be estimated by using volume measurements obtained by a white- light 3D body scanner and the prediction model

  5. White-Light and Radioastronomical Remote-Sensing of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Spangler, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun that play an important role in space weather. Faraday rotation (FR) is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma (such as a CME) and is proportional to the path integral through the plasma of the electron density and the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field. FR observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch; however, separating the contribution of the plasma density from the line-of-sight magnetic field is challenging.We report on simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of three CMEs in August 2012. We made radio observations using the Very Large Array (VLA) at 1 - 2 GHz frequencies of a "constellation" of radio sources through the solar corona at heliocentric distances that ranged from 6 - 15 solar radii: two sources (0842+1835 and 0900+1832) were occulted by a single CME and one source (0843+1547) was occulted by two CMEs. In addition to our radioastronomical observations, which represent one of the first active hunts for CME Faraday rotation since Bird et al. (1985) and the first active hunt using the VLA, we obtained white-light coronagraph images from the LASCO/C3 instrument to determine the Thomson scattering brightness (BT), providing a means to independently estimate the plasma density and determine its contribution to the observed Faraday rotation.A constant density force-free flux rope embedded in the background corona was used to model the effects of the CMEs on BT and FR and infer the plasma densities (6 - 22 x 103 cm-3) and axial magnetic field strengths (2 - 12 mG) for the three CMEs. A single flux rope model successfully reproduces the observed BT and FR profiles for 0842+1835 and 0900+1832; however 0843+1547 was occulted by two CMEs. Using the multiple viewpoints provided by LASCO/C3 and STEREO-A/COR2

  6. Transfer from blue light or green light to white light partially reverses changes in ocular refraction and anatomy of developing guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yi-Feng; Liu, Rui; Dai, Jin-Hui; Chen, Min-Jie; Zhou, Xing-Tao; Chu, Ren-Yuan

    2013-09-26

    Relative to the broadband white light (BL), postnatal guinea pigs develop myopia in a monochromic middle-wavelength light (ML, 530 nm) environment and develop hyperopia in a monochromic short-wavelength light (SL, 430 nm) environment. We investigated whether transfer from SL or ML to BL leads to recuperation of ocular refraction and anatomy of developing guinea pigs. Two-week-old guinea pigs were given (a) SL for 20 weeks, (b) SL recuperation (SLR, SL for 10 weeks then BL for 10 weeks), (c) ML for 20 weeks, (d) ML recuperation (MLR, ML for 10 weeks then BL for 10 weeks), or (e) BL for 20 weeks. Two weeks after transfer from ML to BL (MLR group), ocular refraction increased from 1.95 ± 0.35 D to 2.58 ± 0.24 D, and vitreous length decreased from 3.48 ± 0.06 mm to 3.41 ± 0.06 mm. Two weeks after transfer from SL to BL (SLR group), ocular refraction decreased from 5.65 ± 0.61 D to 4.33 ± 0.49 D, and vitreous length increased from 3.18 ± 0.07 mm to 3.26 ± 0.11 mm. The MLR and SLR groups had final ocular refractions that were significantly different from those of the ML and SL groups at 20 weeks (ML vs. MLR: p < 0.0001; SL vs. SLR: p < 0.0001) but were still significantly different from the BL group (BL vs. MLR: p = 0.0120; BL vs. SLR: p = 0.0010). These results suggest that recuperation was not complete after return to BL for 10 weeks.

  7. Electron-transporting layer doped with cesium azide for high-performance phosphorescent and tandem white organic light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yaoyao; Chen, Xingming; Jin, Yu; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Ye; Lin, Wenyan; Yang, Huishan

    2017-07-01

    Cesium azide was employed as an effective n-dopant in the electron-transporting layer (ETL) of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) owing to its low deposition temperature and high ambient stability. By doping cesium azide onto 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, a green phosphorescent OLED having best efficiencies of 66.25 cd A-1, 81.22 lm W-1 and 18.82% was realized. Moreover, the efficiency roll-off from 1000 cd m-2 to 10 000 cd m-2 is only 12.9%, which is comparable with or even lower than that of devices utilizing the co-host system. Physical mechanisms for the improvement of device performance were studied in depth by analyzing the current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics of the electron-only devices. In particular, by comparing the J-V characteristics of the electron-only devices instead of applying the complicated ultraviolet photoelectron spectrometer measurements, we deduced the decrease in barrier height for electron injection at the ETL/cathode contact. Finally, an efficient tandem white OLED utilizing the n-doped layer in the charge generation unit (CGU) was constructed. As far as we know, this is the first report on the application of this CGU for fabricating tandem white OLEDs. The emissions of the tandem device are all in the warm white region from 1213 cd m-2 to 10870 cd m-2, as is beneficial to the lighting application.

  8. Evaluating the Uncertainties in the Electron Temperature and Radial Speed Measurements Using White Light Corona Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginald, Nelson L.; Davilla, Joseph M.; St. Cyr, O. C.; Rastaetter, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    We examine the uncertainties in two plasma parameters from their true values in a simulated asymmetric corona. We use the Corona Heliosphere (CORHEL) and Magnetohydrodynamics Around the Sphere (MAS) models in the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) to investigate the differences between an assumed symmetric corona and a more realistic, asymmetric one. We were able to predict the electron temperatures and electron bulk flow speeds to within +/-0.5 MK and +/-100 km s(exp-1), respectively, over coronal heights up to 5.0 R from Sun center.We believe that this technique could be incorporated in next-generation white-light coronagraphs to determine these electron plasma parameters in the low solar corona. We have conducted experiments in the past during total solar eclipses to measure the thermal electron temperature and the electron bulk flow speed in the radial direction in the low solar corona. These measurements were made at different altitudes and latitudes in the low solar corona by measuring the shape of the K-coronal spectra between 350 nm and 450 nm and two brightness ratios through filters centered at 385.0 nm/410.0 nm and 398.7 nm/423.3 nm with a bandwidth of is approximately equal to 4 nm. Based on symmetric coronal models used for these measurements, the two measured plasma parameters were expected to represent those values at the points where the lines of sight intersected the plane of the solar limb.

  9. Next Generation Luminaires: Recognizing Innovative, Energy-Efficient Commercial Lighting Luminaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-04-01

    Fact sheet that describes the Next Generation Luminaires SSL lighting design competition, which recognizes excellence in technical innovation and design of high-quality, energy-efficient commercial lighting, both indoor and outdoor.

  10. Design of a High-Power White Light Source with Colloidal Quantum Dots and Non-Rare-Earth Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicanic, Kristopher T.

    This thesis describes the design process of a high-power white light source, using novel phosphor and colloidal quantum dot materials. To incorporate multiple light emitters, we generalized and extended a down-converting layer model. We employed a phosphor mixture comprising of YAG:Ce and K2TiF 6:Mn4+ powders to illustrate the effectiveness of the model. By incorporating experimental photophysical results from the phosphors and colloidal quantum dots, we modeled our system and chose the design suitable for high-power applications. We report a reduction in the correlated color temperature by 600K for phosphor and quantum dot systems, enabling the creation of a warm white light emission at power densities up to 5 kW/cm 2. Furthermore, at this high-power, their emission achieves the digital cinema initiative (DCI) requirements with a luminescence efficacy improvement up to 32% over the stand-alone ceramic YAG:Ce phosphor.

  11. Sensing nanometric displacement of a micro-/nano-fiber induced by optical forces by use of white light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Weiqia; Huang, Hankai; Yu, Jianhui; Dong, Huazhuo; Chen, Zhe; Lu, Huihui

    2015-07-01

    Sensing the nanometric displacement of a micro-/nano-fiber induced by optical forces is a key technology to study optical forces and optical momentum. When the gap between a micro-/nano-fiber and glass substrate becomes down to micrometer scale or less, a white light interference was observed. The gap changes when optical force arising from the propagating pump light along the micro-/nano-fiber causes a transversal nanometric displacement of a micro-/nanofiber, resulting in movement of the interferometric fringes. Therefore this movement of the interferometric fringes can be used to sense the nanometric displacement of the micro-/nano-fiber induced by optical forces. Experimental results show that the resolutions of this method can reach 7.27nm/pixel for tilted angle 0.8o between the micro-/nano-fiber and substrate. It is concluded that the white light interferometry method is suitable for measuring the weak optical force.

  12. Room temperature luminescence properties of fluorescent SiC as white light emitting diode medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J.W., E-mail: jianwusun@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University, 581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Jokubavicius, V.; Liljedahl, R.; Yakimova, R. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University, 581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Juillaguet, S. [Universite Montpellier 2, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5221, F-34095, Montpellier (France); Camassel, J. [CNRS, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5221, F-34095, Montpellier (France); Kamiyama, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tenpaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan); Syvaejaervi, M. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University, 581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2012-11-01

    The high quantum efficiency of donor-acceptor-pair emission in N and B co-doped 6H-SiC opens the way for SiC to constitute as an efficient light-emitting medium for white light-emitting diodes. In this work, we evidence room temperature luminescence in N and B co-doped 6H-SiC fluorescent material grown by the Fast Sublimation Growth Process. Three series of samples, with eight different N and B doping levels, were investigated. In most samples, from photoluminescence measurements a strong N-B donor-acceptor-pair emission band was observed at room temperature, with intensity dependent on the nitrogen pressure in the growth chamber and boron doping level in the source. Low temperature photoluminescence spectra showed that N bound exciton peaks exhibited a continuous broadening with increasing N{sub 2} pressure during the growth, unambiguously indicating an opportunity to control the N doping in the epilayer by conveniently changing the N{sub 2} pressure. Finally, the crystal quality of the N and B doped 6H-SiC was evaluated by X-ray diffraction measurements. The {omega} rocking curves of (0006) Bragg diffractions from the samples grown with lower and higher N{sub 2} pressure show almost the same value of the full width at half maximum as that collected from the substrate. This suggests that the N and B doping, which is expected to give rise to an efficient donor-acceptor-pair emission at room temperature, does not degrade the crystal quality.

  13. Temporal Evolution and Spatial Distribution of White-light Flare Kernels in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawate, Tomoko; Ishii, Takako; Nakatani, Yoshikazu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Asai, Ayumi; Morita, Satoshi; Masuda, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    On 2011 September 6, we observed an X2.1-class flare in continuum and Hα with a frame rate of about 30 Hz. After processing images of the event by using a speckle-masking image reconstruction, we identified white-light (WL) flare ribbons on opposite sides of the magnetic neutral line. We derive the light curve decay times of the WL flare kernels at each resolution element by assuming that the kernels consist of one or two components that decay exponentially, starting from the peak time. As a result, 42% of the pixels have two decay-time components with average decay times of 15.6 and 587 s, whereas the average decay time is 254 s for WL kernels with only one decay-time component. The peak intensities of the shorter decay-time component exhibit good spatial correlation with the WL intensity, whereas the peak intensities of the long decay-time components tend to be larger in the early phase of the flare at the inner part of the flare ribbons, close to the magnetic neutral line. The average intensity of the longer decay-time components is 1.78 times higher than that of the shorter decay-time components. If the shorter decay time is determined by either the chromospheric cooling time or the nonthermal ionization timescale and the longer decay time is attributed to the coronal cooling time, this result suggests that WL sources from both regions appear in 42% of the WL kernels and that WL emission of the coronal origin is sometimes stronger than that of chromospheric origin.

  14. Energy transfer pathways in semiconducting carbon nanotubes revealed using two-dimensional white-light spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlenbacher, Randy D; McDonough, Thomas J; Grechko, Maksim; Wu, Meng-Yin; Arnold, Michael S; Zanni, Martin T

    2015-04-13

    Thin film networks of highly purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being explored for energy harvesting and optoelectronic devices because of their exceptional transport and optical properties. The nanotubes in these films are in close contact, which permits energy to flow through the films, although the pathways and mechanisms for energy transfer are largely unknown. Here we use a broadband continuum to collect femtosecond two-dimensional white-light spectra. The continuum spans 500 to 1,300 nm, resolving energy transfer between all combinations of bandgap (S1) and higher (S2) transitions. We observe ultrafast energy redistribution on the S2 states, non-Förster energy transfer on the S1 states and anti-correlated energy levels. The two-dimensional spectra reveal competing pathways for energy transfer, with S2 excitons taking routes depending on the bandgap separation, whereas S1 excitons relax independent of the bandgap. These observations provide a basis for understanding and ultimately controlling the photophysics of energy flow in CNT-based devices.

  15. Measurement of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in optical fibres using white-light spectral interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Kadulová, M.

    2010-04-01

    We report on a white-light interferometric technique for a broad spectral range measurement (e.g. 500-1600 nm) of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in short-length optical fibres. The technique utilizes an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fibre under test of known length inserted in one of the interferometer arms and the other arm with adjustable path length. We record a series of spectral interferograms by VIS-NIR and NIR fibre-optic spectrometers to measure the equalization wavelength as a function of the path length difference, or equivalently the differential group index dispersion of one polarization mode. The differential group dispersion of the other polarization mode is obtained from measurement of the group modal birefringence dispersion. We verify the applicability of the method by measuring the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in a birefringent holey fibre. We apply a five-term power series fit to the measured data and confirm by its differentiation that the chromatic dispersion agrees well with that specified by the manufacturer. We also measure by this technique the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in an elliptical-core fibre.

  16. Monitoring bacterial biofilms with a microfluidic flow chip designed for imaging with white-light interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brann, Michelle; Suter, Jonathan D.; Addleman, R. Shane; Larimer, Curtis

    2017-07-01

    There is a need for imaging and sensing instrumentation that can monitor transitions in biofilm structure in order to better understand biofilm development and emergent properties such as anti-microbial resistance. Herein, we expanded on our previously reported technique for measuring and monitoring the thickness and topology of live biofilms using white-light interferometry (WLI). A flow cell designed for WLI enabled the use of this non-disruptive imaging method for the capture of high resolution three-dimensional profile images of biofilm growth over time. The fine axial resolution (3 nm) and wide field of view (>1 mm by 1 mm) enabled detection of biofilm formation as early as three hours after inoculation of the flow cell with a live bacterial culture (Pseudomonas fluorescens). WLI imaging facilitated monitoring the early stages of biofilm development and subtle variations in the structure of mature biofilms. Minimally-invasive imaging enabled monitoring of biofilm structure with surface metrology metrics (e.g., surface roughness). The system was used to observe a transition in biofilm structure that occurred in response to expsoure to a common antiseptic. In the future, WLI and the biofilm imaging cell described herein may be used to test the effectiveness of biofilm-specific therapies to combat common diseases associated with biofilm formation such as cystic fibrosis and periodontitis.

  17. Tunneling Injection and Exciton Diffusion of White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Composed Buffer Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su-Hua; Wu, Jian-Ping; Huang, Tao-Liang; Chung, Bin-Fong

    2018-02-01

    Four configurations of buffer layers were inserted into the structure of a white organic light emitting diode, and their impacts on the hole tunneling-injection and exciton diffusion processes were investigated. The insertion of a single buffer layer of 4,4'-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) resulted in a balanced carrier concentration and excellent color stability with insignificant chromaticity coordinate variations of Δ x < 0.023 and Δ y < 0.023. A device with a 2,9-Dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) buffer layer was beneficial for hole tunneling to the emission layer, resulting in a 1.45-fold increase in current density. The tunneling of holes and the diffusion of excitons were confirmed by the preparation of a dual buffer layer of CBP:tris-(phenylpyridine)-iridine (Ir(ppy)3)/BCP. A maximum current efficiency of 12.61 cd/A with a luminance of 13,850 cd/m2 was obtained at 8 V when a device with a dual-buffer layer of CBP:6 wt.% Ir(ppy)3/BCP was prepared.

  18. Are those bugs reflective? Non-destructive biofilm imaging with white light interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larimer, Curtis J.; Brann, Michelle R.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bonheyo, George T.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2016-08-28

    White light interferometry (WLI) is not typically used to image bacterial biofilms that are immersed in water because there is insufficient refractive index contrast to induce reflection from the biofilm’s interface. The soft structure and water-like bulk properties of hydrated biofilms make them difficult to characterize in situ by any means, especially in a non-destructive manner. Here we describe a new method for measuring and monitoring the thickness and topology of live biofilms using a WLI microscope. A microfluidic system was used to create a reflective interface on the surface of biofilms. Live biofilm samples were monitored non-destructively over time. The method enables surface metrology measurements (roughness, surface area) and a novel approach to measuring thickness of the thin hydrated biofilms. Increase in surface roughness preceded observable increase in biofilm thickness, indicating that this measure may be used to predict future development of biofilms. We have also developed a flow cell that enables WLI biofilm imaging in a dynamic environment. We have used this flow cell to observe changes in biofilm structure in response to changes in environmental conditions - flow velocity, availability of nutrients, and presence of biocides.

  19. White polymer light-emitting diodes based on star-shaped polymers with an orange dendritic phosphorescent core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minrong; Li, Yanhu; Cao, Xiaosong; Jiang, Bei; Wu, Hongbin; Qin, Jingui; Cao, Yong; Yang, Chuluo

    2014-12-01

    A series of new star-shaped polymers with a triphenylamine-based iridium(III) dendritic complex as the orange-emitting core and poly(9,9-dihexylfluorene) (PFH) chains as the blue-emitting arms is developed towards white polymer light-emitting diodes (WPLEDs). By fine-tuning the content of the orange phosphor, partial energy transfer and charge trapping from the blue backbone to the orange core is realized to achieve white light emission. Single-layer WPLEDs with the configuration of ITO (indium-tin oxide)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)/polymer/CsF/Al exhibit a maximum current efficiency of 1.69 cd A(-1) and CIE coordinates of (0.35, 0.33), which is very close to the pure white-light point of (0.33, 0.33). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on star-shaped white-emitting single polymers that simultaneously consist of fluorescent and phosphorescent species. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Strong white light in P2O5-Li2O-Yb2O3-Sb2O3 glass doped with Pr3+ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Chengguo; Han, Yingdong; Song, Feng; Ren, Xiaobin; An, Liqun

    2013-01-01

    P2O5-Li2O-Yb2O3-Sb2O3 glasses doped with Pr3+ ion had been prepared to explore white-light-emitting materials. The photoluminescence spectra of the glasses were measured under 270 nm excitation. The emission color of the glass doped with 2 mol% Pr3+ ion was white to the naked eye, and the CIE coordinates (0.336, 0.319) of the sample were close to the standard equal energy white-light illumination (x=0.333, y=0.333). The present working mechanism of the commercial white-LEDs is that a yellow phosphor is excited by a blue LED chip. The emission characters are restricted by the intensity of the blue light and the thickness of the phosphor. However, the luminescent characters of our materials are not effected by the pumping light. Thus, our materials will be helpful in developing white-light-emitting materials.

  1. Near white electroluminescence from self-supporting ZnO nanocone array based heterojunction light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoning; Long, Hao; Mo, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhao; Li, Songzhan; Huang, Huihui; Liu, Yuping; Fang, Guojia

    2015-03-01

    Self-supporting ZnO nanocone arrays (NCAs) were fabricated by a low temperature and substrate-free hydrothermal process in open air, and near white electroluminescence (EL) devices with a structure of n-ZnO NCAs/p-Si heterojunction were fabricated. Different EL performances were achieved by controlling the growth time of ZnO nanocone layer and the chromaticity coordinates of the obtained diodes are tunable and can be changed from (0.36, 0.41) to (0.29, 0.32), which is close to (0.33, 0.33) of standard white light. The mechanism of the EL emission phenomenon was discussed.

  2. Comparative Study of Lettuce and Radish Grown Under Red and Blue Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and White Fluorescent Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickens, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Growing vegetable crops in space will be an essential part of sustaining astronauts during long-term missions. To drive photosynthesis, red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have attracted attention because of their efficiency, longevity, small size, and safety. In efforts to optimize crop production, there have also been recent interests in analyzing the subtle effects of green light on plant growth, and to determine if it serves as a source of growth enhancement or suppression. A comparative study was performed on two short cycle crops of lettuce (Outredgeous) and radish (Cherry Bomb) grown under two light treatments. The first treatment being red and blue LEDs, and the second treatment consisting of white fluorescent lamps which contain a portion of green light. In addition to comparing biomass production, physiological characterizations were conducted on how the light treatments influence morphology, water use, chlorophyll content, and the production of A TP within plant tissues.

  3. The Academic Success of First-Generation African American Male College Students Attending Predominantly White Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewing, Venus

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative, correlational design was utilized in this study to examine the relationship between academic self-efficacy, racial identity, and the academic success of first-generation African American male college students at Predominantly White Institutions of higher education. The study comprised 89 first-generation African American male…

  4. Utilization of solvothermally grown InP/ZnS quantum dots as wavelength converters for fabrication of white light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eun-Pyo; Yang, Heesun

    2013-09-01

    This work reports on a simple solvothermal synthesis of InP/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) using a much safer and cheaper phosphorus precursor of tris(dimethylamino)phosphine than the most popularly chosen tris(trimethylsilyl)phosphine. The band gap of InP QDs is facilely controlled by varying the solvothermal core growth time (4 vs. 6 h) with a fixed temperature of 150 degrees C, and the successive solvothermal ZnS shelling at 220 degrees C for 6 h results in green- and yellow-emtting InP/ZnS QD with emission quantum yield of 41-42%. The broad size distribution of as-synthesized InP/ZnS QDs, which appears to be inherent in the current solvothermal approach, is improved by a size-selective sorting procedure, and the emission properties of the resulting size-sorted QD fractions are investigated. To produce white emission for general lighting source, a blue light-emitting diode (LED) is combined with non-size-soroted green or yellow QDs as wavelength converters. Furthermore, the QD-LED that includes a blend of green and yellow QDs is fabricated to generate a white lighting source with an enhanced color rendering performance, and its electroluminescent properties are characterized in detail.

  5. Efficient and tunable white-light emission of metal–organic frameworks by iridium-complex encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chun-Yi; Wang, Xin-Long; Zhang, Xiao; Qin, Chao; Li, Peng; Su, Zhong-Min; Zhu, Dong-Xia; Shan, Guo-Gang; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Wu, Han; Li, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are well known for their tunable structure and porosity. Many studies have shown they are promising for various important applications, for which their performance can be further enhanced by encapsulating functional species, such as luminescent guest molecules, within the frameworks. Although numerous MOFs are luminescent, very few emit white light and their quantum yield is usually low. Here we report a strategy to achieve efficient white-light emission by encapsulating an iridium complex in the MOF cavity. A mesoporous blue-emitting MOF is prepared as host to encapsulate a yellow-emitting iridium complex, [Ir(ppy)2(bpy)]+. The resultant composites emit bright white light with good colour quality (for example, Commission International de I’Eclairage coordinates, colour-rendering index and correlated colour temperature of (0.31, 0.33), 84.5 and 5409 K, respectively), and high quantum yield up to 115 °C. This strategy may open new perspectives for developing high-performance energy-saving solid-state lighting materials. PMID:24212250

  6. Low-intensity blue-enriched white light (750 lux and standard bright light (10 000 lux are equally effective in treating SAD. A randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bos Elske H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photoreceptor cells containing melanopsin play a role in the phase-shifting effects of short-wavelength light. In a previous study, we compared the standard light treatment (SLT of SAD with treatment using short-wavelength blue-enriched white light (BLT. Both treatments used the same illuminance (10 000 lux and were equally highly effective. It is still possible, however, that neither the newly-discovered photoreceptor cells, nor the biological clock play a major role in the therapeutic effects of light on SAD. Alternatively, these effects may at least be partly mediated by these receptor cells, which may have become saturated as a result of the high illuminances used in the therapy. This randomized controlled study compares the effects of low-intensity BLT to those of high-intensity SLT. Method In a 22-day design, 22 patients suffering from a major depression with a seasonal pattern (SAD were given light treatment (10 000 lux for two weeks on workdays. Subjects were randomly assigned to either of the two conditions, with gender and age evenly distributed over the groups. Light treatment either consisted of 30 minutes SLT (5000°K with the EnergyLight® (Philips, Consumer Lifestyle with a vertical illuminance of 10 000 lux at eye position or BLT (17 000°K with a vertical illuminance of 750 lux using a prototype of the EnergyLight® which emitted a higher proportion of short-wavelengths. All participants completed questionnaires concerning mood, activation and sleep quality on a daily basis. Mood and energy levels were also assessed on a weekly basis by means of the SIGH-SAD and other assessment tools. Results On day 22, SIGH-SAD ratings were significantly lower than on day 1 (SLT 65.2% and BLT 76.4%. On the basis of all assessments no statistically significant differences were found between the two conditions. Conclusion With sample size being small, conclusions can only be preliminary. Both treatment conditions were found

  7. Low-intensity blue-enriched white light (750 lux) and standard bright light (10,000 lux) are equally effective in treating SAD. A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Ybe; Dekker, Vera; Schlangen, Luc J M; Bos, Elske H; Ruiter, Martine J

    2011-01-28

    Photoreceptor cells containing melanopsin play a role in the phase-shifting effects of short-wavelength light. In a previous study, we compared the standard light treatment (SLT) of SAD with treatment using short-wavelength blue-enriched white light (BLT). Both treatments used the same illuminance (10,000 lux) and were equally highly effective. It is still possible, however, that neither the newly-discovered photoreceptor cells, nor the biological clock play a major role in the therapeutic effects of light on SAD. Alternatively, these effects may at least be partly mediated by these receptor cells, which may have become saturated as a result of the high illuminances used in the therapy. This randomized controlled study compares the effects of low-intensity BLT to those of high-intensity SLT. In a 22-day design, 22 patients suffering from a major depression with a seasonal pattern (SAD) were given light treatment (10,000 lux) for two weeks on workdays. Subjects were randomly assigned to either of the two conditions, with gender and age evenly distributed over the groups. Light treatment either consisted of 30 minutes SLT (5000 °K) with the EnergyLight® (Philips, Consumer Lifestyle) with a vertical illuminance of 10,000 lux at eye position or BLT (17,000 °K) with a vertical illuminance of 750 lux using a prototype of the EnergyLight® which emitted a higher proportion of short-wavelengths. All participants completed questionnaires concerning mood, activation and sleep quality on a daily basis. Mood and energy levels were also assessed on a weekly basis by means of the SIGH-SAD and other assessment tools. On day 22, SIGH-SAD ratings were significantly lower than on day 1 (SLT 65.2% and BLT 76.4%). On the basis of all assessments no statistically significant differences were found between the two conditions. With sample size being small, conclusions can only be preliminary. Both treatment conditions were found to be highly effective. The therapeutic effects of low

  8. Blue-Light Therapy following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects on White Matter Water Diffusion in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahil Bajaj

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is a common and often inconspicuous wound that is frequently associated with chronic low-grade symptoms and cognitive dysfunction. Previous evidence suggests that daily blue wavelength light therapy may be effective at reducing fatigue and improving sleep in patients recovering from mTBI. However, the effects of light therapy on recovering brain structure remain unexplored. In this study, we analyzed white matter diffusion properties, including generalized fractional anisotropy, and the quantity of water diffusion in isotropic (i.e., isotropic diffusion and anisotropic fashion (i.e., quantitative anisotropy, QA for fibers crossing 11 brain areas known to be significantly affected following mTBI. Specifically, we investigated how 6 weeks of daily morning blue light exposure therapy (compared to an amber-light placebo condition impacted changes in white matter diffusion in individuals with mTBI. We observed a significant impact of the blue light treatment (relative to the placebo on the amount of water diffusion (QA for multiple brain areas, including the corpus callosum, anterior corona radiata, and thalamus. Moreover, many of these changes were associated with improvements in sleep latency and delayed memory. These findings suggest that blue wavelength light exposure may serve as one of the potential non-pharmacological treatments for facilitating structural and functional recovery following mTBI; they also support the use of QA as a reliable neuro-biomarker for mTBI therapies.

  9. Using specific and adaptive arrangement of grid-type pilot in channel estimation for white-lightLED-based OFDM visible light communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Feng; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung

    2015-03-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) is a promising candidate for light emitting diode (LED)-based optical wireless communication (OWC); however, precise channel estimation is required for synchronization and equalization. In this work, we study and discover that the channel response of the white-lightLED-based OWC was smooth and stable. Hence we propose and demonstrate using a specific and adaptive arrangement of grid-type pilot scheme to estimate the LED OWC channel response. Experimental results show that our scheme can achieve better transmission performance and with some transmission capacity enhancement when compared with the method using training-symbol scheme (also called block-type pilot scheme).

  10. Fabrication of white light-emitting diodes based on solvothermally synthesized copper indium sulfide quantum dots as color converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woo-Seuk; Yang, Heesun

    2012-04-01

    A facile, large-scalable solvothermal synthesis of copper indium sulfide (CIS) quantum dots (QDs) and their application to the fabrication of QD-based white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are reported. Depending on CIS QD growth time of 2 versus 5 h, the core/shell structured QDs of CIS/ZnS exhibit tunable emissions of yellow-orange with excellent quantum yields of 55%-91%. A white QD-LED is realized by applying CIS (2 h)/ZnS QD as a blue-to-yellow color converter. Furthermore, a white QD-LED having a blend of yellow and orange QDs is fabricated to improve a color rendering property through spectral extension, and its electroluminescent properties are evaluated.

  11. TOF SIMS analysis and generation of white photoluminescence from strontium silicate codoped with europium and terbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tshabalala, Modiehi A.; Swart, Hendrik C.; Ntwaeaborwa, Odireleng M., E-mail: ntwaeab@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 South Africa (South Africa)

    2014-03-15

    White light emitting terbium (Tb{sup 3+}) and europium (Eu{sup 3+}) codoped strontium silicate (Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) phosphors were prepared by a solid state reaction process. The structure, particle morphology, chemical composition, ion distribution, photoluminescence (PL), and decay characteristics of the phosphors were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and PL spectroscopy, respectively. The XRD data showed that our Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} composed of two phases, namely, β-Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and α′-Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, and the α′-Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} phase was more prominent than the β-Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} phase. The SEM micrographs showed that the particles were agglomerated together and they did not have definite shapes. All ions (i.e., negative and positive) present in our materials were identified by TOF-SIMS. In addition, the chemical imaging performed with the TOF-SIMS demonstrated how the individual ions including the dopants (Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}) were distributed in the host lattice. White photoluminescence was observed when the Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Tb{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} phosphor was excited at 239 nm using a monochromatized xenon lamp as the excitation source. The phosphor exhibited fast decay lifetimes implying that it is not a good candidate for long afterglow applications.

  12. All-photonic drying and sintering process via flash white light combined with deep-UV and near-infrared irradiation for highly conductive copper nano-ink

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Hyun-Jun; Oh, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-01-01

    We developed an ultra-high speed photonic sintering method involving flash white light (FWL) combined with near infrared (NIR) and deep UV light irradiation to produce highly conductive copper nano-ink film. Flash white light irradiation energy and the power of NIR/deep UV were optimized to obtain high conductivity Cu films. Several microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a x-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier-transform infrared (F...

  13. Increases in light and intermittent smoking among Asian Americans and non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Lyzette; Nydegger, Liesl A; Sakuma, Kari-Lyn K; Tong, Elisa K; White, Martha M; Trinidad, Dennis R

    2014-06-01

    Asian Americans are the fastest growing immigrant group in the United States and are more likely to be light and intermittent smokers (LITS) compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). LITS experience adverse health effects related to smoking. Previous research has aggregated Asian American ethnic groups, masking important differences between groups. We sought to compare LITS rates among Asian American subgroups before and after the 1998 Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) with NHWs in California utilizing data from the California Tobacco Surveys (CTS). We combined 1990, 1992, and 1996 CTS (pre-MSA) and the 1999, 2002, 2005, and 2008 CTS (post-MSA) to examine changes in LITS (smoking daily). Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, and Korean ethnic groups were compared with NHWs. Pre-MSA logistic regression models adjusted for age, gender, education level, language spoken at home, and use of other tobacco products found that Chinese (odds ratio [OR] = 3.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.19, 5.21), Filipinos (OR = 3.55, 95% CI = 2.73, 4.63), Japanese (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.22, 3.27), and Koreans (OR = 3.22, 95% CI = 2.06, 5.03) were significantly more likely to be LITS compared with NHWs. Post-MSA, all Asian American subgroups experienced an increase in LITS (11.7%-37.8%); however, only Chinese (OR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.16, 4.13) and Filipinos (OR = 3.33, 95% CI = 2.26, 4.91) remained significantly more likely to be LITS compared with NHWs. Our results highlight the need for tobacco control efforts that address the growing group of LITS among Asian Americans and NHWs.

  14. Luminescence and white-light emitting luminescent sensor of tetrafluoroterephthalate-lanthanide metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongqiang; Yan, Pengfei; Sun, Jingwen; An, Guanghui; Yao, Xu; Li, Yuxin; Li, Guangming

    2017-04-05

    Two types of sixteen complexes 1-16, namely, {[Ln(TFBDC)1.5(H2O)]·2H2O}n [Ln = Pr (1) and Nd (2)] and {[Ln(TFBDC)1.5(H2O)2]·H2O}n [Ln = Ce (3), Pr (4), Nd (5), Sm (6), Eu (7), Gd (8), Tb (9), Dy (10), Ho (11), Er (12), Yb (13) and Lu (14)], {[Dy0.281Eu0.719(TFBDC)1.5(H2O)2]·H2O}n (15) and {[Gd0.871Eu0.103Tb0.026(TFBDC)1.5(H2O)2]·H2O}n (16), were isolated by the reaction of LnCl3·6H2O with 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoroterephthalic acid (H2TFBDC). X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that 1 and 2 exhibit 3D network structures and complexes 3-14 feature 2D network structures formed via three different coordination modes of the ligand. Luminescence spectra revealed that these complexes exhibit broad-spectrum luminescence from the visible to the near-infrared (NIR) region. Unexpectedly, complex 1 exhibits a unique NIR luminescence pattern and the longest lifetime among reported molecular praseodymium complexes. White-light emission was realized via three approaches using the single-component complex 6 (Sm), the two-component complex 15 (Eu and Dy) and the three-component complex 16 (Eu, Tb and Gd). Complex 9 exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity in its luminescence response to benzaldehyde, which provides a promising luminescent sensor for the detection of benzaldehyde.

  15. Development and Utilization of Host Materials for White Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ching; Chen, Shaw

    2013-05-31

    Our project was primarily focused on the MYPP 2015 goal for white phosphorescent organic devices (PhOLEDs or phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes) for solid-state lighting with long lifetimes and high efficiencies. Our central activity was to synthesize and evaluate a new class of host materials for blue phosphors in the PhOLEDs, known to be a weak link in the device operating lifetime. The work was a collaborative effort between three groups, one primarily responsible for chemical design and characterization (Chen), one primarily responsible for device development (Tang) and one primarily responsible for mechanistic studies and degradation analysis (Rothberg). The host materials were designed with a novel architecture that chemically links groups with good ability to move electrons with those having good ability to move “holes” (positive charges), the main premise being that we could suppress the instability associated with physical separation and crystallization of the electron conducting and hole conducting materials that might cause the devices to fail. We found that these materials do prevent crystallization and that this will increase device lifetimes but that efficiencies were reduced substantially due to interactions between the materials creating new low energy “charge transfer” states that are non-luminescent. Therefore, while our proposed strategy could in principle improve device lifetimes, we were unable to find a materials combination where the efficiency was not substantially compromised. In the course of our project, we made several important contributions that are peripherally related to the main project goal. First, we were able to prepare the proposed new family of materials and develop synthetic routes to make them efficiently. These types of materials that can transport both electrons and holes may yet have important roles to play in organic device technology. Second we developed an important new method for controlling the

  16. Development of an Automatic Program to Analyze Sunspot Groups on White Light Images using OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Moon, Y.; Choi, S.

    2011-12-01

    Sunspots usually appear in a group which can be classified by certain morphological criteria. In this study we examine the moments which are statistical parameters computed by summing over every pixels of contours, for quantifying the morphological characteristics of a sunspot group. The moments can be another additional characteristics to the sunspot group classification such as McIntosh classification. We are developing a program for image processing, detection of contours and computation of the moments using white light full disk images from Big Bear Solar Observatory. We apply the program to count the sunspot number from 530 white light images in 2003. The sunspot numbers obtained by the program are compared with those by SIDC. The comparison shows that they have a good correlation (r=84%). We are extending this application to automatic sunspot classification (e.g., McIntosh classification) and flare forecasting.

  17. Color point tuning for (Sr,Ca,Ba)Si2O2N2:Eu2+ for white light LEDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, V.M.; Ronda, R.C.; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986; Oeckler, O.; Schnick, W.

    2009-01-01

    Color point tuning is an important challenge for improving white light LEDs. In this paper, the possibilities of color tuning with the efficient LED phosphor Sr1-x-y-zCaxBaySi2O2N2:Euz 2+ (0 e x, y e 1; 0.005 e z e 0.16) are investigated. The emission color can be tuned in two ways: by changing Eu2+

  18. Selective area growth and characterization of InGaN nanocolumns for phosphor-free white light emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E. [ISOM and Dept. Ingenieria Electronica, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Jahn, U. [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoeperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-03-21

    This work reports on the morphology and light emission characteristics of ordered InGaN nanocolumns grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Within the growth temperature range of 750 to 650 Degree-Sign C, the In incorporation can be modified either by the growth temperature, the In/Ga ratio, or the III/V ratio, following different mechanisms. Control of these factors allows the optimization of the InGaN nanocolumns light emission wavelength and line-shape. Furthermore, yellow-white emission is obtained at room temperature from nanostructures with a composition-graded active InGaN region obtained by temperature gradients during growth.

  19. Micromorphology of epicuticular waxes and epistomatal chambers of pine species by electron microscopy and white light scanning interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Woo; Lee, In Jung; Kim, Chang Soo; Lee, Don Koo; Park, Eun Woo

    2011-02-01

    High-resolution imaging and quantitative surface analysis of epicuticular waxes and epistomatal chambers of pine species were performed by field emission scanning electron microscopy and white light scanning interferometry. Both juvenile and adult needles were collected from the two-year-old seedlings of Pinus rigida and Pinus densiflora and subjected to surface observations. Epicuticular wax structures developed on the cuticle layer as well as in the epistomatal chambers and appeared to occlude the cavities in the two pine species. The stomata of P. densiflora were characterized by more distinctly raised rings around openings than P. rigida. The most common epicuticular wax structures of the two pine species included tubules with terminal openings and coiled rodlets. Wax platelets were deposited on epistomatal chambers. Either rodlets or tubules seemed to be longer and thicker in P. rigida than those in P. densiflora. White light scanning interferometry revealed quantitative surface profiles, demonstrating more ridged (ca. 4 μm high) stomatal apertures and nearly twofold deeper (ca. 20 μm deep) epistomatal chambers of P. densiflora than those of P. rigida. These results suggest that white light scanning interferometry can be applied to unravel the quantitative surface features of epicuticular sculptures on plant leaves.

  20. Development and application of the near-infrared and white-light thoracoscope system for minimally invasive lung cancer surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yamin; Wang, Kun; He, Kunshan; Ye, Jinzuo; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Jian; Li, Hao; Chen, Xiuyuan; Wang, Jun; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2017-06-01

    In minimally invasive surgery, the white-light thoracoscope as a standard imaging tool is facing challenges of the low contrast between important anatomical or pathological regions and surrounding tissues. Recently, the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging shows superior advantages over the conventional white-light observation, which inspires researchers to develop imaging systems to improve overall outcomes of endoscopic imaging. We developed an NIR and white-light dual-channel thoracoscope system, which achieved high-fluorescent signal acquisition efficiency and the simultaneously optimal visualization of the NIR and color dual-channel signals. The system was designed to have fast and accurate image registration and high signal-to-background ratio by optimizing both software algorithms and optical hardware components for better performance in the NIR spectrum band. The system evaluation demonstrated that the minimally detectable concentration of indocyanine green (ICG) was 0.01 μM, and the spatial resolution was 35 μm. The in vivo feasibility of our system was verified by the preclinical experiments using six porcine models with the intravenous injection of ICG. Furthermore, the system was successfully applied for guiding the minimally invasive segmentectomy in three lung cancer patients, which revealed that our system held great promise for the clinical translation in lung cancer surgeries.

  1. Generation of an incident focused light pulse in FDTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoğlu, Ilker R; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2008-11-10

    A straightforward procedure is described for accurately creating an incident focused light pulse in the 3-D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetic simulation of the image space of an aplanatic converging lens. In this procedure, the focused light pulse is approximated by a finite sum of plane waves, and each plane wave is introduced into the FDTD simulation grid using the total-field/scattered-field (TF/SF) approach. The accuracy of our results is demonstrated by comparison with exact theoretical formulas.

  2. An Efficient Method for Automatic Generation of Linearly Independent Paths in White-box Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyang Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Testing is the one of most significant quality assurance measures for software. It has been shown that the software testing is one of the most critical and important phases in the life cycle of software engineering. In general, software testing takes around 40-60% of the effort, time and cost. Structure-oriented test methods define test cases on the basis of the internal program structures and are widely used. Path-based test is one of the important Structure-oriented test methods during software development. However, there is still lack of automatic and highly efficient tool for generating basic paths in white-box testing. In view of this, an automatic and efficient method for generating basic paths is proposed in this paper. This method firstly transforms the source-code program into corresponding control flow graph (CFG. By modifying the original CFG to a strongly connected graph, a new algorithm (ABPC is designed to automatically construct all basic paths. The ABPC algorithm has computational complexity linear to the number of total edges and nodes in the CFG. Through performance evaluation of many examples, it is shown that the proposed method is correct and scalable to very large test cases. The proposed method can be applied to basis path testing easily.

  3. Selecting the optimal synthesis parameters of InP/CdxZn1-xSe quantum dots for a hybrid remote phosphor white LED for general lighting applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryckaert, Jana; Correia, António; Tessier, Mickael D; Dupont, Dorian; Hens, Zeger; Hanselaer, Peter; Meuret, Youri

    2017-11-27

    Quantum dots can be used in white LEDs for lighting applications to fill the spectral gaps in the combined emission spectrum of the blue pumping LED and a broad band phosphor, in order to improve the source color rendering properties. Because quantum dots are low scattering materials, their use can also reduce the amount of backscattered light which can increase the overall efficiency of the white LED. The absorption spectrum and narrow emission spectrum of quantum dots can be easily tuned by altering their synthesis parameters. Due to the re-absorption events between the different luminescent materials and the light interaction with the LED package, determining the optimal quantum dot properties is a highly non-trivial task. In this paper we propose a methodology to select the optimal quantum dot to be combined with a broad band phosphor in order to realize a white LED with optimal luminous efficacy and CRI. The methodology is based on accurate and efficient simulations using the extended adding-doubling approach that take into account all the optical interactions. The method is elaborated for the specific case of a hybrid, remote phosphor white LED with YAG:Ce phosphor in combination with InP/CdxZn1-xSe type quantum dots. The absorption and emission spectrum of the quantum dots are generated in function of three synthesis parameters (core size, shell size and cadmium fraction) by a semi-empirical 'quantum dot model' to include the continuous tunability of these spectra. The sufficiently fast simulations allow to scan the full parameter space consisting of these synthesis parameters and luminescent material concentrations in terms of CRI and efficacy. A conclusive visualization of the final performance allows to make a well-considered trade-off between these performance parameters. For the hybrid white remote phosphor LED with YAG:Ce and InP/CdxZn1-xSe quantum dots a CRI Ra = 90 (with R9>50) and an overall efficacy of 110 lm/W is found.

  4. Caregiving Practice Patterns of Asian, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White American Family Caregivers of Older Adults Across Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Christina E

    2016-03-01

    This study is a cross-sectional investigation of caregiving practice patterns among Asian, Hispanic and non-Hispanic White American family caregivers of older adults across three immigrant generations. The 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) dataset was used, and 591 Asian, 989 Hispanic and 6537 non-Hispanic White American caregivers of older adults were selected. First, descriptive analyses of caregivers' characteristics, caregiving situations and practice patterns were examined by racial/ethnic groups and immigrant generations. Practice patterns measured were respite care use, hours and length of caregiving. Three hypotheses on caregiving patterns based on assimilation theory were tested and analyzed using logistic regression and generalized linear models by racial/ethnic groups and generations. Caregiving patterns of non-Hispanic White caregivers supported all three hypotheses regarding respite care use, caregiving hours and caregiving duration, showing less caregiving involvement in later generations. However, Asian and Hispanic counterparts showed mixed results. Third generation Asian and Hispanic caregivers used respite care the least and spent the most caregiving hours per week and had the longest caregiving duration compared to earlier generations. These caregiving patterns revealed underlying cultural values related to filial responsibility, even among later generations of caregivers of color. Findings suggest the importance of considering the cultural values of each racial/ethnic group regardless of generation when working with racially and ethnically diverse populations of family caregivers of older adults.

  5. The Classical Pathways of Occipital Lobe Epileptic Propagation Revised in the Light of White Matter Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latini, Francesco; Hjortberg, Mats; Aldskogius, Håkan; Ryttlefors, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The clinical evidences of variable epileptic propagation in occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) have been demonstrated by several studies. However the exact localization of the epileptic focus sometimes represents a problem because of the rapid propagation to frontal, parietal, or temporal regions. Each white matter pathway close to the supposed initial focus can lead the propagation towards a specific direction, explaining the variable semiology of these rare epilepsy syndromes. Some new insights in occipital white matter anatomy are herein described by means of white matter dissection and compared to the classical epileptic patterns, mostly based on the central position of the primary visual cortex. The dissections showed a complex white matter architecture composed by vertical and longitudinal bundles, which are closely interconnected and segregated and are able to support specific high order functions with parallel bidirectional propagation of the electric signal. The same sublobar lesions may hyperactivate different white matter bundles reemphasizing the importance of the ictal semiology as a specific clinical demonstration of the subcortical networks recruited. Merging semiology, white matter anatomy, and electrophysiology may lead us to a better understanding of these complex syndromes and tailored therapeutic options based on individual white matter connectivity.

  6. The Classical Pathways of Occipital Lobe Epileptic Propagation Revised in the Light of White Matter Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latini, Francesco; Hjortberg, Mats; Aldskogius, Håkan; Ryttlefors, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The clinical evidences of variable epileptic propagation in occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) have been demonstrated by several studies. However the exact localization of the epileptic focus sometimes represents a problem because of the rapid propagation to frontal, parietal, or temporal regions. Each white matter pathway close to the supposed initial focus can lead the propagation towards a specific direction, explaining the variable semiology of these rare epilepsy syndromes. Some new insights in occipital white matter anatomy are herein described by means of white matter dissection and compared to the classical epileptic patterns, mostly based on the central position of the primary visual cortex. The dissections showed a complex white matter architecture composed by vertical and longitudinal bundles, which are closely interconnected and segregated and are able to support specific high order functions with parallel bidirectional propagation of the electric signal. The same sublobar lesions may hyperactivate different white matter bundles reemphasizing the importance of the ictal semiology as a specific clinical demonstration of the subcortical networks recruited. Merging semiology, white matter anatomy, and electrophysiology may lead us to a better understanding of these complex syndromes and tailored therapeutic options based on individual white matter connectivity. PMID:26063964

  7. Recent progress in bidirectional interrogation techniques for enhancing multiplexing capability of fiber optic white light interferometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Libo; Zhou, Limin; Jin, Wei

    2003-11-01

    In smart structure applications where fiber sensors are embedded within structural materials, multiple lead in/out fibers are preferred for redundancy and improving reliability. The use of only one lead/out fiber is not optimal because the breakage of a fiber at one location due to, for example, local structural damage, would cause the failure of the whole sensing system. The multiplexing and networking techniques suitable for such applications have attracted considerable research recently. In this article, based on the bidirectional interrogation technique for white light interferometric sensors arrays, a multiplexed fiber optic deformation sensor loop network suitable for smart structure applications has been designed and demonstrated. Loop-network sensor systems are based on the white light interferometric technique. Michelson and Mach-Zehnder optical path interrogators have been developed and demonstrated, respectively. For the usually used one direction interrogate sensing system, it is clear that multiplexed sensor arrays suffer from relatively large fiber segment-induced optical reflective and excess insertion loss that generally limit the total number of sensors that can be accommodated in this configuration. This loop-network bidirection interrogating technique greatly extended the multiplexing capacity of fiber optic white light interferometric sensors system. A practical implementation of this technique is presented which makes use of a popular light emitting diode, superluminescent diode, or amplified spontaneous emission optical light source and standard single mode fiber, which are commonly used in the communication industry. The sensor loop topology is completely passive and absolute length measurements can be obtained for each sensing fiber segment so that it can be used to measure quasidistribution strain or temperature. For large-scale smart structures, this technique not only extends the multiplexing potential, but also provides a redundancy for

  8. Cationic Oligo(thiophene ethynylene) with Broad-Spectrum and High Antibacterial Efficiency under White Light and Specific Biocidal Activity against S. aureus in Dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Li, Junting; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Li, Zhengping; Tang, Yanli

    2016-01-13

    We designed and synthesized a novel oligo(thiophene ethynylene) (OTE) to investigate the antibacterial activities against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative (Ralstonia solanacearum and Escherichia coli) bacteria in vitro by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Notably, OTE presents broad-spectrum and greatly high antibacterial activities after white light irradiation at nanogram per milliliter concentrations. The half inhibitory concentrations (IC50) values obtained for S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli, and R. solanacearum are 8, 13, 24, and 52 ng/mL after illumination for 30 min, respectively, which are lower than that of other PDT agents. Interestingly, OTE shows the specific and very strong dark killing capability against S. aureus at the concentration of 180 ng/mL for 30 min, which is the highest efficiency biocide against S. aureus without the need of irradiation to date. The antibacterial mechanism investigated demonstrated that reactive oxygen species or singlet-oxygen generated by OTE kills bacteria irreversibly upon white light irradiation, and OTE as a v-type oligomer exerts its toxicity directly on destroying bacterial cytoplasmic membrane in the dark. Importantly, the OTE shows no cell cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. The results indicate that it is potential to provide versatile applications in the efficient control of pathogenic organisms and specific application for killing S. aureus.

  9. Blue-Enriched White Light Enhances Physiological Arousal But Not Behavioral Performance during Simulated Driving at Early Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morilla, Beatriz; Madrid, Juan A.; Molina, Enrique; Correa, Angel

    2017-01-01

    Vigilance usually deteriorates over prolonged driving at non-optimal times of day. Exposure to blue-enriched light has shown to enhance arousal, leading to behavioral benefits in some cognitive tasks. However, the cognitive effects of long-wavelength light have been less studied and its effects on driving performance remained to be addressed. We tested the effects of a blue-enriched white light (BWL) and a long-wavelength orange light (OL) vs. a control condition of dim light on subjective, physiological and behavioral measures at 21:45 h. Neurobehavioral tests included the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale and subjective mood scale, recording of distal-proximal temperature gradient (DPG, as index of physiological arousal), accuracy in simulated driving and reaction time in the auditory psychomotor vigilance task. The results showed that BWL decreased the DPG (reflecting enhanced arousal), while it did not improve reaction time or driving performance. Instead, blue light produced larger driving errors than OL, while performance in OL was stable along time on task. These data suggest that physiological arousal induced by light does not necessarily imply cognitive improvement. Indeed, excessive arousal might deteriorate accuracy in complex tasks requiring precision, such as driving. PMID:28690558

  10. Blue-Enriched White Light Enhances Physiological Arousal But Not Behavioral Performance during Simulated Driving at Early Night

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Rodríguez-Morilla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vigilance usually deteriorates over prolonged driving at non-optimal times of day. Exposure to blue-enriched light has shown to enhance arousal, leading to behavioral benefits in some cognitive tasks. However, the cognitive effects of long-wavelength light have been less studied and its effects on driving performance remained to be addressed. We tested the effects of a blue-enriched white light (BWL and a long-wavelength orange light (OL vs. a control condition of dim light on subjective, physiological and behavioral measures at 21:45 h. Neurobehavioral tests included the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale and subjective mood scale, recording of distal-proximal temperature gradient (DPG, as index of physiological arousal, accuracy in simulated driving and reaction time in the auditory psychomotor vigilance task. The results showed that BWL decreased the DPG (reflecting enhanced arousal, while it did not improve reaction time or driving performance. Instead, blue light produced larger driving errors than OL, while performance in OL was stable along time on task. These data suggest that physiological arousal induced by light does not necessarily imply cognitive improvement. Indeed, excessive arousal might deteriorate accuracy in complex tasks requiring precision, such as driving.

  11. Microstructural analysis of human white matter architecture using Polarized Light Imaging (PLI: Views from neuroanatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubertus eAxer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available To date, there are several methods for mapping connectivity, ranging from the macroscopic to molecular scales. However, it is difficult to integrate this multiply-scaled data into one concept. Polarized light imaging (PLI is a method to quantify fiber orientation in gross histological brain sections based on the birefringent properties of the myelin sheaths. The method is capable of imaging fiber orientation of larger-scale architectural patterns with higher detail than diffusion MRI of the human brain. PLI analyses light transmission through a gross histological section of a human brain under rotation of a polarization filter combination. Estimates of the angle of fiber direction and the angle of fiber inclination are automatically calculated at every point of the imaged section. Multiple sections can be assembled into a 3D volume. We describe the principles of PLI and present several studies of fiber anatomy in the human brain: 6 brainstems were serially sectioned, imaged with PLI, and 3D reconstructed. Pyramidal tract and lemniscus medialis were segmented in the PLI datasets. PLI data from the internal capsule was related to results from confocal laser scanning microscopy, which is a method of smaller scale fiber anatomy. PLI fiber architecture of the extreme capsule was compared to macroscopical dissection, which represents a method of larger scale anatomy. The microstructure of the anterior human cingulum bundle was analyzed in serial sections of 6 human brains. PLI can generate highly-resolved 3D datsets of fiber orientation of the human brain and has, therefore, a high comparability to diffusion MR. To get additional information regarding axon structure and density, PLI can also be combined with classical histological stains. It brings the directional aspects of diffusion MRI into the range of histology and may represent a promising tool to close the gap between larger scale diffusion orientation and microstructural histological analysis

  12. White-light phosphorescence emission from a single molecule: application to OLED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolink, Henk J; De Angelis, Filippo; Baranoff, Etienne; Klein, Cédric; Fantacci, Simona; Coronado, Eugenio; Sessolo, Michele; Kalyanasundaram, K; Grätzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Md K

    2009-08-21

    A simple mononuclear cyclometallated iridium(iii) complex exhibits white photo- and electro- luminescence in the wavelength range from 440 to 800 nm, which originates from a single emitting excited state of mixed character.

  13. Using Nonuniform Fiber to Generate Slow Light via SBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhai Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The data pulse delay based on slow light induced by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS in a nonuniform dispersion decreasing fiber (DDF is demonstrated experimentally, and the distortions of data pulses at different beat frequencies are studied. We found that a delay exceeding a pulse width can be achieved at particular beat frequency, and the DDF has larger delay versus gain slope coefficient with much better output pulse quality than single-mode fiber.

  14. Illuminating Solar Decathlon Homes: Exploring Next Generation Lighting Technology - Light Emitting Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-05-22

    This report was prepared by PNNL for the US Department of Energy Building Technologies Program, Solid-State Lighting Program. The report will be provided to teams of university students who are building houses for the 2009 Solar Decathlon, a home design competition sponsored in part by DOE, to encourage teams to build totally solar powered homes. One aspect of the competition is lighting. This report provides the teams with information about LED lighting that can help them determine how they incorporate LED lighting into their homes. The report provides an overview of LED technology, a status of where LED technology is today, questions and answers about lighting quality, efficiency, lifetime etc.; numerous examples of LED products; and several weblinks for further research.

  15. The performance of quantum dots-based white light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Lin; Chung, Shu-Ru

    2017-08-01

    Recently, the investigation of quantum dots (QDs) as a color converter for white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) application has attracted a great deal of attention. Because the narrow emission wavelength of QDs can be controlled by their particle sizes and compositions, which is facilitated to improve the color gamut of display as well as color rendering index (CRI) and the correlated color temperature (CCT) of WLEDs. In a typical commercially available LCD display, the color gamut is approximately to 75 % which is defined by the National Television System Committee (NTSC). In order to enhance NTSC, the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of color converter should be less than 30 nm. Therefore, the QDs are the best choice for display application due to the FWHM of QDs is meet the demand of display application. In this study, the hot injection method with one-pot process is used to synthesis of colloidal ternary ZnCdSe green (G-) and red-emission (R-) QDs with a narrow emission wavelength around 537 and 610 nm. By controlling the complex reagents-stearic acid (SA) and lauric acid (LA), high performance of G- and R-QDs can be prepared. The quantum yields (QYs), particle sizes and FWHM for G- and R-QDs are 70, 30 %, 3.2 +/- 0.5, 4.1 +/- 0.5 nm and 25, 26 nm, respectively. In order to explore the performance of QDs-based WLEDs, mixing ratios effect between G-QD and R-QD are studied and the WLED is packed as conformal-type. Different ratios of R-QD and G-QD (1:10, 1:20 and 1:30) are mixed and fill up the 3020 SMD blue-InGaN LED, and named as LED-10, LED-20 and LED-30. After that, UV curable gel is deposited on the top of QD layer to form WLED and named as LED-10*, LED-20* and LED-30*. The results show that the Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates, color rendering index (CRI), luminous efficacy of LED-10*, LED-20* and LED-30* are (0.27, 0.21), 53, 1.9 lm/W, (0.29, 0.30), 72, 3.3 lm/W and (0.25, 0.34), 45, 6.8 lm/W, respectively. We can find

  16. Subcutaneous white adipocytes express a light sensitive signaling pathway mediated via a melanopsin/TRPC channel axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrusova, Katarina; Fatehi, Mohammad; Barr, Amy; Czarnecka, Zofia; Long, Wentong; Suzuki, Kunimasa; Campbell, Scott; Philippaert, Koenraad; Hubert, Matthew; Tredget, Edward; Kwan, Peter; Touret, Nicolas; Wabitsch, Martin; Lee, Kevin Y; Light, Peter E

    2017-11-27

    Subcutaneous white adipose tissue (scWAT) is the major fat depot in humans and is a central player in regulating whole body metabolism. Skin exposure to UV wavelengths from sunlight is required for Vitamin D synthesis and pigmentation, although it is plausible that longer visible wavelengths that penetrate the skin may regulate scWAT function. In this regard, we discovered a novel blue light-sensitive current in human scWAT that is mediated by melanopsin coupled to transient receptor potential canonical cation channels. This pathway is activated at physiological intensities of light that penetrate the skin on a sunny day. Daily exposure of differentiated adipocytes to blue light resulted in decreased lipid droplet size, increased basal lipolytic rate and alterations in adiponectin and leptin secretion. Our results suggest that scWAT function may be directly under the influence of ambient sunlight exposure and may have important implications for our current understanding of adipocyte biology. (150 words).

  17. "Tightly Wound Rubber Bands": Exploring the College Experiences of Low-Income, First-Generation White Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Georgianna L.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how low-income, first-generation, White students experienced their social class during college. Particular attention was given to how students' spent their time, energy, and resources during college. Overall, participants' stories reflected students who felt overextended and overwhelmed during college mostly due to…

  18. Getting Out, Missing Out, and Surviving: The Social Class Experiences of White, Low-Income, First-Generation College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Georgianna LaNelle

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how White students from low socioeconomic status backgrounds (operationalized as students who are both low income and of the first generation in their family to attend college) experience and navigate social class during college. This was a qualitative research study employing a phenomenological research…

  19. Rapid microwave-assisted synthesis of highly luminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for white light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaling; Zheng, Jingxia; Wang, Junli; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2017-11-01

    Highly luminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) were synthesized rapidly by one-step microwave-assisted hydrothermal method using citric acid as carbon source and ethylenediamine as dopant. The influences of reaction temperature, reaction time and raw material ratio on the fluorescence performance of N-CDs were investigated. Then N-CDs with the highest quantum yield were selected as fluorescent materials for fabricating white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Highly luminescent N-CDs with the quantum yield of 75.96% and blue-to-red spectral composition of 51.48% were obtained at the conditions of 180 °C, 8 min and the molar ratio of citric acid to ethylenediamine 2:1. As-prepared highly luminescent N-CDs have an average size of 6.06 nm, possess extensive oxygen- and nitrogen-containing functional groups on their surface, and exhibit strong absorption in ultraviolet region. White LEDs based on the highly luminescent N-CDs emit warm white light with color coordinates of (0.42, 0.40) and correlated color temperature of 3416 K.

  20. Tuning third harmonic generation of impurity doped quantum dots in the presence of Gaussian white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Surajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-03-01

    We perform a broad exploration of profiles of third harmonic generation (THG) susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in the presence and absence of noise. We have invoked Gaussian white noise in the present study. A Gaussian impurity has been introduced into the QD. Noise has been applied to the system additively and multiplicatively. A perpendicular magnetic field emerges out as a confinement source and a static external electric field has been applied. The THG profiles have been pursued as a function of incident photon energy when several important parameters such as electric field strength, magnetic field strength, confinement energy, dopant location, Al concentration, dopant potential, relaxation time and noise strength assume different values. Moreover, the role of the pathway through which noise is applied (additive/multiplicative) on the THG profiles has also been deciphered. The THG profiles are found to be decorated with interesting observations such as shift of THG peak position and maximization/minimization of THG peak intensity. Presence of noise alters the characteristics of THG profiles and sometimes enhances the THG peak intensity. Furthermore, the mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) also regulates the THG profiles in a few occasions in contrasting manners. The observations highlight the possible scope of tuning the THG coefficient of doped QD systems in the presence of noise and bears tremendous technological importance.

  1. 3D computer generated medical holograms using spatial light modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Sheet

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to electronically generate the diffraction patterns of medical images and then trying to optically reconstruct the corresponding holographs to be displayed in space. This method is proposed in a trial to find a smart alternative of the expensive and perishable recording plates.

  2. Rare-Earth Free Self-Activated Graphene Quantum Dots and Copper-Cysteamine Phosphors for Enhanced White Light-Emitting-Diodes under Single Excitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wubin Dai; Yifeng Lei; Man Xu; Pei Zhao; Zhanhui Zhang; Jia Zhou

    2017-01-01

    .... On the contrary, as for phosphor-convert white light-emitting-diodes (pc-WLEDs), a solution-processed tunable warm white emission LED composite is fabricated in this study under single excitation, with both RE free phosphors graphene quantum dots (GQDs...

  3. Interactions between light intensity and phosphorus nutrition affect the phosphate-mining capacity of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lingyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Vance, Carroll P; White, Philip J; Zhang, Fusuo; Shen, Jianbo

    2014-07-01

    Light intensity affects photosynthetic carbon (C) fixation and the supply of carbon to roots. To evaluate interactions between carbon supply and phosphorus (P) supply, effects of light intensity on sucrose accumulation, root growth, cluster root formation, carboxylate exudation, and P uptake capacity were studied in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) grown hydroponically with either 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) or 600 µmol m(-2) s(-1) light and a sufficient (50 µM P) or deficient (1 µM P) P supply. Plant biomass and root:shoot ratio increased with increasing light intensity, particularly when plants were supplied with sufficient P. Both low P supply and increasing light intensity increased the production of cluster roots and citrate exudation. Transcripts of a phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase gene (LaPEPC3) in cluster roots (which is related to the exudation of citrate), transcripts of a phosphate transporter gene (LaPT1), and P uptake all increased with increasing light intensity, under both P-sufficient and P-deficient conditions. Across all four experimental treatments, increased cluster root formation and carboxylate exudation were associated with lower P concentration in the shoot and greater sucrose concentration in the roots. It is suggested that C in excess of shoot growth capabilities is translocated to the roots as sucrose, which serves as both a nutritional signal and a C-substrate for carboxylate exudation and cluster root formation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. Single 100-terawatt attosecond X-ray light pulse generation

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X R; Zhang, Y X; Lu, H Y; Zhang, H; Dromey, B; Zhu, S P; Zhou, C T; Zepf, M; He, X T

    2016-01-01

    The birth of attosecond light sources is expected to inspire a breakthrough in ultrafast optics, which may extend human real-time measurement and control techniques into atomic-scale electronic dynamics. For applications, it is essential to obtain a single attosecond pulse of high intensity, large photon energy and short duration. Here we show that single 100-terawatt attosecond X-ray light pulse with intensity ${1\\times10^{21}}\\textrm{W}/\\textrm{cm}^{{ 2}}$ and duration ${7.9} \\textrm{as}$ can be produced by intense laser irradiation on a capacitor-nanofoil target composed of two separate nanofoils. In the interaction, a strong electrostatic potential develops between two nanofoils, which drags electrons out of the second foil and piles them up in vacuum, forming an ultradense relativistic electron nanobunch. This nanobunch exists in only half a laser cycle and smears out in others, resulting in coherent synchrotron emission of a single pulse. Such an unprecedentedly giant attosecond X-ray pulse may bring us...

  5. White Light-Emitting Diodes Based on AgInS2/ZnS Quantum Dots with Improved Bandwidth in Visible Light Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Ruan; Yu Zhang; Min Lu; Changyin Ji; Chun Sun; Xiongbin Chen; Hongda Chen; Colvin, Vicki L.; Yu, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dot white light-emitting diodes (QD-WLEDs) were fabricated from green- and red-emitting AgInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs coated on GaN LEDs. Their electroluminescence (EL) spectra were measured at different currents, ranging from 50 mA to 400 mA, and showed good color stability. The modulation bandwidth of previously prepared QD-WLEDs was confirmed to be much wider than that of YAG:Ce phosphor-based WLEDs. These results indicate that the AgInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs are good color-converting ma...

  6. Tuning the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer through a Self-Assembly Approach for Efficient White-Light Emission in an Aqueous Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavi, Pragyan; Sk, Bahadur; Ahir, Palak; Patra, Abhijit

    2017-11-14

    A simple and cost-effective methodology employing environmentally benign substances for the fabrication of white-light emitting materials is important for practical applications in the field of lighting and display devices. Designing purely organic-based white-light-emitting systems with high quantum efficiency in aqueous media is an unmet challenge. With this objective, a new class of pyridoindole-based hydrophobic fluorophore 6,7,8,9-tetrapropylpyrido[1,2-a]indole-10-carbaldehye (TPIC) was introduced. A strategy of self-assembly using nonionic surfactants was employed to enhance the fluorescence of TPIC in an aqueous medium and was exploited as energy donor. The steady-state and time-resolved emission spectra analysis revealed the micelle-mediated energy transfer from TPIC to Nile red (energy acceptor) leading to tunable fluorescence along with white-light emission. The white-light emitting aqueous solution was obtained with the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates of (0.33, 0.36) and significantly high quantum yield of 37 %. Solid-state white-light emission was achieved retaining the assembly of fluorophores in the form of a gel having the high quantum efficiency of 33 % with CIE coordinates of (0.32, 0.36); close to that of pure white light. The bright white luminescence of the inscription prepared using white-light emitting gel on a solid substrate offers promising applications for full-color flat panel displays. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Lanthanides post-functionalized nanocrystalline metal-organic frameworks for tunable white-light emission and orthogonal multi-readout thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Yan, Bing

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate tunable white-light emission and multi-readout thermometry in two respective nanocrystalline luminescent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which are prepared via postsynthetic functionalization with lanthanide cations of a robust UiO type MOF bearing the 2,2'-bipyridyl moiety (UiO-67-bpydc, 1). The white-light emitting framework Eu3+@1 can be conveniently applied as a thin film onto a commercial UV-LED chip for practical white lighting applications. The multi-readout orthogonal thermometry is illustrated in relation to the emission intensity ratio as well as the decay time and luminescence color of Eu3+/Tb3+@1 nanocrystals. This work highlights the opportunity for designing white-light emitters and nanothermometers based on lanthanide functionalized MOFs.We demonstrate tunable white-light emission and multi-readout thermometry in two respective nanocrystalline luminescent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which are prepared via postsynthetic functionalization with lanthanide cations of a robust UiO type MOF bearing the 2,2'-bipyridyl moiety (UiO-67-bpydc, 1). The white-light emitting framework Eu3+@1 can be conveniently applied as a thin film onto a commercial UV-LED chip for practical white lighting applications. The multi-readout orthogonal thermometry is illustrated in relation to the emission intensity ratio as well as the decay time and luminescence color of Eu3+/Tb3+@1 nanocrystals. This work highlights the opportunity for designing white-light emitters and nanothermometers based on lanthanide functionalized MOFs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06873d

  8. Effects of electron blocking and hole trapping of the red guest emitter materials on hybrid white organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Lin-Ann; Vu, Hoang-Tuan [National Formosa University, Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, Huwei, Yunlin County, Taiwan (China); Juang, Fuh-Shyang, E-mail: fsjuang@seed.net.tw [National Formosa University, Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, Huwei, Yunlin County, Taiwan (China); Lai, Yun-Jr [National Formosa University, Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, Huwei, Yunlin County, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Pei-Hsun [Raystar Optronics, Inc., 5F No. 25, Keya Rd. Daya Township, Taichung County, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Yu-Sheng [National Formosa University, Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, Huwei, Yunlin County, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-01

    Hybrid white organic light emitting diodes (HWOLEDs) with fluorescence and phosphorescence hybrid structures are studied in this work. HWOLEDs were fabricated with blue/red emitting layers: fluorescent host material doped with sky blue material, and bipolar phosphorescent host emitting material doped with red dopant material. An electron blocking layer is applied that provides hole red guest emitter hole trapping effects, increases the charge carrier injection quantity into the emitting layers and controls the recombination zone (RZ) that helps balance the device color. Spacer layers were also inserted to expand the RZ, increase efficiency and reduce energy quenching along with roll-off effects. The resulting high efficiency warm white OLED device has the lower highest occupied molecule orbital level red guest material, current efficiency of 15.9 cd/A at current density of 20 mA/cm{sup 2}, and Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates of (0.34, 0.39)

  9. High-power green light generation by second harmonic generation of single-frequency tapered diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.; Sumpf, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    laser emits in excess of 9 W single-frequency output power with a good beam quality. The output from the tapered diode laser is frequency doubled using periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3. We investigate the modulation potential of the green light and improve the modulation depth from 1:4 to 1:50.......We demonstrate the generation of high power (>1.5W) and single-frequency green light by single-pass second harmonic generation of a high power tapered diode laser. The tapered diode laser consists of a DBR grating for wavelength selectivity, a ridge section and a tapered section. The DBR tapered...

  10. Optics, Diagnostics and Applications for Fourth-Generation Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A; Barbee, T; Bionta, R; Chapman, H; Ditmire, T; Dyer, G; Kuba, J; Jankowski, A; London, R; Ryutov, R; Shepherd, R; Shlyaptsev, V; Toor, A

    2003-02-05

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}-wavelength free-electron laser (FEL), proposed for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC). The photon output consists of high brightness, transversely coherent pulses with duration < 300 fs, together with a broad spontaneous spectrum with total power comparable to the coherent output. The output fluence, and pulse duration, pose special challenges for optical component and diagnostic designs. We first discuss the specific requirements for the initial scientific experiments, and our proposed solutions. We then describe the supporting research and development program that includes: (1) radiation field modeling, (2) experimental and theoretical material damage studies, (3) high resolution, high fluence-tolerant optical design, fabrication, and testing, (including material manufacturing), and (4) diagnostic design and testing.

  11. Optimal Color Stability for White Organic Light-Emitting Diode (WOLED by Using Multiple-Ultra-Thin Layers (MUTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan-Lin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The work demonstrates the improvement of color stability for white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED. The devices were prepared by vacuum deposition on ITO-glass substrates. These guest materials of 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (Rubrene were deposited in 4,4′-bis(2,2-diphenyl vinyl-1,1′-biphenyl (DPVBi, resulting in an emitting layer. Experimental results reveal that the properties in the multiple-ultra-thin layer (MUTL are better than those of the emitting layer with a single guest material, reaching the commercial white-light wavelength requirement of 400–700 nm. The function of the MUTL is as the light-emitting and trapping layer. The results show that the MUTL has excellent carrier capture effect, leading to high color stability of the device at various applied voltages. The Commissions Internationale De L’Eclairage (CIE coordinate of this device at 3~7 V is few displacement and shows a very slight variation of (0.016, 0.009. The CIE coordinates at a maximal luminance of 9980 cd/m2 are (0.34, 0.33.

  12. White light emission in Bi3+/Mn2+ion co-doped CsPbCl3perovskite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, He; Bai, Xue; Cui, Haining; Pan, Gencai; Jing, Pengtao; Qu, Songnan; Zhu, Jinyang; Zhai, Yue; Dong, Biao; Song, Hongwei

    2018-01-18

    Colloidal perovskite nanocrystals (NCs), especially the fully inorganic cesium lead halide (CsPbX 3 , X = Cl, Br, I) NCs, have been considered as promising candidates for lighting and display applications due to their narrow band emission, tunable band gap and high photoluminescence quantum yields (QYs). However, owing to the anion exchange in the CsPbX 3 NCs, stable multi-color and white light emissions are difficult to achieve, thus limiting their practical optoelectronic applications. In this work, dual ion Bi 3+ /Mn 2+ codoped CsPbCl 3 perovskite NCs were prepared through the hot injection method for the first time to the best of our knowledge. Through simply adjusting the doping ion concentrations, the codoped NCs exhibited tunable emissions spanning the wide range of correlated color temperature (CCT) from 19 000 K to 4250 K under UV excitation. This interesting spectroscopic behaviour benefits from efficient energy transfer from the perovskite NC host to the intrinsic energy levels of Bi 3+ or Mn 2+ doping ions. Finally, taking advantage of the cooperation between the excitonic transition of the CsPbCl 3 perovskite NC host and the intrinsic emissions from Bi 3+ and Mn 2+ ions, white light emission with the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.33, 0.29) was developed in the codoped CsPbCl 3 NCs.

  13. Application of exciplex in the fabrication of white organic light emitting devices with mixed fluorescent and phosphorescent layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dan; Duan, Yahui; Yang, Yongqiang [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Hu, Nan [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang, Xiao [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Sun, Fengbo [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Duan, Yu, E-mail: duanyu@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, a highly efficient fluorescent/phosphorescent white organic light-emitting device (WOLED) was fabricated using exciplex light emission. The hole-transport material 4,4',4''-tris(N-carbazolyl)triphenylamine (TCTA), and electron-transport material, 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen), were mixed to afford a blue-emitting exciplex. The WOLED was fabricated with a yellow phosphorescent dye, Ir(III) bis(4-phenylthieno [3,2-c] pyridinato-N,C{sup 2'}) acetylacetonate (PO-01), combined with the exciplex. In this structure, the energy can be efficiently transferred from the blend layer to the yellow phosphorescent dye, thus improving the efficiency of the utilization of the triplet exciton. The maximum power efficiency of the WOLED reached a value 9.03 lm/W with an external quantum efficiency of 4.3%. The Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates (x,y) of the device were from (0.39, 0.45) to (0.27, 0.31), with a voltage range of 4–9 V. - Highlights: • An exciplex/phosphorescence hybrid white OLED was fabricated for the first time with blue/orange complementary emitters. • By using exciplex as the blue emitter, non-radiative triplet-states on the exciplex can be harvested for light-emission by transferring them to low triplet-state phosphors.

  14. White Light-Emitting Diodes Based on AgInS2/ZnS Quantum Dots with Improved Bandwidth in Visible Light Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Cheng; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Min; Ji, Changyin; Sun, Chun; Chen, Xiongbin; Chen, Hongda; Colvin, Vicki L.; Yu, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dot white light-emitting diodes (QD-WLEDs) were fabricated from green- and red-emitting AgInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs coated on GaN LEDs. Their electroluminescence (EL) spectra were measured at different currents, ranging from 50 mA to 400 mA, and showed good color stability. The modulation bandwidth of previously prepared QD-WLEDs was confirmed to be much wider than that of YAG:Ce phosphor-based WLEDs. These results indicate that the AgInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs are good color-converting materials for WLEDs and they are capable in visible light communication (VLC). PMID:28344270

  15. White Light-Emitting Diodes Based on AgInS₂/ZnS Quantum Dots with Improved Bandwidth in Visible Light Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Cheng; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Min; Ji, Changyin; Sun, Chun; Chen, Xiongbin; Chen, Hongda; Colvin, Vicki L; Yu, William W

    2016-01-08

    Quantum dot white light-emitting diodes (QD-WLEDs) were fabricated from green- and red-emitting AgInS₂/ZnS core/shell QDs coated on GaN LEDs. Their electroluminescence (EL) spectra were measured at different currents, ranging from 50 mA to 400 mA, and showed good color stability. The modulation bandwidth of previously prepared QD-WLEDs was confirmed to be much wider than that of YAG:Ce phosphor-based WLEDs. These results indicate that the AgInS₂/ZnS core/shell QDs are good color-converting materials for WLEDs and they are capable in visible light communication (VLC).

  16. White Light-Emitting Diodes Based on AgInS2/ZnS Quantum Dots with Improved Bandwidth in Visible Light Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Ruan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot white light-emitting diodes (QD-WLEDs were fabricated from green- and red-emitting AgInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs coated on GaN LEDs. Their electroluminescence (EL spectra were measured at different currents, ranging from 50 mA to 400 mA, and showed good color stability. The modulation bandwidth of previously prepared QD-WLEDs was confirmed to be much wider than that of YAG:Ce phosphor-based WLEDs. These results indicate that the AgInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs are good color-converting materials for WLEDs and they are capable in visible light communication (VLC.

  17. Ability of quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) to assess the activity of white spot lesions during dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masatoshi; Stookey, George K; Zero, Domenick T

    2006-02-01

    To determine the ability of QLF to assess the activity of white spots using visual examination (VE) as the gold standard. Thirty-four specimens were prepared from extracted human permanent posterior teeth presenting natural white spots on the approximal surface. Fluorescence images were acquired at 1-second intervals for the first 10 seconds and every 5 seconds thereafter to 45 seconds. During image acquisition, specimens were dehydrated with compressed air. QLF variables of fluorescence loss (deltaF [%]), lesion size (S [mm2]), and deltaQ (deltaFxS [% x mm2]), were determined. Change in QLF variables per second (deltaQLF(D): deltaF(D), deltaS(D), deltaQ(D)) was determined using the following equation: (subsequent QLF-variables--baseline QLF-variables)/dehydration time. Five experienced dentists independently conducted VE under standardized conditions using a dental unit's light, compressed air, with an explorer, used only to check surface structure. Prior to VE, examiners had participated in a half-day training seminar on VE. After drying the specimens, examiners graded the lesions according to dullness of surface, roughness and presence of microcavitation. Agreement by at least three of them determined the activity status of lesions. deltaQLF(D) values of Active white spot group (n = 7) were compared with those of Inactive white spot group (n = 27) using a two-sample t-test. In general, the active group presented larger values of deltaQLF(D) than the inactive group; however, there were no differences in deltaF(D) and deltaS(D). There were significant differences in deltaQ(D) up to 6 seconds of dehydration (P < 0.05), and no differences after 7 seconds. The results suggest that deltaQ(D) can differentiate between active and inactive white spot lesions using QLF during the first few seconds of dehydration.

  18. Polarization holograms allow highly efficient generation of complex light beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, U; Pagliusi, P; Provenzano, C; Volke-Sepúlveda, K; Cipparrone, Gabriella

    2013-03-25

    We report a viable method to generate complex beams, such as the non-diffracting Bessel and Weber beams, which relies on the encoding of amplitude information, in addition to phase and polarization, using polarization holography. The holograms are recorded in polarization sensitive films by the interference of a reference plane wave with a tailored complex beam, having orthogonal circular polarizations. The high efficiency, the intrinsic achromaticity and the simplicity of use of the polarization holograms make them competitive with respect to existing methods and attractive for several applications. Theoretical analysis, based on the Jones formalism, and experimental results are shown.

  19. CME Flux Rope and Shock Identifications and Locations: Comparison of White Light Data, Graduated Cylindrical Shell Model, and MHD Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Xie, Hong; St. Cyr, O. C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are major transient phenomena in the solar corona that are observed with ground-based and spacecraft-based coronagraphs in white light or with in situ measurements by spacecraft. CMEs transport mass and momentum and often drive shocks. In order to derive the CME and shock trajectories with high precision, we apply the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model to fit a flux rope to the CME directed toward STEREO A after about 19:00 UT on 29 November 2013 and check the quality of the heliocentric distance-time evaluations by carrying out a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the same CME with the Block Adaptive Tree Solar-Wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code. Heliocentric distances of the CME and shock leading edges are determined from the simulated white light images and magnetic field strength data. We find very good agreement between the predicted and observed heliocentric distances, showing that the GCS model and the BATS-R-US simulation approach work very well and are consistent. In order to assess the validity of CME and shock identification criteria in coronagraph images, we also compute synthetic white light images of the CME and shock. We find that the outer edge of a cloud-like illuminated area in the observed and predicted images in fact coincides with the leading edge of the CME flux rope and that the outer edge of a faint illuminated band in front of the CME leading edge coincides with the CME-driven shock front.

  20. Characterization of surface modifications by white light interferometry: applications in ion sputtering, laser ablation, and tribology experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshev, Sergey V; Erck, Robert A; Moore, Jerry F; Zinovev, Alexander V; Tripa, C Emil; Veryovkin, Igor V

    2013-02-27

    In materials science and engineering it is often necessary to obtain quantitative measurements of surface topography with micrometer lateral resolution. From the measured surface, 3D topographic maps can be subsequently analyzed using a variety of software packages to extract the information that is needed. In this article we describe how white light interferometry, and optical profilometry (OP) in general, combined with generic surface analysis software, can be used for materials science and engineering tasks. In this article, a number of applications of white light interferometry for investigation of surface modifications in mass spectrometry, and wear phenomena in tribology and lubrication are demonstrated. We characterize the products of the interaction of semiconductors and metals with energetic ions (sputtering), and laser irradiation (ablation), as well as ex situ measurements of wear of tribological test specimens. Specifically, we will discuss: i. Aspects of traditional ion sputtering-based mass spectrometry such as sputtering rates/yields measurements on Si and Cu and subsequent time-to-depth conversion. ii. Results of quantitative characterization of the interaction of femtosecond laser irradiation with a semiconductor surface. These results are important for applications such as ablation mass spectrometry, where the quantities of evaporated material can be studied and controlled via pulse duration and energy per pulse. Thus, by determining the crater geometry one can define depth and lateral resolution versus experimental setup conditions. iii. Measurements of surface roughness parameters in two dimensions, and quantitative measurements of the surface wear that occur as a result of friction and wear tests. Some inherent drawbacks, possible artifacts, and uncertainty assessments of the white light interferometry approach will be discussed and explained.

  1. Compact solar autoclave based on steam generation using broadband light-harvesting nanoparticles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oara Neumann; Curtis Feronti; Albert D. Neumann; Anjie Dong; Kevin Schell; Benjamin Lu; Eric Kim; Mary Quinn; Shea Thompson; Nathaniel Grady; Peter Nordlander; Maria Oden; Naomi J. Halas

    2013-01-01

    .... Here, we show the use of broadband light-absorbing nanoparticles as solar photothermal heaters, which generate high-temperature steam for a standalone, efficient solar autoclave useful for sanitation...

  2. Modular approach to achieving the next-generation X-ray light source

    CERN Document Server

    Biedron, S G; Freund, H P

    2001-01-01

    A modular approach to the next-generation light source is described. The 'modules' include photocathode, radio-frequency, electron guns and their associated drive-laser systems, linear accelerators, bunch-compression systems, seed laser systems, planar undulators, two-undulator harmonic generation schemes, high-gain harmonic generation systems, nonlinear higher harmonics, and wavelength shifting. These modules will be helpful in distributing the next-generation light source to many more laboratories than the current single-pass, high-gain free-electron laser designs permit, due to both monetary and/or physical space constraints.

  3. Extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light in the fungal pathogen causing white-nose syndrome of bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan M. Palmer; Kevin P. Drees; Jeffrey T. Foster; Daniel L. Lindner

    2018-01-01

    Bat white-nose syndrome (WNS), caused by the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has decimated North American hibernating bats since its emergence in 2006. Here, we utilize comparative genomics to examine the evolutionary history of this pathogen in comparison to six closely related nonpathogenic species....

  4. Teager-Kaiser Energy and Higher-Order Operators in White-Light Interference Microscopy for Surface Shape Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Ouahab Boudraa

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In white-light interference microscopy, measurement of surface shape generally requires peak extraction of the fringe function envelope. In this paper the Teager-Kaiser energy and higher-order energy operators are proposed for efficient extraction of the fringe envelope. These energy operators are compared in terms of precision, robustness to noise, and subsampling. Flexible energy operators, depending on order and lag parameters, can be obtained. Results show that smoothing and interpolation of envelope approximation using spline model performs better than Gaussian-based approach.

  5. Modeling the Quality of Videos Displayed With Local Dimming Backlight at Different Peak White and Ambient Light Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Søgaard, Jacob; Bech, Søren

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of ambient light and peak white (maximum brightness of a display) on the perceived quality of videos displayed using local backlight dimming. Two subjective tests providing quality evaluations are presented and analyzed. The analyses of variance show significant...... is computed using a model of the display. Widely used objective quality metrics are applied based on the rendering models of the videos to predict the subjective evaluations. As these predictions are not satisfying, three machine learning methods are applied: partial least square regression, elastic net...

  6. Enhancement of Color Rendering Index for White Light LED Lamps by Red Y2O3:EU3+ Phosphor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Hoang Quang Minh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an application of the red Y2O3:Eu3+ dopant phosphor compound for reaching the color rendering index as high as 86. The Multi-Chip White LED lamps (MCW-LEDs with high Correlated Color Temperatures (CCTs including 7000 K and 8500 K are employed in this study. Besides, the impacts of the Y2O3:Eu3+ phosphor on the attenuation of light through phosphor layers of the various packages is also demonstrated based on the Beer-Lambert law. Simulation results provide important conclusion for selecting and developing the phosphor materials in MCW-LEDs manufacturing.

  7. 53% Efficient Red Emissive Carbon Quantum Dots for High Color Rendering and Stable Warm White-Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zifei; Yuan, Fanglong; Li, Xiaohong; Li, Yunchao; Zhong, Haizheng; Fan, Louzhen; Yang, Shihe

    2017-10-01

    Red emissive carbon quantum dots (R-CQDs) with quantum yield of 53% is successfully prepared. An ultraviolet (UV)-pumped CQD phosphors-based warm white light-emitting diode (WLED) is realized for the first time and achieves a color rendering index of 97. This work provides a new avenue for the exploration of low cost, environment-friendly, and high-performance CQD phosphors-based warm WLEDs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Optical Pumping Experiments on Next Generation Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S J; Fournier, K B; Scott, H; Chung, H K; Lee, R W

    2004-07-29

    Laser-based plasma spectroscopic techniques have been used with great success to determine the line shapes of atomic transitions in plasmas, study the population kinetics of atomic systems embedded in plasmas, and look at the redistribution of radiation. However, the possibilities for optical lasers end for plasmas with n{sub e}>10{sup 22}cm{sup -3} as light propagation is severely altered by the plasma. The construction of the Tesla Test Facility(TTF) at DESY(Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron), a short pulse tunable free electron laser in the vacuum-ultraviolet and soft X-ray regime (VUV FEL), based on the SASE(self amplified spontaneous emission) process, will provide a major advance in the capability for dense plasma-related research. This source will provide 10{sup 13} photons in a 200 fs duration pulse that is tunable from {approx} 6nm to 100nm. Since an VUV FEL will not have the limitation associated with optical lasers the entire field of high density plasmas kinetics in laser produced plasma will then be available to study with tunable source. Thus, one will be able to use this and other FEL x-ray sources to pump individual transitions creating enhanced population in the excited states that can easily be monitored. We show two case studies illuminating different aspects of plasma spectroscopy.

  9. Fundamental Scaling of Microplasmas and Tunable UV Light Generation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manginell, Ronald P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sillerud, Colin Halliday [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hopkins, Matthew M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yee, Benjamin Tong [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moorman, Matthew W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schwindt, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, John Moses [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pfeifer, Nathaniel Bryant [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The temporal evolution of spectral lines from microplasma devices (MD) was studied, including impurity transitions. Long-wavelength emission diminishes more rapidly than deep UV with decreasing pulse width and RF operation. Thus, switching from DC to short pulsed or RF operation, UV emissions can be suppressed, allowing for real-time tuning of the ionization energy of a microplasma photo-ionization source, which is useful for chemical and atomic physics. Scaling allows MD to operate near atmospheric pressure where excimer states are efficiently created and emit down to 65 nm; laser emissions fall off below 200 nm, making MD light sources attractive for deep UV use. A first fully-kinetic three-dimensional model was developed that explicitly calculates electron-energy distribution function. This, and non-continuum effects, were studied with the model and how they are impacted by geometry and transient or DC operation. Finally, a global non-dimensional model was developed to help explain general trends MD physics.

  10. High-performance next-generation EUV lithography light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Peter; Zakharov, Sergey V.; Aliaga-Rossel, Raul; Benali, Otman; Duffy, Grainne; Sarroukh, Ouassima; Wyndham, Edmund; Zakharov, Vasily S.

    2009-03-01

    EUVL solution for HVM at the 22 nm node requires a high power long-term EUV source operation with hundreds of watts at the intermediate focus output. EUV mask blank and mask defects inspections require at-wavelength tools with high brightness. Theoretical analysis with a 2-D radiation MHD code Z* has been performed to address key issues in EUV plasma sources with radiation transfer. The study shows that self-absorption defines the limiting brightness of a single EUV source, which cannot meet the requirements of the HVM tool with high efficiency and is not sufficient for critical metrology applications, given the limiting etendue of the optics. It is shown that the required irradiance can be achieved by spatial multiplexing, using multiple small sources. We present here details of the study, as well as experimental results from a novel EUV light source with an intrinsic photon collector demonstrating high brightness, the i-SoCoMo concept, where an impulse micro discharge plasma source is integrated to a photon collector based on an active plasma structure. The small physical size and low etendue properties of the i-SoCoMo unit allows a large number of such sources to be put together in one physical package and be operated in a multiplexed fashion to meet necessary power requirements.

  11. Amazon forest structure generates diurnal and seasonal variability in light utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas C. Morton; Jeremy Rubio; Bruce D. Cook; Jean-Philippe Gastellu-Etchegorry; Marcos Longo; Hyeungu Choi; Maria Hunter; Michael Keller

    2016-01-01

    The complex three-dimensional (3-D) structure of tropical forests generates a diversity of light environments for canopy and understory trees. Understanding diurnal and seasonal changes in light availability is critical for interpreting measurements of net ecosystem exchange and improving ecosystem models. Here, we used the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART...

  12. 75 FR 34776 - Florida Power & Light Company; Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    ... COMMISSION Florida Power & Light Company; Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4; Environmental... permit are needed. No effects on the aquatic or terrestrial habitat in the vicinity or the plant, or to..., for Facility Operating License Nos. DPR-31 and DPR-41, issued to Florida Power & Light Company (the...

  13. Lowering the pump power requirement for squeezed light generation using a periodically poled crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Buchhave, Preben

    2003-01-01

    Observations of continuous wave bright squeezed light from an intra-cavity periodically poled KTP second harmonic generator are presented. The experiment includes characterization of the classical as well as the quantum properties of the system.......Observations of continuous wave bright squeezed light from an intra-cavity periodically poled KTP second harmonic generator are presented. The experiment includes characterization of the classical as well as the quantum properties of the system....

  14. Alternating-Current InGaN/GaN Tunnel Junction Nanowire White-Light Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaf, S M; Ra, Y-H; Nguyen, H P T; Djavid, M; Mi, Z

    2015-10-14

    The current LED lighting technology relies on the use of a driver to convert alternating current (AC) to low-voltage direct current (DC) power, a resistive p-GaN contact layer to inject positive charge carriers (holes) for blue light emission, and rare-earth doped phosphors to down-convert blue photons into green/red light, which have been identified as some of the major factors limiting the device efficiency, light quality, and cost. Here, we show that multiple-active region phosphor-free InGaN nanowire white LEDs connected through a polarization engineered tunnel junction can fundamentally address the afore-described challenges. Such a p-GaN contact-free LED offers the benefit of carrier regeneration, leading to enhanced light intensity and reduced efficiency droop. Moreover, through the monolithic integration of p-GaN up and p-GaN down nanowire LED structures on the same substrate, we have demonstrated, for the first time, AC operated LEDs on a Si platform, which can operate efficiently in both polarities (positive and negative) of applied voltage.

  15. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. XXVIII. Characterization of the Galactic White Dwarf Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantin, Nicholas J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy,University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8P 1A1 (Canada); Côté, Patrick; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Ferrarese, Laura; McConnachie, Alan [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics Program, 5071 W. Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Hanes, David A. [Queen’s University, Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Bianchi, Luciana [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [CEA/IRFU/SAp, Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris Diderot, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Starkenburg, Else, E-mail: nfantin@uvic.ca [Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    We use three different techniques to identify hundreds of white dwarf (WD) candidates in the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) based on photometry from the NGVS and GUViCS, and proper motions derived from the NGVS and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Photometric distances for these candidates are calculated using theoretical color–absolute magnitude relations, while effective temperatures are measured by fitting their spectral energy distributions. Disk and halo WD candidates are separated using a tangential velocity cut of 200 km s{sup −1} in a reduced proper motion diagram, which leads to a sample of six halo WD candidates. Cooling ages, calculated for an assumed WD mass of 0.6 M {sub ⊙}, range between 60 Myr and 6 Gyr, although these estimates depend sensitively on the adopted mass. Luminosity functions for the disk and halo subsamples are constructed and compared to previous results from the SDSS and SuperCOSMOS survey. We compute a number density of (2.81 ± 0.52) × 10{sup −3} pc{sup −3} for the disk WD population—consistent with previous measurements. We find (7.85 ± 4.55) × 10{sup −6} pc{sup −3} for the halo, or 0.3% of the disk. Observed stellar counts are also compared to predictions made by the TRILEGAL and Besançon stellar population synthesis models. The comparison suggests that the TRILEGAL model overpredicts the total number of WDs. The WD counts predicted by the Besançon model agree with the observations, although a discrepancy arises when comparing the predicted and observed halo WD populations; the difference is likely due to the WD masses in the adopted model halo.

  16. Formation of indoor nitrous acid (HONO) by light-induced NO2 heterogeneous reactions with white wall paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomei, Vincent; Sörgel, Matthias; Gligorovski, Sasho; Alvarez, Elena Gómez; Gandolfo, Adrien; Strekowski, Rafal; Quivet, Etienne; Held, Andreas; Zetzsch, Cornelius; Wortham, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous nitrogen dioxide (NO2) represents an oxidant that is present in relatively high concentrations in various indoor settings. Remarkably increased NO2 levels up to 1.5 ppm are associated with homes using gas stoves. The heterogeneous reactions of NO2 with adsorbed water on surfaces lead to the generation of nitrous acid (HONO). Here, we present a HONO source induced by heterogeneous reactions of NO2 with selected indoor paint surfaces in the presence of light (300 nmpaint surfaces to generate HONO within indoor environments by light-induced NO2 heterogeneous reactions.

  17. Preparation of a photo-degradation- resistant quantum dot-polymer composite plate for use in the fabrication of a high-stability white-light-emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eun-Pyo; Song, Woo-Seuk; Lee, Ki-Heon; Yang, Heesun

    2013-02-01

    We report on the synthesis of highly fluorescent double-ZnS-shell-capped, yellow-emitting Cu-In-S quantum dots (QDs) with a surprisingly high quantum yield of 92%, the preparation of a free-standing QD-polymethylmethacrylate composite plate, and the application of the QD plate in the fabrication of QD-based white-light-emitting diodes (WLEDs). A free-standing QD plate with QDs embedded uniformly inside a polymeric matrix is used to fabricate a remote-type, resin-free WLED. The QD plate-based WLED displays a high luminous efficiency; however, it suffers from a significantly unstable device performance due to QD degradation upon prolonged photo-excitation. An exceptional operational stability of the QD plate-based WLED is realized by generating hybrid double layers of an organic adhesion layer and a gas barrier layer of sol-gel-derived silica, rendering the QD plate impermeable to oxygen. Our success in achieving a color converter robust against photo-degradation and applying it in the fabrication of a reliable QD-based LED is greatly encouraging as regards the development of next-generation QD-based LED lighting sources.

  18. A Versatile and Simple Approach to Generate Light Emission in Semiconductors Mediated by Electric Double Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Pu, Jiang

    2017-04-18

    The light-emitting device is the primary device for current light sources. In principle, conventional light-emitting devices need heterostructures and/or intentional carrier doping to form a p-n junction. This junction formation is, however, very difficult to achieve for most emerging semiconductors, and the fabrication of light-emitting devices is invariably a significant challenge. This study proposes a versatile and simple approach to realize light-emitting devices. This proposed device requires only a semiconducting film with two electrodes that are covered with an electrolyte. This unique structure achieves light emission at a voltage slightly larger than the bandgap energy of materials. This study applies this concept to emerging direct bandgap semiconductors, such as transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers and zinc oxide single crystals. These devices generate obvious light emission and provide sufficient evidence of the formation of a dynamic p-i-n junction or tunneling junction, presenting a versatile technique to develop optoelectronic devices.

  19. InGaN/GaN disk-in-nanowire white light emitting diodes on (001) silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Wei

    2011-01-01

    High density (? 1011 cm-2) GaN nanowires and InGaN/GaN disk-in-nanowire heterostructures have been grown on (001) silicon substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The nanowires exhibit excellent uniformity in length and diameter and a broad emission is obtained by incorporating InGaN disks of varying composition along the length of the nanowires. Monolithic lighting emitting diodes were fabricated with appropriate n- and p-doping of contact layers. White light emission with chromaticity coordinates of x=0.29 and y=0.37 and a correlated color temperature of 5500-6500 K at an injection current of 50 A/ cm2 is measured. The measured external quantum efficiency of the devices do not exhibit any rollover (droop) up to an injection current density of 400 A/ cm2. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Simultaneous enhancement of photo- and electroluminescence in white organic light-emitting devices by localized surface plasmons of silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingting; Zhu, Wenqing; Shi, Guanjie; Zhai, Guangsheng; Qian, Bingjie; Li, Jun

    2017-02-24

    White organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDs) with enhanced current efficiency and negligible color shifting equipped with an internal color conversion layer (CCL) were fabricated. They were attained by embedding a single layer of silver nanoclusters (SNCs) between the CCL and light-emitting layer (EML). The simultaneous enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) of the CCL and electroluminescence (EL) of the EML were realized by controlling the thickness and size of the SNCs to match the localized surface plasmon resonance spectrum with the PL spectrum of the CCL and the EL spectrum of the EML. The WOLED with optimal SNCs demonstrated a 25.81% enhancement in current efficiency at 60 mA cm-2 and good color stability over the entire range of current density.

  1. High performance flexible top-emitting warm-white organic light-emitting devices and chromaticity shift mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongying Shi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Flexible warm-white top-emitting organic light-emitting devices (TEOLEDs are fabricated onto PET substrates with a simple semi-transparent cathode Sm/Ag and two-color phosphors respectively doped into a single host material TCTA. By adjusting the relative position of the orange-red EML sandwiched between the blue emitting layers, the optimized device exhibits the highest power/current efficiency of 8.07 lm/W and near 13 cd/A, with a correlated color temperature (CCT of 4105 K and a color rendering index (CRI of 70. In addition, a moderate chromaticity variation of (-0.025, +0.008 around warm white illumination coordinates (0.45, 0.44 is obtained over a large luminance range of 1000 to 10000 cd/m2. The emission mechanism is discussed via delta-doping method and single-carrier device, which is summarized that the carrier trapping, the exciton quenching, the mobility change and the recombination zone alteration are negative to color stability while the energy transfer process and the blue/red/blue sandwiched structure are contributed to the color stability in our flexible white TEOLEDs.

  2. Supplemental material: afterburner for generating light (anti-)nuclei with QCD-inspired event generators in pp collisions

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This note complements the paper titled: ``Production of deuterons, tritons, $^{3}$He nuclei and their anti-nuclei in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$~=~0.9, 2.76 and 7~TeV'' with additional material related to Monte Carlo simulations necessary to compare the results with lower energy experiments. It describes a coalescence-based afterburner for QCD-inspired event generators, which allows the generation of light nuclei, hyper-nuclei and their charge conjugates in proton--proton (pp) collisions at LHC energies. The event generators with the afterburner are able to reproduce the differential cross sections of light (anti-)nuclei ($A<4)$ with the same degree of agreement as those of protons and anti-protons at the same momentum per nucleon. They also explain the transverse momentum dependence of the coalescence parameters as the result of hard scattering effects.

  3. Rhodamine B-anchored silica nanoparticles displaying white-light photoluminescence and their uses in preparations of photoluminescent polymeric films and nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Yuan; Liu, Ying-Ling

    2010-10-01

    This work reports white-light photoluminescent (PL) silica nanoparticles and their applications of preparation of PL polymer films and nanofibers. Rhodamine B (RhB) physically adsorbs or chemically bonds to silica nanoparticle (SNP) surfaces, resulting in PL SNPs. The RhB-modified SNPs exhibit white-light PL emissions under an excitation at 365nm, which is different from the inherent yellow light emission of RhB. The SNPs with physically-adsorbed RhB show stimuli-responsive properties. In solutions, the RhB molecules which physically adsorb to SNPs release from SNPs, consequently turning the PL emission from white-light to yellow. On the other hand, the SNPs having covalently-bonded-RhB molecules are effective additives for preparation of white-light PL polymer composites. Both PL poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) films (from casting process) and nanofibers (from electrospinning process) showing white-light PL emission have been prepared. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Semipolar GaN-based laser diodes for Gbit/s white lighting communication: devices to systems

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Changmin

    2018-02-23

    We report the high-speed performance of semipolar GaN ridge laser diodes at 410 nm and the dynamic characteristics including differential gain, damping, and the intrinsic maximum bandwidth. To the best of our knowledge, the achieved modulation bandwidth of 6.8 GHz is the highest reported value in the blue-violet spectrum. The calculated differential gain of ~3 x 10-16 cm2, which is a critical factor in high-speed modulation, proved theoretical predictions of higher gain in semipolar GaN laser diodes than the conventional c-plane counterparts. In addition, we demonstrate the first novel white lighting communication system by using our near-ultraviolet (NUV) LDs and pumping red-, green-, and blueemitting phosphors. This system satisfies both purposes of high-speed communication and high-quality white light illumination. A high data rate of 1.5 Gbit/s using on-off keying (OOK) modulation together with a high color rendering index (CRI) of 80 has been measured.

  5. Flow properties of the solar wind obtained from white light data and a two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Esser, Ruth; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The flow properties of the solar wind from 1 R(sub s) to 1 AU were obtained using a two fluid model constrained by density and scale height temperatures derived from white light observations, as well as knowledge of the electron temperature in coronal holes. The observations were obtained with the white light coronographs on SPARTAN 201-1 and at Mauna Loa (Hawaii), in a north polar coronal hole from 1.16 to 5.5 R(sub s) on 11 Apr. 1993. By specifying the density, temperature, Alfven wave velocity amplitude and heating function at the coronal base, it was found that the model parameters fit well the constraints of the empirical density profiles and temperatures. The optimal range of the input parameters was found to yield a higher proton temperature than electron temperature in the inner corona. The results indicate that no preferential heating of the protons at larger distances is needed to produce higher proton than electron temperatures at 1 AU, as observed in the high speed solar wind.

  6. Chromocolonoscopy detects more adenomas than white light colonoscopy or narrow band imaging colonoscopy in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüneburg, R; Lammert, F; Rabe, C; Rahner, N; Kahl, P; Büttner, R; Propping, P; Sauerbruch, T; Lamberti, C

    2009-04-01

    Individuals carrying germline mutations in one of the genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) have a lifetime risk of up to 80 % of developing colorectal cancer. As there is evidence for a higher incidence of flat adenomatous precursors and because an accelerated adenoma-carcinoma sequence has been postulated for these patients, early detection of these lesions is essential. It was the aim of the present study to assess the detection rate of polypoid lesions by comparing chromocolonoscopy with standard white light colonoscopy and narrow-band imaging (NBI) colonoscopy. 109 patients were included (98 with a functionally relevant mutation in a mismatch repair gene, 11 fulfilling the strict Amsterdam criteria). In 47 patients, standard colonoscopy was followed by chromocolonoscopy with indigo carmine. In 62 patients, NBI was performed first followed by chromocolonoscopy. A total of 128 hyperplastic and 52 adenomatous lesions were detected. In the first series, 0.5 lesions/patient were identified by standard colonoscopy and 1.5 lesions/patient by chromocolonoscopy ( P < 0.001). In the second series, 0.7 lesions/patient were detected by NBI colonoscopy and 1.8 lesions/patient by chromocolonoscopy ( P = 0.01). At least one adenoma was detected in 15 % of patients by both standard and NBI colonoscopy compared with 28 % of patients by chromocolonoscopy. According to this study, chromocolonoscopy detects significantly more hyperplastic and, in particular, adenomatous lesions than standard white light colonoscopy or NBI.

  7. Photophysics of Diphenylbutadiynes in Water, Acetonitrile-Water, and Acetonitrile Solvent Systems: Application to Single Component White Light Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Avik Kumar; Jana, Rounak; Gharpure, Santosh J; Mishra, Ashok K

    2016-07-28

    Diacetylenes have been the subject of current research because of their interesting optoelectronic properties. Herein, we report that substituted diphenylbutadiynes exhibit locally excited (LE) and excimer emissions in water and multiple emissions from the LE, excimer, and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states in acetonitrile-water solvent systems. The LE, excimer, and ICT emissions are clearly distinguishable for a diphenylbutadiynyl derivative with push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) substituents and those are closely overlapped for non-push-pull analogues. In neat acetonitrile, the excimer emission disappears and the LE and ICT emissions predominate. In the case of the push (-NMe2)-pull (-CN) diphenylbutadiyne, the intensity of the ICT emission increases with increasing the fluorophore concentration. This suggests that the ICT emission accompanies with intermolecular CT emission which is of exciplex type. As the LE and exciplex emissions of the push-pull diphenylbutadiyne together cover the visible region (400-700 nm) in acetonitrile, a control of the fluorophore concentration makes the relative intensities of the LE and exciplex emissions such that pure white light emission is achieved. The white light emission is not observed in those diphenylbutadiynyl analogues in which the peripheral substituents of the phenyl rings do not possess strong push-pull character.

  8. Generation of pulsed light in the visible spectral region based on non-linear cavity dumping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sandra; Andersen, Martin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    We propose a novel generic approach for generation of pulsed light in the visible spectrum based on sum-frequency generation between the high circulating intra-cavity power of a high finesse CW laser and a single-passed pulsed laser. For demonstration, we used a CW 1342 nm laser mixed with a pass...

  9. Diatom growth responses to photoperiod and light are predictable from diel reductant generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Talmy, David; Campbell, Douglas A

    2017-02-01

    Light drives phytoplankton productivity, so phytoplankton must exploit variable intensities and durations of light exposure, depending upon season, latitude, and depth. We analyzed the growth, photophysiology and composition of small, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and large, Thalassiosira punctigera, centric diatoms from temperate, coastal marine habitats, responding to a matrix of photoperiods and growth light intensities. T. pseudonana showed fastest growth rates under long photoperiods and low to moderate light intensities, while the larger T. punctigera showed fastest growth rates under short photoperiods and higher light intensities. Photosystem II function and content responded primarily to instantaneous growth light intensities during the photoperiod, while diel carbon fixation and RUBISCO content responded more to photoperiod duration than to instantaneous light intensity. Changing photoperiods caused species-specific changes in the responses of photochemical yield (e - /photon) to growth light intensity. These photophysiological variables showed complex responses to photoperiod and to growth light intensity. Growth rate also showed complex responses to photoperiod and growth light intensity. But these complex responses resolved into a close relation between growth rate and the cumulative daily generation of reductant, across the matrix of photoperiods and light intensities. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Phycology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Phycological Society of America.

  10. All-photonic drying and sintering process via flash white light combined with deep-UV and near-infrared irradiation for highly conductive copper nano-ink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyun-Jun; Oh, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-01-25

    We developed an ultra-high speed photonic sintering method involving flash white light (FWL) combined with near infrared (NIR) and deep UV light irradiation to produce highly conductive copper nano-ink film. Flash white light irradiation energy and the power of NIR/deep UV were optimized to obtain high conductivity Cu films. Several microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), a x-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were employed to characterize the Cu nano-films. Optimally sintered Cu nano-ink films produced using a deep UV-assisted flash white light sintering technique had the lowest resistivity (7.62 μΩ·cm), which was only 4.5-fold higher than that of bulk Cu film (1.68 μΩ•cm).

  11. Response of bats to light with different spectra: light-shy and agile bat presence is affected by white and green, but not red light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, K.; van Grunsven, Roy H. A.; Ramakers, J.J.C.; Ferguson, Kim B.; Raap, Thomas; Donners, Maurice; Veenendaal, Elmar M.; Visser, Marcel E.

    Artificial light at night has shown a remarkable increase over the past decades. Effects are reported for many species groups, and include changes in presence, behaviour, physiology and life-history traits. Among these, bats are strongly affected, and how bat species react to light is likely to vary

  12. Effect of loss on slow-light-enhanced second-harmonic generation in periodic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravi, Sina; Quintero-Bermudez, Rafael; Setzpfandt, Frank; Asger Mortensen, N; Pertsch, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically analyze the dependence of second-harmonic generation efficiency on the group index in periodic optical waveguides with loss. We investigate different possible scenarios of using slow light to enhance the efficiency of this process and show that in some cases there exists a maximally achievable efficiency reached for finite values of the group index at the point of phase-matching. Furthermore, we identify situations for which slow light, surprisingly, does not enhance the second-harmonic generation efficiency. Our results are corroborated by rigorous nonlinear simulations of second-harmonic generation in periodic nanobeam waveguides with loss.

  13. Singly-resonant sum frequency generation of visible light in a semiconductor disk laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Thalbitzer; Schlosser, P.J.; Hastie, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a generic approach for visible light generation is presented. It is based on sum frequency generation between a semiconductor disk laser and a solid-state laser, where the frequency mixing is achieved within the cavity of the semiconductor disk laser using a singlepass of the solid......-state laser light. This exploits the good beam quality and high intra-cavity power present in the semiconductor disk laser to achieve high conversion efficiency. Combining sum frequency mixing and semiconductor disk lasers in this manner allows in principle for generation of any wavelength within the visible...... spectrum, by appropriate choice of semiconductor material and single-pass laser wavelength....

  14. White light emitting diode suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis in hippocampal neuron cells through mitochondrial cytochrome c oxydase-mediated IGF-1 and TNF-α pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zong, Yibo; Sun, Qinwei; Jia, Yimin; Zhao, Ruqian

    2017-12-01

    Light emitting diode (LED) light has been tested to treat traumatic brain injury, neural degenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. Previous studies indicate that blue LED light affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in photosensitive cells and cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrate that white LED light exposure impaired proliferation and induced apoptosis in HeLa and HT-22 hippocampal neural cells, but not C2C12 cells. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying the effect of white LED light exposure on HT-22 cells were elucidated. In HeLa and HT-22 cells, white LED light activated mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (Cco), in association with enhanced ATP synthase activity and elevated intracellular ATP concentration. Also, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production were increased, accompanied by higher calcium concentration and lower mitochondrial membrane potential. HT-22 cells exposed to white LED light for 24h showed reduced viability, with higher apoptotic rate and a cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Concurrently, the mRNA expression and the concentration of IGF-1 were decreased, while that of TNF-α were increased, in light-exposed cells, which was supported by the luciferase activity of both gene promoters. The down-stream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), AKT/mTOR pathways were inhibited, in association with an activation of apoptotic caspase 3. N-Acetylcysteine, a ROS scavenger, protected the cells from LED light-induced cellular damage, with rescued cell viability and restored mRNA expression of IGF-1 and TNF-α. Our data demonstrate that white LED light suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis in hippocampal neuron cells through mitochondrial Cco/ROS-mediated IGF-1 and TNF-α pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of in vitro photodynamic antimicrobial activity of protoporphyrin IX between endoscopic white light and newly developed narrowband endoscopic light against Helicobacter pylori 26695.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, SungSook; Lee, HaeKyung; Chae, HiunSuk

    2012-12-05

    Helicobacter pylori might be readily affected with photodynamic therapy (PDT) by weak wavelengths, because it has few repair genes. Recently, gastrointestinal endoscopy emitting specific wavelengths (narrowband imaging, NBI) has been developed for the early detection of tumors. Coincidentally, its wavelength (415 nm) is very similar to the wavelength (410 nm) that activates protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) as a photosensitizer (PS). Therefore, we studied in vitro PDT against H. pylori using NBI and conventional white light (WL) according to low or high concentration of PpIX along with exposure time. The bactericidal effects, the degree of oxidative DNA damage and membrane integrity of H. pylori after PDT were evaluated. In the control, the numbers of viable cells remained constant during the experiment. Viable cells after PDT using both endoscopic light irradiation, were decreased approximately 10(3) - 10(5) fold at low concentration of PpIX and below 0.80 × 10 at high concentration of PpIX. Only membrane damage after PDT was observed microscopically in H. pylori without DNA injury. Conclusively, either the bactericidal effect in high concentration or the decrease of bacterial loading in low concentration of PpIX, would be expected with PDT using endoscopic light (NBI or WL). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Multiple Continuum Components in the White-Light Flare of 16 January 2009 on the dM4.5e Star YZ CMi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, A. F.; Hawley, S. L.; Holtzman, J. A.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Hilton, E. J.

    2012-03-01

    The white light during M dwarf flares has long been known to exhibit the broadband shape of a T≈10 000 K blackbody, and the white light in solar-flares is thought to arise primarily from hydrogen recombination. Yet, a current lack of broad-wavelength coverage solar flare spectra in the optical/near-UV region prohibits a direct comparison of the continuum properties to determine if they are indeed so different. New spectroscopic observations of a secondary flare during the decay of a megaflare on the dM4.5e star YZ CMi have revealed multiple components in the white-light continuum of stellar flares, including both a blackbody-like spectrum and a hydrogen-recombination spectrum. One of the most surprising findings is that these two components are anti-correlated in their temporal evolution. We combine initial phenomenological modeling of the continuum components with spectra from radiative hydrodynamic models to show that continuum veiling causes the measured anti-correlation. This modeling allows us to use the components' inferred properties to predict how a similar spatially resolved, multiple-component, white-light continuum might appear using analogies to several solar-flare phenomena. We also compare the properties of the optical stellar flare white light to Ellerman bombs on the Sun.

  17. Design of a bike headlamp based on a power white-light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yi-Chien; Chen, Cheng-Chien; Chou, Hung-Yu; Yang, Kai-Yu; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2011-08-01

    In this letter, we present a new design for a light-emitting diode- based bike headlamp. The optical design contains two horizontal reflectors and a light pipe with two horizontal parallel mirrors. The designed illumination pattern in our simulations performs a contrast of 250 in the K-mark regulation, and it was measured to be 21 in the experiment with a not well-finished prototype, which was operated at 1 W. The contrast is higher than 5 as requested in the regulation.

  18. Single-frequency blue light generation by single-pass sum-frequency generation in a coupled ring cavity tapered laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    A generic approach for generation of tunable single frequency light is presented. 340 mW of near diffraction limited, single-frequency, and tunable blue light around 459 nm is generated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) between two tunable tapered diode lasers. One diode laser is operated in a ring...

  19. Numerical Simulations of Gaseous Disks Generated from Collisional Cascades at the Roche Limits of White Dwarf Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Bromley, Benjamin C.

    2017-11-01

    We consider the long-term evolution of gaseous disks fed by the vaporization of small particles produced in a collisional cascade inside the Roche limit of a 0.6 {M}⊙ white dwarf. Adding solids with radius {r}0 at a constant rate {\\dot{M}}0 into a narrow annulus leads to two distinct types of evolution. When {\\dot{M}}0≳ {\\dot{M}}0,{crit}≈ 3× {10}4 {({r}0/1{km})}3.92 {{g}} {{{s}}}-1, the cascade generates a fairly steady accretion disk where the mass transfer rate of gas onto the white dwarf is roughly {\\dot{M}}0 and the mass in gas is {M}g≈ 2.3× {10}22 ({\\dot{M}}0/{10}10 {{g}} {{{s}}}-1) (1500 {{K}}/{T}0) ({10}-3/α ) g, where T 0 is the temperature of the gas near the Roche limit and α is the dimensionless viscosity parameter. If {\\dot{M}}0≲ {\\dot{M}}0,{crit}, the system alternates between high states with large mass transfer rates and low states with negligible accretion. Although either mode of evolution adds significant amounts of metals to the white dwarf photosphere, none of our calculations yield a vertically thin ensemble of solids inside the Roche limit. X-ray observations can place limits on the mass transfer rate and test this model for metallic line white dwarfs.

  20. Two-Dimensional Metal-Organic Layers as a Bright and Processable Phosphor for Fast White-Light Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuefu; Wang, Zi; Lin, Bangjiang; Zhang, Cankun; Cao, Lingyun; Wang, Tingting; Zhang, Jingzheng; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Wenbin

    2017-06-22

    A metal-organic layer (MOL) is a new type of 2D material that is derived from metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by reducing one dimension to a single layer or a few layers. Tetraphenylethylene-based tetracarboxylate ligands (TCBPE), with aggregation-induced emission properties, were assembled into the first luminescent MOL by linking with Zr6 O4 (OH)6 (H2 O)2 (HCO2 )6 clusters. The emissive MOL can replace the lanthanide phosphors in white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) with remarkable processability, color rendering, and brightness. Importantly, the MOL-WLED exhibited a physical switching speed three times that of commercial WLEDs, which is crucial for visible-light communication (VLC), an alternative wireless communication technology to Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, by using room lighting to carry transmitted signals. The short fluorescence lifetime (2.6 ns) together with high quantum yield (50 %) of the MOL affords fast switching of the assembled WLEDs for efficient information encoding and transmission. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. High peak power green light generation by frequency doubling of a superluminescent pulse amplifier system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, He; Zhang, Haitao; He, Linlu; Gao, Gan; Gong, Mali

    2017-08-01

    We present an approach for green laser-light generation based on a fiber superluminescent pulse amplification system and frequency doubling to 552 nm with a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal. The SPA system used in the experiment is capable of yielding 6-nm-bandwidth, 10 ns pulsees. The 10-mm-long PPLN with 6.95 μm period and 0.5 mm thick generated high-power green light with single pulse energy up to 5.49 μJ when hte broadband input pulse coherence characteristics of the superluminescent pulse amplifier and the frequency doubling. This generated green light has proved to have low speckle noise and low photon degeneracy.

  2. Settlement of reactive power compensation in the light of white certificates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zajkowski Konrad

    2017-01-01

    The detailed method and an estimation method proposed for the determination of savings on active energy as a result of the reactive power compensation carried out possess some errors and inconvenience. The detailed method requires knowledge of the network topology and a determination of reactive power Q at each point of the network. The estimation method of analysis is easy in execution, especially if the consumer of energy is the main or the most significant purchaser of electricity in the network. Unfortunately, this latter method can be used only for activities that do not require high computational accuracy. The results obtained by this method are approximate values that can be used for the calculation of economic indicators. The estimation method is suitable for determining the number of white certificates when a power audit concerns a recipient of electricity, the structure of which is a large number of divisions scattered at many different locations in the power system.

  3. Effects of wind energy generation and white-nose syndrome on the viability of the Indiana bat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Erickson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy generation holds the potential to adversely affect wildlife populations. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range. One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis, which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States. In addition to mortality from wind energy generation, the species also faces range-wide threats from the emerging infectious fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS. White-nose syndrome, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans, disturbs hibernating bats leading to high levels of mortality. We used a spatially explicit full-annual-cycle model to investigate how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect population dynamics of this species. In the simulation, wind turbine mortality impacted the metapopulation dynamics of the species by causing extirpation of some of the smaller winter colonies. In general, effects of wind turbines were localized and focused on specific spatial subpopulations. Conversely, WNS had a depressive effect on the species across its range. Wind turbine mortality interacted with WNS and together these stressors had a larger impact than would be expected from either alone, principally because these stressors together act to reduce species abundance across the spectrum of population sizes. Our findings illustrate the importance of not only prioritizing the protection of large winter colonies as is currently done, but also of protecting metapopulation dynamics and migratory connectivity.

  4. Effects of wind energy generation and white-nose syndrome on the viability of the Indiana bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Richard A; Thogmartin, Wayne E; Diffendorfer, Jay E; Russell, Robin E; Szymanski, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Wind energy generation holds the potential to adversely affect wildlife populations. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range. One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat ( Myotis sodalis ), which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States. In addition to mortality from wind energy generation, the species also faces range-wide threats from the emerging infectious fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS). White-nose syndrome, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans , disturbs hibernating bats leading to high levels of mortality. We used a spatially explicit full-annual-cycle model to investigate how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect population dynamics of this species. In the simulation, wind turbine mortality impacted the metapopulation dynamics of the species by causing extirpation of some of the smaller winter colonies. In general, effects of wind turbines were localized and focused on specific spatial subpopulations. Conversely, WNS had a depressive effect on the species across its range. Wind turbine mortality interacted with WNS and together these stressors had a larger impact than would be expected from either alone, principally because these stressors together act to reduce species abundance across the spectrum of population sizes. Our findings illustrate the importance of not only prioritizing the protection of large winter colonies as is currently done, but also of protecting metapopulation dynamics and migratory connectivity.

  5. Effects of wind energy generation and white-nose syndrome on the viability of the Indiana bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Richard A.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Diffendorfer, James E.; Russell, Robin E.; Szymanski, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Wind energy generation holds the potential to adversely affect wildlife populations. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range. One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States. In addition to mortality from wind energy generation, the species also faces range-wide threats from the emerging infectious fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS). White-nose syndrome, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans, disturbs hibernating bats leading to high levels of mortality. We used a spatially explicit full-annual-cycle model to investigate how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect population dynamics of this species. In the simulation, wind turbine mortality impacted the metapopulation dynamics of the species by causing extirpation of some of the smaller winter colonies. In general, effects of wind turbines were localized and focused on specific spatial subpopulations. Conversely, WNS had a depressive effect on the species across its range. Wind turbine mortality interacted with WNS and together these stressors had a larger impact than would be expected from either alone, principally because these stressors together act to reduce species abundance across the spectrum of population sizes. Our findings illustrate the importance of not only prioritizing the protection of large winter colonies as is currently done, but also of protecting metapopulation dynamics and migratory connectivity.

  6. Enhanced and Stable Upconverted White-light Emission in Ho3+/Yb3+/Tm3+-doped LiNbO3Single Crystal via Mg2+Ion Doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lili; Yang, Weiqi; Lin, Jincheng; Huang, Mei; Xue, Yuqi

    2017-11-07

    A strategy to enhance the upconversion white-light intensity via Mg 2+ ion doping was demonstrated in Ho 3+ /Yb 3+ /Tm 3+ /LiNbO 3 single crystal. It is found Mg 2+ ion doping affects the crystal field symmetry around RE 3+ ions and enhance the upconversion emission intensity. Bright white-light is obtained when the Mg 2+ ion concentration is 0.5 mol% in the melt. And the CIE coordinates are hardly changed with Mg 2+ ion doping. In addition, the upconversion mechanism is discussed in detail. It is observed the longer lifetimes of intermediate levels result in the lower upconversion photon numbers, which are beneficial to the upconversion process. Therefore, Mg 2+ ion doped Ho 3+ /Yb 3+ /Tm 3+ /LiNbO 3 single crystals would have potential applications in stable white-light devices and photoelectric instruments.

  7. Antireflective sub-wavelength structures for improvement of the extraction efficiency and color rendering index of monolithic white light-emitting diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Corell, Dennis Dan; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    (CRI) and the correlated color temperature (CCT) of the monolithic white LED have been demonstrated. The CRI of the monolithic white LED could be improved from 92.68 to around 94 by applying a cylinder structure, and the CCT could be modified in a very large range with appropriate design......We have theoretically investigated the influence of antireflective sub-wavelength structures on a monolithic white light-emitting diode (LED). The simulation is based on the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) algorithm, and both cylinder and moth-eye structures have been studied in the work. Our...... simulation results show that a moth-eye structure enhances the light extraction efficiency over the entire visible light range with an extraction efficiency enhancement of up to 26 %. Also for the first time to our best knowledge, the influence of sub-wavelength structures on both the color rendering index...

  8. Experimental demonstration of singular-optical colouring of regularly scattered white light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, O.V.; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Maksimyak, P.P.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental interference modelling of the effects of colouring of a beam traversing a light-scattering medium is presented. It is shown that the result of colouring of the beam at the output of the medium depends on the magnitudes of the phase delays of the singly forward scattered partial signals....... The colouring mechanism has for the first time experimentally been illustrated for a forward propagating beam through a light-scattering medium. This is showed in video-fragments of the interferograms recorded within the zero interference fringe with a gradual change of the path difference of the interfering...... polychromatic wave trains. Spectral investigation of the effects of colouring has been carried out using a solution of liquid crystal in a polymer matrix. The amplitude ratio of the non-scattered and the singly forward scattered interfering components significantly affects the colour intensity. It has further...

  9. Multi-band transmission color filters for multi-color white LEDs based visible light communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qixia; Zhu, Zhendong; Gu, Huarong; Chen, Mengzhu; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2017-11-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based visible light communication (VLC) can provide license-free bands, high data rates, and high security levels, which is a promising technique that will be extensively applied in future. Multi-band transmission color filters with enough peak transmittance and suitable bandwidth play a pivotal role for boosting signal-noise-ratio in VLC systems. In this paper, multi-band transmission color filters with bandwidth of dozens nanometers are designed by a simple analytical method. Experiment results of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) tri-band color filters demonstrate the effectiveness of the multi-band transmission color filters and the corresponding analytical method.

  10. Broadband light generation at ~1300 nm through spectrally recoiled solitons and dispersive waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Peter Andreas; Frosz, Michael Henoch; Bang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We experimentally study the generation of broadband light at ~1300 nm from an 810 nm Ti:sapphire femtosecond pump laser. We use two photonic crystal fibers with a second infrared zero-dispersion wavelength (λZ2) and compare the efficiency of two schemes: in one fiber λZ2=1400 nm and the light...... at 1300 nm is composed of spectrally recoiled solitons; in the other fiber λZ2=1200 nm and the light at 1300 nm is composed of dispersive waves....

  11. The Use of Lighting as a Generator of Theatricality in Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhovana Ramírez Valenzuela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available his article is the study of the search for a method to unite two branches of art: theatre and architecture, through lighting. This allowed us to understand lighting, not only as a technical process, but also as a process that generates emotions and perceptions through the subtle game lighting plays in spaces. In these spaces, drama is the main actor in the decision making process; it can hide what is eye-catching so that the senses are thrown off balance when lightning comes into contact with architecture.

  12. Slow light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Takesue, Hiroki; Shimizu, Kaoru; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Notomi, Masaya

    2013-04-08

    We demonstrate the generation of quantum-correlated photon pairs from a Si photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguide. A slow-light supermode realized by the collective resonance of high-Q and small-mode-volume photonic-crystal cavities successfully enhanced the efficiency of the spontaneous four-wave mixing process. The generation rate of photon pairs was improved by two orders of magnitude compared with that of a photonic-crystal line defect waveguide without a slow-light effect.

  13. Phase study of the generated surface plasmon waves in light transmission through a subwavelength aperture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Mahdieh; Xiao, Sanshui; Farzad, Mahmood Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    Interference of surface plasmon (SP) waves plays a key role in light transmission through a subwavelength aperture surrounded by groove structures. In order to characterize interference of the hole and groove-generated SP waves, their phase information was carefully investigated using finite...... difference time domain simulations. In a structure with only one groove, constructive interference of the generated SP waves will enhance transmitted light by a factor of 5.4 compared with that of a single hole. Increasing the groove number to 3 in the design, which supports constructive interference of SP...... waves, will enhance the transmission coefficient to 10.5 times that for the single-hole transmission coefficient....

  14. Differential group refractive index dispersion of glasses of optical fibres measured by a white-light spectral interferometric technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubina, Petr; Chlebus, Radek; Ciprian, Dalibor

    2007-05-01

    We report on a white-light interferometric technique employing a low-resolution spectrometer to measure the differential group refractive index of glasses of optical fibres over a wide wavelength range. The technique utilizes an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fibre under test of known length inserted in one of the interferometer arms and the other arm with adjustable path length. We record a series of spectral interferograms to measure the equalization wavelength as a function of the path length difference, or equivalently the group dispersion. Subtracting the group dispersion of the optical components present in the interferometer along with the fibre, we measure the wavelength dependence of differential group refractive index for pure silica and SK222 glasses. We confirm that the differential group dispersion measured for pure silica glass agrees well with that described by the dispersion equation.

  15. Cost-effective elimination of lipofuscin fluorescence from formalin-fixed brain tissue by white phosphor light emitting diode array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yulong; Chakrabartty, Avi

    2016-12-01

    Autofluorescence of aldehyde-fixed tissues greatly hinders fluorescence microscopy. In particular, lipofuscin, an autofluorescent component of aged brain tissue, complicates fluorescence imaging of tissue in neurodegenerative diseases. Background and lipofuscin fluorescence can be reduced by greater than 90% through photobleaching using white phosphor light emitting diode arrays prior to treatment with fluorescent probes. We compared the effect of photobleaching versus established chemical quenchers on the quality of fluorescent staining in formalin-fixed brain tissue of frontotemporal dementia with tau-positive inclusions. Unlike chemical quenchers, which reduced fluorescent probe signals as well as background, photobleaching treatment had no effect on probe fluorescence intensity while it effectively reduced background and lipofuscin fluorescence. The advantages and versatility of photobleaching over established methods are discussed.

  16. Color tuning and white light emission via in situ doping of luminescent lanthanide metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qun; Liu, Shuxia; Liu, Yiwei; He, Danfeng; Miao, Jun; Wang, Xingquan; Ji, Yujuan; Zheng, Zhiping

    2014-01-06

    Isostructural lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are synthesized through the spontaneous self-assembly of H3BTPCA (1,1',1″-(benzene-1,3,5-triyl)tripiperidine-4-carboxylic acid) ligands and lanthanide ions (we term these MOFs Ln-BTPCA, Ln = La(3+), Tb(3+), Sm(3+), etc.). Prompted by the observation that the different lanthanide ions have identical coordination environment in these MOFs, we explored and succeeded in the preparation of mixed-lanthanide analogues of the single-lanthanide MOFs by way of in situ doping using a mixture of lanthanide salts. With careful adjustment of the relative concentration of the lanthanide ions, the color of the luminescence can be modulated, and white light-emission can indeed be achieved. The mechanisms possibly responsible for the observed photophysical properties of these mixed-lanthanide MOFs are also discussed.

  17. Signal processing of white-light interferometric low-finesse fiber-optic Fabry-Perot sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cheng; Wang, Anbo

    2013-01-10

    Signal processing for low-finesse fiber-optic Fabry-Perot sensors based on white-light interferometry is investigated. The problem is demonstrated as analogous to the parameter estimation of a noisy, real, discrete harmonic of finite length. The Cramer-Rao bounds for the estimators are given, and three algorithms are evaluated and proven to approach the bounds. A long-standing problem with these types of sensors is the unpredictable jumps in the phase estimation. Emphasis is made on the property and mechanism of the "total phase" estimator in reducing the estimation error, and a varying phase term in the total phase is identified to be responsible for the unwanted demodulation jumps. The theories are verified by simulation and experiment. A solution to reducing the probability of jump is demonstrated. © 2013 Optical Society of America

  18. Flow properties of the solar wind obtained from white light data, Ulysses observations and a two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Esser, Ruth; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Using the empirical constraints provided by observations in the inner corona and in interplanetary space. we derive the flow properties of the solar wind using a two fluid model. Density and scale height temperatures are derived from White Light coronagraph observations on SPARTAN 201-1 and at Mauna Loa, from 1.16 to 5.5 R, in the two polar coronal holes on 11-12 Apr. 1993. Interplanetary measurements of the flow speed and proton mass flux are taken from the Ulysses south polar passage. By comparing the results of the model computations that fit the empirical constraints in the two coronal hole regions, we show how the effects of the line of sight influence the empirical inferences and subsequently the corresponding numerical results.

  19. Performance comparison of polarized white light emitting diodes using wire-grid polarizers with polymeric and glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jung-Chieh; Chou, Shih-Chieh

    2018-03-01

    Polarized white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) packaged with reflective metal wire-grid polarizer of polymeric and glass substrates were investigated. The performance comparison of polymeric wire-grid polarizer film (WGF) and nano wire-grid polarizer (NWGP) with glass substrate was evaluated. The transverse electric field (TE) polarization transmittance of WGF is less than that of NWGP due to its smaller grid parameters. Despite of the higher duty cycle of WGF, the angular-dependent extinction ratio (ER) of the polarized WLEDs (PWLEDs) with WGF is higher than that of with NWGP. Regarding increasing drive currents, the PWLEDs with NWGP had better color stability than that with WGF due to better substrate thermal stability. In summary, linewidth, period and substrate material are the crucial factors for the PWLED packaging using wire grid polarizer.

  20. Effect of gold wire bonding process on angular correlated color temperature uniformity of white light-emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bulong; Luo, Xiaobing; Zheng, Huai; Liu, Sheng

    2011-11-21

    Gold wire bonding is an important packaging process of lighting emitting diode (LED). In this work, we studied the effect of gold wire bonding on the angular uniformity of correlated color temperature (CCT) in white LEDs whose phosphor layers were coated by freely dispersed coating process. Experimental study indicated that different gold wire bonding impacts the geometry of phosphor layer, and it results in different fluctuation trends of angular CCT at different spatial planes in one LED sample. It also results in various fluctuating amplitudes of angular CCT distributions at the same spatial plane for samples with different wire bonding angles. The gold wire bonding process has important impact on angular uniformity of CCT in LED package. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  1. Top-emitting white organic light-emitting devices with a one-dimensional metallic-dielectric photonic crystal anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wenyu; Zhang, Letian; Zhang, Tianyu; Liu, Guoqiang; Xie, Wenfa; Liu, Shiyong; Zhang, Hanzhuang; Zhang, Liying; Li, Bin

    2009-09-15

    Top-emitting white organic light-emitting devices (TEWOLEDs) with 1D metallic-dielectric photonic crystal (1D MDPC) as an anode are investigated. A quasi-periodic 1D MDPC anode allowed for fabrication of multiple-peak TEWOLEDs. A two-peak or three-peak TEWOLED was obtained by simply adjusting the thickness of the dielectric layers in the MDPC. The efficiency of the TEWOLEDs are comparable to the corresponding bottom WOLED (11.1 cd/A), which are 9.9 (two-peak device) and 9.4 cd/A (three-peak device), respectively, and the contrast of the TEWOLEDs is about twice as high as the bottom device owing to the low reflection of the anode.

  2. Strength of the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field - A Comparison of Independent Estimates Using Contemporaneous Radio and White-Light Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anshu; Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Wang, T. J.

    2017-11-01

    We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength (B) during the 23 July 2016 coronal mass ejection (CME) event using i) the flux rope structure of the CME in the white-light coronagraph images and ii) the band-splitting in the associated type II burst. No models were assumed for the coronal electron density (N(r)) we used in the estimation. The results obtained with these two independent methods correspond to different heliocentric distances (r) in the range {≈} 2.5 - 4.5 R_{⊙}, but they show excellent consistency and could be fit with a single power-law distribution of the type B(r)=5.7r^{-2.6} G, which is applicable in that distance range. The power-law index ( i.e. -2.6) is in good agreement with the results obtained in previous studies by different methods.

  3. Influence of lead and cadmium fluoride variation on white light emission characteristics in oxyfluoride glasses and glass–ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Gopi, E-mail: sharmagopi28@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Kanya Maha Vidyalaya, Jalandhar, Punjab 144004 (India); Bagga, Ruchika; Mahendru, Nancy [Department of Physics, Kanya Maha Vidyalaya, Jalandhar, Punjab 144004 (India); Falconieri, Mauro [ENEA, UTAPRAD, C.R.Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome (Italy); Achanta, Venu Gopal [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, TIFR, Mumbai (India); Goel, Ashutosh [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey, NJ (United States); Rasool, Shaik Nayab; Vijaya, Navooru [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati (India)

    2015-03-15

    The radiative properties of Dy-doped glasses and glass–ceramic phosphors with varying lead and cadmium fluoride content are investigated in the present study for white light emitting applications. The precipitation of cubic lead fluoride phase of 10–18 nm crystallites was determined with the help of x-ray diffraction studies and the nanocrystalline nature was confirmed with scanning electron microscopy studies. The small size of the nanocrystallites enables the fabrication of transparent glass–ceramics which is verified by UV–vis spectroscopic study. The photoluminescence and lifetime measurements indicate towards progressive changes in the Dy{sup 3+} ion surroundings and propose enhanced energy transfers taking place post-heat treatments. Finally, CIE chromaticity coordinates are found to lie in the white region proposing the suitability of the present studied materials for color display devices. - Highlights: • Enhanced energy transfer in glass ceramics. • Depolymerization of network with variation in heavy metal fluoride. • Radiative properties of Dy{sup 3+} doped glass as W-LED.

  4. Wavelength-Scanning SPR Imaging Sensors Based on an Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter and a White Light Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjun Zeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A fast surface plasmon resonance (SPR imaging biosensor system based on wavelength interrogation using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF and a white light laser is presented. The system combines the merits of a wide-dynamic detection range and high sensitivity offered by the spectral approach with multiplexed high-throughput data collection and a two-dimensional (2D biosensor array. The key feature is the use of AOTF to realize wavelength scan from a white laser source and thus to achieve fast tracking of the SPR dip movement caused by target molecules binding to the sensor surface. Experimental results show that the system is capable of completing a SPR dip measurement within 0.35 s. To the best of our knowledge, this is the fastest time ever reported in the literature for imaging spectral interrogation. Based on a spectral window with a width of approximately 100 nm, a dynamic detection range and resolution of 4.63 × 10−2 refractive index unit (RIU and 1.27 × 10−6 RIU achieved in a 2D-array sensor is reported here. The spectral SPR imaging sensor scheme has the capability of performing fast high-throughput detection of biomolecular interactions from 2D sensor arrays. The design has no mechanical moving parts, thus making the scheme completely solid-state.

  5. Intense Upconverted White Light Emission from Tm3+ - Er3+ - Yb3+ Doped Zinc Tungsten Tellurite Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan BİLİR

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The different amount of rare earth ions doped zinc tungsten tellurite glasses with the compositions (70-x-y-zTeO2 – 20ZnO – 10WO3 – xEr2O3 – yTm2O3 – zYb2O3 (x = 0.3, 0.5; y = 0.3, 0.5; z = 3 have been synthesized using melt quenching technique. Blue, green, red and infrared luminescence via energy transfer and frequency upconversion mechanisms in Tm3+/Er3+/Yb3+ triply-doped zinc tungsten tellurite glasses were investigated under single 975 nm diode laser excitation. Intense blue (Tm3+: 1D2→3F4, 1G4→3H6; 477 nm, green (2H11/2, 4S3/2→4I15/2 ; 525 nm and 549 nm, red (Er3+: 4F9/2→4I15/2, Tm3+: 1G4→3F4; 659 nm and infrared (Tm3+: 1G4→3H5, 3H4→3H6 ; 807 nm emissions were observed simultaneously at room temperature. Intense white light emission from all samples was observed with CCT values higher than 6500 K and CRI values lower than 80. The CIE coordinates of the emitted white light were found to shift to yellowish-greenish region with increasing pumping power. The possible energy transfer and upconversion mechanisms are discussed and plausible explanations are made.

  6. Dual function of rare earth doped nano Bi2O3: white light emission and photocatalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Dimple P; Roy, Mainak; Tyagi, A K

    2012-09-14

    Undoped Bi(2)O(3) and single and double doped Bi(2)O(3) : M (where M = Tb(3+) and Eu(3+)) nanophosphors were synthesized through a simple sonochemical process and characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), EDS, diffuse reflectance (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry. The TEM micrographs show that resultant nanoparticles have a rod-like shape. Energy transfer was observed from host to the dopant ions. Characteristic green emissions from Tb(3+) ions and red emissions from Eu(3+) ions were observed. Interestingly, the Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the double doped Bi(2)O(3) : Eu(3+)(0.8%) : Tb(3+)(1.2%) nanorods lie in the white light region of the chromaticity diagram and it has a quantum efficiency of 51%. The undoped Bi(2)O(3) showed a band gap of 3.98 eV which is red shifted to 3.81eV in the case of double doped Bi(2)O(3) : Eu(3+)(0.8%) : Tb(3+)(1.2%) nanorods. The photocatalytic activities of undoped nano Bi(2)O(3) and double doped nano Bi(2)O(3) : Eu(3+)(0.8%) : Tb(3+)(1.2%) were evaluated for the degradation of Rhodamine B under UV irradiation of 310 nm. The results showed that Bi(2)O(3) : Eu(3+)(0.8%) : Tb(3+)(1.2%) had better photocatalytic activity compared to undoped nano Bi(2)O(3). The evolution of CO(2) was realized and these results indicated the continuous mineralization of rhodamine B during the photocatalytic process. Thus double doped Bi(2)O(3) : Eu(3+)(0.8%) : Tb(3+)(1.2%) nanorods can be termed as a bifunctional material exhibiting both photocatalytic properties and white light emission.

  7. Microfluidic White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Based on Integrated Patterns of Greenish-Blue and Yellow Solvent-Free Liquid Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naofumi; Kasahara, Takashi; Edura, Tomohiko; Oshima, Juro; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Tsuwaki, Miho; Imato, Toshihiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a novel microfluidic white organic light-emitting diode (microfluidic WOLED) based on integrated sub-100-μm-wide microchannels. Single-μm-thick SU-8-based microchannels, which were sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and cathode pairs, were fabricated by photolithography and heterogeneous bonding technologies. 1-Pyrenebutyric acid 2-ethylhexyl ester (PLQ) was used as a solvent-free greenish-blue liquid emitter, while 2,8-di-tert-butyl-5,11-bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)-6,12-diphenyltetracene (TBRb)-doped PLQ was applied as a yellow liquid emitter. In order to form the liquid white light-emitting layer, the greenish-blue and yellow liquid emitters were alternately injected into the integrated microchannels. The fabricated electro-microfluidic device successfully exhibited white electroluminescence (EL) emission via simultaneous greenish-blue and yellow emissions under an applied voltage of 100 V. A white emission with Commission Internationale de l’Declairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.40, 0.42) was also obtained; the emission corresponds to warm-white light. The proposed device has potential applications in subpixels of liquid-based microdisplays and for lighting. PMID:26439164

  8. Race, Age, and Identity Transformations in the Transition from High School to College for Black and First-Generation White Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Race and class differences in academic and social integration matter for educational success, social mobility, and personal well-being. In this article, I use interview data with students attending predominantly white four-year research universities to investigate the integration experiences of black and first-generation white men. I examine each…

  9. Predicting the Use of Campus Counseling Services for Asian/Pacific Islander, Latino/Hispanic, and White Students: Problem Severity, Gender, and Generational Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kieran T.; Ramos-Sanchez, Lucila; McIver, Stephanie D.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify predictors of counseling center use among Asian/Pacific Islander, Latino/Hispanic, and White college students. Findings indicated that female and 2nd-generation students report the most severe difficulties. Problem severity and gender predicted counseling center use for White and Asian/Pacific…

  10. Response of bats to light with different spectra: light-shy and agile bat presence is affected by white and green, but not red light

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spoelstra, K; van Grunsven, Roy H. A; Ramakers, J.J.C; Ferguson, Kim B; Raap, Thomas; Donners, Maurice; Veenendaal, Elmar M; Visser, Marcel E

    2017-01-01

    .... Different spectra may therefore be applied to reduce negative impacts. We used a unique set-up of eight field sites to study the response of bats to three different experimental light spectra in an otherwise dark and undisturbed natural habitat...

  11. Toward near-white-light electroluminescence from n-ZnO nanocrystals/n-Si isotype heterojunctions via an AZO spectral scissor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuxin; Lu, Qiuchun; Cheng, Xi; Mo, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yulu; Tao, Xiaoma; Ouyang, Yifang

    2017-08-07

    A strategy to realize ZnO-based near-white-light electroluminescence (EL) was proposed by utilizing and regulating the intrinsic defect-related emissions of solution-processed ZnO nanocrystals (NCs). Prototype near-white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based upon this strategy were demonstrated by using n-ZnO NCs/n-Si isotype heterojunctions. The emission color of the n-ZnO NCs/n-Si isotype heterojunction LEDs was tuned toward near white by using an Al-doped ZnO (AZO) spectral "scissor" which can tailor the green light more severely, rather than the blue or red light. Moreover, quantum size effect was clearly observed in both the photoluminescence (PL) and EL spectra via the redshift of the near-band-edge UV emission of the ZnO NCs. The strategy using AZO spectral "scissors" to regulate the VO-related green emission of ZnO may present a promising pathway to realize ZnO-based white-light LEDs.

  12. A long distance voice transmission system based on the white light LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chunyu; Wei, Chang; Wang, Yulian; Wang, Dachi; Yu, Benli; Xu, Feng

    2017-10-01

    A long distance voice transmission system based on a visible light communication technology (VLCT) is proposed in the paper. Our proposed system includes transmitter, receiver and the voice signal processing of single chip microcomputer. In the compact-sized LED transmitter, we use on-off-keying and not-return-to-zero (OOK-NRZ) to easily realize high speed modulation, and then systematic complexity is reduced. A voice transmission system, which possesses the properties of the low-noise and wide modulation band, is achieved by the design of high efficiency receiving optical path and using filters to reduce noise from the surrounding light. To improve the speed of the signal processing, we use single chip microcomputer to code and decode voice signal. Furthermore, serial peripheral interface (SPI) is adopted to accurately transmit voice signal data. The test results of our proposed system show that the transmission distance of this system is more than100 meters with the maximum data rate of 1.5 Mbit/s and a SNR of 30dB. This system has many advantages, such as simple construction, low cost and strong practicality. Therefore, it has extensive application prospect in the fields of the emergency communication and indoor wireless communication, etc.

  13. Future Solid State Lighting using LEDs and Diode Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-01-01

    significant savings. Solid state lighting (SSL) based on LEDs is today the most efficient light source for generation of high quality white light. Diode lasers, however, have the potential of being more efficient than LEDs for the generation of white light. A major advantage using diode lasers for solid state...... lighting is that the high efficiency can be obtained at high light lumen levels in a single element emitter and thus less light sources are required to achieve a desired light level. Furthermore, the high directionality of the generated light from laser diodes increases the energy savings in many...... applications. Within the coming years, it is expected that the efficiency of blue laser diodes will approach the efficiency of infrared diode lasers. This will enable high efficiency white light generation with very high lumen per watt values. SSL today is mainly based on phosphor converted blue light emitting...

  14. Heavy-heavy and heavy-light quarks interactions generated by QCD vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musakhanov Mirzayusuf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The QCD vacuum is populated by instantons that correspond to the tunneling processes in the vacuum. This mechanism creates the strong vacuum gluon fields. As result, the QCD vacuum instantons induce very strong interactions between light quarks, initially almost massless. Such a strong interactions bring a large dynamical mass M of the light quarks and bound them to produce almost massless pions in accordance with the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry (SBCS. On the other hand, the QCD vacuum instantons also interact with heavy quarks and responsible for the generation of the heavy-heavy and heavy-light quarks interactions, with a traces of the SBCS. If we take the average instanton size ρ¯=0.33$\\bar \\rho = 0.33$ fm, and the average inter-instanton distance R¯=1$\\bar R = 1$ fm we obtain the dynamical light quark mass to be M = 365 MeV and the instanton media contribution to the heavy quark mass ΔM=70 MeV. These factors define the coupling between heavy-light and heavy-heavy quarks induced by the QCD vacuum instantons. We consider first the instanton effects on the heavy-heavy quarks potential, including its spin-dependent part. We also discuss those effects on the masses of the charmonia and their hyperfine mass splittings. At the second part we discuss the interaction between a heavy and light quarks generated by instantons and it’s effects.

  15. Optical-density-enhanced squeezed-light generation without optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, You-Lin; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Yu, Ite A.

    2017-11-01

    To achieve a high degree of quantum noise squeezing, an optical cavity is often employed to enhance the interaction time between light and matter. Here, we propose to utilize the effect of coherent population trapping (CPT) to directly generate squeezed light without any optical cavity. Combined with the slow propagation speed of light in a CPT medium, a coherent state passing through an atomic ensemble with a high optical density (OD) can evolve into a highly squeezed state even in a single passage. Our study reveals that noise squeezing of more than 10 dB can be achieved with an OD of 1000, which is currently available in experiments. A larger OD can further increase the degree of squeezing. As the light intensity and two-photon detuning are key factors in the CPT interaction, we also demonstrate that the minimum variance at a given OD can be reached for a wide range of these two factors, showing the proposed scheme is flexible and robust. Furthermore, there is no need to consider the phase-matching condition in the CPT scheme. Our introduction of high OD in atomic media not only brings a long light-matter interaction time comparable to optical cavities, but also opens an alternative avenue in the generation of squeezed light for quantum interface.

  16. Realization of wide circadian variability by quantum dots-luminescent mesoporous silica-based white light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin; Zhang, Jingjing; Chen, Wei; Hao, Junjie; Cheng, Yanhua; Hu, Run; Wu, Dan; Wang, Kai; Luo, Xiaobing

    2017-10-01

    Human comfort has become one of the most important criteria in modern lighting architecture. Here, we proposed a tuning strategy to enhance the non-image forming photobiological effect on the human circadian rhythm based on quantum-dots-converted white light-emitting diodes (QDs-WLEDs). We introduced the limiting variability of the circadian action factor (CAF), defined as the ratio of circadian efficiency and luminous efficiency of radiation. The CAF was deeply discussed and was found to be a function of constraining the color rendering index (CRI) and correlated color temperatures. The maximum CAF variability of QDs-WLEDs was found to be dependent on the QDs’ peak wavelength and full width at half maximum. With the optimized parameters, the packaging materials were synthesized and WLEDs were packaged. Experimental results show that at CRI > 90, the maximum CAF variability can be tuned by 3.83 times (from 0.251 at 2700 K to 0.961 at 6500 K), which implies that our approach could reduce the number of tunable channels, and could achieve wider CAF variability.

  17. Chip-scale white flip-chip light-emitting diode containing indium phosphide/zinc selenide quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Bingfeng; Yan, Linchao; Lao, Yuqin; Ma, Yanfei; Chen, Zimin; Ma, Xuejin; Zhuo, Yi; Pei, Yanli; Wang, Gang

    2017-08-01

    A method for preparing a quantum dot (QD)-white light-emitting diode (WLED) is reported. Holes were etched in the SiO2 layer deposited on the sapphire substrate of the flip-chip LED by inductively coupled plasma, and these holes were then filled with QDs. An ultraviolet-curable resin was then spin-coated on top of the QD-containing SiO2 layer, and the resin was cured to act as a protecting layer. The reflective sidewall structure minimized sidelight leakage. The fabrication of the QD-WLED is simple in preparation and compatible with traditional LED processes, which was the minimum size of the WLED chip-scale integrated package. InP/ZnS core-shell QDs were used as the converter in the WLED. A blue light-emitting diode with a flip-chip structure was used as the excitation source. The QD-WLED exhibited color temperatures from 5900 to 6400 K and Commission Internationale De L'Elcairage color coordinates from (0.315, 0.325) to (0.325, 0.317), under drive currents from 100 to 400 mA. The QD-WLED exhibited stable optoelectronic properties.

  18. arXiv Interferometer-based high-accuracy white light measurement of neutral rubidium density and gradient at AWAKE

    CERN Document Server

    Batsch, Fabian; Oez, Erdem; Moody, Joshua; Gschwendtner, Edda; Caldwell, Allen; Muggli, Patric

    The AWAKE experiment requires an automated online rubidium (Rb) plasma density and gradient diagnostic for densities between 1 and 10$\\cdot$10$^{14}$ cm$^{-3}$. A linear density gradient along the plasma source at the percent level may be useful to improve the electron acceleration process. Because of full laser ionization of Rb vapor to Rb$^{+}$ within a radius of 1 mm, the plasma density equals the vapor density. We measure the Rb vapor densities at both ends of the source, with high precision using, white light interferometry. At either source end, broadband laser light passes a remotely controlled Mach-Zehnder interferometer built out of single mode fibers. The resulting interference signal, influenced by dispersion in the vicinity of the Rb D1 and D2 transitions, is dispersed in wavelength by a spectrograph. Fully automated Fourier-based signal conditioning and a fit algorithm yield the density with an uncertainty between the measurements at both ends of 0.11 to 0.46 $\\%$ over the entire density range. T...

  19. Managing excitons for high performance hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes by using a simple planar heterojunction interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changsheng; Sun, Ning; Wu, Zhongbin; Chen, Jiangshan; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.; Ma, Dongge

    2018-01-01

    High performance hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) were fabricated by inserting a planar heterojunction interlayer between the fluorescent and phosphorescent emitting layers (EMLs). The maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 19.3%, current efficiency of 57.1 cd A-1, and power efficiency (PE) of 66.2 lm W-1 were achieved in the optimized device without any light extraction enhancement. At the luminance of 1000 cd m-2, the EQE and PE remained as high as 18.9% and 60 lm W-1, respectively, showing the reduced efficiency-roll. In order to disclose the reason for such high performance, the distribution of excitons was analyzed by using ultra-thin fluorescent and phosphorescent layers as sensors. It was found that the heterojunction interlayer can efficiently separate the singlet and triplet excitons, preventing the triplet excitons from being quenched by the fluorescent emitter. The introduction of the heterojunction interlayer between the fluorescent and phosphorescent EMLs should offer a simple and efficient route to fabricate the high performance hybrid WOLEDs.

  20. Eliminating the influence of source spectrum of white light scanning interferometry through time-delay estimation algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yunfei; Cai, Hongzhi; Zhong, Liyun; Qiu, Xiang; Tian, Jindong; Lu, Xiaoxu

    2017-05-01

    In white light scanning interferometry (WLSI), the accuracy of profile measurement achieved with the conventional zero optical path difference (ZOPD) position locating method is closely related with the shape of interference signal envelope (ISE), which is mainly decided by the spectral distribution of illumination source. For a broadband light with Gaussian spectral distribution, the corresponding shape of ISE reveals a symmetric distribution, so the accurate ZOPD position can be achieved easily. However, if the spectral distribution of source is irregular, the shape of ISE will become asymmetric or complex multi-peak distribution, WLSI cannot work well through using ZOPD position locating method. Aiming at this problem, we propose time-delay estimation (TDE) based WLSI method, in which the surface profile information is achieved by using the relative displacement of interference signal between different pixels instead of the conventional ZOPD position locating method. Due to all spectral information of interference signal (envelope and phase) are utilized, in addition to revealing the advantage of high accuracy, the proposed method can achieve profile measurement with high accuracy in the case that the shape of ISE is irregular while ZOPD position locating method cannot work. That is to say, the proposed method can effectively eliminate the influence of source spectrum.