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Sample records for white leghorn hens

  1. Ochratoxicosis in White Leghorn breeder hens: Production and breeding performance

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    Zahoor Ul Hassan*, Muhammad Zargham Khan, Ahrar Khan, Ijaz Javed1, Umer Sadique2 and Aisha Khatoon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effect of Ochratoxin A (OTA upon production and breeding parameters in White Leghorn (WL breeder hens. For this purpose, 84 WL breeder hens were divided into seven groups (A-G. The hens in these groups were maintained on feed contaminated with OTA @ 0.0 (control, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/Kg, respectively for 21 days. These hens were artificially inseminated with semen obtained from healthy roosters kept on OTA free feed. Egg production and their quality parameters were recorded. Fertile eggs obtained from each group were set for incubation on weekly basis. At the end of the experiment, hens in each group were killed to determined gross and microscopic lesions in different organs. OTA residue concentrations were determined in extracts of liver, kidneys and breast muscles by immunoaffinity column elution and HPLC-Fluorescent detection techniques. Feeing OTA contaminated diet resulted in a significant decrease in egg mass and egg quality parameters. Liver and kidneys showed characteristic lesions of ochratoxicosis. Residue concentration (ng/g of OTA in the hens fed 10 mg/kg OTA, was the highest in liver (26.336±1.16 followed by kidney (8.223±0.85 and were least in breast muscles (1.235±0.21. Embryonic mortalites were higher, while hatachabilites of the chicks were lower in the groups fed higher doses of OTA. Feeding OTA contaminated diets to breeder hen resulted in residues accumulation in their tissues along with significantly reduced production and breeding performance.

  2. Genetic parameters for egg and related characteristics of white Leghorn hens in a subtropical environment

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    Sabri,Hani M.; Wilson,Henry R.; Harms,Robert H.; Charles J. Wilcox

    1999-01-01

    Estimates of heritability and phenotypic and genetic correlations between egg number, weight, specific gravity, mass, and estimated shell weight were obtained, along with phenotypic and genetic correlations of specific gravity and weight with body weight, weight change, metabolizable energy intake, residual feed consumption, and weight and age at sexual maturity. Data were from 350 White Leghorn hens by 50 sires and 175 dams. Heritabilities of the egg traits ranged from 0.20 to 0.55, increasi...

  3. Reproductive responses of white leghorn hens to graded concentrations of mercuric chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E.F.; Shaffner, C.S.

    1974-01-01

    White Leghorn hens were maintained on diets containing 0, 4, 12 or 36 p.p.m. Hg as HgCl2 from hatching in an effort to confirm (with a second species) our previously reported effects on Japanese quail reproduction. In the quail study both onset of laying and rate of egg production were accelerated by 16 and 32 p.p.m. Hg as HgCl2, but ferti ity was depressed. After 1 year on diets containing HgCl2 none of the Leghorn hens manifested any observed signs of Hg poisoning. Hens fed 4 or 12 p.p.m. Hg began ovipositing an average of 10 days earlier than the controls (P < 0.05). Young hens (< 9 months old) fed 4 or 12 p.p.m. Hg laid significantly more eggs per hen-day than did either controls or those fed 36 p.p.m. Hg. Beyond 9 months of age there were no perceptible differences in rate of egg production among the treatments. These findings support our quail results. When the hens were inseminated with pooled semen from untreated roosters fertility, embryonic development and hatchability appeared to be unaffected by the treatments. This contrasts with our previous experiment with quail in which both sexes were fed HgCl2.

  4. The influence of crumble and mash feed on oral lesions of white leghorn laying hens.

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    Daft, B; Read, D; Manzer, M; Bickford, A; Kinde, H

    2001-01-01

    The effect of crumble and mash feed on oral lesions in laying hens was investigated. Each of two groups of white leghorn hens (group A, n = 120; group B, n = 120) was separated into crumble- and mash-fed treatments. At the start of the trial, group A chickens were free of oral lesions, whereas group B chickens had nearly 100% prevalence of oral lesions. The trials began at 17.4 and 22 wk of age and ended at 32 and 33 wk of age for groups A and B, respectively. Chickens were housed in cages indoors, fed free choice, and serologically monitored. Oral lesions were periodically evaluated by visual scoring. Lesion prevalence peaked in group A chickens at 23-25 wk of age, concurrently with an outbreak of respiratory disease, and decreased to a low level at the end of the trial. For most of the trial, crumble-fed chickens had significantly lower oral lesion prevalence than mash-fed chickens (P < 0.05). Lesion prevalence in group B chickens decreased after treatments began and maintained this trend to the end of the trial. Compared with mash-fed chickens, crumble-fed chickens in group B had significantly lower oral lesion prevalence throughout the trial (P < 0.001). Neither group had significant differences in oral lesion scores between treatments. Most lesions were on the lower palate, pinpoint to 2 mm in diameter, often multiple, and bilaterally symmetrical. Feed analyses for mycotoxins and heavy metals were within normal limits. The inciting etiology of oral lesions was not elucidated in this trial. However, this work demonstrated that once lesions were present, feed type had a strong effect on persistence of oral lesions.

  5. Genetic parameters for egg and related characteristics of white Leghorn hens in a subtropical environment

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    Hani M. Sabri

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of heritability and phenotypic and genetic correlations between egg number, weight, specific gravity, mass, and estimated shell weight were obtained, along with phenotypic and genetic correlations of specific gravity and weight with body weight, weight change, metabolizable energy intake, residual feed consumption, and weight and age at sexual maturity. Data were from 350 White Leghorn hens by 50 sires and 175 dams. Heritabilities of the egg traits ranged from 0.20 to 0.55, increasing with age of bird from 26 to 54 weeks of age. Their standard errors ranged from 0.07 (all data to 0.17 (26 to 29 weeks. Phenotypic correlations ranged from 0.80 to -0.13, and genetic correlations from 0.91 to -0.27, depending on egg trait. The highest phenotypic and genetic correlations were between egg number and mass. Genetic correlations for specific gravity and estimated shell weight were, with body weight, -0.02 and 0.56; weight change, 0.29 and 0.44; daily metabolizable energy intake, -0.10 and 0.33; residual consumption, -0.16 and 0.11; age at sexual maturity, -0.61 and -0.46, and weight at sexual maturity, 0.02 and 0.63. Results should contribute to the design of efficient selection programs for economically important traits in hens.Estimativas de herdabilidade e correlações fenotípicas e genéticas entre o número de ovos, peso, gravidade específica, massa e peso estimado da casca foram obtidas, assim como correlações fenotípicas e genéticas de gravidade específica e peso com peso corporal, alterações ponderais, ingestão de energia metabolizável, consumo alimentar residual e peso e idade ao atingir a maturidade sexual. Os dados foram obtidos de 350 galinhas da raça Leghorn Branca obtidas de 50 pais e 175 mães. A herdabilidade dos caracteres dos ovos variou de 0,20 a 0,55, aumentando com a idade da ave de 26 a 54 semanas. O desvio padrão variou de 0,07 (todos os dados a 0,17 (26 a 29 semanas. As correlações fenotípicas variaram

  6. Biological and economic optimum level of calcium in White Leghorn laying hens.

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    Castillo, C; Cuca, M; Pro, A; González, M; Morales, E

    2004-06-01

    Calcium is important in eggshell formation; inadequate levels in the diet of laying hens may affect shell quality and egg production. An experiment with 250 Leghorn Hy-Line W-98 hens was conducted to evaluate 5 dietary Ca levels (2.96, 3.22, 3.83, 4.31, and 4.82%) in 3 laying periods. The evaluated variables were egg production (EP), egg mass (EM), average daily feed intake (ADFI), feed conversion (FC), and specific gravity (SG). The biological optimum level (BOL) of Ca for maximum egg production and specific gravity, and the economic optimum level (EOL) to maximize profits were calculated. There was no interaction between Ca level and laying period. The results show that the Ca level of the diet (P < 0.05) affected the intake of this nutrient (3.34, 3.68, 4.26, 4.89, and 5.39 g bird/day), ADFI (113, 114, 111, 113, and 111 g bird/day), and SG (1.080, 1.081, 1.082, 1.083, and 1.083). As the hens aged, EP and SG diminished (P < 0.05). BOL for maximum EP and SG were 4.34 and 4.62%, and EOL was 4.38%.

  7. The Effect of Cooled Perches on Immunological Parameters of Caged White Leghorn Hens during the Hot Summer Months.

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    Rebecca A Strong

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine if thermally cooled perches improve hen immunity during hot summer. White Leghorn pullets at 16 week of age were randomly assigned to 18 cages of 3 banks at 9 hens per cage. Each bank was assigned to 1 of the 3 treatments up to 32 week of age: 1 thermally cooled perches, 2 perches with ambient air, and 3 cages without perches. Hens were exposed to natural ambient temperatures from June through September 2013 in Indiana with a 4 h acute heat episode at 27.6 week of age. The packed cell volume, heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L ratio, plasma concentrations of total IgG, and cytokines of interleukin-1β and interleukin-6, plus lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-α factor were measured at both 27.6 and 32 week of age. The mRNA expressions of these cytokines, toll-like receptor-4, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were also examined in the spleen of 32 week-old hens. Except for H/L ratio, thermally cooled perches did not significantly improve currently measured immunological indicators. These results indicated that the ambient temperature of 2013 summer in Indiana (24°C, 17.1 to 33.1°C was not high enough and the 4 h heat episode at 33.3°C (32 to 34.6°C was insufficient in length to evoke severe heat stress in hens. However, cooled perch hens had a lower H/L ratio than both air perch hens and control hens at 27.6 week of age and it was still lower compared to control hens (P < 0.05, respectively at 32 week of age. The lowered H/L ratio of cooled perch hens may suggest that they were able to cope with acute heat stress more effectively than control hens. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of thermally cooled perches on hen health under higher ambient temperatures.

  8. Pathological Responses of White Leghorn Breeder Hens Kept on Ochratoxin A Contaminated Feed

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    Zahoor-ul-Hassan, M. Zargham Khan*, Ahrar Khan and Ijaz Javed1

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins are among the most important environmental contaminants. In the present study, ochratoxin A (OTA was produced by propagation of Aspergillus ochraceus and fed to breeder hens. For this purpose, 84 breeder hens were divided into seven groups (A-G. Group A served as control, while groups B, C, D, E, F and G were fed OTA at 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/Kg feed, respectively for 3 weeks. Clinical signs, feed intake, feed conversion ratio and egg mass production were recorded on daily basis, while body weight was recorded on weekly basis. Lesions on visceral organs and serum biochemical parameters were determined. Significant decrease in feed intake, body weight and egg mass production was found in the OTA treated groups compared to control (P<0.05. Among different groups, diarrhea, unthriftiness, water intake and depression increased with increase in dietary OTA levels. Enlargement and hemorrhages on liver and kidney were more severe in birds fed higher dietary OTA levels. Serum ALT, urea, creatinine and total protein levels were significantly higher in OTA treated groups. It was concluded that production performance, pathological alterations and serum biochemical changes determined became more severe with increase in dietary levels of OTA.

  9. Effects of feeding processed kidney bean meal (Phaseolus vulgaris by replacing soybean meal on egg fertility and qualities of chicks of white leghorn hens

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    Sisay Fikru

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding processed kidney bean meal (PKBM by replacing soybean meal (SBM on fertility, hatchability, embryonic mortality and chick quality of white leghorn (WL hens. A total of 225 white leghorn hens (195 layers and 30 cocks with uniform body weight (BW and age were randomly distributed into 15 pens and assigned to five treatments (i.e., T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5. A total of 360 eggs collected from all the treatment birds were used for the analysis. The feeds of the treatments were SBM substituted by PKBM at 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% levels for T1, T2, T3, T4, and T5, respectively. Replacement of SBM with PKBM in the diet did not affect the fertility, hatchability, embryonic mortality, chick length, chick weight, and chick quality by visual score. As no difference is observed, 100% replacement of SBM by PKBM (dosed at 100 g/kg concentrate diet is possible.

  10. Furnished cage system and hen well-being: Comparative effects of furnished cages and battery cages on behavioral exhibitions in White Leghorn chickens.

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    Pohle, K; Cheng, H-W

    2009-08-01

    The battery cage system is being banned in the European Union before or by 2012, and the furnished cage system will be the only cage system allowed after 2012. This study was conducted to examine the different effects of caging systems, furnished cages vs. battery cages, on bird behaviors. One hundred ninety-two 1-d-old non-beak-trimmed Hy-Line W-36 White Leghorn chicks were reared using standard management practices in raised wire cages. At 19 wk of age, the birds were randomly assigned into battery cages or furnished cages. The battery cages were commercial wire cages containing 6 birds per cage, providing 645 cm(2) of floor space per birds. The furnished cages had wire floors and solid metal walls, with perches, a dustbathing area, scratch pads, and a nestbox area with a concealment curtain. Based on the company recommendations, 10 birds were housed per cage, providing a stocking density of 610 cm(2) of floor space per bird. Behavioral observations were conducted using the Noldus Observer software package. The birds were observed at 5-min intervals for the entire light period. The birds housed in battery cages had higher posture and behavioral transitions and increased time spent walking and performing exploratory behavior (P < 0.05, 0.01, respectively), which may indicate they were stressed, resulting in restlessness, whereas the birds housed in furnished cages had higher levels of preening (P < 0.05). Preening has been considered as a comfort behavior in birds. These results may suggest that furnished cages may be a favorable alternative system for housing birds by allowing them to perform certain natural behaviors.

  11. en gallinas white leghorn L33

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    D. M. García

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio fue evaluar el efecto del peso corporal sobre indicadoresbioproductivos en gallinas White Leghorn L33. Se estudiaron 192 gallinas ponedorascon 39 semanas de edad durante un período de seis semanas y con tres observacionessemanales. Se diseñaron dos grupos según peso vivo, con 96 gallinas cada uno (tres réplicasde 32 aves, teniendo el grupo 1 entre 1500-1600 g y el grupo 2 entre 1735-1820 g; esteúltimo correspondió al rango establecido para este híbrido con esa edad. Además de laviabilidad y mortalidad se determinaron las variables bioproductivas (producción, peso,tamaño, forma y grosor de la cáscara de los huevos, así como la proporción de sucios,manchados y cascados. En la última semana del estudio, se analizó la calidad internadel huevo (dimensión y color de clara y yema y se calcularon los índices de yema, claray Unidades Haugh. Se realizó una estadística descriptiva y se utilizaron las pruebas Tde Student y Fisher (P < 0,05 para comparar las medias entre grupos. Se evidenciarondiferencias estadísticas significativas entre producción, peso y tamaño de los huevos parael grupo de mayor peso corporal. Asimismo, se comprobó mayor calidad interna delhuevo (altura de clara y yema en este segundo grupo. Sin embargo, no se evidenciarondiferencias significativas en la calidad externa de los huevos (sucios, manchados, cascados,pero sí en el grosor de la cáscara. Se concluye que el peso corporal influye directay positivamente sobre los indicadores bioproductivos en gallinas White Leghorn L33.

  12. growth performance and survival of local and white leghorn chicken ...

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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to evaluate the comparative growth, sexual maturity, survival, and feed utilization efficiency of local and White Leghorn chicken under intensive management condition. Five groups of each of the two breeds, with 200 baby chicks each, were subjected to appetite feeding with ...

  13. Comparison of energy utilization efficiency among six lines of White Leghorns.

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    Sabri, H M; Wilson, H R; Wilcox, C J; Harms, R H

    1991-02-01

    Individual records were used of feed consumption, BW, BW change, and egg mass (EM) output during a 4-wk period for 180 hens from six different lines of White Leghorn chickens (30 hens per line). The diet contained 16.45% protein and 2,825 kcal ME/kg. Feed consumption was used to calculate actual ME intake (AcME) for each hen. Multiple regression of AcME was performed with metabolic BW, BW change, and EM production as independent variables. The regression coefficients and the independent variables were then used to calculate the expected ME intake (ExME). The following values were calculated for each hen and were used to compare energy efficiency among the six lines: the residual component of energy intake (RES), defined as the difference between the AcME intake and ExME intake; the relative efficiency ratio (RER), defined as (ExME divided by AcME) X 100 (calculated using the partial regression coefficients of the overall equation); and feed conversion, the ratio of feed consumed to EM. Significant differences among the lines in efficiency of EM produced were observed regardless of the efficiency measurement used. Feed consumption did not indicate differences in RES or RER. A multiple regression equation was derived for each line. Significant differences were found among the six lines in their energy requirements for maintenance and for egg production. These results suggest the possible use of the partial regression coefficients as selection criteria for separately improving maintenance efficiency and egg production efficiency.

  14. Ideal ratios of isoleucine, methionine, methionine plus cystine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine relative to lysine for white leghorn-type laying hens of twenty-eight to thirty-four weeks of age

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    Seven separate experiments were conducted with Hy-Line W-36 hens to determine the ideal ratio of Arg, Ile, Met, Met+Cys, Thr, Trp, and Val relative to Lys for maximal egg mass. The experiments were conducted simultaneously and were each designed as a randomized complete block design with 60 experime...

  15. Comparative evaluation of phenobarbital-induced CYP3A and CYP2H1 gene expression by quantitative RT-PCR in Bantam, Bantamized White Leghorn and White Leghorn chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriya, Harshad V; Kalia, Anil; Bhavsar, Shailesh K; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Rank, Dharamshibhai N; Thaker, Aswin M

    2005-12-01

    The present work was to study induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A and CYP2H1 gene by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative RTPCR in Bantam, Bantamized White Leghorn and White Leghorn chicks. Out of 18 chicks total 3 from each group (Bantam, Bantamized White Leghorn and White Leghorn) were treated intraperitoneal with phenobarbital at the dose rate of 12 mg/100 g (body weight) while the control group was treated with the saline. Total RNA was extracted from the liver samples using Tri Reagent based method. First strand cDNA was synthesized using one step RT-PCR kit. The PCR was performed and the product was subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis. Quantitative RT-PCR was conducted to quantify gene expression level of CYP3A and CYP2H1 genes. Relative expression ratio of CYP3A and CYP2H1 genes was calculated using relative expression software tool (REST). It was found that CYP3A is up regulated by factor of 1.34, 14.51 and 1.00 in Bantam, Bantamized White Leghorn and White Leghorn chicks, respectively. In Bantam and Bantamized White Leghorn chicks CYP2H1 gene was up regulated by factor 1.50 and 80.87, respectively but down regulated by a factor of 1.97 in White Leghorn chicks. The PCR efficiency ranged from 1.30 to 1.70, 0.86 to 1.70 and 0.91 to 1.58 for CYP3A, CYP2H1 and beta-actin, respectively in Bantam, Bantamized White Leghorn and White Leghorn chicks.

  16. Genetic analysis of egg quality traits in White Leghorn chicken

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    Rudra Nath Chatterjee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to estimate the genetic parameters and to assess the inheritance pattern of egg quality traits in White Leghorns. Materials and Methods: Data on 480 eggs produced by 40 week old pullets of 4 genetic groups were used for studying egg quality traits. Heritabilities and correlations were estimated by full sib correlation method using Mixed Model Least Squares and Maximum Likelihood (LSMLMW computer program. Results: The egg weight, haugh unit, yolk index, albumen index, yolk weight, albumen weight, shell weight and shell thickness ranged from 50.01 ± 0.48 to 53.89 ± 0.43 g, 65.38 ± 0.92 to 80.98 ± 1.01, 0.341 ± 0.003 to 0.353 ± 0.003, 0.056 ± 0.002 to 0.087 ± 0.002, 14.16 ± 0.13 to 15.58 ± 0.12 g, 30.92 ± 0.39 to 33.18 ± 0.39 g, 4.32 ± 0.05 to 5.12 ± 0.05 g and 0.336 ± 0.003 to 0.376 ± 0.003 mm, respectively. Heritability estimates for egg weight, yolk index, albumen index and albumen weight ranged from low to medium while those of haugh unit, yolk weight, shell weight and shell thickness ranged from low to high. The genetic and phenotypic correlations of egg weight with other egg quality traits except shell quality traits were mostly positive and moderate to high. High positive genetic and phenotypic correlations between haugh unit and other traits were observed. Genetic correlation of yolk weight with albumen weight was positive while that with shell quality traits was mostly negative. Shell weight was positively correlated with shell thickness. Conclusion: Significant genetic group differences were observed for various egg quality traits studied. The heritability estimates for different egg quality traits were low to moderate. The association among egg quality traits was positive in general. [Vet World 2013; 6(5.000: 263-266

  17. Divergent selection for mature body weight in dwarf White Leghorns. 1. Growth and reproductive responses to selection.

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    Benoff, F H; Renden, J A

    1983-10-01

    Genetic selection for high (H) and low (L) 20-week body weight (BW) in dwarf White Leghorns was practiced for three generations. The base population was the Oregon State University dwarf Leghorn population (C) selected previously for part year hen-housed egg production (EP), early sexual maturity (SM), and large initial egg weight (EW). Asymmetry of response was observed in both sexes. Realized heritabilities for 20-week BW for H and L males were .49 and .36 and for H and L females were .45 and .79, respectively. Twenty-week BW of the 3rd generation H and L line females were 1.48 and .80 kg, respectively, compared to 1.13 kg for the C line. Similar weights for the males were 1.74, .97, and 1.27 kg for the H, L, and C line, respectively. The H and L lines diverged significantly in 10, 20, 40, and 60-week BW, SM, and EW after one generation of selection and the divergence continued through the third generation. The EP and egg specific gravity did not differ among lines. The C line was intermediate to the selected lines for all traits except EP. The EW at 35 and 60 weeks differed between the H and L lines by 10 g at generation 3 and SM was 149 and 157 days for the H and L lines, respectively.

  18. AGENT IN THE DIET OF WHITE ,LEGHORN LAYERS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oleoresin is used as a colorant in the food industry and capsicum is used in the manufacture of medicaments. After extraction, the remaining dried and ground flesh (pepper spent) is left as a by-product. Small—scale poultry producers can use the by-product to feed egg-laying hens. In this regard, it was shown in an earlier ...

  19. El peso corporal y su efecto sobre indicadores bioproductivos en gallinas white leghorn L33

    OpenAIRE

    D. M. García; M. C. Colas; W. S. López; E. O. R. Pérez; A. P. Sánchez; M. C. P. Lamazares; R. G. Grandía

    2016-01-01

    El objetivo del presente estudio fue evaluar el efecto del peso corporal sobre indicadoresbioproductivos en gallinas White Leghorn L33. Se estudiaron 192 gallinas ponedorascon 39 semanas de edad durante un período de seis semanas y con tres observacionessemanales. Se diseñaron dos grupos según peso vivo, con 96 gallinas cada uno (tres réplicasde 32 aves), teniendo el grupo 1 entre 1500-1600 g y el grupo 2 entre 1735-1820 g; esteúltimo correspondió al rango establecido para este híbrido con es...

  20. Proteomic analysis of hen egg white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin-Dubiard, Catherine; Pasco, Maryvonne; Mollé, Daniel; Désert, Colette; Croguennec, Thomas; Nau, Françoise

    2006-05-31

    Hen egg white is an original biological fluid in which major proteins have been widely studied, unlike the minor components. In this study, two-dimensional electrophoresis associated with mass spectrometry enabled the separation of 69 protein spots and their matching with major proteins, which were already known, and with minor proteins. Sixteen proteins were identified, and among them, two had never been previously detected in hen egg white, i.e., Tenp, a protein with strong homology with a bacterial permeability-increasing protein family (BPI), and VMO-1, an outer layer vitelline membrane protein. Thirteen proteins present a very wide polymorphism (ovotransferrin, ovomucoid, clusterin, etc.), some of them up to nine isoforms (ovoinhibitor). Eleven functional protein families were identified (serpin, transferrin, protease inhibitors Kazal, glycosyl hydrolases, lipocalin, bactericidal permeability-increasing protein, clusterin, UPAR/CD59/Ly6/ snake neurotoxin, cysteine protease inhibitor, VMO-1, and folate receptor families). These various biological functions could be interesting for further valorizations. In addition, three spots remain unidentified, probably because these proteins are not yet indexed in the international protein databanks.

  1. Prediction of heterosis using genome-wide SNP-marker data: application to egg production traits in white Leghorn crosses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amuzu-Aweh, E.N.; Bijma, P.; Kinghorn, B.P.; verreijken, A.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Bovenhuis, H.

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of heterosis has a long history with mixed success, partly due to low numbers of genetic markers and/or small data sets. We investigated the prediction of heterosis for egg number, egg weight and survival days in domestic white Leghorns, using ~400¿000 individuals from 47 crosses and

  2. Effects of sex and gonadal steroids on arginine vasotocin and mesotocin in the pineal gland and neurohypophysis of White Leghorn fowls.

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    Robinzon, B; Sayag, N; Koike, T I; Kinzler, S L; Neldon, H L

    1990-12-01

    1. Pineal and neurohypophysial arginine vasotocin (AVT) and mesotocin (MT) were measured in White Leghorn hens, cockerels and castrated males treated with either testosterone propionate (TP) or oestradiol benzoate (EB) (n = 10/group). The lighting regimen was 14 h light: 10 h dark, supplied by natural diffused sunlight and incandescent bulbs. 2. Both AVT and MT were detected in the pineal gland of all the chickens. 3. There was no significant effect of either sex or treatments on pineal MT. 4. Females had about 4 times more pineal AVT than males, regardless of their treatment. There was no effect of the treatments on pineal AVT in the males. 5. No sexual difference in neurohypophysial AVT was detected, but the neurohypophysis of the castrated males treated with EB contained less AVT than the neurohypophysis of the intact males. 6. Intact males had about twice as much MT in the neurohypophysis as females. Castrated males treated with either TP or EB had similar concentrations of neurohypophysial MT, which were lower than that of the intact males, but higher than that of the females.

  3. Pattern recognition receptor genes expression profiling in indigenous chickens of India and White Leghorn.

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    Haunshi, S; Burramsetty, Arun Kumar; Kannaki, T R; Ravindra, K S Raja; Chatterjee, R N

    2017-09-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRR) such as Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, RIG-I helicase receptors, and C-type lectin receptors play a critical role in innate immunity as a first line of defense against invading pathogens through recognition of pathogen and/or damage-associated molecular patterns. Genetic makeup of birds is known to play a role in resistance or susceptibility to various infectious diseases. Therefore, the present study was carried out to elucidate the differential expression of PRR and some of the cytokine genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of indigenous chicken breeds such as Ghagus and Nicobari and an exotic chicken breed, White Leghorn (WLH). The stability of expression of reference genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 3 breeds was first determined using NormFinder and BestKeeper programs. NormFinder determined B2M and G6PDH reference genes as the best combination with stability value of 0.38. Out of total 14 genes studied, expression of ten genes was found to be significantly different among 3 breeds after normalization with these reference genes. Ghagus breed showed higher level of expression of TLR1LB, TLR7, NOD1, NOD5, B-Lec, IFNβ, IL1β, and IL8 genes when compared to Nicobari breed. Further, Ghagus showed higher expression of TLR1LB, MDA5, LGP2, B-Lec, IL1β, and IL8 genes as compared to WLH breed. Higher expression of LGP2 and MDA5 genes was observed in Nicobari compared to the WLH breed while higher expression of TLR7, NOD1, NOD5, and IFNβ genes was observed in WLH as compared to Nicobari breed. No difference was observed in the expression of TLR1LA, TLR3, B-NK, and IFNα genes among 3 breeds. Study revealed significant breed effect in expression profile of PRR and some of the cytokine genes and Ghagus breed seems to have better expression profile of these genes linked to the innate immunity when compared to the WLH and Nicobar breeds. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  4. Social interactions in Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus) and White Leghorn layers in stable groups and after re-grouping.

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    Väisänen, J; Håkansson, J; Jensen, P

    2005-04-01

    Although social behaviour is a major factor affecting the coping of poultry in production environments little is known about how it has been affected by intensive selection processes in fowl. We attempted to clarify selection effects on overall repertoire and occurrence of different social behaviours as well as on aggressive responses to re-grouping with unfamiliar birds by comparing high-producing White Leghorn layers to wild type Red Junglefowl. In the first experiment we observed 8 stable mixed sex groups/breed each consisting of four 24-week-old birds previously familiar to each other. During 9 consecutive days, a wide range of social signals, sexual and aggressive interactions as well as spacing behaviour and activity were recorded over a 12-h photoperiod. In the second experiment, starting at 19 weeks of age, 16 single sex groups of three birds from each breed were formed by mixing unfamiliar individuals. Aggressive behaviours were recorded 0, 5, 24 and 48 h after re-grouping. Results from the stable groups indicated that the repertoire of social behaviours has been preserved during selection with few changes in frequencies and intensities. However, Leghorns showed a more cohesive spacing pattern than junglefowl. In the second experiment, aggressive activity was higher immediately and after 24 h following re-grouping in Leghorns, but there was a drop in the aggressiveness at 5 h to the same level as junglefowl. We suggest that this may indicate poorer social learning capacity with a weaker ability to cope with group disruptions compared to the ancestral breed.

  5. Correlated effects of selection for immunity in White Leghorn chicken lines on natural antibodies and specific antibody responses to KLH and M. butyricum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minozzi, G.; Parmentier, H.K.; Mignon-Grasteau, S.; Nieuwland, M.G.B.; Bed'hom, B.; Gourichon, D.; Minvielle, F.; Pinard-van der Laan, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background - The effect of selection for three general immune response traits on primary antibody responses (Ab) to Mycobacterium butyricum or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was studied in four experimental lines of White Leghorn chicken. Birds underwent 12 generations of selection for one of three

  6. Myricetin Prevents Fibrillogenesis of Hen Egg White Lysozyme

    OpenAIRE

    He, Jianwei; Wang, Yu; Chang, Alan K.; Xu, Linan; Wang, Na; Chong, Xiaoying; Li, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Jones, Gary W.; Song, Youtao

    2014-01-01

    Myricetin is a natural flavonol found in many grapes, berries, fruits, vegetables, and herbs as well as other plants. Recent studies have identified potential antiamyloidogenic activity for this compound. In this study, the kinetics of amyloid fibril formation by hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and the antifibril-forming activity of myricetin were investigated. We demonstrate that myricetin significantly inhibits the fibrillation of HEWL and the inhibitory effect is dose-dependent. Int...

  7. Effect of Dietary Protein and Energy Level on Proximate Composition of Breast and Thigh Meat in White Leghorn Layers at Molt and Post Molt Production Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Javaid*, M. I. Anjum1 and M. Akram2

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to explore the effects of varying protein and energy levels in molt diets on meat composition of White Leghorn layers. One hundred and fifty four, 70 weeks old, layers were randomly divided into 18 experimental units of 8 hens each in addition to 10 birds that were slaughtered at pre molt and post fast stages. After 10 days of fasting during molting, 6 experimental diets having 3 levels of crude protein (CP i.e. 14, 16 and 18% and 2 levels of metabolizable energy (ME i.e. 2700 and 2900 kcal/kg were given to the birds at the rate of 45 g/bird for 25 day. There after the birds were offered ad-libitum layer ration during production phase. Two birds per replicate at post molt, at 50% egg production and at the end of experiment were slaughtered and then breast and thigh meat samples were analyzed for proximate composition. Moisture (71.7 and 70.0% content was significantly (P<0.05 higher while, ether extract (2.13 and 3.49% was significantly (P<0.05 lower in both breast and thigh meat, respectively, with 18% CP diet as compared to 14 and 16% CP diets. Medium Protein-High Energy (MPHE molt diet having 16% CP with 2900 kcal/kg ME produced more dry matter and protein content in meat at the expense of ether extract. Results regarding proximate composition of layer meat determined at different stages of molting and post molt production revealed that moisture and protein contents of both breast and thigh meat were significantly increased where as, ether extract and ash contents were significantly decreased at post fast stage with respect to other stages.

  8. Nigerian Indigenous vs Exotic Hens: the Correlation Factor in Body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic interrelationship within and between strains was assessed using pure Nigerian normal feathered local, pure exotic and their crossbred hens for age and body weight at first lay, egg weight and egg internal quality traits. 100 layers comprising 20 Black Nera, 20 White Leghorn, 20 Normal feathered local chicken, 20 ...

  9. A comparison of cecal colonization of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in white leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogomolnaya Lydia M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial food borne illnesses worldwide. A major source of infection for humans is consumption of chicken or egg products that have been contaminated with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, however our knowledge regarding colonization and persistence factors in the chicken is small. Results We compared intestinal and systemic colonization of 1-week-old White Leghorn chicks and Salmonella-resistant CBA/J mice during infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium ATCC14028, one of the most commonly studied isolates. We also studied the distribution of wild type serotype Typhimurium ATCC14028 and an isogenic invA mutant during competitive infection in the cecum of 1-week-old White Leghorn chicks and 8-week-old CBA/J mice. We found that although the systemic levels of serotype Typhimurium in both infected animal models are low, infected mice have significant splenomegaly beginning at 15 days post infection. In the intestinal tract itself, the cecal contents are the major site for recovery of serotype Typhimurium in the cecum of 1-week-old chicks and Salmonella-resistant mice. Additionally we show that only a small minority of Salmonellae are intracellular in the cecal epithelium of both infected animal models, and while SPI-1 is important for successful infection in the murine model, it is important for association with the cecal epithelium of 1-week-old chicks. Finally, we show that in chicks infected with serotype Typhimurium at 1 week of age, the level of fecal shedding of this organism does not reflect the level of cecal colonization as it does in murine models. Conclusion In our study, we highlight important differences in systemic and intestinal colonization levels between chick and murine serotype Typhimurium infections, and provide evidence that suggests that the role of SPI-1 may not be the same during colonization of both animal models.

  10. Detection of exonic variants within the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene in Black Silky, White Leghorn and Golden duckwing Araucana chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jungsou; Lee, Yoonseok; Hyeong, KiEun; Ha, Jaejung; Yi, JunKoo; Kim, Byungki; Oh, Dongyep

    2014-08-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene can be considered a candidate functional gene for the pigmentation of plumage color. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the genotype frequencies of g.69 T>C, g.376 G>A and g.427 A>G SNPs within the MC1R gene in Black silky (O), Golden duckwing Araucana (GA) and White Leghorn (W). The CC and AA genotype frequencies of g.69 T>C and g.427 A>G SNPs in White Leghorn (W) were both 1.000, and the TT genotype frequency of the g.69 T>C SNP in Golden duckwing Araucana (GA) was also 1.000. The GG and AA genotype frequencies of g.376 G>A and g.427 A>G SNPs in Black silky (O) were both 0.100. When a haplotype is observed using a combination of markers, a Golden duckwing Araucana (GA) can especially be distinguished when it is a TAG, TGG and TAA type in the SNP combination of the MC1R gene. In case of the CAA types, only White Leghorn (W) could specifically be distinguished. Therefore, three SNPs in MC1R may provide identification in chicken breeds.

  11. Temporal embryonic transcription of chicken fast skeletal myosin heavy chain isoforms in the single comb white leghorn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, J; St-Pierre, N; Lilburn, M S; Wick, M

    2016-05-01

    There are numerous factors that can significantly influence embryonic development in poultry and thus make simple days of incubation (chronological age) a less than perfect metric for studying embryonic physiology. The developmental fast skeletal muscle myosin (MyHC), the predominant protein in the Pectoralis major (PM), is temporally expressed as a cadre of highly specific developmental isoforms. In the study described herein, a novel molecular technology (NanoString) was used to characterize the myosin isoform transcriptional patterns in the PM of Single Comb White Leghorn (SCWL) embryos. NanoString technology is based on quantitative analysis of the transcriptome through digital detection and quantification of target mRNA transcripts. Total RNA was isolated and gene transcription quantified using NanoString in embryonic muscle samples collected daily from 6 through 19 days of incubation. Data were analyzed using the LOESS smoothing function at a 95% confidence level. The temporal transcription of MyHC isoforms obtained in this study was consistent with the literature at higher specificity and resolution, thus validating NanoString for use in gene transcription analyses. The results support a hypothesis that the transcription patterns of the embryonic MyHC isoforms may be used as molecular clocks to further investigate the developmental relationships underlying embryonic fast skeletal muscle growth and development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  12. EFFECT OF VITAMIN C SUPPLEMENTATION ON THE PERFORMANCE OF DESI, FAYOUMI AND COMMERCIAL WHITE LEGHORN CHICKEN EXPOSED TO HEAT STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Khan and R. Sardar

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Sixty layers (50 weeks of age each of native Desi, Fayoumi and commercial White Leghorn (Nick Chick were kept in wire cages following completely randomized design for 8 weeks during summer season (June and July. The birds of each type were divided into two groups i.e. with and without supplementation of vitamin C with three replicates assigned to each layer group (10 birds in each replicate. The vitamin C (C-vit fort was added at the rate of 5 ml/5 liter in drinking water throughout the experimental period in respective layer group. The results indicated that the mean egg production, egg weight and egg shell thickness improved (P<0.05 with supplementation of vitamin C in all layers. The average feed consumption of three types of layers was also improved (P<0.05 with supplementation of vitamin C. The blood picture showed that the concentration of ascorbic acid was higher (P<0.05 in groups supplemented with vitamin C. However, the concentrations of blood enzymes (ALP, SGPT and SGOT were lowered (P<0.01 with vitamin C supplementation in all types of layers. Based on the findings of the present study, it was concluded that vitamin C supplementation was effective in improving performance of layers under heat stress conditions.

  13. Enteropathogenicity of Dutch and German avian reoviruses in SPF white leghorn chickens and broilers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Songserm, T.; Roozelaar, van D.; Kant-Eenbergen, H.C.M.; Pol, J.; Pijpers, A.; Huurne, ter A.A.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    The enteropathogenicity of avian reoviruses (ARVs), isolated from chickens affected with malabsorption syndrome (MAS) from The Netherlands and Germany was studied. In the first trial seven different ARVs isolated from MAS cases were inoculated in 1-day-old specific pathogenic free (SPF) white

  14. Effect of Dietary Vanaspati Alone and in Combination with Stressors on Sero-biochemical Profile and Immunity in White Leghorn Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Raj, M. Alpha; Reddy, A. Gopala; Reddy, A. Rajasekhar; Adilaxmamma, K.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 160 White Leghorns of 20 wk age were divided randomly into eight groups. Groups 1, 3, 4 and 5 were fed basal feed and the rest were fed 5% vanaspati supplemented feed until 42 wk of age. From 42 to 54 wk, groups 3, 4 and 5 were fed 1% ferrous sulfate, 100 ppm chlorpyrifos (CPS) and 100 ppm cadmium, respectively, along with basal feed and groups 6, 7 and 8 were fed similar stressors, respectively, along with 5% vanaspati. Groups 1 and 2 served as controls for basal feed and 5% vanas...

  15. Modulatory effects of two levels of dietary Alliums on immune response and certain immunological variables, following immunization, in White Leghorn chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanieh, Hamza; Narabara, Kiyoaki; Piao, Mingzi; Gerile, Chaogetu; Abe, Asaki; Kondo, Yasuhiro

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effects of dietary Allium sativum (garlic, G) and Allium cepa (onion, O) on immune functions in White Leghorn chicken. One-week-old chicks, were fed diets without (control) or with Alliums (GL and OL, 10 g or GH and OH, 30 g/kg diet). Chickens were immunized with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and Brucella abortus (BA). Antibodies, lymphocyte proliferation, and ratios of CD4(+) , CD8(+) and CD4⁻ CD8⁻ lymphocytes were investigated. Histology and weights of the spleen, thymus and bursa (BF), and white blood cell (WBC) counts were studied as well. Alliums at 10 g/kg diet enhanced anti-NDV, anti-SRBC and anti-BA antibody productions, whereas 30 g/kg diet had less stimulatory effects. Histology of the lymphoid organs and proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were not influenced. However, splenocyte and thymocyte proliferations were augmented with garlic. Flow cytometry analysis showed reduction in CD4(+) and increase in CD4⁻ CD8⁻ lymphocyte ratios in GH and OH groups. Garlic-supplemented chickens had heavier spleen and thymus, and higher WBC counts, whereas BF weight increased with both Alliums at 30 g/kg diet. These results suggest that dietary Alliums have a potential to enhance the immune functions in White Leghorn chickens. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  16. Myricetin prevents fibrillogenesis of hen egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianwei; Wang, Yu; Chang, Alan K; Xu, Linan; Wang, Na; Chong, Xiaoying; Li, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Jones, Gary W; Song, Youtao

    2014-10-01

    Myricetin is a natural flavonol found in many grapes, berries, fruits, vegetables, and herbs as well as other plants. Recent studies have identified potential antiamyloidogenic activity for this compound. In this study, the kinetics of amyloid fibril formation by hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and the antifibril-forming activity of myricetin were investigated. We demonstrate that myricetin significantly inhibits the fibrillation of HEWL and the inhibitory effect is dose-dependent. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect toward HEWL fibrillation was stronger than that exerted by the previously characterized fibril-forming inhibitor quercetin, which has high structural similarity with myricetin. Spectrofluorometric and computational studies suggest that the mechanism underlying the inhibitory action of myricetin at a molecular level is to reduce the population of partially unfolded HEWL intermediates. This action is achieved by the tight binding of myricetin to the aggregation-prone region of the β-domain of HEWL and linking to the relatively stable α-domain, thus resulting in the inhibition of amyloid fibril formation.

  17. Purification of chicken carbonic anhydrase isozyme-III (CA-III and its measurement in White Leghorn chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishita Toshiho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The developmental profile of chicken carbonic anhydrase-III (CA-III blood levels has not been previously determined or reported. We isolated CA-III from chicken muscle and investigated age-related changes in the levels of CA-III in blood. Methods CA-III was purified from chicken muscle. The levels of CA-III in plasma and erythrocytes from 278 female chickens (aged 1-93 weeks and 68 male chickens (aged 3-59 weeks were determined by ELISA. Results The mean level of CA-III in female chicken erythrocytes (1 week old was 4.6 μg/g of Hb, and the CA-III level did not change until 16 weeks of age. The level then increased until 63 weeks of age (11.8 μg/g of Hb, decreased to 4.7 μg/g of Hb at 73 weeks of age, and increased again until 93 weeks of age (8.6 μg/g of Hb. The mean level of CA-III in erythrocytes from male chickens (3 weeks old was 2.4 μg/g of Hb, and this level remained steady until 59 weeks of age. The mean plasma level of CA-III in 1-week-old female chickens was 60 ng/mL, and this level was increased at 3 weeks of age (141 ng/mL and then remained steady until 80 weeks of age (122 ng/mL. The mean plasma level of CA-III in 3-week-old male chickens was 58 ng/mL, and this level remained steady until 59 weeks of age. Conclusion We observed both developmental changes and sex differences in CA-III concentrations in White Leghorn (WL chicken erythrocytes and plasma. Simple linear regression analysis showed a significant association between the erythrocyte CA-III level and egg-laying rate in WL-chickens 16-63 weeks of age (p

  18. Serotonin release in the caudal nidopallium of adult laying hens genetically selected for high and low feather pecking behavior: An in vivo microdialysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kops, Marjolein S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341590649; Kjaer, Joergen B.; Güntürkün, Onur; Westphal, Koen G.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304839337; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A.H.; Olivier, Berend|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073067199; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth; Korte, S. Mechiel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/088952827

    2014-01-01

    Severe feather pecking (FP) is a detrimental behavior causing welfare problems in laying hens. Divergent genetic selection for FP in White Leghorns resulted in strong differences in FP incidences between lines. More recently, it was shown that the high FP (HFP) birds have increased locomotor

  19. Lysophosphatidic acid produced by hen egg white lysophospholipase D induces vascular development on extraembryonic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, Junichi; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Satouchi, Kiyoshi; Yoshiomoto, Tanihiro; Tokumura, Akira

    2013-03-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (lysoPtdOH), a lysophospholipid mediator, exerts diverse physiological effects, including angiogenesis, through its specific G-protein-coupled receptors. Previously, we showed that unfertilized hen egg white contains polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich lysoPtdOH and lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD). Here, we examined whether lysoPtdOH was produced by lysoPLD in the presence and absence of a hen fertilized ovum and what the physiological role of lysoPtdOH in hen egg white is. Mass spectrometry showed that fertilized hen egg white contained about 8 μM lysoPtdOH before incubation with an ovum, mainly comprised of 18:1- (12.6 %), 18:2- (37.8 %) and 20:4-molecular species (41.5 %). In an early gestation period, the lysoPtdOH was increased up to 9.6 μM, concomitant with a decrease in the level of polyunsaturated lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPtdCho). Moreover, lysoPtdOH-degrading activities were found in egg white and the vitelline membrane, showing that these enzymes control lysoPtdOH levels in egg white. In an egg yolk angiogenesis assay, two lysoPtdOH receptor antagonists, Ki16425 and N-palmitoyl serine phosphoric acid (NASP), inhibited blood vessel formation induced by exogenously added 18:1-lysoPtdOH and its precursor lysoPtdCho on the hen yolk sac. Ki16425 and NASP also inhibited blood vessel formation in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Furthermore, the relatively higher levels of LPA₁, LPA₂, LPA₄ and LPA₆ mRNA were present in the yolk sac and CAM. These results suggest that lysoPtdOH produced from lysoPtdCho by the action of lysoPLD in hen egg white is involved in the formation of blood vessel networks through several lysoPtdOH receptors on various extraembryonic membranes, including the yolk sac membrane and CAM.

  20. Effects of Flow on Hen Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL) Fibril Formation: Lenght Distribution, Flexibility, and Kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humblet-Hua, K.N.P.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of steady shear and turbulent flow on the formation of amyloid fibrils from hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was studied. The conversion and size distribution of fibrils obtained by heating HEWL solutions at pH 2 were determined. The formation of fibrils was quantified using flow-induced

  1. Bone-Remodeling Transcript Levels Are Independent of Perching in End-of-Lay White Leghorn Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice D. Dale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a bone disease that commonly results in a 30% incidence of fracture in hens used to produce eggs for human consumption. One of the causes of osteoporosis is the lack of mechanical strain placed on weight-bearing bones. In conventionally-caged hens, there is inadequate space for chickens to exercise and induce mechanical strain on their bones. One approach is to encourage mechanical stress on bones by the addition of perches to conventional cages. Our study focuses on the molecular mechanism of bone remodeling in end-of-lay hens (71 weeks with access to perches. We examined bone-specific transcripts that are actively involved during development and remodeling. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we examined seven transcripts (COL2A1 (collagen, type II, alpha 1, RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand, OPG (osteoprotegerin, PTHLH (PTH-like hormone, PTH1R (PTH/PTHLH type-1 receptor, PTH3R (PTH/PTHLH type-3 receptor, and SOX9 (Sry-related high mobility group box in phalange, tibia and femur. Our results indicate that the only significant effect was a difference among bones for COL2A1 (femur > phalange. Therefore, we conclude that access to a perch did not alter transcript expression. Furthermore, because hens have been used as a model for human bone metabolism and osteoporosis, the results indicate that bone remodeling due to mechanical loading in chickens may be a product of different pathways than those involved in the mammalian model.

  2. Functionalisation of Polyvinylpyrrolidone on Gold Nanoparticles Enhances Its Anti-Amyloidogenic Propensity towards Hen Egg White Lysozyme

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tulika Das; Vidyalatha Kolli; Srijeeb Karmakar; Nandini Sarkar

    2017-01-01

    ...)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (PVP-AuNps) on hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) amyloids. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized using various biophysical techniques like Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis...

  3. Determination of space use by laying hens using kinematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mench, Joy A; Blatchford, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    Two states in the United States now have legislation requiring that laying hens be provided with sufficient space to perform particular behaviors. To provide a framework for translating these performance standards into a space requirement, kinematic analysis was used to measure the amount of space needed for White Leghorn hens to stand, turn around 180°, lie down, and wing flap. Hyline W-36 hens (n = 9) were marked on the tops of their heads and the tips of both wings and 3 toes with black livestock marker. Each hen was then placed in a floor pen (91.4 × 91.4 cm) and filmed using 2 high-speed cameras. The resulting images were processed using a software program that generated 3-dimensional space use for each behavior. Because none of the hens lay down in the test pen, the 2-dimensional space required for lying was determined by superimposing a grid over videos of the hens lying down in their home cages. On average, hens required a mean area of 563 (± 8) cm(2) to stand, 1,316 (± 23) cm(2) to turn around, 318 (± 6) cm(2) to lie down, and 1,693 (± 136) cm(2) to wing flap. The mean heights used were 34.8 (± 1.3) cm for standing, 38.6 (± 2.3) cm for turning, and 49.5 (± 1.8) cm for wing flapping. However, space requirements for hens housed in multiple-hen groups in cage or noncage systems cannot be based simply on information about the space required for local movement by a single hen. It must also incorporate consideration of the tendency of hens in a flock to synchronize their behaviors. In addition, it must include not just local movement space but also the space that hens may need to use for longer-distance movements to access resources such as food, water, perches, and nest boxes.

  4. Topical application of garlic reduces northern fowl mite infestation in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birrenkott, G P; Brockenfelt, G E; Greer, J A; Owens, M D

    2000-11-01

    Northern fowl mites (NFM) are external parasites that can lower egg production and cause anemia and even death in laying hens. An experiment was conducted with New Hampshire Red and Single Comb White Leghorn laying hens. Hens were individually caged and provided a complete laying diet and water ad libitum. Hens were assigned to groups in a way that assured that treatments, within each breed, would be applied to comparable numbers of birds with light and heavy mite infestations. Each hen was sprayed around the vent with either water or 10% garlic juice in water. Spraying continued each week for 3 wk. During the fourth week, each bird was scored for the presence of NFM on its skin and feathers. A small snippet of feathers was removed from below the vent of each hen and placed in a labeled petri dish with a round, white filter paper insert. The NFM content of each dish was scored by two individuals approximately 1 h after sampling. There was no significant difference in the NFM scores for hens based on breed or future treatment. After the birds were treated for 3 wk, there was no significant difference in external NFM scores based on breed. There were significantly fewer NFM on the birds treated with garlic juice compared with controls, based on external and petri dish scoring (P hens had a 1.8-unit decrease in external NFM score. Topical application of garlic juice may be an effective way to decrease NFM in laying hens.

  5. Long-term selection using a single trait criterion, non-destructive deformation, in White Leghorns: Effect over time on genetic parameters for traits related to egg production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Olivier; Nirasawa, Keijiro; Vincenot, Christian E; Nagamine, Yoshitaka; Moriya, Kazuyuki

    2017-02-01

    Although non-destructive deformation is relevant for assessing eggshell strength, few long-term selection experiments are documented which use non-destructive deformation as a selection criterion. This study used restricted maximum likelihood-based methods with a four-trait animal model to analyze the effect of non-destructive deformation on egg production, egg weight and sexual maturity in a two-way selection experiment involving 17 generations of White Leghorns. In the strong shell line, corresponding to the line selected for low non-destructive deformation values, the heritability estimates were 0.496 for non-destructive deformation, 0.253 for egg production, 0.660 for egg weight and 0.446 for sexual maturity. In the weak shell line, corresponding to the line selected for high non-destructive deformation values, the heritabilities were 0.372, 0.162, 0.703 and 0.404, respectively. An asymmetric response to selection was observed for non-destructive deformation, egg production and sexual maturity, whereas egg weight decreased for both lines. Using non-destructive deformation to select for stronger eggshell had a small negative effect on egg production and sexual maturity, suggesting the need for breeding programs to balance selection between eggshell traits and egg production traits. However, the analysis of the genetic correlation between non-destructive deformation and egg weight revealed that large eggs are not associated with poor eggshell quality. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  6. Effect of Dietary Vanaspati Alone and in Combination with Stressors on Sero-biochemical Profile and Immunity in White Leghorn Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, M Alpha; Reddy, A Gopala; Reddy, A Rajasekhar; Adilaxmamma, K

    2011-01-01

    A total of 160 White Leghorns of 20 wk age were divided randomly into eight groups. Groups 1, 3, 4 and 5 were fed basal feed and the rest were fed 5% vanaspati supplemented feed until 42 wk of age. From 42 to 54 wk, groups 3, 4 and 5 were fed 1% ferrous sulfate, 100 ppm chlorpyrifos (CPS) and 100 ppm cadmium, respectively, along with basal feed and groups 6, 7 and 8 were fed similar stressors, respectively, along with 5% vanaspati. Groups 1 and 2 served as controls for basal feed and 5% vanaspati feed. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine transaminase (ALT), total protein, albumin, globulin, A/G ratio, total cholesterol, high density cholesterol (HDL), triglycerides, creatinine, hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer, and phytohemagglutination (PHA) index were studied. Supplementation of vanaspati resulted in a significant reduction in PHA, cholesterol, albumin and HI titer. Cadmium significantly increased ALP, AST, creatinine and paradoxically increased HDL cholesterol and HI titers. Vanaspati along with cadmium showed similar effects. Administration of CPS lowered PHA index, whereas supplementation along with vanaspati decreased the HI titers and increased the PHA index. Supplementation of vanaspati alone and in combination revealed harmful effects and aggravated the toxicities of CPS and cadmium. Hence, it is concluded that consumption of vanaspati could be harmful.

  7. Microsatellite mapping of QTLs affecting resistance to coccidiosis (Eimeria tenella) in a Fayoumi × White Leghorn cross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Hélène; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Coville, Jean-Luc; Pitel, Frédérique; Feve, Katia; Leroux, Sophie; Legros, Hélène; Thomas, Aurélie; Gourichon, David; Repérant, Jean-Michel; Rault, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background Avian coccidiosis is a major parasitic disease of poultry, causing severe economical loss to poultry production by affecting growth and feed efficiency of infected birds. Current control strategies using mainly drugs and more recently vaccination are showing drawbacks and alternative strategies are needed. Using genetic resistance that would limit the negative and very costly effects of the disease would be highly relevant. The purpose of this work was to detect for the first time QTL for disease resistance traits to Eimeria tenella in chicken by performing a genome scan in an F2 cross issued from a resistant Fayoumi line and a susceptible Leghorn line. Results The QTL analysis detected 21 chromosome-wide significant QTL for the different traits related to disease resistance (body weight growth, plasma coloration, hematocrit, rectal temperature and lesion) on 6 chromosomes. Out of these, a genome-wide very significant QTL for body weight growth was found on GGA1, five genome-wide significant QTL for body weight growth, plasma coloration and hematocrit and one for plasma coloration were found on GGA1 and GGA6, respectively. Two genome-wide suggestive QTL for plasma coloration and rectal temperature were found on GGA1 and GGA2, respectively. Other chromosme-wide significant QTL were identified on GGA2, GGA3, GGA6, GGA15 and GGA23. Parent-of-origin effects were found for QTL for body weight growth and plasma coloration on GGA1 and GGA3. Several QTL for different resistance phenotypes were identified as co-localized on the same location. Conclusion Using an F2 cross from resistant and susceptible chicken lines proved to be a successful strategy to identify QTL for different resistance traits to Eimeria tenella, opening the way for further gene identification and underlying mechanisms and hopefully possibilities for new breeding strategies for resistance to coccidiosis in the chicken. From the QTL regions identified, several candidate genes and relevant

  8. Microsatellite mapping of QTLs affecting resistance to coccidiosis (Eimeria tenella in a Fayoumi × White Leghorn cross

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourichon David

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian coccidiosis is a major parasitic disease of poultry, causing severe economical loss to poultry production by affecting growth and feed efficiency of infected birds. Current control strategies using mainly drugs and more recently vaccination are showing drawbacks and alternative strategies are needed. Using genetic resistance that would limit the negative and very costly effects of the disease would be highly relevant. The purpose of this work was to detect for the first time QTL for disease resistance traits to Eimeria tenella in chicken by performing a genome scan in an F2 cross issued from a resistant Fayoumi line and a susceptible Leghorn line. Results The QTL analysis detected 21 chromosome-wide significant QTL for the different traits related to disease resistance (body weight growth, plasma coloration, hematocrit, rectal temperature and lesion on 6 chromosomes. Out of these, a genome-wide very significant QTL for body weight growth was found on GGA1, five genome-wide significant QTL for body weight growth, plasma coloration and hematocrit and one for plasma coloration were found on GGA1 and GGA6, respectively. Two genome-wide suggestive QTL for plasma coloration and rectal temperature were found on GGA1 and GGA2, respectively. Other chromosme-wide significant QTL were identified on GGA2, GGA3, GGA6, GGA15 and GGA23. Parent-of-origin effects were found for QTL for body weight growth and plasma coloration on GGA1 and GGA3. Several QTL for different resistance phenotypes were identified as co-localized on the same location. Conclusion Using an F2 cross from resistant and susceptible chicken lines proved to be a successful strategy to identify QTL for different resistance traits to Eimeria tenella, opening the way for further gene identification and underlying mechanisms and hopefully possibilities for new breeding strategies for resistance to coccidiosis in the chicken. From the QTL regions identified, several

  9. Influence of age and housing systems on properties of tibia and humerus of Lohmann White hens1: Bone properties of laying hens in commercial housing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, P; Nelson, N; Haut, R C; Orth, M W; Karcher, D M

    2017-10-01

    This study was aimed at analyzing bone properties of Lohmann White hens in different commercial housing systems at various points throughout production. Pullets reared in conventional cages (CC) were either continued in CC or moved to enriched colony cages (EN) at 19 weeks. Pullets reared in cage-free aviaries (AV) were moved to AV hen houses. Bone samples were collected from 60 hens at each of 18 and 72 wk and 30 hens at 26 and 56 wk from each housing system. Left tibiae and humeri were broken under uniform bending to analyze mechanical properties. Cortical geometry was analyzed using digital calipers at the fracture site. Contralateral tibiae and humeri were used for measurement of ash percentage. AV pullets' humeri had 41% greater cortical areas, and tibiae had 19% greater cortical areas than the CC pullets (P < 0.05). Average humeri diameter was greater in AV pullets than in CC pullets (P < 0.05), whereas the tibiae outer dimensions were similar. Aviary pullet bones had greater stiffness (31 and 7% greater for tibiae and humeri, respectively) and second moment of inertia (43 and 13% greater for tibiae and humeri, respectively) than CC pullets (P < 0.05). The differences between bones of AV and CC hens persisted throughout the laying cycle. Moving CC pullets to EN resulted in decreased endosteal resorption in humeri, evident by a 7.5% greater cortical area in the EN hens (P < 0.05). Whole-bone breaking strength did not change with age. Stiffness increased with age, while energy to failure decreased in both the tibiae and humeri. These results indicated that tibiae and humeri of laying hens become stiffer but lose toughness and become brittle with age. Furthermore, AV and EN systems can bring positive changes in mechanical and structural properties that are more pronounced in the humerus than the tibia. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. The solubility of hen egg-white lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Sandra B.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Baird, James K.; Meehan, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium solubility of chicken egg-white lysozyme in the presence of crystalline solid state was determined as a function of NaCl concentration, pH, and temperature. The solubility curves obtained represent a region of the lysozyme phase diagram. This diagram makes it possible to determine the supersaturation of a given set of conditions or to achieve identical supersaturations by different combinations of parameters. The temperature dependence of the solubility permits the evaluation of Delta-H of crystallization. The data indicate a negative heat of crystallization for the tetragonal crystal form but a positive heat of crystallization for the high-temperature orthorhombic form.

  11. Inheritance of fibrosarcomatous liver tumours in White Leghorn chicks inoculated vu the chorioallantoic membrane with subgroup A Rous sarcoma virus: A four-allele genetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, P K; Naithani, S

    1990-10-01

    An investigation was made using White Leghorn fowl to study the genetic control of subgroup A Rous sarcoma virus-induced fibrosarcomatous liver tumours (LT) in chicks inoculated via the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). A total of 723 CAM-inoculated embryos were hatched in three experiments. In Expt 1, CAM-susceptibility and LT-mortality were examined on a within sire family basis to ascertain the inter-relationship between the two parameters. In Expt 2, sires that had records of high or low LT(+) deaths in the families were selected to produce progeny within high and low incidence lines in the next generation to ascertain the amenability of the trait (LT death) to selection pressure. Survivors of LT-assay (Expt 1) were mated inter se in Expt 3 to study the inheritance of the two traits according to known or proposed genetic models. It was shown that LT mortality is a genetic trait because of its amenability to selection, with a high realised heritability (h(2)(R)= 1.16). In the three experiments, most CAM-susceptibles (S) died of LT(+), and most CAM-resistants(R) survived, but there were some conversely associated phenotypes i.e. S(LT-) and R(LT+). The conventional 2-allele model of the tva (tumour virus a) locus with pleiotropic effect, or a 2-locus model with linkage, were considered inadequate to explain the occurrence of conversely associated phenotypes on a within family basis. However, a 4-allele model of the tva locus showed a good fit to the results of this study.

  12. Combinations of cholecalciferol and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol as vitamin D sources in white laying hen feed diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fernando Remolina Rivera

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cholecalciferol (D3 and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-OHD3 as isolated or associated sources of vitamin D (100%-0%, 75%-25%, 50%-50%, 25%-75%, 0%-100% on the productive performance, egg quality, and bone characteristics was evaluated in white egg-laying hens fed two levels of calcium (Ca and phosphorus (P in the basal diet (BD (BD1 = 0.38% Ca - 0.36% available P and BD2 = 3.2% Ca - 0.30% available P. Nine hundred and sixty Dekalb White hens (24 weeks old were distributed into 80 cages, under a completely randomized factorial design for 16 weeks. The use of associated sources of vitamin D reduced the feed intake and feed conversion ratio, as well as BD1, which also increased the egg production and egg mass. The association of vitamin D sources with up to 50% 25-OHD3 increased the eggshell percentage. There was interaction (p<0.05 between the sources of vitamin D and the concentrations of Ca and available P, sources with at least 50% 25-OHD3 increased ash percentage and bone radiographic densitometry (BRD with BD1; in BD2 the use of 25-OHD3 as isolated vitamin D source increased BRD. The association of D3 and 25-OHD3 improved the productive performance, increased the percentage of eggshell and had different positive effects on the bone characteristics that depend on the concentrations of Ca and available P in the balanced feed of white egg-laying hens.

  13. NMR-based localization of ions involved in salting out of hen egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznański, Jarosław

    2006-01-01

    NaCl-induced aggregation of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was monitored by NMR spectroscopy. Small, but significant, changes induced by salt addition in TOCSY spectra were attributed to the effect of local reorganization of protein backbone upon ion binding. Salt-induced variations in HN and H alpha chemical shifts were mapped on the HEWL 3D structure which allowed the construction of a scheme of the spatial localization of potential ion binding sites. It was found that in a 0.5 M NaCl solution six chloride anions and at least one sodium cation are bound to preferred sites on the HEWL surface.

  14. Human Interleukin-2 and Hen Egg White Lysozyme: Screening for Bacteriolytic Activity against Various Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, P. A.; Ovchinnikova, E. D.; Morozova, O. A.; Matolygina, D. A.; Osipova, H. E.; Cherdyntseva, T. A.; Savin, S. S.; Zakharova, G. S.; Alekseeva, A. A.; Belogurova, N. G.; Smirnov, S. A.; Tishkov, V. I.; Levashov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and hen egg white lysozyme against 34 different species of microorganisms has been studied. It was found that 6 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of interleukin-2. All interleukin-2-sensitive microorganisms belong either to the Enterobacteriaceae, Bacillaceae, or the Lactobacillaceae family. It was also found that 12 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of lysozyme, and 16 species of microorganisms are lysed in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The bacteriolytic activity of interleukin-2 and lysozyme was studied at various pH values. PMID:27099789

  15. Correlation analysis of cortical geometry of tibia and humerus of white leghorns using clinical quantitative computed tomography and microcomputed tomography scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, P; Cox, A G; Robison, C I; Karcher, D M

    2017-08-01

    Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (QCT) has been used in poultry bone research in recent years to analyze cortical and cross-sectional geometry. For QCT to be used as a standard research tool for analysis of bones of laying hens (cortical thickness correlate the cortical parameters measured using clinical CT scans with the measurements from micro-CT, the current gold standard. A total of 15 tibiae and 14 humeri of Lohmann White hens was scanned using clinical CT and micro-CT. Reconstruction of the scans generated images with final voxel resolution of 195 μm for clinical CT scans and 46 μm for micro-CT scans. Cortical and total area were measured using MIMICS® software at proximal, middle, and distal locations of 20 mm sections of humerus diaphysis and 30 mm sections of tibia diaphysis. The total area for proximal and middle locations as well as proximal cortical area measurements for humeri produced strong correlation coefficients (R ≥ 0.70). Moderate strength correlation coefficients (R = 0.40 to 0.60) in humeri were seen in middle and distal cortical areas. Distal total area in humeri displayed a weak correlation coefficient (R ≤ 0.3; P = 0.25). Overall, tibiae demonstrated a weaker correlation. Proximal and middle cortical areas indicated moderate correlation coefficients (R = 0.40 to 0.60), while proximal and middle total areas accompanied by distal cortical and total area displayed weak correlation coefficients (R ≤ 0.3). Only the middle cortical area measurement for tibiae was significant (P = 0.03). These results indicate stronger correlation for humeri measurements among the scans than tibia. Overall, cross-sectional area measurements were only low to moderately correlated between clinical and micro-CT scans. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  16. OSMOTIC RELATIONSHIPS IN THE HEN'S EGG, AS DETERMINED BY COLLIGATIVE PROPERTIES OF YOLK AND WHITE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, E

    1932-09-20

    The osmotic pressure of the yolk and white of the hen's egg have been shown to be identical, by means of direct freezing point determinations, dialyses, and vapor pressure measurements. Dialysates of egg yolk slow the rate of ice formation compared with NaCl solutions. They also show a marked change of freezing rate as the freezing point is approached. The anomalous freezing behavior of this material may lead to errors in the determination of the true freezing point which would tend to make the value for the yolk erroneously low. The postulate of a vital activity at the yolk membrane maintaining an osmotic pressure difference is thus shown to be unnecessary, since a simple osmotic equilibrium exists between the yolk and the white.

  17. Viscosity of egg white from hens of different strains fed with commercial and natural additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Papa Spada

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Yolk color and egg white (albumen cleanliness and viscosity are important parameters by which consumers judge the quality of eggs. This study aimed to investigate changes in albumen viscosity during storage of eggs for up to 36 days from two different commercial laying hen strains (Carijo Barbada and Isa Brown fed a diet containing annatto (1.5 and 2.0% or a synthetic additive without synthetic colorants (control. Analyses of humidity, albumen height, pH, viscosity, foam formation, and stability were carried out on eggs. Carijo Barbada strain had smaller albumen, lower humidity and higher egg white viscosity than Isa Brown strain; however, with storage, viscosity lowered significantly on both strains. Initially, the addition of 2.0% of annatto or a synthetic additive increased viscosity in both strains, but with storage only the control maintained longer viscosity. Lower viscosity did not change foam density and stability.

  18. QTL analysis of a red junglefowl x White Leghorn intercross reveals trade-off in resource allocation between behavior and production traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Karin; Kerje, Susanne; Carlborg, Orjan; Jacobsson, Lina; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per

    2002-11-01

    Behaviors with high energetic costs may decrease in frequency in domestic animals as a response to selection for increased production. The aim of this study was to quantify production traits, foraging behavior, and social motivation in F2 progeny from a White Leghorn x red junglefowl intercross (n = 751-1046) and to perform QTL analyses on the behavioral traits. A foraging-social maze was used for behavioral testing, which consisted of four identical arms and a central box. In two arms there was ad libitum access to the birds' usual food, and in the other two there was novel food (sunflower seeds) mixed with cat litter. In one arm with each of the two food sources, social stimuli were simulated by the presence of a mirror. Each bird could therefore feed on novel or well known food either alone or in the perceived company of a conspecific. Egg production, sexual maturity (females), food intake, and growth were measured individually, and residual food intake and metabolic body weight were estimated using standard methods. A genome scan using 104 microsatellite markers was carried out to identify QTLs affecting behavioral traits. Phenotypic growth rates at different ages showed weak associations in both sexes. Sexual maturity and egg weight were not strongly correlated to growth, indicating that these traits are not genetically linked. Time spent in each arm and in the central part of the maze was analyzed using principal component analyses. Four principal components (PC) were extracted, each reflecting a pattern of behavior in the maze. Females with early onset of sexual maturity scored higher on the PC1 reflecting preference for free food without social stimuli, and females with higher egg production scored higher on the PC2 reflecting exploration. Males with an overall higher growth rate and higher residual food intake scored higher on the PC3, which possibly reflected fear of the test situation, and tended to score higher on the PC4 reflecting low

  19. Correlated effects of selection for immunity in White Leghorn chicken lines on natural antibodies and specific antibody responses to KLH and M. butyricum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourichon David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of selection for three general immune response traits on primary antibody responses (Ab to Mycobacterium butyricum or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH was studied in four experimental lines of White Leghorn chicken. Birds underwent 12 generations of selection for one of three different general immune criteria; high antibody response to Newcastle disease virus 3 weeks after vaccination (ND3, high cell-mediated immune response, using the wing web response to phytohemglutinin (PHA and high phagocytic activity, measured as carbone clearance (CC. Line ND3-L was selected on ND3, line PHA-L was selected on PHA, and line CC-L on CC, but all lines were measured for all three traits. The fourth line was a contemporary random bred control maintained throughout the selection experiment. Principal component analysis was used to distinguish clusters based on the overall set of immune measures. Results In the KLH immunised group, no differences were present between lines for natural antibodies binding to KLH and LPS, and, lines ND3-L and PHA-L had higher titers to LTA and anti-Gal titers measured before the immunisation protocol. The measure of ND3 was correlated positively with LPS titers measured post KLH immunisation and with the difference between LPS titers measured at day 0 and 7 post immunisation. In the M. butyricum immunised group, Line ND3-L showed significantly higher specific antibody response to M. butyricum, and this result agrees well with the hypothesis that the Th-1 pathway was expected to be selected for in this line. Conclusion This study has shown that the two different antigens KLH and M. butyricum gave rise to different responses in the set of selected lines, and that the response was only enhanced for the antigen associated with the same response mechanism as that for the trait (ND3, PHA or CC for which the line was selected. Interactions between innate and acquired immunity have been observed mainly for the

  20. IgE reactivity to hen egg white allergens in dogs with cutaneous adverse food reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakura, Hidekatsu; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Saito, Taku; Miyaji, Kazuki; Fujimura, Masato; Masuda, Kenichi; Okamoto, Noriaki; DeBoer, Douglas J; Sakaguchi, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Dogs with cutaneous adverse food reactions (CAFR) often have specific IgE to food allergens. Egg white, which is majorly composed of ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme, is a food allergen in dogs. Information of the IgE reactivity to purified egg white allergens supports accurate diagnosis and efficiency treatment in humans. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies on the IgE reactivity to purified egg white allergens in dogs. Here, we investigated the IgE reactivity to crude and purified allergens of hen egg white in dogs with CAFR. First, when we examined serum samples from 82 dogs with CAFR for specific IgE to crude egg white by ELISA, 9.8% (8/82) of the dogs with CAFR showed the IgE reactivity to crude egg white. We then used sera from the eight dogs with positive IgE reactivity to crude egg white to examine the IgE reactivity to four purified allergens, ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme, by ELISA. We found that 75% (6/8) of the dogs showed IgE reactivity to both ovomucoid and ovalbumin, and that 37.5% (3/8) of the dogs showed IgE reactivity to ovotransferrin. None (0/8) showed IgE reactivity to lysozyme. Moreover, validating these results, the immunoblot analyses were performed using the sera of the three dogs showing the highest IgE reactivity to crude egg white. Both anti-ovomucoid and anti-ovalbumin IgE were detected in the sera of these dogs, while anti-ovotransferrin IgE was not detected. Considering these, ovomucoid and ovalbumin appears to be the major egg white allergens in dogs with CAFR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Re-refinement of 4xan: hen egg-white lysozyme with carboplatin in sodium bromide solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Schreurs, Antoine M. M.; Kroon - Batenburg, Louise; Helliwell, John R.

    2016-01-01

    A re-refinement of 4xan, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) with carboplatin crystallised in NaBr solution, has been made (Tanley et al 2016). This follows our Response article (Tanley et al 2015) to the Critique article of Shabalin et al 2015, suggesting the need for corrections to some solute molecule

  2. Hydrophobic interaction adsorption of hen egg white proteins albumin, conalbumin, and lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Edwin E Garcia; dos Reis Coimbra, Jane S; Minim, Luis A; Saraiva, Sérgio H; da Silva, César A Sodré

    2006-08-18

    Hydrophobic adsorption equilibrium data of the hen egg white proteins albumin, conalbumin, and lysozyme were obtained in batch systems, at 25 degrees C, using the Streamline Phenyl resin as adsorbent. The influence of three types of salt, NaCl, Na(2)SO(4), or (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and their concentration on the equilibrium data were evaluated. The salt Na(2)SO(4) showed the higher interaction with the studied proteins, thus favoring the adsorption of proteins by the adsorbent, even though each type of salt interacted in a distinct manner with each protein. The isotherm models of Langmuir, Langmuir exponential, and Chen and Sun were well fitted to the equilibrium data, with no significant difference being observed at the 5% level of significance. The mass transfer model applied simulated correctly adsorption kinetics of the proteins under the studied conditions.

  3. Experimental induction and oral transmission of avian AA amyloidosis in vaccinated white hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomoaki; Muhammad, Naeem; Inoshima, Yasuo; Yanai, Tokuma; Goryo, Masanobu; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2013-06-01

    Avian AA amyloidosis is commonly observed in adult birds afflicted with bacterial infections or chronic inflammatory disorders. Experimental AA amyloidosis in birds can be induced by repeated inflammatory stimulation, such as injection with casein or vaccination with oil-emulsified bacterins. However, the transmission of amyloidosis among avian species has not been studied well to date. In the present study, we confirm the potential induction of avian AA amyloidosis by inoculation of Salmonella enteritidis (SE) vaccine or Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine. To determine the transmission of chicken AA amyloidosis among white hens, we induced experimental AA amyloidosis in vaccinated chickens by intravenous or oral administration of chicken AA fibrils. Amyloid deposits were observed in chickens injected with SE and inoculated with chicken AA fibrils intravenously (21/26: 81%) and orally (8/12: 67%). These results suggest that chicken AA amyloidosis can be induced by vaccinations, and may be transmitted among like species by oral administration.

  4. Local pH at the surface of hen egg white lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Kobayashi, Kaito; Yamaguchi, Shoichi

    2018-02-01

    The microenvironment at the surface of hen-egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) was examined by analyzing the change in pKa of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) upon binding to the N-terminus of HEWL. The result showed that the local pH at the HEWL surface is higher than the bulk pH. Furthermore, the data showed that the difference between the local and bulk pH becomes larger with decreasing pH, suggesting HEWL repels more protons at lower pH. Because the local pH affects the protonation states of functional amino-acids at the protein surface, the results provide the fundamental insight into the microenvironment at the protein surface.

  5. The effect of concentration, temperature and stirring on hen egg white lysozyme amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow, Sian-Yang; Dunstan, Dave E

    2013-10-28

    Lysozyme is associated with hereditary systemic amyloidosis in humans. Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) has been extensively studied as an amyloid forming protein. In this study, we investigated HEWL amyloid formation over a range of temperatures at two stirring speeds and at low concentrations to avoid gel formation. The amyloid fibril formation was found to follow first order kinetics with the rate determining step being the unfolding of the lysozyme. Both the rate of formation and final amount of amyloid formed show maxima with temperature at approximately at 65 °C. CD measurements show that the lysozyme is unfolded by 55 °C. The decrease in amyloid formation at temperatures above 65 °C is attributed to competing amorphous aggregation. The majority of the non-fibrillar aggregates are small and uniform in size with a few larger amorphous aggregates observed in the AFM images.

  6. Crowding versus molecular seeding: NMR studies of protein aggregation in hen egg white

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfelice, D.; Adrover, M.; Martorell, G.; Pastore, A.; Temussi, P. A.

    2012-06-01

    In living systems, proteins are surrounded by many other macromolecules of different nature, at high total concentrations. In the last few years, there has been an increasing effort to study biological macromolecules directly in natural crowded environments, such as in intact bacterial cells or by mimicking natural crowding by adding proteins, polysaccharides or even synthetic polymers. We have recently proposed hen egg white (HEW) as a suitable, natural medium to study macromolecules in crowding conditions. Here, we show that HEW can increase dramatically the aggregation kinetics of proteins with an in-built tendency to associate. By dissecting the mechanism we demonstrate that only part of this effect is due to crowding, while another factor playing an important role is the interaction with proteins from the milieu. High molecular weight glycoproteins present in HEW act as efficient molecular seeds for aggregation. Our results bear important consequences for in-cell NMR studies and suggest a role of glycosylated proteins in aggregation.

  7. The Effect of Hen Breeds on the Egg Response to the Non Destructive Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Křivánek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the evaluation of the effect of hen breed on the egg response to the non-destructive impact. The eggs of four hen breeds (Leghorn White, Rhode Island Red, Bar Plymouth Rock and Sussex Light were tested. An experimental system was set up to generate the impact force, measure the response wave signal, and analyse the frequency spectrum in the three direction of loading (sharp end, equator, blunt end. The egg dynamic resonance frequency was obtained through the analysis of the dynamically measured frequency response of an egg excited by light impact of a bar. The results showed that the dominant frequency was significantly affected by the hen bread and not significantly affected by excitation velocity. The dominant frequency enables to estimate the eggshell strength under quasi static compression.

  8. Cooperative folding of the isolated alpha-helical domain of hen egg-white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, P; Peng, Z

    2001-11-23

    Proteins in the alpha-lactalbumin and c-type lysozyme family have been studied extensively as model systems in protein folding. Early formation of the alpha-helical domain is observed in both alpha-lactalbumin and c-type lysozyme; however, the details of the kinetic folding pathways are significantly different. The major folding intermediate of hen egg-white lysozyme has a cooperatively formed tertiary structure, whereas the intermediate of alpha-lactalbumin exhibits the characteristics of a molten globule. In this study, we have designed and constructed an isolated alpha-helical domain of hen egg-white lysozyme, called Lyso-alpha, as a model of the lysozyme folding intermediate that is stable at equilibrium. Disulfide-exchange studies show that under native conditions, the cysteine residues in Lyso-alpha prefer to form the same set of disulfide bonds as in the alpha-helical domain of full-length lysozyme. Under denaturing conditions, formation of the nearest-neighbor disulfide bonds is strongly preferred. In contrast to the isolated alpha-helical domain of alpha-lactalbumin, Lyso-alpha with two native disulfide bonds exhibits a well-defined tertiary structure, as indicated by cooperative thermal unfolding and a well-dispersed NMR spectrum. Thus, the determinants for formation of the cooperative side-chain interactions are located mainly in the alpha-helical domain. Our studies suggest that the difference in kinetic folding pathways between alpha-lactalbumin and lysozyme can be explained by the difference in packing density between secondary structural elements and support the hypothesis that the structured regions in a protein folding intermediate may correspond to regions that can fold independently. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Prediction model for manure zinc excretion in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, K M; Vargas-Jurado, N; Purdum, S E

    2017-10-25

    The objective of this research trial was to compare 2 sources of zinc and different levels of supplementation on manure zinc excretion in laying hens. Bovan White Leghorn hens were used in this study and fed one of 6 dietary treatments. Treatments were in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement with 2 sources of zinc (zinc sulfate or Availa®Zn) and 3 levels (40, 80, or 120 ppm) and were randomly assigned to 48 cages with 5 hens/cage and 8 replicates/treatment. Hens were housed in a tiered manure-belt housing system providing 627.1 cm2/hen and were given access to 110 g/hen/d of feed. Manure samples were collected, and manure zinc content was calculated at 10-week intervals. Data were analyzed using the Glimmix procedure in SAS. There was a significant overall effect of source (P < 0.0001) for zinc content, such that hens fed zinc sulfate had lower amounts of zinc excretion. There was also a significant level effect (P < 0.0001) in which hens fed 120 ppm zinc excreted the greatest amount of zinc. A significant source by level interaction was observed (P < 0.0001) for both the overall and individual analyses, such that 120 ppm Availa®Zn showed the highest zinc excretion, and both 40 ppm zinc sulfate and Availa®Zn showed the lowest zinc excretion. Based on these results, a prediction equation was written for an estimated amount of zinc excretion based on the amount of zinc provided in the diet. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. Effect of moisture content on selected physicochemical properties of two commercial hen egg white powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Qinchun; Labuza, Theodore P

    2012-05-01

    After short-term storage at 23°C, selected physicochemical properties of two hen egg white powders (with and without hydrolysis) were studied. Overall, the effect of moisture content on physicochemical properties of Hydrolysed Egg White powder (HEW) was more severe than those of Dried Egg White powder (DEW). The denaturation temperature (Td) and its enthalpy change (ΔHd) of ovalbumin in DEW followed an exponential model, as well as the Td of HEW. The Gordon-Taylor equation modelled well the glass transition temperatures (Tg) of HEW and DEW. The Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) model fitted well to the type II moisture sorption isotherm. At the critical moisture content (12.0%, dry basis), compared with DEW, the colour of HEW began to darken dramatically and its hardness started to change significantly. These changes were closely related to the inherent characteristics of the two products. The mechanisms relevant to these physicochemical changes were discussed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Denaturation of hen egg white lysozyme in electromagnetic fields: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Niall J; Mooney, Damian A

    2007-03-07

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of hen egg white lysozyme have been performed in the canonical ensemble at 298 K in the presence of external electromagnetic fields of varying intensity in the microwave to far-infrared frequency range. Significant nonthermal field effects were noted, such as marked changes in the protein's secondary structure which led to accelerated incipient local denaturation relative to zero-field conditions. This occurred primarily as a consequence of alignment of the protein's total dipole moment with the external field, although the enhanced molecular mobility and dipolar alignment of water molecules is influential on sidechain motion in solvent-exposed regions. The applied field intensity was found to be highly influential on the extent of denaturation in the frequency range studied, and 0.25-0.5 V Arms-1 fields were found to induce initial denaturation to a comparable extent to thermal denaturation in the 400 to 500 K range. In subsequent zero-field simulations following exposure to the e/m field, the extent of perturbation from the native fold and the degree of residual dipolar alignment were found to be influential on incipient folding.

  12. Low Abundant N-linked Glycosylation in Hen Egg White Lysozyme Is Localized at Nonconsensus Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asperger, Arndt; Marx, Kristina; Albers, Christian; Molin, Laura; Pinato, Odra

    2015-06-05

    Although wild-type hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) is lacking the consensus sequence motif NX(S/T), in 1995 Trudel et al. (Biochem. Cell Biol. 1995, 73, 307-309) proposed the existence of a low abundant N-glycosylated form of HEL; however, the identity of active glycosylation sites in HEL remained a matter of speculation. For the first time since Trudel's initial work, we report here a comprehensive characterization by means of mass spectrometry of N-glycosylation in wild-type HEL. Our analytical approach comprised ZIC-HILIC enrichment of N-glycopeptides from HEL trypsin digest, deglycosylation by (18)O/PNGase F as well as by various endoglycosidases, and LC-MS/MS analysis of both intact and deglycosylated N-glycopeptides engaging multiple techniques of ionization and fragmentation. A novel data interpretation workflow based on MS/MS spectra classification and glycan database searching enabled the straightforward identification of the asparagine-rich N-glycopeptide [34-45] FESNFNTQATNR and allowed for compositional profiling of its modifying N-glycans. The overall heterogeneity profile of N-glycans in HEL comprised at least 26 different compositions. Results obtained from deglycosylation experiments provided clear evidence of asparagine residues N44 and N39 representing active glycosylation sites in HEL. Both of these sites do not fall into any known N-glycosylation-specific sequence motif but are localized in rarely observed nonconsensus sequons (NXN, NXQ).

  13. A natural and readily available crowding agent: NMR studies of proteins in hen egg white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, Gabriel; Adrover, Miquel; Kelly, Geoff; Temussi, Piero Andrea; Pastore, Annalisa

    2011-05-01

    In vitro studies of biological macromolecules are usually performed in dilute, buffered solutions containing one or just a few different biological macromolecules. Under these conditions, the interactions among molecules are diffusion limited. On the contrary, in living systems, macromolecules of a given type are surrounded by many others, at very high total concentrations. In the last few years, there has been an increasing effort to study biological macromolecules directly in natural crowded environments, as in intact bacterial cells or by mimicking natural crowding by adding proteins, polysaccharides, or even synthetic polymers. Here, we propose the use of hen egg white (HEW) as a simple natural medium, with all features of the media of crowded cells, that could be used by any researcher without difficulty and inexpensively. We present a study of the stability and dynamics behavior of model proteins in HEW, chosen as a prototypical, readily accessible natural medium that can mimic cytosol. We show that two typical globular proteins, dissolved in HEW, give NMR spectra very similar to those obtained in dilute buffers, although dynamic parameters are clearly affected by the crowded medium. The thermal stability of one of these proteins, measured in a range comprising both heat and cold denaturation, is also similar to that in buffer. Our data open new possibilities to the study of proteins in natural crowded media. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Kinetic study on thermal denaturation of hen egg-white lysozyme involving precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, D; Mizutani, A; Sakai, T

    1999-01-01

    A kinetic study on the thermal denaturation accompanying precipitation of hen egg-white lysozyme was performed at temperatures between 50 and 90 degrees C. Visible precipitation occurred at lysozyme concentrations higher than 10(-5)M. Even at the concentration of 10(-6)M where no visible precipitation was observed, irreversible and reversible denaturation could be clearly discriminated. The former involves two different reactions with activation energies of approximately 93 and 50 kJ x mol(-1). On the other hand, enthalpy and entropy changes in the latter are 443 kJ x mol(-1) and 1280 J x K(-1) x mol(-1), respectively, indicating a large conformational change. The contradiction that the denaturation or deactivation reaction fitted first-order reaction kinetics while its rate constant depended on the protein concentration, was resolved by newly proposed schemes. The apparent first-order rate constant obtained experimentally depended on the initial protein concentration being on the order of almost unity. Moreover, it was revealed that the apparent first-order reaction involved a second-order reaction that characterized the aggregation of denatured protein molecules. The theory developed here explained reasonably the thermal denaturation accompanying precipitation that occurs at high protein concentration and at high temperature, and was also successfully applied to the lower concentration range with no accompanying precipitation.

  15. Effect of inclusion body contaminants on the oxidative renaturation of hen egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maachupalli-Reddy, J; Kelley, B D; De Bernardez Clark, E

    1997-01-01

    The effect of typical contaminants in inclusion body preparations such as DNA, ribosomal RNA, phospholipids, lipopolysaccharides, and other proteins on renaturation rate and yield of hen egg white lysozyme was investigated. Separate experiments were conducted in which known amounts of individual contaminants were added to test their effect on renaturation kinetics. On the basis of a simplified model for the kinetic competition between folding and aggregation, it was found that none of the above contaminants had an effect on the rate of the folding reaction, but some of them significantly affected the rate of the aggregation reaction and, thus, the overall renaturation yield. While ribosomal RNA did not seem to affect the aggregation reaction, plasmid DNA and lipopolysaccharides increased the aggregation rate, resulting in a decrease of about 10% in the overall renaturation yield. Phospholipids were found to improve refolding yields by about 15% by decreasing the overall rate of the aggregation reaction without affecting the rate of the folding reaction. Proteinaceous contaminants which aggregate upon folding, such as beta-galactosidase and bovine serum albumin, were found to significantly decrease renaturation yields by promoting aggregation. This effect was strongly dependent on the concentration of the proteinaceous impurity. On the other hand, the presence of refolding ribonuclease A, which does not significantly aggregate upon folding under the conditions tested in this work, did not affect the renaturation kinetics of lysozyme, even at concentrations as high as 0.7 mg/mL.

  16. Storage stability of hen egg white powders in three protein/water dough model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Qinchun; Rocca-Smith, Jeancarlo R; Labuza, Theodore P

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, due to the specific health benefits associated with bioactive peptides and the reduction of protein allergenicity by enzymatic hydrolysis, the utilisation of protein hydrolysates in the intermediate-moisture food (IMF) market, such as high protein nutrition bars (HPNB), has significantly increased. Currently, no reported study is related to the storage stability of dried hen egg white (DEW) and its hydrolysates (HEW) in an IMF matrix. Therefore, three DEW/HEW dough model systems (100%HEW+0%DEW, 75%HEW+25%DEW and 50%HEW+50%DEW) were established using two commercial spray-dried egg white powders to study the effect of temperature and fraction of HEW on these IMF models (water activity (a(w)): ∼0.8). During storage at three different temperatures (23, 35 and 45°C) for 70 days, the selected physicochemical properties of the dough systems were compared. Overall, kinetic analysis showed an apparent zero-order model fit for the change in the colour (L(∗)), fluorescence intensity (FI) and hardness, as a function of time, for different dough model systems. As expected, the L(∗), FI and hardness increased as a function of time mainly due to the Maillard reaction. The amount of free amino groups decreased, with an increase in rate of loss, as temperature increased in the 100%HEW+0%DEW model. When DEW was substituted for some HEW, the regeneration of the free amino groups after loss was observed as a function of time. Furthermore, when the percentage of HEW was decreased, the incidence of mouldy samples occurred sooner, which indicates that HEW has some antimicrobial ability, especially in the 100%HEW+0%DEW system where mould growth did not occur. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic variations alter production and behavioral responses following heat stress in 2 strains of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, L A; Felver-Gant, J N; Dennis, R L; Cheng, H W

    2013-02-01

    Genetic differences alter the type and degree of hens' responses and their ability to adapt to a stressor. This study examined the effects of genotypic variations on the productivity and behavior of laying hens following heat stress (HS). Two strains of White Leghorn hens were used: DXL (Dekalb XL), a commercial strain individually selected for egg production and KGB (kind, gentle bird), a strain selected for high group productivity and survivability. Ninety hens (48 DXL and 42 KGB) at 28 wk of age were randomly assigned to either a hot (H: mean = 32.6°C) or control (C: mean = 24.3°C) treatment and housed in pairs by strain for 9 d. Egg production and quality, behavior, body and organ weights, and circulating hormone concentrations were measured. Heat-stressed hens had lower egg production [adjusted (adj) P weight tended to be reduced at d 1 and was reduced at d 9 (adj P = 0.007), but was reduced only at d 9 among H-KGB hens (adj P = 0.007). Eggshell thickness was also reduced among H hens at d 9 (adj P = 0.007), especially among H-KGB hens (adj P = 0.01). Plasma triiodothyronine concentration was reduced among H-hens (adj P = 0.01), especially among H-DXL hens (adj P = 0.01). Neither temperature nor strain affected the plasma thyroxine and plasma and yolk corticosterone concentrations. Heat-stressed hens spent less time walking (adj P = 0.001) and more time drinking (adj P = 0.007) and resting (adj P = 0.001) than C-hens. The results indicate that although HS reduced production and caused behavioral changes among hens from both strains, the responses differed by genotype. The data provide evidence that genetic selection is a useful strategy for reducing HS response in laying hens. The results provide insights for conducting future studies to develop heat-resistant strains to improve hen well-being, especially under the current commercial conditions.

  18. Beak condition and cage density determine abundance and spatial distribution of northern fowl mites, Ornithonyssus sylviarum, and chicken body lice, Menacanthus stramineus, on caged laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullens, B A; Chen, B L; Owen, J P

    2010-12-01

    Adult White Leghorn hens (Hy-Line strain W-36) were inoculated with either northern fowl mites or chicken body lice, and the ectoparasite populations were monitored over periods of 9 to 16 wk. Two beak conditions (beak trimmed or beak intact) and 2 housing densities (1 or 2 hens per 25 × 31 cm suspended wire cage) were tested. Populations of both ectoparasites were at least 10 times lower on beak-intact hens compared with populations on beak-trimmed hens. Cage density did not influence mite numbers, but higher numbers of lice (2 to 3 times) developed on hens held at the higher cage density. Louse distribution on the body and louse population age structure were also influenced by host beak condition. Beak-intact hens had a higher proportion of lice under the wings, whereas beak-trimmed hens had the majority of lice on the lower abdomen. Louse populations on beak-trimmed hens also comprised relatively more immature stages than populations found on beak-intact hens. The effects are likely related to decreased grooming efficiency by beak-trimmed hens and, in the case of lice, the higher host density. The high mite and louse populations on most commercial caged laying hens are probably a direct result of beak trimming. However, selection of more docile breeds that can be held without trimming may allow the hens themselves to reduce ectoparasites below economically damaging levels. This could benefit producers, animal welfare advocates, and human health by reducing 1) costs of beak trimming, 2) pesticide treatment costs (including human and bird chemical exposure concerns), and 3) objections to beak trimming from the animal welfare community.

  19. Robust identification of binding hot spots using continuum electrostatics: application to hen egg-white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David H; Grove, Laurie E; Yueh, Christine; Ngan, Chi Ho; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor

    2011-12-28

    Binding hot spots, protein regions with high binding affinity, can be identified by using X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy to screen libraries of small organic molecules that tend to cluster at such hot spots. FTMap, a direct computational analogue of the experimental screening approaches, uses 16 different probe molecules for global sampling of the surface of a target protein on a dense grid and evaluates the energy of interaction using an empirical energy function that includes a continuum electrostatic term. Energy evaluation is based on the fast Fourier transform correlation approach, which allows for the sampling of billions of probe positions. The grid sampling is followed by off-grid minimization that uses a more detailed energy expression with a continuum electrostatics term. FTMap identifies the hot spots as consensus clusters formed by overlapping clusters of several probes. The hot spots are ranked on the basis of the number of probe clusters, which predicts their binding propensity. We applied FTMap to nine structures of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), whose hot spots have been extensively studied by both experimental and computational methods. FTMap found the primary hot spot in site C of all nine structures, in spite of conformational differences. In addition, secondary hot spots in sites B and D that are known to be important for the binding of polysaccharide substrates were found. The predicted probe-protein interactions agree well with those seen in the complexes of HEWL with various ligands and also agree with an NMR-based study of HEWL in aqueous solutions of eight organic solvents. We argue that FTMap provides more complete information on the HEWL binding site than previous computational methods and yields fewer false-positive binding locations than the X-ray structures of HEWL from crystals soaked in organic solvents. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Susceptibility of various parental lines of commercial white leghorn layers to infection with a naturally occurring recombinant avian leukosis virus containing subgroup B envelope and subgroup J long terminal repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Jody K; Pandiri, Arun R; Fadly, Aly M

    2006-09-01

    Chickens from seven different parental lines of commercial White Leghorn layer flocks from three independent breeders were inoculated with a naturally occurring avian leukosis virus (ALV) containing an ALV-B envelope and an ALV-J long terminal repeat (LTR) termed ALV-B/J. Additional groups of chickens from the same seven parental lines were inoculated with ALV-B. Chickens were tested for ALV viremia and antibody at 0, 4, 8, 16, and 32 wk postinfection. Chickens from all parental lines studied were susceptible to infection with ALV-B with 40%-100% of inoculated chickens positive for ALV at hatch following embryo infection. Similarly, infection of egg layer flocks with the ALV-B/J recombinant virus at 8 days of embryonation induced tolerance to ALV with 86%-100% of the chickens viremic, 40%-75% of the chickens shedding virus, and only 2/125 (2%) of the chickens producing serum-neutralizing antibodies against homologous ALV-B/J recombinant virus at 32 wk postinfection. In contrast, when infected with the ALV-B/J recombinant virus at hatch, 33%-82% of the chickens were viremic, 28%-47% shed virus, and 0%-56% produced serum-neutralizing antibodies against homologous ALV-B/J recombinant virus at 32 wk postinfection. Infection with the ALV-B/J recombinant virus at embryonation and at hatch induced predominately lymphoid leukosis (LL), along with other common ALV neoplasms, including erythroblastosis, osteopetrosis, nephroblastomas, and rhabdosarcomas. No incidence of myeloid leukosis (ML) was observed in any of the commercial White Leghorn egg layer flocks infected with ALV-B/J in the present study. Data suggest that the parental line of commercial layers may influence development of ALV-B/J-induced viremia and antibody, but not tumor type. Differences in type of tumors noted in the present study and those noted in the field case where the ALV-B/J was first isolated may be attributed to differences in the genetics of the commercial layer flock in which ML was first

  1. Fearfulness and feather damage in laying hens divergently selected for high and low feather pecking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenburg, T Bas; de Haas, Elske N; Nielsen, Birte Lindstrøm

    2010-01-01

    Feather pecking (FP) remains a major welfare and economic problem in laying hens. FP has been found to be related to other behavioural characteristics, such as fearfulness. There are indications that fearful birds are more likely to develop FP. Furthermore, FP can lead to increased fearfulness...... in the victims. To investigate further the relationship between FP and fearfulness, feather damage and behavioural fear responses were recorded in three White Leghorn lines of laying hens: a line selected for high FP (HFP line), a line selected for low FP (LFP line) and an unselected control line (10th...... in fear responses between the HFP and LFP lines were not found, neither in the TI-test, nor in the HA or NO test. As expected, birds from the HFP line had considerably more feather damage than birds from the LFP line and birds from the unselected control line were intermediate. Cages that withdrew from...

  2. Interaction between Sorbitol and Hen Egg White Lysozyme: From Dynamics to Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Ramezani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study of the molecular dynamics of proteins based on internal motions is crucial for understanding the mechanism of protein function. Internal movements of proteins play an important role in both protein folding processes and the mechanism of action of enzyme. Knowledge about these movements will help us in understanding these processes correctly. Osmolites are small organic molecules which are utilized by the cells of all organisms, except hallobacteria. Osmolites are produced under extreme stressful conditions in order to help in stabilizing macro-molecules and retaining their biological function. They interact directly with macromolecules, but they exert their effect only when the characteristics or conditions of the solvent present around the cell change. Therefore, their presence affects the stability of the protein indirectly. Materials and Methods: In this work we studied the effect(s of the osmolite Sorbitol on the dynamics of Hen Egg White Lysozyme, and through our study we used NMR Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange to characterize the effect(s. We performed spectrometery in two different conditions, in the absence and presence of sorbitol. The extent of peptide hydrogen exchange was assigned as a function time and in a decreasing manner in the intensity of the peak corresponding to amino acids. The resulting TOCSY spectra were assigned using SPARKY software, as well as we integrated the peaks using this software. Results: The speed of hydrogen exchange, hydrogen atoms of the peptide bond, will give us information about the local structural oscillations where the exchange is taking place. The rate of hydrogen exchange varies from one amino acid to another, and the intensity of the peak of these hydrogen decreases as time passes by. Conclusion: We found that the presence of sorbitol causes a decrease in proton exchange rate, and since there is no noticeable chemical shifts in the peaks of the spectra, in the presence or absence

  3. Heat-induced conversion of beta(2)-microglobulin and hen egg-white lysozyme into amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Kenji; Yagi, Hisashi; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2007-09-28

    Thermodynamic parameters characterizing protein stability can be obtained for a fully reversible folding/unfolding system directly by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). However, the reversible DSC profile can be altered by an irreversible step causing aggregation. Here, to obtain insight into amyloid fibrils, ordered and fibrillar aggregates responsible for various amyloidoses, we studied the effects on human beta(2)-microglobulin and hen egg-white lysozyme of a combination of agitation and heating. Aggregates formed by mildly agitating protein solutions in the native state in the presence of NaCl were heated in the cell of the DSC instrument. For beta(2)-microglobulin, with an increase in the concentration of NaCl at neutral pH, the thermogram began to show an exothermic transition accompanied by a large decrease in heat capacity, followed by a kinetically controlled thermal response. Similarly, the aggregated lysozyme at a high concentration of NaCl revealed a similar distinct transition in the DSC thermogram over a wide pH range. Electron microscopy demonstrated the conformational change into amyloid fibrils. Taken together, the combined use of agitation and heating is a powerful way to generate amyloid fibrils from two proteins, beta(2)-microglobulin and hen egg-white lysozyme, and to evaluate the effects of heat on fibrillation, in which the heat capacity is crucial to characterizing the transition.

  4. Mobility of molecules and ions solubilized in protein gels: diffusion in the thick fraction of hen egg white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krise, Keith M; Milosavljevic, Bratoljub H

    2011-06-13

    The thick fraction of hen egg white is a protein hydrogel with an immeasurably high viscosity composed of ∼90% water that can serve as a model system for mammalian mucous membrane. Measurements of the rate constants of diffusion-controlled reactions occurring within the gel (and corresponding activation energies) and electric conductivity revealed that the thick fraction of egg white can be envisioned as a 3D network comprising hydrated protein molecules (held by intermolecular S-S bridges) surrounded by water pools and channels (of nonuniform diameters) that have a microviscosity that is very similar to that of bulk water. This was corroborated by differential scanning calorimetry measurements that revealed that 16% of water is bound to proteins. The melting kinetics of ice crystallites (produced from the freezable water) indicates nonhomogeneous water pool size.

  5. Effect of snack food by-product inclusion on production of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wyhe, R C; Fraley, S E; Szybisty, C A; Karcher, D M; Karcher, E L

    2012-06-01

    The increased interest in becoming green for consumers and companies is driving groups to develop innovative ways to become more efficient and reduce their waste. Foods past their expiration dates are large sources of waste and are causing food-manufacturing companies to develop waste disposal strategies. Integrating by-products from these companies into animal diets, specifically that of laying hens, could be significantly more cost effective for both the human food manufacturers and the agricultural producers. The study's objective is to evaluate laying hen diets containing snack food by-product, consisting mostly of expired potato chips, and the effect on hen performance. In total, 192 White Leghorn laying hens (45 wk old) were selected from the Michigan State University Poultry Farm. Hens were housed in conventional cages (3 birds/cage) and received 1 of 4 diets for 5 wk: 1) industry control corn-soybean meal, 2) control with 3% by-product, 3) control with 6% by-product, and 4) control with 9% by-product. Diets were formulated to be isocaloric, isonitrogenous, and balanced for sodium. Feed intake was measured for 3 consecutive days each week, and no overall differences between treatments were observed. However, during the first week, feed intake was significantly higher in birds fed the 6% and 9% diets compared with those fed control (P production, egg weight, and specific gravity were measured weekly. Hen BW was measured on d 1, 14, 28, and 35. Egg production, egg weight, specific gravity, and BW were not significantly affected by the addition of snack food by-products to the diet. In conclusion, the addition of expired snack food by-product into poultry diets does not significantly affect laying hen egg production and has the potential to be used as an alternative feed stuff in the future.

  6. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics study of electric and low-frequency microwave fields on hen egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Niall J; Solomentsev, Gleb Y; O'Brien, Paul

    2009-07-21

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of various mutants of hen egg white lysozyme have been performed at 300 K and 1 bar in the presence of both external static electric and low-frequency microwave (2.45 GHz) fields of varying intensity. Significant nonthermal field effects were noted, such as marked changes in the protein's secondary structure relative to the zero-field state, depending on the field conditions, mutation, and orientation with respect to the applied field. This occurred primarily as a consequence of alignment of the protein's total dipole moment with the external field, although the dipolar alignment of water molecules in both the solvation layer and the bulk was also found to be influential. Substantial differences in behavior were found for proteins with and without overall net charges, particularly with respect to translational motion. Localized motion and perturbation of hydrogen bonds were also found to be evident for charged residues.

  7. Effect of nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots on the fibrillation of hen egg-white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hua-Jin; Miao, Min; Liu, Zhe; Yang, Ran; Qu, Ling-Bo

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the fibrillation of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) in the absence and presence of different amount of nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) was studied by Thioflavin T (ThT) spectroscopy, Congo red (CR) binding assays, 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence assay, circular dichroism (CD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental results indicated that not only the fibrillation of HEWL at high temperature (65°C) and low pH (pH=2.0) could be inhibited effectively by N-GQDs, but the inhibition of HEWL by N-GQDs followed a dose-dependent manner. The results of this work suggested that the N-GQDs had a great potential for designing new therapeutic agents and were promising for future treatment of amyloid-related diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reflection of serum immunoglobulin isotypes in the egg yolk of laying hens immunized with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Nath Barman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the seroconversion and development of egg yolk immunoglobulins in adult laying White Leghorn hens immunized against an isolate of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC bearing K91 and K88ac antigens, obtained from diarrheic piglet. Materials and Methods: Adult laying White Leghorn hens were immunized with inactivated enterotoxic E. coli strain isolated originally from a case of piglet diarrhea following recommended schedule. The development of whole antibodies and isotype-specific antibodies in serum and egg yolk were measured using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Piglets suffering from diarrhea with fecal samples positive for ETEC were fed with egg yolk and compared with diarrheic control group. Results: The serum and egg yolk ELISA antibody titer against E. coli strain used in the present study was as high as 2666.66±307.92 and 933.33±203.67 respectively on 50 day-post-vaccination (DPV. The immunoglobulin Y (IgY was the predominant isotype in serum and egg yolk, which reached the peak titer of 2200±519.61 in serum on 40 DPV and 800±244.94 in egg yolk on 50 DPV. IgM titer in serum and egg yolk was found to be meager, and no IgA could be detected. Diarrheic piglets fed with the egg yolk suspension from immunized hens showed a promising result in controlling diarrhea. Conclusion: Egg yolk antibodies are considered a suitable immunotherapeutic alternative to conventional antibiotic therapy. High titer of egg yolk antibodies raised in the immunized hen against an isolate of ETEC holds the potential to be used for passive protection of diarrheic piglets during their most susceptible period of infection.

  9. Influence of cottonseed meal on vanadium toxicity and /sup 48/vanadium distribution in body tissues of laying hens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sell, J.L.; Davis, C.Y.; Scheideler, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    Hens of two commercial White Leghorn strains were fed diets representing a complete factorial arrangement of 0, 3, or 6 ppm vanadium (V) from dicalcium phosphate and 0 or 5% cottonseed meal (CSM). Test diets were fed for 4 consecutive weeks beginning when hens were 25, 40, 62, or 76 weeks old. After each 4-week treatment period, all hens were fed a diet containing no added V or CSM. Albumen quality (Haugh units) was determined on eggs produced on Days 6 and 7 of each week of feeding the test diets. Three ppm V caused a slight decrease in Haugh units, while 6 ppm V reduced Haugh unit score (HU) by 6 to 15 units when fed to hens 29, 44, or 80 weeks old. The relative influence of V on HU of eggs from 66-week-old hens was less pronounced. The inclusion of 5% CSM in the diet counteracted most of the adverse effects of V on egg quality, irrespective of strain of hens. Egg production and egg weight were not affected by V or CSM. In a second experiment, hens fed diets containing no V + no CSM, 6 ppm V + no CSM, no V + 5% CSM, or 6 ppm V + 5% CSM were given 110 microCi of /sup 48/V by oral capsule. Greatest concentrations of /sup 48/V were found in bone, kidney, liver, and magnum. Little /sup 48/V was detected in whites, and none was found in yolks of eggs produced 2 days after /sup 48/V dose.

  10. Temporal changes in distribution, prevalence and intensity of northern fowl mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) parasitism in commercial caged laying hens, with a comprehensive economic analysis of parasite impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullens, Bradley A; Owen, Jeb P; Kuney, Douglas R; Szijj, Coralie E; Klingler, Kimberly A

    2009-03-09

    Establishment and spread of Ornithonyssus sylviarum were documented through time on sentinel hens (50 per house of 28,000-30,000 hens) in the first egg production cycle of three large commercial flocks (12 houses) of white leghorn hens. Mites were controlled using acaricide, and the impacts of treatment on mite populations and economic performance were documented. Mite prevalence and intensity increased rapidly and in tandem for 4-8 weeks after infestation. Intensity declined due to immune system involvement, but prevalence remained high, and this would affect mite sampling plan use and development. Early treatment was more effective at controlling mites; 85% of light infestations were eliminated by a pesticide spray (Ravap), versus 24% of heavy infestations. Hens infested later developed lower peak mite intensities, and those mite populations declined more quickly than on hens infested earlier in life. Raw spatial association by distance indices (SADIE), incorporating both the intensity and distribution of mites within a house, were high from week-to-week within a hen house. Once adjusted spatially to reflect variable hen cohorts becoming infested asynchronously, this analysis showed the association index tended to rebound at intervals of 5-6 weeks after the hen immune system first suppressed them. Large, consistent mite differences in one flock (high vs. low infestation levels) showed the economic damage of mite parasitism (assessed by flock indexing) was very high in the initial stages of mite expansion. Unmitigated infestations overall reduced egg production (2.1-4.0%), individual egg weights (0.5-2.2%), and feed conversion efficiency (5.7%), causing a profit reduction of $0.07-0.10 per hen for a 10-week period. Asynchronous infestation patterns among pesticide-treated hens may have contributed to a lack of apparent flock-level economic effects later in the production cycle. Individual egg weights differed with mite loads periodically, but could be either

  11. Effects of Deinococcus spp. supplement on egg quality traits in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, I-Chen; Wu, Szu-Yin; Liou, Jenn-Fa; Liu, Hsiao-Hui; Chen, Jiau-Hua; Chen, Chin-Chu

    2017-10-25

    To counter the ill effects of synthetic dyes, bacterial pigment production as an alternative is now one of the promising and emerging fields of research. This study was conducted to evaluate the applicability of Deinococcus genus on the egg quality traits in laying hens. In study I, 24 single comb White Leghorn layers were fed with various 1 wt % Deinococcus bacterial strains for 10 d. In study II, 84 brown Hendrix layers were fed with one of 4 diets containing 0, 0.2, 1, or 5 wt % Deinococcus sp. GKB-Aid 1995 powder for 12 wk. In study III, 60 White Leghorn laying hens were fed either with or without 1 wt % Deinococcus sp. GKB-Aid 1995 powder, 1 wt % Deinococcus sp. GKB-Aid 1995 granules, or 1 wt % Deinococcus sp. GKB-Aid 1995 oily granules for 10 successive d. In all of the experiments, feeding Deinococcus powder did not affect egg quality traits except for the yolk color. In particular, supplementation with all Deinococcus powder treatments changed the yolk color (P < 0.05) in study I, with the best pigmentation score obtained by D. grandis and Deinococcus sp. GKB-Aid 1995. Moreover, longer supplementation of Deinococcus sp. GKB-Aid 1995 in study II had a significant effect on feed conversion ratio. With these findings under consideration, the present study suggests that the Deinococcus species, especially Deinococcus sp. GKB-Aid 1995, can be an excellent candidate for improving egg yolk color in laying hens. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  12. Kinetics of secondary structure recovery during the refolding of reduced hen egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, P; Delepierre, M; Goldberg, M E; Chaffotte, A F

    1997-10-03

    We have shown previously that, in less than 4 ms, the unfolded/oxidized hen lysozyme recovered its native secondary structure, while the reduced protein remained fully unfolded. To investigate the role played by disulfide bridges in the acquisition of the secondary structure at later stages of the renaturation/oxidation, the complete refolding of reduced lysozyme was studied. This was done in a renaturation buffer containing 0.5 M guanidinium chloride, 60 microM oxidized glutathione, and 20 microM reduced dithiothreitol, in which the aggregation of lysozyme was minimized and where a renaturation yield of 80% was obtained. The refolded protein could not be distinguished from the native lysozyme by activity, compactness, stability, and several spectroscopic measurements. The kinetics of renaturation were then studied by following the reactivation and the changes in fluorescence and circular dichroism signals. When bi- or triphasic sequential models were fitted to the experimental data, the first two phases had the same calculated rate constants for all the signals showing that, within the time resolution of these experiments, the folding/oxidation of hen lysozyme is highly cooperative, with the secondary structure, the tertiary structure, and the integrity of the active site appearing simultaneously.

  13. Effects induced by feeding organochlorine-contaminated carp from Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, to laying white leghorn hens: I. Effects on health of adult hens, egg production, and fertility: II. Embryotoxic and teratogenic effects

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of the study summarized in this report are as follows: I. This study was conducted to determine the effects of consumption of halogenated hydrocarbon...

  14. Nutritional characteristics and quality of eggs from laying hens fed on a diet supplemented with chestnut tannin extract (Castanea sativa Miller).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minieri, S; Buccioni, A; Serra, A; Galigani, I; Pezzati, A; Rapaccini, S; Antongiovanni, M

    2016-12-01

    The trial was performed with 80 laying hens belonging to two Tuscan autochthonous breeds: 40 birds of the Mugellese (MU) breed and 40 of the White Leghorn (WL) breed. The animals were allotted to 4 groups of individually caged 20 hens each: two groups were fed on a commercial diet and worked as the control groups (MUC and WLC); the other two groups received the same diet, integrated with 2 g of chestnut tannin (CT) extract per kg of diet (MUT and WLT). A sample of 70 eggs were randomly collected and analysed for cholesterol content, fatty acid (FA) profile, weight, thickness of shell and colour of yolk. Physical parameters, including yolk colour, and indices of egg quality were not affected by the treatments. The concentration of unsaturated FAs increased, whereas cholesterol was significantly decreased: -17% in WLT and -9% in MUT. Dietary supplementation with CT extract resulted in a modification of lipid composition, towards a more healthy quality of eggs.

  15. Proteomic comparison by iTRAQ combined with mass spectrometry of egg white proteins in laying hens (Gallus gallus) fed with soybean meal and cottonseed meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tao; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Jing; Wu, Shugeng; Yue, Hongyuan; Qi, Guanghai

    2017-01-01

    Cottonseed meal (CSM) is commonly used in hens' diets to replace soybean meal (SBM). However, the molecular consequences of this substitution remains unclear. To investigate the impact of this substitution at the molecular level, iTRAQ combined with biochemical analysis was performed in Hy-Line W-36 hens supplemented with a mixed diet of CSM and SBM. Egg weight, albumen height, and Haugh unit were significantly reduced in the CSM100 group (100% crude protein of SBM replaced by CSM) compared with the SBM group (P<0.05). A total of 15 proteins, accounting for 75% of egg white proteins with various biological functions of egg whites, were found to be reduced. This finding may relate to the decrease of albumen quality in the CSM100 group. Oviduct magnum morphology and hormone analysis indicated that a reduced level of plasma progesterone caused reduced growth of the tubular gland and epithelial cells in the magnum, further decreasing egg white protein synthesis in the magnum. These findings help demonstrate the molecular mechanisms of a CSM diet that cause adverse effects on albumen quality, while also showing that SBM should not be totally replaced with CSM in a hen diet.

  16. Ortho-methylated 3-hydroxypyridines hinder hen egg-white lysozyme fibrillogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Laura; Pauwels, Kris; Casasnovas, Rodrigo; Sanchis, Pilar; Vilanova, Bartolomé; Muñoz, Francisco; Donoso, Josefa; Adrover, Miquel

    2015-07-01

    Protein aggregation with the concomitant formation of amyloid fibrils is related to several neurodegenerative diseases, but also to non-neuropathic amyloidogenic diseases and non-neurophatic systemic amyloidosis. Lysozyme is the protein involved in the latter, and it is widely used as a model system to study the mechanisms underlying fibril formation and its inhibition. Several phenolic compounds have been reported as inhibitors of fibril formation. However, the anti-aggregating capacity of other heteroaromatic compounds has not been studied in any depth. We have screened the capacity of eleven different hydroxypyridines to affect the acid-induced fibrillization of hen lysozyme. Although most of the tested hydroxypyridines alter the fibrillation kinetics of HEWL, only 3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridine, 3-hydroxy-6-methylpyridine and 3-hydroxy-2,6-dimethylpyridine completely abolish fibril formation. Different biophysical techniques and several theoretical approaches are combined to elucidate their mechanism of action. O-methylated 3-hydroxypyridines bind non-cooperatively to two distinct but amyloidogenic regions of monomeric lysozyme. This stabilises the protein structure, as evidenced by enhanced thermal stability, and results in the inhibition of the conformational transition that precedes fibril assembly. Our results point to o-methylated 3-hydroxypyridines as a promising molecular scaffold for the future development of novel fibrillization inhibitors.

  17. Responses of laying hens to diets containing up to 2% DL-methionine or equimolar (2.25%) 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio)butanoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, R F; Ford, B C; Dibner, J J; Robey, W W; Yersin, A G

    1994-02-01

    Diets supplemented with up to .6% DL-Met (DLM) or .68% 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio)butanoic acid (HMB, Alimet) acidify the urine and reduce the incidence of urolithiasis in pullets and laying hens. Excessive acidification potentially may reduce eggshell quality and bone mineralization by interfering with Ca metabolism and may severely challenge the liver and kidneys, which are the primary organs responsible for attenuating metabolic acidosis. To evaluate these possibilities, 30-wk-old Single Comb White Leghorn hens in full production (five hens per replicate, six replicates per diet treatment) were fed for 30 d a 15.7% CP corn and soybean meal-based control layer ration alone or supplemented with DLM (.5, 1, 1.5, or 2%) or equimolar HMB (.56, 1.13, 1.69, or 2.25%). None of the diets caused mortality or gross hepatic or renal damage. Hens fed diets supplemented with the highest levels of DLM and HMB exhibited significant reductions in feed intake, hen-day egg production, and liver mass and had lower plasma concentrations of alanine amino-transferase and isocitrate dehydrogenase when compared with hens fed the control diet. Kidney mass was not significantly affected by high levels of DLM or HMB, but plasma uric acid was significantly higher in hens fed 2% DLM compared with hens fed the control diet. The highest levels of DLM and HMB did not significantly alter total plasma Ca or inorganic phosphate concentrations, nor were percentage eggshell or femur mineralization (femur ash mass:defatted bone mass, femur ash mass:bone volume) significantly reduced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Identification of eggshell membrane proteins and purification of ovotransferrin and beta-NAGase from hen egg white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborn, G J; Clare, D A; Sheldon, B W; Kelly, R W

    2006-01-01

    Exposure of selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens to egg shell membranes (ESM) significantly reduced their thermal resistance and/or inactivated cells. Although the components responsible for this antibacterial activity have not been conclusively identified, several proteins associated with the ESM activity have been identified including beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, lysozyme and ovotransferrin, with each displaying varying degrees of antibacterial activity. Numerous attempts to purify active fractions of beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, lysozyme and ovotransferrin from the ESM proved somewhat limited; however, hen egg white (HEW) beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase was purified using a two-step chromatographic procedure, isoelectric focusing followed by cation exchange chromatography. Pure fractions of ovotransferrin were also obtained in the process. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry were then used to partially characterize the individual protein components. Purified protein fractions such as these will be required in order to fully elucidate the mechanism responsible for the antimicrobial properties associated with the ESM.

  19. ACE inhibitory peptides and antioxidant peptides derived from in vitro digestion hydrolysate of hen egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shengqi; Sun, Jun; Liu, Yuntao; Zeng, Huawei; Su, Yujie; Yang, Yanjun

    2012-12-01

    Lysozyme from hen egg white is a well-known antimicrobial protein with high ratio of hydrophobic and positively charged amino acid residues. In order to explore functional bioactivities of enzymatic hydrolysates of lysozyme, the protein was subjected to a simulated gastrointestinal digestion and the resulting hydrolysate (LPH2) showed a strong competitive angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity (IC(50)=12.6μg/ml) and a remarkable antioxidant activity. The LPH2 was fractionated using a 3kDa cut-off membrane and the obtained permeate LPH2-3kDa was analysed by MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. Using this technology, 38 different peptides were identified and some of these peptides were well fit with structure requirements of ACE inhibitory peptides and/or antioxidant peptides. The findings from this study suggest that the protein containing high proportion of hydrophobic and positively charged residues have the potential to generate multifunctional peptides, and these peptides would be beneficial ingredient to be used in functional foods. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals using a short hot wire method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Seiji; Maki, Syou; Tanaka, Seiichi; Maekawa, Ryunosuke; Masuda, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2017-07-01

    Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals were examined by using the transient short hot wire method. This method is based on the conventional hot wire method, but improved by using a wire that is much shorter than conventional ones. The magneto-Archimedes levitation technique was utilized to attach the HEWL crystals onto the wire. Owing to the upward magnetic force, the HEWL crystals were deposited at the air-liquid interface of the protein buffer solution where the short hot wire was preliminarily fixed. In situ observation clarified that the wire was completely buried into the HEWL crystals. By means of these techniques, the measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of HEWL crystals was realized for the first time. Gadolinium chloride (a paramagnetic subject) was used as a precipitant agent of crystallization. Crystal growth was carried out over 20 h at 17.2 °C. The applied magnetic field was 4 T. Measurements were conducted during the crystal growth at two different times. The thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the HEWL crystals were determined to be 0.410 W/(m.K) and 3.77×10-8 m2/s at 14 h after, and 0.438 W/(m.K) and 5.18×10-8 m2/s at 20 h after, respectively. We emphasize that this method is versatile and applicable for other protein crystals.

  1. Change in hen sciatic nerve calcium after a single oral dose of tri-o-tolyl phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttrell, W E; Olajos, E J; Pleban, P A

    1993-02-01

    Six trace elements were monitored in neural tissue homogenates from White Leghorn hens orally dosed with tri-o-tolyl phosphate (TOTP) or tri-m-tolyl phosphate (TMTP) (200 mg/kg). Treated birds were monitored daily for development of delayed neurotoxicity, and concentrations of calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, and zinc were measured with atomic absorption spectroscopy at the time of maximal locomotor impairment (27-35 days postdosing). TOTP-treated birds manifested motor deficit by 15 days postdosing, while hens administered TMTP exhibited no signs of delayed neurotoxicity. Total calcium content in the sciatic nerve homogenates from TOTP-dosed hens was significantly less (P < 0.05) at the time of maximal locomotor impairment, while no shifts in the other trace elements were found. Therefore, the ortho isomer of tritolylphosphate elicited symptoms of delayed neurotoxicity in the hen (i.e., organophosphorus ester-induced delayed neurotoxicity or OPIDN) and caused a decrease in total calcium content in the sciatic nerve homogenates, in contrast to effects of the meta isomer. Analysis of neural homogenates at time of maximal locomotor impairment reflected secondary events in the degradative processes, since the initial assault of TOTP happens early after administration. Therefore, at fully developed OPIDN alteration of calcium balance in sciatic nerves is an indicator of axonopathy in a degenerated nerve following chemical injury.

  2. Measurements of genetic variation in residual metabolizable energy intake of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, H M; Wilcox, C J; Wilson, H R; Harms, R H

    1991-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine heritability of the residual component of feed consumption. The effect of test period length was also examined to determine the shortest test period that would result in reliable data. Three hundred and thirty-five pedigreed White Leghorn hens were used. The experiment began when the hens were 26 wk of age and lasted for 28 wk. The residual component of energy intake was determined for each hen for time periods of 2, 4, and 8 wk in length. These values were used to determine heritability. Analyses of the data for each period were performed in two steps. A reduced model, without pedigree information, was used to develop a regression model. A complete model was used for analyses of data. The procedure of starting egg mass output measurements 2 days after body weight measurements was more effective than starting records on the same days that body weights were obtained. The partial regression coefficients of ME intake decreased with age. Also the partial regression coefficients of ME on body weight change increased with the length of the test period. The partial regression coefficients of ME on egg mass increased slightly with age. Heritability of ME intake adjusted for metabolic body weight, body weight change, and egg mass output was highest (.567 +/- .186) when the test was calculated by 8-wk periods. However, the range of estimates over time was lowest when made for 4-wk periods.

  3. Changes of the antigenic and allergenic properties of a hen's egg albumin in a cake with gamma-irradiated egg white

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.-W.; Seo, J.-H.; Kim, J.-H.; Lee, S.-Y.; Kim, K.-S.; Byun, M.-W. E-mail: mwbyun@nanum.kaeri.re.kr

    2005-04-01

    Changes of the antigenicity and allergenicity of a hen's egg albumin (ovalbumin, OVA) in white layer cakes containing egg white gamma-irradiated with 10 or 20 kGy were monitored by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), individually formatted with mouse anti-OVA IgG (mouse IgG) and with egg allergic patients' IgE. Mouse IgG recognized OVA in the cakes with irradiated egg white better than that in the control with a non-irradiated one. Whereas, the detected concentrations of intact OVA in the control significantly decreased in the treatments, when determined by IgE-based ELISA. The results appeared to indicate that the antigenicity of the OVA increased, but that the allergenicity was decreased by irradiation and processing. Egg white irradiated for reducing the egg allergy could be used for producing a safer cake from the egg allergy.

  4. Changes of the antigenic and allergenic properties of a hen's egg albumin in a cake with gamma-irradiated egg white

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju.-Woon; Seo, Ji.-Hyun; Kim, Jae.-Hun; Lee, Soo.-Young; Kim, Kwan.-Soo; Byun, Myung.-Woo

    2005-04-01

    Changes of the antigenicity and allergenicity of a hen's egg albumin (ovalbumin, OVA) in white layer cakes containing egg white gamma-irradiated with 10 or 20 kGy were monitored by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), individually formatted with mouse anti-OVA IgG (mouse IgG) and with egg allergic patients' IgE. Mouse IgG recognized OVA in the cakes with irradiated egg white better than that in the control with a non-irradiated one. Whereas, the detected concentrations of intact OVA in the control significantly decreased in the treatments, when determined by IgE-based ELISA. The results appeared to indicate that the antigenicity of the OVA increased, but that the allergenicity was decreased by irradiation and processing. Egg white irradiated for reducing the egg allergy could be used for producing a safer cake from the egg allergy.

  5. Binding of naringin and naringenin with hen egg white lysozyme: A spectroscopic investigation and molecular docking study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sourav; Ghosh, Pooja; Koley, Sudipta; Singha Roy, Atanu

    2018-03-01

    The interactions of naringenin (NG) and naringin (NR) with Hen Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL) in aqueous medium have been investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy, steady-state fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and molecular docking analyses. Both NG and NR can quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HEWL via static quenching mechanism. At 300 K, the value of binding constant (Kb) of HEWL-NG complex (5.596 ± 0.063 × 104 M- 1) was found to be greater than that of HEWL-NR complex (3.404 ± 0.407 × 104 M- 1). The negative ΔG° values in cases of both the complexes specify the spontaneous binding. The binding distance between the donor (HEWL) and acceptor (NG/NR) was estimated using the Försters theory and the possibility of non-radiative energy transfer from HEWL to NG/NR was observed. The presence of metal ions (Ca2 +, Cu2 + and Fe2 +) decreased the binding affinity of NG/NR towards HEWL. Synchronous fluorescence studies indicate the change in Trp micro-environment due to the incorporation of NG/NR into HEWL. CD and FT-IR studies indicated that the α-helicity of the HEWL was slightly enhanced due to ligand binding. NG and NR inhibited the enzymatic activity of HEWL and exhibited their affinity for the active site of HEWL. Molecular docking studies revealed that both NG and NR bind in the close vicinity of Trp 62 and Trp 63 residues which is vital for the catalytic activity.

  6. Rheological properties, oxidative stability, and tocopherol content during storage of fried dough made with Silky fowl egg: comparison with hen egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyosaki, T

    2010-05-01

    Eggs from Silky fowl and White Leghorn hens were used to prepare fried dough. The rheological properties, lipid oxidative stability, and trans, trans-2,4-decadienal and tocopherol content of fried dough made with Silky fowl egg were compared with dough made with hen egg. The fried dough was stored in a glass bottle at 50 degrees C in the dark for 12 d. The fried dough made with Silky fowl egg showed little change in hardness and adhesion for 12 d at 50 degrees C. However, in the fried dough made with hen egg, hardness increased drastically and adhesion decreased. The fried dough made with Silky fowl egg showed restricted generation of hydroperoxides during 12 d in storage at 50 degrees C. In contrast, the fried dough made with hen egg showed an increased amount of hydroperoxides during the 12-d storage. The lowest concentration of trans, trans-2,4-decadienal was observed in fried dough made with Silky fowl egg, whereas the concentration of trans, trans-2,4-decadienal in fried dough made with hen egg was significantly increased. Total tocopherols in fried dough made with Silky fowl egg were degraded 23.3 mg/100 g of fried dough by the end of the experimental period at 50 degrees C. In contrast, total tocopherols in the fried dough made with hen egg were degraded 40 mg/100 g of fried dough. The ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids decreased and the hydroperoxide content increased with storage time. The unsaturated fatty acid:saturated fatty acid ratio and hydroperoxide and tocopherol contents were lower in fried dough made with Silky fowl egg than in that made with hen egg, indicating decreased lipid oxidation. The present experiment suggests that the use of Silky fowl egg could improve the rheological properties, oxidative stability, and trans, trans-2,4-decadienal and tocopherol contents of fried dough.

  7. E-cadherin expression in ovarian cancer in the laying hen, Gallus domesticus, compared to human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansenberger, Kristine; Zhuge, Yan; Lagman, Jo Ann J; Richards, Cassandra; Barua, Animesh; Bahr, Janice M; Hales, Dale Buchanan

    2009-06-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths in women. Until recently, a significant lack of an appropriate animal model has hindered the discovery of early detection markers for ovarian cancer. The aging hen serves as an animal model because it spontaneously develops ovarian adenocarcinomas similar in histological appearance to the human disease. E-cadherin is an adherens protein that is down-regulated in many cancers, but has been shown to be up-regulated in primary human ovarian cancer. Our objective was to evaluate E-cadherin expression in the hen ovary and compare its expression to human ovarian cancer. White Leghorn hens aged 185 weeks (cancerous and normal) were used for sample collection. A human ovarian tumor tissue array was used for comparison to the human disease. E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression were analyzed in cancerous and normal hen ovaries by immunohistochemistry (IHC), Western blot, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Tissue fixed in neutral buffered formalin was used for IHC. Protein from tissue frozen in liquid nitrogen was analyzed by Western blot. RNA was extracted from tissue preserved in RNAlater and analyzed by qRT-PCR. The human ovarian tumor tissue array was used for IHC. E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression were significantly increased in cancerous hen ovaries as compared to ovaries of normal hens by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Similar expression of E-cadherin was observed by IHC in both human and hen ovarian cancer tissues. Similar E-cadherin expression was also observed in primary ovarian tumor and peritoneal metastatic tissue from cancerous hens. Our findings suggest that the up-regulation of E-cadherin is an early defining event in ovarian cancer and may play a significant role in the initial development of the primary ovarian tumor. E-cadherin also appears to be important in the development of secondary tumors within the peritoneal cavity. Our data suggest that E-cadherin may prove to be an

  8. Heavy-atom derivatives in lipidic cubic phases: results on hen egg-white lysozyme tetragonal derivative crystals with Gd-HPDO3A complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Eric; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Vicat, Jean; Kahn, Richard

    2004-08-01

    Gd-HPDO3A, a neutral gadolinium complex, is a good candidate for obtaining heavy-atom-derivative crystals by the lipidic cubic phase crystallization method known to be effective for membrane proteins. Gadolinium-derivative crystals of hen egg-white lysozyme were obtained by co-crystallizing the protein with 100 mM Gd-HPDO3A in a monoolein cubic phase. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.7 A using Cu Kalpha radiation from a rotating-anode generator. Two binding sites of the gadolinium complex were located from the strong gadolinium anomalous signal. The Gd-atom positions and their refined occupancies were found to be identical to those found in derivative crystals of hen egg-white lysozyme obtained by co-crystallizing the protein with 100 mM Gd-HPDO3A using the hanging-drop technique. Moreover, the refined structures are isomorphous. The lipidic cubic phase is not disturbed by the high concentration of Gd-HPDO3A. This experiment demonstrates that a gadolinium complex, Gd-HPDO3A, can be used to obtain derivative crystals by the lipidic cubic phase crystallization method. Further studies with membrane proteins that are known to crystallize in lipidic cubic phases will be undertaken with Gd-HPDO3A and other Gd complexes to test whether derivative crystals with high Gd-site occupancies can be obtained.

  9. The development of egg-laying behaviour and nest-site selection in a strain of white laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld - Piepers, B.

    1987-01-01

    Since World War II livestock husbandry has been highly intensificated. This trend was most obvious in the poultry industry. Laying hens used to be housed outdoors in free-range systems, but nowadays these systems have almost entirely been replaced by the battery-cage. In the early sixties

  10. Camelina meal increases egg n-3 fatty acid content without altering quality or production in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakani, Radhika; Fowler, Justin; Haq, Akram-Ul; Murphy, Eric J; Rosenberger, Thad A; Berhow, Mark; Bailey, Christopher A

    2012-05-01

    Camelina sativa is an oilseed plant rich in n-3 and n-6 fatty acids and extruding the seeds results in high protein meal (*40%) containing high levels of n-3 fatty acids. In this study, we examined the effects of feeding extruded defatted camelina meal to commercial laying hens, measuring egg production, quality, and fatty acid composition. Lohmann White Leghorn hens (29 weeks old) were randomly allocated to three dietary treatment groups (n = 25 per group) and data was collected over a 12 week production period. All the treatment groups were fed a corn soy based experimental diet containing 0% (control), 5, or 10% extruded camelina meal. We found no significant differences in percent hen-day egg production and feed consumed per dozen eggs. Egg shell strength was significantly higher in both camelina groups compared to the controls. Egg total n-3 fatty acid content increased 1.9- and 2.7-fold in 5 and 10% camelina groups respectively relative to the control. A similar increase in DHA content also occurred. Further camelina meal did not alter glucosinolate levels and no detectable glucosinolates or metabolic product isothiocyanates were found in the eggs from either the 5 or 10% camelina groups. These results indicate that camelina meal is a viable dietary source of n-3 fatty acids for poultry and its dietary inclusion results in eggs enriched with n-3 fatty acids.

  11. Long Term Consumption of Flaxseed Enriched Diet Decreased Ovarian Cancer Incidence and Prostaglandin E2 in Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilati, Erfan; Bahr, Janice M.; Hales, Dale Buchanan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Prevention may be the best approach to reduce ovarian cancer. Flaxseed is the richest vegetable source of omega-3 fatty acids which may be effective in the prevention of ovarian cancer. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the most proinflammatory ecoisanoid and one of the downstream products of two isoforms of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. Our objective was to determine if long-term consumption of a flaxseed enriched diet decreased ovarian cancer severity and incidence in the laying hen and to investigate its potential correlation with the expression of COX enzymes and PGE2 concentration. Methods White Leghorn hens were fed 10% flaxseed-enriched or standard diet for 4 years. The severity and incidence of ovarian cancer were determined by gross pathology and histology. COX-1 and COX-2 protein and mRNA expression and PGE2 concentrations in ovaries were measured by Western blot, quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Results The results demonstrated that there was a reduction in ovarian cancer severity and incidence in hens fed flaxseed diet. In correlation with decreased ovarian cancer severity and incidence, concentration of PGE2 and expression of COX-2 were diminished in ovaries of hens fed flaxseed. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the lower levels of COX-2 and PGE2 are the main contributing factors in the chemo-suppressive role of long-term flaxseed consumption in ovarian cancer in laying hens. These findings may provide the basis for clinical trials of dietary intervention targeting prostaglandin biosynthesis for the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:23707669

  12. Long term consumption of flaxseed enriched diet decreased ovarian cancer incidence and prostaglandin E₂in hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilati, Erfan; Bahr, Janice M; Hales, Dale Buchanan

    2013-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Prevention may be the best approach to reduce ovarian cancer. Flaxseed is the richest vegetable source of omega-3 fatty acids which may be effective in the prevention of ovarian cancer. Prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) is the most pro-inflammatory ecoisanoid and one of the downstream products of two isoforms of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. Our objective was to determine if long-term consumption of a flaxseed enriched diet decreased ovarian cancer severity and incidence in the laying hen and to investigate its potential correlation with the expression of COX enzymes and PGE₂ concentration. White Leghorn hens were fed 10% flaxseed-enriched or standard diet for 4years. The severity and incidence of ovarian cancer were determined by gross pathology and histology. COX-1 and COX-2 protein and mRNA expression and PGE₂ concentrations in ovaries were measured by Western blot, quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. The results demonstrated that there was a reduction in ovarian cancer severity and incidence in hens fed flaxseed diet. In correlation with decreased ovarian cancer severity and incidence, concentration of PGE₂ and expression of COX-2 were diminished in ovaries of hens fed flaxseed. Our findings suggest that the lower levels of COX-2 and PGE₂ are the main contributing factors in the chemo-suppressive role of long-term flaxseed consumption in ovarian cancer in laying hens. These findings may provide the basis for clinical trials of dietary intervention targeting prostaglandin biosynthesis for the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Expression and localization of cyclooxygenases in the oviduct of laying hens during the ovulatory cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhamouly, M; Isobe, N; Yoshimura, Y

    2017-10-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) play important roles in regulation of the functions of the hen oviduct. However, little is known about the expression and localization of the rate-limiting cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) in the oviduct. The aim of this study was to determine the COXs expression and localization in the different segments of the oviduct and to investigate changes in their expression levels during the ovulatory cycle of laying hens. White Leghorn laying hens were killed at 0, 4, 7, 16 and 24 h after oviposition, and samples from the infundibulum, magnum, isthmus, uterus, and vagina were collected. Gene and protein expressions were examined by real-time PCR and western blot, respectively, for both COX-1 and COX-2. Localization of COX-1 and COX-2 in the hen oviduct was determined by immunohistochemistry and PCR analysis of samples collected by laser capture microdissection (LCM). The expression level of COX-1 was highest in the infundibulum, while that of COX-2 was significantly higher in the uterus than in the other segments. The expression levels of COX-1 in the infundibulum and COX-2 in the uterus were higher at 0 and 24 h after oviposition, just prior to subsequent ovulation and oviposition. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of COX-1 and COX-2 in all oviductal segments. The density of COX-2 was the highest in the uterus, and did not change during the ovulatory cycle. COX-1 and COX-2 were localized in the surface epithelium of all oviductal segments besides the uterine tubular glands. We conclude that both COXs are differentially expressed in the different oviductal segments with a temporal association to ovulation and oviposition. COX-1 and COX-2 may play an important role in the infundibulum and uterus, respectively, and COX-2 may be one of the factors regulating the induction of oviposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Restriction of cadmium transfer to eggs from laying hens exposed to cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shin; Okabe, Masashi; Emoto, Tadasu [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The transfer of Cd to eggs of white Leghorn laying hens has been shown to be restricted. After Cd was injected ip into laying hens, the Cd concentrations in the blood, livers, ovaries, and eggs were measured, Although the Cd concentrations in the maternal blood and livers increased remarkably at certain levels of administrations, the Cd concentration in the yolks of eggs was not significantly increased, and was less than 0.04 {mu}g/g wet weight. After egg production stopped in the highest injected group (7.5 mg Cd/kg), Cd in the yolks of eggs had an accumulated range of 0.02-0.03 {mu}g/g wet weight. This was despite the high Cd accumulation in the liver. Furthermore, the Cd concentration in the follicle walls of the ovary increased and was 13- to 52-fold higher than in the follicle yolks. An additional experiment was conducted in order to estimate whether hatching success is affected by the Cd in the laid eggs of Cd-injected laying hens, The ratio of hatching success in the 0.3 or 1.2 {mu}g Cd/egg-injected groups was similar to that in the saline- injected group, indicating that a small amount of Cd in the eggs might exert no marked influence on the hatching success. In conclusion, Cd transfer from laying hen to eggs was restricted after the maternal bird was exposed to Cd. Furthermore, Cd accumulates in the follicle walls of ovary. These results suggest that the follicle walls might play a role in protecting the follicle yolks against Cd toxicity. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Effect of yeast with bacteriocin from rumen bacteria on laying performance, blood biochemistry, faecal microbiota and egg quality of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H T; Shih, W Y; Chen, S W; Wang, S Y

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of yeast with bacteriocin from Ruminococcus albus 7 (albusin B) on physiological state and production performance of laying hens. One hundred and twenty 26-week-old Single Comb White Leghorn (Hyline) laying hens were assigned into five groups including: (i) control group, (ii) yeast control (YC), (iii) 0.125% yeast with bacteriocin (0.125B), (iv) 0.25% yeast with bacteriocin (0.25B) and (v) 0.5% yeast with bacteriocin (0.5B). All supplements were added to the experimental diets of the hens from 26 to 46 weeks of age. Samples were collected every 4 weeks. Blood samples were collected from the wing vein for blood biochemical parameters assay, and faecal samples were collected by swab for the microbiota test. The egg production performance was recorded daily, and fresh eggs were collected for quality test. The blood biochemical assay results indicated that the addition of yeast with bacteriocin decreased the AST (aspartate aminotransferase) activity and it also affects the lactate concentration in laying hen blood. The result of egg quality indicated that yeast with bacteriocin supplementation had no effect on the mass of yolk and the strength of eggshell, but it had positive effect on the laying performance under hot environment. Low concentration bacteriocin (0.125B) supplementation could decrease total yolk cholesterol. The faecal microbiota result indicated that the supplementation of bacteriocin increased the lactobacilli counts. The yeast with bacteriocin supplementation significantly decreased the clostridia counts under hot environment condition, especially in hens receiving 0.25B. Combining the data from clinic chemistry, faecal microbiota, egg production and egg quality, the 0.25B supplementation may result in the best physiological parameter and egg production performance of laying hen. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Various cadmium compounds in the feed for broilers and laying hens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nezel, K.; Matthes, S.; Vogt, H.

    1981-06-01

    The influence of various cadmium compounds on the performance and health of broilers and laying hens and on the residues in tissues and eggs has been investigated. The easily soluble cadmium acetate, cystein cadmium and the low-soluble cadmium sulfide in the doses of 0-20-40 ppm cadmium were compared. Eight x 12 male Lohmann broiler chickens in cages for every ration in the 42-/49-days broiler test and 32 LSL-hens (Leghorn type) in single cages for every ration in the 336-days laying test have been used. Parameters tested in both tests were: mortality, feed intake, weight gain, feed efficiency, pathological-anatomical changes as well as cadmium contents in the test rations and in the pectoral muscle, the thigh muscle, the liver, the kidneys and the bones. In the laying test, also the laying rate, egg weight, daily egg output, egg shell stability and cadmium contents in egg white, yolk and in the tissues were tested. In both age groups the negative effect of cadmium acetate and cystein-cadmium employment on performance and health of the birds were similar; comparable concentrations were found in the tissues. Cadmium sulfide had no effect on the performance of the birds and cadmium contents in the tissues were only slightly raised. In the eggs, no cadmium enhancement was noticed.

  17. Effect of dietary supplementation with Morinda citrifolia on productivity and egg quality of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dairon Más-Toro

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the dietary supplementation of powdered leaves of Morinda citrifolia on productivity and egg quality of laying hens, a total of 160 White Leghorn birds (Hybrid L-33 of 27 weeks of age were allotted during 70 days, according to completely randomized design. Dietary treatments consisted of a control diet fed without or with 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% of powdered leaves of M. citrifolia. Supplementation of 1.0 and 1.5% of M. citrifolia powder increased the egg weight (P0.05 among treatments. Also, supplementation of 0.5 and 1.0% of M. citrifolia increased the shell thickness and the yolk color was pigmented by this medicinal plant. It recommended the dietary supplementation of 1.0% of powdered leaves of M. citrifolia on laying hen diets to improve the egg weight, shell thickness and yolk color.

  18. Effect of an External Electric Field on the Kinetics of Dislocation-Free Growth of Tetragonal Hen Egg White Lysozyme Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiko Koizumi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dislocation-free tetragonal hen egg white (HEW lysozyme crystals were grown from a seed crystal in a cell. The rates of tetragonal HEW lysozyme crystal growth normal to the (110 and (101 faces with and without a 1-MHz external electric field were measured. A decrease in the typical growth rates of the crystal measured under an applied field at 1 MHz was observed, although the overall driving force increased. Assuming that the birth and spread mechanism of two-dimensional nucleation occurs, an increase in the effective surface energy of the step ends was realized in the presence of the electric field, which led to an improvement in the crystal quality of the tetragonal HEW lysozyme crystals. This article also discusses the increase in the effective surface energy of the step ends with respect to the change in the entropy of the solid.

  19. Role of the lysozyme inhibitor Ivy in growth or survival of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria in hen egg white and in human saliva and breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Daphne; Vanlint, Dietrich; Callewaert, Lien; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2008-07-01

    Ivy is a lysozyme inhibitor that protects Escherichia coli against lysozyme-mediated cell wall hydrolysis when the outer membrane is permeabilized by mutation or by chemical or physical stress. In the current work, we have investigated whether Ivy is necessary for the survival or growth of E. coli MG1655 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in hen egg white and in human saliva and breast milk, which are naturally rich in lysozyme and in membrane-permeabilizing components. Wild-type E. coli was able to grow in saliva and breast milk but showed partial inactivation in egg white. The knockout of Ivy did not affect growth in breast milk but slightly increased sensitivity to egg white and caused hypersensitivity to saliva, resulting in the complete inactivation of 10(4) CFU ml(-1) of bacteria within less than 5 hours. The depletion of lysozyme from saliva completely restored the ability of the ivy mutant to grow like the parental strain. P. aeruginosa, in contrast, showed growth in all three substrates, which was not affected by the knockout of Ivy production. These results indicate that lysozyme inhibitors like Ivy promote bacterial survival or growth in particular lysozyme-rich secretions and suggest that they may promote the bacterial colonization of specific niches in the animal host.

  20. Effect of pharmacological levels of dietary vanadium on the egg production, shell thickness and egg yolk cholesterol in laying hens and coturnix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafez, Y.S.; Kratzer, F.H.

    1976-01-01

    The addition of 100 ppm of vanadium to a ration for White Leghorn laying hens caused a significant increase (p < 0.01) in the egg shell thickness, but did not cause any significant change in the egg production, egg weight or egg yolk cholesterol content. The addition of 300 ppm of vanadium caused a severe depression in the egg production which was the only symptom of vanadium toxicity to be observed. The addition of 50, 100, 200 or 300 ppm vanadium to the ration of laying coturnix did not cause any significant change in egg production, egg weight or egg yolk cholesterol content. The addition of the same levels of vanadium to one-day old male coturnix chicks did not cause any significant growth depression or mortality. The authors suggest that coturnix may be more resistant to vanadium toxicity than chickens. 8 references, 5 tables.

  1. Effect of Fennel (Foeniculum Vulgare Mill. Used as a Feed Additive on The Egg Quality of Laying Hens Under Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Gharaghani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, one hundred and twenty 40-wk-old White Leghorn laying hens were submitted to two different thermal conditions (24° C vs. 34° C and were fed three levels (0, 10, or and 20 g/kg of dietof fennel fruits (Foeniculum vulgare Mill. as a feed additive in. This study was carried out according to a factorial design consisting of two temperatures and three fennel levels with five 5 replicates each (n = 2 × 3 × 5. Performance, egg production, egg quality, and oxidative product levels (malondialdehyde, MDA, and carbonyl in the eggs were measured before and after heat exposure. The results showed that the tested temperatures did not affect egg production (p>0.05, but the production of eggs with broken shell and feed intake were affected by heat stress (p0.05, but increased yolk triglyceride levels. Hens that consumed fennel presented lower yolk cholesterol and triglyceride levels (p<0.05. In general, fennel fruit influenced egg yolk cholesterol and triglyceride contents, and because of its antioxidant properties, it may alleviate the adverse effects of heat stress on laying hens.

  2. Age dependent increase in prostaglandin pathway coincides with onset of ovarian cancer in laying hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilati, Erfan; Pan, Lurui; Bahr, Janice M.; Hales, Dale Buchanan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been linked to cancer. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the most pro-inflammatory lipid and one of the downstream products of 2 isoforms of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and mainly occurs in older women. The factors that contribute to the correlation of age and ovarian cancer are unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of COX enzymes and PGE2 levels in ovaries and correlate them to ovarian cancer and aging. White Leghorn hens aged 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 and 3.5 years were used. The incidence of ovarian cancer was determined by gross pathology and histology. COX-1 and COX-2 protein and mRNA expression and PGE2 concentrations in ovaries were measured using Western blot, quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Our results indicated an increase in ovarian cancer incidence and expression of both COX enzymes in ovaries of older hens. In correlation with ovarian cancer incidence and COX enzymes expression, PGE2 concentrations were elevated with age. Ovaries with tumor had elevated COX-1 expression and PGE2 concentration compared to normal ovaries. Our findings suggest that the up-regulation of COX enzymes with age is the main contributing factor in the age associated increase in PGE2. Furthermore, elevated PGE2 in ovaries of hens concomitant with age suggests its important role in early stages of ovarian carcinogenesis. These finding may provide the basis for clinical trials utilizing COX specific inhibitors or dietary intervention targeting prostaglandin biosynthesis for the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:23089186

  3. Effect of genetic selection on growth parameters and tonic immobility in Leghorn pullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K E; Jones, D R

    2012-03-01

    Four genetic stocks of Leghorn pullets were used to evaluate the effects of genetic selection on growth and fearfulness behavior. Three of the stocks were the Ottawa randombred control stocks from 1950 (CS5), 1959 (CS7), and 1972 (CS10). The fourth stock was a 1993 commercial laying stock (CCS) whose ancestors were involved in the formation of the randombred control stocks. Pullets were reared in a brood and grow poultry house with flat deck cages. Each stock was comprised of 840 birds with 21 replicates per strain. Body weight and feed consumption were monitored biweekly. At 16 wk of age, a 20-hen sample from each strain was analyzed for BW, body composition, and tonic immobility. There were significant (P Genetic selection has affected growth parameters, although there appears to be no change in fearfulness behavior but an increase in corticosterone levels in stocks from later years.

  4. Comparative evaluation of dietary supplementation with mannan oligosaccharide and oregano essential oil in forced molted and fully fed laying hens between 82 and 106 weeks of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, M; Bintaş, E; Kırkan, Ş; Akşit, H; Küçükyılmaz, K; Erbaş, G; Çabuk, M; Akşit, D; Parın, U; Ege, G; Koçer, B; Seyrek, K; Tüzün, A E

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of feed-grade preparations of mannan oligosaccharides ( MOS: ) and oregano essential oil ( OEO: ) in forced molted or fully fed 82-week-old, laying hens. A 2 × 3 factorial experiment investigated the influence of molting vs. full feeding and dietary supplements [i.e., unsupplemented control, MOS (1 g/kg) diet, and OEO (24 mg/kg) diet] on production parameters, egg quality, serum stress indicators, blood constituents, tibial characteristics, liver antioxidant status, and cecal microflora composition. A total of 864 Single Comb White Leghorn hens were randomly assigned to 6 treatments, each with 6 replicates of 24 hens each, and studied for 25 wk. Hens were fed a molt diet containing of 50% alfalfa and 50% wheat bran ( AA+WB: ) for 12 d, then returned to the laying ration. Results indicate that molt vs. full feed impacted more on most variables measured than supplementation or supplement type. Significant (P < 0.01) interactions between molting and diet were observed for the egg production, egg weight, egg mass, and feed conversion ratio ( FCR: ). In fully fed hens, MOS supplementation improved (P < 0.01) the egg production, egg weight, and FCR, and an OEO addition significantly improved the egg production and FCR in forced molted hens. Molting improved egg quality despite the significant regression in ovary and oviduct weight (P < 0.01), though supplements showed no influence. The bone ash (P < 0.01) and mineral content (P < 0.05) of molted hens were significantly lower than those of fully fed counterparts; however, poor mineralization was not reflected in the bones' mechanical properties. No significant differences were observed among treatments for hematological characteristics. Both the MOS and particularly the OEO supplementation improved (P < 0.01) liver antioxidant status and mitigated the significant increase in cecal pathogenic bacteria after molt. Our results indicate that full feeding with an

  5. Effects of feeding diets varying in energy and nutrient density to Hy-Line W-36 laying hens on production performance and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dePersio, S; Utterback, P L; Utterback, C W; Rochell, S J; O'Sullivan, N; Bregendahl, K; Arango, J; Parsons, C M; Koelkebeck, K W

    2015-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of feeding 5 different energy and nutrient dense diets to Hy-Line W-36 hens on long-term performance and economics. A total of 480 19 wk old Hy-Line W-36 Single Comb White Leghorn hens were weighed and randomly allocated to 6 replicate groups of 16 hens each (2 adjacent cages containing 8 hens per cage, 60.9×58.4 cm) per dietary treatment in a randomized complete block design. The hens were fed 5 treatment diets formulated to contain 85, 90, 95, 100, and 105% of the energy and nutrient recommendations stated in the 2009 Hy-Line Variety W-36 Commercial Management Guide. Production performance was measured for 52 wk from 19 to 70 wk age. Over the course of the trial, a significant increasing linear response to increasing energy and nutrient density was seen for hen-day egg production, egg weight, egg mass, feed efficiency, energy intake, and body weight (BW). Feed intake showed no significant linear level response to increasing energy and nutrient density except during the early production cycle. No consistent responses were noted for egg quality, percent yolk, and percent egg solids throughout the study. Significant linear responses due to energy and nutrient density were seen for egg income, feed cost, and income minus feed cost. In general, as energy and nutrient density increased, egg income and feed cost per hen increased, but income minus feed cost decreased. Overall, these results indicate that feeding Hy-Line W-36 hens increasing energy and nutrient-dense diets will increase egg production, egg weight, egg mass, feed efficiency, energy intake, BW, egg income, and feed cost, but decrease egg income minus feed cost. However, these benefits do not take effect in early production and seem to be most effective in later stages of the production cycle, perhaps "priming" the birds for better egg-production persistency with age. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  6. Performance, Body Temperature and Egg Quality of Laying Hens Fed Vitamins D and C Under Three Environmental Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria DE

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Three experiments were conducted in a climatic chamber to determine the effects of vitamins D3 and C supplementation on performance, body temperature, and egg quality under thermoneutral temperature (24.8º to 27.0º C, a cyclic heat stress (26.2º C for 16 h and 32.1º C for 8 h and a constant heat stress (30.0º to 32.0º C for three weeks in each temperature. One hundred forty-four White Leghorn hens aged 31 weeks were used in a completely randomized design with a factorial arrangement of 3 x 3: vitamin D3 (2,500, 3,000, and 3,500 IU/kg and vitamin C (0, 200, and 400 ppm, with a total of nine treatments with four replicates of four hens each. Parameters measured included feed intake (FI, feed:gain (FG, egg production (EP, egg weight (EW, egg mass (EM, rectal (RT and dorsal temperatures (DT, percentages of albumen (AP and yolk (YP, Haugh units (HU, yolk index (YI, shell percent (SP, shell thickness (ST and egg specific gravity (ESG. Vitamin D3 influenced the parameters SP, ST, ESG and DT; vitamin C influenced YI, SP and ESG. There was no influence of environmental temperature only on HU. It was concluded that higher levels of vitamin D3 and 200 or 400 ppm of vitamin C can be improve eggshell quality and that heat stress impaired the main characteristics evaluated.

  7. Distribution and metabolism of cis- and trans-resmethrin (5-benzyl-3-furyl-methyl-2,2-dimethyl 3-(2-methyl-propenyl)cyclopropanecarboxylate in laying hens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The cis and trans isomers of the synthetic pyrethroid, resmethrin (5-benzyl-3-furylmethyl-(IRS)-chrysanthemate), labeled with radiocarbon in either the alcohol or acid moiety, were individually administered orally to White Leghorn laying hens at a dosage of 10 mg/kg. With each isomer and label position, greater than 90% of the radiocarbon was eliminated in the excreta within 24 hours posttreatment. Radiocarbon residues in the egg white and yolk fractions were low, with peak levels observed at 1-2 and 4-5 days post-treatment in white and yolk, respectively. Residues were considerably lower in egg whites than in yolks. In birds killed 12 hours post-treatment, radiocarbon residues in tissues were low with peak levels in liver and kidney. Unmetabolized cis- or trans-resmethrin was detected in all tissues analyzed from birds killed at 12 hours post-treatment and represented the major metabolite in fat. The majority of the tissues from hens 14 days post-treatment contained no detectable levels of radiocarbon and would appear not to be indicative of appreciable residue retention. Numerous metabolites were isolated and were present in both the free and conjugated form. The metabolic routes for both resmethrin isomers arise from ester hydrolysis and oxidation of the hydrolytic products. Certain of these metabolites are further conjugated with glucuronic acid, sulfate or other unidentified compounds before excretion.

  8. Genetic structure of the endogenous proviruses and expression of the gag gene in Brown Leghorn chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkov, A V; Korec, E; Chernov, M V; Tikhonenko, A T; Obukh, I B; Hlozánek, I

    1986-01-01

    Seven loci of endogenous proviruses were detected in the genome of Brown Leghorn chickens. Sets of endogenous proviruses in DNA of the chicken embryos examined were identified by blot hybridization with 32P-labelled DNA of RSV and EcoRI restriction endonuclease digestion. Comparison of the results showed that only one locus (A) of endogeneous provirus was associated with a gs+ phenotype as determined by the immunoperoxidase reaction and antibodies against gag gene products of RSV. Restriction endonuclease analysis with HindIII, BamHI and SacI revealed that proviruses A and F in Brown Leghorn chickens correspond to loci ev-3 and ev-6, respectively, in White Leghorn chickens. Other loci (B, C, D, E, and X) were designated ev-22, ev-23, ev-24, ev-25, ev-26, respectively. None of these loci expressed infectious virions. The structure of most of the endogenous proviruses examined is considerably different from the genome of the endogenous chicken virus RAV-O. The difference in structure may be one possible cause of the absence of endogenous provirus expression.

  9. Effect of heat stress on the gene expression of ion transporters/channels in the uterus of laying hens during eggshell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadoran, Shahab; Dehghani Samani, Amir; Hassanpour, Hossein

    2018-01-01

    Heat stress is a problem in laying hens as it decreases egg quality by decreasing eggshell mineralization. Heat stress alters gene expression, hence our aim was to investigate effects of heat stress on gene expression of ion transport elements involving in uterine mineralization (TRPV6, CALB1, ITPR3, SCNN1G, SLC4A4, KCNJ15, SLC4A9, and CLCN2) by real time quantitative PCR. Forty 23-week-old White Leghorn laying hens were housed in two rooms. The control group (n = 20) was maintained at 21-23 °C, and the heat stress group (n = 20) was exposed to 36-38 °C for 8 weeks. All parameters of egg quality including egg weight, surface area, volume, and eggshell weight, thickness, ash weight, and calcium content were decreased in the heat stress group compared to the control group (by 26.9%, 32.7%, 44.1%, 38.4%, 31.7%, 39.4%, and 11.1%, respectively). Total plasma calcium was decreased by 13.4%. Levels of ITPR3, SLC4A4, and SLC4A9 transcripts in the uterine lining were decreased in the heat stress group compared to the control group (by 61.4%, 66.1%, and 66.1%, respectively). CALB1 transcript level was increased (by 34.2 fold) in the heat stress group of hens compared to controls. TRPV6, SCNN1G, KCNJ15, and CLCN2 transcript levels did not significantly differ between control and heat stress groups of laying hens. It is concluded that the down-expression of ITPR3, SLC4A4, and SLC4A9 genes may impair transportation of Cl - , HCO 3 - , and Na + in eggshell mineralization during heat stress. Increased CALB1 gene expression may increase resistance of uterine cells to detrimental effects of heat stress.

  10. Effect of dietary supplementation of nitrocompounds on Salmonella colonization and ileal immune gene expression in laying hens challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Pratima; Cosby, D E; Cox, N A; Kim, W K

    2017-10-05

    Foodborne disease caused by Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) is one of the important public health and economic concerns. A study was conducted to determine the effect of supplementation with 2-nitroethanol (NE) and 2-nitropropanol (NP) on Salmonella recovery of internal organs as well as on the immune gene expression in the ileum of laying hens. Thirty-six White Leghorns were orally gavaged with nalidixic acid resistant Salmonella Enteritidis (SENR). Hens were housed individually in wire-laying cages and randomly assigned to six dietary treatments: T1 = SENR unchallenged (negative control), T2 = SENR challenged (positive control), T3 = SENR challenged + 100 ppm NE, T4 = SENR challenged + 200 ppm NE, T5 = SENR challenged + 100 ppm NP, and T6 = SENR challenged + 200 ppm NP. Hens were sampled at 7 days post inoculation (dpi). Ceca, liver with gall bladder (L/GB), and ovary samples were collected for bacteriology, and ileum samples were collected for analysis of immune gene expression. T3 and T6 significantly reduced (P GB or ovary after supplementation of either nitrocompounds. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1B, IL-6, toll-like receptors (TLR)-4, and IL-10 all were significantly upregulated (P < 0.05) after SENR challenge. Supplementation at both levels of NE and NP showed a significant immune gene expression response in the ileum with reduction of IFN-γ, IL-6, TLR-4, and IL-10 mRNA expression. Overall, nitrocompounds such as NE and NP can be used in the intervention strategy to reduce Salmonella infection in hens. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Flaxseed enriched diet-mediated reduction in ovarian cancer severity is correlated to the reduction of prostaglandin E(2) in laying hen ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilati, Erfan; Hales, Karen; Zhuge, Yan; Ansenberger Fricano, Kristine; Yu, Rui; van Breemen, Richard B; Hales, Dale Buchanan

    2013-09-01

    Prevention of ovarian cancer is the best approach for reducing the impact of this deadly disease. The laying hen is a robust model of spontaneous ovarian cancer that recapitulates the human disease. Dietary intervention with flaxseed, the richest vegetable source of omega-3 fatty acids (OM-3FAs) and phytoestrogen lignans, demonstrate the potential for effective prevention and amelioration of ovarian cancer by targeting inflammatory prostaglandin pathways. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the most pro-inflammatory ecoisanoid and one of the downstream products of two isoforms of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. Our objective was to investigate the effect of flaxseed supplementation for one year on ovarian cancer and correlate its effects to expression of COX enzymes and concentrations of prostaglandins. White Leghorn hens were fed 10% flaxseed-enriched or standard diet for one year. The severity of ovarian cancer was determined by gross pathology and histology. COX-1 and COX-2 localization and protein and mRNA expression and PGE2 and PGE3 concentrations in ovaries were measured by IHC, western blot, quantitative real-time PCR and LC-MS-MS, respectively. The results demonstrated a significant reduction in late stage ovarian tumors in the flaxseed-fed hens compared with the control diet-fed hens. In correlation with decreased ovarian cancer severity, concentrations of PGE2 and expression of COX-2 were diminished in ovaries of flaxseed-fed hens. PGE3 concentrations were below the level of detection. The results demonstrated that in normal ovaries, COX-1 was localized to the granulosa cell layer surrounding the follicles and ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) whereas COX-2 protein was localized to the granulosa cell layer in the follicle. Extensive COX-1 and COX-2 protein expression was found throughout the ovarian carcinoma. Our findings suggest that the flaxseed-mediated reduction in the severity of ovarian cancer in hens is correlated to the reduction in PGE2 in

  12. Does Rearing Laying Hens in Aviaries Adversely Affect Long-Term Welfare following Transfer to Furnished Cages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Hansen, Tone Beate; Orritt, Rachel; Nicol, Christine; Moe, Randi O.; Janczak, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that hens that are reared in aviaries but produce in furnished cages experience poorer welfare in production than hens reared in caged systems. This hypothesis is based on the suggestion that the spatial restriction associated with the transfer from aviaries to cages results in frustration or stress for the aviary reared birds. To assess the difference in welfare between aviary and cage reared hens in production, non-beak trimmed white leghorn birds from both rearing backgrounds were filmed at a commercial farm that used furnished cage housing. The videos were taken at 19 and 21 weeks of age, following the birds' transition to the production environment at 16 weeks. Videos were analysed in terms of the performance of aversion-related behaviour in undisturbed birds, comfort behaviour in undisturbed birds, and alert behaviour directed to a novel object in the home cage. A decrease in the performance of the former behaviour and increase in the performance of the latter two behaviours indicates improved welfare. The results showed that aviary reared birds performed more alert behaviour near to the object than did cage reared birds at 19 but not at 21 weeks of age (P = 0.03). Blood glucose concentrations did not differ between the treatments (P>0.10). There was a significant difference in mortality between treatments (P = 0.000), with more death in aviary reared birds (5.52%) compared to cage birds (2.48%). The higher mortality of aviary-reared birds indicates a negative effect of aviary rearing on bird welfare, whereas the higher duration of alert behavior suggests a positive effect of aviary rearing. PMID:25229879

  13. Does rearing laying hens in aviaries adversely affect long-term welfare following transfer to furnished cages?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M Tahamtani

    Full Text Available This study tests the hypothesis that hens that are reared in aviaries but produce in furnished cages experience poorer welfare in production than hens reared in caged systems. This hypothesis is based on the suggestion that the spatial restriction associated with the transfer from aviaries to cages results in frustration or stress for the aviary reared birds. To assess the difference in welfare between aviary and cage reared hens in production, non-beak trimmed white leghorn birds from both rearing backgrounds were filmed at a commercial farm that used furnished cage housing. The videos were taken at 19 and 21 weeks of age, following the birds' transition to the production environment at 16 weeks. Videos were analysed in terms of the performance of aversion-related behaviour in undisturbed birds, comfort behaviour in undisturbed birds, and alert behaviour directed to a novel object in the home cage. A decrease in the performance of the former behaviour and increase in the performance of the latter two behaviours indicates improved welfare. The results showed that aviary reared birds performed more alert behaviour near to the object than did cage reared birds at 19 but not at 21 weeks of age (P = 0.03. Blood glucose concentrations did not differ between the treatments (P>0.10. There was a significant difference in mortality between treatments (P = 0.000, with more death in aviary reared birds (5.52% compared to cage birds (2.48%. The higher mortality of aviary-reared birds indicates a negative effect of aviary rearing on bird welfare, whereas the higher duration of alert behavior suggests a positive effect of aviary rearing.

  14. Effect of human serum albumin on the kinetics of 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-N-N'-N″ Triacetylchitotrioside hydrolysis catalyzed by hen egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Cristian; Abuin, Elsa; Lissi, Eduardo; Montecinos, Rodrigo

    2011-08-01

    The effect of human serum albumin (HSA) addition on the rate of hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-N-N'-N″ triacetylchitotrioside ((NAG)(3)-MUF) catalyzed by hen egg white lysozyme has been measured in aqueous solution (citrate buffer 50 mM pH = 5.2 at 37 °C). The presence of HSA leads to a decrease in the rate of the process. The reaction follows a Michaelis-Menten mechanism under all the conditions employed. The catalytic rate constant decreases tenfold when the albumin concentration increases, while the Michaelis constant remains almost constant in the albumin concentration range employed. Ultracentrifugation experiments indicate that the main origin of the observed variation in the kinetic behavior is related to the existence of an HSA-lysozyme interaction. Interestingly, the dependence of the catalytic rate constant with albumin concentration parallels the decrease of the free enzyme concentration. We interpret these results in terms of the presence in the system of two enzyme populations; namely, the HSA associated enzyme which does not react and the free enzyme reacting as in the absence of albumin. Other factors such as association of the substrate to albumin or macromolecular crowding effects due to the presence of albumin are discarded. Theoretical modeling of the structure of the HSA-lysozyme complex shows that the Glu35 and Asp52 residues located in the active site of lysozyme are oriented toward the HSA surface. This conformation will inactivate lysozyme molecules bound to HSA.

  15. Measurements of Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Diffusivity of Hen Egg-White Lysozyme Crystals and Its Solution Using the Transient Short Hot Wire Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Seiji; Maki, Syou; Maekawa, Ryunosuke; Tanaka, Seiichi; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2017-08-01

    Protein crystals are an essentially important biological sample to advance the analysis of X-ray structure, but their thermophysical properties, especially thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, have not been studied sufficiently. This current situation can be attributed to various kinds of technical problems; e.g., the fragility of protein crystals and the difficulty of nucleation control. Ideally speaking, protein crystallization should be carried out under a " containerless condition" to eliminate any mechanical distortion of the crystals from the walls. To realize the condition, we have developed an original crystallization method by means of the magneto-Archimedes effect. In this paper, a transient short hot wire method was combined with the technique of magneto-Archimedes effect to realize simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals. As the results, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of HEWL crystals were found to be 0.410-0.438 \\hbox {W}\\cdot \\hbox {m}^{-1}\\cdot \\hbox {K}^{-1} and 3.77-5.18× 10^{-8} \\hbox {m}2\\cdot \\hbox {s}^{-1}, respectively. We clarified by the crystallizing process of HEWL that the crystals were magnetically levitated at the air-liquid interface and the short hot wire was completely buried into them as the crystals grew. We also measured the HEWL solution by the same methods. The thermal conductivity of the solution had almost the same value as that of water and had little dependency on the concentration of HEWL, but the thermal diffusivity was unclear.

  16. Pressure-assisted cold denaturation of hen egg white lysozyme: the influence of co-solvents probed by hydrogen exchange nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtt, K; Winter, R

    2005-08-01

    COSY proton nuclear magnetic resonance was used to measure the exchange rates of amide protons of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in the pressure-assisted cold-denatured state and in the heat-denatured state. After dissolving lysozyme in deuterium oxide buffer, labile protons exchange for deuterons in such a way that exposed protons are substituted rapidly, whereas "protected" protons within structured parts of the protein are substituted slowly. The exchange rates k obs were determined for HEWL under heat treatment (80 degrees C) and under high pressure conditions at low temperature (3.75 kbar, -13 degrees C). Moreover, the influence of co-solvents (sorbitol, urea) on the exchange rate was examined under pressure-assisted cold denaturation conditions, and the corresponding protection factors, P, were determined. The exchange kinetics upon heat treatment was found to be a two-step process with initial slow exchange followed by a fast one, showing residual protection in the slow-exchange state and P-factors in the random-coil-like range for the final temperature-denatured state. Addition of sorbitol (500 mM) led to an increase of P-factors for the pressure-assisted cold denatured state, but not for the heat-denatured state. The presence of 2 M urea resulted in a drastic decrease of the P-factors of the pressure-assisted cold denatured state. For both types of co-solvents, the effect they exert appears to be cooperative, i.e., no particular regions within the protein can be identified with significantly diverse changes of P-factors.

  17. Vitamins C and E can Alleviate Adverse Effects of Heat Stress on Live Weight and Some Egg Quality Profiles of Layer Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Ajakaiye1*, M. Cuesta-Mazorra and J. R. Garcia-Diaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of vitamins C and E on live weight and egg quality profile of layer hens subjected in situ to heat stress. Hybrid White Leghorn (L33 layer hens (n=720 and 39 weeks old, were randomly allotted to 4 treatments containing 0, 150 mg vitamin C, 150 mg (150 IU vitamin E, and 150 mg vitamin C plus 150 mg vitamin E/kg of diet. Final live weight in supplemented groups were significantly (P<0.05 higher than control. Egg, egg yolk and egg albumen weight in groups administered with vitamins E and C+E were very significantly higher compared with control, meanwhile, the same indicators were only significantly (P<0.05 higher in vitamin C group compared with control. Similarly, eggshell weight was significantly (P<0.05 higher in all treated groups, with the highest value recorded in group supplemented with vitamins C+E compared with control. By sustaining bird’s live weight and increasing egg quality indicators, it is concluded that both antioxidants offered protective effect against the thermally stressful hot-humid condition.

  18. Response to long-term selection for egg production in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggenpoel, D G; Ferreira, G F; Hayes, J P; du Preez, J J

    1996-09-01

    1. A White Leghorn line was selected for part-record hen-housed number of eggs from 1962 to 1990. Genetic changes were estimated as deviations from its unselected control line. 2. Over the first 10 generations with selection almost exclusively for number of eggs to the age of 273 d, all traits, except rate of mortality, showed significant changes. Regressions per year were: 273 d production, 3.07 eggs; 497 d production, 5.18 eggs; production from 274 to 497 d, 2.43 eggs; age at first egg, -2.33 d; mean weight of first 10 eggs, -0.82 g; body weight at 497 d, -19.02 g and rate of mortality, 0.19%. 3. Over the rest of the period increasing selection pressure for egg weight has been applied. This resulted in positive changes for this trait and no or small negative changes in egg number. 4. In general, heritabilities and genetic correlations did not change over the period of selection. The heritability of the main trait of selection, production to 273 d was 0.19 +/- 0.04 and heritabilities of egg size traits about 0.50. 5. The genetic correlation between egg production to 273 d and mean weight of first 10 eggs was estimated as -0.37 +/- 0.06 but from the observed response a realised genetic correlation of -0.97 was calculated.

  19. AGENT IN THE DIET OF WHITE ,LEGHORN LAYERS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oleoresin is used as a colorant in the food industry and capsicum is used in the manufacture of medicaments. After extraction, the remaining dried and ground flesh ..... 5. Chandra, S., Neteke, SP. and Cu ta, BS. (1978). Studies on comparative utilization of xantho hylls rom various natural sources for egg yolk pigmentation.

  20. Immunolocalization of avian beta-defensins in the hen oviduct and their changes in the uterus during eggshell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Mageed, A M; Isobe, N; Yoshimura, Y

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether avian beta-defensin proteins (avbetaDs) exist in the oviduct, and whether those in the uterus are secreted to the eggshell membrane and eggshell. The oviducts of White Leghorn hens at different times of egg formation, eggshell membrane, and eggshell were used. The presence of immunoreactive (ir) avbetaD-3, -11, and -12 was examined by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Two or three types of avbetaDs were identified in the mucosal surface epithelial cells in each oviductal segment. The density of ir-avbetaD-3 and -12 in the uterus was decreased after the egg entered this segment. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of ir-avbetaD-3, -11, and -12 in the uterus. In the eggshell membrane, only ir-avbetaD-3 was detected on the surface of fibers at the outer layer of the membrane. The ir-avbetaD-3, -11, and -12 were identified in the eggshell matrix by western blot. These results suggest that the surface epithelial cells are the major sites where avbetaDs proteins exist, and the avbetaDs secreted by the uterus cells are likely to be incorporated in the eggshell membrane and eggshell. These avbetaDs may play roles in the innate host defense of the oviduct and egg surface.

  1. Pressure load on keel bone and foot pads in perching laying hens in relation to perch design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickel, T; Schrader, L; Scholz, B

    2011-04-01

    The provision of perches in housing systems for laying hens is meant to improve hens' welfare by allowing a more natural behavior repertoire. However, the use of perches is associated with welfare problems, such as keel bone deviations and foot pad lesions, that may possibly result from high mechanical pressure load during extended perching activities. The aim of this study was to analyze peak force and contact area of hens' keel bones and foot pads on solid test perches of square, round, and oval shape with 3 different diameters each (experiment 1) and on commercially used perches (round steel tube, 2 sizes of mushroom-shaped plastic, and flattened round plastic) together with 2 prototypes of soft, round polyurethane perches (experiment 2). Test perches were covered with a pressure sensor film and 36 laying hens (18 Lohmann Selected Leghorn, 18 Lohmann Brown) were consecutively placed on each perch in an experimental cage during nighttime. Peak force (N/cm(2)) and contact area (cm(2)) were measured while hens were sitting and standing on the different test perches. Pressure peaks on the keel bone were approximately 5 times higher compared with single foot pad. On square perches, keel bone peak force was lower (P keel bones in sitting hens and foot pads in standing hens (experiment 1). On prototype perches, peak force on the keel bone was lower and contact area was larger compared with all commercial perches tested (P keel bone and foot pad welfare problems in perching laying hens.

  2. Differential gene expression from genome-wide microarray analyses distinguishes Lohmann Selected Leghorn and Lohmann Brown layers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Habig

    Full Text Available The Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL and Lohmann Brown (LB layer lines have been selected for high egg production since more than 50 years and belong to the worldwide leading commercial layer lines. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the molecular processes that are different among these two layer lines using whole genome RNA expression profiles. The hens were kept in the newly developed small group housing system Eurovent German with two different group sizes. Differential expression was observed for 6,276 microarray probes (FDR adjusted P-value <0.05 among the two layer lines LSL and LB. A 2-fold or greater change in gene expression was identified on 151 probe sets. In LSL, 72 of the 151 probe sets were up- and 79 of them were down-regulated. Gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis accounting for biological processes evinced 18 GO-terms for the 72 probe sets with higher expression in LSL, especially those taking part in immune system processes and membrane organization. A total of 32 enriched GO-terms were determined among the 79 down-regulated probe sets of LSL. Particularly, these terms included phosphorus metabolic processes and signaling pathways. In conclusion, the phenotypic differences among the two layer lines LSL and LB are clearly reflected in their gene expression profiles of the cerebrum. These novel findings provide clues for genes involved in economically important line characteristics of commercial laying hens.

  3. Dietary levels of chia: influence on hen weight, egg production and sensory quality, for two strains of hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerza, R; Coates, W

    2002-05-01

    1. Laying hens, 225 white and 225 brown, were fed for 90 d to compare a control diet with diets containing 70, 140, 210 and 280 g/kg chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed. 2. Hen weight was not significantly affected by diet; however, manure production was less for the hens fed on chia. 3. Egg weight and production, yolk weight, and yolk percentage were determined at d 0, 30, 43, 58, 72 and 90. 4. A sensory evaluation was conducted on eggs produced during the last week of the trial. 5. No significant differences in egg production were found among treatments for the brown hens. 6. With the 280 g/kg chia diet, the white hens produced fewer and lighter eggs than did the hens fed on the control diet. 7. No significant differences were detected in yolk weight until d 90. 8. On this date the yolks produced by the white hens fed on the 70 g/kg chia diet were significantly lighter in weight, whereas the brown hens produced significantly heavier yolks, compared with the hens fed on the control diet. 9. Yolk weight as a percentage of egg weight was lower for white hens throughout the trial except on d 58 with the 140 g/kg chia diet. Significant differences, however, were detected only with the 70 g/ kg chia diet on d 90 and with the 210 g/kg chia diet on d 58, 72 and 90. 10. No significant differences in taste preference or flavour were found among any of the chia treatments and the control.

  4. Space use by 4 strains of laying hens to perch, wing flap, dust bathe, stand and lie down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Elizabeth R; Ali, Ahmed B A; Campbell, Dana L M; Siegford, Janice M

    2018-01-01

    The laying hen industry is implementing aviary systems intended to improve welfare by providing hens with more space and resources to perform species-specific behaviors. To date, limited research has examined spatial requirements of various strains of laying hens for performing key behaviors and none has been conducted within an alternative housing system. This study investigated the amount of space used by 4 strains of laying hens (Hy-Line Brown [HB], Bovans Brown [BB], DeKalb White [DW], and Hy-Line W36) to perform 5 different behaviors in the litter area of a commercial-style aviary. Hens were recorded standing [S], lying [L], perching [P], wing flapping [WF], and dust bathing [DB] on an open-litter area with an outer perch between 12:00 and 15:00 at peak lay (28 wk of age). Still images of each behavior were analyzed using ImageJ software for 16 hens per strain, and maximum hen length and width were used to calculate total area occupied per hen for each behavior. Brown hens required, on average, 89.6cm2 more space for S (P≤0.021) and 81.5cm2 more space for L (P≤0.013) than white hens. White hens used, on average, 572cm2 more space to perform WF than brown hens (P≤0.024) while brown hens used 170.3cm2 more space for DB than white hens (P≤0.022). On average, hens of all strains were wider while perching than the 15cm commonly recommended per hen (e.g., DW: 18.03; HB: 21.89cm), and brown hens required, on average, 3.38cm more space while perching than white hens (P≤0.01). Brown and white hens occupy different amounts of space when performing key behaviors. These differences, along with factors such as behavioral synchrony, clustering, and preferred inter-bird distances associated with these behaviors, should be considered when creating industry guidelines, crafting legislation and designing and stocking laying hen facilities to ensure hens can fulfill their behavioral needs.

  5. Experimental validation of the AVIVET trap, a tool to quantitatively monitor the dynamics of Dermanyssus gallinae populations in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, G A; Bronneberg, R G G; Vernooij, J C M; Stegeman, J A

    2017-06-01

    Dermanyssus gallinae (D.gallinae) infestation causes economic losses due to impaired health and production of hens and costs of parasite control across the world. Moreover, infestations are associated with reduced welfare of hens and may cause itching in humans. To effectively implement control methods it is crucially important to have high quality information about the D.gallinae populations in poultry houses in space and time. At present no validated tool is available to quantitatively monitor the dynamics of all four stages of D.gallinae (i.e., eggs, larvae, nymphs, and adults) in poultry houses.This article describes the experimental validation of the AVIVET trap, a device to quantitatively monitor dynamics of D.gallinae infestations. We used the device to study D.gallinae in fully equipped cages with two white specific pathogen free Leghorn laying hens experimentally exposed to three different infestation levels of D.gallinae (low to high).The AVIVET trap was successfully able to detect D.gallinae at high (5,000 D.gallinae), medium (2,500 D.gallinae), and low (50 D.gallinae) level of D.gallinae infestation. The linear equation Y = 10∧10∧(0.47 + 1.21X) with Y = log10 (Total number of D.gallinae nymphs and adults) in the cage and X = log10 (Total number of D.gallinae nymphs and adults) in the AVIVET trap explained 93.8% of the variation.The weight of D.gallinae in the AVIVET trap also appears to be a reliable parameter for quantifying D.gallinae infestation in a poultry house. The weight of D.gallinae in the AVIVET trap correlates 99.6% (P < 0.000) to the counted number of all stages of D.gallinae in the trap (i.e., eggs, larvae, nymphs, and adults) indicating that the trap is highly specific.From this experiment it can be concluded that the AVIVET trap is promising as quantitative tool for monitoring D.gallinae dynamics in a poultry house. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  6. Northern fowl mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) effects on metabolism, body temperatures, skin condition, and egg production as a function of hen MHC haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Amy C; Chappell, Mark A; Owen, Jeb P; Mullens, Bradley A

    2016-11-01

    The northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum, is the most damaging ectoparasite on egg-laying hens in the United States. One potential strategy for management is breeding for mite resistance. Genes of white leghorn chickens linked to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) were previously identified as conferring more (B21 haplotype) or less (B15 haplotype) mite resistance. However, immune responses can be energetically costly to the host and affect the economic damage incurred from mite infestations. We tested energy costs (resting metabolic rate) of mite infestations on egg-laying birds of both MHC B-haplotypes. Resting metabolic rates were documented before (pre-) mite infestation, during (mid-) infestation, and after peak (late) mite infestation. Mite scores, economic parameters (egg production, feed consumption), and physiological aspects such as skin inflammation and skin temperature were recorded weekly. Across experiments and different infestation time points, resting metabolic rates generally were not affected by mite infestation or haplotype, although there were instances of lower metabolic rates in infested versus control hens. Skin temperatures were recorded both at the site of mite feeding damage (vent) and under the wing (no mites), which possibly would reflect a systemic fever response. Ambient temperatures modified skin surface temperature, which generally was not affected by mites or haplotype. Feed conversion efficiency was significantly worse (4.9 to 17.0% depending on trial) in birds infested with mites. Overall egg production and average egg weight were not affected significantly, although there was a trend toward reduced egg production (2 to 8%) by infested hens. The MHC haplotype significantly affected vent skin inflammation. Birds with the mite-resistant B21 haplotype showed earlier onset of inflammation, but a reduced overall area of inflammation compared to mite-susceptible B15 birds. No significant differences in resting energy

  7. Welfare indicators in laying hens in relation to nest exclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, M; Tauson, R; Holm, L

    2016-01-01

    Leghorn hens housed in furnished cages. Welfare indicators were measured between 61 and 70 wk of age in birds excluded from their nests for 5 consecutive d and control birds that had continuous access to nests. Baseline recordings were carried out in both groups prior to and post exclusion period....... The assessed indicators were: corticosterone metabolites in droppings (FCM), corticosterone concentration in yolk, corticosterone concentration in plasma, irregularities of eggshells, heterophil to lymphocyte (H:L) ratio, tonic immobility duration, and feather cover. Behavioral observations showed...... that the birds had a clear preference for using the secluded nest sites, confirming that they were likely to perceive nest exclusion as an undesirable experience. Further, elevated levels of FCM in droppings, yolk corticosterone concentrations, H:L ratios and irregular eggshells were detected in both nest...

  8. Behaviour, health and integument of four hybrids of laying hens in modified and conventional cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, P; Tauson, R; Appleby, M C

    1996-07-01

    1. In 2 trials the health and behaviour of a total of 3552 caged laying hens of 4 hybrids, Dekalb XL, Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL) and Shaver 288 in trial 1 and ISA Brown and LSL in trial 2, were studied. The cage designs were Get-away cages (GA) with 15 hens per cage, a special version of the 'Edinburgh modified cage' called 'Modified and enriched cage' (ME) with 4 ISA or 5 Leghorn hens per cage, conventional metal cages with 4 hens per cage without (CO) and with a perch (PC) and conventional plastic cages (PL) with three hens per cage. GA and ME included nests, perches and sandbaths. 2. In the first trial f1p4nest models were used, artificial turf and welded wire floor. In the second trial both nest models were used in GA, while all nests in ME were equipped with artificial turf. In the second trial there were 4 sandbath treatments in ME; no sandbath, sandbath (25 x 50 cm) first opened at 16 weeks of age, sandbath first opened at 26 weeks and double size sandbath (50 x 50 cm) first opened at 16 weeks. Hens in GA were allowed access to the sandbaths from 26 weeks. 3. At 35 and 55 weeks the best plumage condition (feather cover) was found in PL and GA but plumage condition in ME was not significantly inferior than in GA. Hens in GA had the dirtiest plumage and most bumble foot but no toe pad hyperkeratosis. Some toe pad hyperkeratosis occurred in the other systems. Most keel bone lesions were found in systems with perches. The highest mortality was registered in GA. Hens in systems with perches, sandbaths and nests had increased strength of humerus at slaughter. 4. More eggs were laid in nests with artificial turf than in welded wire floor nests. LSL hens laid larger proportions of eggs in the nests (94% and 92% in the two trials) than the other hybrids. Less than 1% of the eggs in ME and 2% in GA were laid in the sandbaths. 5. The use of perches in ME and PC was approximately 30% in the day time. At night the use was 93% in ME and 89% in PC in trial 1 and 96% in

  9. The effect of dietary supplementation of salts of organic acid on production performance of laying hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Ravinder; Berwal, Raj Singh; Sihag, Sajjan; Patil, Chandrashekhar Santosh; Lalit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of supplementing different levels of salts of organic acid in the laying hen’s diet on their production performance and egg quality parameters during a period of 16-week. Materials and Methods: A total of 140 white leghorn laying hens at 24 weeks of age were randomly distributed to seven dietary treatment groups, i.e. T1 (control), T2 (0.5% sodium-butyrate), T3 (1.0% sodium-butyrate), T4 (1.5% sodium-butyrate), T5 (0.5% calcium-propionate), T6 (1.0% calcium-propionate) and T7 (1.5% calcium-propionate) consisting of 5 replications of 4 birds each in each treatment and housed in individual cages from 24 to 40 weeks of age. Feed intake, percent hen-day egg production, egg weight, egg mass production, feed conversion ratio (FCR), and economics of supplementation of salts of organic acids in layers’ ration were evaluated. Results: The dietary supplementation of salts of organic acids did not significantly affect the feed intake (g/day/hen) and body weight gain (g). Different levels of supplementation significantly (p<0.05) improved production performance (percent hen-day egg production and egg mass production) as compared to control group. FCR in terms of feed intake (kg) per dozen eggs was lowest (1.83±0.05) in T4 and feed intake (kg) per kg egg mass was lowest (2.87±0.05) in T5 as comparison to control (T1) group. Salts of organic acids supplementation resulted in significant (p<0.05) improvement in FCR. Egg weight was significantly (p<0.05) increased at 0.5% level of salts of organic acids in the diet. The cumulative mean values of feed cost per dozen egg production were Rs. 44.14, 42.40, 42.85, 43.26, 42.57, 43.29 and 43.56 in treatment groups T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6 and T7, respectively, and reduction in feed cost per kg egg mass production for Rs. 0.52 and 0.99 in groups T2 and T5, respectively, in comparison to T1 group. Conclusions: It can be concluded that supplementation of salts of organic acids may

  10. Substrate preferences in laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, de, M.J.M.; Reenen, van, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the substrate preference of laying hens with respect to dustbathing and foraging behaviour, in order to determine which resources should be provided in laying hen housing systems for the expression of these behaviours. The consumer demand approach was used to study the strength of preference. Hens had to push a weighted door to enter choice pens with either a wire floor, sand, wood shavings or peat moss as substrate. Twelve Isa-Brown hens, reared on battery cages, successfully...

  11. Salmonella Enteritidis universal stress protein (usp) gene expression is stimulated by egg white and supports oviduct colonization and egg contamination in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspoet, R; Gantois, I; Devloo, R; Martel, A; Haesebrouck, F; Pasmans, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2011-11-21

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis has caused a worldwide egg-associated pandemic since the mid 1980s. The exact mechanisms causing this egg tropism are still largely unknown, and only a few Salmonella genes have been implicated in the interaction with the oviduct or eggs. A in vivo expression technology screening performed previously, identified the uspA and uspB genes as being highly expressed in the chicken oviduct and in eggs. Here, we demonstrate that uspA and uspB gene expression is indeed induced after contact with egg white. Intra-oviduct inoculation of Salmonella Enteritidis uspB and uspBA mutant strains showed that the mutants had a decreased ability to colonize the magnum and isthmus of the oviduct, the organs that produce the egg white and eggshell membranes, respectively, at 7 days post-inoculation. Intravenous challenge showed that a Salmonella Enteritidis uspBA mutant strain had a decreased ability to contaminate eggs. Analogous to the function of universal stress proteins A and B in other bacterial species, we hypothesize that the Salmonella uspA and uspB genes are involved in long term persistence of Salmonella Enteritidis in harmful environments, such as in the oviduct and eggs, by conferring resistance against compounds that damage the bacterial cell membrane and DNA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of dietary bacteriophage supplementation on internal organs, fecal excretion, and ileal immune response in laying hens challenged by Salmonella Enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, P A; Cosby, D E; Cox, N A; Lee, J H; Kim, W K

    2017-09-01

    With the current researches on replacing antibiotics with different dietary interventions, bacteriophages (BP) are potential antimicrobial intervention because of their ability to affect specific bacteria. A study was conducted to evaluate the role of BP against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) on SE internal organs colonization and ileum immune response in laying hens. Hens were challenged both orally and intracloacally with 108 cfu/mL cells of nalidixic acid resistant Salmonella Enteritidis (SENAR). Thirty-two Single Comb White Leghorns were randomly allocated to 4 dietary treatments: 1) unchallenged control (negative control; T1), 2) SENAR challenged control (positive control; T2), 3) SENAR challenged + 0.1% BP (T3), and 4) SENAR challenged + 0.2% BP (T4). The number of SENAR in the ceca was significantly reduced by 0.2% BP supplementation (P < 0.05) at 7 d post infection (dpi). The respective number of SENAR was reduced from 2.9 log cfu/gm in T2 and T3 to 2.0 log cfu/gm in T4. There was no significant effect of T3 on reduction of numbers of cecal SENAR. A significant reduction of SENAR was observed in the liver with gall bladder (LGB) from 0.75 in T2 to 0.18 log cfu/gm in T4. In the spleen, T4 significantly reduced (P < 0.05) SENAR to 0.56 log cfu/gm compared to T2 and T3 (0.94 log cfu/gm). There was no significant effect of T3 in reduction of prevalence of spleen SENAR. By supplementing 0.2% BP (T4), the SENAR in the ovary was reduced to 0 log cfu/gm. There was a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in fecal SENAR at 6 dpi by T4 (0.71 log cfu/gm) compared to the positive control (1.57 log cfu/gm). The expression of interferon (IFN)-Γ, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 was significantly increased in the ileum by SENAR challenge compared to the negative control. This study suggests that apart from commonly used prebiotics or probiotics, BP are pathogen-specific and can be used as one of the dietary strategies to reduce SE colonization and induce

  13. Effects of drinking water treatment on susceptibility of laying hens to Salmonella enteritidis during forced molt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubena, L F; Byrd, J A; Moore, R W; Ricke, S C; Nisbet, D J

    2005-02-01

    Feed deprivation is used in the layer industry to induce molting and stimulate multiple egg-laying cycles in laying hens. Unfortunately, the stress involved increases susceptibility to Salmonella enteritidis (SE), the risk of SE-positive eggs, and incidence of SE in internal organs. Leghorn hens over 50 wk of age were divided into 4 treatment groups of 12 hens each in experiment 1 and 3 treatment groups of 12 hens in experiments 2 and 3; hens were placed in individual laying hen cages. Treatment groups were 1) nonmolted (NM) and received feed and distilled water for 9 d, 2) force molted by feed removal for 9 d and received distilled water, 3) force molted by feed removal for 9 d and received 0.5% lactic acid (LA) in distilled water. An additional group (4) in experiment 1 only was force molted by feed removal for 9 d and received 0.5% acetic acid in distilled water. Seven days before feed removal hens were exposed to an 8L:16D photoperiod, which was continued throughout the experiment. Individual hens among all treatments were challenged orally with 10(4) SE on d 4 of feed removal. When compared with the NM treatments, weight losses were significantly higher in the M treatments, regardless of water treatments. When compared with NM treatments, crop pH was significantly higher in the M treatment receiving distilled water. Crop pH was reduced to that of the NM controls by 0.5% acetic acid in the drinking water. No consistent significant changes were observed for volatile fatty acids. The number of hens positive for SE in crop and ceca after culture and the number of SE per crop and per gram of cecal contents were higher in the M treatments, when compared with the NM treatments, but there was no effect of addition of either of the acids to the drinking water. Additional research using different acid treatment regimens may provide a tool for reducing the incidence of SE in eggs and internal organs during and following molting of laying hens.

  14. Nest use and patterns of egg laying and damage by 4 strains of laying hens in an aviary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, S; Ali, A B A; Campbell, D L M; Siegford, J M

    2017-09-01

    Laying hens are strongly motivated to use nests for egg laying, and alternative production systems (e.g., aviaries) provide artificial sites to meet this need and ensure efficient collection of clean, undamaged eggs. However, nests are typically not provided to allow simultaneous use by all hens; therefore, competition or mislaid eggs can result. To understand the influence of strain on laying eggs outside nests and damage to eggs, we compared daily patterns of nests use and egg laying among 4 laying hen strains (Hy-Line Brown (HB), Bovans Brown (BB), DeKalb White (DW), and Hy-Line W36 (W36)). Hens were observed over 3 consecutive days in aviaries with colony nests in the enclosure's top tier (2 nests/unit, 4 aviary units/strain, 144 hens/unit). The number and location of hens in nests and the number, location and condition of eggs throughout aviaries were recorded. Most eggs (90 to 95%) were laid in nests; however, brown hens consistently laid more non-nest eggs and damaged more eggs than white hens (P ≤ 0.05). Higher nest occupancy by brown hens was correlated with more non-nest and damaged eggs (P ≤ 0.05). In the morning, brown hens occupied more nest space and laid more nest eggs than white hens (e.g., HB vs. DW: 82.97 and 34.66% of space; 91.35 and 68.73% of nest eggs; P ≤ 0.05). At midday, white hens occupied more nest space and laid more nest eggs than brown hens (e.g., HB vs. DW: 28.47 and 15.81% of space; 27.39 and 8.29% of nest eggs; P ≤ 0.05). Brown hens preferred right nest compartments and laid more eggs there, whereas white hens preferred left compartments and W36 laid more eggs there (P ≤ 0.05). These findings indicate that different strains of hens have different patterns of nest use and laying behavior. In brown hens, heavy morning nest use was related to laying eggs outside nests and more damaged eggs, suggesting insufficient space for oviposition in nests. Specific facility design should be matched to hens' preferences to accommodate

  15. Feather loss in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristov Slavča

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examined the incidence of different forms of feather loss and cannibalism in laying hens aged 74 weeks following moulting and in laying hens following exploitation for a period of one year. The forms of feather loss were considered in detail through a repeated examination of video recordings and they were sorted according to localization - to feather loss on the ventral part of the neck, on the dorsal part of the neck, and on the back between the wings. Feather loss on the ventral part of the neck was established in 47.9% hens, and in the dorsal part in 16.77% hens of the 167 laying hens aged 74 weeks following moulting. The group of 129 laying hens that were observed following one-year exploitation exhibited considerably more frequent feather loss, in 96.90% hens it was localized on the ventral part of the neck, in 60.47% hens on the dorsal part of the neck, and in 20.16% hens it was localized on the back between the wings. A comparison of the results of the incidence of co localized forms of feather loss in the one and the other group of laying hens using the t-test showed statistically very significant differences. A detailed consideration of the video recordings using the method of sequence analysis did not reveal any cannibalism in either group of laying hens.

  16. Viscosity of egg white from hens of different strains fed with commercial and natural additives Viscosidade da clara de ovo proveniente de poedeiras de diferentes espécies com aditivos comerciais e naturais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Papa Spada

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Yolk color and egg white (albumen cleanliness and viscosity are important parameters by which consumers judge the quality of eggs. This study aimed to investigate changes in albumen viscosity during storage of eggs for up to 36 days from two different commercial laying hen strains (Carijo Barbada and Isa Brown fed a diet containing annatto (1.5 and 2.0% or a synthetic additive without synthetic colorants (control. Analyses of humidity, albumen height, pH, viscosity, foam formation, and stability were carried out on eggs. Carijo Barbada strain had smaller albumen, lower humidity and higher egg white viscosity than Isa Brown strain; however, with storage, viscosity lowered significantly on both strains. Initially, the addition of 2.0% of annatto or a synthetic additive increased viscosity in both strains, but with storage only the control maintained longer viscosity. Lower viscosity did not change foam density and stability.A coloração da gema, transparência e viscosidade da clara (albúmen são parâmetros importantes que os consumidores consideram na avaliação dos ovos. O objetivo do estudo foi verificar as trocas que ocorrem na armazenagem por 36 dias em relação à viscosidade da clara de ovos produzidos por poedeiras de duas diferentes linhagens (Carijo Barbada eIsa Brown , as quais receberam dietas contendo urucum (1,5 e 2,0% ou aditivo sintético. Foram realizadas as análises de umidade, altura do albúmen, pH, viscosidade, formação e estabilidade da espuma. A linhagem Carijó Barbada apresentou menor quantidade de albúmen, menor umidade e maior viscosidade que a linhagem Isa Brown, entretanto, com a estocagem, a viscosidade diminuiu significativamente para ambas as linhagens. Inicialmente, a adição de 2,0% de urucum ou aditivo sintético foi suficiente para aumentar a viscosidade em ovos obtidos de ambas as linhagens, mas com a estocagem, somente o controle manteve maior viscosidade. A baixa viscosidade não interferiu na

  17. Níveis nutricionais de treonina digestível para poedeiras leves no segundo ciclo de produção Nutritional levels of digestible threonine for white-egg laying hens in the second cycle of production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de determinar a exigência nutricional de treonina digestível para poedeiras comerciais leves de segundo ciclo de produção (79 a 95 semanas de idade, foi conduzido um experimento com 180 poedeiras Lohmann LSL, distribuídas em cinco dietas (0,380; 0,413; 0,446; 0,479; e 0,512% de treonina digestível, seis repetições e seis aves por unidade experimental. Os níveis de treonina na ração tiveram efeito quadrático sobre o consumo de ração, a conversão alimentar por massa e por dúzia de ovos, a taxa de postura, o peso e a massa de ovos. Não foi observado efeito significativo dos níveis de treonina na ração sobre o ganho de peso, a unidade Haugh, o índice de gema e de albúmen e a porcentagem de gema e de albúmem, com exceção da porcentagem de casca, que sofreu efeito quadrático. Mediante análise estatística e interpretação biológica e tomando-se a conversão alimentar por dúzia de ovos como parâmetro decisório, a exigência de treonina digestível no período de 79 a 95 semanas de idade é de 0,469%, que corresponde a um consumo de treonina de 459 mg/ave/dia.In order to determine nutritional requirement of digestible threonine for white-egg laying hens in the second production cycle (from 79 to 95 weeks of age, it was carried out an experiment with 180 commercial Lohmann LSL laying hens, distributed in five diets (0.380; 0.413; 0.446; 0.479 and 0.512% digestible threonine, six replicates and six birds per experiment unit. Levels of threonine in the ration quadratically affected feed intake, feed conversion per mass and per dozen of eggs, laying rate, weight and mass of eggs. It was not observed significant effect of the levels of threonine in the ration on weight gain, Haugh unity, index of yolk and albumen and percentage of yolk and albumen, except for shell percentage, which was quadratically affected. Through statistic analyzes and biological interpretation and using feed conversion per dozen of eggs as

  18. How to motivate laying hens to use the hen run?

    OpenAIRE

    Zeltner, Esther; Hirt, Helen; Hauser, J

    2004-01-01

    In organic agriculture, hens are kept in free range systems. A free range is an enrichment for the hens and brings several advantages for them. Laying hens may show behavioural elements that are not possible in a poultry house. For instance, sunbathing behaviour is only shown in direct sunlight and not in artificial light (Huber, 1987). Hens spend 35.3-47.5% of their time with food searching (Fölsch and Vestergaard, 1981) and, in natural habitats, invertebrate food appears to be an importnat ...

  19. HelthyHens

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    This project focuses on the main challenges for organic laying hen farms regarding disease management, adverse animal welfare and negative impacts on the environment. Parasite infestation levels as well as prevalence of major health and welfare problems such as feather pecking, cannibalism, keel bone and foot lesions are affected by a combination of housing and management factors, e.g. with respect to feeding or hygiene, genotype or therapeutic treatments.

  20. Dynamics of anterior pituitary immunoreactive gonadotrophs in moulted hens supplemented with protein, symbiotic and probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, H; Rahman, Z U

    2016-06-01

    The present work delineates redistribution patterns of the hormone-producing cells of the anterior pituitary, after the phase of moulting. Two hundred single comb White Leghorn hens at the end of their first production cycle (Age = 70 week) were purchased from the commercial poultry farm and were induced to moult by high-dietary zinc (3 g/kg feed/day) after 1 week of acclimatization, at the experimental research station, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad. The moulted birds were equally (n = 50) and randomly allocated to their respective groups as G1 (control; CP (Crude protein) 16%, no supplement), G2 (CP18%, no other supplement), G3 (CP16%, symbiotic at does rate of 85 mg/l in drinking water daily) and G4 (CP16%, probiotic at dose rate of 85 mg/l in drinking water daily). Ten birds were slaughtered in each group at 5% and at peak of post-moult production stage to collect their pituitary glands. An earlier post-moult production recovery, sustained and lengthier production span was seen in the G2 as compared to all other groups. The lowest production and an earlier production decline were seen in G1. The cell diameter and area of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) gonadotroph increased (p ≤ 0.01) in G2 and G3 as compared to G1. The FSH gonadotroph nucleus diameter and area did increase (p ≤ 0.01) in G2 and G3, while LH gonadotroph nucleus diameter and area decreased (p ≤ 0.01) in G2 and G3 as compared to G1. The increased FSH and LH gonadotroph diameter in protein and symbiotic supplemented birds is accountable for the increased egg production in these groups. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Uterine adenocarcinoma with transcoelomic metastases in breeder hens (Gallus domesticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Bwala

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hens involved in a Newcastle disease study were euthanased at regular intervals according to a designed protocol. Of these, 7.14%(n = 42 of the 82-week-old specific pathogen-free breeder hens were found to have well-delineated firm white to yellowish nodules of varying sizes in the abdominal cavity. Histologically, the nodules were identified as an adenocarcinoma originating in the uterus. Transcoelomic spread was evidenced by the presence of similar neoplastic cells embedded in the serosa and outer longitudinal muscle layer of the intestines as well as the liver.

  2. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels during manual restraint in chicks from a high and low feather pecking line of laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, M.; Beuving, G.; Ruesink, W.; Blokhuis, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Neurosympathetic and adrenal responsivity to manual restraint was studied in two White Leghorn chicken lines which differ in their tendency to feather peek. Blood samples were taken from freely moving cannulated birds during resting conditions and during manual restraint (placing the bird on its

  3. The development of imitation crab sticks by substituting spent laying hen meat for Alaska pollack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S K; Hur, I C; Jeong, J Y; Choi, Y J; Choi, B D; Kim, B G; Hur, S J

    2011-08-01

    Imitation crab stick (ICS) samples were divided into 5 treatments, a control composed of commercial ICS containing no breast meat from spent laying hens, and treatments 1, 2, 3, and 4, in which 5, 10, 15, and 20% batter from breast meat of whole spent laying hens was substituted for Alaska pollack surimi, respectively. Imitation crab stick samples containing spent laying hen breast meat batter showed significantly (P 0.05) among ICS samples. During storage, whiteness was greater in the control sample than in the ICS samples containing spent laying hen breast meat batter. The saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids increased, whereas the polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased in response to substituting surimi with spent laying hen breast meat batter. The moisture content and pH were increased as the amount of spent laying hen breast meat batter increased. The lipid oxidation value (TBA-reactive substances) and protein degradation value (volatile basic nitrogen) tended to increase during storage as the amount of spent laying hen breast meat batter increased. None of the sensory evaluation items differed among ICS samples during storage, although the color of the final products, mechanical color (by colorimeter), and textural properties did differ among samples. These results indicate that substituting laying hen breast meat batter for Alaska pollack surimi is a very useful method for the production of ICS because it enables the use of a simple production process that does not require steps, such as washing or pH adjustment, for myofibrillar protein recovery.

  4. Robustness in laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Star, L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the project ‘The genetics of robustness in laying hens’ was to investigate nature and regulation of robustness in laying hens under sub-optimal conditions and the possibility to increase robustness by using animal breeding without loss of production. At the start of the project, a robust animal was defined as ‘an animal under a normal physical condition that has the potential to keep functioning and take short periods to recover under varying environmental conditions’. Next, parame...

  5. Effect of different levels of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) on performance, intestinal Escherichia coli colonization and jejunal morphology in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boka, J; Mahdavi, A H; Samie, A H; Jahanian, R

    2014-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different levels of black cumin seeds (Nigella sativa L.) on performance, intestinal Escherichia coli count and morphology of jejunal epithelial cells in laying hens. A total of 100 Leghorn laying hens (Hy-Line W-36) of 49 weeks old were randomly distributed among five cage replicates of five birds each. Experimental diets consisted of different levels (0%, 1%, 2% and 3% of diet) of dietary black cumin inclusion. The experimental period lasted for a total of 10 weeks, and egg quality indexes and laying hens' performance were measured as two 35-day trial periods. At the final day, two hens per replicate were slaughtered to investigate the influence of dietary treatments on intestinal E. coli colonization and morphology of jejunal cells. Although dietary black cumin in all supplementation levels decreased (p cumin. Dietary treatments decreased (p cumin improved (p cumin. This improvement was due to the increase (p cumin decreased E. coli enumeration in ileal digesta and improved serum lipid profile and eggshell quality, whereas the best intestinal health indices and haying hens' performance were obtained by at least 2% black cumin seeds. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Effect of Fishmeal Supplementation on Body Weight Gain of White ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two 8-week feeding trials were carried out to investigate the effect of supplementing an inadequate commercial diet available in Eritrea. with fishmeal produced locally by sun-drying and grinding on the body weight gain of White Leghorn chicks. The commercial diet consisted 'of a mixture of sorghum, wheat middlings, ...

  7. Opportunities for exercise during pullet rearing, Part II: Long-term effects on bone characteristics of adult laying hens at the end-of-lay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey-Trott, T M; Korver, D R; Guerin, M T; Sandilands, V; Torrey, S; Widowski, T M

    2017-08-01

    Osteoporosis in laying hens has been a production and welfare concern for several decades. The objective of this study was to determine whether differing opportunities for exercise during pullet rearing influences long-term bone quality characteristics in end-of-lay hens. A secondary objective was to assess whether differing opportunities for exercise in adult housing systems alters bone quality characteristics in end-of-lay hens. Four flock replicates of 588 Lohmann Selected Leghorn-Lite pullets were reared in either conventional cages (Conv) or an aviary rearing system (Avi) and placed into conventional cages (CC), 30-bird furnished cages (FC-S), or 60-bird furnished cages (FC-L) for adult housing. Wing and leg bones were collected at the end-of-lay to quantify bone composition and strength using quantitative computed tomography and bone breaking strength (BBS). At the end-of-lay, Avi hens had greater total and cortical cross-sectional area (P < 0.05) for the radius and tibia, greater total bone mineral content of the radius (P < 0.001), and greater tibial cortical bone mineral content (P = 0.029) than the Conv hens; however, total bone mineral density of the radius (P < 0.001) and cortical bone mineral density of the radius and tibia (P < 0.001) were greater in the Conv hens. Hens in the FC-L had greater total bone mineral density for the radius and tibia (P < 0.05) and greater trabecular bone mineral density for the radius (P = 0.027), compared to hens in the FC-S and CC. Total bone mineral content of the tibia (P = 0.030) and cortical bone mineral content of the radius (P = 0.030) and tibia (P = 0.013) were greater in the FC-L compared to the CC. The humerus of Conv hens had greater BBS than the Avi hens (P < 0.001), and the tibiae of FC-L and FC-S hens had greater BBS than CC hens (P = 0.006). Increased opportunities for exercise offered by the aviary rearing system provided improved bone quality characteristics lasting through to the end-of-lay. © The

  8. Screening for hen's egg and chicken meat specific IgE antibodies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both the egg white and yolk antibodies coexisted in 35 (58.3%) patients. Conclusion: Sensitization against hen's egg was higher compared to the chicken meat. Egg white sensitization higher than the egg yolk particularly in Saudi children with food related allergic disorders. Key words: Allergy, atopic dermatitis, chicken ...

  9. Screening for hen's egg and chicken meat specific IgE antibodies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Atopic dermatitis was the most common (55%) clinical condition. Out of the total 60 patients harboring hen's egg and chicken meat specific IgE antibodies high levels of egg white, yolk and chicken meat specific IgEs were detected in 58 (96.6%), 37 (61.6%) and 6 (10%) patients respectively. Both the egg white and ...

  10. Henning Bergenholtz: Bibliovita

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Tarp, Sven

    2009-01-01

    contributed to research and therefore influenced both national and international research communities. Not only has Henning Bergenholtz published theoretical works on lexicography and other topics, but he is also the author and co-author of a range of dictionaries. His theoretical publications in a variety...... of languages include books and papers on the development of theories and principles for the compilation of dictionaries as well as reviews of dictionaries and monographs in a constant quest to learn from other scholars. The dictionaries he has authored and co-authored cover the spectrum from monolingual...... general dictionaries to bilingual specialised dictionaries with languages such as Danish, Dutch, English, Malagasy and Spanish within fields as diverse as microbiology and accounting. In addition, he has been the editor of several books and academic journals, e.g. Hermes and LexicoNordica (he is one...

  11. Productive performance of laying hens fed wheat-based diets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 4 iso-caloric and iso-nitrogenous diets (ME =2720 kcal/kg and CP=150 g/kg) including OP (0.0 and 90.0 g/kg) and a commercial cocktail enzyme with mostly xylanase activity (Nutrase®, 0.0 or 0.9 g/kg) were formulated. To determine blood biochemical parameters and differentiable count of white blood cells, one hen per ...

  12. Effect of feeding hemp seed and hemp seed oil on laying hen performance and egg yolk fatty acid content: evidence of their safety and efficacy for laying hen diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakhar, N; Goldberg, E; Jing, M; Gibson, R; House, J D

    2012-03-01

    Forty-eight 19-wk-old Bovan White laying hens were fed 1 of 5 diets containing either hemp seed (HS) or hemp seed oil (HO). The level of HO was 4, 8, or 12%, whereas the level was 10 or 20% for the HS. A set of 8 birds fed wheat-, barley-, and corn oil-based diets served as the control. Performance was monitored over 12 wk. Average hen-day egg production was not affected upon feeding of either HS or HO diets. Egg weight was higher than that of the controls for hens consuming the 20% HS diet (P hemp products HS or HO in the diets of laying hens up to a maximum level of 20 and 12%, respectively, does not adversely effect the performance of laying hens and leads to the enrichment of the n-3 fatty acid content of eggs.

  13. Rearing Laying Hens in Aviaries Reduces Fearfulness following Transfer to Furnished Cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantsæter, Margrethe; Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Moe, Randi O.; Hansen, Tone B.; Orritt, Rachel; Nicol, Christine; Janczak, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate rearing is essential for ensuring the welfare and productivity of laying hens. Early experience has the potential to affect the development of fearfulness. This study tested whether rearing in aviaries, as opposed to cages, reduces the fearfulness of laying hens after transfer to furnished cages. Fear responses were recorded as avoidance of a novel object in the home cage. Lohmann Selected Leghorns were reared in an aviary system or conventional rearing cages and then transported to furnished cages at 16 weeks, before the onset of lay. Observations of a selection of birds were conducted at 19 (N = 50 independent cages) and 21 (N = 48 independent cages) weeks of age. At 19 and 21 weeks, cage-reared birds showed higher levels of fearfulness indicated by spending more time away from the novel object compared to aviary-reared birds. These results suggest that rearing in an enriched aviary environment reduces fearfulness up to the fifth week after transfer to a new housing system, compared to rearing in cages. PMID:26955634

  14. Prediction of Heterosis in White Leghorn Crossbreds using Paternal 60K SNP Genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amuzu, E.N.Y.; Bovenhuis, H.; Koning, de D.J.; Bijma, P.

    2014-01-01

    Predicting heterosis for crossbred offspring of individual sires would harness variation between sires from the same pure-line, and can increase the utilization of heterosis in crossbreeding schemes. We aimed to derive the theoretical expectation for heterosis in crossbred offspring of individual

  15. Reproductive performance assessment of two White Leghorn lines free of endogenous viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two of the chicken lines that USDA-ARS Avian Disease & Oncology Laboratory (ADOL) have developed and maintained are line 0 and line 0.TVB*S1 (also known as rapid feathering susceptible or RFS). Line 0 was developed in the 1980s (Bacon et al., 2000), and RFS was developed in 2007 (Zhang et al., 2008)...

  16. Investigation on the effects of dietary protein reduction with constant ratio of digestible sulfur amino acids and threonine to lysine on performance, egg quality and protein retention in two strains of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Foroudi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to determine the possibility of using various levels of crude protein (CP by providing laying hens with constant levels of digestible sulfur amino acid, threonine and lysine to improve performance and egg quality. The experiment was conducted as a completely randomized block design in a factorial arrangement (4 × 2 with 8 replicates of 10 hens in each. Factors included 4 levels of CP (18.5%, 17.5%, 16.5% and 15.5% and 2 strains (LSL and Hy-Line W-36 of laying hens. Hens were fed experimental diets from 25 to 33 weeks of age. Production performance was measured for eight weeks and egg quality characteristics were determined at 29 and 33 weeks of age. Protein reduction decreased egg weight, egg mass and hen body weight linearly (P≤0.01. Egg production was not affected by protein reduction but feed efficiency, and average daily feed intake increased significantly (P≤0.01. Lohmann Selected Leghorn laying hens showed significantly higher egg production, egg weight, egg mass, weight gain, feed efficiency and feed intake compared to the W-36 laying hens (P≤0.01. Shell thickness increased linearly as protein levels decreased (P≤0.05. There were significant differences between two strains on the egg quality characteristics (P≤0.01. Significant (P≤0.05 CP × strain interactions were observed for hen weight, albumen height, Haugh units, yolk and shell percentage. Based on the results of this experiment, a reduction in dietary protein level (from 18.5% to 15.5%, without any alteration in digestible TSAA and Thr: Lys ratio, led to inferior egg mass and feed conversion ratio during the peak production period.

  17. Laying hens in aviaries with different litter substrates: Behavior across the flock cycle and feather lipid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D L M; Ali, A B A; Karcher, D M; Siegford, J M

    2017-09-01

    The tiered aviary for laying hens includes a floor litter area to promote foraging and dust bathing. Data are needed on hens' use of different litter substrates and effectiveness of substrates in removing excess feather lipids to ensure a suitable litter area. Bovans White hens were housed in commercial-style aviaries with access to one of 3 litter substrates (wood shavings, straw, or plastic turf mats-AstroTurf®, n = 4 aviary pens per substrate, 144 cage-reared hens populated per pen). Litter areas were videoed across 2 d each at 4 ages: immediately following first aviary opening (25 wk), then at 28, 50, and 68 weeks. Observations of hens throughout the d included percentages of all hens in each pen on the litter area, foraging and transitioning between the tiered enclosure and litter area. Percentages of hens dust bathing were observed from 11:00 to 15:00. Breast and back feather samples from 7 birds per pen at 28, 50, and 68 wk were analyzed for lipid content. Overall, fewer hens simultaneously accessed the AstroTurf® (P straw and shavings are more ideal litter substrates. Further study should investigate alternative substrates or regular substrate addition to encourage more foraging and dust bathing. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  18. Development of locomotion over inclined surfaces in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, C; Tobalske, B; Bowley, S; Harlander-Matauschek, A

    2017-08-07

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate locomotor strategies during development in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus); we were motivated, in part, by current efforts to improve the design of housing systems for laying hens which aim to reduce injury and over-exertion. Using four strains of laying hens (Lohmann Brown, Lohmann LSL lite, Dekalb White and Hyline Brown) throughout this longitudinal study, we investigated their locomotor style and climbing capacity in relation to the degree (0 to 70°) of incline, age (2 to 36 weeks) and the surface substrate (sandpaper or wire grid). Chicks and adult fowl performed only walking behavior to climb inclines ⩽40° and performed a combination of wing-assisted incline running (WAIR) or aerial ascent on steeper inclines. Fewer birds used their wings to aid their hind limbs when climbing 50° inclines on wire grid surface compared with sandpaper. The steepness of angle achieved during WAIR and the tendency to fly instead of using WAIR increased with increasing age and experience. White-feathered strains performed more wing-associated locomotor behavior compared with brown-feathered strains. A subset of birds was never able to climb incline angles >40° even when using WAIR. Therefore, we suggest that inclines of up to 40° should be provided for hens in three-dimensional housing systems, which are easily negotiated (without wing use) by chicks and adult fowl.

  19. Laying hens in furnished cages

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, Helena

    2003-01-01

    Concern for the welfare of laying hens housed in conventional cages has led to a change of the Animal Welfare Legislation in Sweden, implying that cages must provide possibilities for hens to lay eggs in a nest, to rest on a perch and to use litter. Such requirements are also being considered within the whole European Union. The purpose of this thesis is to contribute to the general knowledge of, and further development of, furnished cages, both as regards birds’ use of facilities and their w...

  20. improving performance of laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    A.P Sinurat; P Ketaren; A.J Cowieson; M.H.L Bento

    2012-01-01

    A trial was conducted in order to study the effect of the supplementation of Avizyme 1500® (Danisco Animal Nutrition, Marlborough, UK) on the performance of laying hens for one year. A control diet based on corn – soybean meal was formulated to meet nutrient requirement of ISA Brown laying hens. Two treatments, the control diet (C) and C + 1000 g Avizyme/tonne diet were tested. Each diet was fed to 80 birds (20 replicates of 4 birds) from 20 to 72 weeks of age, and performances of birds (feed...

  1. Feather loss in laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Hristov Slavča; Mitrović Sreten; Todorović Mirjana; Đermanović Vladan; Cvetković Ivica

    2006-01-01

    The paper examined the incidence of different forms of feather loss and cannibalism in laying hens aged 74 weeks following moulting and in laying hens following exploitation for a period of one year. The forms of feather loss were considered in detail through a repeated examination of video recordings and they were sorted according to localization - to feather loss on the ventral part of the neck, on the dorsal part of the neck, and on the back between the wings. Feather loss on the ventral p...

  2. Feather-pecking and injurious pecking in organic laying hens in 107 flocks from eight European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestman, M.; Verwer, Cynthia; Brenninkmeyer, Christine

    2017-01-01

    and flock characteristics (age, genotype). Near the end of lay, 50 hens per flock were assessed for plumage condition and wounds. Potential influencing factors were screened and submitted to a multivariate model. The majority of the flocks (81%) consisted of brown genotypes and were found in six countries...... access to the free range (30% of the variation explained). For feather damage in white hens, no model could be made. Wounds in brown hens were associated with not having daily access to free range (14% of the variation explained). Wounds in white hens were explained by a model containing not topping......-up litter during the laying period (26% of the variation explained). These results suggest that better feeding management, daily access to the free-range area and improved litter management may reduce incidence of plumage damage and associated injurious pecking, hence enhancing the welfare of organic laying...

  3. Níveis nutricionais de metionina+cistina digestível para poedeiras leves no segundo ciclo de produção Nutrition levels of digestible methionine + cystine for white-egg laying hens in the second production cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi conduzido um experimento com o objetivo de estabelecer a exigência nutricional de metionina+cistina para poedeiras leves no segundo ciclo de produção. Foram utilizadas 180 poedeiras leves no período de 79 a 95 semanas de idade, submetidas a uma ração basal deficiente em metionina+cistina e suplementada com 0,00; 0,053; 0,108; 0,161; ou 0,214% de DL-metionina (98%, de forma a proporcionar 0,490; 0,542; 0,594; 0,648; e 0,698% de metionina+cistina digestíveis nas rações. Os níveis de suplementação obedeceram às relações de metionina+cistina:lisina de 75, 83, 91, 99 e 107 com a lisina fixada em 0,653%. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, com cinco níveis de metionina+cistina, seis repetições e seis aves por unidade experimental. Os níveis de metionina+cistina na ração tiveram efeito linear sobre a conversão alimentar por dúzia e por massa de ovos, a taxa de postura, a massa de ovos e o índice de albúmen e efeito quadrático sobre o peso dos ovos e a unidade Haugh. A porcentagem dos componentes dos ovos não foram influenciada pelos níveis de metionina+cistina na ração. A exigência de metionina+cistina para poedeiras leves é superior a 0,698%, valor que corresponde a consumo de pelo menos de 796 mg/ave/dia.It was conducted an experiment with the objective of setting the nutritional requirement of methionine+cystine for white-egg laying hens in the second production cycle. It was used 180 white-egg laying hens from 79 to 95 weeks of age submitted to a basal diet deficient in methionine+cystine, supplemented with 0.00; 0.053; 0.108; 0.161 or 0.214% of DL-methionine (98% to provide 0.490; 0.542; 0.594; 0.648 and 0.698% of digestible methionine+cystine in the rations. Levels of supplementation followed ratios of methionine+cystine:lysine of 75, 83, 91, 99 and 107 with lysine fixed at 0.653%. A complete randomized design with five levels of methionine + cystine was used, with six replicates and six

  4. Investigating behavior changes of laying hens molted by high dietary zinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smayyeh Salari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The commercial egg industry commonly uses induced molt procedures to rejuvenate flocks for a second or third laying cycle. Molting may be induced by feed withdrawal for up to 10 days (7, water withdrawal for 2 days (19, or both, along with a reduction of day length (14. Such programs cause concern about animal welfare because it is thought that they may be harmful to hens (28. Given the concerns for potential bird stress, various methods of nutrient restriction that would avoid long term feed withdrawal have been investigated (20, 24. One of the alternative methods for molt induction is high-dietary Zn (4. Materials and Methods In this study, a total of 30 Hy-line W-36 leghorn hens (at 50 wk old (1400 ± 150 g, were randomly assigned to 5 replicate. Ten cages (3 hens in each cage on both the upper and lower tiers were considered to observe behavior patterns. Data recording of predetermined behavioral patterns were carried out using five Camera Digital Video Recorder Multiplexer System. Behavior recording began at 9:00 h each day and ended at 11:00 h and a second observation starting at 16:00 p.m and ended at 18:00 p.m. Total of ten cages (containing 3 hens/ cage (30 hens total were used to collect 5 behaviors (feeding, drinking, nonnutritive pecking, preening and aggression pecking and one posture (sitting. The following ethogram was adopted from Webster (27 feeding defined as pecking behavior directed toward the feed trough or toward a neighboring feed trough. Drinking was defined as the appearance of ingesting water from the nipple at the near of the cage. Nonnutritive pecking was defined as non aggressive pecking at anything other than feed, which included cage pecking, feather pecking, bill pecking and air pecking. Preening behavior involved the manipulation of the plumage with the beak. Aggressive was the sum of pecks that occurred within a cage or between neighboring cages. Sitting was defined as a crouched posture with shanks

  5. Reduced productivity among confined laying hens infested by Allopsoroptoides galli (Mironov, 2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, N M; Tucci, E C; Freitas, E R; Fernandes, D P B

    2016-04-01

    The mite Allopsoroptoides galli has recently been identified parasitizing commercial chickens, São Paulo State/Brasil, causing severe dermatitis on all parts of the animal's body and a significant decline in productivity, particularly in egg production. The aim of the present study in A. galli infestation was to investigate the impact on laying hens' performance and egg quality. A total of 100 56-week-old Hy-line white laying hens were used. The birds were divided into 2 groups, with 10 replicates of 5 birds in each group. The experimental groups consisted of a non-infested group (hens free of theA. galli) and an infested group (hens presenting A. galli). The infestation with A. galli did not significantly influence feed intake but caused a significant reduction in the body weight of the hens and caused a decrease in egg production, therefore promoting worse feed conversion. The egg weight was reduced; however, the infestation did not significantly affect the internal quality of the eggs, which was measured according to the yolk color, albumen height, and Haugh units, or the quality of the shell, based on its percentage, thickness, and strength. It can be concluded that anA. galli infestation promotes a reduction in body weight, egg production, and egg weight in laying hens, therefore worsening feed conversion. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  6. Rearing system affects prevalence of keel-bone damage in laying hens: a longitudinal study of four consecutive flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey-Trott, T M; Guerin, M T; Sandilands, V; Torrey, S; Widowski, T M

    2017-07-01

    High flock-level prevalence of keel-bone fractures and deviations in laying hens are commonly reported across various housing systems; however, few longitudinal studies exist, especially for furnished and conventional cage systems. Load-bearing exercise improves bone strength and mineral composition in laying hens and has the potential to reduce keel-bone damage, especially if exercise is allowed during critical periods of bone growth throughout the pullet rearing phase. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of keel-bone damage in laying hens housed in furnished and conventional cages, and assess whether opportunities for exercise during the pullet rearing phase influenced the prevalence of keel-bone damage throughout the laying period. Four flock replicates of 588 Lohmann Selected Leghorn-Lite pullets/flock were reared in either conventional cages (Conv) or an aviary rearing system (Avi) and placed into conventional cages (CC), 30-bird furnished cages (FC-S) or 60-bird furnished cages (FC-L) for adult housing. Keel-bone status was determined by palpation at 30, 50, and 70 wk of age. Age (P system (P system had a lower percentage of fractures (41.6% ± 2.8 SE) compared to hens reared in the Conv system (60.3% ± 2.9 SE). Adult housing system did not have an effect on the percentage of keel fractures (P = 0.223). Age had an effect on the presence of deviations (P system (P = 0.218) and adult housing system (P = 0.539) did not affect the presence of deviations. Keel fractures and deviations were strongly associated with each other at all ages: 30 wk: (P system reduced the prevalence of keel-bone fractures through the end-of-lay. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  7. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae can infect a wide range of mammals (including humans) and birds. Disease outbreaks (erysipelas) have been considered unusual in chickens internationally, but outbreaks with high mortality and egg production losses have been diagnosed in Swedish laying hen flocks every year since 1998. Different aspects of E. rhusiopathiae infection in chickens were examined in this thesis with the aim of preventing future outbreaks. These aspects included determi...

  8. Phosphorus requirement in laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, W.; Krimpen, van, M.M.; Star, L.

    2014-01-01

    It was hypothesized that P supply by feed in alternative housing systems can be lowered without negative effects on bone quality and production performance. Therefore, the objectives of the current study were 1) to update the retainable phosphorus (rP) needs of two modern laying hen breeds from 36 to 90 weeks of age housed in an aviary system, 2) to investigate the influence of dietary rP levels on Ca and P content in eggs, manure, carcasses and bones.

  9. Welfare indicators in laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Alm, Malin

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing concern regarding the welfare of laying hens worldwide and there are both ethical and economic reasons for improving their welfare. Although several different welfare indicators are used today, their ability to accurately reflect welfare status is sometimes questioned. This thesis sought to increase knowledge regarding a number of these welfare indicators by investigating whether and to what extent they were affected when layers were exposed to different stressors. Three di...

  10. Influence of genetic strain and access to litter on spatial distribution of 4 strains of laying hens in an aviary system1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A. B. A.; Campbell, D. L. M.; Karcher, D. M.; Siegford, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Many laying hen producers are transitioning from conventional cages to new housing systems including multi-tier aviaries. Aviary resources, such as litter areas, are intended to encourage hens’ expression of natural behaviors to improve their welfare. Little research has examined the influence of laying hen strain on distribution and behavior inside aviaries, yet differences could influence a strain's suitability for an aviary design. This research examined how laying hens of 4 strains (Hy-Line Brown [HB], Bovans Brown [BB], DeKalb White [DW], and Hy-Line W36) distributed themselves among 3 enclosed aviary tiers and 2 litter areas at peak lay (25 to 28 wk of age) and after gaining access to litter on the floor (26 wk). Observations of hens’ spatial distribution were conducted immediately before and after, and 3 wk after hens gained access to litter. More HB and BB hens were in upper tiers in morning compared to DW and W36 (all P ≤ 0.05). However, DW and W36 hens roosted in upper tiers in larger numbers than HB and BB during evening (all P ≤ 0.05). More DW and W36 hens were on litter compared to BB and HB, particularly when litter was first accessible (all P ≤ 0.05). The number of hens on litter increased over time for all strains (P ≤ 0.06). White hens on litter occupied open areas in higher numbers (P ≤ 0.05), while more brown hens occupied litter under the aviary after acclimation (P ≤ 0.05). In the dark period, W36 and DW hens were present in higher numbers in upper tiers than HB and BB, while HB and BB showed higher tier-to-tier movement than DW and W36 (P ≤ 0.05). In general, more white hens roosted higher at night and explored litter sooner, while more brown hens were near or in nests in the morning and moved at night. Distinct strain differences indicate that attention should be paid to the match between configuration of the aviary design and strain of laying hen. PMID:27444438

  11. Dietary supplementation of mannanoligosaccharides to turkey hens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research focused on the effect of a prebiotic additive, mannanoligosaccharides (Bio-Mos), in the diet of turkey hens on their growth performance and measurements of pro-oxidation and antioxidation systems in their blood. The investigation was performed on 240 six-week-old turkey hens of the heavy Big-6 breed, ...

  12. Detection of X-rays from the jet-driving symbiotic star Hen 3-1341

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stute, M.; Luna, G. J. M.; Pillitteri, I. F.; Sokoloski, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Hen 3-1341 is a symbiotic binary system consisting of a white dwarf and a red giant star that is one of about ten symbiotics that show hints of jets. The bipolar jets have been detected through displaced components of emission lines during its outburst from 1998 to 2004. These components disappeared when Hen 3-1341 reached quiescence. On February 23, 2012, Hen 3-1341 started a new outburst with the emergence of new bipolar jets on March 3, 2012. Aims: We observed Hen 3-1341 during quiescence with XMM-Newton in March 2010 with an effective exposure time of 46.8 ks and with Swift on March 8-11, 2012 as ToO observations with an effective exposure time of 10 ks in order to probe the interaction of the jet with the ambient medium and also the accretion onto the white dwarf. Methods: We fitted the XMM-Newton X-ray spectra with XSPEC and examined the X-ray and UV light curves. Results: We report the detection of X-ray emission during quiescence from Hen 3-1341 with XMM-Newton. The spectrum can be fitted with an absorbed one-temperature plasma or an absorbed blackbody. We did not detect Hen 3-1341 during our short Swift exposure. Neither periodic or aperiodic X-ray nor UV variability were found. Conclusions: Our XMM-Newton data suggest that interaction of the residual jet with the interstellar medium might survive for a long time after outbursts and might be responsible for the observed X-ray emission during quiescence. Additional data are strongly needed to confirm these suggestions.

  13. Digestible threonine to lysine ratio in diets for laying hens aged 24-40 weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Cristina da Rocha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-hundred sixteen white laying hens were used to assess the ideal ratio of digestible threonine:lysine in diets for laying hens at 24 to 40 weeks of age. Birds were assigned to a randomized block design, with six treatments, six replicates per treatment and six birds per experimental unit. The cage was used as the blocking criterion. Experimental diets contained different digestible threonine:digestible lysine ratios (65, 70, 75, 80, 85 and 90% with 142 g/kg of crude protein. Experimental diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous and isocaloric with different contents of L-glutamic acid. Feed intake (g/hen/d, egg production (%, egg weight (g, egg mass (g/hen/d, feed conversion ratio (kg/dozen and kg/kg egg, eggshell weight (g, albumen weight (g, yolk weight (g and body weight gain (g were assessed. The maximum egg production was observed at 78% digestible threonine:digestible lysine ratio, while the best values of feed conversion ratio (kg/dozen egg and feed conversion ratio (kg/kg of egg were observed at 77.6% and 75%, respectively. Feed intake, egg mass and egg contents (yolk, albumen and eggshell were not affected by treatments. The estimated digestible threonine:digestible lysine ratio of Hy-Line W36 laying hens at 24 to 40 weeks of age is 78%, corresponding to 5.70 g/kg of dietary digestible threonine.

  14. Health and Welfare in Dutch Organic Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestman, Monique; Wagenaar, Jan-Paul

    2014-06-20

    From 2007-2008, data on animal health and welfare and farm management during rearing and laying periods were collected from 49 flocks of organic laying hens in the Netherlands. Our aim was to investigate how organic egg farms performed in terms of animal health and welfare and which farm factors affected this performance. The flocks in our study were kept on farms with 34 to 25,000 hens (average 9,300 hens). Seventy-one percent of the flocks consisted of 'silver hybrids': white hens that lay brown eggs. Fifty-five percent of the flocks were kept in floor-based housing and 45% of the flocks in aviaries. No relation was found between the amount of time spent outdoors during the laying period and mortality at 60 weeks. Flocks that used their outdoor run more intensively had better feather scores. In 40% of the flocks there was mortality caused by predators. The average feed intake was 129 g/day at 30 weeks and 133 g/day at 60 weeks of age. The average percentage of mislaid eggs decreased from three at 30 weeks to two at 60 weeks. The average mortality was 7.8% at 60 weeks. Twenty-five percent of the flocks were not treated for worms in their first 50 weeks. Flubenol(©) was applied to the flocks that were treated. Ten percent of the flocks followed Flubenol(©) instructions for use and were wormed five or more times. The other 65% percent were treated irregularly between one and four times. Sixty-eight percent of the flocks showed little or no feather damage, 24% showed moderate damage and 8% showed severe damage. The feather score was better if the hens used the free-range area more intensely, the laying percentage at 60 weeks was higher, and if they were allowed to go outside sooner after arrival on the laying farm. In 69% of the flocks, hens had peck wounds in the vent area: on average this was 18% of the hens. Keel bone deformations were found in all flocks, on average in 21% of the birds. In 78% of the flocks, an average of 13% of the hens had foot-sole wounds

  15. Health and Welfare in Dutch Organic Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Bestman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available From 2007–2008, data on animal health and welfare and farm management during rearing and laying periods were collected from 49 flocks of organic laying hens in the Netherlands. Our aim was to investigate how organic egg farms performed in terms of animal health and welfare and which farm factors affected this performance. The flocks in our study were kept on farms with 34 to 25,000 hens (average 9,300 hens. Seventy-one percent of the flocks consisted of ‘silver hybrids’: white hens that lay brown eggs. Fifty-five percent of the flocks were kept in floor-based housing and 45% of the flocks in aviaries. No relation was found between the amount of time spent outdoors during the laying period and mortality at 60 weeks. Flocks that used their outdoor run more intensively had better feather scores. In 40% of the flocks there was mortality caused by predators. The average feed intake was 129 g/day at 30 weeks and 133 g/day at 60 weeks of age. The average percentage of mislaid eggs decreased from three at 30 weeks to two at 60 weeks. The average mortality was 7.8% at 60 weeks. Twenty-five percent of the flocks were not treated for worms in their first 50 weeks. Flubenol© was applied to the flocks that were treated. Ten percent of the flocks followed Flubenol© instructions for use and were wormed five or more times. The other 65% percent were treated irregularly between one and four times. Sixty-eight percent of the flocks showed little or no feather damage, 24% showed moderate damage and 8% showed severe damage. The feather score was better if the hens used the free-range area more intensely, the laying percentage at 60 weeks was higher, and if they were allowed to go outside sooner after arrival on the laying farm. In 69% of the flocks, hens had peck wounds in the vent area: on average this was 18% of the hens. Keel bone deformations were found in all flocks, on average in 21% of the birds. In 78% of the flocks, an average of 13% of the hens

  16. The effect of different cage tiers and age on egg performance, egg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admOUjg

    2014-10-04

    Oct 4, 2014 ... with an electronic balance at the same time every day to calculate hen-day egg production (HDEP) and henhouse ... short diameters of albumen, and diameter of yolk with a digital calliper (± 0.001 mm). ..... Albumen quality of eggs from five commercial strains of white leghorn hens during one year of lay.

  17. Effect of hesperidin dietary supplementation on hen performance, egg quality and yolk oxidative stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goliomytis, M; Orfanou, H; Petrou, E; Charismiadou, M A; Simitzis, P E; Deligeorgis, S G

    2014-02-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation with hesperidin (one or 3 g/kg of feed) for 31 d on the performance, egg quality and yolk oxidative stability of brown and white laying hens (26-wk old). 2. Supplementation with hesperidin did not affect egg production, egg weight and egg quality traits. 3. No hesperidin effect on yolk and plasma cholesterol was observed. A strain effect was found with lower total and per g yolk cholesterol of brown hens in comparison to the white ones. 4. Oxidative stability of egg yolk, expressed as ng MDA/g yolk, was significantly improved in the hesperidin groups even from the first week of supplementation. At the same time, a significant improvement in the oxidative stability of egg yolk due to the incorporation of hesperidin in hens' diet was observed after 30 and 90 d of storage at 20°C and 4°C, respectively. 5. No hesperidin by strain interaction was detected for any of the traits measured. 6. In conclusion, incorporation of hesperidin to laying hens' feed did not affect productive and egg qualitative traits. On the other hand, dietary hesperidin supplementation significantly improved oxidative stability of both fresh and stored eggs. Antioxidant properties of hesperidin seem to make it a promising natural agent for improving the shelf life of eggs.

  18. Experimental reproduction of endocarditis with Pasteurella gallinarum in mature leghorn chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjahjowati, G; Orr, J P; Chirino-Trejo, M; Mills, J H

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Pasteurella gallinarum for mature leghorn chickens was investigated by inoculating thirty 52-week-old chickens intravenously with live P. gallinarum. Each chicken was inoculated once daily for 5 days at one of three different dosage levels with either the type strain ATCC 13361 or a field isolate from a chicken with endocarditis. Chickens were necropsied after death or euthanasia. Valvular endocarditis was present in seven chickens given the field isolate and five chickens given the type strain. Other lesions detected were myocarditis, hepatic and splenic infarcts, nephritis, pneumonia, and encephalitis. At necropsy, P. gallinarum was reisolated from hearts, livers, spleens, lungs, kidneys, and blood. Controls injected with sterile broth had no lesions of endocarditis, nor was P. gallinarum isolated from them. The results confirm the pathogenicity of P. gallinarum for the heart valves of mature chickens.

  19. Infectious Bronchitis Vaccination Protocols for Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sulaiman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A research was conducted to investigate the effects of vaccination protocols for Infectious Bronchitis (IB on egg production, egg quality, and IB antibody titres of laying hens. Different initial vaccination (Control, VicS eye, VicS spray, VicS water, A3 eye, A3 spray, and A3 water for IB were administered to day-old Isa Brown hens. Half the hens were revaccinated regularly during lay whereas the other hens were not vaccinated. Results showed that initial vaccination treatment had significant effects on hen day egg production and egg quality of egg weight, shell reflectivity, shell breaking strength, shell thickness, albumen height, Haugh Units, and IB antibody titre levels, but had no effect on percentage of shell and yolk colour. Egg weight and shell reflectivity were less favourable in the control hens. In contrast, shell breaking strength and shell thickness were highest for the group that initially received A3 vaccine in water. However, regular revaccination had some deleterious effects on egg production and egg quality. There were no significant effects of revaccination on IB antibody titres. It is concluded that there was little advantage in regularly revaccinating laying hens for IB virus, since they had received appropriate initial vaccination.

  20. Genetic correlations between behavioural responses and performance traits in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozempolska-Rucińska, Iwona; Zięba, Grzegorz; Kibała, Lucyna; Próchniak, Tomasz; Łukaszewicz, Marek

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate genetic correlations between the behavioural profile and performance in laying hens as an indirect answer to the question whether the observed behavioural responses are associated with increased levels of stress in these birds. The assessment of birds' temperament was carried out using the novel objects test. The behavioural test was conducted in two successive generations comprising 9,483 Rhode Island White (RIW) birds (approx. 4,700 individuals per generation) and 4,326 Rhode Island Red (RIR) birds (approx. 2,100 individuals per generation). Based on the recorded responses, the birds were divided into two groups: a fearful profile (1,418 RIW hens and 580 RIR hens) and a brave/curious profile (8,065 RIW hens and 3,746 RIR hens). The birds were subjected to standard assessment of their performance traits, including SM, age at sexual maturity; ST, shell thickness; SG, egg specific gravity; EW, mean egg weight; IP, initial egg production; and HC, number of hatched chicks. The pedigree was three generations deep (including two behaviour-recorded generations). Estimation of the (co)variance components was performed with the Gibbs sampling method, which accounts for the discrete character of the behavioural profile denotation. The analyses revealed negative correlations between the performance traits of the laying hens and the behavioural profile defined as fearful. In the group of fearful RIW birds, delayed sexual maturation (0.22) as well as a decrease in the initial egg production (-0.30), egg weight (-0.54), egg specific gravity (-0.331), shell thickness (-0.11), and the number of hatched chicks (-0.24) could be expected. These correlations were less pronounced in the RIR breed, in which the fearful birds exhibited a decline in hatchability (-0.37), egg specific gravity (-0.11), and the number of hatched chicks (-0.18). There were no correlations in the case of the other traits or they were positive but exhibited a substantial

  1. Comparison of fluid types for resuscitation in acute hemorrhagic shock and evaluation of gastric luminal and transcutaneous Pco2 in Leghorn chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernick, Morena B; Steinmetz, Hanspeter W; Martin-Jurado, Olga; Howard, Judith; Vogler, Barbara; Vogt, Rainer; Codron, Daryl; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different fluid types for resuscitation after experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock in anesthetized chickens and to evaluate partial pressures of carbon dioxide measured in arterial blood (Paco2), with a transcutaneous monitor (TcPco2), with a gastric intraluminal monitor (GiPco2), and by end tidal measurements (Etco2) under stable conditions and after induced hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in 40 white leghorn chickens by removing 50% of blood volume by phlebotomy under general anesthesia. Birds were divided into 4 groups: untreated (control group) and treated with intravenous hetastarch (haes group), with a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (hemospan group), or by autotransfusion (blood group). Respiratory rates, heart rates, and systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) were compared at 8 time points (baseline [T0]; at the loss of 10% [T10%], 20% [T20%], 30% [T30%], 40% [T40%], and 50% [T50%] of blood volume; at the end of resuscitation [RES]; and at the end of anesthesia [END]). Packed cell volume (PCV) and blood hemoglobin content were compared at 6 time points (T0, T50%, RES, and 1, 3, and 7 days after induced hemorrhagic shock). Measurements of Paco2, TcPco2, GiPco2, and Etco2 were evaluated at 2 time points (T0 and T50%), and venous lactic acid concentrations were evaluated at 3 time points (T0, T50%, and END). No significant differences were found in mortality, respiratory rate, heart rate, PCV, or hemoglobin values among the 4 groups. Birds given fluid resuscitation had significantly higher SAPs after fluid administration than did birds in the control group. In all groups, PCV and hemoglobin concentrations began to rise by day 3 after phlebotomy, and baseline values were reached 7 days after blood removal. At T0, TcPco2 did not differ significantly from Paco2, but GiPco2 and Etco2 differed significantly from Paco2. After hemorrhagic shock, GiPco2 and TcPco2 differed significantly

  2. Effects of Enzyme Supplementation on Productive Performance and Egg Quality of Laying Hens fed Diets Containing Graded Levels of Whole Date Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torki M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present study was to determine the effects of β-mannanase-based enzyme (Hemicell® on productive performance and egg quality in diets containing graded levels of Whole date waste (WDW fed to laying hens. A total of 336 Hy-line leghorn hens after production peak were randomly divided into 56 cages. Eight iso-energetic and iso-nitrogenous experimental diets in a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement including four levels of WDW (0, 10, 20 and 30% and 2 concentrations of supplemental β-mannanase (0 or 0.06 % were prepared. Each dietary treatment was fed to 7 cages (6 birds/cage from 32 to 38 wk of age. During the experiment, daily egg production, egg weight and feed intake were measured. At the 6th wk, egg quality traits were also recorded. The results showed that there was no interaction between WDW inclusion and enzyme supplementation on performance and egg traits. Dietary supplementation of WDW more than 10% significantly decreased egg production and egg mass compared to no WDW recipient hens (control diet during the entire experiment (P. Inclusion of 30% WDW to the diet, significantly increased overall feed conversion ratio compared to the control group (P. The treatment with 20 and 30% WDW also resulted in lower eggshell thickness as compared to 10% WDW (P. The dietary inclusion of 10% WDW also increased yolk index as compared to the control and 30% WDW groups (P. Enzyme supplementation had no significant effect on productive performance as well as egg quality characteristics. Based on the results of this experiment, it can be concluded that WDW could be included to laying hens diets up to 10% with no deleterious effects on performance and egg quality characteristics.

  3. Biofortified orange maize enhances β-cryptoxanthin concentrations in egg yolks of laying hens better than tangerine peel fortificant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heying, Emily K; Tanumihardjo, Jacob P; Vasic, Vedran; Cook, Mark; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2014-12-10

    The xanthophyll β-cryptoxanthin provides vitamin A and has other purported health benefits. Laying hens deposit xanthophyll carotenoids into egg yolk. Hens (n = 8/group) were fed conventional-bred high β-cryptoxanthin biofortified (orange) maize, tangerine peel-fortified white maize, lutein-fortified yellow maize, or white maize for 40 d to investigate yolk color changes using L*a*b* scales, yolk carotenoid enhancement, and hen vitamin A status. Yolks from hens fed orange maize had scores indicating a darker, orange color and mean higher β-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and β-carotene concentrations (8.43 ± 1.82, 23.1 ± 4.8, 0.16 ± 0.08 nmol/g, respectively) than other treatments (P < 0.0001). Yolk retinol concentrations (mean: 14.4 ± 3.42 nmol/g) were similar among groups and decreased with time (P < 0.0001). Hens fed orange maize had higher liver retinol (0.53 ± 0.20 μmol/g liver) than other groups (P < 0.0001). β-Cryptoxanthin-biofortified eggs could be another choice for consumers, providing enhanced color through a provitamin A carotenoid and supporting eggs' status as a functional food.

  4. Hen's egg as a source of valuable biologically active substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Herman, Marta; Starostecka, Ewa

    2016-07-06

    The aim of this article is to show current knowledge concerning valuable substances biologically active present in hen eggs and underline important nutritive role of hen eggs. Hen egg is a good source of nutrients such as proteins, vitamins (A, B2, B6, B12, D, E, K), minerals and lipids. The significant part of lipids is a group of unsaturated phospholipids, which are components of cell membranes, act protectively on the cardiovascular system and contribute to a decrease of cholesterol level and blood pressure. Therefore, the consumption of unsaturated phospholipids is recommended especially in patients suffering from diseases of the cardiovascular system. Another important substance is egg cystatin, which has a wide spectrum of biological functions, for example the ability to stimulate cell growth, inhibit inflammatory processes and has antibacterial and antiviral properties. Other substance presented in the egg white which helps fight bacteria is lysozyme. It is used in medicine as an aid in antibiotic therapy and analgesic in the course of infection, as well as in tumor malignancies. Among the components contained in the egg yolk there is also immunoglobulin Y which due to its therapeutic importance deserves special attention. Its use offers the possibility of replacing chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of bacterial infections of digestive system, as well as an opportunity for the development of medicine associated with passive immunization of patients. The egg is a rich source of retinol which gradual depletion in the organism causes many eye pathologies. A very important and useful part of the egg, used in medicine is a shell and its membranes, due to the high collagen content relevant in the treatment of connective tissue diseases.

  5. Chlorinated drinking water for lightweight laying hens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schneider, A.F; Almeida, D.S; Moraes, A.N; Picinin, L.C.A; Oliveira, V; Gewehr, C.E

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The study aimed to evaluate the effect of different levels of chlorine in drinking water of laying hens on zootechnical performance, eggs shell quality, hemogasometry levels and calcium content in tibia...

  6. Occurrence of Salmonella sp in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gama NMSQ

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the presence of Salmonella sp in flocks of white laying hens. In different farms, the transport boxes of twelve flocks were inspected at arrival for the presence of Salmonella. Four positive (A, B, L and M and one negative (I flocks were monitored at each four weeks using bacteriological examination of cecal fresh feces up to 52 weeks. Birds were also evaluated at 52 weeks, when 500 eggs were taken randomly, and at 76 weeks, after forced molt. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and S. enterica rough strain were isolated from the transport boxes of the four positive flocks (flocks A, B, L and M. Salmonella sp was not isolated from the transport boxes or from the feces after 76 weeks-old in flock I. Salmonella sp was isolated in the 1st, 11th, 34th, 42nd and 76th weeks from flock A; in the 1st, 4th, 11th and 76th weeks from flock B; in the first week and in the 17th to 52nd weeks from flock L; and in the 1st and 76th weeks from flock M. S. Enteritidis, S. enterica rough strain and Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis were isolated from the four positive flocks. Besides, Salmonella enterica serovar Javiana was isolated from flocks B and L, and Salmonella enterica serovar Mbandaka was isolated from flock L. Eggs produced by flock A and by flock L were contaminated with S. Enteritidis and S. enterica rough strain. According to these results, Salmonella-infected flocks may produce contaminated eggs.

  7. Hen welfare in different housing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, D C; Fulton, R M; Hester, P Y; Karcher, D M; Kjaer, J B; Mench, J A; Mullens, B A; Newberry, R C; Nicol, C J; O'Sullivan, N P; Porter, R E

    2011-01-01

    Egg production systems have become subject to heightened levels of scrutiny. Multiple factors such as disease, skeletal and foot health, pest and parasite load, behavior, stress, affective states, nutrition, and genetics influence the level of welfare hens experience. Although the need to evaluate the influence of these factors on welfare is recognized, research is still in the early stages. We compared conventional cages, furnished cages, noncage systems, and outdoor systems. Specific attributes of each system are shown to affect welfare, and systems that have similar attributes are affected similarly. For instance, environments in which hens are exposed to litter and soil, such as noncage and outdoor systems, provide a greater opportunity for disease and parasites. The more complex the environment, the more difficult it is to clean, and the larger the group size, the more easily disease and parasites are able to spread. Environments such as conventional cages, which limit movement, can lead to osteoporosis, but environments that have increased complexity, such as noncage systems, expose hens to an increased incidence of bone fractures. More space allows for hens to perform a greater repertoire of behaviors, although some deleterious behaviors such as cannibalism and piling, which results in smothering, can occur in large groups. Less is understood about the stress that each system imposes on the hen, but it appears that each system has its unique challenges. Selective breeding for desired traits such as improved bone strength and decreased feather pecking and cannibalism may help to improve welfare. It appears that no single housing system is ideal from a hen welfare perspective. Although environmental complexity increases behavioral opportunities, it also introduces difficulties in terms of disease and pest control. In addition, environmental complexity can create opportunities for the hens to express behaviors that may be detrimental to their welfare. As a

  8. Tocopherol and annatto tocotrienols distribution in laying-hen body

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hansen, H; Wang, T; Dolde, David; Xin, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    The impact of supplementing laying-hen feed with annatto tocotrienols (T3s) and alpha-tocopherol on the distribution of various forms of vitamin E and cholesterol throughout the hen's body was evaluated...

  9. Egg white coagulum: a precisely tailorable membrane for biomimetic multilevel structured nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaolei WANG; Zhu, Hui; Liu, Xuexia; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2013-01-01

    For the first time, hen egg white coagulum was utilized as a surface modification agent for biomimetic multilevel structured nanomaterials (BMSN). By using a straightforward thermal control process, hen egg white can be coagulated in a precisely tailored manner, which is specifically adapted to the morphology of BMSN. Consequently, the structural stability, hydrophobicity and biocompatibility of BMSN can be improved significantly and simultaneously within one hour. Meanwhile, their initial st...

  10. Quality of organic eggs of hybrid and Italian breed hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, C; Marangon, A

    2012-09-01

    The quality of eggs laid by 2 hybrid and 2 Italian dual-purpose genotypes of hens reared under organic farming system was studied. Hens belonging to Hy-Line Brown (brown eggshell, HLB), Hy-Line White (white eggshell, HLW), Ermellinata di Rovigo (brown eggshell, E), and Robusta maculata (brown eggshell, R) genotypes were reared from 24 to 43 wk of age. The trial was carried out from July to December, with environmental temperature ranging from 25°C (±5°C, summer) to 13°C (±7°C, autumn). The HLB eggs were heavier (P HLB, HLW, R, and E (40.7, 38.3, 32.7, 34.1 g, respectively). The E and R yolk weights were similar (16.2 g) and higher (P HLB (15.8 vs. 15.5 g). The HLB showed the highest (P HLB yolk had the lowest (P < 0.01) saturated fatty acids (33.8 vs. 34.9%), and R yolks showed the lowest (P < 0.01) monounsaturated fatty acids (36.3 vs. 38.0%) and the highest (P < 0.01) polyunsaturated fatty acids (28.7 vs. 27.4%) than the other groups. The HLW yolk showed the highest (P < 0.01) n-6/n-3 ratio (13.7) in comparison to the other 3 groups (12.8). During 21 d of storage (at 21°C and 62% RH), the E eggs showed the lowest (P < 0.01) quality (albumen height, 4.93 vs. 5.56 mm; Haugh units, 71 vs. 74). A sensory profile of boiled eggs showed differences (P < 0.05) in odor and flavor sensations and in certain yolk and albumen texture properties according to genotype. The quality of organic eggs from different genotypes differs in relation to the strain but also the interaction with the environmental conditions has to be considered.

  11. Laying performances and egg quality of local barred hens under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study was designated to evaluate the laying performances and egg traits in local barred hens. Sixteen (16) hens and 4 cocks were used, divided into 4 experimental units of 4 hens and 1 cock per unit. Methodology and Results: The following parameters were studied: feed intake (g/bird/day), egg production ...

  12. Hot Electron Nanoscopy and Spectroscopy (HENs)

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2017-08-17

    This chapter includes a brief description of different laser coupling methods with guided surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes at the surface of a cone. It shows some devices, their electromagnetic simulations, and their optical characterization. A theoretical section illustrates the optical and quantum description of the hot charge generation rate as obtained for the SPP propagation along the nanocone in adiabatic compression. The chapter also shows some experimental results concerning the application of the hot electron nanoscopy and spectroscopy (HENs) in the so-called Schottky configuration, highlighting the sensitivity and the nanoscale resolution of the technique. The comparison with Kelvin probe and other electric atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques points out the intrinsic advantages of the HENs. In the end, some further insights are given about the possibility of exploiting HENs with a pulsed laser at the femtosecond time scale without significant pulse broadening and dispersion.

  13. Effect of a plant preparation Citrosept on selected immunity indices in blood of slaughter turkey hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Rusinek-Prystupa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction and objective[/b]. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of per os administration of 3 various dosages of a Citrosept preparation (a grapefruit extractto growing turkey hens on changes in their selected haematological and immunological blood indices. An attempt was also undertaken to select the most efficient dose of the preparation with respect to the mentioned indices in turkey hens. [b]Materials and methods[/b]. The experiment was conducted on 180 turkey hens allocated at random to 4 groups, 45 birds in each group. Samples of their full blood were analyzed for haematological indices, such as red blood cell count (RBS, haemoglobin content (Hb, haematocrit value (Ht, and white blood cell count (WBC. Samples of blood plasma were assayed to determine the activity of lysozyme (chamber-diffusive method and heterophils capability to reduce nitro blue tetrazolium (stimulated and spontaneous NBT test. Phagocytic activity of leucocytes against Staphylococcus aureus 209P strain was assessed and expressed as the percentage of phagocytic cells (% PC and phagocytic index (PI. [b]Results[/b]. The administration of the grapefruit extract to turkey hens with drinking water caused a significant increase in haemoglobin content in blood, as well as an increase in non-specific humoral immunity marker (activity of lysozyme and non-specific cellular immunity marker (percentage of phagocytic cells; P ≤ 0.05. [b]Conclusions[/b]. The results obtained enabled the positive evaluation of the advisability of applying the Citrosept preparation in the feeding of turkey hens at the age of 6–9 weeks. Among the doses examined, the most efficient with respect to the stimulation of the non-specific humoral and cellular immunity was the dose of 0.021 ml/kg of body weight.

  14. The potential of blue lupins as a protein source, in the diets of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R.F. Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Layers diets typically contain 15–20% soya due to its high crude protein content (ca. 36%. Reliance on soya for protein can result in large increases in cost of feed due to the law of supply and demand as a global commodity. Lupin grains have high protein content (35–40% but previous experience with white lupins has shown toxic effects in poultry due to high levels alkaloids and poor performance due to anti-nutritional Non-starch polysaccharides (NSP. Here blue lupins either processed or whole were trialled for their potential as a protein source. Point of lay chickens (64 at 16 weeks of age were weighed and allocated to 16 coops of four hens. Coops, as the experimental unit, were randomly allocated to four treatments: layers mash with soya (Control; or layers mash with 150 g of lupin/kg diet with the lupin either: whole (Whole; dehulled (Dehulled or dehulled + a solid state fermentation enzyme extract (SSF; 150 g/tonne DM. All diets were ground and formulated to be balanced for energy, crude protein and essential amino acids using NIRS. No difference in growth rate, final hen weight, DM and water intake, eggs per day, mean egg weight, yellowness of yolk or chroma was found between treatments. There was a trend (P<0.1 for the SSF treatment to produce less heavy shells and a significant effect for the lupin treatments to have redder yolks (P<0.001. Fecal DM and bacterial counts were not different and there was no sign of enteritis or intestinal tissue hyperplasia from hen autopsies. Inclusion of blue lupins in the diet of laying hens at a rate of 150 g/kg DM resulted in no adverse effects in production or hen health and could be used as part of a balanced ration with inclusion of NSP degrading enzymes to reduce reliance on soya protein.

  15. Iron requirements of broiler breeder hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschetto, Diogo; Vieira, Sergio Luiz; Angel, Clara Roselina; Stefanello, Catarina; Kindlein, Liris; Ebbing, Marco Antonio; Simões, Cristina Tonial

    2017-09-01

    A study was conducted to investigate Fe requirements of broiler breeders. One-hundred-fifty-six Cobb 500 broiler breeder hens were individually placed in electrostatically painted cages at 22 weeks. The study was composed of an adaptation phase, in which hens were fed corn-soy-wheat bran diets until 35 wks. An Fe deficient mash diet (24.6 ppm Fe) was provided from 35 to 46 wk in order to induce a partial body Fe depletion. A production phase followed from 47 to 70 wk when hens were fed 6 diets with increasing Fe sulfate supplementation, which, upon analyses had 24.6, 48.6, 74.3, 99.6, 125.6, and 148.2 ppm Fe. Thirty hatching eggs from each treatment were randomly collected in the last wk of each production period and incubated. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were analyzed from 6 hens as well as all hatched chicks per treatment. Analyses of production and hatching data were conducted using quadratic polynomial (QP), broken-line (BL), and exponential asymptotic (EA) models. Effects of dietary Fe were observed for total eggs and total hatching eggs, egg yolk Fe content, and hen and chick hematocrit and hemoglobin (P < 0.05). These responses to added Fe were optimized when dietary Fe were 96.8, 97.1, 130.6, 122.6, 120.0, and 125.0 ppm (QP) and 76.4, 89.3, 135.0, 128.4, 133.8, and 95.0 ppm (BL) for total hatching eggs, egg yolk Fe content, and hen and chick hematocrit and hemoglobin, respectively. Optimization with the EA model was obtained for total hatching eggs, egg yolk Fe, and hen and chick hemoglobin at 97.9, 111.0, 77.9, and 96.3 ppm Fe for total hatching eggs, egg yolk Fe, and hen and chick hemoglobin, respectively. Adequate Fe levels are needed to maintain egg production as well as hatching chicks' indexes. Fe concentration in the yolk and diet are positively influenced. The average of all Fe requirement estimates obtained in the present study was 106 ppm total Fe, whereas averaged values for BL, QP, and EA models were 107, 113, and 97 ppm Fe, respectively. © 2017

  16. Positive Effect of Plant-Based Diet on the Performance and Health of Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Straková

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An entirely plant-based feed mixture was prepared to minimize the potential risk of transmitting prion infections through animal feed. It consisted of two protein components (soya extracted meal and lupin seed meal and was compared with a diet containing animal protein components (fish meal. The objective of the present work was to prepare and verify the effect of the entirely plant-based diet on the performance, selected qualitative indicators of eggs and the hens' state of health. A specially prepared feed mixture containing fish meal was used as a control diet. The tested plant-based diet administered to experimental hens produced no negative effect on egg production variables such as number of eggs per hen or laying performance. The weight of eggs laid by experimental hens was significantly higher (61.66 g, P ⪬ 0.01, as compared with the control group (60.03 g. The higher average weight of eggs in the experimental group increased the production of egg mass per layer by 540 g in 252-day experimental period. the beneficial effect of the plant-based diet was demonstrated particularly in the improved egg quality, manifesting itself in a highly significant improvement in yolk colour (P ⪬ 0.01 and a significant decrease (P ⪬ 0.05 in cholesterol level in egg yolk. Haematological examination did not indicate statistical differences between experimental and control layers in red blood cell indices such as RBC, haemoglobin, hematocrit, MCHC, MCH, and MCV, while white blood cell indices showed a highly significant increase (P ⪬ 0.01 in Le in experimental hens. Biochemical tests performed in blood plasma revealed significantly lower molar concentrations of glucose (P ⪬ 0.05 and highly significantly lower levels of total lipids, cholesterol, lipoproteins (HDL and LDL in experimental hens (P ⪬ 0.01, as compared with the control group. The results of the study confirm that animal protein in diet for laying hens can be

  17. Intranasal Immunization with Chitosan/pCAGGS-flaA Nanoparticles Inhibits Campylobacter jejuni in a White Leghorn Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-lin Huang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the most common zoonotic bacterium associated with human diarrhea, and chickens are considered to be one of the most important sources for human infection, with no effective prophylactic treatment available. We describe here a prophylactic strategy using chitosan-DNA intranasal immunization to induce specific immune responses. The chitosan used for intranasal administration is a natural mucus absorption enhancer, which results in transgenic DNA expression in chicken nasopharynx. Chickens immunized with chitosan-DNA nanoparticles, which carried a gene for the major structural protein FlaA, produced significantly increased levels of serum anti-Campylobacter jejuni IgG and intestinal mucosal antibody (IgA, compared to those treated with chitosan-DNA (pCAGGS. Chitosan-pCAGGS-flaA intranasal immunization induced reductions of bacterial expellation by 2-3 log10 and 2 log10 in large intestine and cecum of chickens, respectively, when administered with the isolated C. jejuni strain. This study demonstrated that intranasal delivery of chitosan-DNA vaccine successfully induced effective immune response and might be a promising vaccine candidate against C. jejuni infection.

  18. Temporal embryonic transcription of chicken fast skeletal myosin heavy chain isoforms in the single comb white leghorn

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, J.; St-Pierre, N.; Lilburn, M. S.; Wick, M.

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous factors that can significantly influence embryonic development in poultry and thus make simple days of incubation (chronological age) a less than perfect metric for studying embryonic physiology. The developmental fast skeletal muscle myosin (MyHC), the predominant protein in the Pectoralis major (PM), is temporally expressed as a cadre of highly specific developmental isoforms. In the study described herein, a novel molecular technology (NanoString) was used to characteriz...

  19. Predicting heterosis for egg production traits in crossbred offspring of individual White Leghorn sires using genome-wide SNP data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amuzu, Esinam; Bovenhuis, Henk; Koning, De Dirk Jan; Bijma, Piter

    2015-01-01

    Background: The development of a reliable method to predict heterosis would greatly improve the efficiency of commercial crossbreeding schemes. Extending heterosis prediction from the line level to the individual sire level would take advantage of variation between sires from the same pure line,

  20. Histological Study of the Caecal Tonsil in the Cecum of 4- 6 Months of Age White Leghorn Chicks

    OpenAIRE

    M Rezaian; Hamedi, S

    2007-01-01

    Cecum, the largest part of chickens large intestine, has an important role in liquid absorption and cellulose digestion. It acts as a defensive organ as well due to the presence of large masses of diffuse and nodular lymphatic tissue in lamina propria and sub mucosa. The cecal tonsil activity has been proved to be depended on the activity of bursa of fabricious and thymus. As the bursa of fabricious and the thymus are exposed to involution through these ages, finding the changes (if any) occu...

  1. Effects of chronic ochratoxin A and citrinin toxicosis on kidney function of single comb White Leghorn pullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glahn, R P; Shapiro, R S; Vena, V E; Wideman, R F; Huff, W E

    1989-09-01

    The objectives of the present study were to examine the effects of repeated or chronic ochratoxin A (OA) and citrinin exposure, and to determine if severe ochratoxicosis permanently alters renal function in pullets. The OA-treated birds were injected intramuscularly (breast muscle) with a 1 mg/mL solution of OA at a dose of .25 mg/kg BW or .5 mg/kg BW. Citrinin-treated birds were injected with a 6 mg/mL solution of citrinin at a dose of 6 mg/kg BW. Control birds received an equal volume injection of the citrinin and OA solvent, 100% ethanol, at a dose of 1 mL/kg BW. Kidney function was evaluated after 10 consecutive days of OA, citrinin, or ethanol injection, and 2 wk following the final injections. Venous blood gas measurements were taken after the seventh day of injection. The OA increased urine flow rate, decreased urine osmolality, increased ion excretion (Na, K, Ca, P), increased water consumption, increased manure moisture, and caused a relative alkalosis when measured immediately after 10 days of OA injection. These effects of OA were not detected 2 wk later. Citrinin increased manure moisture, decreased plasma P, increased the clearance of para-aminohippuric acid, and had no consistent effect on blood acid-base parameters. The results suggest that OA may cause an osmotic diuresis by inhibiting tubular reabsorption of electrolytes. The data also suggests that the effects of OA may be reversible simply by discontinuing toxin administration. Although the citrinin-induced increase in manure moisture indicates that citrinin had an effect on renal function, renal function analysis suggests that even repeated exposure to high doses of citrinin may only have a short duration of diuretic action on the kidneys.

  2. Apparent metabolizable energy value of whole date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) and its possible use as a feedstuff for aged laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salajegheh, Mohamad Hamed; Yousef Elahi, Mostafa; Salarmoini, Mohamad; Yaghobfar, Akbar

    2017-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the feeding value of whole date palm (WDP) with and without enzyme supplementation on aged laying hen's performance. Apparent metabolizable energy value of WDP was determined by the total collection method using ten adult leghorn cockerels. WDP was substituted with a corn-soybean meal basal diet at 40% level, and then the metabolizable energy of this experimental diet and basal diet was determined. After that, a total number of 256 Bovanz 95-week-old hens were randomly allocated into eight groups consisting of four replicates of eight birds each, based on a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement of the treatments. Eight iso-caloric and iso-nitrogenous experimental diets including one corn-soybean meal-based control diet and two, three, and four corn-soybean meal-based diets included 70, 140, and 210 g/kg ground WDP, respectively. Each of the diets supplemented with two levels of an enzyme (0.0 and 0.07 g/kg Natozim Plus). There was no significant difference in feed intake, feed conversion ratio, egg production, egg mass, eggshell thickness, and Haugh unit among the treatments (P > 0.05). However, yolk color score significantly decreased as dietary WDP level increased. The serum biochemical metabolites were not significantly affected by WDP and enzyme supplementation (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in the relative weight of different organs except for abdominal fat. Our findings show that using WDP up to 21% of the diet was more economic and had no adverse effect on productive performance and serum metabolites of laying hens. However, WDP had an adverse effect on yolk color which can be ameliorated by carotenoid supplementation.

  3. Purification and characterization of avian beta-defensin 11, an antimicrobial peptide of the hen egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé-Grépinet, Virginie; Réhault-Godbert, Sophie; Labas, Valérie; Magallon, Thierry; Derache, Chrystelle; Lavergne, Marion; Gautron, Joël; Lalmanach, Anne-Christine; Nys, Yves

    2010-10-01

    Natural antimicrobial peptides are present in different compartments (eggshell, egg white, and vitelline membranes) of the hen egg and are expected to be involved in the protection of the embryo during its development and to contribute to the production of pathogen-free eggs. In the present study, we used vitelline membranes from hen (Gallus gallus) eggs as a source of avian β-defensin 11 (AvBD11). A purification scheme using affinity chromatography and reverse-phase chromatography was developed. Purified AvBD11 was analyzed by a combination of mass spectrometry approaches to characterize its primary sequence and structure. A monoisotopic molecular species at [M + H](+) of 9,271.56 Da was obtained, and its N- and C-terminal sequences were determined. We also examined posttranslational modifications and identified the presence of 6 internal disulfide bonds. AvBD11 was found to exhibit antimicrobial activity toward both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  4. Hen's egg allergen in house and bed dust is significantly increased after hen's egg consumption-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trendelenburg, V; Tschirner, S; Niggemann, B; Beyer, K

    2017-09-02

    Environmental exposure to food allergens may be a risk factor for cutaneous sensitization. Previous studies could detect peanut allergen in house dust. In this pilot study, we wanted to investigate whether hen's egg allergen is detectable in house dust collected from different household areas and whether levels are increased after intentional hen's egg consumption. Hen's egg protein levels of dust samples were measured using ELISA. In 8 of 8 households, hen's egg was detectable in dust samples of eating area and bed. Forty-eight hours after intentional hen's egg consumption, hen's egg protein levels were significantly increased in both. Still, further research is necessary to investigate whether hen's egg allergen in house and bed dust plays a role in sensitization via skin. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  5. Dietary supplementation of organic selenium could improve performance, antibody response, and yolk oxidative stability in laying hens fed on diets containing oxidized fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laika, M; Jahanian, R

    2015-06-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation of organic selenium (Se) on performance, egg quality indices, and yolk oxidative stability in laying hens fed diets with different fat sources. A total of 270 Hy-line W-36 Leghorn hens of 47 weeks of age were randomly distributed into the 5 replicate cages of 9 dietary treatments. Experimental diets consisted of a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments with three different fat sources (soybean oil, SO; yellow grease, YG; and palm fat powder, PFP) and three different levels of supplemental Se (0, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/kg of diet) as supplied by zinc-L-selenomethionine (ZnSeMet) complex, which fed during a 77-day feeding trial including 7 days for adaptation and 70 days as the main recording period. Results showed that the highest (P supplemented diets. Hen-day egg production was affected by both dietary fat source (P supplementation of ZnSeMet improved (P supplementation with 0.4 mg/kg Se was more effective in diets supplemented with YG. Although feed intake was not affected by experimental diets during the first 35-day period, dietary inclusion of PFP reduced feed intake during both second 35-day (P supplementation of ZnSeMet improved (P Supplementation of ZnSeMet into the diets increased yolk index, with more impact in hens fed on YG-diets. The highest concentration of yolk malondialdehyde was observed in YG-fed groups, and ZnSeMet supplementation of diets decreased (P supplemented by YG, followed by those on SO-diets. Although different fat sources had no effect on antibody titer against Newcastle disease virus, supplemental ZnSeMet improved (P supplementation of ZnSeMet could improve performance parameters and egg oxidative stability in laying hens, with the highest impact in diets containing oxidized (high peroxide values) fat sources.

  6. Shrimp cephalothorax meal in laying hen diets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Salas-Durán

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to meassure the effect of shrimp meal (SM in commercial laying hen diets. From April to September 2013, in Costa Rica, Pleuroncodes planipes was used to obtain a meal (SM with a yield of 15%, particle size of 256 μg and negative for Salmonella sp. Proximate analysis was performed to the SM: crude protein (40.67%, ether extract (11.05%, crude fiber (7.12%, ash (27.48%, calcium (9.03%, phosphorus (2.66%, amino acid profile, pepsin digestibility (84% and acidity (8.34. Subsequently, a trial was performed with 140 40-week-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens, fed with four different diets containing increasing levels of inclusion of SM (0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% during four weeks; and formulated according to the ideal protein and digestible amino acids concepts; being isocaloric and isoproteic. The variables experimentally evaluated were: production percentage, feed intake, body weight, mortality, egg weight and feed conversion ratio. Only egg weight changed significantly between treatments in the third week (p<0.05. The hens fed with 5% SM laid heavier eggs. It is suggested to evaluate a level of SM inclusion up to 15% in laying hens diets.

  7. Paul Henning Krogh on Soil Ecotoxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Paul Henning

    2008-01-01

    In a recent analysis of data from Essential Science Indicators SM from Thomson Reuters , Dr. Paul Henning Krogh was named a Rising Star in the field of Environment & Ecology. His current record in this field includes 48 papers cited a total of 410 times. Dr. Krogh is a Senior Scientist in the Dep...

  8. Phytate phosphorus utilization and intestinal phytase activity in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaeldein M. Abudabos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The first aim of this study was to examine the effects of strain and age on phytate phosphorus (PP utilization and intestinal phytase activity (IPA in two strains of laying hens, Hy-line Brown (HB and Hy-line White W-36 (HW at 32, 52 and 72 weeks of age. A digestion trial was conducted using the indicator method and birds were sampled to measure IPA. The second aim was to examine the effect of feed grade exogenous phytase enzyme on total (TP, water soluble (WSP and phytate phosphorus (PP excretion in the HW strain fed varying levels of phosphorus. Hens were fed three concentrations of available P (AP: 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4%. Each level of P was supplemented with three levels of commercial feed grade exogenous phytase enzyme (0, 300, and 600 FTU/kg and the amount of TP, WSP and PP in excreta per 100 g of feed consumed was calculated. The HB retained more PP as compared to HW. Intestinal phytase activity showed a significant (P<0.01 age effect with the highest activity occurring at 32 weeks. There were significant differences in the amount of TP and SP excreted between birds receiving the 3 levels of phosphorus with 300 units phytase (P<0.01. The results of this study showed that layers are capable of utilizing PP, and that utilization is regulated by IPA and varies with age. Exogenous phytase improved PP utilization but it increased the amount of TP and WSP in excreta.

  9. Effect of Fluorescent vs. Poultry-Specific Light-Emitting Diode Lights on Production Performance and Egg Quality of W-36 Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Xin, Hongwei; Sekhon, Jasreen; Wang, Tong

    2017-12-20

    More energy-efficient, durable, affordable, and dimmable light-emitting diode (LED) lights are finding applications in poultry production. However, data are lacking on controlled comparative studies concerning the impact of such lights during the pullet rearing and subsequent laying phase. This study evaluated two types of poultry-specific LED light (PS-LED) vs. fluorescent light (FL) with regards to their effects on hen laying performance. A total of 432 Hy-Line W-36 laying hens were tested in two batches using four environmental chambers (nine cages per chamber and 6 birds per cage) from 17 to 41 weeks of age (WOA). Dim-to-red PS-LED and warm-white FL were used in the laying phase. The hens had been reared under a dim-to-blue PS-LED or a warm-white FL from 1 to 16 WOA. The measured performance variables included 1) timing of sexual maturity, 2) egg production performance, 3) egg quality, and 4) egg yolk cholesterol. Results showed that the two types of light used during the laying phase had comparable performance responses for all response parameters (P > 0.05) with a few exceptions. Specifically, eggs laid from hens in the PS-LED treatment had lower shell thickness (P = 0.01) and strength (P = 0.03) than those in the FL treatment at 41 WOA. The two types of light used during the rearing phase did not influence the 17 to 41 WOA laying performance, except that hens reared under the PS-LED laid eggs with lower shell thickness (P = 0.02) at 32 WOA as compared to hens reared under the FL. This study demonstrates that the emerging poultry-specific LED lights yield comparable production performance and egg quality of W-36 laying hens to the traditional fluorescent lights. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. Perch use by laying hens in a commercial aviary1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D. L. M.; Makagon, M. M.; Swanson, J. C.; Siegford, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-cage housing systems, such as the aviary, are being implemented by the laying hen industry, including in North America, in an attempt to improve the welfare of hens. Perches are a resource that is consistently included in aviaries. Hens are strongly motivated to perch, and perching can improve leg bone strength. However, hens may prefer elevated perches, particularly at night, and thus simply providing perches is not enough to improve welfare; they must be provided in a way that allows all hens to access them. Observations of laying hens using perches and ledges (flat, solid metal shelves to assist hens’ movement between tiers) in a commercial aviary revealed variation in where hens roosted within the tiered aviary enclosure across the flock cycle (peak, mid and end of lay; P < 0.001 for all age points). Hens most often preferred roosting in the highest enclosure levels, leading to crowding on upper perches and ledges while perch space remained available on lower levels. Restricted access to preferable perches may cause frustration in hens, leading to welfare issues. Hens roosted more on perches at peak lay than mid and end lay (P < 0.001) but roosted less on ledges at peak lay than mid and end lay (P < 0.001). Additionally, more hens roosted on both perches and ledges in the ‘dark’ observation period compared with the number of hens roosting during the ‘light’ observation period (P < 0.001). Further research should look at all structural elements within the system that are used by hens for roosting, such as edges of tiers and upper wire floors, to evaluate how changes in perching preferences across the lay cycle may correlate with system design and bird-based parameters. PMID:26994206

  11. Early Life in a Barren Environment Adversely Affects Spatial Cognition in Laying Hens (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Nordgreen, Janicke; Nordquist, Rebecca E.; Janczak, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial cognition in vertebrates is adversely affected by a lack of environmental complexity during early life. However, to our knowledge, no previous studies have tested the effect of early exposure to varying degrees of environmental complexity on specific components of spatial cognition in chickens. There are two main rearing systems for laying hens in the EU: aviaries and cages. These two systems differ from one another in environmental complexity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that rearing in a barren cage environment relative to a complex aviary environment causes long-lasting deficits in the ability to perform spatial tasks. For this purpose, 24 white Dekalb laying hens, half of which had been reared in an aviary system and the other half in a conventional cage system, were tested in a holeboard task. Birds from both treatment groups learnt the task; however, the cage-reared hens required more time to locate rewards and had poorer levels of working memory. The latter finding supports the hypothesis that rearing in a barren environment causes long-term impairment of short-term memory in chickens. PMID:26664932

  12. Early life in a barren environment adversely affects spatial cognition in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Machado Tahamtani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial cognition in vertebrates is adversely affected by a lack of environmental complexity during early life. However, to our knowledge no previous studies have tested the effect of early exposure to varying degrees of environmental complexity on specific components of spatial cognition in chickens. There are two main rearing systems for laying hens in the EU: aviaries and cages. These two systems differ from one another in environmental complexity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that rearing in a barren cage environment relative to a complex aviary environment causes long-lasting deficits in the ability to perform spatial tasks. For this purpose, 24 white Dekalb laying hens, half of which had been reared in an aviary system and the other half in a conventional cage system, were tested in a holeboard task. Birds from both treatment groups learnt the task, however the cage-reared hens required more time to locate rewards and had poorer levels of working memory. The latter finding supports the hypothesis that rearing in a barren environment causes long-term impairment of short-term memory in chickens.

  13. Carbohydrase and phytase supplementation in diets for semi-heavy laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Geraldo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to evaluate the association of phytase with an enzymatic complex comprised of carbohydrases (α-galactosidase, galactomannan, xylanase and β-glucanase in nutrition reduction diets for semi-heavy laying hens and its effect on egg performance and egg quality. Four hundred Isa Brown laying hens with 42 to 57 weeks of age were distributed in an entirely random experiment with five treatments and 8 repetitions, during five production periods of 21 days. Variables studied: egg production, feed intake, mean egg weight, feed conversion, Haugh unit, percentage of yolk, egg white and albumen, yolk color, eggshell thickness and specific gravity. There was a significant interaction (p 0.05 of treatment on production, egg weight or internal and external egg quality. Treatment effects on feed conversion showed better values for hens fed with the control diet. The levels of nutrient reduction used in the diets with or without enzyme supplementation did not provide good results with regard to feed conversion and feed intake. However, they did not affect the other parameters for egg production and internal and external egg quality.

  14. Limestone particle size and artificial light for laying hens in the second laying cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandro Nunes de Oliveira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of limestone particle size and the use of artificial light for laying hens in the second laying cycle. We used 240 Hisex White laying hens at 82 weeks of age in a completely randomized design in a 5 × 2 factorial arrangement, resulting in 10 treatments with 4 replicates of 6 birds. The variables were the five particle sizes obtained by increasing the proportion of thick limestone (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% compared with thin limestone and two lighting programs: with and without artificial light. Limestone particle size and light did not affect performance or egg quality. However, there were changes in bird feeding schedule throughout the day as a response to the lighting program. Bone quality, density and mineral content of the tibia were not affected by the treatments, but limestone particle size had a quadratic effect of on bone deformity and strength, obtaining maximum inclusion points with 63% and 59% of thick limestone, respectively. The use of large particles of limestone in the diet and the use of a lighting program does not influence the performance and quality of the eggs of laying hens in the second production cycle, but the use of a proportion of 63.3 g of average particle size (0.60 mm replacing the fine limestone (0.23 mm per 100 g of total limestone added to the diet improves bone quality in these birds.

  15. Limestone particle sizes and lighting regimens on egg and bone quality of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Patrícia de Souza Xavier

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of limestone particle sizes in the diet and of lighting regimes on the egg and bone quality and on the performance of commercial laying hens. Three hundred Hissex White layers, at 18 weeks of age, were distributed in a completely randomized design, in a 5×2 factorial arrangement (coarse limestone in the diet at 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%; with or without artificial light, with five replicates of six birds. No significant interaction was observed between particle sizes and lighting regime for the evaluated parameters. There was no significant effect of coarse limestone level in the diet on the performance and egg quality of hens; however, bone deformity (3.23 to 4.01 mm, strength (5.19 to 6.70 kgf cm-2, and mineral matter (51.09 to 59.61% improved as the proportion of coarse limestone increased. For lighting regime, the treatment with artificial light yielded higher Haugh unit values (87.17 vs. 85.54 than that with natural light only. Greater limestone particles improve bone quality of laying hens, and the use of artificial light can benefit the albumen quality of the eggs.

  16. Monochromatic light-emitting diode (LED source in layers hens during the second production cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Borille

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTLight is an important environmental factor for birds, allowing not only their vision, but also influencing their physiological responses, such as behavioral and reproductive activity. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the impact of different colors of monochromatic light (LED sources in laying hens production during the second laying cycle. The study was conducted in an experimental laying house during 70 days. A total of 300 laying hens Isa Brown® genetic strain, aged 95 weeks, in the second laying cycle were used in the study. The artificial light sources used were blue, yellow, green, red and white. The light regimen was continuous illumination of 17 h per day (12 h natural and 5 h artificial in a daily light regimen of 17L:5D (light: dark. The Latin Square design was adopted with five treatments (five colors divided into five periods, and five boxes, with six replicates of ten birds in each box. The production and egg quality were evaluated. The different colors of light source did not affect production parameters or egg quality (p > 0.05. The monochromatic light source may be considered as an alternative to artificial lighting in laying hens during the second production cycle.

  17. Fish by-product meal in diets for commercial laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Ferreira Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the increasing levels (0, 1, 2, 3 e 4% of fish by-product meal in diets for laying hens on performance, egg quality and economic analysis. A total of 160 Dekalb White hens with 52-wk old were distributed in a completely randomized design with five treatments and four replicates of eight birds each. The experiment lasted 84 days divided into four periods of 21 days. Estimates of fish by-product meal levels were determined by polynomial regression. Differences (p < 0.05 were detected for all variables of performance, in egg weight, yolk and albumen percentage, yolk and albumen height, feed cost and production cost, in which the inclusion of fish by-product meal in the diets showed better results. It can be concluded that fish by-product meal can be used in diets for hens as alternative feed, with better results in egg production, feed conversion, egg weight, yolk-albumen ratio and a reduction in feed cost and production cost.

  18. Influence of Ascaridia galli infections and anthelmintic treatments on the behaviour and social ranks of laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauly, M; Duss, C; Erhardt, G

    2007-05-31

    In the present study, the effects of an experimental Ascaridia galli infection and anthelmintic treatment on the behaviour and social status of laying hens of two different lines were studied. Sixty white (Lohmann LSL; LSL) and 60 brown (Lohmann Brown; LB) hens were reared under helminth-free conditions. The hens of each line were divided into four groups. The birds in two of the groups were artificially infected with 250 embryonated A. galli eggs at an age of 27 weeks. The other two groups were kept as uninfected controls. One infection and control group was dewormed at 38 weeks of age and slaughtered 4 weeks later, contemporary with the other animals. Individual faecal Ascaridia egg counts (FEC) were performed 11 weeks post-infection (p.i.). Body weights, laying performance and egg weights were recorded regularly. Blood was taken to measure testosterone levels. The worm burdens established in the intestines were counted in the infected not treated group after slaughtering. In addition, 15 behavioural parameters were recorded by focal animal observation (n=10 per group) of one infection (plus anthelmintic treatment) and one control group, according to the time-sampling method throughout the experiment. All agonistic interactions within the groups were recorded simultaneously on an ongoing basis, thereby allowing the calculation of an individual social rank index. The following results were obtained: Mean FEC and worm burden were higher (p hens than in the LB hens, but their performances were not different (p > 0.05) from the controls. Infections with A. galli resulted in significant behavioural changes in both lines as the infected birds showed a higher food intake and lower locomotion activity during the prepatent and patent periods. After anthelmintic treatment, food intake decreased and locomotion increased. Behavioural changes were more pervasive in the infected LSL hens, as these hens also showed changes in ground pecking and nesting activity not only during

  19. Is there peripheral or ovarian insulin action alteration in broiler breeder hens fed ad libitum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métayer, S; Tesseraud, S; Cassy, S; Taouis, M; Williams, J; Picard, M; Rideau, N

    2006-06-01

    We investigated whether a change in peripheral glucose homeostasis, a local change in the insulin-related ovarian regulatory system, or both occurred in ad libitum-fed broiler breeder hens compared with feed-restricted counterparts. Feed-restricted (R, from 5 to 16 wk of age) and ad libitum-fed (A) hens from a standard commercial line (S) and an experimental dwarf genotype (E) were studied. Basal and stimulated plasma insulin and glucose concentrations were measured during the prebreeding and laying periods. In the basal state (after 16 h fasting) plasma glucose concentrations were significantly lower in SA chickens (-5% at 17 wk, -7.5% at 32 wk) compared with EA, SR, and ER chickens, with no difference in plasma insulin concentrations (n = 16). In 17-wk-old SA birds, 30 min after oral glucose loading, plasma glucose concentrations increased significantly compared with the basal state and were also significantly lower as compared with SR but did not differ significantly from EA and ER. Plasma insulin concentrations did not differ significantly between genotypes or regimens (n = 16). A potential modification of intracellular mediators involved in the regulation of cell growth and survival in small follicles that were overrecruited in SA compared with SR was also investigated in SA and SR hens at 32 wk. There was no effect of food restriction in phospho-Akt, Akt, phospho-ERK, and phospho-S6 in the small white ovarian follicles (n = 6) in the basal state and after 30 min of refeeding. In conclusion, the present study does not demonstrate any evidence of glucose intolerance during the prebreeding period, specific change in the ovarian small follicle insulin signalling pathway, or both, in laying broiler breeders fed ad libitum compared with feed-restricted hens.

  20. Chlorinated drinking water for lightweight laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Schneider

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The study aimed to evaluate the effect of different levels of chlorine in drinking water of laying hens on zootechnical performance, eggs shell quality, hemogasometry levels and calcium content in tibia. 144 Hy-Line laying hens, 61 weeks old, were used distributed in 24 metabolism cages. They were subjected to water diets, for a period of 28 days, using sodium hypochlorite as a chlorine source in order to obtain the following concentrations: 5ppm (control, 20ppm, 50ppm, and 100ppm. Their performance was evaluated through water consumption, feed intake, egg production and weight, egg mass, feed conversion. Shell quality was measured by specific gravity. At the end of the experiment, arterial blood was collected for blood gas level assessment and a poultry of each replicate was sacrificed to obtain tibia and calcium content measurement. There was a water consumption reduction from 20ppm of chlorine and feed intake reduction in poultry receiving water with 100ppm of chlorine. The regression analysis showed that the higher the level of chlorine in water, the higher the reduction in consumption. There were no differences in egg production and weight, egg mass, feed conversion, specific gravity, tibia calcium content, and hemogasometry levels (hydrogenionic potential, carbon dioxide partial pressure, oxygen partial pressure, sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, carbon dioxide total concentration, anion gap and oxygen saturation. The use of levels above 5ppm of chlorine is not recommended in the water of lightweight laying hens.

  1. Egg white coagulum: a precisely tailorable membrane for biomimetic multilevel structured nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolei; Zhu, Hui; Liu, Xuexia; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2013-01-01

    For the first time, hen egg white coagulum was utilized as a surface modification agent for biomimetic multilevel structured nanomaterials (BMSN). By using a straightforward thermal control process, hen egg white can be coagulated in a precisely tailored manner, which is specifically adapted to the morphology of BMSN. Consequently, the structural stability, hydrophobicity and biocompatibility of BMSN can be improved significantly and simultaneously within one hour. Meanwhile, their initial structure-related function can be maintained with higher reliability. These advantages offer an incentive to use egg white coagulum as a facile, precise, quick and much cost-effective alternative to the conventional stabilization materials, such as hot melt adhesive, chitosan and polydopamine.

  2. Genetic analysis of production, immunity and behaviour in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biscarini, F.

    2010-01-01

    The new regulations about the husbandry of laying hens and the so-called genomic revolution offer both opportunities and challenges for the breeding of layers. Hens are currently housed mainly in battery cages of 4 individuals each. Following recent developments of the communitarian legislation,

  3. Selected pharmacokinetic parameters for cefovecin in hens and green iguanas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Line Risager; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Brimer, Leon

    2009-01-01

    hens and green iguanas, following subcutaneous injections with 10 mg cefovecin / kg bodyweight. Preliminary studies in eight additional species of birds and reptiles were performed and results were compared with the parameters found in hens and green iguanas. The kinetics were characterized by rapid...... absorption with peak plasma concentration of 6 ± 2 lg / mL in hens and 35 ± 12 lg / mL in green iguanas. The mean plasma half-life for cefovecin was 0.9 ± 0.3 h for hens and 3.9 h in green iguanas. Volume of distribution was 1.6 ± 0.5 L / kg for hens and 0.3 L / kg for green iguanas and clearance was 1252...... ± 185 mLÆh/ kg for hens and 53 mLÆh/ kg for green iguanas. Results from preliminary studies did not differ notably from those seen in hens and green iguanas. Cefovecin is not suitable for the treatment of bacterial infections with a 14-day dosing interval in hens or green iguanas and seems...

  4. Nutrient digestibility and egg production of laying hens fed graded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increase in the quantity of biodegraded PKM resulted in significant differences in the values determined for feed intake, hen-day production, and average egg weight; but for egg length, yolk index, egg/yolk ratio and egg shell thickness, there was no significant difference. Despite the significantly lower hen-day production of ...

  5. La calcárea phosphórica en el mejoramiento de la calidad de la cáscara del huevo en gallinas ponedoras (Phosphoric calcarea on the impruvement of egg shell thickness quality in eggs laying hens)

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, C., Osmaida; Larrent, N., Marroquin, T. Angelita; Cos, D. Yusell, Bárzaga, G.; Osmaida .; Larrent, N.; Marroquin, T.; Angelita; Cos, D.; Yusell; Bárzaga, G.

    2008-01-01

    ResumenEl presente trabajo se realizó en una granja de ponedora comercial raza White Leghorn (L33) en baterías. Con el objetivo de evaluar la utilización de la Calcárea phosphórica como estimulante para mejorar la calidad de la cáscara del huevo, se escogieron al azar un total de 50 jaulas con 4 gallinas por jaula, por un total de 200 animales; se establecieron dos grupos de estudio de 100 aves cada uno, control y experimental al que se le suministró: Calcárea phosphorica 12CH en soluc...

  6. Performance of Commercial Laying Hen Submitted to Different Debeaking Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CH Oka

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Among the several factors required in breeding laying hens, debeaking is a factor that interferes with batch performance and affects animal welfare. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate three different debeaking procedures and to verify the best technique to be used. For this, the performance of the birds, the incidence of cannibalism, and in rearing phase, the quality of the eggs were evaluated. Dekalb White birds were distributed in a completely randomized design with three treatments, T1 (infrared radiation debeaking T2 (hot blade debeaking and T3 (V debeaking.The data was submitted to Analysis of Variance and compared by Tukey’s test (95%, using statistical software R. The frequencies of mortality and cannibalism were submitted to the Chi-Square test (Software R. It was observed that mortality was lower with IR debeaking in the breeding phase. Already in the rearing phase, the mortality was similar between the debeaking techniques and the cannibalism was null. The final mean weight (g, mean weight gain (g and average daily weight gain in the rearing and egg quality variables were higher for V debeaking when compared to other techniques. It is concluded that V-debeaking provides better bird performance, resistance and shell thickness when compared to the infrared radiations and hot blade debeaking, in addition to subjecting the birds to less stress.

  7. Multiple feather follicle cysts in a Moroseta hen (Gallus gallus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutinelli, Franco; Corro', Michela; Catania, Salvatore; Melchiotti, Erica

    2008-06-01

    An 8-month-old white feathered, black skinned Moroseta hen was presented for examination because of numerous 2 mm- to 30 mm-diameter irregularly shaped, hard nodules in the skin of the head, wings, back, and abdomen. The nodules were confined to the skin and did not involve subcutaneous tissues. Nodules consisted of dilated feather follicles packed with a caseous tan-to-pale-yellow material admixed with feather remnants. Histologically, affected feather follicles were markedly dilated and filled with laminated keratin debris. Necrosis of the epidermis and perifollicular lymphocyte infiltration was also present. Bacteriologic investigation of internal organs was negative, while secondary bacteria, Proteus spp. and Bacillus spp., were isolated from skin nodules. A concomitant lice infestation of Menopon spp., as well as leg mange caused by Cnemidocoptes spp., were also present. These bacterial isolates and parasites were not related to the disease condition. The condition observed was differentiated from benign feather follicle tumors, and a diagnosis of multiple feather follicle cysts was made. In addition, a breed predisposition was hypothesized.

  8. Nest sharing under semi-natural conditions in laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Anja Brinch

    2012-01-01

    Under natural conditions, the feral hen (Gallus gallus domesticus) will choose a nest location away from the flock, whereas under commercial conditions, the domestic hen will often choose the same nest as other hens have used or are still using. Simultaneous nest sharing causes several welfare...... daily of each nest with regard to number of eggs, position, and materials used. On five mornings nesting behaviour was observed. Nest sharing occurred on all but the first 5 days of egg-laying. The majority of hens (n = 14) chose to visit an occupied nest at least once, but no hens exclusively used...... occupied nests. Visits in shared nests lasted longer than visits in undisturbed nests (13 min 50 s (±4 min and 57 s) vs 30 min 44 s (±4 min and 55 s); P used. All shared nests (n = 5) were placed up against the borders, whereas the majority of non-shared nests (n = 7 out of 10...

  9. Soft perches in an aviary system reduce incidence of keel bone damage in laying hens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Stratmann

    Full Text Available Keel bone fractures and deviations are one of the major welfare and health issues in commercial laying hens. In non-cage housing systems like aviaries, falls and collisions with perches and other parts of the housing system are assumed to be one of the main causes for the high incidence of keel bone damage. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of a soft perch material to reduce keel bone fractures and deviations in white (Dekalb White and brown laying hens (ISA Brown kept in an aviary system under commercial conditions. In half of 20 pens, all hard, metal perches were covered with a soft polyurethane material. Palpation of 20 hens per pen was conducted at 18, 21, 23, 30, 38, 44 and 64 weeks of age. Production data including egg laying rate, floor eggs, mortality and feed consumption were collected over the whole laying period. Feather condition and body mass was assessed twice per laying period. The results revealed that pens with soft perches had a reduced number of keel bone fractures and deviations. Also, an interaction between hybrid and age indicated that the ISA hybrid had more fractured keel bones and fewer non-damaged keel bones compared with the DW hybrid at 18 weeks of age, a response that was reversed at the end of the experiment. This is the first study providing evidence for the effectiveness of a soft perch material within a commercial setting. Due to its compressible material soft perches are likely to absorb kinetic energy occurring during collisions and increase the spread of pressure on the keel bone during perching, providing a mechanism to reduce keel bone fractures and deviations, respectively. In combination with genetic selection for more resilient bones and new housing design, perch material is a promising tool to reduce keel bone damage in commercial systems.

  10. Response of laying hens to methionine + cystine intake by dilution technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Cristina Palma Bendezu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to measure the response of Dekalb White laying hens to different intakes of digestible methionine + cystine (met+cys to optimise their performance. Two hundred eighty-eight Dekalb White laying hens, ranging in age from 33 to 48 weeks, were used in the study. The birds were randomly allocated into eight treatment (levels of met+cys and the control treatment groups with six replicates of six hens per unit. The experimental diets consisted of seven increasing levels of met+cys (1.37, 2.75, 4.14, 5.51, 6.89, 7.92 and 8.95 g kg−1 and were prepared using a dilution technique. A control treatment was used to confirm that the limiting response was due to met+cys intake. Egg production, feed intake, egg weight, egg mass and feed conversion per mass were measured. The data were analysed with repeated measures and regression analyses using Broken Line and Quadratic models, as well as using the combination of both models. The different met+cys intakes influenced the studied variables; all the variables except feed conversion per mass were significantly different between the periods and levels. The digestible met+cys intakes based on the association of the Broken Line and Quadratic models to optimise the birds' response to egg mass are 671 mg/bird d for 33 to 36 weeks, 728 mg/bird d for 37 to 40 weeks, 743 mg/bird d for 41 to 44 weeks, and 770 mg/bird d for 45 to 48 weeks.

  11. Dietary levels of chia: influence on yolk cholesterol, lipid content and fatty acid composition for two strains of hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerza, R; Coates, W

    2000-05-01

    Four hundred fifty H&N laying hens, half white and half brown, were fed for 90 d to compare a control diet to diets containing 7, 14, 21, and 28% chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed. Cholesterol content, total fat content, and fatty acid composition of the yolks were determined 30, 43, 58, 72, and 90 d from the start of the trial. Significantly less cholesterol was found in the egg yolks produced by the hens fed the diets with 14, 21, and 28% chia compared with the control, except at Day 90. Palmitic fatty acid content and total saturated fatty acid content decreased as chia percentage increased and as the trial progressed. Total omega-3 fatty acid content was significantly greater (P chia diets compared with the control diet. Total polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content of the yolks from the chia diets was significantly greater (P < 0.05) than from the control diet. Generally, total PUFA content tended to be highest in the yolks of the white hens.

  12. Burimuah et al., Afr. J. Infect. Dis. (2016) 10(2): 134 – 145 DOI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF ADEWUNMI

    migratory birds in. Argentina. Virology 396, 76-84. 3. Beck JR, Swayne DE, Davison S, Casavant S, Gutierrez C.(2003). Validation of egg yolk antibody testing as a method to determine influenza status in white leghorn hens. Avian Dis 2003; 47: Suppl: ...

  13. effect of crude protein levels and follicle stimulation on egg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioline

    Sinzato, D., and Costa, F. A. (1971). A comparison between forced and natural moult in White Leghorn hens caged at two different densities. Pesquisa Agropecuaria. Brasileira, Veterinaria. 6: (4) 33-36. Odunsi, A. A., Farinu, G. O. and Togun, V. A.. (2002). Diet manipulation and post- moulting responses in caged commercial.

  14. Interactions of genotype, housing and dietary calcium in layer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uzivatel

    2016-08-31

    Aug 31, 2016 ... Castillo, C., Cuca, M., Pro, A., González, M. & Morales, E., 2004. Biological and economic optimum level of calcium in white leghorn laying hens. Poult. Sci. 83, 868-872. Cheng, T.K. & Coon, C.N., 1990. Effect of calcium source, particle size, limestone solubility in vitro and calcium intake level on layer bone ...

  15. Effect of Herbal Mycotoxin Binders in Amelioration of Induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacy of herbal mycotoxin binders in ameliorating induced mycotoxicosis was evaluated in white leghorn laying hens. Birds were randomly divided into six groups containing 15 birds in each group. Group I was served as control fed with basal diet, group II birds were fed with aflatoxins and ochratoxin A at 100 ppb each.

  16. The Dominant white, Dun and Smoky Color Variants in Chicken Are Associated With Insertion/Deletion Polymorphisms in the PMEL17 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerje, Susanne; Sharma, Preety; Gunnarsson, Ulrika; Kim, Hyun; Bagchi, Sonchita; Fredriksson, Robert; Schütz, Karin; Jensen, Per; von Heijne, Gunnar; Okimoto, Ron; Andersson, Leif

    2004-01-01

    Dominant white, Dun, and Smoky are alleles at the Dominant white locus, which is one of the major loci affecting plumage color in the domestic chicken. Both Dominant white and Dun inhibit the expression of black eumelanin. Smoky arose in a White Leghorn homozygous for Dominant white and partially restores pigmentation. PMEL17 encodes a melanocyte-specific protein and was identified as a positional candidate gene due to its role in the development of eumelanosomes. Linkage analysis of PMEL17 and Dominant white using a red jungle fowl/White Leghorn intercross revealed no recombination between these loci. Sequence analysis showed that the Dominant white allele was exclusively associated with a 9-bp insertion in exon 10, leading to an insertion of three amino acids in the PMEL17 transmembrane region. Similarly, a deletion of five amino acids in the transmembrane region occurs in the protein encoded by Dun. The Smoky allele shared the 9-bp insertion in exon 10 with Dominant white, as expected from its origin, but also had a deletion of 12 nucleotides in exon 6, eliminating four amino acids from the mature protein. These mutations are, together with the recessive silver mutation in the mouse, the only PMEL17 mutations with phenotypic effects that have been described so far in any species. PMID:15579702

  17. Infection of commercial laying hens with Salmonella Gallinarum: clinical, anatomopathological and haematological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OC Freitas Neto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the susceptibility of commercial laying hens to Salmonella Gallinarum (SG. Two experiments were carried using a mutant strain of Salmonella Gallinarum resistant to nalidix acid (SGNALr. In the first trial, the resistance of birds was evaluated based on clinical signs, faecal shedding, and mortality. It was carried out with six lines of commercial layers being three light white layers, considered to be resistant to SG (W1, W2, W3, and three semi-heavy brown varieties (B1, B2, B3, considered susceptible to SG. Each group contained 15 one-day-old birds. Hens were inoculated in the crop at 5 days of age with 0.2 mL of SGNALr neat culture. In addition, to each brown variety, a new group of 15 birds was challenged with 0.2mL of the same SGNALr culture diluted at 10-3. At the end of the first experiment, the surviving birds were sacrificed, and microbiological culture of liver and spleen was performed. In the second experiment, white and brown birds were inoculated with neat culture at five days of age. Samples were collected for evaluation of blood parameters and histopathology assessment at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, and 14 days post-infection. The results of the first experiment showed higher resistance of white birds (p<0.05, although there was no uniformity in the responses against fowl typhoid among the birds within these groups. In the second experiment, there were differences between white and brown birds both in blood parameters and in organ lesion intensity.

  18. Air quality measurements in laying hens housing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Prodanov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring good environmental conditions of the poultry houses can be costly for the farmers, but without it losses due to poor bird health and performance due to poor air quality can be much more detrimental to net returns. The goal of this study was to investigate the variations in air quality in various areas inside the laying hen houses. Ten houses with laying hen conventional battery cages were measured for O2, H2S, CO, NH3, temperature, relative humidity, CO2, airflow and luminance. The results of the physical measures showed that temperatures in the houses were between 15.31–25.6°C, the relative humidity 48.03-81.12%, while the luminance rarely exceeded 8 lux. As for the gasses, the values for NH3 rarely exceeded 8 ppm, although at some measuring points it reached 26 ppm. O2 was generally at 20.9 %, and the levels of CO2 were very low. No presence of H2S and CO was detected. In this study it was concluded that the measurement of the air quality in a house can vary depending of the places this measures are taken. Multiple measurement points are important because they may make the staff aware of the problems connected to low ventilation and culmination of harmful gases. The air quality in different positions in the houses is of great importance not only for the animal welfare, but also for the safety of the staff.

  19. Development of furnished cages for laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, M C; Walker, A W; Nicol, C J; Lindberg, A C; Freire, R; Hughes, B O; Elson, H A

    2002-09-01

    1. A 3-year trial was carried out of cages for laying hens, occupying a full laying house. The main cage designs used were 5000 cm2 in area, 50 cm high at the rear and furnished with nests and perches. F cages had a front rollaway nest at the side, lined with artificial turf. FD cages also had a dust bath containing sand over the nest. H cages had two nest hollows at the side, one in front of the other. They were compared with conventional cages 2500 cm2 in area and 38 cm high at the rear. 2. Cages were stocked with from 4 to 8 ISA Brown hens per cage, resulting in varied allowances of area, feeder and perch per bird. No birds were beak trimmed. In F and FD cages two further treatments were applied: nests and dust baths were sometimes fitted with gates to exclude birds from dust baths in the morning and from both at night; elevated food troughs, with a lip 33 cm above the cage floor, were compared with standard troughs. 3. Management of the house was generally highly successful, with temperature control achieved by ventilation. Egg production was above breeders' standards and not significantly affected by cage design. More eggs per bird were collected when there were fewer birds per cage but food consumption also then tended to be higher. 4. The number of downgraded eggs was variable, with some tendency for more in furnished cages. Eggs laid in dust baths were often downgraded. Those laid at the back of the cage were frequently dirty because of accumulation of droppings. H nests were unsuccessful, with less than 50% of eggs laid in the nest hollows. However, up to 93% of eggs were laid in front rollaways, and few of these were downgraded. 5. Feather and foot damage were generally less in furnished than in conventional cages, greater where there were more birds per cage. With an elevated food trough there was less feather damage but more overgrowth of claws. In year 2, mortality was greater in cages with more birds. 6. Pre-laying behaviour was mostly settled in

  20. Response of laying hens to feeding low-protein amino acid-supplemented diets under high ambient temperature: performance, egg quality, leukocyte profile, blood lipids, and excreta pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torki, Mehran; Mohebbifar, Ahmad; Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Zardast, Afshin

    2015-05-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether, by using a low-protein amino acid-supplemented diet, the health status, stress response, and excreta quality could be improved without affecting the productive performance of heat-stressed laying hens. The requirements for egg production, egg mass, and feed conversion ratio were also estimated using second-order equations and broken-line regression. A total of 150 Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL-Lite) hens were divided randomly into five groups of 30 with five replicates of six hens. The hens were raised for an 8-week period (52 to 60 weeks) in wire cages situated in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. The five experimental diets (ME; 2,720 kcal/kg) varied according to five crude protein (CP) levels: normal-CP diet (control, 16.5 % CP) and low-CP diets containing 15.0, 13.5, 12.0, or 10.5 % CP. All experimental diets were supplemented with crystalline amino acids at the levels sufficient to meet their requirements. The results showed that under high temperature conditions, all productive performance and egg quality parameters in the birds fed with 15.0, 13.5, and 12.0 % CP diets were similar to those of birds fed with control diet (16.5 % CP), whereas feeding 10.5 % CP diet significantly decreased egg production and egg mass. Estimations of requirements were of 13.93 and 12.77 % CP for egg production, 14.62 and 13.22 % CP for egg mass, and 12.93 and 12.26 % CP for feed conversion ratio using quadratic and broken-line models, respectively. Egg yolk color index, blood triglyceride level, and excreta acidity were also significantly higher in birds fed with 12.0 and 10.5 % CP diets compared with those of control birds. The heterophil to lymphocyte ratio, as a stress indicator, was significantly decreased by 15.0, 13.5, and 12 % CP diets. On the basis of our findings, reducing dietary CP from 16.5 to 12.0 % and supplementing the diets with the essential amino acids showed merit for improving the

  1. Effect of vitamin K on bone integrity and eggshell quality of white hen at the final phase of the laying cycle Efeito da vitamina K sobre a integridade óssea e da casca de ovos de poedeiras leves na fase final de postura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanir Inês Müller Fernandes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of four levels of dietary vitamin K (vit. K on production, egg quality and bone structure of laying hens near the end of the production cycle were studied. A total of 192 Hy-Line, W-36 hens, 67 weeks of age, were distributed into a completely randomized design with four treatments (0, 2, 8, 32 mg vit. K/kg of diet, six replicates and eight birds per experimental unit. Corn-soybean-meal basal diets were isonitrogenous (15.5% crude protein, isoenergetic (2,790 kcal ME/kg, isocalcium (4.25% Ca and isophosphorus (0.40% available P. Vitamin K supplementation did not alter egg mass, feed intake, feed conversion (kg/kg, bone breaking strength, specific egg gravity, eggshell weight, thickness and percentage of thin and cracked shell. A linear effect on egg weight, laying percent, and feed conversion (kg/dozen was observed, as well as a quadratic effect on the ash bone content. In conclusion, the inclusion of increasing levels of vitamin K to the diet influenced performance and bone mineralization, but not eggshell quality. The lack of consistency in the efficiency of supplemental vitamin K on eggshell quality may be due to the age of hens.Objetivou-se com este estudo avaliar o efeito de quatro níveis dietéticos de vitamina K (vit. K sobre o desempenho e a qualidade de ovos e ossos de poedeiras leves na fase final de postura. Foram utilizadas 192 poedeiras comerciais com 67 semanas de idade, distribuídas em delineamento casualizado, com quatro níveis de vitamina K (0, 2, 8, 32 mg/kg, seis repetições e oito aves por unidade experimental. As rações eram isoprotéicas (15,5% de proteína bruta, isoenergéticas (2.790 kcal de energia metabolizável/kg, isocálcicas (4,25% cálcio e isofosfóricas (0,40% fósforo disponível e foram formuladas à base de milho e farelo de soja. A suplementação de vitamina K não alterou a massa de ovos, o consumo de ração, a conversão alimentar (kg/kg, a resistência óssea a quebra, a gravidade espec

  2. The Edinburgh modified cage for laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, M C; Hughes, B O

    1995-12-01

    1. Behaviour, production and welfare of ISA Brown medium hybrids were assessed in 2 trials (each from 20 to 44 weeks of age) of a novel design of cage for laying hens: the Edinburgh Modified Cage (EMC). 2. The EMC was 600 mm wide, 450 mm deep and 450 mm high at the rear; it had a softwood perch and at one side a 250 mm wide nest box (containing litter or artificial turf) with a dust bath directly above. It housed 4 birds and provided 675 cm2/bird in the main cage with an additional 281 cm2/bird in the nest box. The nest box and dust bath had automatically controlled doors which were closed at night. There were 18 EMC; in the first trial these were compared with 6 control cages with perch but without next box or dust bath. 3. Hens spent 32 to 37% of day time on the perch, 5 to 7% in the dust bath and 5 to 6% in the nest. At night 92 to 98% roosted on the perch. 4. Initially only 55 to 70% of eggs were laid in the nest box partly because some eggs were laid before dawn. Once the door was retimed to open 3h before lights-on the proportion rose to 91 to 96%. Very few eggs were laid in the dust bath. Pre-laying behaviour lasted longer in treatments with nest boxes (55 to 76min) than in control cages (48min); disturbance was slight in all treatments, but lowest in control cages. 5. Dust baths were well used, with on average 61% of hens dust bathing during a 3-h afternoon observation period compared with only 17% in control cages. Two birds could use the dust bath simultaneously. 6. It was concluded that although a number of minor design features still required attention the EMC has potential to reduce the disadvantages of conventional cages for welfare while retaining their advantages and has possible commercial application.

  3. [Laying hens in alternative housing systems--practical experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, S

    2003-05-01

    Alternative keeping systems of laying hens in Germany at present are run as deep litter-, aviary- and free-range systems. After a short description of these housing types special requirements on management are considered. First solutions for the reduction of parasite and environmental burden in front of the hen-house are presented as well as opportunities to improve the utilization of that part of the outside run, which lay far from the pen. Although the management has improved a lot, the average mortality in alternative keeping systems of laying hens is still very high, probable reasons were discussed. Beside that the further development of furnished cages for groups of laying hens up to 40 and 60 individuals per unit is described; the first experiences from scientifically attended pilot projects are reported.

  4. Henning Witte : Estonia-film tuleb / Villem Valme

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Valme, Villem, 1977-

    2000-01-01

    Kavandatavast katastrooffilmist "Baltic Storm", mis on ajendatud väidetest, et "Estonia" uppus maffiavandenõu tõttu. Stsenaristideks on Juta Rabe, Henning Witte ja Kaj Holmberg. Ka : Nädal nr. 47, lk. 5

  5. Health and Welfare in Dutch Organic Laying Hens

    OpenAIRE

    Bestman, Monique; Wagenaar, Jan-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Data on animal health and welfare and farm management during rearing and laying periods were collected from 49 flocks of organic laying hens in the Netherlands to establish how farms performed in terms of animal health and welfare and which factors affected health and welfare. Abstract From 2007–2008, data on animal health and welfare and farm management during rearing and laying periods were collected from 49 flocks of organic laying hens in the Netherlands. Our aim was to inv...

  6. Housing system and laying hen strain impacts on egg microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D R; Anderson, K E

    2013-08-01

    Alternative hen housing is becoming more commonplace in the egg market. However, a complete understanding of the implications for alternative housing systems on egg safety has not been achieved. The current study examines the impact of housing Hy-Line Brown, Hy-Line Silver Brown, and Barred Plymouth Rock hens in conventional cage, cage-free, and free range egg production systems on shell microbiology. Eggs were collected at 4 sampling periods. Egg shell emulsion pools were formed and enumerated for total aerobic organisms, Enterobacteriaceae, and yeast and mold counts. Hy-Line Brown and Hy-Line Silver Brown hens produced eggs with significantly (P Eggs from conventional cages had significantly different (P eggs with significantly different (P Enterobacteriaceae among housing systems with conventional caged eggs having the lowest level of contamination for the hen strains. There were no differences within each strain among housing systems for yeast and mold contamination. The study shows that hen strain has an effect on egg microbial levels for various housing systems, and egg safety should be considered when making hen strain selections for each housing system.

  7. Mallard Use of Hen HousesTM in Eastern Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryan Zimmerling

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Nesting structures for ground-nesting waterfowl may be an effective technique for increasing nesting success in regions in which nest success is below the 15% threshold needed to maintain a stable population. We studied the occupancy rate of artificial nesting structures called hen housesTM by Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos nesting in two different wetland habitats, beaver ponds and sewage lagoons, in eastern Ontario during 1999-2001. We hypothesized that, because natural cover was sparse on sewage lagoons, Mallards would occupy hen houses at a higher rate on sewage lagoons than on beaver ponds. However, of the 248 hen houses distributed between beaver ponds and sewage lagoons, none was occupied by waterfowl. Common Grackles (Quiscalus quiscula were the only avian species that nested in hen houses. However, Mallards successfully nested directly under several structures (n = 6 when water levels were low enough to expose the ground beneath them. Mayfield daily nest survival estimates for Mallards nesting in natural cover were similar on sewage lagoons and beaver ponds for all years (mean = 0.99 and were higher than most published estimates. Factors such as nesting cover, predation pressures, and structure design and material may influence the use of artificial hen houses and should be considered when planning a hen house program outside of the Prairie Pothole Region.

  8. Changes in brown eggshell color as the hen ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabaşi, A Z; Miles, R D; Balaban, M O; Portier, K M

    2007-02-01

    The color of eggshells from eggs laid by commercial-type Hy-Line brown hens 25 wk of age was studied over a period of 10 mo. Color measurements were made by a color machine vision system and were analyzed using a mixed model to calculate between and within hen variances and to investigate the effect of time on shell color. Hens laid eggs with lighter colored shells as the flock aged, as evidenced by the lightness (L*) values increasing in time. A decrease in pigmentation was associated with a decrease in the amount of redness (a*) in the eggshell. When L* and a* values were corrected for egg weight, the rate of change in the L* and a* values decreased, indicating that size of the egg was a major factor affecting the color of the eggshell. These findings quantified the observations that older hens lay lighter colored eggs due to an increase in egg size associated with no proportionate change in the quantity of pigment deposited over the shell surface. Using a 2-stage sampling analysis and the variances between and within hens, sample sizes required to estimate the color of eggshells within 5% of the true mean were calculated. Accordingly, 11 eggs would need to be collected from each of the 51 hens housed for a study of brown eggshell color using the L*, a*, and b* (yellowness) coordinates.

  9. White Toenails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page. Please enable Javascript in your browser. White Toenails White toenails can develop for several reasons. Trauma, such ... trauma does not cause broken blood vessels, a white spot may appear under the nail. The spot ...

  10. Digestibility and physico-chemical characteristics of acid silage meal made of pirarucu waste in diets for commercial laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscarina de Souza Batalha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acid silage meal made of pirarucu waste in diets for commercial laying hens on apparent digestibility and energy metabolism. Seventy-two Hisex White hens with 71 weeks of age were assigned to a completely randomized with two treatments (control diet and diet with 3% pirarucu waste acid silage with six replicates of six birds each. The ensiled biomass was light brown in color, showing acidified aroma; creamy consistency; 4.38±0.11 pH; 84.16% dry matter; 40.06% crude protein; 26.82% ether extract; 9.31% mineral matter, 65.16 g kg-1 calcium and 22.90 g kg-1 phosphorus. Differences (p > 0.05 were detected in digestibility of crude protein, non-fiber carbohydrates (soluble carbohydrates, etherextract, mineral matter, metabolizable energy and metabolizable energy coefficient. Our results indicate that the acid silage mealmade of pirarucu waste can be included up to 3% in diets for laying hens, showing satisfactory nutrient digestibility and potential to be used as an energy source.

  11. Black pepper (Piper nigrum in diets for laying hens on performance, egg quality and blood biochemical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Duque Melo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the increasing levels (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6% of black pepper in diets for laying hens on performance, egg quality and blood biochemical parameters. Hissex White hens (n=168 at 30 weeks of age were used. The experimental method was completely randomized with seven treatments with four replicates of six birds each. Estimates of black pepper levels were determined by polynomial regression. The performance showed no significant differences (p > 0.05. The eggshell percentage was significantly influenced (p < 0.05, in which the level of 0.30% inclusion impaired eggshell quality. Triglycerides level increased significantly (p < 0.05, according to increasing levels of black pepper in the diet. It can be concluded that black pepper can be used in diets for laying hens as phytogenic additive without harming the performance. However, this inclusion causes a reduction in eggshell percentage and an increase in the level of triglycerides in the bloodstream.

  12. Soybean oil and beef tallow in the diet of semi-heavy laying hens reared in hot climate regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Martins

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the productive performance and physical quality of eggs from semi-heavy laying hens reared in hot climate regions and fed diets containing soybean oil or beef tallow. The experiment had a duration of 63 days divided into three cycles of 21 days each. A total of 160 semi-heavy Hisex Brown laying hens at 50 weeks of age and with an initial weight of 1.755 ± 0.172 kg were used. The birds were reared in a floor system and housed in boxes. A completely randomized design consisting of two treatments and five replicates was used, with 16 birds per experimental unit (box. Two experimental diets based on corn and soybean meal were formulated and soybean oil or beef tallow was added, corresponding to treatments 1 and 2, respectively. The following parameters were evaluated: egg production (%, feed intake (g/bird/day, egg mass (g/bird/day, feed conversion per egg mass (kg/kg, feed conversion per dozen eggs (kg/dozen, egg weight, percentage of yolk, egg white and shell (%, specific gravity (g/cm3, animal viability (%, and body weight variation (g. No differences (P>0.05 were observed in any of the parameters studied. The dietary inclusion of soybean oil or beef tallow does not influence the productive performance or egg quality of semi-heavy laying hens reared in hot climate regions.

  13. The Effects of Dietary Flavonoid Supplementation on the Antioxidant Status of Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Iskender

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ninety-six 28-week-old Lohmann White laying hens were utilized to test the antioxidant effects of flavonoids (hesperidin, naringin, and quercetin at 0.5 g/kg diet during an 8-wk experimental period. At the end of the experiment blood samples were collected to determine total protein, cholesterol, and malondialdehyde (MDA serum levels as well as activities of glutathione reductase (GR, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, and superoxide dismutase (SOD and level of glutathione (GSH in erythrocyte lysates. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Naringin supplementation did not alter serum cholesterol concentration, whereas hesperidin and quercetin supplementations decreased serum cholesterol concentration. Naringin and quercetin supplementations did not affect serum protein concentration. All flavonoids decreased MDA concentration as well as increased GSH-Px, GR, GST, and SOD activities and GSH level, being quercetion superior to hesperidin and naringin. In conclusion, flavonoids, especially quercetin, exert antioxidant activity, which may help improve wellbeing when laying hens are exposed to stressors.

  14. Distracting laying hens with a 'toy'

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a systematic treatment difference, or simply to the differ- ences normally observed in biological material. Two strains of commercial layer were used in the experiment, viz. a white strain (Lohmann Silver) and a red strain (Loh- mann Brown). The white birds were housed at five birds per cage, and the red at four per cage.

  15. Altered Circulating Levels of Serotonin and Immunological Changes in Laying Hens Divergently Selected for Feather Pecking Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Kjaer, Jørgen B.; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in immunological parameters as well as changes with respect to plasma levels of serotonin and tryptophan in lines selected for and against feather pecking (FP) behavior [high FP (HP) line and low FP (LP) line] for 5 generations. The hens from...... compared with the control and HP lines. Selection for or against FP, therefore, changes the number of white blood cells and the expression of MHC class I molecules on T and B cells, which may influence the health status of the birds...

  16. Scientific Opinion on welfare aspects of the use of perches for laying hens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berg, Charlotte; Vågsholm, Ivar; Ducrot, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This opinion investigated the use of perches for laying hens in cage and non‐cage systems. It is based on various activities reviewing the effects of perch height and design on hen health and welfare...

  17. White Ring; White ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, H.; Yuzawa, H. [Nikken Sekkei Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-01-05

    White Ring is a citizen`s gymnasium used for figure skating and short track speed skating games of 18th Winter Olympic Games in 1998. White Ring is composed of a main-arena and a sub-arena. For the main-arena with an area 41mtimes66m, an ice link can be made by disengaging the potable floor and by flowing brine in the bridged polystyrene pipes embedded in the concrete floor. Due to the fortunate groundwater in this site, well water is used for the outside air treatment energy in 63% during heating and in 35% during cooling. Ammonia is used as a cooling medium for refrigerating facility. For the heating of audience area in the large space, heat load from the outside is reduced by enhancing the heat insulation performance of the roof of arena. The audience seats are locally heated using heaters. For the White Ring, high quality environment is realized for games through various functions of the large-scale roof of the large space. Success of the big event was expected. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Effect of housing environment on laying hen meat quality: Assessing Pectoralis major pH, colour and tenderness in three strains of 80-81 week-old layers housed in conventional and furnished cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzell, K M; Lynch, E; Rathgeber, B M; Dixon, W T; Putman, C T; Jendral, M J

    2017-02-01

    1. Meat quality is affected by factors such as stress, genetic strain and activity and is determined in part by measures of pH, colour and tenderness. In conventional laying hen cages (CC), lack of physical space and inability to perform highly motivated behaviours leads to stress and inactivity. Furnished cages (FCs) permit expression of highly motivated behaviours, but typically house larger group sizes than CC, thereby contributing to social stress. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of CC and FC laying hen housing environments and strain differences on meat quality of 80-81-week-old birds. 2. Pectoralis major meat quality was assessed for two flocks of Shaver White (SH), Lohmann Lite (LL) and Lohmann Brown (LB) hens housed in either 5-hen CC or 40-hen FC. Between 80 and 81 weeks, muscle samples were collected from randomly selected hens and analysed for muscle pH, colour and shear force (SF) using established methods. 3. In both flocks, the combined treatment body weights (BWs) were higher for CC than FC hens and the combined strain BWs were higher for LB than LL and SH hens. Flock 1 LB had lower initial and ultimate pH than SH and LL, and greater pH decline than SH. Muscle redness (a*) was higher for CC SH than FC SH in both flocks. Muscle a* was higher for LL than SH and LB in Flock 1, and higher than SH in Flock 2. Housing differences in muscle SF were absent. In CC, SF was higher for SH than LL and LB in Flock 1, and higher than LB in Flock 2. 4. Lack of housing differences suggests that environmental stressors present in both housing systems similarly affected meat quality. Strain differences for muscle pH, a* and SF indicate increased stress experienced by SH and LL hens. The absence of Flock 2 strain differences is consistent with the cannibalism outbreak that occurred in this flock and most severely impacted LB hens.

  19. Eggshell color in brown-egg laying hens - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiullah, S; Roberts, J R; Chousalkar, K

    2015-10-01

    The major pigment in eggshells of brown-egg laying hens is protoporphyrin IX, but traces of biliverdin and its zinc chelates are also present. The pigment appears to be synthesized in the shell gland. The protoporphyrin IX synthetic pathway is well defined, but precisely where and how it is synthesized in the shell gland of the brown-egg laying hen is still ambiguous. The pigment is deposited onto all shell layers including the shell membranes, but most of it is concentrated in the outermost layer of the calcareous shell and in the cuticle. Recently, the genes that are involved in pigment synthesis have been identified, but the genetic control of synthesis and deposition of brown pigment in the commercial laying hen is not fully understood. The brown coloration of the shell is an important shell quality parameter and has a positive influence on consumer preference. The extent of pigment deposition is influenced by the housing system, hen age, hen strain, diet, stressors, and certain diseases such as infectious bronchitis. In this article, the physiological and biochemical characteristics of the brown pigment in commercial brown-egg layers are reviewed in relation to its various functions in the poultry industry. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  20. The hatching results of indigenous Hungarian speckled hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ákos Benk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the pilot farm of Szeged University Faculty of Agriculture we keep two varieties of the Hungarian speckled hen, the feathered-neck variant and the naked-neck type since 1977. The three colour variations of the domestic hen species were bred from the Hungarian lea-land bird by the middle of the 20th Century. Because of the spread of intensive poultry keeping the population of this species has become endangered. Programs supporting ecological-biological farming that began in the last two decades placed the domestically bred birds in the forefront both as purebreds and as candidates in projects for developing merchandisable bio-poultry. Beside the gene preservation, we endeavor to find the best way for the production-purpose utilisation of the speckled hen stock. On the basis of our experiments the laying hens can be used in small scale egg production. We examined the hatching results of both type of speckled hens, during more than 20 generations.

  1. Effects of organic selenium and zinc on the aging process of laying hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the study was to determine whether supplementing the diets of post-molted hens with organic selenium (Se) (Sel-Plex®) and/or organic Zinc (Zn) (Bio-Plex®) could improve laying hen performance. Prior to molting, 120-78 wk old laying hens were separated into four treatment groups of ...

  2. Behavioral differences of laying hens with fractured keel bones within furnished cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Marie Casey-Trott

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High prevalence of keel bone fractures in laying hens is reported in all housing systems. Keel fractures have been associated with pain and restricted mobility in hens in loose housing. The objective was to determine whether keel fractures were associated with activity of hens in furnished cages. Thirty-six pairs of LSL Lite hens (72 wk were enrolled in the study. One hen with a fractured keel and one hen without were identified by palpation in each of 36 groups of hens housed in either 30 or 60-bird cages stocked at 750cm2/hen. Behavioral activity of each hen was recorded by four observers blind to keel status using focal animal sampling for 10 min within a 2 hr period in the morning (08:00-10:00, afternoon (12:00-14:00, and evening (17:00-19:00. All hens were observed during each of the three sample periods for three days totaling 90 min, and individual hen data was summed for analysis. Hens were euthanized 48hr after final observations, dissected, and classified by keel status: F0 (no fracture, N=24; F1 (single fracture, N=17; F2 (multiple fractures, N=31. The percentages of time hens performed each behavior were analyzed using a mixed procedure in SAS with fracture severity, body weight, cage size, rearing environment, and tier in the model. Fracture severity affected the duration of perching (P=0.04 and standing (P=0.001, bout length of standing (P<0.0001, and location (floor vs perch of resting behaviors (P=0.01. F2 hens perched longer than F0 hens, 20.0% ± 2.9 and 11.6% ± 3.2. F2 hens spent less time standing, 15.2% ± 1.5, than F0 and F1 hens, 20.7% ± 1.6 and 21.6% ± 1.8. F2 hens had shorter standing bouts (22.0 sec ± 4.2 than both F0 and F1 hens, 33.1 sec ± 4.3 and 27.4 sec ± 4.4. Non-fractured hens spent 80.0% ± 6.9 of total resting time on the floor whereas F1 and F2 hens spent 56.9% ± 12.4 and 51.5% ± 7.7, resting on the floor. Behavioral differences reported here provide insight into possible causes of keel damage, or

  3. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Commercial free-range production has become a significant sector of the fresh egg market due to legislation banning conventional cages and consumer preference for products perceived as welfare friendly, as access to outdoor range can lead to welfare benefits such as greater freedom of movement and enhanced behavioural opportunities. This study investigated dispersal patterns, feather condition and activity of laying hens in three distinct zones of the range area; the apron area near shed; enriched zone 10–50 m from shed; and outer range beyond 50 m, in six flocks of laying hens under commercial free-range conditions varying in size between 4000 and 24,000 hens. Each flock was visited for four days to record number of hens in each zone, their behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distances (NND), as well as record temperature and relative humidity during the visit. Temperature and relative humidity varied across the study period in line with seasonal variations and influenced the use of range with fewer hens out of shed as temperature fell or relative humidity rose. On average, 12.5% of the hens were observed on the range and most of these hens were recorded in the apron zone as hen density decreased rapidly with increasing distance from the shed. Larger flocks appeared to have a lower proportion of hens on range. The hens used the range more in the early morning followed by a progressive decrease through to early afternoon. The NND was greatest in the outer range and decreased towards the shed. Feather condition was generally good and hens observed in the outer range had the best overall feather condition. Standing, pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded behaviours and of these, standing occurred most in the apron whereas walking and foraging behaviours were recorded most in the outer range. This study supported the findings of previous studies that reported few hens in the range and greater use of areas closer

  4. Measuring fearfulness of hens in commercial organic egg production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegelund, Lene; Sørensen, Jan Tind

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate agreement between flock-based fear tests used in welfare assessments of laying hens in commercial organic farms, three tests were applied in 27 flocks of layers. Tests were performed at 35 and 55 weeks of age and were based on the concepts of 'novel object', 'sudden sound' and two...... different measures of 'approaching human'. In general, agreements between tests were poor. The two measures based on 'approaching human' had the highest agreement, while the agreement between all other flock-based tests were lower. There was low agreement between testing at age 35 and 55 weeks. In order...... to evaluate the degree to which the flock-based fear tests reflect individual hens' underlying fearfulness; tonic immobility (TI) tests were also applied on individual hens in eight flocks. There was large individual variation in the duration of tonic immobility, but also significant difference between flocks...

  5. Metallothionein in the ovaries of laying hens exposed to cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shin; Okabe, Masashi; Kurasaki, Masaaki; Kojima, Yutaka [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-03-29

    The prescence of metallothionein (MT) and its mRMA in the ovaries of laying hens is reported. In laying hens injected with cadmium (Cd), Cd accumulated in the follicle walls of the ovaries not in the follicle yolks. In the follicle walls, (Cd, Zn)-MT and its mRNA were found. This indicates that MT bound to Cd is biosynthesized in the follicle walls. We suggest that MT might play a role in sequestering Cd. On the other hand, zinc (Zn) was found in the follicle walls and yolks in the Cd-treated laying hens. The relationship between Zn and (Cd,Zn)-MT is also discussed. 27 refs., 3 fig., 2 tab.

  6. Differential expression of vitelline membrane outer layer protein 1: hormonal regulation of expression in the oviduct and in ovarian carcinomas from laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Whasun; Song, Gwonhwa

    2015-01-05

    Vitelline membrane outer layer protein 1 (VMO1), a basic protein present in the outer layer of the vitelline membrane of eggs, plays essential roles in separating the yolk from the egg white and preventing infection from bacteria by forming a barrier of fibrous layers in avian eggs. Although VMO1 is expressed in the oviduct of hens, little is known about endocrine regulation of transcription of VMO1 in the oviduct and its expression in cancerous ovaries of laying hens. Results of present study indicated that expression of VMO1 mRNA increased in the chick oviduct in response to diethylstilbestrol (DES, a synthetic non-steroidal estrogen). VMO1 mRNA and protein were particularly abundant in the glandular epithelium (GE) and luminal epithelium (LE) of the magnum of the oviducts of chicks treated with DES. Also, during the regression and recrudescence phases of the oviduct during induced molting with zinc feeding, VMO1 expression decreased as the oviduct regressed and increased with remodeling and recrudescence of the oviduct in laying hens. In addition, changes in relative expression of specific microRNAs (miR-1623, miR-1552-3p, miR-1573, miR-22-3p, miR-124a and miR-1764) regulating VMO1 gene were detected in the oviducts during the molting period. Moreover, abundant expression of VMO1 was found in GE of cancerous, but not normal ovaries of laying hens. Results of the present study suggest that VMO1 is regulated by estrogen and target microRNAs in the chicken oviduct and that it is a potential diagnostic marker of ovarian cancer in laying hens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Is it possible to increase the n-3 fatty acid content of eggs without affecting their technological and/or sensorial quality and the laying performance of hens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, E; Chartrin, P; Lessire, M; Meteau, K; Chesneau, G; Guillevic, M; Mourot, J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to increase the n-3 fatty acid (n-3 FA) content of eggs without affecting their sensorial and/or technological properties or the laying performance of hens. Laying hens from line 477 were divided into 5 groups corresponding to 5 different diets over the laying period: control diet (C) and diets containing extruded linseed with a high level of fibre (ELHF), extruded linseed with a low level of fibre (ELLF), microalgae, or a combination of 75% ELLF and 25% MA (ELLF+MA). Dietary enrichment with n-3 FA had no effect on the laying performance, hen body weight or egg white viscosity. The egg yolks produced by hens fed the diet containing microalgae were redder than egg yolks from the other groups, suggesting the presence of red pigments in the microalgae preparation. However, the colour difference was low and not perceptible to the human eye. Moreover, colour measurement of egg yolks by sensorial analysis panellists using the Roche colour fan did not reveal a diet effect on this parameter. Egg yolk lipid content was not affected by diet. The egg yolk of hens fed on diets containing linseed and/or microalgae had greater n-3 FA content (×2.5 to 2.9 compared to group C). Linseed mainly increased the linolenic acid content (×3.0 to 3.4 compared to group C) and the microalgae increased the LC n-3 FA content (×4.1 compared to group C). Dietary enrichment with n-3 FA had no effect on the sensorial quality of shell cooked eggs except for the "unusual flavour" criterion for which the score was higher for the MA group compared to the other groups and corresponded to a fishy flavour.

  8. Effects of chopped sinusoidal voltages on the behavior and performance of laying hens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidali, G.; Silversides, F.G.; Boily, R. [Laval Univ., Quebec, PQ (Canada). Faculte de Sciences et Genie; Villeneuve, P.; Joncas, R. [Quebec Ministere de l`Agriculture, des Pecheries et de l`Aminentation, Ste-Foy, PQ (Canada)

    1996-04-01

    Studies were conducted to measure the effects of sinusoidal voltages on hens. One hundred and twenty laying hens between 23 and 43 weeks of age were used in these experiments. Normal sinusoidal voltages with constant amplitudes of one to nine volts and pulses with random amplitudes of 3 to 18 volts were applied to the hens. The electrical resistance of hens was also measured to determine their path resistance to electrical currents. No effects on production performance or behavior of laying hens were found. Neither water and feed consumption, nor egg production and quality were affected by the treatments. No behavioral or health problems were observed. 15 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figs.

  9. White lies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erat, S.; Gneezy, U.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we distinguish between two types of white lies: those that help others at the expense of the person telling the lie, which we term altruistic white lies, and those that help both others and the liar, which we term Pareto white lies. We find that a large fraction of participants are

  10. Egg shell quality and microstructure as affected by vitamin C, other feed additives and high environmental temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Boushy, A.R.

    1966-01-01

    The effects of climatic stress on egg formation (weight, shape, formation period, clutch size and blood calcium) and shell quality were estimated in White Leghorn and White Plymouth Rock hens. Constant environments were used with 85°F 75- 80% r.h., 75-77°F 50-60% r.h. and 55°F 50-60% r.h. as well as

  11. Performance and economy of production of laying hens fed graded ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... level while those on 30% FWCC – based diet had the highest value (N58.55). FWCC is a promising. cheaper and readily available alternative energy feed ingredient. It can be incorporated into layers' rations up to 20% level. Keywords: Performance characteristics, laying hens, economy, fermented wild cocoyam corms.

  12. Performance and egg quality of aged laying hens fed diets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p2492989

    experimental hen house and the room temperature ranged from 19 to 30 °C throughout the laying cycle. The .... 3 Supplied per kilogram of diet 15 mg BHA, 80 mg ethoxyquin, 180 mg BHT, 60 mg citric acid. .... digestibility of the amino acids rather than on total amino acids concentration when MBM was supplemented.

  13. The response of broiler breeder hens to dietary balanced protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two basal feeds (118 and 175 g protein/kg) with similar balanced amino acid mixtures were appropriately blended to produce six experimental diets differing in protein. These were fed for six weeks to 180 broiler breeder hens (Ross 308) housed in individual cages from 26 w of age. A 13 h photoperiod was applied. Half the ...

  14. THE PERFORMANCE OF LAYING HENS FED DIFFERENT CALCIUM SOURCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kismiati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed to evaluate the performance of laying hens fed different calcium sources.Two hundreds of Isa Brown laying hens were used in this study. The hens were raised in individualbattery cages units for 12 weeks. Four calcium source (limestone as a control, 5% limestone + 2.5%eggshells waste, 2.5% limestone + 5% eggshells waste and 7.5% eggshell waste were used in feedexperiment. A completely randomized design was applied, with 4 treatments and 5 replications. Eachexperimental unit consisted of 10 laying hens. The parameters measured were feed intake, proteinintake, calcium intake, phosphorus intake, egg production, egg weight and feed conversion ratio. Resultsof the research showed that the calcium source had significantly effect on performance productions. Theuse of eggshell waste 7.5% significantly increased the feed intake, calcium intake, phosphorus intake,egg production and egg weight except for feed conversion ratio. The conclusion of this research was thatthe use of eggshell waste as calcium source of feed resulted in better performance than using limestoneor mixed limestone with eggshell waste.

  15. Performance and egg quality of aged laying hens fed diets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egg shape index and eggshell weight did not differ among treatments. Eggshell thickness and eggshell breaking strength were higher in hens fed with MBM as compared to control and OSM fed birds. Similar to the tendency in shell quality, MBM inclusion in the diet tended to enhance albumen height and Haugh unit.

  16. Housing system and laying hen strain impacts on egg microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative hen housing is becoming more commonplace in the egg market. However, a complete understanding of the implication of alternative housing systems on egg safety has not been achieved. The current study examines the impact of housing Hy-Line Brown, Hy-Line Silver Brown, and Barred Plymouth...

  17. THE PERFORMANCE OF LAYING HENS FED DIFFERENT CALCIUM SOURCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kismiati

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed to evaluate the performance of laying hens fed different calcium sources. Two hundreds of Isa Brown laying hens were used in this study. The hens were raised in individual battery cages units for 12 weeks. Four calcium source (limestone as a control, 5% limestone + 2.5% eggshells waste, 2.5% limestone + 5% eggshells waste and 7.5% eggshell waste were used in feed experiment. A completely randomized design was applied, with 4 treatments and 5 replications. Each experimental unit consisted of 10 laying hens. The parameters measured were feed intake, protein intake, calcium intake, phosphorus intake, egg production, egg weight and feed conversion ratio. Results of the research showed that the calcium source had significantly effect on performance productions. The use of eggshell waste 7.5% significantly increased the feed intake, calcium intake, phosphorus intake, egg production and egg weight except for feed conversion ratio. The conclusion of this research was that the use of eggshell waste as calcium source of feed resulted in better performance than using limestone or mixed limestone with eggshell waste.

  18. Airborne Fungi in Dwellings for Dairy Cows and Laying Hens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matković, Kristina; Vučemilo, Marija; Vinković, Bara

    2009-01-01

    .... Pathogens contained may be a serious threat to animal and human health.The aim of our study was to analyse the fungi aerosol content in a stable housing dairy cows and in a coop for laying hens over the three autumn months of 2007...

  19. Enrichment of bifidobacteria in the hen caeca by dietary inulin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marounek, Milan; Rada, V.; Dušková, D.; Petr, J.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2001), s. 73-75 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/99/0480; GA AV ČR KSK5020115 Keywords : bifidobacteria * hen * inulin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.776, year: 2001

  20. Chemical features, cholesterol and energy content of table hen eggs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... legislation, on the chemical and nutritional quality of table eggs. The biological material consisted of eggs laid by 1200 Lohmann Brown hens, aged 27 weeks, fed similarly (a corn-wheat-soymeal diet). Conventional AOAC methods were used to analyse the eggs, and gross energy was calculated based on organic matter ...

  1. Haematology and serum biochemistry of laying hens fed red pepper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hematology and serum biochemistry of ISA brown laying hens fed red pepper (Capsicum annum. L.) as feed additive in their diet was studied. Sixty (60) laying birds (in their 32nd week) were randomly allotted to four different dietary treatments with graded levels of red pepper (Capsicum annum. L.) as additive.

  2. Effect of coronavirus infection on reproductive performance of turkey hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkey coronavirus (TCoV) infection causes enteritis in turkeys of varying ages with high mortality in young birds. In older birds, field evidence indicates possible involvement of TCoV in egg production drops in turkey hens. However, no experimental studies have been conducted to demonstrate TCoV...

  3. Utilisation of synthetic amino acids by broiler breeder hens | Nonis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to examine the response of broiler breeder hens to feeds supplemented with synthetic lysine and methionine when fed once or twice daily during peak production. Replacing intact protein with increasing amounts of free lysine and methionine, up to 2.3 g/kg feed, had no effect on feed intake, ...

  4. The effect of feeding clinoptilolite (zeolite) to laying hens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of feeding clinoptilolite (zeolite) to laying hens. M.D. Olver. Animal and Dairy Science Research Institute, lrene. One hundred and twenty 4-month-old, single-combed, brown. Hy-Line pullets were fed two isocaloric diets containing 16 or. 13,5o/o protein with and without 5% clinoptilolite in four.

  5. Development of calcium phosphate based apatite from hen's eggshell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Stoichiometric hydroxyapatite with Ca/P molar ratio, 1⋅67, was synthesized using hen's eggshell as calcium source and phosphoric acid by precipitation method. Conventional EDTA titration and gravimetric methods were adopted to estimate the amount of calcium and phosphorous, respectively. Fourier-transform.

  6. 405 Nigerian Indigenous vs Exotic Hens: the Correlation Factor in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Online). Nigerian Indigenous vs Exotic Hens: the Correlation Factor in Body Weight and Laying Performance (Pp. 405-413). Agaviezor, B. O. - Department of Animal Science and Fisheries, University of Port Harcourt, P.M.B. 5323, Port Harcourt, ...

  7. Control of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in laying hens by inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano; Mesquita, Aline Lopes; de Paiva, Jaqueline Boldrin; Zotesso, Fábio; Berchieri Júnior, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is one of the agents that is responsible for outbreaks of human foodborne salmonellosis caused by Salmonella Enteritidis and is generally associated with the consumption of poultry products. Inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis cell vaccine is one of the available methods to control Salmonella Enteritidis in breeders and laying hens, however results in terms of efficacy vary. This vaccine has never been tested in Brazil, therefore, the present work was carried out to assess three commercial inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines allowed in Brazil. Four hundred white light variety commercial laying hens were obtained at one-day-of age. At eight weeks old, the birds were divided into four groups with one hundred animals each. Birds from three groups (V1, V2 and V3) received different intramuscular vaccines, followed by a booster dose at 16 weeks of age. Birds from another group (CG) were not vaccinated. When the laying hens were 20, 25 and 31 weeks old, 13 from each group were transferred to another room and were challenged by inoculating 2 mL neat culture of Salmonella Enteritidis. On the second day after each challenge, the caecal contents, spleen, liver and ovary of three birds from each group were analyzed for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. Twice a week a cloacal swab of each bird was taken and all eggs laid were examined for the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis. After four consecutive negative cloacal swabs in all the groups, the birds were sacrificed so as to examine the liver, caecal contents and ovaries. Overall, the inactivated vaccine used in group V3 reduced Salmonella Enteritidis in the feces and eggs. A very small amount of Salmonella was found in the spleen, liver, ovary and caeca of the birds in the four groups during the whole experiment. In general, inactivated Salmonella Enteritidis vaccines was able to decrease the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis in the birds and in the eggs as well. Nevertheless, they must

  8. Induction of eggshell apex abnormalities in broiler breeder hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feberwee, A; Landman, W J M

    2010-04-01

    Recently, the causal relationship between eggshell apex abnormalities (EAA) and Mycoplasma synoviae was described. This eggshell pathology has only been documented in table egg layers both spontaneously and experimentally infected with M. synoviae, suggesting that meat-type layers are less prone to this condition. In this study the susceptibility of specified pathogen free (SPF) broiler breeder hens to produce eggs with EAA after M. synoviae infection was assessed. Five groups of 12 hens each were made: a negative control group, a group inoculated intratracheally (i.t.) with a M. synoviae EAA strain at 19 weeks of age, a group inoculated i.t. with this strain at 19 and 26 weeks of age, a group inoculated with M. synoviae i.t. at 19 weeks of age and infected 5 days earlier with infectious bronchitis virus D1466 (IBV), and a fifth group similar to the former but inoculated i.t. twice with an M. synoviae EAA strain at 19 and 26 weeks of age. Eggs with EAA were only produced after a single i.t. inoculation with the M. synoviae EAA strain if preceded by an infection with IBV. The production of eggs with EAA started 6 weeks after M. synoviae EAA inoculation and the proportion of eggs with EAA during the experiment was 9/449 (2%), which was much lower than that in SPF layer hens (14-22%). The present results suggest that broiler breeder hens are less susceptible to producing eggs with EAA after an infection with a M. synoviae EAA strain preceded by an IBV infection, compared with table egg layers. Similar to SPF egg layers, the mean daily egg production per hen was significantly reduced by the M. synoviae EAA strain and there was a general negative effect on eggshell strength by this strain, suggesting it could also have a detrimental effect on hatching egg quality.

  9. STUDIES ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF BUKIT KAMANGS’ LIMESTONE AS MINERAL SOURCE FOR LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Khalil

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Samples of limestone composites were measured for hardness in 5 difference colors: black, darkblue, blue, light blue and white. Limestone was then ground and particle sizes of meal were measured.The meal were mixed with other locally available materials to produce 5 difference mineral formulas:P1: 100% limestone meal, P2: 50% limestone meal + 50% fresh water oyster shell meal, P3: 35%limestone meal + 30% fresh water oyster shell meal + 35% bone meal, P4: 35% limestone meal + 30%fresh water oyster shell meal + 34.2% bone meal + 0.5% salt + 0.3% micro minerals and P5: 100% freshwater oyster shell meal. The formulas were stored for 12 weeks. Samples were taken weekly foranalyzing of moisture content and physical properties. By a feeding trial the five mineral formulas weremixed in the level of 6 % into basal diet and fed to 150 laying hens for 24 weeks. Parameters measuredincluded body weight, feed intake, egg production and FCR. Results showed that the composites ofBukit Kamangs’ limestone had difference hardness. The strongest was found by the black composite of23.4 HRc-C or 245.0 BHN. The meal products contained large particles (>0.42 mm of 17.8%. Moisturecontent of mineral formulas increased during storage, but their physical properties were no significantchanges. The highest moisture increase was found by the product of 100% limestone, but it could bereduced by mixing with oyster shell meal and bone meal. The best laying performances (P<0.05 werefound by the hens fed with diet supplemented with mineral formula containing limestone, fresh wateroyster shell and fortified with micro minerals.

  10. Serum biochemical profile, enzymatic activity and lipid peroxidation in organs of laying hens fed diets containing cashew nut shell liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, N M; Freitas, E R; Trevisan, M T S; do Nascimento, G A J; Salles, R P R; Cruz, C E B; Farias, N N P; da Silva, I N G; Watanabe, P H

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of feeding laying hens diets containing cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) as a source of anacardic acid on the blood biochemical parameters as well as the enzymatic activity and lipid peroxidation of liver and tissues of the reproductive system (ovary, magnum, and uterus). A total of 216 Hisex White commercial laying hens were distributed randomly into six treatments, with six replicates of six birds. Treatments consisted of a diet without growth promoter (GP); a diet with GP; and diets without GP, with addition of increasing levels of CNSL (0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0%). Addition of CNSL to the diet did not affect the blood biochemical parameters (uric acid, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total cholesterol, high density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins and triglycerides), the enzymatic activity (superoxide dismutase and nonprotein sulphydryl groups) in the organs (liver, ovary, magnum and uterus) or the peroxidation of lipids from the blood serum, liver, magnum and uterus (p > 0.05). However, the addition of 0.75% and 1.00% CNSL provided a lower thiobarbituric acid reactive substances content in the birds' ovary (p < 0.001) compared to birds of other treatments, whereas the treatment without the GP provided a higher value. Addition of up to 1% of the CNSL as a source of anacardic acid in the laying hens' diets does not influence blood biochemical parameters or the endogenous enzymatic activity in the liver, ovary, magnum and uterus, but affects the lipid peroxidation in the ovary, although the problem is reduced from the inclusion of 0.75% CNSL. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Ikenna Chielo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources. These were: apron (0–10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments; enriched belt (10–50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided; and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture. Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range

  12. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-04-26

    In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0-10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10-50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range areas tend to be

  13. Prevalence and magnitude of helminth infections in organic laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thapa, Sundar; Hinrichsen, Lena Karina; Brenninkmeyer, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Helminths are associated with health- and welfare problems in organic laying hens. The present observational cross-sectional study therefore aimed to estimate the prevalence and worm burdens of intestinal helminths in organic flocks of laying hens in 8 European countries, and to identify management...... during a farm visit when the hens were on average 62 weeks old. Worm counts were performed for 892 hens from 55 flocks and the number of ascarid (presumably primarily A. galli) eggs per g faeces (EPG) for 881 hens from 54 flocks. The association between parasitological parameters (prevalence, worm burden...... and EPG) and the management factors were analysed by multivariate models. Results showed that A. galli was highly prevalent across Europe with an overall mean prevalence of 69.5% and mean worm burden of 10 worms per hen. The overall mean prevalence and worm burden for Heterakis spp. were 29.0% and 16...

  14. Expression of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF and Its Receptors TrkA and p75 in the Reproductive Organs of Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PU Shaoxia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to investigate the expression levels of nerve growth factor (NGF and its receptors (TrkA and p75 in prehierarchical follicles and oviducts of hens, five 130-day-old laying hens were examined by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analysis. NGF and its receptors were expressed in theca cells and granulosa cells of prehierarchical follicles, and they were also expressed in the epithelial cells of oviducts. The expression of the genes NGF, TrkA and p75 were significantly different in prehierarchical follicles (p<0.05 or p<0.01, and NGF and TrkA gene expression was significantly different in different parts of oviduct (p<0.05 or p<0.01. The expression of NGF and p75 mRNA levels was highest in large white follicle (LWF, as well as the expression of TrkA in small yellow follicle (SYF. In the oviduct, the expression of NGF was the highest in infundibulum, and lowest in isthmus. These results suggest that NGF may play an important role in the regulation of hen reproduction.

  15. Effect of replacing dietary vitamin E by sage on performance and meatiness of spent hens, and the oxidative stability of sausages produced from their meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loetscher, Y; Kreuzer, M; Albiker, D; Stephan, R; Messikommer, R E

    2014-01-01

    A total of 3960 hens (half ISA Warren and half Dekalb White) were housed in 18 compartments with 220 hens each. The effect of replacing dietary vitamin E by sage on productivity, meat yield and oxidative stability of sausages was studied. One third of all animals received either a vitamin E deficient diet (negative control) or diets supplemented with 30 mg/kg α-tocopherylacetate (positive control) or 25 g sage leaves/kg. At slaughter, meat yield was assessed and sausages were produced (n = 12 per treatment). The omission of vitamin E did not impair the oxidative stability of the raw sausage material or the spiced sausages in comparison to the positive control. Sage supplementation improved oxidative stability after 7 m of frozen storage, but not after 1, 4 and 10 m. Spice addition during meat processing had an antioxidant effect regardless of dietary treatment. Diet supplementation of any type did not affect laying performance and sausage meat yield. Feeding antioxidants to spent hens seemed to be not as efficient as in growing chickens, while seasoning with spices during sausage production proved to be a feasible way to delay lipid oxidation.

  16. Dietary influence of digestible lysine concentration on Cobb 500 hen broiler breeder reproductive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, L; McDaniel, C D; Corzo, A

    2012-02-01

    A study was conducted to examine the reproductive parameters of Cobb 500 broiler breeder hens fed 2 different types of diets varying in digestible lysine concentration. In total, 240 Cobb 500 broiler breeder pullets were placed in individual cages and given experimental diets from 35 to 45 wk of age. Treatments 1 and 2 were diets formulated using only commercially available feed ingredients and consisted of digestible lysine intakes of 1,200 (IDL) and 1,010 mg/hen per day (ID). Treatments 3 and 4 consisted of semipurified diets with the inclusion of l-glutamic acid to maintain isonitrogenous conditions with digestible lysine intakes of 1,010 (SPL) and 600 mg/hen per day (SP). Hens fed the SPL and SP diets had lower hen-day egg production than hens fed the ID diet, with hens receiving the IDL diet yielding intermediate values. Hens fed the SP diet had the lowest (P < 0.05) egg weight, but no differences were observed among dietary treatments for egg specific gravity. Fertility and hatchability of eggs set were lowest (P < 0.05) for hens fed the SPL dietary treatment. No differences were observed for early and middle embryonic mortality, contaminated, or pipped eggs. Late embryonic mortality was observed to be higher (P < 0.05) in hens fed the SP diet. A decrease in the daily intake of digestible lysine appeared to improve broiler breeder reproductive performance when hens were fed a semipurified diet. In contrast, the same effect was not observed when hens were fed a standard industry-type diet that contained less lysine.

  17. Outdoor stocking density in free-range laying hens: effects on behaviour and welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D L M; Hinch, G N; Downing, J A; Lee, C

    2017-06-01

    Free-range laying hen systems are increasing within Australia and research is needed to determine optimal outdoor stocking densities. Six small (n=150 hens) experimental flocks of ISA Brown laying hens were housed with access to ranges simulating one of three outdoor stocking densities with two pen replicates per density: 2000 hens/ha, 10 000 hens/ha or 20 000 hens/ha. Birds were provided daily range access from 21 to 36 weeks of age and the range usage of 50% of hens was tracked using radio-frequency identification technology. Throughout the study, basic external health assessments following a modified version of the Welfare Quality® protocol showed most birds were in visibly good condition (although keel damage was increasingly present with age) with few differences between stocking densities. Toenail length at 36 weeks of age was negatively correlated with hours spent ranging for all pens of birds (all r⩾-0.23, P⩽0.04). At 23 weeks of age, there were no differences between outdoor stocking densities in albumen corticosterone concentrations (P=0.44). At 35 weeks of age, density effects were significant (Pdensity showed the highest albumen corticosterone concentrations, although eggs from hens in the 10 000 hens/ha density showed the lowest concentrations (Pdensities showed the least foraging on the range but the most resting outdoors, with hens from the 20 000 hens/ha densities showing the least amount of resting outdoors (all Pdensities (P=0.08). For each of the health and behavioural measures there were differences between pen replicates within stocking densities. These data show outdoor stocking density has some effects on hen welfare, and it appears that consideration of both individual and group-level behaviour is necessary when developing optimal stocking density guidelines and free-range system management practices.

  18. PERFORMANCE AND EGGS QUALITY OF HENS OF GENETIC RESOURCES OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC AND SLOVAKIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Ledvinka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the performance and technological values of eggs of Czech Hen and Oravka breeds housed on litter. The assumption was that the genotype of hens affects their performance, egg weight, and parameters of yolk, albumen and eggshell quality. A total of 30 pullets of Czech Hen breed and 30 pullets of Oravka breed in the age of 17 weeks were included in to the experiment. Environmental conditions corresponded to the standard requirements for laying hens in observed type of housing system. Hen day egg production, egg yield, daily feed consumption per hen, feed consumption per egg and egg weight, egg shape index, proportion and index of yolk and albumen,yolk colour and Haugh units score were monitored in the experiment. From the parameters of eggshell, proportion, thickness, strength and colour of eggshell were observed. Performance parameters of laying hens weren't affected by the genotype of hens. Czech Hen breed showed insignificantly the higher value in all indicators. The significantly (P≤0.01 and P≤0.001 better values of eggshell quality parameters were detected in Czech Hen breed. We found out that Czech Hen breed had also statistically significantly lighter colour of eggshell. There were no significant interbreed differences in egg weight, proportion of yolk and albumen. The egg shape index was significantly higher in Oravka. Index of yolk and albumen was also significantly (P≤0.001 higher in Oravka. Haugh units score, that reflect the quality of the eggs, were found significantly (P≤0.001higher in Oravka too. On the other hand, yolk colour was detected significantly (P≤0.001 darker for the Czech Hen.

  19. Causes of mortality in laying hens in different housing systems in 2001 to 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Oddvar; Jansson, Désirée S; Etterlin, Pernille Engelsen; Vågsholm, Ivar

    2009-01-15

    The husbandry systems for laying hens were changed in Sweden during the years 2001 - 2004, and an increase in the number of submissions for necropsy from laying hen farms was noted. Hence, this study was initiated to compare causes of mortality in different housing systems for commercial laying hens during this change. Based on results from routine necropsies of 914 laying hens performed at the National Veterinary Institute (SVA) in Uppsala, Sweden between 2001 and 2004, a retrospective study on the occurrence of diseases and cannibalism, i.e., pecking leading to mortality, in different housing systems was carried out. Using the number of disease outbreaks in caged flocks as the baseline, the expected number of flocks with a certain category of disease in the other housing systems was estimated having regard to the total number of birds in the population. Whether the actual number of flocks significantly exceeded the expected number was determined using a Poisson distribution for the variance of the baseline number, a continuity correction and the exact value for the Poisson distribution function in Excel 2000. Common causes of mortality in necropsied laying hens included colibacillosis, erysipelas, coccidiosis, red mite infestation, lymphoid leukosis and cannibalism. Less common diagnoses were Newcastle Disease, pasteurellosis and botulism. Considering the size of the populations in the different housing systems, a larger proportion of laying hens than expected was submitted for necropsy from litter-based systems and free range production compared to hens in cages (P parasitic diseases and cannibalism in laying hens kept in litter-based housing systems and free-range systems than in hens kept in cages (P hens housed in litter-based housing systems, with or without access to outdoor areas, were at higher risk of infectious diseases and cannibalistic behaviour compared to laying hens in cages. Future research should focus on finding suitable prophylactic measures

  20. Plasma corticosterone levels in laying hens from three different housing systems: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Asdrubali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical and thyroidal hormones are physiological indicators of various forms of stress in the fowl. In order to establish possible variations in corticosterone levels, blood samples were collected from ISA Brown hens reared in three different housing systems (cage, floor and organic way. Results showed that corticosterone concentrations were highest in caged hens, intermediate in organic reared hens and lowest in floor reared hens. It could be assumed that in the last one system birds have an adequate space in controlled environment that permits them to satisfy, though partially, their behavioural needs without the presence of different chronic stress factors acting in the other systems.

  1. Fiber level for laying hens during the growing phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ednardo Rodrigues Freitas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Feeding management of laying hens has been focused on the direct influence of nutrient intake on weight gain, especially at growing phase. This study evaluates nutrient digestibility, performance, development of the digestive tract, body composition, and bone quality of two strains of laying hens fed with different levels of neutral detergent fiber (NDF during the growing phase from the 7th to the 12th week of age. A total of 1,296 birds were distributed in a completely randomized design in a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement (two strains x three levels of NDF with four replicates of 54 birds per treatment. Semi-heavy (Hy Line Brown and light-strain (Lohman LSL pullets were allotted to dietary treatments consisting of 14.50, 16.50, and 18.50% NDF. An interaction between strains and NDF levels was observed only for feed/gain ratio and light-strain pullets had lower performance with 18.50% NDF. The increasing levels of NDF in the diet reduced the coefficients of digestibility of dry matter, nitrogen and gross energy, and the values of metabolizable energy. Higher levels of NDF in the diet increased the relative weight of liver and intestines and reduced gizzard weight. It was also observed differences between bone quality and composition of the femur and tibia of light and semi-heavy hens. The increase in NDF level in ration for growing phase laying hens above 14.50% decreases the nutrient digestibility and the metabolizable energy of the diet; however, it does not affect the carcass composition, bone quality, feed intake, and weight gain, although it may impair feed conversion of light-strain pullets.

  2. Performance of Laying Hens Fed Diets Containing Varying Levels of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 100 twenty-two- week old Nera Black pullets were used in an eight- week long experiment to assess the effect of brewer's dried grain (BDG) as energy source on performance of laying hens. Five experimental diets were formulated to represent T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5 which contained 0. 25, 50, 75 and 100% brewer's ...

  3. The effect of dietary flaxseed meal on liver and egg yolk fatty acid profiles, immune response and antioxidant status of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek M. Shafey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of supplementing laying hen diets with 0, 50, or 100 g flaxseed meal (FSM/kg over a 12-week period on liver and egg yolk fatty acids (FA composition, liver and serum lipid peroxidation [thiobarbituric acid reactant substances (TBARS, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx], serum lipids (triglyerides, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, proteins (total protein, globulin and albumin, and immune response [serum antibody titres to sheep red blood cells (SRBC and white blood cell count (WBC and differential (heterophils (H, lymphocytes (L, monocytes (M, eosinophils (E and basophils (B] of laying hens were studied. The FSM diets increased total polyunsaturated FA (PUFA and omega-3 FA of α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3, docosapentanoic (C22:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic (C22:6n-3, and they reduced total monounsaturated FA (MUFA and total omega- 3/total omega-6 FA (Σn-6:Σn-3 ratio in the liver and egg yolk. Hens fed the FSM diets had a higher serum anti-SRBC and a lower blood H:L ratio. The 100 g FSM/kg diet increased liver TBARS level when compared with the control diet. Dietary FSM did not influence levels of TBARS, SOD, lipids and proteins in the serum, SOD and GPx in the liver, and blood count of M, E, B and total WBC. It was concluded that the addition of FSM to the diet of laying hens enhanced immune response of birds, increased omeg-3 FA and PUFA, and reduced MUFA and Σn-6:Σn-3 ratio in the liver and egg yolk, and that of 100 g FSM/kg diet increased hepatic lipid peroxidation.

  4. Characterizing the histopathology of natural co-infection with Marek's disease virus and subgroup J avian leucosis virus in egg-laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yawen; Huang, Qi; Yang, Chengcheng; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Qi, Kezong; Liu, Hongmei

    2018-02-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) and avian leucosis virus (ALV) are known to cause tumours in egg-laying hens. Here, we investigated the aetiology of tumours in a flock of egg-laying hens vaccinated against MDV. We carried out gross pathology and histopathological examinations of the diseased tissues, identified virus antigen and sequenced viral oncogenes to elucidate the cause of death in 21-22-week-old hens. At necropsy, diseased hens had distinctly swollen livers, spleens, and proventriculus, and white tumour nodules in the liver. The spleen and liver had been infiltrated by lymphoid tumour cells, while the proventriculus had been infiltrated by both lymphoid tumour cells and myeloblastic cells. Subtype J ALV (ALV-J) and MDV were widely distributed in the proventricular gland cells, and the lymphoid tumour cells in the liver and the spleen. In addition, positive ALV-J signals were also observed in parts of the reticular cells in the spleen. MDV and ALV-J antigens were observed in the same foci of the proventricular gland cells; however, the two antigens were not observed in the same foci from the spleen and liver. The amino acid sequence of the AN-1 (the representative liver tumour tissue that was positive for both ALV-J and MDV) Meq protein was highly similar to the very virulent MDV QD2014 from China. Compared to the ALV-J HPRS-103 reference strain, 10 amino acids (224-CTTEWNYYAY-233) were deleted from the gp85 protein of AN-1. We concluded that concurrent infection with MDV and ALV-J contributed to the tumorigenicity observed in the flock.

  5. USING RICE BRAN IN LAYING HEN DIETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H ERSIN SAMLI

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice bran is an energy and protein rich ingredient used in poultry feeding. To balance energy and protein requirements. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of rice bran on performance and egg quality during peak production of a commercial White laying strain of 22 week of age. Dietary treatments were consisted by inclusion of rice bran at 0, 5, 10 and 15% levels. Each treatment had 6 reps in which 12 birds were randomly assigned in wired fl oor battery cages equipped with nipple drinkers and through feeders. Layers accessed to feed and water freely. Lighting regimen was adjusted to 16h light/8h dark. The experiment lasted for 10 weeks. Overall results of the present experiment indicated that rice bran could be included up to 10% without any adverse affect on laying performance, egg quality and digestive organs.

  6. FACTORS INFLUENCING BIOSECURITY ADOPTION ON LAYING HEN FARMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Lestari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to identify factors that influences biosecurity adoption on laying hen farmers in Sidrap district, South Sulawesi. This district was choosen because beside it was famous as the center of laying hen farms, it was also as one of districts in South Sulawesi which suffered from Avian influenza outbreak. Total samples were 60 respondents. The samples were choosen through stratified random sampling from two subdistricts which had the most populous of layer smallholders, namely Baranti and Maritengngae. Data were obtained through observations and interviews using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using a score based on biosecurity status. Biosecurity status was obtained based on the adoption of biosecurity measures which consisted of 9 stages: farm inputs, traffic onto farms, distance from sources of pathogens to shed, exposure of farm, biosecurity at farm boundary, biosecurity between farm boundary and shed, biosecurity at the shed door, traffic into the shed and susceptibility of the flock. Multiple regression model was employed to analyze the data. The study revealed that the adoption biosecurity were associated with gender, age, education, farming experience, farm-income, family size and social capital. These variables contributed 20% variation in biosecurity adoption of laying hen farms. However, only farm income, family size and social capital were the major factors influencing to the adoption of biosecurity (P<0.05.

  7. CASHEW NUT MEAL IN THE FEEDING OF BROWN LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Braga Cruz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of alternative foods to replace conventional foods is becoming a source of research for many researchers. The cashew nut meal (CNM has high energy and protein value, may be a partial substitute for corn and soybean meal for poultry feed. In this context, this research was conducted to evaluate the effect of inclusion of CNM on the utilization of nutrients in the ration for laying hens, as well as the performance and characteristics of the eggs. The study used 180 Dekalb Brown laying hens 27 weeks of age, distributed in a completely randomized design with six treatments and five replicates of six birds. Treatments consisted of a control diet without CNM and others with the inclusion of this food at levels of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%. Upon regression analysis, a linear increase in nitrogen metabolism, crude energy and apparently metabolizable energy was seen. The dry matter digestibility and metabolizable energy corrected for rations were not affected by the inclusion of the CNM. Feed intake and egg weight were not affected by the inclusion of the CNM; however, egg production, egg mass, feed conversion, and yolk color worsened linearly with inclusion of CNM. Compared to control diet, the inclusion of CNM worsened the egg mass and feed conversion from 15%, and yolk color from 20%. As a result, it is recommended the inclusion of the CNM in the diet of laying hens at a maximum level of 10%.

  8. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium Infection in Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Vivek V.; Devon, Rebecca L.; Sharma, Pardeep; McWhorter, Andrea R.; Chousalkar, Kapil K.

    2016-01-01

    Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonize reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well-described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonize the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post-infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g) in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group, respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% S. Typhimurium, 14.1% S. Mbandaka) compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66%) however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of time

  9. Do laying hens with keel bone fractures experience pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A F Nasr

    Full Text Available The European ban on battery cages has forced a change towards the use of non-cage or furnished cage systems, but unexpectedly this has been associated with an increased prevalence of keel bone fractures in laying hens. Bone fractures are acutely painful in mammals, but the effect of fractures on bird welfare is unclear. We recently reported that keel bone fractures have an effect on bird mobility. One possible explanation for this is that flying becomes mechanically impaired. However it is also possible that if birds have a capacity to feel pain, then ongoing pain resulting from the fracture could contribute to decreased mobility. The aim was to provide proof of concept that administration of appropriate analgesic drugs improves mobility in birds with keel fracture; thereby contributing to the debate about the capacity of birds to experience pain and whether fractures are associated with pain in laying hens. In hens with keel fractures, butorphanol decreased the latency to land from perches compared with latencies recorded for these hens following saline (mean (SEM landing time (seconds birds with keel fractures treated with butorphanol and saline from the 50, 100 and 150 cm perch heights respectively 1.7 (0.3, 2.2 (0.3, p = 0.05, 50 cm; 12.5 (6.6, 16.9 (6.7, p = 0.03, 100 cm; 20.6 (7.4, 26.3 (7.6, p = 0.02 150 cm. Mobility indices were largely unchanged in birds without keel fractures following butorphanol. Critically, butorphanol can be considered analgesic in our study because it improved the ability of birds to perform a complex behaviour that requires both motivation and higher cognitive processing. This is the first study to provide a solid evidential base that birds with keel fractures experience pain, a finding that has significant implications for the welfare of laying hens that are housed in non-cage or furnished caged systems.

  10. THE STUDY OF THE ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY IN AMINO-ACIDS SUPPLEMENTATION OF THE LAYING HEN`S FODDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELIZA SIMIZ

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The experiment has been carried out on 69 Tetra SL hens, 27-36 weeks old, distributed into 3 groups consisted of 23 hens. They were fed with fodder recipes with different protein levels (17, 16 and respectively 15%. These recipes have been supplemented with DL-methionine and L-lysine up to the level of 0.80% lysine and 0.38% methionine. Fish flour has participated in a proportion of 3% in group 1, 1.5% in group 2 and it was absent from the fodder structure used in group 3. The reduction of crude protein with 1-2p% compared to the available commercial products, but with an amino acid supplementation, has led to the improvement of the economic criteria regarding egg production, generating savings of 7.7% in the group with 16% CP and of 12.8% in the group with 15% CP. The egg mass has not been affected significantly (p>0.05, the best yield being achieved from the hens fed with a 16%CP recipe.

  11. Laying hen performance and well-being over two flock cycles on different litter substrates in an aviary housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The momentum to move toward aviary housing has continued to increase in the past eight months. The pressure to find consistent bedding sources for meat birds may impact litter substrate for the laying hen industry as the number of cage-free hens increases in the next nine years. Molting laying hens ...

  12. Quality of foraging material and the effect on hens feed intake, egg production and - quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenfeldt, Sanna; Hammershøj, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    In a project with organic egg laying hens, the effect of different kind of foraging material was studied on feed intake, egg-production and -quality. Udgivelsesdato: August......In a project with organic egg laying hens, the effect of different kind of foraging material was studied on feed intake, egg-production and -quality. Udgivelsesdato: August...

  13. Sand intake by laying hens and its effect on egg production parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, van der J.; Kwakernaak, C.; Kan, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Soil intake may be the most prominent source of environmental contaminants for free range and organic hens, but there are no quantitative data concerning soil intake by domestic hens. Consumption of soil of 14¿32 g a day can be estimated from literature, but such a dilution of nutrient intake seems

  14. Strength of preference for dustbathing and foraging substrates in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de I.C.; Wolthuis, M.; Reenen, van C.G.

    2007-01-01

    The present experiment investigated the substrate preferences of laying hens, with particular respect to dustbathing and foraging behaviour, in order to guide decisions concerning which resources should be provided in laying hen housing systems to best enable the expression of these behaviours. The

  15. Effect of four processed animal proteins in the diet on digestibility and performance in laying hens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krimpen, van M.M.; Veldkamp, T.; Binnendijk, G.P.; Veer, de R.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment was performed to investigate the effect of animal vs. vegetable protein sources in the diet of laying hens on the development of hen performance. A diet containing protein sources of only vegetable origin was compared with 4 diets, each containing 1 of 4 processed animal proteins

  16. Genomic prediction of survival time in a population of brown laying hens showing cannibalistic behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alemu, Setegn W.; Calus, Mario P.L.; Muir, William M.; Peeters, Katrijn; Vereijken, Addie; Bijma, Piter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mortality due to cannibalism causes both economic and welfare problems in laying hens. To limit mortality due to cannibalism, laying hens are often beak-trimmed, which is undesirable for animal welfare reasons. Genetic selection is an alternative strategy to increase survival and is

  17. Egg fertility and hatchability in Avians broiler-breeder hens under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of temperature and humidity in different month of lay was evaluated on fertility and hatchability in broiler breeder hens reared in Sapele, Nigeria. Six million, six hundred and nineteen thousand, seven hundred and forty six eggs from flocks of Avians broiler-breeder hens reared between 2005 and 2006 in a farm ...

  18. The layering and physical characteristics of Shaver Brown Hens in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eggs were collected from 120 Shaver Brown hens for a period of 56 days in order to determine their oviposition time, sequence of laying, lag time, laying intensity and egg weight. The hens were subsequently divided into three classes on the basis of their laying performance namely: good layers, intermediate layers and ...

  19. Specific characteristics of the aviary housing system affect plumage condition, mortality and production in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerkens, J.L.T.; Delezie, Evelyne; Kempen, Ine; Zoons, Johan; Ampe, Bart; Rodenburg, T.B.; Tuyttens, F.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Feather pecking and high mortality levels are significant welfare problems in non-cage housing systems for laying hens. The aim of this study was to identify husbandry-related risk factors for feather damage, mortality, and egg laying performance in laying hens housed in the multi-tier non-cage

  20. Cytological Evaluation of Bone Marrow in Normal Laying Hens and those With Lymphoid Leukosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.I. Al-Sadi and E.Y. Hussein

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate cytologically the bone marrow (and peripheral blood of adult laying hens affected with lymphoid leukosis. Diagnosis of the neoplasm was made on the basis of clinical history, signs and symptoms and pathology. Only histologically confirmed cases were included in the study. Examination of blood smears revealed +2 heterophil toxicity and the presence of large numbers of reactive (blast – transformed lymphocytes. Smears that were prepared from the bone marrow showed increased numbers of hemopoietic cells. The total erythrocyte count (TEC, hemoglobin percentage (Hb% , hemoglobin concentration (Hb conc., packed cell volume (PCV and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC values were significantly higher (P<0.01 in hens with lymphoid leukosis than in apparently normal hens. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH were significantly lower (P< 0.01 in hens with lymphoid leukosis than in apparently normal hens. Results of the leukogram indicated that the total leukocyte count (TLC and the percentage (% of lymphocytes were significantly higher (P < 0.01 in hens with lymphoid leukosis than in apparently normal hens. From results of this study it was concluded that cytological evaluation of bone marrow may prove to be a simple , rapid , and useful tool in the diagnosis of lymphoid leukosis in laying hens. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(11.000: 497-499

  1. QUALITY AND SHELF LIFE EVALUATION OF NUGGETS PREPARED FROM SPENT DUCK AND SPENT HEN MEAT

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Kumar; Biswas, S.; V Singh; M. Ram

    2015-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare the quality of nuggets prepared from spent hen and duck meat. The cooked nuggets were analyzed for pH, thiobarbituric acid (TBA), tyrosine value (TV), moisture, fat, protein, total plate count (TPC) and sensory evaluations. Nuggets prepared from spent hen meat showed significantly higher (p

  2. Depopulation of Caged Layer Hens with a Compressed Air Foam System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Shailesh; Hoffman, John; Stringfellow, Kendre; Abi-Ghanem, Daad; Zhao, Dan; Caldwell, David; Lee, Jason; Styles, Darrel; Berghman, Luc; Byrd, James; Farnell, Yuhua; Archer, Gregory

    2018-01-01

    Simple Summary Reportable diseases, such as avian influenza, spread rapidly among poultry, resulting in the death of a large number of birds. Once such a disease has been diagnosed at a farm, infected and susceptible birds are rapidly killed to prevent the spread of the disease. The methods to eliminate infected caged laying hens are limited. An experiment was conducted to study the effectiveness of foam made from compressed air, water, and soap to kill laying hens in cages. The study found that stress levels of the hens killed using compressed air foam in cages to be similar to the hens killed by carbon dioxide or the negative control. Hens exposed to carbon dioxide died earlier as compared to the foam methods. The authors conclude that application of compressed air foam in cages is an alternative to methods such as gas inhalation and ventilation shutdown to rapidly and humanely kill laying hens during epidemics. Abstract During the 2014–2015 US highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreak, 50.4 million commercial layers and turkeys were affected, resulting in economic losses of $3.3 billion. Rapid depopulation of infected poultry is vital to contain and eradicate reportable diseases like HPAI. The hypothesis of the experiment was that a compressed air foam (CAF) system may be used as an alternative to carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation for depopulating caged layer hens. The objective of this study was to evaluate corticosterone (CORT) and time to cessation of movement (COM) of hens subjected to CAF, CO2 inhalation, and negative control (NEG) treatments. In Experiment 1, two independent trials were conducted using young and spent hens. Experiment 1 consisted of five treatments: NEG, CO2 added to a chamber, a CO2 pre-charged chamber, CAF in cages, and CAF in a chamber. In Experiment 2, only spent hens were randomly assigned to three treatments: CAF in cages, CO2 added to a chamber, and aspirated foam. Serum CORT levels of young hens were not significantly

  3. White Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  4. Outdoor stocking density in free-range laying hens: radio-frequency identification of impacts on range use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D L M; Hinch, G N; Dyall, T R; Warin, L; Little, B A; Lee, C

    2017-01-01

    The number and size of free-range laying hen (Gallus gallus domesticus) production systems are increasing within Australia in response to consumer demand for perceived improvement in hen welfare. However, variation in outdoor stocking density has generated consumer dissatisfaction leading to the development of a national information standard on free-range egg labelling by the Australian Consumer Affairs Ministers. The current Australian Model Code of Practice for Domestic Poultry states a guideline of 1500 hens/ha, but no maximum density is set. Radio-frequency identification (RFID) tracking technology was used to measure daily range usage by individual ISA Brown hens housed in six small flocks (150 hens/flock - 50% of hens tagged), each with access to one of three outdoor stocking density treatments (two replicates per treatment: 2000, 10 000, 20 000 hens/ha), from 22 to 26, 27 to 31 and 32 to 36 weeks of age. There was some variation in range usage across the sampling periods and by weeks 32 to 36 individual hens from the lowest stocking density on average used the range for longer each day (Paccessed the range with 2% of tagged hens in each treatment never venturing outdoors and a large proportion that accessed the range daily (2000 hens/ha: 80.5%; 10 000 hens/ha: 66.5%; 20 000 hens/ha: 71.4%). On average, 38% to 48% of hens were seen on the range simultaneously and used all available areas of all ranges. These results of experimental-sized flocks have implications for determining optimal outdoor stocking densities for commercial free-range laying hens but further research would be needed to determine the effects of increased range usage on hen welfare.

  5. European Whiteness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    2008-01-01

    Born out of the United States’ (U.S.) history of slavery and segregation and intertwined with gender studies and feminism, the field of critical whiteness studies does not fit easily into a European setting and the particular historical context that entails. In order for a field of European...... critical whiteness studies to emerge, its relation to the U.S. theoretical framework, as well as the particularities of the European context need to be taken into account.. The article makes a call for a multi-layered approach to take over from the identity politics so often employed in the fields of U...

  6. Causes of mortality in laying hens in different housing systems in 2001 to 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etterlin Pernille

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The husbandry systems for laying hens were changed in Sweden during the years 2001 – 2004, and an increase in the number of submissions for necropsy from laying hen farms was noted. Hence, this study was initiated to compare causes of mortality in different housing systems for commercial laying hens during this change. Methods Based on results from routine necropsies of 914 laying hens performed at the National Veterinary Institute (SVA in Uppsala, Sweden between 2001 and 2004, a retrospective study on the occurrence of diseases and cannibalism, i.e., pecking leading to mortality, in different housing systems was carried out. Using the number of disease outbreaks in caged flocks as the baseline, the expected number of flocks with a certain category of disease in the other housing systems was estimated having regard to the total number of birds in the population. Whether the actual number of flocks significantly exceeded the expected number was determined using a Poisson distribution for the variance of the baseline number, a continuity correction and the exact value for the Poisson distribution function in Excel 2000. Results Common causes of mortality in necropsied laying hens included colibacillosis, erysipelas, coccidiosis, red mite infestation, lymphoid leukosis and cannibalism. Less common diagnoses were Newcastle Disease, pasteurellosis and botulism. Considering the size of the populations in the different housing systems, a larger proportion of laying hens than expected was submitted for necropsy from litter-based systems and free range production compared to hens in cages (P P P Conclusion The results of the present study indicated that during 2001–2004 laying hens housed in litter-based housing systems, with or without access to outdoor areas, were at higher risk of infectious diseases and cannibalistic behaviour compared to laying hens in cages. Future research should focus on finding suitable prophylactic

  7. Ascarid infections in laying hens kept in different housing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Désirée S; Nyman, Ann; Vågsholm, Ivar; Christensson, Dan; Göransson, Magnus; Fossum, Oddvar; Höglund, Johan

    2010-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of ascarid infections in Swedish commercial laying hens in 2004 and 2008 following a recent nationwide change to alternative housing systems but before anthelmintics became available. Also, the influence on prevalence of farm and flock characteristics and management was studied in 2004. The results showed that the overall prevalence was significantly higher in 2008 (38%; n = 64/169) compared with 2004 (24%; n = 44/186) (P = 0.001). Ascarid infections were rare in caged flocks, including furnished (enriched) cages, both years (2.4 to 4.3%), and were significantly more common in non-cage systems in both years (16.7 to 48.6% in 2004, and 28.6 to 77.1% in 2008 depending on the housing system). There was no significant difference in prevalence between hens kept on litter indoors and free-range/organic hens. The absence of a hygiene barrier at the entrance of the house or unit increased the risk of infection (P parasite eggs were introduced horizontally to the farms. The risk of infection also increased with the age of equipment used in the barn; for example, the risk increased with an odds ratio of 7.5 (95% confidence interval = 2.3 to 25) when comparing equipment 1 year old with equipment ≥7 years old. The results of this study show that ascarid infections may re-emerge following a change to alternative housing. With the impending ban on conventional battery cages in the member states of the European Union, ascarid infections are likely to increase in importance and efficient control options such as hygiene barriers should be implemented on all farms.

  8. Hen egg white lysozyme permeabilizes Escherichia coli outer and inner membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derde, Melanie; Lechevalier, Valérie; Guérin-Dubiard, Catherine; Cochet, Marie-Françoise; Jan, Sophie; Baron, Florence; Gautier, Michel; Vié, Véronique; Nau, Françoise

    2013-10-16

    Natural preservatives answer the consumer demand for long shelf life foods, synthetic molecules being perceived as a health risk. Lysozyme is already used because of its muramidase activity against Gram-positive bacteria. It is also described as active against some Gram-negative bacteria; membrane disruption would be involved, but the mechanism remains unknown. In this study, a spectrophotometric method using the mutant Escherichia coli ML-35p has been adapted to investigate membrane disruption by lysozyme for long durations. Lysozyme rapidly increases the permeability of the outer membrane of E. coli due to large size pore formation. A direct delayed activity of lysozyme against the inner membrane is also demonstrated, but without evidence of perforations.

  9. Preliminary Work in Obtaining Site-Directed Mutants of Hen Egg White Lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Leonard D.

    1996-01-01

    Protein crystal growth studies are recognized as a critical endeavor in the field of molecular biotechnology. The scientific applications of this field include the understanding of how enzymes function and the accumulation of accurate information of atomic structures, a key factor in the process of rational drug design. NASA has committed substantial investment and resources to the field of protein crystal growth and has conducted many microgravity protein crystal growth experiments aboard shuttle flights. Crystals grown in space tend to be larger, denser and have a more perfect habit and geometry. These improved properties gained in the microgravity environment of space result largely from the reduction of solutal convection, and the elimination of sedimentation at the growing crystal surface. Shuttle experiments have yielded many large, high quality crystals that are suitable for high resolution X-ray diffraction analysis. Examples of biologically important macromolecules which have been successfully crystallized during shuttle missions include: lysozyme, isocitrate lyase, gamma-interferon, insulin, human serum albumin and canavalin. Numerous other examples are also available. In addition to obtaining high quality crystals, investigators are also interested in learning the mechanisms by which the growth events take place. Crystallization experiments indicate that for the enzyme HEWL, measured growth rates do not follow mathematical models for 2D nucleation and dislocation-led growth of tetragonal protein crystals. As has been suggested by the laboratory of Marc L. Pusey, a possible explanation for the disagreement between observation and data is that HEWL tetraconal crystals form by aggregated units of lysozyme in supersaturated solutions. Surface measurement data was shown to fit very well with a model using an octamer unit cell as the growth unit. According to this model, the aggregation pathway and subsequent crystal growth is described by: monomer dimer tetramer octamer higher order. It is believed that multimer aggregation of lysozyme occurs by interaction at specific binding sites on the surface of the protein crystals. If the presence of discrete binding sites and the aggregation hypothesis is true, then it follows that the alteration of the binding site(s) should have significant effect on the measurements obtained during growth experiments. Site-directed mutagenesis allows the specific alteration of proteins by replacement, deletion or addition of specific amino acid residues. This report outlines the approach for this strategy and the progress made thus far toward that end.

  10. Renaturation of reduced hen egg white lysozyme containing two blocked sulfhydryl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, A.S.; Taniuchi, H.

    1980-10-01

    Formation of native lysozyme from the reduced form involves many pathways in two processes: incorrect pairing of half-cystine residues by oxidation and rearrangement of disulfide (SS) bonds. The energy barrier against suflhydryl (SH)-disulfide interchange of the native or nativelike species thus formed causes accumulation of these species. For example, the enzymatically active isomers containing three presumably native SS bonds and one open SS bond may be thermodynamically favorable over the nonnative isomers and can be formed from reduced lysozyme or lysozyme containing scrambled SS bonds by nonobligatory and flexible pathways. As an extension of these observations formation of nativelike species from reduced lysozyme containing the average of two carboxymethyl (CM)-cysteine was investigated.

  11. Ortho-methylated 3-hydroxypyridines hinder hen egg-white lysozyme fibrillogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Mariño; Kris Pauwels; Rodrigo Casasnovas; Pilar Sanchis; Bartolomé Vilanova; Francisco Muñoz; Josefa Donoso; Miquel Adrover

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation with the concomitant formation of amyloid fibrils is related to several neurodegenerative diseases, but also to non-neuropathic amyloidogenic diseases and non-neurophatic systemic amyloidosis. Lysozyme is the protein involved in the latter, and it is widely used as a model system to study the mechanisms underlying fibril formation and its inhibition. Several phenolic compounds have been reported as inhibitors of fibril formation. However, the anti-aggregating capacity of o...

  12. Oxidative renaturation of hen egg-white lysozyme. Folding vs aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bernardez Clark, E; Hevehan, D; Szela, S; Maachupalli-Reddy, J

    1998-01-01

    Since the inception of recombinant DNA technology, different strategies have been developed in the isolation, renaturation, and native disulfide bond formation of proteins produced as insoluble inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. One of the major challenges in optimizing renaturation processes is to prevent the formation of off-pathway inactive and aggregated species. On the basis of a simplified kinetic model describing the competition between folding and aggregation, it was possible to analyze the effects of denaturant and thiol/disulfide concentrations on this competition. Although higher guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) concentrations resulted in higher renaturation yields, the folding rate was negatively affected, indicating an optimum range of GdmCl for optimum renaturation rates and yields. Similarly, higher total glutathione concentrations resulted in higher yields but decreased rates, also indicating an optimum total glutathione concentration for optimum renaturation rates and yields (6-16 mM), with an optimum ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione between 1 and 3. To characterize the nature of aggregates, aggregation experiments were performed under different oxidizing/reducing conditions. It is shown that hydrophobic interactions between partially folded polypeptide chains are the major cause of aggregation. Aggregation is fast and aggregate concentration does not significantly increase beyond the first minute of renaturation. Under conditions which promote disulfide bonding, aggregate size, but not concentration, may increase due to disulfide bond formation, resulting in covalently bonded aggregates.

  13. Ortho-methylated 3-hydroxypyridines hinder hen egg-white lysozyme fibrillogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mariño, Laura; Pauwels, Kris; Casasnovas, Rodrigo; Sanchis, Pilar; Vilanova, Bartolomé; Muñoz, Francisco; Donoso, Josefa; Adrover, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation with the concomitant formation of amyloid fibrils is related to several neurodegenerative diseases, but also to non-neuropathic amyloidogenic diseases and non-neurophatic systemic amyloidosis...

  14. Mercury distribution in laying hens fed whalemeal supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, F.R. (Dept. of Agriculture, Melbourne); Bartlett, B.E.

    1975-03-01

    Whalemeal was fed as the protein supplement in the diet of laying hens and the concentration of mercury in the eggs, feces and separate fractions of the carcasses was determined. In preliminary studies, four samples of fish meal, local and imported, were found to contain less than 0.1 ppM of mercury. Three samples of whale solubles and three samples of whalemeal, from western Australia, contained from 1.7 to 3 nd from 7.9 to 10 ppM of mercury respectively. It is apparent that use of whalemeal could have a significant influence in providing excessive mercury levels and therefore warrants carefule consideration. (JWP)

  15. Study of Salmonella Typhimurium infection in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil eChousalkar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of Salmonella enterica are frequently involved in egg and egg product related human food poisoning outbreaks worldwide. In Australia, Salmonella Typhimurium is frequently involved in egg and egg product related foodborne illness and Salmonella Mbandaka has also been found to be a contaminant of the layer farm environment. The ability possessed by Salmonella Enteritidis to colonise reproductive organs and contaminate developing eggs has been well described. However, there are few studies investigating this ability for Salmonella Typhimurium. The hypothesis of this study was that the Salmonella Typhimurium can colonise the gut for a prolonged period of time and that horizontal infection through feces is the main route of egg contamination. At 14 weeks of age hens were orally infected with either S. Typhimurium PT 9 or S. Typhimurium PT 9 and Salmonella Mbandaka. Salmonella shedding in feces and eggs was monitored for 15 weeks post infection. Egg shell surface and internal contents of eggs laid by infected hens were cultured independently for detection of Salmonella spp. The mean Salmonella load in feces ranged from 1.54 to 63.35 and 0.31 to 98.38 most probable number/g (MPN/g in the S. Typhimurium and S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka group respectively. No correlation was found between mean fecal Salmonella load and frequency of egg shell contamination. Egg shell contamination was higher in S. Typhimurium + S. Mbandaka infected group (7.2% Typhimurium, 14.1% Mbandaka compared to birds infected with S. Typhimurium (5.66% however, co-infection had no significant impact on egg contamination by S. Typhimurium. Throughout the study Salmonella was not recovered from internal contents of eggs laid by hens. Salmonella was isolated from different segments of oviduct of hens from both the groups, however pathology was not observed on microscopic examination. This study investigated Salmonella shedding for up to 15 weeks p.i which is a longer period of

  16. Gregarious nesting - An anti-predator response in laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Anja Brinch

    2012-01-01

    in nesting strategy. The aim of the present experiment was to investigate whether gregarious nesting due to behavioural flexibility in nesting strategy is an anti-predator response. Twelve groups of 14–15 Isa Warren hens age 44 weeks were housed in pens each containing three adjacent roll-out nest boxes....... Nesting and spacing behaviour were video recorded for 5 days in each of three distinct periods; (a) pre-predator; a pre-exposure period, (b) predator; a period with daily exposure to a simulated attack by a lifelike flying model of a hooded crow (Corvus cornix, a potential egg-predator), and (c) post...

  17. Tocopherol and annatto tocotrienols distribution in laying-hen body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, H; Wang, T; Dolde, David; Xin, Hongwei

    2015-10-01

    The impact of supplementing laying-hen feed with annatto tocotrienols (T3s) and alpha-tocopherol on the distribution of various forms of vitamin E and cholesterol throughout the hen's body was evaluated. A total of 18 organs or tissues (skin, fat pad, liver and gall bladder, heart, oviduct, forming yolk, laid yolk, lungs, spleen, kidney, pancreas, gizzard, digestive tract, brain, thigh, breast, manure, and blood) were collected after 7 wk of feeding on diets enriched with various levels of alpha-tocopherol and annatto extract that contained gamma-T3 and delta-T3. Tissue weights, contents of lipid, alpha-tocopherol, gamma-T3, delta-T3, cholesterol, and fatty acid composition of extracted lipids from the collected organs and tissues were determined. Tissue weight and lipid content did not change significantly with feed supplementation treatments, except that the liver became heavier with increased levels of supplementation. Overall, the main organs that accumulated the supplemented vitamin E were fat pad, liver and gall bladder, oviduct, forming yolks, laid yolks, kidney, brain, thigh, and breast. Much of annatto gamma-T3 and delta-T3 (> 90%) was found in the manure, indicating poor uptake. In some tissues (brain and oviduct,) a significant increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids was seen with increased supplementation. Alpha-tocopherol impacted the transfer of gamma-T3 to forming and laid yolks, but did not impact delta-T3 transfer. No significant differences were found in most of the tissues in cholesterol, except a reduction in heart, based on tissue as-is. Blood samples showed large variations in individual hens with no significant differences in total and HDL cholesterol, or total triacylglycerols. Supplementing feed with annatto T3s and alpha-tocopherol showed that the vitamin E profile and distribution of the laying-hen body can be altered, but to different extents depending on tissue. The result of this research has significance in enhancing meat nutrient

  18. Effect of genotype and transport on tonic immobility and heterophil/lymphocyte ratio in two local Italian breeds and Isa Brown hens kept under free-range conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele De Marco

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of transport and genotype on the welfare and fear response of laying hens through a comparison of three breeds reared in free-range conditions: a commercial strain, the Isa Brown (IBh, and two local chicken breeds, the Bionda Piemontese (BPh and the Bianca di Saluzzo (BSh. After a journey of 67 km (75 min from the farmhouse of origin to the experimental station, ninety hens, divided according to breed, were free-range reared for two months. Body weight (BW, tonic immobility (TI, red and white blood cells, heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L ratio and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP were assessed at four different sampling times: at the farmhouse of origin (T1, at 1 day (T2, 15 days (T3 and at 2 months (T4 after arrival at the experimental station. No statistical differences were found between the four sampling times for BW, total red and white blood parameters. cells or for AGP. An increase in the H/L ratio (P<0.05 was recorded at time T2 for IBh and BSh, compared to BPh (P<0.05. TI was significantly higher (P<0.05 for the local breeds, BPh and BSh, than for the commercial strain IBh. The results of this study suggest that genetic and adaptive differences can affect both, physiological and ethological parameters.

  19. Measuring the Dispersion in Laser Cavity Mirrors using White-Light Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    how it lends itself to this application. White light is essentially incoherent, like sunlight -- unless one looks on a femtosecond time-scale. Its...dispersion, is group-velocity and the second term σ = 1 , and λ λ ω = 2πν = 2π hc = 2πhcσ . (8.2) hen substitute (8.2) into (8.1) T 2 Δφ ω( )= 1

  20. Hydrolysis of plasma triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins from immature and laying hens (Gallus domesticus) by lipoprotein lipase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, H; Grant, G; Perry, M

    1982-01-01

    Very-low-density (VLD) lipoproteins and portomicrons were isolated from the plasma of immature and laying hens and their size, lipid composition and susceptibility to hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase were compared. In agreement with other studies, VLD lipoproteins from laying hens were found to be smaller and have a different lipid composition than VLD lipoproteins from immature hens. Portomicrons from immature and laying hens had mean diameters of about 150 nm and similar lipid compositions. Hydrolysis of VLD lipoproteins from immature hens, and portomicrons from immature and laying hens, proceeded rapidly until at least 40% of the substrate had been used. In contrast only 1--15% of laying-hen VLD-lipoprotein triacylglycerol was readily hydrolysis occurred slowly. The limited susceptibility of laying-hen VLD lipoproteins appeared to be due to their low content of lipoprotein lipase activator apoprotein, which occurred despite an abundance of activator in the high-density lipoproteins of laying-hen plasma. The results provide further evidence that the liver of the laying hen synthesizes specialized lipoproteins. Their limited susceptibility to hydrolysis by lipoprotein lipase is probably a major factor in ensuring transport of lipid to yolk rather than to other tissues. The form of transport of dietary lipid, however, is similar in immature and laying hens. PMID:7150269

  1. The influence of Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and Starfish (Asterias rubens) meals on production performance, egg quality and apparent total tract digestibility of nutrients of laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afrose, Sadia; Hammershøj, Marianne; Nørgaard, Jan Værum

    2016-01-01

    . The egg weight was not different from the egg weights of control diets, but the inclusion of 4 g mussel meal resulted in a lower (P egg weight than 8 g and 12 g mussel meal per 100 g feed. The egg shell strength was not affected by any of the diets. The egg yolk colour was lower (P ...The aim of the study was to evaluate mussel meal and starfish meals as protein sources for organic layers by studying the effect on production performance, nutrient digestibility and egg quality. A total of 300 Hisex white laying hens (20-week old) were distributed randomly to 6 dietary treatment...... groups, each with five replicates, including a control diet providing fish meal, 3 diets providing mussel meal (4, 8 and 12 g/100 g) and 2 diets providing starfish meal (4 and 8 g/100 g). Laying rate, egg mass, feed conversion ratio, mortality and live weight of the hens did not differ among treatments...

  2. Metabolism of lipid labeled very low density lipoprotein from laying turkey hens in laying turkey hens and immature turkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, W.L.

    1981-07-01

    Labeled very low density lipoprotein of laying turkey hens (VLDL-L) was prepared by injecting 1-/sup 14/C-palmitate abd subsequently isolating the VLDL-L by ultracentrifugation at d.1.006. The isolated VLDL-L then was injected into recipient laying hens, immature males, or immature females. Size exclusion chromatography of recipient laying hen plasma showed no remnant particles of smaller size or greater density than the injected VLDL-L up to 400 min postinjection. In the immature birds of either sex, remnant particles of greater density and smaller size than the injected VLDL-L were present when blood samples were withdrawn at 5 (males) or 1 (females) min postinjection. In laying females, both VLDL-L-triglyceride (VLDL-L-TG) and phospholipids (VLDL-L-PL) had identical fractional clearance rates of .00253 min-1 and had parallel rates of disappearance. The irreversible loss of VLDL-L-TG was 12.8 g/day while it was 4.8 g/day for VLDL-L-PL. Thirty-one percent of the injected radioactivity was isolated in ovarian follicles undergoing rapid development. VLDL-L-TG decayed with a single exponential decay component in both immature males and females, but decayed more rapidly in the males; it also decayed more rapidly in the immature birds of both sexes than in laying females. There was also an increase in triglyceride (TG) radioactivity in lipoproteins of d greater than 1.006. The VLDL-L-PL decayed in a more complex pattern in the immature birds, showing more than a single exponential decay component. There was also an increase in phospholipid (PL) radioactivity in lipoproteins of d greater than 1.006. THe VLDL-TG and PL radioactivities did not decay in a parallel pattern in immature birds where remnant particles of d greater than 1.006 were present soon after lipid labeled VLDL-L injection.

  3. l aceite de atún como fuente de ácidos grasos ω-3 en el huevo de gallina

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez-Valladolid, J. L.; Castillo-Badillo, C.; González-Alcorta, M.; Morales-Barrera, E.; Castillo-Domínguez, R. M.; S Carrillo-Domínguez

    2005-01-01

    Fish oils are a source of polyunsaturated omega 3 fatty acids (AG ω3), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which supply many benefits to human health. Tuna oil was used as a source of marine 3ω FA to enrich eggs by supplementing the diet of egg-laying hens with tuna oil. One hundred and twenty White Leghorn hens of 90 weeks old were allocated on three treatments with four replicates each, on a completely random design. Treatments consisted of adding 1 % and 2 %...

  4. FACTORS INFLUENCING BIOSECURITY ADOPTION ON LAYING HEN FARMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Lestari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to identify factors that influences biosecurity adoption on layinghen farmers in Sidrap district, South Sulawesi. This district was choosen because beside it was famousas the center of laying hen farms, it was also as one of districts in South Sulawesi which suffered fromAvian influenza outbreak. Total samples were 60 respondents. The samples were choosen throughstratified random sampling from two subdistricts which had the most populous of layer smallholders,namely Baranti and Maritengngae. Data were obtained through observations and interviews using aquestionnaire. Data were analyzed using a score based on biosecurity status. Biosecurity status wasobtained based on the adoption of biosecurity measures which consisted of 9 stages: farm inputs, trafficonto farms, distance from sources of pathogens to shed, exposure of farm, biosecurity at farm boundary,biosecurity between farm boundary and shed, biosecurity at the shed door, traffic into the shed andsusceptibility of the flock. Multiple regression model was employed to analyze the data. The studyrevealed that the adoption biosecurity were associated with gender, age, education, farming experience,farm-income, family size and social capital. These variables contributed 20% variation in biosecurityadoption of laying hen farms. However, only farm income, family size and social capital were the majorfactors influencing to the adoption of biosecurity (P<0.05.

  5. Shrimp cephalothorax meal in laying hen diets: effects on egg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Chacón-Villalobos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of shrimp cephalothorax meal Pleuroncodes planipes (HC in laying hen diets over egg quality and yolk color. From April to September 2013 in San José Costa Rica, four inclusion levels of meal were evaluated (0% HC, 5% HC, 10% HC, 15% HC in rations for 140 Hy-Line Brown hens (35 per treatment. There were no significant differences (p>0.05 for Haugh units (M= 90, yolk index (M= 0.41, and pH (M= 6.2. The lowest shell thickness was for 15% HC (M= 0.44 mm (p0.05 among color parameters L* (M= 61.59, b* (M= 57.58 and C* (M = 62.60. The parameter a* was significantly higher (M=72,4 (p<0.05 for 15% HC (M= 29.34. The °h parameter was higher for 0% HC (p<0.05 (M=72.39, and liking for the color of yolk (M= 7.4 was higher as well (p<0.05. Flavor liking generated three clusters: 40% of people preferred 0% HC, 27% preferred 15% HC, and 33% were indifferent. The results show that the inclusions of HC are associated with an acceptable liking of egg, generating a possible market to produce them with inclusions among 10% and 15% HC.

  6. EFFICACY OF PROBIOTICS INTAKE ON INTERNAL MILIEU OF HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mellen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to evaluate the functional efficiency of probiotic preparation on selected blood biochemical parameters of ISA Brown hens. Feed in the experimental group of hens was enriched with a probiotic preparation in the dose of 500g.t-1 consisted of freeze-dried cultures: Lactobacillus bulgaricus LAT 187, L. acidophilus LAT 180, L. helveticus LAT 179, L. delbrueckii ssp. Lactis LAT 182, Streptococcus thermophiles LAT 205, Enterococcus faecium E-253 with concentration of 5.109 (CFU LAB living organisms in 1 gram. Blood samples were collected in 25 and 48 week of hens’ age. Biochemical parameters of mineral profile (calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chlorides, energetic profile (plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, total proteins, bilirubin, glucose, and activities of serum liver enzymes (aspartate aminotransferase AST, alanine aminotransferase ALT, alkaline phosphatase ALP were analysed using Ecoline kits and a semi-automated clinical chemistry analyser Microlab 300 (Vilat Scientific, Dieren, The Nederland. Probiotic preparation reduced (P<0.05 serum cholesterol and triglycerides content. No significant effects of probiotic on remaining parameters were confirmed.

  7. Obesity-associated cardiac pathogenesis in broiler breeder hens: Pathological adaption of cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C Y; Lin, H Y; Chen, Y W; Ko, Y J; Liu, Y J; Chen, Y H; Walzem, R L; Chen, S E

    2017-07-01

    Broiler hens consuming feed to appetite (ad libitum; AL) show increased mortality. Feed restriction (R) typically improves reproductive performance and livability of hens. Rapidly growing broilers can exhibit increased mortality due to cardiac insufficiency but it is unknown whether the increased mortality of non-R broiler hens is also due to cardiac compromise. To assess cardiac growth and physiology in fully mature birds, 45-week-old hens were either continued on R rations or assigned to AL feeding for 7 or 21 days. AL hens exhibited increased bodyweight, adiposity, absolute and relative heart weight, ventricular hypertrophy, and cardiac protein/DNA ratio by d 21 (P growth was attributed to enhanced IGF-1-Akt-FoxO1 signaling and its downstream target, translation initiation factor 4E-BP1 in conjunction with down-regulation of ubiquitin ligase atrogin-1/MAFbx (P growth were further supported by uregulation of heart failure markers, BNP and MHC-β (P broiler hens results in maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy that progresses to overt pathogenesis in contractility and thereby increases mortality. Feed restriction provides clear physiological benefit to heart function of adult broiler hens. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITY OF THE WASTE OF SACCHARIFICATION PROCESS FROM CASSAVA BAGASSE ON THE LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.M. Ali-Mursyid

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study the nutrient digestibility and the metabolizable energyvalue of the waste of saccharification process from cassava bagasse (WSPCB on the laying hens.Twenty ISA-Brown laying hens at the age of 72 weeks were randomly distributed into three feedingtreatments which consisted of cassava bagase (CB, WSPCB of solid state fermentation method(WSPCB-SSF, and WSPCB of sub merged fermentation method (WSPCB-SmF. All of the hens werefasted for 24 hours and 15 of them were fed with CB, WSPCB-SSF and WSPCB-SmF (five hens foreach test-diet. The other five hens were still fasted. Then, all of the hens were fasted again and theirexcreta were collected during 48 hours. The nutrient digestibilities which were measured consisted ofthe Apparent and True Digestibility of Dry matter (ADDM and TDDM, Crude Fiber (ADCF andTDCF, Starch (ADS and TDS, and the Apparent and True Metabolizable Energy (AME and TME.The result of this research showed that the saccharification process generated the solid waste with thenutrient digestibility value (ADDM, TDDM, ADS, TDS, AME, and TME which were significantlylower (P<0.05 than those of CB. The crude fiber digestibility value of the WSPCB has an opositephenomenon in which the ADCF and TDCF of WSPCB-SmF were greater than CB. In conclusion, thenutrient digestibility value, except for ADCF and TDCF, of the WSPCB on the laying hens were lowerin value than those CB.

  9. Influence of commercial laying hen housing systems on the incidence and identification of Salmonella and Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D R; Guard, J; Gast, R K; Buhr, R J; Fedorka-Cray, P J; Abdo, Z; Plumblee, J R; Bourassa, D V; Cox, N A; Rigsby, L L; Robison, C I; Regmi, P; Karcher, D M

    2016-05-01

    The housing of laying hens is important for social, industrial, and regulatory aspects. Many studies have compared hen housing systems on the research farm, but few have fully examined commercial housing systems and management strategies. The current study compared hens housed in commercial cage-free aviary, conventional cage, and enriched colony cage systems. Environmental and eggshell pool samples were collected from selected cages/segments of the housing systems throughout the production cycle and monitored for Salmonella and Campylobacter prevalence. At 77 wk of age, 120 hens per housing system were examined for Salmonella and Campylobacter colonization in the: adrenal glands, spleen, ceca, follicles, and upper reproductive tract. All isolates detected from environmental swabs, eggshell pools, and tissues were identified for serotype. Two predominant Salmonella were detected in all samples:S.Braenderup andS.Kentucky.Campylobacter coli and C. jejuni were the only Campylobacter detected in the flocks. Across all housing systems, approximately 7% of hens were colonized with Salmonella, whereas >90% were colonized with Campylobacter Salmonella Braenderup was the isolate most frequently detected in environmental swabs (PCampylobacter jejuni was the isolate most frequently found in environmental swabs (P<0.01), while housing system impacted the prevalence of C. coli and jejuniin ceca (P<0.0001). The results of this study provide a greater understanding of the impact of hen housing systems on hen health and product safety. Additionally, producers and academia can utilize the findings to make informed decisions on hen housing and management strategies to enhance hen health and food safety. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Causes of mortality in laying hens in different housing systems in 2001 to 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Oddvar; Jansson, Désirée S; Etterlin, Pernille Engelsen; Vågsholm, Ivar

    2009-01-01

    Background The husbandry systems for laying hens were changed in Sweden during the years 2001 – 2004, and an increase in the number of submissions for necropsy from laying hen farms was noted. Hence, this study was initiated to compare causes of mortality in different housing systems for commercial laying hens during this change. Methods Based on results from routine necropsies of 914 laying hens performed at the National Veterinary Institute (SVA) in Uppsala, Sweden between 2001 and 2004, a retrospective study on the occurrence of diseases and cannibalism, i.e., pecking leading to mortality, in different housing systems was carried out. Using the number of disease outbreaks in caged flocks as the baseline, the expected number of flocks with a certain category of disease in the other housing systems was estimated having regard to the total number of birds in the population. Whether the actual number of flocks significantly exceeded the expected number was determined using a Poisson distribution for the variance of the baseline number, a continuity correction and the exact value for the Poisson distribution function in Excel 2000. Results Common causes of mortality in necropsied laying hens included colibacillosis, erysipelas, coccidiosis, red mite infestation, lymphoid leukosis and cannibalism. Less common diagnoses were Newcastle Disease, pasteurellosis and botulism. Considering the size of the populations in the different housing systems, a larger proportion of laying hens than expected was submitted for necropsy from litter-based systems and free range production compared to hens in cages (P < 0.001). The study showed a significantly higher occurrence of bacterial and parasitic diseases and cannibalism in laying hens kept in litter-based housing systems and free-range systems than in hens kept in cages (P < 0.001). The occurrence of viral diseases was significantly higher in indoor litter-based housing systems than in cages (P < 0.001). Conclusion The results

  11. Nutritional quality and amino acid composition of diets consumed by scavenging hens and cocks across seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncobela, Cyprial Ndumiso; Chimonyo, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of season on nutritional quality and amino acid composition of diets that scavenging hens and cocks consume. Thirty hens and 30 cocks were purchased and slaughtered during each of the rainy, post rainy, cool dry and hot dry seasons. A total of 240 birds were used in the study. Fresh crop content weights were high (P cocks. Hens had a higher (P cocks. Histidine, serine, arginine, threonine, cysteine and lysine contents varied with seasons (P < 0.05). Methionine did not vary with season and sex of the bird. Nutritional supplementation of village chickens should, therefore, vary with seasons.

  12. Allergenicity of pasteurized whole raw Hen's egg compared with fresh whole raw Hen's egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netting, Merryn; Donato, Adaweyah; Makrides, Maria; Gold, Michael; Quinn, Patrick; Penttila, Irmeli

    2015-05-01

    Oral food challenges for diagnosis and management of egg allergy using fresh egg are common; however, to limit the risk of foodborne infection, many allergy units use pasteurized raw egg. Pasteurization and drying processes have the potential to affect the structure of egg proteins in egg powder and thus the allergenicity when compared to fresh egg. Our aim was to compare the binding of serum IgE from egg-allergic children to in vitro digested and undigested pasteurized whole raw egg powder with unpasteurized fresh whole raw egg. Egg proteins from in vitro digested or undigested pasteurized whole raw egg powder, fresh whole egg, egg white and egg yolk were separated by SDS-PAGE, transferred onto nitrocellulose membrane and incubated overnight with pooled sera from egg-allergic children. In both the raw egg samples and the pasteurized whole egg powder, protein bands corresponding to known molecular weights of the major egg allergens were present. Pasteurized whole raw egg powder was bound by serum IgE in a similar manner to unpasteurized whole raw egg and was unaffected by in vitro digestion. Serum IgE also bound egg yolk, indicating sensitization to both egg yolk and egg white proteins. The main egg allergens are present in pasteurized whole raw egg powder, and serum IgE of egg-allergic children binds to them in a similar pattern to those in fresh whole raw egg. Pasteurized whole raw egg powder is a suitable substitute for raw egg in clinical practice for oral food challenges. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Salmonella enteritidis and other Salmonella in laying hens and eggs from flocks with Salmonella in their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, C; Johnson, R P; Forsberg, C M; Irwin, R J

    1992-01-01

    Seven Canadian layer flocks with Salmonella enteritidis in their environment were investigated to determine the numbers of hens infected with S. enteritidis, the localization of S. enteritidis in organs of infected hens and the numbers of S. enteritidis-infected eggs produced by two affected flocks. By a microagglutination test (MAT) using S. pullorum antigens, these flocks had more seropositive hens (mean 51.9 +/- 16.9%) than two Salmonella-free flocks (mean 13.0 +/- 4.2%). Culture of tissues of 580 hens (433 seropositive) from the seven flocks detected 26 (4.5%) S. enteritidis-infected hens from two flocks. In one flock, 2/150 hens were infected with S. enteritidis phage type (PT) 8, which was confined to the ceca, and no Salmonella spp. were isolated from 2520 eggs (one day's lay). In the second flock, where 24/150 hens were infected with S. enteritidis PT13, extraintestinal infection was found in nine hens and involved the ovaries and/or oviduct in two hens. Salmonella enteritidis PT13 was isolated from one sample of egg contents and from one sample of cracked shells from among 14,040 eggs (one day's lay) from this flock. The overall prevalence of S. enteritidis-contaminated eggs from the two flocks with infected hens was less than 0.06%. Other Salmonella spp. isolated were S. heidelberg from 58 hens (10%), and S. hadar, S. mbandaka and S. typhimurium from one hen (0.2%) each. The MAT with antigens of S. pullorum had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 24% for detecting S. enteritidis-infected hens.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1423059

  14. Prevention of egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis after oral vaccination of laying hens with Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilroy, Sofie; Raspoet, Ruth; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2016-08-12

    Vaccination of laying hens has been successfully used to reduce egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis, decreasing human salmonellosis cases worldwide. Currently used vaccines for layers are either inactivated vaccines or live attenuated strains produced by mutagenesis. Targeted gene deletion mutants hold promise for future vaccines, because specific bacterial functions can be removed that may improve safety and allow differentiation from field strains. In this study, the efficacy of Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains in laying hens as live vaccines was evaluated. The mutants are deficient in either the membrane channel TolC (ΔtolC) or the multi-drug efflux systems acrAB, acrEF and mdtABC (ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC). These strains have a decreased ability for gut and tissue colonization and are unable to survive in egg white, the latter preventing transmission of the vaccine strains to humans. Two groups of 30 laying hens were orally inoculated at day 1, 6 weeks and 16 weeks of age with 10(8) cfu of either vaccine strain, while a third group was left unvaccinated. At 24 weeks of age, the birds were intravenously challenged with 5 × 10(7) cfu Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 S1400/94. The vaccine strains were not shed or detected in the gut, internal organs or eggs, 2 weeks after the third vaccination. The strains significantly protected against gut and internal organ colonization, and completely prevented egg contamination by Salmonella Enteritidis under the conditions of this study. This indicates that Salmonella Enteritidis ΔtolC and ΔacrABacrEFmdtABC strains might be valuable strains for vaccination of layers against Salmonella Enteritidis.

  15. Both feather peckers and victims are more asymmetrical than control hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado Tahamtani, Fernanda; Forkman, Björn; Hinrichsen, Lena Karina

    2017-01-01

    Feather pecking is the major welfare issue facing the egg farming industry worldwide. Previous research has found a relationship between cannibalistic behaviour, fluctuating asymmetry of bilateral traits (FA) and body weight in laying hens. As cannibalism is linked to severe feather pecking......, it could be suggested that a relationship between feather pecking, FA and body weight also exists. The purpose of this study was to analyse the association between feather pecking behaviour and a) FA, b) body weight and c) comb size in laying hens. Sixty-four laying hens were categorised as feather peckers......, victims or control hens based on weekly performance of feather pecking behaviour from age 0–23 weeks and plumage condition at age 23 weeks. After culling at 23 weeks of age, the lengths of ulna, tarsus and middle toe as well as the widths of tarsus and hock were measured twice in each side. Each trait...

  16. Both feather preckers and victims are more asymmetrical than control hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahamtani, Fernanda M; Forkman, Björn; Hinrichsen, Lena Karina

    2017-01-01

    Feather pecking is the major welfare issue facing the egg farming industry worldwide. Previous research has found a relationship between cannibalistic behaviour, fluctuating asymmetry of bilateral traits (FA) and body weight in laying hens. As cannibalism is linked to severe feather pecking......, it could be suggested that a relationship between feather pecking, FA and body weight also exists. The purpose of this study was to analyse the association between feather pecking behaviour and a) FA, b) body weight and c) comb size in laying hens. Sixty-four laying hens were categorised as feather peckers......, victims or control hens based on weekly performance of feather pecking behaviour from age 0–23 weeks and plumage condition at age 23 weeks. After culling at 23 weeks of age, the lengths of ulna, tarsus and middle toe as well as the widths of tarsus and hock were measured twice in each side. Each trait...

  17. Demonstrating Cell Traction--Using Hens' Egg Vitelline Membrane as Substratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Roger

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways in which hens' egg vitelline membranes can be used to demonstrate cell traction effects. Reviews procedures for using and culturing the membranes and identifies topic areas for student projects. (ML)

  18. Effect of oils sources on blood lipid parameters of commercial laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LS Murata

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was carried out to verify if total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and triacylglicerol plasma levels are affected when laying hens are fed rations containing different dietary oil sources. One hundred sixty 50 week-old hens, assigned to four treatments with five replicates using 8 hens per replicate were used. The experimental period was of 84 days divided in 3 cycles of 28 days each. In the last day of each cycle, blood samples of 2 hens per replicate were randomly choose and blood samples were collected. On the other hand, blood was also collected at 7 am, 11 am and 3 pm aiming to study the daily changes of these lipids. Blood lipid parameters were not affected by different dietary oil sources (p > 0.05; however, HDL-cholesterol did change during the day, giving evidence that this lipid is indeed involved in the egg yolk formation.

  19. ASSESSING RAPTOR DIET: COMPARING PELLETS, PREY REMAINS, AND OBSERVATIONAL DATA AT HEN HARRIER NESTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephen M. Redpath; Roger Clarke; Mike Madders; Simon J. Thirgood

    2001-01-01

    Abstract We compared techniques to assess diet at 17 Hen Harrier (Circus cyaneus) nests. Diet was measured directly from observations and compared to estimates from pellets, prey remains and a combination of pellets and remains...

  20. Long term selection for reduced or increased pecking behaviour in laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenhuis, A J; Kjaer, J B

    2008-01-01

    Feather pecking in laying hens is an important issue in animal welfare. Four studies in laying hens were selected which investigated increased or reduced pecking behaviour using direct or indirect measures of feather pecking behaviour. Direct comparison of the selected experiments is difficult......, as the selection criteria and even the selection procedures varied. Keeping these differences in mind, the results of the experiments showed that a) It is possible to change pecking behaviour in the desired direction using selection, b) Aggressive pecking is not related to feather pecking, c) There is no clear...... selection for reduced pecking behaviour changes the immune response. Feather pecking in laying hens is an important issue in animal welfare. Four studies in laying hens were selected which investigated increased or reduced pecking behaviour using direct or indirect measures of feather pecking behaviour...

  1. NEW ORGANIC APPROACH TO PARASITES: Biological control of parasitic roundworms in organic laying hens using microfungi

    OpenAIRE

    Thapa, Sundar; Meyling, Nicolai V.; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Mejer, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Microfungi can kill chicken roundworm eggs. This project investigates the use of naturally occuring soil microfungi to clean up contaminated pastures and bedding material, thereby controlling roundworm infections in organic laying hens.

  2. Evaluation of welfare parameters in laying hens on the basis of a Bavarian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louton, H; Bergmann, S M; Rauch, E; Liebers, C; Reese, S; Erhard, M H; Hoeborn, C; Schwarzer, A

    2017-09-01

    Health issues like infestation with poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) and behavioral problems such as feather pecking and cannibalism are reported as current problems on laying hen farms. However, the epidemiological prevalence of these issues in Bavaria, Germany, is not known. The objective of the present survey was to determine the epidemiological prevalence of health and behavioral parameters and the management of hen farms in practice. The survey was sent to all laying hen farmers with more than 1,000 hens in Bavaria, Germany, and contained questions regarding flock management, behavior problems and health issues. The response rate was 40.8% and surveys were answered regarding 293 individual flocks on 147 farms. Three-quarters (77.6%) of the respondents housed their hens under conventional conditions. Farming system had an influence (P ≤ 0.05) on several management measures and the hens' behavior. An infestation of the flocks with poultry red mite was stated in 65.7%, whereby a relationship existed with the farming system (P = 0.001) and the provision of an additional dust bath (P ≤ 0.001). The occurrence of feather pecking (18.5%) was related with the farming system (P = 0.001), the presence of roosters (P = 0.034), the locking of laying hens into the aviary (P = 0.006), not allowing access to the entire litter space after housing (P = 0.044) and nervous (P = 0.002) or chasing behavior (P ≤ 0.001) of laying hens. Similarly, cannibalism (15.0%) was related with locking hens into the aviary system (P ≤ 0.001) and not allowing access to the entire litter space (P = 0.026). According to these results, farmers should avoid locking the hens into the aviary or not allowing access to the entire litter space, because these measures relate to nervous behavior that may result in feather pecking or cannibalism. The provision of an additional dust bath is one of the management measures that can positively influence hens' health and behavior. © 2017 Poultry

  3. Effect of four processed animal proteins in the diet on digestibility and performance in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Krimpen, M M; Veldkamp, T; Binnendijk, G P; de Veer, R

    2010-12-01

    An experiment was performed to investigate the effect of animal vs. vegetable protein sources in the diet of laying hens on the development of hen performance. A diet containing protein sources of only vegetable origin was compared with 4 diets, each containing 1 of 4 processed animal proteins (PAP). Two PAP (Daka-58 and Sonac-60) were classified as meat meals, and the remaining 2 (Daka-40 and Sonac-50) were classified as meat and bone meals. First, fecal digestibility of nutrients in the PAP was determined in Lohmann Brown layers. Hens (n = 132) were housed in 22 cages (6 hens/cage) and allotted to 5 dietary treatments. In the PAP diets (4 replicates/treatment), 100 g/kg of CP of animal origin was added, replacing soybean meal and corn (Zea mays) in the basal diet (6 replicates/treatment). The PAP sources differed largely in chemical composition and digestibility coefficients. Energy content (AME(n)) varied from 1,817 (Daka-40) to 3,107 kcal/kg (Sonac-60), and digestible lysine varied from 15.4 (Daka-40) to 28.3 g/kg (Sonac-50). Subsequently, the effect of a control diet (without PAP) vs. 4 PAP diets (50 g/kg of CP of animal origin from the same batches as used in the digestibility study) on performance was determined. All diets were isocaloric (AME(n) = 2,825 kcal/kg) and isonitrogenous (digestible lysine = 6.8 g/kg). Hens were housed in 40 floor pens (12 hens/pen, 8 pens/treatment) from 20 to 40 wk of age. Feed intake levels of the hens fed the meat and bone meal diets were reduced compared with those of hens fed the meat meal diets, whereas the feed intake level of hens fed the control diet was intermediate. Laying hen performance differed between treatments, being was most favorable for the Sonac-50 treatment and most adverse for the Daka-40 treatment. Differences in laying hen performance seemed to be related partly to differences in feed intake and corresponding amino acid intake.

  4. Alleviation of hysteria in laying hens with dietary tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, S R; Ball, R O

    1990-01-01

    A commercial layer breeder flock that was suffering from hysteria was fed a diet containing 5 grams tryptophan/kg for six days. The incidence of episodes of hysteria declined from five times/hour on day 0 to once/hour on day 6 and none on day 8. Feed consumption increased from 107 g to 145 g/hen/day and egg production increased 23% during the six day feeding period. The tryptophan concentration in plasma doubled (from 95.6 to 188.2 mumol/mL). Plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine also increased. Birds that were not in lay, by postmortem examination, had significantly higher plasma valine concentrations (476.4 vs 372.7 mumol/mL). Tryptophan, serotonin and related metabolites increased in both the hypothalamic region and the remainder of the brain following tryptophan feeding, and subsequently declined. High levels of dietary tryptophan may be useful in alleviating hysteria in poultry. PMID:2357668

  5. Response analysis of the dynamic excitation of hen eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Severa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercially produced hen eggs have been tested by means of dynamic excitation of the egg-shells with following analysis of their response. The falling steel ball have been chosen as a exciting instrument and the laser vibrometer have been used as a measuring device for the egg response. The reproductibility of the experiments has been relatively high and the surface velocity has been found to be significantly dependent on the position around the meridian. Analysed frequency spectrum has shown the peak frequency and frequency history. Proposed numerical model has demonstrated reasonable agreement with experimental results and can be used as an effective tool in modelling of analogous or similar experiments.

  6. THE EFFECT OF LUTEIN ADDITIVES ON BIOCHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN BLOOD OF LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Grčević

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to present the performance and some biochemical parameters in the blood of hens fed feed mixtures with different levels of lutein. The study involved a total of 291 Tetra SL hybrid laying hens, divided into 3 groups (O0 with 0 mg/kg lutein added, O200 with 200 mg/kg lutein added and O400 with 400 mg/kg lutein added, and lasted for 5 weeks. The O0 group included 93 hens, whereas experimental groups 98 and 100 hens, respectively. The highest egg production and the best feed consumption per egg were recorded in O400 group with a total of 3367 pieces of eggs produced and 128.60 g of feed consumed. The best laying intensity (96.68% and number of eggs per laying hen (34.19 as well as the highest feed consumption per day (129.01 g, was recorded in O200 group. Lutein added to feed mixtures for laying hens did not significantly affect the values of biochemical parameters in blood (P>0.05. An increase in total cholesterol (CHOL and HDL cholesterol content as well as the decrease of total protein (PROT and albumin (ALB content in the experimental groups can be observed. The content of glucose (GUK and urea was similar between the experimental groups, while the highest content of triglycerides (TGC was recorded in O200 group. It can be concluded that different levels of lutein added to the feed mixtures for laying hens did not have negative effect on the performance and blood biochemical parameters of laying hens.

  7. Ghrelin plasma concentration does not covary with energy demand in adult laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhne, A; Schrader, L; Weigend, S; Petow, S

    2017-10-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is suggested to be involved in food intake regulation in young growing chicken. Whether ghrelin is involved in the regulation of energetic balance associated with laying performance in adult laying hens was studied by use of 4 chicken lines that differ in laying performance and phylogeny (4 lines; 16 hens per line). As housing conditions are also known to affect energy demand, half of the hens per line were housed in single cages and the other half of hens were maintained in a floor housing system. Plasma samples were collected at 17 to 19, 33 to 35, 49 to 51, and 72 wk of age and analyzed with a chicken ghrelin ELISA Kit. From caged hens, individual food consumption and laying performance additionally was recorded. Due to its function in growth and its relationship with ghrelin, also GH plasma concentrations were analyzed. Ghrelin concentrations did not differ between the 4 lines at any of the test periods (all P > 0.05). Ghrelin was negatively related to food consumption only in the growing period of the high-performing lines (both P < 0.0001). During this phase, floor-housed hens showed greater ghrelin concentrations compared with caged hens (P < 0.0001). Our results suggest that in adult layers ghrelin is not involved in regulating energy intake related to laying performance but rather seems to be related to body growth and housing condition before start of lay, the latter possibly due to differences in hens' behavioral activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of superdosing phytase on productive performance and egg quality in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hyuk; Pitargue, Franco Martinez; Jung, Hyunjung; Han, Gi Ppeum; Choi, Hyeon Seok; Kil, Dong Yong

    2017-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of superdosing phytase on productive performance and egg quality in laying hens. A total of 200 42-wk-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens were allotted into 1 of 5 dietary treatments with 5 replicates consisting of 8 hens per replicate. The positive control (PC) and negative control diets (NC) were prepared based on the recommended P levels in layer diets. Supplemental phytase was added to the negative control diet at 10,000 (SD10), 20,000 (SD20), or 30,000 (SD30) fytase units (FTU)/kg. Productive performance was summarized for 6 weeks from 42 weeks to 47 weeks of age. Egg quality was assessed from 4 eggs per replicate randomly collected at the conclusion of the experiment. The SD20 treatment had greater (p<0.05) hen-day egg production than PC, NC, and SD10 treatment groups. There was no difference in hen-day egg production between SD20 and SD30 treatment groups. However, SD30 treatment had greater (p<0.05) hen-day egg production than PC treatment, but showed no difference in hen-day egg production as compared to NC and SD10 treatment groups. However, egg weight, egg mass, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio were not affected by dietary treatments. Egg quality including eggshell strength, eggshell color, egg yolk color, and haugh unit was not influenced by dietary treatments. Superdosing level of 20,000 FTU/kg phytase in diets has a positive effect on egg production rate, but no beneficial effect on egg quality in laying hens.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira spp. isolated from commercial laying hens and free-living wild mallards

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Desiree Seger; Pringle, Märit

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility to tylosin, valnemulin, tiamulin, doxycycline, lincomycin and ampicillin was investigated by broth dilution in 48 Brachyspira spp. isolates from commercial laying hens (n=30) and free-living wild mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) (n=18). Presumed pathogens (B. alvinipulli, B. intermedia, B. pilosicoli), commensals (B. murdochii, B. innocens, ?B. pulli?), and isolates of undetermined species affiliation were included. The laying hens had no...

  10. Depopulation of Caged Layer Hens with a Compressed Air Foam System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Gurung

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 2014–2015 US highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI outbreak, 50.4 million commercial layers and turkeys were affected, resulting in economic losses of $3.3 billion. Rapid depopulation of infected poultry is vital to contain and eradicate reportable diseases like HPAI. The hypothesis of the experiment was that a compressed air foam (CAF system may be used as an alternative to carbon dioxide (CO2 inhalation for depopulating caged layer hens. The objective of this study was to evaluate corticosterone (CORT and time to cessation of movement (COM of hens subjected to CAF, CO2 inhalation, and negative control (NEG treatments. In Experiment 1, two independent trials were conducted using young and spent hens. Experiment 1 consisted of five treatments: NEG, CO2 added to a chamber, a CO2 pre-charged chamber, CAF in cages, and CAF in a chamber. In Experiment 2, only spent hens were randomly assigned to three treatments: CAF in cages, CO2 added to a chamber, and aspirated foam. Serum CORT levels of young hens were not significantly different among the CAF in cages, CAF in a chamber, NEG control, and CO2 inhalation treatments. However, spent hens subjected to the CAF in a chamber had significantly higher CORT levels than birds in the rest of the treatments. Times to COM of spent hens subjected to CAF in cages and aspirated foam were significantly greater than of birds exposed to the CO2 in a chamber treatment. These data suggest that applying CAF in cages is a viable alternative for layer hen depopulation during a reportable disease outbreak.

  11. Depopulation of Caged Layer Hens with a Compressed Air Foam System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Shailesh; Hoffman, John; Stringfellow, Kendre; Abi-Ghanem, Daad; Zhao, Dan; Caldwell, David; Lee, Jason; Styles, Darrel; Berghman, Luc; Byrd, James; Farnell, Yuhua; Archer, Gregory; Farnell, Morgan

    2018-01-11

    During the 2014-2015 US highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) outbreak, 50.4 million commercial layers and turkeys were affected, resulting in economic losses of $3.3 billion. Rapid depopulation of infected poultry is vital to contain and eradicate reportable diseases like HPAI. The hypothesis of the experiment was that a compressed air foam (CAF) system may be used as an alternative to carbon dioxide (CO₂) inhalation for depopulating caged layer hens. The objective of this study was to evaluate corticosterone (CORT) and time to cessation of movement (COM) of hens subjected to CAF, CO₂ inhalation, and negative control (NEG) treatments. In Experiment 1, two independent trials were conducted using young and spent hens. Experiment 1 consisted of five treatments: NEG, CO₂ added to a chamber, a CO₂ pre-charged chamber, CAF in cages, and CAF in a chamber. In Experiment 2, only spent hens were randomly assigned to three treatments: CAF in cages, CO₂ added to a chamber, and aspirated foam. Serum CORT levels of young hens were not significantly different among the CAF in cages, CAF in a chamber, NEG control, and CO₂ inhalation treatments. However, spent hens subjected to the CAF in a chamber had significantly higher CORT levels than birds in the rest of the treatments. Times to COM of spent hens subjected to CAF in cages and aspirated foam were significantly greater than of birds exposed to the CO₂ in a chamber treatment. These data suggest that applying CAF in cages is a viable alternative for layer hen depopulation during a reportable disease outbreak.

  12. Effects of interaction of breed by pen and cage position on hen day ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This were subjected to a two way Analysis of variance to determine the effect of breed by pen and cage interaction on hen-day performance.Mean hen day lay of Haco black by pen interaction was not significantly (P>0.01) different in pen L1 and L3, while that in pen L2 was low and significantly (P<.05) different from that in ...

  13. Influence of gastrointestinal parasitism on biochemical variables in blood of laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Topázio, Josué P; Campigotto, Gabriela; Boiago, Marcel M; Machado, Gustavo; Paiano, Diovani; Tonin, Alexandre A; da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTObjective. This study describes the influence of endoparasites and diet on biochemical variables in sera of brown laying hens. Materials and methods. Biochemical parameters (seric levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein, uric acid, albumin, and alanine aminotransferase activity) were assessed in blood samples of poultry. Three populations of laying hens of different properties (n=20 each) represented our experimental design, from which blood (serum) and feces were collecte...

  14. Population genetic structure of Ascaridia galli re-emerging in non-caged laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Höglund, Johan; Morrison, David A; Engström, Annie; Nejsum, Peter; Jansson, Désirée S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The poultry roundworm Ascaridia galli has reappeared in hens kept for egg production in Sweden after having been almost absent a decade ago. Today this is a frequent intestinal nematode parasite in non-caged laying hens. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic diversity (Fst) in A. galli collected from different poultry production sites in southern Sweden, to identify possible common routes of colonization. Methods Adult parasites (n = 153) from 10 farms, incl...

  15. Influence of selected feeding supplements on the occurrence of coccidias in digestive tract of hens

    OpenAIRE

    PAZDERKOVÁ, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    Poultry farming represents 30 % of meat production worldwide. The occurrence of animal parasites is an enormous problem of poultry farming. This problem is recorded from factory farming as well as from small farming and causes financial losses. The aim of this study was to gain basic data about the occurrence of coccidia oocysts in the excrements of carrier hens. Carrier hens were fed by dietary supplements which were supposed to have influence on native gut microflora composition. This exper...

  16. Learning and Judgment Can Be Affected by Predisposed Fearfulness in Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elske N. de Haas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available High fearfulness could disrupt learning and likely affects judgment in animals, especially when it is part of an animals’ personality, i.e., trait anxiety. Here, we tested whether high fearfulness affects discrimination learning and judgment bias (JB in laying hens. Based on the response to an open field at 5 weeks of age, birds were categorized as fearful (FC by showing no walking or vocalizing or non-fearful (NFC by showing walking and vocalizing. At adult age, birds (n = 24 were trained in a go–go task to discriminate two cues (white or black with a small or large reward. Birds that reached training criteria were exposed to three unrewarded ambiguous cues (25, 50, and 75% black to assess JB. Task acquisition took longer for FC birds than for NFC birds, due to a left side bias, and more sessions were needed to unlearn this side bias. Changes in trial setup increased response latencies for FC birds but not for NFC birds. A larger number of FC birds than NFC birds chose optimistically in the last ambiguous trial (25% black. FC birds had a longer latency to choose in the ambiguous trial (75% black compared to NFC birds. Prior choice in ambiguous trials and a preceding large or small trial affected latencies and choices for both types of birds. Our study showed that fearfulness was associated with differences in discrimination learning ability and JB. It appeared that FC birds used a rigid response strategy during early learning phases by choosing a specific side repeatedly irrespective of success. FC birds were more affected by changes in the setup of the trials in comparison to NFC birds. We speculate that FC birds are more sensitive to changes in environmental cues and reward expectancy. These factors could explain how high fearfulness affects learning.

  17. Learning and Judgment Can Be Affected by Predisposed Fearfulness in Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, Elske N; Lee, Caroline; Rodenburg, T Bas

    2017-01-01

    High fearfulness could disrupt learning and likely affects judgment in animals, especially when it is part of an animals' personality, i.e., trait anxiety. Here, we tested whether high fearfulness affects discrimination learning and judgment bias (JB) in laying hens. Based on the response to an open field at 5 weeks of age, birds were categorized as fearful (FC) by showing no walking or vocalizing or non-fearful (NFC) by showing walking and vocalizing. At adult age, birds (n = 24) were trained in a go-go task to discriminate two cues (white or black) with a small or large reward. Birds that reached training criteria were exposed to three unrewarded ambiguous cues (25, 50, and 75% black) to assess JB. Task acquisition took longer for FC birds than for NFC birds, due to a left side bias, and more sessions were needed to unlearn this side bias. Changes in trial setup increased response latencies for FC birds but not for NFC birds. A larger number of FC birds than NFC birds chose optimistically in the last ambiguous trial (25% black). FC birds had a longer latency to choose in the ambiguous trial (75% black) compared to NFC birds. Prior choice in ambiguous trials and a preceding large or small trial affected latencies and choices for both types of birds. Our study showed that fearfulness was associated with differences in discrimination learning ability and JB. It appeared that FC birds used a rigid response strategy during early learning phases by choosing a specific side repeatedly irrespective of success. FC birds were more affected by changes in the setup of the trials in comparison to NFC birds. We speculate that FC birds are more sensitive to changes in environmental cues and reward expectancy. These factors could explain how high fearfulness affects learning.

  18. Studies on the absorption, distribution and retention of vomitoxin (deoxynivalenol) in laying hens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lun, A.K.L.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of vomitoxin (V) on laying hen performance and the absorption, tissue distribution and retention of this toxin were investigated in four experiments. The results indicated that feeding 82.8 ppm of dietary V did not significantly affect live performance and egg quality. No gross pathological lesions were observed in the gastrointestinal (GI) segments, liver, spleen, heart or kidneys although small erosions were present on the gizzard mucosa of the hens fed the V-diet. No significant V residues were detected (detection limit 20 ppb) in the eggs, liver, kidneys, breast or thigh muscle, but levels of approximately 20 ppb were found in the gizzard of the V-fed hens. Approximately 4.2% of the total ingested V was recovered in the excreta of the hens. Radiolabeling of V was also studied using biosynthesis and chemical labeling methods. Tritiated-V was administered orally to colostomized hens. Over 69% of the total ingested radioactivity was recovered in the urine and approximately 6.5% was recovered in the feces over a 48 hr period. Oral administration of tritiated-V to non-exteriorized hens demonstrated that the V was rapidly absorbed and widely distributed in the body tissues shortly after intubation.

  19. Effects of dietary threonine supplementation on intestinal barrier function and gut microbiota of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X Y; Azzam, M M M; Zou, X T

    2017-10-01

    The effects of supplemental dietary threonine (Thr) on laying performance, expression of intestinal mucin 2 (MUC2) and secretory IgA (sIgA), and intestinal microbiota of laying hens fed a low CP diet were investigated. A total of 240 Lohmann Brown laying hens, 28 wk of age, was allocated to 3 dietary treatments, each of which included 5 replicates of 16 hens. Hens were fed a control diet (16% CP), a low CP diet (14% CP), or a low CP diet supplemented with 0.3% L-Thr for 12 weeks. Chemical analyses of the diets for Thr are 0.49, 0.45, and 0.69%, respectively. Lowering dietary CP impaired egg production and egg mass of laying hens. Dietary Thr supplementation to the low CP diet increased (P < 0.05) egg production and egg mass. In addition, ileal sIgA contents and MUC2 and sIgA mRNA expression were increased (P < 0.05) by dietary Thr addition. Dietary CP reduction reduced (P < 0.05) intestinal bacterial diversity, whereas dietary Thr supplementation to the low CP diet recovered the bacteria diversity and significantly increased the abundance of potential beneficial bacteria. In conclusion, dietary Thr supplementation to a low CP diet could affect intestinal health and hence productivity via regulating intestinal mucin and sIgA expression, and microbial population of laying hens. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  20. Relative bioavailability of tropical volcanic soil-bound chlordecone in laying hens (Gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jondreville, Catherine; Bouveret, Cécile; Lesueur-Jannoyer, Magalie; Rychen, Guido; Feidt, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    The former use of chlordecone (CLD) in the French West Indies has resulted in long-term pollution of soils and of food chains. CLD may be transferred into eggs of hens reared outdoors, through polluted soil ingestion. Tropical volcanic soils display variable capacities of pollutant retention: CLD is less available and more persistent in andosol than in nitisol. The impact of soil type on CLD bioavailability to hens was tested through a relative bioavailability study. The deposition of CLD in egg yolk and in abdominal fat was measured in 42 individually housed laying hens fed with diets containing graded levels of CLD from polluted andosol, nitisol, or spiked oil during 23 days. Within each ingested matrix, the concentration of CLD in yolk and in abdominal fat linearly increased with the amount of ingested CLD (P 0.1), indicating that CLD was equally bioavailable to laying hens, irrespective of the matrix. This suggests that the hen's gastrointestinal tract efficiently extracts CLD from the two tropical volcanic soils, regardless of their retention capacity. Thus, hens reared on polluted soils with CLD may lay contaminated eggs.

  1. Antibody and inflammatory responses in laying hens with experimental primary infections of Ascaridia galli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Atxutegi, C; Gandolfi, B; Arangüena, T; Sepúlveda, R; Arévalo, M; Simón, F

    2009-04-06

    Ascaridia galli, an intestinal nematode that affects hens and other domestic and wild birds, causes economic losses in avian exploitations. The present work shows that A. galli stimulates a strong antibody response as well as an intense inflammatory reaction, in the intestinal mucous of experimentally infected Lohmann Brown laying hens. IgG antibodies against soluble extracts of A. galli embrionated eggs and adult worms, were detected in both blood and yolks eggs from infected hens during a period of 105 days after the infection. This indicates that hens transfer to their offspring a part of the IgG antibodies produced when they become infected. The antigens responsible for the stimulation of specific IgG were molecules of 30-34, 44-54 and 58-90 kDa, while in the yolk eggs of infected hens a reactivity directed against antigens of molecular weight (M(w)) lower than 50 kDa was detected. Histology revealed traumatic lesions with leukocyte infiltration, and inflammation of the intestinal wall of the infected hens after 105 days of initial infection. The possible influence of the immune and inflammatory response on the population dynamics of the parasite is discussed.

  2. Effect of Dietary Phytase Transgenic Corn on Physiological Characteristics and the Fate of Recombinant Plant DNA in Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqi Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate the potential effects of feeding with phytase transgenic corn (PTC on organ weight, serum biochemical parameters and nutrient digestibility, and to determine the fate of the transgenic DNA in laying hens. A total of 144 50-week-old laying hens were grouped randomly into 2 treatments, with 8 replicates per treatment and 9 hens per replicate. Each treatment group of hens was fed with diets containing 62.4% non-transgenic conventional corn (CC or PTC for 16 weeks. The phytase activity for CC was 37 FTU/kg of DM, whereas the phytase activity for PTC was 8,980 FTU/kg of DM. We observed that feeding PTC to laying hens had no adverse effect on organ weight or serum biochemical parameters (p>0.05. A fragment of a poultry-specific ovalbumin gene (ov was amplified from all tissues of hens showing that the DNA preparations were amenable to PCR amplification. Neither the corn-specific invertase gene (ivr nor the transgenic phyA2 gene was detected in the breast muscle, leg muscle, ovary, oviduct and eggs. The digestibility data revealed no significant differences between the hens that received the CC- and PTC-based diets in the digestibility of DM, energy, nitrogen and calcium (p>0.05. Phosphorus digestibility of hens fed the PTC-based diet was greater than that of hens fed the CC-based diet (58.03% vs 47.42%, p<0.01. Based on these results, it was concluded that the PTC had no deleterious effects on the organ weight or serum biochemical parameters of the laying hens. No recombinant phyA2 gene was detected in muscle tissues and reproductive organs of laying hens. The novel plant phytase was efficacious in improving the phosphorus digestibility of laying hens.

  3. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF SYMBIOTIC STARS. X. ORBITS FOR THREE S-TYPE SYSTEMS: V1044 CENTAURI, HEN 3-1213, AND SS 73-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fekel, Francis C. [Tennessee State University, Center of Excellence in Information Systems, 3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard, Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Joyce, Richard R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Wood, Peter R., E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu, E-mail: joyce@noao.edu, E-mail: wood@mso.anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2015-08-15

    Employing new infrared radial velocities, we have computed orbits of the cool giants in three southern S-type symbiotic systems. The orbit for V1044 Cen, an M5.5 giant, has a period of 985 days and a modest eccentricity of 0.16. Hen 3-1213 is a K4 giant, yellow symbiotic with an orbital period of 533 days and a similar eccentricity of 0.18. For the M2 giant SS 73-96 the orbital period is 828 days, and this system has a somewhat larger eccentricity of 0.26. Measurement of the H i Paschen δ emission lines, which may at least partially reflect the motion of the secondary in SS 73-96, results in a mass ratio of 2.4 for the M giant relative to the presumed white dwarf. The estimated orbital inclinations of V1044 Cen and Hen 3-1213 are low, about 40°. However, for SS 73-96 the predicted inclination is 90°, and so an ephemeris for eclipses of the secondary or the hot nebula surrounding it is provided. A search of the orbital velocity residuals of V1044 Cen and SS 73-96 for pulsation periods produced no realistic or convincing period for either star.

  4. Effect of monochromatic and combined light colour on performance, blood parameters, ovarian morphology and reproductive hormones in laying hens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassan, Md Rakibul; Sultana, Shabiha; Choe, Ho Sung; Ryu, Kyeong Seon

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of monochromatic and combined light emitting diode (LED) light colour on performance, ovarian morphology, and reproductive hormone and biochemical blood parameters in laying hens...

  5. Evaluation of carryover effects of dietary lysine intake by Cobb 500 broiler breeder hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, L; McDaniel, C D; Kidd, M T; Lopez, K; Corzo, A

    2013-03-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine the progeny performance of broiler breeder (BB) hens fed diets differing in digestible lysine (dLys). A total of 240 Cobb 500 BB pullets and 40 cockerels, 20 wk of age, were used for each of 2 experiments. In experiment 1, treatment diets were fed from 35 to 45 wk of age. Treatment 1 and 2 diets were formulated with common feed ingredients and BB had dLys daily intakes of 1,200 (IDL-1,200) and 1,010 mg/hen per d (ID-1,010), respectively. Treatments 3 and 4 were composed of semipurified diets formulated to dLys intakes of 1,010 (SPL-1,010) and 600 mg/hen per d (SP-600), respectively. In experiment 1, chick weight at hatch was lower (P < 0.05) for those that came from the SP-600 and SPL-1,010-fed hens, but 42 and 56 d BW was similar for all treatments. Improvements (P < 0.10) in feed conversion ratio were seen at 42 and 56 d for chicks from ID-1,010-fed hens compared with IDL-1,200 hens. For experiment 2, diets were fed to BB hens from 24 to 42 wk of age. Treatment 1 was composed of corn-soybean meal and formulated to a dLys intake of 1,000 mg/hen per d (CS-1,000). Treatments 2, 3, and 4 had inclusion of 25% distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) with dLys intake levels of 1,000 (DDGS-1,000), 800 (DDGS-800), and 600 (DDGS-600) mg/hen per d, respectively. Progeny performance was evaluated from eggs collected at wk 26, 31, and 36. Chick hatch weight was similar for all 3 hatches. Chicks from 26-wk-old BB hens and fed DDGS-600 diets resulted in lower (P < 0.05) BW, carcass weight, and breast weight, and higher (P < 0.05) back half (drumsticks and thighs) yield, at 42 d of age. Growout studies performed on eggs laid during wk 31 and 36 revealed no effect on growth or carcass parameters. In conclusion, the results from experiments 1 and 2 may not be comparable, and therefore, the impact on progeny performance needs to be further evaluated.

  6. Laying hens behave differently in artificially and naturally sourced ammoniated environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, B B; Dos Santos, V M; Wood, D; Van Heyst, B; Harlander-Matauschek, A

    2017-10-05

    Laying hens are chronically exposed to high levels of ammonia (NH3), one of the most abundant aerial pollutants in poultry houses. Tests for aversion to NH3 in laying hens have used artificially sourced NH3/air mixtures (i.e., from a gas cylinder) showing that birds prefer fresh air to NH3. However, artificially sourced NH3/air mixtures may not accurately reflect barn air conditions, where manure emits a variety of gases. Herein, we investigated whether laying hens differentiate between artificially and naturally sourced NH3/air mixtures and how exposure to NH3 affects foraging and aversive behavior. A total of 20 laying hens was exposed to artificially sourced [A] (from an anhydrous NH3 cylinder) and naturally sourced [N] (from conspecific laying hen excreta) gas mixtures. Hens were exposed to A and N mixtures with NH3 concentrations of 25 and 45 ppm, as well as fresh air [FA]. During the experiment, all birds were exposed to each treatment 3 times using a custom-built polycarbonate chamber, containing a foraging area (containing raisins, mealworms, and feed mix) and a gas delivery system. All testing sessions were video recorded, analyzed with INTERACT® software, and subjected to a GLIMMIX procedure in SAS. Our results showed that the laying hens spent less time foraging overall (P < 0.001) and were slower to commence foraging (P = 0.004) in ammoniated environments compared to the fresh air. Laying hens were more likely to forage for a longer time (with fewer interruptions) in N than in A treatments (P < 0.001). Laying hens also reacted with greater aversion towards treatment A compared to treatment N (P < 0.001). These findings suggest that the laying hens of our study preferred fresh to ammoniated air and that they behaved differently in artificially and naturally sourced NH3/air mixtures, possibly due to the presence of familiar stimuli from the excreta. These findings have implications for new developments in methodological approaches for behavioral testing

  7. CYP1B1 expression in ovarian cancer in the laying hen Gallusdomesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Yan; Lagman, Jo Ann J; Ansenberger, Kristine; Mahon, Cassandra J; Daikoku, Takiko; Dey, Sudhansu K; Bahr, Janice M; Hales, Dale B

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. The genetic and molecular mechanisms that cause it still remain largely unknown. CYP1B1 is a cytochrome P450 enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of estrogens to genotoxic catechol estrogens which may cause DNA mutations and initiate ovarian epithelial cancer. Our objectives were to evaluate CYP1B1 expression, distribution and localization in the hen ovary and to determine if there is an increased CYP1B1 expression associated with, and possibly involved in the initiation of ovarian cancer. Two groups of hens were used: 1. young (50 weeks of age; devoid of cancer) and 2. old (165 weeks of age; divided into two groups: age-matched normal and ovarian cancer). CYP1B1 mRNA and protein expression were analyzed in cancerous ovaries, ovaries of age-matched normal and/or young hens by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). RNA was extracted from tissue preserved in RNAlater for qRT-PCR. Tissue frozen in liquid nitrogen was used for ISH. Tissue fixed in neutral buffered formalin was subjected to IHC. Higher expression of CYP1B1 mRNA was observed in cancerous ovaries as compared to ovaries of young and age-matched normal hens by qRT-PCR. ISH and IHC confirmed that the expression of CYP1B1 was much higher in ovarian tumors compared to ovaries of age-matched normal hens. CYP1B1 mRNA and protein were distributed extensively throughout the carcinoma, while primarily localized to the granulosa layer surrounding the follicle in age-matched normal hens. IHC also showed nuclear localization of CYP1B1. Highly expressed CYP1B1 was found in POF-3 from young and age-matched normal hens as compared to POF-1 and POF-2 by qRT-PCR. No significant difference was found in the expression of CYP1B1 between the distal (site of rupture) and the proximal (site of attachment to the ovary) of POF-1 from young and age-matched normal hens. High expression of CYP1B1 in the hen ovary

  8. QTL detection for coccidiosis (Eimeria tenella) resistance in a Fayoumi × Leghorn F2 cross, using a medium-density SNP panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Coccidiosis is a major parasitic disease that causes huge economic losses to the poultry industry. Its pathogenicity leads to depression of body weight gain, lesions and, in the most serious cases, death in affected animals. Genetic variability for resistance to coccidiosis in the chicken has been demonstrated and if this natural resistance could be exploited, it would reduce the costs of the disease. Previously, a design to characterize the genetic regulation of Eimeria tenella resistance was set up in a Fayoumi × Leghorn F2 cross. The 860 F2 animals of this design were phenotyped for weight gain, plasma coloration, hematocrit level, intestinal lesion score and body temperature. In the work reported here, the 860 animals were genotyped for a panel of 1393 (157 microsatellites and 1236 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers that cover the sequenced genome (i.e. the 28 first autosomes and the Z chromosome). In addition, with the aim of finding an index capable of explaining a large amount of the variance associated with resistance to coccidiosis, a composite factor was derived by combining the variables of all these traits in a single variable. QTL detection was performed by linkage analysis using GridQTL and QTLMap. Single and multi-QTL models were applied. Results Thirty-one QTL were identified i.e. 27 with the single-QTL model and four with the multi-QTL model and the average confidence interval was 5.9 cM. Only a few QTL were common with the previous study that used the same design but focused on the 260 more extreme animals that were genotyped with the 157 microsatellites only. Major differences were also found between results obtained with QTLMap and GridQTL. Conclusions The medium-density SNP panel made it possible to genotype new regions of the chicken genome (including micro-chromosomes) that were involved in the genetic control of the traits investigated. This study also highlights the strong variations in QTL detection between

  9. QTL detection for coccidiosis (Eimeria tenella) resistance in a Fayoumi × Leghorn F₂ cross, using a medium-density SNP panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacciu, Nicola; Bed'Hom, Bertrand; Filangi, Olivier; Romé, Hélène; Gourichon, David; Répérant, Jean-Michel; Le Roy, Pascale; Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Hélène; Demeure, Olivier

    2014-02-19

    Coccidiosis is a major parasitic disease that causes huge economic losses to the poultry industry. Its pathogenicity leads to depression of body weight gain, lesions and, in the most serious cases, death in affected animals. Genetic variability for resistance to coccidiosis in the chicken has been demonstrated and if this natural resistance could be exploited, it would reduce the costs of the disease. Previously, a design to characterize the genetic regulation of Eimeria tenella resistance was set up in a Fayoumi × Leghorn F2 cross. The 860 F2 animals of this design were phenotyped for weight gain, plasma coloration, hematocrit level, intestinal lesion score and body temperature. In the work reported here, the 860 animals were genotyped for a panel of 1393 (157 microsatellites and 1236 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers that cover the sequenced genome (i.e. the 28 first autosomes and the Z chromosome). In addition, with the aim of finding an index capable of explaining a large amount of the variance associated with resistance to coccidiosis, a composite factor was derived by combining the variables of all these traits in a single variable. QTL detection was performed by linkage analysis using GridQTL and QTLMap. Single and multi-QTL models were applied. Thirty-one QTL were identified i.e. 27 with the single-QTL model and four with the multi-QTL model and the average confidence interval was 5.9 cM. Only a few QTL were common with the previous study that used the same design but focused on the 260 more extreme animals that were genotyped with the 157 microsatellites only. Major differences were also found between results obtained with QTLMap and GridQTL. The medium-density SNP panel made it possible to genotype new regions of the chicken genome (including micro-chromosomes) that were involved in the genetic control of the traits investigated. This study also highlights the strong variations in QTL detection between different models and marker densities.

  10. Disposition kinetics of albendazole and metabolites in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistoletti, M; Alvarez, L; Lanusse, C; Moreno, L

    2013-04-01

    An increasing prevalence of roundworm parasites in poultry, particularly in litter-based housing systems, has been reported. However, few anthelmintic drugs are commercially available for use in avian production systems. The anthelmintic efficacy of albendazole (ABZ) in poultry has been demonstrated well. The goal of this work was to characterize the ABZ and metabolites plasma disposition kinetics after treatment with different administration routes in laying hens. Twenty-four laying hens Plymouth Rock Barrada were distributed into three groups and treated with ABZ as follows: intravenously at 10 mg/kg (ABZ i.v.); orally at the same dose (ABZ oral); and in medicated feed at 10 mg/kg·day for 7 days (ABZ feed). Blood samples were taken up to 48 h posttreatment (ABZ i.v. and ABZ oral) and up to 10 days poststart feed medication (ABZ feed). The collected plasma samples were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. ABZ and its albendazole sulphoxide (ABZSO) and ABZSO2 metabolites were recovered in plasma after ABZ i.v. administration. ABZ parent compound showed an initial concentration of 16.4 ± 2.0 μg/mL, being rapidly metabolized into the ABZSO and ABZSO2 metabolites. The ABZSO maximum concentration (Cmax ) (3.10 ± 0.78 μg/mL) was higher than that of ABZSO2 Cmax (0.34 ± 0.05 μg/mL). The area under the concentration vs time curve (AUC) for ABZSO (21.9 ± 3.6 μg·h/mL) was higher than that observed for ABZSO2 and ABZ (7.80 ± 1.02 and 12.0 ± 1.6 μg·h/mL, respectively). The ABZ body clearance (Cl) was 0.88 ± 0.11 L·h/kg with an elimination half-life (T1/2el ) of 3.47 ± 0.73 h. The T1/2el for ABZSO and ABZSO2 were 6.36 ± 1.50 and 5.40 ± 1.90 h, respectively. After ABZ oral administration, low ABZ plasma concentrations were measured between 0.5 and 3 h posttreatment. ABZ was rapidly metabolized to ABZSO (Cmax , 1.71 ± 0.62 μg/mL) and ABZSO2 (Cmax , 0.43 ± 0.04 μg/mL). The metabolite systemic exposure (AUC) values were 18.6 ± 2.0 and 10

  11. Effects of nanocalcium carbonate on egg production performance and plasma calcium of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjigohari, S; Ziaei, N; Ramzani Ghara, A; Tasharrofi, S

    2017-04-27

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of nanocalcium carbonate (NCC) instead of calcium carbonate (CC) on egg production, egg weight, egg mass, FCR, blood calcium and egg quality characteristics in laying hens. A total of 120 laying hens were used in a 10-weeks trial, from week 23 to 33 of age. Laying hens were randomly assigned to six treatments with four replications, five hens each. The experimental treatments involved replacing 50% of the CC in the diet by decreasing amounts of NCC and were T1 Basal diet (BD) with 8.06% CC; T2 (6.045% of CC as a negative control); T3 (4.03% of CC replaced by 2.015% NCC); T4 (4.03% of CC replaced by 1.01% NCC); T5 (4.03% of CC replaced by 0.252% NCC) and T6 (4.03 of CC replaced with 0.126%NCC).Egg weight was unaffected by dietary treatments (p > .05). However, the egg production percentage and egg mass in T6 were less than that of other treatments (p < .05). The laying hens in the control group had the best average feed conversion ratio (p < .05). Also, the lowest concentration of calcium in hens' blood was recorded for birds fed T6 (p < .05). The best egg shell quality (relative egg shell weight and egg shell weight/surface) was observed in T1 (p < .05).Collectively, our results demonstrated that NCC could replace CC at a lower inclusion level but extreme reduction of calcium concentration in diets (to 1.43% Ca in the T6 group) reduced production performance, egg quality characteristics, Tibia thickness and blood calcium of laying hens. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Individual differences in personality in laying hens are related to learning a colour cue association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas, Elske N; Lee, Caroline; Hernandez, Carlos E; Naguib, Marc; Rodenburg, T Bas

    2017-01-01

    Personality can influence how animals perceive and learn cues. The behaviour and physiological responses animals show during stressful events is indicative of their personality. Acute induced stress prior to a cognitive test are known to affect the judgement of a stimulus, but personality of an individual could also affect learning of a specific cognitive paradigm. Here, we assessed if adult laying hens' behaviour and physiological responses, as indicators of their personality, were related to their cognitive performance. We assessed their behavioural responses to a tonic immobility test, an open field test, and a manual restraint test, and measured plasma corticosterone levels after manual restraint. After that, hens (n=20) were trained in a pre-set training schedule to associate a colour-cue with a reward. In a two-choice go-go test, hens needed to choose between a baited or non-baited food container displayed randomly on the left or right side of an arena. Success in learning was related to personality, with better performance of hens which showed a reactive personality type by a long latency to walk, struggle or vocalize during the tests. Only eight out of 20 hens reached the training criteria. The non-learners showed a strong side preference during all training days. Side preferences were strong in hens with high levels of plasma corticosterone and with a long duration of tonic immobility, indicating that fearful, stress-sensitive hens are more prone to develop side biases. Our results show that learning can be hindered by side biases, and fearful animals with a more proactive personality type are more sensitive to develop such biases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of the clove essential oil to the production and quality of lyaing hens eggs

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    Henrieta Arpášová

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determinate the effect of the clove (Syzygium aromaticum essential oil to the egg production parameters and egg quality of laying hens. A total of 40 Lohmann Brown laying hens were divided into 4 groups (n = 10. The laying hens were fed 20 weeks ad libitum. The control group was fed with complete feed mixtures without additives. The first group of hens was fed a diet with complete feed mixtures with 0.3 mg.kg-1 of clove essential oil. The second group of hens was fed a diet with complete feed mixtures with 0.6 mg.kg-1 of clove oil and the third group of hens was fed a diet with complete feed mixtures with 1 mg.kg-1 of clove oil. Egg production, egg weight (g, specific egg weight, albumen weight (g, albumen index, Haugh Units (HU, yolk weight (g, yolk index, yolk color (HLR were studied. The results show that the addition of clove oil, especially in the group of laying hens with the addition of 1 mg.kg-1 clove oil had no significantly different (P>0.05 to the egg production (the order of the groups: 90.3; 91.8; 91.3; 92.6 %. In egg weight were found no significant differences between groups. The addition of 1 mg.kg-1 clove oil had significant (P>0.05 influenced the albumen index and the addition of 0.6 mg.kg-1 and 1 mg.kg-1 clove oil had significant (P>0.05 influenced Haugh units. In the control group was found not significant (P>0.05 different in yolk weight compared with other groups. In the other parameters of egg quality (albumen weight, yolk index, yolk colour with the addition of clove oil were found no significant differences between groups.

  14. NUTRIENT DIGESTIBILITY OF THE WASTE OF SACCHARIFICATION PROCESS FROM CASSAVA BAGASSE ON THE LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.M. Ali-Mursyid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study the nutrient digestibility and the metabolizable energy value of the waste of saccharification process from cassava bagasse (WSPCB on the laying hens. Twenty ISA-Brown laying hens at the age of 72 weeks were randomly distributed into three feeding treatments which consisted of cassava bagase (CB, WSPCB of solid state fermentation method (WSPCB-SSF, and WSPCB of sub merged fermentation method (WSPCB-SmF. All of the hens were fasted for 24 hours and 15 of them were fed with CB, WSPCB-SSF and WSPCB-SmF (five hens for each test-diet. The other five hens were still fasted. Then, all of the hens were fasted again and their excreta were collected during 48 hours. The nutrient digestibilities which were measured consisted of the Apparent and True Digestibility of Dry matter (ADDM and TDDM, Crude Fiber (ADCF and TDCF, Starch (ADS and TDS, and the Apparent and True Metabolizable Energy (AME and TME. The result of this research showed that the saccharification process generated the solid waste with the nutrient digestibility value (ADDM, TDDM, ADS, TDS, AME, and TME which were significantly lower (P<0.05 than those of CB. The crude fiber digestibility value of the WSPCB has an oposite phenomenon in which the ADCF and TDCF of WSPCB-SmF were greater than CB. In conclusion, the nutrient digestibility value, except for ADCF and TDCF, of the WSPCB on the laying hens were lower in value than those CB.

  15. Effect of diatomaceous earth on parasite load, egg production, and egg quality of free-range organic laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, D C; Yee, A; Rhee, Y-J; Cheng, K M

    2011-07-01

    The effectiveness of diatomaceous earth (DE) as a treatment against parasites and to increase feed efficiency and egg production of organically raised free-range layer hens was evaluated in 2 breeds of commercial egg layers [Bovan Brown (BB) and Lowmann Brown (LB)] that differ in their resistance to internal parasitic infections. Half the hens of each breed were fed diets supplemented with DE (2%). Their internal parasite loads were assessed by biweekly fecal egg counts (FEC) and by postmortem examination of the gastrointestinal tract. Supplementing DE in diets of LB hens, the more parasite-resistant breed, did not significantly affect their FEC and adult parasite load. However, BB hens treated with dietary DE had significantly lower Capillaria FEC, slightly lower Eimeria FEC, fewer birds infected with Heterakis, and significantly lower Heterakis worm burden than control BB hens. Both BB and LB hens fed the diet containing DE were significantly heavier, laid more eggs, and consumed more feed than hens fed the control diet, but feed efficiency did not differ between the 2 dietary treatments. Additionally, BB hens consuming the DE diet laid larger eggs containing more albumen and yolk than hens consuming the control diet. In a subsequent experiment, the effectiveness of DE to treat a Northern fowl mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) infestation was tested. Relative to controls, both breeds of hens that were dusted with DE had reduced number of mites. The results of this study indicate the DE has the potential to be an effective treatment to help control parasites and improve production of organically raised, free-range layer hens.

  16. High seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and probability of detecting tissue cysts in backyard laying hens compared with hens from large free-range farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schares, G; Bangoura, B; Randau, F; Goroll, T; Ludewig, M; Maksimov, P; Matzkeit, B; Sens, M; Bärwald, A; Conraths, F J; Opsteegh, M; Van der Giessen, J

    2017-10-01

    Serological assays are commonly used to determine the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in livestock, but the predictive value of seropositivity with respect to the presence of infective tissue cysts is less clear. The present study aimed at the identification of seropositive and seronegative free-range laying hens from organic and backyard farms, and the relationship with the presence of viable tissue cysts. In addition, potential risk and protective factors on the selected farms were investigated. An in-house T. gondii surface antigen (TgSAG1, p30, SRS29B) ELISA was validated with sera from experimentally infected chickens and used to examine 470 serum samples collected from laying hens from large organic and small backyard farms at the end of their laying period. A total of 11.7% (55/470) of all chickens tested positive, and another 18.9% (89/470) of test results were inconclusive. The highest seroprevalences were observed on small backyard farms with 47.7% (41/86) of chickens being seropositive while another 20.9% (18/86) of test results were inconclusive. Twenty-nine seropositive, 20 seronegative and 12 laying hens which yielded inconclusive ELISA results, were selected for further examination. Hearts and limb muscles of these hens were examined for T. gondii tissue cysts in a bioassay with IFNɣ-knockout or IFNɣ-receptor-knockout mice. Viable T. gondii was isolated from 75.9% (22/29) of the seropositive, 25.0% (3/12) of the inconclusive, and 5.0% (1/20) of the seronegative chickens. All 26 chickens tested positive in heart samples, while drumstick muscles (i.e. limb muscles) tested positive only in three. Data on putative risk and protective factors were collected on the farms using a standard questionnaire. Generalised multilevel modelling revealed farm size, cat related factors ('cats on the premise', 'cats used for rodent control'), hen house/hall related factors ('size category of hen house/hall', 'frequency category of cleaning hen house

  17. Natural course of sensitization to hen's egg in children not previously exposed to egg ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boissieu, D; Dupont, C

    2006-04-01

    Clinical adverse reactions to egg may occur in infants or children who have never eaten egg. They may be sensitized or even react at first egg ingestion. Few studies are available concerning the reality of egg white allergy in such sensitized children, the natural evolution of this condition and the appropriate decisions to make. To analyze the actuality and natural course of egg allergy in children sensitized without previous of hen's egg ingestion. We set up a clinical decision tree based on clinical history and specific egg white IgE to manage patients who had never ingested egg but were sensitized as demonstrated by a positive SPT and report a cohort of 30 such children The mean level of egg white specific IgE at first analysis, i.e. before 12 months, was high, 28.3 KU(A) /L, with a large range, from 0.6 to >100 KU(A) /L, below 6 KU(A) /L in only 8 patients. In 6 children ("no challenge" group), IgE values remained >8 KU(A) /L by the end of the survey and the oral challenge with egg was always denied. Their mean + SD IgE level was at 51.7 + 38 KU(A) /L at 1 year and 19.7 + 13 KU(A) /L at a mean age of 34 + 5 months. All had an associated anaphylactic reaction with milk and 5 were still allergic to milk by the end of the survey. In the remaining 24 infants, egg was given for the first time at a mean age of 30 + 9 months, by error in 4 cases, all exhibiting an immediate reaction, and in a hospital setting in 20, among whom 14 reacted. Among those 18, with a specific IgE level at 9.1 + 10 KU(A) /L at 28 + 9 months, 4 became tolerant between 3 and 4 years, with specific IgE levels below 1.3 KU(A) /L and a 5th one with specific IgE >100 KU(A) /L at 6 months tolerated scrambled eggs at age 7 year, with specific IgE at 2.6 KU(A) /L. In the 6 others, labeled "non allergic", egg white specific IgE levels were significantly lower, whatever the age, than in the "no challenge" group. The age at challenge was 35 + 8 months, with a mean specific IgE level at 1.0 + 0.9 KU

  18. Aflatoxins, hydroxylated metabolites, and aflatoxicol from breast muscle of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Zaragoza, M; Carvajal-Moreno, M; Méndez-Ramírez, I; Chilpa-Galván, N C; Avila-González, E; Flores-Ortiz, C M

    2014-12-01

    Aflatoxins (AF) are toxic fungal secondary metabolites that are pathological to animals and humans. This study identified and quantified AF (AFB(1), AFB(2), AFG(1), AFG(2)) and their hydroxylated metabolites (AFM(1), AFM(2), AFP(1)) and aflatoxicol (AFL) from laying hen breast muscles. Aflatoxins pass from cereal feed to the laying hen tissues, causing economic losses, and from there to humans. To detect the passage of AF from feed to hen breast muscle tissues, an experiment that included 25 Hy-Line W36 121-wk-old hens was performed for 8 d. Hens in individual cages were distributed into 3 groups: a control group, with feed free of AFB(1), and 2 experimental groups, with feed spiked with 2 AFB(1) dosages: 30 µg·kg(-1) (low) or 500 µg·kg(-1) (high). The daily feed consumption per hen was recorded and afterward hens were euthanized and breast muscles were collected, weighed, and dried individually. Aflatoxins were extracted by 2 chemical methods and quantified by HPLC. Both methods were validated by lineality (calibration curves), recovery percentage (>80%), limit of detection, and limit of quantification. The AF (µg·kg(-1)) averages recovered in control breast muscles were as follows: AFB(1) (18); AFG(1), AFM(2), and AFL (0); AFG(2) (1.3); AFM(1) (52), and AFP1 (79). Hens fed with feed spiked with 30 µg·kg(-1) of AFB(1) had AFG(1) (16); AFG(2) (72); AFM(1) (0); AFM(2) (18); AFP(1) (145); and AFL (5 µg·kg(-1)). Hens with feed spiked with 500 µg·kg(-1) of AFB(1) had AFG(1) (512); AFG(2) (7); AFM(1) (4,775); AFM(2) (0); AFP(1) (661); and AFL (21 µg·kg(-1)). The best AF extraction method was Qian and Yang's method, modified by adding additional AF from both Supelclean LC18 SPE columns; its limit of detection (0.5 ng·mL(-1)) was lower compared with that of Koeltzow and Tanner, which was 1 ng·mL(-1). ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of repeated sodium salicylate administration to laying hens: evidence for time dependent increase in drug elimination from plasma and eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażej Poźniak

    Full Text Available Salicylates were the first non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs to be used in any species and are still widely used in humans and livestock. However, the data on their pharmacokinetics in animals is limited, especially after repeated administration. Evidence exist that in chickens (Gallus gallus salicylate (SA may induce its own elimination. The aim of this study was to investigate salicylate pharmacokinetics and egg residues during repeated administration of sodium salicylate (SS to laying hens. Pharmacokinetics of SA was assessed during 14 d oral administration of SS at daily doses of 50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg body weight to laying hens. On the 1st, 7th and 14th d a 24 h-long pharmacokinetic study was carried out, whereas eggs were collected daily. Salicylate concentrations in plasma and eggs were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and pharmacokinetic variables were calculated using a non-compartmental model. Mean residence time (MRT, minimal plasma concentration (Cmin, C16h and elimination half-life (T1/2el of SA showed gradual decrease in layers administered with a lower dose. Total body clearance (ClB increased. Layers administered with the higher dose showed a decrease only in the T1/2el. In the low dose group, SA was found only in the egg white and was low throughout the experiment. Egg whites from the higher dose group showed initially high SA levels which significantly decreased during the experiment. Yolk SA levels were lower and showed longer periods of accumulation and elimination. Repeated administration of SS induces SA elimination, although this effect may differ depending on the dose and production type of a chicken. Decreased plasma drug concentration may have clinical implications during prolonged SS treatment.

  20. Application of Paracoccus marcusii as a potential feed additive for laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradie, Tersia A; Pieterse, Elsje; Jacobs, Karin

    2018-03-01

    Carotenoids have been used for many years as an added pigment to enhance egg yolk color. One such carotenoid, astaxanthin, has a strong antioxidant activity and is produced by several microorganisms, including the bacterium Paracoccus marcusii, which has shown promise to be used as a feed additive. Therefore, this study investigated the use of P. marcusii as a possible source of pigmentation in layer hen feed to enhance egg yolk color. Paracoccus marcusii was fed to hens in a sucrose solution (10% m/v). The hens were fed daily and all eggs were collected for analysis. Dilutions of egg contents were plated onto selective media to detect the presence of known food pathogens (E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella). In the feeding trial, there was no negative effect on hen body weight, egg production, or overall egg quality. There was a significant increase (P < 0.05) in yolk color as well as an increase in whole egg and yolk weight. There were also no known food pathogens detected in any of the egg samples. This study has shown promising results in using this bacterium as an effective feed additive for laying hens.

  1. Opinion of Belgian Egg Farmers on Hen Welfare and Its Relationship with Housing Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisanne M. Stadig

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As of 2012, the EU has banned the use of conventional cages (CC for laying hens, causing a shift in housing systems. This study’s aim was to gain insight into farmers’ opinions on hen health and welfare in their current housing systems. A survey was sent to 218 Belgian egg farmers, of which 127 (58.3% responded, with 84 still active as egg farmer. Hen welfare tended to be less important in choosing the housing system for farmers with cage than with non-cage systems. Respondents currently using cage systems were more satisfied with hen health than respondents with non-cage systems. Reported mortality increased with farm size and was higher in furnished cages than in floor housing. Feather pecking, cannibalism, smothering and mortality were perceived to be higher in current housing systems than in CC, but only by respondents who shifted to non-cage systems from previously having had CC. Health- and production-related parameters were scored to be more important for hen welfare as compared to behavior-related parameters. Those without CC in the past rated factors relating to natural behavior to be more important for welfare than those with CC. This difference in opinion based on farmer backgrounds should be taken into account in future research.

  2. Opinion of Belgian Egg Farmers on Hen Welfare and Its Relationship with Housing Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadig, Lisanne M; Ampe, Bart A; Van Gansbeke, Suzy; Van den Bogaert, Tom; D'Haenens, Evelien; Heerkens, Jasper L T; Tuyttens, Frank A M

    2015-12-22

    As of 2012, the EU has banned the use of conventional cages (CC) for laying hens, causing a shift in housing systems. This study's aim was to gain insight into farmers' opinions on hen health and welfare in their current housing systems. A survey was sent to 218 Belgian egg farmers, of which 127 (58.3%) responded, with 84 still active as egg farmer. Hen welfare tended to be less important in choosing the housing system for farmers with cage than with non-cage systems. Respondents currently using cage systems were more satisfied with hen health than respondents with non-cage systems. Reported mortality increased with farm size and was higher in furnished cages than in floor housing. Feather pecking, cannibalism, smothering and mortality were perceived to be higher in current housing systems than in CC, but only by respondents who shifted to non-cage systems from previously having had CC. Health- and production-related parameters were scored to be more important for hen welfare as compared to behavior-related parameters. Those without CC in the past rated factors relating to natural behavior to be more important for welfare than those with CC. This difference in opinion based on farmer backgrounds should be taken into account in future research.

  3. Adding value to the meat of spent laying hens manufacturing sausages with a healthy appeal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KMR de Souza

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the viability of the use of spent laying hens' meat in the manufacturing of mortadella-type sausages with healthy appeal by using vegetable oil instead of animal fat. 120 Hy-line® layer hens were distributed in a completely randomized design into two treatments of six replicates with ten birds each. The treatments were birds from light Hy-line® W36 and semi-heavy Hy-line® Brown lines. Cold carcass, wing, breast and leg fillets yields were determined. Dry matter, protein, and lipid contents were determined in breast and leg fillets. The breast and legg fillets of three replicates per treatment were used to manufacture mortadella. After processing, sausages were evaluated for proximal composition, objective color, microbiological parameters, fatty acid profile and sensory acceptance. The meat of light and semi-heavy spent hens presented good yield and composition, allowing it to be used as raw material for the manufacture of processed products. Mortadellas were safe from microbiological point of view, and those made with semi-heavy hens fillets were redder and better accepted by consumers. Values for all sensory attributes were evaluated over score 5 (neither liked nor disliked. Both products presented high polyunsaturated fatty acid contents and good polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio. The excellent potential for the use of meat from spent layer hens of both varieties in the manufacturing of healthier mortadella-type sausage was demonstrated.

  4. Keel-bone damage and foot injuries in commercial laying hens in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Anja Brinch; Hinrichsen, Lena Karina

    2016-01-01

    Keel-bone damage and foot injuries have a negative impact on welfare in laying hens. The extent of the problems in Danish commercial flocks of layers is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the current prevalence of keel-bone damage and foot injuries in Danish commercial flocks...... of laying hens and to investigate the effects of production system, housing system, hybrid and age. The occurrences of keel-bone damage, hyperkeratosis and missing toes were higher at 62 compared to 32 weeks of age, while the reverse was found for toe wounds, foot-pad lesions and bumble feet....... There was no difference between barn and organic production systems in the risk of having keel-bone fractures and foot injuries, except that barn hens were more likely to have foot-pad lesions than organic hens(32 weeks: 16.1 vs 3.1%). Hens in multi-tiered systems were more likely to have keel-bone fractures compared...

  5. Ideal digestible isoleucine: digestible lysine ratio in diets for laying hens aged 24-40 weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Cristina da Rocha

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred fifty-two Hy-Line W36 laying hens were allotted in a randomized block design with 6 treatments, 7 replicates and 6 hens per experimental unit in order to determine the ideal digestible isoleucine: digestible lysine (Ile:Lys ratio for laying hens aged 24-40 weeks. Experimental diets contained 5.92, 6.33, 6.73, 7.14, 7.54 and 7.95 g/kg of digestible isoleucine, resulting in different Ile:Lys ratios (0.73:1, 0.78:1, 0.83:1, 0.88:1, 0.93:1 and 0.98:1. Experimental diets were isonitrogenous, with different dietary contents of glutamic acid, and made isocaloric by adjusting the levels of cornstarch. All essential amino acids were provided proportionally to digestible lysine. Feed intake, egg production, egg weight, egg mass, feed conversion ratio per egg mass, feed conversion ratio per dozen eggs, albumen, yolk and eggshell content were assessed. Feed intake, egg production, egg mass and feed conversion ratio were influenced by Ile: Lys ratios quadratically. The egg weight was not affected by Ile: Lys ratio. No differences were observed in the egg quality according to Ile: Lys ratios. The data indicates that the optimum digestible isoleucine: digestible lysine ratio for laying hens aged 24-40 week is 0.84:1, corresponding to the consumption of 681 mg of isoleucine and 811 mg of lysine/hen day-1.

  6. LIMESTONE OF BUKIT KAMANG AS A CALCIUM SOURCE FOR LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Khalil

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A feeding trial was conducted to study the use of natural limestone meal originated from Bukit Kamanglocated at Agam district of West Sumatra to substitute fresh water oyster shell as the main source ofcalcium in diet of laying hens. The mineral feed formula, as treatments, composed of limestone in combinationwith freshwater oyster shell in five different percent ratios: 100:0; 75:25; 50:50; 25:75 and 0:100. The mineralswere mixed in the level of 6 % into basal diet composed mainly corn, rice bran and concentrates. The fiveexperimental diets were then fed to 150 laying hens. They were divided into 5 groups; each group wassubdivided into 3 replicates groups containing 10 hens. Parameters measured included: feed intake, eggproduction, FCR, eggshell quality, Ca and P retention, tibia bone mineralization. Results showed the nutritivevalues of limestone of Bukit Kamang as mineral source of laying hen diet were found not significantlydifferent from those of oysters shell. The hens fed with diet supplemented with Bukit Kamang’s limestonetended to give better laying performances than those of supplemented with fresh water oyster shell. Thelaying performances, egg shell quality and Ca and P retentions did not significantly improved, when limestonewas mixed by oyster shell.

  7. Relationships between beak condition, preening behavior and ectoparasite infestation levels in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, Giuseppe; Mullens, Bradley A; Mench, Joy A

    2015-09-01

    The effects of beak condition on ectoparasite populations and preening in laying hens were investigated. Beak-trimmed and beak-intact caged Hy-Line W-36 hens were infested with either chicken body lice or northern fowl mites using a 2×2 factorial design with 4 replicate cages (each containing 2 hens)/treatment: 1) BTL: (beak-trimmed lice-infested); 2) BTM: (beak-trimmed mite-infested); 3) BIL: (beak-intact lice-infested); and 4) BIM: (beak-intact mite-infested). Mite scores and lice numbers were estimated weekly. Hens were video recorded the wk before infestation and at wk 6 and 9 post-infestation. Time spent preening on 6 body areas and in total were analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA. There was a wk×beak condition interaction for lice loads, with BTL harboring approximately 17 times more lice than BIL from wk 7 to 10 post-infestation (Phens; preening behavior and louse load were correlated at peak infestation. In contrast, mite infestation did not lead to increased preening, and there was no correlation between preening and mite load. However, both lice- and mite-infested hens directed preening behavior predominantly towards the vent where these parasites are typically found. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. Secondary toxicity in raptors caused by white phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparling, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    White phosphorus (WP) has caused waterfowl die-offs in a tidal saltmarsh used by the U.S. Army for artillery practice for > 40 years. Bald (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)and golden (Aquila chrysaetos) eagles have been observed feeding on dead and dying waterfowl on the marsh and may be exposed to WP through ingestion of contaminated birds. One carcass of each eagle species has been found with measurable levels of WP in fat. To determine if raptors can become intoxicated by ingesting prey that have been exposed to WP we fed live, 10-day-old white leghorn chicks three sublethal doses of WP. Six hrs after the last dose we euthanized the chicks and separated them into two groups--one with the digestive system from gizzard anteriorly removed (NoGut) and one with the digestive system intact and a 1.1 mg pellet of WP implanted deep into the crop (Pel). A third group of same-aged chicks unexposed to WP was used for controls. Fifteen kestrels (Fa/co sparverius) were randomly assigned to each of the treatments and 10 to the control diet. By 7 d of the study 8 of the kestrels had died on the Pel and 3 on the NoGut diet. Survivors on the Pel diet had significantly lower hematocrit, hemoglobin, final body weights and greater liver/body weight ratios and weight loss than control birds. The study showed that raptors and possibly other predators are at risk both when consuming flesh of prey that have succumbed to WP poisoning and when ingesting WP pellets that are incorporated in body parts but that the risk is greater when pellets are present.

  9. Bacteriological contamination, dirt, and cracks of eggshells in furnished cages and noncage systems for laying hens: An international on-farm comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reu, de K.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Messens, W.; Heyndrickx, M.; Tuyttens, F.; Sonck, B.; Zoons, J.; Herman, L.

    2009-01-01

    For laying hens, the effects of housing system on bacterial eggshell contamination and eggshell quality is almost exclusively studied in experimental hen houses. The aim of this study was to compare eggshell hygiene and quality under commercial conditions. Six flocks of laying hens in furnished

  10. Changes of blood parameters associated with bone remodeling following experimentally induced fatty liver disorder in laying hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies have demonstrated that obesity and osteoporosis are two linked disorders in humans. This study examined if excessive lipid consumption affects bone metabolism in laying hens. One hundred 63-week-old laying hens were randomly divided into two treatments, i.e., fed with a regular diet (control...

  11. Comparison of individual and social feather pecking tests in two lines of laying hens at ten different ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, T.B.; Koene, P.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this experiment was to select a suitable test to measure feather pecking in laying hens. Pecking behaviour in individual and social feather pecking tests was compared with pecking behaviour in the homepen. Two lines of laying hens were used that differ in their propensity to display

  12. Risk factors associated with keel bone and foot pad disorders in laying hens housed in aviary systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerkens, J.L.T.; Delezie, E.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Kempen, I.; Zoons, J.; Ampe, B.; Tuyttens, F.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aviary systems for laying hens offer space and opportunities to perform natural behaviors. However, hen welfare can be impaired due to increased risk for keel bone and foot pad disorders in those systems. This cross-sectional study (N = 47 flocks) aimed to assess prevalences of keel bone and foot

  13. Responses of organic housed laying hens to dietary methionine and energy during a summer and winter season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krimpen, van M.M.; Binnendijk, G.P.; Ogun, M.; Kwakkel, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    The main dietary challenge in organic laying hen production is to fulfil the digestible methionine (MET) requirement in a diet consisting of ingredients of organic origin only. The aim of the present experiment was to determine the response of organic housed laying hens (26–34 weeks of age) to

  14. Performance of commercial laying hen genotypes on free range and organic farms in Switzerland, France and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, F.R.; Maurer, V.; Bestman, M.W.P.; Sambeek van, F.; Zeltner, E.; Reuvekamp, B.F.J.; Galea, F.; Niekerk, van T.G.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    1. A total of 257 farmers with free ranging laying hens (organic and conventional) in Switzerland, France and The Netherlands with 273 flocks were interviewed to determine the relationships between the genotype of the hens, management conditions and performance. 2. Almost 20 different genotypes

  15. Selection method and early-life history affect behavioural development, feather pecking and cannibalism in laying hens: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, T.B.; Komen, J.; Ellen, E.D.; Uitdehaag, K.A.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the effects of selection method and early-life history on the behavioural development of laying hens. Especially in larger groups, laying hens often develop damaging behaviours, such as feather pecking and cannibalism, leading to impaired animal welfare. We

  16. Thyroid metabolism in the recessive sex-linked dwarf female chicken. 2. Binding of thyroid hormones by serum proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandhi, R R; Brown, R G; Reinhart, B S; Summers, J D

    1975-03-01

    Serum protein profiles were studied together with serum binding sites and capacity for L-thyroxine in dwarf and non-dwarf White Leghorn and White Rock breeds at ages 1 wk., 4 wks. and in laying hens. Serum protein profiles varied with breed, strain and age. The percent gamma-globulin fraction was greater (P less than .05) in dwarf 1 wk. old and laying hens of the White Leghorn breed when compared with the normals. The only difference found in the White Rock breed was a decreased level of albumin in dwarf laying hens. There were no significant differences in the capacity or sites of binding of L-thyroxine to serum proteins although greater amounts of L-thyroxine were bound to globulin fractions in the dwarf. The data were interpreted to suggest that changes in serum protein profiles may have been the result of hypothyroidism at the cellular level but there was no reason to suspect abnormal binding of thyroid hormones to be the cause of that hypothyroidism.

  17. Egg production and egg quality in free-range laying hens housed at different outdoor stocking densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D L M; Lee, C; Hinch, G N; Roberts, J R

    2017-09-01

    Free-range laying hen systems are increasing in number within Australia. Variation in outdoor stocking densities has led to development of a national information standard on free-range egg labeling, including setting a maximum density of 10,000 hens per hectare. However, there are few data on the impacts of differing outdoor densities on production and egg quality. ISA Brown hens in small (150 hens) flocks were housed in identical indoor pens, each with access (from 21 weeks) to different sized ranges simulating one of three outdoor stocking densities (2 replicates each: 2,000 hens/hectare (ha), 10,000 hens/ha, 20,000 hens/ha). Hen-day production was tracked from 21 through 35 weeks with eggs visually graded daily for external deformities. All eggs laid on one day were weighed each week. Eggs were collected from each pen at 25, 30, and 36 weeks and analyzed for egg quality. There were no effects of outdoor stocking density on average hen-day percentage production (P = 0.67), egg weight (P = 0.09), percentages of deformed eggs (P = 0.30), shell reflectivity (P = 0.74), shell breaking strength (P = 0.07), shell deformation (P = 0.83), or shell thickness (P = 0.24). Eggs from hens in the highest density had the highest percentage shell weight (P = 0.004) and eggs from the lowest density had the highest yolk color score (P < 0.001). The amount of cuticle present did not differ between densities (P = 0.95) but some aspects of shell colors (P ≤ 0.01) and location of protoporphyrin IX (P = 0.046) varied. Hen age affected the majority of measurements. Stocking density differences may be related to hen diet as previous radio-frequency identification tracking of individual hens in these flocks showed birds used the range for longer in the lowest density and the least in the highest density, including depleting the range of vegetation sooner in the smaller ranges. An additional study assessing the relationship between individual hen range use, nutrition, and egg

  18. Residues of veterinary drugs in eggs and possible explanations for their distribution between egg white and yolk

    OpenAIRE

    Kan,Cornelis Adriaan

    2003-01-01

    Veterinary drugs are therapeutically used for laying hens but may also reach them unintentionally via the feed e.g. as a result of cross-contamination during premix manufacture, feed preparation in the feed mill or during feed transport. When these compounds reach the bloodstream, they will occur in the ovary with growing follicles and the oviduct, where the egg white is formed and secreted. The deposition of drugs in either yolk or white or both phases determines where one should look fo...

  19. Effects of taurine and housing density on renal function in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zi-Li; Gao, Yang; Ma, Hai-Tian; Zheng, Liu-Hai; Dai, Bin; Miao, Jin-Feng; Zhang, Yuan-Shu

    This study investigated the putative protective effects of supplemental 2-aminoethane sulfonic acid (taurine) and reduced housing density on renal function in laying hens. We randomly assigned fifteen thousand green-shell laying hens into three groups: a free range group, a low-density caged group, and a high-density caged group. Each group was further divided equally into a control group (C) and a taurine treatment group (T). After 15 d, we analyzed histological changes in kidney cells, inflammatory mediator levels, oxidation and anti-oxidation levels. Experimental data revealed taurine supplementation, and rearing free range or in low-density housing can lessen morphological renal damage, inflammatory mediator levels, and oxidation levels and increase anti-oxidation levels. Our data demonstrate that taurine supplementation and a reduction in housing density can ameliorate renal impairment, increase productivity, enhance health, and promote welfare in laying hens.

  20. Therapeutic effect of flax-based diets on fatty liver in aged laying hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. E.; Cain, J.; Small, C.; Hales, D. B.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the ability of flax-based ingredients to attenuate nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in aged laying hens—a novel and more physiologically relevant model of human disease. Our results showed only hens supplemented with whole flaxseed (WFX) reduced steatosis and hepatocellular ballooning. Serum AST was also reduced in hens provided WFX and defatted flaxseed meal (DFM). Hepatic ω-3 PUFA enrichment was improved with supplementation of WFX, DFM, and flaxseed oil (FXO). However, this effect was more evident in the WFX group. In contrast, transcript abundance of genes linked to NAFLD were predominantly modified with FXO supplementation. Taken together, our data indicate a potential synergistic relationship between the fatty acid and lignan content in flaxseed which attenuated the progression of NAFLD in aged laying hens. Although more research is necessary, these findings demonstrate the potential use of whole flaxseed for the treatment and prevention of NAFLD in humans. PMID:27143762

  1. Effect of Olive Leaf ( Powder on Laying Hens Performance, Egg Quality and Egg Yolk Cholesterol Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Cayan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to measure the effects of olive leaf powder on performance, egg yield, egg quality and yolk cholesterol level of laying hens. A total of 120 Lohmann Brown laying hens of 22 weeks old were used in this experiment. The birds were fed on standard layer diets containing 0, 1%, 2%, or 3% olive leaf powder for 8 weeks. Egg weight and yield were recorded daily; feed intake weekly; egg quality and cholesterol content at the end of the trial. Olive leaf powder had no effect on feed intake, egg weight, egg yield and feed conversion ratio (p>0.05 while olive leaf powder increased final body weight of hens (p0.05. To conclude, olive leaf powder can be used for reducing egg yolk cholesterol content and egg yolk coloring agent in layer diets.

  2. Helminth infection is associated with hen mortality in Danish organic egg production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichsen, Lena Karina; Labouriau, Rodrigo; Engberg, Ricarda M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether two highly prevalent helminth infections (Ascaridia galli and Heterakis species) are associated with an increased mortality rate for hens at the peak of lay. An observational event study with 11 farms was conducted between 2012 and 2013, with weekly......-infected farms and high-infected farms in either summer (August to September) or winter ( January to March) were analysed. No statistically significant associations were found between the mortality rate in winter and summer in low-infected farms. However, the mortality rate was doubled for hens from high......-infected farms observed in the summer season compared with hens from low-infected farms (winter and summer), whereas high-infected farms observed in the winter did not have a significant association between mortality rate and season compared with low-infected farms (summer and winter). The results suggest...

  3. Reconstitution and structure of a bacterial Pnkp1RnlHen1 RNA repair complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pei; Selvadurai, Kiruthika; Huang , Raven H. (UIUC)

    2016-01-22

    Ribotoxins cleave essential RNAs for cell killing, and RNA repair neutralizes the damage inflicted by ribotoxins for cell survival. We report a new bacterial RNA repair complex that performs RNA repair linked to immunity. This new RNA repair complex is a 270-kDa heterohexamer composed of three proteins—Pnkp1, Rnl and Hen1—that are required to repair ribotoxin-cleaved RNA in vitro. The crystal structure of the complex reveals the molecular architecture of the heterohexamer as two rhomboid-shaped ring structures of Pnkp1–Rnl–Hen1 heterotrimer fused at the Pnkp1 dimer interface. The four active sites required for RNA repair are located on the inner rim of each ring. Furthermore, the architecture and the locations of the active sites of the Pnkp1–Rnl–Hen1 heterohexamer suggest an ordered series of repair reactions at the broken RNA ends that confer immunity to recurrent damage.

  4. [Effect of ectopic excitation on pump function of the hen and dog right heart ventricle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibler, N A; Kharin, S N; Tsvetkova, A S; Azarov, Ia E; Shmakov, D N

    2009-01-01

    The pump function of the right heart ventricle has been studied in anesthetized dogs and hens at sinus rhythm, supraventricular rhythm, and subepicardial ectopic excitation of base and apex of the right and left ventricles. Dynamics of the ventricle intracavital pressure was recorded by transmural catheterization. The pump function of the right ventricle in hen (as compared with sinus rhythm) retained to the greater degree at stimulation of the left ventricle apex and deteriorated significantly at stimulation of the right ventricle, whereas in dog (as compared with supraventricular rhythm) it retained to the greater degree at stimulation of the left ventricle base and deteriorated at stimulation of the right ventricle apex. Changes of the pump function of the right heart ventricle at ectopic ventricle stimulation are similar in birds and mammals. Differences in changes of dog and hen pump functions under effect of location of the ectopic excitation seem to be due to morphofunctional peculiarities of heart ventricles.

  5. [Increase of nutritive value of poultry egg by of vitamin fortification of laid-hens diets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodentsova, V M; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Bekenova, N A; Kodentsova, O V

    2005-01-01

    Real content of vitamins A, E, B1 and B2 in hen's eggs from different poultry farms and personal farm varies in wide range and differs from the data of national food chemical tables. Elevated nutritive value eggs with maximal vitamin content may be obtained from hens fed diets with optimal vitamin level. Such way fortified one egg contributes 30% of recommended daily intake of vitamin E, about 10% of vitamins A and B2, 3% of vitamin B1. Intensification of egg yolk pigmentation by means of carotenoids additives to hens ration leads to their 10-fold increase comparing with the data of food chemical tables. Coloured egg provides for 5-10% of carotenoids adequate daily intake.

  6. The hen model of human ovarian cancer develops anti-mesothelin autoantibodies in response to mesothelin expressing tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Study of the hen immune system led to seminal contributions to basic immunological principles. Recent studies of spontaneous ovarian cancer in the laying hen show strikingly similar tumor types and antigen expression compared to human ovarian cancer, suggesting hens would be valuable for studies of tumor immunology and pre-clinical vaccine development. Circulating mesothelin is a relatively specific marker for human ovarian cancer and autoantibodies to mesothelin were reported. We hypothesized that hen tumors express mesothelin and that circulating anti-mesothelin antibodies occur in response to tumors. Methods Mesothelin mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR in hen ovarian tumors and normal ovaries. Mesothelin protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC and two-dimensional SDS-PAGE Western blots. Anti-mesothelin antibodies were assessed by immunoassay of sera from hens with normal ovaries and with ovarian tumors. Results Significant mesothelin mRNA expression was observed in 57% (12/21 of hen ovarian tumors but not in normal ovaries and was found predominantly in serous tumors as in humans. Mesothelin protein was detected in tumors with mesothelin mRNA by IHC and 2D Western blots, but not in normal ovaries or tumors without mesothelin mRNA. Circulating anti-mesothelin antibodies occurred in 44% (n = 4/9 of hens with ovarian tumors which express mesothelin mRNA and were not found in hens with tumors that did not express mesothelin (n = 0/5 or normal ovaries (n = 0/5. Conclusion The results support the utility of the hen as a novel model for preclinical studies of mesothelin as a biomarker and a target for immunotherapy.

  7. Biochemical Parameters and Histopathological Findings in the Forced Molt Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Mert

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of forced molting using biochemical parameters and histopathological findings in laying hens. 36 Hyline W36 strain laying hens, 90 weeks old were chosen for this research. Eight of these chickens were randomly selected and placed in a cage as the control group before the molting program began. All the others 28 chickens were used for the forced molting program. Eight laying hens were slaughtered at the end of the molting program named as molting group. The remaining 20 hens were fed for 37 days, weighted and slaughtered when they reached the maximum egg production (80% as postmolting group. Then, blood was analyzed for malondialdehyde, glutathione, catalase, glucose, calcium, phosphorus, albumin, globulin, total protein, triiodothyronine, thyroxine and Vitamin C. The malondialdehyde and glutathione levels of the thyroid and liver tissues were also analyzed along with an examination of the histopathological changes of the liver, ovarium and thyroid glands; and live body, liver, ovarium, thyroid weights and thyroid lengths. In conclusion, it was found that forced molting produces stress and notable side effects in hens, like the oxidant and antioxidant status of the organs, tissue weights and sizes, hormon profiles, blood biochemical and histopathological parameter changes. The activities of thyroid malondialdehyde (p<0.05, liver glutathione (p<0.01, plasma catalase (p<0.001 were significantly decreased in molting group compared to control values, while liver malondialdehyde levels were significantly increased (p<0.001 and thyroid glutathione levels had nonsignificant effect. These levels in molting hens were the first study for veterinary science.

  8. A Screen-Peck Task for Investigating Cognitive Bias in Laying Hens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Deakin

    Full Text Available Affect-induced cognitive judgement biases occur in both humans and animals. Animals in a more negative affective state tend to interpret ambiguous cues more negatively than animals in a more positive state and vice versa. Investigating animals' responses to ambiguous cues can therefore be used as a proxy measure of affective state. We investigated laying hens' responses to ambiguous stimuli using a novel cognitive bias task. In the 'screen-peck' task, hens were trained to peck a high/low saturation orange circle presented on a computer screen (positive cue-P to obtain a mealworm reward, and to not peck when the oppositely saturated orange circle was presented (negative cue-N to avoid a one second air puff. Ambiguous cues were orange circles of intermediate saturation between the P and N cue (near-positive-NP; middle-M; near-negative-NN, and were unrewarded. Cue pecking showed a clear generalisation curve from P through NP, M, NN to N suggesting that hens were able to associate colour saturation with reward or punishment, and could discriminate between stimuli that were more or less similar to learnt cues. Across six test sessions, there was no evidence for extinction of pecking responses to ambiguous cues. We manipulated affective state by changing temperature during testing to either ~20°C or ~29°C in a repeated measures cross-over design. Hens have been shown to prefer temperatures in the higher range and hence we assumed that exposure to the higher temperature would induce a relatively positive affective state. Hens tested under warmer conditions were significantly more likely to peck the M probe than those tested at cooler temperatures suggesting that increased temperature in the ranges tested here may have some positive effect on hens, inducing a positive cognitive bias.

  9. Arsenic in Eggs and Excreta of Laying Hens in Bangladesh: A Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Amalendu; M A Awal; Majumder, Shankar; Mostofa, Mahbub; Khair, Abul; M.Z. Islam; Rao, D. Ramkishan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect arsenic concentrations in feed, well-water for drinking, eggs, and excreta of laying hens in arsenic-prone areas of Bangladesh and to assess the effect of arsenic-containing feed and well-water on the accumulation of arsenic in eggs and excreta of the same subject. One egg from each laying hen (n=248) and its excreta, feed, and well-water for drinking were collected. Total arsenic concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer, couple...

  10. The welfare evaluation of laying hens reared with alternative housing systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bertuzzi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hens housed in battery cages are more concentrated per surface unit (450 cm2/bird. Associated to this breeding system are economic, hygienic and healthy advantages. However, the battery cage housing of laying hens is strongly criticised for the poor bird’s “quality of life”. For this reason EU regulations will exclude the use of battery cages in the near future. Several papers have emphasised that in any particular system there are certain specific aspects, which are critical to the welfare of birds housed in it (Appleby and Hughes, 1991....

  11. Cage Versus Noncage Laying-Hen Housings: Worker Respiratory Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Diane; Arteaga, Veronica; Armitage, Tracey; Mitloehner, Frank; Tancredi, Daniel; Kenyon, Nicholas; Schenker, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare respiratory health of poultry workers in conventional cage, enriched cage and aviary layer housing on a single commercial facility, motivated by changing requirements for humane housing of hens. Three workers were randomly assigned daily, one to each of conventional cage, enriched cage, and aviary housing in a crossover repeated-measures design for three observation periods (for a total of 123 worker-days, eight different workers). Workers' exposure to particles were assessed (Arteaga et al. J Agromedicine. 2015;20:this issue) and spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide, respiratory symptoms, and questionnaires were conducted pre- and post-shift. Personal exposures to particles and endotoxin were significantly higher in the aviary than the other housings (Arteaga et al., 2015). The use of respiratory protection was high; the median usage was 70% of the shift. Mixed-effects multivariate regression models of respiratory cross-shift changes were marginally significant, but the aviary system consistently posted the highest decrements for forced expiratory volume in 1 and 6 seconds (FEV1 and FEV6) compared with the enriched or conventional housing. The adjusted mean difference in FEV1 aviary - enriched cage housing was -47 mL/s, 95% confidence interval (CI): (-99 to 4.9), P = .07. Similarly, for FEV6, aviary - conventional housing adjusted mean difference was -52.9 mL/6 s, 95% CI: (-108 to 2.4), P = .06. Workers adopting greater than median use of respiratory protection were less likely to exhibit negative cross-shift pulmonary function changes. Although aviary housing exposed workers to significantly higher respiratory exposures, cross-shift pulmonary function changes did not differ significantly between houses. Higher levels of mask use were protective; poultry workers should wear respiratory protection as appropriate to avoid health decrements.

  12. Cage Versus Noncage Laying-Hen Housings: Respiratory Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Veronica; Mitchell, Diane; Armitage, Tracey; Tancredi, Daniel; Schenker, Marc; Mitloehner, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the personal respiratory exposures of poultry workers in three different types of layer housing under commercial production conditions. Workers were randomly assigned to each of conventional cage, enriched cage, and aviary barns in a crossover repeated-measures design for three observation periods over the hens' lifetime. Inhalable and fine particulate matter (PM) and endotoxin in both size fractions were assessed by personal and area samplers over the work shift. Concentrations of inhalable PM, PM2.5 (PM with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm), and endotoxin in both size fractions were higher in aviary than either the conventional or enriched barns. Geometric means (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of inhalable PM and endotoxin for the aviary, conventional, and enriched barns were 8.9 (6.8-11.5) mg/m(3) and 7517.9 (5403.2-10,460.2) EU/m(3), 3.7 (2.8-4.8) mg/m(3) and 1655.7 (1144.6-2395.2) EU/m(3), 2.4 (1.8-3.3) mg/m(3) and 1404.8 (983.3-2007.0) EU/m(3), respectively. Area samplers recorded a lower mean inhalable PM concentration and higher PM2.5 concentration than personal samplers. Ammonia concentrations were low throughout three monitoring seasons. These findings show that the aviary barns pose higher respiratory exposures to poultry workers than either conventional or enriched barns.

  13. Effect of different split-feeding treatments on performance, egg quality, and bone quality of individually housed aged laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, A; Maertens, L; Ampe, B; Buyse, J; Zoons, J; Delezie, E

    2017-10-25

    In order to try to combat the effect of age on eggshell quality in aged laying hens, 5 split-feeding treatments were compared with conventional feeding between 75 and 92 wk of age. In the conventional treatment (T1), the same morning (M) and afternoon (A) diet was fed containing fine (FL) and coarse (CL) limestone at a 50:50 ratio. In the split treatments, the ratio of FL and CL was 50:50 or 30:70, and time of administration (M/A) differed. The following treatments were given: T2 = 50FL-M:50CL-A, T3 = 50CL-M:50FL-A, T4 = 30FL-M:20FL-A+50CL-A, T5 = 30FL-M:70CL-A, and T6 = 0M:30FL-A+70CL-A. A total of 12 individually housed Dekalb white hens was used per treatment. Feed intake, nutrient intake, and laying % was lower in T1 compared to all split treatments (P ≤ 0.001). Due to this low performance in T1, split feeding could not be compared to the conventional system in this trial. By the end of the trial, eggshell quality was improved in T1 as a result of low laying % and more frequent and longer laying pauses. In the split treatments, laying % and feed intake were similar, except in T3 in which a decrease was observed after 81 wk (P ≤ 0.05). Egg weight was higher in T5 and T6 due to higher total and morning protein intake compared to T3 (P ≤ 0.05). Feeding only 50FL-A in T3 not only resulted in lower performance but also in consistently lower shell thickness, indicating a negative effect of suboptimal limestone supplementation. In the split-feeding system, the most optimal combination of morning and afternoon diet was a morning diet with only FL and an afternoon diet with only CL (T2), which both provided ∼50% of the total daily Ca intake. Shell breaking strength and dynamic stiffness could be maintained on this diet between 75 and 92 weeks. Decreasing the amount of Ca in the morning and increasing it in the afternoon did not improve shell quality traits. Bone quality was not affected by limestone particle size or inclusion level in the split

  14. Carbon Dioxide and Nitrogen Infused Compressed Air Foam for Depopulation of Caged Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Shailesh; White, Dima; Archer, Gregory; Styles, Darrel; Zhao, Dan; Farnell, Yuhua; Byrd, James; Farnell, Morgan

    2018-01-01

    Simple Summary Compressed air, detergent, and water make up compressed air foam. Our laboratory has previously reported that compressed air foam may be an effective method for mass depopulation of caged layer hens. Gases, such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen, have also been used for poultry euthanasia and depopulation. The objective of this study was to produce compressed air foam infused with carbon dioxide or nitrogen to compare its efficacy against foam with air and gas inhalation methods (carbon dioxide or nitrogen) for depopulation of caged laying hens. The study showed that a carbon dioxide-air mixture or 100% nitrogen can replace air to make compressed air foam. However, the foam with carbon dioxide had poor foam quality compared to the foam with air or nitrogen. The physiological stress response of hens subjected to foam treatments with and without gas infusion did not differ significantly. Hens exposed to foam with nitrogen died earlier as compared to methods such as foam with air and carbon dioxide. The authors conclude that infusion of nitrogen into compressed air foam results in better foam quality and shortened time to death as compared to the addition of carbon dioxide. Abstract Depopulation of infected poultry flocks is a key strategy to control and contain reportable diseases. Water-based foam, carbon dioxide inhalation, and ventilation shutdown are depopulation methods available to the poultry industry. Unfortunately, these methods have limited usage in caged layer hen operations. Personnel safety and welfare of birds are equally important factors to consider during emergency depopulation procedures. We have previously reported that compressed air foam (CAF) is an alternative method for depopulation of caged layer hens. We hypothesized that infusion of gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen (N2), into the CAF would reduce physiological stress and shorten time to cessation of movement. The study had six treatments, namely a negative control

  15. Productive performance of naked neck, frizzle and dwarf laying hens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    The pullets were the offspring of a Dahlem Red experimental male line heterozygous for the naked neck (Na), frizzle (F) and dwarf (dw) genes and a Rhode Island White female line hemizygous for the normal alleles of the three genes. The gene for light downs (Li) was incorporated to allow colour sexing of day-old chicks.

  16. Deterioration of eggshell quality is related to calbindin in laying hens infected with velogenic genotype VIId Newcastle disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruiqiao; Qi, Xuefeng; Han, Xueying; Liu, Caihong; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ruichun; Wang, Jingyu; Huang, Jinhai

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism by which Newcastle disease virus (NDV) affects eggshell quality. Thirty-week-old specific pathogen free (SPF) egg-laying hens were inoculated with the velogenic genotype VIId NDV strain (infected group) or with inoculating media without virus (control group) by combined intraocular and intranasal routes. The levels of CaBP-D28k mRNA expression in the uterus, a gene related to eggshell quality, were examined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The quality of eggshells was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The infected group showed a marked decline in egg production when compared to the control group. The NDV antigen was found more abundantly in the glandular epithelium of the infected hens' uteri from 1 to 15 d post-inoculation (dpi). The levels of CaBP-D28k mRNA expression in the uteri of infected hens were significantly lower than in the control hens from 3 to 15 dpi (P < 0.05). The changes in the Ca concentrations in the eggshells were consistent with the expression of CaBP-D28k mRNA in the infected hens. Ultrastructural examination of eggshells showed significantly reduced shell thickness in the infected hens from 1 to 15 dpi (P < 0.05). Furthermore, obvious changes in the structure of the external shell surface and shell membrane were detected in the infected hens compared with the control hens. In conclusion, the current study confirmed that velogenic genotype VIId NDV infection is associated with the deterioration of the eggshell quality of the laying hens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Influence of different housing systems on the performance of hens of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of movement and freedom to exercise normal patterns of behaviour are inhibited by this husbandry system. Free- ... and perch hygiene, keel bone condition and toe pad hyper- keratosis.The aim of this study was to ... The housing systems used included a battery system [stocking density 0.1 m2lhen (one hen per cage)], a.

  18. THE INFLUENCE OF AGE HENS ON THE INTENSITY LOAD CAPACITY FROM DIFFERENT WEIGHT GROUPS EGGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Pandurević

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of age of hens on the intensity of load from different weight groups eggs. This paper presents the correlation connection, meaning and significance of differences connection for two weight classes (M - 53 to 63g and L – 63g to 73g, which make up the largest part of the total number of eggs produced during the entire production cycle, as well as for all of the eggs produced, as compared to age-laying hens. Between age and intensity of load to 53 weeks of age hens (SN53/34, there is a strong positive, medium and slight correlation coefficients determined and phenotypic correlation are statistically confirmed at the level of P 0.05. Between the age of hens and intensity of load hardest groups (classes eggs (L there is a complete and very strong connections and established correlation coefficients were statistically significant at P <0.001.

  19. Preliminary Evaluation of a Nest Usage Sensor to Detect Double Nest Occupations of Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Zaninelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional cage systems will be replaced by housing systems that allow hens to move freely. These systems may improve hens’ welfare, but they lead to some disadvantages: disease, bone fractures, cannibalism, piling and lower egg production. New selection criteria for existing commercial strains should be identified considering individual data about laying performance and the behavior of hens. Many recording systems have been developed to collect these data. However, the management of double nest occupations remains critical for the correct egg-to-hen assignment. To limit such events, most systems adopt specific trap devices and additional mechanical components. Others, instead, only prevent these occurrences by narrowing the nest, without any detection and management. The aim of this study was to develop and test a nest usage “sensor”, based on imaging analysis, that is able to automatically detect a double nest occupation. Results showed that the developed sensor correctly identified the double nest occupation occurrences. Therefore, the imaging analysis resulted in being a useful solution that could simplify the nest construction for this type of recording system, allowing the collection of more precise and accurate data, since double nest occupations would be managed and the normal laying behavior of hens would not be discouraged by the presence of the trap devices.

  20. Control methods for Dermanyssus gallinae in systems for laying hens: results of an international seminar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, M.F.; Niekerk, van T.G.C.M.; Chirico, J.; Maurer, V.; Kilpinen, O.; Sparagano, O.; Thind, B.; Zoons, J.; Moore, D.; Bell, B.; Gjevre, A.G.; Chauve, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a seminar on poultry red mite (PRM), Dermanyssus gallinae. Eighteen researchers from eight European countries discussed life cycle issues of the mite, effects of mites on hens and egg production, and monitoring and control methods for PRM in poultry facilities. It

  1. Genetics of survival in cannibalistic laying hens : the contribution of social effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellen, E.D.

    2009-01-01

    Mortality due to cannibalism in laying hens is a worldwide economic and welfare problem occurring in all types of commercial poultry housing systems. Due to prohibition of beak-trimming and the traditional battery system in the European Union in the near future, mortality due to cannibalism in

  2. An Expert System for Monitoring the Daily Production Process in Aviary Systems for Laying Hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokhorst, C.; Lamaker, E.J.J.

    1996-01-01

    An expert system (ES) for monitoring aberrations related to feed consumption, ambient temperature and disease detection was developed in order to support day-to-day management on aviary farms for laying hens. Knowledge of five experts was stored in the knowledge base, which consisted of aberration

  3. Selection on feather pecking affects response to novelty and foraging behaviour in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de E.N.; Nielsen, B.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Buitenhuis, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Feather pecking (FP) is a major welfare problem in laying hens, influenced by multiple factors. FP is thought to be redirected foraging behaviour, however fearful birds are also known to be more sensitive to develop FP. The relationship between fear-responses, foraging and FP is not well understood,

  4. The Little Red Hen: Bringing a Folktale to Life. Grades K-1. Tapestries for Learning Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kelly; Westley, Joan

    This thematic unit involves kindergarten and 1st grade students in the production of a theatrical performance based on the folktale, "The Little Red Hen." The interdisciplinary unit connects knowledge related to theater arts, art, language arts, music, applied mathematics, social studies, and science. Students visit a local theater and…

  5. Effects of dietary red yeast (Sporidiobolus pararoseus) on production performance and egg quality of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapingkae, W; Panyachai, K; Yachai, M; Doan, H V

    2017-06-13

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary red yeast (Sporidiobolus pararoseus) on production performance and egg quality of laying hens. A total of 200 Esa Brown laying hens (23 weeks of age) were allocated equally to negative control group (no yeast supplement); positive control group (2 g/kg of Saccharomyces cerevisiae); 0.5, 1, 2 g/kg red yeast respectively. The experiment was lasted for 12 weeks. Feed intake, hen-day egg production and egg weight were not different between control and supplemented groups. However, yeast-supplemented groups were significantly improved feed efficiency (p  .05) differences among yeast-supplemented groups were observed. The hepatic hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzymeA (HMG-CoA) reductase activity was significantly lower (p < .05) in the 2 g/kg red yeast-supplemented group compared to the control and other red yeast-supplemented groups. Concentrations of caecal short-chain fatty acids was increased (p < .05) in laying hens fed 1 and 2 g/kg red yeast as compared to the control group. Dietary administration of 2 g/kg red yeast (S. pararoceus) significantly improved egg yolk colour, decrease serum and egg yolk cholesterol levels. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Development of hen antihepatitis B antigen IgY-based conjugate for ELISA assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najat Muayed Nafea

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that laying hens can be used as an alternative source for production of polyclonal antibodies against HBsAg and anti-HBs IgY could be labeled with HRP enzyme and could subsequently be used successfully as secondary antibody in ELISA for detection of HBsAg in the patients sera.

  7. QUALITY AND SHELF LIFE EVALUATION OF NUGGETS PREPARED FROM SPENT DUCK AND SPENT HEN MEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to compare the quality of nuggets prepared from spent hen and duck meat. The cooked nuggets were analyzed for pH, thiobarbituric acid (TBA, tyrosine value (TV, moisture, fat, protein, total plate count (TPC and sensory evaluations. Nuggets prepared from spent hen meat showed significantly higher (p<0.05 moisture content however pH, fat and protein content were significantly higher (p<0.05 in duck nuggets. TBA values, TVs and (TPC were highest in duck nuggets but were within the acceptable level up to 7th day of refrigerated storage (4±1°C in both types of nuggets. Both nuggets maintain their sensory quality up to 7th day of refrigeration storage but spent hen nuggets were preferred by consumers compared to nuggets prepared from spent duck meat. Result of the study indicated that, despite the comparative differences among these nuggets, spent duck and hen meat could be used for preparation of nutritionally rich and acceptable nuggets.

  8. GLUCOSE, TOTAL PROTEINS, URIC ACID AND TRIGL YCERIDES CONCENTRATIONS IN BLOOD OF ATIVE LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Mahmood Bhatti, Tanzeela Talat and Rozina Sardar

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken, to estimate levels of glucose, total proteins, albumins, uric acid and triglycerides in plasma of Desi and Naked Neck laying hens. The experimental birds received ration containing 16 per cent crude protein and were housed in open sheds. The mean values (mg/dL observed in Desi hens were 226.736+15.20 glucose, 1.624+0.224 albumin, 5.203+1.078 total proteins, 4.633+1.875 uric acid and 529.800+554.74 triglycerides. In Naked neck hens, the mean values were found to be 231.818+31.376 glucose, 1.562+0.287 albumins, 4.533+0.797total proteins, 4.157+1.336 uric acid and 791.200+320.474 triglycerides. There was no difference (P<0.05 in mean values of blood parameters between both the native laying hens which suggested that in identical genetical mechanism regulated concentrations of blood chemical constituents under study.

  9. Improving Tenderness of Spent Layer Hens Meat Using Papaya Leaves (Carica papaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. O. Abdalla, N. N. A. Ali, F. S. Siddig and S. A. M. Ali*

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were performed to study the use of papaya leaves as a meat tenderizer. The first experiment was to evaluate the effect of papaya dry leaves added to hen’s diet before slaughter. Spent hens (n=48 were used, half of them were fed a concentrate ration containing10% dried papaya leaves powder (DPLP while others received layer ration (Control, for 10 days. The second experiment involved a comparison between papaya leaves juice (PLJ, fresh papaya leaves (FPL and vinegar solution (VS as marinades applied to meat for one or two hours before cooking. Spent layer hens (n=42 were used for tenderness evaluation method. After slaughtering and preparing the chickens two methods of cooking were used (oven and moist cooking. The cooked parts (breast, thigh and drumstick were subjected to a panel test evaluation according to a designed questionnaire. Addition of dried papaya leaves powder to spent layer hens ration significantly (P≤0.05 increased the level of meat tenderness. Moist cooking had significantly (P≤0.05 improved meat tenderization compared to oven cooking. Meat treated with fresh papaya leaves had significantly (P≤0.05 improved tenderness. It was concluded that wrapping the tough meat of spent layer hens with fresh papaya leaves for one hour and moist cooking improve tenderness of meat.

  10. Eggs of free-range hens in northern Nigeria are a good source of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Eggs produced by FR hens could be useful in improving the fatty acid nutrition of pregnant and lactating women in Nigeria, and ultimately their infants who derive much of their nutrition from breast milk. Keywords: Conjugated linoleic acids, docosahexaenoic acid, n.3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, Nigeria, yolk ...

  11. Abatement of particulate matter emission from experimental aviary housings for laying hens by spraying rapeseed oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkel, A.; Riel, van J.W.; Emous, van R.A.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.; Ogink, N.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    In alternative systems for laying hens, concentrations and emission rates of particulate matter (PM) give reason for concern with regard to working conditions, bird health and productivity, and health of residents living near farms. Previously, we found that spraying a film of rapeseed oil onto the

  12. Influence of different housing systems on the performance of hens of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of different housing systems on the performance of hens of four laying strains. Bernice E. Mostert*, E.H. Bowes and J.C. van der Walt. ARC: Animal lmprovement Institute, Private Bag X2, lrene, 1675, RSA. Recieved2T March 1995; accepted l3 July 1995. Four laying strains were evaluated with regard to henday ...

  13. Distance to the popholes does not affect use of the winter garden in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, T.B.; Gerritsen, M.A.; Topelberg, E.; Stump, R.; Naguib, M.

    2015-01-01

    In regulations for free range systems, maximum distances from the house to the popholes are defined. For instance in the Dutch IKB and the German KAT regulations for keeping laying hens, a house that offers free range access only on one side of the house cannot be wider than 15 meters. However,

  14. Causes of keel bone damage and their solutions in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harlander-Matauschek, A.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Sandilands, V.; Tobalske, B.W.; Toscano, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Keel bone damage (KBD) is a critical issue facing the contemporary laying hen industry due to the likely pain leading to compromised welfare and reduced productivity. Recent reports suggest that KBD, while highly variable and likely dependent on a host of factors, extends to all housing systems

  15. Robustness to chronic heat stress in laying hens: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mignon-Grasteau, S.; Moreri, U.; Narcy, A.; Rousseau, X.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Tixier-Boichard, M.; Zerjal, T.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heat is a major stress factor in laying hens and many studies on the effect of heat stress have been published. It remains difficult, however, to draw general conclusions about the effect of chronic heat stress on performance and its relationship with genetic and environmental factors, as

  16. Control methods for Dermanyssus gallinae in systems for laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mul, M.; Fiks-van Niekerk, T.; Chirico, J.

    2009-01-01

    and admitting the problem and in taking timely measures. Currently, the most promising control method combines heating the hen house in combination with chemical treatments. Future areas of development which show promise include the use of entomopathogenic fungi, vaccination and predatory mites. The final aim...

  17. The fearful feather pecker : applying the principles to practice to prevent feather pecking in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de E.N.

    2014-01-01

    Billions of laying hens are kept worldwide. Severe feather pecking (SFP) is a behaviour which occurs with a high prevalence on commercial farms. SFP, the pecking and plucking of feathers of another bird, induces pain and stress and can ultimately lead to cannibalism. Moreover, SFP can occur if a

  18. PERFORMANCE OF LAYER HEN FED FERMENTED Jatropha Curcas L. MEAL SUPPLEMENTED WITH CELLULASE AND PHYTASE ENZYME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumiati

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to study the effect of feeding fermented Jatropha curcas L. meal (JCM supplemented with cellulase and phytase on the performances of ISA-Brown laying hen aged 25-30 weeks. The Jatropha curcas meal was fermented using Rizhopus oligosporus. In this study 200 laying hens were used and distributed to 5 treatments and 4 replications in Completely Randomized Design. The diet treatments were: R0 = control diet (without JCM, R1; diet contained fermented JCM 7.5%, R2; diet contained fermented JCM 7.5% + celullase 200 g/ton, R3; diet contained fermented JCM 7.5% + phytase 200 g/ton and R4; diet contained fermented JCM 7.5% + cellulase 200 g/ton + phytase 200 g/ton. The parameters observed were feed consumption, hen day egg production, egg mass production, egg weight and feed conversion ratio. The results showed that feeding fermented JCM 7.5%, both enzyme supplemented as well as unsupplemented significantly decreased (P<0.05 the feed consumption, hen day egg and egg mass production. However, the treatments did not influence the egg weight. Supplementation of cellulase (R2 or phytase (R3 improved the feed conversion ratio with the value as same as the R0 diet.

  19. Preference of laying hens for different protein sources in a cafeteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laying hens (29-wk old) had access to a basal diet and one of full-fat soybeans, fish meal or blood meal during a 6-week trial to investigate their preference for different protein sources. There was no effect of the dietary treatment on egg production, egg weight or mortality mte (P>0.05). However, weight loss was different ...

  20. Performance And Egg Quality Of Hens Fed Cocoa Husk Based Diet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... hen performance and egg quality. The trial was conducted for 10 weeks. Egg production (EP), egg weight (EW), egg mass (EM), feed consumption (FC), and feed efficiency (FE) were criteria of comparison. Others were feed cost/kg egg, shell weight, percentage shell and yolk colour index. Inclusion of 10 and 20% CHM in ...

  1. Mechanistic insights into small RNA recognition and modification by the HEN1 methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, Alexandra; Baranauskė, Simona; Osipenko, Aleksandr; Klimašauskas, Saulius; Vilkaitis, Giedrius

    2013-07-15

    The HEN1 methyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana modifies the 3'-terminal nucleotides of small regulatory RNAs. Although it is one of the best characterized members of the 2'-O-methyltransferase family, many aspects of its interactions with the cofactor and substrate RNA remained unresolved. To better understand the substrate interactions and contributions of individual steps during HEN1 catalysis, we studied the binding and methylation kinetics of the enzyme using a series of unmethylated, hemimethylated and doubly methylated miRNA and siRNA substrates. The present study shows that HEN1 specifically binds double-stranded unmethylated or hemimethylated miR173/miR173* substrates with a subnanomolar affinity in a cofactor-dependent manner. Kinetic studies under single turnover and pre-steady state conditions in combination with isotope partitioning analysis showed that the binary HEN1-miRNA/miRNA* complex is catalytically competent; however, successive methylation of the two strands in a RNA duplex occurs in a non-processive (distributive) manner. We also find that the observed moderate methylation strand preference is largely exerted at the RNA-binding step and is fairly independent of the nature of the 3'-terminal nucleobase, but shows some dependency on proximal nucleotide mispairs. The results of the present study thus provide novel insights into the mechanism of RNA recognition and modification by a representative small RNA 2'-O-methyltransferase.

  2. Plasma dispositions and concentrations of ivermectin in eggs following treatment of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirak, V Y; Aksit, D; Cihan, H; Gokbulut, C

    2018-01-29

    To determine the plasma disposition and concentrations of ivermectin (IVM) in eggs produced by laying hens following S/C, oral and I/V administration. Twenty-four laying hens, aged 37 weeks and weighing 1.73 (SD 0.124) kg were allocated to three groups of eight birds. The injectable formulation of IVM was administered either orally, S/C, or I/V, at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg liveweight, following dilution (1:5, v/v) with propylene glycol. Heparinised blood samples were collected at various times between 0.25 hours and 20 days after drug administration. Eggs produced by hens were also collected daily throughout the study period. Samples of plasma and homogenised egg were analysed using HPLC. Maximum concentrations of IVM in plasma and mean residence time of IVM were lower after oral (10.2 (SD 7.2) ng/mL and 0.38 (SD 0.14) days, respectively) than after S/C (82.9 (SD 12.4) ng/mL and 1.05 (SD 0.24) days, respectively) administration (phens could result in lower efficacy or subtherapeutic plasma concentrations, which may promote the development of parasitic drug resistance. Due to high IVM residues in eggs compared to the maximum residue limits for other food-producing animal species, a withdrawal period should be necessary for eggs after IVM treatment in laying hens.

  3. Influence of gastrointestinal parasitism on biochemical variables in blood of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josué P Topázio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study describes the influence of endoparasites and diet on biochemical variables in sera of brown laying hens. Materials and methods. Biochemical parameters (seric levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein, uric acid, albumin, and alanine aminotransferase activity were assessed in blood samples of poultry. Three populations of laying hens of different properties (n=20 each represented our experimental design, from which blood (serum and feces were collected for biochemical and parasitological analyzes, respectively. Results. From 60 feces samples evaluated 49 were positive for the presence of parasites and 11 were negative. Among the positive samples, 23 had infection with Eimeria spp and the other 26 samples had mixed parasitism with Eimeria spp and Heterakis gallinarum, which influenced (increasing the levels of total protein and globulin. However, when parasites were analyzed separately, it was observed that the infection by Eimeria spp affected parameters such as cholesterol (which increased, p=0.001 and triglycerides, showing lower results than when the hen was parasitized by Eimeria spp. (p=0.01. Significant (p<0.05 difference was observed in all biochemical variables when the three diets were compared. Conclusions. Our results allowed concluding that the parasitic infection and diet in laying hens influenced the results of serum biochemical parameters evaluated. The main conclusion we found that parasitism caused an increase in total protein and globulin (ie immune response, and there was a negative correlation between parasite load and albumin, uric acid and ALT.

  4. A coprological and serological survey for the prevalence of Ascaridia spp. in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Pacho, J R; Montoya, M N; Arangüena, T; Toro, C; Morchón, R; Marcos-Atxutegi, C; Simón, F

    2005-06-01

    Ascaridia galli is a common nematode found in the intestine of domesticated chickens. The objectives of the study were to conduct a coprological and serological survey on the prevalence of ascaridiosis in laying hens of commercial farms. The farms recently adopted a breeding programme, where the hens have access to outdoor pens. Different amounts of Ascaridia eggs were detected in five of seven studied farms, while the other two farms were found to be free from the parasite. Serological tests revealed a seroprevalence of 21.8% (range 7.6-95%). No positive serum samples were detected in the same farms with previous negative coprological analysis. Western blot analyses confirmed the results obtained by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. In four experimentally infected hens, a progressive increase of the IgG antibody levels was observed, surpassing the cut-off point established for ELISA test 6 weeks post-infection. Serological tests are able to detect the infection before the eggs of the parasite appear in the faeces of infected hens, providing a useful tool to detect infections with Ascaridia spp. in avian farms.

  5. INFLUENCE OF PLANT ESSENTIAL OILS ON SELECTED PARAMETERS OF THE PERFORMANCE OF LAYING HENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrieta ARPÁŠOVÁ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was designed to investigate the effects of feed supplementation with essential oils on egg weight and body mass of laying hens. Hens of the laying breed Isa Brown were randomly divided at the day of hatching into 3 groups (n=26 and fed for 45 weeks on diets which differed in kind of essential oil supplemented. Hens were fed from day 1 by the standard feed mixture. Laying hens accepted fodder ad libitum. In the control group hens took feed mixture without additions, in the first experimental group the feed mixture was supplemented with 0.25 ml/kg thyme essential oil and in the second one hens got hyssop essential oil in the same dose of 0.25 ml/kg. The housing system satisfied enriched cage requirements specified by the Directive 1999/74 EC. The useful area provided for one laying hen presented 943.2 cm2. The equipment of cage consisted of roosts, place for rooting in ashes – synthetic grass, nest and equipment for shortening of clutches. The results showed that the average body weight for a rearing period was in order groups: 736.15±523.49; 747.20±541.6 and 721.95±522.57 (g±SD. Differences between groups were not significant (P>0.05. The average body weight during the laying period was 1763.85±171.46; 1786.08±192.09 and 1729.73±129.12 g for control, thyme oil and hyssop oil supplementation respectively. During the laying period there were significant differences in body weight between control and experimental group with hyssop essential oil supplementation (P<0.05 and between both experimental groups (P<0.01. No significant differences were found out between control group and experimental groups (P>0.05 in egg weight (58.36±4.91; 58.82±4.95 and 58.26±5.33 g respectively.

  6. The Effect of Probiotic Preparation Enriched with Selenium on Performance Parameters of Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrieta Arpášová

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the diet for laying hens supplemented with probiotic product with an organic form of selenium on body weight, egg production, feeed consumption and feed conversion were studied in this experiment. Isa Brown hens (n=90 were randomly divided at the age of 17 weeks into three groups (30 birds per group. Hens in all groups consumed the complete feed mixture ad libitum. In the control group water for drinking contained no additions. In the first experimental group probiotic product was added to the water, in the second experimental group the same probiotic prreparation enriched with O.8 to 1 mg of organic selenium per 1 g of the product was added to the water. The probiotic preparations were administered at the dose of 15 mg per 6 l of water daily, in both experimental groups. Experiment lasted 48 weeks. Hen´s body weight (g±SD at the end of breeding period was within the groups as follows (in order Control–1st and 2nd experimental group: 1882.25±223.68, 1878.73±209.87 and 1860.15±190.90, P>0.05. Between the groups were recorded relatively balanced values in the consumption of food per feeding day, even in the experimental groups werelower feed consumption per eggs, as well as feed conversion recorded, no statistically significant difference (P>0.05 was achieved. Feed conversion was in the order of groups of 2.51, 2.33 and 2.24 kg. During the whole period, the number of eggs per hen was as follows: 274.36; 292.04 and 299.0 pieces. Average number of eggs per hen per month in the order of groups was 22.86±6.76; 24.33±5.93 and 24.91±6.21 pc (mean±SD. Higher egg production, but no statistically significant (P>0.05 was achieved in both experimental groups. The average laying intensity achieved values of 80.42, 81.15 and 83.30%, values of egg mass production per hen were 16.37, 18.14 and 17.61 kg. The results showed that addition of probiotic preparation and probiotic preparation enriched with organic selenium increased egg

  7. Reducing ammonia emissions from laying-hen houses through dietary manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Xin, Hongwei; Burns, Robert T; Roberts, Stacey A; Li, Shuhai; Kliebenstein, James; Bregendahl, Kristjan

    2012-02-01

    Feed additives can change the microbiological environment of the animal digestive track, nutrient composition of feces, and its gaseous emissions. This 2-yr field study involving commercial laying-hen houses in central Iowa was conducted to assess the effects of feeding diets containing EcoCal and corn-dried distillers grain with solubles (DDGS) on ammonia (NH3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4, and N2O) emissions. Three high-rise layer houses (256,600 W-36 hens per house) received standard industry diet (Control), a diet containing 7% EcoCal (EcoCal) or a diet containing 10% DDGS (DDGS). Gaseous emissions were continuously monitored during the period of December 2007 to December 2009, covering the full production cycle. The 24-month test results revealed that mean NH3 emission rates were 0.58 +/- 0.05, 0.82 +/- 0.04, and 0.96 +/- 0.05 g/hen/day for the EcoCal, DDGS, and Control diet, respectively. Namely, compared to the Control diet, the EcoCal and DDGS diets reduced NH3 emission by an average of 39.2% and 14.3%, respectively. The concurrent H2S emission rates were 5.39 +/- 0.46, 1.91 +/- 0.13, and 1.79 +/- 0.16 mg/ hen/day for the EcoCal, DDGS, and Control diet, respectively. CO2 emission rates were similar for the three diets, 87.3 +/- 1.37, 87.4 +/- 1.26, and 89.6 +/- 1.6 g/hen/day for EcoCal, DDGS, and Control, respectively (P = 0.45). The DDGS and EcoCal houses tended to emit less CH4 than the Control house (0.16 and 0.12 vs. 0.20 g/hen/day) during the monitored summer season. The efficacy of NH3 emission reduction by the EcoCal diet decreased with increasing outside temperature, varying from 72.2% in February 2009 to -7.10% in September 2008. Manure of the EcoCal diet contained 68% higher ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) and 4.7 times higher sulfur content than that of the Control diet. Manure pH values were 8.0, 8.9, and 9.3 for EcoCal, DDGS, and Control diets, respectively. This extensive field study verifies that dietary manipulation

  8. Effects of dietary supplementation with red yeast rice on laying performance, egg quality and serum traits of laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Sun; Yifei Wu; Xin Wang; Yong Liu; Xiaohong Yao; Jiangwu Tang

    2015-01-01

    To determine the influence of red yeast rice on production performance, egg quality and serum traits of laying hens, 288 laying hens (40-week-old) were randomly assigned into four groups with 6 replications of 12 birds each. Hens were provided with diets containing 0, 0.5, 1 and 5 g/kg red yeast rice for 8- weeks. Results showed that dietary supplementation of red yeast rice had no effect (P>0.05) on laying performance over the entire feeding period. Albumen height (quadratic, cubic, P<...

  9. Relationship of Salmonella infection and inflammatory intestinal response with hematological and serum biochemical values in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Mario Alberto; Bonnet, María Agustina; Bueno, Dante Javier

    2015-06-15

    There are few studies about the blood serum of laying hens infected with Salmonella. The differential leukocyte count and blood chemistry values are an important aid in the diagnosis of human diseases, but blood parameters in the avian species are not well known. On the other hand, invasive forms of bacterial gastroenteritis, like Salmonella, often cause intestinal inflammation so this study was undertaken to find a biomarker of Salmonella infection and inflammatory intestinal response in the hematological or serum biochemical parameters in laying hens. Furthermore, we evaluated the association of some farm characteristics with Salmonella infection and fecal leukocytes (FL). A fecal sample with at least one fecal leukocyte per field was considered positive for inflammatory intestinal response. False positive serum reactions for Salmonella infection, by serum plate agglutination (SPA) test, were reduced by heating the sample to 56°C for 30 min and then diluting it 5-fold. The range of hematological and biochemical parameter values was very wide, in addition, there was a poor agreement between the SPA and FL results. Comparison of the positive and negative samples in SPA and FL showed that 1.3% and 79.8% of the laying hens were positive and negative in both tests, respectively. Hens with a positive SPA result showed a higher percentage of monocytes than those with a negative SPA result. Hens with a positive FL test had a higher percentage of heterophils, ratio of heterophils to lymphocytes and aspartate aminotransferase values, while the percentage of lymphocytes was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those with a negative FL test. The risk of Salmonella infection increased when the age of laying hens and the number of hens per poultry house was greater than or equal to 18 months old and 10,000 laying hens, compared to less than 18 months old and 10,000 laying hens, respectively. On the other hand, the risk of inflammatory intestinal response was higher in laying

  10. Vanishing White Matter Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In Memory Of Obituaries Contact Us Donate Vanishing White Matter Disease What is Vanishing White Matter Disease? ... of the genetic basis of VWM was a great step forward. First of all, it allows genetic ...

  11. Interrelationship between phosphorus, sodium, and chloride in the diet of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, O M; Miles, R D; Harms, R H

    1984-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted with commercial egg production type hens to determine the effects of dietary phosphorus, sodium, and chloride levels as related to levels of plasma calcium and phosphorus, blood acid-base balance, and production characteristics. Sodium and chloride were supplied to the diet as sodium bicarbonate and hydrochloric acid, respectively. In Experiment 1, five treatment groups were fed diets ad libitum containing .2, .6, 1.0, 1.4, and 1.8% total phosphorus. The remaining treatment group was fed a diet containing .4% total phosphorus from 1400 to 2030 hr and 1.4% total phosphorus from 600 to 1100 hr. In Experiment 2, a 3 X 4 factorial arrangement of treatments was used that consisted of three levels of total phosphorus (.2, .6, and 1.4%) and four levels of added sodium (0, .06, .22, and .45%) provided by sodium bicarbonate. Three other treatment groups were fed diets containing .36% supplemental chloride supplied by hydrochloric acid and either .2, .6, or 1.4% total phosphorus. Egg production was decreased in hens fed diets containing 1.8% total phosphorus. Egg specific gravity was decreased by both low and high phosphorus levels. Hens fed .4% total phosphorus in the afternoon produced eggs with higher specific gravity as compared with hens fed 1.4% total phosphorus during the entire experiment. At 1.4% dietary phosphorus, a significant increase in specific gravity was observed when .2 or .8% sodium bicarbonate was added to the diet. Increasing dietary phosphorus resulted in elevated plasma phosphorus and calcium concentration. Plasma phosphorus of hens fed .2 through 1.8% total phosphorus declined slowly from oviposition until 6 hr after oviposition and then reached a peak at 21 hr after oviposition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Dietary manganese supplementation modulated mechanical and ultrastructural changes during eggshell formation in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y N; Zhang, H J; Wu, S G; Wang, J; Qi, G H

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated the mechanical and ultrastructural changes during eggshell formation in laying hens by using the optimal levels of organic and inorganic manganese (Mn). A total of 270 62-wk-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens were fed a basal diet containing 25.1 mg Mn per kg feed for 2 wks, after which they were randomly allocated into 3 groups and fed the basal diet (control) or the basal diet supplemented with 120 mg Mn per kg feed from monohydrate Mn sulfate (an inorganic source of Mn), or 80 mg Mn per kg feed from an amino acid-Mn complex (an organic source of Mn) for 12 wks. For each group, 6 replicates of 15 hens were used with one hen per cage. Dietary Mn supplementation significantly increased eggshell-breaking strength and thickness in laying hens (P  0.05), whereas the breaking strength of the eggshells was greater at the linear and terminate deposition stages compared with the control (P < 0.05). Dietary Mn supplementation decreased the width of the mammillary knobs and the proportion of mammillary thickness, and increased the proportion of effective thickness of the whole eggshells (P < 0.05). Ultrastructural changes during the eggshell formation indicated that dietary Mn supplementation increased the nucleation site and mammillary knob densities, decreased the mammillary thickness, and increased the proportion of effective thickness and total thickness of the eggshells compared with the control (P < 0.05). Therefore, dietary Mn supplementation can improve the breaking strength and ultrastructure of the eggshells during their formation, and the mammillary and palisade layers are both crucial structures affected by Mn. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  13. A Screen-Peck Task for Investigating Cognitive Bias in Laying Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, William J.; Hodge, James J. L.; Paul, Elizabeth S.; Mendl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Affect-induced cognitive judgement biases occur in both humans and animals. Animals in a more negative affective state tend to interpret ambiguous cues more negatively than animals in a more positive state and vice versa. Investigating animals’ responses to ambiguous cues can therefore be used as a proxy measure of affective state. We investigated laying hens’ responses to ambiguous stimuli using a novel cognitive bias task. In the ‘screen-peck’ task, hens were trained to peck a high/low saturation orange circle presented on a computer screen (positive cue–P) to obtain a mealworm reward, and to not peck when the oppositely saturated orange circle was presented (negative cue–N) to avoid a one second air puff. Ambiguous cues were orange circles of intermediate saturation between the P and N cue (near-positive–NP; middle–M; near-negative–NN), and were unrewarded. Cue pecking showed a clear generalisation curve from P through NP, M, NN to N suggesting that hens were able to associate colour saturation with reward or punishment, and could discriminate between stimuli that were more or less similar to learnt cues. Across six test sessions, there was no evidence for extinction of pecking responses to ambiguous cues. We manipulated affective state by changing temperature during testing to either ~20°C or ~29°C in a repeated measures cross-over design. Hens have been shown to prefer temperatures in the higher range and hence we assumed that exposure to the higher temperature would induce a relatively positive affective state. Hens tested under warmer conditions were significantly more likely to peck the M probe than those tested at cooler temperatures suggesting that increased temperature in the ranges tested here may have some positive effect on hens, inducing a positive cognitive bias. PMID:27410229

  14. Prevalence of gastrointestinal helminth infections in free-range laying hens under mountain farming production conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthijaree, K; Lambertz, C; Gauly, M

    2017-10-27

    1. A cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2015 to July 2016 in South Tyrol, Northern Italy to examine the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths in free-range laying hens under mountain farming production conditions. 2. A total of 280 laying hens from 14 free-range mountain farms (4 organic, 10 conventional) were randomly collected at the end of the laying period. Faecal samples were taken to analyse faecal egg counts (FEC) and faecal oocyst counts (FOC). The gastrointestinal tracts were removed post mortem and examined for the presence of helminths. 3. In faeces, FEC values averaged 258 eggs per g of faeces, which were dominated by Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum. Mean FOC was 80 oocysts/g. In the gastrointestinal tract, at least one nematode species was found in 99.3% of the examined hens. H. gallinarum was the most prevalent nematode (95.7%), followed by Capillaria spp. (66.8%) and A. galli (63.6%). Thirty per cent of the chickens were infected with cestodes (tapeworms). Correlation coefficients between worm counts of H. gallinarum, Capillaria spp. and A. galli ranged from 0.41 to 0.51. 5. The helminth prevalence did not differ between conventional and organic farms, whereas total worm burden was higher in organic compared with conventional farms (318.9 vs. 112.0). Prevalence and infection intensity did not differ between farms that used anthelmintic treatments and those that did not. 6. In conclusion, free-range laying hens under the studied mountain farming conditions are at high risk of nematode infection, especially in organic systems. The vast majority of hens are subclinical infected with at least one helminth species.

  15. Effect of citric acid on the utilization of olive cake diets for laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Al-Harthi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study aims at improving the utilization of olive cake (OC containing-diets for laying hens by citric acid supplementation at 0.1 and 0.2%. Olive cake was collected and dried by sunny warm air at an average temperature of 45°C with continuous stirring until completely dried. Then, the OC was included in isonutritive diets at 0, 10 and 20%. Additionally, citric acid was added at 0, 0.1 and 0.2%. This resulted in 3(OC levels×3(citric acid concentrations, producing 9 different treatments. Each treatment was represented by eight replicates of three laying hens each. The diets were fed to laying hens from 40 to 56 weeks of age. Olive cake inclusion up to 20% without citric acid supplementation in the diets of laying hens did not affect laying performance, egg quality or liver function indices, but 10% and 20% OC diets increased feed intake and impaired the feed conversion ratio (FCR compared with the control group. Citric acid added at 0.1% to the diets of laying hens containing 20% OC yielded similar FCR to the unsupplemented control. In addition, citric acid supplementation at 0.1% significantly decreased relative weight of liver compared with the other levels of citric acid, which is obvious in OC-free diet, and it significantly increased relative weight of ovary compared with the control diet, which is obvious in different diets. In conclusion, OC could be used in the laying hens’ diets at 20% when supplemented with 0.1% citric acid without negative effects on laying performance, egg quality and blood metabolites.

  16. Population genetic structure of Ascaridia galli re-emerging in non-caged laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Johan; Morrison, David A; Engström, Annie; Nejsum, Peter; Jansson, Désirée S

    2012-05-20

    The poultry roundworm Ascaridia galli has reappeared in hens kept for egg production in Sweden after having been almost absent a decade ago. Today this is a frequent intestinal nematode parasite in non-caged laying hens. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic diversity (Fst) in A. galli collected from different poultry production sites in southern Sweden, to identify possible common routes of colonization. Adult parasites (n = 153) from 10 farms, including both broiler breeder parents and laying hens, were investigated by amplified restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (AFLP). Worms from a Danish laying hen farm were also included for comparison. Most of the farms were represented by worms from a single host, but on two farms multiple samples from different hosts were assessed in order to study flock variation. A total of 97 fragments (loci) were amplified among which 81% were variable alleles. The average genetic diversity was 0.13 (range = 0.09-0.38), which is comparable to other AFLP studies on nematodes of human and veterinary importance. Within-farm variation showed that worms harboured by a single hen in a flock covered most of the A. galli genetic variation within the same flock (Fst = 0.01 and 0.03 for two farms). Between-farm analysis showed a moderate population genetic structure (Fst = 0.13), along with a low mutational rate but high gene flow between different farms, and absence of strong genetic selection. Network analysis showed repeated genetic patterns among the farms, with most worms on each farm clustering together as supported by high re-allocation rates. The investigated A. galli populations were not strongly differentiated, indicating that they have undergone a genetic bottlenecking and subsequent drift. This supports the view that the investigated farms have been recently colonized, and that new flocks are reinfected upon arrival with a stationary infection.

  17. Population genetic structure of Ascaridia galli re-emerging in non-caged laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höglund Johan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poultry roundworm Ascaridia galli has reappeared in hens kept for egg production in Sweden after having been almost absent a decade ago. Today this is a frequent intestinal nematode parasite in non-caged laying hens. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic diversity (Fst in A. galli collected from different poultry production sites in southern Sweden, to identify possible common routes of colonization. Methods Adult parasites (n = 153 from 10 farms, including both broiler breeder parents and laying hens, were investigated by amplified restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (AFLP. Worms from a Danish laying hen farm were also included for comparison. Most of the farms were represented by worms from a single host, but on two farms multiple samples from different hosts were assessed in order to study flock variation. Results A total of 97 fragments (loci were amplified among which 81% were variable alleles. The average genetic diversity was 0.13 (range = 0.09-0.38, which is comparable to other AFLP studies on nematodes of human and veterinary importance. Within-farm variation showed that worms harboured by a single hen in a flock covered most of the A. galli genetic variation within the same flock (Fst = 0.01 and 0.03 for two farms. Between-farm analysis showed a moderate population genetic structure (Fst = 0.13, along with a low mutational rate but high gene flow between different farms, and absence of strong genetic selection. Network analysis showed repeated genetic patterns among the farms, with most worms on each farm clustering together as supported by high re-allocation rates. Conclusions The investigated A. galli populations were not strongly differentiated, indicating that they have undergone a genetic bottlenecking and subsequent drift. This supports the view that the investigated farms have been recently colonized, and that new flocks are reinfected upon arrival with a

  18. In-depth analysis of the chicken egg white proteome using an LTQ Orbitrap Velos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Matthias

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hen's egg white has been the subject of intensive chemical, biochemical and food technological research for many decades, because of its importance in human nutrition, its importance as a source of easily accessible model proteins, and its potential use in biotechnological processes. Recently the arsenal of tools used to study the protein components of egg white has been complemented by mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies. Application of these fast and sensitive methods has already enabled the identification of a large number of new egg white proteins. Recent technological advances may be expected to further expand the egg white protein inventory. Results Using a dual pressure linear ion trap Orbitrap instrument, the LTQ Orbitrap Velos, in conjunction with data analysis in the MaxQuant software package, we identified 158 proteins in chicken egg white with two or more sequence unique peptides. This group of proteins identified with very high confidence included 79 proteins identified in egg white for the first time. In addition, 44 proteins were identified tentatively. Conclusions Our results, apart from identifying many new egg white components, indicate that current mass spectrometry technology is sufficiently advanced to permit direct identification of minor components of proteomes dominated by a few major proteins without resorting to indirect techniques, such as chromatographic depletion or peptide library binding, which change the composition of the proteome.

  19. The Tissue Distribution of Lutein in Laying Hens Fed Lutein Fortified Chlorella and Production of Chicken Eggs Enriched with Lutein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    An, Byoung-Ki; Jeon, Jin-Young; Kang, Chang-Won; Kim, Jin-Man; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the dietary effects of conventional or lutein fortified chlorella on lutein absorptions, the tissue distributions and the changes in lutein content of eggs in laying hens...

  20. [Geisteswissenschaft und Publizistik im Baltikum des 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhunderts] / Manfred von Boetticher

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Boetticher, Manfred von, 1947-

    2012-01-01

    Arvustus: Geisteswissenschaft und Publizistik im Baltikum des 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhunderts (Schriften der Baltischen Historischen Kommission, 17; Baltische Biographische Forschungen, 1). Hrsg. von Norbert Angermann, Wilhelm Lenz und Konrad Maier. (Berlin: LIT-Varlag, 2011)