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Sample records for white gay male

  1. Demonized No More: The Spiritual Journeys and Spaces of Black Gay Male College Students at Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Darris R.

    2014-01-01

    Spirituality plays a significant role in the lives of college students (Astin, Astin, & Lindholm, 2011; Bryant, Choi, & Yasuno, 2003; Chickering, 2006; Parks, 2000). However, Black gay males are uniquely positioned with regards to spirituality given how race, gender, and sexual orientation are generally perceived and experienced in the…

  2. Hate crimes against gay males: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Danny G

    2004-03-01

    As the United States has become more multicultural and diverse, there has been an increase in violence motivated by hate. Hate crimes against gay males are the most prevalent of the hate crimes based on sexual orientation. Hate crimes have their roots in normative, individual, and societal attitudes and ideologies that lead to intimidation, bullying, teasing, physical assault, rape, and murder. This paper provides an overview of the issues specific to hate crime assaults against gay males. Mental health nurses may find this knowledge useful in developing further nursing inquiry, education, and clinical practice related to hate crime and violence prevention.

  3. A textual analysis of male gayness in Nakanjani Sibiya's novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... represents gay images that are in agreement with the 1996 Constitution of South Africa, which protects the rights of gay people. The analysis of male gayness is situated within the theoretical framework of intercultural communication. Intercultural communication theory regards gay identities as microcultures or subcultures ...

  4. Global identification predicts gay-male identity integration and well-being among Turkish gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Yasin; Vignoles, Vivian L

    2016-12-01

    In most parts of the world, hegemonic masculinity requires men to endorse traditional masculine ideals, one of which is rejection of homosexuality. Wherever hegemonic masculinity favours heterosexuality over homosexuality, gay males may feel under pressure to negotiate their conflicting male gender and gay sexual identities to maintain positive self-perceptions. However, globalization, as a source of intercultural interaction, might provide a beneficial context for people wishing to create alternative masculinities in the face of hegemonic masculinity. Hence, we tested if global identification would predict higher levels of gay-male identity integration, and indirectly subjective well-being, via alternative masculinity representations for gay and male identities. A community sample of 219 gay and bisexual men from Turkey completed the study. Structural equation modelling revealed that global identification positively predicted gay-male identity integration, and indirectly subjective well-being; however, alternative masculinity representations did not mediate this relationship. Our findings illustrate how identity categories in different domains can intersect and affect each other in complex ways. Moreover, we discuss mental health and well-being implications for gay men living in cultures where they experience high levels of prejudice and stigma. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Attitudes toward straight, gay male, and transsexual parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Brittany A; Zinner, Leah

    2015-01-01

    This study examined American attitudes toward transsexual and gay male parenting, compared to straight parenting. After reporting levels of transphobia, participants read a vignette regarding a couple seeking child adoption. Individuals high in transphobia perceived nontraditional couples as more emotionally unstable than straight couples and were less willing to grant custody of a child to the nontraditional couples vs. the straight couples. In addition, the transsexual couple faced more prejudice and discrimination than the gay male couple. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  6. Gay-related development, early abuse and adult health outcomes among gay males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mark S; Marshal, Michael P; Stall, Ron; Cheong, JeeWon; Wright, Eric R

    2008-11-01

    This study examined relationships between timing of gay-related developmental milestones, early abuse, and emergence of poor health outcomes in adulthood among 1,383 gay/bisexual men in the Urban Men's Health Study. Latent Profile Analysis grouped participants as developing early, middle or late based on the achievement of four phenomena including age of first awareness of same-sex sexual attractions and disclosure of sexual orientation. Participants who developed early were more likely, compared to others, to experience forced sex and gay-related harassment before adulthood. They were more likely to be HIV seropositive and experience gay-related victimization, partner abuse and depression during adulthood. Early forced-sex, gay-related harassment and physical abuse were associated with several negative health outcomes in adulthood including HIV infection, partner abuse, and depression. This analysis suggests that the experience of homophobic attacks against young gay/bisexual male youth helps to explain heightened rates of serious health problems among adult gay men.

  7. Racism in the Gay Community and Homophobia in the Black Community: Negotiating the Gay Black Male Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Clarence Ezra

    2008-01-01

    This research posed the question â How does racism in the gay community and homophobia in the Black community restrict gay Black maleâ s life chances and life opportunities?â Previous research has uncovered racist attitudes within the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community as well as homophobic attitudes within the Black community. Because of conflicting social identifiers (Is it possible for one to be both homosexual and Black?) and the invisibility of a gay Black voi...

  8. Gender Differences in African American Attitudes toward Gay Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Juan; Lemelle, Anthony J., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Used data from the 1993 National Black Politics Study to examine the way gender worked in explaining African American attitudes toward gay men. Results indicated that African American females expressed more positive attitudes toward homosexual men than did African American males, and of the variables examined (including age, church attendance,…

  9. Content Analysis and Methodological Critique of Articles Concerning Lesbian and Gay Male Issues in Counseling Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrke, Robin A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined research on lesbian and gay male issues in counseling psychology journals. Reviewed 6,661 studies from 6 major counseling psychology journals over 12-year period; 43 studies focused on variables related to lesbian or gay male sexual orientation. Content of articles demonstrated perspective of gay male and lesbian acceptance or…

  10. The Forging of a White Gay Aesthetic at the Saint, 1980–84

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Lawrence

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on original interviews with key protagonists and documentary research, the article examines the way in which the DJs who worked at the Saint forged a white gay aesthetic across the first half of the 1980s. A private party located in the East Village, New York, the Saint attracted a privileged white male crowd, and this group's position within the emerging culture of neoliberalism, along with the deepening impact of the AIDS epidemic, encouraged its spinners to sever their ties with sounds that were associated with blackness. However, if Saint DJs rejected a high proportion of records that were being released by New York's independents, and also snubbed Chicago house when it broke in 1985, their forging of an aesthetic that emphasised seamless transitions, often between records that contained similar sonic qualities, preempted the style of mixing that would be popularised in house music culture.

  11. Gay male attraction toward muscular men: does mating context matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varangis, Eleanna; Lanzieri, Nicholas; Hildebrandt, Tom; Feldman, Matthew

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine gay men's perceived attractiveness of male figures based on short-term and long-term partner contexts. A sample of 190 gay adult men rated the attractiveness of line-drawings depicting male figures varying systematically in muscularity and body fat percentage in both short-term and long-term dating contexts. Mixed effects modeling was used to estimate the effects of figure (muscularity and body fat), dating context (short-term vs. long-term), and individual rater characteristics on attractiveness ratings. Results indicated that figure muscularity and body-fat had significant non-linear (i.e., quadratic) relationships with attractiveness ratings, and short-term dating context was associated with more discriminating ratings of attractiveness. Interactions between individual characteristics and figure characteristics indicated that the more available the individual and lower body fat, the more discriminating they were in ratings of attractiveness. The implications for future investigations considering both object and observer characteristics of attractiveness preferences are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Differences in African American and White Women’s Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Wilson; Peterson, John L.; Parrott, Dominic J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine racial differences in women’s attitudes toward lesbians and gay men and to offer an understanding of these differences. Participants were 224 18–30 year old heterosexual African American (64%) and White (36%) female undergraduates from a large urban university in the southeastern United States. Participants completed measures of social demographics, sexual orientation, and sexual prejudice. Results showed that African American, relative to White, women endorsed more negative attitudes toward lesbians and gay men. Also, unlike White women, African American women reported more negative attitudes toward gay men than lesbians. Implications are discussed regarding differences in cultural contexts that exist between African American and White women. PMID:20161368

  13. Attitudes of Heterosexual Students toward Their Gay Male and Lesbian Peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Catherine McHugh; Sedlacek, William

    1997-01-01

    Examines heterosexual college students' (N=224) stereotypical negative attitudes toward gay men and lesbians. Results indicate that participants reported more negative attitudes toward both gay male and lesbian peers than toward students whose sexual orientation was not disclosed in social, academic, and family situations. Implications of these…

  14. The attitudes of nursing students towards lesbians and gay males in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostanci Daştan, Nihal

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted with 158 nursing students using the Homosexuality Attitudes Scale as a descriptive and explorative study to determine the attitudes of nursing students towards lesbians and gay males and the affecting factors. As a result, it was found that the students' attitudes were moderately homophobic; stronger religious belief, conversing with others about homosexuality and the idea of making friends with lesbians and gay males positively affected this attitude. It is thought that this study will help increase the awareness of working nurses and students at the school of nursing towards lesbians and gay males. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Intersectionality, critical race theory, and American sporting oppression: examining black and gay male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric; McCormack, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the influence of the racial categories of White and Black and the sexual categories of gay and straight on sporting American men. The effect of the intersection of these cultural categories is discussed by investigating the exclusion of athletes who are both Black and gay, as well as highlighting the culturally perceived differences of (straight) Black and (White) gay men. However, the analysis accounts for more than just difference, examining the commonalities of oppression between these discrete identity groups. We use the research on Black athletes to call for further empirical study on gay athletes. It is argued that critical race theory and intersectionality offer complex and nuanced understandings of these oppressions, which, when theorizing is left solely to the realm of poststructuralism, can otherwise be missed.

  16. Relational aggression and victimization in gay male relationships: the role of internalized homophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Thomas M; Robertson, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    This article presents two studies that are the first to examine relational aggression and relational victimization in gay male peer relationships. A qualitative pilot study provides a strong rationale for a subsequent empirical investigation of 100 young adult, self-identified gay males. Results of both studies demonstrate that relational aggression and relational victimization are common experiences in gay male relationships. They also reveal forms of relational aggression and victimization that appear to be unique to gay males (e.g., outing). Results of the empirical study found significant relations between engaging in relational aggression against gay males and experiencing relational victimization and between experiencing relational victimization and internalized homophobia. However, there was no significant correlation between internalized homophobia and engaging in relational aggression. A multiple regression analysis found that experiencing relational victimization was correlated more strongly with the combination of engaging in relational aggression and internalized homophobia together than with relational aggression alone. Results are discussed within the framework of Allport's "traits due to victimization" theory and Meyer's theory of "minority stress." Implications for the prevention of relational aggression/victimization in gay male relationships are offered. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Rules of Engagement as Survival Consciousness: Gay Male Law Enforcement Officers' Experiential Learning in a Masculinized Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Joshua C.; Rocco, Tonette S.

    2015-01-01

    Gay men face decisions associated with disclosure, the process of coming out as gay, when and if to disclose, and how much information. These decisions carry more weight in masculinized industries such as law enforcement. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to critically explore gay male law enforcement officers' experiences working in…

  18. Social and psychological creativity in gay male midlife identity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    This study utilizes a qualitative thematic analysis methodology and a social identity theory framework to explore ways in which early midlife gay men report enhancing their social identities through social and psychological creativity. Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with forty early midlife gay men (aged 40-53) in four US cities. Men discussed the collective and individual essences of their age and gay identities, including attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours that they embraced to self-enhance at midlife. These discussions emphasized differences from the younger gay outgroup, often in the context of intergenerational interaction. Identified were three strategies (and seven substrategies) that summarized the ways that interviewees constructed their identities in the interest of self-enhancement, specifically in the context of intergenerational comparisons with younger gay men. These strategies may be considered as extensions to social creativity strategies presented in Tajfel and Turner's (Psychology of intergroup relations. Chicago, IL: Nelson, 1986: 7) social identity theory. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  19. "You're So Gay!:" Do Different Forms of Bullying Matter for Adolescent Males?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearer, Susan M.; Turner, Rhonda K.; Givens, Jami E.; Pollack, William S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined effects of adolescent males' perceptions of being bullied because of verbal taunts related to gender nonconformity (i.e., "They say I'm gay"). Participants included 251 ninth- (n=77), tenth- (n=96), and eleventh- (n=78) grade students in a private, all-male college preparatory school. Participants were divided into two groups…

  20. Working through Whiteness: White, Male College Students Challenging Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nolan L.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study relies on Freire's conception of liberatory praxis to examine White male college students' becoming aware of racism and translating awareness into action. The participants developed racial cognizance via cross-racial contact and course content. They also tended to be open to interrogating racism and racial privilege due to…

  1. Gay-male couples who adopt: challenging historical and contemporary social trends toward becoming a family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobaugh, Edward R; Clements, Paul T; Averill, Jennifer B; Olguin, David L

    2006-08-01

    Gay-male couples who adopt children face ongoing challenges that stem from both historical and contemporary social issues. To examine and identify key points and guidance for advanced practice psychiatric mental health nurses regarding multicultural awareness involved in counseling gay-male couples who explore or exercise their right to adopt and raise children. A comprehensive review of the extant scientific literature and public media, clinical anecdotes, therapeutic experiences, and an examination of Healthy People 2010 as it relates to how community health is profoundly affected by the collective beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors of everyone who lives in the community. Heterosexism, homophobic fears, oppression, and the general stigma that surround gay-male couples who choose to adopt children are a few of the relevant contemporary issues and community beliefs for which advanced practice psychiatric mental health nurses need to assess, explore, and intervene.

  2. Male gays in the female gaze: women who watch m/m pornography

    OpenAIRE

    Neville, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on a piece of wide-scale mixed-methods research that examines the motivations behind women who watch gay male pornography. To date there has been very little interdisciplinary research investigating this phenomenon, despite a recent survey by PornHub (one of the largest online porn sites in the world) showing that gay male porn is the second most popular choice for women porn users out of 25+ possible genre choices. While both academic literature and popular culture have look...

  3. Adult Attachment, Perceived Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation, and Depression in Gay Males: Examining the Mediation and Moderation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakalik, Robyn A.; Wei, Meifen

    2006-01-01

    This study examined perceived discrimination as both a mediator and moderator between adult attachment (anxiety and avoidance) and levels of depression in a gay male sample. Survey data were collected from 234 self-identified gay males through the Internet and in person through community resources across several states. Results from structural…

  4. Gay and bisexual male domestic violence victimization: challenges to feminist theory and responses to violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, P

    1994-01-01

    This article demonstrates how same-sex male battering challenges contemporary feminist domestic violence theory. The author shows current theory to be heterosexist and therefore insufficient to explain the phenomenon of battering among gay/bisexual men. Domestic violence theories that integrate a sociopolitical and a psychological analysis of battering are presented as more inclusive of same-sex domestic violence. Differences between battered gay/bisexual men and battered women are illustrated, focusing on how these men conceptualize and respond to violence against them. The author also examines the social context of homophobia in which same-sex battering occurs; the impact of AIDS on gay/bisexual men as it pertains to battering; the misconception of "mutual combat"; and the difficulty of seeking help. The article highlights the need for empirical research on same-sex male battering.

  5. Implications of the Growing Visibility of Gay and Bisexual Male Students on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    Using a two-year ethnographic study, explores a subculture of gay and bisexual male students at a major university. Identifies areas of concern that student affairs administrators should consider in their efforts to improve the campus climate for these students. Describes the coming out process, visibility, and discrimination. (RJM)

  6. "Quaring" Spirituality: The Spiritual Counterstories and Spaces of Black Gay and Bisexual Male College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Darris R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how Black gay and bisexual male college students experience oppression during their spiritual journeys and how they resist this oppression. Data collection included interviews, field observations, and photovoice. Data were analyzed using quare theory, an alternative to queer theory, which…

  7. The Experiences of Gay Male Undergraduate Students at a Traditional Women's College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Christopher; Holley, Karri

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of gay male undergraduate students enrolled at a traditional women's college using the framework of queer theory. Using data collected from student interviews, journals, and document analysis, the findings offer insight into how institutional space as well as peer culture impact identity. The students reported…

  8. Alberta High School Counsellors' Knowledge of Homosexuality and Their Attitudes toward Gay Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Kevin G.; Orzeck, Tricia L.; McEwen, Scott C.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we investigated Alberta high school counsellors' knowledge about homosexuality and their attitudes toward gay males. Three questionnaires were mailed to 648 high school counselling centres; 223 individuals returned the completed questionnaires. Most counsellors attained low scores in measured homo-negativity and high scores regarding…

  9. Queering the Adult Gaze: Young Male Hustlers and Their Alliances with Older Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, John

    2011-01-01

    Based on ethnographic data collected at a gay bar with sexual minority youths as dancers or strippers, this study calls attention to the gazes through which adults view and position male youths. It highlights a dancer named Austin, who at times engaged in the underground hustling economy centered in the bar. The findings suggest that the social…

  10. Sexual Encounters: Gay Male College Students' Use of the Internet and Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, Rinardo Lamon

    2012-01-01

    There have been many studies that focus on understanding various aspects of human sexuality and how it relates to college students. However, the current research focuses on heterosexual students, leaving a void in the research that focuses on gay male college students. Even more crucially, there is a void in research that focuses on the sexual…

  11. Understanding the Marginalization of Gay and Gender Non-Conforming Black Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCready, Lance T.

    2004-01-01

    This article proposes a multidimensional framework that takes into account multiple categories of difference and forms of oppression to understand and suggest interventions for gay and gender nonconforming Black male students in urban schools. The author builds the case for educators to develop these kinds of frameworks by describing two…

  12. A Phenomenological Study of Gay Male Undergraduate College Students' Experiences at a Jesuit Catholic University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willette, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this interpretative phenomenological study was to understand how male undergraduate students who identify as openly gay experience marginality and mattering at a Jesuit Catholic university. There were 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the United States as of this writing, each with its own varying approach towards the treatment…

  13. Aggression toward gay men as gender role enforcement: effects of male role norms, sexual prejudice, and masculine gender role stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Dominic J

    2009-08-01

    This study examined sexual prejudice and masculine gender role stress as mediators of the relations between male gender norms and anger and aggression toward gay men. Participants were 150 self-identified heterosexual men who completed measures of adherence to male gender role norms, sexual prejudice, masculine gender role stress, and state anger. Participants then viewed a video depicting intimate relationship behavior between 2 gay men, reported state anger a second time, and competed in a laboratory aggression task against either a heterosexual or a gay male. Results indicated that adherence to the antifemininity norm exerted an indirect effect, primarily through sexual prejudice, on increases in anger. Adherence to the status and antifemininity norms exerted indirect effects, also through sexual prejudice, on physical aggression toward the gay, but not the heterosexual, male. Findings provide the first multivariate evidence for determinants of aggression toward gay men motivated by gender role enforcement.

  14. Depression and Associated Factors Among Gay and Heterosexual Male University Students in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginni, Olakunle A; Mosaku, Kolawole S; Mapayi, Boladale M; Akinsulore, Adesanmi; Afolabi, Temitope O

    2017-05-02

    Homosexuality is a recognized risk factor for depression in high-income countries; however, there is little research investigating the relationship between depression and sexual orientation in developing countries, especially in Africa. In this first study to investigate psychopathology in sexual minority men in Nigeria, the prevalence rates of depression in Nigerian gay and heterosexual individuals were compared as well as the explanatory power of risk and resilience factors in both groups. Eighty-one gay and 81 heterosexual male university students were, respectively, recruited from the Obafemi Awolowo University. Both groups were assessed for depression and other clinical factors, including alcohol and other substance use, suicidal ideation, and resilience. Gay students were further assessed for sexuality-related variables, including minority stress factors such as internalized homophobia and perceived stigma. The prevalence rates of depression among gay and heterosexual students were, respectively, 16 and 4.9% (OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.15-11.82), and this increased likelihood for depression was significantly attenuated by resilience. Clinical factors correlated significantly with depression in both groups, explaining 31% of the variance in depression in gay and heterosexual students, respectively. Sexuality-related variables including internalized homophobia and perceived stigma were further associated with depression in gay students-accounting for a further 14% of the variance of depression in gay students. The findings highlight the importance of minority stress factors in understanding depression among non-heterosexual individuals in a developing country, and the need for further research to investigate the mechanisms of these relationships in such settings.

  15. Getting Off: development of a model program for gay and bisexual male methamphetamine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reback, Cathy J; Veniegas, Rosemary; Shoptaw, Steven

    2014-01-01

    An evidence-based gay-specific cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT) intervention for methamphetamine-using gay and bisexual men was adapted for use in a community-based setting, thereby moving research into practice. The 48-session, 16-week GCBT intervention was revised to 24 sessions requiring 8 weeks and renamed Getting Off: A Behavioral Treatment Intervention for Gay and Bisexual Male Methamphetamine Users. GCBT was modified for implementation within the limited resources and capacity of community-based organizations while also retaining drug use and HIV risk reduction outcomes. Since 2007, Getting Off has been sustained with public health funding at the community site and has been adopted by multiple community-based sites.

  16. Out of the Closet and into the Trenches: Gay Male Baby Boomers, Aging, and HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Dana; Bartlam, Bernadette; Smith, Ruth D.

    2012-01-01

    Regardless of HIV status, all gay male Baby Boomers are aging in a context strongly shaped by HIV/AIDS. For this subcohort within the Baby Boom generation, the disproportionately high volume of AIDS deaths among gay men aged 25-44 years at the epidemic's peak (1987-1996) created a cohort effect, decimating their social networks and shaping their…

  17. Negotiating the Gay Male Stereotype in Ballet and Modern Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polasek, Katherine M.; Roper, Emily A.

    2011-01-01

    Dance, ballet and modern in particular, is culturally defined as a feminine activity in the United States. The purpose of the present study was to examine the experiences of professional male modern and ballet dancers in the United States. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 current professional ballet and modern dancers. We examined…

  18. Dyadic Qualitative Analysis of Condom Use Scripts Among Emerging Adult Gay Male Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starks, Tyrel J; Pawson, Mark; Stephenson, Rob; Sullivan, Patrick; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2017-07-26

    Sexual risk reduction among gay male couples has received increasing attention in light of evidence that primary partners account for many-and possibly most-new HIV infections. This study examined the content of condom use scripts in interviews conducted with both members of 17 HIV-negative gay male couples. In each couple, at least one partner was an emerging adult (aged 18 to 29). Three scripts were identified: romantic love, unanticipated condomless anal intercourse (CAI), and negotiated safety. Scripts varied in their emphasis on emotional factors versus HIV risk reduction, the salience of sexual agreements, and the presence of an explicit communication goal. Results indicated that condom use may vary for couples as a result of script content and from the fluid adoption of scripts across contexts. Results highlighted potential tensions between emotional closeness and HIV prevention. Condom use cessation and sexual agreements-a potential mechanism for HIV risk reduction-may also serve as expressions of intimacy. This implies interventions that facilitate direct communication about sexual and relational goals-as well as those that expand couples' repertoires for expressing emotional closeness-may enhance sexual health for gay couples, particularly during the period of emerging adulthood.

  19. Elements of male body image: Prediction of depression, eating pathology and social sensitivity among gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashill, Aaron J

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the relative uniqueness of three components of male body image (i.e., muscle, body fat, and height dissatisfaction) in the prediction of indices of psychological distress (i.e., depression, eating restraint, eating concerns, and social sensitivity) among a community sample of 228 gay men. Results indicated that body fat dissatisfaction was predictive of all four criterion variables (controlling for muscle dissatisfaction). Conversely, muscle dissatisfaction was only associated with social sensitivity, while height dissatisfaction failed to significantly predict any of the criterion variables. These findings highlight the relative importance of body fat dissatisfaction among gay men and suggest that researchers and clinicians working with this population should utilize measures which include assessment of both muscularity and body fat. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Male Role Endorsement Explains Negative Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Among Students in Mexico More Than in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Melanie C; Jonas, Kai J; Denger, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Anti-gay attitudes vary across cultures because the larger social context plays a role in attitude formation. Psychological correlates of these attitudes have been investigated in the United States and Europe. Endorsement of traditional gender roles has emerged from that research as a central correlate, next to religiosity and personal contact with lesbians/gay men. In a cross-sectional study, we tested whether these correlates are relevant in Mexico, characterized as an androcentric culture in which both gender-role traditionalism and religiosity are high, using a college-age student sample (N = 63). Because we relied on self-reports, the motivation to appear nonprejudiced was also assessed. We found typical gender differences in attitudes toward gay men. In bivariate tests, anti-gay attitudes were related to male role endorsement, contact with lesbians/gay men, and religiosity. In a multivariate analysis, variance in attitudes was explained by male role endorsement; personal contact or religiosity did not explain additional variance. In a German comparison sample (N = 112), male role endorsement played a smaller role. Variance in anti-gay attitudes in the German sample was also related to personal contact, religiosity, and the motivation to appear nonprejudiced. We discuss the centrality of (male) gender-role endorsement in cultures with high gender-role traditionalism.

  1. The Internet’s Multiple Roles in Facilitating the Sexual Orientation Identity Development of Gay and Bisexual Male Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Gary W.; Serrano, Pedro A.; Bruce, Douglas; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    One emerging avenue for the exploration of adolescents’ sexual orientation identity development is the Internet since it allows for varying degrees of anonymity and exploration. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the role of the Internet in facilitating the sexual orientation identity development process of gay and bisexual male adolescents. Qualitative interviews were conducted with an ethnically diverse sample of 63 gay/bisexual male adolescents (ages 15–23). Participants reported using a range of Internet applications as they explored and came to accept their sexual orientation identity, with the intended purpose and degree of anonymity desired determining which applications were used. Youth reported that the Internet provided a range of functions with regard to the exploration and acceptance of their sexual orientation identity, including: 1) increasing self awareness of sexual orientation identity; 2) learning about gay/bisexual community life; 3) communicating with other gay/bisexual people; 4) meeting other gay/bisexual people; 5) finding comfort and acceptance with sexual orientation; and 6) facilitating the coming out process. Future research and practice may explore the Internet as a platform for promoting the healthy development of gay and bisexual male adolescents by providing a developmentally and culturally appropriate venue for the exploration and subsequent commitment to an integrated sexual orientation identity. PMID:25585861

  2. The Internet's Multiple Roles in Facilitating the Sexual Orientation Identity Development of Gay and Bisexual Male Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Gary W; Serrano, Pedro A; Bruce, Douglas; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2016-09-01

    One emerging avenue for the exploration of adolescents' sexual orientation identity development is the Internet, since it allows for varying degrees of anonymity and exploration. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the role of the Internet in facilitating the sexual orientation identity development process of gay and bisexual male adolescents. Qualitative interviews were conducted with an ethnically diverse sample of 63 gay/bisexual male adolescents (ages 15-23). Participants reported using a range of Internet applications as they explored and came to accept their sexual orientation identity, with the intended purpose and degree of anonymity desired determining which applications were used. Youth reported that the Internet provided a range of functions with regard to the exploration and acceptance of their sexual orientation identity, including (1) increasing self-awareness of sexual orientation identity, (2) learning about gay/bisexual community life, (3) communicating with other gay/bisexual people, (4) meeting other gay/bisexual people, (5) finding comfort and acceptance with sexual orientation, and (6) facilitating the coming out process. Future research and practice may explore the Internet as a platform for promoting the healthy development of gay and bisexual male adolescents by providing a developmentally and culturally appropriate venue for the exploration and subsequent commitment to an integrated sexual orientation identity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Negotiating multiple identities: how African-American gay and bisexual men persist at a predominantly White institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode-Cross, David T; Tager, David

    2011-01-01

    This consensual qualitative research (CQR) study explores factors contributing to the persistence of African-American gay and bisexual men at a predominately White institution (PWI). Eight participants consistently noted that involvement with an African-American community was crucial to navigating the challenges of attending a PWI. Participants reported that their racial identity was more salient than their sexual orientation in creating social support, and they described feeling uncomfortable using lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) resources. Implications, including education about sexual orientation within African-American campus communities, LGBT outreach to communities of color, and continued institutional support for African-American campus organizations, are discussed.

  4. Negotiating dominant masculinity ideology: strategies used by gay, bisexual and questioning male adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bianca D M; Harper, Gary W; Hidalgo, Marco A; Jamil, Omar B; Torres, Rodrigo Sebastián; Fernandez, M Isabel

    2010-03-01

    In the context of a U.S. dominant masculinity ideology, which devalues men who are not heterosexually identified, many gay, bisexual and questioning (GBQ) adolescent males must develop their own affirming and health-promoting sense of masculinity. In order to promote the well-being of GBQ young men, exploration of their reactions and responses to dominant images of masculinity is needed. We qualitatively analyzed interviews with 39 GBQ African American, Latino, and European American male adolescents (15-23 years old). Participants reported a range of responses to traditional masculinity ideologies, most of which centered on balancing presentations of masculine and feminine characteristics. Negotiation strategies served a variety of functions, including avoiding anti-gay violence, living up to expected images of masculinity, and creating unique images of personhood free of gender role expectations. These data suggest a complex picture of GBQ male adolescents' management of masculinity expectations and serve as a basis for culturally and developmentally specific HIV prevention programs.

  5. Gay male couples' attitudes toward using couples-based voluntary HIV counseling and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jason W

    2014-01-01

    Many men who have sex with men acquire HIV from their primary male partners while in a relationship. Studies with gay couples have demonstrated that relationship characteristics and testing behaviors are important to examine for HIV prevention. Recently, couples-based voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CVCT) has become available to male couples throughout the U.S. However, HIV-negative couples' attitudes toward using CVCT and how their relationship characteristics may affect their use of CVCT remain largely unknown. This information is particularly relevant for organizations that offer CVCT. To assess couples' attitudes, and associated factors toward using CVCT, a cross-sectional study design was used with a novel Internet-based recruitment method to collect dyadic data from a national sample of 275 HIV-negative gay couples. Multivariate multilevel modeling was used to identify factors associated with differences between and within couples about their attitudes towards using CVCT. Findings revealed that couples were "somewhat" to "very likely" to use CVCT. More positive attitudes toward using CVCT were associated with couples who had higher levels of relationship satisfaction and commitment toward their sexual agreement and among those who had at least one partner having had sex outside of the relationship. Less positive attitude toward using CVCT was associated with couples who had higher levels of trust toward their partners being dependable. Differences within couples, including age between partners, whether sex had occurred outside of the relationship, and value toward a sexual agreement also affected their attitudes toward using CVCT. Providing additional testing methods may help HIV-negative gay couples better manage their HIV risk.

  6. Verbal and Physical Abuse as Stressors in the Lives of Lesbian, Gay Male, and Bisexual Youths: Associations with School Problems, Running Away, Substance Abuse, Prostitution, and Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin-Williams, Ritch C.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews verbal and physical abuse that threatens well-being and physical survival of lesbian, gay male, and bisexual youths. Notes that this response to gay male, lesbian, and bisexual adolescents by significant others in their environment is often associated with several problematic outcomes, including school-related problems, running away,…

  7. Thriving Latino Males in Selective Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, David; Sáenz, Victor B.

    2017-01-01

    Researchers focus disproportionately on the underperformance of Latino males in higher education. In response to this research gap, this study explores how Latino males conceptualized and embodied success at selective, predominantly White institutions. Using qualitative data available from "The National Study on Latino Male Achievement in…

  8. Family rejection as a predictor of negative health outcomes in white and Latino lesbian, gay, and bisexual young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Caitlin; Huebner, David; Diaz, Rafael M; Sanchez, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    We examined specific family rejecting reactions to sexual orientation and gender expression during adolescence as predictors of current health problems in a sample of lesbian, gay, and bisexual young adults. On the basis of previously collected in-depth interviews, we developed quantitative scales to assess retrospectively in young adults the frequency of parental and caregiver reactions to a lesbian, gay, or bisexual sexual orientation during adolescence. Our survey instrument also included measures of 9 negative health indicators, including mental health, substance abuse, and sexual risk. The survey was administered to a sample of 224 white and Latino self-identified lesbian, gay, and bisexual young adults, aged 21 to 25, recruited through diverse venues and organizations. Participants completed self-report questionnaires by using either computer-assisted or pencil-and-paper surveys. Higher rates of family rejection were significantly associated with poorer health outcomes. On the basis of odds ratios, lesbian, gay, and bisexual young adults who reported higher levels of family rejection during adolescence were 8.4 times more likely to report having attempted suicide, 5.9 times more likely to report high levels of depression, 3.4 times more likely to use illegal drugs, and 3.4 times more likely to report having engaged in unprotected sexual intercourse compared with peers from families that reported no or low levels of family rejection. Latino men reported the highest number of negative family reactions to their sexual orientation in adolescence. This study establishes a clear link between specific parental and caregiver rejecting behaviors and negative health problems in young lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults. Providers who serve this population should assess and help educate families about the impact of rejecting behaviors. Counseling families, providing anticipatory guidance, and referring families for counseling and support can help make a critical

  9. The complex contribution of sociodemographics to decision-making power in gay male couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Nicholas S; Huebner, David M; Baucom, Brian R W; Hoff, Colleen C

    2016-12-01

    Relationship power is an important dyadic construct in close relationships that is associated with relationship health and partner's individual health. Understanding what predicts power in heterosexual couples has proven difficult, and even less is known about gay couples. Resource models of power posit that demographic characteristics associated with social status (e.g., age, income) confer power within the relationship, which in turn shapes relationship outcomes. We tested this model in a sample of gay male couples (N = 566 couples) and extended it by examining race and HIV status. Multilevel modeling was used to test associations between demographic bases of power and decision-making power. We also examined relative associations among demographic bases and decision-making power with relationship satisfaction given the literature on power imbalances and overall relationship functioning. Results showed that individual income was positively associated with decision-making power, as was participant's HIV status, with HIV-positive men reporting greater power. Age differences within the relationship interacted with relationship length to predict decision-making power, but not satisfaction. HIV-concordant positive couples were less satisfied than concordant negative couples. Higher power partners were less satisfied than lower power partners. Demographic factors contributing to decision-making power among same-sex male couples appear to share some similarities with heterosexual couples (e.g., income is associated with power) and have unique features (e.g., HIV status influences power). However, these same demographics did not reliably predict relationship satisfaction in the manner that existing power theories suggest. Findings indicate important considerations for theories of power among same-sex male couples. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Gay male sexual assault survivors: the relations among internalized homophobia, experiential avoidance, and psychological symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Sari D; Marx, Brian P; Lexington, Jennifer M

    2007-03-01

    This study explored the relations among internalized homophobia (IH), experiential avoidance, and psychological symptom severity in a community sample of 74 gay male sexual assault survivors. Results indicated that IH is associated with both depressive and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity. IH accounted for more variance than assault severity in predicting both PTSD and depression symptom severity. IH and experiential avoidance similarly predicted PTSD symptom severity. In comparison with IH, however, experiential avoidance is a stronger predictor of depression symptom severity. Results also showed that experiential avoidance partially mediated the relation between IH and both depressive and PTSD symptom severity. The implications of these findings are discussed and suggestions for future research are provided.

  11. Genitalia morphometry and testicular characteristics of male white ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was designed to evaluate genitalia morphometry of the male white Japanese quails at three different age groups. Fifty-four male Japanese quails were allotted to 3 treatment groups (Pubertal, Mature and Adult) in a completely randomized design. Pubertal (7-10 weeks), mature (15-20 weeks) and the adults ...

  12. Black and White Adolescent Males' Perceptions of Ideal Body Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sharon H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studied ideal body size beliefs of 337 white and 159 black adolescent males. Findings point toward a greater approval and social acceptance of a larger body size for black females by black males. Cultural differences may be a factor to consider in designing appropriate weight control programs. (SLD)

  13. "It's Just More Acceptable To Be White or Mixed Race and Gay Than Black and Gay": The Perceptions and Experiences of Homophobia in St. Lucia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzens, Jimmy; Mahoney, Berenice; Wilkinson, Dean

    2017-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals come from diverse cultural groups with differing ethnic and racial identities. However, most research on LGB people uses white western samples and studies of Afro-Caribbean diaspora often use Jamaican samples. Thus, the complexity of Afro-Caribbean LGB peoples' experiences of homophobia is largely unknown. The authors' analyses explore experiences of homophobia among LGB people in St. Lucia. Findings indicate issues of skin-shade orientated tolerance, regionalized disparities in levels of tolerance toward LGB people and regionalized passing (regionalized sexual identity shifting). Finally, the authors' findings indicate that skin shade identities and regional location influence the psychological health outcomes of homophobia experienced by LGB people in St. Lucia.

  14. Disparities in Health Risk Behavior and Psychological Distress Among Gay Versus Heterosexual Male Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, Charles; Palesh, Oxana; Gerry, Arianna Aldridge; Andrykowski, Michael A; Heckler, Charles; Mohile, Supriya; Morrow, Gary R; Bowen, Deborah; Mustian, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Gay men have been found to have higher rates of cancer diagnoses than heterosexual men and poorer outcomes postcancer diagnosis. The two aims of this study were to examine rates of cancer diagnosis in a national sample of gay and heterosexual men, and to examine disparities in health risk behavior between gay and heterosexual men and gay and heterosexual cancer survivors. The current study utilized data from a total sample of 14,354 men, including 373 gay men, collected as part of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey conducted in 2009 in the states of Arizona, California, Massachusetts, Ohio, and Wisconsin. This study replicated the finding that prevalence of self-reported cancer diagnoses differed significantly between gay and heterosexual men, with gay men 82% more likely to report a lifetime history of cancer diagnosis (pperspective on behavioral risk factors previously shown to be higher among gay men that may continue postcancer diagnosis. Future research should test the degree to which these disparities are caused by minority stress, as previous studies have indicated that increased health risk behaviors among sexual minority populations may result from exposure to chronic stress and discrimination. Developing behavior change interventions to address these risk behaviors is vital for improving cancer outcomes among gay men.

  15. Attitudes of Heterosexual Students toward Their Gay Male and Lesbian Peers. Research Report #3-95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Catherine McHugh; Sedlacek, William E.

    This study examined heterosexual college students attitudes toward gay men and lesbians, and in what types of situations were negative feelings expressed toward gay men and lesbians. A random sample of 224 residence hall students at the University of Maryland College Park completed the Situational Attitude Scale Sexual Orientation Survey, which…

  16. Measuring Attitudes Regarding Bisexuality in Lesbian, Gay Male, and Heterosexual Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Jonathan J.; Rochlen, Aaron B.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on studies on the development and validation of the Attitudes Regarding Bisexuality Scale (ARBS). In heterosexuals, subscales were strongly related to attitudes toward lesbians and gay men, frequency of religious attendance, political ideology, and prior contact. In lesbians and gay men, subscales correlated with prior experiences and…

  17. Actor-partner effects of demographic and relationship factors associated with HIV risk within gay male couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jason W; Champeau, Donna; Harvey, S Marie

    2013-10-01

    Recent research has investigated the association of relationship factors and dynamics with sexual behaviors and HIV risk among gay male couples. However, few studies with gay male couples have used the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model framework to examine whether factors influence an individual and his partner's sexual risk behaviors. None of these studies analyzed whether relationship factors had influenced the sexual risk behaviors of both partners within the couple. Our cross-sectional study used dyadic data from 142 gay male couples to assess actor-partner effects of relationship commitment, trust, and investment in one's sexual agreement for HIV risk. Multilevel modeling was used to examine which actor-partner effects of these factors were predictive of individuals and their partners having had UAI within and outside the relationship. Results indicated that participants' likelihood of having had UAI within and outside of the relationship significantly decreased with: (1) actor effects of value in and commitment to a sexual agreement, and quality of alternatives to the relationship and (2) partner effects of participant's age, dependability of trust, quality of alternatives to the relationship, and investment of relationship commitment. No significant actor-partner effects were detected for having had UAI within the relationship. Our findings suggest that future HIV prevention strategies should take into account how relationship factors influence an individual and his main partners' sexual risk behaviors and in turn, the couple's risk for HIV. However, more research is needed to examine how actor-partner effects of relationship factors influence a variety of sexual risk behaviors within gay male couples.

  18. Sexual and ethnic identity development among gay-bisexual-questioning (GBQ) male ethnic minority adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Omar B; Harper, Gary W; Fernandez, M Isabel

    2009-07-01

    Identity development is a critical task of adolescence and occurs across multiple areas of self-identification. Although research on the identity development process among individuals who are ethnic and sexual minorities has been conducted for individuals who have 1 minority status or the other, few studies have examined these processes in people who are both ethnic and sexual minorities. In this qualitative study, the authors examined the dual identity development processes related to ethnic and sexual identity among gay-bisexual-questioning (GBQ) Latino and African American male adolescents. Results indicated that the processes associated with the development of sexual orientation and ethnic identity occur concurrently. However, the actual processes involved with the development of each identity not only differed, but seemed to be independent of each other because neither process was referenced in the development of the other. Overall, the process of ethnic identity development involved the process of becoming aware of one's ethnic and cultural heritage, whereas sexual identity development involved finding one's own personally relevant sexual orientation label and connecting to that community. The implications of these findings for the development of interventions to assist in the healthy development of GBQ adolescents are discussed.

  19. Rethinking sexual initiation: pathways to identity formation among gay and bisexual Mexican male youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Héctor; Fontdevila, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    The topic of same-sex sexual initiation has generally remained understudied in the literature on sexual identity formation among sexual minority youth. This article analyzes the narratives of same-sex sexual initiation provided by 76 gay and bisexual Mexican immigrant men who participated in interviews for the Trayectos Study, an ethnographic study of sexuality and HIV risk. These participants were raised in a variety of locations throughout Mexico, where they also realized their same-sex attraction and initiated their sexual lives with men. We argue that Mexican male same-sex sexuality is characterized by three distinct patterns of sexual initiation--one heavily-based on gender roles, one based on homosociality, and one based on object choice--which inform the men's interpretations regarding sexual roles, partner preferences, and sexual behaviors. We analyzed the social factors and forms of cultural/sexual socialization that lead sexual minority youth specifically to each of these three patterns of sexual initiation. Our findings confirm the importance of studying same-sex sexual initiation as a topic in its own right, particularly as a tool to gain a greater understanding of the diversity of same-sex sexual experiences and sexual identities within and among ethnic/cultural groups.

  20. Sexual and Ethnic Identity Development among Gay/Bisexual/Questioning (GBQ) Male Ethnic Minority Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Omar B.; Harper, Gary W.; Fernandez, M. Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Identity development is a critical task of adolescence and occurs across multiple areas of self identification. Though research on the identity development process among individuals who are ethnic and sexual minorities has been conducted for individuals who have one minority status or the other, few studies have examined these processes in persons who are both ethnic and sexual minorities. This qualitative study examined the dual identity development processes related to ethnic and sexual identity among gay/bisexual/questioning (GBQ) Latino and African American male adolescents. Results indicated that the processes associated with the development of sexual orientation and ethnic identity occur concurrently. However, the actual processes involved with the development of each identity not only differed, but seemed to be independent of each other since neither process was referenced in the development of the other. Overall, the process of ethnic identity development involved the process of becoming aware of one’s ethnic and cultural heritage, while sexual identity development involved finding one’s own personally relevant sexual orientation label and connecting to that community. The implications of these findings for the development of interventions to assist in the healthy development of GBQ adolescents are discussed. PMID:19594249

  1. Judgments of self-identified gay and heterosexual male speakers: Which phonemes are most salient in determining sexual orientation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Erik C.; Bainter, Sierra A.; Satariano, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    While numerous studies have demonstrated that a male speaker’s sexual orientation can be identified from relatively long passages of speech, few studies have evaluated whether listeners can determine sexual orientation when presented with word-length stimuli. If listeners are able to distinguish between self-identified gay and heterosexual male speakers of American English, it is unclear whether they form their judgments based on a phoneme, such as a vowel or consonant, or multiple phonemes, such as a vowel and a consonant. In this study, we first found that listeners can distinguish between self-identified gay and heterosexual speakers of American English upon hearing word-length stimuli. We extended these results in a separate experiment to demonstrate that listeners primarily rely on vowels, and to some extent consonants, when forming their judgments. Listeners were able to differentiate between the two groups of speakers for each of the vowels and three of the seven consonants presented. In a follow-up experiment we found evidence that listeners’ judgments improved if they were presented with multiple phonemes, such as a vowel and /s/. These results provide important information about how different phonemes can provide discriminant information about a male speaker’s sexual orientation. PMID:26207075

  2. Insights in Public Health: In What Ways are Hawaii's HIV Prevention Services Engaging Gay Male Couples and Using Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophus, Amber I; Fujitani, Loren; Vallabhbhai, Samantha; Antonio, Jo Anna; Yang, Pua Lani; Elliott, Elyssa; Mitchell, Jason W

    2018-02-01

    Partner-oriented services and Health Information and Communication technology (HICT) in the forms of mHealth (eg, smartphone applications), eHealth (eg, interactive websites), telemedicine, and social media play an important and growing role in HIV prevention. Accordingly, the present study sought to describe: (1) the primary and secondary HIV prevention services available in Hawai'i, (2) the prevention services that are available for gay male couples and partners, and (3) the prevention services that use HICT. Information about prevention services and use of HICT were obtained from websites and phone calls made to 19 organizations in the state, including the Hawai'i Department of Health. Overall, partner-oriented services were limited and only 1 couples-based service was currently being offered. Technology, namely social media, was used by 14 organizations, primarily to increase HIV awareness and advertise events. These findings may inform how best to adapt and better leverage the use of innovative technological tools to help expand access to HIV testing and counseling, sexual health education, and case management services for gay male couples and other MSM populations in the state.

  3. Rethinking Sexual Initiation: Pathways to Identity Formation among Gay and Bisexual Mexican Male Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo, Héctor; Fontdevila, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The topic of same-sex sexual initiation has generally remained understudied in the literature on sexual identity formation among sexual minority youth. This article analyzed the narratives of same-sex sexual initiation provided by 76 gay and bisexual Mexican immigrant men who participated in interviews for the Trayectos Study, an ethnographic study of sexuality and HIV risk. These participants were raised in a variety of locations throughout Mexico, where they also realized their same-sex att...

  4. Strengths and Vulnerabilities of a Sample of Gay and Bisexual Male Adolescents in Puerto Rico

    OpenAIRE

    José Toro-Alfonso; Nelson Varas Díaz; Iván Andújar-Bello; Luis E. Nieves-Rosa

    2006-01-01

    La adolescencia es un proceso de desarrollo de múltiples dimensiones que incluyen los significados sociales que se le atribuyen colocando a la juventud en un limbo social; no son niños o niñas pero todavía no son adultos. Es importante contextualizar las dificultades que enfrentan los adolescentes gay debido a su identidad sexual, su vulnerabilidad social asociada a su particular etapa de desarrollo y su etnicidad. Exploramos las vulnerabilidades y fortalezas de una muestra de jóv...

  5. An Exploratory Study of Puerto Rican MSM Drug Users: The Childhood and Early Teen Years of Gay Males and Transsexual Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlinson, H. Ann; Colon, Hector M.; Robles, Rafaela R.; Soto, Mayra

    2008-01-01

    Research suggests that sexual silence, family loyalty, and homophobia foster health-compromising behaviors among adult Latino gay males, but little is known about the effect of these sociocultural factors on the lives of Latino children and young teens characterized by gender nonconformity and homosexual orientation. This exploratory study of…

  6. What we can't see? Understanding the representations and meanings of UAI, barebacking, and semen exchange in gay male pornography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowlabocus, Sharif; Harbottle, Justin; Witzel, Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, the use of condoms within gay male pornography has been on the wane. Moving from a niche category into more mainstream forms of commercial pornography, unprotected anal sex has become a dominant theme within this sphere of gay male sexual representation. However, while the definition of what constitutes bareback pornography may at first sight appear unproblematic, this article argues that meanings and understandings of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) are not constant across all genres of gay male pornography. Using textual analysis and focus group methods, the authors demonstrate how subcultural understandings of UAI are dependent on a variety of textual factors. These include the age, body type, and racial identities of the performers; the setting, context, and mise-en-scène of the pornographic scene; and the deployment of power relations between the insertive and receptive partners. The article concludes by suggesting that the recognition of the diverse representations of "barebacking" found in contemporary gay male pornography should influence the ways in which health promotion strategies address discussions of UAI and bareback pornography.

  7. Gay and Bisexual Men's Perceptions of Police Helpfulness in Response to Male-Male Intimate Partner Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Finneran

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Despite several recent studies documenting high rates of intimate partner violence (IPV among gay and bisexual men (GBM, the literature is silent regarding GBM’s perceptions of IPV within their community. We examine GBM’s perceptions of same-sex IPV: its commonness, its severity, and the helpfulness of a hypothetical police response to a GBM experiencing IPV.Methods: We drew data from a 2011 survey of venue-recruited GBM (n¼989. Respondents were asked to describe the commonness of IPV, severity of IPV, and helpfulness of a hypothetical police response to IPV among GBM and among heterosexual women. We fitted a logistic model for the outcome of viewing the police response to a gay/bisexual IPV victim as less helpful than for a female heterosexual IPV victim. The regression model controlled for age, race/ethnicity, education, sexual orientation, employment status, and recent receipt of physical, emotional, and sexual IPV, with key covariates being internalized homophobia and experiences of homophobic discrimination.Results: The majority of respondents viewed IPV among GBM as common (54.9% and problematic(63.8%. While most respondents had identical perceptions of the commonness (82.7% and severity (84.1% of IPV in GBM compared to heterosexual women, the majority of the sample (59.1% reported perceiving that contacting the police would be less helpful for a GBM IPV victim than for a heterosexual female IPV victim. In regression, respondents who reported more lifetime experiences of homophobic discrimination were more likely to have this comparatively negative perception (odds ratio: 1.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.17.Conclusion: The results support a minority stress hypothesis to understand GBM’s perceptions of police helpfulness in response to IPV. While IPV was viewed as both common and problematic among GBM, their previous experiences of homophobia were correlated with a learned anticipation of rejection and stigma from

  8. Gay and Bisexual Men's Perceptions of Police Helpfulness in Response to Male-Male Intimate Partner Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finneran, Catherine; Stephenson, Rob

    2013-08-01

    Introduction Despite several recent studies documenting high rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) among gay and bisexual men (GBM), the literature is silent regarding GBM's perceptions of IPV within their community. We examine GBM's perceptions of same-sex IPV: its commonness, its severity, and the helpfulness of a hypothetical police response to a GBM experiencing IPV. We drew data from a 2011 survey of venue-recruited GBM (n=989). Respondents were asked to describe the commonness of IPV, severity of IPV, and helpfulness of a hypothetical police response to IPV among GBM and among heterosexual women. We fitted a logistic model for the outcome of viewing the police response to a gay/bisexual IPV victim as less helpful than for a female heterosexual IPV victim. The regression model controlled for age, race/ethnicity, education, sexual orientation, employment status, and recent receipt of physical, emotional, and sexual IPV, with key covariates being internalized homophobia and experiences of homophobic discrimination. The majority of respondents viewed IPV among GBM as common (54.9%) and problematic (63.8%). While most respondents had identical perceptions of the commonness (82.7%) and severity (84.1%) of IPV in GBM compared to heterosexual women, the majority of the sample (59.1%) reported perceiving that contacting the police would be less helpful for a GBM IPV victim than for a heterosexual female IPV victim. In regression, respondents who reported more lifetime experiences of homophobic discrimination were more likely to have this comparatively negative perception (odds ratio: 1.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.17). The results support a minority stress hypothesis to understand GBM's perceptions of police helpfulness in response to IPV. While IPV was viewed as both common and problematic among GBM, their previous experiences of homophobia were correlated with a learned anticipation of rejection and stigma from law enforcement. As the response to same

  9. Sexually Explicit Media on the Internet: A Content Analysis of Sexual Behaviors, Risk, and Media Characteristics in Gay Male Adult Videos

    OpenAIRE

    Downing, Martin J.; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Antebi, Nadav; Siegel, Karolynn

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that viewing sexually explicit media (SEM), i.e., adult videos, may influence sexual risk taking among men who have sex with men (MSM). Despite this evidence, very little is known about the content of gay male SEM on the Internet, including the prevalence of sexual risk behaviors and their relation to video- and performer-characteristics, viewing frequency, and favorability. The current study content analyzed 302 sexually explicit videos featuring male same-sex perfor...

  10. "Gay Equals White"? Racial, Ethnic, and Sexual Identities and Attitudes Toward LGBT Individuals Among College Students at a Bible Belt University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthen, Meredith G F

    2017-10-18

    While past research has certainly explored a variety of correlates of attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals, the current study is among the first in an emerging line of inquiry that examines attitudes toward each of these groups separately utilizing an intersectional framework with special attention to racial, ethnic, and sexual identities. Using a college sample of students from the Bible Belt of the United States (N = 1,940), I investigated the roles of racial and ethnic identities (Caucasian/White, African American/Black, Asian/Pacific Islander, Native American/Alaskan Native, other race, and Hispanic/Latinx), religiosity, patriarchal gender norms, parental perspectives, and the intersections among these identities and experiences as they relate to attitudes toward LGBT individuals among heterosexual (n = 1,551) and LGB respondents (n = 389). This moves beyond explorations of White heterosexual people's attitudes about "homosexuals" (i.e., away from a focus only on gayness and Whiteness) and expands to include non-White LGB people's LGBT attitudes. Overall, results indicate that racial, ethnic, and sexual identities play a significant role in southern college students' LGBT attitudes, and these patterns are further complicated by interacting cultural experiences with religiosity, patriarchy, and family dynamics. Campus policy and program implications are provided.

  11. Major Article Knowledge of Acute HIV Infection Among Gay and Bisexual Male College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grin, Benjamin; Chan, Philip A.; Operario, Don

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine HIV-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors in at-risk college men who have sex with men (MSM), focusing on knowledge about acute HIV infection (AHI). Participants and Methods A one-time anonymous survey was administered to college students attending a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) conference in February 2012. This paper reports on a study sub-sample of MSM. Results A total of 100 MSM completed the survey. Participants had an average age of 20.4 years. Sixty-six percent reported condom use the last time they had sex. Only 46% had ever heard of symptoms related to AHI. Forty-two percent would likely seek medical care when showing acute symptoms in a setting consistent with AHI. Conclusion Despite having multiple risk factors for HIV infection, many MSM college students are unaware of AHI. HIV prevention programs should target this population and include information about signs, symptoms, and diagnosis of AHI. PMID:23663127

  12. Stigma, medical mistrust, and perceived racism may affect PrEP awareness and uptake in black compared to white gay and bisexual men in Jackson, Mississippi and Boston, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Sean; Taylor, S Wade; Elsesser, Steven A; Mena, Leandro; Hickson, DeMarc; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2017-11-01

    Gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) account for more than two thirds of new HIV infections in the U.S., with Black MSM experiencing the greatest burden. Antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can reduce MSM's vulnerability to HIV infection. Uptake of PrEP has been limited, particularly among racial and ethnic minority MSM. Four semi-structured focus groups with gay and bisexual men and other MSM at risk for HIV infection were convened in Boston and Jackson in late 2013. The analysis plan utilized a within-case, across-case approach to code and analyze emerging themes, and to compare results across the two cities. Participants recruited in Jackson were primarily Black gay men, while Boston participants were mostly non-Hispanic White gay men. Participants in both sites shared concerns about medication side effects and culturally insensitive health care for gay men. Jackson participants described stronger medical mistrust, and more frequently described experiences of anti-gay and HIV related stigma. Multiple addressable barriers to PrEP uptake were described. Information about side effects should be explicitly addressed in PrEP education campaigns. Providers and health departments should address medical mistrust, especially among Black gay and bisexual men and other MSM, in part by training providers in how to provide affirming, culturally competent care. Medicaid should be expanded in Mississippi to cover low-income young Black gay and bisexual men and other MSM.

  13. White Western Male Teachers Constructing Academic Identities in Japanese Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Roslyn

    2014-01-01

    In research on gender and teaching in higher education, the experiences of male teachers "as men", and of whiteness in a "non"-majority-white context have received little attention. As one step towards addressing this gap in the literature, this paper analyses interview accounts of white Western men working as English language…

  14. Sexually explicit media on the internet: a content analysis of sexual behaviors, risk, and media characteristics in gay male adult videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Martin J; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Antebi, Nadav; Siegel, Karolynn

    2014-05-01

    Recent research suggests that viewing sexually explicit media (SEM), i.e., adult videos, may influence sexual risk taking among men who have sex with men. Despite this evidence, very little is known about the content of gay male SEM on the Internet, including the prevalence of sexual risk behaviors and their relation to video- and performer-characteristics, viewing frequency, and favorability. The current study content analyzed 302 sexually explicit videos featuring male same-sex performers that were posted to five highly trafficked adult-oriented websites. Findings revealed that gay male SEM on the Internet features a variety of conventional and nonconventional sexual behaviors. There was a substantial prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) (34 %) and was virtually the same as the prevalence of anal sex with a condom (36 %). The presence of UAI was not associated with video length, amateur production, number of video views, favorability, or website source. However, the presence of other potentially high-risk behaviors (e.g., ejaculation in the mouth, and ejaculation on/in/rubbed into the anus) was associated with longer videos, more views, and group sex videos (three or more performers). The findings of high levels of sexual risk behavior and the fact that there was virtually no difference in the prevalence of anal sex with and without a condom in gay male SEM have important implications for HIV prevention efforts, future research on the role of SEM on sexual risk taking, and public health policy.

  15. "Nothing Has Stopped Me. I Keep Going:" Black Gay Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartone, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Are being Black and gay problematic in the United States? Are Black gay youth "suffering" with these two intersecting identities? Traditional Eurocentric epistemologies would have one believe that Black males, Black gay males, and gay males (liminal groups) are suffering, rarely acknowledging those successfully navigating through…

  16. Paradoxes of an assimilation politics: media production of gay male belonging in the Canadian 'vital public' from the tainted blood scandal to the present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crath, Rory; Rangel, Cristian

    2017-07-01

    Canadian media discourses on gay men's sexuality and political inclusion serve as a rich site for understanding current tensions in debates on sexual citizenship under biopolitical regimes. This paper addresses how public health reporting in one health news media source, Canada's leading newspaper The Globe and Mail, discursively produced contiguous understandings of the moral, social and biological dimensions of gay male subjectivity and sexuality within the context of HIV risk discourses. Specifically, we critically examine the newspaper's coverage of what constitutes the public good when national blood supplies are at stake. Our analysis reveals a profound dichotomy in which gay men - as sexual subjects and subjects of rights - are recalibrated following the political and economic investments of bourgeoisie communities of interest. However encompassing the securing of legal social rights might be, gay men's sexuality is resistant to a reformatting under a heteronormative regulatory regime, as the social traumas caused by HIV continue to cast a shadow on sexual behaviours that purportedly risk leakage of contamination into the body politic.

  17. Homogamy in Masculinity-Femininity Is Positively Linked to Relationship Quality in Gay Male Couples from the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bártová, Klára; Štěrbová, Zuzana; Martinec Nováková, Lenka; Binter, Jakub; Varella, Marco Antonio Corrêa; Valentova, Jaroslava Varella

    2017-07-01

    The main aims of this research were to test the similarity of masculinity-femininity in long-term male same-sex couples from the Czech Republic and to examine whether this similarity predicts higher relationship quality. In Study 1, participants (N = 30) and their partners completed the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) and the Childhood Gender Nonconformity Scale (CGN). In Study 2, participants (N = 40) and their partners completed DAS and the Gender Diagnosticity Scale (GD). Results showed that the partners were no more alike than individuals paired at random in their CGN or GD, but greater similarity in CGN between partners increased Dyadic Cohesion (r = -.41 [-.71, -.02]) and Affectional Expression (r = -.38 [-.60, -.13]). Our results add to previous evidence showing that similarity in same-sex couples increased relationship quality. Although, on average, gay men were not coupled on the basis of homogamy in gender roles, their relationship quality is linked to the gender egalitarian model rather than to the gender stratified one. Thus, a widespread stereotype suggesting that same-sex partners are divided by different gender roles seems to be, at least in our sample from a Western society, rather incorrect.

  18. Counseling across Sexual Orientation: A Gay Male Therapist Reflects on His Work with Heterosexual Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopcke, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Describes homosexual male counselor's experiences as marriage, family, and child counselor. Claims, because of counselor's comfort and openness to alternative roles, parenting situations, and identities, client couples are freed to dialogue about making role changes. Concludes homophobia often obscures valuable contributions homosexual men and…

  19. The Intersection of Sociocultural Factors and Health-Related Behavior in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth: Experiences Among Young Black Gay Males as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Errol; Morgan, Anthony; Sanders, Renata Arrington

    2016-12-01

    Intersectionality suggests that multiple social identities intersect at the individual or micro level of experience and reflects larger social structural inequities experienced on the macro level. This article uses intersectionality to describe how multiple stigmatized social identities can create unique challenges for young black gay and bisexual men (YBGBM). YBGBM exist at the intersection of multiple stigmatized identities compared with their majority peers. This article examines key intersecting identities and cultural expectations that exist in YBGBM and how those factors may predispose young men to adverse health outcomes and health inequality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Patient characteristics, HIV serostatus, and risk behaviors among gay and bisexual males seeking treatment for methamphetamine abuse and dependence in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoptaw, Steven; Reback, Cathy J; Freese, Thomas E

    2002-01-01

    Methamphetamine, a drug used at alarming rates among gay/bisexual males in the West, is often combined with sexual activities, thereby increasing HIV-related risks in an already high-risk group. Findings from 68 gay/bisexual men seeking treatment for methamphetamine dependence in Hollywood, California were analyzed to predict HIV serostatus based on demographic, drug use, or sexual behavior variables. Results showed that more HIV-infected participants than non-infected men reported medical problems (97.6% versus 46.2%; X2 = 24.7, df = 1, p sexual partners with unprotected receptive anal intercourse in the 30 days prior to intake (5.9 versus 0.7; separate t = 3.5, df = 43.7, p sexual partners with unprotected receptive anal intercourse and prior methamphetamine treatment. Findings provide information that may prove helpful in tailoring culturally relevant treatment and prevention messages.

  1. Invisible Racism: Male, Hegemonic Whiteness in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nolan L.

    2009-01-01

    Within the study of higher education, the issue of racial diversity tends to focus on either the universalistic impacts of enacting diverse learning environments or the social marginalization of students of color within these institutions. Generally absent from these discussions is how White students experience multicultural campus environments as…

  2. Canal Town Boys: Poor White Males and Domestic Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Julia

    2000-01-01

    Examines domestic violence embedded within the lives of poor, white, urban middle school boys, describing observations and interviews conducted with 18 boys in their bilingual school, on neighborhood streets, and in the community center. Suggests that by not disrupting their violent attitudes and tendencies, the institutions around which their…

  3. An Unexamined Life: White Male Racial Ignorance and the Agony of Education for Students of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nolan L.; Corces-Zimmerman, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This article critically analyzes the narratives of 62 White male undergraduates at a single institution about their views on race and experiences with racism. It is framed by Mills' (1997) conception of Whiteness that is founded upon an inverted epistemology or an "epistemology of ignorance." Therefore, this analysis centers the ways in…

  4. ARE YOU WHAT YOU DRESS? THE ASSOCIATION OF THE MALE GAY SELF IDENTITY TO LUXURY CLOTHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Gonçalves Altaf

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of the identity of the homosexual modern consumer, favored by the social, economic and psychological conditions produced by capitalism, allowed homosexuals to feel free to express their identity, among other ways through the use of products and services. Thus, understanding what stimulates the consumption of a specific product category by this market niche is no doubt of great importance for the companies that intend to serve this public, considering their attractive consumption profile. This stimulated this exploratory qualitative study, that seeked to identify the relationship between luxury clothing consumption by homosexual men and the development of their extended self, and well as their self image construction. The four steps of the research, done with 12 men, were literature review, in-depth interviews, the filling of two forms (one with Likert scale and the other with a semantic scale, and the analysis of the results. The conclusion is that self concept directly influences the buying behavior of male homosexuals, and that most of the interviewees actually use luxury brands clothes to compose their extended selves.

  5. The relationship between physical activity levels and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Kwang-Jun; Kim, Eon-Ho; Baek, Un-Hyo; Gang, Zhao; Kang, Seol-Jung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physical activity is important for preventing and managing metabolic syndrome. White-collar workers can be inherently predisposed to chronic diseases, as their jobs are primarily sedentary. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers. [Subjects and Methods] Physical activity and metabolic syndrome factors were measured in 331 male public office workers. Physical activity was classified as hig...

  6. Health, Trust, or “Just Understood”: Explicit and Implicit Condom Decision-Making Processes Among Black, White, and Interracial Same-Sex Male Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chadwick K.; Gómez, Anu Manchikanti; Dworkin, Shari; Wilson, Patrick A.; Grisham, Kirk; McReynolds, Jaih; Vielehr, Peter; Hoff, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    Among gay and bisexual men, primary partners are a leading source of HIV infection. Trust, intimacy, and advancements in HIV treatment may impact same-sex male couples’ decisions to engage in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). This qualitative study explored how Black, White and interracial couples discussed, and made decisions regarding condoms. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 same-sex male couples in the New York and San Francisco metropolitan areas. Stratified purposive sampling was used to include Black (n = 16), White (n = 17), and interracial (Black-White) (n = 15) couples. Twenty-six couples were concordant HIV-negative and 22 were HIV-discordant. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Some couples described explicit processes, which involved active discussion, while others described implicit processes, where condom-use decisions occurred without any explicit discussion. These processes also differed by race and HIV status. Black couples tended to report condom-use as “just understood.” White, HIV-discordant couples decided not to use condoms, with some identifying the HIV-positive partner’s suppressed viral load and high CD4 count as deciding factors. After an unplanned episode of UAI, White, HIV-negative couples tended to discontinue condom use while Black HIV-negative couples decided to revert to using condoms. HIV prevention efforts focused on same-sex, male couples must consider the explicit/implicit nature of condom decision-making processes. Understanding differences in these processes and considering relationship dynamics, across race and HIV status, can promote the development of innovative couple–level, HIV prevention interventions. PMID:23912774

  7. organs of the adult male and female african white bellied

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Weight and linear measurement. The observation that the female pangolin has more organs heavier than those of the male agrees with the earlier reports by. Latimer and Sawin (1955, 1957) in the rabbit. The sex effect on five out of the eleven parameters common to the work of. Latirner and Sawin (1957) and this report.

  8. Male role endorsement explains negative attitudes toward lesbians and gay men among students in Mexico more than in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steffens, M.C.; Jonas, K.J.; Denger, L.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-gay attitudes vary across cultures because the larger social context plays a role in attitude formation. Psychological correlates of these attitudes have been investigated in the United States and Europe. Endorsement of traditional gender roles has emerged from that research as a central

  9. “It's Just More Acceptable To Be White or Mixed Race and Gay Than Black and Gay”: The Perceptions and Experiences of Homophobia in St. Lucia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Couzens

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB individuals come from diverse cultural groups with differing ethnic and racial identities. However, most research on LGB people uses white western samples and studies of Afro-Caribbean diaspora often use Jamaican samples. Thus, the complexity of Afro-Caribbean LGB peoples' experiences of homophobia is largely unknown. The authors' analyses explore experiences of homophobia among LGB people in St. Lucia. Findings indicate issues of skin-shade orientated tolerance, regionalized disparities in levels of tolerance toward LGB people and regionalized passing (regionalized sexual identity shifting. Finally, the authors' findings indicate that skin shade identities and regional location influence the psychological health outcomes of homophobia experienced by LGB people in St. Lucia.

  10. “It's Just More Acceptable To Be White or Mixed Race and Gay Than Black and Gay”: The Perceptions and Experiences of Homophobia in St. Lucia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzens, Jimmy; Mahoney, Berenice; Wilkinson, Dean

    2017-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals come from diverse cultural groups with differing ethnic and racial identities. However, most research on LGB people uses white western samples and studies of Afro-Caribbean diaspora often use Jamaican samples. Thus, the complexity of Afro-Caribbean LGB peoples' experiences of homophobia is largely unknown. The authors' analyses explore experiences of homophobia among LGB people in St. Lucia. Findings indicate issues of skin-shade orientated tolerance, regionalized disparities in levels of tolerance toward LGB people and regionalized passing (regionalized sexual identity shifting). Finally, the authors' findings indicate that skin shade identities and regional location influence the psychological health outcomes of homophobia experienced by LGB people in St. Lucia. PMID:28674508

  11. Health, trust, or "just understood": explicit and implicit condom decision-making processes among black, white, and interracial same-sex male couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chadwick K; Gómez, Anu Manchikanti; Dworkin, Shari; Wilson, Patrick A; Grisham, Kirk K; McReynolds, Jaih; Vielehr, Peter; Hoff, Colleen

    2014-05-01

    Among gay and bisexual men, primary partners are a leading source of HIV infection. Trust, intimacy, and advancements in HIV treatment may impact same-sex male (SSM) couples' decisions to engage in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). This qualitative study explored how Black, White and interracial couples discussed, and made decisions regarding condoms. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 SSM couples in the New York and San Francisco metropolitan areas. Stratified purposive sampling was used to include Black (n = 16), White (n = 17), and interracial (Black-White) (n = 15) couples. Twenty-six couples were concordant HIV-negative and 22 were HIV-discordant. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Some couples described explicit processes, which involved active discussion, while others described implicit processes, where condom-use decisions occurred without any explicit discussion. These processes also differed by race and HIV status. Black couples tended to report condom-use as "just understood." White, HIV-discordant couples decided not to use condoms, with some identifying the HIV-positive partner's suppressed viral load and high CD4 count as deciding factors. After an unplanned episode of UAI, White, HIV-negative couples tended to discontinue condom use while Black HIV-negative couples decided to revert to using condoms. HIV prevention efforts focused on same-sex, male couples must consider the explicit/implicit nature of condom decision-making processes. Understanding differences in these processes and considering relationship dynamics, across race and HIV status, can promote the development of innovative couple-level, HIV prevention interventions.

  12. A Preliminary Investigation of the Role of Religion for Family Members of Lesbian, Gay Male, or Bisexual Male and Female Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lease, Suzanne H.; Shulman, Julie L.

    2003-01-01

    Surveys family members of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals regarding the role of religion in acceptance of their family member and how they reconciled any conflicts between religious beliefs and family member's sexual orientation. The most commonly identified theme was believing that the unconditional love associated with God extended…

  13. Exposing Whiteness in Higher Education: White Male College Students Minimizing Racism, Claiming Victimization, and Recreating White Supremacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nolan León

    2014-01-01

    This research critically examines racial views and experiences of 12 white men in a single higher education institution via semi-structured interviews. Participants tended to utilize individualized definitions of racism and experience high levels of racial segregation in both their pre-college and college environments. This corresponded to…

  14. Using Constructivist Grounded Theory to Understand How Black Males Graduate from Predominantly White Four-Year Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Marcus Latrell

    2017-01-01

    Black males graduate from college at rates lower than their female counterparts. They also graduate at lower rates than Asian, Hispanic, and White males and females. This study used Constructivist Grounded Theory to understand the experiences of Black males who graduated from predominantly White four-year institutions. Responses from 10 Black male…

  15. The Racial Identity Development of Male Student-Athletes when Blacks Are the Majority and Whites Are the Minority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Wilma J.; Closson, Rosemary B.

    2012-01-01

    Focus groups were used in the present study to explore the racial identity development of Black male and White male student-athletes on a predominantly Black, Division IA football team at a predominantly White institution (PWI). Findings indicate that the Black male football players demonstrated positive indicators of Black racial identity. The…

  16. The Impact of White Heterosexual Students' Interactions on Attitudes toward Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual People: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Christopher T. H.; Alimo, Craig

    2005-01-01

    Based on the Contact Hypothesis (Allport, 1979) a model for understanding the development of attitudes toward LGB relationships among White heterosexual undergraduate students was proposed. Using 401 White heterosexual students (70% women) attending a large public mid-Atlantic university this model was tested. More specifically, the effects of…

  17. Motivators, concerns, and barriers to adoption of preexposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention among gay and bisexual men in HIV-serodiscordant male relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Ronald A; Kaplan, Rachel L; Lieber, Eli; Landovitz, Raphael J; Lee, Sung-Jae; Leibowitz, Arleen A

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that may facilitate or impede future adoption of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention among gay and bisexual men in HIV-serodiscordant relationships. This qualitative study utilized semistructured interviews conducted with a multiracial/-ethnic sample of 25 gay and bisexual HIV-serodiscordant male couples (n=50 individuals) recruited from community settings in Los Angeles, CA. A modified grounded theory approach was employed to identify major themes relating to future adoption of PrEP for HIV prevention. Motivators for adoption included protection against HIV infection, less concern and fear regarding HIV transmission, the opportunity to engage in unprotected sex, and endorsements of PrEP's effectiveness. Concerns and barriers to adoption included the cost of PrEP, short- and long-term side effects, adverse effects of intermittent use or discontinuing PrEP, and accessibility of PrEP. The findings suggest the need for a carefully planned implementation program along with educational and counseling interventions in the dissemination of an effective PrEP agent.

  18. A Grounded Theory Study of Help-Seeking Behaviors among White Male High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timlin-Scalera, Rebecca M.; Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Blumberg, Fran C.; Jackson, Margo A.

    2003-01-01

    This study used grounded theory methodology (B. G. Glaser & A. L. Strauss, 1967; A. Strauss & J. Corbin, 1990) to explore the help-seeking behaviors of a select group of White male adolescents to understand and identify the mental health stressors in their lives and the factors involved with their decisions to seek or not to seek help for those…

  19. Gifted Black Males in a Predominantly White University: Portraits of High Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Thomas P.

    2002-01-01

    The experiences of five gifted black males in a predominantly white university setting were examined. Significant factors that influenced their achievement included influential mothers, recognition of giftedness, and support from significant teachers and mentors. Additional factors included involvement in extracurricular activities and positive…

  20. Monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis in a white male caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon L; Brandt, Pernille B; Gad, Dorte

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae in an immunocompromised white male after travel to China. The K. pneumoniae isolate belonged to the K2 serotype, and carried the virulence factors RmpA and aerobactin. To the best of our...

  1. Differences and similarities between gay and straight individuals involved in the sadomasochistic subculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordling, Niklas; Sandnabba, N Kenneth; Santtila, Pekka; Alison, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    Results from some new analyses as well as a selective review of the results of six empirical studies on a self-identified sample of sadomasochistically-oriented individuals (22 women and 162 men) with an emphasis on differences between gay and straight participants are presented. The gay male respondents seemed to be better educated, to hold white-collar occupations and to be more sadistically oriented. The gay male respondents became aware of their sadomasochistic preferences and had their first experiences at an older age. They showed a preference for leather outfits, anal intercourse, rimming, dildos, wrestling, special equipment and uniform scenes, and the straight male respondents for verbal humiliation, mask and blindfold, gags, rubber outfits, cane whipping, vaginal intercourse, cross dressing, and straitjackets, and different role plays except for uniform scenes. Four separate sexual themes were identified: hypermasculinity; administration and receiving of pain; physical restriction and psychological humiliation. Gay male participants showed a preference for hypermasculinity and straight men respondents for humiliation. The number of lesbian respondents was too low to draw any definite conclusions. Differences between gay and straight male sadomasochists in the present sample were found. Clearly, sadomasochism cannot be thought of as a unitary phenomenon: People who identify themselves as sadomasochists mean different things by these identifications.

  2. Gay men in the performing arts:Performing sexualities within 'gay-friendly' work contexts

    OpenAIRE

    Rumens, N.; Broomfield, J.

    2014-01-01

    Building on emerging research on ‘gay-friendly’ organizations, this article examines if and how work contexts understood and experienced as ‘gay-friendly’ can be characterized as exhibiting a serious breakdown in heteronormativity. Taking the performing arts as a research setting, one that is often stereotyped as ‘gay-friendly’, and drawing on in-depth interview data with 20 gay male performers in the UK, this article examines how everyday activities and encounters involving drama school educ...

  3. Stigma towards PLWHA: The Role of Internalized Homosexual Stigma in Latino Gay/Bisexual Male and Transgender Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Valles, Jesus; Molina, Yamile; Dirkes, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Stigma negatively affects the health of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Negative attitudes and discriminatory actions towards PLWHA are thought to be based, among other factors, on stigma towards sexual minorities and beliefs about personal responsibility. Yet, there is little evidence to support these linkages and explain how they take place, especially among Latinos. This study analyzes attitudes towards PLWHA among 643 Latino gay/bisexual men and transgender (GBT) people. It examines whether discriminatory actions are predicted by beliefs about personal responsibility and internalized homosexual stigma. Results indicate that Discriminatory Actions towards PLWHA is associated with HIV/AIDS Personal Responsibility Beliefs and Internalized Homosexual Stigma. Further, HIV/AIDS Personal Responsibility Beliefs partially mediates the relationship between Internalized Homosexual Stigma and Discriminatory Actions towards PLWHA. Latino GBT persons who have internalized negative views about homosexuality may project those onto PLWHA. They may think PLWHA are responsible for their serostatus and, hence, deserving of rejection. PMID:23631713

  4. Stigma towards PLWHA: the role of internalized homosexual stigma in Latino gay/bisexual male and transgender communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Valles, Jesus; Molina, Yamile; Dirkes, Jessica

    2013-06-01

    Stigma negatively affects the health of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Negative attitudes and discriminatory actions towards PLWHA are thought to be based, among other factors, on stigma towards sexual minorities and beliefs about personal responsibility. Yet, there is little evidence to support these linkages and explain how they take place, especially among Latinos. This study analyzes attitudes towards PLWHA among 643 Latino gay/bisexual men and transgender (GBT) people. It examines whether discriminatory actions are predicted by beliefs about personal responsibility and internalized homosexual stigma. Results indicate that Discriminatory Actions towards PLWHA is associated with HIV/AIDS Personal Responsibility Beliefs and Internalized Homosexual Stigma. Further, HIV/AIDS Personal Responsibility Beliefs partially mediates the relationship between Internalized Homosexual Stigma and Discriminatory Actions towards PLWHA. Latino GBT persons who have internalized negative views about homosexuality may project those onto PLWHA. They may think PLWHA are responsible for their serostatus and, hence, deserving of rejection.

  5. Friendship Patterns among Lesbian and Gay Youth: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Margaret S.; Witherspoon, Jennifer Jo

    2000-01-01

    Interviewed lesbian, gay, and heterosexual youth regarding their friendship patterns. Homosexual youth lived farther from their friends than heterosexual youth. Gay males and heterosexual females talked more often on the telephone with friends. Gay males were least likely to have friends of the same sex and same sexual orientation. Lesbians were…

  6. Ethnic differences in body composition and obesity related risk factors: study in Chinese and white males living in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this cross-sectional observational study was to identify ethnic differences in body composition and obesity-related risk factors between Chinese and white males living in China. 115 Chinese and 114 white male pilots aged 28-63 years were recruited. Fasting body weight, height and blood pressure were measured following standard procedures. Whole-body and segmental body composition were measured using an 8-contact electrode bioimpedance analysis (BIA system. Fasting serum glucose, fasting plasma total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides (TG were assessed using automatic biochemistry analyzer. After adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI, Chinese males had significantly higher percentage of body fat (PBF both with respect to whole body (Chinese: 23.7%±0.2% vs. Whites: 22.4%±0.2% and the trunk area (Chinese: 25.0%±0.3% vs. Whites: 23.2%±0.3% compared to their white counterparts. At all BMIs, Chinese males had significantly higher fasting glucose levels (Chinese: 5.7±1.0 mmol/L vs. Whites: 5.2±1.0 mmol/L but lower high-density lipoprotein levels (Chinese: 0.8±1.0 mmol/L vs. Whites: 1.0±1.0 mmol/L than white males. In addition, a marginally significantly higher diastolic blood pressure was found among Chinese men than that among white men (Chinese: 80±1.0 mmHg vs. Whites: 77±1.0 mmHg. Chinese males had more body fat and a greater degree of central fat deposition pattern than that seen in white males in the present study. Furthermore, data on blood pressure, fasting glucose and blood lipids suggest that Chinese men may be more prone to obesity-related risk factors than white men.

  7. Modeling distribution of dispersal distances in male white-tailed deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, D.R.; Long, E.S.; Rosenberry, C.S.; Wallingford, B.D.; Smith, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Dispersal distances and their distribution pattern are important to understanding such phenomena as disease spread and gene flow, but oftentimes dispersal characteristics are modeled as a fixed trait for a given species. We found that dispersal distributions differ for spring and autumn dispersals of yearling male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) but that combined data can be adequately modeled based on a log-normal distribution. We modeled distribution of dispersal distances from 3 distinct populations in Pennsylvania and Maryland, USA, based on the relationship between percent forest cover and mean dispersal distance and the relationship between mean and variance of dispersal distances. Our results suggest distributions of distances for dispersing yearling male white-tailed deer can be modeled by simply measuring a readily obtained landscape metric, percent forest cover, which could be used to create generalized spatially explicit disease or gene.

  8. The relationship between physical activity levels and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang-Jun; Kim, Eon-Ho; Baek, Un-Hyo; Gang, Zhao; Kang, Seol-Jung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physical activity is important for preventing and managing metabolic syndrome. White-collar workers can be inherently predisposed to chronic diseases, as their jobs are primarily sedentary. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers. [Subjects and Methods] Physical activity and metabolic syndrome factors were measured in 331 male public office workers. Physical activity was classified as high (N=101), moderate (N=115), or low (N=111) using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. To diagnose metabolic syndrome, the U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program’s standard was used. [Results] Waist circumference and triglyceride levels, factors of metabolic syndrome, were significantly higher in the low physical activity group than in the moderate or high activity group. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly lower in the low physical activity group than in the moderate or high activity group. Waist circumference and fasting glucose were negatively correlated with physical activity level, and HDL cholesterol showed a positive correlation with waist circumference. The odds ratios for metabolic syndrome were 2.03 times higher (95% confidence interval, 1.01–4.09) in the low physical activity group than in the high physical activity group. [Conclusion] Low physical activity was a risk factor for metabolic syndrome in white-collar workers. Therefore, increasing physical activity in daily life may prevent metabolic syndrome in white-collar workers. PMID:27942116

  9. The relationship between physical activity levels and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang-Jun; Kim, Eon-Ho; Baek, Un-Hyo; Gang, Zhao; Kang, Seol-Jung

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] Physical activity is important for preventing and managing metabolic syndrome. White-collar workers can be inherently predisposed to chronic diseases, as their jobs are primarily sedentary. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers. [Subjects and Methods] Physical activity and metabolic syndrome factors were measured in 331 male public office workers. Physical activity was classified as high (N=101), moderate (N=115), or low (N=111) using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. To diagnose metabolic syndrome, the U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program's standard was used. [Results] Waist circumference and triglyceride levels, factors of metabolic syndrome, were significantly higher in the low physical activity group than in the moderate or high activity group. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly lower in the low physical activity group than in the moderate or high activity group. Waist circumference and fasting glucose were negatively correlated with physical activity level, and HDL cholesterol showed a positive correlation with waist circumference. The odds ratios for metabolic syndrome were 2.03 times higher (95% confidence interval, 1.01-4.09) in the low physical activity group than in the high physical activity group. [Conclusion] Low physical activity was a risk factor for metabolic syndrome in white-collar workers. Therefore, increasing physical activity in daily life may prevent metabolic syndrome in white-collar workers.

  10. Substance use and HIV risk profile of gay/bisexual males who drop out of substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, G M; Stall, R D; Paul, J P; Barrett, D C

    2000-02-01

    This analysis was undertaken to identify (a) the level of HIV sexual risk behaviors of men who drop out of treatment and (b) baseline variables associated with later treatment dropout. A cross-sectional sample of 340 gay/bisexual men were recruited from an outpatient substance abuse treatment facility in San Francisco. We compared participants who completed less than 15 visits with participants who graduated from the program. Men who dropped out were more likely than treatment graduates to report injection drug use, social problems related to substance use, self-blaming coping strategies, and more recent substance use prior to entering treatment and less likely to have a college degree, report using sex for tension relief, and have previously attended Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous. Given the strong link between the substance abuse and HIV epidemics, substance abuse treatment agencies have been forced into addressing the issues of HIV sexual risk taking with their clients. Strategies toward reducing substance use relapse and HIV risk reduction are offered.

  11. [Factors associated with depressive symptoms in blue-collar and white-collar male workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yurika; Nishitani, Naoko; Sakakibara, Hisataka

    2015-01-01

    Mental disorders are increasing and their influence on productivity is a concern in the workplace. However, few studies have investigated depression among blue-collar and white-collar workers in the manufacturing industry. The purpose of this study was to clarify the factors associated with depressive symptoms, focusing on lifestyles and insomnia. A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted of 1,963 workers at an annual health checkup in a manufacturing company. Of the 1,712 respondents (response rate: 87%), 1,258 male worker subjects (blue-collar 674; white-collar 584) were analyzed after excluding those with mental diseases. The questionnaire included items on basic attributes and lifestyle. The Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS) and The Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale (CES-D) were used to evaluate insomnia and depressive symptoms. The incidence of depressive symptoms with CES-D scores of ≥16 was 15.1% in both the blue-collar and the white-collar workers. Insomnia with AIS scores of ≥6 were encountered in 18.8% of the blue-collar workers and 18.3% of the white-collar workers. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that for the blue-collar workers, depressive symptoms were associated with "AIS scores ≥6" (Odds ratio (OR): 10.93; 95% confidence interval (CI): 6.12-19.15), "not get rid of fatigue with sleep" (OR: 3.36; 95%CI: 1.85-6.09), "skip breakfast over 3 times a week" (OR: 3.10; 95%CI:1.42-6.76), "no family living together" (OR: 2.08; 95%CI: 1.05-4.12), and "commuting time" (OR: 1.01; 95%CI: 1.00-1.02). For the white-collar workers, depressive symptoms were related to "AIS scores ≥6" (OR: 14.91; 95%CI: 7.54-29.49), and "no family living together" (OR: 2.54; 95%CI: 1.27-5.09). Sleep time was not associated with depression in both blue- and white-collar workers. Depressive symptoms were found in 51.6% of the blue-collar workers with insomnia with AIS scores ≥6 and 53.8% of white-collar workers. Depressive symptoms were

  12. "But I'm Oppressed Too": White Male College Students Framing Racial Emotions as Facts and Recreating Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nolan L.

    2014-01-01

    Most analyses of racism focus on what people think about issues of race and how this relates to racial stratification. This research applies Feagin's "white racial frame" to analyze how White male college students at two universities "feel" about racism. Students at the academically non-selective and less diverse university…

  13. No attitude, no standing around: the organization of social and sexual interaction at a gay male private sex party in New York city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Étienne

    2014-05-01

    Following the onset of the AIDS epidemic, many jurisdictions have outlawed commercial sex-on-premise venues (bathhouses, adult theaters, sex clubs), greatly changing the culture of public or group sex. Today, in New York City (NYC), private sex parties are the main venues for group sex. Dozens of such events are held on a regular basis in the city, attracting sometimes a few hundred participants. Past research in group sex venues shows that different spaces allow for different kinds of sexual and social interaction. What are the norms of interaction of today's private sex parties? This article answers this question by using data collected ethnographically in one recurring gay male private sex party in NYC. The event was a small organization that brought all its participants together in one space at the same time, thus creating great physical intimacy and leading to convivial socialization and interpersonal bonding. This differs from the model of anonymous and impersonal sex that previous researchers have seen in public and commercial spaces. Private sex parties present risk for the transmission of HIV and other sexually-transmitted infections, but their organization and norms of interaction also present new avenues for prevention. Policy-makers should work to make these places safer rather than outlawing them.

  14. Explaining Couple Cohesion in Different Types of Gay Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eeden-Moorefield, Brad; Pasley, Kay; Crosbie-Burnett, Margaret; King, Erin

    2012-01-01

    This Internet-based study used data from a convenience sample of 176 gay men in current partnerships to examine differences in outness, cohesion, and relationship quality between three types of gay male couples: first cohabiting partnerships, repartnerships, and gay stepfamilies. Also, we tested whether relationship quality mediated the link…

  15. Implicit Preferences for Straight People over Lesbian Women and Gay Men Weakened from 2006 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin C Westgate

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Legal rights and cultural attitudes towards lesbian women and gay men have shifted rapidly in the early 21st century. Using 683,976 visitors to Project Implicit from February 2006 to August 2013, we investigated whether shifts were also observable in implicit evaluations that occur outside of conscious awareness or control. Similar to public opinion polling, the estimated explicit preference for straight people over lesbian women and gay men was 26% weaker on the last day compared to the first. The estimated implicit preference for straight people declined by 13.4% over the same period. The largest shifts in implicit evaluations occurred among Hispanic, White, female, liberal, and young adult participants; the smallest shifts occurred among Black, Asian, male, conservative, and older adult participants. Societal change in evaluation of lesbian and gay people is not limited to what people are willing and able to report. However, change in implicit evaluation appears to be slower.

  16. The "Marital" Liaisons of Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    Reports research on the nature of enduring sexual liaisons among homosexual men. Such relationships vary widely and may be subinstitutional adaptions to lack of community support. Gay men committed to the heterosexual world were less likely to enter enduring relationships. Open marriage is the more enduring form of gay male liaisons. (Author)

  17. Gay Adolescents and Suicide: Understanding the Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Robert Li

    2005-01-01

    Suicide among gay [in this article "gay" refers to homosexual males and females, and bisexuals unless otherwise indicated] adolescents is a major public health concern, but it is still under-emphasized within mainstream healthcare. This article brings together information garnered from past studies, articles, and experiences to create a more…

  18. The responses of white blood cells to weight loss among young male judoists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardalan Shariat

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was the assessment of white blood cells in response to acute and gradual weight loss among young male judoists. Material and Methods—Twenty four healthy young judoists aged 17.0±1.2 years (mean ± SD, with one year of experience in judo training, selected and they were randomly classified in two groups of acute weight loss and gradual weight loss. Blood sampling was conducted in three stages: 1 before weight loss, 2 18 hours after weight loss, and 3 after the last phase of physical exercise performance tests. Results— The average amount of white blood cells in the phase 2 for both groups didn’t increase meaningfully (Acute: P=0. 53, Gradual: P=0.48 but the increase in the phase 3 for both groups was significant (P<0.01. Conclusion— This study concludes that acute weight loss can result in changing the level of white blood cells which are determined in immunity system and related disease.

  19. Photoperiodic regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, James C; Aubrecht, Taryn G; Weil, Zachary M; Leuner, Benedetta; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-08-01

    Photoperiodic organisms monitor environmental day length to engage in seasonally appropriate adaptions in physiology and behavior. Among these adaptations are changes in brain volume and neurogenesis, which have been well described in multiple species of birds, yet few studies have described such changes in the brains of adult mammals. White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) are an excellent species in which to investigate the effects of day length on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as males, in addition to having reduced hippocampal volume in short days (SD) with concomitant impairments in hippocampus-mediated behaviors, have photoperiod-dependent changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis. We performed the current experiment to assess the effects of photoperiod on hippocampal neurogenesis longitudinally, using the thymidine analog bromodeoxyuridine at multiple time points across 10 weeks of SD exposure. Compared with counterparts held in long day (LD) lengths, across the first 8 weeks of SD exposure hippocampal neurogenesis was reduced. However, at 10 weeks in SD lengths neurogenic levels in the hippocampus were elevated above those levels in mice held in LD lengths. The current findings are consistent with the natural photoperiodic cycle of hippocampal function in male white-footed mice, and may help to inform research on photoperiodic plasticity in neurogenesis and provide insight into how the complex interplay among the environment, genes and adaptive responses to changing day lengths affects brain structure, function and behavior at multiple levels. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Anti Lithiasis Activity of Avocado (Persea americana Mill Leaves Extract in White Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IETJE WIENTARSIH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia, avocado leaves have been used as traditional medicines for diureticum to cure urolithiasis. This research was to determine anti lithiasis activity of avocado leaves (Persea americana Mill extract on white male rats nefrolithiasis model induced by ethylene glycol. Ethanol extraction method was used to get extract of avogadro leaves. Twenty adult male white rats were divided into 4 different induction treatments i.e. aquadest, ethylene glycol 0.75% and ammonium chloride 2%, and extract of avocado leaves with different levels of 100 and 300 mg/kg bw respectively. Their body weight was measured daily to determine their growth ratio. And at the end of the trial, the kidney was analyzed its calcium level and inhibitory activity to formation of calcium oxalate crystals. The results showed that the amount of calcium level in the kidney of rats treated with extract of avogadro leaves was significantly decreased than that of rats treated with ethylene glycol 0.75% and ammonium chloride 2% (P < 0.05. The extract avocado leaves as a herbal remedy can be recommended as a phytotherapeutic agent especially for preventive action for urolithiasis diseases.

  1. How Religious Engagement Shapes the College Experience of African American Christian Males at a Predominantly White Institution: A Phenomenological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the different aspects of the college experience of African American males in a predominantly White institution is an important topic for researchers. This focus directly responds to the despairing statistics surrounding collegiate African American males, who often show lower graduation rates compared to other racial groups. The need…

  2. Courtesy stigma: the social implications of associating with a gay person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigelman, C K; Howell, J L; Cornell, D P; Cutright, J D; Dewey, J C

    1991-02-01

    We investigated the operation of courtesy stigma with American male college students who reacted to a fictitious male student described as gay, rooming by choice with a gay male student, involuntarily assigned to room with a gay, or rooming with a male heterosexual. Among respondents who expressed strong intolerance of gays, the voluntary associate of a gay was perceived as having homosexual tendencies and as possessing the same stereotyped personality traits attributed to a gay. No such courtesy stigma was attached to the involuntary associate of a gay by these respondents. Relatively tolerant respondents engaged in no courtesy stigmatization at all. Thus, courtesy stigmatization occurred only under circumscribed conditions and appeared to depend more on the tendency of highly intolerant individuals to infer that a male student who apparently liked a gay individual was himself gay than on a motivation to maintain cognitive consistency.

  3. Ethnic differences in thermal pain responses: a comparison of South Asian and White British healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Paul J; Latif, R Khalid; Rowbotham, David J

    2005-11-01

    The expression and report of pain is influenced by social environment and culture. Previous studies have suggested ethnically determined differences in report of pain threshold, intensity and affect. The influence of ethnic differences between White British and South Asians has remained unexplored. Twenty age-matched, male volunteers in each group underwent evaluation. Cold and warm perception and cold and heat threshold were assessed using an ascending method of limits. Magnitude estimation of pain unpleasantness and pain intensity were investigated with thermal stimuli of 46, 47, 48 and 49 degrees C. Subjects also completed a pain anxiety questionnaire. Data was analysed using t-test, Mann-Whitney and repeated measures analysis of variance as appropriate. There were no differences in cold and warm perception between the two groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups for heat pain threshold (P=0.006) and heat pain intensity demonstrated a significant effect for ethnicity (F=13.84, P=0.001). Although no group differences emerged for cold pain threshold and heat unpleasantness, South Asians demonstrated lower cold pain threshold and reported more unpleasantness at all temperatures but this was not statistically significant. Our study shows that ethnicity plays an important role in heat pain threshold and pain report, South Asian males demonstrated lower pain thresholds and higher pain report when compared with matched White British males. There were no differences in pain anxiety between the two groups and no correlations were identified between pain and pain anxiety Haemodynamic measures and anthropometry did not explain group differences.

  4. Pioneers in partnership: lesbian and gay male couples in civil unions compared with those not in civil unions and married heterosexual siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sondra E; Rothblum, Esther D; Balsam, Kimberly F

    2004-06-01

    This study compared 212 lesbians and 123 gay men who had civil unions in Vermont (during the first year legislation made this available) with 166 lesbians and 72 gay men in their friendship network who had not had civil unions, and also with 219 heterosexual married women and 193 heterosexual married men consisting of civil union couples' siblings and their spouses. Married heterosexual couples had been together longer and had more traditional division of labor and child care than did lesbians and gay men in both types of couples. Lesbians in civil unions were more open about their sexual orientation than those not in civil unions, and gay men in civil unions were closer to their family of origin than gay men not in civil unions. This is the first study on same-sex couples with civil unions, and the first to compare lesbians and gay men with their married siblings. At a time of legal changes for same-sex couples, these results indicate that legalized same-sex relationships are related to visibility of same-sex couples to their family and the general public.

  5. Egg white-derived peptides prevent male reproductive dysfunction induced by mercury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzetti, Danize Aparecida; Martinez, Caroline Silveira; Escobar, Alyne Goulart; da Silva, Taiz Martins; Uranga-Ocio, José Antonio; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Castro, Marta Miguel; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative stress in known to contribute to the male reproductive dysfunction induced by mercury (Hg). Our study tested the hypothesis that the egg white hydrolysate (EWH), a potent antioxidant in vitro, is able to prevent the effects of prolonged Hg exposure on male reproductive system in rats. For this, rats were treated for 60 days with: a) Untreated - saline solution (i.m.); b) Hydrolysate - EWH (1 g/kg/day, gavage); c) Mercury - HgCl2 (1st dose 4.6 μg/kg, subsequent doses 0.07 μg/kg/day, i.m.); d) Hydrolysate-Mercury. At the end of the treatment, sperm motility, count and morphological studies were performed; Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) levels, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant capacity, histological and immunohistochemical assays on testis and epididymis were also carried out. As results, HgCl2-treatment decreased sperm number, increased sperm transit time in epididymis and impaired sperm morphology. However, these harmful effects were prevented by EWH. HgCl2-treatment also increased ROS levels, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant capacity in testis and epididymis as well as promoted testicular inflammation and histological changes in epididymis. EWH improved histological and immunohistochemical alterations, probably due to its antioxidant property. In conclusion, the EWH could represent a powerful natural alternative to protect the male reproductive system against Hg-induced sperm toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison on taste threshold between adult male white cigarette and clove cigarette smokers using Murphy clinical test method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Reyses Tapilatu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The habit of smoking white cigarettes and clove cigarettes may affect the gustatory function, that is, it will cause damage to taste buds, resulting in an increase in gustatory threshold. This research used the descriptive comparative method and had the purpose of obtaining an illustration of gustatory threshold and compare gustatory threshold in white cigarette smokers and clove cigarette smokers in young, male adults. For gustatory threshold evaluation, the Murphy method was used to obtain a value for perception threshold and taste identification threshold using sucrose solution of 0.0006 M-0.06 M concentration. Research results indicate that the perception threshold and identification threshold of young, male adult smokers are 0.0119 M and 0.0292 M. Young, male adult clove cigarette smokers have a perception threshold and identification threshold of 0.0151 M and 0.0348 M. The conclusion of this research is that the perception threshold of young, male adult white cigarette smokers and clove cigarette smokers are the same, whereas the identification threshold of young, male adult white cigarette smokers and clove cigarette smokers are different, that is, the identification threshold of clove cigarette smokers is higher than that of white cigarette smokers.

  7. White Privilege? The Intersection of Hip-Hop and Whiteness as a Catalyst for Cross-Racial Interaction among White Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulé, Venice Thandi

    2015-01-01

    Given the prevalence of racial segregation in the U.S., college is an opportunity to prepare students for diversity through cross-racial interaction. Hip-hop, a culture steeped in black and Latino experiences, has significant white supporters. Through diversity and critical whiteness frameworks, this research considers how white hip-hop collegians…

  8. Age-related changes in proximal humerus bone health in healthy, white males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantila Roosa, Sara M.; Hurd, Andrea L.; Xu, Huiping; Fuchs, Robyn K.; Warden, Stuart J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The proximal humerus is relatively under investigated despite being the fourth most common site for osteoporotic fracture. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed to assess age-related changes in dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) properties of the proximal humerus in a cohort of 170 healthy, white males. Results Regression models estimated considerable age-related loss of DXA measured bone quantity at the proximal humerus, with areal bone mineral density modeled to decline by 29% (95%CI, 17.5–35.0%) in the 50 years between ages 30 and 80 years (pproximal humerus bone strength in the 50 years between ages 30 and 80 years (pproximal humeral bone health which, when coupled with a traumatic event such as a fall, may contribute to osteoporotic fracture at this site. PMID:22258805

  9. Altered White Matter and Sensory Response to Bodily Sensation in Female-to-Male Transgender Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Laura K; Brang, David; Landazuri, Rosalynn; Viswanathan, Pavitra; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2017-07-01

    While most people take identification with their body for granted, conditions such as phantom limb pain, alien hand syndrome, and xenomelia suggest that the feeling of bodily congruence is constructed and susceptible to alteration. Individuals with xenomelia typically experience one of their limbs as over-present and aversive, leading to a desire to amputate the limb. Similarly, many transgender individuals describe their untreated sexed body parts as incongruent and aversive, and many experience phantom body parts of the sex they identify with (Ramachandran, 2008). This experience may relate to differences in brain representation of the sexed body part, as suggested in xenomelia (McGeoch et al., 2011). We utilized magnetoencephalography imaging to record brain activity during somatosensory stimulation of the breast-a body part that feels incongruent to most presurgical female-to-male (FtM)-identified transgender individuals-and the hand, a body part that feels congruent. We measured the sensory evoked response in right hemisphere somatosensory and body-related brain areas and found significantly reduced activation in the supramarginal gyrus and secondary somatosensory cortex, but increased activation at the temporal pole for chest sensation in the FtM group (N = 8) relative to non-transgender females (N = 8). In addition, we found increased white matter coherence in the supramarginal gyrus and temporal pole and decreased white matter diffusivity in the anterior insula and temporal pole in the FtM group. These findings suggest that dysphoria related to gender-incongruent body parts in FtM individuals may be tied to differences in neural representation of the body and altered white matter connectivity.

  10. Forensic Applicability of Femur Subtrochanteric Shape to Ancestry Assessment in Thai and White American Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallman, Sean D; Winburn, Allysha P

    2015-09-01

    Ancestry assessment from the postcranial skeleton presents a significant challenge to forensic anthropologists. However, metric dimensions of the femur subtrochanteric region are believed to distinguish between individuals of Asian and non-Asian descent. This study tests the discriminatory power of subtrochanteric shape using modern samples of 128 Thai and 77 White American males. Results indicate that the samples' platymeric index distributions are significantly different (p≤0.001), with the Thai platymeric index range generally lower and the White American range generally higher. While the application of ancestry assessment methods developed from Native American subtrochanteric data results in low correct classification rates for the Thai sample (50.8-57.8%), adapting these methods to the current samples leads to better classification. The Thai data may be more useful in forensic analysis than previously published subtrochanteric data derived from Native American samples. Adapting methods to include appropriate geographic and contemporaneous populations increases the accuracy of femur subtrochanteric ancestry methods. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Total workload, work stress and perceived symptoms in Swedish male and female white-collar employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Gunilla; Berntsson, Leeni; Lundberg, Ulf

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse how paid work, unpaid household tasks, child care, work-child care interactions and perceived work stress are associated with reported symptoms in male and female white-collar employees. A questionnaire was mailed to 1300 men and 1300 women belonging to the white-collar sector, with at least 35 hours of regular employment a week and a participant age of between 32 and 58 years. It contained items relating to total workload (hours spent on paid work, unpaid household tasks and childcare), subjective indices for work stress and symptoms. The response rate was 65% (743 women; 595 men). Gender difference in symptom prevalence was tested by analyses of variance. Odds ratios were used to estimate the bivariate associations between work-related variables and symptom prevalence. A multivariate analysis estimated the effect of paid and unpaid work interaction, work-childcare interplay and possible synergy. The frequency and severity of symptoms was higher in women than in men (P work and household duties (OR 2.09; 1.06-4.14), whereas men responded more selectively to long working hours, i.e. >50 h/week (OR 1.61; 1.02-2.54). However, childcare (working long hours. Working life and private circumstances and the interplay between them need to be taken into account to curb stress-related ill health in both men and women.

  12. Association of television violence exposure with executive functioning and white matter volume in young adult males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, Tom A; Kronenberger, William G; Wang, Yang; Anderson, Caitlin C; Mathews, Vincent P

    2014-07-01

    Prior research has indicated that self-reported violent media exposure is associated with poorer performance on some neuropsychological tests in adolescents. This study aimed to examine the relationship of executive functioning to violent television viewing in healthy young adult males and examine how brain structure is associated with media exposure measures. Sixty-five healthy adult males (ages 18-29) with minimal video game experience estimated their television viewing habits over the past year and, during the subsequent week, recorded television viewing time and characteristics in a daily media diary. Participants then completed a battery of neuropsychological laboratory tests quantifying executive functions and underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Aggregate measures of executive functioning were not associated with measures of overall television viewing (any content type) during the past week or year. However, the amount of television viewing of violent content only, as indicated by both past-year and daily diary measures, was associated with poorer scores on an aggregate score of inhibition, interference control and attention, with no relationship to a composite working memory score. In addition, violent television exposure, as measured with daily media diaries, was associated with reduced frontoparietal white matter volume. Future longitudinal work is necessary to resolve whether individuals with poor executive function and slower white matter growth are more drawn to violent programming, or if extensive media violence exposure modifies cognitive control mechanisms mediated primarily via prefrontal cortex. Impaired inhibitory mechanisms may be related to reported increases in aggression with higher media violence exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. THE THE ACTIVITIES OF ALANINE AMINOTRANSFERASE AND ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE ENZYMES IN MALE WHITE RATS TREATED WITH EXTRACT ARECA NUT TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak Agung Sagung Kendran

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Areca nut is a plant of Arecaceae family, known as herbal medicine and useful as an anthelmetic treatment. The aim of this research was to determine hepar toxicity of the Areca nut extracts given to male white rats by measuring ALT and AST. The doses of extracts were 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, and 400 mg/kg body weight respectively. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance. The results showed that no significant effect of ALT and AST enzymes found in the treatment groups. Betel nut extract in those concentration was not toxic in the male white rats.

  14. Gay and Lesbian Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dynamics > Types of Families > Gay and Lesbian Parents Family Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Gay and Lesbian Parents Page Content Article Body I am gay. Should I worry how this will affect my children? Millions of children have one or more gay ...

  15. The Gender and Race Composition of Jobs and the Male/Female, White/Black Pay Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaskovic-Devey, Donald

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of North Carolina survey data indicates that females' average hourly wages were 71% of males', and blacks' wages were 78% of whites'. Human capital factors (educational attainment and occupational experience) explained 31% and 3% of the racial and gender gaps, respectively. Job gender composition explained 56% of the gender gap; job…

  16. The Impact of Student-Faculty Interaction on Academic Achievement and College Satisfaction for Black Males Attending Predominately White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Lamar R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of student-faculty interactions on academic achievement and college satisfaction among Black males at predominately White institutions. Specifically, the researcher sought to determine if there was a difference in levels of academic achievement and college satisfaction based on how often Black…

  17. Black Male Graduates' Reflections on Their College Experiences at a Private, Faith-Based, Predominantly White Institution of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayworth, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    This study takes an in-depth look at the experiences of 12 Black males who graduated between 2001 and 2012 from a private, faith-based, predominantly White institution of higher education, with a purpose to better understand the essence of their collegiate experiences. Most research on minority college enrollment has focused on reasons why…

  18. Implementing a Mentoring Program for African American Males to Improve Student Satisfaction at a Predominantly White Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coonrod, Curtis C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study is to evaluate the impact of the intervention on student satisfaction of African American males enrolled at a predominantly White institution (PWI), through meaningful engagement activities and mentoring relationships, thus improving their persistence rates at State University (pseudonym). This highly…

  19. The Academic Success of First-Generation African American Male College Students Attending Predominantly White Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewing, Venus

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative, correlational design was utilized in this study to examine the relationship between academic self-efficacy, racial identity, and the academic success of first-generation African American male college students at Predominantly White Institutions of higher education. The study comprised 89 first-generation African American male…

  20. What's Good about Being Gay? Perspectives from Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Gary W.; Brodsky, Asya; Bruce, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    This article explores gay and bisexual male adolescents' positive perceptions of their sexual orientation identity. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with an ethnically diverse sample of 63 gay/bisexual male adolescents in Chicago (N = 42) and Miami (N = 21). Data revealed two major conceptual categories: (1) positive personal…

  1. Effect of fructose and sucralose on flow-mediated vasodilatation in healthy, white European males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Muhammad Qasim; Simpson, Elizabeth Jane; Macdonald, Ian Andrew

    2014-07-01

    To assess how acute consumption of fructose affects flow-mediated dilatation in brachial artery. The randomised cross-over study was conducted at the University of Nottingham's Medical School, Nottingham, United Kingdom in July 2009. Ten healthy, white European males visited the laboratory twice, on separate mornings. On each visit, the volunteers consumed water (3 ml/kg bodyweight) and rested semi-supine on the bed. After 30 minutes, baseline diastolic brachial artery diameter and blood velocity was measured. At 60 minutes, blood velocity and five scans of brachial artery diameter were recorded before a blood pressure cuff was inflated on the forearm for 5 minutes and at 50-60-70-80 and 90 sec after cuff deflation. Fifteen minutes later, the volunteers consumed 500 ml of test-drink containing either fructose (0.75 g/kg bodyweight) or sucralose (sweetness-matched with fructose drink); 45 minutes later, baseline and flow-mediated dilatation was re-measured. Pre-drink and post-drink baseline values were similar on two occasions (p > 0.05). Brachial artery diameter increased (p sucralose; a significant difference was noted in these flow-mediated dilatation responses (p sucralose were not different from those before and after fructose (p sucralose had no effect on flow-mediated dilatation measured at brachial artery.

  2. Reproductive and immune effects of chronic corticosterone treatment in male White's treefrogs, Litoria caerulea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Kristine; Devito, Julia; Jones, Caitlin G; Marentes, Adam; Perez, Rachel; Umeh, Lisa; Weickum, Regina M; McGovern, Kathryn E; Wilson, Emma H; Saltzman, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Amphibian populations are declining globally. The potential contribution of glucocorticoid hormones to these declines has received little attention, but chronic elevation of glucocorticoids has been linked to a suite of negative outcomes across vertebrate taxa. Recently, chronic environmental stress has been associated with precipitous declines in sperm count and sperm viability in White's treefrogs (Litoria caerulea), but the mechanism remains unknown. In order to determine whether corticosterone is responsible for suppressing reproductive and immune function in this species, we elevated circulating concentrations of corticosterone in 10 male captive-bred frogs via transdermal application for 7 days. We compared sperm count, sperm viability, splenic cell count and circulating leucocyte counts in corticosterone-treated frogs with those in untreated control frogs. Chronic application of exogenous corticosterone led to supraphysiological circulating concentrations of corticosterone, but had no effect on sperm count or viability. However, corticosterone-treated frogs demonstrated a significant decrease in circulating eosinophils, which are immune cells implicated in fighting a variety of pathogens, including extracellular parasites. These findings suggest that although chronic elevation of circulating corticosterone is not necessarily associated with reproductive suppression in this species, it may cause immunosuppression. Thus, chronic glucocorticoid elevations in amphibians might enhance susceptibility to infection with pathogens and parasites, and their potential contributions to global population declines warrant further study.

  3. Race, Aging and Gay In/Visibility on US Television

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Jr., Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, I argue that despite the increased visibility of gay men on contemporary telenarratives (both on broadcast and cable networks)people of color remain stubbornly less visible and even within those examples of white gay men who dominate the airwaves, few if any depict men over the age of 40 or gay elders over the age of retirement.This invisibility operates a heuristic that pedagogically educates viewers to interpellate gay men as perpetually young or as young adults, thereby re...

  4. The contribution of school to the feeling of acceptance and the risk of suicide attempts among Austrian gay and bisexual males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plöderl, Martin; Faistauer, Gregor; Fartacek, Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    School-related factors contributing to the suicidality of lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals are understudied, especially in German-speaking Europe. Among our Web-based sample of 468 Austrian gay or bisexual adults, 18% attempted suicide and about one half of them reported that hard times at school related to one's homosexuality partly or mainly caused the attempt. Such suicide attempts were associated with a lack of acceptance at school and harassment experiences. In contrast to suicide attempts, acceptance at school was significantly associated with protective factors such as teachers intervening against homophobia or presence of openly homosexual teachers or peers. These findings may be important for consideration in school-based suicide prevention programs.

  5. Attitudes towards lesbians and gay men: a university survey

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    M.A. This study posits that although the South African government has shown an unprecedented commitment to acknowledging and upholding the human rights of lesbians and gay men, negative attitudes exist towards lesbians and gay men in university communities. A survey of 880 heterosexual students (356 men and 524 women) in a university community was conducted using the Attitudes Towards Lesbian and Gay Male Scale (ATLG). The results indicate that heterosexual students have negative attitudes...

  6. The White Male as Narrative Axis in Mayra Santos-Febres’s Nuestra señora de la noche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene C. Weldt-Basson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mayra Santos-Febres’s 2006 novel, Nuestra señora de la noche , is based on the life of the Puerto Rican madam, Isabel la Negra, a legendary figure in Puerto Rican culture. Using both Mervin Alleyne’s theory of racial discrimination and Aída Hurtado’s theory of racially-based gender discrimination, which shows how the reactions of white and black females are governed by their relation of dependency on or rejection by the white male, this study illustrates how the character Isabel la Negra evolves as a postmodern, feminist character who opposes racism and gender subordination in Puerto Rico through her role as a prostitute. Conversely, the study also illustrates how madness, associated with both white (Cristina Rangel and black (Montse females in the novel, is a powerless rather than feminist strategy, into which women descend due to their mistreatment by patriarchal society. The study illustrates how Fernando Fornarís, the white male protagonist, serves as the narrative axis for the development of women’s polarized reactions to patriarchal domination in the novel.

  7. Gay Couple Counseling: Proceedings of a Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Ralph; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This is a report of a conference on gay couple counseling for members of the helping professions. Discussion topics included (1) Therapists' Panel on Female Couples, (2) Therapists' Panel on Male Couples; (3) Panel of Male Couples and (4) Panel of Female Couples. The conference was held in May, 1974 in New York and was sponsored by The Homosexual…

  8. Identity experience among progressive gay Muslims in North America: a qualitative study within Al-Fatiha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minwalla, Omar; Rosser, B R Simon; Feldman, Jamie; Varga, Christine

    2005-03-01

    This qualitative study aims to document the identity experience of progressive gay Muslim men in a North American context. Six in-depth interviews, supplemented with participant observation, were conducted of gay Muslim men who attended an international conference for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and questioning (LGBTQ) Muslims. For progressive gay Muslims such as these, a Muslim identity appears three-dimensional (religious, ethno-cultural, and color) when integrated with a gay identity. As a religious identity, gay Muslim's relationship to Allah (God) and a reinterpretation of the Qur'an and traditional condemnation of homosexuality appears necessary. As a cultural identity, East-West ethno-cultural differences that impact on homo-sociality and gay identity construction, marriage and the impact of coming out on the Eastern family and siblings emerged as critical issues. As a color identity, internalized racism, dating relationships and social dynamics within gay subculture as Muslims of color in a white dominant context appear key challenges.

  9. Homecoming: the relevance of radical feminism for gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Sexual politics in the gay male world would be enhanced by a serious engagement with radical feminist politics, particularly critiques of pornography and the sex industry. As the domination/subordination dynamic at the heart of patriarchy damages homosexual men, such engagement is crucial to the future of a gay movement.

  10. Understanding Gay Identity Development within the College Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard Allen

    2004-01-01

    Using grounded theory methodology, the experiences of 11 self-identified gay male college students were explored to understand how the environment contributed to the exploration and development of a gay identity. One central category (finding empowerment) and 5 integrative categories (self-acceptance, disclosure to others, environmental…

  11. Reported Effects of Masculine Ideals on Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Francisco J; Greenberg, Stefanie T; Liu, William Ming; Vilain, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study used consensual qualitative research methodology (Hill et al., 2005) to analyze what gay men associate with masculinity and femininity, how they feel masculine ideals affect their self-image, and how masculine ideals affect their same-sex relationships. Written responses were collected from 547 self-identified gay men in the U.S. via an Internet-based survey. Findings supported previous reports that perceptions of gender roles among gay men appear based on masculine and feminine stereotypes. Additionally, more adverse versus positive effects on self-image and same-sex romantic relationships were reported including difficulty being emotional and affectionate, pressure to be physically attractive, and pressure to appear masculine in order to be accepted by society and to be seen as desirable by other gay men. While research on gay men's experience with masculinity continues, psychologists should consider the possible influence of traditional masculine ideals when conceptualizing their gay male clients.

  12. Comparison of some reproductive characteristics of farmed and wild white shrimp males Litopenaeus vannamei (Decapoda: Penaeidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rendón Rodríguez

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We rated some reproductive characteristics of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone, 1931 males using 46 farmed individuals (weighing 21.42±0.56 g and 40 wild individuals (weighing 36.10±0.72 g. In farmed shrimps, spermatophore mean weight was 8.94±0.51 mg; total mean sperm count was 3.90±0.27 x 10(6 in each spermatophore; and mean percentage of normal sperm was 86.9±0.37 %. In wild individuals, the respective values were 30.68±2.32 mg; 6.22±1.09 x 10(6; and 62.1±3.56 %. In both groups, the differences between right and left spermatophore were not significant (pResumen Se evaluaron características reproductivas como peso del espermatóforo, número de espermatozoides y porcentaje de espermatozoides normales en 86 organismos de camarón blanco (Litopenaeus vannamei. de éstos, 46 individuos provinieron de estanques de cultivo con un peso de 21.42±0.56 g y el resto, 40, silvestres con un peso de 36.10±0.72 g. En los camarones cultivados, el peso de los espermatóforos fue de 8.94±0.51 mg; el número total de espermatozoides en cada espermatóforo fue de 3.90±0.27 x 10(6; y el porcentaje de espermatozoides normales fue de 86.9±0.37 %. En los silvestres, los valores respectivos fueron de 30.68±2.32 mg; 6.22±1.09 x 10(6; y 62.1±3.56 %. En ambos grupos, las diferencias entre los espermatóforos derecho e izquierdo no fueron estadísticamente diferentes (p<0.01. Las diferencias en el peso de los espermatóforos y el porcentaje de espermatozoides normales, entre los camarones cultivados y silvestres, fueron significativas (p<0.01; sin embargo, en el número de espermatozoides tales diferencias no fueron significativas (p<0.01. La relación entre el peso del espermatóforo (Ws y el peso de los individuos (Wo fue Ws (mg=1.23(Wo-17.34 (r²=0.89, en camarones cultivados; y Ws (mg=2.57(Wo-60.04 (r²=0.64, en los silvestres. En organismos cultivados, la relación entre el número de espermatozoides (Cs y el peso de los individuos (Wo fue

  13. White Working-Class Male Narratives of "Loyalty to Self" in Discourses of Aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Garth

    2016-01-01

    This paper intends to show the processes and identity negotiations of white working-class boys surrounding their own learner-identity within a "raising aspirations" rhetoric. The current dominant neoliberal discourse, which prioritizes a view of aspiration that is competitive, economic, and status-based, shapes the subjectivities of…

  14. Black Male College Achievers and Resistant Responses to Racist Stereotypes at Predominantly White Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Shaun R.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Shaun R. Harper investigates how Black undergraduate men respond to and resist the internalization of racist stereotypes at predominantly White colleges and universities. Prior studies consistently show that racial stereotypes are commonplace on many campuses, that their effects are usually psychologically and academically…

  15. The Career Trajectory of Black Male Presidents of Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, DeWitt T.

    2016-01-01

    Since the creation of American higher education, the majority of the nation's colleges have been led, managed, and directed by White men. From the Boards of Trustees to the dean level, racial representation in higher education leadership has traditionally not included people of color. This lack of diversity in senior leadership is juxtaposed…

  16. Substance use among lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients entering substance abuse treatment: Comparisons to heterosexual clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flentje, Annesa; Heck, Nicholas C; Sorensen, James L

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated whether sexual orientation-specific differences in substance use behaviors exist among adults entering substance abuse treatment. Admissions records (July 2007-December 2009) were examined for treatment programs in San Francisco, California receiving government funding. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) persons (n = 1,441) were compared to heterosexual persons (n = 11,770) separately by sex, examining primary problem substance of abuse, route of administration, age of first use, and frequency of use prior to treatment. Regarding bisexual males, the only significant finding of note was greater prevalence of methamphetamine as the primary substance of abuse. When compared to heterosexual men, gay and bisexual men evidenced greater rates of primary problem methamphetamine use (44.5% and 21.8%, respectively, vs. 7.7%, adjusted odds ratios [ORs] 6.43 and 2.94), and there was lower primary heroin use among gay men (9.3% vs. 25.8%, OR 0.35). Among LGB individuals, race and ethnicity did not predict primary problem substance, except that among LGB men and women, a non-White race predicted cocaine use (OR 4.83 and 6.40, respectively), and among lesbian and bisexual women, Hispanic ethnicity predicted lower odds of primary cocaine use (OR 0.24). When compared to heterosexual men, gay men were more likely to smoke their primary problem substance (OR 1.61), first used this substance at an older age (M = 23.16 vs. M = 18.55, p substance fewer days prior to treatment (M = 8.75 vs. M = 11.41, p substance use for gay and bisexual men entering substance abuse treatment, but women did not evidence differences. Gay men evidenced unique factors that may reflect less severity of use when entering treatment including fewer days of use and a later age of initiation of their primary problem substances. The results underscore the importance of being sensitive to differences between gay, bisexual, and heterosexual males when considering substance use disorders. (Psyc

  17. Reversible fibroadenomatous mammary hyperplasia in male and female New Zealand white rabbits associated with cyclosporine A administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimer, P M; Harvey, S B; Blas-Machado, U; Lauderdale, J D; Moore, P A

    2009-11-01

    All male and female New Zealand white rabbits in a limbal cell graft study developed marked generalized mammary gland hypertrophy. Postprocedural medications included ophthalmic 0.1% dexamethasone, ophthalmic 0.5% cyclosporine, and subcutaneous cyclosporine A. Cytologic examination revealed epithelial clusters with minimal malignant criteria. On histologic evaluation, there was diffuse glandular hyperplasia with mild cellular atypia and ductal ectasia separated by abundant hypercellular fibrous stroma, consistent with fibroadenomatous mammary gland hyperplasia. The hyperplasia resolved within 2 weeks of cessation of cyclosporine, and at necropsy identifiable mammary masses were not found. Very little has been reported about the use of cyclosporine in laboratory rabbits and its association with development of mammary gland hyperplasia. This is the first report in which administration of cyclosporine to male and female rabbits at a dose as low as 5 mg/kg/day induced benign fibroadenomatous mammary gland hyperplasia. This change regressed after cessation of the drug.

  18. Black gay men as sexual subjects: race, racialisation and the social relations of sex among Black gay men in Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbands, Winston; Makoroka, Lydia; Walcott, Rinaldo; Adam, Barry D; George, Clemon; Remis, Robert S; Rourke, Sean B

    2013-01-01

    In this study of Black gay and bisexual men in Toronto, sexually active survey participants reported on their sexual behaviours with male partners of different ethnoracial backgrounds, and interview participants reflected on how their sexual relationships emerged in the context of race and interracial desire. Most survey participants reported sexual relationships with other Black men. Participants were more likely to be insertive with White and other ethnoracial men than with Black men. A significant number of participants who were receptive or versatile with Black partners switched to the insertive role when their sexual partners were not Black. Interview participants ascribed a sense of fulfilment to their sexual relationships with other Black men, but avoided relationships with White men or interpreted such relationships as either purely sexual and/or inflected by their racialised objectification. Others avoided sexual relationships with other Black men or preferred relationships with White men, sometimes in opposition to experiences of oppressive masculinity from some Black partners but mindful of the possibility of racialised encounters with their White partners. Study participants emerge as informed sexual subjects, self-conscious about their sexual relationships and variously inclined to negotiate or resist racialisation and oppression in the private and public spheres.

  19. Sexual minority specific and related traumatic experiences are associated with increased risk for smoking among gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Cleirigh, Conall; Dale, Sannisha K; Elsesser, Steven; Pantalone, David W; Mayer, Kenneth H; Bradford, Judith B; Safren, Steven A

    2015-05-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that sexual minority specific stress and trauma histories may explain some of the risk for smoking among gay/bisexual men. Patients at a Boston community health center were invited to complete a 25-item questionnaire assessing demographics, general health, trauma history, and substance use. Of the 3103 who responded, 1309 identified as male and gay or bisexual (82.8% White and mean age of 38.55 [sd = 9.76]). A multinomial logistic regression with never smoked as referent group and covariates of age, education, employment, HIV status, and race, showed that the number of sexual minority stressors/traumas were significantly related to the odds of both current and former smoking. In comparison to participants with no trauma history, those who reported 1, 2, 3, and 4 traumas had respectively 1.70 (OR = 1.70: 95% CI: 1.24-2.34), 2.19 (OR = 2.19: 95% CI: 1.48-3.23), 2.88 (OR = 2.88: 95% CI: 1.71-4.85), and 6.94 (OR = 6.94: 95% CI: 2.62-18.38) the odds of identifying as a current smoker. Adjusted logistic regression analysis revealed a significant dose effect of number of sexual minority stressors/traumas with odds of ever smoking. Experiencing intimate partner violence, anti-gay verbal attack, anti-gay physical attack, and childhood sexual abuse were each independently associated with increased odds of the smoking outcomes. A sexual minority specific trauma history may represent a vulnerability for smoking among gay/bisexual men. Interventions that address trauma may enhance the efficacy of smoking cessation programs and improve the mental health of gay/bisexual men. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ommatidial heterogeneity in the compound eye of the male small white butterfly, Pieris rapae crucivora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, XD; Vanhoutte, KAJ; Stavenga, DG; Arikawa, K; Qiu, Xudong

    The ommatidia in the ventral two-thirds of the compound eye of male Pieris rapae crucivora are not uniform. Each ommatidium contains nine photoreceptor cells. Four cells (R1-4) form the distal two-thirds of the rhabdom, four cells (R5-8) approximately occupy the proximal one-third of the rhabdom,

  1. Black Male Retention Initiatives: Exploring Students' Experiences and Program Effectiveness at Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Leger, Gabrielle

    2012-01-01

    Recent initiatives in higher education have been designed to increase Black undergraduate male collegiate retention and persistence through graduation for this historically underrepresented population. Although institutional leaders in higher education have focused on creating more inclusive campuses, designing and implementing programs to retain…

  2. Becoming Gay Fathers through Transnational Commercial Surrogacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Michael Nebeling

    2018-01-01

    Based on eight interviews with Danish gay male couples and one gayman, who had or were planning to become fathers through transnationalcommercial surrogacy, I examine the ways the men form familysubjectivities between traditional kinship patterns and fundamentally newforms of kinship and family...... reaffirming old hierarchizations of racialized and sexualized forms ofprocreation and families....

  3. Psychophysiological reactions to telework in female and male white-collar workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Ulf; Lindfors, Petra

    2002-10-01

    Information technology has created greater flexibility and mobility for employees, such as teleworkers. However, research on stress and health is limited. This study investigated psychophysiological arousal in 26 highly educated white-collar workers (12 women and 14 men) while (a) working at the office, (b) working at home (telework), and (c) relaxing at home. Blood pressure was significantly higher during work at the office than when teleworking at home, and men had significantly elevated epinephrine levels in the evening after telework at home. It was assumed that the lower cardiovascular arousal during telework is due to different work tasks and that elevated epinephrine levels in men after telework are caused by continued work after normal working hours.

  4. Age cohort differences in the developmental milestones of gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drasin, Harry; Beals, Kristin P; Elliott, Marc N; Lever, Janet; Klein, David J; Schuster, Mark A

    2008-01-01

    As the social context in which gay men live changes due to greater visibility, greater acceptance, and easier access to gay subculture, gay males may self-identify and take part in gay social activities at earlier ages than in the past. This study examined whether developmental milestones associated with sexual orientation for gay men have changed over the past several decades. A large and diverse sample of 2,402 gay men who responded to a 1994 survey published in a national magazine provided retrospective information on the age at which they reached individual psychological, social, and sexual behavior developmental milestones. We found evidence that individual psychological and sexual behavior milestones (e.g., awareness of attraction to males, having an orgasm with other male) are slowly moving toward earlier chronological ages (by 1 year of age every 8-25 years, p milestones (e.g., coming out) are moving more rapidly in a similar direction (by 1 year of age every 2-5 years, p < 0.001). The authors perform an innovative sensitivity test to demonstrate the persistence of the finding after correcting for the bias attributable to underrepresentation of those who have not yet self-identified as gay in such samples.

  5. The Phenotype of Diploid and Triploid F1 of Female Kohaku and Sanke Koi with Males White and Red Koi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Alimuddin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis study was done to discover the effect of addition of chromosome number on phenotype F1 hybrid of females kohaku (white-red and sanke (white-red-black koi with males white and red koi. The white and red males koi were the F1 of gynogenesis. Spawning of koi was done by hormonal (ovaprim 0,5 ml/kg body weight and fertilization was done artificially. Triploidization was done by heat shock at 40°C during 1,0-1,5 minutes after 2-3 minute from egg fertilization. Colour analysis was done on 4 months old fish. Triplodization was succeeding on 86,67%.  Addition of chromosome number on koi due to triploidization was suppressed the percentage of koi with combination color (kohaku, shiro-bekko, hi-utsuri, and sanke. It was seen on hybridization of sanke vs white koi as much as 5,55%, while on sanke vs red koi reached 45,02%. Hybridization of kohaku vs white koi as well as kohaku vs red koi produced higher percentages of kohaku compared to kohaku vs kohaku.Key words: Phenotype, diploid, triploid, koi fish, hybrid, chromosome AbstrakStudi ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui pengaruh penambahan jumlah set kromosom terhadap fenotipe keturunan persilangan ikan koi kohaku (putih-merah dan sanke (putih-merah-hitam betina dengan jantan putih dan merah. Ikan koi jantan putih dan merah merupakan hasil ginogenesis generasi pertama. Pemijahan ikan koi dilakukan dengan rangsangan hormonal ovaprim 0,5 ml/kg induk dengan sistim pembuahan buatan. Triploidisasi dilakukan dengan memberikan kejutan panas 400C selama 1,0-1,5 menit pada saat 2,0-3,0 menit setelah pembuahan telur. Analisis warna dilakukan setelah ikan berumur 4 bulan. Tingkat keberhasilan triploidisasi yang diperoleh cukup tinggi, yaitu sebesar 86,67%. Penambahan jumlah set kromosom ikan koi akibat triploidisasi menurunkan persentase ikan koi yang berwarna kombinasi (putih-merah, putih-hitam, merah-hitam dan putih-merah-hitam sebesar 5,55% untuk persilangan sanke vs putih, dan 45,02% untuk persilangan

  6. 'The First Step Is the Two-Step': Hegemonic Masculinity and Dancing in a Country-Western Gay Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Corey W.

    2005-01-01

    Gay men are often rendered feminized males according to masculine, heterosexual ideologies. This research demonstrates that gay men are actually more creative and active agents in their gender performance, simultaneously resisting and reinforcing dominant ideologies around gender and sexuality. One context where the creative agency of gay men is…

  7. Gene by Social-Context Interactions for Number of Sexual Partners Among White Male Youths: Genetics-informed Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guang; Tong, Yuying; Cai, Tianji

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we set out to investigate whether introducing molecular genetic measures into an analysis of sexual partner variety will yield novel sociological insights. The data source is the white male DNA sample in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Our empirical analysis has produced a robust protective effect of the 9R/9R genotype relative to the Any10R genotype in the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1). The gene-environment interaction analysis demonstrates that the protective effect of 9R/9R tends to be lost in schools in which higher proportions of students start having sex early or among those with relatively low levels of cognitive ability. Our genetics-informed sociological analysis suggests that the “one size” of a single social theory may not fit all. Explaining a human trait or behavior may require a theory that accommodates the complex interplay between social contextual and individual influences and genetic predispositions. PMID:19569400

  8. The Effect of Honey Administration on Gastrohistopathological Image Study In Male White Wistar Rat Induced With Indomethacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Suprijono

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastric disorder often generates clinical symptoms such as gastritis or peptic ulcer. Bee honey has high nutrient has been shown to have a protective effect against drugs destroying stomach. The purpose of this study was the difference effect of honey in various concentrations on the gastrohistopathological image in male white Wistar rat induced with indomethacin. Design and Methods: This was an experimental research using control group post test design. 24 male white rats Wistar were randomly divided into 6 groups of 4 mice each. Group I served as the control group (standar and aquades, group II: 3.78 mg of indometachin, group III: 3.78 indomethacin and 3.6 ml honey (25%, group IV: 3.78 indomethacin 3.6 ml honey (50%, group V: 3.78 mg indomethacin 3.78 mg and 3.6 ml (75%(, group VI: 3.78 indomethacin 3,78 mg and honey 3.6 ml 100%. Treatment given by sonde once a day for 15 days. the gastrohistopathological image was evaluated for degree of gastritis and degree of peptic ulcer. The data were tested with test Kruskal-Wallis followed by Mann-Whitney test. Results: Kruskal-Wallis test showed at least significant differences in the degree of gastritis and peptic ulcer between between the two groups (p <0.05. Mann-Whitney test howed that not all groups compared to control showed a significant different in the degrees of gastritis and peptic ulcer. Conclusion: The study suggested that honey have effect on the gastrohistopathological image of indomethacin-induced stomach (Sains Medika, 3(1:41-47.

  9. Medical students’ attitudes toward gay men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Healthcare providers’ attitudes toward sexual minorities influence patient comfort and outcomes. This study characterized medical student attitudes toward gay men, focusing on behavior, personhood, gay civil rights, and male toughness. Methods A cross-sectional web-based anonymous survey was sent to medical students enrolled at the University of California, Davis (N = 371) with a response rate of 68%. Results Few respondents expressed negative attitudes toward gay men or would deny them civil rights. More negative responses were seen with respect to aspects of intimate behavior and homosexuality as a natural form of sexual expression. Men and students younger than 25 years old were more likely to endorse negative attitudes toward behavior as well as more traditional views on male toughness. Conclusions We show that an important minority of students express discomfort with the behavior of gay men and hold to a narrow construction of male identity. These findings suggest that competency training must move beyond conceptual discussions and address attitudes toward behaviors through new pedagogical approaches. PMID:22873668

  10. The therapy relationship with lesbian and gay clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Frances A

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the role of therapy practices and the therapy relationship on lesbian and gay clients' feelings about their current therapist. Participants were 76 lesbian and 40 gay male clients ranging in age from 19 to 69 years. The real relationship was found to predict an additional 8% of variance in clients' positive feelings about their therapist above and beyond months in therapy, therapy practices, and the working alliance. However, therapy practices did not add significance in predicting lesbian and gay clients' feelings about their therapist beyond the working alliance and the real relationship. Fifty-three of the participants responded to a question about their current experiences in therapy, and the data were analyzed using consensual qualitative research-modified (CQR-M; Spangler, Liu, & Hill, 2012). Thirty percent of clients indicated a preference for a lesbian or gay therapist, or gay-friendly therapist. Only 25% found that their therapist lacked knowledge about lesbian and gay issues, but 21% indicated that their therapist was dismissive of and/or viewed their sexual orientation as a problem. More than two-thirds of the participants indicated they had a positive therapy relationship with their therapist. Results highlight the important role that therapy practices and the therapy relationship play in lesbian and gay clients perceptions' of their therapist. The findings also provide support for heterosexual therapists' ability to develop a positive therapy relationship and be effective with lesbian and gay clients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Male reproductive toxicity of 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene in the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawes, S.M. [DynCorp/TAI, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Christ, S.A.; Reddy, T.V.; Toth, G.P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    1,3-Dinitrobenzene has been characterized as a testicular toxicant in both laboratory rats and mice. Recently, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) has been shown to elicit testicular toxicity in rats. Given the need for data with which to do ecological risk assessments of munitions waste and by-products (including nitrobenzenes), male white-footed mice were fed a diet containing 0, 1 50, 375, or 750 mg TNB/kg diet (20 animals per treatment) for 90 days. Testis weight and epididymis weight variables exhibited considerable variation at time of animal sacrifice and were found not to differ significantly by ANOVA or by Tukey`s Studentized Range Test (SAS, Cary, NC). Computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) technology was applied to the measurement of sperm motility. Optimization of the CeliTrak/S{trademark} (Motion Analysis, Santa Rosa, CA) CASA system for tracking sperm heads was performed on sperm from untreated Peromyscus. Cauda epididymal sperm from treated animals were videotaped at 200 frames per second. In addition to the percentage of motile sperm, sperm head curvilinear velocity (VCL), straight-line velocity (VSL), and amplitude of head displacement (ALH) were measured. These measurements were also characterized by considerable within-treatment variation, and again no statistical significance was found. Discussion is made regarding the relevance of this feral rodent model for male reproductive toxicity assessment.

  12. Reference Values of Aortic Root in Male and Female White Elite Athletes According to Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraita, Araceli; Heras, Maria-Eugenia; Morales, Francisco; Marina-Breysse, Manuel; Canda, Alicia; Rabadan, Manuel; Barriopedro, Maria-Isabel; Varela, Amai; de la Rosa, Alejandro; Tuñón, José

    2016-10-01

    There is limited information regarding the aortic root upper physiological limits in all planes in elite athletes according to static and dynamic cardiovascular demands and sex. A cross-sectional study was performed in 3281 healthy elite athletes (2039 men and 1242 women) aged 23.1±5.7 years, with body surface area of 1.9±0.2 m2 and 8.9±4.9 years and 19.2±9.6 hours/week of training. Maximum end-diastolic aortic root diameters were measured in the parasternal long axis by 2-dimensional echocardiography. Age, left ventricular mass, and body surface area were the main predictors of aortic dimensions. Raw values were greater in males than in females (P40 mm and 34 mm, respectively. Raw and corrected aortic measures at all levels were significantly greater in sports, with a high dynamic component in both sexes, except for corrected values of the sinotubular junction in women. Aortic root dimensions in healthy elite athletes are within the established limits for the general population. This study describes the normal dimensions for healthy elite athletes classified according to sex and dynamic and static components of their sports. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Gay men and ambivalence about 'gay community': from gay community attachment to personal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Martin

    2011-09-01

    The concept of 'gay community', and gay men's attachment to and involvement in gay community activities, has held both a symbolic and practical role in understanding and guiding responses to HIV in developed world contexts. In the West, the HIV epidemic has disproportionately affected gay men. Being involved in and connected to gay community activities (what, in Australia, is described as 'gay community attachment') predicted the adoption of safe sex practices. However, the meaning of gay community is changing. This presents a challenge to those working in HIV prevention. With reference to previous research, the meaning of gay community is analysed in qualitative interviews conducted with Australian gay men. The interview data indicate that gay men are often ambivalent about gay communities, suggesting a need for subtlety in the ways we think about and address gay men in HIV education and health promotion. The concept of 'personal communities' may better reflect the ways in which gay men engage with each other and their social networks. Recognising and responding to the changing nature of gay life will ensure that the flexibility and pragmatism of HIV programmes aimed at gay men are maintained.

  14. The gay cousin: learning to accept gay rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Hassmann, R E

    2001-01-01

    In 1996-97 the author interviewed 73 civic leaders in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, on their attitudes toward gay rights. Twelve respondents opposed gay rights, 40 were moderately favorable to gay rights, and 21 were strongly favorable. Almost all favored basic equality rights (education, housing, employment), and only 10 said they had difficulty with gay sexuality. Twenty-seven volunteered a concern with gay "flaunting," but this did not mean that they necessarily opposed gay rights. Respondents had the most difficulty accepting the rights of gays to marry and to adopt children, although almost all of those who opposed gay marriages agreed with the idea of a legal domestic partnership. Most agreed that children should be taught about homosexuality in schools. These 73 civic leaders reflect the rapidly changing attitudes to gay rights in Canada as a whole. Their more favorable attitudes were often a consequence of learning that someone close to them was gay or lesbian. They also responded to changes in religious teaching. Most respondents, including recent immigrants, were influenced by the dominant Canadian values of equality, respect for privacy, and respect for diversity. In general, the process these civic leaders were undergoing was one of humanizing gays, no longer thinking of them as the Other. In their view, human rights for gays did not mean mere formal equality, but rather concern and respect for gays.

  15. An investigation into the effects of vacations on the health status in male white-collar workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarumi, K; Hagihara, A; Morimoto, K

    1998-04-01

    There are many stress factors in occupational settings, and the lack of vacations could be one of factors in the context of work stress. The authors have been studying the relationship between workload and employee health. This time, an investigation into the effects of leisure vacations on worker health status using male white-collar employees aged 20-60 years engaged in a manufacturing company was conducted. The subjects were questioned on work stress factors including vacations and modifiers in their occupational settings, and on psychological and physiological stress reactions; that is, how often they were able to take leisure vacations every year, their average working hours a day and work stress factors from the Demand-Control-Support model. The questions also examined other factors concerning the employees such as type-A behavior and lifestyles as modifiers, diseases of the employees, physical complaints, feelings about sleep, perceived stress, job and life satisfaction, and stress reactions as measured by physiological examination. Correlation and logistic regression analysis were conducted with the 551 eligible subjects. The results were as follows: Leisure vacation was decreasingly related to some of psychological stress reactions after adjustment was made for working hours and for modifiers. Less vacation was increasingly related to the workers' diseases especially among the employees aged 20-34, though the association was not statistically significant. Vacations did not show obvious association with physiological measures. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness and possibility of leisure vacation in controlling fatigue and maintaining the health of workers. Vacation should always be taken into consideration as a stress factor in a survey of the health problems of white-collar workers.

  16. Internalized gay ageism, mattering, and depressive symptoms among midlife and older gay-identified men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Richard G; LeBlanc, Allen J; Meyer, Ilan H; Harig, Frederick A

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we introduce the construct of "internalized gay ageism," or the sense that one feels denigrated or depreciated because of aging in the context of a gay male identity, which we identify as an unexplored aspect of sexual minority stress specific to midlife and older gay-identified men. Using a social stress process framework, we examine the association between internalized gay ageism and depressive symptoms, and whether one's sense of mattering mediates or moderates this association, controlling for three decades of depressive symptom histories. The sample is 312 gay-identified men (average age = 60.7 years, range = 48-78, 61% HIV-negative) participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) since 1984/85, one of the largest and longest running studies of the natural history of HIV/AIDS in the U.S., who provided contemporary (2012/13) reports of stress experiences. We find that internalized gay ageism can reliably be measured among these men, is positively associated with depressive symptoms net of an array of other factors that may also influence symptomatology (including depressive symptom histories), and mattering partially mediates but does not moderate its effect on depressive symptoms. Midlife and older gay men have traversed unparalleled historical changes across their adult lives and have paved the way for younger generations of sexual minorities to live in a time of less institutionalized discrimination. Still, they are at distinct risk for feeling socially invisible and devalued in their later years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationships between religiosity level and attitudes toward lesbians and gay men among Turkish university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between religiosity levels and attitudes toward lesbians and gay men among freshmen university students in Turkey. The Attitudes Towards Lesbians and Gay Men Scale-Short Form and the Religiosity Scale were administered to 91 male (M = 19.95, SD = 1.48 years) and 171 female (M = 19.23, SD = 1.28 years) students. The findings showed that male freshmen (M = 19.32, SD = 4.97) had more negative attitudes toward gay men than toward lesbians (M = 17.84, SD = 5.25), p = .000. In addition, attitudes of male freshmen were significantly more negative toward gay men (M =19.32, SD = 4.97) than females (M = 17.51, SD = 5.73), p = .012. Both male and female freshmen students who had higher levels of religiosity were found to have higher levels of negative attitudes toward both lesbians and gay men.

  18. Familial aspects of male homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, K; Pillard, R C; Horvath, C; Revelle, W; Bailey, J M

    2000-04-01

    Research has generally supported the existence of familial-genetic factors for male sexual orientation, but has not shed much light on the specific nature of those influences. Gay men with gay brothers provide the opportunity to examine several hypotheses. Sixty-six men, representing 37 gay male sibling pairs, completed questionnaires assessing behavior on various measures including childhood and adult gender nonconformity, timing of awareness of homosexual feelings, self-acceptance, and the quality of family relationships. Consistent with prior findings using twins, gay brothers were similar in their degree of childhood gender non-conformity, suggesting that this variable may distinguish etiologically (e.g., genetically) heterogeneous subtypes. The large majority of gay men with brothers knew about their own homosexual feelings before they learned about their brothers' homosexual feelings, suggesting that discovery of brothers' homosexuality is not an important cause of male homosexuality.

  19. Perception of Gay Men as Defectors and Commitment to Group Defense Predict Aggressive Homophobia

    OpenAIRE

    Florian van Leeuwen; Helena Miton; Firat, Rengin B.; Pascal Boyer

    2016-01-01

    Homophobia encompasses a variety of attitudes and behaviors with distinct causal paths. We focus on aggressive homophobia, a propensity to feel anger and express aggression toward gay men. We investigated the conjecture that homosexual males might be seen, in recent Western cultures, as defectors from collective group defense. We predicted that consistent with a functional motive to punish and deter free riding, the perception of gay men as defectors would motivate aggression toward gay men. ...

  20. Gay Emancipation and Information Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedler, Petra

    1996-01-01

    Written and oral information strategies used by two gay groups in the Netherlands serve three functions: dissemination of information about homosexuality; contact--creation of a public presence; and signification--a broader conception of sexuality and gay emancipation. (SK)

  1. The gay librarian: a comparative analysis of attitudes towards professional gender issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, J V

    1995-01-01

    Librarianship is a feminized profession, and like teaching, nursing, and social work with which it shares the occupational traits of a "semi-profession," its low status and prestige have been attributed to a negative feminine image. To date, discussion of a corresponding male librarian image, general male issues, and the broader topic of gender issues has been minimal within the profession, while serious discussion of gay male librarians and their professional identity has been virtually nil. This study compares the responses of straight and self-identified gay males to an exploratory survey of male members of the American Library Association. The topics covered by the survey include reasons for entry into the field, the existence and identity of a male librarian stereotype, and gender issues generally, including gender stratification of work and sexual discrimination and/or harassment. Self-identified gay subjects share many characteristics in common with the straight cohort, including the identification of a gay male stereotype and some denial surrounding gender equity issues. On the other hand, the tentative findings of this exploratory study raise the question of whether both gay and straight male subjects overestimate the number of gay men in librarianship. The report concludes with an update on gay issues within the profession since the survey was completed, and recommendations for further research.

  2. Young, Gay...and Ignored?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Debra

    1995-01-01

    Examines the failure of libraries to meet the information needs of gay and lesbian adolescents. Reviews research in homosexuality and the development of homosexual identities. Discusses library services for gays and lesbians, the experience of gays and lesbians in secondary schools, and the role of the school library; provides a content analysis…

  3. Effect of Nanosilver Particles on Alanin Amino Transferase (ALT Activity and White Blood Cells (WBC Level in Male Wistar Rats, In Vivo Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Naghsh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nanosilver is extensively used in medical equipment. Given the importance of white blood cells (WBC in the immune system and liver cells in the body detoxification, this study has examined the effects of nanosilver particles on the white cell count and ALT liver enzyme in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 40 adult male Wistar rats, provided from Pasteur Institute of Tehran. Nanosilver particles with concentrations of 50, 100, 200 and 400ppm were intraperitoneally injected to the treatment groups. Then, the mean of ALT enzyme concentration and white blood cell count of rats were compared in case and control groups at day 12 after treatment through ANOVA test.Results: The greatest effect of nanosilver particles on the ALT liver enzyme of rats was at concentration 50ppm after 3 days of injection (p=0.002. Also the greatest effect of nanosilver particles on white blood cells of rats was at concentration 400ppm after 12 days of injection (p=0.0001.Conclusion: The oxidative stress induced by intraperitoneally injection of nanosilver particles in rats causes severe irritation and immune system and increases the creation of white blood cells and liver damage in rats treated with nanosilver particles.

  4. Attitudes toward Gay Marriage in States Undergoing Marriage Law Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, Stacey M.; Sanchez, Laura A.; Nock, Steven L.; Wright, James D.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines attitudes toward gay marriage within the context of concern over the weakening of heterosexual marriage. We use data from a three-state survey conducted in 1998 - 2000 and designed to explore attitudes toward marriage and divorce reform (N = 976). We find that women, Whites, and younger persons are more approving of gay…

  5. Clubbing masculinities: gender shifts in gay men's dance floor choreographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Grant Tyler

    2011-01-01

    This article adopts an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the intersections of gender, sexuality, and dance. It examines the expressions of sexuality among gay males through culturally popular forms of club dancing. Drawing on political and musical history, I outline an account of how gay men's gendered choreographies changed throughout the 1970s, 80s, and 90s. Through a notion of "technologies of the body," I situate these developments in relation to cultural levels of homophobia, exploring how masculine expressions are entangled with and regulated by musical structures. My driving hypothesis is that as perceptions of cultural homophobia decrease, popular choreographies of gay men's dance have become more feminine in expression. Exploring this idea in the context of the first decade of the new millennium, I present a case study of TigerHeat, one of the largest weekly gay dance club events in the United States.

  6. Smoking, white blood cell counts, and TNF system activity in Japanese male subjects with normal glucose tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Naoya

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smokers have increased white blood cell (WBC counts and the activation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF. The effect of smoking on WBC counts and TNF system activity, however, has not been separately investigated yet. Subjects and Methods One hundred and forty-two Japanese male subjects with normal glucose tolerance were recruited. They were stratified into two groups based on the questionnaire for smoking: one with current smokers (n = 48 and the other with current non-smokers (n = 94. Whereas no significant differences were observed in age, BMI, high molecular weight (HMW adiponectin, and TNF-α between the two groups, current smokers had significantly higher soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNF-R1 (1203 ± 30 vs. 1116 ± 21 pg/ml, p = 0.010 and increased WBC counts (7165 ± 242 vs. 5590 ± 163/μl, p p = 0.031 as compared to current non-smokers. Next, we classified 48 current smokers into two subpopulations: one with heavy smoking (Brinkman index ≥ 600 and the other with light smoking (Brinkman index Results Whereas no significant difference was observed in age, BMI, HMW adiponectin, WBC counts and TNF-α, sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 were significantly higher in heavy smoking group (1307 ± 44 vs. 1099 ± 30 pg/ml, p p = 0.005 than in light smoking group, whose sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 were similar to non-smokers (sTNF-R1: 1116 ± 15 pg/ml, p = 0.718, sTNF-R2; 1901 ± 32 pg/ml, p = 0.437. In contrast, WBC counts were significantly increased in heavy (7500 ± 324/μl, p p = 0.001 smoking group as compared to non-smokers (5590 ± 178/μl. There was no significant difference in WBC counts between heavy and light smoking group (p = 0.158. Conclusion We can hypothesize that light smoking is associated with an increase in WBC counts, while heavy smoking is responsible for TNF activation in Japanese male subjects with normal glucose tolerance.

  7. Resveratrol Attenuates Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Macrophage Migration to Visceral White Adipose Tissue and Insulin Resistance in Male Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Alba; Zhang, Shelley X. L.; Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Peris, Eduard; Qiao, Zhuanhong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia during sleep (IH), as occurs in sleep apnea, promotes systemic insulin resistance. Resveratrol (Resv) has been reported to ameliorate high-fat diet-induced obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. To examine the effect of Resv on IH-induced metabolic dysfunction, male mice were subjected to IH or room air conditions for 8 weeks and treated with either Resv or vehicle (Veh). Fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and leptin were obtained, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index levels were calculated, and insulin sensitivity tests (phosphorylated AKT [also known as protein kinase B]/total AKT) were performed in 2 visceral white adipose tissue (VWAT) depots (epididymal [Epi] and mesenteric [Mes]) along with flow cytometry assessments for VWAT macrophages and phenotypes (M1 and M2). IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice showed initial reductions in food intake with later recovery, with resultant lower body weights after 8 weeks but with IH-Resv showing better increases in body weight vs IH-Veh. IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice exhibited lower fasting glucose levels, but only IH-Veh had increased homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index vs all 3 other groups. Leptin levels were preserved in IH-Veh but were significantly lower in IH-Resv. Reduced VWAT phosphorylated-AKT/AKT responses to insulin emerged in both Mes and Epi in IH-Veh but normalized in IH-Resv. Increases total macrophage counts and in M1 to M2 ratios occurred in IH-Veh Mes and Epi compared all other 3 groups. Thus, Resv ameliorates food intake and weight gain during IH exposures and markedly attenuates VWAT inflammation and insulin resistance, thereby providing a potentially useful adjunctive therapy for metabolic morbidity in the context of sleep apnea. PMID:25406018

  8. The Impact of Sexual Abuse on Sexual Identity Formation in Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Emerging data suggests that as children, gay males have an increased risk for physical and sexual abuse. Anecdotal evidence suggests that a significant subset of children abused by clergy identify as gay as adults. However, we know very little about the impact of clergy-perpetrated sexual abuse in childhood on the development and psychosocial…

  9. Homosexual Identity Expression among Lesbian and Gay Adolescents: An Analysis of Perceived Structural Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner-Haugrud, Lisa K.; Magruder, Brian

    1996-01-01

    Examines specific sociocultural factors influencing homosexual identity expression for gay and lesbian adolescents. Using the Negotiated Identity Model on a sample of 172 self-identified homosexual adolescents reveals that variables for gay males included political ideology, socioeconomic status, heterosexual friends, and gender nonconformity.…

  10. Body Image Concerns of Gay Men: The Roles of Minority Stress and Conformity to Masculine Norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Sara B.; Mahalik, James R.

    2005-01-01

    The authors hypothesized that gay men's experiences of minority stress and their conformity to masculine norms would be associated with increased body image dissatisfaction and masculine body ideal distress. For this cross-sectional study, 357 gay males completed a Web-based survey, and 2 multiple regression analyses indicated that minority stress…

  11. From Romance to Magical Realism: Limits and Possibilities in Gay Adolescent Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Authors of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) adolescent novels have recently moved away from addressing the "problem" of sexual identity and have instead focused on personal and societal "acceptance" of non-normative sexualities. Within the increasing number of "acceptance" titles published depicting gay males,…

  12. Expressive Writing for Gay-Related Stress: Psychosocial Benefits and Mechanisms Underlying Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachankis, John E.; Goldfried, Marvin R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study tested the effectiveness of an expressive writing intervention for gay men on outcomes related to psychosocial functioning. Method: Seventy-seven gay male college students (mean age = 20.19 years, SD = 1.99) were randomly assigned to write for 20 min a day for 3 consecutive days about either (a) the most stressful or…

  13. Disclosure, discrimination and desire: experiences of Black and South Asian gay men in Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Eamonn; Nelson, Simon; Anderson, Jane; Low, Nicola; Elford, Jonathan

    2010-10-01

    Using findings from a qualitative investigation based on in-depth email interviews with 47 Black and South Asian gay men in Britain, this paper explores the cross-cutting identities and discourses in relation to being both gay and from an ethnic minority background. Taking an intersectional approach, detailed accounts of identity negotiation, cultural pressures, experiences of discrimination and exclusion and the relationship between minority ethnic gay men and mainstream White gay culture are presented and explored. The major findings common to both groups were: cultural barriers limiting disclosure of sexuality to family and wider social networks; experiences of discrimination by White gay men that included exclusion as well as objectification; a lack of positive gay role models and imagery relating to men from minority ethnic backgrounds. Among South Asian gay men, a major theme was regret at being unable to fulfil family expectations regarding marriage and children, while among Black gay men, there was a strong belief that same-sex behaviour subverted cultural notions related to how masculinity is configured. The paper concludes by highlighting the importance of social location, particularly education and income, when examining the intersection of ethnicity and sexuality in future research.

  14. The relation between women's body esteem and friendships with gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Nancy H; Patterson, Heather M; VanderLaan, Doug P; Vasey, Paul L

    2009-06-01

    Women who associate with gay men are often portrayed as physically unattractive and lacking in both self-confidence and attention from straight men. However, many women report enhanced self-esteem and feelings of attractiveness as a result of attention from their gay friends. It is well established that body esteem can be negatively impacted by certain peer processes, yet there is a dearth of quantitative research on positive peer influences on women's body esteem. We tested two hypotheses: (a) women with gay male friends have poor body esteem and are rejected by heterosexual men, and (b) more contact with gay men is positively related to body esteem. Participants were 154 heterosexual women, who completed measures of their friendships with gay men, straight men and women, body esteem, relationship involvement and break-ups. Results supported the hypothesis that women's body esteem, specifically feelings of sexual attractiveness, is positively associated with friendships with gay men.

  15. Gay- and Lesbian-Sounding Auditory Cues Elicit Stereotyping and Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasoli, Fabio; Maass, Anne; Paladino, Maria Paola; Sulpizio, Simone

    2017-07-01

    The growing body of literature on the recognition of sexual orientation from voice ("auditory gaydar") is silent on the cognitive and social consequences of having a gay-/lesbian- versus heterosexual-sounding voice. We investigated this issue in four studies (overall N = 276), conducted in Italian language, in which heterosexual listeners were exposed to single-sentence voice samples of gay/lesbian and heterosexual speakers. In all four studies, listeners were found to make gender-typical inferences about traits and preferences of heterosexual speakers, but gender-atypical inferences about those of gay or lesbian speakers. Behavioral intention measures showed that listeners considered lesbian and gay speakers as less suitable for a leadership position, and male (but not female) listeners took distance from gay speakers. Together, this research demonstrates that having a gay/lesbian rather than heterosexual-sounding voice has tangible consequences for stereotyping and discrimination.

  16. Sexual identity development among gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths: consistency and change over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Hunter, Joyce; Braun, Lisa

    2006-02-01

    A longitudinal report of 156 gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths examined changes in sexual identity over time. Fifty-seven percent of the youths remained consistently self-identified as gay/lesbian, 18% transited from bisexual to gay/lesbian, and 15% consistently identified as bisexual over time. Although youths who consistently identified as gay/lesbian did not differ from other youths on time since experiencing sexual developmental milestones, they reported current sexual orientation and sexual behaviors that were more same-sex centered and they scored higher on aspects of the identity integration process (e.g., more certain, comfortable, and accepting of their same-sex sexuality, more involved in gay-related social activities, more possessing of positive attitudes toward homosexuality, and more comfortable with others knowing about their sexuality) than youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity and youths who consistently identified as bisexual. Contrary to the hypothesis that females are more sexually fluid than males, female youths were less likely to change identities than male youths. The finding that youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity differed from consistently gay/lesbian youths suggests that identity integration continues after the adoption of a gay/lesbian sexual identity.

  17. Sexual Identity Development among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youths: Consistency and Change Over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce; Braun, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    A longitudinal report of 156 gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths examined changes in sexual identity over time. Fifty-seven percent of the youths remained consistently self-identified as gay/lesbian, 18% transited from bisexual to gay/lesbian, and 15% consistently identified as bisexual over time. Although youths who consistently identified as gay/lesbian did not differ from other youths on time since experiencing sexual developmental milestones, they reported current sexual orientation and sexual behaviors that were more same-sex centered and they scored higher on aspects of the identity integration process (e.g., more certain, comfortable, and accepting of their same-sex sexuality, more involved in gay-related social activities, more possessing of positive attitudes toward homosexuality, and more comfortable with others knowing about their sexuality) than youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity and youths who consistently identified as bisexual. Contrary to the hypothesis that females are more sexually fluid than males, female youths were less likely to change identities than male youths. The finding that youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity differed from consistently gay/lesbian youths suggests that identity integration continues after the adoption of a gay/lesbian sexual identity. PMID:16817067

  18. Sexual Positioning and Race-Based Attraction by Preferences for Social Dominance Among Gay Asian/Pacific Islander Men in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Judy Y.; Pratto, Felicia; Operario, Don; Dworkin, Shari L.

    2013-01-01

    For gay men in the United States, race/ethnicity has been demonstrated to factor importantly into sexual preferences, and race-based beliefs regarding certain racial groups are prevalent within the gay male community. For gay men of color, such beliefs may differentially influence their sexual preferences. Yet, little is known about the social-psychological factors underlying differences in sexual preferences among gay men of color. The present study examined how personal preferences for soci...

  19. Counseling Gay Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gerald P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a brief historical context for today's changing popular and professional attitudes. Some current counseling procedures used with adolescent homosexuals are discussed. The legal aspects of counseling gay adolescents conclude the article, followed by an annotated bibliography of suggested reading. (Author)

  20. Contextualizing Gay-straight Alliances: Student, Advisor, and Structural Factors Related to Positive Youth Development among Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V. Paul; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Calzo, Jerel P.; Gray, Mary L.; DiGiovanni, Craig D.; Lipkin, Arthur; Mundy-Shephard, Adrienne; Perrotti, Jeff; Scheer, Jillian R.; Shaw, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Gay-straight alliances (GSAs) may promote resilience. Yet, what GSA components predict well-being? Among 146 youth and advisors in 13 GSAs (58% lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning; 64% White; 38% received free/reduced-cost lunch), student (demographics, victimization, attendance frequency, leadership, support, control), advisor (years served,…

  1. Hepatitis vaccination of men who have sex with men at gay pride events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storholm, Erik David; Fisher, Dennis G; Reynolds, Grace L; Napper, Lucy E; Morrisse, Timothy A; Kochems, Lee M

    2010-06-01

    Prevention researchers have advocated primary prevention such as vaccination in alternative venues. However, there have been major questions about both the attendance of, and the ability to, vaccinate high-risk individuals in such settings. The current study seeks to assess the feasibility of vaccinating high-risk men who have sex with men (MSM) at Gay Pride events. The research questions are: Do gay men who are sampled at Gay Pride events engage in more or less risky behavior than gay men sampled at other venues? Do the gay men who receive hepatitis vaccinations at Gay Pride engage in more or less risky behavior than gay men at Gay Pride who do not receive hepatitis vaccination? Of the 3689 MSM that completed the Field Risk Assessment (FRA), 1095/3689 = 29.68% were recruited at either the 2006 or 2007 Long Beach, California Gay Pride events. The remaining, 2594/3689 = 70.32% were recruited at Long Beach gay bars, gay community organizations and institutions, and through street recruitment in various gay enclaves in the Long Beach area. Logistic regression analysis yielded eight factors that were associated with non-attendance of Gay Pride: Age, had sex while high in the last 12 months, had unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) in the last 12 months, had sex for drugs/money in the last 12 months, been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the last 12 months, used nitrites (poppers) in the last 12 months, and used methamphetamine in the last 12 months. Identifying as White, Asian, or African American compared to Hispanic was also associated with non-attendance. Bivariate analysis indicated that, of the MSM sampled at Gay Pride, 280/1095 = 25.57% received a hepatitis vaccination there. The MSM sampled at Gay Pride who reported engaging in UAI or having used any stimulant (cocaine, crack-cocaine, or methamphetamine) in the last 12 months were more likely to receive hepatitis vaccination on-site. The results provide evidence for the viability of

  2. The construction of men who are nurses as gay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Thomas

    2007-12-01

    This paper is a report of a study to examine the construction of the stereotype of male nurses as gay, and to describe how this discourse impacts on a group of New Zealand male nurses. A discourse stereotyping male nurses as gay is accompanied by one which privileges hegemonic masculinity and marginalizes homosexuality. This social constructionist study drew on data collected from existing texts on men, nursing and masculinity and interviews with 18 New Zealand men conducted in 2003-2004. Discourse analysis, informed by masculinity theory and queer theory, was used to analyse the data. Despite the participants' beliefs that the majority of male nurses are heterosexual, the stereotype persists. A paradox emerged between the 'homosexual' general nurse and the 'heterosexual' psychiatric nurse. The stigma associated with homosexuality exposes male nurses to homophobia in the workplace. The heterosexual men employed strategies to avoid the presumption of homosexuality; these included: avoiding contact with gay colleagues and overt expression of their heterosexuality. There is a paradox between widespread calls for men to participate more in caring and discourses which stereotype male nurses as gay and conflate homosexuality and sexual predation. These stigmatizing discourses create a barrier to caring and, aligned with the presence of homophobia in the workplace, deter men's entry into the profession and may be important issues with respect to their retention. Nurse educators must ensure that nurses are able to resist collusion with stigmatizing discourses that marginalize men (and women) in the profession through the perpetration of gender and sexual stereotypes.

  3. Body image in gay and straight men: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John F; Arcelus, Jon

    2009-11-01

    Recent research has emphasized vulnerability to eating disorders in gay men, with calls for research on causality, cultural factors and focus on a younger age cohort. This study aimed to examine body image and related eating behaviours in younger gay and straight men. Qualitative study using a sample of gay and straight male university students, applying audiotaped and transcribed depth interview subjected to interpretative phenomenological analysis. Fifteen young men (18-24) with a spectrum of sexual orientation (gay, straight and bisexual) agreed to participate. Five dominant categories emerged: body image ideal, external influences, perception of body image, dieting, mechanisms for modification (diet, exercise, cosmetics) and sexual orientation. Health and aesthetic ideals appear less divorced for young men than women, offering some degree of protection from eating disorders. Nonetheless there is widespread body dissatisfaction. Media and social influences are powerful, particularly for single gay men, but the study suggests fewer differences than similarities between gay and straight men. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  4. PERSEPSI GAY TERHADAP STIGMATISASI GAY OLEH PETUGAS KESEHATAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafi Sabila Rosyad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of gays in the community still makes heterosexual as normal sex orientation.Thereareunfair perceptionsof heterosexual group that develop into real behaviorswhicharevery detrimental for homosexuals group in the form of stigmatization against homosexuals.Stigmatization for gay in society also comes fromhealthprofessionals when they think homosexualsconduct violationto theruleof law,social andreligiousvalues.Therefore gays tend to visit certain healthcare providers who are familiar with them or to hide the identity that they are homosexuals.Objective:Todeterminetheperceptionsof gaysregarding gaystigmatizationofhealthcare providers.Methods:A qualitativeby using snowball samplingwith the total of 10participants was applied.TheConceptual Content CognitiveMap(3CMmethods followedby interviewwere utilized to gather data.Results:Six themesregarding gaystigmatizationofhealthcare as perceived by gays as follows: (1 gay isa divergence and contagious; (2 being gay is normal; (3 flamboyant and hedonist personality; (4 exclusiveand bad personality; (5 at high risk of sexually transmitted diseases, lack of self-control, and diseased; and(6 having good personality.Conclusion:Six themes with predominantly negative perceptions regarding stigmatization on gays byhealth careproviders as perceived by gays describe the need of transformation of health care service toincrease the quality of health of minor population like gay.

  5. Gay rights and affirmative action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorelli, J

    1994-01-01

    While affirmative action programs exist for a number of groups, little serious consideration has been given to the establishment of such programs for gay men and lesbians. This essay argues that many of the conditions that justify current affirmative action programs would also justify their extension to gay people, both in terms of compensation for injuries suffered and in terms of benefit to both individuals and society generally. It is argued that anti-discrimination policies are hard to enforce and in any case would be inadequate to redress many of the wrongs suffered by gays and lesbians. It is concluded that programs favoring gay visibility are morally justified.

  6. Consuming My Way Gay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Eichler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available As members of consumerist societies, we are socialized into what it means to be good citizens and participate in society through our consumption. For many, this is taught in the home, yet for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ individuals, home is often not a source of reliable information about our identities. As such, LGBTQ individuals turn to the marketplace to seek information about their sexual and gender identities. This autoethnographic account shares, through three vignettes, how coming out as a queer man is shaped by consumptive pedagogy—that is, learning through consumption. First, material goods are explored as the signifier of sexual orientation. Then, the gay bar as marketplace and the online marketplace for relationships are explored.

  7. End-stage renal disease in young black males in a black-white population: longitudinal analysis of the Bogalusa Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar Erwin A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risk factors in childhood create a life-long burden important in the development of cardiovascular (CV disease in adulthood. Many risk factors for CV disease (e.g., hypertension also increase the risk of renal disease. However, the importance of childhood risk factors on the development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD is not well characterized. Methods The current observations include data from Bogalusa Heart Study participants who were examined multiple times as children between 1973 and 1988. Results Through 2006, fifteen study participants subsequently developed ESRD in adulthood; seven with no known overt cause. Although the Bogalusa Heart Study population is 63% white and 37% black and 51% male and 49% female, all seven ESRD cases with no known overt cause were black males (p 2 among ESRD cases and 18.6 kg/m2 and 18.9 kg/m2 among black and white boys who didn't develop ESRD, respectively. Plasma glucose in childhood was not significantly associated with ESRD. Conclusion These data suggest black males have an increased risk of ESRD in young adulthood. Elevated body mass index and blood pressure in childhood may increase the risk for developing ESRD as young adults.

  8. Understanding him in STEM: Sharing the stories of African American male scholars in engineering academic programs at a predominantly White university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Robert E., III

    Globalization of the world economy has confirmed the need for citizens to exemplify competitive capacities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. Since the 1970s, American higher education has seen increasing numbers of students entering college but has witnessed a decline in the number of students enrolling in STEM programs. African American men fall behind other students in regards to academic performance, persistence, and success throughout primary, secondary, and tertiary schooling. Accordingly, participation of African American men in STEM disciplines is low in comparison to White males and other race groups. Various factors have been identified as contributing to the academic failures of Black men. Poor academic and social preparedness, racial identity issues, institutional climates, negative stereotypes, and fear of success have been cited as potential contributors to the relative invisibility of African American men in STEM disciplines. This study explores the life stories of five African American male scholars in the college of engineering at a predominantly white university. The goal of the qualitative investigation is to help university faculty and administrators understand the institutional, interpersonal, and collective mechanisms influencing the success identities of African American male undergraduates in STEM academic programs. Understanding the lived experiences of this population may help universities innovate stronger supports for men of color in college and broaden the borders for all students interested in STEM careers.

  9. The white blood cell count : its relationship to plasma insulin and other cardiovascular risk factors in healthy male individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Targher, G; Seidell, J C; Tonoli, M; Muggeo, M; de Sandre, G; Cigolini, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the relationships of total and differential white blood cell (WBC) count to the components of the so-called insulin resistance syndrome. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN: The study population consisted of a random sample of 90 38-year-old healthy men with normal glucose tolerance.

  10. Maternal obesity enhances white adipose tissue differentiation and alters genome-scale DNA methylation in male rat offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    The risk of obesity in adulthood is strongly influenced by maternal body composition. Here we examined the hypothesis that maternal obesity influences white adipose tissue (WAT) transcriptome and increases propensity for adipogenesis in the offspring, prior to the development of obesity, using an es...

  11. The role of adolescent behaviors in the female-male disparity in obesity incidence in US black and white young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Whitney R; Stevens, June; Kaufman, Jay S; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2010-07-01

    In the United States, black women are at much greater risk for obesity than black men. We explored whether adolescent behaviors (family dinners, hours of television, playing sports with mother, playing sports with father, bouts of physical activity) were associated with gender disparity in 6-year obesity incidence in young adulthood. We used data from the nationally representative National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to examine adolescent behaviors in nonimmigrant black (n = 1,503) and white (n = 4,452) youths in 1994-95 (aged 11-19 years) and 1995-96 (aged 12-20). We assessed gender disparity in obesity incidence (female incidence minus male incidence) during young adulthood (2001-02; aged 18-26). Standardized gender disparities were calculated using race- and gender-stratified, covariate-adjusted logistic regression models in which males and females were set to the same distributions of adolescent behaviors. In adolescence, black females reported less leisure-time physical activity and lower likelihood of playing sports with either parent compared with black males. Setting adolescent behaviors equal for black males and females did not reduce the estimated gender disparity in obesity incidence (nonstandardized: 9.8 percentage points (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.5, 15.1); fully standardized: 10.2 percentage points (5.2, 15.2)). There was little gender disparity in whites before or after adjustments. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine to what extent behavioral differences during adolescence might account for gender disparity in obesity incidence in black young adults. Male-female differences in these adolescent behaviors did not appear to underlie the gender gap in young adult obesity.

  12. [Study on the causes of sexual orientation of gay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-hui; Bao, Yu-gang; Chen, Hao; Tan, Hong-zhuan

    2013-11-01

    To explore the relevant factors of the causes of sexual orientations of gay. From March to June 2013, 350 gays were recruited from one music bar and three bath centers where gays frequently visited in Changsha city, by proportional stratified sampling method. Meanwhile, another 332 males who identify themselves as non-homosexuality were also recruited considering the composition of ages, gender and educational background. Questionnaire survey was conducted to all the subjects, with 300 effective ones reclaimed. The questionnaire included the general demographic information, traits of character, the condition of foster in childhood and information of family members. The differences between the gays and non-homosexuality groups were analyzed to explore the causes of the sexual orientations of gays. There were statistical significant differences between gays and non- homosexuality group on following indexes (χ(2) was 59.63, 5.90, 16.01, 84.99, 161.57, 77.77, 112.32, 190.84, 30.10 respectively, all of P sexual abuse before the age of 18 (e.g. forced to expose private parts or forced to have sex) by adults, had read or watched books or films about homosexual and experienced sexual pleasure from that before the age of 18. The rate of gays on these indexes was separately 62.3% (187/300), 57.7% (173/300) , 62.3% (187/300) , 63.0% (189/300), 67.3% (202/300) , 62.7% (189/300), 68.0% (204/300), 65.0% (195/300) and the rate on these indexes of non-homosexuality group was separately 21.3% (64/300), 28.0% (84/300) , 25.0% (75/300) , 12.7% (38/300), 31.3% (94/300), 17.7% (53/300) , 12.7% (38/300), 42.7% (128/300) . The rate of gays on these factors:the youngest boy in family, had the father or twin brothers who were homosexual or self identified as gay was 62.7% (188/300), 56.0% (168/300) and 62.0% (18/29) respectively; and the rate was 40.7% (122/300), 4.0% (12/300) and 20.0% (2/10), respectively among non-homosexuality group. The difference showed statistical significance (

  13. Diverse artikelen in Gay Amsterdam News

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekma, G.

    2002-01-01

    Vernedering, in: Gay Amsterdam News 125 (jan 2002), pp. 20-21; Webseks, zaad, zweetseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 126 (feb 2002), pp. 30-31; Wurgseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 127 (mrt 2002), pp. 30-31; Wijnandus Johannes Sengers (1927-2002), in: Gay Amsterdam News 133 (sept 2002), pp. 49.

  14. Gay bashing - a rite of passage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, T.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Most of what is known about the perpetrators of anti-gay violence is reported by victims of such violence. None the less, it is obvious from such reports that 'gay bashers' are overwhelmingly young men who operate in groups, sometimes at gay cruising sites or near gay bars. Drawing on finding from

  15. Gender-role's attitude, perceived similarity, and sexual prejudice against gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falomir-Pichastor, Juan Manuel; Martínez, Carmen; Paterna, Consuelo

    2010-11-01

    Two hundred and twenty-six heterosexual participants (115 women and 111 men) were asked to indicate their attitude toward gender-roles, their perceived similarities with gay men, and their attitude toward gay men (i.e., sexual prejudice). As expected, male participants showed more sexual prejudice than female participants, and perceived dissimilarities were related to a greater sexual prejudice. Support for gender-roles was related to sexual prejudice for male participants, but not for female participants. More interestingly, the three-way interaction suggested that perceived similarities moderated the link between gender-roles and sexual prejudice among heterosexual men, but not among heterosexual women. Attitude in favor of traditional gender-roles was related to sexual prejudice for male participants who perceived gay men as different, but not for those who perceived gay men as similar. These findings are discussed in terms of the defensive function of men's attitude toward homosexuality as a result of threat to masculinity.

  16. Why Parenthood, and Why Now?: Gay Men’s Motivations for Pursuing Parenthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Downing, Jordan B.; Moyer, April M.

    2011-01-01

    The current qualitative study of 35 pre-adoptive gay male couples (70 men) examined gay men’s motivations to parent and their reasons for pursuing parenthood at the current time. Similar to heterosexual couples, gay men described a range of psychologically-oriented reasons as shaping their decision to become parents. Some of these (e.g., desire to teach a child tolerance) may have been uniquely shaped by their sexual minority status, and others (e.g., desire to give a child a good home) in part reflect their adoptive status. Men named age, finances, and relationship factors, as well as unique contextual factors such as the need to find and move to gay-friendly neighborhoods, as influencing their readiness to pursue parenthood at the current time. Gay men’s motivations to parent echo normative life course decision-making processes, but also reflect concerns that are uniquely informed by their sexual minority status. PMID:22563135

  17. Entrevista a Gaye Tuchman

    OpenAIRE

    Tuchman, Gaye; Rosa, Gonçalo Pereira

    2010-01-01

    A socióloga Gaye Tuchman esteve em Portugal a 20 de Outubro de 2009, a convite da Fundação Luso-Americana para o Desenvolvimento (FLAD), onde deu uma palestra sobre as «Mudanças nas Universidades Americanas». Esta investigadora da Universidade de Connecticut, com trabalho reconhecido no campo da sociologia do jornalismo e da sociologia do género, abordou o seu legado sobre a evolução do conhecimento nestas áreas e estabeleceu balizas para a investigação futura.

  18. Sociodemographic Characteristics and Health Outcomes Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual U.S. Adults Using Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wanjun; Zack, Matthew M.; Thompson, William W.; Blank, Michael B.; Yehia, Baligh R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: This study aimed to characterize the sociodemographic characteristics of sexual minority (i.e., gay, lesbian, bisexual) adults and compare sexual minority and heterosexual populations on nine Healthy People 2020 leading health indicators (LHIs). Methods: Using a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey (National Health Interview Survey 2013–2015) of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population (228,893,944 adults), nine Healthy People 2020 LHIs addressing health behaviors and access to care, stratified using a composite variable of sex (female, male) and sexual orientation (gay or lesbian, bisexual, heterosexual), were analyzed individually and in aggregate. Results: In 2013–2015, sexual minority adults represented 2.4% of the U.S. population. Compared to heterosexuals, sexual minorities were more likely to be younger and to have never married. Gays and lesbians were more likely to have earned a graduate degree. Gay males were more likely to have a usual primary care provider, but gay/lesbian females were less likely than heterosexuals to have a usual primary care provider and health insurance. Gay males received more colorectal cancer screening than heterosexual males. Gay males, gay/lesbian females, and bisexual females were more likely to be current smokers than their sex-matched, heterosexual counterparts. Binge drinking was more common in bisexuals compared to heterosexuals. Sexual minority females were more likely to be obese than heterosexual females; the converse was true for gay males. Sexual minorities underwent more HIV testing than their heterosexual peers, but bisexual males were less likely than gay males to be tested. Gay males were more likely to meet all eligible LHIs than heterosexual males. Overall, more sexual minority adults met all eligible LHIs compared to heterosexual adults. Similar results were found regardless of HIV testing LHI inclusion. Conclusion: Differences between sexual minorities and heterosexuals

  19. Degradation of male and female rufous-and-white wren songs in a tropical forest: effects of sex, perch height, and habitat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, Nicole K.S.; Dabelsteen, Torben; Mennill, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    We performed a song transmission experiment to investigate the effects of distance, song post height, receiver perch height, signaller sex, and microhabitat on song degradation in rufous-and-white wrens (Thryothorus rufalbus), a neotropical duetting songbird. We quantified the effects of these fa......We performed a song transmission experiment to investigate the effects of distance, song post height, receiver perch height, signaller sex, and microhabitat on song degradation in rufous-and-white wrens (Thryothorus rufalbus), a neotropical duetting songbird. We quantified the effects...... of these factors on excess attenuation, signal-to-noise ratio, tail-to-signal ratio, and blur ratio of male and female songs. As expected, song degradation increased with distance between signaller and receiver. Songs transmitted best when emitted from moderate heights (5-7 m), although this pattern varied....... Rufous-and-white wren songs appeared more attenuated in open field than forest habitats, but microhabitat conditions within the forests exerted a strong influence on song degradation. These findings match previous studies showing an effect of distance, song post height, and habitat, but contrast...

  20. Gay guys using gay language: friendship, shared values and the intent-context-effect matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Mark; Wignall, Liam; Morris, Max

    2016-12-01

    This article draws on in-depth interviews with 35 openly gay male undergraduates from four universities in England to develop an understanding of the changing nature of language related to homosexuality. In addition to finding a diminution in the prevalence of homophobic language, we demonstrate that participants maintain complex and nuanced understandings of phrases that do not use homophobic pejoratives, such as 'that's so gay'. The majority of participants rejected the notion that these phrases are inherently homophobic, instead arguing that the intent with which they are said and the context in which they are used are vital in understanding their meaning and effect. We conceptualize an intent-context-effect matrix to understand the interdependency of these variables. Highlighting the situated nature of this matrix, we also demonstrate the importance of the existence of shared norms between those saying and hearing the phrase when interpreting such language. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2016.

  1. Differentiating selves: middle-aged gay men in Manchester's less visible 'homospaces'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Scholarship on gay bars/'villages' has overshadowed study of 'homospaces' (gay fields of existence) less available/inaccessible to a wider public - websites, saunas and social/support groups. Based on interviews with 27 men aged 39-61 living in Manchester, this article addresses what middle-aged gay men's accounts of these particular homospaces say about their experiences of age/ageing and how relations of ageism work within them. Specifically, I focus on how study participants use 'ageing capital' in these fields to differentiate themselves from their younger counterparts in three ways. First, ageing capital is implicated in capitulation to gay ageism and a reverse ageism - visible in accounts of differentiation from the 'superficial,' reckless ways of sexualized space that participants associated with younger gay men. Second, it was visible in accounts of resistance to/questioning of gay ageism - strategies that could make sexualized homospaces more habitable. Third, ageing capital was implicated in negotiation with ageing/gay ageism - visible in ambivalent stances hovering between compliance and resistance - towards ageing and ageism, which could reinforce constraints on uses/display of the body. The first and third accounts indicate the multidirectional character of gay ageism, limits on the deployment on ageing capital and show how middle-aged men can undermine their generational claims to represent a more authentic form of gay male embodiment. En route, I also complicate stereotypical thinking that gay social/support groups represent more inclusive, empowering space whilst overtly sexualized spaces of the 'gay scene' represent the opposite. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  2. A special kind of married man: notions of marriage and married men in the Swedish gay press, 1954–1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosqvist, Hanna Bertilsdotter

    2012-01-01

    There has long been ambivalence in the LGBT movement and related research as to the meaning of gay identity in relation to marriage. The article explores changing homonormative discourses of marriage and married men within the Swedish gay press from the mid 1950s to the mid 1980s. Expressions of the changes are a shift in language and in views of extramarital relationships, openness, and gay male identity. As a result of the shift, “married men,” including both “married homosexuals” and “bisexuals,” came to be distinguished from “gays.”

  3. EFFECTIVITY OF EXTRACT RED BETEL LEAF (Piper crocatum WITH WEIGHT INCREASE OF MALE WHITE MICE (Rattus novergicus IN CONDUTION DIABETES WHICH INDUCE ALLOXAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nengah Kerta Besung

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this research is to learn the level of effectiveness of ethanol extract from red betel leaf (Piper crocatum within increase weight of male white mouse in condition for diabetes mellitus. 20 male white mice (Rattus novergicus in 3 mounth with weight between 190-250 gram which adapted during 2 weeks. It classified to be 5 groups random, each group consisty by 4 mice. The first treatment as a negative control (healty mouse whitout giving treatment. The second treatment as alloxan positive control, the third treatment alloxan added by 2% suspension of ethaol extract from red betel leaf (dose 100 mg/kg bb per oral. The fifth treatment is alloxan added by 0.02% suspension glibenclamide (dose 1 ml/kg bb per oral. Giving extract betel leaf is done by oral with used sonde. Giving treatment at treatment III, IV and V is done everyday start from day 3 until the end of the day (21 day. The weight of mouse is measure at day 7, 14 and day 21 used analytical balanced. The result of this research show up that giving 2% ethanol extract from red betel leaf (Piper crocatum with dose (50 mg/kg bb, dose (100 mg/kg bb and glibenclamide 0,02% ( 1 ml/kg bb with significant can increase weight (P<0,05 of white mice which induce alloxan. Result of this research could be conclude that ethanol extract of red betel leaf (Piper crocatum can used for increase the weight.

  4. Antecedents of Intimate Partner Violence Among Gay and Bisexual Men

    OpenAIRE

    Finneran, Catherine; Stephenson, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Examinations of gay and bisexual men’s (GBM) perceptions of intimate partner violence (IPV), including their perceptions of events likely to precipitate IPV, are lacking. Focus group discussions with GBM (n = 83) yielded 24 unique antecedents, or triggers, of IPV in male–male relationships. Venue-recruited survey participants (n = 700) identified antecedents that were likely to cause partner violence in male–male relationships, including antecedents GBM-specific currently absent from the lite...

  5. Counselors' gender and clinical bias against gay men

    OpenAIRE

    品川, 由佳

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated whether counselors exhibited a clinical bias against gay men by examining counselors' clinical judgments and attitudes regarding male clients, as well as counselor variables such as homophobia. Counselors (n = 98) in graduate schools watched a videotape of a male client actor in one of two conditions (homosexual or heterosexual) and rated the client on several clinical dimensions by completing a questionnaire. Then the counselors' homophobia was measured using a separa...

  6. Social media use and HIV transmission risk behavior among ethnically diverse HIV-positive gay men: results of an online study in three U.S. states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfield, Sabina; Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Anderson, Ian; Chiasson, Mary Ann

    2015-10-01

    Though Black and Hispanic men who have sex with men (MSM) are at an increased risk for HIV, few HIV risk reduction interventions that target HIV-positive MSM, and even fewer that use technology, have been designed to target these groups. Despite similar rates of social media and technology use across racial/ethnic groups, online engagement of minority MSM for HIV prevention efforts is low. Since minority MSM tend to have less representation in online HIV prevention studies, the goals of this online anonymous study of HIV-positive gay-identified men were to test the feasibility of conducting targeted recruitment by race/ethnicity and sexual orientation, to assess technology and social media use, and to assess global HIV transmission risk. In 2011, an anonymous online survey was conducted among 463 members of an HIV-positive personals website. Emails were sent to a subset of HIV-positive male members who self-identified as gay. While 57 % were White, substantial proportions of participants were Black (20 %) or Hispanic (18 %). Median age was 46 (range 18-79). Men who reported using 3 or more websites or apps to meet sex partners were significantly more likely to report anal intercourse (AOR 4.43, p social media use, and sexual risk among a diverse sample of HIV-positive gay men. Efficacy trials of technology-based HIV prevention interventions targeting high-risk minority HIV-positive MSM are warranted.

  7. Handedness is a biomarker of variation in anal sex role behavior and Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity among gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Coome, Lindsay A; Monks, D Ashley; VanderLaan, Doug P

    2017-01-01

    Developmental theories of the biological basis of sexual orientation suggest that sexually differentiated psychological and behavioural traits should be linked with sexual orientation. Subgroups of gay men delineated by anal sex roles differ according to at least one such trait: gender expression. The present study assessed the hypothesis that handedness, a biologically determined sexually differentiated trait, corresponds to differences in subgroups of gay men based on anal sex role. Furthermore, it assessed whether handedness mediates the association between gender nonconformity and male sexual orientation. Straight and gay men (N = 333) completed the Edinburgh Inventory of Handedness and the Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity Scale. Gay men also completed measures of anal sex role preference. As in previous studies, gay men showed greater non-right-handedness and gender nonconformity than straight men. Also, among gay men, bottoms/versatiles (i.e., gay men who take a receptive anal sex role, or who take on both a receptive and insertive anal sex role) were more gender-nonconforming than tops (i.e., gay men who take an insertive anal sex role). In support of the hypothesis, bottoms/versatiles were more non-right-handed than tops and handedness mediated the male sexual orientation and anal sex role differences in Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity. Together, these findings suggest that developmental processes linked to handedness underpin variation among men in sexual orientation and gender nonconformity as well as variation among subgroups of gay men that are delineated by anal sex roles.

  8. Handedness is a biomarker of variation in anal sex role behavior and Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity among gay men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlyn Swift-Gallant

    Full Text Available Developmental theories of the biological basis of sexual orientation suggest that sexually differentiated psychological and behavioural traits should be linked with sexual orientation. Subgroups of gay men delineated by anal sex roles differ according to at least one such trait: gender expression. The present study assessed the hypothesis that handedness, a biologically determined sexually differentiated trait, corresponds to differences in subgroups of gay men based on anal sex role. Furthermore, it assessed whether handedness mediates the association between gender nonconformity and male sexual orientation. Straight and gay men (N = 333 completed the Edinburgh Inventory of Handedness and the Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity Scale. Gay men also completed measures of anal sex role preference. As in previous studies, gay men showed greater non-right-handedness and gender nonconformity than straight men. Also, among gay men, bottoms/versatiles (i.e., gay men who take a receptive anal sex role, or who take on both a receptive and insertive anal sex role were more gender-nonconforming than tops (i.e., gay men who take an insertive anal sex role. In support of the hypothesis, bottoms/versatiles were more non-right-handed than tops and handedness mediated the male sexual orientation and anal sex role differences in Recalled Childhood Gender Nonconformity. Together, these findings suggest that developmental processes linked to handedness underpin variation among men in sexual orientation and gender nonconformity as well as variation among subgroups of gay men that are delineated by anal sex roles.

  9. Smoking behavior, intention to quit, and preferences toward cessation programs among gay men in Zurich, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwappach, David L B

    2008-12-01

    International data show that the prevalence of smoking is high among gay males. The need for tailored smoking cessation support has been widely acknowledged, but little is known about gay men's preferences toward culturally-adopted interventions. We investigated preferences toward tailored group programs in a survey study among a sample of gay smokers living in the urban community of Zurich, Switzerland. Preferences were assessed using vignettes describing alternative services randomized over participants. Men that self-defined as gay or bisexual completed the survey (N = 379). Responders smoked on average 20 cigarettes per day (CI 18.9-21.5) and the mean nicotine dependence score was 4.6 (CI 4.3-4.9). Men strongly preferred group cessation programs for gay men over generic programs, and services provided by the local gay health care provider over those offered by the traditional course provider. The data suggest that offering tailored programs will increase participation in cessation services. Results emphasize the need for culturally-adopted cessation interventions that provide men strategies for participating in recreational activities as nonsmokers. Gay health care organizations serve as important door openers to communicate the serious health threats for gay men caused by smoking, and may play an important role in attracting men to cessation services.

  10. Navigating the Path toward Graduation: A Qualitative Case Study of African American Male Persistence at a Predominantly White Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Lamont D.

    2013-01-01

    While higher education personnel continue to be challenged in fostering student persistence, they are especially perplexed with how to promote higher persistence and retention rates among African American men. The purpose of this qualitative research study was to understand how African American male undergraduate students persist at a…

  11. Deaths in the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender United Kingdom communities associated with GHB and precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkery, John M; Loi, Barbara; Claridge, Hugh; Goodair, Christine; Schifano, Fabrizio

    2017-11-08

    Background Misuse of gammahydroxybutrate (GHB) and its prodrugs gammabutyrolactone (GBL) and 1,4 butanediol (1,4-BD) has increased greatly since the early 1990s, particularly amongst lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals in recreational and sexual settings, e.g. 'chemsex'. Objective and method This paper presents an overview of GHB pharmacotoxicology and provides analyses of cases in the LGBT population associated with use of these substances extracted from the UK's National Programme on Substance Abuse Deaths database, to which notification is voluntary. Results From 1995 to September 2013, 21 GHB/GBL-associated fatalities were reported. None involved 1,4-BD. Typical victims were: Male (100%); White (67%), young (mean age 34 years); employed (90%); with a drug misuse history (81%). Most deaths were accidental (67%) or related to recreational drug use (19%), the remaining (potential) suicides. The majority of fatalities (83%) occurred in private residences, typically following recreational use; others occurred in specific 'gay'-oriented locales including clubs and saunas. Three London boroughs accounted for 62% of all notified deaths, reflecting the concentration of both resident and visiting 'gay' individuals. However, this may be an artefact of the voluntary nature of the data submission procedure in particular areas. GHB/GBL alone was implicated in 10% of fatalities. The following substances were implicated either alone or in combination in the remaining cases (percentages may add to more than 100%): cocaine (38%); alcohol (33%); amphetamines (29%); ecstasy (29%); diazepam (24%); ketamine (24%); mephedrone (24%). Post-mortem blood levels: mean 660 (range 22 - 2335; S.D. 726) mg/L. Conclusions Significant caution is needed when ingesting GHB/GBL, particularly with alcohol, benzodiazepines, stimulants, and ketamine. Risk of death is increased due to their CNS-depressant properties. Of these, 'chemsex' drugs such as cocaine, mephedrone and

  12. White-crowned sparrow males show immediate flexibility in song amplitude but not in song minimum frequency in response to changes in noise levels in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derryberry, Elizabeth P; Gentry, Katherine; Derryberry, Graham E; Phillips, Jennifer N; Danner, Raymond M; Danner, Julie E; Luther, David A

    2017-07-01

    The soundscape acts as a selective agent on organisms that use acoustic signals to communicate. A number of studies document variation in structure, amplitude, or timing of signal production in correspondence with environmental noise levels thus supporting the hypothesis that organisms are changing their signaling behaviors to avoid masking. The time scale at which organisms respond is of particular interest. Signal structure may evolve across generations through processes such as cultural or genetic transmission. Individuals may also change their behavior during development (ontogenetic change) or in real time (i.e., immediate flexibility). These are not mutually exclusive mechanisms, and all must be investigated to understand how organisms respond to selection pressures from the soundscape. Previous work on white-crowned sparrows ( Zonotrichia leucophrys ) found that males holding territories in louder areas tend to sing higher frequency songs and that both noise levels and song frequency have increased over time (30 years) in urban areas. These previous findings suggest that songs are changing across generations; however, it is not known if this species also exhibits immediate flexibility. Here, we conducted an exploratory, observational study to ask whether males change the minimum frequency of their song in response to immediate changes in noise levels. We also ask whether males sing louder, as increased minimum frequency may be physiologically linked to producing sound at higher amplitudes, in response to immediate changes in environmental noise. We found that territorial males adjust song amplitude but not minimum frequency in response to changes in environmental noise levels. Our results suggest that males do not show immediate flexibility in song minimum frequency, although experimental manipulations are needed to test this hypothesis further. Our work highlights the need to investigate multiple mechanisms of adaptive response to soundscapes.

  13. “Si Nicaragua Venció”: Lesbian and Gay Solidarity with the Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K. Hobson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the radical imagination of lesbian and gay activism in solidarity with the Nicaraguan Revolution. It examines the reasons US lesbian and gay radicals supported that revolution and investigates the ways that homoerotic, especially lesbian, desire shaped their solidarity. Drawing on Herbert Marcuse and Michel Foucault, the article argues that lesbian and gay radicals viewed the Nicaraguan Revolution in erotic and heterotopic terms. Posters, fliers, and interviews reveal that US activists, people of color and white, represented the Revolution and solidarity through tropes of female masculinity and women’s affection. Many Nicaraguan lesbians and gay men shared these nonnormative images of socialist change. Yet while Nicaraguans claimed Sandinismo as their own, for US activists revolution remained a distant object of desire and solidarity a “seduction,” “crush,” or embrace.  United States activists who embraced developmentalist views of Latin American sexualities remained unable to witness lesbian and gay life inside Nicaragua, while lesbian and gay Sandinistas kept silent about FSLN homophobia so as not to undermine solidarity against the Contra war. Desire served as a powerful tool for mobilizing transnational solidarity. By failing to examine desire critically, however, US activists limited their communications with Nicaraguan lesbians and gay men and weakened the relationship they sought with revolution itself.

  14. Measure of internalized sexual stigma for lesbians and gay men: a new scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingiardi, Vittorio; Baiocco, Roberto; Nardelli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is to propose a new Measure of Internalized Sexual Stigma for Lesbians and Gay Men (MISS-LG) that assesses three dimensions of internalized homonegativity: identity, social discomfort, and sexuality. A convenience sample of 735 Italian lesbians and gay male participants was used to demonstrate the psychometric validity of the scale. Results of confirmatory factor analysis supported three identifiable factors reflecting theoretically based constructs of the MISS-LG. The correlations with other instruments demonstrate the convergent validity: lesbian and gay participants with high internalized sexual stigma describe lower levels of self-disclosure and wellbeing. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  15. Lesbians and Gay Men's Vacation Motivations, Perceptions, and Constraints: A Study of Cruise Vacation Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Clare; Lester, Jo-Anne; Jarvis, Nigel

    2016-08-01

    This study explores the push-pull vacation motivations of gay male and lesbian consumers and examines how these underpin their perceptions and purchase constraints of a mainstream and LGBT(1) cruise. Findings highlight a complex vacation market. Although lesbians and gay men share many of the same travel motivations as their heterosexual counterparts, the study reveals sexuality is a significant variable in their perception of cruise vacations, which further influences purchase constraints and destination choice. Gay men have more favorable perceptions than lesbians of both mainstream and LGBT cruises. The article recommends further inquiry into the multifaceted nature of motivations, perception, and constraints within the LGBT market in relation to cruise vacations.

  16. Intersecting Race and Gender Cues are Associated with Perceptions of Gay Men's Preferred Sexual Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lick, David J; Johnson, Kerri L

    2015-07-01

    Preferences for anal sex roles (top/bottom) are an important aspect of gay male identity, but scholars have only recently begun to explore the factors that covary with these preferences. Here, we argue that the gendered nature of both racial stereotypes (i.e., Black men are masculine, Asian men are feminine) and sexual role stereotypes (i.e., tops are masculine, bottoms are feminine) link the categories Asian/bottom and the categories Black/top. We provide empirical evidence for these claims at three levels of analysis: At the cultural level based upon gay men's stereotypic beliefs about others (Study 1), at the interpersonal level based upon gay men's perceptions of others' sexual role preferences (Study 2), and at the intrapersonal level based upon racially diverse men's self-reported sexual roles on a public hookup website (Study 3). These studies offer the first systematic evidence of linkages between race categories and sexual roles in gay male communities.

  17. Dating violence experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dank, Meredith; Lachman, Pamela; Zweig, Janine M; Yahner, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Media attention and the literature on lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth overwhelmingly focus on violence involving hate crimes and bullying, while ignoring the fact that vulnerable youth also may be at increased risk of violence in their dating relationships. In this study, we examine physical, psychological, sexual, and cyber dating violence experiences among lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth--as compared to those of heterosexual youth, and we explore variations in the likelihood of help-seeking behavior and the presence of particular risk factors among both types of dating violence victims. A total of 5,647 youth (51 % female, 74 % White) from 10 schools participated in a cross-sectional anonymous survey, of which 3,745 reported currently being in a dating relationship or having been in one during the prior year. Results indicated that lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth are at higher risk for all types of dating violence victimization (and nearly all types of dating violence perpetration), compared to heterosexual youth. Further, when looking at gender identity, transgender and female youth are at highest risk of most types of victimization, and are the most likely perpetrators of all forms of dating violence but sexual coercion, which begs further exploration. The findings support the development of dating violence prevention programs that specifically target the needs and vulnerabilities of lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth, in addition to those of female and transgender youth.

  18. Gerak Progresif Gerakan Gay Kontemporer di Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wigke Capriati

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Gay as a social phenomenon has increasingly apparent and attracts many social scientists. Among other area, gay movement in Yogyakarta has demonstrated a vibrant and progressive movement. However, gay movement in Yogyakarta is not growing without challenges. Since it first appearaizce in 1980s, gay movement in Yogyakarta has been evolved substantively in terms of size, approach, and magnitude. Based on close observation and interview with gay activists in Yogyakarta, this paper aims to figure out the nature of gay movement in Yogyakarta and describes their struggle for coexistence among social communities in Yogyakarta.

  19. Photoperiod mediated changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Walton

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD and short day lengths (SD for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus.

  20. Fenofibrate (PPARalpha agonist) induces beige cell formation in subcutaneous white adipose tissue from diet-induced male obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachid, Tamiris Lima; Penna-de-Carvalho, Aline; Bringhenti, Isabele; Aguila, Marcia B; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos A; Souza-Mello, Vanessa

    2015-02-15

    Browning is characterized by the formation of beige/brite fat depots in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT). This study aimed to examine whether the chronic activation of PPARalpha by fenofibrate could induce beige cell depots in the sWAT of diet-induced obese mice. High-fat fed animals presented overweight, insulin resistance and displayed adverse sWAT remodeling. Fenofibrate significantly attenuated these parameters. Treated groups demonstrated active UCP-1 beige cell clusters within sWAT, confirmed through higher gene expression of PPARalpha, PPARbeta, PGC1alpha, BMP8B, UCP-1, PRDM16 and irisin in treated groups. PPARalpha activation seems to be pivotal to trigger browning through irisin induction and UCP-1 transcription, indicating that fenofibrate increased the expression of genes typical of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in the sWAT, characterizing the formation of beige cells. These findings put forward a possible role of PPARalpha as a promising therapeutic for metabolic diseases via beige cell induction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Expressive writing for gay-related stress: psychosocial benefits and mechanisms underlying improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachankis, John E; Goldfried, Marvin R

    2010-02-01

    This study tested the effectiveness of an expressive writing intervention for gay men on outcomes related to psychosocial functioning. Seventy-seven gay male college students (mean age = 20.19 years, SD = 1.99) were randomly assigned to write for 20 min a day for 3 consecutive days about either (a) the most stressful or traumatic gay-related event in their lives or (b) a neutral topic. We tested an exposure-based hypothesis of written emotional expression by asking half of the participants who were assigned to write about gay-related stress to read their previous day's narrative before writing, whereas the other half did not. Posttest and 3-month follow-up outcomes were assessed with common measures of overall psychological distress, depression, physical health symptoms, and positive and negative affect. Gay-specific social functioning was assessed with measures of gay-related rejection sensitivity, gay-specific self-esteem, and items regarding openness and comfort with one's sexual orientation. Participants who wrote about gay-related stress, regardless of whether they read their previous day's writing, reported significantly greater openness with their sexual orientation 3 months following writing than participants who wrote about a neutral topic, F(1, 74) = 6.66, p writing, severity of the expressed topic, previous disclosure of writing topic, tendency to conceal, and level of perceived social support on mental health outcomes. The findings suggest that an expressive writing task targeting gay-related stress can improve gay men's psychosocial functioning, especially openness with sexual orientation. The intervention seems to be particularly beneficial for those men who write about more severe topics and for those with lower levels of social support. The findings suggest future tests of expressive writing tasks for different aspects of stigma-related stress.

  2. Childhood Risk Factors Associated With Adolescent Gun Carrying Among Black and White Males: An Examination of Self-Protection, Social Influence, and Antisocial Propensity Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardslee, Jordan; Docherty, Meagan; Mulvey, Edward; Schubert, Carol; Pardini, Dustin

    2017-11-27

    Adolescent gun violence is a serious public health issue that disproportionately affects young Black males. Although it has been postulated that differential exposure to childhood risk factors might account for racial differences in adolescent gun carrying, no longitudinal studies have directly examined this issue. We examined whether childhood risk factors indexing neighborhood crime, peer delinquency, and conduct problems predicted the initiation of adolescent gun carrying among a community sample of Black and White boys. Analyses then examined whether racial differences in risk factors accounted for racial differences in gun carrying. Data came from a sample of 485 Black and White boys who were repeatedly assessed from 2nd grade until age 18. Multi-informant data collected across the first 3 years of the study were used to assess neighborhood crime, peer delinquency, and conduct problems. Illegal gun carrying was assessed annually from 5th grade through age 18. Growth curve analyses indicated that children with higher initial levels of conduct problems and delinquent peer involvement, as well as those who increased in conduct problems across childhood, were more likely to carry a gun prior to age 18. Black boys were also more likely to carry guns than Whites. Racial differences were greatly reduced, but not eliminated, after controlling for initial levels of conduct problems and delinquent peer involvement. Findings suggest that early prevention programs designed to reduce adolescent gun violence (including racial disparities in gun violence) should target boys with severe conduct problems and those who affiliate with delinquent peers during elementary school. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Stigma, Social Context, and Mental Health: Lesbian and Gay Couples Across the Transition to Adoptive Parenthood

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first study to examine change in depression and anxiety across the first year of adoptive parenthood in same-sex couples (90 couples: 52 lesbian, 38 gay male). Given that sexual minorities uniquely contend with sexual orientation-related stigma, this study examined how both internalized and enacted forms of stigma affect the mental health of lesbians and gay men during the transition to parenthood. In addition, the role of contextual support was examined. Higher perceived workplac...

  4. Eating attitudes, body image satisfaction and self-esteem of South African Black and White male adolescents and their perception of female body silhouettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitau, Tabither M; Micklesfield, Lisa K; Pettifor, John M; Norris, Shane A

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study of urban high schools in Johannesburg, South Africa, sought to examine eating attitudes, body image and self-esteem among male adolescents (n = 391). Anthropometric measurements, Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26), Rosenberg self-esteem, body image satisfaction and perception of females were collected at age 13, 15 and 17 years. Descriptive analysis was done to describe the sample, and non-parametric Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney test was used to test for significant differences between data that were not normally distributed (EAT-26). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient analyses were conducted to test for associations between self-esteem scores and eating attitudes, body mass indices and body image satisfaction scores. To assess the differences between groups that were normally distributed chi-square tests were carried out. Ethnic differences significantly affected adolescent boys' body mass index (BMI), eating attitudes and self-esteem; White boys had higher self-esteem, BMI and normal eating attitudes than the Black boys did. BMI was positively associated with self-esteem (p = 0.01, r = 0.134) and negatively with dieting behaviour in White boys (p = 0.004, r = -0.257), and with lower EAT-26 bulimic and oral control scores in Black boys. In conclusion, the findings highlight ethnic differences and a need to better understand cultural differences that influence adolescent attitudes and behaviour.

  5. Let's talk about gay sex: gay and bisexual men's sexual communication with healthcare professionals after prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, D; Ussher, J M; Perz, J

    2017-01-01

    Although sexual changes after prostate cancer (PCa) have specific meanings and consequences for gay and bisexual (GB) men, little is known about how GB men navigate sexual well-being support. We surveyed 124 GB men with PCa and 21 male partners, and interviewed a sub-sample of 46 GB men and 7 male partners, to examine GB men's experiences of sexual communication with healthcare professionals (HCPs) since the onset of PCa. GB men perceived a number of deficits in HCPs communication: medical support dominated sexual and psychological support; heterosexuality of GB patients was often assumed; sexual orientation disclosure was problematic; and GB men perceived rejection or lack of interest and knowledge from a majority of HCPs with regard to gay sexuality and the impact of PCa on GB men. Facilitators of communication were acknowledgement of sexual orientation and exploration of the impact of PCa on GB men. In order to target improved support for GB men with PCa, it is concluded that HCPs need to address issues of hetero-centricism within PCa care by improving facilitation of sexual orientation disclosure, recognising that GB men with PCa might have specific sexual and relational needs, and increasing knowledge and comfort discussing gay sexuality and gay sexual practices. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Gender Nonconformity and Birth Order in Relation to Anal Sex Role Among Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Coome, Lindsay A; Monks, D Ashley; VanderLaan, Doug P

    2017-04-04

    Androphilia is associated with an elevated number of older brothers among natal males. This association, termed the fraternal birth order effect, has been observed among gay men who exhibit marked gender nonconformity. Gender nonconformity has been linked to gay men's preferred anal sex role. The present study investigated whether these two lines of research intersect by addressing whether the fraternal birth order effect was associated with both gender nonconformity and a receptive anal sex role (243 gay men, 91 heterosexual men). Consistent with previous research, we identified the fraternal birth order effect in our sample of gay men. Also, gay men were significantly more gender-nonconforming on adulthood and recalled childhood measures compared to heterosexual men. When gay men were compared based on anal sex role (i.e., top, versatile, bottom), all groups showed significantly greater recalled childhood and adult male gender nonconformity than heterosexual men, but bottoms were most nonconforming. Only gay men with a bottom anal sex role showed evidence of a fraternal birth order effect. A sororal birth order effect was found in our sample of gay men, driven by versatiles. No significant associations were found between fraternal birth order and gender nonconformity measures. These results suggest that the fraternal birth order effect may apply to a subset of gay men who have a bottom anal sex role preference and that this subgroup is more gender-nonconforming. However, there were no significant associations between fraternal birth order and gender nonconformity at the individual level. As such, based on the present study, whether processes underpinning the fraternal birth order effect influence gender nonconformity is equivocal.

  7. Searching for Gay-Friendly Colleges: How Guidance Counselors Can Help Their Gay Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jeffrey D.

    2002-01-01

    The degree to which the lives of America's gay youth have improved over the past decade is staggering. In no small part due to frequent exposure to gay issues and gay people in the popular media, there is greater acceptance of differences in sexual orientation, and in many communities youth can access one of hundreds of gay student associations…

  8. Teneligliptin Decreases Uric Acid Levels by Reducing Xanthine Dehydrogenase Expression in White Adipose Tissue of Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihiro Moriya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of teneligliptin on uric acid metabolism in male Wistar rats and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The rats were fed with a normal chow diet (NCD or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD with or without teneligliptin for 4 weeks. The plasma uric acid level was not significantly different between the control and teneligliptin groups under the NCD condition. However, the plasma uric acid level was significantly decreased in the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared to the HFD-fed control rats. The expression levels of xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh mRNA in liver and epididymal adipose tissue of NCD-fed rats were not altered by teneligliptin treatment. On the other hand, Xdh expression was reduced significantly in the epididymal adipose tissue of the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared with that of HFD-fed control rats, whereas Xdh expression in liver did not change significantly in either group. Furthermore, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. DPP-4 treatment significantly increased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. With DPP-4 pretreatment, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh mRNA expression compared to the DPP-4-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In conclusion, our studies suggest that teneligliptin reduces uric acid levels by suppressing Xdh expression in epididymal adipose tissue of obese subjects.

  9. Teneligliptin Decreases Uric Acid Levels by Reducing Xanthine Dehydrogenase Expression in White Adipose Tissue of Male Wistar Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Chihiro; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of teneligliptin on uric acid metabolism in male Wistar rats and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The rats were fed with a normal chow diet (NCD) or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD) with or without teneligliptin for 4 weeks. The plasma uric acid level was not significantly different between the control and teneligliptin groups under the NCD condition. However, the plasma uric acid level was significantly decreased in the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared to the HFD-fed control rats. The expression levels of xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh) mRNA in liver and epididymal adipose tissue of NCD-fed rats were not altered by teneligliptin treatment. On the other hand, Xdh expression was reduced significantly in the epididymal adipose tissue of the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared with that of HFD-fed control rats, whereas Xdh expression in liver did not change significantly in either group. Furthermore, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. DPP-4 treatment significantly increased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. With DPP-4 pretreatment, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh mRNA expression compared to the DPP-4-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In conclusion, our studies suggest that teneligliptin reduces uric acid levels by suppressing Xdh expression in epididymal adipose tissue of obese subjects.

  10. The Right of Gay Student Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, William R.

    1984-01-01

    The conflict that often develops between university administrations and students wishing to form a gay student organization is discussed. Cases addressing the rights of gay student organizations are analyzed. (MLW)

  11. Health Concerns for Gay and Lesbian Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gay and Lesbian Teens Page Content Article Body Sexual activity Most teens, whether they are gay, lesbian, ... or alcohol to relieve depression , anxiety , and low self-esteem . Doing so can lead to addiction. Drug and ...

  12. Gay men seeking surrogacy to achieve parenthood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Norton, Wendy; Hudson, Nicky; Culley, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    .... The research that currently exists on gay fatherhood is largely related to gay men who become parents through processes such as adoption and fostering and children conceived through previous heterosexual relationships...

  13. Sexual restrictions beyond anti-gay prejudice: Anal sex, oral sex, masculinity and sexual prejudice in Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    West, Keon

    2016-01-01

    This is the first quantitative research to investigate attitudes toward heterosexual anal and oral sex in Jamaica, compare them to anti-gay and anti-lesbian attitudes, and frame them within a broader understanding of sexual prejudice based on gender norms. Fifty Jamaican participants’ attitudes toward heterosexual anal sex were as negative as attitudes toward gay male sex, and more negative than attitudes toward lesbian sex. Negative attitudes toward male sexual behaviours were predicted by m...

  14. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States have lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgender (LGBT) parents. Some children of LGBT parents were conceived in heterosexual marriages ... to common beliefs, children of lesbian, gay, or transgender parents: Are not ... be gay than children with heterosexual parents. Are not more likely to ...

  15. Role of Large Cabbage White butterfly male-derived compounds in elicitation of direct and indirect egg-killing defenses in the black mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina E. Fatouros

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To successfully exert defenses against herbivores and pathogens plants need to recognize reliable cues produced by their attackers. Up to now, few elicitors associated with herbivorous insects have been identified. We have previously shown that accessory reproductive gland secretions associated with eggs of Cabbage White butterflies (Pieris spp. induce chemical changes in Brussels sprouts plants recruiting egg-killing parasitoids. Only secretions of mated female butterflies contain minute amounts of male-derived anti-aphrodisiac compounds that elicit this indirect plant defense. Here, we used the black mustard (Brassica nigra to investigate how eggs of the Large Cabbage White butterfly (P. brassicae induce, either an egg-killing direct (i.e. hypersensitive response (HR-like necrosis or indirect defense (i.e. oviposition-induced plant volatiles attracting Trichogramma egg parasitoids. Plants induced by P. brassicae egg-associated secretions expressed both traits and previous mating enhanced elicitation. Treatment with the anti-aphrodisiac compound of P. brassicae, benzyl cyanide, induced stronger HR when compared to controls. Expression of the salicylic (SA pathway- and HR-marker PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE1 (PR1 was induced only in plants showing an HR-like necrosis. Trichogramma wasps were attracted to volatiles induced by secretion of mated P. brassicae females but application of benzyl cyanide did not elicit the parasitoid-attracting volatiles. We conclude that egg-associated secretions of Pieris butterflies contain specific elicitors of the different plant defense traits against eggs in Brassica plants. While in Brussels sprouts plants anti-aphrodisiac compounds in Pieris egg-associated secretions were clearly shown to elicit indirect defense, the wild relative B. nigra, recognizes different herbivore cues that mediate the defensive responses. These results add another level of specificity to the mechanisms by which plants recognize their

  16. Childhood Gender Nonconformity and Body Dissatisfaction in Gay and Heterosexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Scott M.; Singh, Devendra; Randall, Patrick K.

    2000-01-01

    Employed a measure of recalled childhood gender nonconformity to examine gender role behaviors in association with body dissatisfaction among ethnically diverse, homosexual and heterosexual, predominantly college-aged males. Gay males reported more body dissatisfaction and recalled more childhood gender atypical behaviors. Group differences in…

  17. Comparison of Attitudes toward Gay Men and Lesbians among Students at Bowling Green State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Trisha; Nicoloff, Jennifer

    This study examined the attitudes toward gay men and lesbians among male and female undergraduate students and graduate students at Bowling Green State University (Ohio). The subject pool included 99 students between the ages of 18 and 48. The sample included 47 males, 52 females, 60 undergraduate students, and 39 graduate students. A…

  18. Effect of Psychopathy on Physical Aggression Toward Gay and Heterosexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Dominic J.; Zeichner, Amos

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of psychopathy on antigay aggression. Participants were 84 heterosexual men who competed in an aggression paradigm in which electric shocks were received from and administered to a randomly determined fictitious opponent (heterosexual male, gay male) during a competitive reaction time…

  19. Queer(ed) risks: life insurance, HIV/AIDS, and the "gay question".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Neil

    2010-01-01

    In 2004 the Association of British Insurers (ABI) issued its second Statement of Best Practice on HIV and Insurance. This prohibited use of the "gay question" (employed by some underwriters in application forms for life insurance to identify heightened risk of infection with HIV), in response to growing criticism that the practice was actuarially unreliable, unfair to gay men, and unnecessary, given the availability of alternative "behaviour-based" risk criteria. While the overhaul of this controversial practice is clearly a victory for gay (male) identity politics, this paper argues that the interests of gay men seem to have dominated at the expense of a more far-reaching critique of the industry's evaluation of infection risk. It contends that a more radical (or "queerer") challenge is needed which can better understand and address the injustices created by criteria for appraising risk of infection that still remain in place.

  20. In the slammer: the myth of the prison in American gay pornographic video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, John

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the significance of the prison scenario and its various permutations in the texts of American commercial pornographic video. The paper will identify the prison as a highly eroticised all male environment, an arena where the active/passive dichotomy of gay pornography is staged and re-staged. The significances of the prison are multiple. The prison draws on a gay mythology of homosexual desire that has its origins in sources as diverse as the literature of the Marquis de Sade and Jean Genet and the erotic illustrations of Tom of Finland and Etienne. Prison scenarios take many shapes in gay pornography such as the American penitentiary, the military brig, and the fantasised dungeon of the leatherman. I see these scenarios as performing an important function within gay porn by offering idealised spaces for the acts of pornography: voyeurism, narcissistic display and active/ passive role-play.

  1. The lived experience of gay men caring for others with HIV/AIDS: resilient coping skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Ian; Edward, Karen-Leigh

    2008-04-01

    There is a dearth of research conducted on the relationship aspect of gay men caring for gay men. This Australian research conducted in 2002 investigated the emotional effects of HIV/AIDS on the gay male carers of gay men with the disease. This study was phenomenological inquiry and employed van Manen's approach to content analysis. Twelve participants for the study were recruited. The results produced emergent themes relating to coping with HIV/AIDS, living day-to-day with HIV/AIDS, coping with the last phase of AIDS towards death, saying goodbye and remembrance. This research highlights the resilient coping style of carers of persons living with HIV/AIDS. The research also gives rise to recommendations for practice and educational contexts in terms of the support and care considerations for persons living with HIV/AIDS and their carers.

  2. Attitudes and Beliefs About the Acceptability and Justness of Peer Victimization of Lesbian and Gay University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Stacey L; Davis, Alan K; Leith, Jaclyn; Hinman, Nova; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Burmeister, Jacob M; Dworsky, Dryw

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the acceptability and justness of anti-lesbian and gay victimization among 473 undergraduates. Participants were assigned to one of four vignette conditions that described an individual being verbally victimized in a typical college setting. Each vignette varied by victim gender (male; female) and sexual orientation (lesbian/gay; heterosexual). Participants completed background questionnaires and a measure that assessed the acceptability of the actions described in the vignettes. Overall, victimization was rated as unacceptable regardless of the sexual orientation and gender of the victim. However, participants rated the victimization of lesbian and gay students as more harmful and unjust than victimization of heterosexual students. Although the acceptability of anti-lesbian and gay victimization was low, 3%-12% of participants rated anti-lesbian and gay victimization as slightly or completely acceptable and just. Given that victimization is associated with long-term negative outcomes, college administrators should consider interventions aimed at decreasing the acceptability of victimization among students.

  3. General and gay-related racism experienced by Latino gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibañez, Gladys E; Van Oss Marin, Barbara; Flores, Stephen A; Millett, Gregorio; Diaz, Rafael M

    2009-07-01

    Latino gay men report experiences of racial discrimination within and outside the gay community. This study focused on correlates of racism within general and gay contexts. Racism was assessed in a probability sample of 911 Latino gay men recruited from 3 U.S. cities. Factor analysis of the 10-item scale produced 2 factors: (a) General Racism Experiences, and (b) Racism Experiences in Gay Contexts. The scale and each factor showed adequate reliability and validity. Latino gay men with darker skin, more Indian features, more time in the United States, and low self-esteem reported more racism in both general and gay contexts. The authors examine the psychometric properties of a measure that assesses interpersonal racism among Latinos, report correlates of racism within a gay context, and provide an assessment tool for understanding the role of racism in the lives of Latino gay men.

  4. Changes in gay men's participation in gay community life: implications for HIV surveillance and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotska, Iryna B; Holt, Martin; Prestage, Garrett

    2012-04-01

    Successful antiretroviral treatments, achievements in gay acceptance and human rights, and internet use have prompted changes in gay socialising which create potential challenges for engaging with gay men for HIV surveillance and research. We used data from the Australian behavioural surveillance and explored (i) the relationship between community engagement and HIV related practices, and (ii) time trends in gay men's engagement with the gay community. Analyses were conducted using log-binomial regression and chi-square test for trend. The proportion of men who socialized mainly with gay men declined and the Internet use to connect with sex partners increased over time. Gay social engagement was associated with HIV positive serostatus, unprotected anal intercourse with regular partners and a high frequency of HIV/STI testing. Our findings indicate a shift in how gay men socialise and find partners. We discuss the challenges for ongoing engagement with gay men for behavioural surveillance and HIV research.

  5. Health Differences Among Lesbian, Gay, and Transgender Veterans by Rural/Small Town and Suburban/Urban Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauth, Michael R; Barrera, Terri L; Denton, F Nicholas; Latini, David M

    2017-06-01

    We explored the relationship between geographic location and health indicators for lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans. We solicited participation in an online survey through national and city LGBT organizations and personal contacts to examine differences in depression, anxiety, alcohol and tobacco use, and body mass index among lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans (n = 252) in suburban/urban and rural/small town locations. Bisexual participants were too few to include in the analyses. As expected, rural/small town lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans spent more time traveling to their primary care provider. Travel time was also positively related to depressive and anxiety symptoms. However, only suburban/urban and rural/small town gay men differed in measures of depression and anxiety and tobacco use. That is, rural/small town gay men reported greater depressive and anxiety symptoms and greater tobacco use than their suburban/urban counterparts. Consistent with this finding, rural/small town gay men reported less community-related identity than suburban/urban men. Suburban/urban lesbian women showed a nonsignificant trend for community identity compared with rural/small town women. Similar to civilian studies, suburban/urban and rural/small town lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans evidenced few health differences, with the exception of suburban/urban gay men. Although rural/small town gay male veterans evidenced more depression and anxiety and less community identity than suburban/urban men, social networks likely differ for lesbian, gay, and transgender subgroups. Lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans may also differ from their civilian counterparts in ways that we do not yet understand.

  6. Effect of different dietary concentrations of inorganic and organic copper on growth performance and lipid metabolism of White Pekin male ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Y A; Qota, E M; Zeweil, H S; Bovera, F; Abd Al-Hamid, A E; Sahledom, M D

    2012-01-01

    1. The effect of different dietary concentrations of inorganic and organic copper on performance and lipid metabolism of White Pekin ducks (WPD) was investigated from 1-49 d of age. A common basal diet was supplemented with 4, 8, 12 and 150 mg/kg of copper (Cu) from inorganic and organic sources to obtain 9 treatments, including 4 concentrations of Cu x two sources, and the unsupplemented control group. Each treatment contained 5 replicates of 9 male ducks each. 2. Supplementation of Cu at 8 mg/kg in inorganic form was adequate for growth of male WPD from 1-56 d of age. Inorganic Cu significantly decreased feed intake and improved feed conversion ratio, compared with the organic form. 3. Plasma Cu significantly increased, while plasma Zn significantly decreased, due to Cu supplementation. Organic Cu showed better efficacy than inorganic for improving liver Cu concentration, Cu excretion and apparent Cu retention. 4. Dietary Cu concentration significantly affected percentage blood and Hgb and abdominal fat deposition. In addition, inorganic Cu increased percentage blood and abdominal fat deposition compared with the organic source. 5. Supplementation of 150 mg/kg of Cu significantly decreased liver and meat lipids, cholesterol, and colour and tenderness of meat; while liver protein and moisture was increased. In addition, dietary 150 mg/kg of Cu supplementation significantly decreased plasma lipids, triglycerides and cholesterol, while increasing plasma AST and ALT. 6. Organic Cu was more potent for decreasing plasma triglycerides than the inorganic source. However, plasma cholesterol was only significantly decreased with the inorganic source of Cu, compared with the unsupplemented control. 7. The organic Cu was safer as a feed additive for WPD, especially at the lower concentrations up to 12 mg; while some mild to moderate changes may be developed at the higher doses, when fed at pharmacological concentrations as a growth promoter.

  7. Evaluation of White Sesame Seed Oil on Glucose Control and Biomarkers of Hepatic, Cardiac, and Renal Functions in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats with Chemically Induced Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Farhan; Iqbal, Sanaullah; Nasir, Muhammad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Swan, Pamela; Sweazea, Karen

    2017-05-01

    White sesame seed oil (WSSO) has been used in cooking and food preparations for centuries. It has many purported health benefits and may be a promising nutraceutical. The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effects of WSSO on fasting blood glucose (GLU) and insulin (INS) in male Sprague-Dawley rats with chemically induced diabetes. A secondary aim was to explore other hematological biomarkers of hepatic, cardiac, and renal function. Sixty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into standard diet groups, normal control (NCON) (n = 21) and diabetic control (DCON) (n = 21), and a diabetic sesame oil (DSO) (n = 21) group, which were fed a diet containing 12% WSSO. Blood samples were analyzed at 0, 30, and 60 days. Differences between groups and across days were assessed with two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. At baseline, GLU and INS were similar in both diabetic groups, mean 248.4 ± 2.8 mg/dL and mean 23.4 ± 0.4 μU/mL, respectively. At 60 days, GLU was significantly (P < .05) higher in DCON (298.0 ± 2.3 mg/dL) compared with DSO (202.1 ± 1.0 mg/dL). INS showed similar favorable trends after WSSO supplementation. Consumption of WSSO significantly improved glucose control and other biomarkers of hepatic stress, as well as cardiac and renal health. WSSO may be a viable functional food to help reduce the detrimental effects of diabetes.

  8. Antecedents of intimate partner violence among gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finneran, Catherine; Stephenson, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Examinations of gay and bisexual men's (GBM) perceptions of intimate partner violence (IPV), including their perceptions of events likely to precipitate IPV, are lacking. Focus group discussions with GBM (n = 83) yielded 24 unique antecedents, or triggers, of IPV in male-male relationships. Venue-recruited survey participants (n = 700) identified antecedents that were likely to cause partner violence in male-male relationships, including antecedents GBM-specific currently absent from the literature. Chi-square tests found significant variations in antecedent endorsement when tested against recent receipt of IPV. Linear regression confirmed that men reporting recent IPV endorsed significantly more IPV antecedents than men without recent IPV (beta = 1.8155, p < .012). A better understanding of the IPV event itself in male-male couples versus heterosexual couples, including its antecedents, can inform and strengthen IPV prevention efforts.

  9. Long commuting time, extensive overtime, and sympathodominant state assessed in terms of short-term heart rate variability among male white-collar workers in the Tokyo megalopolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, T; Nishikido, N; Kobayashi, T; Kurokawa, Y; Kaneko, T; Kabuto, M

    1998-07-01

    To investigate the possible effects of long commuting time and extensive overtime on daytime cardiac autonomic activity, the short-term heart rate variability (HRV) both at supine rest and at standing rest of 223 male white-collar workers in the Tokyo Megalopolis was examined. Workers with a one-way commute of 90 min or more exhibited decreased vagal activity at supine rest and increased sympathetic activity regardless of posture, and those doing overtime of 60 h/month or more exhibited decreased vagal activity and increased sympathetic activity at standing rest. These findings suggest that chronic stress or fatigue resulting from long commuting time or extensive overtime caused these individuals to be in a sympathodominant state. Although these shifts in autonomic activities are not direct indicators of disease, it can be hypothesized that they can induce cardiovascular abnormalities or dysfunctions related to the onset of heart disease. Assessment of the daily and weekly variations in HRV as a function of daily life activities (such as working, commuting, sleeping, and exercising) among workers in Asia-Pacific urban areas might be one way of studying the possible effects of long commuting time, and extensive overtime, on health.

  10. Alcohol Use and Mental Health Conditions Among Black College Males: Do Those Attending Postsecondary Minority Institutions Fare Better Than Those at Primarily White Institutions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Adam E; Jackson, Zachary; Watkins, Daphne C; Goodwill, Janelle R; Hunte, Haslyn E R

    2017-07-01

    While there is a sizeable body of research examining the association between alcohol use and mental health conditions among college students, there are sparse investigations specifically focusing on these associations among Black college students. This is concerning given Black college students face different stressors compared with their non-Black peers. Black males appear especially at risk, exhibiting increased susceptibility to mental health issues and drinking in greater quantities and more frequently than Black females. This investigation examined the association between alcohol consumption and mental health conditions among Black men attending institutions of higher education in the United States and sought to determine differences between Black men attending predominantly White institutions (PWIs) compared with those attending postsecondary minority institutions. Final sample included 416 Black men, 323 of which attended a PWI. Data were from the National College Health Assessment. Black men attending a PWI reported significantly greater levels of alcohol consumption and significantly more mental health conditions. Attendance at a minority-serving institution was associated with fewer mental health conditions among Black men. Future studies should seek to replicate these findings and conduct culturally sensitive and gender-specific research examining why Black men at PWIs report greater alcohol consumption and more mental health conditions than their peers attending postsecondary minority institutions.

  11. Gay Service Organizations: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Theodore J.

    1976-01-01

    A report of a survey taken of gay service organizations determined: (1) what services are offered; (2) to what sex and age group these services are offered; (3) the financial structures of these organizations; and, (4) who works for them. (Author)

  12. Beyond Gay-Straight Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Decades' worth of studies point to the importance of parental involvement in K-12 schooling. Yet when it comes to policies related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, families are often deliberately left out of the conversation, according to several leading experts in LGBT youth development. Even in schools where…

  13. The Counselor and Gay Liberation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killinger, Raymond R.

    1971-01-01

    Counselors who accept the gay liberation struggle for acceptance and equality, must first rid themselves of their own narrow or destructive attitudes toward homosexuals. It is only after acceptance of persons with different sexual preferences that the counselor can begin to think of himself as a helping person in this area. (Author/BY)

  14. Predictors of Relationship Dissolution in Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Adoptive Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Garcia, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Little work has examined relationship dissolution or divorce in adoptive parents or same-sex parent couples. The current study examined predictors of relationship dissolution across the first 5 years of parenthood among a sample of heterosexual, lesbian, and gay male adoptive couples. Of the 190 couples in the study, 15 (7.9%) dissolved their relationships during the first 5 years of adoptive parenthood. Specifically, 7 of 57 lesbian couples (12.3%), 1 of 49 gay male couples (2.0%), and 7 of ...

  15. “Boys Must be Men, and Men Must Have Sex with Women”: A Qualitative CBPR Study to Explore Sexual Risk among African American, Latino, and White Gay Men and MSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Scott D.; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.; Vissman, Aaron T.; Stowers, Jason; Davis, A. Bernard; Hannah, Anthony; Alonzo, Jorge; Marsiglia, Flavio F.

    2012-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be disproportionately impacted by HIV and sexually transmitted diseases (STD). This study was designed to explore sexual risk among MSM using community-based participatory research (CBPR). An academic-community partnership conducted nine focus groups with 88 MSM. Participants self-identified as African American/Black (n=28), Hispanic/Latino (n=33), white (n=21), and bi-racial/ethnic (n=6). Mean age was 27 (range 18–60) years. Grounded theory was used. Twelve themes related to HIV risk emerged, including low HIV and STD knowledge particularly among Latino MSM and MSM who use the Internet for sexual networking; stereotyping of African American MSM as sexually “dominant” and Latino MSM as less likely to be HIV infected; and the eroticization of “barebacking.” Twelve intervention approaches also were identified, including developing culturally congruent programming using community-identified assets; harnessing social media used by informal networks of MSM; and promoting protection within the context of intimate relationships. A community forum was held to develop recommendations and move these themes to action. PMID:20413391

  16. Boys must be men, and men must have sex with women: a qualitative CBPR study to explore sexual risk among African American, Latino, and White gay men and MSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Scott D; Hergenrather, Kenneth C; Vissman, Aaron T; Stowers, Jason; Davis, A Bernard; Hannah, Anthony; Alonzo, Jorge; Marsiglia, Flavio F

    2011-03-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV and sexually transmitted diseases. This study was designed to explore sexual risk among MSM using community-based participatory research (CBPR). An academic-community partnership conducted nine focus groups with 88 MSM. Participants self-identified as African American/Black (n=28), Hispanic/Latino (n=33), White (n=21), and biracial/ethnic (n=6). The mean age was 27 years (range=18-60 years). Grounded theory was used. Twelve themes related to HIV risk emerged, including low knowledge of HIV and sexually transmitted diseases, particularly among Latino MSM and MSM who use the Internet for sexual networking; stereotyping of African American MSM as sexually "dominant" and Latino MSM as less likely to be HIV infected; and the eroticization of "barebacking." Twelve intervention approaches also were identified, including developing culturally congruent programming using community-identified assets, harnessing social media used by informal networks of MSM, and promoting protection within the context of intimate relationships. A community forum was held to develop recommendations and move these themes to action. © The Author(s) 2011

  17. Health Care Providers’ Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Toward Lesbian Women and Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskind, Rachel G.; Nosek, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined providers’ implicit and explicit attitudes toward lesbian and gay people by provider gender, sexual identity, and race/ethnicity. Methods. We examined attitudes toward heterosexual people versus lesbian and gay people in Implicit Association Test takers: 2338 medical doctors, 5379 nurses, 8531 mental health providers, 2735 other treatment providers, and 214 110 nonproviders in the United States and internationally between May 2006 and December 2012. We characterized the sample with descriptive statistics and calculated Cohen d, a standardized effect size measure, with 95% confidence intervals. Results. Among heterosexual providers, implicit preferences always favored heterosexual people over lesbian and gay people. Implicit preferences for heterosexual women were weaker than implicit preferences for heterosexual men. Heterosexual nurses held the strongest implicit preference for heterosexual men over gay men (Cohen d = 1.30; 95% confidence interval = 1.28, 1.32 among female nurses; Cohen d = 1.38; 95% confidence interval = 1.32, 1.44 among male nurses). Among all groups, explicit preferences for heterosexual versus lesbian and gay people were weaker than implicit preferences. Conclusions. Implicit preferences for heterosexual people versus lesbian and gay people are pervasive among heterosexual health care providers. Future research should investigate how implicit sexual prejudice affects care. PMID:26180976

  18. Ocular pharmacokinetics comparison between 0.2% olopatadine and 0.77% olopatadine hydrochloride ophthalmic solutions administered to male New Zealand white rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ganesh R; Cason, Marita M; Womble, Scott W; Li, Guangming; Chastain, James E

    2015-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare uptake and distribution of the commercially available formulation of 0.2% olopatadine and the newly developed 0.77% olopatadine hydrochloride ophthalmic solution formulation with improved solubility following a single (30 μL), bilateral topical ocular dose in male New Zealand white rabbits. Each animal received a single 30-μL topical ocular dose (0.2% olopatadine or 0.77% olopatadine hydrochloride ophthalmic solution) to the right (OD) eye followed by the left (OS) eye for a total dose of 60 μL. Olopatadine concentrations were measured in ocular tissues (cornea, bulbar, conjunctiva, choroid, iris-ciliary body, whole lens, retina), aqueous humor, and plasma at prespecified time points over 24 h using a qualified liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analytical method. Olopatadine was absorbed into the eye and reached maximal levels (Cmax) within 30 min (0.5 h) to 2 h (Tmax) in ocular tissues and plasma for both treatment groups, except for the lens in which the Tmax was 4 h in the 0.2% olopatadine group and 8 h in the 0.77% olopatadine hydrochloride group, respectively. Tissues associated with the site of dosing, that is, the conjunctiva and cornea, had the highest concentrations of olopatadine in both the 0.2% olopatadine (609 and 720 ng/g) and 0.77% olopatadine hydrochloride (3,000 and 2,230 ng/g) dose groups. The greatest differences between 0.2% olopatadine and 0.77% olopatadine hydrochloride were associated with the overall duration and level of ocular exposures. The newly developed 0.77% olopatadine hydrochloride ophthalmic solution formulation resulted in a higher and more prolonged olopatadine concentration in the target tissue, that is, conjunctiva compared to the commercial formulation of 0.2% olopatadine ophthalmic solution.

  19. The Effect of Honey on Plasma Malondialdehyde (MDA Level onAlloxan-Induced hyperglycemic Rats An Experimental studies in rats Galur Wistar White Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bela Risqiyani Fajrilah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Malondialdehyde (MDA is the end product of lipid peroxidation and a marker of free radicals. Honey is a safe sweetener proven to lower blood glucose level and contains flavonoids, vitamin A, C, E as a source of antioxidant that can capture free radicals. This study aims to determine the effect of honey on plasma MDA level ionalloxan-induced hyperglycemicrats. This was an experimental study with post-test only control group design conducted for 25 days using 18 white male Wistar rats divided into 3 groups randomly. A negative control group, group B were given honey orally at the dose of 0.54 ml/mice/day, and group C were given honey orally at the of dose 0.9 ml/head/day. Each group consisted of 6 rats. Blood plasma MDA was evaluated by Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substance (TBARS test assay. One way ANOVA analysis test followed post hoc were applied for data analysis. The results showed that mean levels of MDA in group A, B, and C were 6.02 mmol/l ± 0.36, 4.37 mmol/± 0.30, and 1.12 mmol/l ± 0.11 respectively. Bivariate analysis One way ANOVA test showed a significant difference (p<0,05. Post hoc tests showed a significant differences between the study groups (p<0,05. It can be concluded that honey had an effect on the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA in the blood plasma of alloxan-induced hyperglycemic rats.

  20. Effects of short-term fasting on stress physiology, body condition, and locomotor activity in wintering male white-crowned sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jesse S; Pérez, Jonathan H; Meddle, Simone L; Wingfield, John C

    2017-08-01

    For wild free-living animals the availability of food resources can be greatly affected by environmental perturbations such as weather events. In response to environmental perturbations, animals activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to adjust physiology and behavior. The literature asserts that during weather events food intake declines leading to changes in HPA axis activity, as measured by both baseline and stress-induced glucocorticoid concentrations. Here we investigated how body condition, locomotor activity, and stress physiology were affected by varying lengths of a fast (1, 2, 6, and 24h; similar to that experienced by free-living birds) compared to when food was provided ad libitum in captive wintering male white-crowned sparrows, Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii, exposed to a short day photoperiod. Baseline corticosterone concentrations were increased for all fasting durations but were highest in 6 and 24h fasted birds. Stress-induced corticosterone was elevated in 1h fasted birds with a trend for the 2h of fast; no other differences were found. Baseline corticosterone concentrations were negatively related to both total fat scores and body mass. All birds lost body mass regardless of fast length but birds fasted for 24h lost the most. Fat scores declined in the 6 and 24h groups, and no measureable changes were detected in pectoralis muscle profile. Locomotor activity was increased over the entire period in which food was removed regardless of fasting duration. Together this suggests that reduced food availability is responsible, at least in part, for the rapid elevation both baseline corticosterone under any duration of fast and stress-induced concentrations during short-term fasts. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Predicting self-esteem, well-being, and distress in a cohort of gay men: the importance of cultural stigma, personal visibility, community networks, and positive identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frable, D E; Wortman, C; Joseph, J

    1997-09-01

    Homosexual and bisexual men (N = 825) enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study in Chicago completed a 90-minute self-administered questionnaire that included the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, a Well-Being Index, and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist. Participants indicated their experiences with gay stigma, their visibility as gay men, their involvement in the gay community, and their commitment to a positive gay identity. Data from this predominantly white, young, educated, and middle-class cohort are consistent with a structural model in which cultural stigma is negatively associated with positive self-perceptions. This within-group result contrasts sharply with between-group results that indicate our gay cohort was neither particularly low in global self-esteem nor high in psychological distress when compared to nonstigmatized samples.

  2. Lesbian and gay rights as a free speech issue: a review of relevant caselaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, P

    1991-01-01

    The legal struggles waged by lesbian and gay male litigants almost invariably involve issues of freedom of expression, broadly construed. To illustrate this point, a wide array of caselaw is examined--ranging from classic "access to a forum" controversies to those concerning symbolic conduct and freedom of association (including marriage and child custody law), employment discrimination, and proscriptions against deviant sexual conduct. In each category, claims to a right of freedom of expression are manifested. Cautionary notes are offered concerning those cases in which gay litigants try to protect their rights by inhibiting the speech of others. A brief concluding section assesses the long-term and short-term efficacy of raising First Amendment arguments (as opposed to privacy or equal protection arguments) in lesbian/gay male litigation.

  3. Factors influencing the career and academic choices of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Margaret S; Dimito, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This is an empirical study of academic and career choices for 119 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students using a questionnaire. Respondents who reported that their sexual orientation influenced their choices a great deal indicated that the influences were both positive and negative. This group was most likely to have experienced anti-LGBT discrimination in the past. In comparing lesbian, bisexual people, and gay males, gay males and respondents from visible minorities were the most likely to feel a negative impact, while bisexual respondents were the least likely. There were too few transgender respondents to include in these statistical comparisons; however, frequencies suggest that transgender people may be the most vulnerable of all. Results suggest that counselors need to take sexual orientation issues, particularly past experiences of discrimination, when working with LGBT clients.

  4. "It Really Is Not Just Gay, but African American Gay": The Impact of Community and Church on the Experiences of Black Lesbians Living in North Central Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Clare F

    2016-09-01

    The experiences of Black lesbians highlight the unique circumstance found at the intersection of sexuality, race, and gender. However, most sexuality research tends to focus on White lesbians and White gay men, and most race research tends to focus on Black heterosexuals. Furthermore, research on the Black gay community tends to focus on those living in the Northeast or on the West Coast, neglecting experiences of those living in the more politically, socially, and religiously conservative South. This article draws on data obtained from semistructured interviews with 12 Black lesbians living in north central Florida, exploring their perspectives as they negotiate a social world of intersecting oppressions. Participants especially highlight how they contextualized their sexuality in racialized terms and negotiated it in racially defined communities.

  5. The gay bashing scene chez Proust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, T

    1993-01-01

    This essay presents a contemporary translation of and brief commentary on the gay bashing scene found in Marcel Proust's A la Recherche du Temps perdu: Le Côté de Guermantes, Tome I. The paper notes that Proust argues in this passage for the acceptance of homosexuality for two main reasons: because gay bashing won't eradicate it; and because gayness is the simple, direct movement of a being toward perceived beauty. The paper suggests that Proust reveals his own gayness (and that of his protagonist) by employing the latter argument in defense of homosexuality whereas, throughout the novel, he presents heterosexual attraction as an immensely indirect, artistically manufactured construct.

  6. Male Adolescent Contraceptive Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Madelon Lubin; Finkel, David J.

    1978-01-01

    The contraceptive utilization of a sample of sexually active, urban, high school males (Black, Hispanic, and White) was examined by anonymous questionnaire. Contraceptive use was haphazard, but White males tended to be more effective contraceptors than the other two groups. Reasons for nonuse were also studied. (Author/SJL)

  7. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in an Older Gay Man: A Clinical Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, Jason M.; Crabb, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Although strong evidence supports cognitive-behavioral therapy for late-life depression and depression in racial and ethnic minorities, there are no empirical studies on the treatment of depression in older sexual minorities. Three distinct literatures were tapped to create a depression treatment protocol for an older gay male. Interventions were…

  8. Stigma, Social Context, and Mental Health: Lesbian and Gay Couples across the Transition to Adoptive Parenthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first study to examine change in depression and anxiety across the first year of adoptive parenthood in same-sex couples (90 couples: 52 lesbian, 38 gay male). Given that sexual minorities uniquely contend with sexual orientation-related stigma, this study examined how both internalized and enacted forms of stigma affect the mental…

  9. Gay Men with AIDS and Their Families of Origin: An Analysis of Social Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadushin, Goldie

    1996-01-01

    Reviews literature on relationships of gay men with AIDS and their families of origin. Some reasons for the absence of family from support networks include family's lack of acceptance of homosexuality and relationship with a male partner; stigma associated with AIDS; inability of family to communicate openly about homosexuality and AIDS. (FC)

  10. Planned gay father families in kinship arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, H.H.M.W.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined whether there are differences between gay father families (n = 36) and heterosexual families (n = 36) on father-child relationship, fathers' experiences of parental stress and children's wellbeing. The gay fathers in this study all became parents while in same-sex

  11. Stereotypes of Older Lesbians and Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Sara L.; Canetto, Silvia Sara

    2009-01-01

    This study examined stereotypes of older lesbians and gay men. Key findings are that older lesbians and gay men were perceived as similar to older heterosexual women and men with regard to aging stereotypes, such as being judicious. At the same time, sexual minorities were targets of unique stereotypes. Consistent with the implicit inversion…

  12. Fear of Success in Gay Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzkowitz, Stuart; Petrie, Donna

    1982-01-01

    Compared gay women (N=11) with heterosexual women (N=12) for frequency of high and low fear of success responses. Probability analysis determined the two groups differed significantly, with gay women evidencing less fear of success than expected. Devised a continuum of kinds of responses with subsequent analysis. (Author)

  13. Health Issues for Gay Men: Prevention First

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as condom use every time you have sex. Gay men and men who have sex with men might be at higher risk of ... long-term health. Makadon HJ. Primary care of gay men and men who have sex with men. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. ...

  14. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... campaign to reduce the new HIV infections among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men Data and Statistics Men who have sex with men (MSM) accounted for 63% of the estimated new HIV infections in 2010. Go to this HIV topic page for more information. ... Health About LGBT Health Gay and Bisexual Men Lesbian and Bisexual Women Transgender ...

  15. Dating violence among gay men in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Kirin Qilin

    2013-08-01

    This is the first study on the prevalence of dating violence and threats of being forced to "come out of the closet" among Chinese gay men. Data on social demographic information and the experience of dating violence, including types of abuse, threats of "outing," and the gender of abusers were collected from 418 gay men and 330 heterosexual men by self-administered questionnaires. Mann-Whitney U test, χ(2) test, and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to test group differences. Up to 32.8% of the gay men had experienced one abuse or more. Among those experiencing abuse, 83.9% of the gay men never told anyone about their abuse. The experience of any form of abuse by gay men was 5.07 times higher than the rate of abuse among heterosexual men controlling for age in logistic regression models. In addition, 12.4% of the gay men have experienced the threat of being outed. Overall, dating violence is more prevalent in gay men than in heterosexuals. Efforts to prevent dating violence, especially among gay men, should be made in China.

  16. Collection Development "Gay Parenting": Building Rainbow Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    While gay parenthood has existed from time immemorial, it has only emerged as a viable means of family building within the past 20 years. Celebrities like Melissa Etheridge, who had children with ex-partner Julie Cypher and sperm donor David Crosby, and Rosie O'Donnell, who adopted, have ushered gay parenting into the popular consciousness and…

  17. Personality of Polish gay men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Kwiatkowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Sexuality is a part of one’s identity and personality that is shaped under the influence of biological and environmental factors and interactions with society. The results of research conducted so far and concerning the personality traits of gay men and women are not consistent, and only a small number of them concern the Polish population. Hence the objective of the present research was to provide personality profiles of men and women with different sexual orientations. Participants and procedure The participants (N = 346 included 84 gay women, 82 gay men, 95 heterosexual women and 85 heterosexual men. The following measures were used: a survey developed by the author, the Kinsey Scale, the EPQ-R (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised adapted by Brzozowski and Drwal (1995, and the Sixteen-factor Personality Questionnaire of Cattell adapted by Nowakowska (1970. Results The results support the hypothesis that gay women and heterosexual men share similar personality traits, while gay men have more diverse traits, similar to the traits typical for heterosexual women and men. In particular, personalities of gay men are described by such traits as progressive attitude, independence, or willingness to take risks, which means traits linked to factor Q1. The highest values of that factor are observable in the case of gay men, as compared to gay women, and also in comparison with heterosexual men and women. Conclusions Sexual orientation is responsible for differences in personality traits of the studied group to a greater extent than their biological sex.

  18. Social anxiety in young gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachankis, John E; Goldfried, Marvin R

    2006-01-01

    Based on the assumption that sexual minority individuals are particularly sensitive to the possible rejection of others, the present study examined the occurrence and correlates of social anxiety symptomatology in gay and heterosexual men. Eighty-seven heterosexual and 87 gay undergraduate men between the ages of 18 and 24 completed common measures of social anxiety, self-esteem, boyhood gender conformity, and a modified S-R Inventory of Anxiousness. Results reveal that gay men reported greater fear of negative evaluation and social interaction anxiety and lower self-esteem than heterosexual men. Gay men who are less open about their sexual orientation and those who are less comfortable with being gay were more likely to experience anxiety in social interactions. The modified S-R Inventory of Anxiousness was useful in revealing that relatively innocuous situations for heterosexual men can be anxiety-provoking for gay men. The hypothesis that gay men who were gender nonconforming as children would report a higher degree of social interaction anxiety was not supported. Results are discussed in terms of the socialization experiences of gay men and are explicated using a minority stress framework. Implications are offered for the treatment of social anxiety in this population.

  19. Psychobiology of Male Homosexuality: Recent Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Annicchiarico Iseda, Ivan Darío; Universidad Nacional de Colombia

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, empirical and theoretical reports which question the causes of male homosexuality are examined. According to these reports, male homosexuality differs from female homosexuality in some respects. Additionally, evidence favouring the consideration of male homosexuality as a biological condition is shown: there are brain differences between gay men and heterosexual men, there are genetic and perinatal factors associated to male homosexuality, there are cognitive and behavioral dif...

  20. Tswanarising global gayness: the 'unAfrican' argument, Western gay media imagery, local responses and gay culture in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a strategic intervention in the debate over the value of globalised gay identity for emerging sexual minority communities in the South. Focusing on self-identifying gay men in Botswana using semi-structured interviews, it explores their views of what characterises 'modern gay culture' and relates these to international media clichés of a glamorous, stylish, hedonistic gayness. I argue that identifying with what is so visibly a Western image of gayness exposes sexual minority communities to the most dangerous of the justifications for homophobia in Africa, the argument that sexual dissidence is a neo-colonial conspiracy to subvert 'African values'. The 'unAfrican' argument has to be taken very seriously, not only because it taps into the intense, conflicted emotions at the heart of the post-colonial condition, but also because it contains an undeniable germ of truth. This poses a dilemma, since global gay discourses, including the media clichés, are an important source of inspiration for African sexual minorities. A communication activism strategy is proposed to undermine the unAfrican argument by cultivating and asserting the 'tswanarisation' of gay culture in Botswana that is already taking place. A similar strategy may also be effective in other African societies.

  1. Correlates of homophobia, transphobia, and internalized homophobia in gay or lesbian and heterosexual samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, Katrina; Nagoshi, Craig T; Nagoshi, Julie L

    2013-01-01

    This research assessed the correlates of homophobia and transphobia in heterosexual and homosexual individuals, based on a theory of different sources of perceived symbolic threat to social status. Compared to 310 heterosexual college students, a sample of 30 gay male and 30 lesbian college students scored lower on homophobia, transphobia, and religious fundamentalism. Mean gender differences were smaller for gay men and lesbians for homophobia, aggressiveness, benevolent sexism, masculinity, and femininity. Fundamentalism, right-wing authoritarianism, and hostile and benevolent sexism were correlated only with homophobia in lesbians, whereas fundamentalism and authoritarianism were correlated only with transphobia in gay men. Correlates of internalized homophobia were different than those found for homophobia and transphobia, which was discussed in terms of gender differences in threats to status based on sexual orientation versus gender identity.

  2. Luxury clothing: a mirror of gay consumers sexual option? [doi: 10.5329/RECADM.20121101010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Gonçalves Altaf

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Through a qualitative exploratory research, the present paper investigates the behaviour of Brazilian gay consumers as to their luxury clothing consumption, assuming that this behaviour might help the construction of their self-concept once those products reflect their sexual option. A bibliographical review is followed by the results for in-depth interviews with 12 gay men, and completed with the use of a semantic scale that measures the interviewees’ self-concept and luxury clothing concept. An examination of the results is followed by their implications, indicating that the self-concept directly influences the male gay’s buying behaviour in this market.   Keywords Gay consumers; Luxury clothing consumption; Self-concept construction; Buying behaviour. 

  3. Affect in the San Diego Gay Men's Chorus /

    OpenAIRE

    Gurlly, Aaron W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent LGBT political victories in the U.S. call for an examination of gay pride, an examination which necessitates an exploration of the shame against which gay pride operates. I begin this project with an exploration of literatures of gay shame to illustrate how that concept is based on a specific, limited type of gay experience. Silvan Tomkins's affect theory suggests that we should understand shame more broadly than it is conceived in the gay shame literature. I argue that Tomkins's ideas...

  4. Depression in Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Members of the Canadian Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Roger L; Lasiuk, Gerri C; Norris, Colleen M

    2016-10-01

    Lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals have been shown to have different risks for mood and anxiety disorders than heterosexuals in population studies, but there is a paucity of research in this area in military populations. This study examined the relationship between sexual orientation and depression in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). Data were drawn from the Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey 2013 (n = 8165), a representative sample of Regular and Reserve members of the Canadian military. Binomial logistic regression was used to predict 12-month and lifetime odds ratios for major depressive episode (MDE) stratified by sexual orientation and sex. Gay male members had higher risk (AOR = 3.80, 95% CI 1.60-9.05) for lifetime MDE, but not for past 12-month MDE compared to heterosexual males. There was no significant difference in risk for lesbians or bisexuals compared to heterosexuals. The results suggest that gay male members of the CAF are at higher risk for a history of MDE, but not current MDE. This may be a result of ongoing discrimination and stigma faced by gay men in the military or may reflect MDE that occurred before military service. The lack of difference in MDE risk for lesbian and bisexual members compared to heterosexual members is an important positive finding.

  5. Gay men seeking surrogacy to achieve parenthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Wendy; Hudson, Nicky; Culley, Lorraine

    2013-09-01

    Assisted reproduction technologies have developed at an extraordinary rate in recent years. This, combined with the changing landscape of legal, technical and social possibilities, enables gay men to consider their options for fatherhood as new opportunities emerge for them to create families. Media coverage of gay celebrities embracing surrogacy as a way of having a family and high-profile legal cases have raised awareness of surrogacy across the world. However, gay fatherhood achieved through assisted reproduction is a highly under-researched area, both in the UK and internationally. The research that currently exists on gay fatherhood is largely related to gay men who become parents through processes such as adoption and fostering and children conceived through previous heterosexual relationships. Much of this evidence has centred on parenting experiences, the outcomes for children or the legal perspectives. This paper outlines the different types of surrogacy and the legal issues facing gay men who choose this route to parenthood, summarizes the limited research on gay men and surrogacy and discusses gaps in the current knowledge base. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bodice Rippers without the Bodice: Ten Male-on-Male Romances for a Core Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Devon

    2011-01-01

    One of the hottest growing segments of the romance genre is male-on-male (M/M) romance--gay romantic fiction mostly written and read by straight women. Featuring traditional romance conventions, including mistaken identities, star-crossed lovers, and happy endings, these stories show both physical and emotional intimacy between men. M/M builds on…

  7. Too Important to Fail: Assessing the Role of a First Year Experience Program in the Persistence of African American Male Students at a Predominantly White University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Continued research on the first-year experience of African American male students entering institutions of higher learning is necessary and can provide a deeper look at institutional and individual factors that African American male students may encounter, and impact their academic success. Understanding the issues that affect African American…

  8. Exploration of Perceptions Held by African American Male Student Affairs Administrators at Predominantly White Institutions through the Conceptual Frameworks of Herzberg, Cose, and Kanter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surratt, David Alan

    2014-01-01

    With institutional importance placed on diversity in higher education, considerable research has been conducted regarding the experiences of African Americans at predominantly White institutions. However, the focus has been limited regarding African American administrators in higher education (Jackson, 2004; Allen, 2000; Weems, 2003). The purpose…

  9. Shame and internalized homophobia in gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, D J; Oleson, T

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated for the first time the relationship between internalized homophobia and shame in gay men. It also briefly re-examined the relationship between internalized homophobia and self-esteem in gay men. A sample of 100 gay men from a variety of sources responded to three questionnaires and a demographic survey. Findings included a significant positive relationship between shame and internalized homophobia and a significant inverse relationship between internalized homophobia and self-esteem. Additional findings included significant correlations between seven variables and internalized homophobia and between six variables and internalized shame.

  10. Oppression and resiliency in a post-apartheid South Africa: unheard voices of Black gay men and lesbians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Kevin J

    2004-08-01

    Guided by photovoice, a form of participatory action research that uses documentary photography and storytelling, this study examines how Black gay men and lesbians view themselves in relation to White gay men and lesbians in South Africa. Participants were from 4 South African townships and included 4 women, and 3 men. Participants discussed interracial dating, a lack of education, and information regarding differing sexualities and health care. They reported being sexually and physically assaulted for challenging the heterosexual status quo. Other themes that emerged from this study were classism, cultural traditions of visiting African healers, and segregated social spaces. Amidst oppression and despair, participants showed signs of strength, hope, and optimism.

  11. Straight eye for the gay guy: composing queerness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the work of Didier Eribon and his theorization of the construction of gay male subjectivity, this article examines different "texts," broadly defined, that grapple specifically with straight men attempting to represent male homosexuality: Norman Mailer's essay, "The Homosexual Villain"; the Bravo reality television series Boy Meets Boy, and Michael Griffith's short story, "Hooper Gets a Perm." These texts represent attempts by straight authors to grapple with queer experience in ways that move the imagination of queers beyond simple stereotypes or uncritical explorations of the sexual "other." In the process of examining these texts, the following questions are addressed: What happens when a straight man attempts to represent a gay man? Does he "get it right," and is such a question even useful? More specifically, what is the value in having straights imagine queerness? Is such an imagining possible? Is such desirable? And, if so, what are the contours of such an imagining-as well as its possibilities and limitations, pedagogically, personally, and politically? Ultimately, I contend that the straight imagining of queerness offers rich potential for mutual understanding; furthermore, attempting to understand what goes into the making of those representations tells us much about how queerness circulates in our culture as a subject, a figure of discussion, contention, and representation.

  12. Gay men and intimate partner violence: a gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliffe, John L; Han, Christina; Maria, Estephanie Sta; Lohan, Maria; Howard, Terry; Stewart, Donna E; MacMillan, Harriet

    2014-05-01

    Though intimate partner violence (IPV) is predominately understood as a women's health issue most often emerging within heterosexual relationships, there is increasing recognition of the existence of male victims of IPV. In this qualitative study we explored connections between masculinities and IPV among gay men. The findings show how recognising IPV was based on an array of participant experiences, including the emotional, physical and sexual abuse inflicted by their partner, which in turn led to three processes. Normalising and concealing violence referred to the participants' complicity in accepting violence as part of their relationship and their reluctance to disclose that they were victims of IPV. Realising a way out included the participants' understandings that the triggers for, and patterns of, IPV would best be quelled by leaving the relationship. Nurturing recovery detailed the strategies employed by participants to mend and sustain their wellbeing in the aftermath of leaving an abusive relationship. In terms of masculinities and men's health research, the findings reveal the limits of idealising hegemonic masculinities and gender relations as heterosexual, while highlighting a plurality of gay masculinities and the need for IPV support services that bridge the divide between male and female as well as between homosexual and heterosexual. © 2014 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2014 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Gender-Atypical personality or sexual behavior: what is disgusting about male homosexuality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, T Andrew; Sackett-Fox, Kyrsten

    2018-01-15

    Research consistently finds that homosexuality elicits strong feelings of disgust, but the reasons remain unclear. In the current research, we investigate responses to gay men who violate social norms governing the expression of gender and sexuality. Two hundred forty-three college undergraduates read a vignette about a gay male college student whose personality traits (masculine, feminine, or neutral) and sexual behavior (active vs. passive) varied, and reported their affective responses to and cognitive appraisals of the target. The gay target who displayed a feminine personality elicited more disgust and was perceived as lower in gender role conformity than a gay man who displayed a masculine personality. Similarly, the gay target who assumed a passive sex role elicited more disgust and was perceived as lower in gender role conformity than a gay man who assumed an active sex role. The sexual behavior/disgust relationship was mediated by perceived gender role conformity.

  14. Dyadic, Partner, and Social Network Influences on Intimate Partner Violence among Male-Male Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Stephenson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite a recent focus on intimate partner violence (IPV among men who have sex with men (MSM, the male-male couple is largely absent from the IPV literature. Specifically, research on dyadic factors shaping IPV in male-male couples is lacking.Methods: We took a subsample of 403 gay/bisexual men with main partners from a 2011 survey of approximately 1,000 gay and bisexual men from Atlanta. Logistic regression models of recent (,12 month experience and perpetration of physical and sexual IPV examined dyadic factors, including racial differences, age differences, and social network characteristics of couples as key covariates shaping the reporting of IPV.Results: Findings indicate that men were more likely to report perpetration of physical violence if they were a different race to their main partner, whereas main partner age was associated with decreased reporting of physical violence. Having social networks that contained more gay friends was associated with significant reductions in the reporting of IPV, whereas having social networks comprised of sex partners or closeted gay friends was associated with increased reporting of IPV victimization and perpetration.Conclusion: The results point to several unique factors shaping the reporting of IPV within male-male couples and highlight the need for intervention efforts and prevention programs that focus on male couples, a group largely absent from both research and prevention efforts. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(4:316–323.

  15. Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AGLP Committees NEW! AGLP Board Video Introductions AGLP History Awards AGLP News Newsletter Archives Education Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health GAP LGBT Online Curriculum LGBT Treatment Guidelines LGBT Mental Health ...

  16. A lover's cock and other gay poems gay sunshine press, san francisco, 1980. A lover's cock and other gay poems gay sunshine press, san francisco, 1980

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonia Dilamar Araújo

    2008-01-01

    .... But only now they are having their works printed by Gay Sunshine Press. The collection of erotic poems - A Lover's Cock - reveals to the reader the sexual liberation which happened a century ahead of its time...

  17. The construction and validation of the homopositivity scale: an instrument measuring endorsement of positive stereotypes about gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Todd G; Bearden, Anomi G

    2007-01-01

    Social scientists appear to focus on negative beliefs about, and attitudes toward, gay men and lesbian women. This emphasis, though understandable in view of the widespread oppression of gay and lesbian individuals, is somewhat myopic because it ignores what might be referred to as the positive dimension of stereotypes. Although such a concept may appear oxymoronic, it is widely recognized that individuals may endorse a mixture of positive and negative stereotypes toward stigmatized groups such as African Americans and women. The purpose of the current series of studies (Study 1, N = 212; Study 2, N = 105) was to devise an instrument measuring endorsement of positive stereotypes about gay men (Homopositivity Scale; HPS). Two versions of the HPS (of varying length) were evaluated, with scale scores on both appearing to be internally consistent and factorially distinct from scales measuring negative stereotypes and prejudices about gay men. These studies also suggest that females are more likely than males to endorse positive stereotypes about gay men, and that such endorsement is negatively associated with need for uniqueness and need for cognition, and positively associated with media contact and benevolent sexism. The limitations of the two studies are outlined and the importance of assessing positive stereotypes about gay men in conjunction with oft-examined homonegativity is discussed.

  18. Visibilidade gay na escola: estudantes queer / Gay visibility in school: queer students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ferraz da Silva

    2007-01-01

    unfixing potencial of those individuals, intending to think the unthinkable about the school curriculum. This work starts on the visibility of a sexual identity that runs away from the heterossexual rule and challenges the education tendency to normality. The way this gay group stands and constructs their bodies allow them to cross the borders of male/female, pointing out thenon-natural caracter of sexual and gender identities based on biology, presenting themselves as diference that scapes from binary classifications. One of the references of this research is the thinking of Michel Foucault, specially when talking about thehistorical and discursive construction of concepts such as sexuality, identity, diference and normality that have been used to create and maintain patterns of conduct. When driving these problematization to the school context, I consider the queer theorization useful to think the possibility of a non heteronormative education, that would be able to produce diferences and desconstruct identities instead of cristalize them.

  19. Homophobia and communal coping for HIV risk management among gay men in relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowski, Courtney; Stephenson, Rob

    2015-02-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) remain disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic in the US and estimates suggest that one to two-thirds of new infections occur among main partners. Previous research has focused on individual MSM and their risk for HIV, yet couples' ability to manage risk has been largely understudied. In particular, the role that homophobia plays in shaping the ability of gay male couples to cope with HIV risk is currently understudied. A sample of 447 gay/bisexual men with main partners was taken from a 2011 survey of gay and bisexual men in Atlanta. Linear regression models were fitted for three couples' coping outcome scales (outcome efficacy, couple efficacy, communal coping) and included indicators of homophobia (internalized homophobia and homophobic discrimination). Findings indicate that reporting of increased levels of internalized homophobia were consistently associated with decreased outcome measures of couples' coping ability regarding risk management. The results highlight the role that homophobia plays in gay male couples' relationships and HIV risk, extending the existing literature in the field of same-sex relationships as influenced by homophobia.

  20. Perception of Gay Men as Defectors and Commitment to Group Defense Predict Aggressive Homophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian van Leeuwen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Homophobia encompasses a variety of attitudes and behaviors with distinct causal paths. We focus on aggressive homophobia, a propensity to feel anger and express aggression toward gay men. We investigated the conjecture that homosexual males might be seen, in recent Western cultures, as defectors from collective group defense. We predicted that consistent with a functional motive to punish and deter free riding, the perception of gay men as defectors would motivate aggression toward gay men. We also predicted that individuals with greater commitment to group defense might show more aggressive homophobia (as these individuals have more to lose from the defection than individuals who are not committed to group defense. Study 1 showed that aggressive homophobia correlated positively with the tendency to implicitly associate gay men with defection from group defense. Study 2 showed that a tendency to punish homosexual males for a theft correlated positively with commitment to group defense. The findings suggest that coalitional psychology might contribute to explaining the existence and quality of certain kinds of social stigma.

  1. Homophobia and Communal Coping for HIV risk management among Gay Men in Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowski, Courtney; Stephenson, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) remain disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic in the US and estimates suggest that one to two-thirds of new infections occur among main partners. Previous research has focused on individual MSM and their risk for HIV, yet couples’ ability to manage risk has been largely understudied. In particular, the role that homophobia plays in shaping the ability of gay male couples to cope with HIV risk is currently under-studied. A sample of 447 gay/bisexual men with main partners was taken from a 2011 survey of gay and bisexual men in Atlanta. Linear regression models were fitted for three couples’ coping outcome scales (outcome efficacy, couple efficacy, communal coping) and included indicators of homophobia (internalized homophobia and homophobic discrimination). Findings indicate that reporting of increased levels of internalized homophobia were consistently associated with decreased outcome measures of couples’ coping ability regarding risk management. The results highlight the role that homophobia plays in gay male couples’ relationships and HIV risk, extending the existing literature in the field of same-sex relationships as influenced by homophobia. PMID:25614049

  2. The Experiences and Meanings That Shape Heterosexual Fathers' Relationships With Their Gay Sons in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Jacques; Fourie, Eduard

    2016-12-01

    Gay men's relationships with their mothers are likely to be more positive than their relationships with their fathers, and fathers are less likely to be told, less likely to be told first, and more likely to react negatively to disclosure than mothers. Drawing on an interpretivist approach, an individual in-depth interview strategy was adopted in the study as a means of gathering data from six Afrikaans-speaking White fathers, between the ages of 53 and 61 years (median: 55.5 years), residing in Gauteng, South Africa. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed for later coding and analysis. Through thematic network analysis, eight organizing themes emerged and were explored. For the purpose of this article only three organizing themes are discussed, namely "subliminal awareness prior to coming out," "epistemic rupture of internal systems of ideas/beliefs," and "acceptance as a complex and ongoing dialectical and reconciliatory process." The themes support the view that most parents are neither totally rejecting nor fully accepting of their gay sons. Although the fathers may have attained a level of "loving denial" in the relationships with their gay sons, most continue to struggle with the meaning and expression of same-sex sexuality. Despite these challenges, it is recognized that the fathers are adapting to changing circumstances and are trying to find ways to tolerate, accommodate, and in some ways accept their gay sons.

  3. Size matters: a comparison of anti- and pro-gay organizations' estimates of the size of the gay population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Matthew V

    2002-01-01

    This articles examines estimates of the size of the gay population that are provided in the Websites of pro- and anti-gay groups. There are marked differences in the estimates that are provided by these groups. While most pro-gay groups suggest that approximately ten percent of the population is gay, anti-gay groups argue that only 1-3 percent of the population is gay. While none of the pro-gay groups address the methodological problems associated with the Kinsey data, all of the anti-gay groups that address the issue of size discredit Kinsey's work and/or the ten percent estimate that comes from Kinsey's work and is often cited by pro-gay organizations.

  4. Defeminization and adult psychological well-being among male homosexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, J

    1983-02-01

    Whitam's hypothesis that a majority of gay men exhibit a cross-gender role preference during childhood but that most defeminize by adulthood was tested and supported by data on 1556 gay men. Gay and heterosexual males were found to differ strongly in cross-gender characteristics during childhood but considerably less so during adulthood. By categorizing gay respondents simultaneously by both childhood and adult cross-gendering, sizable differences were found in measures of psychological well-being. No or minimal differences were found between homosexual and heterosexual males on these measures. It was suggested that these two groups may differ not at all or minimally on purely psychological measures but that major differences may be found in cultural variables and particularly in gender culture.

  5. Are Gay Communities Dying or Just in Transition? Results from an International Consultation Examining Structural Change in Gay Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon Rosser, B. R.; West, William; Weinmeyer, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to identify how urban gay communities are undergoing structural change, reasons for that change, and implications for HIV prevention planning. Key informants (N=29) at the AIDS Impact Conference from 17 cities in 14 countries completed surveys and participated in a facilitated structured dialog about how gay communities are changing. In all cities, the virtual gay community was identified as now larger than the offline physical community. Most cities identified that while the gay population in their cities appeared stable or growing, the gay community appeared in decline. Measures included greater integration of heterosexuals into historically gay-identified neighborhoods and movement of gay persons into suburbs, decreased number of gay bars and clubs, less attendance at gay events, less volunteerism in gay or AIDS organizations and overall identification and visibility as a gay community. Participants attributed structural change to multiple factors including gay neighborhood gentrification, achievement of civil rights, less discrimination, a vibrant virtual community and changes in drug use. Consistent with social assimilation, across cities, gay infrastructure, visibility and community identification appears to be decreasing. HIV prevention planning, interventions, treatment services, and policies need to be re-conceptualized for MSM in post-gay communities. Four recommendations for future HIV prevention and research are detailed. PMID:18484330

  6. Race Fucker: representações raciais na pornografia gay Race Fucker: racial representations in gay pornography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmundo Pinho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo, procuro explorar determinada perspectiva crítica relacionada à articulação entre raça, sexualidade e gênero, entendendo que a pornografia gay se prestaria exemplarmente a flagrar a produção de um sistema ordenado de classificações e categorias, estereótipos e representações, instituídos como um discurso capaz de ser lido como o inventário da fetichização socialmente produzida para o desejo sexual racializado. Para desenvolver essa perspectiva apresento uma breve discussão teórica sobre a pornografia, interrogada pela articulação prazer/poder e a leitura de três conjuntos êmicos de representação racial associados ao desejo homossexual: a negritude, a branquidade e a brasilidade.In this study the author seeks to explore a specific critical perspective related to the race, sexuality and gender articulation, understanding that gay pornography will be exemplary to show the production of a coordinated system of classifications and categories, stereotypes and representations built as a discourse that may be read as a socially produced inventory of fetichization for racialized sexual desire. In order to develop this view the author presents a short theoretical discussion on pornography, interrogated by the power/pleasure articulation and the reading of three hemic corpora of racial representation related to homosexual desire: blackness, whiteness and brazilianness.

  7. Mental Health Trainees' Explicit and Implicit Attitudes Toward Transracial Adoptive Families Headed by Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tony Xing; Jordan-Arthur, Brittany; Garafano, Jeffrey S; Curran, Laura

    2017-01-01

    We investigated 109 (79.8% female; 76% White, and 83.5% Heterosexual) mental health trainees' explicit and implicit attitudes toward heterosexual, lesbian, and gay White couples adopting and raising Black children. To determine explicit attitudes, we used a vignette depicting a Black child ready for adoption and three types of equally qualified White families who were headed by a heterosexual couple, gay couple, or lesbian couple. The trainees were asked to indicate which type of family they preferred to adopt the child. To determine implicit attitudes, we used the computer programed latency-based multifactor implicit association test (IAT) protocol. The IAT data were collected from each participant individually. Explicit data showed that over 80% of the participants indicated no strong preference in terms of which type of family should adopted the child. However, IAT data showed that the trainees implicitly preferred lesbian couples. Overall, the degree of congruence between explicit and implicit was very low. Implications for training were discussed.

  8. Wedding Imagery and Public Support for Gay Marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Paul R; Wilson, David C; Habegger, Michael

    2016-08-01

    This study uses an experiment embedded in a large, nationally representative survey to test whether exposure to imagery of a gay or lesbian couple's wedding influences support for gay marriage. It also tests whether any such effects depend on the nature of the image (gay or lesbian couple, kissing or not) and viewer characteristics (sex, age, race, education, religion, and ideology). Results show that exposure to imagery of a gay couple kissing reduced support for gay marriage relative to the baseline. Other image treatments (gay couple not kissing, lesbian couple kissing, lesbian couple not kissing) did not significantly influence opinion.

  9. Violence against bisexuals, gays and lesbians in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Hernández, Luis; Granados-Cosme, José Arturo

    2006-01-01

    An essential premise of this work is that three dominant ideologies explain oppression against BGL, as a result of a gender system: adhesion to gender stereotypes, androcentrism and heterosexism. Three hundred eighteen bisexual and gay males (BG) and 188 bisexual and lesbian females (BL) were surveyed. By means of a self-applied questionnaire, variables of interest were researched. The following trends were observed: an important number of men and women interviewed suffered violence in their childhood and adolescence because they defied gender stereotypes, and not because of their sexual orientation; BG males were more often victims of violence than BL females. Within the BG group, those who challenged gender stereotypes were more frequently attacked than those who did not; men were identified as aggressors more frequently than women; and in the BG group, gender stereotype transgression was associated with the perception of suffering violence in the future.

  10. The influence of dual-identity development on the psychosocial functioning of African-American gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Isiaah; Allison, Kevin W; Zamboni, Brian D; Soto, Tomas

    2002-08-01

    To examine the influence of racial-ethnic and sexual identity development on the psychosocial functioning of African-American gay and bisexual men (AAGBM), 174 AAGBM completed questionnaire packets designed to assess their levels of racial-ethnic and sexual identity development, self-esteem, social support, male gender role stress, HIV prevention self-efficacy, psychological distress, and life satisfaction. The results indicate that AAGBM who possess more positive (i.e., integrated) self-identification as being African American and gay reported higher levels of self-esteem, HIV prevention self-efficacy, stronger social support networks, greater levels of life satisfaction, and lower levels of male gender role and psychological distress than their counterparts who reported less positive (i.e., less well integrated) African American and gay identity development. Although higher levels of racial-ethnic identity development were associated with greater levels of life satisfaction, sexual identity development was not.

  11. HOMOSEXUALITY AND DISCRIMINATION: INTERNALIZED PREJUDICE IN GAY MALES

    OpenAIRE

    ADRIANA NUNAN DO NASCIMENTO SILVA

    2007-01-01

    Apesar de nas últimas duas décadas termos presenciado o surgimento de uma vasta gama de estudos relacionados à homossexualidade, pouco foi produzido sobre o tema do preconceito sexual internalizado e sua relação com a formação da identidade do sujeito. Através de conceitos oriundos da Psicologia Social, esta tese visa proceder a uma investigação exploratória deste tipo específico de preconceito e sua correlação com sintomas clínicos tais como depressã...

  12. White Toenails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page. Please enable Javascript in your browser. White Toenails White toenails can develop for several reasons. Trauma, such ... trauma does not cause broken blood vessels, a white spot may appear under the nail. The spot ...

  13. Offsetting Risks: High School Gay-Straight Alliances and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Nicholas C.; Flentje, Annesa; Cochran, Bryan N.

    2011-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are at risk for engaging in negative health behaviors and for experiencing at-school victimization. Specific benefits of attending a high school with a gay-straight alliance (GSA), including lower levels of suicidality, have been published; however, it is unclear whether GSAs are related to…

  14. Images of Male Friendships: An Investigation of How African American Undergraduate Men Develop Interpersonal Relationships with Other Men at a Predominantly White Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Brian Lamont

    2013-01-01

    African American men enter postsecondary institutions having been socialized to adopt stereotypical notions of masculinity. These traditional expectations of masculinity play a role in how African American men negotiate relationships with their male counterparts on the campus. African American men cultivate close relationships with other men to…

  15. Gay and Bisexual Adolescent Boys' Perspectives on Parent-Adolescent Relationships and Parenting Practices Related to Teen Sex and Dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Brian A; Thomann, Matthew; Coventry, Ryan; Macapagal, Kathryn; Mustanski, Brian; Newcomb, Michael E

    2017-12-26

    Close parent-adolescent relationships and specific parenting practices (e.g., communication about sex, monitoring) are associated with reduced sexual risk behavior among heterosexual youth. Despite gay/bisexual male youth being at increased risk of HIV, little is known about parental influences on their sexual behavior. As such, the goal of the current study was to examine parent-adolescent relationships and parenting practices related to teen sex and dating from the perspective of gay/bisexual adolescent boys. Online focus groups were conducted with 52 gay/bisexual male youth ages 14-17 years. Most gay/bisexual adolescent boys felt that their sexual orientation had an influence on their relationships with their parents and discussions about sex/dating. Although some felt that their relationships improved after coming out, a larger percentage reported that it put strain on their relationships. Discussions about sex/dating generally decreased after coming out, but some youth described positive conversations with their parents. Many reported that their parents struggled with whether or not to adapt parenting practices (e.g., rules about dating) after they came out. Youth consistently noted that parent-adolescent relationships and parenting practices depended on the adolescent's level of outness. Findings have important implications for refining HIV prevention programs for gay/bisexual adolescent boys, especially interventions that include parents.

  16. Corpos Consumidos: cultura de consumo gay carioca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo André Teixeira Ayrosa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O estudo de grupos socialmente marginalizados, como gays, negros e moradores de favelas, entre outros, é de extrema relevância, uma vez que a tais minorias é praticamente negado o status de membros de uma sociedade moderna e de consumo (BARBOSA, 2006. O objetivo deste artigo é investigar como o discurso associado à posse do corpo é utilizado por homens gays para administrar o estigma relacionado à identidade homossexual. Como métodos de coleta de dados, foram adotados, antes de tudo, uma observação participante de um grupo gay da cidade do Rio de Janeiro e, posteriormente, 20 entrevistas semiestruturadas com homens gays no período compreendido entre os anos de 2005 e 2008. Os resultados sugerem que: (i o corpo é uma construção e, sendo assim, é construído e manipulado segundo os padrões estéticos da cultura gay; (ii o grupo gay estudado constrói o corpo de acordo com um ideal de hipermasculinidade; e (iii os significados associados ao corpo são usados como forma de demarcação na cultura gay. Esses resultados evidenciaram uma imensa gama de serviços estéticos ligados a esse culto ao corpo por parte do grupo. O corpo é, então, uma “insígnia” que faz daquele que o possui um vigilante de si mesmo, o qual controla, disciplina, domestica e aprisiona esse mesmo corpo, visando a atingir “a boa forma” ou a forma requerida pelo grupo de que faz parte. ----- Consumed Bodies: gay culture consumption in Rio ----- ABSTRACT ----- The study of socially marginalized groups, such as gays and blacks, among others, is highly relevant since these minorities are virtually denied the status of members of modern consumer society (BARBOSA, 2006. This study aims to investigate how possession of body is used by gay men to deal with the stigma of homosexual identity. The study is based on participant observation in a group of gay men in the city of Rio de Janeiro, as well as 20 semi-structured interviews with gay men conducted between

  17. Are gay communities dying or just in transition? Results from an international consultation examining possible structural change in gay communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon Rosser, B R; West, William; Weinmeyer, Richard

    2008-05-01

    This study sought to identify how urban gay communities are undergoing structural change, reasons for that change, and implications for HIV prevention planning. Key informants (N=29) at the AIDS Impact Conference from 17 cities in 14 countries completed surveys and participated in a facilitated structured dialog about if gay communities are changing, and if so, how they are changing. In all cities, the virtual gay community was identified as currently larger than the offline physical community. Most cities identified that while the gay population in their cities appeared stable or growing, the gay community appeared in decline. Measures included greater integration of heterosexuals into historically gay-identified neighborhoods and movement of gay persons into suburbs, decreased number of gay bars/clubs, less attendance at gay events, less volunteerism in gay or HIV/AIDS organizations, and the overall declining visibility of gay communities. Participants attributed structural change to multiple factors including gay neighborhood gentrification, achievement of civil rights, less discrimination, a vibrant virtual community, and changes in drug use. Consistent with social assimilation, gay infrastructure, visibility, and community identification appears to be decreasing across cities. HIV prevention planning, interventions, treatment services, and policies need to be re-conceptualized for MSM in the future. Four recommendations for future HIV prevention and research are detailed.

  18. Research Update. Providing Leisure Services for Gays and Lesbians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Arnold H.

    1993-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on leisure services for gays and lesbians. The article highlights research on homosexuals, from various disciplines; it focuses on gay and lesbian youth and notes practical implications for leisure service delivery. (SM)

  19. Identity and Sex: Concurent Aspects of Gay Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Monterrubio, J. Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The present article aims to contribute to the recognition of two relevant aspects in gay travel; identity and sex. The paper explores the existing published work related to the relationships between tourism, gay men and identity. It concludes that the issue of identity commonly plays a crucial role as a travel reason in gay tourism. Also, it analyses the research evidence to suggest that sex is a frequently-present phenomenon in gay travel. By critically analysing the available research, the ...

  20. Fear of ostracism still silences some gay MDs, students.

    OpenAIRE

    Robb, N

    1996-01-01

    "Coming out" remains a very major decision for a gay or lesbian medical student. Canadian students interviewed for this article say they have feared being ostracized by their peers or encountering bias among older faculty members. A recent survey by the US-based Gay and Lesbian Medical Association found that 59% of gay and lesbian physician and medical student respondents have experienced job-related discrimination because of their sexuality. However, other gay/lesbian physicians and students...

  1. Gambaran Konflik Pada Tahapan-Tahapan Proses Coming Out Gay

    OpenAIRE

    Ginting, Rizty Desta Mahestri

    2011-01-01

    Pandangan masyarakat Indonesia secara umum masih menolak keberadaan kaum gay. Kondisi ini memberikan kesulitan tersendiri bagi kaum gay di Indonesia untuk melakukan coming out. Hal ini menyebabkan proses coming out yang dilakukan gay seringkali mengundang resiko konflik. Konflik yang dialami saat coming out berpeluang menghambat proses coming out. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk memahami bagaimana konflik yang terjadi pada tiap tahapan proses coming out gay. Untuk menjawab ma...

  2. Look into the HIV Epidemic of Gay Community with a Socio-Cultural Perspective: A Qualitative Study in China, 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huijing; Lv, Fan; Zhang, Nanci Nanyi; Wu, Zunyou; Liao, Qinghua; Chang, Zhanjun; Li, Yi; Xu, Huifang; OuYang, Lin; Huan, Xiping; Yang, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Current Chinese studies continue to view male homosexuality through a disease focused lens which pays limited attention to socio-cultural aspects of sexual behavior and HIV transmission. This qualitative study aimed to investigate how socio-cultural factors influence gay men's sexual beliefs and behaviors in contemporary China, and their implications for HIV epidemic. Qualitative methodology was used in this study. During 2015-2016, in-depth interviews were conducted with 61 self identified gay men in Jiangxi, Henan, Heilongjiang, Guangdong, Jiangsu provinces and Chongqing municipality of China. Our study revealed that: 1) influenced by Chinese traditional culture, gay men have conflicts on self-identity, which led to low self-acceptance and negative attitude on sex, and huge socio-psychological stress; 2) a generational differences within gay community was observed, reflected in varied sexual attitudes and practices as well as way for approaching new friends, both of which have implications and challenges on HIV control and prevention; 3) socio-cultural barriers, including open minds towards casual sex and nonmonogamous relationship, and low priority of health demands were widely observed and led to negative coping with AIDS among gay community. It is essential to take a holistic view into gay men's HIV epidemic in China. Socio-cultural barriers for HIV control and prevention found in this study call for serious and imperative consideration on integrated measures, including targeted efforts towards effective sex education and further inclusion of socio-cultural perspectives in HIV/AIDS interventions for gay men.

  3. Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Adoptive Parents' Experiences in Preschool Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E

    2014-01-01

    Little research has examined the school experiences of lesbian/gay (LG) parent families or adoptive parent families. The current exploratory study examined the experiences of 79 lesbian, 75 gay male, and 112 heterosexual adoptive parents of preschool-age children with respect to their (a) level of disclosure regarding their LG parent and adoptive family status at their children's schools; (b) perceived challenges in navigating the preschool environment and advocating on behalf of their children and families; and (c) recommendations to teachers and schools about how to create affirming school environments with respect to family structure, adoption, and race/ethnicity. Findings revealed that the majority of parents were open about their LG and adoptive family status, and had not encountered challenges related to family diversity. Those parents who did experience challenges tended to describe implicit forms of marginalization, such as insensitive language and school assignments. Recommendations for teachers included discussing and reading books about diverse families, tailoring assignments to meet the needs of diverse families, and offering school community-building activities and events to help bridge differences across families.

  4. White Ring; White ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, H.; Yuzawa, H. [Nikken Sekkei Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-01-05

    White Ring is a citizen`s gymnasium used for figure skating and short track speed skating games of 18th Winter Olympic Games in 1998. White Ring is composed of a main-arena and a sub-arena. For the main-arena with an area 41mtimes66m, an ice link can be made by disengaging the potable floor and by flowing brine in the bridged polystyrene pipes embedded in the concrete floor. Due to the fortunate groundwater in this site, well water is used for the outside air treatment energy in 63% during heating and in 35% during cooling. Ammonia is used as a cooling medium for refrigerating facility. For the heating of audience area in the large space, heat load from the outside is reduced by enhancing the heat insulation performance of the roof of arena. The audience seats are locally heated using heaters. For the White Ring, high quality environment is realized for games through various functions of the large-scale roof of the large space. Success of the big event was expected. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Jamaica, Three Years Later: Effects of Intensified Pro-Gay Activism on Severe Prejudice Against Lesbians and Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Keon

    2016-01-01

    Jamaica has developed an international reputation for severe anti-gay prejudice. However, in the past few years, between 2012 and 2015, intensified waves of activism have increased the visibility of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Jamaicans, and supported their social and legal inclusion in Jamaican society. This research investigated the effects of that activism by taking advantage of two large, representative surveys of Jamaicans' attitudes toward lesbians and gay men: one in 2012 and one in 2015. Over the three-year period there were significant reductions in desire for social distance and opposition to gay rights. However, there was no significant change in anti-gay attitudes, and there was evidence of an increase in anti-gay behaviors. There was also no evidence of polarization of responses to gay men and lesbians; rather, the most prejudiced Jamaicans showed the largest reductions in bias. Implications of these findings for activism in Jamaica and other anti-gay countries are discussed.

  6. The Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Identity Scale: Factor Analytic Evidence and Associations with Health and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J.; Burks, Alixandra C.; Golom, Frank D.; Stroud, Caroline H.; Graham, James L.

    2017-01-01

    We tested the psychometric properties of the Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Identity Scale. Findings included (1) a three-factor structure (i.e., Negative Identity, Identity Uncertainty, Identity Superiority); (2) less positive identities among HIV-positive persons, African Americans, males, and bisexuals; and (3) convergent patterns with subjective…

  7. The Challenges to Intimacy and Sexual Relationships for Gay Men in HIV Serodiscordant Relationships: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Robert; Bor, Robert

    2001-01-01

    HIV creates imbalance in long term, HIV-serodiscordant, gay male relationships, particularly in sexual relations and issues of physical and emotional intimacy. Partners employ a range of coping strategies and techniques. This article explores these issues and how partners preserve their relationships in the face of these unique challenges. (BF)

  8. Gay Youth at a Social Gathering: Play and Identity Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Donald B.; Geddes, Jackie

    Being gay or lesbian has been associated with many risk factors for youth, including the risk of rejection by family and peers. A limited study concerning gay youth at play and the significance of play in identity development of gay youth is reported here. The report has two purposes: to describe the social activities at a gathering specifically…

  9. Coping with Perceived Ethnic Prejudice on the Gay Scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspal, Rusi

    2017-01-01

    There has been only cursory research into the sociological and psychological aspects of ethnic/racial discrimination among ethnic minority gay and bisexual men, and none that focuses specifically upon British ethnic minority gay men. This article focuses on perceptions of intergroup relations on the gay scene among young British South Asian gay…

  10. Men as Victims: "Victim" Identities, Gay Identities, and Masculinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The impact and meanings of homophobic violence on gay men's identities are explored with a particular focus on their identities as men and as gay men. Homosexuality can pose a challenge to conventional masculinities, and for some gay men, being victimized on account of sexual orientation reawakens conflicts about their masculinity that they…

  11. Addiction and recovery in gay and lesbian persons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kus, Robert J

    1995-01-01

    .... Addiction and Recovery is a vital resourcefor anyone providing servicesfor gay, lesbian, and bisexualclients. Rik Isensee,LCSW Author, LOVE BEIWEEN MEN, and GROWING UP GAY IN A DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILYMore pre-publication REVIEWS,COMMENTARIES, EVALUATIONS . .. "A ddiction and Recovery in Gay and Lesbian Persons" is an excellentcollection of multifa...

  12. Studying the Experiences of Gay and Lesbian Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Christopher J.

    1998-01-01

    Explores how gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth are integrated into society. The sexual minority youth of today have greater opportunities for development and acceptance than older gays and lesbians had, however, gay youth are still at high risk for confusion, societal pressure, and feelings of self-destruction and isolation. (EMS)

  13. Attitudes towards lesbians and gay men and support for lesbian and gay human rights among psychology students

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, S J; Kitzinger, C.; Wilkinson, S

    2003-01-01

    A questionnaire comprising two scales, the short form of the Attitudes Towards Lesbians and Gay Men Scale (ATLG-S; Herek, 1984) and the newly devised Support for Lesbian and Gay Human Rights Scale (SLGHR) were administered to 226 students taking undergraduate psychology courses at universities in the United Kingdom, to assess their attitudes towards lesbians and gay men, and their level of support for lesbian and gay human rights. The results indicated that whilst only a small percentage of r...

  14. Stigma, Social Context, and Mental Health: Lesbian and Gay Couples Across the Transition to Adoptive Parenthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.

    2010-01-01

    This is the first study to examine change in depression and anxiety across the first year of adoptive parenthood in same-sex couples (90 couples: 52 lesbian, 38 gay male). Given that sexual minorities uniquely contend with sexual orientation-related stigma, this study examined how both internalized and enacted forms of stigma affect the mental health of lesbians and gay men during the transition to parenthood. In addition, the role of contextual support was examined. Higher perceived workplace support, family support, and relationship quality were related to lower depressive and anxious symptoms at the time of the adoption, and higher perceived friend support was related to lower anxiety symptoms. Lower internalized homophobia and higher perceived neighborhood gay-friendliness were related to lower depressive symptoms. Finally, individuals with high internalized homophobia who lived in states with unfavorable legal climates regarding gay adoption experienced the steepest increases in depressive and anxious symptoms. Findings have important implications for counselors working with sexual minorities, especially those experiencing the transition to parenthood. PMID:21171740

  15. Gender-Typed Behavior Over Time in Children with Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Garcia, Randi L.

    2016-01-01

    The current longitudinal study examined patterns and predictors of parent-reported gender-typed play behavior in adopted boys and girls in lesbian, gay, and heterosexual two-parent families, across early childhood (Mage = 2.82 to 6.06 years). Specifically, using a sample of 181 couples (56 lesbian couples, 48 gay male couples, and 77 heterosexual couples), we examined parent reports of children’s gender-typed play behavior on the Pre-School Activities Inventory (PSAI; Golombok & Rust, 1993) at three time points (mean age = 2.82 years at T1, 3.93 years at T2, and 6.06 years at T3). Family structure variables (i.e., parents’ gender and sexual orientation; children’s gender and sibling status) were included as predictors. At T1, according to parent reports, children in lesbian-parent families had less gender-differentiated behavior (boys were less masculine, girls were less feminine) than children in heterosexual- and gay-parent families, whereas the degree of gender differentiation did not differ between heterosexual- versus gay-parent families. Findings from a Common Fate Growth Model (Ledermann & Macho, 2014) revealed that, regardless of family type, the parent-reported gender-typed behavior of boys, but not girls, significantly changed over time (i.e., boys’ behavior became more masculine). Our findings have implications for researchers who study gender development in children and adolescents, particularly those who are being raised by two mothers or two fathers. PMID:27416364

  16. Preschool selection considerations and experiences of school mistreatment among lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Smith, JuliAnna Z.

    2016-01-01

    The current study is the first to investigate the school selection considerations and school-related experiences of sexual-minority parents with young children. The sample consisted of 210 parents in 105 couples, including 35 lesbian couples, 30 gay male couples, and 40 heterosexual couples, all of whom had adopted a child three years earlier. We found that parents with less income were more likely to consider cost in choosing a preschool, and parents with less education were more likely to consider location. More educated parents tended to emphasize racial diversity and the presence of adoptive families, and, among sexual-minority parents, the presence of other lesbian/gay parents. Sexual-minority parents were more likely to consider racial diversity than heterosexual parents. In reporting on their experiences with schools, heterosexual parents were more likely to perceive mistreatment due to their adoptive status than sexual-minority parents, and sexual-minority parents living in less gay-friendly communities were more likely to perceive mistreatment due to their sexual orientation than sexual-minority parents living in more gay-friendly communities. Our findings have implications for early childhood educators and administrators seeking to create an inclusive learning community for all types of families. PMID:27110062

  17. Preschool selection considerations and experiences of school mistreatment among lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E; Smith, JuliAnna Z

    2014-01-01

    The current study is the first to investigate the school selection considerations and school-related experiences of sexual-minority parents with young children. The sample consisted of 210 parents in 105 couples, including 35 lesbian couples, 30 gay male couples, and 40 heterosexual couples, all of whom had adopted a child three years earlier. We found that parents with less income were more likely to consider cost in choosing a preschool, and parents with less education were more likely to consider location. More educated parents tended to emphasize racial diversity and the presence of adoptive families, and, among sexual-minority parents, the presence of other lesbian/gay parents. Sexual-minority parents were more likely to consider racial diversity than heterosexual parents. In reporting on their experiences with schools, heterosexual parents were more likely to perceive mistreatment due to their adoptive status than sexual-minority parents, and sexual-minority parents living in less gay-friendly communities were more likely to perceive mistreatment due to their sexual orientation than sexual-minority parents living in more gay-friendly communities. Our findings have implications for early childhood educators and administrators seeking to create an inclusive learning community for all types of families.

  18. Internalized homophobia, mental health, sexual behaviors, and outness of gay/bisexual men from Southwest China

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Wenjian; Zheng, Lijun; Xu, Yin; Zheng, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Background Social attitudes toward male homosexuality in China so far are still not optimistic. Sexual minorities in China have reported high levels of internalized homophobia. Methods This Internet-based study examined the associations among internalized homophobia, mental health, sexual behaviors, and outness among 435 gay/bisexual men in Southwest China from 2014 to 2015. Latent profile analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, univariate logistic regression, and separate multivariate logist...

  19. An imputation-based genome-wide association study on traits related to male reproduction in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueyan; Zhao, Kewei; Ren, Jun; Zhang, Feng; Jiang, Chao; Hong, Yuan; Jiang, Kai; Yang, Qiang; Wang, Chengbin; Ding, Nengshui; Huang, Lusheng; Zhang, Zhiyan; Xing, Yuyun

    2016-05-01

    Boar reproductive traits are economically important for the pig industry. Here we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for 13 reproductive traits measured on 205 F2 boars at day 300 using 60 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data imputed from a reference panel of 1200 pigs in a White Duroc × Erhualian F2 intercross population. We identified 10 significant loci for seven traits on eight pig chromosomes (SSC). Two loci surpassed the genome-wide significance level, including one for epididymal weight around 60.25 Mb on SSC7 and one for semen temperature around 43.69 Mb on SSC4. Four of the 10 significant loci that we identified were consistent with previously reported quantitative trait loci for boar reproduction traits. We highlighted several interesting candidate genes at these loci, including APN, TEP1, PARP2, SPINK1 and PDE1C. To evaluate the imputation accuracy, we further genotyped nine GWAS top SNPs using PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism or Sanger sequencing. We found an average of 91.44% of genotype concordance, 95.36% of allelic concordance and 0.85 of r(2) correlation between imputed and real genotype data. This indicates that our GWAS mapping results based on imputed SNP data are reliable, providing insights into the genetic basis of boar reproductive traits. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  20. It's Not Me, It's You: Perceptions of Partner Body Image Preferences Associated With Eating Disorder Symptoms in Gay and Heterosexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussner, Lauren M; Smith, April R

    2015-01-01

    This study explored perceptions of partner body image preferences and symptoms of disordered eating in gay and heterosexual men. Participants were male college students (n = 201; M age = 20.46), and over one third identified as gay. We compared discrepancies between participants' current and ideal body type and participants' current body type and the body type they believed they should have to attract a dating partner. For gay men, the discrepancy between their current body and the body they believed they should have to attract a dating partner was significantly greater than the discrepancy between their current and ideal body types. In gay and heterosexual men, the discrepancy between current body and the body they believed they should have to attract a dating partner predicted eating, shape, and weight concern. Results suggest that perceptions of partner body image preferences may contribute to eating disorder pathology in men.

  1. La Gay Pride entre subversion et banalisation

    OpenAIRE

    Blidon, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Depuis l’émeute de Stonewall en 1969, la Gay Pride s’est banalisée jusqu’à faire partie intégrante du calendrier festif annuel des métropoles nord-américaines ou européennes. De manifestation confidentielle faisant figure de coming out collectif mettant en cause la domination hétérosexuelle et le statut de minoritaire dans lequel elle enferme les gays, les lesbiennes, les trans- ou les bisexuel(le)s, elle est devenue une fête urbaine qui draine des participants tant hétérosexuels qu’homosexue...

  2. The medical value and cost-effectiveness of an exercise test for sport preparticipation evaluation in asymptomatic middle-aged white male and female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Laurent; Kervio, Gaelle; Doutreleau, Stephane; Mathieu, Jean-Philippe; Guy, Jean-Michel; Mignot, Aude; Corneloup, Luc; Passard, François; Laporte, Thierry; Girard-Girod, Aude; Hennebert, Olivier; Bernadet, Philippe; Vincent-Chevalier, Marie-Pierre; Gencel, Laurent; Carré, François

    2017-03-01

    Cardiovascular events related to high-intensity sport practice are rare but dramatic. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of these events after the age of 35 years. The value of a maximal exercise test (ET) for detection of athletes at risk remains a matter of debate. The aim of this prospective multicentre study was to clarify the medical value and cost-effectiveness of an ET in middle-aged white asymptomatic athletes who participate in high-intensity sport. All athletes had a physical examination, assessment of cardiovascular risk factors, a resting electrocardiogram and an ET. In case of abnormal ET, complementary cardiovascular evaluation was performed, when requested, to detect potential cardiovascular disease. 1361 asymptomatic athletes (mean age 50.4±9.6 years; mean training 5.1±3.2h/week; 10.4% women) with a normal resting electrocardiogram and without cardiovascular disease were consecutively included. An abnormal ET was reported in 144 subjects (94% men); this was positively related to the subject's age and cardiovascular risk level. Cardiac arrhythmias (48%) and CAD symptoms (33.3%) were mainly reported. Cardiovascular disease was confirmed in 24 cases (1.7% from the whole population; 16.7% from those with an abnormal ET) - mainly CAD (n=12) and arterial hypertension (n=8). Seventy athletes presented significant unexplained arrhythmias. The cost was approximately €8450 for every confirmed case of cardiovascular disease. In this multicentre study in middle-aged athletes, a systematic ET was abnormal in 10.6% of cases. About 2% of subjects had cardiovascular disease, mainly arrhythmias and CAD. From these results, it seems that in a trained population aged >35 years, ET should be targeted at men with at least two cardiovascular risk factors, with acceptable cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictors of prejudice against lesbians and gay men in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Keon; Cowell, Noel M

    2015-01-01

    Jamaica has acquired an international reputation for strong antigay prejudice, incidents of antigay violence, and outspoken, antigay public figures. In recent years, national and international gay rights groups have attempted to improve this situation. However, these efforts have not been based on an empirical analysis of the factors underlying Jamaican antigay bias, which is essential for developing effective prejudice-reducing strategies. Using data collected in two large-scale national surveys in 2011 and 2012 (N 2011 = 997, N 2012 = 945), we investigated predictors of Jamaican antigay prejudice, including age, gender, religious affiliation, education, income, and a preference for dancehall music. We also examined changes in reported antigay bias between 2011 and 2012 after accounting for other predictors. All proposed variables predicted some aspect of antigay prejudice, though sometimes in unexpected ways. Male gender emerged as a particularly important predictor. We discuss the strengths and limitations of our design and the implications of our findings for prejudice-reduction strategies in Jamaica.

  4. Leading Causes of Death in Males United States, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by Race/Ethnicity, 2004 All Males by Race/Ethnicity, 2004 All Males by Age Group, 2004 White Males by Age Group, 2004 ... by Race/Ethnicity, 2003 All Males by Race/Ethnicity, 2002 All Males by Age Group, 2002 White Males by Age Group, 2002 ...

  5. PS1-02: Health Behaviors in Asian-Indian and White, Non-Hispanic Vegetarian Males in the California Men’s Health Study (CMHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Nirupa; Van Den Eeden, Stephen; Jacobsen, Steven; Ahmed, Ameena; Quinn, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies show a reduced risk of chronic diseases among vegetarians. A vegetarian diet based on fruits, vegetables, and legumes is popular among Asian-Indians. The purpose of this study is to determine if race/ethnicity, Asian-Indian and white non-Hispanic (WNH), modifies the association between a vegetarian diet and health behaviors. Methods Subjects are participants in the CMHS, a multiethnic cohort of 84,170 men 45–69 years of age enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Southern and Northern California (2001–02). Descriptive and multivariable statistics were used to evaluate data from a mailed survey. Results Vegetarians accounted for 1.4% (736/51,901) of WNHs and 20.4% (124/602) of Asian-Indians. Age was not associated with diet among Asian-Indians, but among WNHs, vegetarian diet was associated with younger age (vegetarians reported higher educational attainment, with at least a college degree compared to non-vegetarians (73.1% vs. 52.8%, p vegetarians were first generation immigrants, with a majority residing in the U.S. vegetarians were more likely to self-report a healthy weight (51.5% vs. 24.7%, p self-report a CVD event (8.2% vs. 11.5%, p Vegetarians in both groups more often consumed a lower fat diet compared to non-vegetarians [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 3.22 (2.80–3.71)]. Vegetarians reported consuming more fruits and vegetables; however a significant difference wasn’t detected among Asian-Indians. Further, WNH vegetarians reported less sedentary activity [AOR = 0.65 (0.54–0.78)] and more moderate/vigorous physical activity [AOR = 1.87 (1.55–2.25)] than WNH non-vegetarians, however this was not the case among Asian-Indians. Vegetarians in both groups were less likely to report alcohol use or current/ever smoking compared to non-vegetarians. Discussion Compared to non-vegetarians, vegetarians more often reported healthier behaviors including a lower fat diet, higher fruit and vegetable intake, more physical and less sedentary activity. In

  6. White lies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erat, S.; Gneezy, U.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we distinguish between two types of white lies: those that help others at the expense of the person telling the lie, which we term altruistic white lies, and those that help both others and the liar, which we term Pareto white lies. We find that a large fraction of participants are

  7. Attitudes towards lesbians and gay men and support for lesbian and gay human rights among psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Sonja J; Kitzinger, Celia; Wilkinson, Sue

    2002-01-01

    A questionnaire comprising two scales, the short form of the Attitudes Towards Lesbians and Gay Men Scale (ATLG-S; Herek, 1984) and the newly devised Support for Lesbian and Gay Human Rights Scale (SLGHR) were administered to 226 students taking undergraduate psychology courses at universities in the United Kingdom, to assess their attitudes towards lesbians and gay men, and their level of support for lesbian and gay human rights. The results indicated that whilst only a small percentage of respondents expressed negative attitudes towards lesbians and gay men on the ATLG-S, the sample as a whole did not overwhelmingly support lesbian and gay human rights. The lack of support for lesbian and gay human rights is discussed in relation to its implications for psychology students as future practitioners and policymakers.

  8. Policy Issues in Gay and Lesbian Adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Notes that adoption agencies have developed few specific policies on the issue of lesbian and gay adoption. Provides an overview of key considerations about homosexual adopters, including beliefs and values of agency professionals, the legal and social ramifications of adoption into a relationship not based on marriage, and possible consequences…

  9. Legal Protections Gay Students Must Receive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Julie

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses practical guidance on schools' legal rights and responsibilities with respect to students, programs, and curriculum. Like all other individuals, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students are guaranteed equal protection under the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution and free speech and association under the…

  10. Colleges and Gay Student Organizations: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Annette

    1984-01-01

    Reviews recent litigation concerning colleges' refusal to recognize gay student organizations. Concludes that recognition can be denied only in very rare circumstances when groups fail to abide by reasonable time, place, and manner regulations or when their behavior incites unlawful action. (JAC)

  11. Sampling Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ilan H.; Wilson, Patrick A.

    2009-01-01

    Sampling has been the single most influential component of conducting research with lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) populations. Poor sampling designs can result in biased results that will mislead other researchers, policymakers, and practitioners. Investigators wishing to study LGB populations must therefore devote significant energy and…

  12. Parental Influence, Gay Youths, and Safer Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSala, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    To begin to understand the role that family relationships and interactions play in young gay men's decisions to avoid unsafe sexual practices, parents and sons (ages 16 to 25) in 30 families were qualitatively interviewed about issues and concerns related to HIV risk. Most of the youths reported feeling obliged to their parents to stay healthy,…

  13. Gay Rights on Campus, circa 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Elizabeth P.; Ford, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    The environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, staff, and faculty on college campuses has certainly improved over the last generation, but recent dramatic episodes confirm the continuing need for vigilance and reform. Students remain the constituency most vulnerable to the effects of entrenched bigotry: the harassment…

  14. Listening to Gay and Lesbian Teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissen, Rita M.

    1993-01-01

    Surveys of homosexual support groups nationwide asked how respondents felt about being gay in high school and how school staff could improve the experience. Few had happy high school memories. Most wanted teachers to actively interrupt homophobic and prejudiced behavior and promote awareness. Preservice teachers need preparation for such…

  15. A lover's cock and other gay poems gay sunshine press, san francisco, 1980. A lover's cock and other gay poems gay sunshine press, san francisco, 1980.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Dilamar Araújo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The union of the two French symbolist poets Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine revolutionizes the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries with its homoerotic poems. But only now they are having their works printed by Gay Sunshine Press. The collection of erotic poems - A Lover's Cock - reveals to the reader the sexual liberation which happened a century ahead of its time. Rimbaud and Verlaine's is a bold, strong and direct style for a period when to be gay was infamous and unacceptable. In fact, they were ostracized by the Parisian society because of their rude behaviour. The union of the two French symbolist poets Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine revolutionizes the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries with its homoerotic poems. But only now they are having their works printed by Gay Sunshine Press. The collection of erotic poems - A Lover's Cock - reveals to the reader the sexual liberation which happened a century ahead of its time. Rimbaud and Verlaine's is a bold, strong and direct style for a period when to be gay was infamous and unacceptable. In fact, they were ostracized by the Parisian society because of their rude behaviour.

  16. College Students' Attitudes toward Gays and Lesbians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonody, Jill M.; Siebert, Darcy Clay; Rutledge, Scott Edward

    2009-01-01

    A variety of pedagogical techniques have shown promising results in promoting acceptance and affirmation of gays and lesbians among students in social work, allied health, and education professions. In this article we examine whether 211 students enrolled in a human sexuality course in a southeastern university changed their attitudes toward gays…

  17. HIV among Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Gay and Bisexual Men Format: Select One ...

  18. Histopatologi Usus Halus Tikus Putih Jantan yang Diberikan Deksametason dan Vitamin E (HISTOPATHOLOGY SMALL INSTESTINE OF MALE WHITE RATS THAT WERE DEXAMETHASONE AND VITAMINE E SUPLEMENTED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadek Karina Dewi Wijayanthi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Deksametason telah diketahui sebagai obat kortikosteroid sintetik yang banyak digunakan oleh masyarakat. Jika deksametason digunakan dalam jangka waktu panjang dan pemakaian dosis besar, menyebabkan stres oksidatif pada sel akibat akumulasi radikal bebas yang menyebabkan kematian sel pada jaringan organ tubuh. Vitamin E diketahui memiliki peran yang baik sebagai antioksidan. Saat ini belum diketahui efek samping pemberian deksametason dan vitamin E terhadap kerusakan usus halus tikus putih (Rattus norvegicus. Penelitian ini menggunakan sampel 25 ekor tikus putih jantan, dibagi dalam 5 kelompok perlakuan, yaitu kontrol negatif (P0, kontrol positif (P1 diberikan deksametason Harsen  0.13 mg/kg, dan perlakuan diberikan deksametason Harsen 0.13 mg/kg dengan variasi vitamin E (Natur-E bertingkat yaitu P2 (100 mg/kg, P3 (150 mg/kg, dan P4 (200 mg/kg. Setelah perlakuan diberikan selama 2 minggu, tikus dinekropsi dan usus halus diambil untuk selanjutnya dibuat sediaan histopatologi dengan pewarnaan hematoksilin-eosin (HE. Hasil menunjukkan perlakuan P1 terlihat nekrosis berat (kaseosa pada usus halus, sedangkan seluruh perlakuan P2, P3, dan P4 berpengaruh terhadap perbaikan kerusakan akibat efek samping deksametason. Perlakuan 4 (P4 sebagai hasil paling baik dalam mengurangi efek samping deksametason.   Dexamethasone it’s in period a synthetic corticosteroid drug that widely used by the public. If  it used for long time and the use of large doses, causing oxidative stress in cells due to the accumulation of free radicals which may cause cell death in the body organs tissues. Vitamin E was known to have a good role as an antioxidant effect. Currently, unknown effects of dexamethasone and vitamin E administration on damage of the small intestine of rat (Rattus norvegicus. This study used an experimental design. Samples 25 male rats were divided into 5 groups, namely the negative control or no treatment (P0, positive control (P1 was given

  19. Identity, Stress, and Resilience in Lesbians, Gay Men, and Bisexuals of Color

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Ilan H

    2010-01-01

    The author addresses two issues raised in Moradi, DeBlaere, and Huang’s Major Contribution to this issue: the intersection of racial/ethnic and lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) identities and the question of stress and resilience. The author expands on Moradi et al.’s work, hoping to encourage further research. On the intersection of identities, the author notes that LGB identities among people of color have been construed as different from the identities of White LGB persons, purportedly bec...

  20. Psychometric properties of Attitudes Towards Lesbians and Gay Men Scale with Chinese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Joseph; Kwok, Diana K

    2012-04-01

    The 10-item Attitudes Towards Lesbian and Gay Men Scale was translated into traditional Chinese, with slight modification in item wordings (by replacing the words such as "lesbians" with "female homosexuals" and "gay men" with "male homosexuals"). Data were collected with a convenient sample of 462 Chinese undergraduate students in social work training programmes from three Hong Kong universities. Analysis of the data showed responses to the scale and its two subscales were internally consistent and a one-factor structure was found on the total scale and separately on each of its two subscales. Differences by religious belief and sex were observed using the total scale scores, as in previous studies using this scale. Researchers could consider using this scale with Hong Kong Chinese and in subsequent cross-cultural studies involving a wider range of Chinese respondents.

  1. Religious Coping Strategies and Mental Health Among Religious Jewish Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Guy; Yossef, Ifat; Savaya, Riki

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the effects of positive and negative religious coping strategies on the mental health of 113 Israeli gay and bisexual Jewish males with high levels of religiosity, and how sexual identity formation (internalized homophobia and coming out) and societal variables (family and friends' acceptance of sexual orientation and social connections within the LGBT community) mitigated the effects of religious coping strategies on mental health. Findings showed that when dealing with the stress arising from the conflict between religious and sexual identities, individuals used both positive and negative religious coping strategies, but only negative religious coping was associated with poorer mental health. In addition, only in the presence of social resources (social connections with the LGBT community and the acceptance of sexual orientation by friends), did the use of positive religious coping result in better mental health outcomes. These findings underlined the importance of these resilience social factors in the lives of religious Jewish gay and bisexual men.

  2. Demographic, Psychological, and Social Characteristics of Self-Identified Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adults in a US Probability Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herek, Gregory M; Norton, Aaron T; Allen, Thomas J; Sims, Charles L

    2010-09-01

    Using data from a US national probability sample of self-identified lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults (N = 662), this article reports population parameter estimates for a variety of demographic, psychological, and social variables. Special emphasis is given to information with relevance to public policy and law. Compared with the US adult population, respondents were younger, more highly educated, and less likely to be non-Hispanic White, but differences were observed between gender and sexual orientation groups on all of these variables. Overall, respondents tended to be politically liberal, not highly religious, and supportive of marriage equality for same-sex couples. Women were more likely than men to be in a committed relationship. Virtually all coupled gay men and lesbians had a same-sex partner, whereas the vast majority of coupled bisexuals were in a heterosexual relationship. Compared with bisexuals, gay men and lesbians reported stronger commitment to a sexual-minority identity, greater community identification and involvement, and more extensive disclosure of their sexual orientation to others. Most respondents reported experiencing little or no choice about their sexual orientation. The importance of distinguishing among lesbians, gay men, bisexual women, and bisexual men in behavioral and social research is discussed.

  3. Barriers to foundation funding of gay organizations: evidence from Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, S A

    2001-01-01

    Gay, lesbian, and bisexual service organizations in the United States receive a small share of the philanthropic grants awarded by foundations and other institutional donors. A survey of Massachusetts gay organizations provides explanations for this phenomenon and suggests that a variety of barriers impedes foundation giving. The findings are consistent with those of two national surveys of lesbian organizations and a survey of gay service needs in California. The most commonly cited barriers include: a difficulty in finding foundations sympathetic to gay service programs; a lack of paid grant writers; the perceived need for 501 (c)(3) nonprofit status in order to qualify for most grants; foundations' predilection for funding established service organizations, and their reluctance to fund political advocacy, a lack of familiarity with gay service needs; and homophobia. Although the AIDS crisis helped educate foundations about the gay community, consider-able barriers remain.

  4. How Like Perceives Like: Gay People on "Gaydar".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    When lacking explicit knowledge of someone's sexual orientation, gay people commonly assess the likelihood that another is gay using their "gaydar." The term gaydar is a playful mix of the word gay with radar, suggesting that one can sense, intuit, or perceive some set of characteristics in another that signal a shared minority status. While commonly mentioned, the exact criteria a gay person uses when employing their gaydar are little discussed. Drawing methodologically on a series of five focus groups of self-identified lesbians and gay men, this study explores the physical, visual, energetic, and conversational cues gay people consider when they employ the trope of gaydar. Specifically, interview subjects most often described their gaydar as triggered by the following elements: physical presentation, including mannerisms, dress, and voice; interactions, especially eye contact; a presence or absence of certain conversational social norms; and, intangibly, as a kind of energetic exchange.

  5. Queering Black Gay Historiography: Performance, (Mis) Identifications, and Possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Thomas Howard

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation will examine black gay theatre/ performance in the United States from 1970 to 2010. My intent is to establish a genealogy of black gay performance by situating performance strategies of visibility employed by black gay men in the late 20th century utilizing various performance genres such as revue, theatrical biography, the "event" and history play. Specifically, I am interested that this writing act as a discursive in interrogating the historiography of the tactics of blac...

  6. Homophobia and Violence against Gays and Lesbians in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhar, Roman; Švab, Alenka

    2008-01-01

    The authors present and discuss empirical findings from various research projects on homophobic violence in Slovenia. Existing research on violence against gays and lesbians shows a high level of verbal, physical and sexual violence experienced by gays and lesbians and at the same time a low recognition of such violence in society. According to public opinion and the research results, Slovenia is still homophobic society. Violence is an all-pervading element of everyday life of gays and lesbi...

  7. New to New York: Ecological and Psychological Predictors of Health Among Recently Arrived Young Adult Gay and Bisexual Urban Migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachankis, John E; Eldahan, Adam I; Golub, Sarit A

    2016-10-01

    Young gay and bisexual men might move to urban enclaves to escape homophobic environments and achieve greater sexual and social freedom, yet little is known about the health risks that these young migrants face. Drawing on recent qualitative depictions of gay and bisexual men's urban ecologies and psychological research on motivation and goal pursuit, we investigated migration-related motivations, experiences, health risks, and their associations among young gay and bisexual men in New York City. Gay and bisexual men (n = 273; ages 18-29) who had moved to New York City within the past 12 months completed an online survey regarding their hometowns, new urban experiences, migration motivations, and health risks. Not having a college degree, HIV infection, hometown stigma, within-US migration, and moving to outside a gay-dense neighborhood were associated with moving to escape stress; hometown structural stigma and domestic migration were associated with moving for opportunity. Migrating from larger US-based hometowns, having recently arrived, and moving for opportunity predicted HIV transmission risk. Social isolation predicted lower drug use but more mental health problems. Higher income predicted lower HIV and mental health risk but higher alcohol risk. Hometown interpersonal discrimination predicted all health risks, but hometown structural stigma protected against drug risk. Findings offer a comprehensive picture of young gay and bisexual male migrants' experiences and health risks and help build a theory of high-risk migration. Results can inform structural- and individual-level interventions to support the health of this sizeable and vulnerable segment of the urban population.

  8. Predictors of sports motivation among gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Brian D; Crawford, Isiaah; Carrico, Adam W

    2008-01-01

    Athletic activities are associated with reduced levels of stress and negative mood states among heterosexuals; thus, examining this association among gay/bisexual men is warranted. The current study examined the relationship between sports motivation and mood states, self-esteem, body esteem, life satisfaction, perceptions of masculinity/femininity, and parental encouragement for athletic endeavors among 195 gay/bisexual men. The results were mixed, but suggest that sports participation among gay/bisexual men may relate to a desire to express their masculinity and maintain a positive body image. Gay/bisexual men may be more likely to participate in sports if they receive positive reinforcement from others.

  9. Gay and lesbian mental health: a sourcebook for practitioners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexander, Christopher J

    1996-01-01

    ...: parenting, coming out processes of lesbians, gay men's self-image, adolescence as a homosexual, parental guidance of homosexual children, eating disorders, aging, dual needs of ethnic homosexuals...

  10. Comprehensive care of lesbian and gay patients and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, A E; Silenzio, V M

    1996-03-01

    A significant proportion of the population is predominantly gay or lesbian, but the unique health care needs of these patients and their families often are ignored. The most significant health risk for lesbians and gays may be that they avoid routine health care. Families that include gay members may have special needs, largely related to how homosexuality is perceived. Physicians can improve the health care of gay and bisexual men and women and their families by maintaining a non-homophobic attitude, being sure to distinguish sexual behavior from sexual identity, communicating clearly and sensitively by using gender-neutral terms, and being aware of how their own attitudes affect clinical judgment.

  11. Progress in biological threat agent vaccine development: a repeat-dose toxicity study of a recombinant ricin toxin A-chain (rRTA) 1-33/44-198 vaccine (RVEc) in male and female New Zealand white rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Daniel E; Horn, Thomas L; Detrisac, Carol J; Lindsey, Changhong Y; Smith, Leonard A

    2011-03-01

    A recombinant ricin toxin A-chain 1-33/44-198 vaccine (RVEc) was administered to male and female New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits (10/sex/group) in a repeat-dose toxicity study. The RVEc vaccine was administered on study days 1, 29, 57, and 85 via intramuscular (IM) injection (0, 100, or 200 μg/dose). All study animals were observed throughout treatment until euthanized and submitted for necropsy on study day 88 or 99 (recovery period). There were no treatment-related or toxicologically significant effects observed. There were no statistically significant differences noted in the antibody titers and/or concentrations in 100 μg RVEc-treated animals when compared to 200 μg RVEc-treated animals, suggesting that both doses produced comparable antibody titers/concentrations during the study. The highest immune response was observed on study day 99 (ie, 2 weeks after the last dose). The immune response observed demonstrated that RVEc is biologically active in the rabbit model, with no apparent marked sex differences.

  12. Are Gay Communities Dying or Just in Transition? Results from an International Consultation Examining Structural Change in Gay Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Rosser, B. R.; West, William; Weinmeyer, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to identify how urban gay communities are undergoing structural change, reasons for that change, and implications for HIV prevention planning. Key informants (N=29) at the AIDS Impact Conference from 17 cities in 14 countries completed surveys and participated in a facilitated structured dialog about how gay communities are changing. In all cities, the virtual gay community was identified as now larger than the offline physical community. Most cities identified that while th...

  13. Jamaica, Three Years Later: Effects of Intensified Pro-Gay Activism on Severe Prejudice Against Lesbians and Gay Men

    OpenAIRE

    West, Keon

    2016-01-01

    Jamaica has developed an international reputation for severe anti-gay prejudice. However, in the past few years, between 2012 and 2015, intensified waves of activism have increased the visibility of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Jamaicans, and supported their social and legal inclusion in Jamaican society. This research investigated the effects of that activism by taking advantage of two large, representative surveys of Jamaicans' attitudes toward lesbians and gay men: one in...

  14. Psychobiology of Male Homosexuality: Recent Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Annicchia rico

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, empirical and theoretical reports which question the causes ofmale homosexuality are examined. According to these reports, male homosexualitydiffers from female homosexuality in some respects. Additionally,evidence favouring the consideration of male homosexuality as a biologicalcondition is shown: there are brain differences between gay men and heterosexualmen, there are genetic and perinatal factors associated to malehomosexuality, there are cognitive and behavioral differences between gayand heterosexual men, there are animal models for studying homosexuality;finally, there are negative findings concerning the psychosocial factorsassociated to male homosexuality.

  15. The effects of body image perceptions and sociocommunicative orientations on self-esteem, depression, and identification and involvement in the gay community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrench, Jason S; Knapp, Jennifer L

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how nonverbally communicated messages based on weight and physical appearance related to antifat attitudes, image fixation, and discrimination based on physical appearance and weight on bisexual, gay, and lesbian people. Using an Internet-based sample of 233 participants (88% Anglo/Saxon or Caucasian), the results indicated Richmond and Valencic's (2000) conceptualization of image fixation negatively related to an individual's self-esteem and positively related to reported levels of depression. Results also indicated people with highly assertive and responsive communicative behaviors were less likely to hold antifat attitudes and less likely to dislike fat people. Differences between gay/bisexual males and lesbian/bisexual females were also analyzed, and gay/bisexual males had significantly higher levels of image fixation, antifat attitudes, dislike of fat people, weight locus of control, perceptions of self physical/weight discrimination, and depression than lesbian/bisexual females. The results also indicated lesbian/bisexual females had significantly higher levels of self-esteem and interaction and involvement within the bisexual and gay and lesbian community than gay/bisexual men.

  16. Identity, Stress, and Resilience in Lesbians, Gay Men, and Bisexuals of Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Ilan H

    2010-04-01

    The author addresses two issues raised in Moradi, DeBlaere, and Huang's Major Contribution to this issue: the intersection of racial/ethnic and lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) identities and the question of stress and resilience. The author expands on Moradi et al.'s work, hoping to encourage further research. On the intersection of identities, the author notes that LGB identities among people of color have been construed as different from the identities of White LGB persons, purportedly because of an inherent conflict between racial/ethnic and gay identities. The author suggests that contrary to this, LGB people of color can have positive racial/ethnic and LGB identities. On the question of stress and resilience, hypotheses have suggested that compared with White LGB individuals, LGB people of color have both more stress and more resilience. The author addresses the competing hypotheses within the larger perspective of minority stress theory, noting that the study of stress and resilience among LGB people of color is relevant to core questions about social stress as a cause of mental disorders.

  17. Through the lens of hetero-normative assumptions: re-thinking attitudes towards gay parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Jarred; Knight, Tess

    2011-01-01

    In this study we explored the attitudes and beliefs of nine heterosexual adults towards gay male and female couples parenting children. We conceptualised participants' perceptions as one primary lens through which gay parenting is viewed. Based on the narratives provided, this lens comprised hetero-normative, homophobic or heterosexist assumptions and coloured the way in which participants perceived aspects of the concept of gay couples parenting children. At times, participants attempted to adjust their primary lens and adopt different views that initially suggested ambivalence and sometimes contradictory positions. Despite the range of attitudes and assumptions about same-sex parenting, consensus over the potential negative developmental impact on children raised by same-sex parents remained evident. Evidence suggests that same-sex parenting is already a reality in Westernised nations and has little or no bearing on the sexual orientation of children. However, concern that children be brought up with every opportunity to 'become' heterosexual, whether they are the product of same-sex or opposite-sex parents, remains evident.

  18. Lesbian and Gay Issues in Education: A Study of the Attitudes of First-year Students in a College of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Stephen M.

    1988-01-01

    Investigated the attitudes of 80 first-year teacher education students towards lesbian women, gay men, and "homosexuality and education" using specially constructed scales. Results showed significant differences in the attitudes of male and female students. An attempt to alter the students' views is reported and the scales for measuring…

  19. Gender-typed behavior over time in children with lesbian, gay, and heterosexual parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E; Garcia, Randi L

    2016-10-01

    The current longitudinal study examined patterns and predictors of parent-reported gender-typed play behavior in adopted boys and girls in lesbian, gay, and heterosexual 2-parent families, across early childhood (Mage = 2.82 to 6.06 years). Specifically, using a sample of 181 couples (56 lesbian couples, 48 gay male couples, and 77 heterosexual couples), we examined parent reports of children's gender-typed play behavior on the Pre-School Activities Inventory (PSAI; Golombok & Rust, 1993) at 3 time points (mean age = 2.82 years at T1, 3.93 years at T2, and 6.06 years at T3). Family structure variables (i.e., parents' gender and sexual orientation; children's gender and sibling status) were included as predictors. At T1, according to parent reports, children in lesbian-parent families had less gender-differentiated behavior (boys were less masculine, girls were less feminine) than children in heterosexual- and gay-parent families, whereas the degree of gender differentiation did not differ between heterosexual- versus gay-parent families. Findings from a Common Fate Growth Model (Ledermann & Macho, 2014) revealed that, regardless of family type, the parent-reported gender-typed behavior of boys, but not girls, significantly changed over time (i.e., boys' behavior became more masculine). Our findings have implications for researchers who study gender development in children and adolescents, particularly those who are being raised by 2 mothers or 2 fathers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Unsettled Relations: Schools, Gay Marriage, and Educating for Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Cris

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Cris Mayo examines the relationship among anti-LGBTQ policies, gay marriage, and sexuality education. Her concern is that because gay marriage is insufficiently different from heterosexual marriage, adding it as an issue to curriculum or broader culture debate elides rather than addresses sexual difference. In other words,…

  1. Preservice Teacher Attitudes toward Gay and Lesbian Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbstrith, Julie C.; Tobin, Renée M.; Hesson-McInnis, Matthew S.; Schneider, W. Joel

    2013-01-01

    Gay and lesbian parents are raising an increasing number of children, but little is known about how these parents are viewed by school personnel. In this study, preservice teacher attitudes toward gay and lesbian parents were assessed using implicit, explicit, behavioral, and behavioroid measures. Implicit measures indicate that participants rated…

  2. Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients" provide psychologists with (a) a frame of reference for the treatment of lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients and (b) basic information and further references in the areas of assessment, intervention, identity, relationships, diversity, education, training, and…

  3. A Teacher Fears for Kids over Freshly Ambushed Gay Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Bonnie J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the passing of new laws forbidding gay marriage or legal recognition of same-sex unions in the United States and the impact of the gay rights issue on students. Across the nation, faculty who enjoy secure academic appointments, work with caring colleagues, and reside in university towns are subject to new…

  4. Anti-Gay Initiatives Cause Anxiety on State Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Jeff

    1994-01-01

    In at least 10 states, conservative groups are pushing for ballot initiatives to limit gay-rights laws or remove public funding from gay organizations. Legal experts feel colleges and universities would be affected, particularly in constraints placed on curriculum content, college policies and services, and use of institutional facilities for…

  5. Prejudice or Preference? Attitudes of Gay and Lesbian Christians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Elizabeth A.; Gorsuch, Richard L.

    Research on the attitudes of heterosexual churchgoers is extensive. However, very little empirical information is available about the attitudes held by gay and lesbian Christians. In the current study, it was hypothesized that gay and lesbian Christians, unlike their heterosexual peers, would demonstrate desire for and acceptance of social…

  6. Educated To Be Invisible: The Gay and Lesbian Adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Katheryn L.

    The opportunity to grow and socialize in a supportive environment, a process taken for granted by heterosexual adolescents, continues to elude the gay and lesbian adolescent population, especially within the educational community. A goal of education should be to provide support for gay and lesbian teenagers before self-defeating behavior patterns…

  7. Including Curriculum Content on Lesbian and Gay Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Bernie S.

    1989-01-01

    A rationale for requiring content on gay and lesbian issues in the social work curriculum, to decrease homophobic attitudes and prepare students to provide effective practice, is presented. Methods and resources for incorporating lesbian and gay issues in human behavior, direct practice, policy, community organization, and research courses are…

  8. Attitudes toward lesbians and gays among American and Dutch adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collier, K.L.; Horn, S.S.; Bos, H.M.W.; Sandfort, T.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Attitudes toward lesbians and gays vary across national populations, and previous research has found relatively more accepting attitudes in the Netherlands as compared to the United States. In this study, we compared beliefs about and attitudes toward lesbians and gays in samples of Dutch and

  9. Faith and Sexual Orientation Identity Development in Gay College Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Merrily; Glassmann, Danny; Garrett, J. Matthew; Badaszewski, Philip; Jones, Ginny; Pierre, Darren; Fresk, Kara; Young, Dallin; Correll-Hughes, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of gay-identified college men related to their faith and sexual orientation identity development. The findings suggest that for gay-identified college men, faith and sexual orientation identity development includes examination of one's faith and sexual orientation identity, important relationships, and a desire…

  10. Cognitive-Behavioral Erectile Dysfunction Treatment for Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Trevor A.; Schwartz, Danielle R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to assist cognitive-behavioral therapists who are treating erectile dysfunction among gay men. Little information is available to cognitive-behavioral therapists about the psychological and social effects of erectile dysfunction in this population, or how to incorporate the concerns of gay men with erectile…

  11. The Developmental Experience of Gay/Lesbian Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Don

    1996-01-01

    Argues that American society is homophobic. Claims that one of the negative consequences gay/lesbian youth face when living in a homophobic environment is the internalized belief that acceptance is based upon how well one can hide one's identity. Explores some of the dimensions of the gay/lesbian developmental process. (RJM)

  12. The mediation of gay men's lives: A review on gay dating app studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, S. (Shangwei); J.R. Ward (Janelle)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractA growing body of literature focuses on gay men's use of mobile dating applications or “dating apps.” Running on smartphones and working with GPS, dating apps connect users to others in close geographic proximity and often in real time. These apps allow users to create profiles to

  13. The only gay in the village? Everyday life of gays and lesbians in rural Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhar, Roman; Svab, Alenka

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the comparison of the characteristics, experiences, and perceptions of everyday life of gays and lesbians living in rural and urban areas of Slovenia. We focus on the following thematic aspects: (1) coming out; (2) intimate partnerships; (3) the access and the use of gay infrastructure; and (4) violence against gays and lesbians. The article also addresses and discusses the urban/rural divide as a Western construct that might not be completely applicable to other social and cultural contexts. Taking Slovenia as an example, this article questions the self-evidence of rural/urban divide as an analytical concept. On the basis of our research, we conclude that this concept requires continuous revisions and reinterpretations in a concrete social and cultural context(s). The characteristics of gay and lesbian everyday life either in rural or in urban context in Slovenia lead to the conclusion that even within a specific social and cultural context, the concept of urban/rural divide should be used carefully, taking into account complexities of everyday lives and various factors that influence them.

  14. Sun, sand, and citizenship: the marketing of gay tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, David R

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates trends in the marketing of gay and lesbian tourism. It reviews gay and lesbian travel guides from the 1960s to the 1990s before examining more recent travel materials including brochures and Web sites promoting specific American cities. These promotional materials are a valuable object of inquiry because they are uniquely situated at the intersection of discussions of sexuality, the market, representation, space, and citizenship. Through an aggregate semiotic analysis and ideological criticism, this article examines themes and concerns raised by the recent wave of gay tourism marketing, including questions of visibility, privacy, and assimilation. I argue that while marketers' recent attempts to lure gay and lesbian tourists to specific destinations may seem to suggest increased tolerance and societal inclusion, the specific strategies that they employ actually reveal the second-class citizen status still experienced by gays and lesbians within the rest of American society.

  15. Some like it mellow: on gay men complicating pornography discourses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneau, Simon; van der Meulen, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Despite the proliferation of writing on pornography generally, much of the literature that focuses on gay pornography specifically conforms to either a pro- or anti-porn framework. This overly simplistic dichotomy positions pornography as a homogeneous construct, albeit one that is either "good" or "bad." Even theorists who situate pornography on a continuum, with erotica at one end and hardcore at the other, tend to reify these discourses. Further, it is not uncommon for researchers to draw conclusions about the effects of pornography consumption without defining exactly what pornography is. This ethnographic research draws on qualitative interviews with 20 consumers' of gay pornography in Toronto, Canada. By using a thematic analysis to document the ways in which gay men define, distinguish, and conceptualize gay pornography, five definitional categories were developed: Mellow; Commercial; Raunch; Amateur; and Bareback. These broad conceptualizations are discussed in reference to writing on gay pornography. Our research results emphasize the importance of clear definitions of pornography within pornography research.

  16. Support for an expanded tripartite influence model with gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylka, Tracy L; Andorka, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether an expanded tripartite influence model would represent gay men's experiences. This model was extended by adding partners and gay community involvement as sources of social influence and considering dual body image pathways (muscularity and body fat dissatisfaction) to muscularity enhancement and disordered eating behaviors. Latent variable structural equation modeling analyses upheld this model for 346 gay men. Dual body image pathways to body change behaviors were supported, although three unanticipated interrelationships emerged, suggesting that muscularity and body fat concerns and behaviors may be more integrated for gay men. Internalization of the mesomorphic ideal, appearance comparison, muscularity dissatisfaction, and body fat dissatisfaction were key mediators in the model. Of the sources of social influence, friend and media pressure to be lean, gay community involvement, and partner, friend, media, and family pressures to be muscular made incremental contributions. Unexpectedly, certain sources were directly connected to body change behaviors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Gay men talking about health: are sexuality and health interlinked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jeffery; Braun, Virginia; McCreanor, Tim

    2012-05-01

    Defining and describing health has traditionally been the role of medical experts. Although a rich literature has recently established the importance of lay accounts of health, one important gap relates to gay men's accounts of health. Data from 11 focus groups involving 45 gay men were thematically analyzed to investigate gay men's views of health. Two contrasting positions on a possible relationship between sexuality and health-there is no link or there is a definite link-were identified. In addition, five key ways gay men talked about health were identified: health is the absence of disease, is functional ability, is fitness and exercise, is psychological, and is multifaceted. Although there are similarities in the ways gay and other men talk about health, important differences exist, which suggest that issues of sexuality need to be considered by health policy and service planners so that responsive health services can be provided.

  18. "Gay Boy Talk" Meets "Girl Talk": HIV Risk Assessment Assumptions in Young Gay Men's Sexual Health Communication with Best Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutchler, Matt G.; McDavitt, Bryce

    2011-01-01

    Young adults, particularly young gay men (YGM), are vulnerable to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Yet, little is known about how YGM discuss sexual health issues with their friends ("gay boy talk"). We conducted semi-structured interviews with YGM and their best friends (11 YGM/YGM dyads and 13 YGM/heterosexual female dyads). In this paper, we…

  19. Improving the Lives of Students, Gay and Straight Alike: Gay-Straight Alliances and the Role of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Heather Elise

    2012-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students face many risk factors every day when they enter their school's door. These students often fear for their safety at school, are victimized, have academic difficulties, suffer from issues with their identity development, and are at risk for suicide. School-based Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs)…

  20. "There aren't any gays here": encountering heteroprofessionalism in an international development workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizzi, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Western-oriented workplaces use professionalism as a normative value to sustain and promote a cohesive work environment. Yet, through this qualitative study, the author points out some implications of using professionalism to manage staff relationships and behaviors. Using post-conflict Kosovo as the context, the author examined (a) the work experiences of 8 gay male aid workers and (b) the attitudes toward homosexuality of foreign staff members in 2 international aid agencies. The author introduces and suggests heteroprofessionalism as a root to homophobic and heterosexist behaviors present in the study. Heteroprofessionalism is defined as a professional value that screens out homosexuality.

  1. Prior interpersonal contact with and attitudes towards gays and lesbians in an interviewing context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, A L; Vasseur, R B

    1993-01-01

    The impact of previous interpersonal contact or exposure to male homosexuals and lesbians on interviewing strategy was assessed. Previous research on attitudes toward homosexuals suggests that prior exposure reduces the negativity of attitudes toward homosexuals. In support of that research and research looking at the use of confirmatory questioning strategies in social interactions, it was expected that individuals with prior exposure to homosexuals and/or positive attitudes toward homosexuals would choose fewer negative information-seeking questions for a proposed interview. The results support previous research findings regarding attitudes towards gay men and lesbians and suggest that pre-interview attitudes and prior exposure may influence interviewer strategy.

  2. Look into the HIV Epidemic of Gay Community with a Socio-Cultural Perspective: A Qualitative Study in China, 2015-2016.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijing He

    Full Text Available Current Chinese studies continue to view male homosexuality through a disease focused lens which pays limited attention to socio-cultural aspects of sexual behavior and HIV transmission. This qualitative study aimed to investigate how socio-cultural factors influence gay men's sexual beliefs and behaviors in contemporary China, and their implications for HIV epidemic.Qualitative methodology was used in this study. During 2015-2016, in-depth interviews were conducted with 61 self identified gay men in Jiangxi, Henan, Heilongjiang, Guangdong, Jiangsu provinces and Chongqing municipality of China. Our study revealed that: 1 influenced by Chinese traditional culture, gay men have conflicts on self-identity, which led to low self-acceptance and negative attitude on sex, and huge socio-psychological stress; 2 a generational differences within gay community was observed, reflected in varied sexual attitudes and practices as well as way for approaching new friends, both of which have implications and challenges on HIV control and prevention; 3 socio-cultural barriers, including open minds towards casual sex and nonmonogamous relationship, and low priority of health demands were widely observed and led to negative coping with AIDS among gay community.It is essential to take a holistic view into gay men's HIV epidemic in China. Socio-cultural barriers for HIV control and prevention found in this study call for serious and imperative consideration on integrated measures, including targeted efforts towards effective sex education and further inclusion of socio-cultural perspectives in HIV/AIDS interventions for gay men.

  3. Are Patients Ready for Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Family Physicians - A Croatian Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabovac, Igor; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Milošević, Milan

    2016-06-01

    Discrimination and harassment of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) physicians from their colleagues and superiors are known. However there is little knowledge about the patients’ attitudes and discrimination toward physicians. A cross sectional Internet survey was conducted in urban Croatian regions. The participants were asked to answer questions regarding their socio-demographic status, the Attitudes Towards Lesbians and Gay Men Scale (ATLG), and whether they would refuse to see a LGB physician and, if so, why. Of the 1004 participants, 8.8% said they would refuse a male GB physician while 7.9% would refuse a female LB physician, and 7.3% would refuse both. The two most common reasons for discriminating were: “disaccord with political or religious beliefs” and “fear of being sexually harassed”. A logistical regression model showed that male sex, higher ATLG score and higher age were associated with more refusals of male GB physicians. Also higher age, higher ATLG score were associated with more refusals of female LB physicians, while personal contact with LGB people was associated with less refusals of both groups. The observed prevalence of discrimination is significant. The results suggest that discrimination is based on emotional reasons and stereotypical beliefs. Educational efforts should be directed towards changing misconceptions about LGB people.

  4. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Cecil R; Telingator, Cynthia J

    2016-12-01

    Families headed by sexual minorities encounter unique barriers to care and health equity despite greater cultural acceptance and visibility. Empirical research suggests that children in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) families develop and function comparably to those from traditional families. In helping families, awareness of family structure is important. The health care provider should be familiar with family composition, and their community, social supports, race/ethnic concerns, financial issues, and other vulnerabilities. Cultivating an office culture and practice that supports all patients to comfortably discuss their family history, interpersonal experiences, needs, and vulnerabilities is essential for excellence in clinical care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Recruiting a U.S. national sample of HIV-negative gay and bisexual men to complete at-home self-administered HIV/STI testing and surveys: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Cain, Demetria; Whitfield, Thomas H. F.; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Pawson, Mark; Ventuneac, Ana; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    We describe enrollment for the One Thousand Strong panel, present characteristics of the panel relative to other large U.S. national studies of gay and bisexual men (GBM), and examine demographic and behavioral characteristics that were associated with passing enrollment milestones. A U.S. national sample of HIV-negative men were enrolled via an established online panel of over 22,000 GBM. Participants (n = 1071) passed three milestones to join our panel. Milestone 1 was screening eligible and providing informed consent. Milestone 2 involved completing an hour-long at-home computer-assisted self-interview (CASI) survey. Milestone 3 involved completing at-home self-administered rapid HIV testing and collecting/returning urine and rectal samples for gonorrhea and chlamydia testing. Compared to those who completed milestones: those not passing milestone 1 were more likely to be non-White and older; those not passing milestone 2 were less likely to have insurance or a primary care physician; and those not passing milestone 3 were less educated, more likely to be bisexual as opposed to gay, more likely to live in the Midwest, had fewer male partners in the past year, and less likely to have tested for HIV in the past year. Effect sizes for significant findings were small. We successfully enrolled a national sample of HIV-negative GBM who completed at-home CASI assessments and at-home self-administered HIV and urine and rectal STI testing. This indicates high feasibility and acceptability of incorporating self-administered biological assays into otherwise fully online studies. Differences in completion of study milestones indicate a need for further investigation into the reasons for lower engagement by certain groups. PMID:26858776

  6. Psychometric properties of the attitudes toward gay men scale in Argentinian context: The influence of sex, authoritarianism, and social dominance orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Etchezahar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though prejudice toward male homosexuality is one of the main reasons for discrimination in Argentina, there is no valid measure to assess it. The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the Attitudes Toward Gay Men Scale (ATG and to examine the influence of sex, right wing authoritarianism, and social dominance orientation on anti-gay attitudes. Data were collected with a convenience sample of 436 undergraduate students from University of Buenos Aires. Analysis of the data showed adequate psychometric properties for the ATG Scale and the moderating effect of sex, right wing uthoritarianism and social dominance orientation on anti-gay attitudes. Implications of these findings were discussed.

  7. Depression and Suicidality in Gay Men: Implications for Health Care Providers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Carrie; Oliffe, John L.; Kelly, Mary T.; Ferlatte, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Gay men are a subgroup vulnerable to depression and suicidality. The prevalence of depression among gay men is three times higher than the general adult population. Because depression is a known risk factor for suicide, gay men are also at high risk for suicidality. Despite the high prevalence of depression and suicidality, health researchers and health care providers have tended to focus on sexual health issues, most often human immunodeficiency virus in gay men. Related to this, gay men’s h...

  8. Sexism and the Black Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Barbara A.

    1973-01-01

    Explores the myth'' of matriarchy, compares the status of black women with that of white women in terms of marriage, education, income and political participation, and examines the ideology of several black men in order to analyze the black male's participation in upholding the value of male superiority. (RJ)

  9. Recruiting Young Gay and Bisexual Men for a Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intervention Through Social Media: The Effects of Advertisement Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Paul L; Katz, Mira L; Bauermeister, Jose A; Shoben, Abigail B; Paskett, Electra D; McRee, Annie-Laurie

    2017-06-02

    Web-based approaches, specifically social media sites, represent a promising approach for recruiting young gay and bisexual men for research studies. Little is known, however, about how the performance of social media advertisements (ads) used to recruit this population is affected by ad content (ie, image and text). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different images and text included in social media ads used to recruit young gay and bisexual men for the pilot test of a Web-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination intervention. In July and September 2016, we used paid Facebook advertisements to recruit men who were aged 18-25 years, self-identified as gay or bisexual, US resident, and had not received HPV vaccine. A 4x2x2 factorial experiment varied ad image (a single young adult male, a young adult male couple, a group of young adult men, or a young adult male talking to a doctor), content focus (text mentioning HPV or HPV vaccine), and disease framing (text mentioning cancer or a sexually transmitted disease [STD]). Poisson regression determined whether these experimental factors affected ad performance. The recruitment campaign reached a total of 35,646 users who viewed ads for 36,395 times. This resulted in an overall unique click-through rate of 2.01% (717/35,646) and an overall conversion rate of 0.66% (241/36,395). Reach was higher for ads that included an image of a couple (incidence rate ratio, IRR=4.91, 95% CI 2.68-8.97, PFacebook ads are a convenient and cost-efficient strategy for reaching and recruiting young gay and bisexual men for a Web-based HPV vaccination intervention. To help optimize ad performance among this population, researchers should consider the importance of the text and image included in the social media recruitment ads.

  10. White Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  11. Piety and the agnostic gay poet: Thom Gunn's biblical homoerotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klawitter, G

    1997-01-01

    Thom Gunn has relied on biblical stories throughout his writing career to carry gay-themed poems. Although he characterizes himself agnostic, it is difficult to reconcile this self-definition with the tenderness evident in his biblical poems, a tenderness that many would identify with a kind of piety. Two of these poems reflect Gunn's reaction to paintings by Caravaggio, "The Sacrifice of Isaac" and "The Conversion of St. Paul." For the former, Gunn seems to have intuited Caravaggio's fascination with the naked figure of Isaac who appears about to be sodomized by Abraham. For the Paul poem, Gunn chooses one of two Caravaggio paintings on the subject, the one which emphasizes Paul in a recumbent and vulnerable sexual position. Gunn has also written tenderly of the Virgin Mary and Christ. His poem "Lazarus Not Raised" is an unusual look at the New Testament Lazarus story from Lazarus's point of view as a dead man who is not particularly interested in coming back to life even though he is encouraged to do so by a bevy of male friends. In recent years Gunn has continued to use biblical flavors in his verse, maintaining all the time his agnosticism.

  12. Lesbian, gay and bisexual college student perspectives on disparities in weight-related behaviours and body image: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanKim, Nicole A; Porta, Carolyn M; Eisenberg, Marla E; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Laska, Melissa N

    2016-12-01

    To (1) explore college students' perceived sexual orientation-related barriers to engaging in physical activity, eating healthfully and maintaining healthy body images and (2) identify types of campus resources on physical activity, healthy eating and body image available to lesbian, gay and bisexual college students. Previous research has highlighted sexual orientation disparities in weight status, physical activity, healthy eating and body image. Despite this, little is known about the context surrounding these disparities. Cross-sectional study using individual interviews. Thirty (15 males, 15 females) lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer and pansexual-identified college students, aged 18-30 years participated in the study. Quasi-inductive coding was used to analyse transcribed interview data and an iterative coding process was used to organise data into themes. Many felt their sexual orientation helped them be physically active, engage in healthful eating habits and have a positive body image. However, sexual orientation was also identified as a stressor that adversely impacted physical activity and eating habits. Lesbian, gay and bisexual students may have to negotiate their sexuality in ways that could adversely influence their physical activity, eating habits and body image. Both clinical and institutional interventions should be inclusive of all people, including lesbian, gay and bisexual, queer, and pansexual students. Further, tailored interventions to meet the specific health needs of sexual minority populations are needed. Clinicians need to understand the context in which sexual minority young adults experience health promotion messaging and programming. Clinic-based tailored interventions are critical as part of a multi-faceted approach in promoting physical activity and healthier eating habits for all young people, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer and pansexual, to more effectively address the prevention of chronic diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons

  13. Sitges (Catalunya y el carnaval gay: el turismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacaba Gutiérrez, José Juan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I explain the development of a tourist village in the Catalonian coast (northeast of Spain as a gay destination during carnival times during the month February. My intention is to include my reflections in this paper in the symbolic - cognitive studies about tourism and I want also to reflect about the idea of the constructions in gay culture of different places all around the world of leisure or/and pilgrimage. Sitges is a scale gay destination really knowledge in Western Europe during the hole year, but during carnival times, it's convert in a gay pilgrimage in different ways and there is have been crated during those last years gays places of leisure in the village that make me create the idea of the existence of a gay Carnival in Sitges Carnival. Because we cannot consider the gay carnival independent of what I call Sitges Carnival, I explain also the development and the historical conflicts between those two carnivals, and how those separate spaces have been created

  14. European Whiteness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    2008-01-01

    Born out of the United States’ (U.S.) history of slavery and segregation and intertwined with gender studies and feminism, the field of critical whiteness studies does not fit easily into a European setting and the particular historical context that entails. In order for a field of European...... critical whiteness studies to emerge, its relation to the U.S. theoretical framework, as well as the particularities of the European context need to be taken into account.. The article makes a call for a multi-layered approach to take over from the identity politics so often employed in the fields of U...

  15. Sexually Explicit Media Use by Sexual Identity: A Comparative Analysis of Gay, Bisexual, and Heterosexual Men in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Martin J; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Scheinmann, Roberta; Antebi-Gruszka, Nadav; Hirshfield, Sabina

    2017-08-01

    Advances in production and distribution of sexually explicit media (SEM) online have resulted in widespread use among men. Limited research has compared contexts of use and behaviors viewed in Internet SEM by sexual identity. The current study examined differences in recent SEM use (past 6 months) by sexual identity among an ethnically diverse sample of 821 men who completed an online survey in 2015. Both gay and bisexual men reported significantly more frequent use of Internet SEM compared to heterosexual men. Although most participants reported viewing SEM at home (on a computer, tablet, or smartphone), significantly more gay men reported SEM use at a sex party or commercial sex venue than either heterosexual or bisexual men. Sexual identity predicted viewing of high-risk and protective behaviors in separate logistic regression models. Specifically, compared to heterosexual men, gay and bisexual men had increased odds of viewing condomless anal sex (gay OR 5.20, 95 % CI 3.35-8.09; bisexual OR 3.99, 95 % CI 2.24-7.10) and anal sex with a condom (gay OR 3.93, 95 % CI 2.64-5.83; bisexual OR 4.59, 95 % CI 2.78-7.57). Compared to gay men, heterosexual and bisexual men had increased odds of viewing condomless vaginal sex (heterosexual OR 27.08, 95 % CI 15.25-48.07; bisexual OR 5.59, 95 % CI 3.81-8.21) and vaginal sex with a condom (heterosexual OR 7.90, 95 % CI 5.19-12.03; bisexual OR 4.97, 95 % CI 3.32-7.44). There was also evidence of identity discrepant SEM viewing as 20.7 % of heterosexual-identified men reported viewing male same-sex behavior and 55.0 % of gay-identified men reported viewing heterosexual behavior. Findings suggest the importance of assessing SEM use across media types and contexts and have implications for research to address the potential influence of SEM on sexual behavior (e.g., investigate associations between viewing condomless vaginal sex and engaging in high-risk encounters with female partners).

  16. Internalized heterosexism, alcohol use, and alcohol-related problems among lesbians and gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, Dean M

    2006-07-01

    Research regarding internalized heterosexism in relation to alcohol use and alcohol-related problems has suffered from methodological problems. Moreover, the results of the research have been mixed. The purpose of the current study was to examine internalized heterosexism in relation to alcohol use and alcohol-related problems among a sample of 335 lesbians and gay men recruited through lesbian and gay events, listserves, and friendship networks. Females completed the Lesbian Internalized Homophobia Scale [Szymanski, D. M., & Chung, Y. B. (2001). The internalized homophobia scale for lesbians: A rational/theoretical approach. Journal of Homosexuality, 41(2), 37-52.]; males completed the Internalized Homonegativity Inventory [Mayfield, W. (2001). The development of an internalized homonegativity inventory for gay men. Journal of Homosexuality, 41(2), 53-76.]. Items from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse [Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2000). National household survey on drug abuse: main findings 1998. Rockville, MD: Author.] measured alcohol consumption. The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test [Selzer, M. L. (1971). The Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test: the quest for a new diagnostic instrument. American Journal of Psychiatry, 127, 89-94.] and the Drinker Inventory of Consequences [Miller, W. R., Tonigan, J. S., & Longabaugh, R. (1995). The drinker inventory of consequences (DrInC): An instrument for assessing adverse consequences of alcohol abuse test manual. National institute on alcohol abuse and alcoholism project match monograph series volume 4. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.] measured alcohol-related problems. The hypothesis that a positive relationship exists was partially supported for lesbians, but generally not supported for males.

  17. Religious affiliation, internalized homophobia, and mental health in lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, David M; Meyer, Ilan H

    2012-10-01

    Most religious environments in the United States do not affirm homosexuality. The authors investigated the relationship between exposure to nonaffirming religious environments and internalized homophobia and mental health in a sample of lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals (LGBs) in New York City. Guided by minority stress theory, the authors hypothesized that exposure to nonaffirming religious settings would lead to higher internalized homophobia, more depressive symptoms, and less psychological well-being. The authors hypothesized that Black and Latino LGBs would be more likely than White LGBs to participate in nonaffirming religious settings and would therefore have higher internalized homophobia than White LGBs. Participants were 355 LGBs recruited through community-based venue sampling and evenly divided among Black, Latino, and White race or ethnic groups and among age groups within each race or ethnic group, as well as between women and men. Results supported the general hypothesis that nonaffirming religion was associated with higher internalized homophobia. There was no main effect of nonaffirming religion on mental health, an unexpected finding discussed in this article. Latinos, but not Blacks, had higher internalized homophobia than Whites, and as predicted, this was mediated by their greater exposure to nonaffirming religion. © 2012 American Orthopsychiatric Association.

  18. Gendered racial exclusion among White internet daters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Cynthia; Robnett, Belinda; Komaie, Golnaz

    2009-03-01

    Acceptance by the dominant group reveals the current standing of racial groups in the U.S. hierarchy, as well as the possibility for assimilation. However, few researchers have addressed the gendered nature of racial preferences by whites. We examine whites' exclusion of blacks, Latinos, Asians, Middle Easterners, East Indians and Native Americans as possible dates, using a sample of profiles collected from an internet dating website. We find that white men are more willing than white women to date non-whites in general, yet, with the exception of their top two preferences for dates, whites and Latinos, the racial hierarchies of males and females differ. Among daters with stated racial preferences, white men are more likely to exclude blacks as possible dates, while white women are more likely to exclude Asians. We argue that exclusion relates to racialized images of masculinity and femininity, and shapes dating and marriage outcomes, and thus minority groups' possibilities for full social incorporation.

  19. How gay-straight alliance groups mitigate the relationship between gay-bias victimization and adolescent suicide attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brennan; Royne Stafford, Marla B; Pullig, Chris

    2014-12-01

    We examined the relationships between victimization from being bullied, suicide, hopelessness, and the presence of a Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) on a school campus. We analyzed data from the California Healthy Kids Survey from 2005 to 2007 using hierarchical modeling. We found that gay-bias (versus non-gay-bias) victimization is meaningfully connected with the inwardly destructive behavior of attempted suicide among adolescents. We also found that hopelessness helps explain associations between gay-bias victimization and suicide attempts and that the presence of a GSA club on a school's campus attenuates significant connections between gay-bias victimization and suicide attempts by reducing hopelessness. Gay-bias victims are more likely than other victims to attempt suicide while also feeling more hopeless. The presence of a GSA on campus may help to reduce the attempted suicide and hopelessness associated with gay-bias victimization. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Community Cleavages: Gay and Bisexual Men?s Perceptions of Gay and Mainstream Community Acceptance in the Post-AIDS, Post-Rights Era

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Nathaniel M.; Bauer, Greta R.; Coleman, Todd A.; Blot, Soraya; Pugh, Daniel; Fraser, Meredith; Powell, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Changes in gay and bisexual men's connectedness to the gay community are related to the declining public visibility of HIV/AIDS and greater acceptance for homosexuality and bisexuality in mainstream society. Little work, however, has focused on perceived acceptance for subgroups within the gay community or broader society. Using interviews (n = 20) and a survey (n = 202) of gay and bisexual men in a mid-sized Canadian city, we find perceived hierarchies of acceptance for the various subgroups...

  1. (In)visibility in lesbian and gay student organizing: the case of gay student services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaserfirer, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on newspaper, movement correspondence, and interview data, I examine the (in)visibility of a lesbian and gay student group, Gay Student Services (GSS), in a hostile university campus in Texas from the mid-1970s through the 1980s. GSS formed to create a safe space for sexual minorities at Texas A&M University (TAMU) and asked university officials to recognize the group officially. TAMU's resistance to their request forced GSS to file a lawsuit to achieve recognition. Using interviews with past members and archival data, such as newspapers and movement correspondence, I examine how GSS utilized (in)visibility to navigate the hostile environment. By controlling their (in)visibility, GSS members protected the organization from scrutiny and protect members' safety.

  2. Go home, gay boy! Or, why do Singaporean gay men prefer to "go home" and not "come out"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chris K K

    2011-01-01

    Anglo-American ontologies posit that gay men should come out to match their outer selves with their inner ones. In Confucianized Singapore, however, gay men refrain from coming out to their parents to avoid shaming their families. Instead, they couch their homosexuality in kinship terms and "go home" with their boyfriends (Chou, 2000). "Going home" gains familial acceptance, but it does not challenge mainstream discourses of homosexuality. By examining how Singaporean gay men negotiate their sexuality with their families, I question the validity of coming out and going home as both ontological discourses and strategies.

  3. Predictors of relationship dissolution in lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adoptive parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E; Garcia, Randi

    2015-06-01

    Little work has examined relationship dissolution or divorce in adoptive parents or same-sex parent couples. The current study examined predictors of relationship dissolution across the first 5 years of parenthood among a sample of heterosexual, lesbian, and gay male adoptive couples. Of the 190 couples in the study, 15 (7.9%) dissolved their relationships during the first 5 years of adoptive parenthood. Specifically, 7 of 57 lesbian couples (12.3%), 1 of 49 gay male couples (2.0%), and 7 of 84 heterosexual couples (8.3%) dissolved their unions. Results of our logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds of relationship dissolution were significantly higher for (a) couples who adopted a noninfant (i.e., older child); (b) participants who reported feeling less prepared for the adoption, 3 months postadoptive placement; and (c) couples in which both partners reported very low or very high preadoption levels of relationship maintenance behaviors. Findings have implications for adoption professionals seeking to support same-sex and heterosexual prospective adopters, as well as societal debates and policy regarding same-sex relationships and parenting. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Internalized Homonegativity, Sense of Belonging, and Depressive Symptoms Among Australian Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Kenneth; McLaren, Suzanne; Jenkins, Megan; Corboy, Denise; Gibbs, Petah M; Molloy, Mari

    2017-01-01

    Internalized homonegativity has been directly linked to depression among gay men. The aim of the study was to test whether internalized homonegativity is indirectly related to depressive symptoms via a sense of belonging to the broad gay community, gay groups, gay friends, and the general community. A sample of 246 self-identified Australian gay men, aged 18-82 years, completed the Internalized Homophobia Scale, the Psychological subscale of the Sense of Belonging Instrument, the Sense of Belonging Within Gay Communities Scale, and the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Results indicated that the final model was an excellent fit to the data. Internalized homonegativity was indirectly related to depressive symptoms via sense of belonging to gay groups, with gay friends, and to the general community. Interventions aimed at reducing internalized homonegativity among gay men have the potential to enhance sense of belonging and, in turn, decrease depressive symptoms.

  5. How do male sex workers on Craigslist differ from those on Rentboy? A comparison of two samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Koken, Juline; Smith, Martez; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2017-04-01

    Much contemporary focus on male-for-male sex work has been with men who place advertisements on profile-based sex work websites. Less is known about men who sell sex via online bulletin boards. We compared two samples of men who were selling sex: a 2014-2015 survey of men on Craigslist.org (n = 95) and a 2013 study of men on Rentboy.com (n = 418). In multivariable modelling, compared to Rentboy, Craigslist participants had a significantly higher odds of being non-White (AOR = 5.32), gay identified (AOR = 2.32), making less than US$20,000 a year (AOR = 3.77), having used marijuana in the past 12 months (AOR = 3.41). Furthermore, compared to Rentboy, Craigslist participants had significantly lower odds of escorting full-time (AOR = .24), kissing (AOR = .23) or having anal insertive sex (AOR = .36) with their last male client, that their last paid encounter exceeded 1 hour in duration (AOR = .49) or having been paid over US$200 for that encounter (AOR = .19), and fewer clients in the past 30 days (AOR = .95). Craigslist participants were at greater economic disadvantage compared to men from Rentboy; however, they were less likely to engage in HIV risk behaviours (anal sex and condomless anal sex). These samples may represent distinct populations along the continuum of sex work.

  6. Investigating differences in public support for gay rights issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Public opinion surrounding two of the most well-known gay rights issues-same-sex marriage and adoption by gays and lesbians-varies widely: About 30% of the public favors same-sex marriage, while about 50% favors adoption. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the demographic variables that predict attitudes toward same-sex marriage and adoption by gays and lesbians. Political ideology and attendance at religious services emerged as the strongest predictors. However, a close examination of the two issues shows that there were important differences between them. These differences may aid gay rights advocates in crafting media campaigns designed to increase support for same-sex marriage.

  7. Portuguese Older Gay Men: Pathways to Family Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Daniela Marques

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Research in the field of older gay men remains scarce. This exploratory study examines older gay men's experiences in the construction of family integrity (versus disconnection and alienation. The family integrity approach is a developmental perspective that links ego integrity to a larger process of constructing meaning within the family system. The sample comprises ten participants (from 60 to 88 years old. A semi-structured interview was conducted and submitted to content analysis. The main findings suggest three experiences in older gay men's construction of family integrity: (i influence of homosexuality throughout life; (ii establishing a family of choice; (iii creating a legacy associated with homosexuality. Family integrity in older gay men seems to evolve from disclosure at a young age to making homosexuality a legacy in old age.

  8. Visibility that demystifies: gays, gender, and sex on television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzley, Sara Baker

    2010-01-01

    A content analysis of 98 episodes of primetime entertainment programs on commercial broadcast and cable television stations from the 2005-2006 season showed that gay characters on television were more likely to be shown in sexual situations than straight characters, and women were more likely to be shown in same-sex sexual situations than men. In addition, gay characters were more likely to be depicted as sexually active on cable television than they were on commercial broadcast television, and they were more likely to be relegated to guest star status on commercial broadcast television than on cable television. The study also showed that gay characters made up 7.5% of all the characters studied. This study discusses the implications of these findings for gay and straight audiences.

  9. Internalized homophobia and health issues affecting lesbians and gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, I R

    2000-02-01

    This paper investigates the concept of internalized homophobia in both theory and research relating to lesbian and gay health. It offers a contemporary and critical review of research in this area, and discusses a range of recent findings relating to a range of health issues including HIV and AIDS. Whilst the concept has a resonance for gay men and lesbians, and is widely used in 'lesbian and gay-affirmative' interventions, the paper demonstrates that research findings have been equivocal and the term is often used without full consideration of its sociopolitical consequences. The paper concludes that the concept does have a valuable role to play in health promotion work with lesbians and gay men but invites further discussion and examination of the construct.

  10. A Developmental Approach to Gay and Lesbian Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, William P.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the literature concerning homosexual identity development. Discusses at-risk issues (suicide, human immunodeficiency virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome infection, school problems) and developmental difficulties for gay and lesbian youth (sensitization, identity confusion, identity assumption, commitment). Proposes developmental…

  11. Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Health: Stigma and Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... friends, and the wider gay community—have: higher self-esteem, a more positive group identity, and more positive ... in a way that invites open discussion about sexual orientation can help their teens feel loved and ...

  12. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    VIRAL HEPATITIS Information for Gay and Bisexual Men What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by ... United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. ...

  13. "Dude, You're Such a Slut!" Barriers and Facilitators of Sexual Communication Among Young Gay Men and Their Best Friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDavitt, Bryce; Mutchler, Matt G

    2014-07-01

    Conversations with friends are a crucial source of information about sexuality for young gay men, and a key way that sexual health norms are shared during emerging adulthood. However, friends can only provide this support if they are able to talk openly about sexuality. We explored this issue through qualitative interviews with an ethnically diverse sample of young gay men and their best friends. Using theories of sexual scripts, stigma, and emerging adulthood, we examined how conversations about sex could be obstructed or facilitated by several key factors, including judgmentalism, comfort/discomfort, and receptivity. Gay male friends sometimes spoke about unprotected sex in judgmental ways (e.g., calling a friend "slut" or "whore" for having sex without condoms). In some cases, this language could be used playfully, while in others it had the effect of shaming a friend and obstructing further communication about sexual risk. Female friends were rarely openly judgmental, but often felt uncomfortable talking about gay male sexuality, which could render this topic taboo. Sexual communication was facilitated most effectively when friends encouraged it through humor or supportive questioning. Drawing on these findings, we show how judgmentalism and discomfort may generate sexual scripts with contradictory norms, and potentially obstruct support from friends around sexual exploration during a period of life when it may be most developmentally important.

  14. “Dude, You’re Such a Slut!” Barriers and Facilitators of Sexual Communication Among Young Gay Men and Their Best Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDavitt, Bryce; Mutchler, Matt G.

    2014-01-01

    Conversations with friends are a crucial source of information about sexuality for young gay men, and a key way that sexual health norms are shared during emerging adulthood. However, friends can only provide this support if they are able to talk openly about sexuality. We explored this issue through qualitative interviews with an ethnically diverse sample of young gay men and their best friends. Using theories of sexual scripts, stigma, and emerging adulthood, we examined how conversations about sex could be obstructed or facilitated by several key factors, including judgmentalism, comfort/discomfort, and receptivity. Gay male friends sometimes spoke about unprotected sex in judgmental ways (e.g., calling a friend “slut” or “whore” for having sex without condoms). In some cases, this language could be used playfully, while in others it had the effect of shaming a friend and obstructing further communication about sexual risk. Female friends were rarely openly judgmental, but often felt uncomfortable talking about gay male sexuality, which could render this topic taboo. Sexual communication was facilitated most effectively when friends encouraged it through humor or supportive questioning. Drawing on these findings, we show how judgmentalism and discomfort may generate sexual scripts with contradictory norms, and potentially obstruct support from friends around sexual exploration during a period of life when it may be most developmentally important. PMID:25419044

  15. Military Gay Ban Revisited: Is our Military Ready for Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-20

    Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender ] (LGBT) rights is exploited by those seeking to divide us. But at its core, this issue is about who we are as...support from the lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender (LGBT) community and in return made several campaign promises along the way. One of the campaign...Legislative History of the Law Regarding Homosexuals in the Military. Center for Military Readiness. (22 August 2008). Donnelly, Elaine. The

  16. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, Charles

    2018-02-01

    To discuss lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)-specific survivorship issues including: integrating sexual and gender minority identities with cancer survivor identities; coordinating medical care and disclosing identities to health care providers; dealing with late effects of treatment; and addressing LGBT family and relationship issues. Published articles, quotes from an online survey of 311 LGBT survivors. The transition from active cancer treatment to survivorship presents challenges, and LGBT cancer survivors may face additional challenges as they enter the survivorship phase. Oncology nurses can improve the quality of survivorship care delivered to LGBT survivors and their caregivers by addressing the disparities and gaps in health care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. El personaje gay en la literatura colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Rubio Rivas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este documento aborda desde el campo de los estudios culturales, las representaciones del personaje gay en la novela colombiana de los primeros siete años del presente siglo. Fue posible reconocer en las representaciones, una serie de normas positivas y negativas que rigen la sexualidad y el género de los personajes, los cuales se encuentran inscritos en estructuras de poder y de subordinación basadas en dichas normas, impuestas o administradas a través de diversas estrategias. También se encontró, en mayor o menor medida, la presencia de estereotipos, creencias y atribuciones de causalidad, de las que se presenta una breve mención.

  18. Walt Whitman, our great gay poet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, John

    2008-01-01

    This article surveys the critical debates around Walt Whitman's "Calamus" cluster, arguing that a "queer" reading of Whitman--one that does not see him as, for example, a closeted homosexual who censored his work for fear of being "outed"--is both historically accurate and politically efficacious. While previous efforts to reclaim Whitman as "our great gay poet" are understandable--particularly given critical readings of Whitman that denied the homoeroticism of his poems--today, a reading of Whitman as homosexual threatens to simplify our understanding of the history of homosexuality and to blunt the power of Whitman's poetry to continue to "queer" normative understandings of sex and gender identity categories and their relationship to politics.

  19. Evaluating internet interviews with gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayling, Russel; Mewse, Avril J

    2009-04-01

    In this article we describe the use of the Internet to conduct online synchronous interviews on gay men's experiences of Internet sex-seeking and barebacking, using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). We then present the results of a separate IPA of the issues we encountered during the research. The analysis is focused around four superordinate themes: positive experience, technological issues, boundaries, and requests/expectations. We argue that online qualitative research is valuable in its own right, and that the advantages considerably outweigh the difficulties. This is particularly true in accessing individuals who might not participate in other types of research settings to discuss experiences that would otherwise be too difficult to talk about. Several issues that are problematic in more conventional research still apply, albeit in a different guise, but these must be situated in the context of who or what is being researched, and why, and can be largely overcome with more creative methodologies and considered preparation.

  20. Understanding Gay Community Subcultures: Implications for HIV Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, Garrett; Brown, Graham; De Wit, John; Bavinton, Benjamin; Fairley, Christopher; Maycock, Bruce; Batrouney, Colin; Keen, Phillip; Down, Ian; Hammoud, Mohamed; Zablotska, Iryna

    2015-12-01

    Gay and bisexual men (GBM) who participate in gay community subcultures have different profiles, including differing risk behaviors. We examined men's participation in gay community subcultures, and its association with risk behavior. In a cross-sectional survey, 849 GBM provided information about men in their personal networks. We devised measures of their participation in five subcultural groupings and explored their associations with sexual behavior. We identified five subcultural groupings: sexually adventurous; bear tribes; alternative queer; party scene; and sexually conservative. Higher scores on the sexually adventurous measure was associated with being older, having more gay friends, being HIV-positive, and being more sexually active. It was also independently associated with unprotected anal intercourse with casual partners (AOR 1.82; 95 % CI 1.20-2.76; p = 0.005). HIV prevention strategies need to account for the different subcultural groupings in which GBM participate. Measures of engagement with gay subcultures are useful indicators of differential rates of risk behavior and modes of participation in gay community life. Men in more sexually adventurous subcultures are more likely to engage in sexual risk behavior.

  1. Body image satisfaction in heterosexual, gay, and lesbian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplau, Letitia Anne; Frederick, David A; Yee, Curtis; Maisel, Natalya; Lever, Janet; Ghavami, Negin

    2009-10-01

    Does the prevalence and degree of body dissatisfaction differ among heterosexual and homosexual men and women? Some theorists have suggested that, compared to their heterosexual peers, gay men are at greater risk for body dissatisfaction and lesbians at lower risk. Past studies examining this issue have generally relied on small samples recruited from gay or lesbian groups. Further, these studies have sometimes produced conflicting results, particularly for comparisons of lesbian and heterosexual women. In the present research, we compared body satisfaction and comfort with one's body during sexual activity among lesbian women, gay men, heterosexual women, and heterosexual men through two large online studies (Ns = 2,512 and 54,865). Compared to all other groups, heterosexual men reported more positive evaluations of their appearance, less preoccupation with their weight, more positive effects of their body image on their quality of life and the quality of their sex life, more comfort wearing a swimsuit in public, and greater willingness to reveal aspects of their body to their partner during sexual activity. Few significant differences were found among gay men, lesbian women, and heterosexual women. Many gay men (42%) reported that their feelings about their body had negative effects on the quality of their sex life, as did some lesbian women (27%), heterosexual women (30%), and heterosexual men (22%). Overall, the findings supported the hypothesis that gay men are at greater risk than heterosexual men for experiencing body dissatisfaction. There was little evidence that lesbian women experience greater body satisfaction than heterosexual women.

  2. White Sponge Nevus: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghbali, Amirala; Pouralibaba, Firouz; Eslami, Hossein; Pakdel, Farzaneh; Jamali, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    White sponge nevus (WSN) is a rare hereditary dyskeratotic hyperplasia of mucous membranes. It is an autosomal dominant disorder with variable penetrance. We report a case of WSN in a healthy 21-year-old male with no history of familial involvement. A white smooth plaque with no erythema or other structural abnormalities was observed, which confirmed the diagnosis of WSN histopathologically. PMID:23230487

  3. Race Fucker: representações raciais na pornografia gay Race Fucker: racial representations in gay pornography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osmundo Pinho

    2012-01-01

    Neste estudo, procuro explorar determinada perspectiva crítica relacionada à articulação entre raça, sexualidade e gênero, entendendo que a pornografia gay se prestaria exemplarmente a flagrar...

  4. Greater Engagement Among Members of Gay-Straight Alliances: Individual and Structural Contributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V. Paul; Heck, Nicholas C.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Calzo, Jerel P.

    2017-01-01

    Using youth program models to frame the study of Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs), we identified individual and structural predictors of greater engagement in these settings with a cross-sectional sample of 295 youth in 33 GSAs from the 2014 Massachusetts GSA Network Survey (69% LGBQ, 68% cisgen-der female, 68% White, Mage = 16.07). Multilevel modeling results indicated that members who perceived more support/socializing from their GSA, had more LGB friends, were longer serving members, and were in GSAs with more open and respectful climates reported greater engagement. Further, there was a curvilinear association between organizational structure in the GSA and engagement: Perceptions of more structure were associated with greater engagement to a point, after which greater structure was related to less engagement. PMID:28757649

  5. Frequency of discrimination, harassment, and violence in lesbian, gay men, and bisexual in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelullo, Concetta P; Di Giuseppe, Gabriella; Angelillo, Italo F

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed the frequency of discrimination, harassment, and violence and the associated factors among a random sample of 1000 lesbian, gay men, and bisexual women and men recruited from randomly selected public venues in Italy. A face-to-face interview sought information about: socio-demographics, frequency of discrimination, verbal harassment, and physical and sexual violence because of their sexual orientation, and their fear of suffering each types of victimization. In the whole sample, 28.3% and 11.9% self-reported at least one episode of victimization because of the sexual orientation in their lifetime and in the last year. Those unmarried, compared to the others, and with a college degree or higher, compared to less educated respondents, were more likely to have experienced an episode of victimization in their lifetime. Lesbians, compared to bisexual, had almost twice the odds of experiencing an episode of victimization. The most commonly reported experiences across the lifetime were verbal harassment, discrimination, and physical or sexual violence. Among those who had experienced one episode of victimization in their lifetime, 42.1% self-reported one episode in the last year. Perceived fear of suffering violence because of their sexual orientation, measured on a 10-point Likert scale with a higher score indicative of greater fear, ranges from 5.7 for verbal harassment to 6.4 for discrimination. Participants were more likely to have fear of suffering victimization because of their sexual orientation if they were female (compared to male), lesbian and gay men (compared to bisexual women and men), unmarried (compared to the others), and if they have already suffered an episode of victimization (compared to those who have not suffered an episode). The study provides important insights into the violence experiences of lesbian, gay men, and bisexual women and men and the results may serve for improving policy initiatives to reduce such

  6. Frequency of discrimination, harassment, and violence in lesbian, gay men, and bisexual in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta P Pelullo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This cross-sectional study assessed the frequency of discrimination, harassment, and violence and the associated factors among a random sample of 1000 lesbian, gay men, and bisexual women and men recruited from randomly selected public venues in Italy. METHODS: A face-to-face interview sought information about: socio-demographics, frequency of discrimination, verbal harassment, and physical and sexual violence because of their sexual orientation, and their fear of suffering each types of victimization. RESULTS: In the whole sample, 28.3% and 11.9% self-reported at least one episode of victimization because of the sexual orientation in their lifetime and in the last year. Those unmarried, compared to the others, and with a college degree or higher, compared to less educated respondents, were more likely to have experienced an episode of victimization in their lifetime. Lesbians, compared to bisexual, had almost twice the odds of experiencing an episode of victimization. The most commonly reported experiences across the lifetime were verbal harassment, discrimination, and physical or sexual violence. Among those who had experienced one episode of victimization in their lifetime, 42.1% self-reported one episode in the last year. Perceived fear of suffering violence because of their sexual orientation, measured on a 10-point Likert scale with a higher score indicative of greater fear, ranges from 5.7 for verbal harassment to 6.4 for discrimination. Participants were more likely to have fear of suffering victimization because of their sexual orientation if they were female (compared to male, lesbian and gay men (compared to bisexual women and men, unmarried (compared to the others, and if they have already suffered an episode of victimization (compared to those who have not suffered an episode. CONCLUSIONS: The study provides important insights into the violence experiences of lesbian, gay men, and bisexual women and men and the results

  7. Relationship between the use of gay mobile phone applications and HIV infection among men who have sex with men in Ningbo, China: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hang; Xu, Jie; McGoogan, Jennifer; Dong, Hongjun; Xu, Guozhang; Wu, Zunyou

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the use of gay mobile phone applications (gay apps) and HIV prevalence among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a relationship between the use of gay apps and HIV infection and provide a targeted intervention to MSM. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Chinese MSM who were over 18 years old and had self-reported homosexual intercourse in the past six months were interviewed in 2016. Proportions were used for categorical variables and determinants of HIV infection were assessed using univariate and multivariate regression. Of the 403 participants, nearly 66.0% reported having used gay apps to seek sexual partners in the past six months. A higher proportion of the gay app users were younger than 19 years old, single, had high school education, were earning less than 115 GBP income per month, and identified themselves as homosexual. Compared to app non-users, a greater proportion of app users reported a higher frequency of male-male sexual contact (≥1 time/week: 57.5% versus 39.4%, p < 0.01), multiple male sex partners (34.2% versus 11.7%, p < 0.001), and unprotected sex with men (51.5% versus 36.5%, p < 0.01) in the past six months. The prevalence of HIV among app users was 7.9%. HIV infection was significantly associated with being an app user (adjusted odds ratio = 5.2, 95% CI = 1.1-24.3). It is suggested that the use of gay apps, especially Blued, is popular among Chinese MSM and is associated with high-risk sexual behaviors and HIV infection. Therefore, there is an urgent need to promote HIV testing and HIV prevention through gay apps to decrease the risk of HIV infection among Chinese MSM.

  8. Perceptions of the Influence of Black Greek Affiliation on Involvement, Engagement, and Persistence on Black Male Student Success: Differences between a Historically Black University and a Predominantly White Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    While there is research on the impact of Greek Letter Organization membership on college student engagement and success, the focus is primarily on the experiences of White students with mixed results. The findings in these studies include lower moral and cognitive development and less concern for social issues than their non-Greek counterparts.…

  9. Condoms - male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prophylactics; Rubbers; Male condoms; Contraceptive - condom; Contraception - condom; Barrier method - condom ... The male condom is a thin cover that fits over a man's erect penis . Condoms are made of: Animal ...

  10. Effects of Traditional Gender Role Norms and Religious Fundamentalism on Self-Identified Heterosexual Men's Attitudes, Anger, and Aggression Toward Gay Men and Lesbians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Wilson; Parrott, Dominic J.; Peterson, John L.

    2011-01-01

    Sexual prejudice and antigay anger were examined as mediators of the associations between traditional male gender norms, religious fundamentalism, and aggression toward gay men and lesbians. Participants were 201 self-identified heterosexual men recruited from the community to complete computer-administered measures of adherence to traditional male gender norms (i.e., status, toughness, antifemininity), religious fundamentalism, sexual prejudice, and frequency of aggression toward gay men and lesbians. Additionally, participants completed a structured interview designed to assess anger in response to a vignette depicting a male-male intimate relationship (i.e., partners saying “I love you,” holding hands, kissing). Results showed that sexual prejudice and antigay anger partially mediated the effect of antifemininity on aggression and fully mediated the effect of religious fundamentalism on aggression. Sexual prejudice alone fully mediated the effect of status on aggression and neither sexual prejudice nor antigay anger mediated the effect of toughness on aggression. Further, results suggested that religious fundamentalism is a multifaceted construct of which some aspects increase risk for aggression toward gay men and lesbians, whereas other aspects decrease this risk. These data provide multivariate evidence from a nonprobability, community-based sample that extreme internalization of dominant cultural values can set the stage for violence toward marginalized groups. Implications for intervention programming and future research are reviewed. PMID:22081759

  11. Morphometric differentiation of Corex ligerica Gay in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Urbaniak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental material involved 7 Carex ligerica Gay populations which were cultured in standardised conditions in a greenhouse before their spikes were collected for morphological studies. Four characters reflecting size of male and female glumes, selected from particular spikes were examined. Mahalanobis distances for each pair of populations were calculated and their significance was estimated using Hotellings T2 statistics. Dendrite was constructed on the basis of shortest Mahalanobis distances while Euclidean distances provided grounds for hierarchy grouping. The result obtained from a multivariate analysis indicated a definite interpopulation variability within the species. All of the examined populations were found to differ significantly on the grounds of Mahalanobis distances. The dendrograms manifested the distinct character of the populations originating from regions around the lower course of the Vistula river - 5 (Toruń-Wrzosy, 3 (Tychnowy, 2 (Piaski and 6 (Kadyny, not noted before. Moreover, similarity of two geographically distant populations, the population 1 (Złotoria from the Central Poland and the population 4 (Szumiłowo from the western part of the country, attracted attention, as well as the individual character of the population 7 (Kopanica originating from the southernmost location. From the point of view of historical geography of plants, the obtained differentiation pattern may represent sequele of migration in the postglacial period, which crossed the area of Poland along multiple distinct pathways. The obtained results point to importance of culturing plants in uniform conditions of a greenhouse, which permits to describe genetic variability unbiased by modifying effects of the environment.

  12. Religious affiliation and attitudes towards gay men: On the mediating role of masculinity threat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reese, G.; Steffens, M.C.; Jonas, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research suggests that people from some religious backgrounds hold more negative attitudes towards gay men than others do. The current research focuses on psychological variables as an alternative explanation to religious affiliation, testing whether masculinity beliefs regarding gay men

  13. Coming out narratives of older gay men living in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Stephen; Kushner, Bernie; Adams, Jeffery

    2015-10-01

    Explore the coming out narratives in a group of older gay men. A narrative gerontological approach was employed to explore the coming out narratives of older gay men. Semi-structured digitally recorded individual interviews were undertaken with 12 gay men aged between 65 and 81 years who lived in the community. Data were analysed using a narrative data analytic process. Three collective narratives related to the coming out of older gay men were identified: 'early gay experiences', 'trying not to be gay' and 'acceptance'. Older gay men come from diverse socio-cultural backgrounds. However, they all grew up in an era where same-sex attraction was a criminal offence. The path to accepting being a gay man was individualised and stressful for these participants. Consequently health and social service providers need to support the ongoing development of resilience and provide a person-centred approach to care that promotes wellbeing. © 2015 AJA Inc.

  14. Sexual orientation and education politics: gay and lesbian representation in American schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Kenneth D; Rienzo, Barbara A; Button, James W

    2002-01-01

    In what has sometimes provoked a "culture war" over America's schools, gays and lesbians have sought an expanded voice in the making of education policy. This paper explores the factors that promote gay representation on school boards, how this variable in turn influences gay representation in both administrative and teaching positions, and how all three forms of gay representation relate to school board policies regarding sexual orientation education. Three of the four models drawn from the social movement literature help to explain gay school board representation. In a manner similar to other minority groups, gay representation on school boards directly or indirectly promotes the appointment of gays to administrative and teaching positions and the adoption of policies that address the problems faced by gay and lesbian students in the public schools.

  15. Male Hypogonadism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male hypogonadism Overview Male hypogonadism is a condition in which the body doesn't produce enough testosterone — the hormone that plays a key ... sperm or both. You may be born with male hypogonadism, or it can develop later in life, ...

  16. Examining the Relationship between Male Rape Myth Acceptance, Female Rape Myth Acceptance, Victim Blame, Homophobia, Gender Roles, and Ambivalent Sexism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michelle; Gilston, Jennifer; Rogers, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between male rape myth acceptance, female rape myth acceptance, attitudes toward gay men, a series of gender role and sexism measures, victim blame and assault severity were investigated. It was predicted that men would display more negative, stereotypical attitudes than women and that male rape myth endorsement would be related…

  17. VISIBILIDADE GAY NA ESCOLA: ESTUDANTES QUEER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ferraz da Silva

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Nesse artigo apresento as considerações e análises presentes na pesquisa em processo, que realizo numa escola pública. Sua constituição deve seu primeiro movimento às manifestações de desconforto e homofobia com relação a um grupo específico de três estudantes gays na comunidade escolar na qual atuo como professora. Percebo que a presença desse grupo desacomoda o cotidiano escolar e desenvolvo minha argumentação com base no potencial desestabilizador desses sujeitos, na intenção de pensar o impensável no currículo escolar. Esse trabalho parte da visibilidade de uma identidade sexual que foge à norma heterossexual e desafia a tendência normalizadora e homogeneizadora da educação. A maneira como esse grupo gay se posiciona e constrói seus corpos cruza as fronteiras do masculino/feminino, desnaturalizando as identidades sexuais e de gênero que se baseiam em características biológicas e se apresentando como diferença que escapa às classificações binárias. Na construção da pesquisa utilizo como referência o pensamento de Michel Foucault, especialmente com relação à construção histórica e discursiva de conceitos como sexualidade, identidade, diferença e normalidade que têm servido para criação e manutenção de padrões de conduta. Ao levar a problematização desses conceitos para o contexto escolar, considero produtiva a teorização queer para pensar a possibilidade de uma educação não heteronormativa, produtora de diferenças, que desconstrua identidades ao invés de tentar cristalizá-las.

  18. Aging out: a qualitative exploration of ageism and heterosexism among aging African American lesbians and gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Imani

    2014-01-01

    African Americans elders, like their non-African American counterparts, are not a homogeneous group; however an early characteristic placed on all African Americans is in their shared history in the United States. As members of multiple minority groups, older lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people of African descent have survived racism, heterosexism, homophobia, and now ageism. This article describes a qualitative study grounded in Black feminist and minority stress theories that explored the issues of perceived social discrimination and alienation of 15 older African American lesbians and gay males whose lived experiences were captured using in-depth, face-to-face interviews. Several themes were identified in the study, including (a) Sense of Alienation in the African American Community, (b) Deliberate Concealment of Sexual Identity and Orientation, (c) Aversion to LGBT Labels, (d) Perceived Discrimination and Alienation From Organized Religion, (e) Feelings of Grief and Loss Related to Aging, (f) Isolation, and (g) Fear of Financial and Physical Dependence. The implication of the findings suggests that the ethos and needs of older African American lesbian women and gay men need to be addressed to eliminate potential barriers to successful aging for this cohort.

  19. Places for all? Cape Town’s public library services to gays and lesbians

    OpenAIRE

    Genevieve Hart; Ncumisa Mfazo

    2010-01-01

    The article reports on an investigation of the provision of gay and lesbian literature and of information services to gays and lesbians in Cape Town’s public libraries. Although by definition public libraries serve all members of a community, the international literature suggests that they neglect the reading and information needs and interests of gays and lesbians. The progressive South African Constitution views the rights of gays and lesbians as human rights; yet homophobia is prevalent. U...

  20. Sexual Identity Development among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youths: Consistency and Change Over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce; Braun, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    A longitudinal report of 156 gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths examined changes in sexual identity over time. Fifty-seven percent of the youths remained consistently self-identified as gay/lesbian, 18% transited from bisexual to gay/lesbian, and 15% consistently identified as bisexual over time. Although youths who consistently identified as gay/lesbian did not differ from other youths on time since experiencing sexual developmental milestones, they reported current sexual orientation and sex...

  1. Parent adjustment over time in gay, lesbian, and heterosexual parent families adopting from foster care

    OpenAIRE

    Lavner, JA; Waterman, J; Peplau, LA

    2014-01-01

    Although increasing numbers of gay and lesbian individuals and couples are adopting children, gay men and lesbian women continue to face increased scrutiny and legal obstacles from the child welfare system. To date, little research has compared the experiences of gay or lesbian and heterosexual adoptive parents over time, limiting conceptual understandings of the similarities they share and the unique challenges that gay and lesbian adoptive parents may face. This study compared the adoption ...

  2. The effect of the promiscuity stereotype on opposition to gay rights

    OpenAIRE

    Pinsof, David; Haselton, Martie G.

    2017-01-01

    Opposition to gay rights is prevalent in countries around the world. Recent correlational research suggests that opposition to gay rights may be driven by an interaction between one's own short-term mating orientation (i.e. willingness to engage in casual sex) and representations of gay people as sexually promiscuous. Here, we experimentally manipulated representations of gay men by randomly assigning participants to read one of two versions of a fictitious newspaper article, one of which con...

  3. Self-reported sexual difficulties and their association with depression and other factors among gay men attending high HIV-caseload general practices in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Limin; Newman, Christy E; Kidd, Michael R; Saltman, Deborah C; Rogers, Gary D; Kippax, Susan C

    2009-05-01

    Sexual expression affects physical, mental and social well-being. There is a lack of understanding of male sexual dysfunction in homosexually active men. Aim. We investigated gay men's self-report of a number of sexual problems. The survey data were from a sample of 542 self-identified gay men, 40% of whom were HIV positive, recruited from six high HIV-caseload general practices in Australia. The reporting of experiencing three or more sexual problems over a period of at least 1 month in the 12 months prior to a survey was defined here as having "multiple" sexual problems. We explored a number of factors, including HIV status, depression, alcohol and other drug use, and sexual risk-taking with casual male partners, in association with multiple sexual problems. Rates of a range of self-reported sexual problems were high, with erectile dysfunction and lack of sexual desire being the most commonly reported. These high rates were consistent with the limited data from previous Australian studies. Men who had multiple sexual problems were likely to suffer from major depression (P gay men (48.4%) reported multiple sexual problems than the HIV-negative men (35.1%, P = 0.002). Factors independently associated with multiple sexual problems among the HIV-negative gay men were poorer general health and interpersonal isolation, whereas for the HIV-positive gay men, they were adoption of avoidant strategies to cope with daily life stress, sexual risk-taking in casual encounters, and the use of antidepressants. Our findings underscore the complex interactions between depression, sexual dysfunction, sexual risk taking, HIV infection, and general well-being among homosexually active men.

  4. Internalized homophobia, mental health, sexual behaviors, and outness of gay/bisexual men from Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjian; Zheng, Lijun; Xu, Yin; Zheng, Yong

    2017-02-17

    Social attitudes toward male homosexuality in China so far are still not optimistic. Sexual minorities in China have reported high levels of internalized homophobia. This Internet-based study examined the associations among internalized homophobia, mental health, sexual behaviors, and outness among 435 gay/bisexual men in Southwest China from 2014 to 2015. Latent profile analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, univariate logistic regression, and separate multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted. This descriptive study found the Internalized Homophobia Scale to be suitable for use in China. The sample demonstrated a high prevalence of internalized homophobia. Latent profile analysis suggested a 2-class solution as optimal, and a high level of internalized homophobia was significantly associated with greater psychological distress (Wald = 6.49, AOR = 1.66), transactional sex during the previous 6 months (Wald = 5.23, AOR = 2.77), more sexual compulsions (Wald = 14.05, AOR = 2.12), and the concealment of sexual identity from others (Wald = 30.70, AOR = 0.30) and parents (Wald = 6.72, AOR = 0.49). These findings contribute to our understanding of internalized homophobia in China, and highlight the need to decrease gay-related psychological stress/distress and improve public health services.

  5. Identity profiles in lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth: the role of family influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Hallie R; Malik, Neena M; Page, Matthew J L; Makynen, Emily; Lindahl, Kristin M

    2013-03-01

    Sexual identity development is a central task of adolescence and young adulthood and can be especially challenging for sexual minority youth. Recent research has moved from a stage model of identity development in lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth to examining identity in a non-linear, multidimensional manner. In addition, although families have been identified as important to youth's identity development, limited research has examined the influence of parental responses to youth's disclosure of their LGB sexual orientation on LGB identity. The current study examined a multidimensional model of LGB identity and its links with parental support and rejection. One hundred and sixty-nine LGB adolescents and young adults (ages 14-24, 56 % male, 48 % gay, 31 % lesbian, 21 % bisexual) described themselves on dimensions of LGB identity and reported on parental rejection, sexuality-specific social support, and non-sexuality-specific social support. Using latent profile analysis (LPA), two profiles were identified, indicating that youth experience both affirmed and struggling identities. Results indicated that parental rejection and sexuality-specific social support from families were salient links to LGB identity profile classification, while non-sexuality specific social support was unrelated. Parental rejection and sexuality-specific social support may be important to target in interventions for families to foster affirmed LGB identity development in youth.

  6. Gender-Typed Play Behavior in Early Childhood: Adopted Children with Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Abbie E.; Kashy, Deborah A.; Smith, JuilAnna Z.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether the gender-typed play of young children varies as a function of family structure. Using a sample of 126 couples (44 lesbian couples, 34 gay male couples, and 48 heterosexual couples) located throughout the United States, with an adopted child between the age of 2 and 4 years old (mean = 2.5 years), we examined parent reports of children’s gender-typed play behavior utilizing the Pre-School Activities Inventory (PSAI; Golombok & Rust, 1993). Findings revealed that the perceived play behaviors of boys and girls in same-gender parent families were more similar (i.e., less gender-stereotyped) than the perceived play behavior of boys and girls in heterosexual-parent families (which were more divergent; that is, gender-stereotyped). Sons of lesbian mothers were less masculine in their play behavior than sons of gay fathers and sons of heterosexual parents. Our findings have implications for researchers who study gender development in children and adolescents. PMID:23420542

  7. Identity Profiles in Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: The Role of Family Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Hallie R.; Malik, Neena M.; Page, Matthew J. L.; Makynen, Emily; Lindahl, Kristin M.

    2012-01-01

    Sexual identity development is a central task of adolescence and young adulthood and can be especially challenging for sexual minority youth. Recent research has moved from a stage model of identity development in lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth to examining identity in a non-linear, multidimensional manner. In addition, although families have been identified as important to youth's identity development, limited research has examined the influence of parental responses to youth's disclosure of their LGB sexual orientation on LGB identity. The current study examined a multidimensional model of LGB identity and its links with parental support and rejection. One hundred and sixty-nine LGB adolescents and young adults (ages 14–24, 56% male, 48% gay, 31% lesbian, 21% bisexual) described themselves on dimensions of LGB identity and reported on parental rejection, sexuality-specific social support, and non-sexuality-specific social support. Using latent profile analysis (LPA), two profiles were identified, indicating that youth experience both affirmed and struggling identities. Results indicated that parental rejection and sexuality-specific social support from families were salient links to LGB identity profile classification, while non-sexuality specific social support was unrelated. Parental rejection and sexuality-specific social support may be important to target in interventions for families to foster affirmed LGB identity development in youth. PMID:22847752

  8. Australian gay and bisexual men's use of erectile dysfunction medications during recent sexual encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, Garrett; Jin, Fengyi; Bavinton, Benjamin; Grulich, Andrew; Brown, Graham; Pitts, Marian; Hurley, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Use of erectile dysfunction medications (EDMs) is relatively common among gay and bisexual men and has been associated with human immunodeficiency virus sexual risk behavior. We aimed to determine what factors were related to EDM use on occasions when participants engaged in protected anal intercourse (PAIC) and when they engaged in unprotected anal intercourse (UAIC) with casual partners. An online cross-sectional survey was conducted, resulting in a sample of 1,376 Australian gay and bisexual men who reported an occasion of anal intercourse with casual male partners in the previous year. The main outcome measure was the use of EDM during most recent occasions of PAIC and UAIC. Men were as likely to use EDM on occasions when they were using condoms (11.6%) as they were on occasions when they did not use condoms (13.0%). There was no association between use of EDM and self-esteem, nor was there an association between sexual risk behavior and self-esteem. Men who used EDM were more sexually active overall and appeared to often use EDM to enhance and extend their sexual experiences. Men did not appear to use EDM specifically for the purposes of risk-taking and mainly used EDM to enhance sexual pleasure. Mental health issues were not indicated by use of EDM. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  9. Immigrant Sexual Citizenship: Intersectional Templates among Mexican Gay Immigrants to the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Steven; Carrillo, Héctor

    2014-01-01

    Existing literature on sexual citizenship has emphasized the sexuality-related claims of de jure citizens of nation-states, generally ignoring immigrants. Conversely, the literature on immigration rarely attends to the salience of sexual issues in understanding the social incorporation of migrants. This article seeks to fill the gap by theorizing and analyzing immigrant sexual citizenship. While some scholars of sexual citizenship have focused on the rights and recognition granted formally by the nation-state and others have stressed more diffuse, cultural perceptions of community and local belonging, we argue that the lived experiences of immigrant sexual citizenship call for multiscalar scrutiny of templates and practices of citizenship that bridge national policies with local connections. Analysis of ethnographic data from a study of 76 Mexican gay and bisexual male immigrants to San Diego, California reveals the specific citizenship templates that these men encounter as they negotiate their intersecting social statuses as gay/bisexual and as immigrants (legal or undocumented); these include an "asylum" template, a "rights" template, and a "local attachments" template. However, the complications of their intersecting identities constrain their capacity to claim immigrant sexual citizenship. The study underscores the importance of both intersectional and multiscalar approaches in research on citizenship as social practice.

  10. Pathways to Suicide in Lesbian and Gay Populations in Australia: A Life Chart Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerrett, Delaney M; Kõlves, Kairi; De Leo, Diego

    2017-07-01

    Given the continued paucity of research into suicide in lesbian and gay (LG) people, there is a need to investigate the characteristics of those LG suicides that are able to be identified. The aim of this article was to analyze pathways to suicide in lesbian and gay individuals by way of life charts. Data were gathered through of 24 psychological autopsy interviews with next-of-kin of an LG person who had died by suicide. The female (n = 5) and male (n = 19) cases in this study clustered into younger and older suicides. The defining feature of the younger suicides was lack of acceptance by family and, to a lesser extent, self, and that of the older suicides was romantic relationship conflict, although this was also common in younger suicides. There appears to have been, furthermore, an accumulation of risk factors, particularly in the period prior to death where these specific risk factors combined with other life stressors, such as work problems. Initiatives to reduce stigma around diversity in sexuality and to support families and young people through the "coming out" process as well as services designed to assist those experiencing problems in same-sex relationships, in particular, would appear to be the most relevant within the trajectories presented.

  11. Sexual compulsivity and interpersonal functioning: sexual relationship quality and sexual health in gay relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starks, Tyrel J; Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2013-10-01

    The present study examined the role of sexual compulsivity (SC) in four aspects of interpersonal functioning relevant to main partnerships-sexual satisfaction, sexual communication, the presence of weekly sexual activity with main partner, and the number of recent casual male sex partners (i.e., outside of the relationship) with whom participants had unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). Data were collected using a street-intercept strategy from both members of 172 gay male couples (N = 344 individuals) attending gay-community events together. SC was measured using the Sexual Compulsivity Scale; sexual satisfaction using a modified version of the Sexual Functioning Inventory (SFI); and sexual communication using a shortened version of the Dyadic Sexual Communication (DSC) Scale. Men high on SC were as likely to be partnered with men low on SC as they were to be partnered with others having high levels of SC. SC was negatively associated with sexual satisfaction and sexual communication. Individuals with higher SC scores and those whose partners had higher SC scores engaged in UAI with a greater number of male partners outside their relationship. SC was unrelated to frequency of sex with main partners. SC was associated with lower sexual relationship quality and increased potential for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission from a casual partner and subsequent transmission to (or reinfection with) a primary partner. Couples interventions for SC may be relevant to individual and public health. They provide a platform to practice communication skills, identify preferred sexual activities, and negotiate sexual safety. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. How Organisational Culture Influences Teachers' Support of Openly Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I analyse the relationship between US high schools' organisational cultures and student perceptions of responses to anti-gay language in their school. Using data from 67 interviews with young people who identified as gay, lesbian or bisexual, I compare teachers' responses to anti-gay language in schools that do and schools that do…

  13. Relationship Preferences Among Gay and Lesbian Online Daters : Individual and Contextual Influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potarca, Gina; Mills, Melinda; Neberich, Wiebke

    There is currently little knowledge about what gay men and lesbians seek in a romantic relationship. This study extends the literature on gay men and lesbians' partnership preferences by engaging in the first large-scale empirical study of the long-term dating intentions and monogamy beliefs of gay

  14. Beyond the Straight and Narrow: Librarians Can Give Gay Teens the Support They Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jami

    2004-01-01

    For gay students, some always feel like they are wearing a mask. They cannot let their family, even their friends, see the real them. According to researchers, the road to adulthood for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered teens is riddled with more potholes than for other teens. For starters, gay teens are two to three times more likely to…

  15. A Queer analysis of the discursive construction of gay identity in Gayle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 2003 the book Gayle: the language of kinks and queens: a history and dictionary of gay language in South Africa was published, documenting more than 1400 lexical items used by South African gays and lesbians. Given that the field of gay language is an established discipline within sociolinguistic research elsewhere ...

  16. Assessing Lesbian and Gay Prospective Foster and Adoptive Families: A Focus on the Home Study Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Gerald P.

    2007-01-01

    Foster care and adoption by gay men and lesbians is not a new phenomenon. Children and youth have always been placed by states and public agencies in homes with gay and lesbian parents. Some gay men and lesbians have fostered or adopted children independently from private agencies or have made private adoption arrangements with individual…

  17. Adaptation and Age-Related Expectations of Older Gay and Lesbian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quam, Jean K.; Whitford, Gary S.

    1992-01-01

    Respondents in a study of lesbian women and gay men over age 50 who indicated high levels of involvement in the gay community reported acceptance of the aging process and high levels of life satisfaction, despite predictable problems associated with aging and sexual orientation. Being active in the gay community was an asset to accepting one's…

  18. Extension of the Rejection Sensitivity Construct to the Interpersonal Functioning of Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachankis, John E.; Goldfried, Marvin R.; Ramrattan, Melissa E.

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of recent evidence suggesting that gay men are particularly likely to fear interpersonal rejection, the authors set out to extend the "rejection sensitivity" construct to the mental health concerns of gay men. After establishing a reliable and valid measure of the gay-related rejection sensitivity construct, the authors use this to…

  19. Les commerces gays et le processus de gentrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Giraud

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Interrogeant le rôle des populations homosexuelles dans la gentrification d’un ancien quartier historique de Paris (celui du Marais, cet article aborde cette question dans sa dimension commerciale. Depuis le début des années 80, l’implantation de commerces gays dans ce secteur a accompagné les effets de la gentrification et les a même accélérés pour partie depuis les années 90. Aujourd’hui cependant, la relation entre cette présence commerciale spécifique et les transformations socio-économiques de ce quartier parisien apparaissent nettement plus ambigus.In this paper, we examinate the role of gay men towards gentrification and urban renaissance by focusing on gay business development in “Le Marais”. We demonstrate that, in this old neighbourhood of the city-center, the emergence of a gay commercial area has supported gentrification during the eighties and then contributed to the urban, economical and cultural renaissance. The historical link between gentrification and “gay spaces” has changed and became since a few years more and more diversified.

  20. Attitudes toward Lesbians and Gays among American and Dutch Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Kate L.; Horn, Stacey S.; Bos, Henny M. W.; Sandfort, Theo G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Attitudes toward lesbians and gays vary across national populations, and previous research has found relatively more accepting attitudes in the Netherlands as compared to the U.S. In this study, we compared beliefs about and attitudes toward lesbians and gays in samples of Dutch and American heterosexual adolescents, utilizing survey data from 1,080 American adolescents (mean age = 15.86 years) attending two schools and from 1,391 Dutch adolescents (mean age = 16.27 years) attending eight schools. Findings indicated the Dutch participants were more tolerant of lesbians and gays, after adjusting for the gender, age, and racial/ethnic minority status of the participants. However, between-country differences were attenuated by accounting for the beliefs about lesbians and gays that participants used to justify their attitudes. American participants were more likely to justify their attitudes using beliefs related to social norms and religious opposition, while the Dutch participants were more likely to justify their attitudes using beliefs related to individual rights and the biological/genetic basis of homosexuality. The results suggest that the relative importance of particular beliefs about lesbians and gays to attitudes at the group level may be context-dependent but also that certain beliefs are salient to attitudes across national contexts. PMID:24512056