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Sample records for white layer formation

  1. Hybrid structure of white layer in high carbon steel - Formation mechanism and its properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Rumana; Pahlevani, Farshid; Witteveen, Evelien; Banerjee, Amborish; Joe, Bill; Prusty, B Gangadhara; Dippenaar, Rian; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2017-10-16

    This study identifies for the first time, the hybrid structure of the white layer in high carbon steel and describes its formation mechanism and properties. The so-called 'white layer' in steel forms during high strain rate deformation and appears featureless under optical microscopy. While many researchers have investigated the formation of the white layer, there has been no definitive study, nor is there sufficient evidence to fully explain the formation, structure and properties of the layer. In this study, the formation, morphology and mechanical properties of the white layer was determined following impact testing, using a combination of optical and SE- microscopy, HR-EBSD, TKD and TEM as well as nano-indentation hardness measurements and FE modelling. The phase transformation and recrystallization within and near the white layer was also investigated. The microstructure of the steel in the white layer consisted of nano-sized grains of martensite. A very thin layer of austenite with nano sized grains was identified within the white layer by HR-EBSD techniques, the presence of which is attributed to a thermally-induced reverse phase transformation. Overall, the combination of phase transformations, strain hardening and grain refinement led to a hybrid structure and an increase in hardness of the white layer.

  2. Surface crack formation on rails at grinding induced martensite white etching layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Carsten Jørn; Fæster, Søren; Dhar, Somrita

    2017-01-01

    The connection between profile grinding of rails, martensite surface layers and crack initiation has been investigated using visual inspection, optical microscopy and 3D X-ray computerized tomography. Newly grinded rails were extracted and found to be covered by a continuous surface layer...... of martensite with varying thickness formed by the grinding process. Worn R350HT and R200 rails were extracted from the Danish rail network as they had transverse bands resembling grinding marks on the running surface. The transverse bands were shown to consist of martensite which had extensive crack formation...

  3. Apatite formation on calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangdaeng, S; Sata, V; Aguiar, J B; Pacheco-Torgal, F; Chindaprasirt, P

    2015-06-01

    In this study, calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer was investigated for use as biomaterial. Sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate were used as activators. In vitro test was performed with simulated body fluid (SBF) for bioactivity characterization. The formation of hydroxyapatite bio-layer on the 28-day soaked samples surface was tested using SEM, EDS and XRD analyses. The results showed that the morphology of hydroxyapatite was affected by the source material composition, alkali concentration and curing temperature. The calcined kaolin-white Portland cement geopolymer with relatively high compressive strength could be fabricated for use as biomaterial. The mix with 50% white Portland cement and 50% calcined kaolin had 28-day compressive strength of 59.0MPa and the hydroxyapatite bio-layer on the 28-day soaked sample surface was clearly evident. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modelling the formation of double white dwarfs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluijs, M.V.; Verbunt, F.W.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068970374; Pols, O.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/111811155

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the formation of the ten double-lined double white dwarfs that have been observed so far. A detailed stellar evolution code is used to calculate grids of single-star and binary models and we use these to reconstruct possible evolutionary scenarios. We apply various criteria to select

  5. Protective layer formation on magnesium in cell culture medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagener, V.; Virtanen, S., E-mail: virtanen@ww.uni-erlangen.de

    2016-06-01

    In the past, different studies showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) or similar calcium phosphates can be precipitated on Mg during immersion in simulated body fluids. However, at the same time, in most cases a dark grey or black layer is built under the white HA crystals. This layer seems to consist as well of calcium phosphates. Until now, neither the morphology nor its influence on Mg corrosion have been investigated in detail. In this work commercially pure magnesium (cp) was immersed in cell culture medium for one, three and five days at room temperature and in the incubator (37 °C, 5% CO{sub 2}). In addition, the influence of proteins on the formation of a corrosion layer was investigated by adding 20% of fetal calf serum (FCS) to the cell culture medium in the incubator. In order to analyze the formed layers, SEM images of cross sections, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements were carried out. Characterization of the corrosion behavior was achieved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and by potentio-dynamic polarization in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) at 37 °C. Surface analysis showed that all formed layers consist mainly of amorphous calcium phosphate compounds. For the immersion at room temperature the Ca/P ratio indicates the formation of HA, while in the incubator probably pre-stages to HA are formed. The different immersion conditions lead to a variation in layer thicknesses. However, electrochemical characterization shows that the layer thickness does not influence the corrosion resistance of magnesium. The main influencing factor for the corrosion behavior is the layer morphology. Thus, immersion at room temperature leads to the highest corrosion protection due to the formation of a compact outer layer. Layers formed in the incubator show much worse performances due to completely porous

  6. Protective layer formation on magnesium in cell culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, V; Virtanen, S

    2016-06-01

    In the past, different studies showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) or similar calcium phosphates can be precipitated on Mg during immersion in simulated body fluids. However, at the same time, in most cases a dark grey or black layer is built under the white HA crystals. This layer seems to consist as well of calcium phosphates. Until now, neither the morphology nor its influence on Mg corrosion have been investigated in detail. In this work commercially pure magnesium (cp) was immersed in cell culture medium for one, three and five days at room temperature and in the incubator (37 °C, 5% CO2). In addition, the influence of proteins on the formation of a corrosion layer was investigated by adding 20% of fetal calf serum (FCS) to the cell culture medium in the incubator. In order to analyze the formed layers, SEM images of cross sections, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements were carried out. Characterization of the corrosion behavior was achieved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and by potentio-dynamic polarization in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) at 37°C. Surface analysis showed that all formed layers consist mainly of amorphous calcium phosphate compounds. For the immersion at room temperature the Ca/P ratio indicates the formation of HA, while in the incubator probably pre-stages to HA are formed. The different immersion conditions lead to a variation in layer thicknesses. However, electrochemical characterization shows that the layer thickness does not influence the corrosion resistance of magnesium. The main influencing factor for the corrosion behavior is the layer morphology. Thus, immersion at room temperature leads to the highest corrosion protection due to the formation of a compact outer layer. Layers formed in the incubator show much worse performances due to completely porous structures. The

  7. White-Light Emission from Layered Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew D; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2018-02-20

    With nearly 20% of global electricity consumed by lighting, more efficient illumination sources can enable massive energy savings. However, effectively creating the high-quality white light required for indoor illumination remains a challenge. To accurately represent color, the illumination source must provide photons with all the energies visible to our eye. Such a broad emission is difficult to achieve from a single material. In commercial white-light sources, one or more light-emitting diodes, coated by one or more phosphors, yield a combined emission that appears white. However, combining emitters leads to changes in the emission color over time due to the unequal degradation rates of the emitters and efficiency losses due to overlapping absorption and emission energies of the different components. A single material that emits broadband white light (a continuous emission spanning 400-700 nm) would obviate these problems. In 2014, we described broadband white-light emission upon near-UV excitation from three new layered perovskites. To date, nine white-light-emitting perovskites have been reported by us and others, making this a burgeoning field of study. This Account outlines our work on understanding how a bulk material, with no obvious emissive sites, can emit every color of the visible spectrum. Although the initial discoveries were fortuitous, our understanding of the emission mechanism and identification of structural parameters that correlate with the broad emission have now positioned us to design white-light emitters. Layered hybrid halide perovskites feature anionic layers of corner-sharing metal-halide octahedra partitioned by organic cations. The narrow, room-temperature photoluminescence of lead-halide perovskites has been studied for several decades, and attributed to the radiative recombination of free excitons (excited electron-hole pairs). We proposed that the broad white emission we observed primarily stems from exciton self-trapping. Here, the

  8. Recurrent white thrombi formation in hemodialysis tubing: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathe, Kiran P; Yeo, Wee-Song; Liu, Isaac Desheng; Ekambaram, Sudha; Azar, Mohammed; Yap, Hui-Kim; Ng, Kar-Hui

    2015-01-15

    While the appearance of red clots in the dialyzer is a common phenomenon in every hemodialysis unit, the occurrence of white thrombi in the tubing is relatively rare. We describe an adolescent male with recurrent white thrombi formation in the hemodialysis tubing. This patient had chronic renal failure from focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, but was no longer nephrotic at the time of the thrombi formation. He had a history of recurrent thrombosis of his vascular access. However, no pro-thrombotic risk factors could be identified. White particulate matter, measuring 1 to 3mm in size, and adherent to the arterial and venous blood tubing lines was found during the rinse back of a hemodialysis session. This was associated with a 60% decrease in his platelet count. Light microscopic examination of the deposits revealed the presence of platelet aggregates. He subsequently developed thrombosis of his arteriovenous graft six hours later. The white thrombi recurred at the next dialysis session, as well as six months later. These episodes occurred regardless of the type of dialysis machine or tubing, and appeared to resolve with an increase in heparin dose. Recurrent white thrombi formation can occur in the hemodialysis tubing of a patient with no identifiable pro-thrombotic factors. The white thrombi may be a harbinger of arteriovenous graft thrombosis and may be prevented by an increase in heparin dose.

  9. Layer Formation in Sedimentary Fingering Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Reali, J F; Alsinan, A; Meiburg, E

    2016-01-01

    When particles settle through a stable temperature or salinity gradient they can drive an instability known as sedimentary fingering convection. This phenomenon is thought to occur beneath sediment-rich river plumes in lakes and oceans, in the context of marine snow where decaying organic materials serve as the suspended particles, or in the atmosphere in the presence of aerosols or volcanic ash. Laboratory experiments of Houk and Green (1973) and Green (1987) have shown sedimentary fingering convection to be similar to the more commonly known thermohaline fingering convection in many ways. Here, we study the phenomenon using 3D direct numerical simulations. We find evidence for layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection in regions of parameter space where it does not occur for non-sedimentary systems. This is due to two complementary effects. Sedimentation affects the turbulent fluxes and broadens the region of parameter space unstable to the $\\gamma$-instability (Radko 2003) to include systems at l...

  10. A multi-layered image format for the web with an adaptive layer selection algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tair Milan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a proposed multi-layered image format for use on the web. The format implements an algorithm for selecting adequate layer images depending on the image container's surroundings and size. The layer selection depends on the weighted average brightness of the underlying web page background within the bounds of the image. The proposed image format supports multiple image layers with adjoined thresholds and activation conditions. Depending on these conditions and the underlying background, a layer's visibility will be adequately set. The selection algorithm takes into account the background brightness, each layer's adjoined threshold values, and other newly introduced layer conditions.

  11. Color stabilization in white organic light emitting devices utilizing trapping layers inserted in both an electron transport layer and an emitting layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwack, Byoung Chan; Lee, Kwang Seop; Choo, Dong Chul; Kim, Tae Whan; Seo, Ji Hyun; Kim, Young Kwan

    2008-10-01

    The electrical and the optical properties of white organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) utilizing trapping layers inserted into both an electron transport layer (ETL) and an emitting layer (EML) were investigated. The current density of OLEDs with an ETL containing a 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene) layer was slightly smaller than those of other devices. The luminance-current density and luminance efficiency-current density of the OLEDs with rubrene layers embedded in only an ETL or an EML were similar to the blue reference device. While the electroluminescence (EL) spectrum for the OLEDs with a rubrene layer in the ETL in the low voltage range showed the white color, that with rubrene layers in both the EML and the ETL exhibited white color, regardless of the applied voltage. The Commission International de l'Eclairage coordinates of the white OLEDs became stabilized by inserting rubrene layers into both the EML and the ETL.

  12. Whisker Formation On Galvanic Tin Surface Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radanyi A.L.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports the effect of substrate composition, thickness of the tin electroplate and its morphology on pressure-induced tin whisker formation. Pure tin deposits of different thickness were obtained on a copper and brass substrates using methane sulfonic industrial bath. The deposits were compressed by a steel bearing ball forming imprint on the surface. The microstructure of tin whiskers obtained at the boundary of each imprint, their length and number were studied using both light and scanning electron microscopy. It was shown that the most intensive formation and growth of whiskers was observed in the first two hours. In general, brass substrate was shown to be more prone to whisker formation than copper independently of the tin coating thickness. The results have been compared with industrial bright tin finish on control unit socket leads and proposals have been made as to modification of the production process in order to minimize the risk of whiskering.

  13. Formation mechanism of bimetal composite layer between LCS and HCCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-chang Zhu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A low carbon steel (LCS/high chromium white cast iron (HCCI bimetal wear plate about 20 mm in thickness was prepared by liquid-liquid bimetal composite casting technology to substitute for the welding wear plate. A clear and distinguishable composite layer between the LCS and the HCCI was detected with SEM, and the composition and phase were analyzed through EDS and XRD. The composite layer was composed of three sublayers from the LCS to the HCCI: pearlite transition layer, composite layer, and HCCI transition layer. The Vickers hardness from the pearlite transition layer to the HCCI transition layer was 360 HV to 855 HV. The austenite grows as dendrites between the composite layer and the HCCI transition layer under constitutional undercooling. A large amount of C and Cr, and a small amount of Si and Mn dissolve in the matrix. Granular Cr7C3 is uniformly distributed. Due to the solute redistribution at the solid-liquid interface, the primary austenite grows from planar to cellular and finally to the distinct dendrite crystals. The dendrite crystals have an obvious growth direction perpendicular to the composite layer.

  14. Color stable white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with red emissive electron transport layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wook Kim, Jin; Yoo, Seung Il; Sung Kang, Jin [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Eun Lee, Song; Kwan Kim, Young [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwa Yu, Hyeong; Turak, Ayse [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Young Kim, Woo, E-mail: wykim@hoseo.edu [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2015-06-28

    We analyzed the performance of multi-emissive white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) in relation to various red emitting sites of hole and electron transport layers (HTL and ETL). The shift of the recombination zone producing stable white emission in PHOLEDs was utilized as luminance was increased with red emission in its electron transport layer. Multi-emissive white PHOLEDs including the red light emitting electron transport layer yielded maximum external quantum efficiency of 17.4% with CIE color coordinates (−0.030, +0.001) shifting only from 1000 to 10 000 cd/m{sup 2}. Additionally, we observed a reduction of energy loss in the white PHOLED via Ir(piq){sub 3} as phosphorescent red dopant in electron transport layer.

  15. Simple single-emitting layer hybrid white organic light emitting with high color stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, C.; Lu, Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    Simultaneously achieving a high efficiency and color quality at luminance levels required for solid-state lighting has been difficult for white organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Single-emitting layer (SEL) white OLEDs, in particular, exhibit a significant tradeoff between efficiency and color stability. Furthermore, despite the simplicity of SEL white OLEDs being its main advantage, the reported device structures are often complicated by the use of multiple blocking layers. In this paper, we report a highly simplified three-layered white OLED that achieves a low turn-on voltage of 2.7 V, an external quantum efficiency of 18.9% and power efficiency of 30 lm/W at 1000 cd/cm2. This simple white OLED also shows good color quality with a color rendering index of 75, CIE coordinates (0.42, 0.46), and little color shifting at high luminance. The device consists of a SEL sandwiched between a hole transport layer and an electron transport layer. The SEL comprises a thermally activated delayer fluorescent molecule having dual functions as a blue emitter and as a host for other lower energy emitters. The improved color stability and efficiency in such a simple device structure is explained as due to the elimination of significant energy barriers at various organic-organic interfaces in the traditional devices having multiple blocking layers.

  16. Formation of alumina layers on iron-base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, J.; Grabke, H.J.

    1984-09-01

    The formation of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-layers has been studied for ferritic alloys Fe-6Al-M and austenitic alloys Fe-27 Ni-4 Al-M where M-Ti, Zr, V, Nb, W, B, Si... (concentration in wt%). One or more alloying elements M had been added and in some cases carbon. The oxidation was performed at 1000/sup 0/C in H/sub 2/O-H/sub 2/ mixtures at PO/sub 2/ = 10/sup -19/ bar. After 1/2 h oxidation the oxide layers were investigated by X-ray structures analysis, scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The alloy Fe-6Al and most doped alloys form badly adherent layers, however, on alloys with additions of 0.1 to 1% Ti, Zr, V or Y the oxide layers are fine-grained and well-adherent. The Ti-doped ferritic alloys showed very protective layers, which is caused by the formation of a Ti(C, O)-layer beneath the ..cap alpha..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The presence of the oxicarbide induces nucleation and improves the adherence of ..cap alpha..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, according to epitaxial relations between ferrite and oxicarbide and between oxicarbide and alumina. The favourable influence of Ti and Zr on the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ formation is also effective on the austenitic alloys.

  17. Analytical study of modern paint layers on metal knight shields: the use and effect of titanium white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Clara Bratt; Sanyova, Jana; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær

    2014-04-24

    Painted metal knight shields of the Order of the Elephant produced during the last part of the 20th century are characterized by a striking variety in their conservation state. Three different coat systems were identified and investigated by Fourier transform infrared microscopy (μ-FTIR), micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS), scanning electron microscopy-Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and Thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation-gas chromatography-mass Spectrometry (THM-GC-MS). Chalking of the white paint layer on the first group of knight shields displayed in the window niches was found to be related to the use of titanium white of the anatase type. A pristine condition of the second group could be attributed to priming of the lead rich metal support with a zinc potassium chromate based primer and the use of mainly stable white pigments in the top coat. Severe delamination of the paint layer of the third group was caused by the formation of lead corrosion products between the paint layer and the metal support. The results are discussed in relation to the climatic conditions as well as the historical context of contemporary paint production and availability in Denmark. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hindered settling and the formation of layered intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bons, Paul D.; Baur, Albrecht; Elburg, Marlina A.; Lindhuber, Matthias J.; Marks, Michael A. W.; Soesoo, Alvar; van Milligen, Boudewijn P.; Walte, Nicolas P.

    2015-04-01

    Layered intrusions are characterized by (often repetitive) layering on a range of scales. Many explanations for the formation of such layering have been proposed over the past decades. We investigated the formation of "mats" by hindered crystal settling, a model that was first suggested by Lauder (1964). The interaction of sinking and rising crystals leads to the amplification of perturbations in crystal density within a magma chamber, a process similar to the formation of traffic jams in dense traffic (Bons et al., 2015). Once these "crystal traffic jams" form they constitute a barrier for further settling of crystals. Between these barriers, the magma evolves in a semi-closed system in which stratification may develop by gravitational sorting. Barriers, and therefore layers, form sequentially during inward cooling of the magma chamber. Barring later equilibration, mineralogical and geochemical trends within the layers are repetitive, but with variations due to the random process of initial perturbation formation. Layers can form in the transition between two end-member regimes: (1) in a fast cooling and/or viscous magma crystals cannot sink or float a significant distance and minerals are distributed homogeneously throughout the chamber; (2) in a slow cooling and/or low-viscosity magma crystals can quickly settle at the top and bottom of the chamber and crystals concentrations are never high enough to form "traffic jams". As a result, heavy and light minerals get fully separated in the chamber. Between these two end members, crystals can sink and float a significant distance, but not the whole height of the magma chamber before entrapment in "traffic jams". We illustrate the development of layers with numerical models and compare the results with the layered nepheline syenites (kakortokites) of the Ilímaussaq intrusion in SW Greenland. References: Bons, P.D., Baur, A., Elburg, M.A., Lindhuber, M.J., Marks, M.A.W., Soesoo, A., van Milligen, B.P., Walte, N.P. 2015

  19. Enhancing Color Purity and Stable Efficiency of White Organic Light Diodes by Using Hole-Blocking Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Jung Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The organic light-emitting diodes with triple hole-blocking layer (THBL formation sandwich structure which generate white emission were fabricated. The 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnapthacene (Rubrene, (4,4′-N,N′-dicarbazolebiphenyl (CBP, and 4,4′-bis(2,2′diphenylvinil-1,1′-biphenyl (DPVBi were used as emitting materials in the device. The function of CBP layer is not only an emitting layer but also a hole-blocking layer (HBL, and the Rubrene was doped into the CBP. The optimal configuration structure was indium tin oxide (ITO/Molybdenum trioxide (MoO3 (5 nm/[4,4-bis[N-(1-naphthyl-N-phenylamino]biphenyl (NPB (35 nm/CBP (HBL1 (5 nm/DPVBi (I (10 nm/CBP (HBL2 : Rubrene (4 : 1 (3 nm/DPVBi (II (30 nm/CBP (HBL3 (2 nm/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen (10 nm/Lithium fluoride (LiF/aluminum (Al. The result showed that the device with Rubrene doped in CBP (HBL2 exhibited a stable white emission with the color coordinates of (0.322, 0.368, and the coordinate with the slight shift of ±Δx,y = (0.001, 0.011 for applied voltage of 8–12 V was observed.

  20. Mechanisms of layer structure formation in peritectic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumder, P.; Trivedi, R. [Ames Lab., IA (United States); Karma, A. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The mechanisms of layer structure formation in the two phase region of peritectic systems are discussed. Under diffusive growth conditions, a banded structure is predicted within a narrow composition range in the hypoperitectic composition. Experimental studies show the formation of an oscillatory structure in the hyperperitectic region. It is shown that this structure is induced by convection in the melt, and it is a novel structure in which a large single tree-like structure of primary phase is surrounded by the peritectic phase. Basic ideas of convection that lead to this tree-like morphology are described.

  1. White OLED using {beta}-diketones rare earth binuclear complex as emitting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirino, W.G. [LOEM, Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, P.O.Box 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Legnani, C. [LOEM, Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, P.O.Box 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Cremona, M. [LOEM, Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, P.O.Box 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil)]. E-mail: cremona@fis.puc-rio.br; Lima, P.P. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, UFPE-CCEN, Recife, PE, 50670-901 (Brazil); Junior, S.A. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, UFPE-CCEN, Recife, PE, 50670-901 (Brazil); Malta, O.L. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, UFPE-CCEN, Recife, PE, 50670-901 (Brazil)

    2006-01-03

    In this work, the fabrication and the characterization of a white triple-layer OLED using a {beta}-diketones binuclear complex [Eu(btfa){sub 3}phenterpyTb(acac){sub 3}] as the emitting layer is reported. The devices were assembled using a heterojunction between three organic molecular materials: the N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)benzidine (NPB) as hole-transporting layer, the {beta}-diketones binuclear complex and the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq{sub 3}) as the electron transporting layer. All the organic layers were sequentially deposited under high vacuum environment by thermal evaporation onto ITO substrates and without breaking vacuum. Continuous electroluminescence emission was obtained varying the applied bias voltage from 10 to 22 V showing a wide emission band from 400 to 700 nm with about 100 cd/m{sup 2} of luminance. The white emission results from a combined action between the binuclear complex, acting as hole blocking and emitting layer, blue from NPB and the typical Alq{sub 3} green emission. The intensity ratio of the peaks is determined by the layer thickness and by the bias voltage applied to the OLED, allowing us to obtain a color tunable light source.

  2. Physical Limitations of Phosphor layer thickness and concentration for White LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cher Ming; Singh, Preetpal; Zhao, Wenyu; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2018-02-05

    Increasing phosphor layer thickness and concentration can enhance the lumen flux of white LED (W-LED). In this work, we found that increasing the phosphor layer thickness and concentration can increase its temperature, and there is also a maximum thickness and concentration beyond which their increase will not lead to lumen increase, but only temperature increase. Higher thickness and higher concentration also results in warm light instead of White light. The maximum thickness and concentration are found to be limited by the scattering of light rays with higher % decrease of blue light rays than the yellow light rays. The results obtained in this work can also be used to compute the temperature and thermo-mechanical stress distribution of an encapsulated LED, demonstrating its usefulness to the design of encapsulated LED packages. Simulation software like ANSYS and TracePro are used extensively to verify the root cause mechanisms.

  3. Effects of Flow on Hen Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL) Fibril Formation: Lenght Distribution, Flexibility, and Kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humblet-Hua, K.N.P.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of steady shear and turbulent flow on the formation of amyloid fibrils from hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was studied. The conversion and size distribution of fibrils obtained by heating HEWL solutions at pH 2 were determined. The formation of fibrils was quantified using flow-induced

  4. In situ heat treatment from multiple layers of a tar sands formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-11-30

    A method for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. The method includes providing a drive fluid to a first hydrocarbon containing layer of the formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the first layer. At least some of the mobilized hydrocarbons are allowed to flow into a second hydrocarbon containing layer of the formation. Heat is provided to the second layer from one or more heaters located in the second layer. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the second layer of the formation.

  5. Tunneling Injection and Exciton Diffusion of White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Composed Buffer Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su-Hua; Wu, Jian-Ping; Huang, Tao-Liang; Chung, Bin-Fong

    2018-02-01

    Four configurations of buffer layers were inserted into the structure of a white organic light emitting diode, and their impacts on the hole tunneling-injection and exciton diffusion processes were investigated. The insertion of a single buffer layer of 4,4'-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) resulted in a balanced carrier concentration and excellent color stability with insignificant chromaticity coordinate variations of Δ x < 0.023 and Δ y < 0.023. A device with a 2,9-Dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) buffer layer was beneficial for hole tunneling to the emission layer, resulting in a 1.45-fold increase in current density. The tunneling of holes and the diffusion of excitons were confirmed by the preparation of a dual buffer layer of CBP:tris-(phenylpyridine)-iridine (Ir(ppy)3)/BCP. A maximum current efficiency of 12.61 cd/A with a luminance of 13,850 cd/m2 was obtained at 8 V when a device with a dual-buffer layer of CBP:6 wt.% Ir(ppy)3/BCP was prepared.

  6. Potential vorticity and layer thickness variations in the flow around Jupiter's Great Red Spot and White Oval BC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Timothy E.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1988-01-01

    Using Voyager images, layer thickness variations in the flow around Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) and White Oval BC were investigated by treating potential vorticity as a conserved tracer. Fluid trajectories around the GRS and the White Oval BC were calculated assuming the flow to be frictionless, adiabatic, hydrostatic, and steady in the reference frame of the vortex. The data obtained constitute a useful diagnostic which will help to differentiate between models of Jovian vortices. Implications of the observations were studied in the context of a one-layer quasi-geostrophic model in which a thin upper weather layer, which contains the vortex, is supported hydrostatically by a much deeper lower layer.

  7. The depositional environment and petrology of the White Rim Sandstone Member of the Permian Cutler Formation, Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele-Mallory, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The White Rim Sandstone Member of the Cutler Formation of Permian age in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, was deposited in coastal eolian and associated interdune environments. This conclusion is based on stratigraphic relationships primary sedimentary structures, and petrologic features. The White Rim consists of two major genetic units. The first represents a coastal dune field and the second represents related interdune ponds. Distinctive sedimentary structures of the coastal dune unit include large- to medium-scale, unidirectional, tabular-planar cross-bedding; high-index ripples oriented parallel to dip direction of the foresets; coarse-grained lag layers; avalanche or slump marks; and raindrop impressions. Cross-bedding measurements suggest the dunes were deposited as transverse ridges by a dominantly northwest to southeast wind. Distinctive sedimentary structures of the interdune pond unit include wavy, horizontally laminated bedding, adhesion ripples, and desiccation polygons. These features may have been produced by alternate wetting and drying of sediment during water-table fluctuations. Evidence of bioturbation is also present in this unit. Petrologic characteristics of the White Rim helped to define the depositional environment as coastal. A crinoid fragment was identified at one location; both units are enriched in heavy minerals, and small amounts of well rounded, reworked glauconite were found in the White Rim throughout the study area. Earlier work indicates that the White Rim sandstone is late Wolfcampian to early Leonardian in age. During this time, the Canyonlands area was located in a depositional area alternately dominated by marine and nonmarine environments. Results of this study suggest the White Rim represents a coastal dune field that was deposited by predominantly on-shore winds during a period of marine transgression.

  8. White organic light-emitting devices with tunable color emission fabricated utilizing exciplex formation at heterointerfaces including m-MDATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Seop; Choo, Dong Chul; Kim, Tae Whan, E-mail: twk@hanyang.ac.kr

    2011-05-31

    The electrical and the optical properties of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) fabricated utilizing a 4,4',4''-tris(2-methylphenyl-phenylamino)triphenylamine (m-MTDATA) were investigated to clarify the effect of exciplex on their color stabilization and color purity. The electrons combined with the holes at heterointerfaces between the m-MTDATA layer and the 9,10-di(2-naphthyl)anthracene (MADN) and the 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethyl aminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM1) emitting layer (EML) resulted in the formation of the exciplex. The emission peak of the electroluminescence spectra for the OLEDs fabricated utilizing the m-MTDATA layer shifted to a lower energy side in comparison with that of the EML. This was due to the interaction of the holes in the m-MTDATA layer and the electrons in the MADN EML. Carriers in white OLEDs (WOLEDs) with exciplex emissions existed at the heterointerfaces between the m-MTDATA and the EML because the DCM1 EML was too thin to affect the EL peak related to the m-MTDATA layer. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of WOLEDs at 9.5 V were (0.33, 0.36), and their maximum current efficiency at 46 mA/cm{sup 2} was 2.03 cd/A.

  9. Phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes by electron transporting layer engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok Jae; Koo, Ja Ryong; Lee, Dong Hyung; Lee, Ho Won; Lee, Kum Hee; Yoon, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Kwan

    2014-10-01

    The authors describe the fabrication of white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) with dual electron transporting layers (D-ETL) using 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanhroline/ 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) and bis-(2-methyl-8-quinolinolate)-4-(phenylphenolato) aluminum/BPhen. Stepwise D-ETL easily transports electrons easily to the emitting layer and reduces the leakage of electrons. Therefore, WOLEDs with D-ETL show higher external quantum efficiency (EQE) when compared to a control WOLED with a single ETL device. The optimized WOLEDs showed a peak EQE of 13.0%, luminous efficiency of 27.4 cd/A, and Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates of (0.40, 0.39) at 1000 cd/m2.

  10. Effect of Multi-Layered Corium Formations on Integrity of Steel Components under Steam Explosion Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Tae Hyun; Chang, Yoon-Suk [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yong-Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The object of the present study is to examine effect of multi-layered corium formations on the integrity of steel components under a representative steam explosion condition. In this context, multi-layered corium formation conditions are assumed based on a previous study. Subsequently, stress evaluation of steel components is performed by TNT (trinitrotoluene) model for the steam explosion analysis and their results are discussed. In this paper, comparative numerical analyses were carried out to examine effect of the multi-layered corium formations on integrity of steel components under a typical steam explosion condition and the following conclusions were derived. (1) The highest maximum von Mises stress was calculated at RPV. However, stress values of all components did not exceed their yield strengths. (2) Effect of the 3-layer corium formation was higher than 2-layer corium formation. Resulting von Mises stress increased 20% than that of no corium formation and 16% than that of 2-layer corium formation.

  11. Diurnal Ekman layer cycles at White Sands, New Mexico observed with Doppler lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Andrew; Jerolmack, Douglas

    2017-11-01

    Atmospheric boundary layer turbulence is produced by shear and buoyancy, which are forced by larger-scale geostrophic and solar controls. Their absolute and relative inputs result in a nonlinear response of boundary-normal flow deflection within the Ekman layer. Classical analytical solutions for the deflection were found by assuming extrema of the shear-buoyancy phase space. At the chosen field site, a low-roughness long-fetch salt flat upwind of White Sands dune field, we employ a ground-based upward-facing Doppler lidar to observe the layer's dynamics throughout a continuous 70-day time series of wind vector measurements between 10 and 300 metres aloft. Within this domain we identify transition path bifurcation in the shear-buoyancy phase space, where deflection transience and the associated transformation of the vertical extent of the Ekman layer, are dependent on the daily stability cycle. Our analysis probes the natural system that is often modelled with idealised theory, revealing non-equilibrium dynamics that have implications within atmospheric science and geomorphology.

  12. Transmission of Thermonuclear Detonations through Layers of Burned Material in Carbon-Oxygen White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamezo, V. N.; Oran, E. S.

    2006-06-01

    In three-dimensional delayed-detonation models of type Ia supernovae, detonations propagate through funnels of degenerate carbon-oxygen matter that are left unburned by turbulent deflagrations in central parts of a white dwarf. Some of these funnels can be disconnected from the rest of the unburned material, thus creating unburned pockets that cannot be directly reached by a detonation wave. These pockets may or may not ignite when strong shocks generated by detonations reach them through layers of burned material. In this work, we study the detonation transmission phenomena in exploding white dwarfs using one-dimensional time-dependent numerical simulations based on reactive Euler equations. The thermonuclear burning of carbon-oxygen mixture is modeled by a 13-nuclei alpha network. We use a steady-state solution for the reaction-zone structure of a one-dimensional detonation wave as an initial condition. Time-dependent computations performed for a fully resolved carbon reaction scale show that a detonation shock passing through a layer of burned material can initiate a new detonation or decay. The critical thickness of burned material that allows the detonation reignition is a function of density. This work was supported in part by the NASA ATP program (NRA-02-OSS-01-ATP) and by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) through the Office of Naval Research.

  13. Effects of organic mineral dietary supplementation on production performance and egg quality of white layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIM Fernandes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This trial aimed at evaluating the effect of organic trace mineral supplementation of commercial layer diets on productive performance and egg quality. One-hundred-ninety-two Hy Line W36 white 69-w-old layers were distributed into a completely randomized design with three treatments, and eight replicates, with eight birds each. Treatments consisted of a basal diet supplemented with inorganic trace minerals (R1, and two others experimental diets containing 0.250 ppm (R2 and 0.500 ppm (R3 of an organic source of zinc, manganese, and selenium. Feed intake (g/bird/day, feed conversion ratio (kg/dozen egg and kg/kg egg, egg weight (g, egg production (%, thin and cracked eggshells (%, specific gravity (g/mL, Haugh Units, total egg solids (%, yolk yield, white and shell yields (%, eggshell thickness, and egg Se content were evaluated Tukey's test analyzed differences among means at 5% of probability using PROC GLM in SAS (2000. Although not significant as compared to the non-supplemented diet, improvements on relative cracked-plus-thin shells were observed with the use of organic mineral blend. The addition of the organic blend to the diet at 0.250 kg/ton resulted in (p<0.05 higher total egg solids. Also, as compared to eggs from control group, fresh and dried yolk yields were higher with the dietary inclusion of the organic mineral blend at 0.250 and 0.500 kg/ton.

  14. Formation mechanism of bimetal composite layer between LCS and HCCI

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yong-chang Zhu Zun-jie Wei Shou-fan Rong Hong-wei Wang Chun-ming Zou

    2016-01-01

    A low carbon steel (LCS)/high chromium white cast iron (HCCI) bimetal wear plate about 20 mm in thickness was prepared by liquid-liquid bimetal composite casting technology to substitute for the welding wear plate...

  15. Collision avoidance in TV white spaces: a cross-layer design approach for cognitive radio networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foukalas, Fotis; Karetsos, George T.

    2015-07-01

    One of the most promising applications of cognitive radio networks (CRNs) is the efficient exploitation of TV white spaces (TVWSs) for enhancing the performance of wireless networks. In this paper, we propose a cross-layer design (CLD) of carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA) mechanism at the medium access control (MAC) layer with spectrum sensing (SpSe) at the physical layer, for identifying the occupancy status of TV bands. The proposed CLD relies on a Markov chain model with a state pair containing both the SpSe and the CSMA/CA from which we derive the collision probability and the achievable throughput. Analytical and simulation results are obtained for different collision avoidance and SpSe implementation scenarios by varying the contention window, back off stage and probability of detection. The obtained results depict the achievable throughput under different collision avoidance and SpSe implementation scenarios indicating thereby the performance of collision avoidance in TVWSs-based CRNs.

  16. Sugar signalling mediates cluster root formation and phosphorus starvation-induced gene expression in white lupin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Keqin; Yamagishi, Masumi; Osaki, Mitsuru; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Cluster root (CR) formation contributes much to the adaptation to phosphorus (P) deficiency. CR formation by white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) is affected by the P-limiting level in shoots, but not in roots. Thus, shoot-derived signals have been expected to transmit the message of P-deficiency to stimulate CR formation. In this study, it is shown that sugars are required for a response to P starvation including CR formation and the expression of P starvation-induced genes. White lupin plants were grown in vitro on P-sufficient or P-deficient media supplemented with sucrose for 4 weeks. Sucrose supply stimulated CR formation in plants on both P-sufficient and P-deficient media, but no CR appeared on the P-sufficient medium without sucrose. Glucose and fructose also stimulated CR formation on the P-sufficient medium. On the medium with sucrose, a high concentration of inorganic phosphate in leaves did not suppress CR formation. Because sorbitol or organic acid in the media did not stimulate CR formation, the sucrose effect was not due to increased osmotic pressure or enriched energy source, that is, sucrose acted as a signal. Gene transcription induced by P starvation, LaPT1 and LaPEPC3, was magnified by the combination of P limitation and sucrose feeding, and that of LaSAP was stimulated by sucrose supply independently of P supply. These results suggest that at least two sugar-signalling mediating systems control P starvation responses in white lupin roots. One system regulates CR formation and LaSAP expression, which acts even when P is sufficient if roots receive sugar as a signal. The other system controls LaPT1 and LaPEPC3 expression, which acts when P is insufficient. PMID:18487637

  17. Using white noise to gate organic transistors for dynamic monitoring of cultured cell layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivnay, Jonathan; Leleux, Pierre; Hama, Adel; Ramuz, Marc; Huerta, Miriam; Malliaras, George G; Owens, Roisin M

    2015-06-26

    Impedance sensing of biological systems allows for monitoring of cell and tissue properties, including cell-substrate attachment, layer confluence, and the "tightness" of an epithelial tissue. These properties are critical for electrical detection of tissue health and viability in applications such as toxicological screening. Organic transistors based on conducting polymers offer a promising route to efficiently transduce ionic currents to attain high quality impedance spectra, but collection of complete impedance spectra can be time consuming (minutes). By applying uniform white noise at the gate of an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT), and measuring the resulting current noise, we are able to dynamically monitor the impedance and thus integrity of cultured epithelial monolayers. We show that noise sourcing can be used to track rapid monolayer disruption due to compounds which interfere with dynamic polymerization events crucial for maintaining cytoskeletal integrity, and to resolve sub-second alterations to the monolayer integrity.

  18. Dynamics of altered surface layer formation on dissolving silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daval, Damien; Bernard, Sylvain; Rémusat, Laurent; Wild, Bastien; Guyot, François; Micha, Jean Sébastien; Rieutord, François; Magnin, Valérie; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro

    2017-07-01

    The extrapolation of mineral dissolution kinetics experiments to geological timescales has frequently been challenged by the observation that mineral dissolution rates decrease with time. In the present study, we report a detailed investigation of the early stages of wollastonite dissolution kinetics, linking time-resolved measurements of wollastonite dissolution rate as a function of crystallographic orientation to the evolution of physicochemical properties (i.e., diffusivity, density, and thickness) of amorphous silica-rich layers (ASSLs) that developed on each surface. Batch dissolution experiments conducted at room temperature and at far-from-equilibrium conditions revealed that the initial (i.e., ASSL-free) dissolution rate of wollastonite (R(hkl)) based on Ca release observe the following trend: R(010) ≈R(100) >R(101) >R(001) . A gradual decrease of the dissolution rate of some faces by up to one order of magnitude resulted in a modification of this trend after two days: R(010) ≫R(100) ⩾R(101) ≈R(001) . In parallel, the diffusivity of ASSLs developed on each face was estimated based on the measurement of the concentration profile of a conservative tracer (methylene blue) across the ASSL using nanoSIMS. The apparent diffusion coefficients of methylene blue as a function of the crystallographic orientation (Dapp(hkl)) observe the following trend: Dapp(010) ⩾Dapp(100) >Dapp(101) ≫Dapp(001) , and decreases as a function of time for the (1 0 0) and (1 0 1) faces. Finally, the density of ASSL was estimated based on the modeling of X-ray reflectivity patterns acquired as a function of time. The density of ASSLs developed on the (0 1 0) faces remains low and constant, whereas it increases for the ASSLs developed on the (0 0 1) faces. On the whole, our results suggest that the impact of the formation of ASSLs on the wollastonite dissolution rate is anisotropic: while some crystal faces are weakly affected by the formation of non-passivating ASSLs (e

  19. Control of a White Organic Light Emitting Diode emission parameters using a single doped RGB active layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, D. [Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais e i3N – Instituto de Nanoestruturas, Nanomodelação e Nanofabricação, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus da Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Pinto, A.; Califórnia, A.; Gomes, J. [CeNTI – Centro de Nanotecnologia, Materiais Técnicos, Funcionais e Inteligentes, Rua Fernando Mesquita 2785, 4760-034 Vila Nova de Famalicão (Portugal); Pereira, L., E-mail: luiz@ua.pt [Departmento de Física e i3N – Instituto de Nanoestruturas, Nanomodelação e Nanofabricação, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • A simple WOLED for Solid State Lighting is proposed with high color stability. • Energy transfer and electroluminescence dynamics of a single RGB layer for WOLEDs. • White shade modulation and stability over large emitting areas and applied voltages. - Abstract: Solid State Lighting technologies based on Organic Light Emitting Diodes, became an interesting focus due to their unique properties. The use of a unique RGB active layer for white emission, although simple in theory, shows difficulty to stabilize both CIE coordinates and color modulation. In this work, a WOLED using a simple RGB layer, was developed achieving a high color stability and shade modulation. The RGB matrix comprises a blue host material NPB, doped with two guests, a green (Coumarin 153) and a red (DCM1) in low concentrations. The RGB layer carrier dynamics allows for the white emission in low device complexity and high stability. This was also shown independent of the white shade, obtained through small changes in the red dopant resulting in devices ranging from warm to cool white i.e. an easy color tuning. A detailed analysis of the opto-electrical behavior is made.

  20. On the formation of ion acoustic double layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutradhar Das, S.; Bujarbarua, S.

    1988-02-01

    A theoretical model of the existence of ion acoustic double layers in a plasma with electron drift velocity less than the electron thermal speed which has already been observed experimentally and in numerical simulation, has been presented in this paper. The velocity and thickness of these double layers have been calculated.

  1. White light emission from an exciplex interface with a single emitting layer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Wilson; Perez-Gutierrez, Enrique; Agular, Andres; Barbosa G, J. Oracio C.; Maldonado, Jose L.; Meneses-Nava, Marco Antonio; Rodriguez Rivera, Mario A.; Rodriguez, Braulio

    2017-02-01

    Efficient solid state lighting devices based in inorganic emissive materials are now available in the market meanwhile for organic emissive materials still a lot of research work is in its way. [1,2] In this work a new organic emissive material based on carbazole, N-(4-Ethynylphenyl) carba-zole-d4 (6-d4), is used as electron-acceptor and commercial PEDOT:PSS as the electron-donor to obtain white emission. Besides the HOMO-LUMO levels of materials the white emission showed dependence on the films thicknesses and applied voltages. In here it is reported that by diminishing the thickness of the PEDOT:PSS layer, from 60 to 35 nm, and by keeping the derivative carbazole layer constant at 100 nm the electro-luminescence (EL) changed from emissive exciton states to the mixture of emissive exciton and exciplex states. [3] For the former thicknesses no white light was obtained meanwhile for the later the EL spectra broadened due to the emission of exciplex states. Under this condition, the best-achieved CIE coordinate was (0.31,0.33) with a driving voltage of 8 V. To lower the driving voltage of the devices a thin film of LiF was added between the derivative of carbazol and cathode but the CIE coordinates changed. The best CIE coordinates for this case were (0.29, 0.34) and (0.32, 0.37) with driving voltage of about 6.5 V. Acknowledgments: CeMie-Sol/27 (Mexico) 207450 References [1] Timothy L Dawson, Society of Dyers and Colourists, Color. Technol., 126, 1-10 (2010), doi: 10.1111/j.1478-4408.2010.00220.x [2] G. M. Farinola, R. Ragni, Journal of Solid State Lighting, 2:9 (2015), doi: 10.1186/s40539-015-0028-7. [3] E. Angioni, et al, J. Mater. Chem. C, 2016, 4, 3851, doi: 10.1039/c6tc00750c.

  2. The effect of concentration, temperature and stirring on hen egg white lysozyme amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow, Sian-Yang; Dunstan, Dave E

    2013-10-28

    Lysozyme is associated with hereditary systemic amyloidosis in humans. Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) has been extensively studied as an amyloid forming protein. In this study, we investigated HEWL amyloid formation over a range of temperatures at two stirring speeds and at low concentrations to avoid gel formation. The amyloid fibril formation was found to follow first order kinetics with the rate determining step being the unfolding of the lysozyme. Both the rate of formation and final amount of amyloid formed show maxima with temperature at approximately at 65 °C. CD measurements show that the lysozyme is unfolded by 55 °C. The decrease in amyloid formation at temperatures above 65 °C is attributed to competing amorphous aggregation. The majority of the non-fibrillar aggregates are small and uniform in size with a few larger amorphous aggregates observed in the AFM images.

  3. Novel polydopamine imprinting layers coated magnetic carbon nanotubes for specific separation of lysozyme from egg white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruixia; Zhang, Lili; Hao, Yi; Cui, Xihui; Liu, Dechun; Zhang, Min; Tang, Yuhai

    2015-11-01

    Novel core-shell nanocomposites, consisting of magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) core surrounded by a thin polydopamine (PDA) imprinting shell for specific recognition of lysozyme (Lyz), were fabricated for the first time. The obtained products were characterized and the results showed that the PDA layer was successfully attached onto the surface of MCNTs and the corresponding thickness of imprinting layer was just about 10nm which could enable the template access the recognition cavities easily. The polymerization conditions and adsorption performance of the resultant nanomaterials were investigated in detail. The results indicated that the obtained imprinted polymers showed fast kinetic and high affinity towards Lyz and could be used to specifically separate Lyz from real egg white. In addition, the prepared materials had excellent stability and no obvious deterioration after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. Easy preparation, rapid separation, high binding capacity, and satisfactory selectivity for the template protein make this polymer attractive in biotechnology and biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Visualization and characterization of interfacial polymerization layer formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yali; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2015-01-01

    We present a microfluidic platform to visualize the formation of free-standing films by interfacial polymerization. A microfluidic device is fabricated, with an array of micropillars to stabilize an aqueous–organic interface that allows a direct observation of the films formation process via optical

  5. Surface tension in plasmas related to double layer formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, Sebastian; Lozneanu, Erzilia [Al. I. Cuza University, Dept. of Plasma Physics, Iasi (Romania)

    2001-07-01

    Self-organized space charge configurations bordered by electric double layers appear in plasma as the result of the transition into a state characterized by local minimum of the free energy. Considering the self-assemblage process of such a complex well-confined space-charge configuration in plasma, known by the name of ball of fire, as a nucleation process, it becomes possible to define an equivalent surface tension for the double layer that covers the core of the ball of fire and to make some predictions for its surface tension coefficient and capacitance. (author)

  6. Cross-Layer Dynamic Spectrum Map Management Framework for White Space Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Jongman; Yoon Seungil; Lim Kyutae

    2010-01-01

    White space, unused TV spectrum, will be allowed for unlicensed use by wireless communication devices "the so called white space applications (WSAs)." WSAs retrieve a location-based spectrum map, a list of open white space channels, from a spectrum map server and can select one on the list as their operating channel for the broadband Internet access. However, since not only primary users such as TV broadcasting services use white space shortly or longly but also neighboring WSAs do, WSAs nee...

  7. Effect of Electric Discharge Machining on Material Removal Rate and White Layer Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAHID MEHMOOD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the MRR (Material Removal Rate of the aerospace grade (2024 T6 aluminum alloy 2024 T6 has been determined with copper electrode and kerosene oil is used as dielectric liquid. Discharge energy is controlled by electric current while keeping Pulse-ON time and Pulse-OFF time as constant. The characteristics of the EDMed (Electric Discharge Machined surface are discussed. The sub-surface defect due to arcing has been explained. As the surface material of tool electrode and workpiece melts simultaneously and there are chances of the contamination of both surfaces by the contents of each other. Therefore, the EDS (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy of the white layer and base material of the workpiece was performed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope at the discharge currents of 3, 6 and 12 amperes. It was conformed that the contamination of the surface of the workpiece material occurred by carbon, copper and oxygen contents. The quantitative analysis of these contents with respect to the discharge current has been presented in this paper.

  8. Microstructures and formation mechanism of hypoeutectic white cast iron by isothermal electromagnetic rheocast process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wanning

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was made on the evolution of microstructures of hypoeutectic white cast iron slurry containing 2.5wt.%C and 1.8wt.%Si produced by rheocasting in which the solidifying alloy was vigorously agitated by electromagnetic stirrer during isothermal cooling processes. The results indicated that under the proper agitating temperatures and speeds applied, the dendrite structures in white cast iron slurry were gradually evolved into spherical structures during a certain agitating time. It also revealed that the bent dendrites were formed by either convection force or by the growth of the dendrites themselves in the bending direction; then, as they were in solidifying, they were gradually being alternated into separated particles and into more spherical structures at the end of the isothermal cooling process. Especially, the dendrites were granulated as the bending process proceeding, which suggested that they were caused by unwanted elements such as sulfur and phosphor usually contained in engineering cast iron. Convective flow of the melt caused corrosion on the dendritic segments where they were weaker in strength and lower in melting temperature because of higher concentration of sulfur or phosphor. And the granulation process for such dendrites formed in the melt became possible under the condition. Certainly, dendrite fragments are another factors considerable to function for spherical particles formation. A new mechanism, regarding to the rheocast structure formation of white cast iron, was suggested based on the structural evolution observed in the study.

  9. Visualization and characterization of interfacial polymerization layer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yali; Benes, Nieck E; Lammertink, Rob G H

    2015-01-21

    We present a microfluidic platform to visualize the formation of free-standing films by interfacial polymerization. A microfluidic device is fabricated, with an array of micropillars to stabilize an aqueous-organic interface that allows a direct observation of the films formation process via optical microscopy. Three different amines are selected to react with trimesoyl chloride: piperazine, JEFFAMINE(®)D-230, and an ammonium functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane. Tracking the formation of the free-standing films in time reveals strong effects of the characteristics of the amine precursor on the morphological evolution of the films. Piperazine exhibits a rapid reaction with trimesoyl chloride, forming a film up to 20 μm thick within half a minute. JEFFAMINE(®)D-230 displays much slower film formation kinetics. The location of the polymerization reaction was initially in the aqueous phase and then shifted into the organic phase. Our in situ real-time observations provide information on the kinetics and the changing location of the polymerization. This provides insights with important implications for fine-tuning of interfacial polymerizations for various applications.

  10. Time sequenced heating of multiple layers in a hydrocarbon containing formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Bernard [Houston, TX; Hale, Arthur Herman [Houston, TX; Miller, David Scott [Katy, TX; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX

    2009-12-22

    A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation may include providing heat to a first hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a first heater located in an opening in the formation. The opening and the first heater may have a horizontal or inclined portion located in the first hydrocarbon layer and at least one connecting portion extending between the horizontal or inclined portion and the surface. Isolation material is placed in the opening such that the isolation material partially isolates the layer in which the horizontal or inclined portion of the first heater is located. An additional horizontal or inclined opening portion that extends from at least one of the connecting portions of the opening is formed in a second hydrocarbon layer. A second heater to provide heat the second hydrocarbon formation is placed in the additional substantially horizontal opening portion.

  11. Evaluation of the Components Released by Wine Yeast Strains on Protein Haze Formation in White Wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Cristine Giese

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultures of 23 indigenous yeast strains (22 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a non-Saccharomyces, Torulaspora delbrueckii, isolated from fermentation tanks at wineries in Castilla-La Mancha (Spain, and were performed under winemaking conditions using a synthetic must. Polysaccharide analysis and turbidity assays were conducted so as to observe the capacity of the released mannoproteins against protein haze formation in white wine, and 3 strains (2 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and T. delbrueckii were chosen for further experiments. The action of a commercial b-glucanolytic enzyme preparation (Lallzyme BETA®, and a β-(1→3-glucanase preparation from Trichoderma harzianum Rifai were evaluated to release polysaccharides from the different yeast strains’ cell walls. Protection against protein haze formation was strain dependent, and only two strains (Sc2 and Sc4 presented >50% stabilization in comparison to controls. Addition of β-glucanases did not increase the concentrations of polysaccharides in the fermentation musts; however, a significant increase of polymeric mannose (mannoproteins was detected using an enzymatic assay following total acid hydrolysis of the soluble polysaccharides. Enzymatic treatment presented positive effects and decreased protein haze formation in white wine. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v8i6.869

  12. On contribution of horizontal and intra-layer convection to the formation of the Baltic Sea cold intermediate layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Chubarenko

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal cascades down the coastal slopes and intra-layer convection are considered as the two additional mechanisms contributing to the Baltic Sea cold intermediate layer (CIL formation along with conventional seasonal vertical mixing. Field measurements are presented, reporting for the first time the possibility of denser water formation and cascading from the Baltic Sea underwater slopes, which take place under fall and winter cooling conditions and deliver waters into intermediate layer of salinity stratified deep-sea area. The presence in spring within the CIL of water with temperature below that of maximum density (Tmd and that at the local surface in winter time allows tracing its formation: it is argued that the source of the coldest waters of the Baltic CIL is early spring (March–April cascading, arising due to heating of water before reaching the Tmd. Fast increase of the open water heat content during further spring heating indicates that horizontal exchange rather than direct solar heating is responsible for that. When the surface is covered with water, heated above the Tmd, the conditions within the CIL become favorable for intralayer convection due to the presence of waters of Tmd in intermediate layer, which can explain its well-known features – the observed increase of its salinity and deepening with time.

  13. Formation of Degenerate Band Gaps in Layered Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey P. Vinogradov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the review, peculiarities of spectra of one-dimensional photonic crystals made of anisotropic and/or magnetooptic materials are considered. The attention is focused on band gaps of a special type—the so called degenerate band gaps which are degenerate with respect to polarization. Mechanisms of formation and properties of these band gaps are analyzed. Peculiarities of spectra of photonic crystals that arise due to the linkage between band gaps are discussed. Particularly, it is shown that formation of a frozen mode is caused by linkage between Brillouin and degenerate band gaps. Also, existence of the optical Borrmann effect at the boundaries of degenerate band gaps and optical Tamm states at the frequencies of degenerate band gaps are analyzed.

  14. A model for thin layer formation by delayed particle settling at sharp density gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prairie, Jennifer C.; White, Brian L.

    2017-02-01

    Thin layers - regions where plankton or particles accumulate vertically on scales of a few meters or less - are common in coastal waters, and have important implications for both trophic dynamics and carbon cycling. These features can form by a variety of biological and physical mechanisms, including localized growth, shear-thinning, and directed swimming. An additional mechanism may result in the formation of thin layers of marine aggregates, which have been shown to decrease their settling velocity when passing through sharp density gradients, a behavior termed delayed settling. Here, we apply a simple vertical advection-diffusion model to predict the properties of aggregate thin layers formed by this process. We assume a constant vertical flux of particles from the surface, which is parameterized by observations from laboratory experiments with marine aggregates. The formation, maintenance, and shape of the layers are described in relation to non-dimensional numbers that depend on environmental conditions and particle settling properties. In particular, model results demonstrate layer intensity and sharpness both increase with higher Péclet number (Pe), that is, under conditions with weaker mixing relative to layer formation. Similarly, more intense and sharper layers are found when the delayed settling behavior of aggregates is characterized by a lower velocity minimum. The model also predicts layers that are vertically asymmetric and highly "peaky" when compared with a Gaussian distribution, features often seen in thin layers in natural environments. Lastly, by comparing model predictions with observations of thin layers in the field, we are able to gain some insight into the applicability of delayed settling as a thin layer formation mechanism in different environmental conditions.

  15. INCREASING THE EFFICIENCY OF THE ALLOYED LAYER FORMATION WHEN HARDENING TUNGSTEN CARBIDE WITH COMBINED METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Anatoly D. Verkhoturov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the research aimed at improving the tungsten carbide durability with the help of spark alloying methods, arc welding and laser processing. The paper presents the formation of the alloyed layer thickness of more than 1400 mm with gradient transition properties. The parameters of the islet coating formation for durability improvement by laser processing are represented.

  16. Improvement of color purity in white OLED based on Zn(HPB){sub 2} as blue emitting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Eun [Department of Electrical Engineering and NTRC, Dong-A University, Busan, 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won-Sam [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Functional Materials, Inje University, Gimhae, 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung-Sang [Department of Electrical Engineering and NTRC, Dong-A University, Busan, 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Burm-Jong [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Functional Materials, Inje University, Gimhae, 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Soo [Department of Electrical Engineering and NTRC, Dong-A University, Busan, 604-714 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: yskwon@dau.ac.kr

    2008-04-01

    We synthesized zinc (II) [2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole] (Zn(HPB){sub 2}) as blue emitting materials and evaluated in the organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). The layer of Zn(HPB){sub 2} doped with 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl) -4H-pyran (DCJTB) (Zn(HPB){sub 2}:DCJTB) as emitters has been demonstrated. The structure of the device is indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/N,N'-bis-(1-naphthl)-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPB, 40 nm)/Zn(HPB){sub 2}/Zn(HPB){sub 2}:DCJTB/Alq{sub 3} (20 nm)/LiF/Al. The thickness of Zn(HPB){sub 2} layer was 0, 10, 20, 30 nm at the same time the thickness of Zn(HPB){sub 2}:DCJTB layer were 40, 30, 20, 10 nm. When thickness of Zn(HPB){sub 2} layer was 30 nm and the thickness of Zn(HPB){sub 2}:DCJTB layer was 10 nm, white emission is achieved. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the white emission are (0.304, 0.332) at an applied voltage of 10.5 V.

  17. Rheology of PVC Plastisol: Formation of Immobilized Layer in Pseudoplastic Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, N.; Harrell, E. R.

    2001-06-01

    Hoffman in the early 1970s examined mechanism of dilatancy and fracture of plastisol under high-shear conditions. The samples were monodispersed spherical particles of PVC. He discovered formation of immobilized layer in the pseudoplastic flow preceding dilatancy and subsequent destruction of the layer at the fracture. However, his analysis was focused primarily on the mechanism of the fracture, and the mechanism of pseudoplastic flow remains unexplored. The present work begins with analyses of Hoffman's data to show that pseudoplastic flow, i.e., the decrease of viscosity with the increase of shear rate, is a result of the development of the immobilized layer and creation of a mobile layer of low-viscosity fluid. Hoffman took the mobile layer to consist of pure plasticizer. The present work shows that the mobile layer contains PVC particles. The thickness of mobile layer decreases (and the thickness of immobilized layer increases) with the increase of shear rate. The particle concentration and hence viscosity of the mobile layer decrease with the increase of shear rate. Similar analyses of our dynamic viscosity-frequency relationship show that (1) the pseudoplastic behavior is a result of formation of immobilized layer, which grows thicker with the increasing frequency, and (2) the mobile layer contains dispersed particles, the concentration of which decreases with increasing frequency. (3) A presence of coarse particles results in a tighter packing of the immobilized layer and lower viscosity of the mobile layer for a given volume fraction of particles. This explains why the presence and the amount of the coarse particles are important parameters in plastisol formulation. The elastic modulus-frequency relationship is also interpreted with the development of the immobilized layer, giving strain amplification. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  18. Water Transfer Characteristics during Methane Hydrate Formation Processes in Layered Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousheng Deng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Gas hydrate formation processes in porous media are always accompanied by water transfer. To study the transfer characteristics comprehensively, two kinds of layered media consisting of coarse sand and loess were used to form methane hydrate in them. An apparatus with three PF-meter sensors detecting water content and temperature changes in media during the formation processes was applied to study the water transfer characteristics. It was experimentally observed that the hydrate formation configurations in different layered media were similar; however, the water transfer characteristics and water conversion ratios were different.

  19. New-particle formation events in a continental boundary layer: first results from the SATURN experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stratmann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During the SATURN experiment, which took place from 27 May to 14 June 2002, new particle formation in the continental boundary layer was investigated. Simultaneous ground-based and tethered-balloon-borne measurements were performed, including meteorological parameters, particle number concentrations and size distributions, gaseous precursor concentrations and SODAR and LIDAR observations. Newly formed particles were observed inside the residual layer, before the break-up process of the nocturnal inversion, and inside the mixing layer throughout the break-up of the nocturnal inversion and during the evolution of the planetary boundary layer.

  20. Relating performance of thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes to support layer formation and structure

    KAUST Repository

    Tiraferri, Alberto

    2011-02-01

    Osmotically driven membrane processes have the potential to treat impaired water sources, desalinate sea/brackish waters, and sustainably produce energy. The development of a membrane tailored for these processes is essential to advance the technology to the point that it is commercially viable. Here, a systematic investigation of the influence of thin-film composite membrane support layer structure on forward osmosis performance is conducted. The membranes consist of a selective polyamide active layer formed by interfacial polymerization on top of a polysulfone support layer fabricated by phase separation. By systematically varying the conditions used during the casting of the polysulfone layer, an array of support layers with differing structures was produced. The role that solvent quality, dope polymer concentration, fabric layer wetting, and casting blade gate height play in the support layer structure formation was investigated. Using a 1M NaCl draw solution and a deionized water feed, water fluxes ranging from 4 to 25Lm-2h-1 with consistently high salt rejection (>95.5%) were produced. The relationship between membrane structure and performance was analyzed. This study confirms the hypothesis that the optimal forward osmosis membrane consists of a mixed-structure support layer, where a thin sponge-like layer sits on top of highly porous macrovoids. Both the active layer transport properties and the support layer structural characteristics need to be optimized in order to fabricate a high performance forward osmosis membrane. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  1. High-efficiency/CRI/color stability warm white organic light-emitting diodes by incorporating ultrathin phosphorescence layers in a blue fluorescence layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yanqin; Wang, Kexiang; Zhao, Bo; Gao, Long; Tao, Peng; Liu, Xuguang; Hao, Yuying; Wang, Hua; Xu, Bingshe; Zhu, Furong

    2018-01-01

    By incorporating ultrathin (white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) were obtained. All four devices realize good warm white light emission, with high color rending index (CRI) of >80, low correlated color temperature of color stability at a wide voltage range of 5 V-9 V. These hybrid WOLEDs also reveal high forward-viewing external quantum efficiencies (EQE) of 17.82%-19.34%, which are close to the theoretical value of 20%, indicating an almost complete exciton harvesting. In addition, the electroluminescence spectra of the hybrid WOLEDs can be easily improved by only changing the incorporating sequence of the ultrathin phosphorescence layers without device efficiency loss. For example, the hybrid WOLED with an incorporation sequence of ultrathin red/yellow/green phosphorescence layers exhibits an ultra-high CRI of 96 and a high EQE of 19.34%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first WOLED with good tradeoff among device efficiency, CRI, and color stability. The introduction of ultrathin (<0.1 nm) phosphorescence layers can also greatly reduce the consumption of phosphorescent emitters as well as simplify device structures and fabrication process, thus leading to low cost. Such a finding is very meaningful for the potential commercialization of hybrid WOLEDs.

  2. SHR overexpression induces the formation of supernumerary cell layers with cortex cell identity in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, S; Dievart, A; Divol, F; Pauluzzi, G; Meynard, D; Swarup, R; Wu, S; Gallagher, K L; Périn, C

    2017-05-01

    The number of root cortex cell layers varies among plants, and many species have several cortical cell layers. We recently demonstrated that the two rice orthologs of the Arabidopsis SHR gene, OsSHR1 and OsSHR2, could complement the A. thaliana shr mutant. Moreover, OsSHR1 and OsSHR2 expression in A. thaliana roots induced the formation of extra root cortical cell layers. In this article, we demonstrate that the overexpression of AtSHR and OsSHR2 in rice roots leads to plants with wide and short roots that contain a high number of extra cortical cell layers. We hypothesize that SHR genes share a conserved function in the control of cortical cell layer division and the number of ground tissue cell layers in land plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimal Color Stability for White Organic Light-Emitting Diode (WOLED by Using Multiple-Ultra-Thin Layers (MUTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan-Lin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The work demonstrates the improvement of color stability for white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED. The devices were prepared by vacuum deposition on ITO-glass substrates. These guest materials of 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (Rubrene were deposited in 4,4′-bis(2,2-diphenyl vinyl-1,1′-biphenyl (DPVBi, resulting in an emitting layer. Experimental results reveal that the properties in the multiple-ultra-thin layer (MUTL are better than those of the emitting layer with a single guest material, reaching the commercial white-light wavelength requirement of 400–700 nm. The function of the MUTL is as the light-emitting and trapping layer. The results show that the MUTL has excellent carrier capture effect, leading to high color stability of the device at various applied voltages. The Commissions Internationale De L’Eclairage (CIE coordinate of this device at 3~7 V is few displacement and shows a very slight variation of (0.016, 0.009. The CIE coordinates at a maximal luminance of 9980 cd/m2 are (0.34, 0.33.

  4. Zintl layer formation during perovskite atomic layer deposition on Ge (001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shen; Lin, Edward L.; Hamze, Ali K.; Posadas, Agham; Wu, HsinWei; Smith, David J.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2017-02-01

    Using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and density functional theory, we analyzed the surface core level shifts and surface structure during the initial growth of ABO3 perovskites on Ge (001) by atomic layer deposition, where A = Ba, Sr and B = Ti, Hf, Zr. We find that the initial dosing of the barium- or strontium-bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl) precursors on a clean Ge surface produces a surface phase that has the same chemical and structural properties as the 0.5-monolayer Ba Zintl layer formed when depositing Ba by molecular beam epitaxy. Similar binding energy shifts are found for Ba, Sr, and Ge when using either chemical or elemental metal sources. The observed germanium surface core level shifts are consistent with the flattening of the initially tilted Ge surface dimers using both molecular and atomic metal sources. Similar binding energy shifts and changes in dimer tilting with alkaline earth metal adsorption are found with density functional theory calculations. High angle angular dark field scanning transmission microscopy images of BaTiO3, SrZrO3, SrHfO3, and SrHf0.55Ti0.45O3 reveal the location of the Ba (or Sr) atomic columns between the Ge dimers. The results imply that the organic ligands dissociate from the precursor after precursor adsorption on the Ge surface, producing the same Zintl template critical for perovskite growth on Group IV semiconductors during molecular beam epitaxy.

  5. Formation of a mixed Fe(II)-Zn-Al layered hydroxide: Effects of Zn co-sorption on Fe(II) layered hydroxide formation and kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starcher, Autumn N.; Elzinga, Evert J.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2017-08-01

    Previous research demonstrated the formation of single divalent metal (Co, Ni, and ZnAl) and mixed divalent metal (NiZnAl) layered double hydroxide (LDH) phases from reactions of the divalent metal with Al-bearing substrates and soils in both laboratory experiments and in the natural environment. Recently Fe(II)-Al-LDH phases have been found in laboratory batch reaction studies, and although they have yet to be found in the natural environment. Potential locations of Fe(II)-Al-LDH phases in nature include areas with suboxic and anoxic conditions. Because these areas can be environments of significant contaminant accumulation, it is important to understand the possible interactions and impacts of contaminant elements on LDH phase formation. One such contaminant, Zn, can also form as an LDH and has been found to form as a mixed divalent layered hydroxide phase. To understand how Zn impacts the formation of Fe(II)-Al-LDH phase formation and kinetics, 3 mM or 0.8 mM Fe(II) and 0.8 mM Zn were batch reacted with either 10 g/L pyrophyllite or 7.5 g/L γ-Al2O3 for up to three months under anoxic conditions. Aqueous samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and solid samples were analyzed with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Shell-by-shell fits of Fe(II) and co-sorption samples with pyrophyllite show the formation of a mixed divalent metal (Fe(II)-Zn-Al) layered hydroxide phase, while Fe(II) and Zn co-sorption samples with γ-Al2O3 produce Fe(II)-Al-LDH phases and Zn in inner-sphere complexation with the γ-Al2O3. This study demonstrates the formation of a mixed divalent metal layered hydroxide and further iterates the importance of sorbent reactivity on LDH phase formation.

  6. Analysis of Boundary Layer Meteorological Data Collected at the White Sands Missile Range

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Sean; Tofsted, David; Yarbrough, Jimmy; Elliott, D. S; Quintis, David

    2007-01-01

    During the late spring and summer of 2007, a series of near-surface measurements of winds, temperature, radiative fluxes and absolute humidity were collected at an observing site located on the White...

  7. Morphology and Kinetics of Interfacial Layer Formation during Continuous Hot-Dip Galvanizing and Galvannealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Fourmentin, R.; Mc Dermid, J. R.

    2008-09-01

    A galvanizing simulator with rapid spot cooling was used to obtain a well-characterized reaction times as short as 2 seconds in order to study the short-time microstructural development and kinetics of the galvanizing and galvannealing interfacial reaction layer. It was determined that the incubation and nucleation events of the interfacial layer formation were completed by the 2-second reaction time in all cases. For a 0.20 wt pct dissolved Al bath, FeAl3 nucleates and grows during the initial stages of interfacial layer formation followed by Fe2Al5Zn X formation by diffusion-controlled transformation and growth. The final microstructure of the interfacial layer consisted of Fe2Al5Zn X in a two-layer arrangement comprising a fine-grained, compact lower layer with a coarser, noncompact upper layer. The Al content of the interfacial layer increased with reaction time and reaction temperature. Both of the Fe-Al phases formed exhibited a strong preferential crystallographic orientation with respect to the substrate surface. The evolution of the interfacial layer formed in a 0.13 wt pct dissolved Al bath was the result of competing processes. Fe-Al phases formed and grew during the reaction times explored, per the preceding mechanism. However, Fe-Zn phases also nucleated and grew during the reaction times explored via the process of inhibition breakdown, with these phases dominating the interfacial layer microstructures at longer reaction times. In this case, the Al content of the interfacial layer increased for all reaction times explored, but decreased with increasing reaction temperature, due to the more rapid initiation of inhibition breakdown. A model to describe the interfacial layer growth kinetics as a function of reaction time, bath temperature, and inhibition layer microstructure for the case of the 0.20 wt pct dissolved Al bath was proposed. It indicated that the development of microstructure of the interfacial layer had significant influence on the

  8. Cross-Layer Dynamic Spectrum Map Management Framework for White Space Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jongman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available White space, unused TV spectrum, will be allowed for unlicensed use by wireless communication devices "the so called white space applications (WSAs." WSAs retrieve a location-based spectrum map, a list of open white space channels, from a spectrum map server and can select one on the list as their operating channel for the broadband Internet access. However, since not only primary users such as TV broadcasting services use white space shortly or longly but also neighboring WSAs do, WSAs need to perform spectrum sensing that determines the occupancy status, either occupied or unoccupied, of white space channels and select one among the unoccupied channels according to the spectrum sensing results. In a conventional spectrum sensing, they can execute unnecessary spectrum sensing on the already occupied channels. This paper proposes a dynamic management framework of white space that extends a spectrum map to contain occupancy information with the assistance of WSAs. Our framework enables WSAs to avoid unnecessary spectrum sensing on the channels that are marked as occupied according to the extended spectrum map. In return for the provision of the spectrum map, a spectrum map server obtains the spectrum sensing results of associated WSAs to update the extended spectrum map about the channel occupancy status. Theoretical analysis indicates that the proposed framework can contribute to shortening the total spectrum sensing time of WSAs by up to 50%.

  9. Anode-originated SEI migration contributes to formation of cathode-electrolyte interphase layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shuyu; Jackson, David; Dreibelbis, Mark L.; Kuech, Thomas F.; Hamers, Robert J.

    2018-01-01

    Cathode-electrolyte interphase (CEI) formation is a key process that impacts the performance of lithium-ion batteries. In this work, we characterized the composition and stoichiometry of CEI layer on LiNixMnyCo1-x-yO2 (NMC) cathodes via a novel combination of quantitative correlation analysis of X-ray photoelectron spectra and binder-free cathode formulation. By comparing the CEI formation in NMC-based cells with lithium, graphite and lithium titanate anodes, we demonstrate a CEI formation pathway via migration of surface species that originally formed on the anode side. A case study of cathodes coated by atomic layer deposition with a thin layer of Al2O3 demonstrates that anode-to-cathode migration can be mitigated by ALD cathode coatings. This work highlights the importance of anode-mediated processes in order to correctly interpret surface phenomena on the cathode side and to guide further development of surface protection strategies.

  10. The formation of the rodlet layer of streptomycetes is the result of the interplay between rodlins and chaplins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessen, Dennis; Stokroos, Ietse; Deelstra, Heine J.; Penninga, Nynke A.; Bormann, Christiane; Salas, José A.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Wosten, H.A B

    2004-01-01

    Streptomycetes form hydrophobic aerial hyphae that eventually septate into hydrophobic spores. Both aerial hyphae and spores possess a typical surface layer called the rodlet layer. We present here evidence that rodlet formation is conserved in the streptomycetes. The formation of the rodlet layer

  11. Sporadic Ca and Ca+ layers at mid-latitudes: Simultaneous observations and implications for their formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerding

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the observations of 188 sporadic layers of either Ca atoms and/or Ca ions that we have observed during 112 nights of lidar soundings of Ca, and 58 nights of Ca+ soundings, at Kühlungsborn, Germany (54° N, 12° E. The Ca+ soundings have been performed simultaneously and in a common volume with the Ca soundings by two separate lidars. Correlations between sporadic neutral and ionized metal layers are demonstrated through four case studies. A systematic study of the variations of occurrence of sporadic Ca and Ca+ layers reveals that neutral and ionized Ca layers are not as closely correlated as expected earlier: (a The altitude distribution shows the simultaneous occurrence of both sporadic Ca and Ca+ layers to be most likely only in the narrow altitude range between 90 and 95 km. Above that region, in the lower thermosphere, the sporadic ion layers are much more frequent than atom layers. Below 90 km only very few sporadic layers have been observed; (b The seasonal variation of sporadic Ca layers exhibits a minimum of occurrence in summer, while sporadic Ca+ layers do not show a significant seasonal variation (only the dense Ca+ layers appear to have a maximum in summer. At mid-latitudes sporadic Ca layers are more frequent than sporadic layers of other atmospheric metals like Na or K. For the explanation of our observations new formation mechanisms are discussed.Key words. Ionosphere (ion chemistry and composition; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; mid-latitude ionosphere

  12. Formation of Millisecond Pulsars with Heavy White Dwarf Companions: Extreme Mass Transfer on Subthermal Timescales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauris; van Den Heuvel EP; Savonije

    2000-02-20

    We have performed detailed numerical calculations of the nonconservative evolution of close X-ray binary systems with intermediate-mass (2.0-6.0 M middle dot in circle) donor stars and a 1.3 M middle dot in circle accreting neutron star. We calculated the thermal response of the donor star to mass loss in order to determine its stability and follow the evolution of the mass transfer. Under the assumption of the "isotropic reemission model," we demonstrate that in many cases it is possible for the binary to prevent a spiral-in and survive a highly super-Eddington mass transfer phase (1millisecond pulsars with heavy CO white dwarfs and relatively short orbital periods (3-50 days). However, we conclude that to produce a binary pulsar with a O-Ne-Mg white dwarf or Porb approximately 1 day (e.g., PSR B0655+64) the above scenario does not work, and a spiral-in phase is still considered the most plausible scenario for the formation of such a system.

  13. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  14. Formation of Silver Selenide Layers on Polyamide 6 Films by the Use of Potassium Selenotrithionate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigijus IVANAUSKAS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A polyamide 6 films if treated with the potassium selenotrithionate, K2SeS2O6, solution in hydrochloric acid, absorbs selenium the form of selenotrithionate anion, SeS2O62-, and the anions decompose in polymer with time. Further interaction of selenized PA films with AgNO3 solution (10 min, 80 °C leads to the formation of silver selenide layers on the polymer surface. The mechanism of formation of silver selenide layers on PA 6 films was proposed. The chemical analyzes show that the concentrations of silver and selenium in polyamide 6 film increase when increase the duration of polymer seleniumization. The molar ratio of Ag/Se in the layers of silver selenide on polyamide films varied from 0.57 : 1 to 0.7 : 1. The X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of silver selenide layers with elemental selenium in the surface of polyamide 6. The phases of orthorhombic naumannite - Ag2Se (24-1041 and monoclinic selenium - Se8 (71-528 were identified in the formed layers.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.4.775

  15. THE MAIN METHODS OF FORMATION OF OXIDE LAYERS IN THE PRODUCTION OF SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AND IP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shangereeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Film silicon oxide plays an important role in the process of creating silicon structures and semiconductor devices. The article is devoted to methods of formation of oxide layers, whichinclude: thermal oxidation, anodizing in electrolytes, pyrolytic deposition (deposition from the gas phase and plasma anodizing or oxidation.

  16. Lens epithelial cell layer formation related to hydrogel foldable intraocular lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, M.W.; Kalicharan, D; van der Want, JJL

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of postoperative lens epithelial cel (LEC) layer formation anterior to the Hydroview hydrogel foldable intraocular lens (IOL), the effect on vision, and the appearance under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Setting: Eye Unit of district general hospital,

  17. Defect formation and carrier doping in epitaxial films of the infinite layer compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feenstra, R.; Pennycook, S.J.; Chisholm, M.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.] [and others

    1996-02-01

    The correlation between defect formation and carrier doping in epitaxial films of the infinite layer compound SrCuO{sub 2} has been studied via molecular beam epitaxy controlled layer-by-layer growth experiments, chemically resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, x-ray diffraction, electrical transport measurements, and post-growth oxidation-reduction annealing. Based on the complementary information provided by these experiments, it is concluded that the carrier doping is dominated by the formation of an electron-doped, Sr and O deficient matrix under mildly oxidizing growth conditions. Hole-doping is induced by extended defects containing excess Sr atoms and may lead to superconductivity after high-temperature oxidation.

  18. Optical analyses of the formation of a silver nanoparticle-containing layer in glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackerow, Stefan; Abdolvand, Amin

    2012-10-08

    We present results of our observations on the formation of a silver nanoparticle-containing layer in glass over time. First, silver ions are driven into the glass by field-assisted ion exchange at 300 °C. A following annealing step at 550 °C resulted in the formation of silver nanoparticles (glasses have been prepared. The sequence of slices showed the growth of the nanoparticle-containing layer over time. Transmission spectra of the slices have been measured with a spatial resolution of 1.5 µm. Simulating spectra using the Maxwell-Garnett theory allowed us to determine the volume filling factor distribution of the nanoparticles across the layers. A first attempt to simulate the diffusion of silver is performed.

  19. Pattern formation in single-phase FAC. A stability analysis of an oxide layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinemanas, Daniel [The Israel Electric Corp., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Chemistry; Herszage, Amiel [The Israel Electric Corp., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Energy Technologies Development

    2013-03-15

    Pattern formation is a salient characteristic of the flow-accelerated corrosion process, particularly in single-phase flow, where a typical ''orange peel'' surface texture is normally formed. The process of such pattern formation is, however, not well understood. In order to gain some insight into the role of the various processes and parameters involved in this process, a linear stability analysis of an oxide layer based on the Sanchez-Caldera model was performed. According to the results obtained in this study, it follows that the oxide layer is stable regarding perturbations of the oxide thickness or the reaction constant, but it is unstable in respect to perturbations of the mass transfer coefficient. These results suggest therefore that the flow, and not local surface in homogeneities, plays a central role in the pattern formation process. (orig.)

  20. The formation of multiple layers of ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Wu, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional theoretical model to study the formation process of multiple layers of small ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere as measured by rockets and associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). The proposed mechanism primarily takes into account the transport processes induced by gravity waves through collision coupling between the neutral atmosphere and the ice particles. Numerical solutions of the model indicate that the dynamic influence of wind variation induced by gravity waves can make a significant contribution to the vertical and horizontal transport of ice particles and ultimately transform them into thin multiple layers. Additionally, the pattern of the multiple layers at least partially depends on the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave, the ice particle size and the wind velocity. The results presented in this paper will be helpful to better understand the occurrence of multiple layers of PMSE as well as its variation process.

  1. The formation of multiple layers of ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-dimensional theoretical model to study the formation process of multiple layers of small ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere as measured by rockets and associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. The proposed mechanism primarily takes into account the transport processes induced by gravity waves through collision coupling between the neutral atmosphere and the ice particles. Numerical solutions of the model indicate that the dynamic influence of wind variation induced by gravity waves can make a significant contribution to the vertical and horizontal transport of ice particles and ultimately transform them into thin multiple layers. Additionally, the pattern of the multiple layers at least partially depends on the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave, the ice particle size and the wind velocity. The results presented in this paper will be helpful to better understand the occurrence of multiple layers of PMSE as well as its variation process.

  2. Formation of thin tungsten oxide layers: characterization and exposure to deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addab, Y.; Martin, C.; Pardanaud, C.; Khayadjian, J.; Achkasov, K.; Kogut, D.; Cartry, G.; Giacometti, G.; Cabié, M.; Gardarein, J. L.; Roubin, P.

    2016-02-01

    Thin tungsten oxide layers with thicknesses up to 250 nm have been formed on W surfaces by thermal oxidation following a parabolic growth rate. The reflectance of the layers in the IR range 2.5-16 μm has been measured showing a decrease with the layer thickness especially at low wavelengths. Raman microscopy and x-ray diffraction show a nanocrystalline WO3 monoclinic structure. Low energy deuterium plasma exposure (11 eV/D+) has been performed inducing a phase transition, a change in the sample colour and the formation of tungsten bronze (D x WO3). Implantation modifies the whole layer suggesting a deep diffusion of deuterium inside the oxide. After exposure, a deuterium release due to the oxidation of D x WO3 under ambient conditions has been evidenced showing a reversible deuterium retention.

  3. Fluoride-dependent formation of mineralized layers in bovine dentin during demineralization in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damen, J J; Buijs, M J; ten Cate, J M

    1998-01-01

    Demineralization of dentin in the presence of fluoride produces lesions with a mineralized surface layer which becomes thicker and more mineralized with higher fluoride concentrations whereas the lesion depth is hardly affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the time of fluoride treatment and the amount of fluoride taken up on the properties of the mineralized layer. Discs of bovine dentin embedded in methylmethacrylate with one surface exposed were demineralized in 50 mM acetic acid, 2.2 mM CaCl2, 2.2 mM KH2PO4, pH 5.0. At the start and/or later during the demineralization period, the specimens were incubated individually for 1 or 2 days in 10 ml of the same demineralization solution supplemented with 0.5, 2.0 or 5.0 ppm fluoride, which was then assessed for changes in calcium and fluoride concentrations. After 2, 5 and 8 days, specimens were sectioned for microradiographic analysis so as to follow development of the lesions and the mineralized layers. The results were the following: While demineralization with fluoride present at the first day led to the formation of a surface layer, fluoride present only at a later day produced a subsurface layer, not at the lesion front but closer to the surface. This layer resulted from (re)precipitation and not from preservation of the original mineral. The 'integrated mineral content' of the surface layer increased linearly with the uptake of fluoride, which resulted in an apparent fluorapatite content of about 20 vol%. The profiles of the surface layers remained unchanged during continued demineralization in the absence of fluoride. It was concluded that in the presence of fluoride mineral loss is reduced as a result of the reprecipitation of dissolved mineral ions as a layer of fluoride-enriched apatite. This layer does not offer protection of underlying dentin against continued demineralization.

  4. Transport-driven formation of a polar ozone layer on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montmessin, Franck; Lefèvre, Franck

    2013-11-01

    Since the seasonal and spatial distribution of ozone on Mars was detected by the ultraviolet spectrometer onboard the spacecraft Mariner 7, our understanding has evolved considerably thanks to parallel efforts in observations and modelling. At low-to-mid latitudes, martian ozone is distributed vertically in two main layers, a near-surface layer and a layer at an altitude between 30 and 60km (ref. ). Here we report evidence from the SPICAM UV spectrometer onboard the Mars Express orbiter for the existence of a previously overlooked ozone layer that emerges in the southern polar night at 40-60km in altitude, with no counterpart observed at the north pole. Comparisons with global climate simulations for Mars indicate that this layer forms as a result of the large-scale transport of oxygen-rich air from sunlit latitudes to the poles, where the oxygen atoms recombine to form ozone during the polar night. However, transport-driven ozone formation is counteracted in our simulations by the destruction of ozone by reactions with hydrogen radicals, whose concentrations vary seasonally on Mars, reflecting seasonal variations of water vapour. We conclude that the observed dichotomy between the ozone layers of the two poles, with a significantly richer layer in the southern hemisphere, can be explained by the interplay of these mechanisms.

  5. Formation of CuxS Layers on Polypropylene Sulfurized by Molten Sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasa ALABURDAITĖ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The processes of formation of electrically conductive layers of copper sulfides CuxS by the sorption-diffusion method on polypropylene (PP using molten sulfur as sulfurizing agent was investigated. The amount of sorbed sulfur increased with the increase of the duration of treatment. Copper sulfide layers were formed on the surface of polypropylene after the treatment of sulfurized polymer with Cu(II/I salt solution. The amount of copper sulfide in layer increased with the increase of treatment duration in copper salt solution. XRD spectra of PP films treated for 3 min with molten sulfur and then with Cu(II/I salt solution for the different time showed that the copper sulfide phases, mostly digenite, Cu2-xS and a-chalcocite, Cu2S were formed in the layers. Electromotive force measurement results confirmed the composition of formed CuxS layers on PP. The phase composition of layers also changed after the annealing. The value of electrical resistance of copper sulfide layers on PP varied from 20 W/cm2 to 80 W/cm2 and after annealing at 80 °C - in the interval of 10 W/cm2 - 60 W/cm2.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.4.776

  6. FSP27 contributes to efficient energy storage in murine white adipocytes by promoting the formation of unilocular lipid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Naonobu; Tamori, Yoshikazu; Tateya, Sanshiro; Kawaguchi, Takayuki; Shibakusa, Tetsuro; Mizunoya, Wataru; Inoue, Kazuo; Kitazawa, Riko; Kitazawa, Sohei; Matsuki, Yasushi; Hiramatsu, Ryuji; Masubuchi, Satoru; Omachi, Asako; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Saito, Masayuki; Amo, Taku; Ohta, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Osumi, Takashi; Cheng, Jinglei; Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Nakao, Harumi; Nakao, Kazuki; Aiba, Atsu; Okamura, Hitoshi; Fushiki, Tohru; Kasuga, Masato

    2008-08-01

    White adipocytes are unique in that they contain large unilocular lipid droplets that occupy most of the cytoplasm. To identify genes involved in the maintenance of mature adipocytes, we expressed dominant-negative PPARgamma in 3T3-L1 cells and performed a microarray screen. The fat-specific protein of 27 kDa (FSP27) was strongly downregulated in this context. FSP27 expression correlated with induction of differentiation in cultured preadipocytes, and the protein localized to lipid droplets in murine white adipocytes in vivo. Ablation of FSP27 in mice resulted in the formation of multilocular lipid droplets in these cells. Furthermore, FSP27-deficient mice were protected from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and displayed an increased metabolic rate due to increased mitochondrial biogenesis in white adipose tissue (WAT). Depletion of FSP27 by siRNA in murine cultured white adipocytes resulted in the formation of numerous small lipid droplets, increased lipolysis, and decreased triacylglycerol storage, while expression of FSP27 in COS cells promoted the formation of large lipid droplets. Our results suggest that FSP27 contributes to efficient energy storage in WAT by promoting the formation of unilocular lipid droplets, thereby restricting lipolysis. In addition, we found that the nature of lipid accumulation in WAT appears to be associated with maintenance of energy balance and insulin sensitivity.

  7. Storm surges in the White and Barents Seas: formation, statistics, analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korablina, Anastasia; Arkhipkin, Victor

    2017-04-01

    .4), White Sea. Quantitative assessment of the pressure and wind contributing to the surge formation was made. The analysis has shown that the wind has a larger contribution (90%) to surge formation in the study area. The study was performed in the framework of the Russian Science Foundation (project 14-37-00038).

  8. Forecasting and modelling ice layer formation on the snowpack due to freezing precipitations in the Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéno, Louis; Vionnet, Vincent; Cabot, Frédéric; Vrécourt, Dominique; Dombrowski-Etchevers, Ingrid

    2017-04-01

    In the Pyrenees, freezing precipitations in altitude occur at least once per winter, leading to the formation of a pure ice layer on the surface of the snowpack. It may lead to accidents and fatalities among mountaineers and skiers, with sometimes a higher human toll than avalanches. Such events are not predicted by the current operational systems for snow and avalanche hazard forecasting. A crowd-sourced database of surface ice layer occurrences is first built up, using reports from Internet mountaineering and ski-touring communities, to mitigate the lack of observations from conventional observation networks. A simple diagnostic of freezing precipitation is then developed, based on the cloud water content and screen temperature forecast by the Numerical Weather Prediction model AROME, operating at 2.5-km resolution. The performance of this diagnostic is assessed for the event of 5-6 January 2012, with a good representation of altitudinal and spatial distributions of the ice layer. An evaluation of the diagnostic for major events over five winters gives good skills of detection compared to the occurrences reported in the observation database. A new modelling of ice formation on the surface of the snowpack due to impinging supercooled water is added to the detailed snowpack model Crocus. It is combined to the atmospheric diagnostic of freezing precipitations and resulting snowpack simulations over a winter season capture well the formation of the main ice layers. Their influence on the snowpack stratigraphy is also realistically simulated. These simple methods enable to forecast the occurrence of surface ice layer formations with good confidence and to simulate their evolution within the snowpack, even if an accurate estimation of freezing precipitation amounts remains the main challenge.

  9. Formation of interstitial atoms in surface layers of helium-implanted tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, O. V.; Ksenofontov, V. A.; Masilov, A. A.; Sadanov, E. V.

    2013-11-01

    Using a method of field ion microscopy, the atomic structure of surface and near-surface layers of a perfect dislocation-free tungsten irradiated by helium ions with energies below the threshold of displacement was studied. We have found the output of tungsten atoms from the bulk as a result of their displacement from regular lattice positions occupied by implanted helium atoms and the formation of interstitial tungsten atoms. It is shown that high concentrations of helium and the presence of image forces have a considerable effect on the development of these processes. Depleted zones consisting of helium-vacancy complexes are revealed within the irradiated near-surface layer.

  10. Mixing and trapping of dissolved CO2 in deep geologic formations with shale layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agartan, Elif; Cihan, Abdullah; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2017-07-01

    For dissolution trapping, the spatial variability of the geologic properties of naturally complex storage formations can significantly impact flow patterns and storage mechanisms of dissolved CO2. The significance of diffusive mixing that occurs in low permeability layers embedded between relatively higher permeability materials was highlighted by Agartan et al. (2015) using a highly controlled laboratory experimental study on trapping of dissolved CO2 in multilayered systems. In this paper, we present a numerical modeling study on the impacts of low permeability layers on flow and storage of dissolved CO2 in realistic field-scale settings. The simulator of variable-density flow used in this study was first verified using the experimental data in Agartan et al. (2015) to capture the observed processes. The simulator was then applied to a synthetic, field-scale multilayered system, with 19 sensitivity cases having variable permeability and thickness of the shale layers as well as the source strength and geometry of the source zone of dissolved CO2. Simulation results showed that the presence of continuous shale layers in the storage system disrupts the convective mixing by enhancing lateral spreading of dissolved CO2 in sandstone layers and retarding the vertical mixing of dissolved CO2. The effectiveness of trapping of dissolved CO2 depends on the physical properties of the shale layers and configurations of the source zone. The comparison to homogeneous cases with effective vertical permeability shows that it is important to capture these continuous thin shale layers in a storage formation and include them in the models to enhance dissolution trapping.

  11. Specific Features of Chip Making and Work-piece Surface Layer Formation in Machining Thermal Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Yaroslavtsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of unique engineering structural and performance properties inherent in metallic composites characterizes wear- and erosion-resistant high-temperature coatings made by thermal spraying methods. This allows their use both in manufacturing processes to enhance the wear strength of products, which have to operate under the cyclic loading, high contact pressures, corrosion and high temperatures and in product renewal.Thermal coatings contribute to the qualitative improvement of the technical level of production and product restoration using the ceramic composite materials. However, the possibility to have a significantly increased product performance, reduce their factory labour hours and materials/output ratio in manufacturing and restoration is largely dependent on the degree of the surface layer quality of products at their finishing stage, which is usually provided by different kinds of machining.When machining the plasma-sprayed thermal coatings, a removing process of the cut-off layer material is determined by its distinctive features such as a layered structure, high internal stresses, low ductility material, high tendency to the surface layer strengthening and rehardening, porosity, high abrasive properties, etc. When coatings are machined these coating properties result in specific characteristics of chip formation and conditions for formation of the billet surface layer.The chip formation of plasma-sprayed coatings was studied at micro-velocities using an experimental tool-setting microscope-based setup, created in BMSTU. The setup allowed simultaneous recording both the individual stages (phases of the chip formation process and the operating force factors.It is found that formation of individual chip elements comes with the multiple micro-cracks that cause chipping-off the small particles of material. The emerging main crack in the cut-off layer of material leads to separation of the largest chip element. Then all the stages

  12. A STRANGE STAR SCENARIO FOR THE FORMATION OF ECCENTRIC MILLISECOND PULSAR/HELIUM WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Long; Li, Xiang-Dong [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira, E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Presidency University, 86/1, College Street, Kolkata 700 073 (India)

    2015-07-01

    According to the recycling scenario, millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have evolved from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Their orbits are expected to be circular due to tidal interactions during binary evolution, as observed in most binary MSPs. There are some peculiar systems that do not fit this picture. Three recent examples are the PSRs J2234+06, J1946+3417, and J1950+2414, all of which are MSPs in eccentric orbits but with mass functions compatible with expected He white dwarf (WD) companions. It has been suggested these MSPs may have formed from delayed accretion-induced collapse of massive WDs, or the eccentricity may be induced by dynamical interaction between the binary and a circumbinary disk. Assuming that the core density of accreting neutron stars (NSs) in LMXBs may reach the density of quark deconfinement, which can lead to phase transition from NSs to strange quark stars, we show that the resultant MSPs are likely to have an eccentric orbit, due to the sudden loss of the gravitational mass of the NS during the transition. The eccentricities can be reproduced with a reasonable estimate of the mass loss. This scenario might also account for the formation of the youngest known X-ray binary Cir X–1, which also possesses a low-field compact star in an eccentric orbit.

  13. A Strange Star Scenario for the Formation of Eccentric Millisecond Pulsar/Helium White Dwarf Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Long; Li, Xiang-Dong; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2015-07-01

    According to the recycling scenario, millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have evolved from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Their orbits are expected to be circular due to tidal interactions during binary evolution, as observed in most binary MSPs. There are some peculiar systems that do not fit this picture. Three recent examples are the PSRs J2234+06, J1946+3417, and J1950+2414, all of which are MSPs in eccentric orbits but with mass functions compatible with expected He white dwarf (WD) companions. It has been suggested these MSPs may have formed from delayed accretion-induced collapse of massive WDs, or the eccentricity may be induced by dynamical interaction between the binary and a circumbinary disk. Assuming that the core density of accreting neutron stars (NSs) in LMXBs may reach the density of quark deconfinement, which can lead to phase transition from NSs to strange quark stars, we show that the resultant MSPs are likely to have an eccentric orbit, due to the sudden loss of the gravitational mass of the NS during the transition. The eccentricities can be reproduced with a reasonable estimate of the mass loss. This scenario might also account for the formation of the youngest known X-ray binary Cir X-1, which also possesses a low-field compact star in an eccentric orbit.

  14. Blue and white phosphorescent organic light emitting diode performance improvement by confining electrons and holes inside double emitting layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yu-Sheng; Hong, Lin-Ann; Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Chen, Cheng-Yin

    2014-09-15

    In this research, complex emitting layers (EML) were fabricated using TCTA doping hole-transport material in the front half of a bipolar 26DCzPPy as well as PPT doping electron-transport material in the back half of 26DCzPPy. Blue dopant FIrpic was also mixed inside the complex emitting layer to produce a highly efficient blue phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (OLED). The hole and electron injection and carrier recombination rate were effectively increased. The fabricated complex emitting layers exhibited current efficiency of 42 cd/A and power efficiency of 30 lm/W when the luminance was 1000 cd/m{sup 2}, driving voltage was 4.4 V, and current density was 2.4 mA/cm{sup 2}. A white OLED component was then manufactured by doping red dopant [Os(bpftz){sub 2}(PPh{sub 2}Me){sub 2}] (Os) in proper locations. When the Os dopant was doped in between the complex emitting layers, excitons were effectively confined within, increasing the recombination rate and therefore reducing the color shift. The resulting Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE) coordinates shifted from 4 to 10 V is (Δx=−0.04, Δy=+0.01). The component had a current efficiency of 35.7 cd/A, a power efficiency of 24 lm/W, driving voltage of 4.6 V and a CIE{sub x,y} of (0.31,0.35) at a luminance of 1000 cd/m{sup 2}, with a maximum luminance of 15,600 cd/m{sup 2} at 10 V. Attaching an outcoupling enhancement film was applied to increase the luminance efficiency to 30 lm/W. - Highlights: • Used the complex double emitting layers. • Respectively doped hole and electron transport material in the bipolar host. • Electrons and holes are effectively confined within EMLs to produce excitons.

  15. Formation of Al-alloyed Layer on Magnesium with Use of Casting Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mola R.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Al-enriched layer was formed on a magnesium substrate with use of casting. The magnesium melt was cast into a steel mould with an aluminium insert placed inside. Different conditions of the casting process were applied. The reaction between the molten magnesium and the aluminium piece during casting led to the formation of an Al-enriched surface layer on the magnesium substrate. The thickness of the layer was dependent on the casting conditions. In all fabricated layers the following phases were detected: a solid solution of Mg in Al, Al3Mg2, Mg17Al12 and a solid solution of Mg in Al. When the temperature of the melt and the mould was lower (variant 1 – 670°C and 310°; variant 2 – 680°C and 310°C, respectively the unreacted thin layer of aluminium was observed in the outer zone. Applying higher temperatures of the melt (685°C and the mould (325°C resulted in deep penetration of aluminium into the magnesium substrate. Areas enriched in aluminium were locally observed. The Al-enriched layers composed mainly of Mg-Al intermetallic phases have hardness from 187-256 HV0.1.

  16. Two-Dimensional Metal-Organic Layers as a Bright and Processable Phosphor for Fast White-Light Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuefu; Wang, Zi; Lin, Bangjiang; Zhang, Cankun; Cao, Lingyun; Wang, Tingting; Zhang, Jingzheng; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Wenbin

    2017-06-22

    A metal-organic layer (MOL) is a new type of 2D material that is derived from metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by reducing one dimension to a single layer or a few layers. Tetraphenylethylene-based tetracarboxylate ligands (TCBPE), with aggregation-induced emission properties, were assembled into the first luminescent MOL by linking with Zr6 O4 (OH)6 (H2 O)2 (HCO2 )6 clusters. The emissive MOL can replace the lanthanide phosphors in white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) with remarkable processability, color rendering, and brightness. Importantly, the MOL-WLED exhibited a physical switching speed three times that of commercial WLEDs, which is crucial for visible-light communication (VLC), an alternative wireless communication technology to Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, by using room lighting to carry transmitted signals. The short fluorescence lifetime (2.6 ns) together with high quantum yield (50 %) of the MOL affords fast switching of the assembled WLEDs for efficient information encoding and transmission. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Nanotube formation through the continuous one-dimensional fusion of hollow nanocapsules composed of layer-by-layer poly(lactic acid) stereocomplex films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kenta; Kida, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Yuji; Arikawa, Yuuya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2010-06-23

    Hollow nanocapsules composed of a poly(lactic acid)s (PLAs) stereocomplex can be fabricated by a combination of the layer-by-layer assembly technique and the silica template method. These hollow capsules one-dimensionally fuse together to generate novel PLA nanotubes. The formation of nanotubes was affected by the molecular weights of PLAs constituting the hollow capsules.

  18. Formation of nickel germanides from Ni layers with thickness below 10 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonka, Lukas; Kubart, Tomas; Primetzhofer, Daniel; Abedin, Ahmad; Hellström, Per-Erik; Östling, Mikael; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Lavoie, Christian; Zhang, Shi-Li; Zhang, Zhen

    2017-03-01

    The authors have studied the reaction between a Ge (100) substrate and thin layers of Ni ranging from 2 to 10 nm in thickness. The formation of metal-rich Ni5Ge3Ni5Ge3 was found to precede that of the monogermanide NiGe by means of real-time in situ x-ray diffraction during ramp-annealing and ex situ x-ray pole figure analyses for phase identification. The observed sequential growth of Ni5Ge3Ni5Ge3 and NiGe with such thin Ni layers is different from the previously reported simultaneous growth with thicker Ni layers. The phase transformation from Ni5Ge3Ni5Ge3 to NiGe was found to be nucleation-controlled for Ni thicknesses <5 nm<5 nm, which is well supported by thermodynamic considerations. Specifically, the temperature for the NiGe formation increased with decreasing Ni (rather Ni5Ge3Ni5Ge3) thickness below 5 nm. In combination with sheet resistance measurement and microscopic surface inspection of samples annealed with a standard rapid thermal processing, the temperature range for achieving morphologically stable NiGe layers was identified for this standard annealing process. As expected, it was found to be strongly dependent on the initial Ni thickness

  19. Application of exciplex in the fabrication of white organic light emitting devices with mixed fluorescent and phosphorescent layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dan; Duan, Yahui; Yang, Yongqiang [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Hu, Nan [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang, Xiao [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Sun, Fengbo [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Duan, Yu, E-mail: duanyu@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, a highly efficient fluorescent/phosphorescent white organic light-emitting device (WOLED) was fabricated using exciplex light emission. The hole-transport material 4,4',4''-tris(N-carbazolyl)triphenylamine (TCTA), and electron-transport material, 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen), were mixed to afford a blue-emitting exciplex. The WOLED was fabricated with a yellow phosphorescent dye, Ir(III) bis(4-phenylthieno [3,2-c] pyridinato-N,C{sup 2'}) acetylacetonate (PO-01), combined with the exciplex. In this structure, the energy can be efficiently transferred from the blend layer to the yellow phosphorescent dye, thus improving the efficiency of the utilization of the triplet exciton. The maximum power efficiency of the WOLED reached a value 9.03 lm/W with an external quantum efficiency of 4.3%. The Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates (x,y) of the device were from (0.39, 0.45) to (0.27, 0.31), with a voltage range of 4–9 V. - Highlights: • An exciplex/phosphorescence hybrid white OLED was fabricated for the first time with blue/orange complementary emitters. • By using exciplex as the blue emitter, non-radiative triplet-states on the exciplex can be harvested for light-emission by transferring them to low triplet-state phosphors.

  20. Coulometry and Calorimetry of Electric Double Layer Formation in Porous Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Mathijs; Griffioen, Elian; Biesheuvel, P. M.; van Roij, René; Erné, Ben

    2017-10-01

    Coulometric measurements on salt-water-immersed nanoporous carbon electrodes reveal, at a fixed voltage, a charge decrease with increasing temperature. During far-out-of-equilibrium charging of these electrodes, calorimetry indicates the production of both irreversible Joule heat and reversible heat, the latter being associated with entropy changes during electric double layer (EDL) formation in the nanopores. These measurements grant experimental access—for the first time—to the entropic contribution of the grand potential; for our electrodes, this amounts to roughly 25% of the total grand potential energy cost of EDL formation at large applied potentials, in contrast with point-charge model calculations that predict 100%. The coulometric and calorimetric experiments show a consistent picture of the role of heat and temperature in EDL formation and provide hitherto unused information to test against EDL models.

  1. Safety level of Levofloxacin following repeated oral adminstration in White Leg Horn layer birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin H. Patel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Levofloxacin is a fluorinated quinolone which has broad-spectrum antibacterial activity at low plasma/tissue concentration. The present study was designed to investigate safety of levofloxacin (10 mg/kg after repeated oral administration at 12 hours interval for 14 days in layer birds (30-35 weeks old and weighing between 1.5-2.0 kg and to determine tissue concentration of the drug following oral administration (10 mg/kg for 5 days. Drug concentration in tissue was determined using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. Repeated oral administration of levofloxacin in layer birds was found safe based on evaluation of haematological (Hb, PCV, TLC and DLC, blood biochemical (AST, ALT, AKP, ACP, LDH, BUN, Serum total protein, Serum albumin, Serum Creatinine, Blood glucose and Total bilirubin and histopathology of liver, kidney and joint cartilage. Levofloxacin could not be detected in body tissues (liver and skeletal muscle at 12 hours after the last administration. [Vet. World 2009; 2(4.000: 137-139

  2. Understanding Passive Layer Formation for Further Corrosion Management in Gas Production Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, R. K.; Rahmawati, S. D.; Gadesa, A.; Wahyuningrum, D.

    2017-07-01

    Corrosion is a critical issue during the development of a gas field, especially wet gas or retrograde gas field. Corrosion affects the management system of a field and further impacts the amount of investment. Therefore, accurate prediction of corrosion rate is needed to plan an effective preventive action before going further to the development phase. One of the important parameters that should be noticed to create an accurate prediction is the formation of the passive layer. In CO2-H2S environment, there will be three possibilities of passive layer: FeS, FeCO3 or no passive layer. In this study, we create mathematical models to determine the formed passive layer in each segment of the gas production tubing and pipeline. The model is built using Faraday’s Law and Thermodynamic approach to account the passive layer formation at different temperature, pH, corrosion rate and partial pressure of CO2 and H2S. From the simulation, it was found that there were three boundary conditions: no scale-FeS boundary, no scale-FeCO3 boundary and FeS-FeCO3 boundary. The first two boundaries evolved over a time as the concentration of Fe2+ ions was increasing. However, FeS-FeCO3 boundary remained steady as it was not affected by the addition of Fe2+ ions. Using sample case study, few variations were noticed at production pipeline and tubing. It was caused by the gas composition, which contained high CO2 and very low H2S. Boundary conditions only changed slightly over two days period.

  3. Chemical models for martian weathering profiles: Insights into formation of layered phyllosilicate and sulfate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.; Mironenko, Mikhail V.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical chemical models for water-basalt interaction have been used to constrain the formation of stratified mineralogical sequences of Noachian clay-bearing rocks exposed in the Mawrth Vallis region and in other places on cratered martian highlands. The numerical approaches are based on calculations of water-rock type chemical equilibria and models which include rates of mineral dissolution. Results show that the observed clay-bearing sequences could have formed through downward percolation and neutralization of acidic H2SO4-HCl solutions. A formation of weathering profiles by slightly acidic fluids equilibrated with current atmospheric CO2 requires large volumes of water and is inconsistent with observations. Weathering by solutions equilibrated with putative dense CO2 atmospheres leads to consumption of CO2 to abundant carbonates which are not observed in clay stratigraphies. Weathering by H2SO4-HCl solutions leads to formation of amorphous silica, Al-rich clays, ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, and minor titanium oxide and alunite at the top of weathering profiles. Mg-Fe phyllosilicates, Ca sulfates, zeolites, and minor carbonates precipitate from neutral and alkaline solutions at depth. Acidic weathering causes leaching of Na, Mg, and Ca from upper layers and accumulation of Mg-Na-Ca sulfate-chloride solutions at depth. Neutral MgSO4 type solutions dominate in middle parts of weathering profiles and could occur in deeper layers owing to incomplete alteration of Ca minerals and a limited trapping of Ca to sulfates. Although salts are not abundant in the Noachian geological formations, the results suggest the formation of Noachian salty solutions and their accumulation at depth. A partial freezing and migration of alteration solutions could have separated sulfate-rich compositions from low-temperature chloride brines and contributed to the observed diversity of salt deposits. A Hesperian remobilization and release of subsurface MgSO4 type solutions into newly

  4. Comparison of Polythionates as Precursors for the Formation of Thallium Sulfide Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalijus JANICKIS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The processes of obtaining layers of thallium, sulfides, TlxSy, by the sorption-diffusion method on polyamide 6 using solutions of lower polythionates - sodium trithionate and tetrathionate, Na2S3O6, Na2S4O6, potassium pentathionate, K2S5O6, and of dodecathionic acid, H2S12O6, as precursors of sulfur are compared. The concentration of sorbed sulfur increases with increasing the duration of treatment, the concentration and temperature of precursor solution. It rather significantly also depends on the nature - sulfurity of polythionate, i. e. on the number of sulfur atoms in the polythionate anion: effectiveness of sulfurization using solutions of dodecathionic acid is significantly higher than that of lower polythionates. Thallium sulfide layers are formed on the surface of polyamide after the treatment of sulfurized polymer with Tl(I salt solution. The concentration of thallium in the layer increases with the increase of initial sulfurization duration and in case of H2S12O6 solution used - on the temperature of this process. The results of X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of thallium sulfide layers in the surface of polyamide 6. The phase composition of layer changes depending on the conditions of initial treatment in a H2S12O6 solution. Five thallium sulfide phases, two forms of TlS, Tl2S2, Tl4S3 and Tl2S5 were identified in the composition of the layers treated for different time with a solution of dodecathionic acid at the temperature of 20 °C and 30 °C and then with Tl(I salt solution by X-ray diffraction but the maxima of TlS and Tl2S5 phases predominate in the diffractograms.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.4.774

  5. Histogen Layers Contributing to Adventitious Bud Formation Are Determined by their Cell Division Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshima, Tomoyuki; Yang, Soo-Jung; Ohno, Sho; Honda, Keita; Deguchi, Ayumi; Doi, Motoaki; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Hosokawa, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    Saintpaulia ionantha is propagated by adventitious buds in horticulture, and periclinal chimeral cultivars are usually difficult to propagate. However, some periclinal chimeral cultivars can be propagated with adventitious buds, and the mechanism of which has been unknown. Striped flower cultivars "Kaname," "Concord," and "Monique" were used to investigate what causes flower color separation in adventitious shoot-derived plants by tissue culture. These cultivars were revealed to have mutated flavonoid 3', 5' hydroxylase (SiF3'5'H), WDR1 (SiWDR1), or flavonoid 3 hydroxylase (SiF3H), respectively, in their L1 layer. From our previous study using "Kaname," all flowers from adventitious shoots were colored pink, which was the epidermal color of mother plants' flowers. We used "Concrd" and "Monique" from which we obtained not only monochromatic-colored plants the same as the epidermal color of mother plants, but also plants with a monochromatic colored plants, same as the subepidermal color, and a striped flower color the same as mother plants. Histological observations revealed that epidermal cells divided actively at 14 d after culture and they were involved in the formation of adventitious shoots in the cultured leaf segments of "Kaname." On the other hand, in "Concord" and "Monique," the number of divided cells in the subepidermis was rather higher than that of epidermal cells, and subepidermal cells were sometimes involved in shoot formation. In addition, the plant and leaf size of L1-derived plants from "Concord" and "Monique" were non-vigorous and smaller than those derived from the subepidermal layer. In conclusion, periclinal chimeral cultivars of Saintpaulia can be divided into two types. One type has a high cell division activity in the L1 layer, from which only single flower-colored plants derived from L1 can be obtained as adventitious shoots. Another type has a low cell division activity in the L1 layer, from which striped flower-colored plants the same as

  6. Histogen Layers Contributing to Adventitious Bud Formation Are Determined by their Cell Division Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Nabeshima

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Saintpaulia ionantha is propagated by adventitious buds in horticulture, and periclinal chimeral cultivars are usually difficult to propagate. However, some periclinal chimeral cultivars can be propagated with adventitious buds, and the mechanism of which has been unknown. Striped flower cultivars “Kaname,” “Concord,” and “Monique” were used to investigate what causes flower color separation in adventitious shoot-derived plants by tissue culture. These cultivars were revealed to have mutated flavonoid 3′, 5′ hydroxylase (SiF3′5′H, WDR1 (SiWDR1, or flavonoid 3 hydroxylase (SiF3H, respectively, in their L1 layer. From our previous study using “Kaname,” all flowers from adventitious shoots were colored pink, which was the epidermal color of mother plants' flowers. We used “Concrd” and “Monique” from which we obtained not only monochromatic-colored plants the same as the epidermal color of mother plants, but also plants with a monochromatic colored plants, same as the subepidermal color, and a striped flower color the same as mother plants. Histological observations revealed that epidermal cells divided actively at 14 d after culture and they were involved in the formation of adventitious shoots in the cultured leaf segments of “Kaname.” On the other hand, in “Concord” and “Monique,” the number of divided cells in the subepidermis was rather higher than that of epidermal cells, and subepidermal cells were sometimes involved in shoot formation. In addition, the plant and leaf size of L1-derived plants from “Concord” and “Monique” were non-vigorous and smaller than those derived from the subepidermal layer. In conclusion, periclinal chimeral cultivars of Saintpaulia can be divided into two types. One type has a high cell division activity in the L1 layer, from which only single flower-colored plants derived from L1 can be obtained as adventitious shoots. Another type has a low cell division activity

  7. Development of a Highly Efficient Hybrid White Organic-Light-Emitting Diode with a Single Emission Layer by Solution Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun-Yi; Chen, Show-An

    2018-02-07

    We use a mixed host, 2,6-bis[3-(carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]pyridine blended with 20 wt % tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl)amine, to lower the hole-injection barrier, along with the bipolar and high-photoluminescence-quantum-yield (Φp= 84%), blue thermally activated delay fluorescence (TADF) material of 9,9-dimethyl-9,10-dihydroacridine-2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine (DMAC-TRZ) as a blue dopant to compose the emission layer for the fabrication of a TADF blue organic-light-emitting diode (BOLED). The device is highly efficient with the following performance parameters: maximum brightness (Bmax) = 57586 cd/m2, maximum current efficiency (CEmax) = 35.3 cd/A, maximum power efficiency (PEmax) = 21.4 lm/W, maximum external quantum efficiency (EQEmax) = 14.1%, and CIE coordinates (0.18, 0.42). This device has the best performance recorded among the reported solution-processed TADF BOLEDs and has a low efficiency roll-off: at brightness values of 1000 and 5000 cd/m2, its CEs are close, being 35.1 and 30.1 cd/A, respectively. Upon further doping of the red phosphor Ir(dpm)PQ2 (emission peak λmax = 595 nm) into the blue emission layer, we obtained a TADF-phosphor hybrid white organic-light-emitting diode (T-P hybrid WOLED) with high performance: Bmax = 43594 cd/m2, CEmax = 28.8 cd/A, PEmax = 18.1 lm/W, and CIE coordinates (0.38, 0.44). This Bmax = 43594 cd/m2 is better than that of the vacuum-deposited WOLED with a blue TADF emitter, 10000 cd/m2. This is also the first report on a T-P hybrid WOLED with a solution-processed emitting layer.

  8. Dilational surface visco-elasticity of polyelectrolyte/surfactant solutions: formation of heterogeneous adsorption layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, B A; Loglio, G; Miller, R

    2011-10-14

    Recent application of the methods of surface dilational rheology to solutions of the complexes between synthetic polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants (PSC) gave a possibility to determine some steps of the adsorption layer formation and to discover an abrupt transition connected with the formation of microaggregates at the liquid surface. The kinetic dependencies of the dynamic surface elasticity are always monotonous at low surfactant concentrations but can have one or two local maxima in the range beyond the critical aggregation concentration. The first maximum is accompanied by the generation of higher harmonics of induced surface tension oscillations and caused by heterogeneities in the adsorption layer. The formation of a multilayered structure at the surface for some systems leads to the second maximum in the dynamic surface elasticity. The hydrophobicity and charge density of a polymer chain influence strongly the surface structure, resulting in a variety of dynamic surface properties of PSC solutions. Optical methods and atomic force microscopy give additional information for the systems under consideration. Experimental results and existing theoretical frameworks are reviewed with emphasis on the general features of all studied PSC systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Modelling of fast jet formation under explosion collision of two-layer alumina/copper tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Balagansky

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Under explosion collapse of two-layer tubes with an outer layer of high-modulus ceramics and an inner layer of copper, formation of a fast and dense copper jet is plausible. We have performed a numerical simulation of the explosion collapse of a two-layer alumina/copper tube using ANSYS AUTODYN software. The simulation was performed in a 2D-axis symmetry posting on an Eulerian mesh of 3900x1200 cells. The simulation results indicate two separate stages of the tube collapse process: the nonstationary and the stationary stage. At the initial stage, a non-stationary fragmented jet is moving with the velocity of leading elements up to 30 km/s. The collapse velocity of the tube to the symmetry axis is about 2 km/s, and the pressure in the contact zone exceeds 700 GPa. During the stationary stage, a dense jet is forming with the velocity of 20 km/s. Temperature of the dense jet is about 2000 K, jet failure occurs when the value of effective plastic deformation reaches 30.

  10. Selenopentathionic and Telluropentathionic Acids as Precursors for Formation of Semiconducting Layers on the Surface of Polyamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skirma Zalenkiene

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The layers of copper chalcogenides, which were formed on the surface of semihydrophilic polymer—polyamide 6 (PA using monoselenopentathionic H2SeS4O6 and monotelluropentathionic H2TeS4O6 acids as precursors of chalcogens, were characterized. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and UV spectroscopy were used to monitor the effect of chalcogens on the changes in structure of PA corresponding to the concentration of the precursor's solution and an exposure time. The IR spectra of modified PA were completely different from that of the initial PA. Further interaction of chalcogenized PA with copper (II/I salt solution leads to the formation of CuxS, CuxSe, CuxTe, and mixed –CuxS–CuySe and CuxS–CuyTe layers which have different electric transport properties. The surface properties of PA after treatment are studied using AFM and XRD. The electrical resistances of layers with various composition formed over a wide concentration range 0.01–0.5 mol⋅dm−3 of precursor's solution were measured. Variation in the conductivity of layers of Cu–Se–S and Cu–Te–S on the surface of PA shows an evident increase with the increasing of the mass fraction of selenium or tellurium.

  11. Interfacial phenomena during salt layer formation under high rate dissolution conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammons, Joshua A; Davenport, Alison J; Ghahari, S Majid; Monir, Mehdi; Tinnes, Jean-Phillipe; Amri, Mahrez; Terrill, Nick; Marone, Federica; Mokso, Rajmund; Stampanoni, Marco; Rayment, Trevor

    2013-06-06

    Interfacial phenomena occurring during high metal dissolution rates, in an environment with diffusion-limited transport of dissolution products, have been investigated using time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and fast radiography. Time resolved SAXS data reveal that highly anisotropic interfacial X-ray scattering always precedes salt nucleation. The correlation between the interfacial scattering the presence of salt crystals indicates that the interface is between the metal electrode and the concentrated NiCl2 electrolyte and can therefore be interpreted as reflectivity or Porod scattering. Using fast radiography, we show that continued crystal nucleation and growth results in formation of a crystal-containing salt layer, which initially extends far from the interface (>20 μm), until the NiCl2 concentration decreases below saturation. Dissolution of this thick salt layer occurs mainly at the furthest boundary from the interface until, the salt layer thickness decreases to a steady state value, resulting in a steady state limiting current. These results show that the presence of a crystalline salt layer at a dissolving interface causes microscopic roughening which has implications for understanding both the role of salt films in pitting corrosion and electrochemical processing.

  12. Irreversible fouling of membrane bioreactors due to formation of a non-biofilm gel layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Larsen, Poul; Zheng, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS), known to contribute to fouling in membrane bio-reactors (MBRs), are generally divided into bound and free EPS. The free EPS are able to form a gel layer on the membrane active surface. The mechanisms involved in formation of such layer and its effects...... on performance of the MBR membranes were studied. The free EPS, extracted by centrifugation and microfiltration, contained a significant amount of humic-like substances. Under static contact to the membrane, adsorption of humic-like substances to the membrane occurred and could be explained by conventional...... adsorption kinetics. Due to static adsorption, surface roughness of the membrane declined significantly, indicating that adsorbed matters to the membranefilled the cavities of the membrane surface. Filtration of the free EPS caused 50% waterflux decline. The fouling resistance linearly increased...

  13. Modeling the barrier-layer formation in the South-Eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Durand, F.; Shankar, D.; DeBoyer Montegut, C.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Blanke, B.; Madec, G.

    -layer formation in the South-Eastern Arabian Sea F. Durand1, D. Shankar2, C. de Boyer Mont?gut3, S.S.C. Shenoi2, B. Blanke4, G. Madec3 (1) IRD, LEGOS, UMR5566 CNRS-CNES-IRD-UPS, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse, France (2) Physical Oceanography Division..., National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403004, India (3) Laboratoire d?Oc?anographie et de Climatologie : Exp?rimentation et Analyses Num?riques, Universit? Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05, France (4) Laboratoire...

  14. Enhanced High Temperature Corrosion Resistance in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems by Nano-Passive Layer Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold R. Marder

    2007-06-14

    Due to their excellent corrosion resistance, iron aluminum alloys are currently being considered for use as weld claddings in fossil fuel fired power plants. The susceptibility to hydrogen cracking of these alloys at higher aluminum concentrations has highlighted the need for research into the effect of chromium additions on the corrosion resistance of lower aluminum alloys. In the present work, three iron aluminum alloys were exposed to simulated coal combustion environments at 500 C and 700 C for both short (100 hours) and long (5,000 hours) isothermal durations. Scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the corrosion products. All alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the short term tests. For longer exposures, increasing the aluminum concentration was beneficial to the corrosion resistance. The addition of chromium to the binary iron aluminum alloy prevented the formation iron sulfide and resulted in lower corrosion kinetics. A classification of the corrosion products that developed on these alloys is presented. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of the as-corroded coupons revealed that chromium was able to form chromium sulfides only on the higher aluminum alloy, thereby preventing the formation of deleterious iron sulfides. When the aluminum concentration was too low to permit selective oxidation of only aluminum (upon initial exposure to the corrosion environment), the formation of chromium oxide alongside the aluminum oxide led to depletion of chromium beneath the oxide layer. Upon penetration of sulfur through the oxide into this depletion layer, iron sulfides (rather than chromium sulfides) were found to form on the low aluminum alloy. Thus, it was found in this work that the role of chromium on alloy corrosion resistance was strongly effected by the aluminum concentration of the alloy. STEM analysis also revealed the encapsulation of external iron sulfide products with a thin layer of aluminum oxide, which may provide a

  15. Optical Formation of Waveguide Elements in Photorefractive Surface Layer of a Lithium Niobate Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezpaly, A. D.; Shandarov, V. M.

    Formation of channel optical waveguides due to the sequential point-to-point exposure of local stripe-like regions of Y-cut lithium niobate sample surface is experimentally investigated. The surface layer of the sample is thermally doped with Cu ions to increase its photorefractive sensitivity. The laser radiation with wavelength of 532 nm and optical power of 10 mW is used for the crystal exposure in experiments. The optical inhomogeneities formed during the sample exposure are studied with their probing by laser beams with wavelength of 633 nm.

  16. White polymer light emitting diodes based on PVK: the effect of the electron injection barrier on transport properties, electroluminescence and controlling the electroplex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipjyoti; Gopikrishna, Peddaboodi; Narasimhan, Rahul; Singh, Ashish; Dey, Anamika; Iyer, Parameswar Krishnan

    2016-12-07

    The effects of the electron injection barrier on the charge transport, brightness and the electroluminescence (EL) properties of polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) with poly(9-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) as an emissive layer have been studied. By using Al and LiF/Al as the cathode in single layer PLEDs and diverse electron transporting layers (ETLs) such as 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP), 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) and 2,2',2''-(1,3,5-benzinetriyl)-tris(1-phenyl-1-H-benzimidazole) (TPBi) in the case of multilayer PLEDs, the charge transport, brightness, color tuning and the EL properties of the devices were drastically modified. The energy barrier for electrons affects the electron current flowing through the device, thereby affecting the operating voltage and the brightness of the PLEDs. The PLEDs with TPBi as the ETL possess the lowest injection barrier and give the maximum brightness of 426.24 cd m-2. The electron injection barrier is also found to play a major role in defining the EL spectra of the PLEDs. A larger injection barrier gives rise to electroplex formation in the EML-ETL interface of the PLEDs and an additional peak at ∼605 nm was observed in the EL spectrum. As a result, a near white emission with CIE coordinates of (0.30, 0.30) and (0.25, 0.23) at 20 V was obtained from devices with BCP and BPhen as ETLs. Furthermore, PVK doped with 2-phenyl-5-(4-biphenylyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) at 10, 20 and 30 wt% ratios modified the electron transport nature of PVK and had a remarkable influence on the aforesaid properties, especially on the electroplex formation.

  17. White Coat Ceremony as a Professional Identity Formation Activity in a United States Family Medicine Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Lee Bidwell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction White coat ceremonies (WCCs in medical school mark the transition of students to medicine, beginning their professional identity formation as a physician. However, a literature/web search revealed a paucity of residency-focused WCCs. Methods A 90-minute Family Medicine Residency (FM WCC was designed to support residents’ professional identity formation as a specialty physician. Through faculty narratives and brief histories of the white coat and the specialty, the WCC concludes with new residents donning their specialty embroidered white coats. A brief e-survey was sent to attendees, and WCC leaders were debriefed to determine the value and key elements of WCC. Results Seventy-nine percent of survey respondents (34/43 agreed that the WCC is an important transition event for residents’ identity while reaffirming FM values for faculty/staff. WCC leaders identified critical steps for initiating a WCC. Conclusion A resident WCC formally marks the transition to specialty physician identity. Lessons Learned Ceremony structure will evolve over time.

  18. Extinct Stars and Eviscerated Planets: Using Observations of White Dwarf Pollution to Understand the Formation, Composition and Evolution of Planetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, M. J.

    2017-05-01

    I will discuss the work that will required for the white-dwarf community to be able to extract the unique data that only white dwarf systems can supply on the fundamental processes governing the formation and evolution of planetary systems.

  19. Hydraulic Fracture Growth in a Layered Formation based on Fracturing Experiments and Discrete Element Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushi, Zou; Xinfang, Ma; Tong, Zhou; Ning, Li; Ming, Chen; Sihai, Li; Yinuo, Zhang; Han, Li

    2017-09-01

    Hydraulic fracture (HF) height containment tends to occur in layered formations, and it significantly influences the entire HF geometry or the stimulated reservoir volume. This study aims to explore the influence of preexisting bedding planes (BPs) on the HF height growth in layered formations. Laboratory fracturing experiments were performed to confirm the occurrence of HF height containment in natural shale that contains multiple weak and high-permeability BPs under triaxial stresses. Numerical simulations were then conducted to further illustrate the manner in which vertical stress, BP permeability, BP density(or spacing), pump rate, and fluid viscosity control HF height growth using a 3D discrete element method-based fracturing model. In this model, the rock matrix was considered transversely isotropic and multiple BPs can be explicitly represented. Experimental and numerical results show that the vertically growing HF tends to be limited by multi-high-permeability BPs, even under higher vertical stress. When the vertically growing HF intersects with the multi-high-permeability BPs, the injection pressure will be sharply reduced. If a low pumping rate or a low-viscosity fluid is used, the excess fracturing fluid leak-off into the BPs obviously decreases the rate of pressure build up, which will then limit the growth of HF. Otherwise, a higher pumping rate and/or a higher viscosity will reduce the leak-off time and fluid volume, but increase the injection pressure to drive the HF to grow and to penetrate through the BPs.

  20. Formation of Porous Apatite Layer during In Vitro Study of Hydroxyapatite-AW Based Glass Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat Sooksaen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research discussed the fabrication, characterization, and in vitro study of composites based on the mixture of hydroxyapatite powder and apatite-wollastonite (AW based glass. AW based glass was prepared from the SiO2-CaO-MgO-P2O5-CaF2 glass system. This study focuses on the effect of composition and sintering temperature that influences the properties of these composites. Microstructural study revealed the formation of apatite layer on the composite surfaces when immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF solution at 37°C. Composites containing ≥50 wt% AW based glass showed good bioactivity after 7 days of immersion in the SBF. A porous calcium phosphate (potentially hydroxycarbonate apatite, HCA layer formed at the SBF-composite interface and the layer became denser at longer soaking period, for periods ranging from 7 to 28 days. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES analysis showed that early stage of soaking occurred with the release of Ca and Si ions from the composites and the decrease of P ions with slow exchange rate.

  1. Simulataneous Formation of InGaN Nanostructures with Varying Shapes for White Light Source Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Gasim, Anwar A.

    2012-01-01

    Varying shapes of InGaN nanostructures were simultaneously formed on silicon epitaxially. The nanowires and nanomushrooms emit violet-blue light, and broad yellow-orange-red luminescence, respectively. The combination of which is promising for white light emission.

  2. In situ formation of silver nanoparticle layer by supramolecule-directed assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ruitao, E-mail: g0701276@nus.edu.sg; Teo, Shileng, E-mail: attenzion@hotmail.com; Srinivasan, M.P., E-mail: srinivasan.mp@nus.edu.sg

    2014-01-01

    We report an in situ synthesis route for preparation of a layer of AgNPs (silver nanoparticles) on the silicon surface by employing an immobilized supramolecular layer as a directing agent. The AgNPs were immobilized and stabilized by a calix[7]hydroquinone monolayer which in turn was immobilized on the silicon surface by covalent layer-by-layer assembly. The calix[7]hydroquinone moiety served as a nano-reactor, container and template in the in situ synthesis process. AgNPs were formed by reduction of Ag ions by the hydroquinone form of the calix[7]arene. The AgNPs were obtained as plate-shaped particles with a diameter of about 10 nm and a height of less than 2 nm, and were stabilized and wrapped by calix[7]arene molecules. By repeated application of the redox properties of calix[7]arene, the size of the AgNPs can be adjusted continuously up to islands of 100 nm or larger. The process of in situ synthesis under controlled conditions, together with calibrated variation of particle size has the potential to serve as building blocks for electronic nano-devices. A significant advantage derived by this method of formation and assembly is its surfactant-free nature that enables access to the active surface of the nanoparticle. - Highlights: • 4-Methoxycalix[7]arene synthesized as a pure product • 4-Methoxycalix[7]arene immobilized by covalent bonding • In situ synthesis of Ag nanoparticles on the surface of the calixarene monolayer • Repeated redox process for forming Ag nanoparticles on the calixarene surface.

  3. Core and filament formation in magnetized, self-gravitating isothermal layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Loo, Sven; Keto, Eric; Zhang, Qizhou, E-mail: svanloo@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We examine the role of the gravitational instability in an isothermal, self-gravitating layer threaded by magnetic fields on the formation of filaments and dense cores. Using a numerical simulation, we follow the non-linear evolution of a perturbed equilibrium layer. The linear evolution of such a layer is described in the analytic work of Nagai et al. We find that filaments and dense cores form simultaneously. Depending on the initial magnetic field, the resulting filaments form either a spiderweb-like network (for weak magnetic fields) or a network of parallel filaments aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field lines (for strong magnetic fields). Although the filaments are radially collapsing, the density profile of their central region (up to the thermal scale height) can be approximated by a hydrodynamical equilibrium density structure. Thus, the magnetic field does not play a significant role in setting the density distribution of the filaments. The density distribution outside of the central region deviates from the equilibrium. The radial column density distribution is then flatter than the expected power law of r {sup –4} and similar to filament profiles observed with Herschel. Our results do not explain the near constant filament width of ∼0.1pc. However, our model does not include turbulent motions. It is expected that the accretion-driven amplification of these turbulent motions provides additional support within the filaments against gravitational collapse. Finally, we interpret the filamentary network of the massive star forming complex G14.225-0.506 in terms of the gravitational instability model and find that the properties of the complex are consistent with being formed out of an unstable layer threaded by a strong, parallel magnetic field.

  4. Influence of Slip and Lubrication Regime on the Formation of White Etching Cracks on a Two-Disc Test Rig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Gutiérrez Guzmán

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A common cause for maintenance and downtime in multiple fields of the mechanical transmission industries are premature rolling bearing failures due to white etching cracks (WEC. Within this work, WEC have been successfully recreated on a two-disc test rig under rolling contact loading without additional loading such as hydrogen pre-charging. This paper summarizes the state of the investigations regarding the influence of the slip type and the lubrication regime on the WEC formation on the two-disc test rig.

  5. Compact Layers of Hybrid Halide Perovskites Fabricated via the Aerosol Deposition Process—Uncoupling Material Synthesis and Layer Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Panzer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the successful fabrication of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite layers by the aerosol deposition method (ADM. The layers show high structural purity and compactness, thus making them suitable for application in perovskite-based optoelectronic devices. By using the aerosol deposition method we are able to decouple material synthesis from layer processing. Our results therefore allow for enhanced and easy control over the fabrication of perovskite-based devices, further paving the way for their commercialization.

  6. Direct formation of millisecond pulsars from rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of massive white dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Paulo C. C.; Tauris, Thomas M.

    2014-02-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are believed to be old neutron stars, formed via Type Ib/c core-collapse supernovae, which have subsequently been spun up to high rotation rates via accretion from a companion star in a highly circularized low-mass X-ray binary. The recent discoveries of Galactic field binary MSPs in eccentric orbits, and mass functions compatible with that expected for helium white dwarf companions, PSR J2234+06 and PSR J1946+3417, therefore challenge this picture. Here, we present a hypothesis for producing this new class of systems, where the MSPs are formed directly from a rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a super-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf. We compute the orbital properties of the MSPs formed in such events and demonstrate that our hypothesis can reproduce the observed eccentricities, masses and orbital periods of the white dwarfs, as well as forecasting the pulsar masses and velocities. Finally, we compare this hypothesis to a triple-star scenario.

  7. Mechanisms of Egg Yolk Formation and Implications on Early Life History of White Perch (Morone americana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Schilling

    Full Text Available The three white perch (Morone americana vitellogenins (VtgAa, VtgAb, VtgC were quantified accurately and precisely in the liver, plasma, and ovary during pre-, early-, mid-, and post-vitellogenic oocyte growth using protein cleavage-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (PC-IDMS. Western blotting generally mirrored the PC-IDMS results. By PC-IDMS, VtgC was quantifiable in pre-vitellogenic ovary tissues and VtgAb was quantifiable in pre-vitellogenic liver tissues however, neither protein was detected by western blotting in these respective tissues at this time point. Immunohistochemistry indicated that VtgC was present within pre-vitellogenic oocytes and localized to lipid droplets within vitellogenic oocytes. Affinity purification coupled to tandem mass spectrometry using highly purified VtgC as a bait protein revealed a single specific interacting protein (Y-box binding protein 2a-like [Ybx2a-like] that eluted with suramin buffer and confirmed that VtgC does not bind the ovary vitellogenin receptors (LR8 and Lrp13. Western blotting for LR8 and Lrp13 showed that both receptors were expressed during vitellogenesis with LR8 and Lrp13 expression highest in early- and mid-vitellogenesis, respectively. The VtgAa within the ovary peaked during post-vitellogenesis, while VtgAb peaked during early-vitellogenesis in both white perch and the closely related striped bass (M. saxatilis. The VtgC was steadily accumulated by oocytes beginning during pre-vitellogenesis and continued until post-vitellogenesis and its composition varies widely between striped bass and white perch. In striped bass, the VtgC accounted for 26% of the vitellogenin-derived egg yolk, however in the white perch it comprised only 4%. Striped bass larvae have an extended developmental window and these larvae have yolk stores that may enable them to survive in the absence of food for twice as long as white perch after hatch. Thus, the VtgC may play an integral role in providing nutrients to

  8. Mechanisms of Egg Yolk Formation and Implications on Early Life History of White Perch (Morone americana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Justin; Loziuk, Philip L.; Muddiman, David C.; Daniels, Harry V.; Reading, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    The three white perch (Morone americana) vitellogenins (VtgAa, VtgAb, VtgC) were quantified accurately and precisely in the liver, plasma, and ovary during pre-, early-, mid-, and post-vitellogenic oocyte growth using protein cleavage-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (PC-IDMS). Western blotting generally mirrored the PC-IDMS results. By PC-IDMS, VtgC was quantifiable in pre-vitellogenic ovary tissues and VtgAb was quantifiable in pre-vitellogenic liver tissues however, neither protein was detected by western blotting in these respective tissues at this time point. Immunohistochemistry indicated that VtgC was present within pre-vitellogenic oocytes and localized to lipid droplets within vitellogenic oocytes. Affinity purification coupled to tandem mass spectrometry using highly purified VtgC as a bait protein revealed a single specific interacting protein (Y-box binding protein 2a-like [Ybx2a-like]) that eluted with suramin buffer and confirmed that VtgC does not bind the ovary vitellogenin receptors (LR8 and Lrp13). Western blotting for LR8 and Lrp13 showed that both receptors were expressed during vitellogenesis with LR8 and Lrp13 expression highest in early- and mid-vitellogenesis, respectively. The VtgAa within the ovary peaked during post-vitellogenesis, while VtgAb peaked during early-vitellogenesis in both white perch and the closely related striped bass (M. saxatilis). The VtgC was steadily accumulated by oocytes beginning during pre-vitellogenesis and continued until post-vitellogenesis and its composition varies widely between striped bass and white perch. In striped bass, the VtgC accounted for 26% of the vitellogenin-derived egg yolk, however in the white perch it comprised only 4%. Striped bass larvae have an extended developmental window and these larvae have yolk stores that may enable them to survive in the absence of food for twice as long as white perch after hatch. Thus, the VtgC may play an integral role in providing nutrients to late stage

  9. Formation of needle-shaped domains in a surface layer of X-cut lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranin, V. D.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of needle-shaped domains in a surface layer of X-cut lithium niobate in the electric field of contact electrodes is studied. It is found that a voltage of 1200-1250 V produces stable needle-shaped domains in an interelectrode gap 140 ± 5 μm wide. The domains are from 20 to 30 μm long and are aligned with the polar axis of the crystal and with electric lines of force. When a voltage of 1300-1350 V is applied to the crystal, the size of the domains increases stepwise and their growth rate rises considerably to about 1 μm/s. The domains localize within 300-600 μm from the edge of the electrodes because of the increase in the electric field strength at right angles. The sizes of the domains differ greatly because of microscopic defects present at the electrode boundaries.

  10. In situ formation of graphene layers on graphite surfaces for efficient anodes of microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiahuan; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Cai, Xixi; Zhou, Shungui

    2015-09-15

    Graphene can be used to improve the performance of the anode in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) due to its good biocompatibility, high electrical conductivity and large surface area. However, the chemical production and modification of the graphene on the anode are environmentally hazardous because of the use of various harmful chemicals. This study reports a novel method based on the electrochemical exfoliation of a graphite plate (GP) for the in situ formation of graphene layers on the surface of a graphite electrode. When the resultant graphene-layer-based graphite plate electrode (GL/GP) was used as an anode in an MFC, a maximum power density of 0.67 ± 0.034 W/m(2) was achieved. This value corresponds to 1.72-, 1.56- and 1.26-times the maximum power densities of the original GP, exfoliated-graphene-modified GP (EG/GP) and chemically-reduced-graphene-modified GP (rGO/GP) anodes, respectively. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the high performance of the GL/GP anode was attributable to its macroporous structure, improved electron transfer and high electrochemical capacitance. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is a facile and environmentally friendly synthesis technique for the fabrication of high-performance graphene-based electrodes for use in microbial energy harvesting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Social interactions in Red Junglefowl (Gallus gallus) and White Leghorn layers in stable groups and after re-grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väisänen, J; Håkansson, J; Jensen, P

    2005-04-01

    Although social behaviour is a major factor affecting the coping of poultry in production environments little is known about how it has been affected by intensive selection processes in fowl. We attempted to clarify selection effects on overall repertoire and occurrence of different social behaviours as well as on aggressive responses to re-grouping with unfamiliar birds by comparing high-producing White Leghorn layers to wild type Red Junglefowl. In the first experiment we observed 8 stable mixed sex groups/breed each consisting of four 24-week-old birds previously familiar to each other. During 9 consecutive days, a wide range of social signals, sexual and aggressive interactions as well as spacing behaviour and activity were recorded over a 12-h photoperiod. In the second experiment, starting at 19 weeks of age, 16 single sex groups of three birds from each breed were formed by mixing unfamiliar individuals. Aggressive behaviours were recorded 0, 5, 24 and 48 h after re-grouping. Results from the stable groups indicated that the repertoire of social behaviours has been preserved during selection with few changes in frequencies and intensities. However, Leghorns showed a more cohesive spacing pattern than junglefowl. In the second experiment, aggressive activity was higher immediately and after 24 h following re-grouping in Leghorns, but there was a drop in the aggressiveness at 5 h to the same level as junglefowl. We suggest that this may indicate poorer social learning capacity with a weaker ability to cope with group disruptions compared to the ancestral breed.

  12. Development of White-Light Emitting Active Layers in Nitride Based Heterostructures for Phosphorless Solid State Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan Talbot; Kailash Mishra

    2007-12-31

    This report provides a summary of research activities carried out at the University of California, San Diego and Central Research of OSRAM SYLVANIA in Beverly, MA partially supported by a research contract from US Department of Energy, DE-FC26-04NT422274. The main objective of this project was to develop III-V nitrides activated by rare earth ions, RE{sup 3+}, which could eliminate the need for phosphors in nitride-based solid state light sources. The main idea was to convert electron-hole pairs injected into the active layer in a LED die to white light directly through transitions within the energy levels of the 4f{sup n}-manifold of RE{sup 3+}. We focused on the following materials: Eu{sup 3+}(red), Tb{sup 3+}(green), Er{sup 3+}(green), Dy{sup 3+}(yellow) and Tm{sup 3+}(blue) in AlN, GaN and alloys of AlN and GaN. Our strategy was to explore candidate materials in powder form first, and then study their behavior in thin films. Thin films of these materials were to be deposited on sapphire substrates using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The photo- and cathode-luminescence measurements of these materials were used to investigate their suitability for white light generation. The project proceeded along this route with minor modifications needed to produce better materials and to expedite our progress towards the final goal. The project made the following accomplishments: (1) red emission from Eu{sup 3+}, green from Tb{sup 3+}, yellow from Dy{sup 3+} and blue from Tm{sup 3+} in AlN powders; (2) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} and green emission from Tb{sup 3+} in GaN powder; (3) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} in alloys of GaN and AlN; (4) green emission from Tb{sup 3+} in GaN thin films by PLD; (5) red emission from Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} in GaN thin films deposited by MOVPE; (6) energy transfer from host to RE{sup 3+}; (7) energy transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} in AlN powders; (8) emission from AlN powder samples

  13. Granular hydrodynamics and pattern formation in vertically oscillated granular disk layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Jos? A.; P?Schel, Thorsten; Salue?A, Clara

    The goal of this study is to demonstrate numerically that certain hydrodynamic systems, derived from inelastic kinetic theory, give fairly good descriptions of rapid granular flows even if they are way beyond their supposed validity limits. A numerical hydrodynamic solver is presented for a vibrated granular bed in two dimensions. It is based on a highly accurate shock capturing state-of-the-art numerical scheme applied to a compressible Navier-Stokes system for granular flow. The hydrodynamic simulation of granular flows is challenging, particularly in systems where dilute and dense regions occur at the same time and interact with each other. As a benchmark experiment, we investigate the formation of Faraday waves in a two-dimensional thin layer exposed to vertical vibration in the presence of gravity. The results of the hydrodynamic simulations are compared with those of event-driven molecular dynamics and the overall quantitative agreement is good at the level of the formation and structure of periodic patterns. The accurate numerical scheme for the hydrodynamic description improves the reproduction of the primary onset of patterns compared to previous literature. To our knowledge, these are the first hydrodynamic results for Faraday waves in two-dimensional granular beds that accurately predict the wavelengths of the two-dimensional standing waves as a function of the perturbation's amplitude. Movies are available with the online version of the paper.

  14. Study on the formation of heterogeneous structures in leached layers during the corrosion process of glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willemien Anaf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Le verre, corrodé dans des conditions naturelles, montre souvent des hétérogénéités dans la couche lixiviée, comme une structure lamellaire ou des inclusions de MnO2 ou Ca3(PO42. La formation de ces hétérogénéités n’est pas encore bien comprise. Des structures de ce type ont été produites artificiellement en laboratoire en immergeant des échantillons de verre dans des solutions riches en métaux. Les résultats expérimentaux ont été comparés avec des théories décrivant la corrosion du verre.Glass that corrodes under natural conditions often shows heterogeneities in the leached layer, such as a lamellar structure or inclusions of MnO2 or Ca3(PO42. The formation of these heterogeneities is still not well understood. By means of experiments under laboratory conditions, our aim was to artificially generate specific structures. Therefore, glass samples were immersed in metal-rich solutions. The experimental results were compared with theories describing glass corrosion from a molecular point of view.

  15. The formation of sporadic E layers by a vortical perturbation excited in a horizontal wind shear flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Didebulidze

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the mid-latitude sporadic E layers (Es layers by an atmospheric vortical perturbation excited in a horizontal shear flow (horizontal wind with a horizontal linear shear is investigated. A three-dimensional atmospheric vortical perturbation (atmospheric shear waves, whose velocity vector is in the horizontal plane and has a vertical wavenumber kz≠0, can provide a vertical shear of the horizontal wind. The shear waves influence the vertical transport of heavy metallic ions and their convergence into thin and dense horizontal layers. The proposed mechanism takes into account the dynamical influence of the shear wave velocity in the horizontal wind on the vertical drift velocity of the ions. It also can explain the multi-layer structure of Es layers. The pattern of the multi-layer structure depends on the value of the shear-wave vertical wavelength, the ion-neutral collision frequency and the direction of the background horizontal wind. The modelling of formation of sporadic E layers with a single and a double peak is presented. Also, the importance of shear wave coupling with short-period atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs on the variations of sporadic E layer ion density is examined and discussed.

  16. The double helium-white dwarf channel for the formation of AM CVn binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Fei; Liu, Jin-Zhong; Jeffery, C. Simon; Hall, Philip D.; Bi, Shao-Lan

    2018-01-01

    Most close double helium white dwarfs will merge within a Hubble time due to orbital decay by gravitational wave radiation. However, a significant fraction with low mass ratios will survive for a long time as a consequence of stable mass transfer. Such stable mass transfer between two helium white dwarfs (HeWDs) provides one channel for the production of AM CVn binary stars. In previous calculations of double HeWD progenitors, the accreting HeWD was treated as a point mass. We have computed the evolution of 16 double HeWD models in order to investigate the consequences of treating the evolution of both components in detail. We find that the boundary between binaries having stable and unstable mass transfer is slightly modified by this approach. By comparing with observed periods and mass ratios, we redetermine masses of eight known AM CVn stars by our double HeWDs channel, i.e. HM Cnc, AM CVn, V406 Hya, J0926, J1240, GP Com, Gaia14aae and V396 Hya.We propose that central spikes in the triple-peaked emission spectra of J1240, GP Com and V396 Hya and the surface abundance ratios of N/C/O in GP Com can be explained by the stable double HeWD channel. The mass estimates derived from our calculations are used to discuss the predicted gravitational wave signal in the context of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) project.

  17. The deep chlorophyll layer in Lake Ontario: Extent, mechanisms of formation, and abiotic predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, Anne E.; Watkins, James M.; Weidel, Brian C.; Luckey, Frederick J.; Rudstam, Lars G.

    2017-01-01

    Epilimnetic production has declined in Lake Ontario, but increased production in metalimnetic deep chlorophyll layers (DCLs) may compensate for these losses. We investigated the spatial and temporal extent of DCLs, the mechanisms driving DCL formation, and the use of physical variables for predicting the depth and concentration of the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) during April–September 2013. A DCL with DCM concentrations 2 to 3 times greater than those in the epilimnion was present when the euphotic depth extended below the epilimnion, which occurred primarily from late June through mid-August. In situ growth was important for DCL formation in June and July, but settling and photoadaptation likely also contributed to the later-season DCL. Supporting evidence includes: phytoplankton biovolume was 2.4 × greater in the DCL than in the epilimnion during July, the DCL phytoplankton community of July was different from that of May and the July epilimnion (p = 0.004), and there were concurrences of DCM with maxima in fine particle concentration and dissolved oxygen saturation. Higher nutrient levels in the metalimnion may also be a necessary condition for DCL formation because July metalimnetic concentrations were 1.5 × (nitrate) and 3.5 × (silica) greater than in the epilimnion. Thermal structure variables including epilimnion depth, thermocline depth, and thermocline steepness were useful for predicting DCM depth; the inclusion of euphotic depth only marginally improved these predictions. However, euphotic depth was critical for predicting DCM concentrations. The DCL is a productive and predictable feature of the Lake Ontario ecosystem during the stratified period.

  18. Boundary layer new particle formation over East Antarctic sea ice – possible Hg-driven nucleation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Humphries

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol observations above the Southern Ocean and Antarctic sea ice are scarce. Measurements of aerosols and atmospheric composition were made in East Antarctic pack ice on board the Australian icebreaker Aurora Australis during the spring of 2012. One particle formation event was observed during the 32 days of observations. This event occurred on the only day to exhibit extended periods of global irradiance in excess of 600 W m−2. Within the single air mass influencing the measurements, number concentrations of particles larger than 3 nm (CN3 reached almost 7700 cm−3 within a few hours of clouds clearing, and grew at rates of 5.6 nm h−1. Formation rates of 3 nm particles were in the range of those measured at other Antarctic locations at 0.2–1.1 ± 0.1 cm−3 s−1. Our investigations into the nucleation chemistry found that there were insufficient precursor concentrations for known halogen or organic chemistry to explain the nucleation event. Modelling studies utilising known sulfuric acid nucleation schemes could not simultaneously reproduce both particle formation or growth rates. Surprising correlations with total gaseous mercury (TGM were found that, together with other data, suggest a mercury-driven photochemical nucleation mechanism may be responsible for aerosol nucleation. Given the very low vapour pressures of the mercury species involved, this nucleation chemistry is likely only possible where pre-existing aerosol concentrations are low and both TGM concentrations and solar radiation levels are relatively high (∼ 1.5 ng m−3 and ≥ 600 W m−2, respectively, such as those observed in the Antarctic sea ice boundary layer in this study or in the global free troposphere, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere.

  19. Evidence for self-organized formation of logarithmic spirals during explosive crystallization of amorphous Ge:Mn layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Danilo; Baunack, Stefan; Thomas, Jürgen; Oswald, Steffen; Wendrock, Horst; Rebohle, Lars; Schumann, Thomas; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Blaschke, Daniel; Gemming, Thomas; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Schmidt, Heidemarie

    2017-05-01

    Logarithmic spirals are found on different length scales in nature, e.g., in nautilus shells, cyclones, and galaxies. The underlying formation laws can be related to different growth mechanisms, pressure gradients, and density waves. Here, we report on the self-organized formation of symmetric logarithmic crystallization spirals in a solid material on the micrometer length scale, namely, in an amorphous Ge:Mn layer on a Ge substrate. After exposure to a single light pulse of a flashlamp array, the Ge:Mn layer is crystallized and reveals a partially rippled surface and logarithmic microspirals. Finally, we present a model describing the formation of the crystallization spirals by directional explosive crystallization of the amorphous Ge:Mn layer, which is triggered by the flashlamp light pulse.

  20. Neurotropic action of soy lecithin in the process of cognitive function formation in white rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drozdov A.L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In experiments conducted on white rats neurotropic action of soy lecithin, known as a source of unsaturated fatty acids on the background of the neurotoxic impact of CCl4 was studied. Useage of CCl4 by courses showed a significant inhibitory effect that affected the spontaneous behavior of rats “in the open field” by significant inhibition of mobility (44 - 77%, research activity (81% and increased emotionality (140%. Such usage of soy lecithin having anti-oxidant activity and membrane-stabilizing effect led to optimization of spontaneous behavior of rats. The infringement of cognitive function is, possibly, due to the prooxydative effect of CCl4 and decrease in the unsaturated fatty acid fraction in the structure of the brain lipids. Level of research, mink instinct, emotionality, vertical mobility were restored, and horizontal mobility even increased by 59%. Thus, soy lecithin may be recommended as a drug with correcting cognitive brain function.

  1. The increase of apatite layer formation by the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) surface modification of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szubert, M; Adamska, K; Szybowicz, M; Jesionowski, T; Buchwald, T; Voelkel, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was the surface modification of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate by poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) grafting and characterization of modificates. The bioactivity examination was carried out by the determination to grow an apatite layer on modified materials during incubation in simulated body fluid at 37°C. The additional issue taken up in this paper was to investigate the influence of fluid replacement. The process of the surface modification of biomaterials was evaluated by means of infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Formation of the apatite layer was assessed by means of scanning electron microscopy and confirmed by energy dispersive, Raman and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. During exposure in simulated body fluid, the variation of the zeta potential, pH measurement and relative weight was monitored. Examination of scanning electron microscopy micrographs suggests that modification of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate by poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) significantly increases apatite layer formation. Raman spectroscopy evaluation revealed that the formation of the apatite layer was more significant in the case of hydroxyapatite modificate, when compared to the β-tricalcium phosphate modificate. Both modificates were characterized by stable pH, close to the natural pH of human body fluids. Furthermore, we have shown that a weekly changed, simulated body fluid solution increases apatite layer formation. © 2013.

  2. Formation of an Anti-Core–Shell Structure in Layered Oxide Cathodes for Li-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hanlei [Materials; amp, Department; NorthEast; Omenya, Fredrick [NorthEast; Whittingham, M. Stanley [NorthEast; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental; Zhou, Guangwen [Materials; amp, Department; NorthEast

    2017-10-20

    The layered → rock-salt phase transformation in the layered dioxide cathodes for Li-ion batteries is believed to result in a “core-shell” structure of the primary particles, in which the core region maintains as the layered phase while the surface region undergoes the phase transformation to the rock-salt phase. Using transmission electron microscopy, here we demonstrate the formation of an “anti-core-shell” structure in cycled primary particles with a formula of LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05O2, in which the surface and subsurface regions remain as the layered structure while the rock-salt phase forms as domains in the bulk with a thin layer of the spinel phase between the rock-salt core and the skin of the layered phase. Formation of this anti-core-shell structure is attributed to the oxygen loss at the surface that drives the migration of oxygen from the bulk to the surface, thereby resulting in localized areas of significantly reduced oxygen levels in the bulk of the particle, which subsequently undergoes the phase transformation to the rock-salt domains. The formation of the anti-core-shell rock-salt domains is responsible for the reduced capacity, discharge voltage and ionic conductivity in cycled cathode.

  3. High quality relaxed germanium layers grown on (110) and (111) silicon substrates with reduced stacking fault formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huy Nguyen, Van; Dobbie, A.; Myronov, M.; Leadley, D. R.

    2013-10-01

    Epitaxial growth of Ge on Si has been investigated in order to produce high quality Ge layers on (110)- and (111)-orientated Si substrates, which are of considerable interest for their predicted superior electronic properties compared to (100) orientation. Using the low temperature/high temperature growth technique in reduced pressure chemical vapour deposition, high quality (111) Ge layers have been demonstrated almost entirely suppressing the formation of stacking faults (relaxed Ge seed layer, where the residual compressive strain promotes an intermediate islanding step between the low temperature and high temperature growth phases. (110)-oriented layers were also examined and found to have similar low rms roughness (1.6 nm) and TDD below 108 cm-2, although use of a thin seed layer did not offer the same relative improvement seen for (111).

  4. The formation mechanism of secondary phases in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} absorber layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, H., E-mail: hyesun.yoo@fau.de [Chair for Crystallography and Structural Physics, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Staudtstr. 3, 91058, Erlangen (Germany); Wibowo, R.A. [Chair for Crystallography and Structural Physics, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Staudtstr. 3, 91058, Erlangen (Germany); Manoharan, G. [Saint-Gobain Recherche, 39, Quai Lucien Lefranc, 93303 Aubervilliers Cedex (France); Lechner, R.; Jost, S. [AVANCIS GmbH & Co. KG, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 München (Germany); Verger, A. [Saint-Gobain Recherche, 39, Quai Lucien Lefranc, 93303 Aubervilliers Cedex (France); Palm, J. [AVANCIS GmbH & Co. KG, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 München (Germany); Hock, R. [Chair for Crystallography and Structural Physics, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Staudtstr. 3, 91058, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Secondary phase formation in a Cu2ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} based p-type layer for photovoltaic applications is one of the major problems which must be overcome to improve solar cell efficiency. To better understand the crystallization mechanism of secondary phases in the material system Cu-Zn-Sn-Se, we investigated the selenization of binary metallic layers as a function of temperature. The sputtered thin film precursors comprise Cu-Zn, Cu-Sn, and Zn-Sn with different sequence. A total six precursors were studied by time-resolved X-ray diffraction while temperature increased from 30 °C to 550 °C. Selenium had been always deposited on top of the metallic precursors in a separate thermal evaporation step. The observed reaction sequences were shown different results depending on the metals which are in first contact with selenium. From these experimental results, the mutual affinities of metals are determined, and a way of reducing the ZnSe crystallization is presented. Preferable precursor composed of ternary metallic layers with Se is also suggested in conclusion with respect to a stacking order of the metals. - Highlights: • The tendency of the reaction between each element is founded. • The formation process depends on the binding affinity and sequence of stacked layer. • The formation of Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} is not influenced by the sequence of stacked layers. • As the sequence of stacked layer, the formation of ZnSe can be controlled. • Suggest the preferable sequence of stacked layers to form a homogeneous film.

  5. Attribution of white-light emitting centers with carbonized surface in nano-structured SiO{sub 2}:C layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasin, A.V., E-mail: av966@yahoo.co [Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Kiev, 03028 (Ukraine); Muto, Sh. [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, 464-8603 (Japan); Ishikawa, Yu. [Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Nagoya, 456-8587 (Japan); Salonen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Nazarov, A.N.; Lysenko, V.S. [Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Kiev, 03028 (Ukraine)

    2011-04-01

    Carbon incorporated silicon oxide layers were fabricated by carbonization of porous silicon layer in acetylene atmosphere followed by oxidation in wet argon. The resulting porous SiO{sub 2}:C material exhibited a strong white photoluminescence. Subsequent thermal treatment in oxygen at 600 {sup o}C significantly decreased the green-yellow part of photoluminescence band while blue shoulder remained unchanged. Annealing at the same temperature in pure argon did not change light-emission properties indicating that the green-yellow light-emission sites originate from the surface. This study focuses on the interface of silicon oxide matrix and carbon inclusions by high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). It is confirmed by EELS and STEM that the green-yellow emission band is associated with the carbonized interface in the porous layer.

  6. The Effect of Degree of Substitution of Cationic Starch on Multi-layer Formation of Ionic Starches in Recycled Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hamidreza rudi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Layer-by-layer self-assembly technique is a novel method in nanotechnology for modifcation of the surface properties of solid materials. Among these materials cellulosic fbers can undergo surface changes by formation of polyelectrolyte multi-layers (PEM using layer-by-layer method. In this study, the effect of degree of substitution of cationic starch on multi-layer build up of cationic and anionic starches and on the bonding ability of the waste corrugated container (OCC recycled fber with layer-by-layer  technique was  investigated. Experiments were  conducted  at pH≈7.5 and 750 rpm stirring rate in a dynamic drainage jar (DDJ for 10 min deposition time to  construct 1  to 8  consecutive  layers. The handsheets  at 60 g/m2 on weight basis were made with untreated and  layer-by-layer  treated fbers and  their strengths have been evaluated. The results showed that the interbonding ability indices of fbers such as  tensile  index and  internal bonding  improved signifcantly with multi-layering of cationic starch. However, there was no meaningful change in quality of the specimens formed. Compared to the untreated fbers, the tensile index of cationic starch increased by 129% at 7th layer with DS≈0.045 and internal bonding increased by 400% at the 5th  layer. Moreover, with  regard  to  different  degrees  of  substitution  of  starch,  the increasing  trend  in properties was observed;  in which DS≈0.018  for  lower number of layers and DS≈0.045 for higher number of layers. In the frst case, more starch of lower DS was needed to neutralize the charge of the fber surface but in the second case greater charge balance of two polymers resulted in further adsorption and greater stability of cationic starch layer, and consequently higher strength has been achieved for the obtained paper.

  7. Formation of millisecond pulsars with low-mass helium white dwarf companions in very compact binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Kun; Li, X.-D., E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-08-20

    Binary millisecond pulsars (BMSPs) are thought to have evolved from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). If the mass transfer in LMXBs is driven by nuclear evolution of the donor star, the final orbital period is predicted to be well correlated with the mass of the white dwarf (WD), which is the degenerate He core of the donor. Here we show that this relation can be extended to very small WD mass (∼0.14-0.17 M {sub ☉}) and narrow orbital period (about a few hours), depending mainly on the metallicities of the donor stars. There is also discontinuity in the relation, which is due to the temporary contraction of the donor when the H-burning shell crosses the hydrogen discontinuity. BMSPs with low-mass He WD companions in very compact binaries can be accounted for if the progenitor binary experienced very late Case A mass transfer. The WD companion of PSR J1738+0333 is likely to evolve from a Pop II star. For PSR J0348+0432, to explain its extreme compact orbit in the Roche-lobe-decoupling phase, even lower metallicity (Z = 0.0001) is required.

  8. ON THE FORMATION OF ECCENTRIC MILLISECOND PULSARS WITH HELIUM WHITE-DWARF COMPANIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniadis, John, E-mail: antoniadis@dunlap.utoronto.ca [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2014-12-20

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) orbiting helium white dwarfs (WDs) in eccentric orbits challenge the established binary-evolution paradigm that predicts efficient orbital circularization during the mass-transfer episode that spins up the pulsar. Freire and Tauris recently proposed that these binary MSPs may instead form from the rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a massive WD. However, their hypothesis predicts that eccentric systems preferably host low-mass pulsars and travel with small systemic velocities—in tension with new observational constraints. Here, I show that a substantial growth in eccentricity may alternatively arise from the dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. Such a disk may form from ejected donor material during hydrogen flash episodes, when the neutron star is already an active radio pulsar and tidal forces can no longer circularize the binary. I demonstrate that a short-lived (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} yr) disk can result in eccentricities of e ≅ 0.01-0.15 for orbital periods between 15 and 50 days. Finally, I propose that, more generally, the disk hypothesis may explain the lack of circular binary pulsars for the aforementioned orbital-period range.

  9. Carbon Dioxide and Methane Formation in Norway Spruce Stems Infected by White-Rot Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari M. Hietala

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Globally, billions of tons of carbon sequestered in trees are annually recycled back to the atmosphere through wood decomposition by microbes. In Norway, every fifth Norway spruce shows at final harvest infection by pathogenic white-rot fungi in the genera Heterobasidion and Armillaria. As these fungi can mineralize all components of wood, we predicted that they have a significant carbon footprint. Gas samples taken from infected stems were analyzed for CO2 and CH4 concentrations, and wood samples from different parts of the decay columns were incubated under hypoxic (4% O2 and anoxic laboratory conditions. In spring and summer the stem concentrations of CO2 were generally two times higher in trees with heartwood decay than in healthy trees. For most of the healthy trees and trees with heartwood decay, mean stem concentrations of CH4 were comparable to ambient air, and only some Armillaria infected trees showed moderately elevated CH4. Consistently, low CH4 production potentials were recorded in the laboratory experiment. Up-scaling of CO2 efflux due to wood decay in living trees suggests that the balance between carbon sequestration and emission may be substantially influenced in stands with high frequency of advanced root and stem heartwood decay.

  10. The formation of snow streamers in the turbulent atmosphere boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Wang, Zheng-Shi

    2016-12-01

    The drifting snow in the turbulent atmosphere boundary layer is an important type of aeolian multi-phase flow. Current theoretical and numerical studies of drifting snow mostly consider the flow field as steady wind velocity. Whereas, little is known about the effects of turbulent wind structures on saltating snow particles. In this paper, a 3-D drifting snow model based on Large Eddy Simulation is established, in which the trajectory of every snow grain is calculated and the coupling effect between wind field and snow particles is considered. The results indicate that the saltating snow particles are re-organized by the suction effect of high-speed rotating vortexes, which results in the local convergence of particle concentration, known as snow streamers. The turbulent wind leads to the spatial non-uniform of snow particles lifted by aerodynamic entrainment, but this does not affect the formation of snow streamers. Whereas the stochastic grain-bed interactions make a great contribution to the final shapes of snow streamers. Generally, snow streamers display a characteristic length about 0.5 m and a characteristic width of approximately 0.16 m, and their characteristic sizes are not sensitive to the wind speed. Compared to the typical sand streamer, snow streamer is slightly narrower and the occurrence of other complex streamer patterns is later than that of sand streamers due to the better follow performance of snow grains with air flow.

  11. Atomisation and droplet formation mechanisms in a model two-phase mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Stephane; Ling, Yue; Fuster, Daniel; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2017-11-01

    We study atomization in a turbulent two-phase mixing layer inspired by the Grenoble air-water experiments. A planar gas jet of large velocity is emitted on top of a planar liquid jet of smaller velocity. The density ratio and momentum ratios are both set at 20 in the numerical simulation in order to ease the simulation. We use a Volume-Of-Fluid method with good parallelisation properties, implemented in our code http://parissimulator.sf.net. Our simulations show two distinct droplet formation mechanisms, one in which thin liquid sheets are punctured to form rapidly expanding holes and the other in which ligaments of irregular shape form and breakup in a manner similar but not identical to jets in Rayleigh-Plateau-Savart instabilities. Observed distributions of particle sizes are extracted for a sequence of ever more refined grids, the largest grid containing approximately eight billion points. Although their accuracy is limited at small sizes by the grid resolution and at large size by statistical effects, the distributions overlap in the central region. The observed distributions are much closer to log normal distributions than to gamma distributions as is also the case for experiments.

  12. Layer-by-layer self-assembly of minocycline-loaded chitosan/alginate multilayer on titanium substrates to inhibit biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongbin; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Xiaoping; Cen, Lian; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2014-11-01

    Bacteria adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation are primary causes of implant associated infection. The biofilm makes the bacteria highly resistant to the host defense and antimicrobial treatment. Antibacterial coatings on the surface of titanium implant can prevent biofilm formation effectively, but it is still a challenge to accomplish relatively long lasting antibacterial effects before wound healing or formation of biological seal. The purpose of our work was to construct antibacterial multilayer coatings loaded with minocycline on surface of Ti substrates using chitosan and alginate based on layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique. In this study, the surfaces of Ti substrates were first hydroxylated and then treated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) to obtain amino-functionalized Ti substrates. Next, the precursor layer of chitosan was covalently conjugated to amino-functionalized Ti substrates. The following alternately coating alginate loaded with minocycline and chitosan onto the precursor layer of chitosan was carried out via LbL self-assembly technique to construct the multilayer coatings on Ti substrates. The multilayer coatings loaded more minocycline and improved sustainability of minocycline release to kill planktonic and adherent bacteria. Moreover, surface charge and hydrophilicity of the coatings and antibacterial ability of chitosan itself also played roles in the antibacterial performance, which can keep the antibacterial ability of the multilayer coatings after minocycline release ceases. In conclusion, LbL self-assembly method provides a promising strategy to fabricate long-term antibacterial surfaces, which is especially effective in preventing implant associated infections in the early stage. Loading minocycline on the surface of implants based on LbL self-assembly strategy can endow implants with sustained antibacterial property. This can inhabit the immediate colonization of bacteria onto the surface of implants in the

  13. Root-derived auxin contributes to the phosphorus-deficiency-induced cluster-root formation in white lupin (Lupinus albus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhi Bin; You, Xue Di; Suo, Dong; Chen, Yun Long; Tang, Caixian; Yang, Jian Li; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2013-08-01

    Formation of cluster roots is a typical morphological response to phosphorus (P) deficiency in white lupin (Lupinus albus), but its physiological and molecular mechanisms are still unclear. We investigated the role of auxin in the initiation of cluster roots by distinguishing the sources of auxin, measuring the longitudinal distribution patterns of free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) along the root and the related gene expressions responsible for polar auxin transport (PAT) in different developmental stages of cluster roots. We found that removal of shoot apex or primary root apex and application of auxin-influx or -efflux transport inhibitors, 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, to the stem did not affect the number of cluster roots and the free-IAA concentration in the roots of P-deficient plants, but when these inhibitors were applied directly to the growth media, the cluster-root formation was greatly suppressed, suggesting the fundamental role of root-derived IAA in cluster-root formation. The concentration of free IAA in the roots was higher in P-deficient plants than in P-adequate ones, and the highest in the lateral-root apex and the lowest in the mature cluster roots. Meanwhile the expression patterns of LaAUX1, LaPIN1 and LaPIN3 transcripts related to PAT was consistent with concentrations of free IAA along the lateral root, indicating the contribution of IAA redistribution in the cluster-root development. We proposed that root-derived IAA plays a direct and important role in the P-deficiency-induced formation of cluster roots. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  14. Electron-transporting layer doped with cesium azide for high-performance phosphorescent and tandem white organic light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yaoyao; Chen, Xingming; Jin, Yu; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Ye; Lin, Wenyan; Yang, Huishan

    2017-07-01

    Cesium azide was employed as an effective n-dopant in the electron-transporting layer (ETL) of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) owing to its low deposition temperature and high ambient stability. By doping cesium azide onto 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, a green phosphorescent OLED having best efficiencies of 66.25 cd A-1, 81.22 lm W-1 and 18.82% was realized. Moreover, the efficiency roll-off from 1000 cd m-2 to 10 000 cd m-2 is only 12.9%, which is comparable with or even lower than that of devices utilizing the co-host system. Physical mechanisms for the improvement of device performance were studied in depth by analyzing the current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics of the electron-only devices. In particular, by comparing the J-V characteristics of the electron-only devices instead of applying the complicated ultraviolet photoelectron spectrometer measurements, we deduced the decrease in barrier height for electron injection at the ETL/cathode contact. Finally, an efficient tandem white OLED utilizing the n-doped layer in the charge generation unit (CGU) was constructed. As far as we know, this is the first report on the application of this CGU for fabricating tandem white OLEDs. The emissions of the tandem device are all in the warm white region from 1213 cd m-2 to 10870 cd m-2, as is beneficial to the lighting application.

  15. Formation and entrainment of fluid mud layers in troughs of subtidal dunes in an estuarine turbidity zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Marius; Schrottke, Kerstin; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The formation and entrainment of fluid mud layers in troughs of subtidal dunes were investigated in the Weser Estuary, North Sea, Germany, based on hydroacoustic measurements. Near-bed suspension layers were found to consist of a suspension of large mud flocs of variable concentration, ranging from...... 25 g/L below the lutocline to 70 g/L at the river bed, whereas the gelling concentration was below 70 g/L. Sites of fluid mud formation coincided with the location of the estuarine turbidity zone during slack water. On average, near-bed density gradients were initially observed in dune troughs 1.2 h...... before slack water, and all fluid mud layers were entrained 2.3 h after slack water. No shear instabilities occurred until 1.8 h after slack water. While the flow was oriented in the dune direction, rapid entrainment was related to the development of the turbulent flow field behind dunes and is explained...

  16. Direct formation of large-scale multi-layered germanene on Si substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsu-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Ze; Medina, Henry; Su, Teng-Yu; Chou, Ta-Shun; Chen, Yi-Hsuan; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Liang, Jenq-Horng

    2015-09-07

    Germanene layers with lonsdaleite structure has been synthesized from a SiGe thin film for the first time using a N2 plasma-assisted process in this investigation. Multi-layered germanene can be directly observed, and the derived lattice parameters are nearly consistent with the theoretical results. Furthermore, large-scale multi-layered germanene has also been demonstrated for applications.

  17. The influence of manufacturing factors on the formation of layer connections in multilayer exterior walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korol' Elena Anatol'evna

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer exterior walls are wide-spread in modern civil construction. One type of such structures is a three-layer wall with insulation layer made of lightweight concrete and exterior layers made of structural concrete. It is necessary to provide durable monolithic connection of concrete layers in the process of manufacturing this structure in order to decrease the percentage of web reinforcement and increase thermal engineering homogeneity of multilayer exterior walls. Experimental research of three-layer samples with external layers made of claydite-concrete and internal layer made of polystyrene concrete were conducted in order to establish the strength of layer connections in the multilayer exterior wall. Different temporal parameters and concrete strength were assigned during manufacturing of the samples. The samples were tested under axial tension and shear in the layer contact zone. The nature of tensile rupture and shearing failure was checked after the tests. The relations between manufacturing parameters, strength of the concrete used in samples and layer connection strength were established as a result of experimental research. The climatic tests of three-layer exterior wall model made of claydite-concrete and polystyrene concrete were conducted in order to establish the reduction of the layers contact zone strength during the maintenance. The wall model was made of concrete samples of varying strength. The experimental model was exposed to 35 cycles of alternate freezing and thawing in climatic chamber. During freezing and thawing, the strength tests of external and internal layers contact zone by tearing the cylindrical samples were conducted. Consequently, the nature of contact zone strength reduction for the samples with different concrete strength of external and internal layers was established. As a result of the conducted research, the optimal temporal parameters of manufacturing and optimal concrete strength were established

  18. Fenofibrate (PPARalpha agonist) induces beige cell formation in subcutaneous white adipose tissue from diet-induced male obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachid, Tamiris Lima; Penna-de-Carvalho, Aline; Bringhenti, Isabele; Aguila, Marcia B; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos A; Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2015-02-15

    Browning is characterized by the formation of beige/brite fat depots in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT). This study aimed to examine whether the chronic activation of PPARalpha by fenofibrate could induce beige cell depots in the sWAT of diet-induced obese mice. High-fat fed animals presented overweight, insulin resistance and displayed adverse sWAT remodeling. Fenofibrate significantly attenuated these parameters. Treated groups demonstrated active UCP-1 beige cell clusters within sWAT, confirmed through higher gene expression of PPARalpha, PPARbeta, PGC1alpha, BMP8B, UCP-1, PRDM16 and irisin in treated groups. PPARalpha activation seems to be pivotal to trigger browning through irisin induction and UCP-1 transcription, indicating that fenofibrate increased the expression of genes typical of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in the sWAT, characterizing the formation of beige cells. These findings put forward a possible role of PPARalpha as a promising therapeutic for metabolic diseases via beige cell induction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Polarized white light from LEDs using remote-phosphor layer sandwiched between reflective polarizer and light-recycling dichroic filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Hye; Yang, Su Ji; Do, Young Rag

    2013-09-09

    This study introduces an efficient polarized, white phosphor-converted, light-emitting diode (pc-LED) using a remote phosphor film sandwiched between a reflective polarizer film (RPF) and a short-wavelength pass dichroic filter (SPDF). The on-axis brightness of polarized white light emission of a RPF/SPDF-sandwiched phosphor film over a blue LED, showed greater recovery than that of a conventional unpolarized remote phosphor film over blue LED, due to the recycling effect of yellow light from an SPDF. The relative luminous efficacy of an RPF/SPDF-sandwiched phosphor film was made 1.40 times better by adding an SPDF on the backside of an RPF-capped phosphor film. A polarization ratio of 0.84 was demonstrated for a white LED with an RPF/SPDF-sandwiched phosphor film, in good agreement with the measured results from the RPF-only sample.

  20. Corrosion inhibition performance of imidazolium ionic liquids and their influence on surface ferrous carbonate layer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongrui

    Corrosion inhibitors as effective anti-corrosion applications were widely studied and drawn much attention in both academe and industrial area. In this work, a systematic work, including inhibitors selection, anti-corrosion property and characterization, influence on scale formation, testing system design and so on, were reported. The corrosion inhibition performance of four imidazolium ionic liquids in carbon dioxide saturated NaCl solution was investigated by using electrochemical and surface analysis technologies. The four compounds are 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (a), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (b), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (c), 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (d). Under the testing conditions, compound d showed the highest inhibition efficiency and selected as the main object of further study. As a selected representative formula, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride was studied in detail about its corrosion inhibition performance on mild steel in carbon dioxide saturated NaCl brine at pH 3.8 and 6.8. Electrochemical and surface analysis techniques were used to characterize the specimen corrosion process during the immersion in the blank and inhibiting solutions. The precorrosion of specimen surface showed significant and different influences on the anti-corrosion property of DMICL at pH 3.8 and 6.8. The corrosion inhibition efficiency (IE) was calculated based on parameters obtained from electrochemical techniques; the achieved IE was higher than 98% at the 25th hour for the steel with a well-polished surface at pH 3.8. The fitting parameters obtained from electrochemical data helped to account for the interfacial changes. As proved in previous research, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride could be used as good corrosion inhibitors under certain conditions. However, under other conditions, such chemicals, as well as other species in oil transporting system, could be a factor influencing the evolution of protective surface

  1. Insights into the synthesis of layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles: Part 2. Formation mechanisms of LDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaodi; Dey, Sandwip K

    2015-11-15

    This study demonstrates the effect of (co)intercalated anion compositions on nanostructure evolution to understand the formation mechanisms of layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles following coprecipitation and hydrothermal treatments (HT). Initially, the room temperature coprecipitation resulted in amorphous primary nanoparticles that agglomerated at the edges due to low surface charge densities. The reversibility of such agglomeration was determined by the crystalline quality upon HT and consequent surface charge density, which in turn were strongly influenced by the composition of the intercalated anions. Upon crystallization, the agglomerated Zn2Al(OH)6(NO3)0.3(CO3)0.35⋅xH2O primary nanoparticles re-dispersed, but the Zn2Al(OH)6(NO3)⋅xH2O nanoparticles with much lower stability and higher disorder (especially at the edges) exhibited irreversible agglomeration, and transformed into secondary nanoparticles via aggregational growth. Additionally, the stability studies on Zn2Al(OH)6(NO3)y(CO3)0.5(1-y)⋅xH2O nanoparticles (y=0-1) showed that the size difference between the cointercalated anions caused phase separation when 0.9⩾y⩾0.6, leading to bimodal size distributions. Moreover, the coarsening rates were controlled through the cointercalated anion compositions. By gradually varying the ratio of cointercalated NO3(-) to CO3(2-), monodispersed Zn2Al(OH)6(NO3)y(CO3)0.5(1-y)⋅xH2O (0.5⩾y⩾0) nanoparticles with systematic variation in the particle size of ∼200-400nm were obtained after HT at 85°C for 12h. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Performance Improvement of GaN-Based Flip-Chip White Light-Emitting Diodes with Diffused Nanorod Reflector and with ZnO Nanorod Antireflection Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ying Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The GaN-based flip-chip white light-emitting diodes (FCWLEDs with diffused ZnO nanorod reflector and with ZnO nanorod antireflection layer were fabricated. The ZnO nanorod array grown using an aqueous solution method was combined with Al metal to form the diffused ZnO nanorod reflector. It could avoid the blue light emitted out from the Mg-doped GaN layer of the FCWLEDs, which caused more blue light emitted out from the sapphire substrate to pump the phosphor. Moreover, the ZnO nanorod array was utilized as the antireflection layer of the FCWLEDs to reduce the total reflection loss. The light output power and the phosphor conversion efficiency of the FCWLEDs with diffused nanorod reflector and 250 nm long ZnO nanorod antireflection layer were improved from 21.15 mW to 23.90 mW and from 77.6% to 80.1% in comparison with the FCWLEDs with diffused nanorod reflector and without ZnO nanorod antireflection layer, respectively.

  3. Selective formation of porous layer on n-type InP by anodic etching combined with scratching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Masahiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Jo, Nishi-8 Chome, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)]. E-mail: seo@elechem1-mc.eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Yamaya, Tadafumi [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Jo, Nishi-8 Chome, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2005-11-10

    The selective formation of porous layer on n-type InP (001) surface was investigated by using scratching with a diamond scriber followed by anodic etching in deaerated 0.5M HCl. Since the InP specimen was highly doped, the anodic etching proceeded in the dark. The potentiodynamic polarization showed the anodic current shoulder in the potential region between 0.8 and 1.3V (SHE) for the scratched area in addition to the anodic current peak at 1.7V (SHE) for the intact area. The selective formation of porous layer on the scratched are was brought by the anodic etching at a constant potential between 1.0 and 1.2V (SHE) for a certain time. The nucleation and growth of etch pits on intact area, however, took place when the time passed the critical value. The cross section of porous layer on the scratched area perpendicular to the [1-bar 10] or [110] scratching direction had a V-shape, while the cross section of porous layer on the scratched area parallel to the [1-bar 10] or [110] scratching direction had a band structure with stripes oriented to the [1-bar 11] or [11-bar 1] direction. Moreover, nano-scratching at a constant normal force in the micro-Newton range followed by anodic etching showed the possibility for selective formation of porous wire with a nano-meter width.

  4. Investigating Large Igneous Province Formation and Associated Paleoenvironmental Events: A White Paper for Scientific Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Rampino

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Earth’s history has been punctuated over at least the last 3.5 billion years by massive volcanism on a scale unknown in the recent geological past. Largely unknown mechanical and dynamic processes, with unclear relationships to seafloor spreading and subduction, generated voluminous, predominately mafic magmas that were emplaced into the Earth’s lithosphere. The resultant large igneous provinces (LIPs; Coffin and Eldholm, 1994; Ernst and Buchan, 2001; Bryan and Ernst, 2008 were at times accompanied by catastrophic environmental changes. The interaction of the LIP-associated mantle processes with the Earth’s crust have produced a variety of surface expressions (Fig. 1a and 1b; the most common present-day examples are oceanic plateaus (e.g., Kerguelen/Broken Ridge, Ontong Java, Manihiki, Hikurangi, Shatsky, ocean basin flood basalts (e.g., Caribbean, Nauru, magma-dominated divergent continental margins (e.g., theNorth Atlantic, and continental flood basalts (e.g., Columbia River, Deccan Traps, Siberian Traps. Environmental effects associated with LIP formation include climate changes, mass and other extinctions, variations in ocean and atmospheric chemistry, and Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs. Therefore, the geodynamic processes in the mantle that produce LIPs have potentially profoundly affected the Earth’s environment, particularly the biosphere and climate. The IntegratedOcean Drilling Program (IODP affords unique opportunities to investigate LIPs and associated environmental effects, building upon results from the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP (Coffin et al., 2006. To this end, a workshop on LIPs, sponsored by IODP Management International (IODP-MI and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership, was held at the University of Ulster in Coleraine, Northern Ireland, U.K. on 22–25 July 2007 (Coffinet al., 2007.

  5. Metasomatic processes in the Lukkulaisvaara layered intrusion, Russia, and formation of low-sulfide PGE mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, S. V.; Glebovitsky, V. A.; Kol'Tsov, A. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Korneev, S. I.; Savatenkov, V. M.

    2008-08-01

    The Nadezhda ore-controlling structure and related rocks of the Lukkulaisvaara layered intrusion from the Oulanka plutonic group have been studied. Tensile deformation arising at the cooling stage at interfaces of rocks dissimilar in composition with different compressibility coefficients controlled the intensity of secondary processes and the high concentration of sulfide and platinum group minerals (PGM) along the perimeter of the fine-grained gabbronorite body in contact zones with country rocks. These zones were specific geochemical barriers. Magmas of supplementary injections could have been one of the sources of fluid affecting the rocks. Fe-Ni-Cu sulfides and PGM crystallized within the temperature range T = 800-350°C. Regional metamorphism did not exceed conditions of greenschist facies. Results of modeling of metasomatic processes indicate that decompression played the leading role in formation of the major secondary mineral assemblages: Czo-An10-Chl-Tr(Act) and Qtz-An70-Amph-Bt. The decreasing pressure under isothermal conditions resulted in a rise in solubility of metals in chloride solution and their transport into dilatable zones. The cooling model leading to the enrichment of rocks in potassium and then to its leaching is realized more seldom, resulting in a Qtz-Ms-Chl-Act-Czo mineral assemblage and eventually in Qtz-Chl veins. The change of P and T during pluton cooling resulted in changing of the direction of metasomatic processes and telescoping of different superimposed mineral assemblages: Amph(±Act)-Bt ± Chl 1 ± Qtz as an early one and Qtz-Czo-Chl2-Ab-Ms as a late one. The model mineral assemblages that match natural counterparts are as follows: (1) Qtz-Pl-Amph-Bt and Qtz-Pl-Chl-Bt(Ms) and (2) Tr(Act)-Chl-An10-Czo, Qtz-An10-Chl-Ms(Bt), and Qtz-Czo-Chl-An10-Ms. At the same time, the An40-50-Amph-Bt, Qtz-An40-50-Amph-Bt, Qtz-An10-20-Chl-Bt(Ms), An30-40-Chl-Tr(Act)-Bt, An30-Chl-Tr(Act), and An30-Tr (Act)-Bt assemblages are suggested to be

  6. Imaging transient formation of diffusion layers with fluorescence-enabled electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Stephen M; Zhang, Bo

    2014-12-16

    Fluorescence-enabled electrochemical microscopy (FEEM) is demonstrated as a new technique to image transient concentration profiles of redox species generated on ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs). FEEM converts an electrical signal into an optical signal by electrically coupling a conventional redox reaction to a fluorogenic reporter reaction on a closed bipolar electrode. We describe the implementation of FEEM for diffusion layer imaging and use an array of thousands of parallel bipolar electrodes to image the diffusion layers of UMEs in two and three dimensions. This new technique provides a way to image an entire 2-dimensional lateral cross section of a dynamic diffusion layer in a single experiment. By taking several of these lateral cross sections at different axial positions in the diffusion layer, a 3-dimensional image of the diffusion layer can be built. We image the diffusion layer of a 10 μm diameter carbon fiber electrode over the course of a cyclic voltammetry experiment and compare the FEEM-generated images to concentration profiles generated from numerical simulation. We also image the diffusion layer of a two electrode array consisting of two 10 μm diameter carbon fibers over the course of a potential step experiment.

  7. Formation of Hard Composite Layer on Tool Steel by Laser Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonek M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigations include alloying the PMHSS6-5-3 steel surface layer with carbide and ceramic powders WC, VC, TiC, SiC, Si3N4 and Al2O3, using the high power diode laser (HPDL. Laser treatment is especially promising for solving contemporary surface engineering problems making it possible to focus precisely the delivered energy in the form of heat in the surface layer. The structural mechanism was determined of surface layers development, effect was studied of alloying parameters, method on structure refinement and influence of these factors on the mechanical properties of surface layer, and especially on its abrasive wear resistance. The fine grained martensite structure is responsible for hardness increase of the alloyed layer. The tribological wear relationships were determined for laser treated surface layers, determining friction coefficient, and wear trace shape developed due to the abrasive wear of the investigated surfaces. Comparison of the laser treatment parameters and tribological properties of surface layer after remelting and alloying with hard particles of the PMHSS6-5-3 steel using the high power diode laser to obtain the optimum service properties is the outcome of the investigations carried out.

  8. Heterogeneous distribution of plankton within the mixed layer and its implications for bloom formation in tropical seas

    KAUST Repository

    Calbet, Albert

    2015-06-11

    Intensive sampling at the coastal waters of the central Red Sea during a period of thermal stratification, prior to the main seasonal bloom during winter, showed that vertical patches of prokaryotes and microplankton developed and persisted for several days within the apparently density uniform upper layer. These vertical structures were most likely the result of in situ growth and mortality (e.g., grazing) rather than physical or behavioural aggregation. Simulating a mixing event by adding nutrient-rich deep water abruptly triggered dense phytoplankton blooms in the nutrient-poor environment of the upper layer. These findings suggest that vertical structures within the mixed layer provide critical seeding stocks that can rapidly exploit nutrient influx during mixing, leading to winter bloom formation.

  9. Formation and propagation of Love waves in a surface layer with a P-wave source. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florence, A.L.; Miller, S.A.

    1990-04-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate experimentally, and support with theoretical calculations, the formation and propagation of Love waves from a P-wave source due to scattering at material heterogeneities. The P-wave source is a spherical piezoelectric crystal cast in a surface layer of rock simulant overlaying a higher impedance granite substrate. Excitation of the piezoelectric crystal with a known voltage applies a spherical compressional pulse of known amplitude to the surrounding medium. Lateral heterogeneities cast in the surface layer convert incident P-wave energy into shear waves. The horizontally polarized shear waves (SH waves) trapped in the surface layer wave guide are the Love waves we will measure at the surface.

  10. FORMATION OF BINARY MILLISECOND PULSARS BY ACCRETION-INDUCED COLLAPSE OF WHITE DWARFS UNDER WIND-DRIVEN EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablimit, Iminhaji; Li, Xiang-Dong, E-mail: lixd@nju.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of massive white dwarfs (WDs) has been proposed to be an important channel to form binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Recent investigations on thermal timescale mass transfer in WD binaries demonstrate that the resultant MSPs are likely to have relatively wide orbit periods (≳ 10 days). Here we calculate the evolution of WD binaries taking into account the excited wind from the companion star induced by X-ray irradiation of the accreting WD, which may drive rapid mass transfer even when the companion star is less massive than the WD. This scenario can naturally explain the formation of the strong-field neutron star in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822–37. After AIC the mass transfer resumes when the companion star refills its Roche lobe, and the neutron star is recycled owing to mass accretion. A large fraction of the binaries will evolve to become binary MSPs with an He WD companion, with the orbital periods distributed between ≳ 0.1 days and ≲ 30 days, while some of them may follow the cataclysmic variable-like evolution toward very short orbits. If we instead assume that the newborn neutron star appears as an MSP and that part of its rotational energy is used to ablate its companion star, the binaries may also evolve to be the redback-like systems.

  11. Formation of Binary Millisecond Pulsars by Accretion-induced Collapse of White Dwarfs under Wind-driven Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablimit, Iminhaji; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-02-01

    Accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of massive white dwarfs (WDs) has been proposed to be an important channel to form binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Recent investigations on thermal timescale mass transfer in WD binaries demonstrate that the resultant MSPs are likely to have relatively wide orbit periods (gsim 10 days). Here we calculate the evolution of WD binaries taking into account the excited wind from the companion star induced by X-ray irradiation of the accreting WD, which may drive rapid mass transfer even when the companion star is less massive than the WD. This scenario can naturally explain the formation of the strong-field neutron star in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822-37. After AIC the mass transfer resumes when the companion star refills its Roche lobe, and the neutron star is recycled owing to mass accretion. A large fraction of the binaries will evolve to become binary MSPs with an He WD companion, with the orbital periods distributed between >~ 0.1 days and <~ 30 days, while some of them may follow the cataclysmic variable-like evolution toward very short orbits. If we instead assume that the newborn neutron star appears as an MSP and that part of its rotational energy is used to ablate its companion star, the binaries may also evolve to be the redback-like systems.

  12. Observations of barrier layer formation in the Bay of Bengal during summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vinayachandran, P.N.; Murty, V.S.N.; RameshBabu, V.

    at this location and the consequent reduction in salinity by more than 4 psu. The objective of this paper is to describe this event and its implications to the upper ocean characteristics. The obser- vations are described in the next section. Relative roles... surface heat flux, the barrier layer may not affect the rate of change of the temperature of the surface mixed layer particularly when the depth of the mixed layer is small. In the Bay of Bengal during cloud free conditions this could be the case...

  13. In-situ phase formation study of copper indium diselenide absorber layers from CuIn nanoparticles and evaporated selenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Möckel, Stefan A., E-mail: Stefan.Moeckel@ww.uni-erlangen.de [Department of Materials Science, Chair of Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Hölzing, Astrid; Hock, Rainer [Chair for Crystallography and Structural Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Staudtstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wellmann, Peter J. [Department of Materials Science, Chair of Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-05-01

    In this work CuInSe{sub 2} (CISe) thin films were fabricated by rapid thermal processing of printed CuIn nanoparticles and thermally evaporated selenium as precursor layer. Research is focused on real-time investigations such as in-situ X-ray diffraction and dynamic scanning calorimetry. These measurements show CISe formation starting at 300 °C. Significant amount of intermediate phases as reported for state-of-the-art rapid thermal processing of stacked elemental layer was not observed. The morphology of the nanoparticulate layers was examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Grain size developed from nanosized binary CuIn nanoparticles to microsized CISe grains. Porosity decreases in the temperature range from 340 °C to 540 °C. - Highlights: ► Synthesis and characterisation of CuIn nanoparticles ► Preparation of precursor layers for CuInSe2 from nanoparticles ► Characterisation by dynamic scanning calorimetry and in-situ X-ray diffraction ► CuInSe{sub 2} formation from 300 °C although high amount of sodium included.

  14. Layered zinc hydroxide salts: delamination, preferred orientation of hydroxide lamellae, and formation of ZnO nanodiscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demel, Jan; Pleštil, Josef; Bezdička, Petr; Janda, Pavel; Klementová, Mariana; Lang, Kamil

    2011-08-15

    Delamination of layered zinc hydroxide salts (LZH) into hydroxide layers provides nanobuilding blocs of a two-dimensional anisotropy. The methodology, extent of delamination, the size and stability of hydroxide lamellae are described in detail. The ability of lamellae to restack to form oriented hydroxide films depends on the solvent, original LZH salt, and conditions used for delamination. The most interesting results were obtained using LZH intercalated with dodecyl sulfate anions and LZH nitrate delaminated in butanol at 60 °C and in formamide at room temperature, respectively. The former method produces hydroxide lamellae of a lateral size of ca. 10-20 nm. The inner structure of the hydroxide layers is conserved and separated lamellae restack to the original layered structure of LZH dodecyl sulfate. The latter method yields lamellae with a size decreasing from 73.3 nm to 10 nm after a 2-week aging, while their thickness is nearly constant (2.6-3.8 nm). However, the use of formamide is complicated by the formation of Zn(II) formate. The major part of LZH intercalated with dodecyl sulfate anions is transformed during the delamination procedure to anisotropic ZnO nanoparticles, either needle-like particles prolonged in the [0 0 1] direction or disc-like particles flattened along the (0 0 1) plane. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The formation and evolution of layered structures in porous media: effects of porosity and mechanical dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoofs, Stan; Trompert, Ron A.; Hansen, Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    Horizontally layered structures can develop in porous or partially molten environments, such as hydrothermal systems, magmatic intrusions and the early Earth's mantle. The porosity f of these natural environments is typically small. Since dissolved chemical elements unlike heat cannot diffuse

  16. Thin phytoplankton layer formation at eddies, filaments, and fronts in a coastal upwelling zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, T. M. Shaun; Cheriton, Olivia M.; Pennington, J. Timothy; Chavez, Francisco P.

    2009-02-01

    On two cruises in August and September 2003 (hereafter cruises 2 and 3) during wind relaxations and transitions to upwelling conditions, thin layers of phytoplankton were observed in or a few meters below the stratified transition layer at the mixed layer base and in regions of sheared flow on the flanks of eddies, filaments, and fronts near Monterey Bay, California. On an earlier cruise in August (cruise 1), no thin layers were found after a prolonged wind relaxation. Chlorophyll concentrations and shear were both an order of magnitude less than on cruises 2 and 3. Our vertical profiles were made using a fluorometer mounted on a conductivity-temperature-depth package, which was lowered from the ship as slowly as 0.25ms-1 every 10 km on five ˜80-km cross-shore transects. Remotely sensed sea-surface temperature, chlorophyll, and currents are required to understand the temporal and spatial evolution of the circulation and to interpret the quasi-synoptic in situ data. Decorrelation scales are ˜20km from lagged temperature and salinity covariances. Objectively mapped sections of the in situ data indicate the waters containing thin layers were recently upwelled at either the Point Sur or Point Año Nuevo upwelling centers. Spatially limited distributions of phytoplankton at the coastal upwelling centers ( ˜40km alongshore, 20 km cross-shore, and 30 m thick) were transformed into thin layers by current shear and isolated from wind-driven vertical mixing by the stratification maximum of the transition layer. Vertically sheared horizontal currents on the flanks of the eddies, filaments, and fronts horizontally stretched and vertically thinned phytoplankton distributions. These thin, elongated structures were then observed as thin layers of phytoplankton in vertical fluorescence profiles at four stations on cruise 2 and eight stations on cruise 3. Light winds during relaxations did not mix away these thin layers. On cruise 2, thin layers were found at eddies at the

  17. The influence of manufacturing factors on the formation of layer connections in multilayer exterior walls

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Korol', E. A; Pugach, E. M; Khar'kin, Y. A

    2014-01-01

    .... It is necessary to provide durable monolithic connection of concrete layers in the process of manufacturing this structure in order to decrease the percentage of web reinforcement and increase...

  18. Formation and composition of cemented layers in low-sulphide mine tailings, Laver, northern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakangas, Lena; Öhlander, Björn

    2006-08-01

    Cemented layers (hardpans) are common in carbonate or sulphide-rich mine tailings and where pyrrhotite is the predominating Fe-sulphide. Laver, northern Sweden, is an abandoned Cu-mine where the tailings have low pyrrhotite content, almost no pyrite and no carbonates. Two cemented layers at different locations in the Laver tailings impoundment were investigated, with the aim to determine their effects on metal mobility. The cementing agents were mainly jarosite and Fe-oxyhydroxides in the layer formed where the tailings have a barren surface, whereas only Fe-oxyhydroxides were identified below grass-covered tailings surface. Arsenic was enriched in both layers which also exhibit high concentrations of Mo, V, Hg and Pb compared to unoxidised tailings. Sequential extraction indicates that these metals and As were mainly retained with crystalline Fe-oxides, and therefore potentially will be remobilised if the oxic conditions become more reducing, for instance as a result of remediation of the tailings impoundment.

  19. FORMATION OF GRADIENT SURFACE LAYERS BY MEANS OF MULTIFOLD LASER ALLOYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Devoino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The capability of deriving laser alloying layers with a smoothly varying gradient of properties was investigated. It was reached by conducting of repeated alloying with a series of lower depth of a melting zone. Obtained nature of allocation structural component and gradient of properties through the thickness, as well as general morphology of the hardened layer have proved a high level of its operation properties in conditions of high contact loading.

  20. ASPIICS: a giant, white light and emission line coronagraph for the ESA proba-3 formation flight mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, P. L.; Vivès, S.; Curdt, W.; Damé, L.; Davila, J.; Defise, J.-M.; Fineschi, S.; Heinzel, P.; Howard, Russel; Kuzin, S.; Schmutz, W.; Tsinganos, K.; Zhukov, A.

    2017-11-01

    Classical externally-occulted coronagraphs are presently limited in their performances by the distance between the external occulter and the front objective. The diffraction fringe from the occulter and the vignetted pupil which degrades the spatial resolution prevent useful observations of the white light corona inside typically 2-2.5 solar radii (Rsun). Formation flying offers and elegant solution to these limitations and allows conceiving giant, externally-occulted coronagraphs using a two-component space system with the external occulter on one spacecraft and the optical instrument on the other spacecraft at a distance of hundred meters [1, 2]. Such an instrument ASPIICS (Association de Satellites Pour l'Imagerie et l'Interférométrie de la Couronne Solaire) has been selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) to fly on its PROBA-3 mission of formation flying demonstration which is presently in phase B (Fig. 1). The classical design of an externally-occulted coronagraph is adapted to the formation flying configuration allowing the detection of the very inner corona as close as 0.04 solar radii from the solar limb. By tuning the position of the occulter spacecraft, it may even be possible to reach the chromosphere and the upper part of the spicules [3]. ASPIICS will perform (i) high spatial resolution imaging of the continuum K+F corona in photometric and polarimetric modes, (ii) high spatial resolution imaging of the E-corona in two coronal emission lines (CEL): Fe XIV and He I D3, and (iii) two-dimensional spectrophotometry of the Fe XIV emission line. ASPIICS will address the question of the coronal heating and the role of waves by characterizing propagating fluctuations (waves and turbulence) in the solar wind acceleration region and by looking for oscillations in the intensity and Doppler shift of spectral lines. The combined imaging and spectral diagnostics capabilities available with ASPIICS will allow mapping the velocity field of the corona both in the

  1. Disequilibrium of Flavonol Synthase and Dihydroflavonol-4-Reductase Expression Associated Tightly to White vs. Red Color Flower Formation in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ping; Ning, Guogui; Wang, Zhen; Shen, Yuxiao; Jin, Huanan; Li, Penghui; Huang, Shasha; Zhao, Jian; Bao, Manzhu

    2016-01-01

    Flower color is the main character throughout the plant kingdom. Though substantial information exists regarding the structural and regulatory genes involved in anthocyanin and flavonol biosynthesis, little is known that what make a diverse white vs. red color flower in natural species. Here, the contents of pigments in seven species from varied phylogenetic location in plants with red and white flowers were determined. Flavonols could be detected in red and white flowers, but anthocyanins we...

  2. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, Andrey; Smolander, S.

    2010-01-01

    We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the vertical...

  3. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, Andrey; Smolander, S.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out column model simulations to study particle fluxes and deposition and to evaluate different particle formation mechanisms at a boreal forest site in Finland. We show that kinetic nucleation of sulphuric acid cannot be responsible for new particle formation alone as the simulated...

  4. Nitride alloy layer formation of duplex stainless steel using nitriding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleque, M. A.; Lailatul, P. H.; Fathaen, A. A.; Norinsan, K.; Haider, J.

    2018-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) shows a good corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical properties. However, DSS performance decrease as it works under aggressive environment and at high temperature. At the mentioned environment, the DSS become susceptible to wear failure. Surface modification is the favourable technique to widen the application of duplex stainless steel and improve the wear resistance and its hardness properties. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to nitride alloy layer on the surface of duplex stainless steel by the nitriding process temperature of 400°C and 450°C at different time and ammonia composition using a horizontal tube furnace. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyzer are used to analyse the morphology, composition and the nitrided alloy layer for treated DSS. The micro hardnesss Vickers tester was used to measure hardness on cross-sectional area of nitrided DSS. After nitriding, it was observed that the hardness performance increased until 1100 Hv0.5kgf compared to substrate material of 250 Hv0.5kgf. The thickness layer of nitride alloy also increased from 5μm until 100μm due to diffusion of nitrogen on the surface of DSS. The x-ray diffraction results showed that the nitride layer consists of iron nitride, expanded austenite and chromium nitride. It can be concluded that nitride alloy layer can be produced via nitriding process using tube furnace with significant improvement of microstructural and hardness properties.

  5. Experimental investigation and modeling on air layer formation around a rotating grinding wheel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Majumdar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Impingement of grinding fluid deep into grinding zone is a challenge due to presence of air layer around the grinding wheel. This paper presents experimental observation on air boundary layer formed around a rotating grinding wheel, a rexine-cloth covered grinding wheel and a solid disc. The effect of porous and rough grinding wheel surface towards strengthening air boundary layer has been studied. Modeling has been done to estimate variation of air pressure within this boundary layer. Out of three different methods of extrapolation done, the most suitable one is suggested. Results obtained using three different wheels are compared. A scraper board is also employed to observe reduction of air pressure. Higher value of air pressure is noted in case of bare grinding wheel than that in other conditions. Use of scraper board along with rexine-covered wheel is found to reduce air pressure to a large extent such that it becomes close to air pressure noted around the solid wheel. It shows the beneficial effect of using scraper board and rexine-pasted wheel to suppress air layer effectively. Correspondingly, grinding fluid is expected to reach deep into the grinding zone thereby rendering better control of grinding temperature, and hence, better grinding performance.

  6. On the occurrence and formation of multiple layers of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, P.; Rapp, M.; Serafimovich, A.; Latteck, R.

    2005-03-01

    Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) have been studied at Andenes (69°N, 16°E), Norway, using VHF radar observations from 1994-1997 and since 1999. One remarkable feature of all PMSE is the fact that the radar echoes often occur in the form of two or more distinct layers that can persist for periods of up to several hours. Until now, the layering mechanism leading to these multiple structures is not well understood. Here we are studying the occurrence and the mean altitude distribution of these multiple layer events. To discuss the processes that are potentially responsible for the creation of these multiple structures, we apply a microphysical model of the generation and growth of mesospheric ice particles under the influence of temperature and wind variations caused by a long period gravity wave. Finally, this model approach is tested with gravity wave characteristics derived from MF and VHF radar wind measurements during the PMSE observations.

  7. Adaptive panoramic tomography with a circular rotational movement for the formation of multifocal image layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. S.; Cho, H. S.; Park, Y. O.; Je, U. K.; Hong, D. K.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.

    2012-02-01

    Panoramic radiography with which only structures within a certain image layer are in focus and others out of focus on the panoramic image has become a popular imaging technique especially in dentistry. However, the major drawback to the technique is a mismatch between the structures to be focused and the predefined image layer mainly due to the various shapes and sizes of dental arches and/or to malpositioning of the patient. These result in image quality typically inferior to that obtained using intraoral radiographic techniques. In this paper, to overcome these difficulties, we suggest a new panoramic reconstruction algorithm, the so-called adaptive panoramic tomography ( APT), capable of reconstructing multifocal image layers with no additional exposure. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, we performed systematic simulation studies with a circular rotational movement and investigated the image performance.

  8. Adaptive panoramic tomography with a circular rotational movement for the formation of multifocal image layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. S.; Cho, H. S.; Park, Y. O.; Je, U. K.; Hong, D. K.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S. [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Panoramic radiography with which only structures within a certain image layer are in focus and others out of focus on the panoramic image has become a popular imaging technique especially in dentistry. However, the major drawback to the technique is a mismatch between the structures to be focused and the predefined image layer mainly due to the various shapes and sizes of dental arches and/or to malpositioning of the patient. These result in image quality typically inferior to that obtained using intraoral radiographic techniques. In this paper, to overcome these difficulties, we suggest a new panoramic reconstruction algorithm, the so-called adaptive panoramic tomography (APT), capable of reconstructing multifocal image layers with no additional exposure. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, we performed systematic simulation studies with a circular rotational movement and investigated the image performance.

  9. On the Formation of Planetesimals: Radial Contraction of the Dust Layer Interacting with the Protoplanetary Disk Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makalkin, A. B.; Artyushkova, M. E.

    2017-11-01

    Radial contraction of the dust layer in the midplane of a gas-dust protoplanetary disk that consists of large dust aggregates is modeled. Sizes of aggregates vary from centimeters to meters assuming the monodispersion of the layer. The highly nonlinear continuity equation for the solid phase of the dust layer is solved numerically. The purpose of the study is to identify the conditions under which the solid matter is accumulated in the layer, which contributes to the formation of planetesimals as a result of gravitational instability of the dust phase of the layer. We consider the collective interaction of the layer with the surrounding gas of the protoplanetary disk: shear stresses act on the gas in the dust layer that has a higher orbital velocity than the gas outside the layer, this leads to a loss of angular momentum and a radial drift of the layer. The stress magnitude is determined by the turbulent viscosity, which is represented as the sum of the α-viscosity associated with global turbulence in the disk and the viscosity associated with turbulence that is localized in a thin equatorial region comprising the dust layer and is caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The evaporation of water ice and the continuity of the mass flux of the nonvolatile component on the ice line is also taken into account. It is shown that the accumulation of solid matter on either side of the ice line and in other regions of the disk is determined primarily by the ratio of the radii of dust aggregates on either side of the ice line. If after the ice evaporation the sizes (or density) of dust aggregates decrease by an order of magnitude or more, the density of the solid phase of the layer's matter in the annular zone adjacent to the ice line from the inside increases sharply. If, however, the sizes of the aggregates on the inner side of the ice line are only a few times smaller than behind the ice line, then in the same zone there is a deficit of mass at the place of the

  10. Color-stable and efficient tandem white organic light-emitting devices using a LiF n-doping layer and a MoO{sub x} p-doping layer as charge generating unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu; Wu, Qingyang; Zhang, Zhensong; Yue, Shouzhen; Guo, Runda; Wang, Peng; Wu, Mingzhu; Gou, Changhua; Zhao, Yi, E-mail: yizhao@jlu.edu.cn; Liu, Shiyong

    2013-10-31

    We have demonstrated color-stable and efficient tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) using 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen):LiF/4,4′,4″-tris(N-3-methylphenyl-N-phenyl-amino)triphenylamine (m-MTDATA):molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub x}) as charge generating unit (CGU), which has the advantages of air stability and ease of fabrication; the working mechanism of Bphen:LiF/m-MTDATA:MoO{sub x} is also discussed through analysis of the electrical and spectral emission properties of tandem devices with different CGUs. The performance of tandem white OLED, comprising blue and yellow phosphorescent EL units, can be improved by optimizing the thickness of Bphen:LiF layer. The device comprised of 30 nm Bphen:LiF layer has a maximum current efficiency of 38.7 cd/A and it can still maintain 24.6 cd/A at the luminance of 10,370 cd/m{sup 2}. Moreover, the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of the device are rather stable and the variation is only (± 0.003, ± 0.007) over a wide range of luminance (100–13,000 cd/m{sup 2}). - Highlights: • LiF n-doping layer and MoO{sub x} p-doping layer were used as charge generating units. • The device performance was improved by optimizing the thickness of n-doping layer. • High luminance and efficiency were both achieved at a very low current density. • The device showed rather stable spectra over a wide range of luminance.

  11. The Effect of Strain on the Formation of an Intermetallic Layer in an Al-Ni Laminated Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monireh Azimi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the influence of strain on phase formation at the Al/Ni interface was investigated during cold roll bonding and annealing. A sandwich sample composed of an Al-Ni-Al stack was cold rolled with reductions in the range of 50% to 90%, followed by annealing at 450 °C for 60 min. The crystallography of the annealed sandwich samples was analyzed by XRD (X-ray diffraction, whereas the microstructure was studied by scanning electron microscopy, equipped with EDS (energy dispersive spectrometer analysis, and optical microscope. In the annealed samples, the intermetallic phase Al3Ni has formed at the Ni/Al interface, preferentially on the Al side of the interface. It is found that the applied strains did not have an effect on the type of intermetallic phase that was formed. However, the rolling reduction has a significant effect on the morphology of the intermetallic layer, as it was observed that after the lowest reduction of 50% only some scattered intermetallic nuclei were present, whereas at the highest rolling reduction of 90% a continuous intermetallic layer of 4.1 μm was exhibited. The formation of the intermetallic layer is discussed in terms of Al and Ni diffusion at the interface and irregular nature of the Al/Ni bonded interface after rolling reductions.

  12. Formation of a nanocrystalline layer on the surface of stone wool fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng; Korsgaard, Martin; Kirkegaard, Lise Frank

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, we report a simple approach for creating a nanocrystalline layer on the surface of stone wool fibers (SWFs) with a basalt-like composition. The approach is based on a preoxidation process of the SWFs in atmospheric air at a temperature around the glass transition temperature...

  13. Formation of HgSe thin films using electrochemical atomic Layer epitaxy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathe

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth of HgSe using electrochemical atomic-layer epitaxy (EC-ALE) is reported. EC-ALE is the electrochemical analog of ALE, where electrochemical surface-limited reactions referred to as underpotential deposits, generally result...

  14. Protoporphyrin IX formation and photobleaching in different layers of normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Idorn, Luise W; Philipsen, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for various skin disorders, and selective targeting of specific skin structures is desirable. The objective was to assess accumulation of PpIX fluorescence and photobleaching within skin layers using different photosensitizers and light sources. Normal...

  15. The formation of organic (propolis films)/inorganic (layered crystals) interfaces for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapak, S. I.; Bakhtinov, A. P.; Gavrylyuk, S. V.; Kovalyuk, Z. D.; Lytvyn, O. S.

    2008-10-01

    Propolis (honeybee glue) organic films were prepared from an alcoholic solution on the surfaces of inorganic layered semiconductors (indium, gallium and bismuth selenides). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are used to characterize structural properties of an organic/inorganic interfaces. It is shown that nanodimensional linear defects and nanodimensional cavities of various shapes are formed on the van der Waals (VDW) surfaces of layered crystals as a result of chemical interaction between the components of propolis (flavonoids, aminoacids and phenolic acids) and the VDW surfaces as well as deformation interaction between the VDW surfaces and propolis films during their polymerization. The nanocavities are formed as a result of the rupture of strong covalent bonds in the upper layers of layered crystals and have the shape of hexagons or triangles in the (0001) plane. The shape, lateral size and distribution of nanodimensional defects on the VDW surfaces depends on the type of crystals, the magnitude and distribution of surface stresses. We have obtained self-organized nanofold structures of propolis/InSe interface. It is established that such heterostructures have photosensitivity in the infrared range hνpropolis films at room temperature).

  16. A mechanical model for surface layer formation on self-lubricating ceramic composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Jiupeng; Valefi, Mahdiar; de Rooij, Matthias B.; Schipper, Dirk J.

    2010-01-01

    To predict the thickness of a self-lubricating layer on the contact surface of ceramic composite material containing a soft phase during dry sliding test, a mechanical model was built to calculate the material transfer of the soft second phase in the composite to the surface. The tribological test,

  17. Formation of nematic liquid crystals of sterically stabilized layered double hydroxide platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, M.C.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837563; Devid, E.J.; van Schooneveld, M.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315032863; Vonk, Ch.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/159054885

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal platelets of hydrotalcite, a layered double hydroxide, have been prepared by coprecipitation at pH 11−12 of magnesium nitrate and aluminum nitrate at two different magnesium to aluminum ratios. Changing the temperature and ionic strength during hydrothermal treatment, the platelets were

  18. Wound-induced suberization genes are differentially expressed during closing layer and wound periderm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuber wounds incurred at harvest and upon seed cutting require rapid suberization as a major part of the healing process to prevent infection and desiccation. The first stage of this healing process is referred to as closing layer development and is followed by the second stage, wound periderm deve...

  19. Formation Energies of Native Point Defects in Strained-Layer Superlattices (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-05

    largest distance from interfaces. We did not study defect format at the interfaces because the defects form chemical bonding with two different compound...energy level results, we can identify promising SLS designs for high-performing photodetectors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Defect levels; chemical ...formation energy of an NPD in a bulk compound, we need to evaluate the chemical potential for Ga and As. For example, to antisite AsGa, we calculate the

  20. High-resolution studies of double-layered ejecta craters: Morphology, inherent structure, and a phenomenological formation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Gerwin; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The ejecta blankets of impact craters in volatile-rich environments often possess characteristic layered ejecta morphologies. The so-called double-layered ejecta (DLE) craters are characterized by two ejecta layers with distinct morphologies. The analysis of high-resolution image data, especially HiRISE and CTX, provides new insights into the formation of DLE craters. A new phenomenological excavation and ejecta emplacement model for DLE craters is proposed based on a detailed case study of the Martian crater Steinheim—a well-preserved DLE crater—and studies of other DLE craters. The observations show that the outer ejecta layer is emplaced as medial and distal ejecta that propagate outwards in a debris avalanche or (if saturated with water) a debris flow mode after landing, overrunning previously formed secondary craters. In contrast, the inner ejecta layer is formed by a translational slide of the proximal ejecta deposits during the emplacement stage that overrun and superimpose parts of the outer ejecta layer. Based on our model, DLE craters on Mars are the result of an impact event into a rock/ice mixture that produces large amounts of shock-induced vaporization and melting of ground ice, leading to high ejection angles, proximal landing positions, and an ejecta curtain with relatively wet (in terms of water in liquid form) composition in the distal part versus dryer composition in the proximal part. As a consequence, basal melting of ice components in the ejecta at the transient crater rim, which is induced by frictional heating and the enhanced pressure at depth, initiates an outwards directed collapse of crater rim material in a translational slide mode. Our results indicate that similar processes may also be applicable for other planetary bodies with volatile-rich environments, such as Ganymede, Europa, and the Earth.

  1. Formation of charge-nanopatterned templates with flexible geometry via layer by layer deposition of polyelectrolytes for directed self-assembly of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Mustafa; Dahint, Reiner

    2017-03-01

    Nanostructure formation via self-assembly processes offers a fast and cost-effective approach to generate surface patterns on large lateral scale. In particular, if the high precision of lithographic techniques is not required, a situation typical of many biotechnological and biomedical applications, it may be considered as the method of choice as it does not require any sophisticated instrumentation. However, in many cases the variety and complexity of the surface structures accessible with a single self-assembly based technique is limited. Here, we report on a new approach which combines two different self-assembly strategies, colloidal lithography and layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolytes, in order to significantly expand the spectrum of accessible patterns. In particular, flat and donut-like charge-patterned templates have been generated, which facilitate subsequent deposition of gold nanoparticles in dot, grid, ring, out-of-ring and circular patch structures. Potential applications are e.g. in the fields of biofunctional interfaces with well-defined lateral dimensions, optical devices with tuned properties, and controlled three-dimensional material growth.

  2. European Whiteness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    2008-01-01

    Born out of the United States’ (U.S.) history of slavery and segregation and intertwined with gender studies and feminism, the field of critical whiteness studies does not fit easily into a European setting and the particular historical context that entails. In order for a field of European...... critical whiteness studies to emerge, its relation to the U.S. theoretical framework, as well as the particularities of the European context need to be taken into account.. The article makes a call for a multi-layered approach to take over from the identity politics so often employed in the fields of U...

  3. Effect of Dietary Protein and Energy Level on Proximate Composition of Breast and Thigh Meat in White Leghorn Layers at Molt and Post Molt Production Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Javaid*, M. I. Anjum1 and M. Akram2

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to explore the effects of varying protein and energy levels in molt diets on meat composition of White Leghorn layers. One hundred and fifty four, 70 weeks old, layers were randomly divided into 18 experimental units of 8 hens each in addition to 10 birds that were slaughtered at pre molt and post fast stages. After 10 days of fasting during molting, 6 experimental diets having 3 levels of crude protein (CP i.e. 14, 16 and 18% and 2 levels of metabolizable energy (ME i.e. 2700 and 2900 kcal/kg were given to the birds at the rate of 45 g/bird for 25 day. There after the birds were offered ad-libitum layer ration during production phase. Two birds per replicate at post molt, at 50% egg production and at the end of experiment were slaughtered and then breast and thigh meat samples were analyzed for proximate composition. Moisture (71.7 and 70.0% content was significantly (P<0.05 higher while, ether extract (2.13 and 3.49% was significantly (P<0.05 lower in both breast and thigh meat, respectively, with 18% CP diet as compared to 14 and 16% CP diets. Medium Protein-High Energy (MPHE molt diet having 16% CP with 2900 kcal/kg ME produced more dry matter and protein content in meat at the expense of ether extract. Results regarding proximate composition of layer meat determined at different stages of molting and post molt production revealed that moisture and protein contents of both breast and thigh meat were significantly increased where as, ether extract and ash contents were significantly decreased at post fast stage with respect to other stages.

  4. Effect of Ga seeding layer on formation of epitaxial Y-shaped GaN nanoparticles on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, V. V.; Bolshakov, A. D.; Mozharov, A. M.; Sapunov, G. A.; Shtrom, I. V.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Mukhin, I. S.

    2017-11-01

    Silicon and aluminium nitrides, commonly used as buffer layers for GaN growth on Si are wide gap insulators, preventing barrier free charge-carrier transport across the heterojunction and limiting the functionality of GaN-on-silicon technology. In this work we explore possibility of direct growth of GaN on Si nano-heterostructures by PA-MBE with use of Ga-nanodroplets as seeds. It is demonstrated that use of seeding layer can result in formation of Y-shaped planar GaN nanoparticles (GaN tripods) along with commonly observed GaN nanowires. Growth mechanism, morphology and structural characterization of GaN/Si nano-heterostructures is discussed.

  5. Lidar Probing of the Mesosphere: Simultaneous Observations of Sporadic Sodium and Iron Formations, Calcium Ion Layers, Neutral Temperature and Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Timothy J.; Qian, Jun; Scherrer, Daniel R.; Senft, Daniel C.; Pfenninger, W. Matthew; Papen, George C.; Gardner, Chester S.

    1992-01-01

    Meteoritic ablation in the upper atmosphere is the commonly accepted source of the mesospheric metals between 80 and 105 km. The vertical and temporal behavior of some of these metals can be probed with high accuracy and resolution using resonance fluorescence lidar techniques. Of considerable interest in recent years has been the sporadic and rapid formation of thin, dense enhancements in these metallic layers. Since late Mar. 1991, the UIUC CEDAR lidar system, located at the Urbana Atmospheric Observatory, has been routinely operating at the Fe resonance line of 372 nm in order to probe the mesospheric Fe layer. In Nov. 1991, the capability to investigate mesospheric Ca(+) at the resonance line of 393.4 nm was added. The lidar's eximer-pumped dye laser uses Exciton QUI laser dye dissolved in p-dioxane, which can lase at both the Fe and Ca(+) frequencies. Various aspects of this investigation are discussed.

  6. Simultaneous shunt protection and back contact formation for CdTe solar cells with single wall carbon nanotube layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Adam B.; Khanal, Rajendra R.; Song, Zhaoning; Watthage, Suneth C.; Kormanyos, Kenneth R.; Heben, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Thin film photovoltaic (PV) devices and modules prepared by commercial processes can be severely compromised by through-device low resistance electrical pathways. The defects can be due to thin or missing semiconductor material, metal diffusion along grain boundaries, or areas containing diodes with low turn-on potentials. We report the use of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) layers to enable both protection against these defects and back contact formation for CdTe PV devices. Samples prepared with a SWCNT back contact exhibited good efficiency and did not require shunt protection, while devices prepared without shunt protection using a standard metal back contact performed poorly. We describe the mechanism by which the SWCNT layer functions. In addition to avoiding the need for shunt protection by other means, the SWCNT film also provides a route to higher short circuit currents.

  7. Irreversible fouling of membrane bioreactors due to formation of a non-biofilm gel-like layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Larsen, Poul; Zheng, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS), known to contribute to fouling in membrane bio-reactors (MBR)s, are generally divided into bound and free EPS. The free EPS are able to form a gel-like layer on the membrane active surface. The mechanisms involved in formation of such layer and its effects...... on performance of the MBR membranes were studied. The free EPS, extracted by centrifugation and microfiltration, contained a significant amount of humic-like substances. Under static contact to the membrane, adsorption of humic-like substances to the membrane occurred and could be explained by conventional...... adsorption kinetics. Due to static adsorption, surface roughness of the membrane declined significantly indicating that adsorbed matters to the membrane filled the cavities of the membrane surface. Filtration of the free EPS caused 50% water flux decline. The fouling resistance linearly increased...

  8. Structure of Pigment Metabolic Pathways and Their Contributions to White Tepal Color Formation of Chinese Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis cv Jinzhanyintai

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, YuJun; Yang, Jingwen; Lu, Bingguo; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Haiyang; Hong, Yuwei; Wu, Binghua; Miao, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Chinese narcissus (Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis) is one of the ten traditional flowers in China and a famous bulb flower in the world flower market. However, only white color tepals are formed in mature flowers of the cultivated varieties, which constrains their applicable occasions. Unfortunately, for lack of genome information of narcissus species, the explanation of tepal color formation of Chinese narcissus is still not clear. Concerning no genome information, the application of trans...

  9. Effects of Fermented Sumach on the Formation of Slime Layer of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahra Kırmusaoğlu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the most commonly isolated bacterial pathogens in hospitals, and the most frequent cause of nosocomial infections. Nosocomial staphylococcal foreign-body infections related to biofilm formation are a serious threat, demanding new therapeutic and preventive strategies. Implantation of intravenous catheters and surgical implantation of prosthetic implants carry a risk of infection. In order to prevent all these effects of biofilms, a study was designed to observe the possible antibacterial effect of sumach (Rhus coriaria on the biofilm formation of S. aureus. Material and Methods: The influence of varying concentrations of sumach on the formation of biofilms by 13 strains of Staphylococcus aureus was tested by a microelisa assay. Results: The significant differences between varying concentrations of sumach (0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 µl/ml were observed in four methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and nine methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA (p<0.05. In bacteria, a dose-related decrease in the formation of slime, which is a major virulence factor of staphylococcal infections, was observed. Conclusion: In our study, using 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 µl/ml of sumach, thirteen strains lost, 17%, 22%, 28% and 48% respectively of their capacity to produce biofilms. Sumach, which is a herbal product, can decrease the formation of biofilm, which is a major virulence factor in staphylococcal infections.

  10. Formation of nanocrystalline CrSi 2 layers in Si by ion implantation and pulsed annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalov, R. I.; Bayazitov, R. M.; Valeev, V. F.; Galkin, N. G.; Goroshko, D. L.; Galkin, K. N.; Chusovitin, E. A.; Gaiduk, P. I.; Ivlev, G. D.; Gatskevich, E. I.

    In this work buried nanocrystalline CrSi2 layers were synthesized by ion implantation, pulsed annealing and MBE. The structural, optical and thermoelectrical properties of CrSi2 layers were studied by methods of SEM, TEM, RBS, PL and Seebeck coefficient measurements. The characteristic features of pulsed nanosecond annealing of Cr-implanted Si and epitaxial growth of triple Si/nc-CrSi2/Si heterostructures were established. It is shown that grown Si/nc-CrSi2/Si heterostructures, which preliminary implanted with the high-dose (ϕ = 6 × 1016cm-2) of Cr+ ions, have the noticeable low temperature (T = 10 - 100 K) photoluminescence signal at 1450-1600 nm and the large Seebeck coefficient (-(60-300) μV/K) in the temperature range of T = 340 - 415 K.

  11. A peculiar mode of formation of the surface lining layer in the lungs of Salamandra salamandra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniakowska-Witalińska, L

    1980-01-01

    The pneumocytes of the larva of Salamandra salamandra contain numerous lamellar bodies and their precursors: electron-dense bodies at various stages of development. Both lamellar bodies and electron-dense bodies occur inside the fluid-filled lung. The former are spherical or bell-shaped and possess concentrically arranged smooth membranes, 8 nm thicks; the latter have paracrystalline cores composed of alternatively oriented clear and dark striations (3 . 6--3 . 9 nm and 2 . 6--3 . 6 nm, respectively). On all sides such cores separate membranes, which assume a concentric orientation. No tubular myelin was observed in any phase of the transformation of lamellar bodies and electron-dense bodies into the surface lining layer. Fixation of the lungs of adult individuals with tannic acid-containing fixative visualized the surface lining layer, but not tubular myelin.

  12. Formation and Detection of Clay Network Structure in Poly(propylene) /Layered Silicate Nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abranyi, Agnes; Szazdi, Laszlo; Pukanszky Jr., Bela; Vancso, Gyula J.; Pukanszky, B.; Pukanszky, Bela

    2006-01-01

    The study of the structure and the rheological properties of poly(propylene) (PP)/montmorillonite (MMT)/maleinated PP (MAPP) composites strongly suggests that a silicate network may form under certain conditions. Network formation could not be proven unambiguously with the usual techniques, i.e.,

  13. Evolution towards and beyond accretion-induced collapse of massive white dwarfs and formation of millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauris, T. M.; Sanyal, D.; Yoon, S.-C.; Langer, N.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are generally believed to be old neutron stars (NSs), formed via type Ib/c core-collapse supernovae (SNe), which have been spun up to high rotation rates via accretion from a companion star in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). In an alternative formation channel, NSs are produced via the accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of a massive white dwarf (WD) in a close binary. Aims: Here we investigate binary evolution leading to AIC and examine if NSs formed in this way can subsequently be recycled to form MSPs and, if so, how they can observationally be distinguished from pulsars formed via the standard core-collapse SN channel in terms of their masses, spins, orbital periods and space velocities. Methods: Numerical calculations with a detailed stellar evolution code were used for the first time to study the combined pre- and post-AIC evolution of close binaries. We investigated the mass transfer onto a massive WD (treated as a point mass) in 240 systems with three different types of non-degenerate donor stars: main-sequence stars, red giants, and helium stars. When the WD is able to accrete sufficient mass (depending on the mass-transfer rate and the duration of the accretion phase) we assumed it collapses to form a NS and we studied the dynamical effects of this implosion on the binary orbit. Subsequently, we followed the mass-transfer epoch which resumes once the donor star refills its Roche lobe and calculated the continued LMXB evolution until the end. Results: We show that recycled pulsars may form via AIC from all three types of progenitor systems investigated and find that the final properties of the resulting MSPs are, in general, remarkably similar to those of MSPs formed via the standard core-collapse SN channel. However, as a consequence of the fine-tuned mass-transfer rate necessary to make the WD grow in mass, the resultant MSPs created via the AIC channel preferentially form in certain orbital period intervals. In addition

  14. Possible role of electric forces in bromine activation during polar boundary layer ozone depletion and aerosol formation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Ekaterina

    2017-11-01

    This work presents a hypothesis about the mechanism of bromine activation during polar boundary layer ozone depletion events (ODEs) as well as the mechanism of aerosol formation from the frost flowers. The author suggests that ODEs may be initiated by the electric-field gradients created at the sharp tips of ice formations as a result of the combined effect of various environmental conditions. According to the author's estimates, these electric-field gradients may be sufficient for the onset of point or corona discharges followed by generation of high local concentrations of the reactive oxygen species and initiation of free-radical and redox reactions. This process may be responsible for the formation of seed bromine which then undergoes further amplification by HOBr-driven bromine explosion. The proposed hypothesis may explain a variety of environmental conditions and substrates as well as poor reproducibility of ODE initiation observed by researchers in the field. According to the author's estimates, high wind can generate sufficient conditions for overcoming the Rayleigh limit and thus can initiate ;spraying; of charged aerosol nanoparticles. These charged aerosol nanoparticles can provoke formation of free radicals, turning the ODE on. One can also envision a possible emission of halogen ion as a result of the ;electrospray; process analogous to that of electrospray ionization mass-spectrometry.

  15. High-permeance crosslinked PTMSP thin-film composite membranes as supports for CO2 selective layer formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepan D. Bazhenov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the development of the composite gas separation membranes for post-combustion CO2 capture, little attention is focused on the optimization of the membrane supports, which satisfy the conditions of this technology. The primary requirements to the membrane supports are concerned with their high CO2 permeance. In this work, the membrane supports with desired characteristics were developed as high-permeance gas separation thin film composite (TFC membranes with the thin defect-free layer from the crosslinked highly permeable polymer, poly[1-(trimethylsilyl-1-propyne] (PTMSP. This layer is insoluble in chloroform and can be used as a gutter layer for the further deposition of the СО2-selective materials from the organic solvents. Crosslinking of PTMSP was performed using polyethyleneimine (PEI and poly (ethyleneglycol diglycidyl ether (PEGDGE as crosslinking agents. Optimal concentrations of PEI in PTMSP and PEGDGE in methanol were selected in order to diminish the undesirable effect on the final membrane gas transport characteristics. The conditions of the kiss-coating technique for the deposition of the thin defect-free PTMSP-based layer, namely, composition of the casting solution and the speed of movement of the porous commercial microfiltration-grade support, were optimized. The procedure of post-treatment with alcohols and alcohol solutions was shown to be crucial for the improvement of gas permeance of the membranes with the crosslinked PTMSP layer having thickness ranging within 1–2.5 μm. The claimed membranes showed the following characteristics: CO2 permeance is equal to 50–54 m3(STP/(m2 h bar (18,500–20,000 GPU, ideal CO2/N2 selectivity is 3.6–3.7, and their selective layers are insoluble in chloroform. Thus, the developed high-permeance TFC membranes are considered as a promising supports for further modification by enhanced CO2 selective layer formation. Keywords: Thin-film composite membrane

  16. Novel genes participating in the formation of prismatic and nacreous layers in the pearl oyster as revealed by their tissue distribution and RNA interference knockdown.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Funabara

    Full Text Available In our previous publication, we identified novel gene candidates involved in shell formation by EST analyses of the nacreous and prismatic layer-forming tissues in the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. In the present study, 14 of those genes, including two known genes, were selected and further examined for their involvement in shell formation using the RNA interference. Molecular characterization based on the deduced amino acid sequences showed that seven of the novel genes encode secretory proteins. The tissue distribution of the transcripts of the genes, as analyzed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, was mostly consistent with those obtained by the EST analysis reported previously. Shells in the pearl oysters injected with dsRNAs targeting genes 000027, 000058, 000081, 000096, 000113 (nacrein, 000118, 000133 and 000411 (MSI60, which showed expression specific to the nacreous layer forming tissues, showed abnormal surface appearance in this layer. Individuals injected with dsRNAs targeting genes 000027, 000113 and 000133 also exhibited abnormal prismatic layers. Individuals injected with dsRNAs targeting genes 000031, 000066, 000098, 000145, 000194 and 000200, which showed expression specific to prismatic layer forming tissues, displayed an abnormal surface appearance in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. Taken together, the results suggest that the genes involved in prismatic layer formation might also be involved in the formation of the nacreous layers.

  17. Multilayered Films Produced by Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Chitosan and Alginate as a Potential Platform for the Formation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cell aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Hatami

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The construction of multilayered films with tunable properties could offer new routes to produce biomaterials as a platform for 3D cell cultivation. In this study, multilayered films produced with five bilayers of chitosan and alginate (CHT/ALG were built using water-soluble modified mesyl and tosyl–CHT via layer-by-layer (LbL self-assembly. NMR results demonstrated the presences of mesyl (2.83 ppm and tosyl groups (2.39, 7.37 and 7.70 ppm in the chemical structure of modified chitosans. The buildup of multilayered films was monitored by quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM-D and film thickness was estimated using the Voigt-based viscoelastic model. QCM-D results demonstrated that CHT/ALG films constructed using mesyl or tosyl modifications (mCHT/ALG were significantly thinner in comparison to the CHT/ALG films constructed with unmodified chitosan (p < 0.05. Adhesion analysis demonstrated that human adipose stem cells (hASCs did not adhere to the mCHT/ALG multilayered films and formed aggregates with sizes between ca. 100–200 µm. In vitro studies on cell metabolic activity and live/dead staining suggested that mCHT/ALG multilayered films are nontoxic toward hACSs. Multilayered films produced via LbL assembly of ALG and off-the-shelf, water-soluble modified chitosans could be used as a scaffold for the 3D aggregates formation of hASCs in vitro.

  18. Exploring the formation of multiple layer hydrates for a complex pharmaceutical compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin S; Siepmann, J Ilja; Xu, Wei; Kiang, Y-H; Sheth, Agam R; Karaborni, Sami

    2009-04-30

    The pharmaceutical compound A, 3-{2-oxo-3-[3-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro[1,8]naphthyridin-2-yl)propyl]imidazolidin-1-yl}-3(S)-(6-methoxypyridin-3-yl)propionic acid, is known to exist in five different crystalline forms that differ in the hydration state ranging from the anhydrous desolvate over hemihydrate, dihydrate, and tetrahydrate forms to the pentahydrate. The formation of the higher hydrates and the concomitant lattice expansion leads to undesirable tablet cracking at higher humidities. In this work, particle-based simulation techniques are used to explore the hydrate formation of compound A as a function of humidity. It is found that a simulation strategy employing Monte Carlo simulations in the isobaric-isothermal and Gibbs ensembles and transferable force fields, which are not parametrized against any experimental data for compound A, is able to yield satisfactory crystal structures for the anhydrate and pentahydrate and to predict the existence of all five hydrates.

  19. Disequilibrium of flavonol synthase and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase expression associated tightly to white versus red color flower formation in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping eLuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flower colour is the main character throughout the plant kingdom. Though substantial information exists regarding the structural and regulatory genes involved in anthocyanin and flavonol biosynthesis, little is known that what make a diverse white versus red color flower in natural species. Here, the contents of pigments in seven species from varied phylogenetic location in plants with red and white flowers.were determined. Flavonols could be detected in red and white flowers, but anthocyanins were almost undetectable in the white cultivar. Comparisons of expression patterns of gene related to the flavonoid biosynthesis indicated that disequilibrium expression of flavonol synthase (FLS and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR genes determined the accumulation of flavonols and anothcyanins in both red and white flowers of seven species. To further investigate the role of such common regulatory patterns in determining flower color, FLS genes were isolated from Rosa rugosa (RrFLS1, Prunus persica (PpFLS and Petunia hybrida (PhFLS, and DFR genes were isolated from Rosa rugosa (RrDFR1 and Petunia hybrida (PhDFR. Heterologous expression of the FLS genes within tobacco host plants demonstrated conservation of function, with the transgenes promoting flavonol biosynthesis and inhibiting anthocyanin accumulation, so resulting in white flowers. Conversely, overexpression of DFR genes in tobacco displayed down-regulation of the endogenous NtFLS gene, and the promotion of anthocyanin synthesis. On this basis, we propose a model in which FLS and DFR gene-products compete for common substrates in order to direct the biosynthesis of flavonols and anthocyanins, respectively, thereby determining white versus red coloration of flowers.

  20. Disequilibrium of Flavonol Synthase and Dihydroflavonol-4-Reductase Expression Associated Tightly to White vs. Red Color Flower Formation in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ping; Ning, Guogui; Wang, Zhen; Shen, Yuxiao; Jin, Huanan; Li, Penghui; Huang, Shasha; Zhao, Jian; Bao, Manzhu

    2015-01-01

    Flower color is the main character throughout the plant kingdom. Though substantial information exists regarding the structural and regulatory genes involved in anthocyanin and flavonol biosynthesis, little is known that what make a diverse white vs. red color flower in natural species. Here, the contents of pigments in seven species from varied phylogenetic location in plants with red and white flowers were determined. Flavonols could be detected in red and white flowers, but anthocyanins were almost undetectable in the white cultivar. Comparisons of expression patterns of gene related to the flavonoid biosynthesis indicated that disequilibrium expression of flavonol synthase (FLS) and dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) genes determined the accumulation of flavonols and anothcyanins in both red and white flowers of seven species. To further investigate the role of such common regulatory patterns in determining flower color, FLS genes were isolated from Rosa rugosa (RrFLS1), Prunus persica (PpFLS), and Petunia hybrida (PhFLS), and DFR genes were isolated from Rosa rugosa (RrDFR1) and Petunia hybrida (PhDFR). Heterologous expression of the FLS genes within tobacco host plants demonstrated conservation of function, with the transgenes promoting flavonol biosynthesis and inhibiting anthocyanin accumulation, so resulting in white flowers. Conversely, overexpression of DFR genes in tobacco displayed down-regulation of the endogenous NtFLS gene, and the promotion of anthocyanin synthesis. On this basis, we propose a model in which FLS and DFR gene-products compete for common substrates in order to direct the biosynthesis of flavonols and anthocyanins, respectively, thereby determining white vs. red coloration of flowers.

  1. Formation Energies of Native Point Defects in Strained layer Superlattices (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-05

    removed In atom depends on overpressure conditions, such as In- rich or As- rich , and the structure of the In solid. However, these conditions and...For the formation energy in the As- rich environment, the chemical potential of As is set as the value of solid As, and the chemical potential for Ga...is the difference between chemical potentials for GaAs and As. Similarly, in the Ga- rich environment, the chemical potential of Ga is set as the value

  2. In situ monitoring of structure formation in the active layer of polymer solar cells during roll-to-roll coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea H. Rossander

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The active layer crystallization during roll-to-roll coating of organic solar cells is studied in situ. We developed an X-ray setup where the coater unit is an integrated part of the small angle X-ray scattering instrument, making it possible to control the coating process while recording scattering measurements in situ, enabling us to follow the crystal formation during drying. By varying the distance between the coating head and the point where the X-ray beam hits the film, we obtained measurements of 4 different stages of drying. For each of those stages, the scattering from as long a foil as possible is summed together, with the distance from coating head to scattering point kept constant. The results are average crystallographic properties for the active layer coated on a 30 m long foil. With this insight into the dynamics of crystallization in a roll-coated polymer film, we find that the formation of textured and untextured crystallites seems uncorrelated, and happens at widely different rates. Untextured P3HT crystallites form later in the drying process than expected which may explain previous studies speculating that untextured crystallization depends on concentration. Textured crystallites, however, begin forming much earlier and steadily increases as the film dries, showing a development similar to other in situ studies of these materials.

  3. Effect of wollastonite ceramics and bioactive glass on the formation of a bonelike apatite layer on a cobalt base alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, D A; Medina, A; Escobedo, J C; Escobedo, S; López, M A

    2004-08-01

    A biomimetic method was used to promote a bioactive surface on a cobalt base alloy (ASTM F-75). The metallic substrates were alkali treated and some of the samples were subsequently heat treated. The treated samples were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) on granular particles of either bioactive glass or wollastonite. For comparative purposes, no bioactive system was used in some tests. Three different methods were used for the immersion of the samples in SBF: 1) 21 days in SBF, 2) 21 days in 1.5 SBF, and 3) 7 days in SBF followed by 14 days in 1.5 SBF (re-immersion method). A bonelike apatite layer was formed on all the samples placed on wollastonite and bioactive glass particles. The morphology of the apatite layer formed by using the re-immersion method and wollastonite closely resembled the existing bioactive systems. No apatite layer was observed on the samples treated without bioactive material and soaked for 21 days in SBF or 1.5 SBF, apart from the substrates treated by using the re-immersion method. The heat treatment delayed the apatite formation in all the cases studied. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 70A: 341-346, 2004

  4. Chitin-binding proteins of Artemia diapause cysts participate in formation of the embryonic cuticle layer of cyst shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wen-Ming; Li, Hua-Wei; Dai, Zhong-Min; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Fan; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The brine shrimp Artemia reproduces either ovoviviparously, producing free-swimming nauplii, or oviparously, producing encysted embryos (diapause cysts) able to cope with harsh and complex habitats. When the cysts enter diapause they are encased in a complex external shell that protects them from certain extreme environments. The genomic comparison of oviparous and ovoviviparous ovisacs has been described previously. We isolated three significantly up-regulated genes in oviparous oocytes and identified them as Arp-CBP (Artemia parthenogenetica chitin-binding protein) genes. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that the expression of Arp-CBP genes gradually increases during diapause cyst formation and significant mRNA accumulation occurs during the ovisac stage of oviparous development. Moreover, in situ hybridization results demonstrated that Arp-CBP mRNAs are expressed in the embryo. Interestingly, the results of immune electron microscopy showed that all three Arp-CBPs are distributed throughout the cellular ECL (embryonic cuticle layer) of the cyst shell. Furthermore, knockdown of Arp-CBP by RNA interference resulted in marked changes in the composition of the embryonic cuticular layer. The fibrous layer of the cyst shell adopted a loose conformation and the inner and outer cuticular membranes exhibited marked irregularities when Arp-CBP expression was suppressed. Finally, an in vitro recombinant protein-binding assay showed that all three Arp-CBPs have carbohydrate-binding activities. These findings provide significant insight into the mechanisms by which the ECL of Artemia cyst shell is formed, and demonstrate that Arp-CBPs are involved in construction of the fibrous lattice and are required for formation of the ECL of the cyst shell.

  5. Formation of Silver Nanoplates Layer on Amino Group Grafted Silica Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgis PILIPAVICIUS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study the self-arrangement of Ag nanoplates on (3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES silanized silica coatings was investigated. Silica coatings were made by sol-gel method and silanized in two different ways. The first one includes silanization in acidic 2-propanol solution, the other one – in dry toluene. Coatings were silanized by using different amounts of APTES in case of silanization in 2-propanol. Silver nanoplates layer of functionalized silica coatings was obtained via self-assembly. Coatings were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM, water contact angle measurements (CA, FT-IR analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Research showed that dense Ag nanoplates arrangement occurs when there is a high amount of amino groups on the surface.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.8405

  6. Soil surface organic layers in Arctic Alaska: spatial distribution, rates of formation, and microclimatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Carson A.; Mann, Daniel H.; Verbyla, David L.; Kunz, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Organic layers of living and dead vegetation cover the ground surface in many permafrost landscapes and play important roles in ecosystem processes. These soil surface organic layers (SSOLs) store large amounts of carbon and buffer the underlying permafrost and its contained carbon from changes in aboveground climate. Understanding the dynamics of SSOLs is a prerequisite for predicting how permafrost and carbon stocks will respond to warming climate. Here we ask three questions about SSOLs in a representative area of the Arctic Foothills region of northern Alaska: (1) What environmental factors control the thickness of SSOLs and the carbon they store? (2) How long do SSOLs take to develop on newly stabilized point bars? (3) How do SSOLs affect temperature in the underlying ground? Results show that SSOL thickness and distribution correlate with elevation, drainage area, vegetation productivity, and incoming solar radiation. A multiple regression model based on these correlations can simulate spatial distribution of SSOLs and estimate the organic carbon stored there. SSOLs develop within a few decades after a new, sandy, geomorphic surface stabilizes but require 500–700 years to reach steady state thickness. Mature SSOLs lower the growing season temperature and mean annual temperature of the underlying mineral soil by 8 and 3°C, respectively. We suggest that the proximate effects of warming climate on permafrost landscapes now covered by SSOLs will occur indirectly via climate's effects on the frequency, extent, and severity of disturbances like fires and landslides that disrupt the SSOLs and interfere with their protection of the underlying permafrost.

  7. Experience-driven formation of parts-based representations in a model of layered visual memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenia Jitsev

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Growing neuropsychological and neurophysiological evidence suggests that the visual cortex uses parts-based representations to encode, store and retrieve relevant objects. In such a scheme, objects are represented as a set of spatially distributed local features, or parts, arranged in stereotypical fashion. To encode the local appearance and to represent the relations between the constituent parts, there has to be an appropriate memory structure formed by previous experience with visual objects. Here, we propose a model how a hierarchical memory structure supporting efficient storage and rapid recall of parts-based representations can be established by an experience-driven process of self-organization. The process is based on the collaboration of slow bidirectional synaptic plasticity and homeostatic unit activity regulation, both running at the top of fast activity dynamics with winner-take-all character modulated by an oscillatory rhythm. These neural mechanisms lay down the basis for cooperation and competition between the distributed units and their synaptic connections. Choosing human face recognition as a test task, we show that, under the condition of open-ended, unsupervised incremental learning, the system is able to form memory traces for individual faces in a parts-based fashion. On a lower memory layer the synaptic structure is developed to represent local facial features and their interrelations, while the identities of different persons are captured explicitly on a higher layer. An additional property of the resulting representations is the sparseness of both the activity during the recall and the synaptic patterns comprising the memory traces.

  8. Evaluation of simulated cross-formational travel times using water age measurements in layered aquifer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papafotiou, Alexandros; Ewing, John; Deeds, Neil; Kreitler, Charlie

    2013-04-01

    The recent hydrologic droughts in the southwestern USA have brought forward the necessity for sustainable management of groundwater that was recharged several thousands of years ago, also known as fossil water, as this resource is not directly rechargeable even through heavy rain events. Groundwater age studies can enable water authorities to map the origins of groundwater, quantify water ages in aquifers and plan sustainable water resource policies on local and regional scales. In this study, numerical groundwater availability models (GAMs) are combined with water age measurements to perform a water age analysis of the Wilcox, Carrizo, Queen City, Sparta, Jackson and Yegua aquifers that span central Texas dipping toward the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. The 3D GAMs have initially been calibrated using well data. The water age analysis is carried out using 2D simulations to characterize down dip flow, cross-formational flow in the aquifers and the impact on associated water ages in representative transects extracted from the 3D models, including a discussion on bridging the gap between the 3D hydrogeological system and its simplified 2D representations. A systematic quantification of water age sensitivity to formation hydraulic conductivities and recharge at the aquifer outcrops is performed, whereby travel times in the simulated aquifers are compared to water age measurements obtained from C-14 and Tritium age dating techniques. The analysis therefore delivers the spectrum of water age isolines under consideration of model parameter uncertainty, evaluating the predictive ability of cross-formational water age studies when using 2D transect models.

  9. Electrochemistry of metal complexes applications from electroplating to oxide layer formation

    CERN Document Server

    Survila, Arvydas

    2015-01-01

    This book aims to sequentially cover all the major stages of electrochemical processes (mass transport, adsorption, charge transfer), with a special emphasis on their deep interrelation. Starting with general considerations on equilibria in solutions and at interfaces as well as on mass transport, the text acquaints readers with the theory and common experimental practice for studying electrochemical reactions of metals complexes. The core part of the book deals with all important aspects of electroplating, including a systematic discussion of co-deposition of metals and formation of alloys.

  10. Layer Thickness of SPF 30 Sunscreen and Formation of Pre-vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigalavicius, Mantas; Iani, Vladimir; Juzeniene, Asta

    2016-03-01

    Most studies have demonstrated that sunscreens with lower sun protection factor (SPF) do not prevent the production of vitamin D because much lower amount of sunscreen (SPFUV radiation can penetrate the skin. Since less sunscreen is applied, higher SPF sunscreens may be used to achieve the desired protection. However, there is little information regarding the application of high-SPF sunscreen and vitamin D formation. The aim of this study was to measure the influence of the amount of two SPF 30 sunscreens on pre-vitamin D formation in a cuvette with 7-dehydrocholesterol. Sunscreen with physical (reflecting) or chemical (absorbing) UV filters exhibits different levels of protection in vitro even if the SPF is the same. The level of photoprotection is differentially reduced when less sunscreen than the recommended application thickness is applied. The usual application of 0.8-1 mg/cm(2) is below the recommended value of 2 mg/cm(2), and pre-vitamin D may be formed when lower amounts of SPF ≤30 sunscreen are applied, showing that a significant amount of UV radiation may enter the skin. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Nitric oxide is the shared signalling molecule in phosphorus- and iron-deficiency-induced formation of cluster roots in white lupin (Lupinus albus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhi Bin; Chen, Li Qian; Suo, Dong; Li, Gui Xin; Tang, Cai Xian; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2012-05-01

    Formation of cluster roots is one of the most specific root adaptations to nutrient deficiency. In white lupin (Lupinus albus), cluster roots can be induced by phosphorus (P) or iron (Fe) deficiency. The aim of the present work was to investigate the potential shared signalling pathway in P- and Fe-deficiency-induced cluster root formation. Measurements were made of the internal concentration of nutrients, levels of nitric oxide (NO), citrate exudation and expression of some specific genes under four P × Fe combinations, namely (1) 50 µm P and 10 µm Fe (+P + Fe); (2) 0 P and 10 µm Fe (-P + Fe); (3) 50 µm P and 0 Fe (+P-Fe); and (4) 0 P and 0 Fe (-P-Fe), and these were examined in relation to the formation of cluster roots. The deficiency of P, Fe or both increased the cluster root number and cluster zones. It also enhanced NO accumulation in pericycle cells and rootlet primordia at various stages of cluster root development. The formation of cluster roots and rootlet primordia, together with the expression of LaSCR1 and LaSCR2 which is crucial in cluster root formation, were induced by the exogenous NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) under the +P + Fe condition, but were inhibited by the NO-specific endogenous scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl- 3-oxide (cPTIO) under -P + Fe, +P-Fe and -P-Fe conditions. However, cluster roots induced by an exogenous supply of the NO donor did not secrete citrate, unlike those formed under -P or -Fe conditions. NO plays an important role in the shared signalling pathway of the P- and Fe-deficiency-induced formation of cluster roots in white lupin.

  12. Nitric oxide is the shared signalling molecule in phosphorus- and iron-deficiency-induced formation of cluster roots in white lupin (Lupinus albus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhi Bin; Chen, Li Qian; Suo, Dong; Li, Gui Xin; Tang, Cai Xian; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Formation of cluster roots is one of the most specific root adaptations to nutrient deficiency. In white lupin (Lupinus albus), cluster roots can be induced by phosphorus (P) or iron (Fe) deficiency. The aim of the present work was to investigate the potential shared signalling pathway in P- and Fe-deficiency-induced cluster root formation. Methods Measurements were made of the internal concentration of nutrients, levels of nitric oxide (NO), citrate exudation and expression of some specific genes under four P × Fe combinations, namely (1) 50 µm P and 10 µm Fe (+P + Fe); (2) 0 P and 10 µm Fe (–P + Fe); (3) 50 µm P and 0 Fe (+P–Fe); and (4) 0 P and 0 Fe (–P–Fe), and these were examined in relation to the formation of cluster roots. Key Results The deficiency of P, Fe or both increased the cluster root number and cluster zones. It also enhanced NO accumulation in pericycle cells and rootlet primordia at various stages of cluster root development. The formation of cluster roots and rootlet primordia, together with the expression of LaSCR1 and LaSCR2 which is crucial in cluster root formation, were induced by the exogenous NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) under the +P + Fe condition, but were inhibited by the NO-specific endogenous scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl- 3-oxide (cPTIO) under –P + Fe, +P–Fe and –P–Fe conditions. However, cluster roots induced by an exogenous supply of the NO donor did not secrete citrate, unlike those formed under –P or –Fe conditions. Conclusions NO plays an important role in the shared signalling pathway of the P- and Fe-deficiency-induced formation of cluster roots in white lupin. PMID:22351487

  13. A FIB/TEM study of butterfly crack formation and white etching area (WEA) microstructural changes under rolling contact fatigue in 100Cr6 bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.-H., E-mail: martin.evans@soton.ac.uk [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Walker, J.C.; Ma, C.; Wang, L.; Wood, R.J.K. [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Butterflies are microscopic damage features forming at subsurface material imperfections induced during rolling contact fatigue (RCF) in rolling element bearings. Butterflies can lead to degradation of the load bearing capacity of the material by their associated cracks causing premature spalling failures. Recently, butterfly formation has been cited to be related to a premature failure mode in wind turbine gearbox bearings; white structure flaking (WSF). Butterflies consist of cracks with surrounding microstructural change called ‘white etching area’ (WEA) forming wings that revolve around their initiators. The formation mechanisms of butterflies in bearing steels have been studied over the last 50 years, but are still not fully understood. This paper presents a detailed microstructural analysis of a butterfly that has initiated from a void in standard 100Cr6 bearing steel under rolling contact fatigue on a laboratory two-roller test rig under transient operating conditions. Analysis was conducted using focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, 3D reconstruction and transmission electron microscopy (STEM/TEM) methods. FIB tomography revealed an extensive presence of voids/cavities immediately adjacent to the main crack on the non-WEA side and at the crack tip. This provides evidence for a void/cavity coalescence mechanism for the butterfly cracks formation. Spherical M{sub 3}C carbide deformation and dissolution as part of the microstructural change in WEA were observed in both FIB and STEM/TEM analyses, where TEM analyses also revealed the formation of superfine nano-grains (3–15 nm diameter) intersecting a dissolving spherical M{sub 3}C carbide. This is evidence of the early formation of nano-grains associated with the WEA formation mechanism.

  14. FORMATION OF THE GALACTIC MILLISECOND PULSAR TRIPLE SYSTEM PSR J0337+1715—A NEUTRON STAR WITH TWO ORBITING WHITE DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauris, T. M. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Van den Heuvel, E. P. J., E-mail: tauris@astro.uni-bonn.de [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-01-20

    The millisecond pulsar in a triple system (PSR J0337+1715, recently discovered by Ransom et al.) is an unusual neutron star with two orbiting white dwarfs. The existence of such a system in the Galactic field poses new challenges to stellar astrophysics for understanding evolution, interactions, and mass transfer in close multiple stellar systems. In addition, this system provides the first precise confirmation for a very wide-orbit system of the white dwarf mass-orbital period relation. Here, we present a self-consistent, semi-analytical solution to the formation of PSR J0337+1715. Our model constrains the peculiar velocity of the system to be less than 160 km s{sup –1} and brings novel insight to, for example, common envelope evolution in a triple system, for which we find evidence for in-spiral of both outer stars. Finally, we briefly discuss our scenario in relation to alternative models.

  15. Residual Stress, Structure and Other Properties Formation by Combined Thermo-Hardening Processing of Surface Layer of Gray Cast Iron Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimyanov, Kh M.; Nikitin, Yu V.; Semenova, Yu S.; Eremina, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    The proposed combined thermo-hardening processing of gray cast iron enables to control the surface layer structure and mechanical properties formation. The processing includes high-speed heating by low-temperature plasma source and ultrasonic surface plastic deformation. The algorithm of calculation the stress-strain state of a surface layer at combined processing of gray cast iron is developed. This algorithm is based on method of sections. The ultrasonic surface deformation contribution is determined during formation of residual stresses. It is established that the combination of the thermal and deformation effects on the material provides an additional increment of microhardness and increase of surface layer thickness. Experimental results shows that the features of structural and phase transformations in a surface layer are revealed without a surface melting by energy of low-temperature plasma. The top of a layer does not contain inclusions of graphite that testifies to change of structural transformations in conditions of combined processing.

  16. CHEMICAL TRANSPORT AND SPONTANEOUS LAYER FORMATION IN FINGERING CONVECTION IN ASTROPHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Justin M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 201 Interdisciplinary Sciences Building, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Garaud, Pascale [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Baskin School of Engineering, 1156 High Street, Mail Stop SOE2, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Stellmach, Stephan, E-mail: jumbrown@ucsc.edu [Institut fuer Geophysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2013-05-01

    A region of a star that is stable to convection according to the Ledoux criterion may nevertheless undergo additional mixing if the mean molecular weight increases with radius. This process is called fingering (thermohaline) convection and may account for some of the unexplained mixing in stars such as those that have been polluted by planetary infall and those burning {sup 3}He. We propose a new model for mixing by fingering convection in the parameter regime relevant for stellar (and planetary) interiors. Our theory is based on physical principles and supported by three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. We also discuss the possibility of formation of thermocompositional staircases in fingering regions, and their role in enhancing mixing. Finally, we provide a simple algorithm to implement this theory in one-dimensional stellar codes, such as KEPLER and MESA.

  17. Method for reducing formation of electrically resistive layer on ferritic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowski, James M.

    2013-09-10

    A method of reducing the formation of electrically resistive scale on a an article comprising a silicon-containing ferritic stainless subjected to oxidizing conditions in service includes, prior to placing the article in service, subjecting the article to conditions under which silica, which includes silicon derived from the steel, forms on a surface of the steel. Optionally, at least a portion of the silica is removed from the surface to placing the article in service. A ferritic stainless steel alloy having a reduced tendency to form silica on at least a surface thereof also is provided. The steel includes a near-surface region that has been depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the steel.

  18. Mechanism of Thin Layers Graphite Formation by 13C Implantation and Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelle Gutierrez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of thin layers graphite (TLG synthesis on a polycrystalline nickel film deposited on SiO2 (300 nm thick/Si(100 has been investigated by 13C implantation of four equivalent graphene monolayers and annealing at moderate temperatures (450–600 °C. During this process, the implanted 13C segregates to the surface. Nuclear Reaction Analyses (NRA are used for the first time in the topic of graphene synthesis to separate the isotopes and to determine the 12C and 13C concentrations at each step. Indeed, a significant part of carbon in the TLG also comes from residual 12C carbon absorbed into the metallic matrix. Raman spectroscopy and imaging are used to determine the main location of each carbon isotope in the TLG. The Raman mappings especially emphasize the role of 12C previously present at the surface that first diffuses along grain boundaries. They play the role of nucleation precursors. Around them the implanted 13C or a mixture of bulk 12C–13C aggregate and further precipitate into graphene-like fragments. Graphenization is effective at around 600 °C. These results point out the importance of controlling carbon incorporation, as well as the importance of preparing a uniform nickel surface, in order to avoid heterogeneous nucleation.

  19. Syllabic discrimination in premature human infants prior to complete formation of cortical layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Mahdi; Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine; Fournier, Marc; Kongolo, Guy; Goudjil, Sabrina; Dubois, Jessica; Grebe, Reinhard; Wallois, Fabrice

    2013-03-19

    The ontogeny of linguistic functions in the human brain remains elusive. Although some auditory capacities are described before term, whether and how such immature cortical circuits might process speech are unknown. Here we used functional optical imaging to evaluate the cerebral responses to syllables at the earliest age at which cortical responses to external stimuli can be recorded in humans (28- to 32-wk gestational age). At this age, the cortical organization in layers is not completed. Many neurons are still located in the subplate and in the process of migrating to their final location. Nevertheless, we observed several points of similarity with the adult linguistic network. First, whereas syllables elicited larger right than left responses, the posterior temporal region escaped this general pattern, showing faster and more sustained responses over the left than over the right hemisphere. Second, discrimination responses to a change of phoneme (ba vs. ga) and a change of human voice (male vs. female) were already present and involved inferior frontal areas, even in the youngest infants (29-wk gestational age). Third, whereas both types of changes elicited responses in the right frontal region, the left frontal region only reacted to a change of phoneme. These results demonstrate a sophisticated organization of perisylvian areas at the very onset of cortical circuitry, 3 mo before term. They emphasize the influence of innate factors on regions involved in linguistic processing and social communication in humans.

  20. Formation of a Molecular Wire Using the Chemically Adsorbed Monomolecular Layer Having Pyrrolyl Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Ogawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A molecular wire containing polypyrrolyl conjugate bonds has been prepared by a chemical adsorption technique using 1,1,1-trichloro-12-pyrrolyl-1-siladodecane (PNN and an electrooxidative polymerization technique, and the conductivity of the molecular wire without any dopant has been measured by using AFM/STM at room temperature. When sample dimension measured was about 0.3 nm (thickness of the conductive portion in the PNN monomolecular layer ×100 μm (the average width of an electric path ×2 mm (the distance between Pt positive electrode and the AFM tip covered with Au, the conductivity of the polymerized PNN molecular wire at room temperature was larger than 1.6 × 105 S/cm both in an atmosphere and in a vacuum chamber of 10−5 Torr. The activation energy obtained by Arrhenius' plots was almost zero in the temperature range between 320 and 450 K.

  1. Formation of passivating layers by 1,2,4-triazole derivatives on copper in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Yu. I.; Shikhaliev, Kh. S.; Agafonkina, M. O.; Andreeva, N. P.; Semiletov, A. M.; Chirkunov, A. A.; Potapov, A. Yu.; Solov'ev, V. E.

    2017-12-01

    Ellipsometry and electrochemical measurements are used to study the adsorption of some substituted 1,2,4-triazoles on copper and their effect on dissolution of copper in aqueous buffer solutions at pH 7.4. It is found that the adsorption of triazole compounds on copper is polymolecular at potential E = 0.0 V, in relation to a normal hydrogen electrode. The first layer is described by the Temkin equation with free adsorption energy (-Δ G a 0) = 55.2-76.3 kJ/mol and an energy heterogeneity factor that varies from 0.91 to 2.5. The maximum value of -Δ G a 0 is found for an acid and a hydrogen sulfide corrosion inhibitor that is a mixture of triazole derivatives. The same inhibitor is the one least sensitive to the energy heterogeneity of the surface of a copper electrode, due to its high chemical reactivity and ability to be adsorbed on different active sites. This inhibitor is likely chemisorbed on copper and forms an ultrathin coating in an aqueous solution that is vastly superior to similar coatings produced by the familiar corrosion inhibitors of triazole group compounds in protecting against atmospheric corrosion.

  2. Peroxidase and catalase activities are involved in direct adventitious shoot formation induced by thidiazuron in eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) zygotic embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Newton, Ronald J

    2005-08-01

    We reported establishment of an efficient plant regeneration procedure through direct adventitious shoot (DAS) formation from cotyledons and hypocotyls of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) mature embryos in this investigation. Multiple DASs were initiated from cotyledons of embryos on PS medium containing N6-benzyladenine (BA), thidiazuron (TDZ), or kinetin (KIN). Among different concentrations of casein enzymatic hydrosylate (CH) and glutamine used in this study, 500 mg l(-1) CH or 600 mg l(-1) glutamine induced the highest frequency of DAS formation. Rooting of regenerated shoots was obtained on PS medium supplemented with 0.01-0.1 microM indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) with the highest frequency on medium containing 0.01 muM IAA. No DASs were obtained on medium without TDZ. Measurement of peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) activity during direct shoot induction and differentiation demonstrated that the lowest POD activity appeared in the 5-6th week of culture and lowest CAT activity occurred in the 7-8th week of culture on medium with TDZ. No such a change in POD and CAT activities was observed on medium without TDZ. These results demonstrated that POD and CAT activities were involved in DAS formation induced by TDZ in eastern white pine.

  3. Formation of organic layer on femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumaru, Naoki, E-mail: yasuma@fukui-nct.ac.jp [National Institute of Technology, Fukui College, Sabae, Fukui 916-8507 (Japan); Sentoku, Eisuke [National Institute of Technology, Fukui College, Sabae, Fukui 916-8507 (Japan); Kiuchi, Junsuke [Eyetec Co., Ltd., Sabae, Fukui 916-0016 (Japan)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Surface analyses of two types of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on titanium were conducted. • The parallel-oriented ultrafine LIPSS showed the almost same roughness and chemical states as the non-irradiated Ti surface. • The well-known perpendicular-oriented LIPSS were typically covered with an organic layer similar to a cellulose derivative. - Abstract: Two types of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) formed on titanium by femtosecond (fs) laser pulses (λ = 800 nm, τ = 180 fs, ν = 1 kHz) in air were investigated experimentally. At a laser fluence F above the ablation threshold, LIPSS with a minimum mean spacing of D < λ⁄2 were observed perpendicular to the laser polarization direction. In contrast, for F slightly below than the ablation threshold, ultrafine LIPSS with a minimum value of D < λ/10 were formed parallel to the polarization direction. The surface roughness of the parallel-oriented LIPSS was almost the same as that of the non-irradiated surface, unlike the high roughness of the perpendicular-oriented LIPSS. In addition, although the surface state of the parallel-oriented LIPSS was the same as that of the non-irradiated surface, the perpendicular-oriented LIPSS were covered with an organic thin film similar to a cellulose derivative that cannot be easily formed by conventional chemical synthesis. The results of these surface analyses indicate that these two types of LIPSS are formed through different mechanisms. This fs-laser processing technique may become a new technology for the artificial synthesis of cellulose derivatives.

  4. The Formation and Evolution of Double Layers in Earth's Auroral Upward Current Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, D. S.; Newman, D. L.; Ergun, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    the cold electrons colder and denser compared with the non-oblique DLs. The simulated DLs that we observe are quasi-stable and have no appreciable drift associated with them, as indicated by observations.In addition to the formation of a quasi-stable DL, we also demonstrate the formation and evolution of ion phase space holes and ion acoustic solitons within the newly formed auroral cavity. The ion acoustic solitons which form are highly assymetric. We show that the ion acoustic soliton may explain the mid-cavity DLs previously reported by Ergun, et al (2004).

  5. Effect of temperature on deposition layer formation in HBr/N2/fluorocarbon-based plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Taku; Yokogawa, Kenetsu; Mori, Masahito

    2017-06-01

    The effects of wafer temperature on etching rate and surface composition were investigated to clarify the surface reaction mechanism under HBr/N2/fluorocarbon-based gas plasma for developing a process for three-dimensional NAND flash devices. The etching rates of both polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) and SiO2 were found to increase at a wafer temperature of 20 °C as compared with those at 60 °C. Comparing the gas combination of fluorocarbon/N2 and HBr/N2 mixtures, the temperature dependence of SiO2 etching rates was considered to relevant to the sticking probability of fluorocarbon polymers. To determine the cause of the temperature dependence of the poly-Si etching rate, surface composition was evaluated by thermal-desorption-spectroscopy and laser-sputtered-neutral-mass-spectrometry analyses. Ammonium bromide was confirmed in the deposition film at a wafer temperature of 20 °C. The observed increase in poly-Si etching rate at lower temperatures was possibly caused by increased amounts of nitrogen, hydrogen, and bromine fixed to the surface with the formation of ammonium bromide.

  6. Melt-layer formation on PFMs and the consequences for the material performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Steudel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the numerous challenges of the demonstration power plant DEMO is the selection of appropriate plasma facing materials (PFMs and this task is ultimately important to the success for DEMO. Low-activation stainless steel (e.g. EUROFER, P92, which is already intended as structural material, could also become a possible plasma facing material, e.g. for the first wall (FW. Therefore, the ferritic martensitic steel P92 was investigated under DEMO relevant loading conditions. An area of the sample surfaces was firstly molten by transient events with varying power densities (A=245MW/m2, B=708MW/m2 and afterwards simultaneously and sequentially exposed to thermal and particle loads. Surface modifications and pronounced microstructure changes were investigated dependent on the pre-exposure, loading sequence and power density. More precisely, it turned out that there was no connection between the loading sequence and the surface modifications for the preloaded A-samples contrary to preloaded B-samples. The preloaded B-samples exhibited surface roughening, melting and the formation of holes dependent on the loading sequence and power density.

  7. Anthropogenic pollution elevates the peak height of new particle formation from planetary boundary layer to lower free troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Jia, Xingcan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Ding, Deping; Li, Jie; Wang, Zifa

    2017-07-01

    New particle formation (NPF) and subsequent growth are primary sources of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud condensation nuclei. Previous studies have been conducted in relatively clean environments; investigation of NPF events over highly polluted megacities is still lacking. Here we show, based on a recent yearlong aircraft campaign conducted over Beijing, China, from April 2011 to June 2012, that NPF occurrence peaks in the lower free troposphere (LT), instead of planetary boundary layer (PBL), as most previous studies have found and that the distance of NPF peak to PBL top increases with increasing aerosol loading. Further analysis reveals that increased aerosols suppress NPF in PBL, but enhance NPF in LT due to a complex chain of aerosol-radiation-photochemistry interactions that affect both NPF sources and sinks. These findings shed new light on our understanding of NPF occurrence, NPF vertical distribution, and thus their effects on atmospheric photochemistry, clouds, and climate.

  8. Structure of Pigment Metabolic Pathways and Their Contributions to White Tepal Color Formation of Chinese Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis cv Jinzhanyintai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yujun; Yang, Jingwen; Lu, Bingguo; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Haiyang; Hong, Yuwei; Wu, Binghua; Miao, Ying

    2017-09-08

    Chinese narcissus (Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis) is one of the ten traditional flowers in China and a famous bulb flower in the world flower market. However, only white color tepals are formed in mature flowers of the cultivated varieties, which constrains their applicable occasions. Unfortunately, for lack of genome information of narcissus species, the explanation of tepal color formation of Chinese narcissus is still not clear. Concerning no genome information, the application of transcriptome profile to dissect biological phenomena in plants was reported to be effective. As known, pigments are metabolites of related metabolic pathways, which dominantly decide flower color. In this study, transcriptome profile and pigment metabolite analysis methods were used in the most widely cultivated Chinese narcissus "Jinzhanyintai" to discover the structure of pigment metabolic pathways and their contributions to white tepal color formation during flower development and pigmentation processes. By using comparative KEGG pathway enrichment analysis, three pathways related to flavonoid, carotenoid and chlorophyll pigment metabolism showed significant variations. The structure of flavonoids metabolic pathway was depicted, but, due to the lack of F3'5'H gene; the decreased expression of C4H, CHS and ANS genes; and the high expression of FLS gene, the effect of this pathway to synthesize functional anthocyanins in tepals was weak. Similarly, the expression of DXS, MCT and PSY genes in carotenoids synthesis sub-pathway was decreased, while CCD1/CCD4 genes in carotenoids degradation sub-pathway was increased; therefore, the effect of carotenoids metabolic pathway to synthesize adequate color pigments in tepals is restricted. Interestingly, genes in chlorophyll synthesis sub-pathway displayed uniform down-regulated expression, while genes in heme formation and chlorophyll breakdown sub-pathways displayed up-regulated expression, which also indicates negative regulation of

  9. Research of influence of gas nitriding duration on formation of diffusion layer of steel 20Kh2N4A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna O. Kostyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The research of the gas nitriding process, which allows to obtain a high surface quality of steel parts and has a wide application in mass production, is relevant. Aim of the research is to study the influence of gas nitriding modes on the structure and properties of alloy steel. The research material in this work is steel 20Kh2N4A. Nitriding of the samples is carried out in a shaft furnace at the temperature of 510…530 °C during 35, 40, 46 and 48 h. It is found that the alloy steel 20Kh2N4A preliminary heat treatment before nitriding provides the hardness of products core to 279...321 HV due to the formation of perlite-sorta structure with carbides of alloying elements. The results show that increasing the duration of nitriding from 35 to 48 hours at 510…530 °С increases the depth of nitrided layer from 0,35 to 0,55 mm with surface hardness up to 648 MPa at the maximum depth of the layer. The results of this research can be used in industry and research works.

  10. Heuristic Analysis Model of Nitrided Layers' Formation Consisting of the Image Processing and Analysis and Elements of Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcicki, Tomasz; Nowicki, Michał

    2016-04-01

    The article presents a selected area of research and development concerning the methods of material analysis based on the automatic image recognition of the investigated metallographic sections. The objectives of the analyses of the materials for gas nitriding technology are described. The methods of the preparation of nitrided layers, the steps of the process and the construction and operation of devices for gas nitriding are given. We discuss the possibility of using the methods of digital images processing in the analysis of the materials, as well as their essential task groups: improving the quality of the images, segmentation, morphological transformations and image recognition. The developed analysis model of the nitrided layers formation, covering image processing and analysis techniques, as well as selected methods of artificial intelligence are presented. The model is divided into stages, which are formalized in order to better reproduce their actions. The validation of the presented method is performed. The advantages and limitations of the developed solution, as well as the possibilities of its practical use, are listed.

  11. Formation of silicon carbide defect qubits with optically transparent electrodes and atomic layer deposited silicon oxide surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, O. M.; Higa, B.; Liu, B.; Sims, P.; Torres, C.; Davidson, B.; Lerum, L.; Romero, H.; Fahem, M.; Lasher, M.; Barua, R.; deEscobar, A.; Cothern, J.; Simonsen, K.; Ramirez, A. D.; Banks, H.; Carter, S. G.; Gaskill, D. K.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2017-08-01

    Defect qubits in silicon carbide are an emerging system for quantum information science and technology. It is important to passivate and protect the surface to preserve the particular defect configurations as well as to provide means to tune the opto-electronic properties via electronic or opto-electronic gating. In this work, we construct defect qubit device structures that integrate Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) electrodes and a thin atomic layer deposited (ALD) siliconoxide surface passivation. The devices are formed via 12C ion implantation and high temperature annealing of 4H and 6H silicon carbide. The process involves the integration of optically transparent indium tin oxide electrodes and a surface passivation film of silicon-oxide by atomic layer deposition. We find good contact is formed between ITO and SiC, and after complete processing, the measured broad-band photoluminescence (PL) with excitation at 785 nm in a scanning PL system is consistent with the formation of silicon vacancies. We find minimal change in the room temperature emission in regions beneath the ITO electrodes and the SiOx-SiC passivated surface. We evaluate the ability of an electric field to tune the optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) response of the qubit system by simulations of the spectrum with a modified spin Hamiltonian that considers the Stark Effect. We quantify the simulated strength of the electric-field tuning of the energy levels and ODMR response for the various identified spin 3/2 transitions of the silicon vacancy.

  12. A novel Eulerian approach for modelling cyanobacteria movement: Thin layer formation and recurrent risk to drinking water intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndong, Mouhamed; Bird, David; Nguyen Quang, Tri; Kahawita, René; Hamilton, David; de Boutray, Marie Laure; Prévost, Michèle; Dorner, Sarah

    2017-12-15

    Toxic cyanobacteria (CB) blooms are being reported in an increasing number of water bodies worldwide. As drinking water (DW) treatment can be disrupted by CB, in addition to long term management plans, short term operational decision-making tools are needed that enable an understanding of the temporal variability of CB movement in relation to drinking water intakes. In this paper, we propose a novel conservative model based on a Eulerian framework and compare results with data from CB blooms in Missisquoi Bay (Québec, Canada). The hydrodynamic model considered the effects of wind and light intensity, demonstrated that current understanding of cell buoyancy in relation to light intensity in full-scale systems is incomplete and some factors are yet to be fully characterized. Factors affecting CB buoyancy play a major role in the formation of a thin surface layer that could be of ecological importance with regards to cell concentrations and toxin production. Depending on velocities, wind contributes either to the accumulation or to the dispersion of CB. Lake recirculation effects have a tendency to create zones of low CB concentrations in a water body. Monitoring efforts and future research should focus on short-term variations of CB throughout the water column and the characterization of factors other than light intensity that affect cell buoyancy. These factors are critical for understanding the risk of breakthrough into treatment plants as well as the formation of surface scums and subsequent toxin production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Formation of Ge self-assembled quantum dots on a Si {sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyungjun [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1595 (United States); Shin, Chansun [Nuclear Materials Technology Development, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Joonyeon [Nano Device Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Chongryang, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: presto@kist.re.kr

    2005-12-15

    Ge self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs) grown on a relaxed Si{sub 0.75}Ge{sub 0.25} buffer layer were observed using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of buried misfit dislocations on the formation and the distribution of Ge SAQDs was extensively investigated. The Burgers vector determination of each buried dislocation using the g.b = 0 invisibility criterion with plane-view TEM micrographs shows that Ge SAQDs grow at specific positions related to the Burgers vectors of buried dislocations. The measurement of the lateral distance between a SAQD and the corresponding misfit dislocation with plane-view and cross-sectional TEM images reveals that SAQDs form at the intersections of the top surface with the slip planes of misfit dislocations. The stress field on the top surface due to misfit dislocations is computed, and it is found that the strain energy of the misfit dislocations provides the preferential formation sites for Ge SAQDs nucleation.

  14. Effect of Annealed Oxides on the Formation of Inhibition Layer During Hot-Dip Galvanizing of 590Mpa Trip Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Huh, Joo Youl [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Suk Kyu; Park, Rho Bum; Kim, Jong Sang [POSCO Technical Research Laboratories, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The selective surface oxidation of a transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) steel containing 1.6 wt.% Mn and 1.5 wt.% Si during annealing at 800 .deg. C was investigated for its influence on the formation of an inhibition layer during hot-dip galvanizing. The selective oxidation of the alloying elements and the oxide morphology were significantly influenced by the annealing atmosphere. The pure N{sub 2} atmosphere with a dew point -40 .deg. C promoted the selective oxidation of Mn as a crystalline Mn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} phase, whereas the N{sub 2} + 10% H{sub 2} atmosphere with the same dew point -40 .deg. C promoted the selective oxidation of Si as an amorphous Si-rich oxide phase. During hot-dip galvanizing, the Mn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} phase was reduced more readily by Al in the Zn bath than the Si-rich oxide phase. Consequently, the pure N{sub 2} atmosphere resulted in a higher formation rate of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} particles at the Zn/steel interface and better galvanizability than the N{sub 2} + 10% H{sub 2} atmosphere.

  15. 3D Voronoi grid dedicated software for modeling gas migration in deep layered sedimentary formations with TOUGH2-TMGAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonduà, Stefano; Battistelli, Alfredo; Berry, Paolo; Bortolotti, Villiam; Consonni, Alberto; Cormio, Carlo; Geloni, Claudio; Vasini, Ester Maria

    2017-11-01

    As is known, a full three-dimensional (3D) unstructured grid permits a great degree of flexibility when performing accurate numerical reservoir simulations. However, when the Integral Finite Difference Method (IFDM) is used for spatial discretization, constraints (arising from the required orthogonality between the segment connecting the blocks nodes and the interface area between blocks) pose difficulties in the creation of grids with irregular shaped blocks. The full 3D Voronoi approach guarantees the respect of IFDM constraints and allows generation of grids conforming to geological formations and structural objects and at the same time higher grid resolution in volumes of interest. In this work, we present dedicated pre- and post-processing gridding software tools for the TOUGH family of numerical reservoir simulators, developed by the Geothermal Research Group of the DICAM Department, University of Bologna. VORO2MESH is a new software coded in C++, based on the voro++ library, allowing computation of the 3D Voronoi tessellation for a given domain and the creation of a ready to use TOUGH2 MESH file. If a set of geological surfaces is available, the software can directly generate the set of Voronoi seed points used for tessellation. In order to reduce the number of connections and so to decrease computation time, VORO2MESH can produce a mixed grid with regular blocks (orthogonal prisms) and irregular blocks (polyhedron Voronoi blocks) at the point of contact between different geological formations. In order to visualize 3D Voronoi grids together with the results of numerical simulations, the functionality of the TOUGH2Viewer post-processor has been extended. We describe an application of VORO2MESH and TOUGH2Viewer to validate the two tools. The case study deals with the simulation of the migration of gases in deep layered sedimentary formations at basin scale using TOUGH2-TMGAS. A comparison between the simulation performances of unstructured and structured

  16. Effect of strip temperature on the formation of an Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} inhibition layer during hot-dip galvanizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Monojit [R and D Division, Tata Steel Ltd., Jamshedpur 831001 (India)], E-mail: monoron@yahoo.com; Singh, Shiv Brat [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2009-04-15

    The theory of nucleation has been employed to derive expressions for the formation of an Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} layer during commercial strip galvanizing. This is then used to show the effect of the strip entry temperature on the nucleation of the Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} layer. An attempt was also made to verify this effect through controlled experiments in a hot-dip galvanizing simulator and electron microscopic characterization of a few samples.

  17. Role of crystallographic anisotropy in the formation of surface layers of single NiTi crystals after ion-plasma alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletika, T. M., E-mail: poletm@ispms.tsc.ru; Girsova, S. L., E-mail: llm@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Meisner, L. L., E-mail: girs@ispms.tsc.ru; Meisner, S. N., E-mail: msn@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Shulepov, I. A., E-mail: iashulepov@tpu.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The structure of the surface and near-surface layers of single crystals of NiTi, differently oriented relative to the direction of ion beam treatment was investigated. The role of the crystallographic orientation in formation of structure of surface layers after ion-plasma alloying was revealed. It was found that the orientation effects of selective sputtering and channeling determine the thickness of the oxide and amorphous layers, the depth of penetration of ions and impurities, the distribution of Ni with depth.

  18. The effect of SiC powder mixing electrical discharge machining on white layer thickness, heat flux and fatigue life of AISI D2 die steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Khazraji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with studying the effect of powder mixing electrical discharge machining (PMEDM parameters using copper and graphite electrodes on the white layer thickness (WLT, the total heat flux generated and the fatigue life. Response surface methodology (RSM was used to plan and design the experimental work matrices for two groups of experiments: for the first EDM group, kerosene dielectric was used alone, whereas the second was treated by adding the SiC micro powders mixing to dielectric fluid (PMEDM. The total heat flux generated and fatigue lives after EDM and PMEDM models were developed by FEM using ANSYS 15.0 software. The graphite electrodes gave a total heat flux higher than copper electrodes by 82.4%, while using the SiC powder and graphite electrodes gave a higher total heat flux than copper electrodes by 91.5%. The lowest WLT values of 5.0 µm and 5.57 µm are reached at a high current and low current with low pulse on time using the copper and graphite electrodes and the SiC powder, respectively. This means that there is an improvement in WLT by 134% and 110%, respectively, when compared with the use of same electrodes and kerosene dielectric alone. The graphite electrodes with PMEDM and SiC powder improved the experimental fatigue safety factor by 7.30% compared with the use of copper electrodes and by 14.61% and 18.61% compared with results using the kerosene dielectric alone with copper and graphite electrodes, respectively.

  19. GEOTAIL observation of tilted X-line formation during flux transfer events (FTEs in the dayside magnetospheric boundary layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nowada

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic field and plasma structures during two successive crossings of the subsolar magnetospheric boundary layers (i.e. MagnetoPause Current Layer (MPCL and Low-Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL under the southward-dawnward IMF are examined on the basis of the data obtained by the GEOTAIL spacecraft. A significant and interesting feature is found, that is, Flux Transfer Events (FTEs occur in association with the formation of the tilted X-line. During the first inbound MPCL/LLBL crossing, the ion velocity enhancement (in particular, the Vl component negatively increases can be observed in association with simultaneous typical bipolar signature (positive followed by negative in the Bn component. In addition, a clear D-shaped ion distribution whose origin is the magnetosheath can also be found in the dawnward direction. A few minutes later, the satellite experiences outbound MPCL crossing. The negative enhancement of the Vm component can be found as well as the positive enhancement of the Vl component. Simultaneously, a typical bipolar signature with the polarity (negative followed by positive opposite that observed in the first encounter can also be observed. The ions from the magnetosheath flow predominantly in the duskward direction, although the D-shaped ion distribution cannot be observed. These results indicate that the satellite initially observes one part of a reconnected flux tube formed by FTEs whose magnetospheric side is anchored to the Southern Hemisphere. The ions confined in this partial flux tube are flowing in the south-dawnward direction. Then, the satellite observes the other part of the reconnected flux tube whose magnetospheric side is anchored to the Northern Hemisphere. The ions confined in this flux tube flow dominantly in the north-duskward direction. Furthermore, it can be considered that the second MPCL crossing is a direct cut through the diffusion

  20. Chlorine-Incorporation-Induced Formation of the Layered Phase for Antimony-Based Lead-Free Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fangyuan; Yang, Dongwen; Jiang, Youyu; Liu, Tiefeng; Zhao, Xingang; Ming, Yue; Luo, Bangwu; Qin, Fei; Fan, Jiacheng; Han, Hongwei; Zhang, Lijun; Zhou, Yinhua

    2018-01-24

    The environmental toxicity of Pb in organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells remains an issue, which has triggered intense research on seeking alternative Pb-free perovskites for solar applications. Halide perovskites based on group-VA cations of Bi 3+ and Sb 3+ with the same lone-pair ns 2 state as Pb 2+ are promising candidates. Herein, through a joint experimental and theoretical study, we demonstrate that Cl-incorporated methylammonium Sb halide perovskites (CH 3 NH 3 ) 3 Sb 2 Cl X I 9-X show promise as efficient solar absorbers for Pb-free perovskite solar cells. Inclusion of methylammonium chloride into the precursor solutions suppresses the formation of the undesired zero-dimensional dimer phase and leads to the successful synthesis of high-quality perovskite films composed of the two-dimensional layered phase favored for photovoltaics. Solar cells based on the as-obtained (CH 3 NH 3 ) 3 Sb 2 Cl X I 9-X films reach a record-high power conversion efficiency over 2%. This finding offers a new perspective for the development of nontoxic and low-cost Sb-based perovskite solar cells.

  1. FISSION-TRACK DATING OF A TEPHRA LAYER IN THE ALAT FORMATION OF THE DANDIERO GROUP (DANAKIL DEPRESSION, ERITREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIULIO BIGAZZI

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to date a biotite separate from a tephra layer recognized near Buia (Danakil Depression, Eritrea in the liwer part of the Homo remains – bearing Dandiero group (formerly attributed to the Danakil Formation using the 39Ar/40Ar method failed because of xenocrystic contamination. For this reason it was applied the fission-track method on glass, since no other phases datable with this technique were present. The quality of glass was very poor for fission-track dating, because of the small size of grains. In addition, after polishing only few glass shards showed useful surfaces for track counting and only 25 spontaneous tracks were counted. The determined fission-track age - 0.75 +/- 0.16 Ma - is a rejuvenated age due to the presence of a certain amount of annealing of spontaneous tracks. An attempt to apply the plateau method for correcting this apparent age failed. A corrected age of 1.3 +/- 0.3 Ma was computed using the size-correction method. In spite of its low precision, this fission-track age represents a significant result, since it corroborates the attribution to Jaramillo Subchron of the normal magnetozone near the base of which the tephra is located. 

  2. Mechanism of tribofilm formation on Ti6Al4V oxygen diffusion layer in a simulated body fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, R; Ghasemi, H M; Abedini, M; Wang, C; Neville, A

    2018-01-01

    An Oxygen Diffusion Layer (ODL) was generated on the surface of Ti6Al4V alloy by thermal oxidation treatment. In vitro tests for cytotoxicity were performed in the presence of Ti6Al4V and the ODL samples with the culture of G292 Cells using MTT assay. The results showed a similar cell viability in the presence of the both samples. Wear behaviour of Ti6Al4V and the ODL samples was investigated in a phosphate buffered saline solution under a normal load of 30N at a sliding velocity of 0.1m/s. The worn surface and subsurface of the samples were studied using SEM, STEM, TEM, XPS, AFM, nano-hardness and surface profilometry. A bio-tribofilm was observed on the worn surface of the ODL. TEM studies showed that the tribofilm had an amorphous structure and contained oxygen and phosphorous as confirmed by XPS and EDS analysis. AFM images also revealed that the tribofilm consisted of compacted fine debris. The formation of the tribofilm on the ODL with higher hardness and strength resulted in a decrease of about 95% in the wear rate compared with Ti6Al4V alloy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  4. Formation mechanisms of neutral Fe layers in the thermosphere at Antarctica studied with a thermosphere-ionosphere Fe/Fe+ (TIFe) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xinzhao; Yu, Zhibin

    2017-06-01

    With a thermosphere-ionosphere Fe/Fe+ (TIFe) model developed from first principles at the University of Colorado, we present the first quantitative investigation of formation mechanisms of thermospheric Fe layers observed by lidar in Antarctica. These recently discovered neutral metal layers in the thermosphere between 100 and 200 km provide unique tracers for studies of fundamental processes in the space-atmosphere interaction region. The TIFe model formulates and expands the TIFe theory originally proposed by Chu et al. that the thermospheric Fe layers are produced through the neutralization of converged Fe+ layers. Through testing mechanisms and reproducing the 28 May 2011 event at McMurdo, we conceive the lifecycle of meteoric metals via deposition, transport, chemistry, and wave dynamics for thermospheric Fe layers with gravity wave signatures. While the meteor injection of iron species is negligible above 120 km, the polar electric field transports metallic ions Fe+ upward from their main deposition region into the E-F regions, providing the major source of Fe+ (and accordingly Fe) in the thermosphere. Atmospheric wave-induced vertical shears of vertical and horizontal winds converge Fe+ to form dense Fe+ layers. Direct electron-Fe+ recombination is the major channel to neutralize Fe+ layers to form Fe above 120 km. Fe layer shapes are determined by multiple factors of neutral winds, electric field, and aurora activity. Gravity-wave-induced vertical wind plays a key role in forming gravity-wave-shaped Fe layers. Aurora particle precipitation enhances Fe+ neutralization by increasing electron density while accelerating Fe loss via charge transfer with enhanced NO+ and O2+ densities.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryThe discoveries of neutral metal layers reaching near 200 km in the thermosphere have significant scientific merit because such discoveries challenge the current understandings of upper atmospheric composition, chemistry, dynamics

  5. Optimization of MoSe{sub 2} formation for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}-based solar cells by using thin superficial molybdenum oxide barrier layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchatelet, A., E-mail: aurelien.duchatelet@edf.fr [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), UMR 7174 EDF-CNRS-Chimie ParisTech, 6 quai Watier 78401, Chatou Cedex (France); Savidand, G. [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), UMR 7174 EDF-CNRS-Chimie ParisTech, 6 quai Watier 78401, Chatou Cedex (France); Vannier, R.N. [Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide (UCCS), UMR 8181, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Lille, Bat C7a-BP 90108, F-59652, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Lincot, D., E-mail: Daniel-Lincot@chimie-paristech.fr [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), UMR 7174 EDF-CNRS-Chimie ParisTech, 6 quai Watier 78401, Chatou Cedex (France)

    2013-10-31

    During the formation of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films deposited on Mo substrate by the selenization of Cu-In-Ga precursor, the reaction of Mo with Se can lead to a high consumption of Mo back contact and the formation of a thick MoSe{sub 2} layer, thus deteriorating the electrical properties of the back contact. In this study, the effect of thermal oxidation pre-treatment on Mo has been investigated to control the growth of MoSe{sub 2}. It has been demonstrated that a thin and covering MoO{sub 2} layer can block the selenization of Mo. Using this effect, a MoSe{sub 2} layer with controlled thickness can be formed by adding a thin and controlled Mo layer on top of an oxidized Mo substrate. In this configuration, only the Mo added on top of oxidized Mo forms MoSe{sub 2} and the whole Mo protected by MoO{sub 2} remains after selenization. Thanks to this Glass/Mo/MoO{sub 2}/Mo substrate configuration and the metallic behavior of MoO{sub 2}, the good electrical properties of the back contact are kept after selenization. - Highlights: • Selenization of Cu-In-Ga on Mo substrate produces thick detrimental MoSe{sub 2} layer. • MoO{sub 2} layer on Mo surface blocks MoSe{sub 2} formation. • Mo layer on top of MoO{sub 2}/Mo substrate enables to control MoSe{sub 2}.

  6. Physical processes in an electron current layer causing intense plasma heating and formation of x-lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nagendra; Wells, B. E. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Khazanov, Igor [CSPAR, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We study the evolution of an electron current layer (ECL) through its several stages by means of three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with ion to electron mass ratio M/m{sub e} = 400. An ECL evolves through the following stages: (i) Electrostatic (ES) current-driven instability (CDI) soon after its formation with half width w about 2 electron skin depth (d{sub e}), (ii) current disruption in the central part of the ECL by trapping of electrons and generation of anomalous resistivity, (iii) electron tearing instability (ETI) with significantly large growth rates in the lower end of the whistler frequency range, (iv) widening of the ECL and modulation of its width by the ETI, (v) gradual heating of electrons by the CDI-driven ES ion modes create the condition that the electrons become hotter than the ions, (vi) despite the reduced electron drift associated with the current disruption by the CDI, the enhanced electron temperature continues to favor a slow growth of the ion waves reaching nonlinear amplitudes, (vii) the nonlinear ion waves undergo modulation and collapse into localized density cavities containing spiky electric fields like in double layers (DLs), (viii) such spiky electric fields are very effective in further rapid heating of both electrons and ions. As predicted by the electron magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) theories, the ETI growth rate maximizes at wave numbers in the range 0.4 < k{sub x}W < 0.8 where k{sub x} is the wave number parallel to the ECL magnetic field and w is the evolving half width of the ECL. The developing ETI generates in-plane currents that support out-of-plane magnetic fields around the emerging x-lines. The ETI and the spiky electrostatic structures are accompanied by fluctuations in the magnetic fields near and above the lower-hybrid (ion plasma) frequency, including the whistler frequency range. We compare our results with experimental results and satellite observation.

  7. Single component Mn-doped perovskite-related CsPb2ClxBr5-x nanoplatelets with a record white light quantum yield of 49%: a new single layer color conversion material for light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Xu, Shuhong; Shao, Haibao; Li, Lang; Cui, Yiping; Wang, Chunlei

    2017-11-09

    Single component nanocrystals (NCs) with white fluorescence are promising single layer color conversion media for white light-emitting diodes (LED) because the undesirable changes of chromaticity coordinates for the mixture of blue, green and red emitting NCs can be avoided. However, their practical applications have been hindered by the relative low photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) for traditional semiconductor NCs. Though Mn-doped perovskite nanocube is a potential candidate, it has been unable to realize a white-light emission to date. In this work, the synthesis of Mn-doped 2D perovskite-related CsPb2ClxBr5-x nanoplatelets with a pure white emission from a single component is reported. Unlike Mn-doped perovskite nanocubes with insufficient energy transfer efficiency, the current reported Mn-doped 2D perovskite-related CsPb2ClxBr5-x nanoplatelets show a 10 times higher energy transfer efficiency from perovskite to Mn impurities at the required emission wavelengths (about 450 nm for perovskite emission and 580 nm for Mn emission). As a result, the Mn/perovskite dual emission intensity ratio surprisingly elevates from less than 0.25 in case of Mn-doped nanocubes to 0.99 in the current Mn-doped CsPb2ClxBr5-x nanoplatelets, giving rise to a pure white light emission with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.35, 0.32). More importantly, the highest PL QY for Mn-doped perovskite-related CsPb2ClxBr5-x nanoplatelets is up to 49%, which is a new record for white-emitting nanocrystals with single component. These highly luminescent nanoplatelets can be blended with polystyrene (PS) without changing the white light emission but dramatically improving perovskite stability. The perovskite-PS composites are available not only as a good solution processable coating material for assembling LED, but also as a superior conversion material for achieving white light LED with a single conversion layer.

  8. The role of internal waves in the formation of layered structure at exchange flows between two closed basins (Middle and southern basins of the Caspian sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Bidokhti

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available  Layered structures in the oceans have always attracted the attention of oceanographers. The formation of these structures have been attributed to phenomena such as double – diffusive convection, internal waves and turbulent modulated mixing .In this paper, the vertical structures of temperature, salinity, density and the layered structure in the middle parts of Caspian Sea have been studied. Counters of iso-quantities of these physical properties, show the existence of regular structures, which indicate that internal waves which are produced by exchanging flow between two basins, as a result of horizontal density gradients (usually from north basin to south basin may generate these layers. Froude number of this flow is about one. The length of wave of the internal waves is found to be about 200 km and the flow velocity associated with this gravity drive flow is about 0.2 m/s, the frequency of these waves is of order of inertial frequency. The normal modes of these waves have a near steady structure and can fold the inflow front from the North Caspian sea to South Caspian Sea basins, then the layered structure are formed. The thickness of these layers so formed is found to be about 10-20 m. These are in agreement with the values predicted by the model of Wong et al, (2001. In these waters density ratio is negative. Thus, double – diffusive convection does not often happen and cannot produce these layered structures.

  9. White Toenails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page. Please enable Javascript in your browser. White Toenails White toenails can develop for several reasons. Trauma, such ... trauma does not cause broken blood vessels, a white spot may appear under the nail. The spot ...

  10. The influence of polymer content on early gel-layer formation in HPMC matrices: The use of CLSM visualisation to identify the percolation threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Laura Michelle; Campiñez, María Dolores; Pygall, Samuel R; Burley, Jonathan C; Gupta, Pranav; Storey, David E; Caraballo, Isidoro; Melia, Colin D

    2015-08-01

    Percolation theory has been used for several years in the design of HPMC hydrophilic matrices. This theory predicts that a minimum threshold content of polymer is required to provide extended release of drug, and that matrices with a lower polymer content will exhibit more rapid drug release as a result of percolation pathways facilitating the faster penetration of the aqueous medium. At present, percolation thresholds in HPMC matrices have been estimated solely through the mathematical modelling of dissolution data. This paper examines whether they can be also identified in a novel way: through the use of confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM) to observe the morphology of the emerging gel layer during the initial period of polymer hydration and early gel formation at the matrix surface. In this study, matrices have been prepared with a polymer content of 5-30% w/w HPMC 2208 (Methocel K4M), with a mix of other excipients (a soluble drug (caffeine), lactose, microcrystalline cellulose and magnesium stearate) to provide a typical industrially realistic formulation. Dissolution studies, undertaken in water using USP apparatus 2 (paddle) at 50rpm, provided data for the calculation of the percolation threshold through relating dissolution kinetic parameters to the excipient volumetric fraction of the dry matrix. The HPMC percolation threshold estimated this way was found to be 12.8% v/v, which was equivalent to a matrix polymer content of 11.5% w/w. The pattern of polymer hydration and gel layer growth during early gel layer formation was examined by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM). Clear differences in gel layer formation were observed. At polymer contents above the estimated threshold a continuous gel layer was formed within 15min, whereas matrices with polymer contents below the threshold were characterised by irregular gel layer formation with little evidence of HPMC particle coalescence. According to percolation theory, this

  11. Computer simulation for the formation of the insulator layer of silicon-on-insulator devices by N sup + and O sup + Co-implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Lin Qing; Xie Xin Yun; Lin Chenglu; Liu Xiang Hua

    2002-01-01

    A buried sandwiched layer consisting of silicon dioxide (upper part), silicon oxynitride (medium part) and silicon nitride (lower part) is formed by N sup + and O sup + co-implantation in silicon wafers at a constant temperature of 550 degree C. The microstructure is performed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. To predict the quality of the buried sandwiched layer, the authors study the computer simulation for the formation of the SIMON (separated by implantation of oxygen and nitrogen) structure. The simulation program for SIMOX (separated by implantation of oxygen) is improved in order to be applied in O sup + and N sup + co-implantation on the basis of different formation mechanism between SIMOX and SIMNI (separated by implantation of nitrogen) structures. There is a good agreement between experiment and simulation results verifying the theoretical model and presumption in the program

  12. Differential erosion and the formation of layered yardangs in the Loulan region (Lop Nur), eastern Tarim Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yongchong; Xu, Lishuai; Mu, Guijin

    2018-02-01

    Yardangs are a type of wind-sculpted landform which generally form in hyper-arid regions. Several factors affect the development of yardangs, and the relative importance of these factors likely varies with differences in regional environmental factors. In the Loulan region of Lop Nur, wind dynamics are the principal factor affecting the development of yardangs. However, layered yardangs, which have undergone a unique form of differential erosion, are common in the region. These erosional landforms differ from typical yardangs which are eroded solely by abrasion and deflation. We conducted field and laboratory investigations of layered yardangs to determine their origin. The results indicate that there are two types of strata comprising the yardangs: uncompacted sand-silt layers, with a lower carbonate content; and compacted clay-silt layers, with a higher carbonate content. Both types of strata are horizontal and occur in alternating layers. This type of structure enables the wind to more easily erode the less resistant sand-silt layers at different heights, leaving the more resistant compacted clay-silt layers relatively intact. Eventually the undercut remnant clay-silt layers collapse once the weight of the suspended strata exceeds their elastic resistance (more than 90% of the fallen blocks have length/thickness ratios between 1.2 and 2.5). Therefore, in addition to wind dynamics, the lithology and structure of the strata are important factors affecting the development of the layered yardangs. This type of differential erosion accelerates the development of the yardangs in the Loulan region.

  13. Cube Texture Formation of Cu-33at.%Ni Alloy Substrates and CeO2 Buffer Layer for YBCO Coated Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Hui; Li, Suo Hong; Ru, Liang Ya

    2014-01-01

    Cube texture formation of Cu-33 at.%Ni alloy substartes and CeO2 buffer layer prepared by chemical solution deposition on the textured substrate were investigated by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) and XRD technics systematically. The results shown that a strong cube textured Cu-33at.......%Ni alloy substrate with the cube texture fraction of 99.8 % (cube texture fraction...

  14. Visible light activity of pulsed layer deposited BiVO{sub 4}/MnO{sub 2} films decorated with gold nanoparticles: The evidence for hydroxyl radicals formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzciński, Konrad, E-mail: trzcinskikonrad@gmail.com [Faculty of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Szkoda, Mariusz [Faculty of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Sawczak, Mirosław [Centre for Plasma and Laser Engineering, The Szewalski Institute of Fluid Flow Machinery, Fiszera 14, 80-231 Gdansk (Poland); Karczewski, Jakub [Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Lisowska-Oleksiak, Anna [Faculty of Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The BiVO{sub 4} + MnO{sub 2} photoactive layers were prepared by pulsed laser deposition method. • Prepared layers can act as photoanodes for water splitting. • The thin BiVO{sub 4} + MnO{sub 2} film can be used as photocatalyst for methylene blue degradation. • The formation of hydroxyl radicals during photocatalys illumination has been proved. • The dropcasted GNP improved significantly photocatalytic properties of tested layers. - Abstract: Thin films containing BiVO{sub 4} and MnO{sub 2} deposited on FTO and modified by Au nanoparticles were studied towards their photoelectrochemical and photocatalytical activities in an aqueous electrolyte. Electrodes were prepared by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. The surfactant-free ablation process was used for preparation of the gold nanoparticles (GNP) water suspension. Obtained layers of varied thicknesses (27–115 nm) were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, UV–vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Electrochemical methods such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, linear voltammetry and chronoamperometry under visible light illumination and in the dark were applied to characterize layers as photoanodes. Simple modification of the BiVO{sub 4} + MnO{sub 2} layer by drop-casting of small amount of colloidal gold (1.5 × 10{sup −14} mol of GNP on 1 cm{sup 2}) leads to enhancement of the generated photocurrent recorded at E = 0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl (0.1 M KCl) from 63 μA/cm{sup 2} to 280 μA/cm{sup 2}. Photocatalytical studies were also exploited towards decomposition of methylene blue (MB). A possible mechanism of MB photodegradation was proposed. The formation of hydroxyl radicals was detected by photoluminescence spectra using terephthalic acid as the probe molecule.

  15. Deep sequencing of ESTs from nacreous and prismatic layer producing tissues and a screen for novel shell formation-related genes in the pearl oyster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeharu Kinoshita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite its economic importance, we have a limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying shell formation in pearl oysters, wherein the calcium carbonate crystals, nacre and prism, are formed in a highly controlled manner. We constructed comprehensive expressed gene profiles in the shell-forming tissues of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata and identified novel shell formation-related genes candidates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed the GS FLX 454 system and constructed transcriptome data sets from pallial mantle and pearl sac, which form the nacreous layer, and from the mantle edge, which forms the prismatic layer in P. fucata. We sequenced 260477 reads and obtained 29682 unique sequences. We also screened novel nacreous and prismatic gene candidates by a combined analysis of sequence and expression data sets, and identified various genes encoding lectin, protease, protease inhibitors, lysine-rich matrix protein, and secreting calcium-binding proteins. We also examined the expression of known nacreous and prismatic genes in our EST library and identified novel isoforms with tissue-specific expressions. CONCLUSIONS: We constructed EST data sets from the nacre- and prism-producing tissues in P. fucata and found 29682 unique sequences containing novel gene candidates for nacreous and prismatic layer formation. This is the first report of deep sequencing of ESTs in the shell-forming tissues of P. fucata and our data provide a powerful tool for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms of molluscan biomineralization.

  16. Formation of a CdO layer on CdS/ZnO nanorod arrays to enhance their photoelectrochemical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Thanh Khue; Pham, Long Quoc; Kim, Do Yoon; Zheng, Jin You; Kim, Dokyoung; Pawar, Amol U; Kang, Young Soo

    2014-12-01

    The performance and photocatalytic activity of the well-known CdS/ZnO nanorod array system were improved significantly by the layer-by-layer heterojunction structure fabrication of a transparent conductive oxide (TCO) CdO layer on the CdS/ZnO nanorods. Accordingly, a CdO layer with a thickness of approximately 5-10 nm can be formed that surrounds the CdS/ZnO nanorod arrays after annealing at 500 °C under air. At an external potential of 0.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl, the CdO/CdS/ZnO nanorod array electrodes exhibit an increased incident photon to conversion efficiency, which is significantly higher than that of the CdS/ZnO nanorod array electrodes. The high charge separation between the electrons and holes at the interfaces of the heterojunction structure results from the specific band energy structure of the photoanode materials, and the unique high conductivity of the CdO layer is attributed to the suppression of electron-hole recombination; this suppression enhances the photocurrent density of the CdO/CdS/ZnO nanorod arrays. The photoresponse of the electrodes in an electrolytic solution without sacrificial agents indicated that the CdO layer also has the ability to suppress the well-known photocorrosive behavior of CdS/ZnO nanorods. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Enhanced electrochemical performance of Li-rich layered cathode materials via chemical activation of Li2MnO3 component and formation of spinel/carbon coating layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shengli; Xu, Kaijie; Wang, Yonggang; Shen, Xiangqian; Wang, Wenzhi; Su, Yanjing; Zhu, Meng; Xi, Xiaoming

    2017-10-01

    Li-rich layered oxides are promising cathode materials for advanced Li-ion batteries because of their high specific capacity and operating potential. In this work, the Li-rich layered oxide Li1·2Mn0·54Ni0·13Co0·13O2 (LMNC), is modified via a carbonization-reduction process (yielding the corresponding reduced compound denoted LMNC-R). Compared to the pristine oxide, LMNC-R delivers significantly enhanced initial discharge capacity/columbic efficiency, remarkably improved rate performance with an accelerated Li+ diffusion rate, and significantly increased capacity/voltage retention. The specific energy density and energy retention after 100 cycles increase from 378.2 Wh kg-1 and 47.7% for LMNC to 572.0 Wh kg-1 and 71.3%, respectively, for LMNC-R. The enhancement in the electrochemical performance of LMNC-R can be attributed to the synchronous formation of the oxygen non-stoichiometric Li2MnO3-δ component and to the carbon/spinel double coating layer in the material that resulted from the post-treatment process. Thus, the carbonization-reduction modification process can be used to tailor the structural evolution procedure and to suppress the metal ion dissolution of the Li-rich layered oxide during cycling.

  18. Contributions of the wall boundary layer to the formation of the counter-rotating vortex pair in transverse jets

    KAUST Repository

    SCHLEGEL, FABRICE

    2011-04-08

    Using high-resolution 3-D vortex simulations, this study seeks a mechanistic understanding of vorticity dynamics in transverse jets at a finite Reynolds number. A full no-slip boundary condition, rigorously formulated in terms of vorticity generation along the channel wall, captures unsteady interactions between the wall boundary layer and the jet - in particular, the separation of the wall boundary layer and its transport into the interior. For comparison, we also implement a reduced boundary condition that suppresses the separation of the wall boundary layer away from the jet nozzle. By contrasting results obtained with these two boundary conditions, we characterize near-field vortical structures formed as the wall boundary layer separates on the backside of the jet. Using various Eulerian and Lagrangian diagnostics, it is demonstrated that several near-wall vortical structures are formed as the wall boundary layer separates. The counter-rotating vortex pair, manifested by the presence of vortices aligned with the jet trajectory, is initiated closer to the jet exit. Moreover tornado-like wall-normal vortices originate from the separation of spanwise vorticity in the wall boundary layer at the side of the jet and from the entrainment of streamwise wall vortices in the recirculation zone on the lee side. These tornado-like vortices are absent in the case where separation is suppressed. Tornado-like vortices merge with counter-rotating vorticity originating in the jet shear layer, significantly increasing wall-normal circulation and causing deeper jet penetration into the crossflow stream. © 2011 Cambridge University Press.

  19. Formation and investigation of ultrathin layers of Co{sub 2}FeSi ferromagnetic alloy synthesized on silicon covered with a CaF{sub 2} barrier layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebenyuk, G.S.; Gomoyunova, M.V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Pronin, I.I., E-mail: Igor.Pronin@mail.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); ITMO University, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vyalikh, D.V. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Saint Petersburg State University, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Molodtsov, S.L. [ITMO University, 197101 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Experimental Physics, Technische Universitat Bergakademie Freiberg, 09599 Freiberg (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Highlights: • Formation of Co{sub 2}FeSi alloy films on the CaF{sub 2}/Si(111) substrate is studied in situ. • 5 nm CaF{sub 2} layer inhibits the diffusion of the alloy components into a substrate. • Annealing of deposited Co/Fe/Si layers at 200 °C leads to formation of the alloy. • The alloy is characterized by the mode with energy of 99.01 eV in Si 2p spectra. • 2 nm Co{sub 2}FeSi film is ferromagnetic and stable at temperatures below 450 °C. - Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Ultrathin (∼2 nm) films of Co{sub 2}FeSi ferromagnetic alloy were formed on silicon by solid-phase epitaxy and studied in situ. Experiments were carried out in an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using substrates of Si(1 1 1) single crystals covered with a 5 nm thick CaF{sub 2} barrier layer. The elemental and phase composition as well as the magnetic properties of the synthesized films were analyzed by photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation and by magnetic linear dichroism in photoemission of Fe 3p and Co 3p electrons. The study shows that the synthesis of the Co{sub 2}FeSi ferromagnetic alloy occurs in the temperature range of 200–400 °C. At higher temperatures, the films become island-like and lose their ferromagnetic properties, as the CaF{sub 2} barrier layer is unable to prevent a mass transfer between the film and the Si substrate, which violates the stoichiometry of the alloy.

  20. White Ring; White ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, H.; Yuzawa, H. [Nikken Sekkei Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-01-05

    White Ring is a citizen`s gymnasium used for figure skating and short track speed skating games of 18th Winter Olympic Games in 1998. White Ring is composed of a main-arena and a sub-arena. For the main-arena with an area 41mtimes66m, an ice link can be made by disengaging the potable floor and by flowing brine in the bridged polystyrene pipes embedded in the concrete floor. Due to the fortunate groundwater in this site, well water is used for the outside air treatment energy in 63% during heating and in 35% during cooling. Ammonia is used as a cooling medium for refrigerating facility. For the heating of audience area in the large space, heat load from the outside is reduced by enhancing the heat insulation performance of the roof of arena. The audience seats are locally heated using heaters. For the White Ring, high quality environment is realized for games through various functions of the large-scale roof of the large space. Success of the big event was expected. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer and its feedback on the haze formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-04-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) plays a key role in air pollution dispersion and influences day-to-day air quality. Some studies suggest that high aerosol loadings during severe haze events may modify PBL dynamics by radiative effects and hence enhance the development of haze. This study mainly investigates the radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer by conducting simulations with Weather Research and Forecasting single-column model (WRF-SCM). We find that high aerosol loading in PBL depressed boundary layer height (PBLH). But the magnitude of the changes of PBLH after adding aerosol loadings in our simulations are small and can't explain extreme high aerosol concentrations observed. We also investigate the impacts of the initial temperature and moisture profiles on the evolution of PBL. Our studies show that the impact of the vertical profile of moisture is comparable with aerosol effects.

  2. Layer-by-Layer Formation of Block-Copolymer-Derived TiO2 for Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Guldin, Stefan

    2011-12-15

    Morphology control on the 10 nm length scale in mesoporous TiO 2 films is crucial for the manufacture of high-performance dye-sensitized solar cells. While the combination of block-copolymer self-assembly with sol-gel chemistry yields good results for very thin films, the shrinkage during the film manufacture typically prevents the build-up of sufficiently thick layers to enable optimum solar cell operation. Here, a study on the temporal evolution of block-copolymer-directed mesoporous TiO 2 films during annealing and calcination is presented. The in-situ investigation of the shrinkage process enables the establishment of a simple and fast protocol for the fabrication of thicker films. When used as photoanodes in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells, the mesoporous networks exhibit significantly enhanced transport and collection rates compared to the state-of-the-art nanoparticle-based devices. As a consequence of the increased film thickness, power conversion efficiencies above 4% are reached. Fabrication of sufficiently thick mesoporous TiO 2 photoelectrodes with morphology control on the 10 nm length scale is essential for solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSC). This study of the temporal evolution of block-copolymer-directed mesoporous TiO 2 films during annealing and calcination enables the build-up of sufficiently thick films for high-performance ssDSC devices. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Nanostructured graded-index antireflection layer formation on GaN for enhancing light extraction from light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylewicz, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Wasielewski, R.; Mazur, P.; Rahman, F.

    2012-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and characterization of a randomly etched gallium nitride (GaN) surface for enhancing light extraction from light-emitting diodes. Our technique uses silica spheres as nano-targets in a sputter-etch process and produces a fine-grained surface with features around 35 nm. The textured surface layer acts as a graded refractive index layer with antireflection properties. Measurements show that photoluminescence intensity from such treated surfaces on a GaN LED wafer increases 2.2 times over that from pristine surfaces. These findings are also supported by computer modelling studies described here.

  4. THE C-FLAME QUENCHING BY CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY MIXING IN SUPER-AGB STARS AND THE FORMATION OF HYBRID C/O/Ne WHITE DWARFS AND SN PROGENITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denissenkov, P. A.; Herwig, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Truran, J. W. [The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Paxton, B., E-mail: pavelden@uvic.ca, E-mail: fherwig@uvic.ca [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2013-07-20

    After off-center C ignition in the cores of super asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) stars, the C flame propagates all the way down to the center, trailing behind it the C-shell convective zone, and thus building a degenerate ONe core. This standard picture is obtained in stellar evolution simulations if the bottom C-shell convection boundary is assumed to be a discontinuity associated with a strict interpretation of the Schwarzschild condition for convective instability. However, this boundary is prone to additional mixing processes, such as thermohaline convection and convective boundary mixing. Using hydrodynamic simulations, we show that contrary to previous results, thermohaline mixing is too inefficient to interfere with the C-flame propagation. However, even a small amount of convective boundary mixing removes the physical conditions required for the C-flame propagation all the way to the center. This result holds even if we allow for some turbulent heat transport in the CBM region. As a result, SAGB stars build in their interiors hybrid C-O-Ne degenerate cores composed of a relatively large CO core (M{sub CO} Almost-Equal-To 0.2 M{sub Sun }) surrounded by a thick ONe zone ({Delta}M{sub ONe} {approx}> 0.85 M{sub Sun }) with another thin CO layer above. If exposed by mass loss, these cores will become hybrid C-O-Ne white dwarfs. Otherwise, the ignition of C-rich material in the central core, surrounded by the thick ONe zone, may trigger a thermonuclear supernova (SN) explosion. The quenching of the C-flame may have implications for the ignition mechanism of SN Ia in the double-degenerate merger scenario.

  5. Evaluation of passive oxide layer formation-biocompatibility relationship in NiTi shape memory alloys: geometry and body location dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, S M; Canadinc, D; Maier, H J; Birer, O

    2014-03-01

    A systematic set of ex-situ experiments were carried out on Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) in order to identify the dependence of its biocompatibility on sample geometry and body location. NiTi samples with three different geometries were immersed into three different fluids simulating different body parts. The changes observed in alloy surface and chemical content of fluids upon immersion experiments designed for four different time periods were analyzed in terms of ion release, oxide layer formation, and chemical composition of the surface layer. The results indicate that both sample geometry and immersion fluid significantly affect the alloy biocompatibility, as evidenced by the passive oxide layer formation on the alloy surface and ion release from the samples. Upon a 30 day immersion period, all three types of NiTi samples exhibited lower ion release than the critical value for clinic applications. However; a significant amount of ion release was detected in the case of gastric fluid, warranting a thorough investigation prior to utility of NiTi in gastrointestinal treatments involving long-time contact with tissue. Furthermore, certain geometries appear to be safer than the others for each fluid, providing a new set of guidelines to follow while designing implants making use of NiTi SMAs to be employed in treatments targeting specific body parts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. On the formation of dense understory layers in forests worldwide: consequences and implications for forest dynamics, biodiversity, and succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro A. Royo; Walter P. Carson

    2006-01-01

    The mechanistic basis underpinning forest succession is the gap-phase paradigm in which overstory disturbance interacts with seedling and sapling shade tolerance to determine successional trajectories. The theory, and ensuing simulation models, typically assume that understory plants have little impact on the advance regeneration layer's composition. We challenge...

  7. Shallow boron-doped layer formation by boron diffusion from poly-Si through thin SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Masayasu

    1994-06-01

    This paper discusses boron doping using metal oxide semiconductor structure (poly-Si/SiO2/Si). The thin SiO2 layer acts as a stopper to poly-Si removal after doping. When boron implantation is used for poly-Si doping, shallow boron-doped layers suitable for base application can be formed by wet O2-ambient drive-in. When BF2 implantation is used, shallow boron-doped layers can be formed even by N2-ambient drive-in. The surface boron concentration of boron-doped layers increases with dose and saturates, since boron concentration in poly-Si in the region near the interface with SiO2 also increases with dose and saturates. An estimate of the boron diffusion coefficient in SiO2, D(sub ox), shows that it increases by about one order of magnitude both for boron implantation with subsequent wet O2-ambient drive-in and for BF2 implantation with subsequent N2-ambient drive-in.

  8. FORMATION AND RESEARCH OF MULTI-LAYER COMPOSITE PLASMA OXIDE COATINGS BASED ON ELEMENTS OF SCREEN METEROID PTOTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Okovity

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research for influence of plasma jet parameters (current, spraying distance, plasmasupporting nitrogen gas consumption, fractional composition of an initial powder and cooling degree by compressed air on characteristics of anti-meteorite coatings, subsequent processing modes by pulsed plasma. Properties of the obtained coatings and results of ballistic tests have been given in the paper. The proposed methodology has been based on complex metallographic, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopic investigations of anti-meteorite aluminum oxide coating. Optimization of air plasma spraying parameters for NiAl and Al2O3 materials has been carried out in the paper. The spraying parameters optimization has been executed on the basis of obtaining maximum materials utilization factor. Surface treatment of model screen elements with a double-layer composite coating (adhesive metal NiAl layer and hard ceramic oxide Al2O3 layer has been fulfilled while using compression plasma stream. Nitrogen has been used as working gas. Composite hard ceramic oxide Al2O3 coating is represented by porous structure consisting of 10–15 µm-size fused Al2O3 particles. Metallic inclusions formed due to erosion of plasmatron electrodes have been observed in the space between the particles. Surface of bilayer composite coatings has been processed by a compression plasma stream and due to nonsteady processes of melting and recrystallization high strength polycrystalline layer has been formed on their surface. In this context, those areas of the polycrystalline layer which had metal inclusions have appeared to be painted in various colors depending on chemical composition of the inclusions.

  9. Susceptibility of various parental lines of commercial white leghorn layers to infection with a naturally occurring recombinant avian leukosis virus containing subgroup B envelope and subgroup J long terminal repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Jody K; Pandiri, Arun R; Fadly, Aly M

    2006-09-01

    Chickens from seven different parental lines of commercial White Leghorn layer flocks from three independent breeders were inoculated with a naturally occurring avian leukosis virus (ALV) containing an ALV-B envelope and an ALV-J long terminal repeat (LTR) termed ALV-B/J. Additional groups of chickens from the same seven parental lines were inoculated with ALV-B. Chickens were tested for ALV viremia and antibody at 0, 4, 8, 16, and 32 wk postinfection. Chickens from all parental lines studied were susceptible to infection with ALV-B with 40%-100% of inoculated chickens positive for ALV at hatch following embryo infection. Similarly, infection of egg layer flocks with the ALV-B/J recombinant virus at 8 days of embryonation induced tolerance to ALV with 86%-100% of the chickens viremic, 40%-75% of the chickens shedding virus, and only 2/125 (2%) of the chickens producing serum-neutralizing antibodies against homologous ALV-B/J recombinant virus at 32 wk postinfection. In contrast, when infected with the ALV-B/J recombinant virus at hatch, 33%-82% of the chickens were viremic, 28%-47% shed virus, and 0%-56% produced serum-neutralizing antibodies against homologous ALV-B/J recombinant virus at 32 wk postinfection. Infection with the ALV-B/J recombinant virus at embryonation and at hatch induced predominately lymphoid leukosis (LL), along with other common ALV neoplasms, including erythroblastosis, osteopetrosis, nephroblastomas, and rhabdosarcomas. No incidence of myeloid leukosis (ML) was observed in any of the commercial White Leghorn egg layer flocks infected with ALV-B/J in the present study. Data suggest that the parental line of commercial layers may influence development of ALV-B/J-induced viremia and antibody, but not tumor type. Differences in type of tumors noted in the present study and those noted in the field case where the ALV-B/J was first isolated may be attributed to differences in the genetics of the commercial layer flock in which ML was first

  10. The manageable formation of the gradient-layered polymer/fullerene blend films via the addition of bathocuproine and their applications in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Dashan; Quan, Wei; Liu, Jinsuo; Li, Guifang; Chen, Lei [Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin (China); Zhang, Jidong; Yan, Donghang [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin Province (China)

    2012-06-15

    We report the manageable formation of the gradient-layered poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM) blend film by spin coating via introducing bathocuproine (BCP) into the mixed P3HT/PCBM solution. The BCP can improve the aggregation and thereby the preferential precipitation of PCBM during the spin-coating process, leading to the gradient-layered phase separation of P3HT and PCBM. The regular solar cells using the gradient-layered ternary blend films gave poor photovoltaic performance, due to the mismatch between the polarity of the regular-device structure and the vertical composition profile of the ternary blend film. By contrast, in the inverted solar cell, the gradient-layered ternary blend film could provide the increased device performance over the conventional bulk heterojunction binary blend films. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Tertiary lignites of As Pontes (NW-Spain) - an example for the composition of bright coal layers and its implications for formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagemann, H.W.; Pickel, W. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Geologie, Geochemie und Lagerstaetten des Erdoels und der Kohle; Cabrera, L.; Saez, A. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Geologia Dinamica, Geofisica i Paleontologia

    1997-12-31

    The Tertiary lignite basin of As Pontes is characterized by the frequent occurrence of bright brown coal layers. These layers, macroscopically very similar to those described for example in the Weisselster Basin and various other lignite deposits were studied in detail mainly by means of organic petrography in one seam of the basin and the data were related to the brightness of the coals. The question, if the colour of lignite is mainly influenced by the original plant input or the depositional environment, is under strong controversial discussion up to now. The bright coals of the As Pontes Basin are mineral rich (especially in clay) and/or contain high amounts of lipid rich matter (liptinite), especially coalification products of cork-tissue (suberinite). The results of the study indicate that the bright coal is highly degraded in comparison to the dark coals of the same basin. The formation of bright, litinite/mineral-rich lignite layers occurred especially during early basin evolution stages influenced by water table oscillations. Sedimentological, petrographical and organic geochemical data point to the fact that, although the paleoenvironments, where peat deposition took place, did not experience drastic changes, they were affected by noticable variations in hydrochemistry and groundwater stability, related to the tectonic historical record of the basin and the paleoclimatic conditions. In summary the origin of the bright layers of the As Pontes lignite is mainly related to the depositional environment. (orig.)

  12. Formation and photovoltaic performance of few-layered graphene-decorated TiO2 nanocrystals used in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueli; Cheng, Yuqing; Shu, Wei; Peng, Zhuoyin; Chen, Keqiang; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Wen; Zakharova, Galina S

    2014-06-21

    Few-layer graphene/TiO2 nanocrystal composites are successfully in situ synthesized at a low temperature of 400 °C using C28H16Br2 as the precursor. Raman mapping images show that the TiO2 nanocrystals are very uniformly dispersed in the composite films, and the in situ coating during the thermal decomposition process will favor the formation of a good interface combination between the few-layered graphene and the TiO2 nanocrystals. The few-layer graphene/TiO2 nanocrystal composites are used as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the conversion efficiency of 8.25% is obtained under full sun irradiation (AM 1.5), which increases by 65% compared with that of the pure TiO2 nanocrystal DSSCs (5.01%). It is found that the good interface combination between few-layered graphene and TiO2 nanocrystals may improve the electric conductivity and lifetime of photoinduced electrons in DSSCs. Moreover, some carbon atoms are doped into the crystal structure of the TiO2 nanocrystals during the thermal decomposition process, which will enhance the light absorption by narrowing the band gap and favor the improvement of the photovoltaic efficiency.

  13. Formation and photovoltaic performance of few-layered graphene-decorated TiO2 nanocrystals used in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueli; Cheng, Yuqing; Shu, Wei; Peng, Zhuoyin; Chen, Keqiang; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Wen; Zakharova, Galina S.

    2014-05-01

    Few-layer graphene/TiO2 nanocrystal composites are successfully in situ synthesized at a low temperature of 400 °C using C28H16Br2 as the precursor. Raman mapping images show that the TiO2 nanocrystals are very uniformly dispersed in the composite films, and the in situ coating during the thermal decomposition process will favor the formation of a good interface combination between the few-layered graphene and the TiO2 nanocrystals. The few-layer graphene/TiO2 nanocrystal composites are used as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the conversion efficiency of 8.25% is obtained under full sun irradiation (AM 1.5), which increases by 65% compared with that of the pure TiO2 nanocrystal DSSCs (5.01%). It is found that the good interface combination between few-layered graphene and TiO2 nanocrystals may improve the electric conductivity and lifetime of photoinduced electrons in DSSCs. Moreover, some carbon atoms are doped into the crystal structure of the TiO2 nanocrystals during the thermal decomposition process, which will enhance the light absorption by narrowing the band gap and favor the improvement of the photovoltaic efficiency.

  14. Chemical stabilization and improved thermal resilience of molecular arrangements: possible formation of a surface network of bonds by multiple pulse atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pauli, Muriel; Matos, Matheus J S; Siles, Pablo F; Prado, Mariana C; Neves, Bernardo R A; Ferreira, Sukarno O; Mazzoni, Mário S C; Malachias, Angelo

    2014-08-14

    In this work, we make use of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface reaction based on trimethyl-aluminum (TMA) and water to modify O-H terminated self-assembled layers of octadecylphosphonic acid (OPA). The structural modifications were investigated by X-ray reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. We observed a significant improvement in the thermal stability of ALD-modified molecules, with the existence of a supramolecular packing structure up to 500 °C. Following the experimental observations, density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate the possibility of formation of a covalent network with aluminum atoms connecting OPA molecules at terrace surfaces. Chemical stability is also achieved on top of such a composite surface, inhibiting further ALD oxide deposition. On the other hand, in the terrace edges, where the covalent array is discontinued, the chemical conditions allow for oxide growth. Analysis of the DFT results on band structure and density of states of modified OPA molecules suggests that besides the observed thermal resilience, the dielectric character of OPA layers is preserved. This new ALD-modified OPA composite is potentially suitable for applications such as dielectric layers in organic devices, where better thermal performance is required.

  15. In situ monitoring of structure formation in the active layer of polymer solar cells during roll-to-roll coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossander, Lea Hildebrandt; Zawacka, Natalia Klaudia; Dam, Henrik Friis

    2014-01-01

    scattering measurements in situ, enabling us to follow the crystal formation during drying. By varying the distance between the coating head and the point where the X-ray beam hits the film, we obtained measurements of 4 different stages of drying. For each of those stages, the scattering from as long a foil......The active layer crystallization during roll-to-roll coating of organic solar cells is studied in situ. We developed an X-ray setup where the coater unit is an integrated part of the small angle X-ray scattering instrument, making it possible to control the coating process while recording...... as possible is summed together, with the distance from coating head to scattering point kept constant. The results are average crystallographic properties for the active layer coated on a 30 m long foil. With this insight into the dynamics of crystallization in a roll-coated polymer film, we find...

  16. The role of anions, solvent molecules and solvated electrons in layer formation processes on anode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahner, D. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie

    1999-09-01

    The reactivity of anions, solvent molecules and solvated electrons against anode materials are coupled in a given electrolyte solution. The ratio between anion and solvent decomposition depends on the potential and the electrolyte composition. The life time of trapped solvated electrons within the growing SEI layer depends on the donor-acceptor properties of the incorporated solvent molecules and is in the range among 3-10 s. The places of the trapped electrons are the origin of 'metallic' lithium clusters within the forming layer. Their growth will lead to the well-known lithium dendrites on lithium-metal or the progressive irreversible capacity loss on lithium-carbons and therefore causes a lot of problems. Suggestions will be made how to solve these problems in order to achieve a homogeneous SEI with a reduced dendrite growth or decreased irreversible capacity loss. (orig.)

  17. White luminescence emission from silicon implanted germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Angélica Guadalupe; Escobosa-Echavarría, Arturo Escobosa; Kudriavtsev, Yuriy

    2018-01-01

    Germanium crystals were implanted with low-energy and high-dose silicon ions. The implantation led to amorphization of a near-surface layer due to the formation of many adatoms and vacancies. Adatoms can be absorbed in germanium by the amorphous matrix faster than vacancies. The excess of vacancies and their ability to cluster resulted in formation of a porous structure beneath the surface. Pores of different sizes and depths were observed experimentally. A subsequent thermal annealing was carried out at 973 K in order to repair the damage due to the implantation. The annealing resulted, among other things, in oxidation of the pores. Visible white luminescence was observed for the as-implanted samples at the 325 nm excitation wavelength; the photoluminescence intensity increased after the annealing. The optical properties were attributed to the combined effects of different defects and the formation of germanium oxides with oxygen deficiencies.

  18. Effect of Dietary Vanaspati Alone and in Combination with Stressors on Sero-biochemical Profile and Immunity in White Leghorn Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Raj, M. Alpha; Reddy, A. Gopala; Reddy, A. Rajasekhar; Adilaxmamma, K.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 160 White Leghorns of 20 wk age were divided randomly into eight groups. Groups 1, 3, 4 and 5 were fed basal feed and the rest were fed 5% vanaspati supplemented feed until 42 wk of age. From 42 to 54 wk, groups 3, 4 and 5 were fed 1% ferrous sulfate, 100 ppm chlorpyrifos (CPS) and 100 ppm cadmium, respectively, along with basal feed and groups 6, 7 and 8 were fed similar stressors, respectively, along with 5% vanaspati. Groups 1 and 2 served as controls for basal feed and 5% vanas...

  19. A visualization of threading dislocations formation and dynamics in mosaic growth of GaN-based light emitting diode epitaxial layers on (0001) sapphire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravadgar, P.; Horng, R. H.; Ou, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    A clear visualization of the origin and characteristics of threading dislocations (TDs) of GaN-based light emitting diode epitaxial layers on (0001) sapphire substrates have been carried out. Special experimental set up and chemical etchant along with field emission scanning electron microscopy are employed to study the dynamics of GaN TDs at different growth stages. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis visualized the formation of edge TDs is arising from extension of coalescences at boundaries of different tilting-twining nucleation grains "mosaic growth." Etch pits as representatives of edge TDs are in agreement with previous theoretical models and analyses of TDs core position and characteristics.

  20. XPS and STEM Study of the Interface Formation between Ultra-Thin Ru and Ir OER Catalyst Layers and Perylene Red Support Whiskers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasoska, Liliana [3M Industrial Mineral Products; Cullen, David A [ORNL; Hester, Amy E [3M Industrial Mineral Products; Atanasoski, Radoslav [3M Industrial Mineral Products

    2013-01-01

    The interface formation between perylene red (PR) and ruthenium or iridium OER catalysts has been studied systematically by XPS and STEM. The OER catalyst over-layers with thicknesses ranging from ~0.1 to ~50 nm were vapor deposited onto PR ex-situ. As seen by STEM, Ru and Ir form into nanoparticles, which agglomerate with increased loading. XPS data show a strong interaction between Ru and PR. Ir also interacts with PR although not to the extent seen for Ru. At low coverages, the entire Ru deposit is in the reacted state while a small portion of the deposited Ir remains metallic. Ru and Ir bonding occur at the PR carbonyl sites as evidenced by the attenuation of carbonyl photoemission and the emergence of new peak assigned to C-O single bond. The curve fitting analysis and the derived stoichiometry indicates the formation of metallo-organic bonds. The co-existence of oxide bonds is also apparent.

  1. White lies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erat, S.; Gneezy, U.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we distinguish between two types of white lies: those that help others at the expense of the person telling the lie, which we term altruistic white lies, and those that help both others and the liar, which we term Pareto white lies. We find that a large fraction of participants are

  2. Efficient electron-induced removal of oxalate ions and formation of copper nanoparticles from copper(II oxalate precursor layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Rückriem

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Copper(II oxalate grown on carboxy-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAM using a step-by-step approach was used as precursor for the electron-induced synthesis of surface-supported copper nanoparticles. The precursor material was deposited by dipping the surfaces alternately in ethanolic solutions of copper(II acetate and oxalic acid with intermediate thorough rinsing steps. The deposition of copper(II oxalate and the efficient electron-induced removal of the oxalate ions was monitored by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS. Helium ion microscopy (HIM reveals the formation of spherical nanoparticles with well-defined size and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS confirms their metallic nature. Continued irradiation after depletion of oxalate does not lead to further particle growth giving evidence that nanoparticle formation is primarily controlled by the available amount of precursor.

  3. ARX regulates cortical intermediate progenitor cell expansion and upper layer neuron formation through repression of Cdkn1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasante, Gaia; Simonet, Jacqueline C; Calogero, Raffaele; Crispi, Stefania; Sessa, Alessandro; Cho, Ginam; Golden, Jeffrey A; Broccoli, Vania

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the Aristaless-related homeobox (ARX) gene are found in a spectrum of epilepsy and X-linked intellectual disability disorders. During development Arx is expressed in pallial ventricular zone (VZ) progenitor cells where the excitatory projection neurons of the cortex are born. Arx(-/Y) mice were shown to have decreased proliferation in the cortical VZ resulting in smaller brains; however, the basis for this reduced proliferation was not established. To determine the role of ARX on cell cycle dynamics in cortical progenitor cells, we generated cerebral cortex-specific Arx mouse mutants (cKO). The loss of pallial Arx resulted in the reduction of cortical progenitor cells, particularly the proliferation of intermediate progenitor cells (IPCs) was affected. Later in development and postnatally cKO brains showed a reduction of upper layer but not deeper layer neurons consistent with the IPC defect. Transcriptional profile analysis of E14.5 Arx-ablated cortices compared with control revealed that CDKN1C, an inhibitor of cell cycle progression, is overexpressed in the cortical VZ and SVZ of Arx KOs throughout corticogenesis. We also identified ARX as a direct regulator of Cdkn1c transcription. Together these data support a model where ARX regulates the expansion of cortical progenitor cells through repression of Cdkn1c. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Formation of carbonaceous nano-layers under high interfacial pressures during lubrication with mineral and bio-based oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltrus, John P. [U.S. DOE

    2014-01-01

    In order to better protect steel surfaces against wear under high loads, understanding of chemical reactions between lubricants and metal at high interfacial pressures and elevated temperatures needs to be improved. Solutions at 5 to 20 wt. % of zinc di-2-ethylhexyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) and chlorinated paraffins (CP) in inhibited paraffinic mineral oil (IPMO) and inhibited soy bean oil (ISBO) were compared on a Twist Compression Tribotester (TCT) at 200 MPa. Microscopy of wear tracks after 10 seconds tribotesting showed much smoother surface profiles than those of unworn areas. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) coupled with Ar-ion sputtering demonstrated that additive solutions in ISBO formed 2–3 times thicker carbon-containing nano-layers compared to IPMO. The amounts of Cl, S or P were unexpectedly low and detectable only on the top surface with less than 5 nm penetration. CP blends in IPMO formed more inorganic chlorides than those in ISBO. It can be concluded that base oils are primarily responsible for the thickness of carbonaceous nano-layers during early stages of severe boundary lubrication, while CP or ZDDP additive contributions are important, but less significant.

  5. XPS and STEM study of the interface formation between ultra-thin Ru and Ir OER catalyst layers and perylene red support whiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanasoska Ljiljana L.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interface formation between nano-structured perylene red (PR whiskers and oxygen evolution reaction (OER catalysts ruthenium and iridium has been studied systematically by XPS and STEM. The OER catalyst over-layers with thicknesses ranging from ~0.1 to ~50 nm were vapor deposited onto PR ex-situ. STEM images demonstrate that, with increasing thickness, Ru and Ir transform from amorphous clusters to crystalline nanoparticles, which agglomerate with increased over-layer thickness. XPS data show a strong interaction between Ru and PR. Ir also interacts with PR although not to the extent seen for Ru. At low coverages, the entire Ru deposit is in the reacted state while a small portion of the deposited Ir remains metallic. Ru and Ir bonding occur at the PR carbonyl sites as evidenced by the attenuation of carbonyl photoemission and the emergence of new peak assigned to C-O single bond. The curve fitting analysis and the derived stoichiometry indicates the formation of metallo-organic bonds. The co-existence of oxide bonds is also apparent.

  6. In Situ Formation of ZnO in Graphene: A Facile Way To Produce a Smooth and Highly Conductive Electron Transport Layer for Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Aifeng; Wang, Qingxia; Chen, Lie; Hu, Xiaotian; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Yinfu; Chen, Yiwang

    2015-07-29

    A novel electron transport layer (ETL) based on zinc oxide@graphene:ethyl cellulose (ZnO@G:EC) nanocomposite is prepared by in situ formation of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals in a graphene matrix to improve the performance of polymer solar cells. Liquid ultrasound exfoliation by ethyl cellulose as stabilizer not only allows for uniform dispersion of graphene solution but also maintains an original structure of graphene gaining a high conductivity. The ZnO@G:EC ETL displays a quite smooth morphology and develops the energy-level alignment for the electron extraction and transportation. Subsequently, the device based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) with the ZnO@G:EC as ETL obtains a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.9%, exhibiting a ∼20% improvement compared to the familiar device with bare ZnO nanocrystals as ETL. Replacing the active layer with polythieno[3,4-b]thiophene/benzodithiophene (PTB7): (6,6)-phenyl-C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM), the PCE can be dramatically improved to 8.4%. This facile and fascinating method to produce a smooth and highly conductive electron transport layer provides an anticipated approach to obtain high performance polymer solar cells.

  7. Effective Duration of Gas Nitriding Process on AISI 316L for the Formation of a Desired Thickness of Surface Nitrided Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Hassan R. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High temperature gas nitriding performed on AISI 316L at the temperature of 1200°C. The microstructure of treated AISI 316L samples were observed to identify the formation of the microstructure of nitrided surface layer. The grain size of austenite tends to be enlarged when the nitriding time increases, but the austenite single phase structure is maintained even after the long-time solution nitriding. Using microhardness testing, the hardness values drop to the center of the samples. The increase in surface hardness is due to the high nitrogen concentration at or near the surface. At 245HV, the graph of the effective duration of nitriding process was plotted to achieve the maximum depth of nitrogen diffuse under the surface. Using Sigma Plot software best fit lines of the experimental result found and plotted to find out effective duration of nitriding equation as Y=1.9491(1-0.7947x, where Y is the thickness of nitrided layer below the surface and X is duration of nitriding process. Based on this equation, the duration of gas nitriding process can be estimated to produce desired thickness of nitrided layer.

  8. Mechanical intermixing of components in (CoMoNi)-based systems and the formation of (CoMoNi)/WC nanocomposite layers on Ti sheets under ball collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romankov, S.; Park, Y. C.; Shchetinin, I. V.

    2017-11-01

    Cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), and nickel (Ni) components were simultaneously introduced onto titanium (Ti) surfaces from a composed target using ball collisions. Tungsten carbide (WC) balls were selected for processing as the source of a cemented carbide reinforcement phase. During processing, ball collisions continuously introduced components from the target and the grinding media onto the Ti surface and induced mechanical intermixing of the elements, resulting in formation of a complex nanocomposite structure onto the Ti surface. The as-fabricated microstructure consisted of uniformly dispersed WC particles embedded within an integrated metallic matrix composed of an amorphous phase with nanocrystalline grains. The phase composition of the alloyed layers, atomic reactions, and the matrix grain sizes depended on the combination of components introduced onto the Ti surface during milling. The as-fabricated layer exhibited a very high hardness compared to industrial metallic alloys and tool steel materials. This approach could be used for the manufacture of both cemented carbides and amorphous matrix composite layers.

  9. Glass formation and unusual hygroscopic growth of iodic acid solution droplets with relevance for iodine mediated particle formation in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Iodine oxide particles are known to nucleate in the marine boundary layer where gas phase molecular iodine and organoiodine species are produced by macroalgae. These ultra-fine particles may then grow through the condensation of other materials to sizes where they may serve as cloud condensation nuclei. There has been some debate over the chemical identity of the initially nucleated particles. In laboratory simulations, hygroscopic measurements have been used to infer that they are composed of insoluble I2O4, while elemental analysis of laboratory generated particles suggests soluble I2O5 or its hydrated form iodic acid, HIO3 (I2O5·H2O. In this paper we explore the response of super-micron sized aqueous iodic acid solution droplets to varying humidity using both Raman microscopy and single particle electrodynamic traps. These measurements reveal that the propensity of an iodic acid solution droplet to crystallise is negligible on drying to ~0% relative humidity (RH. On applying mechanical pressure to these droplets they shatter in a manner consistent with an ultra-viscous liquid or a brittle glass. Water retention in amorphous material at low RH is important for understanding the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles and uptake of other condensable material. Subsequent water uptake between 10 and 20% RH causes their viscosity to reduce sufficiently that the cracked droplets flow and merge. The persistence of iodic acid solution in an amorphous state, rather than a crystalline state, suggests they will more readily accommodate other condensable material and are therefore more likely to grow to sizes where they may serve as cloud condensation nuclei. On increasing the humidity to ~90% the mass of the droplets only increases by ~20% with a corresponding increase in radius of only 6%, which is remarkably small for a highly soluble material. We suggest that the

  10. Controlling the formation of wrinkles in a single layer graphene sheet subjected to in-plane shear

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Wen Hui

    2011-08-01

    The initiation and development of wrinkles in a single layer graphene sheet subjected to in-plane shear displacements are investigated. The dependence of the wavelength and amplitude of wrinkles on the applied shear displacements is explicitly obtained with molecular mechanics simulations. A continuum model is developed for the characteristics of the wrinkles which show that the wrinkle wavelength decreases with an increase in shear loading, while the amplitude of the wrinkles is found to initially increase and then become stable. The propagation and growth process of the wrinkles in the sheet is elucidated. It is expected that the research could promote applications of graphenes in the transportation of biological systems, separation science, and the development of the fluidic electronics. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The formation of low-mass helium white dwarfs orbiting pulsars . Evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries below the bifurcation period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istrate, A. G.; Tauris, T. M.; Langer, N.

    2014-11-01

    Context. Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are generally believed to be old neutron stars (NSs) that have been spun up to high rotation rates via accretion of matter from a companion star in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). This scenario has been strongly supported by various pieces of observational evidence. However, many details of this recycling scenario remain to be understood. Aims: Here we investigate binary evolution in close LMXBs to study the formation of radio MSPs with low-mass helium white dwarf companions (He WDs) in tight binaries with orbital periods Porb ≃ 2-9h. In particular, we examine i) if the observed systems can be reproduced by theoretical modelling using standard prescriptions of orbital angular momentum losses (i.e. with respect to the nature and the strength of magnetic braking), ii) if our computations of the Roche-lobe detachments can match the observed orbital periods, and iii) if the correlation between WD mass and orbital period (MWD, Porb) is valid for systems with Porb< 2 days. Methods: Numerical calculations with a detailed stellar evolution code were used to trace the mass-transfer phase in ~400 close LMXB systems with different initial values of donor star mass, NS mass, orbital period, and the so-called γ-index of magnetic braking. Subsequently, we followed the orbital and the interior evolution of the detached low-mass (proto) He WDs, including stages with residual shell hydrogen burning. Results: We find that severe fine-tuning is necessary to reproduce the observed MSPs in tight binaries with He WD companions of mass <0.20 M⊙, which suggests that something needs to be modified or is missing in the standard input physics of LMXB modelling. Results from previous independent studies support this conclusion. We demonstrate that the theoretically calculated (MWD, Porb)-relation is in general also valid for systems with Porb< 2 days, although with a large scatter in He WD masses between 0.15-0.20 M⊙. The results of the thermal

  12. Step-height standards based on the rapid formation of monolayer steps on the surface of layered crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komonov, A.I. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ISP SBRAS), pr. Lavrentieva 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Prinz, V.Ya., E-mail: prinz@isp.nsc.ru [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ISP SBRAS), pr. Lavrentieva 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Seleznev, V.A. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ISP SBRAS), pr. Lavrentieva 13, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kokh, K.A. [Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IGM SB RAS), pr. Koptyuga 3, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Shlegel, V.N. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (NIIC SB RAS), pr. Lavrentieva 3, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Easily reproducible step-height standard for SPM calibrations was proposed. • Step-height standard is monolayer steps on the surface of layered single crystal. • Long-term change in surface morphology of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and ZnWO{sub 4} was investigated. • Conducting surface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals appropriate for calibrating STM. • Ability of robust SPM calibrations under ambient conditions were demonstrated. - Abstract: Metrology is essential for nanotechnology, especially for structures and devices with feature sizes going down to nm. Scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) permits measurement of nanometer- and subnanometer-scale objects. Accuracy of size measurements performed using SPMs is largely defined by the accuracy of used calibration measures. In the present publication, we demonstrate that height standards of monolayer step (∼1 and ∼0.6 nm) can be easily prepared by cleaving Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and ZnWO{sub 4} layered single crystals. It was shown that the conducting surface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals offers height standard appropriate for calibrating STMs and for testing conductive SPM probes. Our AFM study of the morphology of freshly cleaved (0001) Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} surfaces proved that such surfaces remained atomically smooth during a period of at least half a year. The (010) surfaces of ZnWO{sub 4} crystals remained atomically smooth during one day, but already two days later an additional nanorelief of amplitude ∼0.3 nm appeared on those surfaces. This relief, however, did not further grow in height, and it did not hamper the calibration. Simplicity and the possibility of rapid fabrication of the step-height standards, as well as their high stability, make these standards available for a great, permanently growing number of users involved in 3D printing activities.

  13. The S-layer homology domain-containing protein SlhA from Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T is important for swarming and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Janesch

    Full Text Available Swarming and biofilm formation have been studied for a variety of bacteria. While this is well investigated for Gram-negative bacteria, less is known about Gram-positive bacteria, including Paenibacillus alvei, a secondary invader of diseased honeybee colonies infected with Melissococcus pluton, the causative agent of European foulbrood (EFB.Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T is a Gram-positive bacterium which was recently shown to employ S-layer homology (SLH domains as cell wall targeting modules to display proteins on its cell surface. This study deals with the newly identified 1335-amino acid protein SlhA from P. alvei which carries at the C‑terminus three consecutive SLH-motifs containing the predicted binding sequences SRGE, VRQD, and LRGD instead of the common TRAE motif. Based on the proof of cell surface location of SlhA by fluorescence microscopy using a SlhA-GFP chimera, the binding mechanism was investigated in an in vitro assay. To unravel a putative function of the SlhA protein, a knockout mutant was constructed. Experimental data indicated that one SLH domain is sufficient for anchoring of SlhA to the cell surface, and the SLH domains of SlhA recognize both the peptidoglycan and the secondary cell wall polymer in vitro. This is in agreement with previous data from the S-layer protein SpaA, pinpointing a wider utilization of that mechanism for cell surface display of proteins in P. alvei. Compared to the wild-type bacterium ΔslhA revealed changed colony morphology, loss of swarming motility and impaired biofilm formation. The phenotype was similar to that of the flagella knockout Δhag, possibly due to reduced EPS production influencing the functionality of the flagella of ΔslhA.This study demonstrates the involvement of the SLH domain-containing protein SlhA in swarming and biofilm formation of P. alvei CCM 2051(T.

  14. White Centered Retinal Hemorrhages in Vitamin B12 Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Zehetner

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To report a case of severe vitamin B12 deficiency anemia presenting with white centered retinal hemorrhages. Methods: Interventional case report. Results: A 40-year-old man, general practitioner himself, presented with a 1-day history of diminished left visual acuity and a drop-shaped central scotoma. The corrected visual acuities were 20/20, OD and 20/100, OS. Ophthalmic examination revealed bilaterally pale tarsal conjunctiva, discretely icteric bulbar conjunctiva and disseminated white centered intraretinal hemorrhages with foveal involvement. OCT imaging through these lesions revealed a retinal thickening caused by a sub-ILM accumulation of hyperreflective and inhomogeneous deposits within the nerve fiber layer. Immediate laboratory work-up showed severe megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency requiring erythrocyte transfusions. Discussion: Most reports of white centered retinal hemorrhages have been described in patients with leukemic retinopathy and bacterial endocarditis. It is interesting that this case of vitamin B12 deficiency anemia retinopathy has a clinically indistinguishable fundus appearance. This is probably due to the common pathology of capillary disruption and subsequent hemostatic fibrin plug formation. In megaloblastic anemia, direct anoxia results in endothelial dysfunction. The loss of impermeability allows extrusion of whole blood and subsequent diffusion from the disrupted site throughout and above the nerve fiber layer. Therefore the biomicroscopic pattern of white centered hemorrhages observed in anemic retinopathy is most likely due to the clot formation as the reparative sequence after capillary rupture.

  15. Iodine-mediated coastal particle formation: an overview of the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe Roscoff coastal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. McFiggans

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a summary of the measurements made during the heavily-instrumented Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe coastal study in Roscoff on the North West coast of France throughout September 2006. It was clearly demonstrated that iodine-mediated coastal particle formation occurs, driven by daytime low tide emission of molecular iodine, I2, by macroalgal species fully or partially exposed by the receding waterline. Ultrafine particle concentrations strongly correlate with the rapidly recycled reactive iodine species, IO, produced at high concentrations following photolysis of I2. The heterogeneous macroalgal I2 sources lead to variable relative concentrations of iodine species observed by path-integrated and in situ measurement techniques.

    Apparent particle emission fluxes were associated with an enhanced apparent depositional flux of ozone, consistent with both a direct O3 deposition to macroalgae and involvement of O3 in iodine photochemistry and subsequent particle formation below the measurement height. The magnitude of the particle formation events was observed to be greatest at the lowest tides with the highest concentrations of ultrafine particles growing to the largest sizes, probably by the condensation of anthropogenically-formed condensable material. At such sizes the particles should be able to act as cloud condensation nuclei at reasonable atmospheric supersaturations.

  16. Effect of Dietary Vanaspati Alone and in Combination with Stressors on Sero-biochemical Profile and Immunity in White Leghorn Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, M Alpha; Reddy, A Gopala; Reddy, A Rajasekhar; Adilaxmamma, K

    2011-01-01

    A total of 160 White Leghorns of 20 wk age were divided randomly into eight groups. Groups 1, 3, 4 and 5 were fed basal feed and the rest were fed 5% vanaspati supplemented feed until 42 wk of age. From 42 to 54 wk, groups 3, 4 and 5 were fed 1% ferrous sulfate, 100 ppm chlorpyrifos (CPS) and 100 ppm cadmium, respectively, along with basal feed and groups 6, 7 and 8 were fed similar stressors, respectively, along with 5% vanaspati. Groups 1 and 2 served as controls for basal feed and 5% vanaspati feed. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine transaminase (ALT), total protein, albumin, globulin, A/G ratio, total cholesterol, high density cholesterol (HDL), triglycerides, creatinine, hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer, and phytohemagglutination (PHA) index were studied. Supplementation of vanaspati resulted in a significant reduction in PHA, cholesterol, albumin and HI titer. Cadmium significantly increased ALP, AST, creatinine and paradoxically increased HDL cholesterol and HI titers. Vanaspati along with cadmium showed similar effects. Administration of CPS lowered PHA index, whereas supplementation along with vanaspati decreased the HI titers and increased the PHA index. Supplementation of vanaspati alone and in combination revealed harmful effects and aggravated the toxicities of CPS and cadmium. Hence, it is concluded that consumption of vanaspati could be harmful.

  17. Solvent Role in the Formation of Electric Double Layers with Surface Charge Regulation: A Bystander or a Key Participant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleharty, Mark E.; van Swol, Frank; Petsev, Dimiter N.

    2016-01-01

    The charge formation at interfaces involving electrolyte solutions is due to the chemical equilibrium between the surface reactive groups and the potential determining ions in the solution (i.e., charge regulation). In this Letter we report our findings that this equilibrium is strongly coupled to the precise molecular structure of the solution near the charged interface. The neutral solvent molecules dominate this structure due to their overwhelmingly large number. Treating the solvent as a structureless continuum leads to a fundamentally inadequate physical picture of charged interfaces. We show that a proper account of the solvent effect leads to an unexpected and complex system behavior that is affected by the molecular and ionic excluded volumes and van der Waals interactions.

  18. Three-Dimensional Multiscale Modeling of Stable Intermediate State Formation Mechanism in a Single Active Layer- Phase Change Memory Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, Onur; Cinar, Ibrahim; Karakas, Vedat; Aslan, Ozgur Burak; Gokce, Aisha; Stipe, Barry; Katine, Jordan A.; Aktas, Gulen; Ozatay, Ozhan

    2014-03-01

    Phase change memory (PCM) appears as a potential memory technology with its superior scalability which could be enhanced by a boost in storage density via multiple-bit per cell functionality. Given the large contrast between set and reset states of a PCM cell it is yet unclear whether it is possible to create intermediate logic states reproducibly and controllably in a device with a single active phase change layer. Here we report the results of a 3D finite element model that pinpoints the direct effect of current distribution and the indirect effect of device top contact fabrication induced defects through modification of phase change kinetics (crystallite nucleation and growth rates) on stabilization of intermediate states. A comprehensive picture of the electrical, thermal and phase change dynamics is obtained using a multiphysics approach. Our study shows that homogeneous and heterogeneous phase transition can be induced in the active region such that nonuniform temperature distribution and modification of switching dynamics with various contact shapes and sizes play a major role in the stabilization of a mixed phase state. This work has been supported by the European Commission FP7 Marie Curie IRG grant: PCM-256281 and TUBITAK grant: 113F385.

  19. A novel strategy for high-stability lithium sulfur batteries by in situ formation of polysulfide adsorptive-blocking layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liming; Li, Gaoran; Liu, Binhong; Li, Zhoupeng; Zheng, Junsheng; Zheng, Jim P.

    2017-07-01

    Lithium sulfur (Lisbnd S) batteries are one of the most promising energy storage devices owing to their high energy and power density. However, the shuttle effect as a key barrier hinders its practical application by resulting in low coulombic efficiency and poor cycling performance. Herein, a novel design of in situ formed polysulfide adsorptive-blocking layer (PAL) on the cathode surface was developed to tame the polysulfide shuttling and promote the cycling stability for Lisbnd S batteries. The PAL is consisted of La2S3, which is capable to chemically adsorb polysulfide via the strong interaction of Lasbnd S bond and Ssbnd S bond, and build an effective barrier against sulfur escaping. Moreover, the La2S3 is capable to suppress the crystallization of Li2S and promote the ion transfer, which contributes to the reduced internal resistance of batteries. Furthermore, the by-product LiNO3 simultaneously forms a stable anode solid and electrolyte interface to further inhibit the polysulfide shuttle. By this simple and convenient method, the resultant Lisbnd S batteries achieved exceptional cycling stability with an ultralow decay rate of 0.055% since the 10th cycle.

  20. Step-height standards based on the rapid formation of monolayer steps on the surface of layered crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komonov, A. I.; Prinz, V. Ya.; Seleznev, V. A.; Kokh, K. A.; Shlegel, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    Metrology is essential for nanotechnology, especially for structures and devices with feature sizes going down to nm. Scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) permits measurement of nanometer- and subnanometer-scale objects. Accuracy of size measurements performed using SPMs is largely defined by the accuracy of used calibration measures. In the present publication, we demonstrate that height standards of monolayer step (∼1 and ∼0.6 nm) can be easily prepared by cleaving Bi2Se3 and ZnWO4 layered single crystals. It was shown that the conducting surface of Bi2Se3 crystals offers height standard appropriate for calibrating STMs and for testing conductive SPM probes. Our AFM study of the morphology of freshly cleaved (0001) Bi2Se3 surfaces proved that such surfaces remained atomically smooth during a period of at least half a year. The (010) surfaces of ZnWO4 crystals remained atomically smooth during one day, but already two days later an additional nanorelief of amplitude ∼0.3 nm appeared on those surfaces. This relief, however, did not further grow in height, and it did not hamper the calibration. Simplicity and the possibility of rapid fabrication of the step-height standards, as well as their high stability, make these standards available for a great, permanently growing number of users involved in 3D printing activities.

  1. Exploring Pore Formation of Atomic Layer-Deposited Overlayers by in Situ Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tao; Karwal, Saurabh; Aoun, Bachir; Zhao, Haiyan; Ren, Yang; Canlas, Christian P.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.

    2016-10-11

    In this work, we explore the pore structure of overcoated materials by in situ synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)/(WAXS). Thin films of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) with thicknesses of 4.9 and 2.5 nm, respectively, are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on non-porous nanoparticles. In situ X-ray measurements reveal that porosity is induced in the ALD films by annealing the samples at high temperature. Moreover, this pore formation can be attributed to densification resulting from an amorphous to crystalline phase transition of the ALD films as confirmed by high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and pair distribution function (PDF). Simultaneous SAXS/WAXS results not only show the porosity is formed by the phase transition but also that the pore size increases with temperature.

  2. Exploring Pore Formation of Atomic Layer-Deposited Overlayers by in Situ Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tao; Karwal, Saurabh; Aoun, Bachir; Zhao, Haiyan; Ren, Yang; Canlas, Christian P.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.

    2016-10-11

    In this work, we explore the pore structure of overcoated materials by in situ synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)/(WAXS). Thin films of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) with thicknesses of 4.9 and 2.5 nm, respectively, are prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on non-porous nanoparticles. In situ X-ray measurements reveal that porosity is induced in the ALD films by annealing the samples at high temperature. Moreover, this pore formation can be attributed to densification resulting from an amorphous to crystalline phase transition of the ALD films as confirmed by high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and pair distribution function (PDF). Simultaneous SAXS/WAXS results not only show that the porosity is formed by this phase transition but also that the pore size increases with temperature.

  3. Peculiarities of helium porosity formation in the surface layer of the structural materials used for the first wall of fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, I. I.; Stal'tsov, M. S.; Kalin, B. A.; Bogachev, I. A.; Guseva, L. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to study the formation of helium porosity in the nearsurface layer of ferritic-martensitic steels and vanadium irradiated by 40-keV He+ ions at a temperature of 923 K up to fluence of 5 × 1020 He+/m2 and, then, by 7.5-MeV Ni2+ ions at 923 K up to dose of 100 dpa. Large gas bubbles are found to form in the zone with the maximum concentration of radiation vacancies during He+ ion irradiation. Moreover, small bubbles form in some grains at the depths that are larger than the He+ ion range in the irradiated material. Sequential irradiation by He+ and Ni2+ ions leads to the nucleation of helium bubbles at still larger depths due to helium atom transport via recoil and/or ion mixing. The precipitation hardening of the steels by Y2O3 oxide nanoparticles is found to suppress helium swelling substantially.

  4. Morphology transition of raft-model membrane induced by osmotic pressure: Formation of double-layered vesicle similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onai, Teruaki; Hirai, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: mhirai@fs.aramaki.gunma-u.ac.j [Department of Physics, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8510 (Japan)

    2010-10-01

    The effect of osmotic pressure on the structure of large uni-lamellar vesicle (LUV) of the lipid mixtures of monosialoganglioside (G{sub M1})-cholesterol-dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) was studies by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) method. The molar ratios of the mixtures were 0.1/0.1/1, 0/0.1/1, and 0/0/1. The ternary lipid mixture is a model of lipid rafts. The value of osmotic pressure was varied from 0 to 4.16x10{sup 5} N/m{sup 2} by adding the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in the range from 0 to 25 % w/v. In the case of the mixtures without G{sub M1}, the rise of the osmotic pressure just enhances the multi-lamellar stacking with deceasing the inter-lamellar spacing. On the other hand, the mixture containing G{sub M1} shows the structural transition from a uni-lamellar vesicle to a double-layered vesicle (a liposome including a smaller one inside) by the rise of osmotic pressure. In this morphology transition the total surface area of the double-layered vesicle is mostly as same as that of the LUV at the initial state. The polar head region of G{sub M1} is bulky and highly hydrophilic due to the oligosaccharide chain containing a sialic acid residue. Then, the present results suggest that the existence of G{sub M1} in the outer-leaflet of the LUV is essentially important for such a double-layered vesicle formation. Alternatively, a phenomenon similar to an endo- and/or exocytosis in cells can be caused simply by a variation of osmotic pressure.

  5. Impact of sapphire nitridation on formation of Al-polar inversion domains in N-polar AlN epitaxial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolyarchuk, N.; Markurt, T.; Courville, A.; March, K.; Tottereau, O.; Vennéguès, P.; Albrecht, M.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we study the basic processes during the initial stages of growth which control polarity in N-polar AlN films grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. More specifically, we study the morphology and atomic structure of the films as dependent on nitridation conditions, i.e., duration and temperature, by atomic force microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy ,and high resolution high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Our experimental results show that beyond a critical temperature of 1000 °C in addition to an omnipresent two-dimensional aluminum-oxynitride layer, three-dimensional Al-polar AlN islands form. While the aluminum-oxynitride layer is unstable under high temperature growth conditions and results in N-polar films, Al-polar islands are stable and induce Al-polar columnar inversion domains in the N-polar AlN films. Appropriate nitridation conditions (approximately 10 minutes at T = 850 °C-950 °C) and adjustment of growth parameters (reactor pressure, NH3 flux, etc.) prevent the formation of Al-polar islands, which is essential for achieving N-polar films free of inversion domains.

  6. Quaternary Ti-20Nb-10Zr-5Ta alloy during immersion in simulated physiological solutions: formation of layers, dissolution and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošev, Ingrid; Hmeljak, Julija; Žerjav, Gregor; Cör, Andrej; Calderon Moreno, Jose Maria; Popa, Monica

    2014-04-01

    Samples of the quaternary Ti-20Nb-10Zr-5Ta alloy were immersed in Hanks' simulated physiological solution and in minimum essential medium (MEM) for 25 days. Samples of Ti metal served as controls. During immersion, the concentration of ions dissolved in MEM was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, while at the end of the experiment the composition of the surface layers was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and their morphology by scanning electron microscopy equipped for chemical analysis. The surface layer formed during immersion was comprised primarily of TiO2 but contained oxides of alloying elements as well. The degree of oxidation differed for different metal cations; while titanium achieved the highest valency, tantalum remained as the metal or is oxidized to its sub-oxides. Calcium phosphate was formed in both solutions, while formation of organic-related species was observed only in MEM. Dissolution of titanium ions was similar for metal and alloy. Among alloying elements, zirconium dissolved in the largest quantity. The long-term effects of alloy implanted in the recipient's body were investigated in MEM, using two types of human cells-an osteoblast-like cell line and immortalized pulmonary fibroblasts. The in vitro biocompatibility of the quaternary alloy was similar to that of titanium, since no detrimental effects on cell survival, induction of apoptosis, delay of growth, or change in alkaline phosphatase activity were observed on incubation in MEM.

  7. Flux Growth of Highly Crystalline Photocatalytic BaTiO3 Particle Layers on Porous Titanium Sponge Substrate and Insights into the Formation Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Li, B.

    2017-09-01

    A unique architecture of idiomorphic and highly crystalline BaTiO3 particle layers directly grown on a porous titanium sponge substrate was successfully achieved for the first time using a facile molten salt method at a relatively low temperature of 700 °C. Specifically, the low-melting KCl-NaCl eutectic salts and barium hydroxide octahydrate were employed as the reaction medium and barium source, respectively. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry were used to characterize the structure, morphology and optical property of the obtained samples. The results revealed that the flux-grown tetragonal BaTiO3 products had well-defined and uniform morphology with an average size of 300 nm and a band gap of ∼3.16 eV. Based on XRD, EDS, SEM, and TEM, the possible formation mechanism responsible for the well-developed architecture of BaTiO3 particle layers was proposed and discussed. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activity of the flux-grown BaTiO3 products for organic pollutant degradation under simulated sunlight irradiation was also investigated.

  8. Formation of nano-laminated structures in a dry sliding wear-induced layer under different wear mechanisms of 20CrNi2Mo steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Cun-hong; Liang, Yi-long; Jiang, Yun; Yang, Ming; Long, Shao-lei

    2017-11-01

    The microstructures of 20CrNi2Mo steel underneath the contact surface were examined after dry sliding. Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and an ultra-micro-hardness tester were used to characterize the worn surface and dry sliding wear-induced layer. Martensite laths were ultra-refined due to cumulative strains and a large strain gradient that occurred during cyclic loading in wear near the surface. The microstructure evolution in dominant abrasive wear differs from that in adhesive wear. In dominant abrasive wear, only bent martensite laths with high-density deformation dislocations were observed. In contrast, in dominant adhesive wear, gradient structures were formed along the depth from the wear surface. Cross-sectional TEM foils were prepared in a focused ion beam (FIB) to observe the gradient structures in a dry sliding wear-induced layer at depths of approximately 1-5 μm and 5-20 μm. The gradient structures contained nano-laminated structures with an average thickness of 30-50 nm and bent martensite laths. We found that the original martensite laths coordinated with the strain energy and provided origin boundaries for the formation of gradient structures. Geometrically necessary boundaries (GNBs) and isolated dislocation boundaries (IDBs) play important roles in forming the nano-laminated structures.

  9. Study on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on sol-gel processed hafnium oxide as dielectric layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Guy G; Acton, Orb; Ma, Hong; Ka, Jae Won; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2009-02-17

    High dielectric constant (k) metal oxides such as hafnium oxide (HfO2) have gained significant interest due to their applications in microelectronics. In order to study and control the surface properties of hafnium oxide, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of four different long aliphatic molecules with binding groups of phosphonic acid, carboxylic acid, and catechol were formed and characterized. Surface modification was performed to improve the interface between metal oxide and top deposited materials as well as to create suitable dielectric properties, that is, leakage current and capacitance densities, which are important in organic thin film transistors. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and simple metal-HfO2-SAM-metal devices were used to characterize the surfaces before and after SAM modification on sol-gel processed hafnium oxide. The alkylphosphonic acid provided the best monolayer formation on sol-gel processed hafnium oxide to generate a well-packed, ultrathin dielectric exhibiting a low leakage current density of 2x10(-8) A/cm2 at an applied voltage of -2.0 V and high capacitance density of 0.55 microF/cm2 at 10 kHz. Dialkylcatechol showed similar characteristics and the potential for using the catechol SAMs to modify HfO2 surfaces. In addition, the integration of this alkylphosphonic acid SAM/hafnium oxide hybrid dielectric into pentacene-based thin film transistors yields low-voltage operation within 1.5 V and improved performance over bare hafnium oxide.

  10. Observations of the effect of varying Hoop stress on fatigue failure and the formation of white etching areas in hydrogen infused 100Cr6 steel rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janakiraman, Shravan; West, Ole; Klit, Peder

    2015-01-01

    White etching cracks (WECs) in wind turbine gearbox bearings have been studied previously. Rolling contact fatigue (RCF) tests are conducted on 100Cr6 bearing steel rings, in this study, to generate WECs like those found in wind turbine bearings. This research studies the effect of two different...

  11. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction study of growth and interface formation of the Ga(1-x)In(x)Sb/InAs strained-layer superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W. C.; Zborowski, J. T.; Golding, T. D.; Shih, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) during molecular beam epitaxy is used to study the growth and interface formation of the Ga(1-x)In(x)Sb/InAs (x is not greater than 0.4) strained-layer superlattices (SLSs) on GaSb(100) substrates. A number of surface atomic structures were observed in the growth of the SLS: a (1 x 3) phase from the InAs epilayer surface, a (2 x 3) phase, a (2 x 4) phase, and diffuse (1 x 1)-like phases from the InAs epilayer surface. It is suggested that the long-range order quality of the interface of Ga(1-x)In(x)Sb on InAs may be better than that of the interface of InAs on Ga(1-x)In(x)Sb, but the abruptness of the interfaces would still be compatible. The RHEED intensity variations in the formation of the interfaces are discussed in terms of interface chemical reactions.

  12. The differences in crown formation during the splash on the thin water layers formed on the saturated soil surface and model surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Rafał; Polakowski, Cezary; Bieganowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Splash is the first stage of a negative phenomenon–soil erosion. The aim of this work was to describe the crown formation quantitatively (as part of the splash erosion) and compare the course of this phenomenon on the thin water film formed on a smooth glass surface and on the surface of saturated soil. The height of the falling water drop was 1.5 m. The observation of the crowns was carried out by high-speed cameras. The static and dynamic parameters of crown formation were analysed. It was found that the crowns formed on the water film covering the saturated soil surface were smaller and the time intervals of their existence were shorter. In addition, the shapes of the crowns were different from those created on the water layer covering the glass surface. These differences can be explained by the slightly different values of surface tension and viscosity of the soil solution, the greater roughness of the soil surface and the lower thickness of the water film on the soil surface. PMID:28750072

  13. Formation of self-organized domain structures with charged domain walls in lithium niobate with surface layer modified by proton exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Chuvakova, M. A.; Dolbilov, M. A.; Zelenovskiy, P. S.; Lobov, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    We have studied the self-organized dendrite domain structures appeared as a result of polarization reversal in the uniform field in lithium niobate single crystals with the artificial surface layer created by proton exchange. We have revealed the self-organized sub-micron scale dendrite domain patterns consisting of domain stripes oriented along the X crystallographic directions separated by arrays of dashed residual domains at the surface by scanning probe microscopy. Raman confocal microscopy allowed visualizing the quasi-regular dendrite domain structures with similar geometry in the vicinity of both polar surfaces. The depth of the structure was about 20 μm for Z+ polar surface and 70 μm for Z- one. According to the proposed mechanism, the dendrite structure formation at the surface was related to the ineffective screening of the residual depolarization field. The computer simulation of the structure formation based on the cellular automata model with probabilistic switching rule proved the eligibility of the proposed scheme, the simulated dendrite domain patterns at various depths being similar to the experimental ones.

  14. Mechanisms of oxide layer formation and destruction on a chromia former nickel base alloy in HTR environment; Mecanismes de formation et de destruction de la couche d'oxyde sur un alliage chrominoformeur en milieu HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouillard, F

    2007-10-15

    Haynes 230 alloy which contains 22 wt.% chromium could be a promising candidate material for structures and heat exchangers (maximum operating temperature: 850-950 C) in Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). The feasibility demonstration involves to valid its corrosion resistance in the reactor specific environment namely impure helium. The alloys surface reactivity was investigated at temperatures between 850 and 1000 C. We especially focused on the influence of different parameters such as concentrations of impurities in the gas phase (carbon monoxide and methane, water vapour/hydrogen ratio), alloy composition (activities of Cr and C, alloying element contents) and temperature. Two main behaviours have been revealed: the formation of a Cr/Mn rich oxide layer at 900 C and its following reduction at higher temperatures. At 900 C, the water vapour is the main oxidizing gas. However in the initial times, the carbon monoxide reacts at the metal/oxide interface which involves a gaseous transport through the scale; CO mainly oxidizes the minor alloying elements aluminium and silicon. Above a critical temperature TA, the carbon in solution in the alloy reduces chromia. To ascribe the scale destruction, a model is proposed based on thermodynamic interfacial data for the alloy, oxide layer morphology and carbon monoxide partial pressure in helium; the model is then validated regarding experimental results and observations. (author)

  15. R/G/B/natural white light thin colloidal quantum dot-based light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Wan Ki; Lim, Jaehoon; Lee, Donggu; Park, Myeongjin; Lee, Hyunkoo; Kwak, Jeonghun; Char, Kookheon; Lee, Changhee; Lee, Seonghoon

    2014-10-08

    Bright, low-voltage driven colloidal quantum dot (QD)-based white light-emitting devices (LEDs) with practicable device performances are enabled by the direct exciton formation within quantum-dot active layers in a hybrid device structure. Detailed device characterization reveals that white-QLEDs can be rationalized as a parallel circuit, in which different QDs are connected through the same set of electrically common organic and inorganic charge transport layers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Interaction of amines with native aluminium oxide layers in non-aqueous environment: Application to the understanding of the formation of epoxy-amine/metal interphases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercier, D.; Rouchaud, J.-C. [Centre d' Etudes de Chimie Metallurgique, CNRS, 15 rue Georges Urbain, 94407 Vitry Cedex (France); Barthes-Labrousse, M.-G. [Centre d' Etudes de Chimie Metallurgique, CNRS, 15 rue Georges Urbain, 94407 Vitry Cedex (France)], E-mail: marie-genevieve.barthes@u-psud.fr

    2008-08-15

    Interaction of propylamine (PA), 1,2-diaminoethane (DAE) or 3-aminomethyl-3,5,5-trimethylcyclohexylamine (isophorone diamine, IPDA) with native aluminium oxide layers in non-aqueous environment has been studied using time-resolved inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The formation of several surface complexes has been evidenced. Monodentate and bidentate metal-bond surface complexes (MBSC) result from interactions between the amine terminations of the molecule and aluminium cations by donation of the N lone electron pair to the metal ion (Lewis-like mechanism leading to O-Al...N bonds). Monodentate and bidentate hydrogen-bond surface complexes (HBSC) are due to interaction of the amino group with surface hydroxyl groups by protonation of the amine termination (Bronsted-like mechanism leading to the formation of Al-OH...N bonds) or interaction with carbonaceous contamination (C{sub x}O{sub y}H{sub z}...N bonds). Diamines can also form mixed complexes with one amino group forming an O-Al...N bond and the other group forming an Al-OH...N or C{sub x}O{sub y}H{sub z}...N bond. Al-OH...N and C{sub x}O{sub y}H{sub z}...N bonds are less stable under vacuum than O-Al...N bonds, leading to partial desorption of the DAE molecules in vacuum and modification of the interaction modes. Only DAE and IPDA can lead to partial dissolution of the aluminium native (hydr)oxide films. A detailed mechanism of dissolution has been proposed based on the formation of mononuclear bidentate (chelate) MBSC by ligand exchange between the terminal {eta}{sup 1}-OH and bridged {mu}{sub 2}-OH surface sites and the amino terminations of the molecule. The detachment of this complex from the surface is likely to be the precursor step to the formation of the interphase in epoxy-amine/metal systems.

  17. Conditions for the formation and atmospheric dispersion of a toxic, heavy gas layer during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits by sill intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Michael; Hankin, Robin K. S.

    2010-05-01

    There is compelling evidence for massive discharge of volatiles, including toxic species, into the atmosphere at the end of the Permian. It has been argued that most of the gases were produced during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits in the East Siberia Tunguska basin following sill intrusion (Retallack and Jahren, 2008; Svensen et al., 2009). The release of the volatiles has been proposed as a major cause of environmental and extinction events at the end of the Permian, with venting of carbon gases and halocarbons to the atmosphere leading to global warming and atmospheric ozone depletion (Svensen et al., 2009) Here we consider the conditions required for the formation and dispersion of toxic, heavier than air, gas plumes, made up of a mixture of CO2, CH4, H2S and SO2 and formed during the thermal metamorphism of C- and S- rich sediments. Dispersion models and density considerations within a range of CO2/CH4 ratios and volatile fluxes and temperatures, for gas discharge by both seepage and from vents, allow the possibility that following sill emplacement much of the vast East Siberia Tunguska basin was - at least intermittently - covered by a heavy, toxic gas layer that was unfavorable for life. Dispersion scenarios for a heavy gas layer beyond the Siberian region during end-Permian times will be presented. REFERENCES G. J. Retallack and A. H. Jahren, Methane release from igneous intrusion of coal during Late Permian extinction events, Journal of Geology, volume 116, 1-20, 2008 H. Svensen et al., Siberian gas venting and the end-Permian environmental crisis, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, volume 277, 490-500, 2009

  18. In situ platelets formation into aqueous polymer colloids: The topochemical transformation from single to double layered hydroxide (LSH-LDH) uncovered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpfling, Thomas; Langry, Arthur; Hintze-Bruening, Horst; Leroux, Fabrice

    2016-01-15

    Layered Single Hydroxide (LSH) of chemical composition Zn5(OH)8(acetate)2·nH2O is synthesized under in situ condition in an aqueous dispersion of an amphiphilic, carboxylate bearing polyester via a modified polyol route. The one-pot LSH generation yields agglomerates of well intercalated platelets, 9-10nm separated from each other. However the corresponding Layered Double Hydroxide (LDH) of formal composition Zn2Al(OH)6 (acetate)·nH2O is found to proceed via the formation of crystallized, similarly spaced LSH sheets in the neighborhood of amorphous Al rich domains as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron micrographs. The initial phase segregation effaces over time while LSH platelets convert into the LDH phase. Fingerprinted by the change of in-plane cation accommodation, the associated topochemical reaction of the edge-sharing octahedral LSH platelets involves the transformation of metal lacunae, adjacently covered by one tetrahedral coordinated cation on each side to balance the negative surcharge, into fully occupied and monolayered platelets of edge-sharing octahedral LDH, the former voids being occupied by trivalent cations. This replenishing process of empty sites, coupled with the dissolution of tetrahedral sites is likely to be observed for the first time due to the presence of well separated, polymer intercalated platelets. TEM pictures vision crystal growth arising from the zone of the LSH edge-slab and by using solid state kinetics formalism the associated high activation energy of the first-order reaction agrees well with a plausible dissolution re-precipitation mechanism. The conversion of LSH into LDH platelets may be extended to others cations as Co(2+), Cu(2+), as well as the aluminum source (AlCl3) and the water-soluble polymer (NVP), thus indicating it is a new prevalent facet of LDH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Removal of antimonate ions from an aqueous solution by anion exchange with magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxide and the formation of a brandholzite-like structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Tomohito; Nakamura, Mami; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    A magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxide intercalated with NO(3)(-) (NO(3)•Mg-Al LDH) removed Sb(V) in solution. The antimony (Sb) removal increased with time and with an increasing molar ratio of Al/Sb, i.e., the quantity of NO(3)•Mg-Al LDH. The removal of Sb(V) in solution by NO(3)•Mg-Al LDH was not due to the reaction of Sb(V) with dissolved Mg(2+) but was rather caused by anion exchange between Sb(V), i.e., Sb(OH)(6)(-), in an aqueous solution and NO(3)(-) in the interlayer of the Mg-Al LDH. The intercalation of Sb(OH)(6)(-) in the interlayer of Mg-Al LDH is thought to result in the formation of a brandholzite-like structure. Some Sb(OH)(6) (-) was likely adsorbed on the surface of the NO(3)•Mg-Al LDH. The efficiency of the Sb removal decreased in the following order, irrespective of the reaction time: NO(3)•Mg-Al LDH ≈ Cl•Mg-Al LDH > SO(4)•Mg-Al LDH > CO(3)•Mg-Al LDH. The removal of Sb by SO(4)•Mg-Al LDH and Cl•Mg-Al LDH was also caused by anion exchange between Sb(V), i.e., Sb(OH)(6) (-), in an aqueous solution and SO(4)(2-) and Cl(-) in the interlayer of Mg-Al LDH, which formed a brandholzite-like structure due to the intercalation of Sb(OH)(6)(-) into the interlayer. In the case of SO(4)•Mg-Al LDH, hydrogen bonds between the Mg-Al LDH-positive host layer and Sb(OH)(6)(-) were probably stronger than the electrostatic force of attraction between the Mg-Al LDH-positive host layer and SO(4)(2-). The results suggested that Cl•Mg-Al LDH was as effective as NO(3)•Mg-Al LDH for the treatment of Sb(V) in aqueous solutions.

  20. Characterization of white OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenbin; Lu, Lili

    2007-11-01

    White OLEDs (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention for several applications, such as backlights in LCD, full-color OLED display using on-chip color filters, and low cost illumination sources. OLEDs have typically very broad emissions, which makes them uniquely suitable for light source applications. In this paper, some fundamentals of the CIE colorimetry system including the color-rendering index are described. Given the spectral power distribution of WOLED, the parameters of a light source (chromaticity coordinate, CCT, CRI, and the luminous efficacy) can be calculated. A MATLAB program for this purpose is developed in this paper. WOLEDs utilizing two primary-color emitters are fabricated. NPB doped with 2% Rubrene is used as the red-emitting layer and anthracene derivative as the blue-emitting layer. With a structure of ITO/2TNATA(20nm)/NPB(20 nm)/ NPB:rubrene(2%)(10nm)/ anthracene (30 nm)/Alq 3(20nm)LiF(1nm)/Al(100nm), a white light with CIE coordinates of (0.34, 0.37) is generated. The color properties are presented in this paper. The results show that the white color can be created from numerous combinations of different spectra. Based upon this, the characterization of the WOLED is simulated and the design of WOLED for illumination is discussed. In contrary to light source applications where illumination quality white is the most important, all colors are equally important for display applications. The white spectrum of the two-emitter WOLED is transmitted through the typical red, blue and green color filters. The performance of this color display is simulated and the WOLED design for display application is discussed.

  1. Prevention of fibrous layer formation between bone and adhesive bone cement: in vivo evaluation of bone impregnation with 4-META/MMA-TBB cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, T; Morita, S; Shinomiya, K; Watanabe, A; Nakabayashi, N; Ishihara, K

    2000-10-01

    We have studied a new adhesive bone cement, that consists of 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) and methylmethacrylate (MMA) as monomers, tri-n-butyl borane (TBB) as the initiator, and polymethylmethacrylate powder (4-META/MMA-TBB cement). This cement has shown remarkable adhesive properties to bone in vitro. In this study, we assessed the interface in vivo periodically. The femora of rabbits were fenestrated and filled with either the 4-META/MMA-TBB cement or a conventional polymethylmethacrylate cement. The animals were killed after 1, 4, 12, and 24 weeks to analyze the interface by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Optical microscopic examinations showed that the cured 4-META/MMA-TBB adhesive cement bonded to bone directly for 24 weeks, whereas a fibrous tissue layer was observed between the bone and cured conventional cement at 12 weeks after the operation. The transmission electron microscopy views of 4-META/MMA-TBB cement bonded to bone demonstrated a unique "hybridized bone" with the cement in the subsurface of the substrate in every case. The formation of the hybridized bone indicates the bonding mechanism of the adhesive cement to bone, which prevents the fibrosis intervention between bone and cement. These results suggest that the biomechanical and adhesive properties of 4-META/MMA-TBB cement make it a useful bone-bonding agent in orthopedic surgery. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. White Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  3. A re-assessment of sucrose signaling involved in cluster-root formation and function in phosphate-deficient white lupin (Lupinus albus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengrui; Shen, Jianbo; Ludewig, Uwe; Neumann, Günter

    2015-07-01

    Apart from substrate functions, a signaling role of sucrose in root growth regulation is well established. This raised the question whether sucrose signals might also be involved in formation of cluster-roots (CRs) under phosphate (Pi) limitation, mediating exudation of phosphorus (P)-mobilizing root exudates, e.g. in Lupinus albus and members of the Proteaceae. Earlier studies demonstrated that CR formation in L. albus was mimicked to some extent by external application of high sucrose concentrations (25 mM) in the presence of extremely high P supply (1-10 mM), usually suppressing CR formation. In this study, we re-addressed this question using an axenic hydroponic culture system with normal P supply (0.1 mM) and a range of sucrose applications (0.25-25 mM). The 2.5 mM sucrose concentration was comparable with internal sucrose levels in the zone of CR initiation in first-order laterals of P-deficient plants (3.4 mM) and induced the same CR morphology. Similar to earlier studies, high sucrose concentrations (25 mM) resulted in root thickening and inhibition of root elongation, associated with a 10-fold increase of the internal sucrose level. The sucrose analog palatinose and a combination of glucose/fructose failed to stimulate CR formation under P-sufficient conditions, demonstrating a signal function of sucrose and excluding osmotic or carbon source effects. In contrast to earlier findings, sucrose was able to induce CR formation but had no effect on CR functioning with respect to citrate exudation, in vitro activity and expression of genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, secretory acid phosphatase and MATE transporters, mediating P-mobilizing functions of CRs. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  4. Application of compound blue for white OLED

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, T; He, S.J; Wang, D.K; Jiang, N; Lu, Z.H

    2014-01-01

    ...[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-pyridine]beryllium(Bepp2) to yield high efficiency. When combined with green and red phosphorescent emitting layers, a broad band white light organic light-emitting diodes are obtained and studied...

  5. A Strange Dwarf Scenario for the Formation of the Peculiar Double White Dwarf Binary SDSS J125733.63+542850.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Long; Chen, Wen-Cong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2018-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope observation of the double white dwarf (WD) binary SDSS J125733.63+542850.5 reveal that the massive WD has a surface gravity logg1 ˜ 8.7 (which implies a mass of M1 ˜ 1.06 M⊙) and an effective temperature T1 ˜ 13000 K, while the effective temperature of the low-mass WD (M2 double WD binary. We assume that the massive WD is a strange dwarf originating from a phase transition in a ˜1.1 M⊙ WD, which has experienced accretion and spin-down processes. Its high effective temperature could arise from the heating process during the phase transition. Our simulations suggest that the progenitor of SDSS J125733.63+542850.5 can be a binary system consisting of a 0.65 M_{⊙} WD and a 1.5 M_{⊙} main sequence star in a 1.492 day orbit. Especially, the secondary star (i.e., the progenitor of the low mass WD) is likely to have an ultra-low metallicity of Z = 0.0001.

  6. Iron silicide formation at different layers of (Fe/Si){sub 3} multilayered structures determined by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badía-Romano, L., E-mail: lbadia@unizar.es; Bartolomé, J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Rubín, J. [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales y Fluidos, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Magén, C. [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Bürgler, D. E. [Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-07-14

    The morphology and the quantitative composition of the Fe-Si interface layer forming at each Fe layer of a (Fe/Si){sub 3} multilayer have been determined by means of conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). For the CEMS measurements, each layer was selected by depositing the Mössbauer active {sup 57}Fe isotope with 95% enrichment. Samples with Fe layers of nominal thickness d{sub Fe} = 2.6 nm and Si spacers of d{sub Si} = 1.5 nm were prepared by thermal evaporation onto a GaAs(001) substrate with an intermediate Ag(001) buffer layer. HRTEM images showed that Si layers grow amorphous and the epitaxial growth of the Fe is good only for the first deposited layer. The CEMS spectra show that at all Fe/Si and Si/Fe interfaces a paramagnetic c-Fe{sub 1−x}Si phase is formed, which contains 16% of the nominal Fe deposited in the Fe layer. The bottom Fe layer, which is in contact with the Ag buffer, also contains α-Fe and an Fe{sub 1−x}Si{sub x} alloy that cannot be attributed to a single phase. In contrast, the other two layers only comprise an Fe{sub 1−x}Si{sub x} alloy with a Si concentration of ≃0.15, but no α-Fe.

  7. Layered Fault Management Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sztipanovits, Janos

    2004-01-01

    ... UAVs or Organic Air Vehicles. The approach of this effort was to analyze fault management requirements of formation flight for fleets of UAVs, and develop a layered fault management architecture which demonstrates significant...

  8. Crystal mat-formation as an igneous layering-forming process: Textural and geochemical evidence from the 'lower layered' nepheline syenite sequence of the Ilímaussaq complex, South Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhuber, Matthias J.; Marks, Michael A. W.; Bons, Paul D.; Wenzel, Thomas; Markl, Gregor

    2015-05-01

    The lower layered nepheline syenite sequence (kakortokites) of the Mesoproterozoic alkaline to peralkaline Ilímaussaq complex, South Greenland shows spectacular rhythmic meter-scale igneous layering. The 29 exposed units have sharp contacts against each other and each of these units consists of three modally graded layers dominated by arfvedsonitic amphibole, eudialyte-group minerals, and alkali feldspar, respectively. This study uses field observations on changes in mineral orientation, recurrent mineral textures, compositional data from eudialyte-group minerals and amphibole, and settling rate calculations based on a modified Stokes' equation to explain the igneous layering of the kakortokites. We propose that the three major cumulus minerals (amphibole, eudialyte s.l., and alkali feldspar) were separated from each other by density contrasts, resulting in modally graded layers within each unit. The densest of these three minerals (amphibole) formed crystal mats within the cooling magma body. These crystal mats acted as barriers that inhibited large-scale vertical migration of melts and crystals with increasing effectiveness over time. The sub-volumes of magma captured in between the crystal mats evolved largely as geochemically independent sub-systems, as indicated by the observed trends in mineral composition.

  9. Effect of the Ammonia Flow on the Formation of Microstructure Defects in GaN Layers Grown by High-Temperature Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchuk, M.; Lukin, G.; Zimmermann, F.; Röder, C.; Motylenko, M.; Pätzold, O.; Heitmann, J.; Kortus, J.; Rafaja, D.

    2017-03-01

    High-temperature vapor phase epitaxy (HTVPE) is a physical vapor transport technology for a deposition of gallium nitride (GaN) layers. However, little is known about the influence of the deposition parameters on the microstructure of the layers. In order to fill this gap, the influence of the ammonia (NH3) flow applied during the HTVPE growth on the microstructure of the deposited GaN layers is investigated in this work. Although the HTVPE technology is intended to grow GaN layers on foreign substrates, the GaN layers under study were grown on GaN templates produced by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy in order to be able to separate the growth defects from the defects induced by the lattice misfit between the foreign substrate and the GaN layer. The microstructure of the layers is characterized by means of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence. In samples deposited at low ammonia flow, planar defects were detected, along which the nitrogen atoms are found to be substituted by impurity atoms. The interplay between these planar defects and the threading dislocations is discussed. A combination of XRD and micro-Raman spectroscopy reveals the presence of compressive residual stress in the samples.

  10. White dwarf dynamical interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Aznar Siguan, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Premi Extraordinari de Doctorat, promoció 2014-2015. Àmbit de Ciències Merging white dwarfs is a promising channel to trigger Type Ia supernovae, known as the double degenerate scenario. Supernovae are stellar explosions that radiate as much energy as any ordinary star is expected to emit over its entire life span, outshining briefly the whole hosting galaxy. They enrich the interstellar medium with higher mass elements and trigger the formation of new stars by the produced expanding shock...

  11. Formation of a Crack-Free, Hybrid Skin Layer with Tunable Surface Topography and Improved Gas Permeation Selectivity on Elastomers Using Gel-Liquid Infiltration Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyuan; Gorham, Justin M; Killgore, Jason P; Omidvar, Maryam; Lin, Haiqing; DelRio, Frank W; Cox, Lewis M; Zhang, Zheng; Ding, Yifu

    2017-08-23

    Surface modifications of elastomers and gels are crucial for emerging applications such as soft robotics and flexible electronics, in large part because they provide a platform to control wettability, adhesion, and permeability. Current surface modification methods via ultraviolet-ozone (UVO) and/or O2 plasma, atomic layer deposition (ALD), plasmas deposition, and chemical treatment impart a dense polymer or inorganic layer on the surface that is brittle and easy to fracture at low strain levels. This paper presents a new method, based on gel-liquid infiltration polymerization, to form hybrid skin layers atop elastomers. The method is unique in that it allows for control of the skin layer topography, with tunable feature sizes and aspect ratios as high as 1.8 without fracture. Unlike previous techniques, the skin layer formed here dramatically improves the barrier properties of the elastomer, while preserving skin layer flexibility. Moreover, the method is versatile and likely applicable to most interfacial polymerization systems and network polymers on flat and patterned surfaces.

  12. Sexual Biofilm Formation in Candida tropicalis Opaque Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephen K.; Hirakawa, Matthew P.; Bennett, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis are opportunistic fungal pathogens that can transition between white and opaque phenotypic states. White and opaque cells differ both morphologically and in their responses to environmental signals. In C. albicans, opaque cells respond to sexual pheromones by undergoing conjugation, while white cells are induced by pheromones to form sexual biofilms. Here, we show that sexual biofilm formation also occurs in C. tropicalis but, unlike C. albicans, biofilms are formed exclusively by opaque cells. C. tropicalis biofilm formation was dependent on the pheromone receptors Ste2 and Ste3, confirming the role of pheromone signaling in sexual biofilm development. Structural analysis of C. tropicalis sexual biofilms revealed stratified communities consisting of a basal layer of yeast cells and an upper layer of filamentous cells, together with an extracellular matrix. Transcriptional profiling showed that genes involved in pheromone signaling and conjugation were upregulated in sexual biofilms. Furthermore, FGR23, which encodes an agglutinin-like protein, was found to enhance both mating and sexual biofilm formation. Together, these studies reveal that C. tropicalis opaque cells form sexual biofilms with a complex architecture, and suggest a conserved role for sexual agglutinins in mediating mating, cell cohesion and biofilm formation. PMID:24612417

  13. Formation of Transparent SiO2 Protective Layer on Polycarbonate by 157 nm F2 Laser for Lightweight Automobile Window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihiko Nojima,; Masayuki Okoshi,; Hidetoshi Nojiri,; Narumi Inoue,

    2010-07-01

    A transparent, hard silica glass (SiO2) layer was formed on a conventional protective coat made of silicone ([SiO(CH3)2]n) on a polycarbonate plate by the 157 nm F2 laser-induced photochemical modification of silicone into SiO2. An optimum laser irradiation time of the F2 laser was found to form a crack-free SiO2 layer. The high optical transparency of the samples in the visible light region remained unchanged after the F2 laser irradiation. In the Taber abrasion test, the SiO2 layer markedly reduced the number of scratches, resulting in a low haze value. The haze values of the samples also depend on the thickness of the silicone protective coat underneath the SiO2 protective layer. As a result, the difference of haze value (δHz) was successfully reduced to 3.6%, compared with these of the nonirradiated sample and a bare polycarbonate plate of approximately 11.3 and 41.3%, respectively, which is comparable to the case of a bare silica glass of approximately 1.6%. In addition, the thickness of the SiO2 protective layer was estimated to be approximately 0.44 μm for the 30-s laser irradiation by immersing the samples in 1 wt % hydrogen fluoride aqueous solution and measuring the depth using a surface profilometer.

  14. Throwing Icebergs at White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    Where do the metals come from that pollute the atmospheres of many white dwarfs? Close-in asteroids may not be the only culprits! A new study shows that distant planet-size and icy objects could share some of the blame.Pollution ProblemsArtists impression of rocky debris lying close around a white dwarf star. [NASA/ESA/STScI/G. Bacon]When a low- to intermediate-mass star reaches the end of its life, its outer layers are blown off, leaving behind its compact core. The strong gravity of this white dwarf causes elements heavier than hydrogen and helium to rapidly sink to its center in a process known as sedimentation, leaving an atmosphere that should be free of metallic elements.Therefore its perhaps surprising that roughly 2550% of all white dwarfs are observed to have atmospheric pollution by heavy elements. The short timescales for sedimentation suggest that these elements were added to the white dwarf recently but how did they get there?Bringing Ice InwardIn the generally accepted theory, pre-existing rocky bodies or an orbiting asteroid belt survive the stars evolution, later accreting onto the final white dwarf. But this scenario doesnt explain a few observations that suggest white dwarfs might be accreting larger planetary-size bodies and bodies with ices and volatile materials.Dynamical evolution of a Neptune-like planet (a) and a Kuiper belt analog object (b) in wide binary star systems. Both have large eccentricity excitations during the white dwarf phase. [Stephan et al. 2017]How might you get large or icy objects which would begin on very wide orbits close enough to a white dwarf to become disrupted and accrete? Led by Alexander Stephan, a team of scientists at UCLA now suggest that the key is for the white dwarf to be in a binary system.Influence of a CompanionIn the authors model, the white-dwarf progenitor is orbited by both a distant stellar companion (a common occurrence) and a number of large potential polluters, which could have masses between that

  15. Concept Formation in Environmental Education: 14-Year Olds' Work on the Intensified Greenhouse Effect and the Depletion of the Ozone Layer. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterlind, Karolina

    2005-01-01

    A case study is presented describing the work of three pupils in the upper level of compulsory school. The pupils were learning about the intensified greenhouse effect and the depletion of the ozone layer. In their work, the need for certain domain-specific knowledge becomes apparent; for example, understanding such concepts as photosynthesis,…

  16. Formation and maintenance of high-nitrate, low pH layers in the eastern Indian Ocean and the role of nitrogen fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Waite

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the biogeochemistry of low dissolved oxygen high-nitrate (LDOHN layers forming against the backdrop of several interleaving regional water masses in the eastern Indian Ocean, off northwest Australia adjacent to Ningaloo Reef. These water masses, including the forming Leeuwin Current, have been shown directly to impact the ecological function of Ningaloo Reef and other iconic coastal habitats downstream. Our results indicate that LDOHN layers are formed from multiple subduction events of the Eastern Gyral Current beneath the Leeuwin Current (LC; the LC originates from both the Indonesian Throughflow and tropical Indian Ocean. Density differences of up to 0.025 kg m−3 between the Eastern Gyral Current and the Leeuwin Current produce sharp gradients that can trap high concentrations of particles (measured as low transmission along the density interfaces. The oxidation of the trapped particulate matter results in local depletion of dissolved oxygen and regeneration of dissolved nitrate (nitrification. We document an associated increase in total dissolved carbon dioxide, which lowers the seawater pH by 0.04 units. Based on isotopic measurements (δ15N and δ18O of dissolved nitrate, we determine that ~ 40–100% of the nitrate found in LDOHN layers is likely to originate from nitrogen fixation, and that, regionally, the importance of N-fixation in contributing to LDOHN layers is likely to be highest at the surface and offshore.

  17. Two-Step Physical Deposition of a Compact CuI Hole-Transport Layer and the Formation of an Interfacial Species in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibzadeh, Saba; Nejand, Bahram Abdollahi; Moshaii, Ahmad; Mohammadian, Nasim; Alizadeh, Amir Hossein; Mohammadpour, Rahele; Ahmadi, Vahid; Alizadeh, Abdolali

    2016-08-09

    A simple and practical approach is introduced for the deposition of CuI as an inexpensive inorganic hole-transport material (HTM) for the fabrication of low cost perovskite solar cells (PSCs) by gas-solid phase transformation of Cu to CuI. The method provides a uniform and well-controlled CuI layer with large grains and good compactness that prevents the direct connection between the contact electrodes. Solar cells prepared with CuI as the HTM with Au electrodes displays an exceptionally high short-circuit current density of 32 mA cm(-2) , owing to an interfacial species formed between the perovskite and the Cu resulting in a long wavelength contribution to the incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE), and an overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.4 %. The growth of crystalline and uniform CuI on a low roughness perovskite layer leads to remarkably high charge extraction in the cells, which originates from the high hole mobility of CuI in addition to a large number of contact points between CuI and the perovskite layer. In addition, the solvent-free method has no damaging side effect on the perovskite layer, which makes it an appropriate method for large scale applications of CuI in perovskite solar cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Two novel homologous proteins of Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans are involved in the formation of the rodlet layer and mediate attachment to a hydrophobic surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessen, Dennis; Wösten, Han A.B.; Keulen, Geertje van; Faber, Onno G.; Alves, Alexandra M.C.R.; Meijer, Wim G.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    The filamentous bacteria Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans exhibit a complex life cycle. After a branched submerged mycelium has been established, aerial hyphae are formed that may septate to form chains of spores. The aerial structures possess several surface layers of unknown

  19. Cross-Layer Design of an Energy-Efficient Cluster Formation Algorithm with Carrier-Sensing Multiple Access for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buratti Chiara

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A new energy-efficient scheme for data transmission in a wireless sensor network (WSN is proposed, having in mind a typical application including a sink, which periodically triggers the WSN, and nodes uniformly distributed over a specified area. Routing, multiple access control (MAC, physical, energy, and propagation aspects are jointly taken into account through simulation; however, the protocol design is based on some analytical considerations reported in the appendix. Information routing is based on a clustered self-organized structure; a carrier-sensing multiple access (CSMA protocol is chosen at MAC layer. Two different scenarios are examined, characterized by different channel fading rates. Four versions of our protocol are presented, suitably oriented to the two different scenarios; two of them implement a cross-layer (CL approach, where MAC parameters influence both the network and physical layers. Performance is measured in terms of network lifetime (related to energy efficiency and packet loss rate (related to network availability. The paper discusses the rationale behind the selection of MAC protocols for WSNs and provides a complete model characterization spanning from the network layer to the propagation channel. The advantages of the CL approach, with respect to an algorithm which belongs to the well-known class of low-energy adaptive clustering hierarchy (LEACH protocols, are shown.

  20. Plasma nitriding of CA-6NM steel: effect of H2 + N2 gas mixtures in nitride layer formation for low N2 contents at 500 ºC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Nardelli Allenstein

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to characterize the phases, thickness, hardness and hardness profiles of the nitride layers formed on the CA-6NM martensitic stainless steel which was plasma nitrided in gas mixtures containing different nitrogen amounts. Nitriding was performed at 500 ºC temperature, and 532 Pa (4 Torr pressure, for gas mixtures of 5% N2 + 95% H2, 10% N2 + 90% H2, and 20% N2 + 80% H2, and 2 hours nitriding time. A 6 hours nitriding time condition for gas mixture of 5% N2 + 95% H2 was also studied. Nitrided samples results were compared with non-nitrided condition. Thickness and microstructure of the nitrided layers were characterized by optical microscopy (OM, using Villela and Nital etchants, and the phases were identified by X-ray diffraction. Hardness profiles and hardness measured on surface steel were determined using Vickers hardness and nanoindentation tester, respectively. It was verified that nitrided layer produced in CA-6NM martensitc stainless steel is constituted of compound layer, being that formation of the diffusion zone was not observed for the studied conditions. The higher the nitrogen amounts in gas mixture the higher is the thickness of the nitrided layer and the probability to form different nitride phases, in the case γ'-Fe4N, ε-Fe2-3N and CrN phases. Intrinsic hardness of the nitrided layers produced in the CA-6NM stainless steel is about 12-14 GPa (~1200-1400 HV.

  1. Organic light emitting device having multiple separate emissive layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R [Ann Arbor, MI

    2012-03-27

    An organic light emitting device having multiple separate emissive layers is provided. Each emissive layer may define an exciton formation region, allowing exciton formation to occur across the entire emissive region. By aligning the energy levels of each emissive layer with the adjacent emissive layers, exciton formation in each layer may be improved. Devices incorporating multiple emissive layers with multiple exciton formation regions may exhibit improved performance, including internal quantum efficiencies of up to 100%.

  2. The magnum-isthmus junction of the fowl oviduct participates in the formation of the avian-type shell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Kun Ming; Sultana, Fowzia; Howlider, Mohammad Abdur Rahman; Iwasawa, Atsushi; Yoshizaki, Norio

    2006-01-01

    Avian eggs possess a shell membrane in the shape of an asymmetrical ellipsoid and with a limiting membrane that is a smooth layer of homogeneous, dense materials. We describe the role of the magnum-isthmus junction (MIJ) of the oviduct in the formation of the avian-type shell membrane in the domestic fowl Gallus domesticus. The narrow width of the lumen at the MIJ indirectly participates in the determination of the asymmetrical ellipsoid shape of eggs that are encased by the egg-white layer and subsequently by the peri-albumen layer (PL) and the shell membrane. The PL reacts with Alcian blue and exists between the egg white and the limiting membrane. It is added to the ovulating egg at the MIJ and covers the outermost surface of the egg-white layer. The function of the PL is to provide a smooth surface by covering the irregular surface of the egg-white layer. The materials of the PL consist of an Alcian blue-positive polysaccharide (or glycoprotein) of 240 kDa and five proteins of 135, 116, 72, 49, and 46 kDa. The isolated materials have an affinity to bind with the egg-white mass. An antiserum against quail PL materials stains the domestic fowl PL and secretory cells of the luminal epithelium at the MIJ, and cross-reacts with the molecules of 240, 135, and 116 kDa.

  3. Improvement of resistive switching performances via an amorphous ZrO2 layer formation in TiO2-based forming-free resistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Baiwen; Xu, Dinglin; Tang, Minghua; Xiao, Yongguang; Zhou, Yuzhou; Xiong, Rongxin; Li, Zheng; Zhou, Yichun

    2014-09-01

    We present the effects of an amorphous ZrO2 layer on the TiO2-based bipolar resistive switching memory device where the ZrO2 layer plays an important role as a supplementary reservoir of oxygen vacancies. Compared with Pt/TiO2/Pt monolayer device, a remarkably improved uniformity of switching parameters such as switching voltages and resistances in high/low states is demonstrated in the Pt/ZrO2/TiO2/Pt system. The resistive switching mechanism of memory devices incorporating the ZrO2/TiO2 bilayer structure can be attributed to multiple conducting filaments through the occurrence of redox reactions at the ZrO2/TiO2 surface.

  4. Extraordinary N atom tunneling in formation of InN shell layer on GaN nanorod m-plane sidewall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Duanjun; Lin, Na; Xu, Hongmei; Liao, Che-Hao; Yang, C C

    2014-12-12

    We report the extraordinary tunneling process that finds the lower cohesive energy route for stablizing InN shell layer on m-plane sidewall of GaN nanorod. The [0001] orientated GaN nanorod array is grown on sapphire substrate patterned with Ga nanoparticle by metal-organic vapor deposition method, based on which the simulation structures of c-plane top surface and m-plane sidewall surface is constructed for the first-principles calculations. The results show that the introduction of In wetting monolayer could effectively lower the cohesive energy of adalayers on non-polar GaN surfaces. Most importantly, it is revealed that there exists an extraordinary tunneling process in which the N atoms will drag out the In wetting atoms and tunnel through to form stable InN shell layer on the nanorod sidewall.

  5. Formation process and superparamagnetic properties of (Mn,Ga)As nanocrystals in GaAs fabricated by annealing of (Ga,Mn)As layers with low Mn content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadowski, Janusz; Domagala, Jaroslaw Z.; Mathieu, Roland

    2011-01-01

    X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and magnetization measurements are employed to study the structural and magnetic properties of Mn-rich (Mn,Ga)As nanocrystals embedded in GaAs. These nanocomposites are obtained by moderate-temperature (400°C) and high-temperature (560°C and 630......,Ga)As nanocrystals, with similar diameters of 7-10 nm, are observed to coexist in layers with an initial Mn content of 0.5% and 2% after higher-temperature annealing. Measurements of magnetization relaxation in the time span 0.1-10 000 s provide evidence for superparamagnetic properties of the (Mn,Ga)As nanocrystals......, as well as for the absence of spin-glass dynamics. These findings point to weak coupling between nanocrystals even in layers with the highest nanocrystal density....

  6. Linkage of iron elution and dissolved oxygen consumption with removal of organic pollutants by nanoscale zero-valent iron: Effects of pH on iron dissolution and formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Nanae; Suzuki, Moe; Kurosu, Shunji; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    The iron elution and dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption in organic pollutant removal by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was examined in the range of solution pH from 3.0 to 9.0. Their behaviors were linked with the removal of organic pollutant through the dissolution of iron and the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer affected strongly by solution pH and DO. As an example of organic pollutants, azo-dye Orange II was chosen in this study. The chemical composition analyses before and after reaction confirmed the corrosion of nZVI into ions, the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer on nZVI surface and the adsorption of the pollutant and its intermediates. The complete decolorization of Orange II with nZVI was accomplished very quickly. On the other hand, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal was considerably slow and the maximum TOC removal was around 40% obtained at pH 9.0. The reductive cleavage of azo-bond by emitted electrons more readily took place as compared with the cleavage of aromatic rings of Orange II leading to the degradation to smaller molecules and subsequently the mineralization. A reaction kinetic model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood/Eley-Rideal approach was developed to elucidate mechanisms for organic pollutant removal controlled by the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer, the progress of which could be characterized by considering the dynamic concentration changes in Fe(2+) and DO. The dynamic profiles of Orange II removal linked with Fe(2+) and DO could be reasonably simulated in the range of pH from 3.0 to 9.0. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Zonal flows and long-distance correlations during the formation of the edge shear layer in the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, I; Pedrosa, M A; Hidalgo, C [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Carreras, B A; Garcia, L [Universidad Carlos III, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: ivan.calvo@ciemat.es

    2009-06-15

    A theoretical interpretation is given for the observed long-distance correlations in potential fluctuations in TJ-II. The value of the correlation increases above the critical point of the transition for the emergence of the plasma edge shear flow layer. Mean (i.e. surface averaged, zero-frequency) sheared flows cannot account for the experimental results. A model consisting of four envelope equations for the fluctuation level, the mean flow shear, the zonal flow amplitude shear and the averaged pressure gradient is proposed. It is shown that the presence of zonal flows is essential to reproduce the main features of the experimental observations.

  8. Zonal flows and long-distance correlations during the formation of the edge shear layer in the TJ-II stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, I.; Carreras, B. A.; Garcia, L.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.

    2009-06-01

    A theoretical interpretation is given for the observed long-distance correlations in potential fluctuations in TJ-II. The value of the correlation increases above the critical point of the transition for the emergence of the plasma edge shear flow layer. Mean (i.e. surface averaged, zero-frequency) sheared flows cannot account for the experimental results. A model consisting of four envelope equations for the fluctuation level, the mean flow shear, the zonal flow amplitude shear and the averaged pressure gradient is proposed. It is shown that the presence of zonal flows is essential to reproduce the main features of the experimental observations.

  9. Changes of the antigenic and allergenic properties of a hen's egg albumin in a cake with gamma-irradiated egg white

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.-W.; Seo, J.-H.; Kim, J.-H.; Lee, S.-Y.; Kim, K.-S.; Byun, M.-W. E-mail: mwbyun@nanum.kaeri.re.kr

    2005-04-01

    Changes of the antigenicity and allergenicity of a hen's egg albumin (ovalbumin, OVA) in white layer cakes containing egg white gamma-irradiated with 10 or 20 kGy were monitored by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), individually formatted with mouse anti-OVA IgG (mouse IgG) and with egg allergic patients' IgE. Mouse IgG recognized OVA in the cakes with irradiated egg white better than that in the control with a non-irradiated one. Whereas, the detected concentrations of intact OVA in the control significantly decreased in the treatments, when determined by IgE-based ELISA. The results appeared to indicate that the antigenicity of the OVA increased, but that the allergenicity was decreased by irradiation and processing. Egg white irradiated for reducing the egg allergy could be used for producing a safer cake from the egg allergy.

  10. Changes of the antigenic and allergenic properties of a hen's egg albumin in a cake with gamma-irradiated egg white

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju.-Woon; Seo, Ji.-Hyun; Kim, Jae.-Hun; Lee, Soo.-Young; Kim, Kwan.-Soo; Byun, Myung.-Woo

    2005-04-01

    Changes of the antigenicity and allergenicity of a hen's egg albumin (ovalbumin, OVA) in white layer cakes containing egg white gamma-irradiated with 10 or 20 kGy were monitored by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), individually formatted with mouse anti-OVA IgG (mouse IgG) and with egg allergic patients' IgE. Mouse IgG recognized OVA in the cakes with irradiated egg white better than that in the control with a non-irradiated one. Whereas, the detected concentrations of intact OVA in the control significantly decreased in the treatments, when determined by IgE-based ELISA. The results appeared to indicate that the antigenicity of the OVA increased, but that the allergenicity was decreased by irradiation and processing. Egg white irradiated for reducing the egg allergy could be used for producing a safer cake from the egg allergy.

  11. New layered tin(II) thiophosphates ASnPS4 (A = K, Rb, Cs): synthesis, structure, glass formation, and the modulated CsSnPS4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Santanu; Malliakas, Christos D; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2012-11-05

    The layered compounds KSnPS(4) (1), RbSnPS(4) (2), and CsSnPS(4) (3) were synthesized using the chalcophosphate flux technique at high temperature and are rare examples of divalent Sn(II) thiophosphates. Orange polyhedral crystals of compound 1 crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with a = 6.6673(13) Å, b = 11.9697(24) Å, c = 8.7604(18), and β=127.347(8)° in a 2-dimensional layered structure. Compound 2 is isostructural to 1. Yellow block shaped crystals of compound 3 crystallize in the monoclinic superspace group P2(1)(αβ0)0 with a commensurate q-vector at 1/4a* + 1/4c* with a = 18.0477(14) Å, b = 6.2021(5) Å, and c = 6.8415(5) Å. The structure of all three compounds contains SnS(3) pyramids, which is an extremely rare solid state chalcogenide coordination environment. All three compounds are semiconductors having well-defined band-gaps between 2.0 and 2.2 eV. The compounds are congruently melting and can be obtained as glasses by rapid quenching of the melt, which subsequently crystallize upon heating.

  12. Temperature- and Al/N ratio-dependent AlN seed layer formation on (110) Si substrates by using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Young-Kyun; Park, Chul-Hyun; Oh, Jae-Eung [Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Tae; Kim, Moon-Deock [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    AlN seed layers with a thickness of 50 nm were grown by using nitrogen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on (110) Si substrates with different V/III ratios in the temperature range from 850 .deg. C to 940 .deg. C. In varying the Al/N ratio and the growth temperature, distinct surface morphologies emerge, which are quite different from those observed in AlN growth on (111) Si substrates. Under N-rich conditions, AlN films exhibits randomly distributed islands with different sizes ranging from 10 nm to 1 m. In Al-rich conditions, two distinct surface morphologies, (1) closely-packed islands preferentially aligned along the [1120]{sub AIN} /[110]{sub Si} azimuth and (2) smooth flat surfaces, are observed at various growth temperatures. The observed morphology transition is attributed to the asymmetric strain distribution between hexagonal symmetric AlN layers and rectangular (110) Si substrates and to varying surface adatom migration rates present at different growth temperatures.

  13. Influence of HEPES buffer on the local pH and formation of surface layer during in vitro degradation tests of magnesium in DMEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Naddaf Dezfuli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body is a buffered environment where pH is effectively maintained. HEPES is a biological buffer often used to mimic the buffering activity of the body in in vitro studies on the degradation behavior of magnesium. However, the influence of HEPES on the degradation behavior of magnesium in the DMEM pseudo-physiological solution has not yet been determined. The research aimed at elucidating the degradation mechanisms of magnesium in DMEM with and without HEPES. The morphologies and compositions of surface layers formed during in vitro degradation tests for 15–3600 s were characterized. The effect of HEPES on the electrochemical behavior and corrosion tendency was determined by performing electrochemical tests. HEPES indeed retained the local pH, leading to intense intergranular/interparticle corrosion of magnesium made from powder and an increased degradation rate. This was attributed to an interconnected network of cracks formed at the original powder particle boundaries and grain boundaries in the surface layer, which provided pathways for the corrosive medium to interact continuously with the internal surfaces and promoted further dissolution. Surface analysis revealed significantly reduced amounts of precipitated calcium phosphates due to the buffering activity of HEPES so that magnesium became less well protected in the buffered environment.

  14. Direct formation of a current collector layer on a partially reduced graphite oxide film using sputter-assisted metal deposition to fabricate high-power micro-supercapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Segi; Yu, Jin

    2016-03-01

    When a reduced graphite oxide (RGO) freestanding film is fabricated on a supercapacitor cell via compression onto a current collector, there are gaps between the film and the current collector, even if the cell is carefully assembled. These gaps can induce increases in the electrical series resistance (ESR) of the cell, resulting in degradation of the cell's electrochemical performance. Here, to effectively reduce the ESR of the supercapacitor, metal sputtering deposition is introduced. This enables the direct formation of the current collector layer on a partially reduced GO (pRGO) film, the model system. Using metal sputtering, a nickel (Ni) layer with a thickness <1 μm can be created easily on one side of the pRGO film. Good electrical interconnection between the pRGO film and the current collector can be obtained using a Ni layer formed on the pRGO film. The pRGO film sustains its film form with high packing density (∼1.31 g cm-3). Furthermore, the Ni-sputtered pRGO film with optimized Ni thickness exhibits remarkable enhancement of its electrochemical performance. This includes a superior rate capability and semi-permanent cycle life compared with the untreated pRGO film. This is due to the significant decrease in the ESR of the film.

  15. Formation properties of an InGaN active layer for high-efficiency InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well-nanowire light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sung Won; Lee, Bongsoo; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-09-01

    Nitride-based nanowires (NWs) have several advantages, such as flexibility in choosing a substrate, easy fabrication, large light-emitting area, no internal electric field, enhanced light extraction, and reduced defects by strain relief, that are useful for enhancing the efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Here, we report how crucial the formation properties of the InGaN active layer are for enhancing the efficiency of core-shell InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well (MQW)-NW LEDs that are selectively grown on oxide templates with perfectly-circular hole patterns. The nanostructures are analyzed for two types of LEDs, one containing defect-free MQW active layer and the other containing MQW layer with defects by using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The I-V curve of the defect-free LED shows a rectifying behavior with an on/off ratio of ~109, typical of a diode, and the off-state leakage current of the LED with defects is much larger than that of the defect-free LED, resulting in brighter electroluminescence from the latter device. These results suggest that well-defined nonpolar InGaN/GaN MQW-NWs can be utilized for the realization of high-performance LEDs.

  16. The role of nitrogen in luminescent Si nanoprecipitate formation during annealing of Si ion-implanted SiO sub 2 layers

    CERN Document Server

    Kachurin, G A; Zhuravlev, K S; Ruault, M O

    2001-01-01

    SiO sub 2 layers were implanted with 25 keV Si sup + and 13 keV N sup + ions with the doses of (1-4) x 10 sup 1 sup 6 cm sup - sup 2 and (0.2-2) x 10 sup 1 sup 6 cm sup - sup 2 , respectively. Then the samples were annealed at 900-1100 deg C to form luminescent silicon nanoprecipitates. The nitrogen effect on the process is controlled by photoluminescence spectra. It is found out that the photoluminescence intensity increases considerably at the appropriate ratio between silicon and nitrogen. It has been concluded that the interaction of nitrogen with excessive silicon results in increasing the number of precipitation centers. This raises the nanocrystals number and reduces their mean size

  17. In Situ Formation of Decavanadate-Intercalated Layered Double Hydroxide Films on AA2024 and their Anti-Corrosive Properties when Combined with Hybrid Sol Gel Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junsheng Wu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A layered double hydroxide (LDH film was formed in situ on aluminum alloy 2024 through a urea hydrolysis method, and a decavanadate-intercalated LDH (LDH-V film fabricated through the dip coating method. The microstructural and morphological characteristics were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The corrosion-resistant performance was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM, and a salt-spray test (SST.The SEM results showed that a complete and defect-free surface was formed on the LDH-VS film. The anticorrosion results revealed that the LDH-VS film had better corrosion-resistant properties than the LDH-S film, especially long-term corrosion resistance. The mechanism of corrosion protection was proposed to consist of the self-healing effect of the decavanadate intercalation and the shielding effect of the sol-gel film.

  18. Shallow Groundwater and Brine Processes in Antarctica: Linking Seasonal and Interannual Changes in Active Layer Hydrology to Ecosystem Change and Thermokarst Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    We report on measurements of soil hydrological and thermal properties from the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica (MDV), and relate them to changes in the spatial patterns of shallow groundwater flow (water tracks), landscape subsidence (thermokarst), and microbial and invertebrate ecosystem response. We show that shallow groundwater in the MDV is primarily derived from snowfall and seasonal ground ice melt, but is evaporatively concentrated during the summer flow period to produce saline to hypersaline active layer solutions. Multi-year profiles of soil temperature and soil moisture indicate that water track flow is largely limited to the duration of active layer conditions (~2 months) and that water track discharge is characterized by an early season pulse as ground ice melts, and a late season pulse as solutions flowing downslope accumulate at the base of the water tracks. Evaporative concentration of water track fluids, coupled with soil salt dissolution, and/or cation exchange reactions, result in enrichment of water track fluids in chloride and sulfate salts (depending on local soil chemistry) such that initially fresh snowmelt becomes saline to hypersaline over several km of groundwater flow. These brines shape soil ecosystems in the MDV by controlling salinity-dependent habitat suitability for invertebrates and microbial organisms. We show that these soil salts and shallow groundwater solutions accumulate in local depressions to form ponds, and that where these ponds are located above buried ice, the presence of salts leads to expansion of the basins to form large thermokarst depressions. Because water tracks are primarily snow-fed, and are moderated by shallow groundwater processes, they represent a component of the Antarctic hydrological system that is likely to respond rapidly to regional changes in temperature and precipitation, altering Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems, carbon budgets, and ground ice distribution.

  19. Formation of high electrical-resistivity thin surface layer on carbonyl-iron powder (CIP) and thermal stability of nanocrystalline structure and vortex magnetic structure of CIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, K.; Miyajima, Y.; Sonehara, M.; Sato, T.; Hayashi, F.; Zettsu, N.; Teshima, K.; Mizusaki, H.

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the carbonyl-iron powder (CIP) used in the metal composite bulk magnetic core for high-efficient/light-weight SiC/GaN power device MHz switching dc-dc converter, where the fine CIP with a mean diameter of 1.1 μm is used to suppress the MHz band eddy current inside the CIP body. When applying the CIP to composite core together with the resin matrix, high electrical resistivity layer must be formed on the CIP-surface in order to suppress the overlapped eddy current between adjacent CIPs. In this study, tens nm thick silica (SiO2) was successfully deposited on the CIP-surface by using hydrolysis of TEOS (Si(OC2H5)4). Also tens nm thick oxidized layer of the CIP-surface was successfully formed by using CIP annealing in dry air. The SiC/GaN power device can operate at ambient temperature over 200 degree-C, and the composite magnetic core is required to operate at such ambient temperature. The as-made CIP had small coercivity below 800 A/m (10 Oe) due to its nanocrystalline-structure and had a single vortex magnetic structure. From the experimental results, both nanocrystalline and single vortex magnetic structure were maintained after heat-exposure of 250 degree-C, and the powder coercivity after same heat-exposure was nearly same as that of the as-made CIP. Therefore, the CIP with thermally stable nanocrystalline-structure and vortex magnetic state was considered to be heat-resistant magnetic powder used in the iron-based composite core for SiC/GaN power electronics.

  20. Formation of high electrical-resistivity thin surface layer on carbonyl-iron powder (CIP and thermal stability of nanocrystalline structure and vortex magnetic structure of CIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sugimura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the carbonyl-iron powder (CIP used in the metal composite bulk magnetic core for high-efficient/light-weight SiC/GaN power device MHz switching dc-dc converter, where the fine CIP with a mean diameter of 1.1 μm is used to suppress the MHz band eddy current inside the CIP body. When applying the CIP to composite core together with the resin matrix, high electrical resistivity layer must be formed on the CIP-surface in order to suppress the overlapped eddy current between adjacent CIPs. In this study, tens nm thick silica (SiO2 was successfully deposited on the CIP-surface by using hydrolysis of TEOS (Si(OC2H54. Also tens nm thick oxidized layer of the CIP-surface was successfully formed by using CIP annealing in dry air. The SiC/GaN power device can operate at ambient temperature over 200 degree-C, and the composite magnetic core is required to operate at such ambient temperature. The as-made CIP had small coercivity below 800 A/m (10 Oe due to its nanocrystalline-structure and had a single vortex magnetic structure. From the experimental results, both nanocrystalline and single vortex magnetic structure were maintained after heat-exposure of 250 degree-C, and the powder coercivity after same heat-exposure was nearly same as that of the as-made CIP. Therefore, the CIP with thermally stable nanocrystalline-structure and vortex magnetic state was considered to be heat-resistant magnetic powder used in the iron-based composite core for SiC/GaN power electronics.

  1. In vitro apatite formation on nano-crystalline titania layer aligned parallel to Ti6Al4V alloy substrates with sub-millimeter gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Yuko; Uetsuki, Keita; Shirosaki, Yuki; Osaka, Akiyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Pure titanium substrates were chemically oxidized with H2O2 and subsequent thermally oxidized at 400 °C in air to form anatase-type titania layer on their surface. The chemically and thermally oxidized titanium substrate (CHT) was aligned parallel to the counter specimen such as commercially pure titanium (cpTi), titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) popularly used as implant materials or Al substrate with 0.3-mm gap. Then, they were soaked in Kokubo's simulated body fluid (SBF, pH 7.4, 36.5 °C) for 7 days. XRD and SEM analysis showed that the in vitro apatite-forming ability of the contact surface of the CHT specimen decreased in the order: cpTi > Ti6Al4V > Al. EDX and XPS surface analysis showed that aluminum species were present on the contact surface of the CHT specimen aligned parallel to the counter specimen such as Ti6Al4V and Al. This result indicated that Ti6Al4V or Al specimens released the aluminum species into the SBF under the spatial gap. The released aluminum species might be positively or negatively charged in the SBF and thus can interact with calcium or phosphate species as well as titania layer, causing the suppression of the primary heterogeneous nucleation and growth of apatite on the contact surface of the CHT specimen under the spatial gap. The diffusion and adsorption of aluminum species derived from the half-sized counter specimen under the spatial gap resulted in two dimensionally area-selective deposition of apatite particles on the contact surfaces of the CHT specimen.

  2. Investigation of chemical bonding states at interface of Zn/organic materials for analysis of early stage of inorganic/organic hybrid multi-layer formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ken, E-mail: k_cho@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Shiratani, Masaharu [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru [Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Interactions between Ar-O{sub 2} mixture plasmas and Zn thin film on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were investigated using the combinatorial plasma process analyzer, on the basis of nondestructive depth analyses of chemical bonding states at Zn thin film and Zn/PET interface via hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HXPES). After the Ar-O{sub 2} plasma exposure, peak-area ratio of O 1 s to Zn 2p{sub 3/2} evaluated from the HXPES spectra is found to increase with increasing the ion saturation current Multiplication-Sign time and saturated at the value obtained from ZnO. The HXPES C 1 s spectra measured at a take-off angle (TOA) of 80 Degree-Sign showed insignificant change in oxygen functionalities (O=C-O bond and C-O bond) after the deposition of Zn thin film and the plasma exposure. Whereas, the HXPES C 1 s spectra measurement at a TOA of 20 Degree-Sign suggested that the oxygen functionalities degraded in shallower regions up to about a few nanometer from the Zn/PET interface due to deposition of Zn thin film. However, after the plasma exposure, oxidation of PET substrate at the degraded layer of Zn/PET interface was caused by oxygen radicals and/or ions, which diffused through the Zn thin film.

  3. The paleolacustrine evolution of Juventae Chasma and Maja Valles and its implications for the formation of interior layered deposits on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samir, Muna; Nabhan, Sami; Fritz, Jörg; Winkler, Andreas; Bishop, Janice L.; Gross, Christoph; Jaumann, Ralf

    2017-08-01

    Juventae Chasma, Mars, is an approximately 7 km deep basin located in close vicinity of Valles Marineris. It extends for ∼190 km east-west and ∼270 km north-south and exhibits several light-toned interior layered deposits (ILDs). These deposits form four large and distinctive light-toned mounds referred to as mound A, B, C, and D, from south to north. The deposits, with thicknesses up to several kilometers, consist dominantly of Mg-, Fe-rich anhydrous, or simple hydrated sulfate minerals at the base partly overlain by hydrated sulfates, suggesting precipitation as a result of evaporation processes related to chemical reactions of sulfate solutions with martian rocks. Results of experimentally produced sulfate solutions containing Mg, Na, K, Ca, Fe, and Al cations are used to simulate such evaporation processes in Juventae Chasma. Rock/fluid interactions were studied by leaching igneous mineral and rock samples including the martian meteorite Tissint with pH 1.3 sulfuric acid solutions. The resulting fluids were then chemically analyzed and numerically evaporated at 25 °C, 75 °C, and between 100° and 200 °C using the Geochemist's Workbench software. The resulting sulfate precipitations were similar to those sulfates observed in Juventae Chasma. This enabled the development of a paleolacustrine model of the Juventae basin including the evolution of the Maja Valles outflow channel system. The results indicate that sulfuric acid solutions were in contact with olivine minerals to form these sulfate-rich outcrops on the surface of Mars or olivine-bearing rocks with a mineral composition of a peridotite on or within the martian regolith at the time of the late Noachian or Hesperian. Simulated moderate to warm conditions (25° - 200 °C) were used to explain the characteristic stratigraphy of multiply hydrated sulfate precipitation above anhydrous or less hydrated sulfates in lake water, with a water volume large enough to fill Juventae Chasma and to form Maja

  4. SIM's Search for Planets Orbiting White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasavage, John P., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Once launched, The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) will be the most precise astrometric instrument ever developed. These capabilities are vital to exoplanetary studies, in particular, for low-mass, Earthlike planets. I propose to use SIM to observe a sample ( 25-50) of nearby white dwarfs in hopes of detecting planetary companions with masses in the 10 Earth mass range on average. Because of the nature of white dwarfs' spectral signatures (a few broad, if any, absorption lines), current radial velocity planet hunting techniques are not viable. Astrometry is currently the only technique capable of detecting low mass planets around white dwarfs and SIM would be the best suited astrometric instrument to do so. Planetary detections around white dwarfs would better enable us to probe planetary formation theory as well as planetary evolution theory in conjunction with stellar evolution. Because astrometric signatures are inversely related to distance, the closer the system, the larger the signature (all else being equal). Because most stars will eventually end their lives as white dwarfs, these objects are plentiful and on average, closer to the Sun than more rare objects. Thus, a number of white dwarfs are close enough to the Sun to permit low mass planetary signature detections. Given that white dwarfs are the remnants of main-sequence dwarfs with spectral classes from B to K (thus far), we could better understand planetary formation over a broader range of objects than those currently investigated using radial velocity techniques (F, G, and K stars primarily).

  5. Single-layer MoS2 formation by sulfidation of molybdenum oxides in different oxidation states on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salazar Moreira, Norberto José; Beinik, Igor; Lauritsen, Jeppe V.

    2017-01-01

    The sulfidation of a MoO3 precursor into MoS2 is an important step in the preparation of catalysts for the hydrodesulfurization process that is widely utilized in oil refineries. Molybdenum oxides are also the most commonly used precursors for MoS2 growth in, e.g., the synthesis of novel two-dime......O3 powder allow us to control the stoichiometry and oxidation state of the precursor oxide. Subsequently, we investigate the sulfidation of the compounds ranging from pure low-oxygen Mo to fully oxidized MoO3 oxide sulfidation using two different methods. We find that the prerequisite...... for the efficient formation of MoS2 is that Mo stays in the highest Mo6+ state before sulfidation, whereas the presence of the reduced MoOx phase impedes the MoS2 growth. We also find that it is more efficient to form MoS2 by post-sulfidation of MoOx rather than its reactive deposition in H2S gas, which leads...

  6. A 2-d modeling approach for studying the formation, maintenance, and decay of Tropical Tropopause Layer Cirrus associated with Deep Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henz, D. R.; Hashino, T.; Tripoli, G. J.; Smith, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    This study is being conducted to examine the distribution, variability, and formation-decay processes of TTL cirrus associated with tropical deep convection using the University of Wisconsin Non-Hydrostatic modeling system (NMS). The experimental design is based on Tripoli, Hack and Kiehl (1992) which explicitly simulates the radiative-convective equilibrium of the tropical atmosphere over extended periods of weeks or months using a 2D periodic cloud resolving model. The experiment design includes a radiation parameterization to explicitly simulate radiative transfer through simulated crystals. Advanced Microphysics Prediction System (AMP) will be used to simulate microphysics by employing SHIPS (Spectral Habit Ice Prediction System) for ice, SLiPS (Spectral Liquid Prediction System) for droplets, and SAPS (Spectral Aerosol Prediction System) for aerosols. The ice scheme called SHIPS is unique in that ice particle properties (such as size, particle density, and crystal habitats) are explicitly predicted in a CRM (Hashino and Tripoli, 2007, 2008). The Advanced Microphysics Prediction System (AMPS) technology provides a particularly strong tool that effectively enables the explicit modeling of the TTL cloud microphysics and dynamical processes which has yet to be accomplished by more traditional bulk microphysics approaches.

  7. Vanishing White Matter Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In Memory Of Obituaries Contact Us Donate Vanishing White Matter Disease What is Vanishing White Matter Disease? ... of the genetic basis of VWM was a great step forward. First of all, it allows genetic ...

  8. Formation and evolution of the Lithosphere Asthenosphere Boundary and oceanic crustal Layer 2A across the Atlantic Ocean from 0 to 75 Ma using ultra-deep seismic reflection imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satish; Mehouachi, Fares; Audhkhasi, Pranav; Marjanovic, Milena

    2017-04-01

    The plate tectonics theory is based on the existence of a rigid lithosphere plate moving over the underlying ductile asthenosphere, forming the most prevalent active plate boundary on earth, lithosphere asthenosphere boundary (LAB), but the nature of this plate boundary remain very elusive. Surface wave tomography has been used to define the LAB, with resolution >30 km vertically and hundreds of kilometre laterally. Recently, receiver function methods have been used to image the LAB, but the vertical resolution is about 10 km with a very limited sub-surface sampling. In order to image the LAB on metric scale, we acquired seismic reflection data in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean starting the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at zero age to near the continental margin of Nigeria corresponding to a lithosphere of 75 Ma and across the great equatorial fracture zones (Romanche, St Paul, and Chain). We used a 12 km long multi-sensor streamer towed at 30 m water depth and a 10170 cubic inch air gun source consisting of six sub-arrays each with 8 airguns. These data have allowed us to image the base of the LAB down to 90 km depth. We have also imaged the layer 2A continuously from 0-75 My over the oceanic crust. In this talk, we will present the above results in detail to provide the insight about the formation and evolution of the LAB and layer 2A with age.

  9. Heat treatment of nitrided layer formed on X37CrMoV5-1 hot working tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciski, A.; Wach, P.; Tacikowski, J.; Babul, T.; Šuchmann, P.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the technology consisting of combination of the nitriding process with subsequent austenitizing at temperature above eutectoid temperature of the Fe-C system and further rapid cooling. Such treatment will cause formation of the martensite in the area of the primarily nitrided layer and the additional precipitation hardening by tempering of heat treated steel. The article shows that the heat treatment process of nitrided layer formed on X37CrMoV5-1 steel leads to strengthening of surface layer, the substrate and the core of nitrided part. Heat treatment of nitrided steel with the tempering in inert (nitrogen) or active (ammonia) atmosphere can increase the thickness of the layer formed by short-term nitriding process. After the nitriding process of X37CrMoV5-1 steel the nitrided layer had a thickness of about 160 μm, while a subsurface layer of iron nitrides had a thickness of 7 μm. After subsequent quenching and tempering processes, the nitrided layer undergoes additional diffusion and its thickness is increased to about 220 μm (inert atmosphere) or 280 μm (active atmosphere). If the tempering process is carried out in an inert atmosphere, the primarily formed layer of iron nitrides disappears. Tempering in an active atmosphere leads to forming of white layer with a thickness of 7 μm. Basic properties of nitrided layers formed in such way, like the hardness and the wear resistance, are presented.

  10. Enhancing the electrochemical performance of Li-rich layered oxide Li1.13Ni0.3Mn0.57O2 via WO3 doping and accompanying spontaneous surface phase formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiajia; Liu, Haodong; Hu, Tao; Meng, Ying Shirley; Luo, Jian

    2018-01-01

    WO3 doping and accompanying spontaneous formation of a surface phase can substantially improve the discharge capacity, rate capability, and cycling stability of Co-free Li-rich layered oxide Li1.13Ni0.3Mn0.57O2 cathode material. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in conjunction with ion sputtering, shows that W segregates to the particle surfaces, decreases the surface Ni/Mn ratio, and changes the surface valence state. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy further suggests that W segregation increases surface structural disorder. The spontaneous and simultaneous changes in the surface structure, composition, and valence state represent the formation of a surface phase (complexion) as the preferred surface thermodynamic state. Consequently, the averaged discharge capacity is increased by ∼13% from 251 to 284 mAh g-1 at a low rate of C/20 and by ∼200% from 30 to 90 mAh g-1 at a high rate of 40C, in comparison with an undoped specimen processed under identical conditions. Moreover, after 100 cycles at a charge/discharge rate of 1C, the WO3 doped specimen retained a discharge capacity of 188 mAh g-1, being 27% higher than that of the undoped specimen. In a broader context, this work exemplifies an opportunity of utilizing spontaneously-formed surface phases as a scalable and cost-effective method to improve materials properties.

  11. Enthalpies of formation of layered LiNi{sub x}Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1-2x}O{sub 2} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) compounds as lithium ion battery cathode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masoumi, Maryam; Cupid, Damian M.; Reichmann, Thomas L.; Seifert, Hans J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials - Applied Materials Physics; Chang, Keke; Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Materials Chemistry

    2017-11-15

    Layer-structured mixed transition metal oxides with the formula LiNi{sub x}Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1-2x}O{sub 2} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) are considered as important cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. In an effort to evaluate the relative thermodynamic stabilities of individual compositions in this series, the enthalpies of formation of selected stoichiometries are determined by high temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry and verified by ab-initio calculations. The measured and calculated data are in good agreement with each other, and the results show that LiCoO{sub 2}-LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}O{sub 2} solid solution approaches ideal behavior. By increasing x, i.e. by equimolar substitution of Mn{sup 4+} and Ni{sup 2+} for Co{sup 3+}, the enthalpy of formation of LiNi{sub x}Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1-2x}O{sub 2} from the elements becomes more exothermic, implying increased energetic stability. This conclusion is in agreement with the literature results showing improved structural stability and cycling performance of Ni/Mn-rich LiNi{sub x}Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1-2x}O{sub 2} compounds cycled to higher cut-off voltages.

  12. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  13. Mechanism of chalaza formation in quail eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Anisur; Baoyindeligeer; Iwasawa, Atsushi; Yoshizaki, Norio

    2007-12-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the mechanism of chalaza formation in eggs of the Japanese quail Coturnix japonica and to determine the production site of chalaza materials in the oviduct. Electrophoretic profiles of the chalaza materials showed six bands of 480, 320, 210, 180, 96, and 58 kDa following Coomassie Blue staining and one band of 600 kDa after immunoblotting. An antiserum was produced against the 180-kDa band. This antiserum and an antiserum generated against the 600-kDa protein were used as probes to detect chalaza materials. Immunofluorescent and immunoelectron-microscopic observations revealed that chalazae and chalaziferous layers overlaid to approximately 40 microm upon the vitelline membrane of the ovum were composed of the same materials as those produced by both types of secretory cells in the luminal and glandular epithelia at the infundibulum. We propose that the mechanism of chalaza formation is as follows: (1) chalazae first appear as fine filaments at the presumptive sharp and blunt ends of the ovum at the infundibulum; (2) these filaments are twisted into a lead fiber while the ovum is rotating and descending in the magnum; (3) at the posterior end of the magnum, the lead fiber is anchored to the thick egg white and lifted outward with the chalaziferous sublayers when the inner egg white is liquefied by absorbing water; (4) the lead fiber and chalaziferous sublayers are twisted further into the chalaza in the uterus.

  14. Canavan Disease: A White Matter Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shalini; Mattan, Natalia S.; de Vellis, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Breakdown of oligodendrocyte-neuron interactions in white matter (WM), such as the loss of myelin, results in axonal dysfunction and hence a disruption of information processing between brain regions. The major feature of leukodystrophies is the lack of proper myelin formation during early development or the onset of myelin loss late in life.…

  15. Avaliação de programas de iluminação sobre o desempenho zootécnico de poedeiras leves Evaluation of lightning programs upon the performance of white egg layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Jorge de Freitas

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliado o efeito de programas de iluminação sobre o desempenho zootécnico de poedeiras leves ao final de produção, em experimento realizado no Departamento de Zootecnia da Universidade Federal de Lavras - UFLA. Foram testados um programa de iluminação intermitente e outro com apenas iluminação natural, em dias de luminosidade crescente, em comparação com um programa contínuo com a utilização de 288 poedeiras leves da linhagem Leghorn branca. As aves foram alojadas em galpão dividido em 3 ambientes, por lona de plástico preta, de forma que a iluminação de um não interferisse na dos outros. Cada ambiente experimental apresentou 32 gaiolas nas quais foram alojadas 96 galinhas. Foi realizado um período pré-experimental de 28 dias. O período experimental teve duração de 112 dias, em que avaliou-se o consumo de ração, a produção de ovos, o peso e a massa dos ovos e a conversão alimentar por massa de ovos. O delineamento utilizado foi o inteiramente ao acaso, com restrição nos tratamentos, e oito repetições. As aves submetidas ao programa de iluminação intermitente e iluminação natural consumiram (P0,05 nos programas de iluminação testados. A produção e a massa de ovos foi maior (PThis experiment was conducted with objective to evaluate the effect of lighting programs for light at the Department of Animal Science of the Federal University of Lavras . An intermittent lighting program and another with only natural lighting on days of increasing lighting as compared with a continuous program by utilizing 288 light layers were tested. The hens were keept in a house divided into three environments in such a way the lighting of one did not interfere with that of the other one. The experimental period lasted 112 days , divided into four periods of 28 days. The design utilized was the completely randomized with restriction in the treatments and eight replicates. The means of the treatments were compared with the

  16. ON THE EVOLUTION OF MAGNETIC WHITE DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremblay, P.-E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P. [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C. P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Freytag, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy at Uppsala University, Regementsvägen 1, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Steiner, O. [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstr. 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Ludwig, H.-G. [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Landessternwarte, Königstuhl 12, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Steffen, M. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Wedemeyer, S., E-mail: tremblay@stsci.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2015-10-10

    We present the first radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the atmosphere of white dwarf stars. We demonstrate that convective energy transfer is seriously impeded by magnetic fields when the plasma-β parameter, the thermal-to-magnetic-pressure ratio, becomes smaller than unity. The critical field strength that inhibits convection in the photosphere of white dwarfs is in the range B = 1–50 kG, which is much smaller than the typical 1–1000 MG field strengths observed in magnetic white dwarfs, implying that these objects have radiative atmospheres. We have employed evolutionary models to study the cooling process of high-field magnetic white dwarfs, where convection is entirely suppressed during the full evolution (B ≳ 10 MG). We find that the inhibition of convection has no effect on cooling rates until the effective temperature (T{sub eff}) reaches a value of around 5500 K. In this regime, the standard convective sequences start to deviate from the ones without convection due to the convective coupling between the outer layers and the degenerate reservoir of thermal energy. Since no magnetic white dwarfs are currently known at the low temperatures where this coupling significantly changes the evolution, the effects of magnetism on cooling rates are not expected to be observed. This result contrasts with a recent suggestion that magnetic white dwarfs with T{sub eff} ≲ 10,000 K cool significantly slower than non-magnetic degenerates.

  17. Tunable White-Light Emission in Single-Cation-Templated Three-Layered 2D Perovskites (CH 3 CH 2 NH 3 ) 4 Pb 3 Br 10–x Cl x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Lingling; Wu, Yilei; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Traore, Boubacar [Institut; Katan, Claudine [Institut; Even, Jacky [Fonctions; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2017-08-16

    Two-dimensional (2D) hybrid halide perovskites come as a family (B)2(A)n-1PbnX3n+1 (B and A= cations; X= halide). These perovskites are promising semiconductors for solar cells and optoelectronic applications. Among the fascinating properties of these materials is white-light emission, which has been mostly observed in single-layered 2D lead bromide or chloride systems (n = 1), where the broad emission comes from the transient photoexcited states generated by self-trapped excitons (STEs) from structural distortion. Here we report a multilayered 2D perovskite (n = 3) exhibiting a tunable white-light emission. Ethylammonium (EA+) can stabilize the 2D perovskite structure in EA4Pb3Br10–xClx (x = 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9.5, and 10) with EA+ being both the A and B cations in this system. Because of the larger size of EA, these materials show a high distortion level in their inorganic structures, with EA4Pb3Cl10 having a much larger distortion than that of EA4Pb3Br10, which results in broadband white-light emission of EA4Pb3Cl10 in contrast to narrow blue emission of EA4Pb3Br10. The average lifetime of the series decreases gradually from the Cl end to the Br end, indicating that the larger distortion also prolongs the lifetime (more STE states). The band gap of EA4Pb3Br10–xClx ranges from 3.45 eV (x = 10) to 2.75 eV (x = 0), following Vegard’s law. First-principles density functional theory calculations (DFT) show that both EA4Pb3Cl10 and EA4Pb3Br10 are direct band gap semiconductors. The color rendering index (CRI) of the series improves from 66 (EA4Pb3Cl10) to 83 (EA4Pb3Br0.5Cl9.5), displaying high tunability and versatility of the

  18. Sailing to White Boat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This is a composite red-green-blue image of the rock called White Boat. It is the first rock target that Spirit drove to after finishing a series of investigations on the rock Adirondack. White Boat stood out to scientists due to its light color and more tabular shape compared to the dark, rounded rocks that surround it.

  19. Creating White Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLisky, Claire Louise; Carey, Jane

    Vedtagelsen af White Australien som regeringens politik i 1901 viser, at hvidheden var afgørende for den måde, hvorpå den nye nation i Australien blev konstitueret. Og alligevel har historikere i vid udstrækning overset hvidhed i deres studier af Australiens race fortid. 'Creating White Australia...

  20. White Teachers Talking Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, Avner; Garrett, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the increasing racial diversity in American schools and the consistently homogenous teacher workforce in the United States, understanding the ways white teachers consider and attend to racial issues is of crucial importance to the educational landscape. This paper, based on a qualitative study, explores five white American teachers'…

  1. White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Zheng; Matthew Stough

    2008-09-30

    The goal of this project is to develop a high efficiency phosphor converting (white) Light Emitting Diode (pcLED) 1-Watt package through an increase in package extraction efficiency. A transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor is proposed to replace the powdered phosphor to reduce the scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is proposed between blue LED die and phosphor layer to recover inward yellow emission. At the end of the project we expect to recycle approximately 50% of the unrecovered backward light in current package construction, and develop a pcLED device with 80 lm/W{sub e} using our technology improvements and commercially available chip/package source. The success of the project will benefit luminous efficacy of white LEDs by increasing package extraction efficiency. In most phosphor-converting white LEDs, the white color is obtained by combining a blue LED die (or chip) with a powdered phosphor layer. The phosphor partially absorbs the blue light from the LED die and converts it into a broad green-yellow emission. The mixture of the transmitted blue light and green-yellow light emerging gives white light. There are two major drawbacks for current pcLEDs in terms of package extraction efficiency. The first is light scattering caused by phosphor particles. When the blue photons from the chip strike the phosphor particles, some blue light will be scattered by phosphor particles. Converted yellow emission photons are also scattered. A portion of scattered light is in the backward direction toward the die. The amount of this backward light varies and depends in part on the particle size of phosphors. The other drawback is that yellow emission from phosphor powders is isotropic. Although some backward light can be recovered by the reflector in current LED packages, there is still a portion of backward light that will be absorbed inside the package and further converted to heat. Heat

  2. A Model for the Galactic Population of Symbiotic Stars with White Dwarf Accretors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungelson, L.; Livio, M.; Tutukov, A.; Kenyon, S. J.

    1995-07-01

    By means of a population synthesis code, we investigate the formation of symbiotic systems in which the hot components are assumed to be white dwarfs which are either burning hydrogen steadily or are in a post-nova plateau" phase, in the evolution of exploding white dwarfs. Our estimate for the total number of symbiotic systems in the Galaxy, ˜3000-30,000 (depending on different model assumptions), is compatible with observational estimates. The crucial parameter for the determination of the birthrate and number of symbiotic stars is the mass of the hydrogen layer which the white dwarf can accumulate prior to hydrogen ignition. We model the distributions of symbiotic stars over orbital periods, masses of the components, mass-loss rates by the cool components, and brightness of components, and we obtain a reasonable agreement with observations. We show that in systems which are the most efficient in producing the symbiotic phenomenon, the accretors have to capture up to ˜30% of the matter lost by the cool component via a stellar wind. If the fraction of captured matter is significantly lower, it becomes impossible to explain even the lowest observational estimates of the number of symbiotic stars. The theoretical estimate of the average rate of symbiotic novae is ˜0.1 yr-1, compatible with the observed one. The apparent normal chemical composition of symbiotic novae can be explained if the white dwarfs in these systems, which have systematically lower masses than in cataclysmic binaries, manage to preserve "buffer" helium layers between their CO cores and the accreted hydrogen envelopes. Mass exchange in symbiotic systems does not lead to SN Ia's via the accumulation of a Chandrasekhar mass. However, if sub-Chandrasekhar-mass, double-detonation models indeed produce SN Ia's, then symbiotic systems can be the progenitors of ≲⅓ of the events. According to the model, SN Ia's in symbiotic binaries belong to young and intermediate-age populations (t ≲ 6 × 109

  3. White dwarf cosmochronology in the solar neighborhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremblay, P.-E.; Kalirai, J. S.; Soderblom, D. R.; Cignoni, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cummings, J., E-mail: tremblay@stsci.edu [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-08-20

    The study of the stellar formation history in the solar neighborhood is a powerful technique to recover information about the early stages and evolution of the Milky Way. We present a new method that consists of directly probing the formation history from the nearby stellar remnants. We rely on the volume complete sample of white dwarfs within 20 pc, where accurate cooling ages and masses have been determined. The well characterized initial-final mass relation is employed in order to recover the initial masses (1 ≲ M {sub initial}/M {sub ☉} ≲ 8) and total ages for the local degenerate sample. We correct for moderate biases that are necessary to transform our results to a global stellar formation rate, which can be compared to similar studies based on the properties of main-sequence stars in the solar neighborhood. Our method provides precise formation rates for all ages except in very recent times, and the results suggest an enhanced formation rate for the solar neighborhood in the last 5 Gyr compared to the range 5 < Age (Gyr) < 10. Furthermore, the observed total age of ∼10 Gyr for the oldest white dwarfs in the local sample is consistent with the early seminal studies that have determined the age of the Galactic disk from stellar remnants. The main shortcoming of our study is the small size of the local white dwarf sample. However, the presented technique can be applied to larger samples in the future.

  4. White Dwarf Cosmochronology in the Solar Neighborhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, P.-E.; Kalirai, J. S.; Soderblom, D. R.; Cignoni, M.; Cummings, J.

    2014-08-01

    The study of the stellar formation history in the solar neighborhood is a powerful technique to recover information about the early stages and evolution of the Milky Way. We present a new method that consists of directly probing the formation history from the nearby stellar remnants. We rely on the volume complete sample of white dwarfs within 20 pc, where accurate cooling ages and masses have been determined. The well characterized initial-final mass relation is employed in order to recover the initial masses (1 ages for the local degenerate sample. We correct for moderate biases that are necessary to transform our results to a global stellar formation rate, which can be compared to similar studies based on the properties of main-sequence stars in the solar neighborhood. Our method provides precise formation rates for all ages except in very recent times, and the results suggest an enhanced formation rate for the solar neighborhood in the last 5 Gyr compared to the range 5 Age (Gyr) age of ~10 Gyr for the oldest white dwarfs in the local sample is consistent with the early seminal studies that have determined the age of the Galactic disk from stellar remnants. The main shortcoming of our study is the small size of the local white dwarf sample. However, the presented technique can be applied to larger samples in the future.

  5. Optical and biochemical properties of a southwest Florida whiting event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jacqueline S.; Hu, Chuanmin; Robbins, Lisa L.; Byrne, Robert H.; Paul, John H.; Wolny, Jennifer L.

    2017-09-01

    ;Whiting; in oceanography is a term used to describe a sharply defined patch of water that contains high levels of suspended, fine-grained calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Whitings have been reported in many oceanic and lake environments, and recently have been reported in southwest Florida coastal waters. Here, field and laboratory measurements were used to study optical, biological, and chemical properties of whiting waters off southwest Florida. No significant difference was found in chlorophyll a concentrations between whiting and outside waters (non-whiting water), but average particle backscattering coefficients in whiting waters were double those in outside waters, and remote sensing reflectance in whiting waters was higher at all wavelengths (400-700 nm). While other potential causes cannot be completely ruled out, particle composition and biochemical differences between sampled whiting water, contiguous water, and outside water indicate a biologically precipitated mode of whiting formation. Taxonomic examination of marine phytoplankton samples collected during a whiting event revealed a community dominated by autotrophic picoplankton and a small (carbonate parameters differed from whiting and contiguous to outside water, more sampling is needed to determine if these results are statistically significant.

  6. Layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  7. Astrometric Binaries: White Dwarfs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliversen, Nancy A.

    We propose to observe a selection of astrometric or spectroscopicastrometric binaries nearer than about 20 pc with unseen low mass companions. Systems of this type are important for determining the luminosity function of low mass stars (white dwarfs and very late main sequence M stars), and their contribution to the total mass of the galaxy. Systems of this type are also important because the low mass, invisible companions are potential candidates in the search for planets. Our target list is selected primarily from the list of 31 astrometric binaries near the sun by Lippincott (1978, Space Sci. Rev., 22, 153), with additional candidates from recent observations by Kamper. The elimination of stars with previous IUE observations, red companions resolved by infrared speckle interferometry, or primaries later than M1 (because if white dwarf companions are present they should have been detected in the visible region) reduces the list to 5 targets which need further information. IUE SWP low dispersion observations of these targets will show clearly whether the remaining unseen companions are white dwarfs, thus eliminating very cool main sequence stars or planets. This is also important in providing complete statistical information about the nearest stars. The discovery of a white dwarf in such a nearby system would provide important additional information about the masses of white dwarfs. Recent results by Greenstein (1986, A. J., 92, 859) from binary systems containing white dwarfs imply that 80% of such systems are as yet undetected. The preference of binaries for companions of approximately equal mass makes the Lippincott-Kamper list of A through K primaries with unseen companions a good one to use to search for white dwarfs. The mass and light dominance of the current primary over the white dwarf in the visible makes ultraviolet observations essential to obtain an accurate census of white dwarf binaries.

  8. Layering in peralkaline magmas, Ilímaussaq Complex, S Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Emma J.; Finch, Adrian A.; Donaldson, Colin H.

    2017-01-01

    The peralkaline to agpaitic Ilímaussaq Complex, S. Greenland, displays spectacular macrorhythmic (> 5 m) layering via the kakortokite (agpaitic nepheline syenite), which outcrops as the lowest exposed rocks in the complex. This study applies crystal size distribution (CSD) analyses and eudialyte-group mineral chemical compositions to study the marker horizon, Unit 0, and the contact to the underlying Unit - 1. Unit 0 is the best-developed unit in the kakortokites and as such is ideal for gaining insight into processes of crystal formation and growth within the layered kakortokite. The findings are consistent with a model whereby the bulk of the black and red layers developed through in situ crystallisation at the crystal mush-magma interface, whereas the white layer developed through a range of processes operating throughout the magma chamber, including density segregation (gravitational settling and flotation). Primary textures were modified through late-stage textural coarsening via grain overgrowth. An open-system model is proposed, where varying concentrations of halogens, in combination with undercooling, controlled crystal nucleation and growth to form Unit 0. Our observations suggest that the model is applicable more widely to the layering throughout the kakortokite series and potentially other layered peralkaline/agpaitic rocks around the world.

  9. White Blood Cell Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Blood Additional Content Medical News Overview of White Blood Cell Disorders By Mary Territo, MD, Emeritus ... service to the community. The legacy of this great resource continues as the Merck Manual in the ...

  10. Distribution System White Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA worked with stakeholders and developed a series of white papers on distribution system issues ranked of potentially significant public health concern (see list below) to serve as background material for EPA, expert and stakeholder discussions.

  11. White Lake AOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    White Lake is in Muskegon County along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. It was named an Area of Concern on the Great Lakes under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1987 and delisted in 2014.

  12. AGENT IN THE DIET OF WHITE ,LEGHORN LAYERS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oleoresin is used as a colorant in the food industry and capsicum is used in the manufacture of medicaments. After extraction, the remaining dried and ground flesh (pepper spent) is left as a by-product. Small—scale poultry producers can use the by-product to feed egg-laying hens. In this regard, it was shown in an earlier ...

  13. AGENT IN THE DIET OF WHITE ,LEGHORN LAYERS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oleoresin is used as a colorant in the food industry and capsicum is used in the manufacture of medicaments. After extraction, the remaining dried and ground flesh ..... 5. Chandra, S., Neteke, SP. and Cu ta, BS. (1978). Studies on comparative utilization of xantho hylls rom various natural sources for egg yolk pigmentation.

  14. White Rose Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, W. [Husky Oil Operations Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The status of Husky's White Rose Project in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland was presented with particular focus on the province of Newfoundland, resource development applications and project challenges. Husky Energy merged with Renaissance Energy in August 2000. It is publicly traded on the Toronto Stock Exchange. Its Q1 2000 production was 270 mboe/d with a clear strategy to deliver an additional 200 mboe/d by 2005. The 5 major projects which represent 80 per cent of Husky's growth are the White Rose, Tucker Lake, Wenchang, Terra Nova and Lloyd Project. This presentation included a map showing the land holdings related to Husky's White Rose Project. The development plans include the drilling of 15-20 wells in the basin which holds an estimated 230 mm/bbls of oil reserves. The presentation also described the Canada-Newfoundland benefits that White Rose will bring in terms of direct person-hours and spin off employment. No gas export infrastructure is currently in place. It is believed that between 7 and 10 tcf of discovered gas reserves is required and there is not enough White Rose gas on which to base an economic gas development. The White Rose challenge will be to deliver a technically and commercially viable project that meets the needs of the owners, governments, unions and supply community. The successful completion of the White Rose Project will demonstrate that the Grand Banks can be developed effectively and efficiently and will contribute to Newfoundland's offshore petroleum industry. tabs., figs.

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of superficial white onychomycosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Boabaid, Roberta Oliveira; Timm, Vitor; Silva, Ricardo Marques e; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita

    2015-01-01

    Superficial white onychomycosis is characterized by opaque, friable, whitish superficial spots on the nail plate. We examined an affected halux nail of a 20-year-old male patient with scanning electron microscopy. The mycological examination isolated Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Abundant hyphae with the formation of arthrospores were found on the nail's surface, forming small fungal colonies. These findings showed the great capacity for dissemination of this form of onychomycosis. PMID:26560225

  16. Histological study of white rhinoceros integument.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H Plochocki

    Full Text Available In this study, we report findings from a microscopic analysis of the white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum integumentary ultrastructure. Skin samples from the cheek, shoulder, flank and rump were taken from a 46-year-old female southern white rhinoceros and examined using H&E and elastic histological stains. The epidermis was thickest in the flank (1.003 mm followed by the rump, cheek and shoulder. The stratum corneum comprised more than half the epidermal thickness. Numerous melanin granules were found in the basal and spinosum layers. The epidermal-dermal junction was characterized by abundant papillary folds increasing surface contact between integument layers. Most of the dermal thickness consisted of organized collagen bundles with scattered elastic fibers. Collagen fiber bundles were thickest in the flank (210.9 μm followed by shoulder, rump and cheek. Simple coiled sweat glands were present in the dermis, but hair and sebaceous glands were absent. Together, these data suggest the white rhinoceros has a unique integumentary system among large terrestrial herbivores.

  17. White butterflies as solar photovoltaic concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Katie; Senthilarasu, S.; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H.; Mallick, Tapas K.

    2015-07-01

    Man’s harvesting of photovoltaic energy requires the deployment of extensive arrays of solar panels. To improve both the gathering of thermal and photovoltaic energy from the sun we have examined the concept of biomimicry in white butterflies of the family Pieridae. We tested the hypothesis that the V-shaped posture of basking white butterflies mimics the V-trough concentrator which is designed to increase solar input to photovoltaic cells. These solar concentrators improve harvesting efficiency but are both heavy and bulky, severely limiting their deployment. Here, we show that the attachment of butterfly wings to a solar cell increases its output power by 42.3%, proving that the wings are indeed highly reflective. Importantly, and relative to current concentrators, the wings improve the power to weight ratio of the overall structure 17-fold, vastly expanding their potential application. Moreover, a single mono-layer of scale cells removed from the butterflies’ wings maintained this high reflectivity showing that a single layer of scale cell-like structures can also form a useful coating. As predicted, the wings increased the temperature of the butterflies’ thorax dramatically, showing that the V-shaped basking posture of white butterflies has indeed evolved to increase the temperature of their flight muscles prior to take-off.

  18. White butterflies as solar photovoltaic concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Katie; Senthilarasu, S; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Mallick, Tapas K

    2015-07-31

    Man's harvesting of photovoltaic energy requires the deployment of extensive arrays of solar panels. To improve both the gathering of thermal and photovoltaic energy from the sun we have examined the concept of biomimicry in white butterflies of the family Pieridae. We tested the hypothesis that the V-shaped posture of basking white butterflies mimics the V-trough concentrator which is designed to increase solar input to photovoltaic cells. These solar concentrators improve harvesting efficiency but are both heavy and bulky, severely limiting their deployment. Here, we show that the attachment of butterfly wings to a solar cell increases its output power by 42.3%, proving that the wings are indeed highly reflective. Importantly, and relative to current concentrators, the wings improve the power to weight ratio of the overall structure 17-fold, vastly expanding their potential application. Moreover, a single mono-layer of scale cells removed from the butterflies' wings maintained this high reflectivity showing that a single layer of scale cell-like structures can also form a useful coating. As predicted, the wings increased the temperature of the butterflies' thorax dramatically, showing that the V-shaped basking posture of white butterflies has indeed evolved to increase the temperature of their flight muscles prior to take-off.

  19. The Magnum-Isthmus Junction of the Fowl Oviduct Participates in the Formation of the Avian-type Shell Membrane(Morphology)

    OpenAIRE

    Kun Ming, Mao; Fowzia, Sultana; Abdur Rahman Howlider, Mohammad; Atsushi, Iwasawa; Norio, Yoshizaki; Department of Poultry Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University; Department of Animal Resource Production, United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Gifu University

    2006-01-01

    Avian eggs possess a shell membrane in the shape of an asymmetrical ellipsoid and with a limiting membrane that is a smooth layer of homogeneous, dense materials. We describe the role of the magnum-isthmus junction (MIJ) of the oviduct in the formation of the avian-type shell membrane in the domestic fowl Gallus domesticus. The narrow width of the lumen at the MIJ indirectly participates in the determination of the asymmetrical ellipsoid shape of eggs that are encased by the egg-white layer a...

  20. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2013-10-15

    A method for treating a karsted formation containing heavy hydrocarbons and dolomite includes providing heat to at least part of one or more karsted layers in the formation from one or more heaters located in the karsted layers. A temperature in at least one of the karsted layers is allowed to reach a decomposition temperature of dolomite in the formation. The dolomite is allowed to decompose and at least some hydrocarbons are produced from at least one of the karsted layers of the formation.

  1. The antiplaque efficacy of white tea extract mouthrinse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipika Kalyan Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to assess the antiplaque efficacy of a mouthwash containing white tea. It also assessed the antibacterial properties of white tea against Prevotella intermedia (Pi, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa in vitro. Materials and Methods: Forty-five subjects with healthy periodontium were randomly chosen and were divided into three groups and advised to use mouthwashes A, B, and C (Group A, white tea; Group B, distilled water [placebo]; Group C, chlorhexidine for 4 days. They were advised to refrain from any kind of mechanical oral hygiene techniques. Plaque index (PI was checked on day 1 and 5. In vitro testing for against Pi, Pg, and Aa against white tea extract was undertaken. Results: PI significantly increased from day 1 to day 5 (P < 0.01 in Groups A, B, and C. In inter-group comparison, there was a statistical significant difference between white tea mouthrinse group and placebo group, chlorhexidine group and placebo group and also chlorhexidine group and white tea mouthrinse group. However, chlohexidine showed superior antiplaque activity. In vitro test, white tea showed effective inhibition against all three bacterial strains Pi, Pg, and Aa at 1% concentration. Conclusion: White tea mouthrinse potently inhibits plaque formation although not as comparable to chlorhexidine mouthrinse. Hence, for those preferring herbal products, white tea mouthrinse is a good option.

  2. Differential white cell count by centrifugal microfluidics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregory Jon; Tentori, Augusto M.; Schaff, Ulrich Y.

    2010-07-01

    We present a method for counting white blood cells that is uniquely compatible with centrifugation based microfluidics. Blood is deposited on top of one or more layers of density media within a microfluidic disk. Spinning the disk causes the cell populations within whole blood to settle through the media, reaching an equilibrium based on the density of each cell type. Separation and fluorescence measurement of cell types stained with a DNA dye is demonstrated using this technique. The integrated signal from bands of fluorescent microspheres is shown to be proportional to their initial concentration in suspension. Among the current generation of medical diagnostics are devices based on the principle of centrifuging a CD sized disk functionalized with microfluidics. These portable 'lab on a disk' devices are capable of conducting multiple assays directly from a blood sample, embodied by platforms developed by Gyros, Samsung, and Abaxis. [1,2] However, no centrifugal platform to date includes a differential white blood cell count, which is an important metric complimentary to diagnostic assays. Measuring the differential white blood cell count (the relative fraction of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes) is a standard medical diagnostic technique useful for identifying sepsis, leukemia, AIDS, radiation exposure, and a host of other conditions that affect the immune system. Several methods exist for measuring the relative white blood cell count including flow cytometry, electrical impedance, and visual identification from a stained drop of blood under a microscope. However, none of these methods is easily incorporated into a centrifugal microfluidic diagnostic platform.

  3. Localized application of soil organic matter shifts distribution of cluster roots of white lupin in the soil profile due to localized release of phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Gang; Shen, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Fu-Suo; Lambers, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Phosphorus (P) is a major factor controlling cluster-root formation. Cluster-root proliferation tends to concentrate in organic matter (OM)-rich surface-soil layers, but the nature of this response of cluster-root formation to OM is not clear. Cluster-root proliferation in response to localized application of OM was characterized in Lupinus albus (white lupin) grown in stratified soil columns to test if the stimulating effect of OM on cluster-root formation was due to (a) P release from breakdown of OM; (b) a decrease in soil density; or (c) effects of micro-organisms other than releasing P from OM. Methods Lupin plants were grown in three-layer stratified soil columns where P was applied at 0 or 330 mg P kg−1 to create a P-deficient or P-sufficient background, and OM, phytate mixed with OM, or perlite was applied to the top or middle layers with or without sterilization. Key Results Non-sterile OM stimulated cluster-root proliferation and root length, and this effect became greater when phytate was supplied in the presence of OM. Both sterile OM and perlite significantly decreased cluster-root formation in the localized layers. The OM position did not change the proportion of total cluster roots to total roots in dry biomass among no-P treatments, but more cluster roots were concentrated in the OM layers with a decreased proportion in other places. Conclusions Localized application of non-sterile OM or phytate plus OM stimulated cluster-root proliferation of L. albus in the localized layers. This effect is predominantly accounted for by P release from breakdown of OM or phytate, but not due to a change in soil density associated with OM. No evidence was found for effects of micro-organisms in OM other than those responsible for P release. PMID:20150198

  4. Formation and characterization of conductive thin layers of copper sulfide (Cu {sub x}S) on the surface of polyethylene and polyamide by the use of higher polythionic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancutiene, Ingrida [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu Str. 19, LT 50254, Kaunas 9 (Lithuania)]. E-mail: ingrida.ancutiene@ktu.lt; Janickis, Vitalijus [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu Str. 19, LT 50254, Kaunas 9 (Lithuania); Ivanauskas, Remigijus [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu Str. 19, LT 50254, Kaunas 9 (Lithuania)

    2006-04-15

    Layers of copper sulfide of varying composition and properties are formed on the surface of polyethylene and polyamide by a sorption-diffusion method using solutions of higher polythionic acids, H{sub 2}S {sub n}O{sub 6}. The concentration of sulfur adsorbed-diffused into PE and PA depends on the degree of the acid sulfurity, n, the temperature of the solution and the period of the polymer treatment. The amount of copper in a sulfide (Cu {sub x}S) layer formed after the sulfured polymer treatment with a solution of Cu(I-II) salt is strongly dependent on the concentration of sulfur in the PE and PA. By the chemical analysis of the obtained sulfide layers was determined that a value of x in the Cu {sub x}S layers varies in the interval 1 < x < 2. The microscopic investigation of transverse sections of PE and PA samples with copper sulfide layers showed that the major part of copper sulfide is in the surface matrix of the polymer. X-ray diffraction studies of the Cu {sub x}S layers obtained seven phases: with x = 2 (chalcocite), 1.9375 (djurleite), 1.8 (digenite), 1.75 (anilite), 1.12 (yarrowite), 1.06 (talnakhite) and 1 (covellite). The measurements of the electrical conductance of Cu {sub x}S layers (0.1-4 S cm{sup -2}) showed that its value greatly depends on the conditions of PE and PA interaction with H{sub 2}S {sub n}O{sub 6} and of further interaction with Cu(I-II) salt solution, on the chemical and phase composition of the layer.

  5. White collar crime

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    The White Collar Crime has particular characteristics that range from the profile of its author to the difficulties of the criminal process where it is investigated. El delito de Cuello Blanco cuenta con características particulares desde el perfil de su autor, hasta las dificultades del proceso penal en que se investiga.

  6. white's friction factor formulae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    Environmental Engineering, Elizade University, Ilara Monkin, Ondo State. NIGERIA. ACCURATE SOLUTIONS OF COLEBROOK- WHITE'S FRICTION FACTOR FORMULAE. S. Lukman1 and I. A. Oke2,*. 1 CIVIL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT, UNIVERSITY OF HAFR AL-BATIN, HAFR AL-BATIN, SAUDI ARABIA. 2 CIVIL ...

  7. White matter lesion progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofer, Edith; Cavalieri, Margherita; Bis, Joshua C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter lesion (WML) progression on magnetic resonance imaging is related to cognitive decline and stroke, but its determinants besides baseline WML burden are largely unknown. Here, we estimated heritability of WML progression, and sought common genetic variants asso...

  8. White Sea - Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    At bottom center of this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from April 13, 2001, the White Sea in western Russia is becoming free of ice in its southern extent. Meanwhile, the blue-green waters along the coast of the peninsula jutting out into the Barents Sea to the northeast could be due to a phytoplankton bloom.

  9. White-tailed deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul E. Johns; John C. Kilgo

    2005-01-01

    from a public relations standpoint, the white-tailed deer (Odocileus virginiamus) is probably the most important wildlife species occurring on the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS deer herd has been the subject of more scientific investigations than any comparable deer population in the world, resulting in more than 125 published papers. Each year...

  10. probably mostly white

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Willem Scholtz

    internet – the (probably mostly white) public's interest in the so-called Border War is ostensibly at an all-time high. By far most of the publications are written by ex- ... understanding of this very important episode in the history of Southern Africa. It was, therefore, with some anticipation that one waited for this book, which.

  11. White dots do matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soeken, Mathias; Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal

    2013-01-01

    Toffoli circuits. We also show how to use these rules to derive more complex formulas. The major difference compared to existing approaches is the use of negative controls (white dots), which significantly increases the algebraic strength. We show how existing optimisation approaches can be adapted...

  12. Binary white dwarfs in the halo of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oirschot, Pim; Nelemans, Gijs; Toonen, Silvia; Pols, Onno; Brown, Anthony G. A.; Helmi, Amina; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2014-09-01

    Aims: We study single and binary white dwarfs in the inner halo of the Milky Way in order to learn more about the conditions under which the population of halo stars was born, such as the initial mass function (IMF), the star formation history, or the binary fraction. Methods: We simulate the evolution of low-metallicity halo stars at distances up to ~3 kpc using the binary population synthesis code SeBa. We use two different white dwarf cooling models to predict the present-day luminosities of halo white dwarfs. We determine the white dwarf luminosity functions (WDLFs) for eight different halo models and compare these with the observed halo WDLF of white dwarfs in the SuperCOSMOS Sky Survey. Furthermore, we predict the properties of binary white dwarfs in the halo and determine the number of halo white dwarfs that is expected to be observed with the Gaia satellite. Results: By comparing the WDLFs, we find that a standard IMF matches the observations more accurately than a top-heavy one, but the difference with a bottom-heavy IMF is small. A burst of star formation 13 Gyr ago fits slightly better than a star formation burst 10 Gyr ago and also slightly better than continuous star formation 10-13 Gyr ago. Gaia will be the first instument to constrain the bright end of the field halo WDLF, where contributions from binary WDs are considerable. Many of these will have He cores, of which a handful have atypical surface gravities (log g 0 in our standard model for WD cooling. These so called pre-WDs, if observed, can help us to constrain white dwarf cooling models and might teach us something about the fraction of halo stars that reside in binaries. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Three Dimensional Double Layers in Magnetized Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jovanovic, D.; Lynov, Jens-Peter; Michelsen, Poul

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the formation of fully three dimensional double layers in a magnetized plasma. The measurements are performed in a magnetized stationary plasma column with radius 1.5 cm. Double layers are produced by introducing an electron beam with radius 0...

  14. Peeling Back the Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image of the rock target named 'Mazatzal' on sol 77 (March 22, 2004). It is a close-up look at the rock face and the targets that will be brushed and ground by the rock abrasion tool in upcoming sols. Mazatzal, like most rocks on Earth and Mars, has layers of material near its surface that provide clues about the history of the rock. Scientists believe that the top layer of Mazatzal is actually a coating of dust and possibly even salts. Under this light coating may be a more solid portion of the rock that has been chemically altered by weathering. Past this layer is the unaltered rock, which may give scientists the best information about how Mazatzal was formed. Because each layer reveals information about the formation and subsequent history of Mazatzal, it is important that scientists get a look at each of them. For this reason, they have developed a multi-part strategy to use the rock abrasion tool to systematically peel back Mazatzal's layers and analyze what's underneath with the rover's microscopic imager, and its Moessbauer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometers. The strategy began on sol 77 when scientists used the microscopic imager to get a closer look at targets on Mazatzal named 'New York,' 'Illinois' and 'Arizona.' These rock areas were targeted because they posed the best opportunity for successfully using the rock abrasion tool; Arizona also allowed for a close-up look at a range of tones. On sol 78, Spirit's rock abrasion tool will do a light brushing on the Illinois target to preserve some of the surface layers. Then, a brushing of the New York target should remove the top coating of any dust and salts and perhaps reveal the chemically altered rock underneath. Finally, on sol 79, the rock abrasion tool will be commanded to grind into the New York target, which will give scientists the best chance of observing Mazatzal's interior. The Mazatzal targets were named after the home states of

  15. Plato: White and Non-white Love

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amo Sulaiman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Plato’s dialogues, the Symposium, and Phaedrus, provide a reasonableexplanation of love. G. Vlastos and M. Nussbaum do not share such anopinion. The former contends that Plato’s view of love is about lovingonly a person’s beauty, but not the entire person; thus, it falls short of anappropriate explanation of love. The latter holds that a theory of love should be complete, and that Plato’s one is incomplete on the grounds that it does not account for personal love. These criticisms will be re-evaluated in light of the duality of love (the white and non-white horses—in Phaedrus as well as participants’ views in the Symposium; a re-assessment will weaken the mentioned objections. This paper contends that from the Symposium and Phaedrus, one can have a fruitful understanding of being in love, being out of love, falling inlove, loving for its own sake and being erotically in love. In order to account for these related issues of love it is important to consider Plato’s works in terms of his “official” and “unofficial” views. The former is construed as the doctrine of the lover or loving for its own sake: this is associates with Diotima’s views which are repeated by Socrates. With reference to the latter, it is possible to explain what personal love or being in love, being out of love, falling in love, and being erotically in love involve. Erotic love will be interpreted as an extension of our philosophical conception of love, related to views of love that are mentioned in the Symposium other than Socrates’ report of Diotima’s conceptions. This paper is divided into two parts: the first one will show views of love in the Symposium. That is, being in love, being out of love, falling in love and loving for its own sake will be discussed. In addition, the forementioned criticisms will be re-evaluated. In the second section, we will show that Aristophanes’ speech expresses erotic love, and then Kant’s objections will be

  16. Formation of NiCrAlY/NiAl multi-layered coating by low pressure plasma spraying; Genatsu plasma yosha ni yoru NiCrAlY/NiAl tasomaku no seisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizawa, H. [Industrial Res. Inst. of Nagano Pref., Nagano (Japan).; Yonehama, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Kobayashi, M. [Shinshu Univ., Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Education

    1997-12-15

    NiCrAlY/NiAl multi-layered coating was produced on SUS310S steel by means of mutual low pressure plasma spraying of NiCrAlY and Al powders which was accompanied with self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction of metal deposits. The NiAl layer contained Ni3Al particles and Cr2Al phase along the fine grain boundary. Also, Ni3Al was detected in the NiCrAlY layer with a small amount of NiAl particles. As the result, high hardness was obtained in both the layers, i.e., 650HV in NiAl layer and 450HV in NiCrAlY one at 673K. The structure of the multilayered coating changed hardly during annealing lower than 973K because enriched Cr at NiCrAlY/NiAl interface suppressed NiAl + Ni3Al{yields}Ni5Al3 peritectoid reaction. The SHS reaction time of an compressed Al droplet in diameter of 50{mu}m was calculated as 4.17times10{sup -3} second. 20 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Multisensor optimal information fusion input white noise deconvolution estimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuli

    2004-08-01

    The unified multisensor optimal information fusion criterion weighted by matrices is rederived in the linear minimum variance sense, where the assumption of normal distribution is avoided. Based on this fusion criterion, the optimal information fusion input white noise deconvolution estimators are presented for discrete time-varying linear stochastic control system with multiple sensors and correlated noises, which can be applied to seismic data processing in oil exploration. A three-layer fusion structure with fault tolerant property and reliability is given. The first fusion layer and the second fusion layer both have netted parallel structures to determine the first-step prediction error cross-covariance for the state and the estimation error cross-covariance for the input white noise between any two sensors at each time step, respectively. The third fusion layer is the fusion center to determine the optimal matrix weights and obtain the optimal fusion input white noise estimators. The simulation results for Bernoulli-Gaussian input white noise deconvolution estimators show the effectiveness.

  18. Programming balanced optical beam splitters in white paint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, S.R.; Huisman, T.J.; Huisman, T.J.; Goorden, S.A.; Mosk, Allard; Pinkse, Pepijn Willemszoon Harry

    2014-01-01

    Wavefront shaping allows for ultimate control of light propagation in multiple-scattering media by adaptive manipulation of incident waves. We shine two separate wavefront-shaped beams on a layer of dry white paint to create two enhanced output spots of equal intensity. We experimentally confirm by

  19. Device Physics of White Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, Herman T.; Hof, Andre; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2012-01-01

    The charge transport and recombination in white-emitting polymer light- emitting diodes (PLEDs) are studied. The PLED investigated has a single emissive layer consisting of a copolymer in which a green and red dye are incorporated in a blue backbone. From single-carrier devices the effect of the

  20. Device physics of white polymer light-emitting diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H.T.; Hof, A.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    The charge transport and recombination in white-emitting polymer light- emitting diodes (PLEDs) are studied. The PLED investigated has a single emissive layer consisting of a copolymer in which a green and red dye are incorporated in a blue backbone. From single-carrier devices the effect of the

  1. Usage Record Format Recommendation

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsen, J.K.; Muller-Pfeerkorn, R

    2013-01-01

    For resources to be shared, sites must be able to exchange basic accounting and usage data in a common format. This document describes a common format which enables the exchange of basic accounting and usage data from different resources. This record format is intended to facilitate the sharing of usage information, particularly in the area of the accounting of jobs, computing, memory, storage and cloud usage but with a structure that allows an easy extension to other resources. This document describes the Usage Record components both in natural language form and annotated XML. This document does not address how these records should be used, nor does it attempt to dictate the format in which the accounting records are stored. Instead, it denes a common exchange format. Furthermore, nothing is said regarding the communication mechanisms employed to exchange the records, i.e. transport layer, framing, authentication, integrity, etc.

  2. The Jung-White Letters

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Kirsten; Nielsen, Sine Birkedal

    2012-01-01

    This report is based on the correspondence The Jung-White Letters, between psychotherapist C. G. Jung and theologian Victor White. Their correspondence deals mainly with the relationship between religion and science. The report analyses Jung and White's conflict on the subject of evil as understood in the Christian doctrine privatio boni, investigating the underlying epistemological reasoning behind their disagreement. Theologian White is influenced by the Catholic Dominican order, whose phil...

  3. Perceived Whiteness under Different Lighting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oota, Akiko; Kanaya, Sueko; Ayama, Miyoshi; Mukai, Kenji

    Many white and nearly white objects are in our living and working areas, such as documents written on white paper, white curtains, white clothes, white walls, and white furniture. The perceived whiteness of these objects is important to the impression of the lighting in these areas. To investigate the perceived whiteness in living areas, a series of experiments were conducted using four different fluorescent lamps in three different environments. It was found that the areas of perceived whiteness in the living area environments were larger than the areas of perceived whiteness under achromatic conditions. Based on these results, a perceived whiteness index is proposed for these experimental conditions.

  4. White noise on bialgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Schürmann, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Stochastic processes with independent increments on a group are generalized to the concept of "white noise" on a Hopf algebra or bialgebra. The main purpose of the book is the characterization of these processes as solutions of quantum stochastic differential equations in the sense of R.L. Hudsonand K.R. Parthasarathy. The notes are a contribution to quantum probability but they are also related to classical probability, quantum groups, and operator algebras. The Az ma martingales appear as examples of white noise on a Hopf algebra which is a deformation of the Heisenberg group. The book will be of interest to probabilists and quantum probabilists. Specialists in algebraic structures who are curious about the role of their concepts in probablility theory as well as quantum theory may find the book interesting. The reader should havesome knowledge of functional analysis, operator algebras, and probability theory.

  5. WHITE CELLS AS LIGHT GATHERERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of White cells (J. V. White . ’Long optical paths at large aperture’, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 32:285 (1942)) as light gatherers is analyzed in this...unobservable. It is evident, therefore, that White cells and the sources used with them must be properly designed and applied to be effective. (Author)

  6. White dwarf planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonsor Amy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The recognition that planets may survive the late stages of stellar evolution, and the prospects for finding them around White Dwarfs, are growing. We discuss two aspects governing planetary survival through stellar evolution to the White Dwarf stage. First we discuss the case of a single planet, and its survival under the effects of stellar mass loss, radius expansion, and tidal orbital decay as the star evolves along the Asymptotic Giant Branch. We show that, for stars initially of 1 − 5 M⊙, any planets within about 1 − 5 AU will be engulfed, this distance depending on the stellar and planet masses and the planet's eccentricity. Planets engulfed by the star's envelope are unlikely to survive. Hence, planets surviving the Asymptotic Giant Branch phase will probably be found beyond ∼ 2 AU for a 1  M⊙ progenitor and ∼ 10 AU for a 5 M⊙ progenitor. We then discuss the evolution of two-planet systems around evolving stars. As stars lose mass, planet–planet interactions become stronger, and many systems stable on the Main Sequence become destabilised following evolution of the primary. The outcome of such instabilities is typically the ejection of one planet, with the survivor being left on an eccentric orbit. These eccentric planets could in turn be responsible for feeding planetesimals into the neighbourhood of White Dwarfs, causing observed pollution and circumstellar discs.

  7. White Rose project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, W. [Husky Oil Operations Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The status of Husky's White Rose Project off the Grand Banks of Newfoundland was presented with particular focus on project achievements from October 2000 to March 2002, execution strategy and the challenge of delivering the project safely, in an environmentally sensitive manner, both on schedule and within budget. The project is the third oil development offshore Newfoundland and Labrador where recoverable reserves are estimated at 884 MMbbls for Hibernia, 40 MMbbls for Terra Nova, and 200 to 250 MMbbls for the White Rose project. Cost competitive methods can be used to develop White Rose, which will then stimulate more exploration activity and expand the base of experienced individuals. This presentation included computer generated images of the field layout depicting 3 glory holes or drill centres. The well count is currently at 21 wells of which 10 are at the stage of first oil. Production capacity is 100 bbls per day. Graphs depicting drilling performance were also included, along with the FPSO execution strategy, turret schematics, and the project schedule. tabs., figs.

  8. High quality boron-doped epitaxial layers grown at 200°C from SiF4/H2/Ar gas mixtures for emitter formation in crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léal, Ronan; Haddad, Farah; Poulain, Gilles; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2017-02-01

    Controlling the doping profile in solar cells emitter and front/back surface field is mandatory to reach high efficiencies. In the current state of the art, these doped layers are made by dopant diffusion at around 900°C, which implies potential temperature induced damages in the c-Si absorber and for which a precise control of doping is difficult. An alternative solution based on boron-doped epitaxial silicon layers grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from 200°C using SiF4/H2/Ar/B2H6 chemistry is reported. The structural properties of the doped and undoped epitaxial layers were assessed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The incorporation of boron has been studied via plasma profiling time of flight mass spectrometry (PP-TOFMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements. The boron-doped epitaxial layers revealed excellent structural and electrical properties even for high carrier concentrations (>1019cm-3). Sheet resistances between 100 and 130 Ω/sq can been obtained depending on the thickness and the doping concentration, which is within the range of targeted values for emitters in c-Si solar cells. Electrochemical capacitance voltage (ECV) revealed a uniform doping profile around 3.1019 cm-3 and by comparing with SIMS measurement a doping efficiency around 50% has been found.

  9. High quality boron-doped epitaxial layers grown at 200°C from SiF4/H2/Ar gas mixtures for emitter formation in crystalline silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Léal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the doping profile in solar cells emitter and front/back surface field is mandatory to reach high efficiencies. In the current state of the art, these doped layers are made by dopant diffusion at around 900°C, which implies potential temperature induced damages in the c-Si absorber and for which a precise control of doping is difficult. An alternative solution based on boron-doped epitaxial silicon layers grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD from 200°C using SiF4/H2/Ar/B2H6 chemistry is reported. The structural properties of the doped and undoped epitaxial layers were assessed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The incorporation of boron has been studied via plasma profiling time of flight mass spectrometry (PP-TOFMS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS measurements. The boron-doped epitaxial layers revealed excellent structural and electrical properties even for high carrier concentrations (>1019cm-3. Sheet resistances between 100 and 130 Ω/sq can been obtained depending on the thickness and the doping concentration, which is within the range of targeted values for emitters in c-Si solar cells. Electrochemical capacitance voltage (ECV revealed a uniform doping profile around 3.1019 cm-3 and by comparing with SIMS measurement a doping efficiency around 50% has been found.

  10. Evidence for Kinetic Limitations as a Controlling Factor of Ge Pyramid Formation: a Study of Structural Features of Ge/Si(001) Wetting Layer Formed by Ge Deposition at Room Temperature Followed by Annealing at 600 °C

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Storozhevykh, Mikhail S; Arapkina, Larisa V; Yuryev, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    .... The experiment has demonstrated that the Ge/Si(001) film formed in the conditions of an isolated system consists of the standard patched wetting layer and large droplike clusters of Ge rather than of huts or domes which appear when a film is grown...

  11. Tailoring graphene layer-to-layer growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Wu, Bin; Guo, Wei; Wang, Lifeng; Li, Jingbo; Liu, Yunqi

    2017-06-01

    A layered material grown between a substrate and the upper layer involves complex interactions and a confined reaction space, representing an unusual growth mode. Here, we show multi-layer graphene domains grown on liquid or solid Cu by the chemical vapor deposition method via this ‘double-substrate’ mode. We demonstrate the interlayer-induced coupling effect on the twist angle in bi- and multi-layer graphene. We discover dramatic growth disunity for different graphene layers, which is explained by the ideas of a chemical ‘gate’ and a material transport process within a confined space. These key results lead to a consistent framework for understanding the dynamic evolution of multi-layered graphene flakes and tailoring the layer-to-layer growth for practical applications.

  12. White-Ceramic Conversion on Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr Surface for Dental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Obata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr (TNTZ alloy has excellent mechanical properties and bone conductivity. For dental application, TNTZ surfaces were converted to white oxidized layer by a simple heat treatment in air to achieve the formation of aesthetic surfaces. The oxidized layer formed by the heat treatment at 1000°C for 0.5 or 1 hr was whiter and joined to TNTZ substrate more strongly than that formed by the treatment at 900°C. The layer consisted of TiO2 (rutile, TiNb2O7, and TiTa2O7 and possessed ~30 μm in thickness for the sample heat-treated at 1000°C and ~10 μm for that heat-treated at 900°C. The surface average roughness and the wettability increased after the heat treatment. The spreading and proliferation level of mouse osteoblast-like cell (MC3T3-E1 cell on the heat-treated sample were almost the same as those on as-prepared one. The cell spreading on TNTZ was better than those on pure titanium (CP Ti regardless of the heat treatment for the samples. There was no deterioration in the in vitro cell compatibility of TNTZ after the oxidized layer coating by the heat treatment.

  13. Role of Al in Zn bath on the formation of the inhibition layer during hot-dip galvanizing for a 1.2Si-1.5Mn transformation-induced plasticity steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuang-Kuo; Hsu, Chiung-Wen; Chang, Liuwen; Gan, Dershin; Yang, Kuo-Cheng

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated the interaction between the Al in the Zn bath and the surface oxides formed by selective oxidation on a 1.2Si-1.5Mn TRIP steel during hot-dip galvanizing. XPS and TEM were employed for characterization. The results indicated that the amorphous xMnO·SiO2 oxide could react with Al to form a Si-Mn-Al-containing oxide. The crystalline MnSiO3 and Mn2SiO4 oxides could be largely reduced by Al to form holes in the oxide film. Consequently, the steel covered by a layer of mixed xMnO·SiO2 and MnSiO3 could form a continuous Fe2Al5 inhibition layer and showed the highest galvanizability among the three samples examined.

  14. The White Rabbit project

    CERN Document Server

    Serrano, J; Gousiou, E; van der Bij, E; Wlostowski, T; Daniluk, G; Lipinski, M

    2013-01-01

    White Rabbit (WR) is a multi-laboratory, multi- company collaboration for the development of a new Ethernet-based technology which ensures sub-nanosecond synchronisation and deterministic data transfer. The project uses an open source paradigm for the development of its hardware, gateware and software components. This article provides an introduction to the technical choices and an explanation of the basic principles underlying WR. It then describes some possible applications and the current status of the project. Finally, it provides insight on current developments and future plans.

  15. 'Snow White' in Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This color image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the trench dubbed 'Snow White,' after further digging on the 25th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (June 19, 2008). The lander's solar panel is casting a shadow over a portion of the trench. The trench is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Mystery of a Dimming White Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    show that the observed light curves could be created by a starspot at about 10,000K (compared to the white dwarfs effective temperature of ~11,900K), covering 14% of the surface area at an inclination of 90.The formation of such a starspot would almost certainly require the presence of magnetic fields. Interestingly, J1529+2928 doesnt have a strong magnetic field; from its spectra, the team can constrain its field strength to be less than 70 kG.Given that up to 15% of white dwarfs are thought to have kG magnetic fields, eclipse-like events such as this one might in fact be common for white dwarfs. If so, then many similar events will likely be observed with future surveys of transients like Keplers ongoing K2 mission, which is expected to image another several hundred white dwarfs, or the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will image 13 million white dwarfs.CitationMukremin Kilic et al 2015 ApJ 814 L31. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/814/2/L31

  17. Innovation in Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Joseph J; Cui, Jiwei; Björnmalm, Mattias; Braunger, Julia A; Ejima, Hirotaka; Caruso, Frank

    2016-12-14

    Methods for depositing thin films are important in generating functional materials for diverse applications in a wide variety of fields. Over the last half-century, the layer-by-layer assembly of nanoscale films has received intense and growing interest. This has been fueled by innovation in the available materials and assembly technologies, as well as the film-characterization techniques. In this Review, we explore, discuss, and detail innovation in layer-by-layer assembly in terms of past and present developments, and we highlight how these might guide future advances. A particular focus is on conventional and early developments that have only recently regained interest in the layer-by-layer assembly field. We then review unconventional assemblies and approaches that have been gaining popularity, which include inorganic/organic hybrid materials, cells and tissues, and the use of stereocomplexation, patterning, and dip-pen lithography, to name a few. A relatively recent development is the use of layer-by-layer assembly materials and techniques to assemble films in a single continuous step. We name this "quasi"-layer-by-layer assembly and discuss the impacts and innovations surrounding this approach. Finally, the application of characterization methods to monitor and evaluate layer-by-layer assembly is discussed, as innovation in this area is often overlooked but is essential for development of the field. While we intend for this Review to be easily accessible and act as a guide to researchers new to layer-by-layer assembly, we also believe it will provide insight to current researchers in the field and help guide future developments and innovation.

  18. Identification of undesirable white-colony-forming yeasts appeared on the surface of Japanese kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ayaka; Muraoka, Naomi; Nakamura, Mariko; Yanagisawa, Yasuhira; Amachi, Seigo

    2018-02-01

    To identify yeasts involved in white-colony formation on Japanese commercial kimchi products, three types of kimchi were prepared and fermented at four different temperatures. At 4 °C, yeast colonies did not appear until 35 days, while more rapid white-colony formation occurred at higher temperatures (10, 15, and 25 °C). Combination of PCR-DGGE and direct isolation of yeasts from white colonies revealed that Kazachstania exigua and K. pseudohumilis were responsible for the white-colony formation. Inoculation of the isolated Kazachstania strains into fresh kimchi successfully reproduced white-colony formation at 15 °C but not at 4 °C. Growth experiments in liquid medium revealed that Kazachstania spp. grew fast at 15 °C even in the presence of acidulants, which are commonly added to Japanese kimchi products for prevention of yeast growth. These results suggest that white-colony formation on Japanese kimchi is caused by the genus Kazachstania, and that one of important factors determining white-colony formation is its fermentation temperature.

  19. The White House saga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daković Nevena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Frank Capra expressed his gratitude to the immigrant dream come true by creating a brilliant cinematic myth about the American political system, presenting it as an 'inherently good' when in the hands of honest and good people. His 'morality fairytales', 'fantasies of good will' imbued with belief in restoration of old-new principles, offer complex reflections on an idealised Americanism of the 1930s which have become the foundation of representations of the American political system. The Capraesque narrative - 'a blend of optimism, humor, patriotism, and, to those who really understand his work, (and darkness, despair, and the need to fight for things you care about...' (Bassinger 1982: 48 - as a combination of all-American values, ordinary people and historical figures, a democracy myth - has been extended by an endless network of intertextual echoes in film and TV production. Following the developmental lines - through political melodrama, melodramatic politics and political soap opera - one will be led from Capra to the series The West Wing (1996 - 2006, House of Cards (2013 - 2015 and Madame Secretary (2014 - ; from the comprehensive Washington Postcard (Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 1939 to the focal points at the White House; from Capra's comedy to the saga of the fight against terrorism led by the president and both ordinary and trained American citizens (White House Down, 2013, Roland Emmerich.

  20. Food consumption and daily feeding periodicity : comparison between pelagic and demersal whiting in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Pelagic North Sea whiting Merlagius merlangus fed at night, while demersal whiting fed by day. The estimated specific daily ration ranged from 4.38 to 7.84% in 1992 and from 3.99 to 10.31% in 1993 using the in situ rate of gastric evacuation. Using Anderson's evacuation model the specific daily r...... composition and energy density of the prey and spatial distribution of the whiting, demonstrates the need for a sampling design that includes both pelagic and demersal layers when quantifying the food consumption of whiting.(C) 2000 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles....... ration ranged from 0.41 to 1.66% in 1992 and from 0.78 to 1.75% in 1993. The specific daily rations were significantly different where energy density of stomach content by length class of whiting was significantly different between the two layers and years. The fact that daily ration was related to prey...

  1. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  2. Formation of multiple networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnani, Matteo; Rossi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    While most research in Social Network Analysis has focused on single networks, the availability of complex on-line data about individuals and their mutual heterogenous connections has recently determined a renewed interest in multi-layer network analysis. To the best of our knowledge, in this paper...... we introduce the first network formation model for multiple networks. Network formation models are among the most popular tools in traditional network studies, because of both their practical and theoretical impact. However, existing models are not sufficient to describe the generation of multiple...... networks. Our model, motivated by an empirical analysis of real multi-layered network data, is a conservative extension of single-network models and emphasizes the additional level of complexity that we experience when we move from a single- to a more complete and realistic multi-network context....

  3. Shock dynamics in layered periodic media

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Solutions of constant-coeffcient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coeffcients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by a computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

  4. Binary white dwarfs in the halo of the Milky Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oirschot, Pim; Nelemans, Gijs; Toonen, Silvia; Pols, Onno; Brown, Anthony G. A.; Helmi, Amina; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    Aims: We study single and binary white dwarfs in the inner halo of the Milky Way in order to learn more about the conditions under which the population of halo stars was born, such as the initial mass function (IMF), the star formation history, or the binary fraction. Methods: We simulate the

  5. The Yellow Ring Measurement for the Phosphor-converted White LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Chang, Chun-Li; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Liao, Tai-Shan

    Since Nichia Corporation developed YAG-based phosphor successfully, which had provided the best performance of conversion efficiency, the phosphor-converted white LED is already regarded as the major manufacturing process for white light generation. In general, the principle of white light generation is that a blue chip emits yellowish green lights by pass ing through phosphor layer and then yellowish green lights mix part of blue lights to yield white lights. However, the consistency of the blue chip and the homogeneity of the phosphor layer are key factors to affect the quality of white LED. Due to the lim itations of current LED package, bracket or phosphor, the lightspot of a white LED projection has the common features that yellow lights surround the periphery of white lights. This phenomenon is so-called "yellow ring". The study aims to identify the scope of yellow ring by the RGB proportion of lightspot. In addition, we create an analysis model of yellow ring to evaluate the degree of yellow ring in white light LED. From the experiment result, the yellow ring will appear when blue light decreases over 15%, and disappear in case the intensity of white light drop down to 10∼15%.

  6. Formation of an interface layer between Al{sub 1-x}Si{sub x}O{sub y} thin films and the Si substrate during rapid thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalowski, Pawel Piotr; Beyer, Volkhard; Czernohorsky, Malte; Kuecher, Peter; Teichert, Steffen [Fraunhofer-Center for Nanoelectronic Technologies, Koenigsbruecker Strasse 180, 01099 Dresden (Germany); Jaschke, Gert [Qimonda Dresden GmbH and Co. OHG, Koenigsbruecker Strasse 180, 01099 Dresden (Germany); Moeller, Wolfhard [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials, Research Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PO Box 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Silicon diffusion from the substrate through Al{sub 1-x}Si{sub x}O{sub y} thin films was investigated by ToF-SIMS depth profiling. Two types of substrate stacks were analyzed: Si wafer with either native oxide or with additional silicon nitride layer. The amount of diffused silicon depends strongly on the type of the substrate. The activation energy for pure alumina was found to be 2.27 {+-} 0.02 eV and 3.73 {+-} 0.02 eV for SiO{sub 2}/Si and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}/Si samples, respectively. Furthermore it was proved that the activation energy increases with higher concentration of Si for SiO{sub 2}/Si samples whereas it decreases for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}/Si. Detailed analysis of SIMS depth profiles provide satisfactory explanation of this phenomenon: SiO{sub 2} has much stronger tendency to react with Al{sub 1-x}Si{sub x}O{sub y} material forming an interface layer that restrain further diffusion of Si from the substrate (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Nanospherical solid electrolyte interface layer formation in binder-free carbon nanotube aerogel/Si nanohybrids to provide lithium-ion battery anodes with a long-cycle life and high capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Kim, Ilhwan; Woo, Chang-Su; Lee, Hoo-Jeong; Hyun, Seungmin

    2017-04-06

    Silicon anodes for lithium ion batteries (LiBs) have been attracting considerable attention due to a theoretical capacity up to about 10 times higher than that of conventional graphite. However, huge volume expansion during the cycle causes cracks in the silicon, resulting in the degradation of cycling performance and eventual failure. Moreover, low electrical conductivity and an unstable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer resulting from repeated changes in volume still block the next step forward for the commercialization of the silicon material. Herein we demonstrate the carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogel/Si nanohybrid structure for anode materials of LiBs via freeze casting followed by an RF magnetron sputtering process, exhibiting improved capacity retention compared to Si only samples during 1000 electrochemical cycles. The CNT aerogels as 3D porous scaffold structures could provide buffer volume for the expansion/shrinkage of Si lattices upon cycling and increase electrical conductivity. In addition, the nanospherical and relatively thin SEI layers of the CNT aerogel/Si nanohybrid structure show better lithium ion diffusion characteristics during cycling. For this reason, the Si@CNT aerogel anode still yielded a high specific capacity of 1439 mA h g(-1) after 1000 charge/discharge cycles with low capacity fading. Our approach could be applied to other group IV LiB materials that undergo large volume changes, and also has promising potential for high performance energy applications.

  8. ILC Higgs White Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Asner, D.M.; Calancha, C.; Fujii, K.; Graf, N.; Haber, H.E.; Ishikawa, A.; Kanemura, S.; Kawada, S.; Kurata, M.; Miyamoto, A.; Neal, H.; Ono, H.; Potter, C.; Strube, J.; Suehara, T.; Tanabe, T.; Tian, J.; Tsumura, J.; Watanuki, S.; Weiglein, G.; Yagyu, K.; Yokoya, H.

    2013-01-01

    The ILC Higgs White Paper is a review of Higgs Boson theory and experiment at the International Linear Collider (ILC). Theory topics include the Standard Model Higgs, the two-Higgs doublet model, alternative approaches to electroweak symmetry breaking, and precision goals for Higgs boson experiments. Experimental topics include the measurement of the Higgs cross section times branching ratio for various Higgs decay modes at ILC center of mass energies of 250, 500, and 1000 GeV, and the extraction of Higgs couplings and the total Higgs width from these measurements. Luminosity scenarios based on the ILC TDR machine design are used throughout. The gamma-gamma collider option at the ILC is also discussed.

  9. White Religious Educators Resisting White Fragility: Lessons from Mystics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Decades of work in dismantling racism have not yielded the kind of results for which religious educators have hoped. One primary reason has been what scholars term "white fragility," a symptom of the structural racism which confers systemic privilege upon White people. Lessons learned from Christian mystics point to powerful ways to…

  10. 50 CFR 660.373 - Pacific whiting (whiting) fishery management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... whiting caught shoreward of 100-fm (183-m) in the Eureka, CA area.The “per trip” limit for other.../Groundfish-Fishery-Management/Whiting-Management/index.cfm), phone, fax, letter, press release, and/or USCG... fm (183 m) depth contour. Latitude and longitude coordinates defining the boundary line approximating...

  11. The Achievement Gap between White and Non-White Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-LeBouef, Ana; Slate, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This Collection contains three seminal modules by Authors Ana Rojas-LeBouef and John R. Slate, professors and researchers from Sam Houston State University in Texas. They are nationally recognized scholars in the area of the academic inequity between White and Non-White students. This paper is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1--The…

  12. Multiple Pathways to Whiteness: White Teachers' Unsteady Racial Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Erin T.

    2017-01-01

    Teacher education programs in the US, recognizing the mismatch that exists in preschool provision between mostly white teachers and a very diverse intake of young children, have begun to explore ways of raising racial awareness among pre-service teachers, with the aim of improving non-white children's classroom experiences and outcomes. This paper…

  13. Silvicultural guide for northern white-cedar (eastern white cedar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuelle Boulfroy; Eric Forget; Philip V. Hofmeyer; Laura S. Kenefic; Catherine Larouche; Guy Lessard; Jean-Martin Lussier; Fred Pinto; Jean-Claude Ruel; Aaron. Weiskittel

    2012-01-01

    Northern white-cedar (eastern white cedar; Thuja occidentalis L.) is an important tree species in the northeastern United States and adjacent Canada, occurring both in pure stands and as a minor species in mixed stands of hardwoods or other softwoods. Yet practitioners have little and often contradictory information about cedar ecology and...

  14. Multiple Realities: A Relationship Narrative Approach in Therapy with Black-White Mixed-Race Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockquemore, Kerry Ann; Laszloffy, Tracey A.

    2003-01-01

    Emerging empirical research on racial identity formation among persons with one Black and one White parent reveals that multiple identity options are possible. Presents a relational narrative approach to therapy with Black-White mixed-race clients who experience systematic invalidation of their chosen racial identity through a detailed case…

  15. Soil formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Buurman, P.

    1998-01-01

    Soil Formation deals with qualitative and quantitative aspects of soil formation (or pedogenesis) and the underlying chemical, biological, and physical processes. The starting point of the text is the process - and not soil classification. Effects of weathering and new formation of minerals,

  16. Ozone Layer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeters, Richard; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been monitoring the ozone layer from space using optical remote sensing techniques since 1970. With concern over catalytic destruction of ozone (mid-1970s) and the development of the Antarctic ozone hole (mid-1980s), long term ozone monitoring has become the primary focus of NASA's series of ozone measuring instruments. A series of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) instruments has produced a nearly continuous record of global ozone from 1979 to the present. These instruments infer ozone by measuring sunlight backscattered from the atmosphere in the ultraviolet through differential absorption. These measurements have documented a 15 Dobson Unit drop in global average ozone since 1980, and the declines in ozone in the antarctic each October have been far more dramatic. Instruments that measure the ozone vertical distribution, the SBUV and SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) instruments for example, show that the largest changes are occurring in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. The goal of ozone measurement in the next decades will be to document the predicted recovery of the ozone layer as CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) levels decline. This will require a continuation of global measurements of total column ozone on a global basis, but using data from successor instruments to TOMS. Hyperspectral instruments capable of measuring in the UV will be needed for this purpose. Establishing the relative roles of chemistry and dynamics will require instruments to measure ozone in the troposphere and in the stratosphere with good vertical resolution. Instruments that can measure other chemicals important to ozone formation and destruction will also be needed.

  17. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  18. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  19. The white dwarf population of NGC 6397

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Santiago; García-Berro, Enrique; Althaus, Leandro G.; Camisassa, María E.

    2015-09-01

    Context. NGC 6397 is one of the most interesting, well-observed, and most thoroughly theoretically studied globular clusters. The existing wealth of observations allows us to study the reliability of the theoretical white dwarf cooling sequences of low-metallicity progenitors, to determine the age of NGC 6397 and the percentage of unresolved binaries. We also assess other important characteristics of the cluster, such as the slope of the initial mass function or the fraction of white dwarfs with hydrogen-deficient atmospheres. Aims: We present a population synthesis study of the white dwarf population of NGC 6397. In particular, we study the shape of the color-magnitude diagram and the corresponding magnitude and color distributions. Methods: To do this, we used an advanced Monte Carlo code that incorporates the most recent and reliable cooling sequences and an accurate modeling of the observational biases. Results: Our theoretical models and the observed data agree well. In particular, we find that this agreement is best for those cooling sequences that take into account residual hydrogen burning. This result has important consequences for the evolution of progenitor stars during the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch phase, since it implies that appreciable third dredge-up in low-mass, low-metallicity progenitors is not expected to occur. Using a standard burst duration of 1.0 Gyr, we obtain that the age of the cluster is 12.8+0.50-0.75 Gyr. Greater ages are also compatible with the observed data, but then unrealistic longer durations of the initial burst of star formation are needed to fit the luminosity function. Conclusions: We conclude that a correct modeling of the white dwarf population of globular clusters, used in combination with the number counts of main-sequence stars, provides a unique tool for modeling the properties of globular clusters.

  20. Polymer OLED White Light Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homer Antoniadis; Vi-En Choong; Stelios Choulis; Brian Cumpston; Rahul Gupta; Mathew Mathai; Michael Moyer; Franky So

    2005-12-19

    OSRAM Opto Semiconductors (OSRAM) successfully completed development, fabrication and characterization of the large area, polymer based white light OLED prototype at their OLED Research and Development (R&D) facility in San Jose, CA. The program, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), consisted of three key objectives: (1) Develop new polymer materials and device architectures--in order to improve the performance of organic light emitters. (2) Develop processing techniques--in order to demonstrate and enable the manufacturing of large area, white light and color tunable, solid state light sources. (3) Develop new electronics and driving schemes for organic light sources, including color-tunable light sources. The key performance goals are listed. A world record efficiency of 25 lm/W was established for the solution processed white organic device from the significant improvements made during the project. However, the challenges to transfer this technology from an R&D level to a large tile format such as, the robustness of the device and the coating uniformity of large area panels, remain. In this regard, the purity and the blend nature of the materials are two factors that need to be addressed in future work. During the first year, OSRAM's Materials and Device group (M&D) worked closely with the major polymer material suppliers to develop the polymer emissive technology. M&D was successful in demonstrating a 7-8 lm/W white light source which was based on fluorescent materials. However, it became apparent that the major gains in efficiency could only be made if phosphorescent materials were utilized. Thus, in order to improve the performance of the resulting devices, the focus of the project shifted towards development of solution-processable phosphorescent light emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) and device architectures. The result is a higher efficiency than the outlined project milestone.

  1. Mechanism of Formation of the Thermoelectric Layered Cobaltate Ca3Co4O9 by Annealing of CaO–CoO Thin Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Biplab; Schroeder, Jeremy L.; Kerdsongpanya, Sit

    2015-01-01

    The layered cobaltate Ca3Co4O9 is of interest for energy-harvesting and heat-conversion applications because of its good thermoelectric properties and the fact that the raw materials Ca and Co are nontoxic, abundantly available, and inexpensive. While single-crystalline Ca3Co4O9 exhibits high See....... With this method, we demonstrate production of epitaxial Ca3Co4O9 thin films with in-plane electrical resistivity of 6.44 mΩ cm and a Seebeck coefficient of 118 μV K−1 at 300 K....... Seebeck coefficient and low resistivity, its widespread use is hampered by the fact that single crystals are too small and expensive. A promising alternative approach is the growth of highly textured and/or epitaxial Ca3Co4O9 thin films with correspondingly anisotropic properties. Here, we present a two...

  2. Black Managers in White Corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, John P.

    The study examines the major determinants of the career patterns of black managers in white businesses and the effects of corporations on their black managers' identities and relationships to the black community. Analyzed were occupational mobility theories; white and black managers' career patterns, goals, and related factors; company employment…

  3. White noise and sleep induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J A; Moran, D J; Lee, A; Talbert, D

    1990-01-01

    We studied two groups of 20 neonates, between 2 and 7 days old, in a randomised trial. Sixteen (80%) fell asleep within five minutes in response to white noise compared with only five (25%) who fell asleep spontaneously in the control group. White noise may help mothers settle difficult babies.

  4. Axion cooling of white dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Isern, J.; Catalan, S.; Garcia--Berro, E.; Salaris, M.; Torres, S.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of white dwarfs is a simple gravothermal process. This process can be tested in two ways, through the luminosity function of these stars and through the secular variation of the period of pulsation of those stars that are variable. Here we show how the mass of the axion can be constrained using the white dwarf luminosity function.

  5. Astrophysics of white dwarf binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelemans, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    White dwarf binaries are the most common compact binaries in the Universe and are especially important for low-frequency gravitational wave detectors such as LISA. There are a number of open questions about binary evolution and the Galactic population of white dwarf binaries that can be solved using

  6. Acting White: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Kitae

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis of acting White has been heatedly debated and influential over the last 20 years or so in explaining the Black-White test score gap. Recently, economists have joined the debate and started providing new theoretical and empirical analyses of the phenomenon. This paper critically reviews the arguments that have been advanced to…

  7. Black-on-white polymer-stabilized cholesteric formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John L.; Magyar, Gregory R.; Francl, James J.; Nixon, Christine M.

    1995-08-01

    Recent research by Doane, Yang, and Chien demonstrated the use of cholesteric liquid crystals in multiplexed, high resolution, reflective diplays. These materials utilize the bistability of the cholesteric planar and focal conic states for displays with a colored image on a black background. Many commercial applications of these materials, such as electronic books and newspapers, portable faxes and personal data assistants, require, or at least prefer, black-on- white images. We report on relatively high polymer content (equalsV 20% by weight) dispersions of cholesteric liquid crystals that produce a white, reflecting, planar state. The polymer network appears to form cholesteric domains with varying pitch lengths resulting in planar states that reflect in the red, green, and blue portions of the spectrum. Utilizing a black absorbing layer behind a display using these materials offers white images on a black background, or vice-versa.

  8. Nanostructured ZnO Arrays with Self-ZnO Layer Created Using Simple Electrostatic Layer-by-Layer Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PilHo Huh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of unique ZnO nanoarrays utilizing photodynamic polymer, surface-relief grating structures, and unique electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly as a simple and economical methodology was demonstrated. Atomic force microscope (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDAX analysis were employed to characterize elemental composition and morphology of the resulting ZnO nanostructures with self-ZnO layer. Optical behavior of the final product was studied by UV-vis-NIR absorption and photoluminescence (PL spectra.

  9. Preservation of Archaeal Surface Layer Structure During Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Adrienne; Miot, Jennyfer; Lombard, Carine; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bernard, Sylvain; Zirah, Séverine; Guyot, François

    2016-05-01

    Proteinaceous surface layers (S-layers) are highly ordered, crystalline structures commonly found in prokaryotic cell envelopes that augment their structural stability and modify interactions with metals in the environment. While mineral formation associated with S-layers has previously been noted, the mechanisms were unconstrained. Using Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a hyperthermophilic archaeon native to metal-enriched environments and possessing a cell envelope composed only of a S-layer and a lipid cell membrane, we describe a passive process of iron phosphate nucleation and growth within the S-layer of cells and cell-free S-layer “ghosts” during incubation in a Fe-rich medium, independently of metabolic activity. This process followed five steps: (1) initial formation of mineral patches associated with S-layer; (2) patch expansion; (3) patch connection; (4) formation of a continuous mineral encrusted layer at the cell surface; (5) early stages of S-layer fossilization via growth of the extracellular mineralized layer and the mineralization of cytosolic face of the cell membrane. At more advanced stages of encrustation, encrusted outer membrane vesicles are formed, likely in an attempt to remove damaged S-layer proteins. The S-layer structure remains strikingly well preserved even upon the final step of encrustation, offering potential biosignatures to be looked for in the fossil record.

  10. White Sands Missile Range Urban Study: Flow and Stability Around a Single Building Part 1: Background and Overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vaucher, Gail

    2006-01-01

    ...) is the primary work environment for an Army Soldier. Characterizing this atmospheric surface layer was the focus of five field studies conducted between fiscal years 2001 2005 at White Sands Missile Range, NM...

  11. The White Rabbit Project

    CERN Document Server

    Serrano, J; Cattin, M; Garcia Cota, E; Lewis, J; Moreira, P; Wlostowski, T; Gaderer, G; Loschmidt, P; Dedic, J; Bär, R; Fleck, T; Kreider, M; Prados, C; Rauch, S

    2009-01-01

    Reliable, fast and deterministic transmission of control information in a network is a need formany distributed systems. One example is timing systems, where a reference frequency is used to accurately schedule time-critical messages. TheWhite Rabbit (WR) project is a multi-laboratory and multi-company effort to bring together the best of the data transfer and timing worlds in a completely open design. It takes advantage of the latest developments for improving timing over Ethernet, such as IEEE 1588 (Precision Time Protocol) and Synchronous Ethernet. The presented approach aims for a general purpose, fieldbus-like transmission system, which provides deterministic data and timing (sub-ns accuracy and ps jitter) to around 1000 stations. It automatically compensates for fiber lengths in the order of 10 km. This paper describes the WR design goals and the specification used for the project. It goes on to describe the central component of the WR system structure - the WR switch - with theoretical considerations a...

  12. Enhancement of electroplex emission by using multi-layer device structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yuanmin [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing 100044 (China); Teng Feng [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China) and Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing 100044 (China)]. E-mail: advanced9898@126.com; Xu Zheng [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing 100044 (China); Hou Yanbing [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang Yongsheng [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing 100044 (China); Xu Xurong [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Key Laboratory for Information Storage, Displays and Materials, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2005-04-30

    Electroplex emission based on poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) and 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) has been improved dramatically by using a multi-layer device structure indium-tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulphonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS)/PVK/BCP/PVK/BCP/LiF/Al. Electroplex emission at 595 nm has been improved about 10 times under low voltage and four times under high voltage compared to the double layer device ITO/PVK/BCP/Al. The maximum brightness of the device also has been improved about eight times. Bright white emission via electroplex formation can be obtained with Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates (0.336, 0.320) at 26 V with a brightness of 123 cd/m{sup 2}. Based on the analysis of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the materials, we suggest the enhancement is mainly ascribed to the confinement effect of the quantum-well-like multi-layer device structure. Every hole and electron has more possibilities to cross recombination at the PVK/BCP interface.

  13. Stacked white OLED having separate red, green and blue sub-elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stephen; Qi, Xiangfei; Slootsky, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The present invention relates to efficient organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The devices employ three emissive sub-elements, typically emitting red, green and blue, to sufficiently cover the visible spectrum. Thus, the devices may be white-emitting OLEDs, or WOLEDs. Each sub-element comprises at least one organic layer which is an emissive layer--i.e., the layer is capable of emitting light when a voltage is applied across the stacked device. The sub-elements are vertically stacked and are separated by charge generating layers. The charge-generating layers are layers that inject charge carriers into the adjacent layer(s) but do not have a direct external connection.

  14. Molecular orbital calculations for the formation of GaN layers on ultra-thin AlN/6H-SiC surface using alternating pulsative supply of gaseous trimethyl gallium (TMG) and NH sub 3

    CERN Document Server

    Seong, S Y

    2001-01-01

    The steps for the generation of very thin GaN films on ultrathin AlN/6H-SiC surface by alternating a pulsative supply (APS) of trimethyl gallium and NH sub 3 gases have been examined by ASED-MO calculations. We postulate that the gallium clusters was formed with the evaporation of CH sub 4 gases via the decomposition of trimethyl gallium (TMG), dimethyl gallium (DMG), and monomethyl gallium (MMG). During the injection of NH sub 3 gas into the reactor, the atomic hydrogens were produced from the thermal decomposition of NH sub 3 molecule. These hydrogen gases activated the Ga-C bond cleavage. An energetically stable GaN nucleation site was formed via nitrogen incorporation into the layer of gallium cluster. The nitrogen atoms produced from the thermal degradation of NH sub 3 were expected to incorporate into the edge of the gallium cluster since the galliums bind weakly to each other (0.19 eV). The structure was stabilized by 2.08 eV, as an adsorbed N atom incorporated into a tetrahedral site of the Ga cluster...

  15. Reducing interface recombination for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 by atomic layer deposited buffer layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultqvist, Adam; Li, Jian V.; Kuciauskas, Darius; Dippo, Patricia; Contreras, Miguel A.; Levi, Dean H.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2015-07-01

    Partial CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell stacks with different atomic layer deposited buffer layers and pretreatments were analyzed by photoluminescence (PL) and capacitance voltage (CV) measurements to investigate the buffer layer/CIGS interface. Atomic layer deposited ZnS, ZnO, and SnOx buffer layers were compared with chemical bath deposited CdS buffer layers. Band bending, charge density, and interface state density were extracted from the CV measurement using an analysis technique new to CIGS. The surface recombination velocity calculated from the density of interface traps for a ZnS/CIGS stack shows a remarkably low value of 810 cm/s, approaching the range of single crystalline II-VI systems. Both the PL spectra and its lifetime depend on the buffer layer; thus, these measurements are not only sensitive to the absorber but also to the absorber/buffer layer system. Pretreatment of the CIGS prior to the buffer layer deposition plays a significant role on the electrical properties for the same buffer layer/CIGS stack, further illuminating the importance of good interface formation. Finally, ZnS is found to be the best performing buffer layer in this study, especially if the CIGS surface is pretreated with potassium cyanide.

  16. White spots in the pupil (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... occasion, the pupil of the eye may appear white. This is never a normal condition and requires ... an ophthalmologist. The causes of a cloudy or white cornea are different than those of a white ...

  17. Basic Ozone Layer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the ozone layer and how human activities deplete it. This page provides information on the chemical processes that lead to ozone layer depletion, and scientists' efforts to understand them.

  18. VSWI Wetlands Advisory Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset represents the DEC Wetlands Program's Advisory layer. This layer makes the most up-to-date, non-jurisdictional, wetlands mapping avaiable to the public...

  19. Proteomic analysis of hen egg white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin-Dubiard, Catherine; Pasco, Maryvonne; Mollé, Daniel; Désert, Colette; Croguennec, Thomas; Nau, Françoise

    2006-05-31

    Hen egg white is an original biological fluid in which major proteins have been widely studied, unlike the minor components. In this study, two-dimensional electrophoresis associated with mass spectrometry enabled the separation of 69 protein spots and their matching with major proteins, which were already known, and with minor proteins. Sixteen proteins were identified, and among them, two had never been previously detected in hen egg white, i.e., Tenp, a protein with strong homology with a bacterial permeability-increasing protein family (BPI), and VMO-1, an outer layer vitelline membrane protein. Thirteen proteins present a very wide polymorphism (ovotransferrin, ovomucoid, clusterin, etc.), some of them up to nine isoforms (ovoinhibitor). Eleven functional protein families were identified (serpin, transferrin, protease inhibitors Kazal, glycosyl hydrolases, lipocalin, bactericidal permeability-increasing protein, clusterin, UPAR/CD59/Ly6/ snake neurotoxin, cysteine protease inhibitor, VMO-1, and folate receptor families). These various biological functions could be interesting for further valorizations. In addition, three spots remain unidentified, probably because these proteins are not yet indexed in the international protein databanks.

  20. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.