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Sample records for white filamentary hair

  1. ESTROGEN RECEPTORS OF HAIRS BLACKS AND WHITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laswati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aging is termed as same as degenerative process, in which all part of tissue organs retarted the microstructure either macrostructure, forming and function even the colour, including black hair change to white hair. Several researchers have been recommended that estrogen hormone be able ease black to white hair, but hormone without any presenting of receptor won’t be work properly. The main aim of this study were to determine amount of estrogen receptor contents in famales and males black and white hairs included the microscopically structure. Method: Twelve females and males there were 50 -56 years old each pairs black and white head hairs were plucked along with follicles. This estrogen receptors analyzed using radioreceptor binding assay there were 5mm eah hair follices including the root cutted and each pair put its in 2 ml glass tube already filled in with 500 µl 125I-estradiol and incubated in 37oC for 3 hrs. Following times were over the tube flushed twice carefully the hair won’t be flushed. Then count by putting in the gamma counter chamber for 1 minute each. The values that shown in the monitor as CPM (count per minute, recorded as receptor of estradiol. Results: Mean (±SD sum estrogen receptor in females black and white hairs were 479.3 ± 37.5 and 387.7 ± 33.0, but significantly decreased in male black hair was 316.9±17.8 and 274.0 ± 19.8. All those pairs significantly different either female black and white hairs or male black and white hair and also significantly different among groups. Conclusion: The lowest estrogen receptors recorded in male white hairs and microstructure decreasing of melanin contents.

  2. Trichosporon inkin and Trichosporon mucoides as unusual causes of white piedra of scalp hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendolkar, Uma; Shinde, Alka; Baveja, Sujata; Dhurat, Rachita; Phiske, Meghana

    2014-01-01

    White piedra of scalp hair is considered a rare entity. We report three cases of this disorder all of whom presented with nodules on the hair. Potassium hydroxide preparations of the hair revealed clustered arthrospores and mature, easily detachable nodules. Cultures grew Trichosporon inkin in 2 patients and Trichosporon mucoides in one patient. Both these fungi are unusual causes of white piedra.

  3. Trichosporon inkin and Trichosporon mucoides as unusual causes of white piedra of scalp hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Tendolkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available White piedra of scalp hair is considered a rare entity. We report three cases of this disorder all of whom presented with nodules on the hair. Potassium hydroxide preparations of the hair revealed clustered arthrospores and mature, easily detachable nodules. Cultures grew Trichosporon inkin in 2 patients and Trichosporon mucoides in one patient. Both these fungi are unusual causes of white piedra.

  4. Topical liposomal Rose Bengal for photodynamic white hair removal: randomized, controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, Nevien; Fadel, Maha

    2014-04-01

    Blond and white hair removal by laser is a complicated task with weak satisfactory results due to the deficiency in laser-absorbing chromophore. To investigate if repetitive sessions of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using external application of liposomal Rose bengal (RB) photosensitizer followed by intense pulsed light (IPL) exposure enables removal of gray and white hair. Rose bengal loaded in liposomes (LRB) was constructed, prepared in hydrogel, and was studied for some pharmaceutical properties. Penetration and selective hair follicle damage in mice skin were studied. Topical gel containing LRB was used for treating fifteen adult females who were complaining of facial white terminal hair. Unwanted facial hair was treated for three sessions at intervals of 4-6 weeks using intense pulsed light (IPL). At each session, the treatment area was pre-treated with topical LRB gel, while a control group of another 15 patients applied placebo gel before IPL treatment. Evaluations included hair regrowth, which was measured 4 weeks after each treatment session and at 6 months follow-up by counting the number of terminal hair compared with baseline pretreatment values. Treatment outcomes and complications if any were also reported. Average hair regrowth in the LRB group was 56% after 3 treatment cycles. After six-months follow up, average terminal hair count compared with baseline pretreatment showed 40% reduction and no recorded side effects. A significant difference (Phair removal using rose bengal-encapsulated liposomal gel in combination with IPL treatment showed significant efficacy in the treatment of white hair compared with a control group.

  5. Successful white hair removal with combined coloring and intense pulsed Light (IPL): a randomized clinical trial.

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    Alijanpoor, Robabeh; Poorsattar BejehMir, Arash; Mokmeli, Soheila

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce adjunct therapy to intense pulsed light (IPL) and to assess it in terms of safety, expense, feasibility, and efficacy. Currently there is no satisfactory, efficient method for long-term white hair removal. We conducted a randomized clinical trial of hirsute patients with excessive white hair on the chin and cheeks. In addition to IPL, the patients were randomly assigned to have their white hair colored with either black eyeliner or black hair dye as an adjunct to IPL aided for of six sessions (with a 4-week interval between sessions). The primary efficacy outcome, which was defined as the outcome after six sessions of therapy, was scored as poor (60%) response to white hair removal in predefined areas. The secondary outcome was recurrence 6 months after the final therapy session. In the eyeliner group (n=31), 15 (48.4%) individuals showed a fair response, and 16 (51.6%) individuals showed a good response. In the color-dye group (n=31), 1 (3.2%), 17 (54.8%) and 13 (41.9%) participants scored poor, fair, and good, respectively. There were no differences in clinician judgment of the treatment success between the eyeliner and color-dye groups after the six therapy sessions (p=0.895). Thirty-one patients had 6 months of visits (11 in the hair dye and 20 in the eyeliner group). Three participants in the color-dye group and five participants in the eyeliner group failed to show improvement 6 months after the laser surgery. There was no distinguishable pattern of failure between the two study groups (p=1). This study supports that hair coloring is an efficient and feasible technique that can be combined with IPL to eliminate white facial hair.

  6. A randomized, controlled, double-blind study evaluating melanin-encapsulated liposomes as a chromophore for laser hair removal of blond, white, and gray hair.

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    Sand, Michael; Bechara, Falk Georges; Sand, Daniel; Altmeyer, Peter; Hoffmann, Klaus

    2007-05-01

    Laser hair removal of blond and white hair is a complicated task with often unsatisfactory results as a result of a lack of laser-absorbing chromophore. In the present study, we investigated if repetitive external application of liposomal melanin (Lipoxome; Dalton Medicare B.V., Zevenbergschen Hoek, The Netherlands) enables removal of blond/white and gray hair with a diode laser. Forty-two areas of blond, gray, or white facial and body hair of 16 patients were treated with a liposomal melanin spray (Lipoxome) and 3 cycles of 800 nm diode laser at intervals of 8 weeks (28-40 J/cm). A control group of 16 patients applied physiological saline spray before diode laser treatment. Hair regrowth was measured 8 weeks after each cycle and additionally 6 months after the last treatment by counting the number of terminal hairs compared with baseline pretreatment values. Complications and treatment outcomes were documented. Mean regrowth in the liposomal melanin group was 83% after 3 treatment cycles. Six months after therapy, average terminal hair count compared with baseline pretreatment showed 14% reduction. Although significant difference was seen compared with the control group showing a 10% reduction of hair growth after 6 months (P hair compared with a control group. However, the clinically observed hair reduction was so weak that additional effort as well as higher costs argues against the application of the tested formulation.

  7. Effect of hair color and sun sensitivity on nevus counts in white children in Colorado.

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    Aalborg, Jenny; Morelli, Joseph G; Byers, Tim E; Mokrohisky, Stefan T; Crane, Lori A

    2010-09-01

    It has been widely reported that individuals with a light phenotype (ie, light hair color, light base skin color, and propensity to burn) have more nevi and are at greater risk for developing skin cancer. No studies have systematically investigated how phenotypic traits may interact in relation to nevus development. We sought to systematically examine whether any combinations of phenotype are associated with a greater or lesser risk for nevus development in white children. In the summer of 2007, 654 children were examined to determine full body nevus counts, skin color by colorimetry, and hair and eye color by comparison with charts. Interviews of parents were conducted to capture sun sensitivity, sun exposure, and sun protection practices. Among 9-year-old children with sun sensitivity rating type II (painful burn/light tan), those with light hair had lower nevus counts than did those with dark hair (P value for interaction = .03). This relationship was independent of eye color, presence of freckling, sex, usual daily sun exposure, sunburn in 2004 to 2007, sun protection index, and waterside vacation sun exposure. The difference in nevus counts was further determined to be specific to small nevi (white children, dark-haired individuals who burn readily and then tan slightly are more prone to nevus development, and may therefore be a previously underrecognized high-risk group for melanoma. Copyright 2009 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetosheath Filamentary Structures

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    Rojas-Castillo, D. I.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Omidi, N.; Kajdic, P.

    2014-12-01

    The terrestrial magnetosheath is full of highly perturbed plasma. The inhomogeneity of this region leads to temperature anisotropies that can originate waves; e.g, mirror mode and ion cyclotron waves. Other structures like the magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) can also be present. These are structures reported from results of global hybrid simulations by Omidi et al. (2014) that are formed in the quasi-parallel region of the bow shock and they are convected into the magnetosheath. The MFS are characterized by field aligned enhancements of density and temperature that are anti-correlated. In this work we analyze magnetic field and plasma data from the THEMIS mission to explore the possible existence of MFS.

  9. White Lupin Cluster Root Acclimation to Phosphorus Deficiency and Root Hair Development Involve Unique Glycerophosphodiester Phosphodiesterases1[W][OA

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    Cheng, Lingyun; Bucciarelli, Bruna; Liu, Junqi; Zinn, Kelly; Miller, Susan; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Allan, Deborah; Shen, Jianbo; Vance, Carroll P.

    2011-01-01

    White lupin (Lupinus albus) is a legume that is very efficient in accessing unavailable phosphorus (Pi). It develops short, densely clustered tertiary lateral roots (cluster/proteoid roots) in response to Pi limitation. In this report, we characterize two glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (GPX-PDE) genes (GPX-PDE1 and GPX-PDE2) from white lupin and propose a role for these two GPX-PDEs in root hair growth and development and in a Pi stress-induced phospholipid degradation pathway in cluster roots. Both GPX-PDE1 and GPX-PDE2 are highly expressed in Pi-deficient cluster roots, particularly in root hairs, epidermal cells, and vascular bundles. Expression of both genes is a function of both Pi availability and photosynthate. GPX-PDE1 Pi deficiency-induced expression is attenuated as photosynthate is deprived, while that of GPX-PDE2 is strikingly enhanced. Yeast complementation assays and in vitro enzyme assays revealed that GPX-PDE1 shows catalytic activity with glycerophosphocholine while GPX-PDE2 shows highest activity with glycerophosphoinositol. Cell-free protein extracts from Pi-deficient cluster roots display GPX-PDE enzyme activity for both glycerophosphocholine and glycerophosphoinositol. Knockdown of expression of GPX-PDE through RNA interference resulted in impaired root hair development and density. We propose that white lupin GPX-PDE1 and GPX-PDE2 are involved in the acclimation to Pi limitation by enhancing glycerophosphodiester degradation and mediating root hair development. PMID:21464471

  10. Morphological analysis of patchy thickening and reddish discoloration of active hair growth areas in the skin of New Zealand White rabbits.

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    Ishihara, Tomoko; Yamashita, Haruhiro; Sakurai, Takanobu; Morita, Junya; Sakamoto, Kouji; Ishii, Aiko; Sasaki, Minoru

    2017-10-01

    Patchy thickening and reddish discoloration of active hair growth areas of skin in rabbits are occasionally found, and this gross feature could affect precise evaluation when conducting a dermal irritation test. Since little is known about the mechanism of this phenomenon, we examined the dorsal skin of New Zealand White rabbits morphologically and immunohistochemically in order to identify the possible mechanism responsible for developing these skin changes in relation to the hair cycle. Skin samples from 4 rabbits were divided into three groups (5 samples/group) based on their macroscopic characteristics: a thickened skin, erythematous skin, and smooth skin group. Histomorphological examination revealed that the percentage of hair follicles in the anagen phase, hair follicle length, hair follicle area, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells in the hair follicles were greater in the thickened skin and erythematous skin groups than in the smooth skin group. Unlike mice and rats, the dermis was nearly adjacent to the muscular layer with a thin hypodermis, and the whole lengths of hair follicles in the anagen phase were located in the dermis in the rabbit skin. These results suggest that large hair follicles in the anagen phase compressed the surrounding dermis; therefore, the skin was grossly raised and showed thickening. A higher number of CD31-positive blood vessels, suggesting the occurrence of angiogenesis, was observed around the hair follicles in the erythematous skin group, and they seemed to affect the reddish discoloration of skin noted grossly.

  11. Hair removal.

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    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available systems. Evidence has been found for long-term hair removal efficacy beyond 6 months after repetitive treatments with alexandrite, diode, and long-pulse Nd:YAG lasers, whereas the current long-term evidence is sparse for IPL devices. Treatment parameters must be adjusted to patient skin type and chromophore. Longer wavelengths and cooling are safer for patients with darker skin types. Hair removal with lasers and IPL sources are generally safe treatment procedures when performed by properly educated operators. However, safety issues must be addressed since burns and adverse events do occur. New treatment procedures are evolving. Consumer-based treatments with portable home devices are rapidly evolving, and presently include low-level diode lasers and IPL devices. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. White lupin cluster root acclimation to phosphorus deficiency and root hair development involve unique glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterases

    Science.gov (United States)

    White lupin (Lupinus albus L.) is a phosphate (Pi) deficiency tolerant legume which develops short, densely clustered tertiary lateral roots (cluster/proteoid roots) in response to Pi limitation. In this report we characterize two glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (GPX-PDE) genes (GPX-PDE1 and...

  13. Aging changes in hair and nails

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    ... the follicles make less melanin, and this causes gray hair. Graying often begins in the 30s. Scalp hair ... all. Graying is largely determined by your genes. Gray hair tends to occur earlier in white people and ...

  14. Assembly of filamentary void galaxy configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieder, Steven; van de Weijgaert, Rien; Cautun, Marius; Beygu, Burcu; Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation and evolution of filamentary configurations of dark matter haloes in voids. Our investigation uses the high-resolution Lambda cold dark matter simulation CosmoGrid to look for void systems resembling the VGS_31 elongated system of three interacting galaxies that was recently

  15. Filamentary Switching: Synaptic Plasticity through Device Volatility

    CERN Document Server

    La Barbera, Selina; Alibart, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Replicating the computational functionalities and performances of the brain remains one of the biggest challenges for the future of information and communication technologies. Such an ambitious goal requires research efforts from the architecture level to the basic device level (i.e., investigating the opportunities offered by emerging nanotechnologies to build such systems). Nanodevices, or, more precisely, memory or memristive devices, have been proposed for the implementation of synaptic functions, offering the required features and integration in a single component. In this paper, we demonstrate that the basic physics involved in the filamentary switching of electrochemical metallization cells can reproduce important biological synaptic functions that are key mechanisms for information processing and storage. The transition from short- to long-term plasticity has been reported as a direct consequence of filament growth (i.e., increased conductance) in filamentary memory devices. In this paper, we show tha...

  16. Premature graying of hair.

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    Pandhi, Deepika; Khanna, Deepshikha

    2013-01-01

    Premature graying is an important cause of low self-esteem, often interfering with socio-cultural adjustment. The onset and progression of graying or canities correlate very closely with chronological aging, and occur in varying degrees in all individuals eventually, regardless of gender or race. Premature canities may occur alone as an autosomal dominant condition or in association with various autoimmune or premature aging syndromes. It needs to be differentiated from various genetic hypomelanotic hair disorders. Reduction in melanogenically active melanocytes in the hair bulb of gray anagen hair follicles with resultant pigment loss is central to the pathogenesis of graying. Defective melanosomal transfers to cortical keratinocytes and melanin incontinence due to melanocyte degeneration are also believed to contribute to this. The white color of canities is an optical effect; the reflection of incident light masks the intrinsic pale yellow color of hair keratin. Full range of color from normal to white can be seen both along individual hair and from hair to hair, and admixture of pigmented and white hair is believed to give the appearance of gray. Graying of hair is usually progressive and permanent, but there are occasional reports of spontaneous repigmentation of gray hair. Studies evaluating the association of canities with osteopenia and cardiovascular disease have revealed mixed results. Despite the extensive molecular research being carried out to understand the pathogenesis of canities, there is paucity of effective evidence-based treatment options. Reports of repigmentation of previously white hair following certain inflammatory processes and use of drugs have suggested the possibility of cytokine-induced recruitment of outer sheath melanocytes to the hair bulb and rekindled the hope for finding an effective drug for treatment of premature canities. In the end, camouflage techniques using hair colorants are outlined.

  17. Premature graying of hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Pandhi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Premature graying is an important cause of low self-esteem, often interfering with socio-cultural adjustment. The onset and progression of graying or canities correlate very closely with chronological aging, and occur in varying degrees in all individuals eventually, regardless of gender or race. Premature canities may occur alone as an autosomal dominant condition or in association with various autoimmune or premature aging syndromes. It needs to be differentiated from various genetic hypomelanotic hair disorders. Reduction in melanogenically active melanocytes in the hair bulb of gray anagen hair follicles with resultant pigment loss is central to the pathogenesis of graying. Defective melanosomal transfers to cortical keratinocytes and melanin incontinence due to melanocyte degeneration are also believed to contribute to this. The white color of canities is an optical effect; the reflection of incident light masks the intrinsic pale yellow color of hair keratin. Full range of color from normal to white can be seen both along individual hair and from hair to hair, and admixture of pigmented and white hair is believed to give the appearance of gray. Graying of hair is usually progressive and permanent, but there are occasional reports of spontaneous repigmentation of gray hair. Studies evaluating the association of canities with osteopenia and cardiovascular disease have revealed mixed results. Despite the extensive molecular research being carried out to understand the pathogenesis of canities, there is paucity of effective evidence-based treatment options. Reports of repigmentation of previously white hair following certain inflammatory processes and use of drugs have suggested the possibility of cytokine-induced recruitment of outer sheath melanocytes to the hair bulb and rekindled the hope for finding an effective drug for treatment of premature canities. In the end, camouflage techniques using hair colorants are outlined.

  18. Hair transplant

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    ... hair transplant is a surgical procedure to improve baldness. Description During a hair transplant, hairs are moved ... a hair transplant have male or female pattern baldness . Hair loss is on the front or top ...

  19. Healthy hair: what is it?

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    Sinclair, Rodney D

    2007-12-01

    Shiny hair with a smooth texture and clean-cut ends or tapered tips is generally perceived to be healthy. Hair texture and shine relate to hair surface properties, whereas the integrity of hair ends relates to the hair cortex. Hair can be straight, wavy or curly, blonde, black, brown, red, gray white, and its natural variations are important to our identity. Manipulation of the normal structure of the hair shaft is epidemic and dictated by culture, fashion, and above all, celebrity. Although cosmetic procedures are intrinsically safe, there is potential for damage to the hair. Loss of lustre, frizz, split ends, and other hair problems are particularly prevalent among people who repeatedly alter the natural style of their hair or among people with hair that is intrinsically weak. This may be due to individual or racial variation or less commonly an inherited structural abnormality in hair fiber formation. Hair health is also affected by common afflictions of the scalp as well as age-related phenomena such as graying and androgenetic alopecia. Hair products that improve the structural integrity of hair fibers and increase tensile strength are available, as are products that increase hair volume, reduce frizz, improve hair manageability, and stimulate new hair growth.

  20. Identification of Differentially Expressed miRNAs between White and Black Hair Follicles by RNA-Sequencing in the Goat (Capra hircus

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    Zhenyang Wu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a key role in many biological processes by regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. A number of miRNAs have been identified from livestock species. However, compared with other animals, such as pigs and cows, the number of miRNAs identified in goats is quite low, particularly in hair follicles. In this study, to investigate the functional roles of miRNAs in goat hair follicles of goats with different coat colors, we sequenced miRNAs from two hair follicles samples (white and black using Solexa sequencing. A total of 35,604,016 reads were obtained, which included 30,878,637 clean reads (86.73%. MiRDeep2 software identified 214 miRNAs. Among them, 205 were conserved among species and nine were novel miRNAs. Furthermore, DESeq software identified six differentially expressed miRNAs. Quantitative PCR confirmed differential expression of two miRNAs, miR-10b and miR-211. KEGG pathways were analyzed using the DAVID website for the predicted target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs. Several signaling pathways including Notch and MAPK pathways may affect the process of coat color formation. Our study showed that the identified miRNAs might play an essential role in black and white follicle formation in goats.

  1. Identification of differentially expressed miRNAs between white and black hair follicles by RNA-sequencing in the goat (Capra hircus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenyang; Fu, Yuhua; Cao, Jianhua; Yu, Mei; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhao, Shuhong

    2014-05-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a key role in many biological processes by regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. A number of miRNAs have been identified from livestock species. However, compared with other animals, such as pigs and cows, the number of miRNAs identified in goats is quite low, particularly in hair follicles. In this study, to investigate the functional roles of miRNAs in goat hair follicles of goats with different coat colors, we sequenced miRNAs from two hair follicles samples (white and black) using Solexa sequencing. A total of 35,604,016 reads were obtained, which included 30,878,637 clean reads (86.73%). MiRDeep2 software identified 214 miRNAs. Among them, 205 were conserved among species and nine were novel miRNAs. Furthermore, DESeq software identified six differentially expressed miRNAs. Quantitative PCR confirmed differential expression of two miRNAs, miR-10b and miR-211. KEGG pathways were analyzed using the DAVID website for the predicted target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs. Several signaling pathways including Notch and MAPK pathways may affect the process of coat color formation. Our study showed that the identified miRNAs might play an essential role in black and white follicle formation in goats.

  2. Filamentary ion flow theory and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Lattarulo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Presents all-new laboratory-tested theory for calculating more accurate ionized electric fields to aid in designing high-voltage devices and its components Understanding and accurately calculating corona originated electric fields are important issues for scientists who are involved in electromagnetic and electrostatic studies. High-voltage dc lines and equipment, in particular, can generate ion flows that can give rise to environmental inconveniences. Filamentary Ion Flow: Theory and Experiments provides interdisciplinary theoretical arguments to attain a final model for computational elect

  3. Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overall hair thinning and not bald patches. Full-body hair loss. Some conditions and medical treatments, such as ... in the loss of hair all over your body. The hair usually grows back. Patches of scaling that spread ...

  4. Filamentary and hierarchical pictures - Kinetic energy criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klypin, Anatoly A.; Melott, Adrian L.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new criterion for formation of second-generation filaments. The criterion called the kinetic energy ratio, KR, is based on comparison of peculiar velocities at different scales. We suggest that the clumpiness of the distribution in some cases might be less important than the 'coldness' or 'hotness' of the flow for formation of coherent structures. The kinetic energy ratio is analogous to the Mach number except for one essential difference. If at some scale KR is greater than 1, as estimated at the linear stage, then when fluctuations of this scale reach nonlinearity, the objects they produce must be anisotropic ('filamentary'). In the case of power-law initial spectra the kinetic ratio criterion suggests that the border line is the power-spectrum with the slope n = -1.

  5. Laser hair removal pearls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Emily P; Goldberg, David J

    2008-03-01

    A number of lasers and light devices are now available for the treatment of unwanted hair. The goal of laser hair removal is to damage stem cells in the bulge of the follicle through the targeting of melanin, the endogenous chromophore for laser and light devices utilized to remove hair. The competing chromophores in the skin and hair, oxyhemoglobin and water, have a decreased absorption between 690 nm and 1000 nm, thus making this an ideal range for laser and light sources. Pearls of laser hair removal are presented in this review, focusing on four areas of recent development: 1 treatment of blond, white and gray hair; 2 paradoxical hypertrichosis; 3 laser hair removal in children; and 4 comparison of lasers and IPL. Laser and light-based technologies to remove hair represents one of the most exciting areas where discoveries by dermatologists have led to novel treatment approaches. It is likely that in the next decade, continued advancements in this field will bring us closer to the development of a more permanent and painless form of hair removal.

  6. Body Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Body Puberty Body hair Body hair Even before you get your first period , you ... spreads up in a V shape over time. Body hair is normal, and some people think it looks ...

  7. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the product. ...

  8. Hair Treatments and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hair treatments? Hair treatments include hair coloring, hair curling (permanents), hair bleaching, and hair straightening (relaxers) agents. ... dyes include hydrogen peroxide, ammonia, and alcohols. Hair curling or permanent wave chemicals include ammonium thioglycolate and ...

  9. Assembly of filamentary void galaxy configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Steven; van de Weygaert, Rien; Cautun, Marius; Beygu, Burcu; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2013-10-01

    We study the formation and evolution of filamentary configurations of dark matter haloes in voids. Our investigation uses the high-resolution Λ cold dark matter simulation CosmoGrid to look for void systems resembling the VGS_31 elongated system of three interacting galaxies that was recently discovered by the Void Galaxy Survey inside a large void in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy redshift survey. H I data revealed these galaxies to be embedded in a common elongated envelope, possibly embedded in intravoid filament. In the CosmoGrid simulation we look for systems similar to VGS_31 in mass, size and environment. We find a total of eight such systems. For these systems, we study the distribution of neighbour haloes, the assembly and evolution of the main haloes and the dynamical evolution of the haloes, as well as the evolution of the large-scale structure in which the systems are embedded. The spatial distribution of the haloes follows that of the dark matter environment. We find that VGS_31-like systems have a large variation in formation time, having formed between 10 Gyr ago and the present epoch. However, the environments in which the systems are embedded evolved to resemble each other substantially. Each of the VGS_31-like systems is embedded in an intravoid wall, that no later than z = 0.5 became the only prominent feature in its environment. While part of the void walls retain a rather featureless character, we find that around half of them are marked by a pronounced and rapidly evolving substructure. Five haloes find themselves in a tenuous filament of a few h-1 Mpc long inside the intravoid wall. Finally, we compare the results to observed data from VGS_31. Our study implies that the VGS_31 galaxies formed in the same (proto)filament, and did not meet just recently. The diversity amongst the simulated halo systems indicates that VGS_31 may not be typical for groups of galaxies in voids.

  10. Ingrown Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with curly beards. It develops when shaved hairs curve back into the skin, leading to inflammation. Chronic ingrown hairs can lead to: Bacterial infection (from scratching) Skin darkening (hyperpigmentation) Permanent scarring (keloids) Pseudofolliculitis barbae, also known as razor bumps Prevention ...

  11. Your Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hair, like that on your cheek, is almost invisible. Depending on where it is, hair has different ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for ...

  12. Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to treat acne, bipolar disorder, and ADHD. Diet pills that contain amphetamines also can cause hair loss. Alopecia areata (pronounced: al-uh-PEE-shuh air-ee-AH-tuh) . This skin disease causes hair ...

  13. Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hair if you have certain diseases, such as thyroid problems, diabetes, or lupus. If you take certain medicines or have chemotherapy for cancer, you may also lose your hair. Other causes are stress, a low protein diet, a family history, or poor nutrition. Treatment for hair loss depends ...

  14. Root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grierson, C.; Nielsen, E.; Ketelaar, T.; Schiefelbein, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair

  15. Hair cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madnani, Nina; Khan, Kaleem

    2013-01-01

    The hair cosmetic industry has undergone a revolutionary change over the last two decades. The focus has dramatically veered from merely cleaning to repair, increasing the tensile strength, reducing oxidative damage, and stimulating growth. Newer shorter procedures to make hair look naturally more lustrous, smooth, and manageable have evolved. Specialized grooming products have been formulated to cleanse, calm, and condition the hair, and are tailored for different hair-types, for example, dry, dry-damaged, oily, colored, and gray hair. Other products are formulated to alter the color or structure of the hair shaft, for example, hair dyes, perming/relaxing. Hair sprays and waxes/gels, can alter the 'lift' of the hair-shaft. Although dermatologists are experts in managing scalp and hair diseases, the esthetic applications of newer cosmetic therapies still remain elusive. This article attempts to fill the lacunae in our knowledge of hair cosmetics and esthetic procedures relevant in today's rapidly changing beauty-enhancing industry, with special emphasis on the Indian scenario for chemical and 'natural' hair products.

  16. Hair cosmetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Madnani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hair cosmetic industry has undergone a revolutionary change over the last two decades. The focus has dramatically veered from merely cleaning to repair, increasing the tensile strength, reducing oxidative damage, and stimulating growth. Newer shorter procedures to make hair look naturally more lustrous, smooth, and manageable have evolved. Specialized grooming products have been formulated to cleanse, calm, and condition the hair, and are tailored for different hair-types, for example, dry, dry-damaged, oily, colored, and gray hair. Other products are formulated to alter the color or structure of the hair shaft, for example, hair dyes, perming/relaxing. Hair sprays and waxes/gels, can alter the ′lift′ of the hair-shaft. Although dermatologists are experts in managing scalp and hair diseases, the esthetic applications of newer cosmetic therapies still remain elusive. This article attempts to fill the lacunae in our knowledge of hair cosmetics and esthetic procedures relevant in today′s rapidly changing beauty-enhancing industry, with special emphasis on the Indian scenario for chemical and ′natural′ hair products.

  17. Hair Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in girls who need it. Deciding to remove body hair is a personal choice. Getting rid of body hair doesn't make a person healthier, and you ... you don't want to. Some cultures view body hair as beautiful and natural, so do what feels ...

  18. Bisous model-Detecting filamentary patterns in point processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, E.; Stoica, R. S.; Kipper, R.; Saar, E.

    2016-07-01

    The cosmic web is a highly complex geometrical pattern, with galaxy clusters at the intersection of filaments and filaments at the intersection of walls. Identifying and describing the filamentary network is not a trivial task due to the overwhelming complexity of the structure, its connectivity and the intrinsic hierarchical nature. To detect and quantify galactic filaments we use the Bisous model, which is a marked point process built to model multi-dimensional patterns. The Bisous filament finder works directly with the galaxy distribution data and the model intrinsically takes into account the connectivity of the filamentary network. The Bisous model generates the visit map (the probability to find a filament at a given point) together with the filament orientation field. Using these two fields, we can extract filament spines from the data. Together with this paper we publish the computer code for the Bisous model that is made available in GitHub. The Bisous filament finder has been successfully used in several cosmological applications and further development of the model will allow to detect the filamentary network also in photometric redshift surveys, using the full redshift posterior. We also want to encourage the astro-statistical community to use the model and to connect it with all other existing methods for filamentary pattern detection and characterisation.

  19. Hair casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweta S Parmar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair casts or pseudonits are circumferential concretions,which cover the hair shaft in such a way that, it could be easily removed. They are thin, cylindrical, and elongated in length. We present an unusual case of an 8-year-old girl presenting with hair casts. Occurrence of these is unusual, and they may have varied associations. This patient was suffering from developmental delay. It is commonly misdiagnosed as and very important to differentiate from pediculosis capitis.

  20. Organ representation areas of different internal organs localized on the eyebrows & eyelids by the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test electromagnetic resonance phenomenon between 2 identical molecules--Part I: Detection of increased markers for cancer & heart disease from white hairs on the eyebrows and marked decrease in the markers after taking one optimal dose of DHEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Organ representation areas of different internal organs were localized on the eyebrows for the first time in 2005 and localized on the surrounding tissue around the eye in 2008 using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT) electromagnetic resonance phenomenon between 2 identical tissue. The appearance of white hairs at specific organ representation areas of eyebrows represent an abnormal condition of the specific internal organ if the BDORT grading is (-)4 or a higher negative value. When one of these white hairs on the eyebrows is examined at any location along its entire length by the BDORT, if the grading is a very abnormal negative value of (-)6 or a higher (-) value, significantly abnormal conditions exist or existed at the corresponding time at the specific location of the hair. The heart representation area on the eyebrow is located nearest to the bridge of the nose on each side, where abnormally increased BNP (Brain Natriuretic Peptide) and cardiac Troponin I content is detected on the part of the white hair where the BDORT grading is (-)6 or a higher negative value. In the very abnormal part of the white hair representing the heart, Asbestos, TXB2, and PLGF (Placental Growth Factor) are markedly increased, while DHEA is markedly reduced. If Integrin alpha5beta1 and Oncogene C-fos Ab2 are more than 5-10 ng (BDORT units), malignancy can be suspected. When one optimal dose of DHEA, 8.5 mg, was taken once, normal body tissue telomere was increased from less than 1 ng (during which time the patient experienced extreme tiredness and frequent urination), to 525 ng (BDORT units), not only did severe tiredness & frequent urination completely disappear, but also the white hair representing the left ventricle changed to black hair, and the semi-transparent white hair representing the kidney changed to a non-transparent white hair, with significant decreases in the abnormal parameters. Thus, it is possible to detect unrecognized serious heart conditions or early

  1. Hair removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair...

  2. Hair Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hædersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair...

  3. Effects of gamma rays on the regeneration of murine hair follicles in the natural hair cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Kimihiko

    2017-09-01

    This review evaluates the effects of γ-rays on the regeneration of murine hair follicles in the natural hair cycle. A series of studies were performed to investigate this issue, in which the whole bodies of C57BL/10JHir mice in the 1st telogen phase of the hair cycle were irradiated with γ-rays. The dermis of the irradiated skin showed a decrease in hair follicle density and induction of curved hair follicles along with the presence of white hairs and hypopigmented hair bulbs in the 2nd and 3rd anagen phases. An increased frequency of hypopigmented hair bulbs was still observed in the later hair cycle at postnatal day 200. There was no significant difference in the number of stem cells in the hair bulge region between control and irradiated skin. These results show that the effects of γ-rays on the pigmentation of murine hair follicles are persistently carried over to later hair cycles, although those on the number and structure of hair follicles appear to be hidden by the effects of aging. Our findings may be important for understanding the mechanisms of the actions of stem cells on hair regeneration in connection with age-related phenotypes.

  4. Use of body hair and beard hair in hair restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Sanusi

    2013-08-01

    For many hair restoration patients with limited scalp donor hair it is possible to use nonhead hair sources to increase the potential follicle supply. Follicular unit extraction provides the hair restoration surgeon with a useful surgical means for accessing this valuable source of donor reserve. Nonhead hair can also be used to restore eyebrows, eyelashes, and moustaches. This article focuses on the use of body hair and beard in hair restoration. Discussed are the indications and effective techniques for performing hair transplants using non head hair donor sources, along with the pitfalls and risks of this surgical modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural monitoring of filamentary composites using embedded fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashon, John L.; Lehner, David L.; Bower, Mark V.; Gilbert, John A.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring overall integrity of structural components made of filamentary composites, by embedding optical fibers between lamina of a composite beam, is investigated using a beam constructed of Kevlar/epoxy cloth with embedded optical fibers aligned with the longitudinal axis of the beam. Phase changes were monitored in three different optical fibers as the composite beam was subjected to pure bending, and the strain response of the fibers was compared to the strain gage readings taken at the surface, showing a strong correlation between the phase change and the applied deformation.

  6. Recent progress towards a quantitative description of filamentary SOL transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carralero, D.; Siccinio, M.; Komm, M.

    2017-01-01

    in the outer midplane and a transition between the sheath-limited and the inertial filamentary regimes. Divertor collisionality is found to be the parameter triggering the transition. A clear reduction of the ion temperature takes place in the far SOL after the transition, both for the background......-mode plasmas, although a secondary threshold related to deuterium fueling is observed. EMC3-EIRENE simulations of neutral dynamics show that an ionization front near the main chamber wall is formed after the shoulder formation. Finally, a clear increase of SOL opacity to neutrals is observed, associated...

  7. Qualitative investigation of fresh human scalp hair with full-field optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo June; Pi, Long-Quan; Min, Gihyeon; Lee, Won-Soo; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2012-03-01

    We have investigated depth-resolved cellular structures of unmodified fresh human scalp hairs with ultrahigh-resolution full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). The Linnik-type white light interference microscope has been home-implemented to observe the micro-internal layers of human hairs in their natural environment. In hair shafts, FF-OCT has qualitatively revealed the cellular hair compartments of cuticle and cortex layers involved in keratin filaments and melanin granules. No significant difference between black and white hair shafts was observed except for absence of only the melanin granules in the white hair, reflecting that the density of the melanin granules directly affects the hair color. Anatomical description of plucked hair bulbs was also obtained with the FF-OCT in three-dimensions. We expect this approach will be useful for evaluating cellular alteration of natural hairs on cosmetic assessment or diagnosis of hair diseases.

  8. Hair Dye

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cosmetics, temporary tattoos, photographic development and lithography plates, photocopying and printing inks, black rubber, oils, greases and gasoline [2]. PPD is the most common constituent of hair dye formulations. It is often the key ingredient but can also be used for color enhancement. PPD is commonly used.

  9. Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infants and Children Shoulder Problems Skin Rashes & Other Skin Problems Throat Problems Tooth Problems Urination Problems Back to Symptoms Step 2 Answering Questions Is your hair falling out in small patches?YesNoAre these patches red, itchy or oily?YesNoAre you a man who has gradually lost ...

  10. Investigation of low velocity impact damage on filamentary composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the results of an investigation of the effect of low velocity impact on the residual modulus and residual strength of flat filamentary composite materials. Theoretical analysis of composite materials indicates that the modulus of the material must decrease as impact damage increases. This decrease must also correlate to the decrease in residual strength. This study attempts to verify these hypotheses. Graphite/epoxy laminates (AS4/3501-6) of various fiber orientations (8 (0 deg), 2 (+ or - 45 deg)sub 8) were impacted using a falling weight impact tester. Impact energies ranged from 0.42 to 1.55 ft-lb, with impact velocities from 2.03 to 3.98 ft/sec. The results show that there is a reduction in residual modulus of the plate as the impact energy increases.

  11. Telogen Effluvium Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Telogen Effluvium Hair Loss Share | It is normal to lose up to ... months after the "shock". This sudden increase in hair loss, usually described as the hair coming out in ...

  12. Galaxy Formation through Filamentary Accretion at z = 6.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. C.; Willott, C. J.; Carilli, C. L.; Ferrara, A.; Wang, R.; Wagg, J.

    2017-08-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array observations of the dust continuum and [C II] 158 μm line emission from the z = 6.0695 Lyman-Break Galaxy (LBG) WMH5. These observations at 0.″3 spatial resolution show a compact (˜3 kpc) main galaxy in dust and [C II] emission, with a “tail” of emission extending to the east by about 5 kpc (in projection). The [C II] tail is comprised predominantly of two distinct sub-components in velocity, separated from the core by ˜100 and 250 km s-1, with narrow intrinsic widths of about 80 km s-1, which we call “sub-galaxies.” The sub-galaxies themselves are extended east-west by about 3 kpc in individual channel images. The [C II] tail joins smoothly into the main galaxy velocity field. The [C II] line to continuum ratios are comparable for the main and sub-galaxy positions, within a factor two. In addition, these ratios are comparable to z˜ 5.5 LBGs. We conjecture that the WMH5 system represents the early formation of a galaxy through the accretion of smaller satellite galaxies, embedded in a smoother gas distribution, along a possibly filamentary structure. The results are consistent with current cosmological simulations of early galaxy formation and support the idea of very early enrichment with dust and heavy elements of the accreting material.

  13. Langmuir Bursts and Filamentary Double Layers in Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, William L.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis reports the results of new studies involving laboratory plasma double layers. Filamentary double layers were created in a triple plasma device. The radial size of the current filament, and central plasma column were varied using a variable aperture R _{rm O}. The scaling of the double layer potential drop V_{ rm dl} with the parameter jd ^2, where j is the current density in the double layer and d is the double layer thickness, was determined for several filament radii. For relatively large values of the filament radius, the one-dimensional (Langmuir) scaling was obeyed. For smaller values of the filament radius, the potential drop became less dependent on the parameter jd^2. Langmuir bursts were observed in the high potential region of anode double layers when a sufficient supply of cold electrons was available to make a bump on tail distribution of electrons. The electric fields of Langmuir bursts were determined by observing deflections of a beam from an electron gun. The electric field of the bursts was strong enough to allow for caviton formation and Langmuir collapse. Other properties of the bursts were also recorded, including characteristic frequencies, burst height, width, and time distributions.

  14. Formation of stellar clusters in magnetized, filamentary infrared dark clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pak Shing; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2018-01-01

    Star formation in a filamentary infrared dark cloud (IRDC) is simulated over the dynamic range of 4.2 pc to 28 au for a period of 3.5 × 105 yr, including magnetic fields and both radiative and outflow feedback from the protostars. At the end of the simulation, the star formation efficiency is 4.3 per cent and the star formation rate per free-fall time is εff ≃ 0.04, within the range of observed values. The total stellar mass increases as ∼t2, whereas the number of protostars increases as ∼t1.5. We find that the density profile around most of the simulated protostars is ∼ρ ∝ r-1.5. At the end of the simulation, the protostellar mass function approaches the Chabrier stellar initial mass function. We infer that the time to form a star of median mass 0.2 M⊙ is about 1.4 × 105 yr from the median mass accretion rate. We find good agreement among the protostellar luminosities observed in the large sample of Dunham et al., our simulation and a theoretical estimate, and we conclude that the classical protostellar luminosity problem is resolved. The multiplicity of the stellar systems in the simulation agrees, to within a factor of 2, with observations of Class I young stellar objects; most of the simulated multiple systems are unbound. Bipolar protostellar outflows are launched using a subgrid model, and extend up to 1 pc from their host star. The mass-velocity relation of the simulated outflows is consistent with both observation and theory.

  15. Repigmentation and curling of hair after acitretin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckin, Dilek; Yildiz, Ayfer

    2009-08-01

    Drug-induced hair colour and texture changes have been reported rarely. We describe a 70-year-old woman with psoriasis who noticed darkening of her previously white hair, which also gained a curly appearance after 6 months of acitretin treatment. We present this case to emphasize that acitretin can be added to the list of drugs that induce changes in hair colour and texture.

  16. Frontier in hair loss and trichoscopy: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebtisam Elghblawi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Skin surfaces have always been examined using dermoscopy, a familiar tool which is useful to magnify and examine skin especially in cases of pigmented skin lesions. However, to examine the hair and scalp, a practical tool called trichoscopy has surfaced recently and has proven to be handy and functional in diagnosing most hair-related diseases. It is also referred to as dermoscopy of the hair and the scalp. It can aid in assessing active diseases in the scalp and hair, such as yellow dots, dystrophic hairs, cadaverized black dots, white dots, and exclamation mark hairs – all of which denote specific criteria for hair diseases. Trichoscopy is a very newly developed non-invasive technique for hair image analysis. It permits non-invasive visualization of hair shafts at higher intensification (about ×70 and ×100 and enables measurement of hair shaft width without the need for removing hair for diagnostic reasons. Moreover, it helps in vivo visualization of the epidermal portion of hair follicles and perifollicular epidermis (orifices. Consequently, it is valuable as it permits the inspection of structures that are otherwise not seen by the naked eye. Trichoscopy is the new frontier for the diagnosis of hair and scalp disease. Nowadays, a trichoscope is considered a must for dermatologists and it is a hot topic in the treatment of hair diseases. There is pooled evidence that the utilization of trichoscopy in the clinical setting for evaluating hair disorders can improve its diagnostic capability beyond simple clinical scrutiny. Trichoscopy can identify both hair shaft and hair opening abnormalities without the need for hair sampling, as well as distinguish between different scalp and hair diseases. Furthermore, it can give easy and quick evaluation of the hair with a follow-up to determine progress and prognosis of the disease with photos. It can also aid in some genetic hair shaft dystrophies such as trichorrhexis nodosa, trichorrhexis

  17. The effects of gamma rays on the regeneration of hair follicles are carried over to later hair cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Kimihiko; Ishihara, Yoshie; Inoue, Sonoe; Hirobe, Tomohisa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the effects of gamma rays on the regeneration of hair follicles are carried over to later hair cycles. The whole bodies of C57BL/10JHir mice in the 1st telogen phase were irradiated with (60)Co γ-rays. Mice were examined for the effects on hair follicles, including their number, morphology and pigmentation in the 3rd anagen phase. Effects of γ-rays on hair follicle stem cells were investigated by the indirect immunolabeling of keratin 15 (K15). Decreased hair follicle density and induction of curved hair follicles were observed in the dermis of irradiated skin. In addition, white hair and hypopigmented hair bulbs were found. The number of K15-positive hair follicle stem cells in the hair bulge region of irradiated skin appeared to decrease slightly but not significantly. These results suggest that the effects of γ-rays are carried over to a later hair cycle to affect the number, structure and pigmentation of hair follicles in the 3rd anagen phase when stem cells and committed progenitors for keratinocytes and melanocytes are irradiated in the 1st telogen phase.

  18. Hair loss in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harfmann, Katya L; Bechtel, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Hair loss is a common cause of morbidity for many women. As a key member of the woman's health care team, the obstetrician/gynecologist may be the first person to evaluate the complaint of hair loss. Common types of nonscarring hair loss, including female pattern hair loss and telogen effluvium, may be diagnosed and managed by the obstetrician/gynecologist. A systematic approach to diagnosis and management of these common forms of hair loss is presented.

  19. Cortisol analysis of hair of captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Yumi; Morimura, Naruki; Mori, Yusuke; Hayashi, Misato; Suzuki, Juri

    2013-12-01

    In addition to behavioral evaluations, stress assessments are also important for measuring animal welfare. Assessments of long-term stress are particularly important given that prolonged stress can affect physical health and reproduction. The use of hair cortisol as a marker of long-term stress has been increasing, but there has not yet been any report on the use of such methods with chimpanzees. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish and validate a methodology for analyzing hair cortisol in captive chimpanzees. In the first experiment, hair was removed from the arms of nine chimpanzees living in the Kumamoto Sanctuary (KS) and the regrown hair was sampled 3 months later. Fecal samples were collected periodically during the hair-growth period. The results showed that hair cortisol level was positively correlated with the rate of receiving aggression. Although the correlation between hair and fecal cortisol levels was not significant, the individual with the highest hair cortisol concentration also had the highest fecal cortisol concentration. These results suggest that hair cortisol may reflect long-term stress in chimpanzees. In the second experiment, we investigated the physiological factors affecting hair cortisol concentrations. We cut hair from the arms, sides, and backs of 25 chimpanzees living at the KS and the Primate Research Institute. The results revealed that cortisol varied based on source body part and hair whiteness. Therefore, we recommend that hair should always be collected from the same body part and that white hair should be avoided as much as possible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The dependence of the incorporation of methamphetamine into rat hair on dose, frequency of administration and hair pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eunyoung; Park, Yonghoon; Kim, Eunmi; Lee, Sooyeun; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun; Song, Joon Myong

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, the incorporation of methamphetamine (MA) into rat hair was studied. The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether MA can be detected or positive hair results can be obtained in hair of rats administered a single dose of MA. The relationship between dose and frequency of administration and the concentrations of MA and its metabolite, amphetamine (AP), in rat hair were evaluated and the MA and AP concentrations in white and pigmented hair were compared. MA was administered to rats as follows: low dose (0.5mg/kg/day), medium dose (2mg/kg/day) and high dose (10mg/kg/day). The frequency of administration was one time per day for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 15 and 30 days. Hair and urine samples were collected from rats and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). MA could be identified in pigmented rat hair when MA was administered for 4 or more days at low daily dose and on day 1 following administration of medium and high daily doses. Positive results for MA were obtained from pigmented rat hair when MA was administered for 30 days at low daily dose, for 4 or more days at medium daily dose, or for 2 or more days at high daily dose. The concentrations of MA and AP found in rat hair were proportional to the dose and frequency of administration. The concentrations of MA and AP in pigmented rat hair were 2-10 times higher than those in white rat hair. The results of this study on the incorporation of MA into rat hair can serve as a model to better understand the incorporation of MA into human hair even though there are differences between animal models and human hair. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Age-related hair pigment loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2015-01-01

    Humans are social animals that communicate disproportionately via potent genetic signals imbued in the skin and hair, including racial, ethnic, health, gender, and age status. For the vast majority of us, age-related hair pigment loss becomes the inescapable signal of our disappearing youth. The hair follicle (HF) pigmentary unit is a wonderful tissue for studying mechanisms generally regulating aging, often before this becomes evident elsewhere in the body. Given that follicular melanocytes (unlike those in the epidermis) are regulated by the hair growth cycle, this cycle is likely to impact the process of aging in the HF pigmentary unit. The formal identification of melanocyte stem cells in the mouse skin has spurred a flurry of reports on the potential involvement of melanocyte stem cell depletion in hair graying (i.e., canities). Caution is recommended, however, against simple extrapolation of murine data to humans. Regardless, hair graying in both species is likely to involve an age-related imbalance in the tissue's oxidative stress handling that will impact not only melanogenesis but also melanocyte stem cell and melanocyte homeostasis and survival. There is some emerging evidence that the HF pigmentary unit may have regenerative potential, even after it has begun to produce white hair fibers. It may therefore be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some aging-associated changes to maintain melanin production for longer. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Method and apparatus for fabricating a composite structure consisting of a filamentary material in a metal matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, J.G.; Anderson, R.C.

    1975-10-21

    A method and apparatus are provided for preparing a composite structure consisting of filamentary material within a metal matrix. The method is practiced by the steps of confining the metal for forming the matrix in a first chamber, heating the confined metal to a temperature adequate to effect melting thereof, introducing a stream of inert gas into the chamber for pressurizing the atmosphere in the chamber to a pressure greater than atmospheric pressure, confining the filamentary material in a second chamber, heating the confined filamentary material to a temperature less than the melting temperature of the metal, evacuating the second chamber to provide an atmosphere therein at a pressure, placing the second chamber in registry with the first chamber to provide for the forced flow of the molten metal into the second chamber to effect infiltration of the filamentary material with the molten metal, and thereafter cooling the metal infiltrated-filamentary material to form said composite structure.

  3. Hair analysis for drugs of abuse XX. Incorporation and behaviors of seven methamphetamine homologs in the rat hair root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Y; Kikura, R; Takahashi, K

    1998-01-01

    To elucidate drug disposition in hair, the incorporation and retention behavior of 7 phenethylamines in the rat hair root were investigated: methamphetamine(MA), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine(MDMA), benzphetamine(BZP), ephedrine(EP), N,N-dimethylamphetamine(DMA), p-nitro-methamphetamine(NO2MA), and N-acetylmethamphetamine(AcMA). On day 10 after shaving the hair on the back of the rats, drug was intraperitoneally administered at a single dose of 10 mg/kg to Long Evans rats (which were male and 6 weeks of age), possessing black and white hair, and the back hair that grew was collected by plucking with hair nippers at 0.083 h (5 min), 0.25 h, 0.5 h, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 9 h, 24 h, 33 h and 48 h. After washing the plucked hairs three times with 0.1% sodium dodecylsulfate, the amount of drug in each of the hair root samples was analyzed by a selected ion monitoring of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The times at which the concentration of each drug in the hair root samples reached the peak concentration, ranged between 3.30 and 41.51 ng/mg. For each drug, the point of time at which the largest positive incremental change in drug concentration was seen, ranged between 5 min and 1 h, for all of the drugs except for AcMA which was hardly incorporated in the rat hair. The data showed that there are mainly 4 modes in which a drug becomes incorporated into the black hair root: rapid and prolonged incorporation (NO2MA, MDMA), rapid and short incorporation(MA, DMA), slow and prolonged incorporation(BZP, EP), slow and short incorporation, which includes hardly any incorporation (AcMA). As all seven drugs were hardly incorporated into the white hair, it was concluded that the combination of melanin and basic compounds is essential for a drug to become incorporated into hair. Our results suggest that a portion of the drugs in the hair root is accumulated in the hair shaft, and the remaining portion is redistributed outside the hair shaft. The second

  4. Hair removal in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Pereira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to hormonal stimulation during puberty, changes occur in hair type and distribution. In both sexes, body and facial unwanted hair may have a negative psychological impact on the teenager. There are several available methods of hair removal, but the choice of the most suitable one for each individual can raise doubts. Objective: To review the main methods of hair removal and clarify their indications, advantages and disadvantages. Development: There are several removal methods currently available. Shaving and depilation with chemicals products are temporary methods, that need frequent repetition, because hair removal is next to the cutaneous surface. The epilating methods in which there is full hair extraction include: epilation with wax, thread, tweezers, epilating machines, laser, intense pulsed light, and electrolysis. Conclusions: The age of beginning hair removal and the method choice must be individualized and take into consideration the skin and hair type, location, dermatological and endocrine problems, removal frequency, cost and personal preferences.

  5. Hair dye poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002703.htm Hair dye poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair dye poisoning occurs when someone swallows dye or tint ...

  6. Forensic Science: Hair Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Elhannan L.

    1980-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students use a microscope to do a forensic hair comparative study and a medullary classification. Mounting methods, medulla types, hair photographs, and activities are described. (DS)

  7. Female Pattern Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of hormone imbalance, such as excess facial or body hair, a hormone evaluation should be done. Hormonal changes ... any sudden physical or psychological stress to the body. These types of hair loss are "Telogen Effluvium" and are usually temporary. ...

  8. Coherent array of branched filamentary scales along the wing margin of a small moth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Tejima, Shin; Sakuma, Masayuki; Sakamaki, Yositaka; Kodama, Ryuji

    2017-04-01

    In butterflies and moths, the wing margins are fringed with specialized scales that are typically longer than common scales. In the hindwings of some small moths, the posterior margins are fringed with particularly long filamentary scales. Despite the small size of these moth wings, these scales are much longer than those of large moths and butterflies. In the current study, photography of the tethered flight of a small moth, Phthorimaea operculella, revealed a wide array composed of a large number of long filamentary scales. This array did not become disheveled in flight, maintaining a coherent sheet-like structure during wingbeat. Examination of the morphology of individual scales revealed that each filamentary scale consists of a proximal stalk and distal branches. Moreover, not only long scales but also shorter scales of various lengths were found to coexist in each small section of the wing margin. Scale branches were ubiquitously and densely distributed within the scale array to form a mesh-like architecture similar to a nonwoven fabric. We propose that possible mechanical interactions among branched filamentary scales, mediated by these branches, may contribute to maintaining a coherent sheet-like structure of the scale array during wingbeat.

  9. Hair removal in adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Pereira; Susana Machado; Manuela Selores

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Due to hormonal stimulation during puberty, changes occur in hair type and distribution. In both sexes, body and facial unwanted hair may have a negative psychological impact on the teenager. There are several available methods of hair removal, but the choice of the most suitable one for each individual can raise doubts. Objective: To review the main methods of hair removal and clarify their indications, advantages and disadvantages. Development: There are several remova...

  10. [Study of distribution and metabolism of methamphetamine in hair of guinea pig].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y; Shen, M; Zhao, Z Q; Ye, Y H; Xiang, P; Shen, B H

    2001-11-01

    To study the distribution and metabolism of methamphetamine in the hair of guinea pig. Determination of methamphetamine and its metabolite amphetamine in hair was performed by GC/MS and GC/NPD. Concentration-time course of methamphetamine and amphetamine in hair of guinea were recorded. Relationship between hair color, administrated dose and drug concentration in hair were also discussed. The concentration of amphetamine is higher than the concentration of methamphetamine in the hair of guinea administrated a single dose or seven doses of methamphetamine. The concentration of methamphetamine and amphetamine were significantly related with administration dose and the incorporation rate into white and brown hair is much poorer than that of black hair. Administration methods, dose and the color of hair affect the concentration of methamphetamine and amphetamine.

  11. Epidermal hairs of Acanthaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, Khwaja J.

    1978-01-01

    Structure and distribution of the foliar epidermal hairs of 109 species and two varieties belonging to 39 genera of the family Acanthaceae have been studied. Both glandular and non-glandular epidermal hairs have been recorded in the investigated taxa. The glandular hairs may be subsessile or

  12. The influence of hair bleach on the ultrastructure of human hair with special reference to hair damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takehito

    2011-05-01

    The influence of human hair bleaching agents with different bleaching strength on the ultrastructure of human hair was studied using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer equipped with TEM (EDS-TEM). Two kinds of bleaching agents were used: a lightener agent with a weak bleaching effect and a powder-bleach with a stronger bleaching effect. From the comparison of the bleaching properties obtained by the electronic staining of black and white hair samples, it was suggested that the permeability of hair was increased by bleaching, and there was an increase of the stainability of hair subjected to electronic staining. The bleaching action provoked the decomposition of melanin granules and the flow out of granular contents into the intermacrofibrillar matrix. Some metal elements were detected in the melanin granular matrix by EDS-TEM. As a result, the diffusion of metal elements into the intermacrofibrillar matrix promoted further damage to the hair by catalytic action with the hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching agents outside the melanin granules. Further study will lead us to the edge of the development of a new bleaching agent, which reacts only with melanin granules and causes the minimum of damage to outside the melanin granules.

  13. Hair and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Graham A; Bhogal, Ranjit K

    2016-01-01

    Hair is the ultimate personal beauty tool of self-expression. It is more malleable than skin and it is more personal than clothing; however, hair does not remain constant with age. Hair is arguably in peak condition at about 30 years of age. With time, there is a gradual change in many aspects of hair: hair diameter is reduced, hair density is decreased, androgenic alopecia may develop, and pigmentation may be diminished, producing a significant psychological impact. These age-related changes can be exacerbated by blast drying, heat straightening, perming, and coloring. In this review, the changes in hair fiber and array (collection of fiber) properties that occur during aging and the impact on styling and potential interventions that consumers undergo to circumvent these issues are discussed.

  14. Hair dye contact allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søsted, Heidi; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2004-01-01

    Colouring of hair can cause severe allergic contact dermatitis. The most frequently reported hair dye allergens are p-phenylenediamine (PPD) and toluene-2,5-diamine, which are included in, respectively, the patch test standard series and the hairdressers series. The aim of the present study...... was to identify dye precursors and couplers in hair dyeing products causing clinical hair dye dermatitis and to compare the data with the contents of these compounds in a randomly selected set of similar products. The patient material comprised 9 cases of characteristic clinical allergic hair dye reaction, where...... exposure history and patch testing had identified a specific hair dye product as the cause of the reaction. The 9 products used by the patients were subjected to chemical analysis. 8 hair dye products contained toluene-2,5-diamine (0.18 to 0.98%). PPD (0.27%) was found in 1 product, and m-aminophenol (0...

  15. Exposure to gamma-rays at the telogen phase of the hair cycle inhibits hair follicle regeneration at the anagen phase in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Kimihiko; Hirobe, Tomohisa

    2014-02-01

    The effects of ionizing radiations on somatic stem cells largely remain to be studied. Hair follicles are self-renewing structures that reconstitute themselves throughout the hair cycle, which is comprised of the following phases: Anagen (growth), catagen (regression) and telogen (resting), suggesting the presence of their own stem cells. The whole bodies of C57BL/10JHir mice in the 1st telogen phase were irradiated with γ-rays. Mice were examined for effects on hair follicles, including their number, morphology and pigmentation in the 2nd anagen phase. Decreased hair follicle density and induction of curved hair follicles were observed in the dermal skin of irradiated mice. In addition to these keratinocyte-derived anomalies, melanocyte-derived anomalies including white hair and hypopigmented hair bulbs were found. The decrease in hair follicle density and the increase in the frequency of hypopigmented hair bulbs were dependent on the dose of γ-rays. These results suggest that γ-rays damage stem cells and progenitors for keratinocytes and melanocytes, thereby affecting the structure and character of regenerated hair follicles. The density of hair follicles and pigment production in hair bulbs are established as criteria for the effects of γ-rays on the hair cycle.

  16. Leukotrichia developed following application of intense pulsed light for hair removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmanesh, Mohammed; Mostaghimi, Mehran; Yousefi, Ismail; Mousavi, Zahra Beigum; Rasai, Sima; Esmaili, Hamid Reza; Khadivi, Heshmat A

    2002-07-01

    Lasers and light sources are now used worldwide for permanent or prolonged hair removal. Patients now prefer lasers and light sources for hair removal because of their noninvasiveness and fewer reported side effects. To study and report on leukotrichia that developed following application of intense pulsed light (IPL). From February 9, 2001 to February 14, 2002 a total of 821 patients were treated for unwanted hair. The system used was a noncoherent IPL system, with a 650 nm flashlamp filter; the parameters used varied with different Fitzpatrick skin types. The patients were treated monthly, with the rate of hair loss, measured by hair counts, and possible side effects recorded. Twenty-nine of 821 patients treated developed leukotrichia. Thirteen patients had no white or gray hairs before IPL therapy; the remaining 16 patients, who had few white hairs before treatment reported accelerated development of new white hairs starting after the first or second IPL therapy. Restoration of hair color occurred in 9 patients and the remaining 20 patients had no improvement or worsening of the condition within the next 2-6 months. Temporary or permanent leukotrichia may develop following IPL and laser hair removal therapy. This finding may be explained by the difference in the thermal relaxation times of melanocytes and germinative cells. The light absorbed and the heat produced by melanin may be sufficient enough to destroy or impair the function of melanocytes but insufficient to damage the hair follicle cells.

  17. Hair loss in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Romero, J A; Grimalt, R

    2014-02-01

    Hair diseases represent a significant portion of cases seen by pediatric dermatologists although hair has always been a secondary aspect in pediatricians and dermatologists training, on the erroneous basis that there is not much information extractable from it. Dermatologists are in the enviable situation of being able to study many disorders with simple diagnostic techniques. The hair is easily accessible to examination but, paradoxically, this approach is often disregarded by non-dermatologist. This paper has been written on the purpose of trying to serve in the diagnostic process of daily practice, and trying to help, for example, to distinguish between certain acquired and some genetically determined hair diseases. We will focus on all the data that can be obtained from our patients' hair and try to help on using the messages given by hair for each patient. Quite often it is extremely hard to distinguish between abnormality and normality in neonatal hair aspects. We will specially focus in the most common physiological changes that may mislead to an incorrect diagnosis. Specific treatment for those hair diseases that do have one, and basic general approach to improve the cosmetic appearance of hair, will be also be discussed for those hair disturbances that do not have a specific treatment.

  18. Do You Have Hair Loss or Hair Shedding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that can eventually cause hair loss. Related resources Alopecia areata Developing in otherwise healthy people, this disease that can cause round bald patches on the scalp, diffuse hair loss, or in rare cases, complete hair loss. Five ...

  19. Drugs and hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mansi; Harrison, Shannon; Sinclair, Rodney

    2013-01-01

    Hair loss is a common complaint, both in men and women, and use of prescription medications is widespread. When there is a temporal association between the onset of hair loss and commencement of a medication, the medication is commonly thought to have caused the hair loss. However, hair loss and in particular telogen effluvium may occur in response to a number of triggers including fever, hemorrhage, severe illness, stress, and childbirth, and a thorough exclusion of these potential confounders is necessary before the hair loss can be blamed on the medication. Certain medications are known to cause hair loss by a variety of mechanisms including anagen arrest, telogen effluvium, or accentuation of androgenetic alopecia by androgens. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Resistive Switching Characteristics in ZrO2 and Its Filamentary Conduction Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hung Lai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the conduction properties of sputtered ZrO2 exhibiting reversible and stable resistance change. Similar current distributions in on/off conduction and set/reset switching were observed in top electrodes with a diameter of 150, 250, and 350 µm. The size independence of current magnitude implied the presence of an uneven filamentary path over the electrode area. Increased current compliance was imposed on the turn-on process, and the observed increase in on-state current and turn-off threshold was attributed to incremental filament diameter. Variations in current conduction and resistance switching were analyzed by monitoring sweeping bias limits in both positive and negative polarities. These experimental observations were interpreted based on the aspect ratio of channels comprising conductive and oxidized filament portions, thereby elucidating the characteristics of filamentary resistive switching.

  1. Penetration of filamentary structures in the x-point region of spherical tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baver, D. A.; Myra, J. R.; Scotti, F.; Zweben, S. J.; Militello, F.; Walkden, N.

    2017-10-01

    ArbiTER is a flexible eigenvalue code designed for plasma physics applications. It is used here to gain insight into the spatial dependence of filamentary structures in the scrape-off layer of spherical tokamaks. In particular, observations on MAST reveal the presence of a quiescent x-point region. Observations in NSTX similarly reveal a reduction in divertor fluctuations near the separatrix and a loss of midplane correlation. We will report on the penetration of filamentary structures into the vicinity of the x-point, as well as growth rate trends, for a variety of profiles and toroidal mode numbers. This will determine whether linear properties of these structures can explain experimental observations. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-FG02-02ER54678.

  2. Senile hair graying: H2O2-mediated oxidative stress affects human hair color by blunting methionine sulfoxide repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J M; Decker, H; Hartmann, H; Chavan, B; Rokos, H; Spencer, J D; Hasse, S; Thornton, M J; Shalbaf, M; Paus, R; Schallreuter, K U

    2009-07-01

    Senile graying of human hair has been the subject of intense research since ancient times. Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in hair follicle melanocyte apoptosis and DNA damage. Here we show for the first time by FT-Raman spectroscopy in vivo that human gray/white scalp hair shafts accumulate hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in millimolar concentrations. Moreover, we demonstrate almost absent catalase and methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B protein expression via immunofluorescence and Western blot in association with a functional loss of methionine sulfoxide (Met-S=O) repair in the entire gray hair follicle. Accordingly, Met-S=O formation of Met residues, including Met 374 in the active site of tyrosinase, the key enzyme in melanogenesis, limits enzyme functionality, as evidenced by FT-Raman spectroscopy, computer simulation, and enzyme kinetics, which leads to gradual loss of hair color. Notably, under in vitro conditions, Met oxidation can be prevented by L-methionine. In summary, our data feed the long-voiced, but insufficiently proven, concept of H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative damage in the entire human hair follicle, inclusive of the hair shaft, as a key element in senile hair graying, which does not exclusively affect follicle melanocytes. This new insight could open new strategies for intervention and reversal of the hair graying process.

  3. Electromagnetic radiation from filamentary sources in the presence of axially magnetized cylindrical plasma scatterers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es’kin, V. A.; Ivoninsky, A. V.; Kudrin, A. V., E-mail: kud@rf.unn.ru; Popova, L. L. [Lobachevsky University (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Electromagnetic radiation from filamentary electric-dipole and magnetic-current sources of infinite length in the presence of gyrotropic cylindrical scatterers in the surrounding free space is studied. The scatterers are assumed to be infinitely long, axially magnetized circular plasma columns parallel to the axis of the filamentary source. The field and the radiation pattern of each source are calculated in the case where the source frequency is equal to one of the surface plasmon resonance frequencies of the cylindrical scatterers. It is shown that the presence of even a single resonant magnetized plasma scatterer of small electrical radius or a few such scatterers significantly affects the total fields of the filamentary sources, so that their radiation patterns become essentially different from those in the absence of scatterers or the presence of isotropic scatterers of the same shape and size. It is concluded that the radiation characteristics of the considered sources can efficiently be controlled using their resonance interaction with the neighboring gyrotropic scatterers.

  4. Magnetosheath Filamentary Structures Formed by Ion Acceleration at the Quasi-Parallel Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  5. Side Effects: Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hair loss, also called alopecia, is a side effect of cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Learn how to cope with and manage hair loss. Listen to tips from others who have experienced hair loss.

  6. Graying: gerontobiology of the hair follicle pigmentary unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, D J; Paus, R

    2001-01-01

    The visual appearance of humans derives predominantly from their skin and hair color. The phylogenetically ancient biochemical [corrected] pathway underling this phenomenon is called melanogenesis and results in the production of melanin pigments in neural crest-derived melanocytes, followed by its transfer to epithelial cells. While melanin from epidermal melanocytes clearly protects human skin by screening harmful ultraviolet radiation, the biologic value of hair pigmentation is less clear. In addition to important roles in social/sexual communication, one potential benefit of pigmented scalp hair in humans may be the rapid excretion of heavy metals, chemicals, toxins from the body by their selective binding to melanin. The hair follicle and epidermal melanogenic systems are broadly distinct, though open. The primary distinguishing feature of follicular melanogenesis, compared to the continuous melanogenesis in the epidermis, is the tight coupling of hair follicle melanogenesis to the hair growth cycle. This cycle appears to involve periods of melanocyte proliferation (during early anagen), maturation (mid to late anagen) and melanocyte death via apoptosis (during early catagen). Thus, each hair cycle is associated with the reconstruction of an intact hair follicle pigmentary unit... at least for the first 10 cycles or so. Thereafter, gray and white hairs appear, suggesting an age-related, genetically regulated exhaustion of the pigmentary potential of each individual hair follicle. Melanocyte aging may be associated with reactive oxygen species-mediated damage to nuclear and mitochondrial DNA with resultant accumulation of mutations with age, in addition to dysregulation of anti-oxidant mechanisms or pro/anti-apoptotic factors within the cells. While the perception of "gray hair" derives in large part from the admixture of pigmented and white hair, it is important to note that individual hair follicles can indeed exhibit pigment dilution or true grayness. This

  7. Hair Loss Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Gabriella; McMichael, Amy

    2017-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hair loss is a common complaint seen in dermatology clinics. From frustration and attempts at self-help, patients with hair loss may present to the dermatologist with false beliefs, or myths, about the causes of their condition and what treatments are effective. METHODS: We identified 12 common myths about hair loss, categorized as myths about minoxidil treatment, vitamin and mineral supplements, natural topical treatments, and hair care practices. We performed a PubMed search to find evidence to support or refute each myth. RESULTS: We found that there is little evidence to support many of these common hair loss myths. In some cases, randomized controlled trials have investigated the effects of particular therapies and point to the effectiveness of certain hair loss treatments. DISCUSSION: In many cases, there have not been sufficient randomized controlled trials to evaluate the effect of different therapies and hair care practices on hair loss. It is best to guide patients toward treatments with a long track record of efficacy and away from those where little is known scientifically. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(7):690-694..

  8. Hair and nail relationship.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baran, R.; Dawber, R.P.; Haneke, E.

    2005-01-01

    Hair and nails are often stated to have much in common in relation to their origin, anatomical structures, and common involvement in many diseases. Hair and nails are predominantly epithelial structures derived from primitive epidermis and made up of keratinous fibrils embedded in a sulfur-rich

  9. Hair and Physiological Baldness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercantini, Edward S.

    1965-01-01

    Human hair is one of the structures of the body about which little is generally known. Disease affecting the hair is often minimized or ignored by physicians because of lack of knowledge of this rudimentary organ. However, the patient's attitude toward hair loss is very different from the doctor's and he feels great concern about such loss. The development, growth and morphology of human hair are briefly presented. Experimental work which will increase our knowledge of hair growth and loss is reviewed. The various forms of physiological alopecia from birth onward are discussed, with special emphasis on the least-known type of physiological baldness, “male-pattern baldness” in the adult female. PMID:14312445

  10. The myth of the short-haired lesbian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipkin, D

    1999-01-01

    ABSTRACT A number of myths and misperceptions related to images of lesbian beauty surround hair length. Short hair has become a symbol of being a lesbian, and many lesbians with long hair have felt pressured to cut theirs when they come out. For this essay, seven white lesbians were interviewed regarding their long hair. They describe how, in choosing not to cut their hair, or to grow it long again, they are not recognized or taken seriously as lesbians, both by other lesbians and by heterosexuals. They feel that they are perceived as heterosexual or bisexual, questioning, just coming out, trying to pass as straight, or buying into male-defined standards of female beauty. This is in part because many lesbians have rejected traditionally "feminine" images of beauty,Including long hair, and have placed a higher value on more "masculine" attributes,Including short hair. In doing so, however, lesbians are still reacting to male-defined images and standards, and may be internalizing and perpetuating sexism. As more and more different kinds of women are coming out as lesbian, it becomes necessary to avoid making assumptions based on a woman's hair length. The time has come to create new images of who and what lesbians are and can be, and new standards of lesbian beauty.

  11. Africans Consuming Hair, Africans Consumed by Hair

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If relationships forged and entertained with hair are anything to go by, Africans, it seems to us, are more amenable to flexible, composite and negotiated personal and collective identities than they are to fixities and purities. Perhaps schooled by repeated encounters with the violence of dominant others or simply enlightened ...

  12. Hair Follicle Pigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej; Wortsman, Jacobo; Plonka, Przemyslaw M.; Schallreuter, Karin U.; Paus, Ralf; Tobin, Desmond J.

    2005-01-01

    Hair shaft melanin components (eu- or/and pheomelanin) are a long-lived record of precise interactions in the hair follicle pigmentary unit, e.g., between follicular melanocytes, keratinocytes, and dermal papilla fibroblasts. Follicular melanogenesis (FM) involves sequentially the melanogenic activity of follicular melanocytes, the transfer of melanin granules into cortical and medulla keratinocytes, and the formation of pigmented hair shafts. This activity is in turn regulated by an array of enzymes, structural and regulatory proteins, transporters, and receptors and their ligands, acting on the developmental stages, cellular, and hair follicle levels. FM is stringently coupled to the anagen stage of the hair cycle, being switched-off in catagen to remain absent through telogen. At the organ level FM is precisely coupled to the life cycle of melanocytes with changes in their compartmental distribution and accelerated melanoblast/melanocyte differentiation with enhanced secretory activity. The melanocyte compartments in the upper hair follicle also provides a reservoir for the repigmentation of epidermis and, for the cyclic formation of new anagen hair bulbs. Melanin synthesis and pigment transfer to bulb keratinocytes are dependent on the availability of melanin precursors, and regulation by signal transduction pathways intrinsic to skin and hair follicle, which are both receptor dependent and independent, act through auto-, para- or intracrine mechanisms and can be modified by hormonal signals. The important regulators are MC1 receptor its and adrenocorticotropic hormone, melanocyte stimulating hormone, agouti protein ligands (in rodents), c-Kit, and the endothelin receptors with their ligands. Melanin itself has a wide range of bioactivities that extend far beyond its determination of hair color. PMID:15654948

  13. The pattern of hair dyeing in koreans with gray hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Seong Jin; Shin, Hyoseung; Paik, Seung Hwan; Choi, Jae Woo; Lee, Jong Hee; Cho, Soyun; Kwon, Ohsang

    2013-11-01

    Hair graying is considered as a part of normal ageing process. Nonetheless, this process raises a significant cosmetic concern, especially among ethnic Korean elderly whose baseline hair color is black. For this reason, Korean elderly dye their hair with frequency despite the risk of dermatologic problems such as allergic contact dermatitis. In this study, the authors investigate the prevalence and pattern of hair dyeing and its relation with scalp diseases in Korea. Six hundred twenty subjects (330 men and 290 women) with graying hair were given a questionnaire survery and underwent a physical examination. Of the 620 total, 272 subjects (43.9%) dyed their hair. Hair dyeing was significantly more frequent among women than among men (phair dyeing when compared to either younger or older groups. Subjective self-assessment of the extent of hair graying was associated with increased prevalence of hair dyeing, that is, individuals who feel graying has advanced by more than 20% of the overall hair were much more likely to dye their hair (pHair dyeing did not correlate with either alopecia or scalp disease. Our survey has found that the prevalence of hair dyeing is higher among Korean women than men. People in their fifties and sixties and people with more than 20% extent of grayness were more likely to dye their hair than otherwise. Hair dyeing was not associated with any increase in the prevalence of scalp diseases.

  14. Tryptophan and kynurenine determination in human hair by liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dario, Michelli F; Freire, Thamires Batello; Pinto, Claudinéia Aparecida Sales de Oliveira; Prado, María Segunda Aurora; Baby, André R; Velasco, Maria Valéria R

    2017-10-15

    Tryptophan, an amino acid found in hair proteinaceous structure is used as a marker of hair photodegradation. Also, protein loss caused by several chemical/physical treatments can be inferred by tryptophan quantification. Kynurenine is a photo-oxidation product of tryptophan, expected to be detected when hair is exposed mainly to UVB (290-320nm) radiation range. Tryptophan from hair is usually quantified directly as a solid or after alkaline hydrolysis, spectrofluorimetrically. However, these types of measure are not sufficiently specific and present several interfering substances. Thus, this work aimed to propose a quantification method for both tryptophan and kynurenine in hair samples, after alkali hydrolysis process, by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorimetric and UV detection. The tryptophan and kynurenine quantification method was developed and validated. Black, white, bleached and dyed (blond and auburn) hair tresses were used in this study. Tryptophan and kynurenine were separated within ∼9min by HPLC. Both black and white virgin hair samples presented similar concentrations of tryptophan, while bleaching caused a reduction in the tryptophan content as well as dyeing process. Unexpectedly, UV/vis radiation did not promote significantly the conversion of tryptophan into its photo-oxidation product and consequently, kynurenine was not detected. Thus, this works presented an acceptable method for quantification of tryptophan and its photooxidation metabolite kynurenine in hair samples. Also, the results indicated that bleaching and dyeing processes promoted protein/amino acids loss but tryptophan is not extensively degraded in human hair by solar radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation of filamentary barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weili, FAN; Zhengming, SHENG; Fucheng, LIU

    2017-11-01

    The plasma behavior of filamentary barrier discharges in helium is simulated using a two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo model. Four different phases have been suggested in terms of the development of the discharge: the Townsend phase; the space-charge dominated phase; the formation of the cathode layer, and the extinguishing phase. The spatial-temporal evolution of the particle densities, velocities of the charged particles, electric fields, and surface charges has been demonstrated. Our simulation provides insights into the underlying mechanism of the discharge and explains many dynamical behaviors of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) filaments.

  16. Thermodynamics of Phase Transitions and Bipolar Filamentary Switching in Resistive Random-Access Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, V. G.; Niraula, D.; Karpov, I. V.; Kotlyar, R.

    2017-08-01

    We present a phenomenological theory of bipolar filamentary resistive random-access memory describing the commonly observed features of their current-voltage characteristics. Our approach follows the approach of a thermodynamic theory developed earlier for chalcogenide memory and threshold switches and largely independent of their microscopic details. It explains, without adjustable parameters, such features as the domains of filament formation and switching, voltage-independent current in set and current-independent voltage in reset regimes, the relation between the set and reset voltages, filament resistance independent of its length, etc. Furthermore, it expresses the observed features through the material and circuitry parameters, thus paving the way to device improvements.

  17. Hair dyeing, hair washing and hair cortisol concentrations among women from the healthy start study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Sheila K.; Larsen, Sofus C.; Olsen, Nanna J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hair cortisol concentration (HCC) has been suggested as a promising marker for chronic stress. However, studies investigating the influence of hair dyeing and hair washing frequency on HCC have shown inconsistent results. Objective: To examine associations between HCC and hair dyeing...

  18. Help! It's Hair Loss!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hairs to break close to the scalp. Alopecia areata (say: ar-ee-AT-uh) . In this condition, ... fall out. No one knows exactly what causes alopecia areata, but it looks like the body's own immune ...

  19. Tips for Healthy Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... less oil, so you may not need to shampoo as often. But if you see flakes in ... lead to dandruff and other scalp diseases. Concentrate shampoo on the scalp. When washing your hair, concentrate ...

  20. Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... restore hair. *Photograph used with permission of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. This photograph was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. # 60, Gathers RC, Jankowski M, Eide M, ...

  1. Hair patterns of the lower limb in Central Indian males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, B D

    1977-08-01

    The distribution of hair of the right lower limb has been studied in a random sample of 220 healthy Central Indian males 17 to 45 years of age. The common hair patterns observed are the proximal phalangeal hair in all toes in 55.45%, the middle phalangeal hair in the third toe in 8.18%, the tibial on the dorsum of foot in 69.55%, and the pedo-cruro-femoral in the lower limb in 70.00% subjects. Comparison of these findings with those of the right upper limb shows that hairiness of the two limbs is correlated, that the dorsum of foot is less hairy than the dorsum of hand, and that the third and second toes are comparable with the fourth and third fingers, respectively, as regards their middle phalangeal hair. Comparison with the available literature shows that the Central Indian males resemble the Whites in having greater frequency of middle phalangeal hair than those of the Negroes, that the dorsum of feet of this population is less hairy than the White and more hairy than the Negroes, and that the general hairiness of the lower limb is more or less equal in the three groups of persons.

  2. An astrosphere around the blue supergiant κ Cas: possible explanation of its filamentary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Alexashov, D. B.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Izmodenov, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    High-resolution mid-infrared observations carried out by the Spitzer Space Telescope allowed one to resolve the fine structure of many astrospheres. In particular, they showed that the astrosphere around the B0.7 Ia star κ Cas (HD 2905) has a clear-cut arc structure with numerous cirrus-like filaments beyond it. Previously, we suggested a physical mechanism for the formation of such filamentary structures. Namely, we showed theoretically that they might represent the non-monotonic spatial distribution of the interstellar dust in astrospheres (viewed as filaments) caused by interaction of the dust grains with the interstellar magnetic field disturbed in the astrosphere due to colliding of the stellar and interstellar winds. In this paper, we invoke this mechanism to explain the structure of the astrosphere around κ Cas. We performed 3D magnetohydrodynamic modelling of the astrosphere for realistic parameters of the stellar wind and space velocity. The dust dynamics and the density distribution in the astrosphere were calculated in the framework of a kinetic model. It is found that the model results with the classical MRN (Mathis, Rumpl & Nordsieck 1977) size distribution of dust in the interstellar medium do not match the observations, and that the observed filamentary structure of the astrosphere can be reproduced only if the dust is composed mainly of big (μm-sized) grains. Comparison of the model results with observations allowed us to estimate parameters (number density and magnetic field strength) of the surrounding interstellar medium.

  3. Filamentary pattern in the cosmic web: galaxy filaments as pearl necklaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Elmo; Bussov, Maarja

    2016-10-01

    Galaxies form chains (filaments) that connect groups and clusters of galaxies. The filamentary network includes nearly half of the galaxies and is visually the most striking feature in cosmological maps. We study the distribution of galaxies along such a filamentary network, trying to find specific patterns. Our galaxy filaments are defined using the Bisous process. We use the two-point correlation function and the Rayleigh $Z$-squared statistic to study how the galaxies are distributed along the filaments. We show that galaxies and galaxy groups are not uniformly distributed along filaments, but tend to form a regular pattern. The characteristic length of the pattern is 7~$h-1$Mpc. A slightly smaller characteristic length 4~$h-1$Mpc can also be found, using the $Z$-squared statistic. One can say that galaxy filaments are like pearl necklaces, where the pearls are galaxy groups distributed more or less regularly along the filaments. We propose that this well defined characteristic scale could be used as a cosmological test.

  4. Neuromorphic crossbar circuit with nanoscale filamentary-switching binary memristors for speech recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Son Ngoc; Ham, Seok-Jin; Min, Kyeong-Sik

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a neuromorphic crossbar circuit with binary memristors is proposed for speech recognition. The binary memristors which are based on filamentary-switching mechanism can be found more popularly and are easy to be fabricated than analog memristors that are rare in materials and need a more complicated fabrication process. Thus, we develop a neuromorphic crossbar circuit using filamentary-switching binary memristors not using interface-switching analog memristors. The proposed binary memristor crossbar can recognize five vowels with 4-bit 64 input channels. The proposed crossbar is tested by 2,500 speech samples and verified to be able to recognize 89.2% of the tested samples. From the statistical simulation, the recognition rate of the binary memristor crossbar is estimated to be degraded very little from 89.2% to 80%, though the percentage variation in memristance is increased very much from 0% to 15%. In contrast, the analog memristor crossbar loses its recognition rate significantly from 96% to 9% for the same percentage variation in memristance.

  5. A 500 pc filamentary gas wisp in the disk of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Menten, Karl; Belloche, Arnaud

    2013-11-01

    Star formation occurs in molecular gas. In previous studies, the structure of the molecular gas has been studied in terms of molecular clouds, but has been overlooked beyond the cloud scale. We present an observational study of the molecular gas at 49.5° wisp. This has a large physical extent and a velocity dispersion of ~5kms-1. The eastern part of the filamentary gas wisp is located ~130 pc above the Galactic disk (which corresponds to 1.5-4 e-folding scale-heights), and the total mass of the gas wisp is ≳ 1 × 105 M⊙. It is composed of two molecular clouds and an expanding bubble. The velocity structure of the gas wisp can be explained as a smooth quiescent component disturbed by the expansion of a bubble. That the length of the gas wisp exceeds by much the thickness of the molecular disk of the Milky Way is consistent with the cloud-formation scenario in which the gas is cold prior to the formation of molecular clouds. Star formation in the filamentary gas wisp occurs at the edge of a bubble (G52L nebula),which is consistent with some models of triggered star formation. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. [Repigmentation of gray hair after thyroid hormone treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, P; Guzmán, M; Marquina, M; Pretel, M; Aguado, L; Lloret, P; Gorrochategui, A

    2007-11-01

    Darkening of gray and white hairs occurred in 2 patients with increased exogenous triiodothyronine (T3) due to treatment of myxedema coma in one case and iatrogenic hyperthyroidism in the other. We hypothesized that thyroid hormone may affect the homeostasis of hair follicles. To test our hypothesis and investigate the influence of thyroid hormone on the hair cycle, we used an in vivo murine model and an in vitro model based on culture of follicular units. We used the standard C57BL/6 murine model of the hair cycle. T3 (0.5 microg) dissolved in ethanol was applied topically once daily for 10 days to a depilated area in the telogen phase on the backs of the mice. Follicular units, obtained from hair transplant interventions, were cultured in vitro with different concentrations of T3. On day 5, all T3-treated mice entered the anagen phase, whereas the anagen phase started spontaneously in control mice on day 9, and not until day 15 had all controls entered this phase. In the in vitro experiment, follicular units treated with 100 nmol/L T3 grew significantly larger compared to the control group. These data suggest that follicles in the telogen phase can be induced to enter the anagen phase by the topical application of T3. This thyroid hormone may reverse graying of the terminal hair. In the in vitro experiments, T3 stimulated hair shaft growth. Follicular melanocytes may be the target cell for these actions.

  7. Specific melanin content in human hairs and mitochondrial DNA typing success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linch, Charles A; Champagne, Jarrod R; Bonnette, Michelle D; Dawson Cruz, Tracey

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated whether a difference exists in the ability to obtain quality mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data from hair shafts due to specific melanin content differences. Eumelanin, the pigment in darker hairs, protects nuclear DNA in the skin by absorbing and scattering UV radiation. In contrast, sensitized pheomelanin, the predominate melanin in red hairs and some blond hairs, is unable to prevent DNA damage in skin upon exposure to UV radiation. It has been reported in the literature that darker hairs (predominate eumelanin content) have a higher mtDNA sequencing success rate than lighter colored hairs. However, others have reported to the contrary when different methodologies are used. In this study, 2-cm hair fragments were cut from dark brown, red, and gray white hairs and typed using standard casework mtDNA sequence analysis methods. All 30 hair fragments produced quality mtDNA sequence data on first attempt from the second half of hypervariable region 1. These results are likely due to the apparent shielding of mtDNA by the hard protein of the hair shaft fiber from radiation-induced damage, regardless of melanin type, after 10-months minimal solar exposure. Nonetheless, this study may serve as a guide for future quantitative studies that investigate hair mtDNA photodamage in circumstances of increased solar, chemical, environmental, or mechanical damage.

  8. Essential of Hair Care Cosmetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Alessandrini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, hair care and style play a very important role in people’s physical aspect and self-perception. Hair cosmetics can be distinguished into two main categories: cosmetics with temporary effect on the hair, for example shampoos, conditioners, sprays, and temporary colors; and cosmetics with permanent effect on the hair, such as permanent waves, relaxers, bleaches and permanent colors. These cosmetic procedures may induce hair abnormalities. We provide an overview on the most important characteristics of these procedures, analyzing components and effects on the hair. Finally, we evaluated new camouflage techniques and tattoo scalp.

  9. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Hair Loss (Alopecia) “Losing my hair was hard at first. Then ... and anywhere on your body may fall out. Hair loss is called alopecia. When will my hair start ...

  10. How to Stop Damaging Your Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... damage your hair Washing your hair by rubbing shampoo into the length of your hair Changes that can help prevent hair damage: Gently massage shampoo into your scalp. When you rinse the shampoo ...

  11. Hair from different ethnic groups vary in elemental composition and nitrogen and phosphorus mineralisation in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malepfane, N M; Muchaonyerwa, P

    2017-02-01

    Disposal of hair wastes at landfills causes nitrate leaching to ground water, and use of the waste as fertiliser could be a viable option. This study was to determine elemental composition of major hair types in South Africa and their nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) release in soil. Wastes of African, White and Indian hair were obtained from local salons and analysed for carbon (C), N and sulphur (S) with the Leco CNS analyzer, and P, bases, aluminium (Al) and micronutrients, with the ICP. We also conducted an incubation study to determine changes in mineral N and P in soil. Hair wastes were added to soil at increasing rates based on N, incubated at 25 °C with destructive sampling after 0, 28, 56 and 84 days and pH, ammonium-N, nitrate-N and extractable P measured. All data were subjected to analysis of variance. Indian and White hair had higher N than African. White hair had higher C and lower potassium (K) than those of other types. The Fe levels in hair were in the order White > African > Indian, whilst those of Al were African > Indian > White. African hair had higher calcium (Ca), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn) and cobalt (Co) than the other types. Ammonium-N and nitrate-N releases were in the order: Indian > African > White, especially at higher rates. Ammonium-N increased in the first 28 days and declined thereafter, when nitrate-N increased and pH decreased. The findings implied that hair types differ in elemental composition and nitrogen release in soil, with implications on pollution and soil fertility.

  12. Smokers? hair: Does smoking cause premature hair graying?

    OpenAIRE

    Zayed, Ayman A.; Shahait, Awni D.; Ayoub, Musa N.; Yousef, Al-Motassem

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To determine if there is a significant association between premature hair graying and cigarette smoking. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in a nonclinical setting on 207 participants on August 24 until 25, 2010. Participants were classified into two groups [premature hair graying (PHG) and normal hair graying]. PHG was defined as the first appearance of gray hair before the age of 30. Data were collected using an interview questionnaire and meas...

  13. Body hair transplant: An additional source of donor hair in hair restoration surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poswal Arvind

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgenic alopecia (pattern baldness is a condition in which there is androgen mediated progressive miniaturization and loss of hair follicles in a genetically susceptible individual. A 47-year-old male patient with advanced degree of hair loss (Norwood 6 category wanted to go for full hair restoration surgery. Due to the limited availability of donor hair in the scalp, a small session with 700-chest hair was performed. On follow-up at eight months it was observed that chest hair grew and formed a cosmetically acceptable forelock.

  14. Is the filamentary dark cloud GF 6 a star forming region? — Stability analysis and infrared properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaeheon; Kim, Hyun-Goo; Kim, Sang Joon; Zhang, Bo

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of mapping observations and stability analyses toward the filamentary dark cloud GF 6. We investigate the internal structures of a typical filamentary dark cloud GF 6 to know whether the filamentary dark cloud will form stars. We perform radio observations with both 12CO (J=1-0) and 13CO (J=1-0) emission lines to examine the mass distribution and its evolutionary status. The 13CO gas column density map shows eight subclumps in the GF 6 region with sizes on a sub-pc scale. The resulting local thermodynamic equilibrium masses of all the subclumps are too low to form stars against the turbulent dissipation. We also investigate the properties of embedded infrared point sources to know whether they are newly formed stars. The infrared properties also indicate that these point sources are not related to star forming activities associated with GF 6. Both radio and infrared properties indicate that the filamentary dark cloud GF 6 is too light to contract gravitationally and will eventually be dissipated away.

  15. Taking Care of Your Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it may be better to choose a mild shampoo instead of a shampoo designed for oily hair. For some people — especially ... at the crown but dry on the ends) — shampoos for oily hair can be too harsh. If ...

  16. Optimization of biomimetic hair sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izadi, N.; Jaganatharaja, R.K.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2007-01-01

    High density arrays of artificial hair sensors, biomimicking the extremely sensitive mechanoreceptive filiform hairs found on cerci of crickets have been fabricated. We assess the sensitivity of these artificial sensors and present a scheme for further optimization addressing the deteriorating

  17. High-mass Star Formation through Filamentary Collapse and Clump-fed Accretion in G22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jinghua; Li, Jin-Zeng; Wu, Yuefang; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Henkel, Christian; Wang, Ke; Liu, Tie; Liu, Hong-Li; Zavagno, Annie; Ren, Zhiyuan; Huang, Ya-Fang

    2018-01-01

    How mass is accumulated from cloud-scale down to individual stars is a key open question in understanding high-mass star formation. Here, we present the mass accumulation process in a hub-filament cloud G22 that is composed of four supercritical filaments. Velocity gradients detected along three filaments indicate that they are collapsing with a total mass infall rate of about 440 M ⊙ Myr‑1, suggesting the hub mass would be doubled in six free-fall times, adding up to ∼2 Myr. A fraction of the masses in the central clumps C1 and C2 can be accounted for through large-scale filamentary collapse. Ubiquitous blue profiles in HCO+ (3–2) and 13CO (3–2) spectra suggest a clump-scale collapse scenario in the most massive and densest clump C1. The estimated infall velocity and mass infall rate are 0.31 km s‑1 and 7.2 × 10‑4 M ⊙ yr‑1, respectively. In clump C1, a hot molecular core (SMA1) is revealed by the Submillimeter Array observations and an outflow-driving high-mass protostar is located at the center of SMA1. The mass of the protostar is estimated to be 11–15 M ⊙ and it is still growing with an accretion rate of 7 × 10‑5 M ⊙ yr‑1. The coexistent infall in filaments, clump C1, and the central hot core in G22 suggests that pre-assembled mass reservoirs (i.e., high-mass starless cores) may not be required to form high-mass stars. In the course of high-mass star formation, the central protostar, the core, and the clump can simultaneously grow in mass via core-fed/disk accretion, clump-fed accretion, and filamentary/cloud collapse.

  18. Predicting hair cortisol levels with hair pigmentation genes: A possible hair pigmentation bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, A. (Alexander); G. Noppe (Gerard); F. Liu; M.H. Kayser (Manfred); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); E.F.C. van Rossum (Liesbeth); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractCortisol concentrations in hair are used to create hormone profiles spanning months. This method allows assessment of chronic cortisol exposure, but might be biased by hair pigmentation: dark hair was previously related to higher concentrations. It is unclear whether this association

  19. Drug-induced hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Hair loss can have major psychological consequences. It can be due to a wide variety of causes, including hormonal disorders, dietary factors, infections, inflammation, trauma, emotional factors, and cancer. Drugs can also induce hair loss, by interacting with the hair growth cycle. Drug-induced hair loss may be immediate or delayed, sudden or gradual, and diffuse or localised. It is usually reversible after drug discontinuation. The drugs most often implicated in hair loss are anticancer agents, interferon, azole antifungals, lithium, immunosuppressants, and many other drugs belonging to a variety of pharmacological classes.

  20. Female pattern hair loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Singal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Female pattern hair loss (FPHL is a common cause of hair loss in women characterized by diffuse reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp with retention of the frontal hairline. Its prevalence increases with advancing age and is associated with significant psychological morbidity. The pathophysiology of FPHL is still not completely understood and seems to be multifactorial. Although androgens have been implicated, the involvement of androgen-independent mechanisms is evident from frequent lack of clinical or biochemical markers of hyperandrogenism in affected women. The role of genetic polymorphisms involving the androgen and estrogen receptors is being increasingly recognized in its causation and predicting treatment response to anti-androgens. There are different clinical patterns and classifications of FPHL, knowledge of which facilitates patient management and research. Chronic telogen effluvium remains as the most important differential diagnosis. Thorough history, clinical examination, and evaluation are essential to confirm diagnosis. Patients with clinical signs of androgen excess require assessment of biochemical parameters and imaging studies. It is prudent to screen the patients for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors. The treatment comprises medical and/or surgical modalities. Medical treatment should be initiated early as it effectively arrests hair loss progression rather than stimulating regrowth. Minoxidil continues to be the first line therapy whereas anti-androgens form the second line of treatment. The progressive nature of FPHL mandates long-term treatment for sustained effect. Medical therapy may be supplemented with cosmetic concealment in those desirous of greater hair density. Surgery may be worthwhile in some carefully selected patients.

  1. Black Hole's 1/N Hair

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2013-01-01

    According to the standard view classically black holes carry no hair, whereas quantum hair is at best exponentially weak. We show that suppression of hair is an artifact of the semi-classical treatment and that in the quantum picture hair appears as an inverse mass-square effect. Such hair is predicted in the microscopic quantum description in which a black hole represents a self-sustained leaky Bose-condensate of N soft gravitons. In this picture the Hawking radiation is the quantum depletion of the condensate. Within this picture we show that quantum black hole physics is fully compatible with continuous global symmetries and that global hair appears with the strength B/N, where B is the global charge swallowed by the black hole. For large charge this hair has dramatic effect on black hole dynamics. Our findings can have interesting astrophysical consequences, such as existence of black holes with large detectable baryonic and leptonic numbers.

  2. Quantitative analysis of desmethylselegiline, methamphetamine, and amphetamine in hair and plasma from Parkinson patients on long-term selegiline medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronstrand, Robert; Ahlner, Johan; Dizdar, Nil; Larson, Göran

    2003-04-01

    Hair and plasma from patients on long-term selegiline medication were analyzed to evaluate the relationships between plasma and hair melanin concentrations and the incorporation of the selegiline metabolites methamphetamine and amphetamine in hair, and to evaluate hair analyses for determining compliance in medication. Analyses were performed on both the whole hairs, as well as pigmented and non-pigmented hairs from gray-haired patients. Melanin was quantitated by spectrophotometry, and metabolites were quantitated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentrations in pigmented and non-pigmented hairs differed significantly for both methamphetamine (p < 0.01) and amphetamine (p < 0.02), with mean concentration ratios being 3.69 +/- 1.88 and 2.95 +/- 1.16 for methamphetamine and amphetamine, respectively. Segmental analysis indicated that some patients had not been compliant with medication. We concluded that the incorporation of methamphetamine and amphetamine into hair of single individuals shows a preference for pigmented hairs over white hairs and that segmental analysis of hair may be useful when measuring compliance with medication.

  3. Predicting hair cortisol levels with hair pigmentation genes: a possible hair pigmentation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Alexander; Noppe, Gerard; Liu, Fan; Kayser, Manfred; Verhulst, Frank C; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C; Tiemeier, Henning

    2017-08-17

    Cortisol concentrations in hair are used to create hormone profiles spanning months. This method allows assessment of chronic cortisol exposure, but might be biased by hair pigmentation: dark hair was previously related to higher concentrations. It is unclear whether this association arises from local effects, such as increased hormone extractability, or whether the association represents systemic differences arising from population stratification. We tested the hypothesis that hair pigmentation gene variants are associated with varying cortisol levels independent of genetic ancestry. Hormone concentrations and genotype were measured in 1674 children from the Generation R cohort at age 6. We computed a polygenic score of hair color based on 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms. This score was used to predict hair cortisol concentrations, adjusted for genetic ancestry, sex, age and corticosteroid use. A 1-standard deviation (SD) higher polygenic score (darker hair) was associated with 0.08 SD higher cortisol levels (SE = 0.03, p = 0.002). This suggests that variation in hair cortisol concentrations is partly explained by local hair effects. In multi-ancestry studies this hair pigmentation bias can reduce power and confound results. Researchers should therefore consider adjusting analyses by reported hair color, by polygenic scores, or by both.

  4. 28 CFR 551.4 - Hair length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hair length. (a) The Warden may not restrict hair length if the inmate keeps it neat and clean. (b) The Warden shall require an inmate with long hair to wear a cap or hair net when working in food service or... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hair length. 551.4 Section 551.4 Judicial...

  5. Understanding filamentary growth in electrochemical metallization memory cells using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Stephan; Kaupmann, Philip; Waser, Rainer

    2015-07-01

    We report on a 2D kinetic Monte Carlo model that describes the resistive switching in electrochemical metallization cells. To simulate the switching process, we consider several different processes on the atomic scale: electron-transfer reactions at the boundaries, ion migration, adsorption/desorption from/to interfaces, surface diffusion and nucleation. These processes result in a growth/dissolution of a metallic filament within an insulating matrix. In addition, the model includes electron tunneling between the growing filament and the counter electrode, which allows for simulating multilevel switching. It is shown that the simulation model can reproduce the reported switching kinetics, switching variability and multilevel capabilities of ECM devices. As a major result, the influence of mechanical stress working on the host matrix due to the filamentary growth is investigated. It is demonstrated that the size and shape of the filament depend on the Young's modulus of the insulating matrix. For high values a wire-like structure evolves, whereas the shape is dendritic if the Young's modulus is negligible.We report on a 2D kinetic Monte Carlo model that describes the resistive switching in electrochemical metallization cells. To simulate the switching process, we consider several different processes on the atomic scale: electron-transfer reactions at the boundaries, ion migration, adsorption/desorption from/to interfaces, surface diffusion and nucleation. These processes result in a growth/dissolution of a metallic filament within an insulating matrix. In addition, the model includes electron tunneling between the growing filament and the counter electrode, which allows for simulating multilevel switching. It is shown that the simulation model can reproduce the reported switching kinetics, switching variability and multilevel capabilities of ECM devices. As a major result, the influence of mechanical stress working on the host matrix due to the filamentary growth is

  6. Gravitational Contraction and Fragmentation of Filamentary Molecular Clouds: Breakdown of Isothermality and Appearance of Two- Dimensionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsu, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    & Rachford (1956) (DROS), and linearizing the Planck function (LIN). From some numerical tests, we find that DROS and LIN can be chosen as the alternative scheme. Third, using DROS, we perform two-dimensional RHD calculations with the FLD approximation to investigate the fragmentation process of radially contracting filamentary clouds. As a result, we find when the fragmentation occurs, which cannot be determined by one-dimensional approaches. We define the criteria for judging the appearance of two-dimensionality using the mean central density, which was approximately one order of magnitude higher than previous implicit understandings. The density when fragmentations appear is corresponding to several Jupiter mass, which is several times smaller than previously predicted. The mass is in agreement with planet mass objects observed using the microlensing effect and the candidates of the first hydrostatic cores observed by ALMA along filamentary clouds.

  7. Leptin controls hair follicle cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Reiko; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Kabashima-Kubo, Rieko; Yoshioka, Manabu; Nishio, Daisuke; Nakamura, Motonobu

    2014-04-01

    Leptin is a cytokine well known for its ability to control body weight and energy metabolism. Several lines of evidence have recently revealed that leptin also plays an important role in wound healing and immune modulation in skin. Sumikawa et al. Exp Dermatol 2014 evaluated the effect of leptin on hair follicle cycling using mutant and wild-type mice. They report that leptin is produced in dermal papilla cells in hair follicles and that leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice show an abnormality in hair follicle cycling. Moreover, leptin injection induced the transition into the growth stage of the hair cycle (anagen). On this basis, it now deserves exploration whether leptin-mediated signalling is a key stimulus for anagen induction and whether this may be targeted to manage human hair disorders with defect in the control of hair follicle cycling. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Raccoon Dog Skin to Determine Melanin Content in Hair and Melanin Distribution in Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhanyu Du; Kai Huang; Jiaping Zhao; Xingchao Song; Xiumei Xing; Qiong Wu; Linbo Zhang; Chao Xu

    2017-01-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is an important canid fur-bearing animal species worldwide. Chinese raccoon dogs that present a white mutation, especially those with a white coat. Exploring melanin biosynthesis in the hair and skin of raccoon dogs is important for understanding the survival and evolutionary mechanisms of them. In this study, we measured the content of melanin in the hair of two types of raccoon dog and generated stained slices of skin tissue. The results indicated ...

  9. Systemic causes of hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Richard L; Garibyan, Lilit; Kimball, Alexandra B; Drake, Lynn A

    2016-09-01

    Hair loss is both a common chief complaint by patients and a clinical challenge for physicians, especially general practitioners, yet few dermatological problems yield as much patient satisfaction when resolved as hair loss. The diagnosis is often attributed to androgen-related hair loss, while other causes, some of which are life-threatening but treatable, are overlooked. We searched for relevant literature on hair loss and supported these findings with our clinical experience to identify seven major systemic etiologies of hair loss, ranging from infectious agents to consumption of unsafe supplements. Many causes are only described in the literature through case studies, though some original articles and meta-analyses are available. Careful history taking, proper examination techniques, and judicious use of laboratory tests are essential to reach at the correct diagnosis in a cost-effective manner when performing patient work-up. Such methodical evaluation of hair loss can result in the appropriate treatment plan and provide significant patient satisfaction. Key messages Hair loss is a common chief complaint and a difficult challenge for both general practitioners and dermatology consultants. We identified seven major categories of systemic hair loss etiology and present a framework for their clinical evaluation. A methodical approach to hair loss can result in the appropriate treatment plan and provide significant patient satisfaction.

  10. Trichotillomania (Hair-Pulling Disorder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with trichotillomania, hair pulling is a way of dealing with negative or uncomfortable feelings, such as stress, anxiety, tension, boredom, loneliness, fatigue or frustration. Positive feelings. ...

  11. The amazing miniorgan: Hair follicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiler Çelik Özenci

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hair is a primary characteristic of mammals, and exerts a wide range of functions including thermoregulation, physical protection, sensory activity, and social interactions. The hair shaft consists of terminally differentiated keratinocytes that are produced by the hair follicle. Hair follicle development takes place during fetal skin development and relies on tightly regulated ectodermal–mesodermal interactions. Hair follicles form during embryonic development and, after birth, undergo recurrent cycling of growth (anagen, apoptosis-driven regression (catagen, and relative quiescence (telogen. As a functional mini-organ, the hair follicle develops in an environment with dynamic and alternating changes of diverse molecular signals. Our molecular understanding of hair follicle biology relies heavily on genetically engineered mouse models with abnormalities in hair structure, growth, and/or pigmentation and significant advances have been made toward the identification of key signaling pathways and the regulatory genes involved. In this review, the basic concepts of hair follicle, a mini-complex organ, biology will be presented and its importance in clinical applications will be summarized.

  12. Teaching Your Child Healthy Hair Care Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 0; c Teaching your child healthy hair care habits Many common hair care practices can lead to ... conditioner. Teaching your child other healthy hair care habits Many things that we do to style our ...

  13. Deformation processed Al/Ca nano-filamentary composite conductors for HVDC applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czahor, C. F.; Anderson, I. E.; Riedemann, T. M.; Russell, A. M.

    2017-07-01

    Efficient long-distance power transmission is necessary as the world continues to implement renewable energy sources, often sited in remote areas. Light, strong, high-conductivity materials are desirable for this application to reduce both construction and operational costs. In this study an Al/Ca (11.5% vol.) composite with nano-filamentary reinforcement was produced by powder metallurgy then extruded, swaged, and wire drawn to a maximum true strain of 12.7. The tensile strength increased exponentially as the filament size was reduced to the sub-micron level. In an effort to improve the conductor’s ability to operate at elevated temperatures, the deformation-processed wires were heat-treated at 260°C to transform the Ca-reinforcing filaments to Al2Ca. Such a transformation raised the tensile strength by as much as 28%, and caused little change in ductility, while the electrical conductivity was reduced by only 1% to 3%. Al/Al2Ca composites are compared to existing conductor materials to show how implementation could affect installation and performance.

  14. Effect of the local geometry on the motion of a filamentary vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Fuentes, Oscar

    2017-11-01

    In his seminal paper on vortex motion Helmholtz (1858) showed that a curved vortex moves within the fluid whereas a straight one remains stationary. Schwedoff (1887) later claimed that the velocity of a vortex increases with the curvature and is perpendicular to the plane of curvature. This conjecture, mathematically formalized by Da Rios (1906), is now known as the local induction approximation (LIA). Here we use a higher-order Frenet-Serret representation of the vortex centerline in order to study the effect of curvature, torsion and their derivatives on the motion of a filamentary vortex. We found that, to leading order, the curvature induces a vortex velocity in the binormal direction, the torsion induces velocity in the tangential direction and the changes in curvature and torsion along the vortex induce velocity in the normal direction. We verify these results by studying, separately, the evolution of a helical vortex and an elliptical vortex ring, whose motion is also calculated using different analytic/numerical methods.

  15. Filamentary Alfvénic structures excited at the edges of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pottelette

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations performed by the French DEMETER satellite at altitudes of about 710 km suggest that the generation of equatorial plasma bubbles correlates with the presence of filamentary structures of field aligned currents carried by Alfvén waves. These localized structures are located at the bubble edges. We study the dynamics of the equatorial plasma bubbles, taking into account that their motion is dictated by gravity driven and displacement currents. Ion-polarization currents appear to be crucial for the accurate description of the evolution of plasma bubbles in the high altitude ionosphere. During their eastward/westward motion the bubbles intersect gravity driven currents flowing transversely with respect to the background magnetic field. The circulation of these currents is prohibited by large density depressions located at the bubble edges acting as perfect insulators. As a result, in these localized regions the transverse currents have to be locally closed by field aligned currents. Such a physical process generates kinetic Alfvén waves which appear to be stationary in the plasma bubble reference frame. Using a two-dimensional model and "in situ" wave measurements on board the DEMETER spacecraft, we give estimates for the magnitude of the field aligned currents and the associated Alfvén fields.

  16. Electric field strength determination in filamentary DBDs by CARS-based four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Patrick; Kettlitz, Manfred; Brandenburg, Ronny; Hoeft, Hans; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    The electric field strength is a basic parameter of non-thermal plasmas. Therefore, a profound knowledge of the electric field distribution is crucial. In this contribution a four wave mixing technique based on Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure electric field strengths in filamentary dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs). The discharges are operated with a pulsed voltage in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. Small amounts hydrogen (10 vol%) are admixed as tracer gas to evaluate the electric field strength in the 1 mm discharge gap. Absolute values of the electric field strength are determined by calibration of the CARS setup with high voltage amplitudes below the ignition threshold of the arrangement. Alteration of the electric field strength has been observed during the internal polarity reversal and the breakdown process. In this case the major advantage over emission based methods is that this technique can be used independently from emission, e.g. in the pre-phase and in between two consecutive, opposite discharge pulses where no emission occurs at all. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Forschergruppe FOR 1123 and Sonderforschungsbereich TRR 24 ``Fundamentals of complex plasmas''.

  17. Filamentary MgB2 wires manufactured by different processes subjected to tensile loading and unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováč, P.; Kulich, M.; Kopera, L.; Melišek, T.; Kováč, J.; Hušek, I.

    2017-06-01

    A reversible strain effect on the transport critical current (I c) of filamentary MgB2 wires manufactured by three different processes has been examined at 4.2 K and under an external field of 5 T. MgB2 wires with a Nb barrier and a Monel® outer sheath made by powder-in-tube ex situ, in situ and by diffusion of magnesium into the boron process, have been examined. The wire samples were loaded and partially unloaded at progressively higher strain levels to determine the irreversible strain limit (ε irr), which is defined as the ultimate strain where the critical current (I c) is still reversible. It was found that the strain tolerances of the tested MgB2 wires are affected by the production process. The highest annealing temperature (>900 °C), applied in the ex situ process, causes an apparent softening of the Monel® and, together with the poor grain connectivity of MgB2 filaments, leads to the lowest strain tolerance (ε irr = 0.20%). The best grain connectivity, in internal Mg diffusion (IMD)-made MgB2, combined with a stronger Monel® sheath (heat treated at a lower temperature ∼640 °C) results in the best strain tolerance (ε irr = 0.55%).

  18. Smokers′ hair: Does smoking cause premature hair graying?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman A Zayed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine if there is a significant association between premature hair graying and cigarette smoking. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in a nonclinical setting on 207 participants on August 24 until 25, 2010. Participants were classified into two groups [premature hair graying (PHG and normal hair graying]. PHG was defined as the first appearance of gray hair before the age of 30. Data were collected using an interview questionnaire and measurements of body mass index, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose and blood pressure. Collected data were statistically analyzed using SPSS 16, Chicago, IL. Results: Of the 207 subjects, 104 (50.2% had first appearance of gray hair before the age of 30 (PHG group while the other 103 (49.8% were considered normal hair graying group. The prevalence of smokers in the "PHG" group was higher (40.2% vs. 24.7%, P = 0.031. Smokers had earlier onset of hair graying (smokers: 31 (7.4 vs. nonsmokers: 34 (8.6, P = 0.034. Using multiple logistic regression with conditional likelihood, smokers were two and half times (95% CI: 1.5-4.6 more prone to develop PHG. Conclusion: This study suggests that there is a significant relation (with adjusted odds ratio of two and half between onset of gray hair before the age of 30 and cigarette smoking.

  19. Smokers' hair: Does smoking cause premature hair graying?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Ayman A; Shahait, Awni D; Ayoub, Musa N; Yousef, Al-Motassem

    2013-04-01

    To determine if there is a significant association between premature hair graying and cigarette smoking. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in a nonclinical setting on 207 participants on August 24 until 25, 2010. Participants were classified into two groups [premature hair graying (PHG) and normal hair graying]. PHG was defined as the first appearance of gray hair before the age of 30. Data were collected using an interview questionnaire and measurements of body mass index, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose and blood pressure. Collected data were statistically analyzed using SPSS 16, Chicago, IL. Of the 207 subjects, 104 (50.2%) had first appearance of gray hair before the age of 30 (PHG group) while the other 103 (49.8%) were considered normal hair graying group. The prevalence of smokers in the "PHG" group was higher (40.2% vs. 24.7%, P = 0.031). Smokers had earlier onset of hair graying (smokers: 31 (7.4) vs. nonsmokers: 34 (8.6), P = 0.034). Using multiple logistic regression with conditional likelihood, smokers were two and half times (95% CI: 1.5-4.6) more prone to develop PHG. This study suggests that there is a significant relation (with adjusted odds ratio of two and half) between onset of gray hair before the age of 30 and cigarette smoking.

  20. Mercury analysis in hair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteban, Marta; Schindler, Birgit K; Jiménez-Guerrero, José A

    2015-01-01

    assurance program (QAP) for assessing mercury levels in hair samples from more than 1800 mother-child pairs recruited in 17 European countries. To ensure the comparability of the results, standard operating procedures (SOPs) for sampling and for mercury analysis were drafted and distributed to participating.......20-0.71 and 0.80-1.63) per exercise. The results revealed relative standard deviations of 7.87-13.55% and 4.04-11.31% for the low and high mercury concentration ranges, respectively. A total of 16 out of 18 participating laboratories the QAP requirements and were allowed to analyze samples from the DEMOCOPHES...

  1. Investigation of hair dye deposition, hair color loss, and hair damage during multiple oxidative dyeing and shampooing cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojin; McMullen, Roger L; Kulcsar, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Color fastness is a major concern for consumers and manufacturers of oxidative hair dye products. Hair dye loss results from multiple wash cycles in which the hair dye is dissolved by water and leaches from the hair shaft. In this study, we carried out a series of measurements to help us better understand the kinetics of the leaching process and pathways associated with its escape from the fiber. Hair dye leaching kinetics was measured by suspending hair in a dissolution apparatus and monitoring the dye concentration in solution (leached dye) with an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The physical state of dye deposited in hair fibers was evaluated by a reflectance light microscopy technique, based on image stacking, allowing enhanced depth of field imaging. The dye distribution within the fiber was monitored by infrared spectroscopic imaging of hair fiber cross sections. Damage to the ultrafine structure of the hair cuticle (surface, endocuticle, and cell membrane complex) and cortex (cell membrane complex) was determined in hair cross sections and on the hair fiber surface with atomic force microscopy. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we investigated how consecutive coloring and leaching processes affect the internal proteins of hair. Further, to probe the surface properties of hair we utilized contact angle measurements. This study was conducted on both pigmented and nonpigmented hair to gain insight into the influence of melanin on the hair dye deposition and leaching processes. Both types of hair were colored utilizing a commercial oxidative hair dye product based on pyrazole chemistry.

  2. Hair regrowth after cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, S.L.; Whitton, A.; Plowman, P.N. (Saint Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (UK))

    1983-07-01

    Florid scalp hair regrowth following the depilatory effects of both whole cranial radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy is described in a patient who simultaneously exhibited acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa in the head and neck region. The regrowth of more youthful and more senile scalp hair following cranial radiotherapy are exemplified in two further case reports.

  3. Professionalizing hair care in Tonga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besnier, N.

    2013-01-01

    In the course of the last two decades, Nuku'alofa, the capital of Tonga, witnessed an explosion of a particular kind of business, hair salons. For owners, workers, and customers alike, hair salons represent modernity and cosmopolitanism, and they thus attract a particular kind of clientele and

  4. A toddler with hair fascination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Patricia; Needlman, Robert D; Stein, Martin T

    2010-04-01

    Joseph is a 24-months old boy referred by his pediatrician because of an "obsession" with pulling and eating hair. When Joseph was 14 months old, he enjoyed touching and twirling his mother's long hair. She observed that it seemed to provide comfort to him. At 18 months, he initiated pulling out and eating his own hair, twirling his mother's hair around his thumb and then sucking on it. Currently, he searches the carpet or a hard floor and looks for hair to eat. The identical behavior is observed at daycare. Joseph's teacher commented, "He pulled hair from a girl who has the longest hair of all the children. We try to distract him from this habit, but he is not distracted for long." Less frequently, Joseph has also eaten sand, chalk, and crayons at daycare. Joseph's mother describes him as a "happy and outgoing" child who interacts with his peers and has a best friend at the daycare. There have not been recent changes or stressful events in his life. Joseph separates from his mother with ease and he sleeps comfortably through the night in his own bed. There have been no episodes of nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, or constipation. Strands of hair are occasionally seen in the stool. Prenatal and perinatal history was unremarkable. Joseph was breast-fed for 11 months, described as an "easy" baby, achieved motor, social, and language developmental milestones at the usual time, and has been in excellent health. He lives with his mother and maternal grandparents; the biological father has never been involved in his care. At 20 months, Joseph's pediatrician suggested cutting his hair. After several haircuts, Joseph stopped pulling his own hair. However, he continued to search the floor for hair. Hemoglobin and a blood lead level were normal. Joseph appeared pleasant and friendly with normal growth parameters and facial features. He was sitting comfortably on his mother's lap, sucking on his thumb. Social interactions with his mother were appropriate and reciprocal. He

  5. The influence of hair lipids in ethnic hair properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, M; Barba, C; Manich, A M; Rubio, L; Alonso, C; Coderch, L

    2016-02-01

    Biochemical studies have mainly focused on the composition of hair. African hair exhibited lower moisturization and less radial swelling when flushing with water compared with Asian or Caucasian hair, and they assumed a possible lipid differentiation among human populations. This study consists in the lipid characterization of different ethnic hairs (Caucasian, Asian and African hairs) and the influence of these lipids in different hair properties such as humidity and mechanical properties. Evaluation of water sorption and desorption of the different ethnic hairs and with and without lipids is also studied mainly to determine permeation changes of the keratin fibres. Extractions of exogenous and endogenous lipids with different organic solvents were performed; lipid analysis and its quantification using thin-layer chromatography coupled to an automated flame ionization detector (TLC/FID) were performed. Absorption and desorption curves were obtained in a thermogravimetric balance equipped with a controlled humidity chamber, the Q5000SA Sorption Analyzer (TA Instruments, New Castle, IL, U.S.A.). Also, mechanical properties (breaking stress and breaking elongation) were analysed using a computer programmable dynamometer (Instron 5500R). Lipid extraction showed the highest amount of total lipids for the African hair which may come from external sebaceous lipids compared with Asian or Caucasian hair. Caucasian fibres were found to be the most hydrated fibre, and a decrease in moisture was found in the extracted fibres, again, which is more important for the Caucasian hair. A superior lineal mass was found for the Asian fibres which supported their higher strength. The results obtained from the analysis of the mechanical properties of delipidized fibres indicate a surprising increase in the strength of African and Caucasian fibres. Perhaps this increase in strength could be related to the humidity decrease in lipid-extracted hair fibres. Results of water uptake and

  6. Human hair growth ex vivo is correlated with in vivo hair growth: selective categorization of hair follicles for more reliable hair follicle organ culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh Sang; Oh, Jun Kyu; Kim, Mi Hyang; Park, So Hyun; Pyo, Hyun Keol; Kim, Kyu Han; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Eun, Hee Chul

    2006-02-01

    Of the numerous assays used to assess hair growth, hair follicle organ culture model is one of the most popular and powerful in vitro systems. Changes in hair growth are commonly employed as a measurement of follicular activity. Hair cycle stage of mouse vibrissa follicles in vivo is known to determine subsequent hair growth and follicle behavior in vitro and it is recommended that follicles be taken at precisely the same cyclic stage. This study was performed to evaluate whether categorization of human hair follicles by the growth in vivo could be used to select follicles of the defined anagen stage for more consistent culture. Occipital scalp samples were obtained from three subjects, 2 weeks later after hair bleaching. Hair growth and follicle length of isolated anagen VI follicles were measured under a videomicroscope. Follicles were categorized into four groups according to hair growth and some were cultured ex vivo for 6 days. Follicles showed considerable variations with respect to hair growth and follicle length; however, these two variables were relatively well correlated. Hair growth in culture was closely related with hair growth rate in vivo. Moreover, minoxidil uniquely demonstrated a significant increase of hair growth in categorized hair follicles assumed at a similar early anagen VI stage of hair cycle. Selection of follicles at a defined stage based on hair-growth rate would permit a more reliable outcome in human hair follicle organ culture.

  7. Gas kinematics and star formation in the filamentary molecular cloud G47.06+0.26

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Xu, Ye; Zhang, Chuan-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Yu, Naiping; Ning, Chang-Chun; Ju, Bing-Gang

    2018-01-01

    Aims: We performed a multi-wavelength study toward the filamentary cloud G47.06+0.26 to investigate the gas kinematics and star formation. Methods: We present the 12CO (J = 1-0), 13CO (J = 1-0) and C18O (J = 1-0) observations of G47.06+0.26 obtained with the Purple Mountain Observation (PMO) 13.7 m radio telescope to investigate the detailed kinematics of the filament. Radio continuum and infrared archival data were obtained from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL), the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) survey, and the Multi-band Imaging Photometer Survey of the Galaxy (MIPSGAL). To trace massive clumps and extract young stellar objects in G47.06+0.26, we used the BGPS catalog v2.0 and the GLIMPSE I catalog, respectively. Results: The 12CO (J = 1-0) and 13CO (J = 1-0) emission of G47.06+0.26 appear to show a filamentary structure. The filament extends about 45' (58.1 pc) along the east-west direction. The mean width is about 6.8 pc, as traced by the 13CO (J = 1-0) emission. G47.06+0.26 has a linear mass density of 361.5 M⊙pc-1. The external pressure (due to neighboring bubbles and H II regions) may help preventing the filament from dispersing under the effects of turbulence. From the velocity-field map, we discern a velocity gradient perpendicular to G47.06+0.26. From the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) catalog, we found nine BGPS sources in G47.06+0.26, that appear to these sources have sufficient mass to form massive stars. We obtained that the clump formation efficiency (CFE) is 18% in the filament. Four infrared bubbles were found to be located in, and adjacent to, G47.06+0.26. Particularly, infrared bubble N98 shows a cometary structure. CO molecular gas adjacent to N98 also shows a very intense emission. H II regions associated with infrared bubbles can inject the energy to surrounding gas. We calculated the kinetic energy, ionization energy, and thermal energy

  8. White Toenails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page. Please enable Javascript in your browser. White Toenails White toenails can develop for several reasons. Trauma, such ... trauma does not cause broken blood vessels, a white spot may appear under the nail. The spot ...

  9. The carbon inventory in a quiescent, filamentary molecular cloud in G328

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Michael G.; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Braiding, Catherine; Storey, John W. V. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Kulesa, Craig [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hollenbach, David J. [Carl Sagan Center, SETI Institute, 189 Bernado Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043-5203 (United States); Wolfire, Mark [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Glück, Christian [KOSMA, I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Rowell, Gavin, E-mail: m.burton@unsw.edu.au [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2014-02-20

    We present spectral line images of [C I] 809 GHz, CO J = 1-0 115 GHz and H I 1.4 GHz line emission, and calculate the corresponding C, CO and H column densities, for a sinuous, quiescent giant molecular cloud about 5 kpc distant along the l = 328° sightline (hereafter G328) in our Galaxy. The [C I] data comes from the High Elevation Antarctic Terahertz telescope, a new facility on the summit of the Antarctic plateau where the precipitable water vapor falls to the lowest values found on the surface of the Earth. The CO and H I data sets come from the Mopra and Parkes/ATCA telescopes, respectively. We identify a filamentary molecular cloud, ∼75 × 5 pc long with mass ∼4 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} and a narrow velocity emission range of just 4 km s{sup –1}. The morphology and kinematics of this filament are similar in CO, [C I], and H I, though in the latter appears as self-absorption. We calculate line fluxes and column densities for the three emitting species, which are broadly consistent with a photodissociation region model for a GMC exposed to the average interstellar radiation field. The [C/CO] abundance ratio averaged through the filament is found to be approximately unity. The G328 filament is constrained to be cold (T {sub Dust} < 20 K) by the lack of far-IR emission, to show no clear signs of star formation, and to only be mildly turbulent from the narrow line width. We suggest that it may represent a GMC shortly after formation, or perhaps still in the process of formation.

  10. THE ROLE OF TURBULENCE AND MAGNETIC FIELDS IN SIMULATED FILAMENTARY STRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Helen; Pudritz, Ralph [Origins Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Klassen, Mikhail; Pillsworth, Samantha, E-mail: helen.kirk@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University,Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2015-04-01

    We use numerical simulations of turbulent cluster-forming regions to study the nature of dense filamentary structures in star formation. Using four hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations chosen to match observations, we identify filaments in the resulting column density maps and analyze their properties. We calculate the radial column density profiles of the filaments every 0.05 Myr and fit the profiles with the modified isothermal and pressure-confined isothermal cylinder models, finding reasonable fits for either model. The filaments formed in the simulations have similar radial column density profiles to those observed. Magnetic fields provide additional pressure support to the filaments, making “puffier” filaments less prone to fragmentation than in the pure hydrodynamic case, which continue to condense at a slower rate. In the higher density simulations, the filaments grow faster through the increased importance of gravity. Not all of the filaments identified in the simulations will evolve to form stars: some expand and disperse. Given these different filament evolutionary paths, the trends in bulk filament width as a function of time, magnetic field strength, or density are weak, and all cases are reasonably consistent with the finding of a constant filament width in different star-forming regions. In the simulations, the mean FWHM lies between 0.06 and 0.26 pc for all times and initial conditions, with most lying between 0.1 to 0.15 pc; the range in FWHMs is however, larger than seen in typical Herschel analyses. Finally, the filaments display a wealth of substructure similar to the recent discovery of filament bundles in Taurus.

  11. Photodynamic therapy for hair removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. M. Ali

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unwanted hair is one of the most common medical problems affecting women of reproductive age inducing a lot of psychological stress and threatening their femininity and self-esteem. Old methods of removing unwanted hair include shaving, waxing, chemical depilation, and electrolysis, all of which have temporary results. However laser-assisted hair removal is the most efficient method of long-term hair removal currently available. It is desirable to develop a reduced cost photodynamic therapy (PDT system whose properties should include high efficiency and low side-effects. Method: Mice skin tissues were used in this study and divided into six groups such as controls, free methylene blue (MB incubation, liposome methylene blue (MB incubation, laser without methylene blue (MB, free methylene blue (MB for 3 and 4 hrs and laser, liposome methylene blue (MB for 3 hrs and laser. Methylene blue (MBwas applied to wax epilated areas. The areas were irradiated with CW He-Ne laser system that emits orange-red light with wavelength 632.8 nm and 10 mW at energy density of 5 J/ cm2 for 10 minutes. The UV-visible absorption spectrum was collected by Cary spectrophotometer. Results: Methylene blue (MB is selectively absorbed by actively growing hair follicles due to its cationic property. Methylene blue (MBuntreated sections showed that hair follicle and sebaceous gland are intact and there is no change due to the laser exposure. Free methylene blue (MB sections incubated for 3 hrs showed that He:Ne laser induced destruction in hair follicles, leaving an intact epidermis. Treated section with free methylene blue (MB for 4 hrs showed degeneration and necrosis in hair follicle, leaving an intact epidermis. Liposomal methylene blue (MB sections incubated for 3 hrs showed He:Ne laser induced destruction in hair follicles with intradermal leucocytic infiltration. Conclusions: Low power CW He:Ne laser and methylene blue (MB offered a successful PDT system

  12. Harvesting electricity from human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulachan, Brindan; Singh, Sushil K; Philip, Deepu; Das, Mainak

    2016-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of human hair is a debatable issue among hair experts and scientists. There are unsubstantiated claims that hair conducts electricity. However, hair experts provided ample evidence that hair is an insulator. Although wet hair exhibited drastic reduction in resistivity; scientists regarded hair as a proton semiconductor at the best. Here, we demonstrate that hair filaments generate electricity on absorbing water vapor between 50 degrees and 80 degrees C. This electricity can operate low power electronic systems. Essentially, we are exposing the hydrated hair polymer to a high temperature (50 degrees-80 degrees C). It has long been speculated that when certain biopolymers are simultaneously hydrated and exposed to high temperature, they exhibit significant proton hopping at a specific temperature regime. This happens due to rapid movement of water molecules on the polymer surface. This lead us to speculate that the observed flow of current is partly ionic and partly due to "proton hopping" in the hydrated nano spaces of hair filament. Such proton hopping is exceptionally high when the hydrated hair polymer is exposed to a temperature between 50 degrees and 80 degrees C. Differential scanning calorimetry data further corroborated the results and indicated that indeed at this temperature range, there is an enormous movement of water molecules on the hair polymer surface. This enormously rapid movement of water molecules lead to the "making and breaking" of innumerable hydrogen bonds and thus resulting in hopping of the protons. What is challenging is "how to tap these hopping protons to obtain useful electricity?" We achieved this by placing a bundle of hair between two different electrodes having different electro negativities, and exposing it to water vapor (water + heat). The two different electrodes offered directionality to the hopping protons and the existing ions and thus resulting in the generation of useful current. Further, by

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Hair Follicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishioka, Noriaki; Terada, Masahiro; Yamada, Shin; Seki, Masaya; Takahashi, Rika; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Higashibata, Akira; Mukai, Chiaki

    2013-02-01

    Hair root cells actively divide in a hair follicle, and they sensitively reflect physical conditions. By analyzing the human hair, we can know stress levels on the human body and metabolic conditions caused by microgravity environment and cosmic radiation. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has initiated a human research study to investigate the effects of long-term space flight on gene expression and mineral metabolism by analyzing hair samples of astronauts who stayed in the International Space Station (ISS) for 6 months. During long-term flights, the physiological effects on astronauts include muscle atrophy and bone calcium loss. Furthermore, radiation and psychological effects are important issue to consider. Therefore, an understanding of the effects of the space environment is important for developing countermeasures against the effects experienced by astronauts. In this experiment, we identify functionally important target proteins that integrate transcriptome, mineral metabolism and proteome profiles from human hair. To compare the protein expression data with the gene expression data from hair roots, we developed the protein processing method. We extracted the protein from five strands of hair using ISOGEN reagents. Then, these extracted proteins were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. These collected profiles will give us useful physiological information to examine the effect of space flight.

  14. The ethnic differences of the damage of hair and integral hair lipid after ultra violet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jae Hong; Park, Tae-Sik; Lee, Hae-Jin; Kim, Yoon-Duk; Pi, Long-Quan; Jin, Xin-Hai; Lee, Won-Soo

    2013-02-01

    Genetic factors account for the majority of differences in skin color and hair morphology across human populations. Although many studies have been conducted to examine differences in skin color across populations, few studies have examined differences in hair morphology. To investigate changing of integral hair lipids after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in three human ethnic groups. We studied the UV irradiation induced hair damage in hairs of three human populations. UV irradiation had been performed with self-manufactured phototherapy system. Damaged hair samples were prepared at 12 and 48 hours after UVA (20 J/sec) and UVB (8 J/sec) irradiation. We evaluated the changes of hair lipid using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), lipid TEM and HP-TLC. After UV irradiation, hair surface damage was shown. African hair showed more severe damage on hair surface than others. The lipid compositions across human populations were similar, but Asian hair had more integral hair lipids than other groups as a whole. Especially, free fatty acid contents were higher than other lipids. After UV irradiation, lipid contents were decreased. These patterns were shown in all human populations. Asian hair has more integral hair lipid than European or African hair. After UV irradiation, European and African hair samples exhibited more damage because they have less integral hair lipids. However, Asian hair samples have less damage. We conclude that integral hair lipid may protect the hair against the UV light.

  15. Stress and Hair Loss: Are They Related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your scalp, eyebrows or other areas of your body. Hair pulling can be a way of dealing with ... possibly including severe stress. With alopecia areata, the body's immune system attacks the hair follicles — causing hair loss. Stress and hair loss ...

  16. Hair follicle proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R

    1993-01-01

    Proteoglycans are polymorphic macromolecules present in all mammalian tissues, including the skin and its appendages. They consist of a core protein to which one or more glycosaminoglycan chains are covalently attached. Broadly, they can be divided into classes based on location and core protein...... structure. These classes include cell surface proteoglycans, basement membrane proteoglycans, small leucine-rich proteoglycans, large proteoglycans aggregating with hyaluronan, and intracellular granule proteoglycans. They have a wide range of functions, but little is known of the proteoglycans...... that are present in the epithelial and stromal compartments of hair follicles. However, the transmembrane proteoglycan syndecan may be important in follicle morphogenesis, both with respect to the epithelium and dermal papilla cells. Syndecan may possess both heparan and chondroitin sulfate chains, interacts...

  17. Hair Cortisol in Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rietschel, Liz; Streit, Fabian; Zhu, Gu

    2017-01-01

    Hair cortisol concentration (HCC) is a promising measure of long-term hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. Previous research has suggested an association between HCC and psychological variables, and initial studies of inter-individual variance in HCC have implicated genetic factors....... However, whether HCC and psychological variables share genetic risk factors remains unclear. The aims of the present twin study were to: (i) assess the heritability of HCC; (ii) estimate the phenotypic and genetic correlation between HPA axis activity and the psychological variables perceived stress...... depression, and neuroticism were calculated using data from large genome wide association studies. The twin model revealed a heritability for HCC of 72%. No significant phenotypic or genetic correlation was found between HCC and the three psychological variables of interest. PRS did not explain variance...

  18. A mechanical model of overnight hair curling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hang; Chen, Xi

    2015-09-01

    Based on the observation of overnight hair curling procedure, we establish a mechanical model to describe the temporary wave formation of straight hair (initial curvature is zero), which incorporates the contact between hair and hair roller. Systematic studies are carried out to explore the effects of radius ratio between hair and hair roller, hair's average axial strain, creep time, Poisson's ratio and gravity on the curl retention. The variation of curl retention with respect to time obtained from our numerical model is validated by a simple theoretical model and by overnight curling experiments on hair samples. The results of simulation show that overnight hair curling is suitable to create a wavy hairstyle within about 7 hours, while the combined usage with hair fixatives enables a wavy hairstyle with desired curvature that lasts for a day or more.

  19. Determination of physicochemical properties of delipidized hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Roger L; Laura, Donna; Chen, Susan; Koelmel, Donald; Zhang, Guojin; Gillece, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Using various physicochemical methods of analysis, we examined human hair in its virgin and delipidized state. Free lipids were removed by a solvent extraction technique (covalently bound lipids were not removed) using a series of solvents with varying polarity. We analyzed the surface properties of hair by conducting mechanical combing and dynamic contact angle analysis. In addition, we used inverse gas chromatography surface energy analysis to explore the chemical composition of the hair surface based on interactions of various nonpolar and polar probes with biological molecules residing on the hair surface. Further, we investigated the importance that free lipids play in the internal structural properties of hair using dynamic scanning calorimetry and tensile strength measurements. The microstructure of the hair surface was probed by atomic force microscopy, whereas the lipid content of hair's morphological components was determined by infrared spectroscopic imaging. We also monitored the water management properties of virgin and delipidized hair by dynamic vapor sorption, which yielded unique water sorption isotherms for each hair type. Using all these techniques, differences were found in the chemical composition and physical behavior of virgin and delipidized hair. To better understand the influence of hair lipid composition on hair styling treatments, we conducted mechanical analyses of hair shaped into omega loops to determine the stiffness, elasticity, and flexibility of hair-polymer assemblies. Although there were no discernible differences between untreated virgin and delipidized hair, in terms of stiffness and elasticity, we found that treatment with hair styling agents produced different effects depending on the hair type used. Likewise, streaming potential measurements were carried out to monitor the binding capacity of rinse-off treatments on virgin and delipidized hair. Using this technique, we monitored the surface potential of hair and found

  20. White Ring; White ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, H.; Yuzawa, H. [Nikken Sekkei Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-01-05

    White Ring is a citizen`s gymnasium used for figure skating and short track speed skating games of 18th Winter Olympic Games in 1998. White Ring is composed of a main-arena and a sub-arena. For the main-arena with an area 41mtimes66m, an ice link can be made by disengaging the potable floor and by flowing brine in the bridged polystyrene pipes embedded in the concrete floor. Due to the fortunate groundwater in this site, well water is used for the outside air treatment energy in 63% during heating and in 35% during cooling. Ammonia is used as a cooling medium for refrigerating facility. For the heating of audience area in the large space, heat load from the outside is reduced by enhancing the heat insulation performance of the roof of arena. The audience seats are locally heated using heaters. For the White Ring, high quality environment is realized for games through various functions of the large-scale roof of the large space. Success of the big event was expected. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Horse Shampoo for Human Hair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiriac Anca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lately, a new idea has caught the attention of young people of both genders, being debated in consultation rooms, during classes, and especially on social media: is using horse shampoo for human hair wrong or not?

  2. Treatments for unwanted facial hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, J; Lui, H

    Twenty-two percent of women in North America have unwanted facial hair, which can cause embarrassment and result in a significant emotional burden. Treatment options include plucking, waxing (including the sugar forms), depilatories, bleaching, shaving, electrolysis, laser, intense pulsed light (IPL), and eflornithine 13.9% cream (Vaniqa, Barrier Therapeutics in Canada and Shire Pharmaceuticals elsewhere). Eflornithine 13.9% cream is a topical treatment that does not remove the hairs, but acts to reduce the rate of growth and appears to be effective for unwanted facial hair on the mustache and chin area. Eflornithine 13.9% cream can be used in combination with other treatments such as lasers and IPL to give the patient the best chance for successful hair removal.

  3. Hair-Thread Tourniquet Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Gokcen

    2016-01-01

    Two month-old male infant was brought to the emergency service with the complaint of fever, uneasiness, and swelling on 4th-5th toes of right foot.  Apparent swelling, rubescence and increase in heat were seen and a constrictive band was observed to surround proximal phalanges of both toes in the physical examination of the patient (Figure 1.  A hair was found on the constrictive band surrounding both toes. The hair was removed by means of forceps. Oral antibiotic was administered to the patient. The patient was treated successfully by not letting a necrosis develop on the toes. It should be remembered that hair-thread tourniquet syndrome may be observed in the infant patients applying to the hospital with the complaints of unexplained fever and uneasiness. Figure 1: Appearance of the toes right after the hair was removed. Arrows show the constrictive band. 

  4. Multiwavelength Stellar Polarimetry of the Filamentary Cloud IC5146. I. Dust Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia-Wei; Lai, Shih-Ping; Eswaraiah, Chakali; Clemens, Dan P.; Chen, Wen-Ping; Pandey, Anil K.

    2017-11-01

    We present optical and near-infrared stellar polarization observations toward the dark filamentary clouds associated with IC5146. The data allow us to investigate the dust properties (this paper) and the magnetic field structure (Paper II). A total of 2022 background stars were detected in the R c , I\\prime , H, and/or K bands to {A}V≲ 25 mag. The ratio of the polarization percentage at different wavelengths provides an estimate of {λ }\\max , the wavelength of the peak polarization, which is an indicator of the small-size cutoff of the grain size distribution. The grain size distribution seems to significantly change at {A}V˜ 3 mag, where both the average and dispersion of {P}{Rc}/{P}H decrease. In addition, we found {λ }\\max ˜ 0.6{--}0.9 μm for {A}V> 2.5 mag, which is larger than the ˜0.55 μm in the general interstellar medium (ISM), suggesting that grain growth has already started in low-A V regions. Our data also reveal that polarization efficiency ({PE}\\equiv {P}λ /{A}V) decreases with A V as a power law in the R c , I\\prime , and K bands with indices of -0.71 ± 0.10, -1.23 ± 0.10, and -0.53 ± 0.09. However, H-band data show a power index change; the PE varies with A V steeply (index of -0.95 ± 0.30) when {A}Vsoftly (index of -0.25 ± 0.06) for greater A V values. The soft decay of PE in high-A V regions is consistent with the radiative alignment torque model, suggesting that our data trace the magnetic field to {A}V˜ 20 mag. Furthermore, the breakpoint found in the H band is similar to that for A V , where we found the {P}{Rc}/{P}H dispersion significantly decreased. Therefore, the flat PE-A V in high-A V regions implies that the power-index changes result from additional grain growth.

  5. GAS KINEMATICS AND STAR FORMATION IN THE FILAMENTARY IRDC G34.43+0.24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Li, Di; Zhang, Chuan-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Wang, Jun-Jie [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Ning, Chang-Chun [NAOC-TU Joint Center for Astrophysics, Lhasa 850000 (China); Ju, Bing-Gang, E-mail: xujl@bao.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Qinghai Station, 817000, Delingha (China)

    2016-03-10

    We performed a multiwavelength study toward the infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G34.43+0.24. New maps of {sup 13}CO J = 1–0 and C{sup 18}O J = 1–0 were obtained from the Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) 13.7 m radio telescope. At 8 μm (Spitzer-IRAC), IRDC G34.43+0.24 appears to be a dark filament extended by 18′ along the north–south direction. Based on the association with the 870 μm and C{sup 18}O J = 1–0 emission, we suggest that IRDC G34.43+0.24 should not be 18′ in length, but extend to 34′. IRDC G34.43+0.24 contains some massive protostars, UC H ii regions, and infrared bubbles. The spatial extend of IRDC G34.43+0.24 is about 37 pc, assuming a distance of 3.7 kpc. IRDC G34.43+0.24 has a linear mass density of ∼1.6 × 10{sup 3} M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −1}, which is roughly consistent with its critical mass to length ratio. The turbulent motion may help stabilize the filament against the radial collapse. Both infrared bubbles N61 and N62 show a ringlike structure at 8 μm. In particular, N61 has a double-shell structure that has expanded into IRDC G34.43+0.24. The outer shell is traced by 8 μm and {sup 13}CO J = 1–0 emission, while the inner shell is traced by 24 μm and 20 cm emission. We suggest that the outer shell (9.9 × 10{sup 5} years) is created by the expansion of H ii region G34.172+0.175, while the inner shell (4.1 ∼ 6.3 × 10{sup 5} years) may be produced by the energetic stellar wind of its central massive star. From the GLIMPSE I catalog, we selected some Class I sources with an age of ∼10{sup 5} years. These Class I sources are clustered along the filamentary molecular cloud.

  6. Effects of repeated hair washing and a single hair dyeing on concentrations of methamphetamine and amphetamine in human hairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeck, SeungKyung; Han, EunYoung; Chung, HeeSun; Pyo, MyoungYun

    2011-03-20

    The effects of repeated hair washing and a single hair dyeing on concentrations of methamphetamine (MA) and amphetamine (AM) in hair samples of MA addicts were studied. Thirty-one MA positive hair samples collected from male (n = 24, 24-51 yrs) and female abusers (n = 7, 17-46 yrs) were evaluated for MA and AM concentration's changes after repeated hair washing and a single hair dyeing. Thirty-one MA positive hair samples, no additional treatment hair sample group (NAT), were treated in vitro with liquid soap or three kinds of hair dyes which were black, brown and yellow color hair dye, respectively. Quantitation of AM and MA in hair samples was utilized GC-MS using selected ion monitoring. MA and AM concentrations in NAT were 10.41 ± 8.91 ng/mg (range 1.50-30.0 ng/mg) and 2.24 ± 2.75 ng/mg (range 0.41-12.90 ng/mg). And, their concentrations were decreased about 23.3 ± 4.5% (range 16.7-32.8%) in hair repeated washing group (WAS) and 32.6 ± 4.82 (22.2-41.9) in three kinds of a single hair dyeing groups in comparison to original concentrations of MA and AM in NAT. A statistically significant difference was found between NAT and WAS or three hair dyeing groups (p 0.05). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Laser hair removal: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Stephanie D; Graber, Emmy M

    2013-06-01

    Unwanted hair growth is a common aesthetic problem. Laser hair removal has emerged as a leading treatment option for long-term depilation. To extensively review the literature on laser hair removal pertaining to its theoretical basis, current laser and light-based devices, and their complications. Special treatment recommendations for darker skin types were considered. A comprehensive literature search related to the long-pulse alexandrite (755 nm), long-pulse diode (810 nm), long-pulse neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG; 1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) system, as well as newer home-use devices, was conducted. The literature supports the use of the alexandrite, diode, Nd:YAG and IPL devices for long-term hair removal. Because of its longer wavelength, the Nd:YAG is the best laser system to use for pigmented skin. Further research is needed regarding the safety and efficacy of home-use devices. Current in-office laser hair removal devices effectively provide a durable solution for unwanted hair removal. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. An Unusual Case of White Piedra Due to Trichosporon inkin Mimicking Trichobacteriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Kaiwen; Ran, Xin; Dai, Yaling; Tang, Jiaoqing; Yang, Qin; Pradhan, Sushmita; Ran, Yuping

    2016-12-01

    White piedra is a superficial mycosis characterized by soft, white-to-tan, irregular nodules attached to the hair shafts. A 36-year-old man presented with small lumps in his pubic hair, without any other symptoms. The clinical features were suggestive of trichobacteriosis. Pathology analysis of the infected hair revealed that the concretions surrounding the hair shaft were full of fungal elements, parts of which had invaded into the cuticle. Culture on Sabouraud dextrose agar grew creamy, yellow-white colonies identified as Trichosporon inkin by the sequence of the nuclear ribosomal intergenic spacer region. The condition was treated by shaving the pubic hair and administering antifungal therapy (oral itraconazole and topical ketoconazole).

  9. Effect of nitrogen addition to ozone generation characteristics by diffuse and filamentary dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Naoki; Tsuji, Takafumi; Ogiso, Ryota; Yoshioka, Yoshio

    2017-05-01

    Ozone is widely used for gas treatment, advanced oxidation processes, microorganisms inactivation, etc. In this research, we investigated the effect of nitrogen addition to ozone generation characteristics by atmospheric pressure Townsend discharge (APTD) type and filamentary dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) type ozone generators. The result showed that the ozone generated by the filamentary DBD increases rapidly with the increase of O2 content, and is higher than that by the APTD. On the other hand, it is interesting that the ozone generated by the APTD gradually decreases with the increase of O2 content. In order to clarify why the characteristics of ozone generation by the two kinds of discharge modes showed different dependency to the N2 content, we analyzed the exhaust gas composition using FTIR spectroscopy and calculated the rate coefficients using BOLSIG+ code. As a result, we found that although O2 content decreased with increasing N2 content, additional O atoms produced by excited N2 molecules contribute to ozone generation in case of APTD. Contribution to the topical issue "The 15th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi and Tomáš Hoder

  10. Clinical effect of 1g/L fluorometholone drops combined with soft corneal contact lens for filamentary keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bin Shen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the clinical effect of 1g/L fluorometholone drops combined with soft corneal contact lens in the treatment of patients with filamentary keratitis. METHODS: A total of 30 patients(45 eyeswere included in this study and were randomly divided into two groups: 16 patients(23 eyeswere in treatment group and 14 patients(22 eyesin control group. In the treatment group, after removed filaments, the patients wore soft corneal contact lens and received corticosteroid eye drops(1g/L fluorometholone dropsand artificial tears(sodium hyaluronate. In the control group, patients received only artificial tears(sodium hyaluronateafter removed filaments. Clinical effects of the two groups were record. The patients were followed up for 3mo.RESULTS: The total clinical effective rate of the patients in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group(22 eyes vs 17 eyes, 96% vs 77%. The difference between two groups had statistical significance(U=1.992, P=0.046. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that 1g/L fluorometholone drops combined with soft corneal contact lens is effective to patients with filamentary keratitis.

  11. Thinning Hair and Hair Loss: Could it be Female Pattern Hair Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they can continue to produce new hair growth. Platelet-rich plasma therapy: This therapy uses your own blood. After ... FPHL is still in the experimental stages. Like platelet-rich plasma therapy, more studies are needed to know whether ...

  12. Premature hair whitening is an independent predictor of carotid intima-media thickness in young and middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Turan; Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Çetin, Mustafa; Durakoğlugil, Murtaza Emre; Uğurlu, Yavuz; Şahin, İsmail; Çanga, Aytun

    2013-01-01

    Premature graying or whitening of the hair may possibly represent premature atherosclerotic changes as a surrogate marker of different host responses to cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs). This study was undertaken to test whether carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT) as a validated surrogate marker of the severity and extent of coronary artery disease (CAD) is higher in subjects with prominent signs of hair whitening, independent of chronological age and other CVRFs. The current study was conducted in young and middle-aged patients (gray/white-hair scale was used to determine the percentage of hair whitening. In the groups determined according to the degree of hair whitening, age (phair whitening, CIMT was found to be related to age, waist circumference, the levels of uric acid, bilirubin and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, the presence of a family history of CAD and hair whitening, while hair whitening was found to be related to age, hypertension, the bilirubin level and CIMT. Our findings suggest that premature hair whitening intensity is independently related to CIMT. In cumulative assessments of CVRFs on the human body, the presence of premature hair whitening may be useful in identifying individuals with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

  13. Effect of intense pulsed light treatment on human skin in vitro: analysis of immediate effects on dermal papillae and hair follicle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larouche, D; Kim, D H; Ratté, G; Beaumont, C; Germain, L

    2013-10-01

    Hair follicles house a permanent pool of epithelial stem cells. Intense pulsed light (IPL) sources have been successfully used for hair removal, but long-term hair reduction may require several treatments. Many questions remain regarding the impact of IPL treatment on the structure of the hair follicle, more specifically on hair follicular stem cells and dermal papilla cells, a group of specialized cells that orchestrate hair growth. To characterize the destruction of human hair follicles and surrounding tissues following IPL treatment, with more attention paid to the bulge and the bulb regions. Human scalp specimens of Fitzpatrick skin phototype II were exposed ex vivo to IPL pulses and were then processed for histological analysis, immunodetection of stem cell-associated keratin 19, and revelation of the endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity expressed in dermal papilla cells. Histological analysis confirmed that pigmented structures, such as the melanin-rich matrix cells of the bulb in anagen follicles and the hair shaft, are principally targeted by IPL treatment, while white hairs and epidermis remained unaffected. Damage caused by heat sometimes extended over the dermal papilla cells, while stem cells were mostly spared. IPL epilation principally targets pigmented structures. Our results suggest that, under the tested conditions, collateral damage does not deplete stem cells. Damage at the dermal papilla was observed only with high-energy treatment modalities. Extrapolated to frequently treated hairs, these observations explain why some hairs grow back after a single IPL treatment. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  14. 6-Gingerol inhibits hair shaft growth in cultured human hair follicles and modulates hair growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yong; Sun, Yabin; Wang, Wenjun; Du, Benjun; Xiao, Shun-e; Hu, Yijue; Hu, Zhiqi

    2013-01-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) has been traditionally used to check hair loss and stimulate hair growth in East Asia. Several companies produce shampoo containing an extract of ginger claimed to have anti-hair loss and hair growth promotion properties. However, there is no scientific evidence to back up these claims. This study was undertaken to measure 6-gingerol, the main active component of ginger, on hair shaft elongation in vitro and hair growth in vivo, and to investigate its effect on human dermal papilla cells (DPCs) in vivo and in vitro. 6-Gingerol suppressed hair growth in hair follicles in culture and the proliferation of cultured DPCs. The growth inhibition of DPCs by 6-gingerol in vitro may reflect a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Similar results were obtained in vivo. The results of this study showed that 6-gingerol does not have the ability to promote hair growth, on the contrary, can suppress human hair growth via its inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects on DPCs in vitro, and can cause prolongation of telogen phase in vivo. Thus, 6-gingerol rather than being a hair growth stimulating drug, it is a potential hair growth suppressive drug; i.e. for hair removal.

  15. 6-Gingerol inhibits hair shaft growth in cultured human hair follicles and modulates hair growth in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Miao

    Full Text Available Ginger (Zingiber officinale has been traditionally used to check hair loss and stimulate hair growth in East Asia. Several companies produce shampoo containing an extract of ginger claimed to have anti-hair loss and hair growth promotion properties. However, there is no scientific evidence to back up these claims. This study was undertaken to measure 6-gingerol, the main active component of ginger, on hair shaft elongation in vitro and hair growth in vivo, and to investigate its effect on human dermal papilla cells (DPCs in vivo and in vitro. 6-Gingerol suppressed hair growth in hair follicles in culture and the proliferation of cultured DPCs. The growth inhibition of DPCs by 6-gingerol in vitro may reflect a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Similar results were obtained in vivo. The results of this study showed that 6-gingerol does not have the ability to promote hair growth, on the contrary, can suppress human hair growth via its inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects on DPCs in vitro, and can cause prolongation of telogen phase in vivo. Thus, 6-gingerol rather than being a hair growth stimulating drug, it is a potential hair growth suppressive drug; i.e. for hair removal.

  16. Hair restoration surgery: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose PT

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Paul T RoseHair Transplant Institute of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA Abstract: Hair loss is a common problem affecting both men and women. The most frequent etiology is androgenetic alopecia, but other causes of hair loss such as trauma, various dermatologic diseases, and systemic diseases can cause alopecia. The loss of hair can have profound effects on one’s self esteem and emotional well-being, as one’s appearance plays a role in the work place and interpersonal relationships. It is therefore not surprising that means to remedy hair loss are widely sought. Hair transplant surgery has become increasingly popular, and the results that we are able to create today are quite remarkable, providing a natural appearance when the procedure is performed well. In spite of this, hair transplant surgery is not perfect. It is not perfect because the hair transplant surgeon is still faced with challenges that prevent the achievement of optimal results. Some of these challenges include a limit to donor hair availability, hair survival, and ways to conceal any evidence of a surgical procedure having taken place. This article examines some of the most important challenges facing hair restoration surgery today and possible solutions to these challenges. Keywords: hair loss, alopecia, hair transplant, surgical procedure

  17. Soft Hair on Black Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, Stephen W; Perry, Malcolm J; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-06-10

    It has recently been shown that Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs supertranslation symmetries imply an infinite number of conservation laws for all gravitational theories in asymptotically Minkowskian spacetimes. These laws require black holes to carry a large amount of soft (i.e., zero-energy) supertranslation hair. The presence of a Maxwell field similarly implies soft electric hair. This Letter gives an explicit description of soft hair in terms of soft gravitons or photons on the black hole horizon, and shows that complete information about their quantum state is stored on a holographic plate at the future boundary of the horizon. Charge conservation is used to give an infinite number of exact relations between the evaporation products of black holes which have different soft hair but are otherwise identical. It is further argued that soft hair which is spatially localized to much less than a Planck length cannot be excited in a physically realizable process, giving an effective number of soft degrees of freedom proportional to the horizon area in Planck units.

  18. White lies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erat, S.; Gneezy, U.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we distinguish between two types of white lies: those that help others at the expense of the person telling the lie, which we term altruistic white lies, and those that help both others and the liar, which we term Pareto white lies. We find that a large fraction of participants are

  19. Planck intermediate results XXXVIII. E- and B-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    The quest for a B-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. We present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the 353 GHz Planck Stokes maps at h...

  20. Frequency response for electromotility of isolated outer hair cells of the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, HP; vanDijk, P; Segenhout, HM

    1996-01-01

    Frequency and impulse responses were determined for isolated guinea pig outer hair cells by electrically stimulating the cells between two wire electrodes with white noise. Cells were attached to the bottom of a small culture dish at one end while the other end was freely moving. Results have the

  1. Patchy alopecia areata sparing gray hairs: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wei-Xue; Mao, Qiu-Xia; Xiao, Xue-Min; Li, Zhi-Liang; Yu, Rui-Xing; Li, Cheng-Rang

    2014-05-01

    Alopecia areata is an unpredictable, non-scarring hair loss condition. Patchy alopecia areata sparing gray hairs is rare. Here we present 4 cases with patchy non-scarring hair loss, which attacked pigmented hairs only and spared gray hairs. It should be differentiated from vitiligo, colocalization of vitiligo and alopecia areata, and depigmented hair regrowth after alopecia areata.

  2. Patchy alopecia areata sparing gray hairs: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Wei-Xue; Mao, Qiu-Xia; Xiao, Xue-Min; Li, Zhi-Liang; Yu, Rui-Xing; Li, Cheng-Rang

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia areata is an unpredictable, non-scarring hair loss condition. Patchy alopecia areata sparing gray hairs is rare. Here we present 4 cases with patchy non-scarring hair loss, which attacked pigmented hairs only and spared gray hairs. It should be differentiated from vitiligo, colocalization of vitiligo and alopecia areata, and depigmented hair regrowth after alopecia areata.

  3. Trichoscopic Hair Evaluation in Patients with Ectodermal Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowska, Adriana; Górska, Renata; Rudnicka, Lidia; Zadurska, Małgorzata

    2015-07-01

    Hair abnormalities in ectodermal dysplasia may be difficult to identify. Among 16 patients with ectodermal dysplasia trichoscopy (hair dermoscopy) revealed predominance of pilosebaceous units with 1 hair (69%), abnormalities of hair shaft pigmentation (gray hair with single dark hairs, 56%), pili torti, trichothiodystrophy, trichorrhexis nodosa, and rarely, cicatricial alopecia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pollution Damage and Protection of Asian Hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Qu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke was used to simulate a polluted environment and an experiment was performed to reveal how virgin and bleached hair are damaged by a polluted environment. The dry/wet combability, surface contact angle, tryptophan content, and cuticle morphology of the smoke exposed hair were evaluated, and compared to unexposed virgin hair. The results showed that pollution exposure can cause significant chemical damage to hair. In particular, virgin hair exposure to pollution can cause damage to the hair cuticles (higher wet/dry combing, protein degradation, and a more hydrophilic hair surface. The experiment also demonstrated that the styling polymer, polyimide-1 (isobutylene/dimethyl amino propyl maleimide/ethoxylated maleimide/maleic acid copolymer, can provide effective protection against such hair damage.

  5. Mechanical characterization of curly hair: Influence of the use of nonconventional hair straightening treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, M G A; Maia Campos, P M B G

    2017-11-01

    Hair straighteners are very popular around the world, although they can cause great damage to the hair. Thus, the characterization of the mechanical properties of curly hair using advanced techniques is very important to clarify how hair straighteners act on hair fibers and to contribute to the development of effective products. On this basis, we chose two nonconventional hair straighteners (formaldehyde and glyoxylic acid) to investigate how hair straightening treatments affect the mechanical properties of curly hair. The mechanical properties of curly hair were evaluated using a tensile test, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), a torsion modulus, dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The techniques used effectively helped the understanding of the influence of nonconventional hair straighteners on hair properties. For the break stress and the break extension tests, formaldehyde showed a marked decrease in these parameters, with great hair damage. Glyoxylic acid had a slight effect compared to formaldehyde treatment. Both treatments showed an increase in shear modulus, a decrease in water sorption and damage to the hair surface. A combination of the techniques used in this study permitted a better understanding of nonconventional hair straightener treatments and also supported the choice of the better treatment, considering a good relationship between efficacy and safety. Thus, it is very important to determine the properties of hair for the development of cosmetics used to improve the beauty of curly hair. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Hair transplantation in alopecia androgenetica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gurinderjit

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred patients suffering from male pattern baldness were given 3 to 4 sittings of hair transplantation at an interval of about 4 to 6 weeks each. They included 46 patients of type III baldness, 23 patients of type III (vertex baldness, and 31 patients of type IV baldness. It needed 3 sittings in type III as well as type III (vertex patients, whereas type IV patients needed 4 sittings for cosmetically acceptable results. Sixty percent patients of type III (including type III vertex showed excellent results; whereas 24 percent patients showed good response. Thirty-four percent patients of type IV got excellent cosmetic appearance; whereas, good results could be obtained in 17 percent patients. The reasons for poor results in certain patients were poor density of hair at donor sites and poor growth of hair in some of the transplanted plugs.

  7. Management of hair loss diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Ohyama

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of hair loss diseases is sometimes difficult because of insufficient efficacy and limited options. However, recent advances in understanding of the pathophysiology and development of new remedies have improved the treatment of refractory hair loss conditions. In this article, an update on the management of hair loss diseases is provided, especially focusing on recently reported therapeutic approaches for alopecia areata (AA. An accurate diagnosis is indispensable to optimize treatment. Dry dermoscopy represents new diagnostic techniques, which could enable the differentiation of barely indistinguishable alopecias, e.g. AA and trichotillomania. An organized scalp biopsy adopting both vertical and transverse sectioning approaches also provides a deep insight into the pathophysiology of ongoing alopecias. Among various treatments for AA, intraregional corticosteroid and contact immunotherapy have been recognized as first-line therapies. However, some AA cases are refractory to both treatments. Recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of pulse corticosteroid therapy or the combination of oral psoralen ultraviolet A therapy and systemic corticosteroids for severe AA. Previous clinical observations have suggested the potential role of antihistamines as supportive medications for AA. Experimental evaluation using AA model mice further supports their effectiveness in AA treatment. Finasteride opens up new possibilities for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. For androgenetic alopecia patients refractory to finasteride, the combination of finasteride with topical minoxidil or the administration of dutasteride, another 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, may provide better outcomes. Scarring alopecia is the most difficult form of hair loss disorder to treat. The bulge stem cell area is destroyed by unnecessary immune reactions with resultant permanent loss of hair follicle structures in scarring alopecia. Currently, treatment options for

  8. The hair of the Prophet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    This paper explore the politics of (in)visibility in Islam by discussing the affective presence and agency of relics - in this case a single hair of the Prophet Muhammad. The relic is obviously not the Prophet, but it is also not-not the Prophet, as the hair is filled with the baraka (blessings......) of the Prophet and thereby seems to confirm Sir James Frazer’s thesis of ‘sympathetic magic’ where part and wholes are forever connected. Based on a study of the Naqshbandi Mujaddidi Saifi tariqa, this paper set out to ‘follow the hair’ in different settings in Denmark, Norway and Pakistan in order to discuss...

  9. Automatic hair detection in the wild

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julian, Pauline; Dehais, Christophe; Lauze, Francois Bernard

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for segmenting the hair region in uncontrolled, real life conditions images. Our method is based on a simple statistical hair shape model representing the upper hair part. We detect this region by minimizing an energy which uses active shape and active contour. Th...

  10. To grow or not to grow: Hair morphogenesis and human genetic hair disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Duverger, Olivier; Morasso, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse models have greatly helped in elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in hair formation and regeneration. Recent publications have reviewed the genes involved in mouse hair development based on the phenotype of transgenic, knockout and mutant animal models. While much of this information has been instrumental in determining molecular aspects of human hair development and cycling, mice exhibit a specific pattern of hair morphogenesis and hair distribution throughout the body that c...

  11. Clofazimine-induced Hair Pigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Mariam; Samson, Joan Felicita; Simi, Puthenveedu Salahudeen

    2012-01-01

    A 45-year-old man was treated with WHO multibacillary multidrug therapy for borderline leprosy and high dose daily Clofazimine for lepra reaction. Along with the expected side effect of skin pigmentation, the patient also noticed darkening of previously grey hair. This colour persisted eight months after completing multibacillary multidrug therapy. PMID:23180930

  12. Nanotechnology-Based Cosmetics for Hair Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Rosen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hair is a significant indicator of health and can have a major impact on an individual’s cosmetic appearance. Research within the cosmetics industry has revealed that when nanomaterials are engineered into hair care, they can enhance the benefits of active ingredients in order to improve hair cosmesis. Within the cosmetics arena, the unique size and intrinsic properties of nanoparticles can be tailored to target the hair follicle and shaft. This review aims to provide an overview of cosmetic nanocarriers that can be employed to improve the appearance of hair.

  13. Hair loss related to primary psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Çığıl Fettahoğlu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Scalp hair has greater social and psychological importance than its' biological significance. In the hair disorder consultation services there are lots of patients who are often considered as "difficult" or "problematic", because of their biopsychosocial problems. When it’s considered that the hair loss patients refer to the dermatology clinics in the first step, we can understand the importance of the awareness of the clinicians about the causal and/or consequential relationship between hair diseases and the psychological problems. In this paper, hair loss diseases that are related to primary psychiatric disorders are reviewed.

  14. Human fine body hair enhances ectoparasite detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Isabelle; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2012-06-23

    Although we are relatively naked in comparison with other primates, the human body is covered in a layer of fine hair (vellus and terminal hair) at a relatively high follicular density. There are relatively few explanations for the evolutionary maintenance of this type of human hair. Here, we experimentally test the hypothesis that human fine body hair plays a defensive function against ectoparasites (bed bugs). Our results show that fine body hair enhances the detection of ectoparasites through the combined effects of (i) increasing the parasite's search time and (ii) enhancing its detection.

  15. Hair loss in women: medical and cosmetic approaches to increase scalp hair fullness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, R; Patel, M; Dawson, T L; Yazdabadi, A; Yip, L; Perez, A; Rufaut, N W

    2011-12-01

    Androgenetic alopecia affects both men and women. In men it produces male pattern hair loss with bitemporal recession and vertex baldness. In women it produces female pattern hair loss (FPHL) with diffuse alopecia over the mid-frontal scalp. FPHL occurs as a result of nonuniform hair follicle miniaturization within follicular units. Diffuse alopecia is produced by a reduction in the number of terminal fibres per follicular unit. Baldness occurs only when all hairs within the follicular units are miniaturized and is a relatively late event in women. The concepts of follicular units and primary and secondary hair follicles within follicular units are well established in comparative mammalian studies, particularly in sheep. However, discovery of these structures in the human scalp hair and investigation of the changes in follicular unit anatomy during the development of androgenetic alopecia have provided a clearer understanding of the early stages of androgenetic alopecia and how the male and female patterns of hair loss are related. FPHL is the most common cause of alopecia in women and approximately one-third of adult caucasian women experience hair loss. The impact of FPHL is predominantly psychological. While men anticipate age-related hair loss, hair loss in women is usually unexpected and unwelcome at any age. Treatment options to arrest hair loss progression and stimulate partial hair regrowth for FPHL include the androgen receptor antagonists spironolactone and cyproterone acetate, the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride and the androgen-independent hair growth stimulator minoxidil. These treatments appear to work best when initiated early. Hair transplantation should be considered in advanced FPHL that is resistant to medical treatments. Hair transplantation requires well-preserved hair growth over the occipital donor area. The psychological impact of FPHL may also be reduced by cosmetic products that improve the appearance of the hair. These agents work to

  16. PA01.05. Formulation & Evaluation of herbomineral natural hair colorant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjari, Anita S.; Bhutada, S.; Jadhao, Sanjivani; Desa, Priti

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Irrespective of age, Graying of hairs (pallitya) has become a crucial problem in the present era. The varied reasons like genetic factor, environmental factor, life style, faulty food habits etc. are causative factors. To overcome the problem of Pallitya many synthetic dyes are used by the community. But these dyes are having chief disadvantage of producing hypersensitivity in some individuals. The efficacy of different formulations was assessed, on the white hairs procured from Barber's Shop. After that sensitivity was tested on human being. Purpose to formulate the herbomineral natural hair Colorant, to find out the efficacy of the different groups as a natural hair colorant, to Asses the sensitivity. Method: In the present study the combination of herbomineral colorant was formulated. For that Madayantika / Heena & Mandur bhasma were common drugs in the formulation & addition of kashtaushadhi from Keshranjana Gana i.e. Aamrashthi Phala Majja, Bibhitak Phala Twak, Bhrungaraj & Neelika in different proportions was done. Group 1 Heena + Mandur bhasma + Aamrasthi Phala Majjja Group 2 Heena + Mandur bhasma + Bibhitak phala Twaka Group 3 Heena + Mandur bhasma + Bhrungaraj Group 4 Heena + Mandur bhasma + Neelika The efficacy of different formulations was assessed, on the white hairs procured from Barber's Shop. After that sensitivity was tested on human being by applying the guase piece applied with the above formulations at under arm region. Result: Out of 4 groups, combination of Madayntika, Mandura bhasma & Neelika is found suitable hair colorant & non-sensitive to human being. Conclusion: Out of 4 groups, combination of Madayntika, Mandura bhasma & Neelika is found suitable hair colorant & non-sensitive to human being.

  17. Alterations in Hair Follicle Dynamics in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudine Piérard-Franchimont

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine changes supervening after parturition and menopause participate in the control of sebum production and hair growth modulation. The ensuing conditions include some peculiar aspects of hair loss (effluvium, alopecia, and facial hirsutism. The hair cycling is of major clinical relevance because most hair growth disorders result from disturbances in this chronobiological feature. Of note, any correlation between a biologic abnormality and hair cycling disturbance does not prove a relationship of causality. The proportion of postmenopausal women is rising in the overall population. Therefore, the prevalence of these hair follicle disturbances is globally on the rise. Current therapies aim at correcting the underlying hormonal imbalances, and at improving the overall cosmetic appearance. However, in absence of pathogenic diagnosis and causality criteria, chances are low that a treatment given by the whims of fate will adequately control hair effluvium. The risk and frequency of therapeutic inertia are further increased. When the hair loss is not controlled and/or compensated by growth of new hairs, several clinical aspects of alopecia inexorably develop. Currently, there is little evidence supporting any specific treatment for these endocrine hair disorders in post-partum and postmenopausal women. Current hair treatment strategies are symptomatic and nonspecific so current researchers aim at developing new, targeted methods.

  18. Managing hair loss in midlife women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmirani, Paradi

    2013-02-01

    Hair is considered one of the most defining aspects of human appearance. Hair loss, or alopecia in women is often met with significant emotional distress and anxiety. In midlife, women may encounter various hormonal and age-related physiologic changes that can lead to alterations in hair texture and growth. The most significant hormonal alteration is the onset of menopause in which there is a cessation of ovarian estrogen production. This decrease in estrogen is known to have deleterious effects on the skin and cutaneous appendages. As our understanding of the molecular and hormonal controls on the hair follicle has grown, there has been increased interest in the various modulators of hair growth, including the potential role of estrogen. Further study of hair changes in midlife women provides an important opportunity for identification of the complex regulation of hair growth as well as identification of treatment targets that may specifically benefit women. In this review, management of hair loss in midlife women is discussed with a focus on three most commonly encountered clinical conditions: female pattern hair loss, hair shaft alterations due to hair care, and telogen effluvium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Female pattern hair loss: Current treatment concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Q Dinh

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Quan Q Dinh, Rodney SinclairDepartment of Dermatology, St Vincent’s Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Fewer than 45% of women go through life with a full head of hair. Female pattern hair loss is the commonest cause of hair loss in women and prevalence increases with advancing age. Affected women may experience psychological distress and impaired social functioning. In most cases the diagnosis can be made clinically and the condition treated medically. While many women using oral antiandrogens and topical minoxidil will regrow some hair, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment is desirable as these treatments are more effective at arresting progression of hair loss than stimulating regrowth. Adjunctive nonpharmacological treatment modalities such as counseling, cosmetic camouflage and hair transplantation are important measures for some patients. The histology of female pattern hair loss is identical to that of male androgenetic alopecia. While the clinical pattern of the hair loss differs between men, the response to oral antiandrogens suggests that female pattern hair loss is an androgen dependant condition, at least in the majority of cases. Female pattern hair loss is a chronic progressive condition. All treatments need to be continued to maintain the effect. An initial therapeutic response often takes 12 or even 24 months. Given this delay, monitoring for treatment effect through clinical photography or standardized clinical severity scales is helpful.Keywords: female pattern hair loss, androgenetic alopecia

  20. Classifications of Patterned Hair Loss: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mysore, Venkataram

    2016-01-01

    Patterned hair loss is the most common cause of hair loss seen in both the sexes after puberty. Numerous classification systems have been proposed by various researchers for grading purposes. These systems vary from the simpler systems based on recession of the hairline to the more advanced multifactorial systems based on the morphological and dynamic parameters that affect the scalp and the hair itself. Most of these preexisting systems have certain limitations. Currently, the Hamilton-Norwood classification system for males and the Ludwig system for females are most commonly used to describe patterns of hair loss. In this article, we review the various classification systems for patterned hair loss in both the sexes. Relevant articles were identified through searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE. Search terms included but were not limited to androgenic alopecia classification, patterned hair loss classification, male pattern baldness classification, and female pattern hair loss classification. Further publications were identified from the reference lists of the reviewed articles.

  1. Determination and Commitment of Mechanosensory Hair Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Kelley

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound and movement are perceived through the vibration of modified ciliary bundles located on the apical surfaces of specialized mechanosensory hair cells. These hair cells derive from specific regions of the otocyst that become determined to develop initially as sensory epithelia and ultimately as either hair cells or supporting cells. The number of hair cells in an individual vertebrate is surprisingly small and the ability to replace these cells varies among different classes. The molecular and cellular factors that specify hair cell identity are not known, but the results of recent experiments have begun to identify some of the signaling pathways that play important roles in hair cell development. This review will describe recent findings related to the factors that influence the final choice of a progenitor cell to develop as a hair cell and discuss their implications for the overall development of the auditory and vestibular systems.

  2. Biophysics of Human Hair Structural, Nanomechanical, and Nanotribological Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2010-01-01

    This book presents the biophysics of hair. It deals with the structure of hair, its mechanical properties, the nanomechanical characterization, tensile deformation, tribological characterization, the thickness distribution and binding interactions on hair surface. Another important topic of the book is the health of hair, human hair and skin, hair care, cleaning and conditioning treatments and damaging processes. It is the first book on the biophysical properties of hair.

  3. Physiological Maturation of Regenerating Hair Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    The bullfrog saccule, a sensor of gravity and substrate-borne vibration, is a model system for hair cell transduction. Saccular hair cells also increase in number throughout adult life and rapidly recover after hair cell damage, making this organ an ideal system for studying hair cell development, repair, and regeneration. We have used of hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers to identify damaged hair cells and hair cell precursors in organotypic cultures of the bullfrog saccule. We then used an innovative combination of confocal, electron, and time-lapse microscopy to study the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of new hair cells after gentamicin ototoxicity in normal and mitotically blocked saccular cultures. These studies have shown that gentamicin ototoxicity produces both lethal and sublethal hair cell damage. They have also shown that hair cell recovery in this organ takes place by both the repair of sublethally damaged hair cells and by the replacement of lost hair cells by mitotic regeneration. In parallel studies, we have used biophysical and molecular biological techniques to study the differentiation and innervation of developing, repairing, and regenerating hair cells. More specifically, we have used RT-PCR to obtain the bullfrog homologues of L-type voltage- gated calcium (L-VGCC) and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channel genes. We have then obtained probes for these genes and, using in situ hybridization, begun to examine their expression in the bullfrog saccule and amphibian papilla. We have also used fluorescent-labeled channel toxins and channel toxin derivatives to determine the time of appearance of L-type voltage-gated calcium (L-VGCC) and Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels and to study dynamic changes in the number, distribution, and co-localization of these proteins in developing, repairing, and regenerating hair cells. Using time-lapse microscopy, we are also studying the dynamic relationship

  4. Nonlinear flow response of soft hair beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, José; Comtet, Jean; de Langre, Emmanuel; Hosoi, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    We are `hairy' on the inside: beds of passive fibres anchored to a surface and immersed in fluids are prevalent in many biological systems, including intestines, tongues, and blood vessels. These hairs are soft enough to deform in response to stresses from fluid flows. Yet fluid stresses are in turn affected by hair deformation, leading to a coupled elastoviscous problem that is poorly understood. Here we investigate a biomimetic model system of elastomer hair beds subject to shear-driven Stokes flows. We characterize this system with a theoretical model that accounts for the large-deformation flow response of hair beds. Hair bending results in a drag-reducing nonlinearity because the hair tip lowers towards the base, widening the gap through which fluid flows. When hairs are cantilevered at an angle subnormal to the surface, flow against the grain bends hairs away from the base, narrowing the gap. The flow response of angled hair beds is axially asymmetric and amounts to a rectification nonlinearity. We identify an elastoviscous parameter that controls nonlinear behaviour. Our study raises the hypothesis that biological hairy surfaces function to reduce fluid drag. Furthermore, angled hairs may be incorporated in the design of integrated microfluidic components, such as diodes and pumps.

  5. Hair removal with intense pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bedewi, Ahmed F

    2004-01-01

    The use of light and laser for hair removal has evolved during the past few years. Laser systems such as the ruby laser (694 nm), alexandrite laser (755 nm), diode laser (810 nm) and neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1,064 nm) are commonly used in hair removal. However, permanent hair removal has been difficult to achieve using lasers owing to the long growth/rest cycle of normal human hair follicles. There is still an increasing demand for safer and more efficient hair removal techniques. The latest and most effective choice in the treatment of hair removal is non-coherent intense pulsed light (IPL), which is both efficient and safe for hair removal. A group of 210 patients with skin type III-V were treated for superfluous hair in different areas of the body (face, extremities, axillae, bikini line and back) for three to five sessions at 6-week intervals using IPL. There was a significant hair reduction of about 80% with no side effects and minimal complications. Follow-up was done 6 months after the last session. In conclusion, IPL is very effective and safe for hair removal.

  6. Biologic rhythms derived from Siberian mammoths' hairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilde, Mike; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Qualls, Clifford; Phillips, Genevieve; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi; Agenbroad, Larry; Appenzeller, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  7. Biologic rhythms derived from Siberian mammoths' hairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Spilde

    Full Text Available Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios, which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  8. Metals in female scalp hair globally and its impact on perceived hair health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Simon; Staite, William; Bowtell, Philip; Marsh, Jennifer

    2013-06-01

    Globally, billions of individuals wash their hair in water, which acts as an exogenous metal source. Many studies which measure the metal levels found on human hair specifically aim to remove exogenous materials prior to analysis. Although this is needed when using hair analysis to probe the impact of the local environment on endogenous metal levels, it is not relevant for understanding exactly what is on hair as a result of contact with its daily environment. Understanding these levels are important, as the presence of redox active metals, such as copper and iron, can impact fibre health, either as a result of UV irradiation, or during the hair colouring process. A global hair sampling study of over 300 individuals from nine countries has been performed, and the combined endogenous and exogenous metals analysed. The levels measured vary widely, even within the narrow geography of each hair sampling location. The levels of calcium, magnesium, copper and iron were not correlated, and within each location, there are expected to be individuals with high metal levels. Levels increased from hair root to tip for calcium, magnesium and copper, attributed to hair contact with the environment showing the impact of exogenous metals in the overall levels on hair. Levels of redox metals were comparable between individuals who coloured or did not colour their hair, although water hardness ions were statistically significantly higher for hair colouring individuals. Individuals who perceived their hair health as poor had higher metal levels on their hair. Controlling metals on hair, either by preventing their binding during environmental contact, or through controlling their ability to cause hair damage, should lead to improved consumer perceived hair health. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  9. Clinical, dermoscopic, and histopathologic features of body hair disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchaprateep, Ratchathorn; Tanus, Aline; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-05-01

    Dermoscopic examination of hair and scalp, also named "trichoscopy," is an essential tool in diagnosis of hair and scalp diseases. Trichoscopy is fast and noninvasive and can be used to evaluate hair disorders in all body areas. Body hair disorders are uncommon, and most publications on their dermoscopic features are limited to case reports or series. In this review we present the available information on the dermoscopic diagnosis of body hair disorders including keratosis pilaris, trichostasis spinulosa, pili multigemini, circle hairs, rolled hairs, eruptive vellus hair cyst, and ingrown hairs. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. New Treatments for Hair Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vañó-Galván, S; Camacho, F

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of hair loss is an important part of clinical dermatology given the prevalence of the problem and great impact on patients' quality of life. Many new treatments have been introduced in recent years. This review summarizes the main ones in 4 groups: a) For androgenetic alopecia, we discuss new excipients for oral minoxidil, dutasteride, and finasteride as well as new forms of topical application; prostaglandin agonists and antagonists; low-level laser therapy; and regenerative medicine with Wnt signaling activators and stem cell therapy. b) For alopecia areata, Janus kinase inhibitors are reviewed. c) For frontal fibrosing alopecia, we discuss the use of antiandrogens and, for some patients, pioglitazone. d) Finally, we mention new robotic devices for hair transplant procedures and techniques for optimal follicular unit extraction. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Hair transplantation: Standard guidelines of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patwardhan Narendra

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Hair transplantation is a surgical method of hair restoration. Physician qualification : The physician performing hair transplantation should have completed post graduation training in dermatology; he should have adequate background training in dermatosurgery at a centre that provides education training in cutaneous surgery. In addition, he should obtain specific hair transplantation training or experience at the surgical table(hands on under the supervision of an appropriately trained and experienced hair transplant surgeon. In addition to the surgical technique, training should include instruction in local anesthesia and emergency resuscitation and care. Facility : Hair transplantation can be performed safely in an outpatient day case dermatosurgical facility. The day case theatre should be equipped with facilities for monitoring and handling emergencies. A plan for handling emergencies should be in place and all nursing staff should be familiar with the emergency plan. It is preferable, but not mandatory to have a standby anesthetist. Indication for hair transplantation is pattern hair loss in males and also in females. In female pattern hair loss, investigations to rule out any underlying cause for hair loss such as anemia and thyroid deficiency should be carried out. Hair transplantation can also be performed in selected cases of scarring alopecia, eyebrows and eye lashes, by experienced surgeons. Preoperative counseling and informed consent :Detailed consent form listing details about the procedure and possible complications should be signed by the patient. The consent form should specifically state the limitations of the procedure and if more procedures are needed for proper results, it should be clearly mentioned. Patient should be provided with adequate opportunity to seek information through brochures, computer presentations, and personal discussions. Need for concomitant medical therapy should be emphasized. Patients should understand

  12. Matting of Hair Due to Halo-egg Shampoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z M Mani

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of hair matting in an 18 year old female is reported. The hair got densely entangled immediately after washing the hair with ′Halo Egg′ shampoo. The hair was disentangled completely after prolonged dipping of the hair in arachis oil frr 5 days.

  13. Diagnosis of Hair Loss: Clinical features of common causes of hair loss

    OpenAIRE

    Coupe, Robert L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Common causes of hair loss include androgenic hair loss, alopecia areata, trichotillomania, tinea capitis, telogen effluvium, and traction alopecia. The author discusses their distinguishing clinical features and those of less common alopecias.

  14. To grow or not to grow: hair morphogenesis and human genetic hair disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duverger, Olivier; Morasso, Maria I

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models have greatly helped in elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in hair formation and regeneration. Recent publications have reviewed the genes involved in mouse hair development based on the phenotype of transgenic, knockout and mutant animal models. While much of this information has been instrumental in determining molecular aspects of human hair development and cycling, mice exhibit a specific pattern of hair morphogenesis and hair distribution throughout the body that cannot be directly correlated to human hair. In this mini-review, we discuss specific aspects of human hair follicle development and present an up-to-date summary of human genetic disorders associated with abnormalities in hair follicle morphogenesis, structure or regeneration. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Ion beam microanalysis of human hair follicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertesz, Zs. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-4001 Debrecen, P.O. Box 51 (Hungary)]. E-mail: zsofi@atomki.hu; Szikszai, Z. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-4001 Debrecen, P.O. Box 51 (Hungary); Pelicon, P. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O. Box 3000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Simcic, J. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P.O. Box 3000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Telek, A. [Department of Physiology and Cell Physiology Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Research Center for Molecular Medicine, H-4012, Debrecen, Nagyerdei krt. 98 (Hungary); Biro, T. [Department of Physiology and Cell Physiology Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Center, Research Center for Molecular Medicine, H-4012, Debrecen, Nagyerdei krt. 98 (Hungary)

    2007-07-15

    Hair follicle is an appendage organ of the skin which is of importance to the survival of mammals and still maintains significance for the human race - not just biologically, but also through cosmetic and commercial considerations. However data on composition of hair follicles are scarce and mostly limited to the hair shaft. In this study we provide detailed information on the elemental distribution in human hair follicles in different growth phases (anagen and catagen) using a scanning proton microprobe. The analysis of skin samples obtained from human adults undergoing plastic surgery and of organ-cultured human hair follicles may yield a new insight into the function, development and cyclic activity of the hair follicle.

  16. LSD in pubic hair in a fatality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulier, Jean-michel; Maublanc, Julie; Lamballais, Florence; Bargel, Sophie; Lachâtre, Gérard

    2012-05-10

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a potent hallucinogen, active at very low dosage and its determination in body fluids in a forensic context may present some difficulties, even more so in hair. A dedicated liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ES-MS/MS) assay in hair was used to document the case of a 24-year-old man found dead after a party. Briefly, after a decontamination step, a 50mg sample of the victim's pubic hair was cut into small pieces (LSD. A LSD concentration of 0.66pg/mg of pubic hair was observed. However, this result remains difficult to interpret owing to the concomitant LSD presence in the victim's post mortem blood and urine, the lack of previously reported LSD concentrations in hair, and the absence of data about LSD incorporation and stability in pubic hair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cryopreservation of Hair-Follicle Associated Pluripotent (HAP) Stem Cells Maintains Differentiation and Hair-Growth Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M; Kajiura, Satoshi; Cao, Wenluo; Liu, Fang; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicles contain nestin-expressing pluripotent stem cells which originate above the bulge area of the follicle, below the sebaceous gland. We have termed these cells hair follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. We have established efficient cryopreservation methods of the hair follicle that maintain the pluripotency of HAP stem cells as well as hair growth. We cryopreserved the whole hair follicle by slow-rate cooling in TC-Protector medium or in DMSO-containing medium and storage in liquid nitrogen or at -80 °C. After thawing and culture of the cryopreserved whisker follicles, growing HAP stem cells formed hair spheres. The hair spheres contained cells that differentiated to neurons, glial cells, and other cell types. The hair spheres derived from slow-cooling cryopreserved hair follicles were as pluripotent as hair spheres from fresh hair follicles. We have also previously demonstrated that cryopreserved mouse whisker hair follicles maintain their hair-growth potential. DMSO better cryopreserved mouse whisker follicles compared to glycerol. DMSO-cryopreserved hair follicles also maintained the HAP stem cells, evidenced by P75ntr expression. Subcutaneous transplantation of DMSO-cryopreserved hair follicles in nude mice resulted in extensive hair fiber growth over 8 weeks, indicating the functional recovery of hair-shaft growth of cryopreserved hair follicles. HAP stem cells can be used for nerve and spinal-cord repair. This biobanking of hair follicles can allow each patient the potential for their own stem cell use for regenerative medicine or hair transplantation.

  18. Depletion of CD200+ Hair Follicle Stem Cells in Human Prematurely Gray Hair Follicles

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanty, Sujata; Kumar, Anil; Dhawan, Jyoti; Sharma, Vinod K; Gupta, Somesh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Melanocyte stem cells (MelSCs) are known to be depleted in gray hair follicles. Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) are important for maintenance of stemness of MelSCs. Methods: We compared the proportion of CD200+ (Cluster of Differentiation 200 positive) stem cells in the outer root sheath cell suspension of gray and pigmented hair follicles of three patients with the premature graying of hair. In addition, explants culture for HFSCs was also carried out from gray and pigmented h...

  19. Ethnic considerations in hair restoration surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jeffrey; Bared, Anthony; Kuka, Gorana

    2014-08-01

    Patients of different ethnicities have specific characteristics that are essential for hair transplant surgeons to understand so that aesthetic results can be achieved. In this article, the approaches of follicular unit extraction and follicular unit grafting or strip hair transplants for pattern hair loss are reviewed, along with the procedures of eyebrow and beard transplants and surgical hairline advancement/forehead reduction surgeries, within various ethnic groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Trichosporosis (white piedra). A case report from Finald.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotovirta, M; Stubb, S; Salonen, A

    1975-01-01

    A 25-year-old Finnish male had had brownish-black nodules along the shafts of his scrotal hair for a period of 1 1/2 years. From the clinical appearance, piedra was suspected. Fungal culture demonstrated Trichosporum cutanum (T. Beigelii) and a diagnosis of white piedra was made. The patient has never been outside the boundaries of Finland.

  1. Hair Loss: Common Causes and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T Grant; Slomiany, W Paul; Allison, Robert

    2017-09-15

    Hair loss is often distressing and can have a significant effect on the patient's quality of life. Patients may present to their family physician first with diffuse or patchy hair loss. Scarring alopecia is best evaluated by a dermatologist. Nonscarring alopecias can be readily diagnosed and treated in the family physician's office. Androgenetic alopecia can be diagnosed clinically and treated with minoxidil. Alopecia areata is diagnosed by typical patches of hair loss and is self-limited. Tinea capitis causes patches of alopecia that may be erythematous and scaly and must be treated systemically. Telogen effluvium is a nonscarring, noninflammatory alopecia of relatively sudden onset caused by physiologic or emotional stress. Once the precipitating cause is removed, the hair typically will regrow. Trichotillomania is an impulse-control disorder; treatment is aimed at controlling the underlying psychiatric condition. Trichorrhexis nodosa occurs when hairs break secondary to trauma and is often a result of hair styling or overuse of hair products. Anagen effluvium is the abnormal diffuse loss of hair during the growth phase caused by an event that impairs the mitotic activity of the hair follicle, most commonly chemotherapy. Physician support is especially important for patients in this situation.

  2. Human hair genealogies and stem cell latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavaré Simon

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stem cells divide to reproduce themselves and produce differentiated progeny. A fundamental problem in human biology has been the inability to measure how often stem cells divide. Although it is impossible to observe every division directly, one method for counting divisions is to count replication errors; the greater the number of divisions, the greater the numbers of errors. Stem cells with more divisions should produce progeny with more replication errors. Methods To test this approach, epigenetic errors (methylation in CpG-rich molecular clocks were measured from human hairs. Hairs exhibit growth and replacement cycles and "new" hairs physically reappear even on "old" heads. Errors may accumulate in long-lived stem cells, or in their differentiated progeny that are eventually shed. Results Average hair errors increased until two years of age, and then were constant despite decades of replacement, consistent with new hairs arising from infrequently dividing bulge stem cells. Errors were significantly more frequent in longer hairs, consistent with long-lived but eventually shed mitotic follicle cells. Conclusion Constant average hair methylation regardless of age contrasts with the age-related methylation observed in human intestine, suggesting that error accumulation and therefore stem cell latency differs among tissues. Epigenetic molecular clocks imply similar mitotic ages for hairs on young and old human heads, consistent with a restart with each new hair, and with genealogies surreptitiously written within somatic cell genomes.

  3. Drug-induced hair colour changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Francesco; De Simone, Clara; Del Regno, Laura; Peris, Ketty

    2016-12-01

    Hair colour modifications comprise lightening/greying, darkening, or even a complete hair colour change, which may involve the scalp and/or all body hair. Systemic medications may cause hair loss or hypertrichosis, while hair colour change is an uncommon adverse effect. The rapidly increasing use of new target therapies will make the observation of these side effects more frequent. A clear relationship between drug intake and hair colour modification may be difficult to demonstrate and the underlying mechanisms of hair changes are often unknown. To assess whether a side effect is determined by a specific drug, different algorithms or scores (e.g. Naranjo, Karch, Kramer, and Begaud) have been developed. The knowledge of previous similar reports on drug reactions is a key point of most algorithms, therefore all adverse events should be recognised and reported to the scientific community. Furthermore, even if hair colour change is not a life-threatening side effect, it is of deep concern for patient's quality of life and adherence to treatment. We performed a review of the literature on systemic drugs which may induce changes in hair colour.

  4. Model for multi-filamentary conduction in graphene/hexagonal-boron-nitride/graphene based resistive switching devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chengbin; Miranda, Enrique; Villena, Marco A.; Xiao, Na; Jing, Xu; Xie, Xiaoming; Wu, Tianru; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Lanza, Mario

    2017-06-01

    Despite the enormous interest raised by graphene and related materials, recent global concern about their real usefulness in industry has raised, as there is a preoccupying lack of 2D materials based electronic devices in the market. Moreover, analytical tools capable of describing and predicting the behavior of the devices (which are necessary before facing mass production) are very scarce. In this work we synthesize a resistive random access memory (RRAM) using graphene/hexagonal-boron-nitride/graphene (G/h-BN/G) van der Waals structures, and we develop a compact model that accurately describes its functioning. The devices were fabricated using scalable methods (i.e. CVD for material growth and shadow mask for electrode patterning), and they show reproducible resistive switching (RS). The measured characteristics during the forming, set and reset processes were fitted using the model developed. The model is based on the nonlinear Landauer approach for mesoscopic conductors, in this case atomic-sized filaments formed within the 2D materials system. Besides providing excellent overall fitting results (which have been corroborated in log-log, log-linear and linear-linear plots), the model is able to explain the dispersion of the data obtained from cycle-to-cycle in terms of the particular features of the filamentary paths, mainly their confinement potential barrier height.

  5. Probing the Massive Star-forming Environment: A Multiwavelength Investigation of the Filamentary IRDC G333.73+0.37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veena, V. S.; Vig, S.; Mookerjea, B.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Tej, A.; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.

    2018-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the filamentary infrared dark cloud (IRDC) G333.73+0.37. The region contains two distinct mid-infrared sources S1 and S2 connected by dark lanes of gas and dust. Cold dust emission from the IRDC is detected at seven wavelength bands, and we have identified 10 high-density clumps in the region. The physical properties of the clumps such as temperature (14.3–22.3 K) and mass (87–1530 M ⊙) are determined by fitting a modified blackbody to the spectral energy distribution of each clump between 160 μm and 1.2 mm. The total mass of the IRDC is estimated to be ∼4700 M ⊙. The molecular line emission toward S1 reveals signatures of protostellar activity. Low-frequency radio emission at 1300 and 610 MHz is detected toward S1 (shell-like) and S2 (compact morphology), confirming the presence of newly formed massive stars in the IRDC. Photometric analysis of near- and mid-infrared point sources unveils the young stellar object population associated with the cloud. Fragmentation analysis indicates that the filament is supercritical. We observe a velocity gradient along the filament, which is likely to be associated with accretion flows within the filament rather than rotation. Based on various age estimates obtained for objects in different evolutionary stages, we attempt to set a limit to the current age of this cloud.

  6. Determination of the electric field strength of filamentary DBDs by CARS-based four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, P.; Kettlitz, M.; Brandenburg, R.; Höft, H.; Czarnetzki, U.

    2016-10-01

    It is demonstrated that a four-wave mixing technique based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) can determine the electric field strength of a pulsed-driven filamentary dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) of 1 mm gap, using hydrogen as a tracer medium in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. The measurements are presented for a hydrogen admixture of 10%, but even 5% H2 admixture delivers sufficient infrared signals. The lasers do not affect the discharge by photoionization or by other radiation-induced processes. The absolute values of the electric field strength can be determined by the calibration of the CARS setup with high voltage amplitudes below the ignition threshold of the arrangement. This procedure also enables the determination of the applied breakdown voltage. The alteration of the electric field is observed during the internal polarity reversal and the breakdown process. One advantage of the CARS technique over emission-based methods is that it can be used independently of emission, e.g. in the pre-phase and in between two consecutive discharges, where no emission occurs at all.

  7. Diffuse mode and diffuse-to-filamentary transition in a high pressure nanosecond scale corona discharge under high voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardiveau, P.; Moreau, N.; Bentaleb, S.; Postel, C.; Pasquiers, S.

    2009-09-01

    The dynamics of a point-to-plane corona discharge induced in high pressure air under nanosecond scale high overvoltage is investigated. The electrical and optical properties of the discharge can be described in space and time with fast and precise current measurements coupled to gated and intensified imaging. Under atmospheric pressure, the discharge exhibits a diffuse pattern like a multielectron avalanche propagating through a direct field ionization mechanism. The diffuse regime can exist since the voltage rise time is much shorter than the characteristic time of the field screening effects, and as long as the local field is higher than the critical ionization field in air. As one of these conditions is not fulfilled, the discharge turns into a multi-channel regime and the diffuse-to-filamentary transition strongly depends on the overvoltage, the point-to-plane gap length and the pressure. When pressure is increased above atmospheric pressure, the diffuse stage and its transition to streamers seem to satisfy similarity rules as the key parameter is the reduced critical ionization field only. However, above 3 bar, neither diffuse avalanche nor streamer filaments are observed but a kind of streamer-leader regime, due to the fact that mechanisms such as photoionization and heat diffusion are not similar to pressure.

  8. Filamentary field-aligned currents at the polar cap region during northward interplanetary magnetic field derived with the Swarm constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Hermann; Huang, Tao; Wing, Simon; Kervalishvili, Guram; Rauberg, Jan; Korth, Haje

    2017-01-01

    ESA’s Swarm constellation mission makes it possible for the first time to determine field-aligned currents (FACs) in the ionosphere uniquely. In particular at high latitudes, the dual-satellite approach can reliably detect some FAC structures which are missed by the traditional single-satellite technique. These FAC events occur preferentially poleward of the auroral oval and during times of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Most events appear on the nightside. They are not related to the typical FAC structures poleward of the cusp, commonly termed NBZ. Simultaneously observed precipitating particle spectrograms and auroral images from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites are consistent with the detected FACs and indicate that they occur on closed field lines mostly adjacent to the auroral oval. We suggest that the FACs are associated with Sun-aligned filamentary auroral arcs. Here we introduce in an initial study features of the high-latitude FAC structures which have been observed during the early phase of the Swarm mission. A more systematic survey over longer times is required to fully characterize the so far undetected field aligned currents.

  9. Formation of the First Star Clusters and Massive Star Binaries by Fragmentation of Filamentary Primordial Gas Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shingo; Yoshida, Naoki; Sakurai, Yuya; Fujii, Michiko S.

    2018-03-01

    We perform a set of cosmological simulations of early structure formation incorporating baryonic streaming motions. We present a case where a significantly elongated gas cloud with ∼104 solar mass (M ⊙) is formed in a pre-galactic (∼107 M ⊙) dark halo. The gas streaming into the halo compresses and heats the massive filamentary cloud to a temperature of ∼10,000 Kelvin. The gas cloud cools rapidly by atomic hydrogen cooling, and then by molecular hydrogen cooling down to ∼400 Kelvin. The rapid decrease of the temperature and hence of the Jeans mass triggers fragmentation of the filament to yield multiple gas clumps with a few hundred solar masses. We estimate the mass of the primordial star formed in each fragment by adopting an analytic model based on a large set of radiation hydrodynamics simulations of protostellar evolution. The resulting stellar masses are in the range of ∼50–120 M ⊙. The massive stars gravitationally attract each other and form a compact star cluster. We follow the dynamics of the star cluster using a hybrid N-body simulation. We show that massive star binaries are formed in a few million years through multi-body interactions at the cluster center. The eventual formation of the remnant black holes will leave a massive black hole binary, which can be a progenitor of strong gravitational wave sources similar to those recently detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO).

  10. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  11. Effect of a filamentary discharge on the particle trajectory in a plane-to-plane DBD precipitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zouzou, N; Moreau, E, E-mail: noureddine.zouzou@univ-poitiers.fr [Institut Pprime, CNRS - Universite de Poitiers - ENSMA, SP2MI - Teleport 2 Boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie, BP 30179, F86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France)

    2011-07-20

    In this paper, particle velocity fields inside a plane-to-plane dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) precipitator are investigated using time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The main objective is to analyse the effect of a filamentary discharge on the particle trajectory. A sine wave high voltage (24 kV, 30 Hz) is applied to create a DBD inside a planar gap (6.4 mm) filled with particles with a mean size of about 0.28 {mu}m. The time-averaged velocity of the flow in the centre of the channel is about 1 m s{sup -1}. After the establishment of the discharge several filaments cross the gap, and induce a strong effect on the particle trajectory. During a complete period of the voltage, successive phenomena are observed. Before the first filament propagation, the shape of the velocity profiles is typical of a laminar flow. At the early stage following the filament propagation across the gap, the grey-level images show a sudden disappearance of the particles at the same location where the filament takes place. This is due to the fast precipitation of particles. During the positive half-cycle, the particles migrate mainly towards the grounded electrode due to their positive net charge. At the end of a half-cycle, the polarity of the electric field is reversed then the particles initially charged return towards the channel centre. Consequently, the particles oscillate delaying their collection.

  12. Discharge transitions between glow-like and filamentary in a xenon/chlorine-filled barrier discharge lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Jinzhou; Guo Ying; Xia Lei; Zhang Jing [Department of Applied Physics, Plasma and Application Research Center, DongHua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2007-08-15

    An asymmetric electric voltage pulse source (2-20 kHz, V{sub p-p}: 0-20 kV) was applied to stimulate excimer radiation by a dielectric barrier discharge in a binary gas mixture of chlorine (10.8 Torr)/xenon at high pressure ({approx}460 Torr). When the source frequency increases continuously from 2.0 to 12.0 kHz or in reverse under a fixed output voltage of V{sub p-p} (13.8 kV), it is observed that the discharge modes excited by this pulse source transmit between glow-like and filamentary, and we observe a mixed mode with filaments randomly distributed in the diffuse-like background in the narrow frequency range 7.0-8.0 kHz. It is argued that the reasons for the discharge transition could be the frequency and the time derivative of the voltage waveform of the power source. It is also observed that there is an obvious difference in the emission spectral profiles and the energy efficiency of excimer emission for the two discharge modes.

  13. Liquid Chromatographic Detection of Permethrin from Filter Paper Wipes of White-tailed Deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple, small-scale method for the determination of the presence or absence of permethrin on the hair coat of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann), by high performance liquid chromatography was developed. White-tailed deer in South Texas and the northeastern U.S. are routinely tr...

  14. Sensory Hairs in the Bowhead Whale, Balaena mysticetus (Cetacea, Mammalia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Summer E; Crish, Samuel D; George, John C; Stimmelmayr, Raphaella; Thewissen, J G M

    2015-07-01

    We studied the histology and morphometrics of the hairs of bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus). These whales are hairless except for two patches of more than 300 hairs on the rostral tip of the lower lip and chin, the rostral tip of the upper lip, and a bilateral row of approximately ten hairs caudal to the blowhole. Histological data indicate that hairs in all three of these areas are vibrissae: they show an outermost connective tissue capsule, a circumferential blood sinus system surrounding the hair shaft, and dense innervation to the follicle. Morphometric data were collected on hair diameters, epidermal recess diameters, hair follicle length, and external hair lengths. The main difference between the hairs in the different regions is that blowhole hairs have larger diameters than the hairs in the chin and rostrum regions. We speculate that the hair shaft thickness patterns in bowheads reflect functional specializations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Hybrid fur rendering: combining volumetric fur with explicit hair strands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias Grønbeck; Falster, Viggo; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2016-01-01

    Hair is typically modeled and rendered using either explicitly defined hair strand geometry or a volume texture of hair densities. Taken each on their own, these two hair representations have difficulties in the case of animal fur as it consists of very dense and thin undercoat hairs in combination...... with coarse guard hairs. Explicit hair strand geometry is not well-suited for the undercoat hairs, while volume textures are not well-suited for the guard hairs. To efficiently model and render both guard hairs and undercoat hairs, we present a hybrid technique that combines rasterization of explicitly...... defined guard hairs with ray marching of a prismatic shell volume with dynamic resolution. The latter is the key to practical combination of the two techniques, and it also enables a high degree of detail in the undercoat. We demonstrate that our hybrid technique creates a more detailed and soft fur...

  16. Hair Growth Promotion Activity and Its Mechanism of Polygonum multiflorum

    OpenAIRE

    Yunfei Li; Mingnuan Han; Pei Lin; Yanran He; Jie Yu; Ronghua Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Polygonum multiflorum Radix (PMR) has long history in hair growth promotion and hair coloring in clinical applications. However, several crucial problems in its clinic usage and mechanisms are still unsolved or lack scientific evidences. In this research, C57BL/6J mice were used to investigate hair growth promotion activity and possible mechanism of PMR and Polygonum multiflorum Radix Preparata (PMRP). Hair growth promotion activities were investigated by hair length, hair covered skin ratio,...

  17. Standard guidelines of care: Laser and IPL hair reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Buddhadev Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    Laser-assisted hair removal, Laser hair removal, Laser and light-assisted hair removal, Laser and light-assisted, long-term hair reduction, IPL photodepilation, LHE photodepilation; all these are acceptable synonyms. Laser (Ruby, Nd Yag, Alexandrite, Diode), intense pulse light, light and heat energy system are the different light-/Laser-based systems used for hair removal; each have its advantages and disadvantages. The word "LONG-TERM HAIR REDUCTION" should be used rather than permanent hai...

  18. Hair Color and Hearing Loss: A Survey in a Group of Military Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Movahhed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been shown that low levels of pigmentation increase susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in humans. For this reason, white populations develop more pronounced noise- induced hearing loss in comparison to black populations. Similarly, blue-eyed individuals exhibit greater temporary threshold shift than brown-eyed subjects; still, no strong correlation has been verified between the lightness of hair color and susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. This study was performed with the purpose of investigating a possible association between hair color and the degree of hearing loss due to firing noise. Study Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: A tertiary referral center with an accredited otorhinolaryngology-head & neck surgery department.   Materials and Methods: A total of 57 military recruits were divided into two groups; light-colored (blond and light brown and dark-colored hair (dark brown and black. The two groups were matched based on history of firing noise exposure (number of rounds; type of weapon and the level of hearing loss at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 kHz sound frequencies was compared between them.   Results: The results showed that the mean level of hearing loss of light-colored hair individuals (20.5±17dB was significantly greater than that of dark-haired subjects (13.5±11dB, (P=0.023.   Conclusion: The results indicate that hair color (blond versus black can be used as an index for predicting susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in military environments. Therefore, based on the individual's hair color, upgraded hearing conservation programs are highly recommended.

  19. Hair curvature: a natural dialectic and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissimov, Joseph N; Das Chaudhuri, Asit Baran

    2014-08-01

    Although hair forms (straight, curly, wavy, etc.) are present in apparently infinite variations, each fibre can be reduced to a finite sequence of tandem segments of just three types: straight, bent/curly, or twisted. Hair forms can thus be regarded as resulting from genetic pathways that induce, reverse or modulate these basic curvature modes. However, physical interconversions between twists and curls demonstrate that strict one-to-one correspondences between them and their genetic causes do not exist. Current hair-curvature theories do not distinguish between bending and twisting mechanisms. We here introduce a multiple papillary centres (MPC) model which is particularly suitable to explain twisting. The model combines previously known features of hair cross-sectional morphology with partially/completely separated dermal papillae within single follicles, and requires such papillae to induce differential growth rates of hair cortical material in their immediate neighbourhoods. The MPC model can further help to explain other, poorly understood, aspects of hair growth and morphology. Separate bending and twisting mechanisms would be preferentially affected at the major or minor ellipsoidal sides of fibres, respectively, and together they exhaust the possibilities for influencing hair-form phenotypes. As such they suggest dialectic for hair-curvature development. We define a natural-dialectic (ND) which could take advantage of speculative aspects of dialectic, but would verify its input data and results by experimental methods. We use this as a top-down approach to first define routes by which hair bending or twisting may be brought about and then review evidence in support of such routes. In particular we consider the wingless (Wnt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways as paradigm pathways for molecular hair bending and twisting mechanisms, respectively. In addition to the Wnt canonical pathway, the Wnt/Ca(2+) and planar cell polarity (PCP) pathways

  20. Phase-locked spiking of inner ear hair cells and the driven noisy Adler equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlomovitz, Roie; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2014-12-06

    The inner ear constitutes a remarkably sensitive mechanical detector. This detection occurs in a noisy and highly viscous environment, as the sensory cells-the hair cells-are immersed in a fluid-filled compartment and operate at room or higher temperatures. We model the active motility of hair cell bundles of the vestibular system with the Adler equation, which describes the phase degree of freedom of bundle motion. We explore both analytically and numerically the response of the system to external signals, in the presence of white noise. The theoretical model predicts that hair bundles poised in the quiescent regime can exhibit sporadic spikes-sudden excursions in the position of the bundle. In this spiking regime, the system exhibits stochastic resonance, with the spiking rate peaking at an optimal level of noise. Upon the application of a very weak signal, the spikes occur at a preferential phase of the stimulus cycle. We compare the theoretical predictions of our model to experimental measurements obtained in vitro from individual hair cells. Finally, we show that an array of uncoupled hair cells could provide a sensitive detector that encodes the frequency of the applied signal.

  1. Straight or Curly? Hair and Race in Carmen Montañez's "Pelo bueno, pelo malo"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Loyola, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    Historically, black women's hair has been a site where power and social relations are defined. In Puerto Rico, cultural production has been critical in perpetuating as well as in contesting the prevailing white European ideal of beauty and its impact on women's hairstyling practices. Nevertheless, the link between aesthetic preferences and the…

  2. Hair: what is new in diagnosis and management? Female pattern hair loss update: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanaskova Mesinkovska, Natasha; Bergfeld, Wilma F

    2013-01-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is the most common cause of alopecia in women. FPHL is characterized histologically with increased numbers of miniaturized, velluslike hair follicles. The goal of treatment of FPHL is to arrest hair loss progression and stimulate hair regrowth. The treatments for FPHL can be divided into androgen-dependent and androgen-independent. There is an important adjuvant role for nutritional supplements, light therapy, and hair transplants. All treatments work best when initiated early. Combinations of treatments tend to be more efficacious. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Survey of the Awareness, Knowledge and Behavior of Hair Dye Use in a Korean Population with Gray Hair

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jung Eun; Jung, Hee Dam; Kang, Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Background Gray hair naturally develops in the process of human aging. Many people with gray hair periodically dye their hair. Hair dyeing products are widely used and they can cause adverse effects. Therefore, the user's knowledge and recognition about hair dyeing and related side effects are important. Objective The goal of this study was to lay the foundation for understanding, preventing and treating side effects caused by hair coloring products. Methods We conducted a questionnaire surve...

  4. Depletion of CD200+ hair follicle stem cells in human prematurely gray hair follicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Mohanty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Melanocyte stem cells (MelSCs are known to be depleted in gray hair follicles. Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs are important for maintenance of stemness of MelSCs. Methods: We compared the proportion of CD200+ (Cluster of Differentiation 200 positive stem cells in the outer root sheath cell suspension of gray and pigmented hair follicles of three patients with the premature graying of hair. In addition, explants culture for HFSCs was also carried out from gray and pigmented hair follicles. Cultured HFSCs were also differentiated into melanocytes. Results: The mean ± SD CD200+ HFSCs population were 9.4 ± 1.4% and 3.5 ± 0.5% for pigmented and gray hair follicles, respectively ( P = 0.002. In explants culture, the growth of HFSCs from the gray hair follicle stopped at around day 20-22, whereas the growth of the cells from the pigmented follicle continued. Conclusion: CD200+ HFSCs are depleted in prematurely gray hair in the humans. CD200+ hair follicle stem cell yield is poorer in gray hair explant culture than pigmented hair explant culture.

  5. Depletion of CD200+ Hair Follicle Stem Cells in Human Prematurely Gray Hair Follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sujata; Kumar, Anil; Dhawan, Jyoti; Sharma, Vinod K; Gupta, Somesh

    2013-04-01

    Melanocyte stem cells (MelSCs) are known to be depleted in gray hair follicles. Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) are important for maintenance of stemness of MelSCs. We compared the proportion of CD200+ (Cluster of Differentiation 200 positive) stem cells in the outer root sheath cell suspension of gray and pigmented hair follicles of three patients with the premature graying of hair. In addition, explants culture for HFSCs was also carried out from gray and pigmented hair follicles. Cultured HFSCs were also differentiated into melanocytes. The mean ± SD CD200+ HFSCs population were 9.4 ± 1.4% and 3.5 ± 0.5% for pigmented and gray hair follicles, respectively (P = 0.002). In explants culture, the growth of HFSCs from the gray hair follicle stopped at around day 20-22, whereas the growth of the cells from the pigmented follicle continued. CD200+ HFSCs are depleted in prematurely gray hair in the humans. CD200+ hair follicle stem cell yield is poorer in gray hair explant culture than pigmented hair explant culture.

  6. White Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  7. Changing trends in hair restoration surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataram Mysore

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgenetic alopecia is an important and common cause for baldness. Despite recent advances, the drug therapy of this condition remains unsatisfactory. Surgical hair restoration is the only permanent method of treating this condition. Introduction of recent techniques such as follicular unit transplantation have improved the cosmetic results and patient satisfaction. This article discusses the latest trends in hair restoration surgery.

  8. Missing Strands? Dealing with Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017 Print this issue Missing Strands? Dealing with Hair Loss En español Send us your comments Hair loss is often associated with men and aging, but ... depends on the cause. A family history of baldness, medical conditions or their treatments, and many other ...

  9. Live cell imaging of Arabidopsis root hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Root hairs are tubular extensions from the root surface that expand by tip growth. This highly focused type of cell expansion, combined with position of root hairs on the surface of the root, makes them ideal cells for microscopic observation. This chapter describes the method that is routinely used

  10. Can polar bear hairs absorb environmental energy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ji-Huan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A polar bear (Ursus maritimus has superior ability to survive in harsh Arctic regions, why does the animal have such an excellent thermal protection? The present paper finds that the unique labyrinth cavity structure of the polar bear hair plays an important role. The hair can not only prevent body temperature loss but can also absorb energy from the environment.

  11. Fractal analysis of polar bear hairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qing-Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hairs of a polar bear (Ursus maritimus are of superior properties such as the excellent thermal protection. Why do polar bears can resist such cold environment? The paper concludes that its fractal porosity plays an important role, and its fractal dimensions are very close to the golden mean, 1.618, revealing the possible optimal structure of polar bear hair.

  12. Biophysics of Hair Cell Sensory Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duifhuis, Hendrikus; Horst, Johannes; van Dijk, Pim; van Netten, Sietse

    1993-01-01

    The last decade revealed to auditory researchers that hair cells can not only detect and process mechanical energy, but are also able to produce it. Thanks to the active hair cell, ears can produce otoacoustic emissions. This book gives the newest insights into the biophysics and physiology of

  13. Species Identification Key of Korean Mammal Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEE, Eunok; CHOI, Tae-Young; WOO, Donggul; MIN, Mi-Sook; SUGITA, Shoei; LEE, Hang

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hair microstructures of Korean terrestrial mammals from 23 species (22 wild and one domestic) were analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to construct a hair identification key. The hairs were examined using the medulla structures and cuticular scales of guard hairs from the dorsal regions of mature adult animals. All cuticular scale structures in the hair of Rodentia, Lagomorpha, Carnivora and Insectivora showed the petal pattern, and those of Artiodactyla and Chiroptera showed the wave pattern and coronal pattern, respectively. Rodentia, Lagomorpha and Carnivora showed multicellular, and Insectivora and Artiodactyla showed unicellular regular, mesh or columnar in the medulla structures, respectively. Chiroptera did not show the medulla structures in their hair. We found that it is possible to distinguish between species and order based on general appearance, medulla structures and cuticular scales. Thus, we constructed a hair identification key with morphological characteristics from each species. This study suggests that hair identification keys could be useful in fields, such as forensic science, food safety and foraging ecology. PMID:24451929

  14. Removing Pubic Hair (For Young Men)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it ok to shave my pubic hair?” Tags: body hair , shaving Related Content Shaving I shaved my pubic ... How can I prevent them? Is shaving my body OK? I keep getting razor burn in my crotch from it… Can I use ... by @YoungMensHealth Young Men’s Health (YMH) is ...

  15. European Whiteness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    2008-01-01

    Born out of the United States’ (U.S.) history of slavery and segregation and intertwined with gender studies and feminism, the field of critical whiteness studies does not fit easily into a European setting and the particular historical context that entails. In order for a field of European...... critical whiteness studies to emerge, its relation to the U.S. theoretical framework, as well as the particularities of the European context need to be taken into account.. The article makes a call for a multi-layered approach to take over from the identity politics so often employed in the fields of U...

  16. [Hair removal with intense pulsed light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Meng-Hua; Chen, Guo-Zhang; Yao, Li-Ying

    2005-07-01

    To evaluate the hair-removal effect of intense pulsed light (IPL). The unwanted hairs were removed with ELITE plus IPL. The treatment took 3 - 5 procedures, with an interval of over 2 months. 341 patients underwent the treatment. All the patients were well tolerant without anesthesia. The unwanted hairs were wholly removed after 3 - 5 procedures. After operation, routine cleaning and make-up were allowed and bandaging was not necessary. There were blister in 3 cases and infection in 1 case. No pigmentation and scarring happened. Following-up of 3 - 6 months showed steady results with less regeneration of very thin and soft hair. IPL is an ideal hair-removal method because of the credible effect, simple operation, rapid treatment and no serious complications.

  17. The human hair: from anatomy to physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffoli, Barbara; Rinaldi, Fabio; Labanca, Mauro; Sorbellini, Elisabetta; Trink, Anna; Guanziroli, Elena; Rezzani, Rita; Rodella, Luigi F

    2014-03-01

    Hair is a unique character of mammals and has several functions, from protection of the skin to sexual and social communication. In literature, there are various studies about hair that take into consideration different aspects within many fields of science, including biology, dermatology, cosmetics, forensic sciences, and medicine. We carried out a search of studies published in PubMed up to 2013. In this review, we summarized the principal anatomical and physiological aspects of the different types of human hair, and we considered the clinical significance of the different structures and the distribution of the hair in the human body. This review could be the basis for improvement and progression in the field of hair research. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  18. Unconsumed precursors and couplers after formation of oxidative hair dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Søsted, Heidi; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2006-01-01

    Contact allergy to hair dye ingredients, especially precursors and couplers, is a well-known entity among consumers having hair colouring done at home or at a hairdresser. The aim of the present investigation was to estimate consumer exposure to some selected precursors (p-phenylenediamine, toluene......-2,5-diamine) and couplers (3-aminophenol, 4-aminophenol, resorcinol) of oxidative hair dyes during and after hair dyeing. Concentrations of unconsumed precursors and couplers in 8 hair dye formulations for non-professional use were investigated, under the conditions reflecting hair dyeing. Oxidative...... hair dye formation in the absence of hair was investigated using 6 products, and 2 products were used for experimental hair dyeing. In both presence and absence of hair, significant amounts of unconsumed precursors and couplers remained in the hair dye formulations after final colour development. Thus...

  19. Archaeologies of Hair: an introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven P. Ashby

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This collection of short articles represents an original attempt to bring together scholarship that is usually divided along lines of specialism in time, place, method, or discipline. The shared focus of its contributions is on hair: more than an infrequently preserved element of human remains, but a widespread (and arguably cross-cultural symbol of power, of fertility, of identity and the self. Moreover, its care and treatment using various forms of material culture, and its artistic representation in diverse media, offer a unique opportunity to examine the interface between the body and material culture. Where exceptional taphonomic conditions facilitate the preservation of hair and associated organic material, the result is some of the richest assemblages of human remains and associated material culture in the archaeological record (e.g. Wilson et al. 2007; Fletcher 1998. In contrast, 'everyday' objects associated with haircare are among the most taphonomically robust, frequently encountered and recognisable personal items known to archaeologists (e.g. Stephens 2008; Ashby 2011, and provide us with insight into the making of personal and bodily identities, even in the absence of human remains themselves. When studied in an interdisciplinary framework, the interpretative potential of this material is clear, but such work has been rare. This collection aims to set a new agenda for cross-disciplinary research focused on the nexus of human and artefactual remains, by highlighting the rich and diverse potential of this material when studied through archaeological, biochemical, artistic, historical, sociological and anthropological lenses.

  20. The Lore of the Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, Nicolas; Yagi, Kent; Stein, Leo

    2016-03-01

    Stars can be hairy beasts, especially in theories that go beyond Einstein's. In the latter, a scalar field can be sourced and anchored to a neutron star, and if the later is in a binary system, the scalar field will emit dipole radiation. This radiation removes energy from the binary, forcing the orbit to adiabatically decay much more rapidly than due to the emission of gravitational waves as predicted in General Relativity. The detailed radio observation of binary pulsars has constrained the orbital decay of compact binaries stringently, so much so that theories that predict neutron stars with scalar hair are believed to be essentially ruled out. In this talk I will explain why this ``lore'' is actually incorrect, providing a counter-example in which scalar hair is sourced by neutron stars, yet dipole radiation is absent. I will then describe what binary systems need to be observed to constrain such theories with future astrophysical observations. I acknowledge support from NSF CAREER Grant PHY-1250636.

  1. What is the use of elephant hair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor L Myhrvold

    Full Text Available The idea that low surface densities of hairs could be a heat loss mechanism is understood in engineering and has been postulated in some thermal studies of animals. However, its biological implications, both for thermoregulation as well as for the evolution of epidermal structures, have not yet been noted. Since early epidermal structures are poorly preserved in the fossil record, we study modern elephants to infer not only the heat transfer effect of present-day sparse hair, but also its potential evolutionary origins. Here we use a combination of theoretical and empirical approaches, and a range of hair densities determined from photographs, to test whether sparse hairs increase convective heat loss from elephant skin, thus serving an intentional evolutionary purpose. Our conclusion is that elephants are covered with hair that significantly enhances their thermoregulation ability by over 5% under all scenarios considered, and by up to 23% at low wind speeds where their thermoregulation needs are greatest. The broader biological significance of this finding suggests that maintaining a low-density hair cover can be evolutionary purposeful and beneficial, which is consistent with the fact that elephants have the greatest need for heat loss of any modern terrestrial animal because of their high body-volume to skin-surface ratio. Elephant hair is the first documented example in nature where increasing heat transfer due to a low hair density covering may be a desirable effect, and therefore raises the possibility of such a covering for similarly sized animals in the past. This elephant example dispels the widely-held assumption that in modern endotherms body hair functions exclusively as an insulator and could therefore be a first step to resolving the prior paradox of why hair was able to evolve in a world much warmer than our own.

  2. The degree of premature hair graying as an independent risk marker for coronary artery disease: a predictor of biological age rather than chronological age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Çetin, Mustafa; Durakoğlugil, Murtaza Emre; Erdoğan, Turan; Çanga, Aytun; Çiçek, Yüksel; Doğan, Sıtkı; Şahin, Ismail; Şatıroğlu, Omer; Bostan, Mehmet

    2012-09-01

    Age is the most important and uncorrectable coronary risk factor at the moment. The concept of measuring aging biologically rather than only chronologically may be of importance in clinical practice. Hair graying is the most apparent sign of biological aging in humans, yet its mechanism is largely unknown. Today, it is known that cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), especially in combination, cause premature atherosclerosis. In our opinion, premature hair graying or whitening may represent early atherosclerotic changes as a surrogate of host response to the CVRFs. In this study, we planned to investigate the relationship of hair graying with CVRFs and coronary atherosclerotic burden in order to determine whether it is an independent marker for coronary artery disease (CAD). The current study has a cross-sectional observational design. Two hundred and thirteen men who underwent coronary angiography with a suspicion of CAD were enrolled in the study. The patients were evaluated in terms of age, demographical properties and the CVRFs. Hair whitening score (HWS) was defined according to extent of gray/white hairs (1: pure black; 2: black>white; 3: black=white; 4: white>black; 5: pure white). Coronary atherosclerotic burden was assessed by the Gensini score. Analyses were performed in age-matched normal coronary arteries (NCA) and CAD groups. Linear and logistic regression analyses were used for the multivariate analyses of independent variables associated with hair greying. The CVRFs were higher in CAD group. Hair whitening score (2.7 ± 1.3 vs. 3.3 ± 1.2, p=0.002), hair losing score (1.2 ± 0.9 vs. 1.5 ± 1.0, p=0.038) and xanthelasma rate (24% vs. 45%, p=0.013) were also significantly different between NCA and CAD groups. Age (phair graying. In our study, we found that the degree of gray/white hairs is related to extent of CAD. Our findings also suggested that hair graying is a risk marker for CAD independent of age and other traditional risk factors. Biological age

  3. Biologic Rhythms Derived from Siberian Mammoths Hairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Spilde; A Lanzirotti; C Qualls; G Phillips; A Ali; L Agenbroad; O Appenzeller

    2011-12-31

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was {approx}31 cms/year and {approx}16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  4. Gender differences in scalp hair growth rates are maintained but reduced in pattern hair loss compared to controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, D J J; Rushton, D H

    2016-08-01

    Hair loss is related to follicular density, programmed regrowth and hair productivity. The dissatisfaction with hair growth in patients experiencing hair loss might be due to slower linear hair growth rate (LHGR). LHGR and hair diameter was evaluated in Caucasian controls and patients with patterned hair loss employing the validated non-invasive, contrast-enhanced-phototrichogram with exogen collection. We evaluated 59,765 anagen hairs (controls 24,609, patients 35,156) and found thinner hairs grew slower than thicker hairs. LHGR in normal women was generally higher than in normal men. LHGR correlates with hair diameter (P hair of equal thickness in controls, subjects affected with patterned hair loss showed reduced hair growth rates, an observation found in both male and female patients. Males with pattern hair loss showed further reduction in growth rates as clinical severity worsened. However, sample size limitations prevented statistical evaluation of LHGR in severely affected females. Caucasian ethnicity. In pattern hair loss, LHGR significantly contributes to the apparent decrease in hair volume in affected areas. In early onset, LHRG might have a prognostic value in females but not in males. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Classifications of patterned hair loss: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patterned hair loss is the most common cause of hair loss seen in both the sexes after puberty. Numerous classification systems have been proposed by various researchers for grading purposes. These systems vary from the simpler systems based on recession of the hairline to the more advanced multifactorial systems based on the morphological and dynamic parameters that affect the scalp and the hair itself. Most of these preexisting systems have certain limitations. Currently, the Hamilton-Norwood classification system for males and the Ludwig system for females are most commonly used to describe patterns of hair loss. In this article, we review the various classification systems for patterned hair loss in both the sexes. Relevant articles were identified through searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE. Search terms included but were not limited to androgenic alopecia classification, patterned hair loss classification, male pattern baldness classification, and female pattern hair loss classification. Further publications were identified from the reference lists of the reviewed articles.

  6. Molecular basis of hair cell loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, David N

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms that lead to the death of hair cells are reviewed. Exposure to noise, the use of ototoxic drugs that damage the cochlea and old age are accompanied by hair cell death. Outer hair cells are often more susceptible than inner hair cells, partly because of an intrinsically greater susceptibility; high frequency cells are also more vulnerable. A common factor in hair cell loss following age-related changes and exposure to ototoxic drugs or high noise levels is the generation of reactive oxygen species, which can trigger intrinsic apoptosis (the mitochondrial pathway). However, hair cell death is sometimes produced via an extracellular signal pathway triggering extrinsic apoptosis. Necrosis and necroptosis also play a role and, in various situations in which cochlear damage occurs, a balance exists between these possible routes of cell death, with no one mechanism being exclusively activated. Finally, the numerous studies on these mechanisms of hair cell death have led to the identification of many potential therapeutic agents, some of which have been used to attempt to treat people exposed to damaging events, although clinical trials are not yet conclusive. Continued work in this area is likely to lead to clinical treatments that could be used to prevent or ameliorate hearing loss.

  7. Evaluation of human hairs with terahertz wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serita, Kazunori; Murakami, Hironaru; Kawayama, Iwao; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2014-03-01

    Single human hairs using a scanning laser terahertz (THz) imaging system are evaluated. The system features near-field THz emission and far-field THz detection. A sample is set in the vicinity of a two-dimensional THz emitter, and an excitation laser beam is scanned over the emitter via a galvanometer. By detecting the transmitted THz wave pulses that are locally generated at the irradiation spots of the excitation laser, we can obtain the THz transmission image and the spectrum of the sample with imaging time of 47 s for 512×512 pixels and maximum resolution of ˜27 μm. Using the system, we succeeded in observing the specific features of single human hairs in both the THz transmittance spectra and transmission images; it was found that the THz transmittance spectrum of gray hair shows a tendency of increase while that of black hair shows a decrease with increasing frequency above 1.2 THz. We could also observe the change of the moisture retention in the hair, and it is found that cuticles play one of the important roles in keeping moisture inside the hair. Those obtained data indicate that our system can be useful for evaluating single human hairs and those kinds of microscale samples.

  8. Automated body hair counting and length measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallotton, P; Thomas, N

    2008-11-01

    Hair loss or hair excess is a common condition. There is a growing need to quantitatively assess the success of interventions aimed at replenishing areas that lack hair or at removing hair from areas such as the back, the legs, or the arms. Non-invasive methods that do not require staining are highly desirable because the staining process itself may affect the efficacy of the treatment. We introduce a system based on a flatbed scanner and on novel and sensitive image analysis algorithms to count the number of hairs and their individual length. Additionally, a measure of hair visibility is introduced, which allows assessing objectively the severity of the condition. Our system is able to detect even hairs that are difficult to see to a human observer. It is robust to skin impurities or variations in the skin texture and colour. Scanner imaging ensures a sharp image over the whole field. The system analyses on the order of two images per minute, making it suitable for large clinical studies. Counts delivered by a human counter vs. the software were within 10% of each other (N=12). Based on our results, we expect that the software will be useful to a number of researchers investigating medical and cosmetic issues involving objective assessment of pilosity. The algorithm itself may be of use for other applications.

  9. 21 CFR 895.101 - Prosthetic hair fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic hair fibers. 895.101 Section 895.101...) MEDICAL DEVICES BANNED DEVICES Listing of Banned Devices § 895.101 Prosthetic hair fibers. Prosthetic hair fibers are devices intended for implantation into the human scalp to simulate natural hair or conceal...

  10. Contact allergy to common ingredients in hair dyes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søsted, Heidi; Rustemeyer, Thomas; Gonçalo, Margarida

    2013-01-01

    p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is the primary patch test screening agent for hair dye contact allergy, and approximately 100 different hair dye chemicals are allowed.......p-Phenylenediamine (PPD) is the primary patch test screening agent for hair dye contact allergy, and approximately 100 different hair dye chemicals are allowed....

  11. Relationship between head lice infestation and hair grooming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hair grooming practices and hair characteristics are some of the host related risk factors for head lice infestation. Certain hair grooming practices and characteristics have been reported to affect head lice infestation. Objective: To determine the relationship between head lice infestation and hair grooming ...

  12. Protective effect of superoxide dismutase against hair graying in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerit, I; Filipe, P; Freitas, J; Vassy, J

    2004-01-01

    Oxygen free radicals play a role in the aging process, and the protective effect of various antioxidants has been intensively studied, in particular for cutaneous aging. Besides hereditary factors, free radical-mediated damage to melanocytes of the hair follicle has been considered as a mechanism for aging of the hair. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the role of photosensitization reactions for hair graying and to demonstrate potential protective effects of superoxide dismutase (SOD). Mice with black hair were depilated with the fingertips on a surface of 6 x 2.5 cm on both sides of the dorsum. The right side received five applications of a SOD-containing gel before exposure to psoralen (concentration 0.5 mg/mL) plus UV-A (365 nm, 4 J/cm2). The left side was pretreated in the same way with a gel free of SOD. When the hair started growing again, the SOD-protected side was covered with black hair, whereas the hair on the vehicle-treated side was gray or white in 27 of the 30 animals studied. The 0.01% SOD concentration was as protective as the 0.1% concentration. Heat-inactivated SOD, applied in another five animals, was not protective. Using fluorescent labeling of the SOD with fluorescein isothiocyanate, epifluorescence microscopy and digital imaging processing, we show that SOD applied to the skin surface penetrates through the follicular appendages, as well as through the unbroken stratum corneum. Our findings suggest that superoxide radicals, generated by interaction of UV-A light with the sensitizer, initiated the formation of secondary products with well-known DNA-damaging effects, such as lipid peroxidation products and tumor necrosis factor alpha. SOD prevented the damage to melanocyte DNA by dismutating superoxide. Photosensitization may be another mechanism for hair graying, which can be influenced by antioxidants. Given the large number of exogenous and endogenous sensitizers, this mechanism deserves further study for human hair graying.

  13. Thymosin Beta-4 Induces Mouse Hair Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Gao

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is known to induce hair growth and hair follicle (HF development; however, its mechanism of action is unknown. We generated mice that overexpressed Tβ4 in the epidermis, as well as Tβ4 global knockout mice, to study the role of Tβ4 in HF development and explore the mechanism of Tβ4 on hair growth. To study Tβ4 function, we depilated control and experimental mice and made tissue sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E. To explore the effect of Tβ4 on hair growth and HF development, the mRNA and protein levels of Tβ4 and VEGF were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting in control and experimental mice. Protein expression levels and the phosphorylation of P38, ERK and AKT were also examined by western blotting. The results of depilation indicated that hair re-growth was faster in Tβ4-overexpressing mice, but slower in knockout mice. Histological examination revealed that Tβ4-overexpressing mice had a higher number of hair shafts and HFs clustered together to form groups, while the HFs of control mice and knockout mice were separate. Hair shafts in knockout mice were significantly reduced in number compared with control mice. Increased Tβ4 expression at the mRNA and protein levels was confirmed in Tβ4-overexpressing mice, which also had increased VEGF expression. On the other hand, knockout mice had reduced levels of VEGF expression. Mechanistically, Tβ4-overexpressing mice showed increased protein expression levels and phosphorylation of P38, ERK and AKT, whereas knockout mice had decreased levels of both expression and phosphorylation of these proteins. Tβ4 appears to regulate P38/ERK/AKT signaling via its effect on VEGF expression, with a resultant effect on the speed of hair growth, the pattern of HFs and the number of hair shafts.

  14. Aging of the Hair Follicle Pigmentation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Desmond J

    2009-01-01

    Skin and hair phenotypes are powerful cues in human communication. They impart much information, not least about our racial, ethnic, health, gender and age status. In the case of the latter parameter, we experience significant change in pigmentation in our journey from birth to puberty and through to young adulthood, middle age and beyond. The hair follicle pigmentary unit is perhaps one of our most visible, accessible and potent aging sensors, with marked dilution of pigment intensity occurring long before even subtle changes are seen in the epidermis. This dichotomy is of interest as both skin compartments contain melanocyte subpopulations of similar embryologic (i.e., neural crest) origin. Research groups are actively pursuing the study of the differential aging of melanocytes in the hair bulb versus the epidermis and in particular are examining whether this is in part linked to the stringent coupling of follicular melanocytes to the hair growth cycle. Whether some follicular melanocyte subpopulations are affected, like epidermal melanocytes, by UV irradiation is not yet clear. A particular target of research into hair graying or canities is the nature of the melanocyte stem compartment and whether this is depleted due to reactive oxygen species-associated damage, coupled with an impaired antioxidant status, and a failure of melanocyte stem cell renewal. Over the last few years, we and others have developed advanced in vitro models and assay systems for isolated hair follicle melanocytes and for intact anagen hair follicle organ culture which may provide research tools to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of hair follicle pigmentation. Long term, it may be feasible to develop strategies to modulate some of these aging-associated changes in the hair follicle that impinge particularly on the melanocyte populations. PMID:20927229

  15. A rare case of woolly hair with unusual associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Woolly hair is a congenital abnormality of scalp hair manifesting as short, kinked hair, which may also involve the hair over the other parts of the body. Keratosis pilaris has been a well known association of woolly hair, and can also be a part of the Naxos or Carvajal syndromes. We herein present a case of woolly hair with associated keratosis pilaris, canaliform dystrophy of nails, increased interdental spaces and recurrent bullous impetigo. Although keratosis pilaris and teeth abnormalities have been reported as isolated associations with woolly hair, such a combination of findings as seen in our patient has not been reported before.

  16. Validation of a simultaneous analytical method for the detection of 27 benzodiazepines and metabolites and zolpidem in hair using LC-MS/MS and its application to human and rat hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihyun; Lee, Sooyeun; In, Sanghwan; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun

    2011-04-15

    Benzodiazepines and zolpidem are controlled in many countries due to their inherent adverse effects of a high degree of tolerance and dependence. Recently, as some of these drugs have become distributed illegally and available through media such as the Internet, their abuse is becoming a serious social problem. Hair is a useful specimen to prove chronic drug use. In the present study, a simultaneous analytical method for the detection of 27 benzodiazepines and metabolites and zolpidem in hair was established and validated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The drugs and their metabolites in hair were extracted using methanol, filtered and injected on the LC-MS/MS. The following validation parameters of the method were satisfactory: selectivity, linearity, matrix effect, recovery, process efficiency, intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy and processed sample stability. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were the total drug detected from the sample. The LODs ranged from 0.005 ng (zolpidem) to 0.5 ng (bromazepam and chlordiazepoxide) and the LOQs were 0.25 ng in every analyte except for bromazepam and chlordiazepoxide, for which they were 0.5 ng. The developed method was successfully applied to five legal cases involving use of benzodiazepines and zolpidem and to an animal study on drug incorporation into hair. Diazepam and its three metabolites, as well as lorazepam, were detected in hair from both the multiple- and single-dose administration groups of lean Zucker rats. The concentration of diazepam was higher than those of its metabolites in both dark grey and white hair from the multiple-dose administration groups, with the mean concentration ranges from 0.16 to 0.51 ng/mg and from 0.10 to 0.24 ng/mg, respectively. The mean concentration ranges of lorazepam were from 0.05 to 0.37 ng/mg in dark grey hair and from 0.11 to 0.45 ng/mg in white hair from the multiple-dose administration groups. Hair

  17. Penile hair tourniquet resulting in hypospadias failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisieux E Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile hair tourniquet (PHT is a painless form of penile ischemia, typically seen in toddlers with long-haired mothers, caused by entanglement of hair on the balano-prepucial sulcus, normally associated with circumcision. Its association with hypospadias has been reported only once. A school-aged boy admitted for surgery to treat hypospadias failure was incidentally detected to have PHT and severe hourglass deformity of the penis. Urethral anastomosis and glanuloplasty were done after removal of the constricting ring, without complications. Normal erections were reported during follow up. Treatment may involve urethral reconstruction and penile reimplantation in extreme cases.

  18. Two Cases of Hair Balls in Girls

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir A. Shcherbak; Sergey G. Gaymolenko; Valentina G. Cherdantseva

    2016-01-01

    This article describes two cases of hair balls in girls between aged 2.5 and 12 years. The reason for this quite rare disease may be trichotillomania (compulsive desire to pull out own hair) and trichophagia (compulsive or impulsive desire to pull out, and then to swallow own or someone's hair) typical for Rapunzel syndrome. Initially, the children were enrolled in the Oncology Centre in view of suspected abdominal tumour. After detection of foreign bodies in the stomach, they were transferre...

  19. Body to Scalp: Evolving Trends in Body Hair Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Kuldeep; Savant, Sandeep S.

    2017-01-01

    Follicular unit extraction (FUE) is becoming an increasingly popular method for hair restoration. As FUE leaves behind no linear scars, it is more suitable to harvest from various body areas including beard, chest, and extremities in hirsute individuals. Body hair characteristics such as thickness, length, and hair cycle may not completely match to that of the scalp hair. The techniques of harvesting body hairs are more time consuming, requiring higher degree of skill than regular scalp FUE. Body hair transplantation can be successfully used either alone or in combination with scalp hair in advanced grades of baldness, for improving the cosmetic appearance of hairlines and in scarring alopecia when there is paucity of donor scalp hair. Harvesting of body hairs opens up a new viable donor source for hair restoration surgeons, especially in cases of advanced Norwood grades five and above of androgenetic alopecia. PMID:28584752

  20. Body to scalp: Evolving trends in body hair transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Saxena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Follicular unit extraction (FUE is becoming an increasingly popular method for hair restoration. As FUE leaves behind no linear scars, it is more suitable to harvest from various body areas including beard, chest, and extremities in hirsute individuals. Body hair characteristics such as thickness, length, and hair cycle may not completely match to that of the scalp hair. The techniques of harvesting body hairs are more time consuming, requiring higher degree of skill than regular scalp FUE. Body hair transplantation can be successfully used either alone or in combination with scalp hair in advanced grades of baldness, for improving the cosmetic appearance of hairlines and in scarring alopecia when there is paucity of donor scalp hair. Harvesting of body hairs opens up a new viable donor source for hair restoration surgeons, especially in cases of advanced Norwood grades five and above of androgenetic alopecia.

  1. Body to Scalp: Evolving Trends in Body Hair Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Kuldeep; Savant, Sandeep S

    2017-01-01

    Follicular unit extraction (FUE) is becoming an increasingly popular method for hair restoration. As FUE leaves behind no linear scars, it is more suitable to harvest from various body areas including beard, chest, and extremities in hirsute individuals. Body hair characteristics such as thickness, length, and hair cycle may not completely match to that of the scalp hair. The techniques of harvesting body hairs are more time consuming, requiring higher degree of skill than regular scalp FUE. Body hair transplantation can be successfully used either alone or in combination with scalp hair in advanced grades of baldness, for improving the cosmetic appearance of hairlines and in scarring alopecia when there is paucity of donor scalp hair. Harvesting of body hairs opens up a new viable donor source for hair restoration surgeons, especially in cases of advanced Norwood grades five and above of androgenetic alopecia.

  2. Root hair defective4 encodes a phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate phosphatase required for proper root hair development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thole, J.M.; Vermeer, J.E.M.; Zhang, Y.; Gadella, Th.W.J.; Nielsen, E.

    2008-01-01

    Polarized expansion of root hair cells in Arabidopsis thaliana is improperly controlled in root hair-defective rhd4-1 mutant plants, resulting in root hairs that are shorter and randomly form bulges along their length. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy in rhd4-1 root hairs, we analyzed

  3. A review of surgical methods (excluding hair transplantation and their role in hair loss management today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep S Sattur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is more than one way to manage hair loss surgically. Apart from hair transplantation, there are other techniques which have been used by many to treat baldness. This article attempts to review the surgical methodology and philosophy that have acted as guiding lights in the approach to surgical treatment of baldness over the years and reviews the current role of other techniques in the armamentarium of hair restoration surgeons today.

  4. Temporary hair removal by low fluence photoepilation: histological study on biopsies and cultured human hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosen, Guido F; Westgate, Gillian E; Philpott, Mike; Berretty, Paul J M; Nuijs, Tom A M; Bjerring, Peter

    2008-10-01

    We have recently shown that repeated low fluence photoepilation (LFP) with intense pulsed light (IPL) leads to effective hair removal, which is fully reversible. Contrary to permanent hair removal treatments, LFP does not induce severe damage to the hair follicle. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the impact of LFP on the structure and the physiology of the hair follicle. Single pulses of IPL with a fluence of 9 J/cm(2) and duration of 15 milliseconds were applied to one lower leg of 12 female subjects, followed by taking a single biopsy per person, either immediately, or after 3 or 7 days. Additionally, we present a novel approach to examine the effects of LFP, in which ex vivo hairy human scalp skin was exposed to IPL pulses with the same parameters as above, followed by isolation and culturing of the hair follicles over several days. Samples were examined histologically and morphologically. The majority of the cultured follicles that had been exposed to LFP treatment showed a marked treatment effect. The melanin containing part of the hair follicle bulb was the target and a catagen-like transformation was observed demonstrating that hair formation had ceased. The other follicles that had been exposed to LFP showed a less strong or no response. The skin biopsies also revealed that the melanin-rich region of the hair follicle bulb matrix was targeted; other parts of the follicle and the skin remained unaffected. Catagen/telogen hair follicles were visible with unusual melanin clumping, indicating this cycle phase was induced by the IPL treatment. Low fluence photoepilation targets the pigmented matrix area of the anagen hair follicle bulb, causing a highly localized but mild trauma that interrupts the hair cycle, induces a catagen-like state and eventually leads to temporary loss of the hair. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. The nexus of hair corticosterone level, immunocompetence, metabolic rates and overwinter survival in the root vole, Microtus oeconomus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Książek, Aneta; Zub, Karol; Szafrańska, Paulina A; Wieczorek, Monika; Konarzewski, Marek

    2017-09-01

    Although corticosterone (CORT) regulates many physiological mechanisms, the associations between CORT levels, immunocompetence, energy expenditures and overwinter survival have not been examined. Here, we studied individual variation in CORT level extracted from hair, immunocompetence quantified as the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte (N/L) ratio, total white blood cells (WBC) and natural antibody levels (NAbs), along with the resting (RMR) and peak metabolic rates (PMR) and mortality during three consecutive winter seasons in a natural population of the root vole, Microtus oeconomus. In early winter, hair CORT level was strongly positively associated with body mass and inversely related to voles' ability to survive. We suggest that the observed association between hair CORT level and body mass may be the key component of the physiological nexus driving the survivorship of individual rodents. Additionally, hair CORT was a significant predictor of variation of the whole body RMR, which in turn enhanced overwinter survival in the studied population. On the other hand, hair CORT was not significantly associated with changes in the blood indices. Interestingly, the analysis carried out only during the first year of study (2008), which was characterized by a high population density and prevalence of infestation with a blood protozoan, Babesia spp., showed that the intensity of the infestation was negatively correlated with both the hair CORT level and the N/L ratio. Because CORT is often considered immunosuppressive, we expected a positive association between its level and the N/L ratio. However, hair CORT did not significantly correlate with the N/L ratio. We suggest that the lack of an association between hair CORT and the N/L ratio resulted from a small inter-individual variation in the N/L ratio in 2008, which was much higher and less variable than in the other years of our study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Artificial Hair: By the Dawn to Automatic Biofibre® Hair Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Roccia

    2017-12-01

    In 1995 the European Union (UE recognised the artificial hair implant as a legitimate medical treatment and outlined the rules related to that procedure. In 1996, biocompatible fibres (Biofibre® produced by Medicap® Italy were approved by the UE Authorities and by the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA as medical devices for hair implant. An effective medical protocol was developed during the following years to provide correct guidelines for appropriate treatment, and to reduce possible related complications. Automatic Biofibre® hair implant represents the last achievement in this hair restoration technique with significant advantages for the patients.

  7. In Vitro Methodologies to Evaluate the Effects of Hair Care Products on Hair Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Miranda da Gama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumers use different hair care products to change the physical appearance of their hair, such as shampoos, conditioners, hair dye and hair straighteners. They expect cosmetics products to be available in the market to meet their needs in a broad and effective manner. Evaluating efficacy of hair care products in vitro involves the use of highly accurate equipment. This review aims to discuss in vitro methodologies used to evaluate the effects of hair care products on hair fiber, which can be assessed by various methods, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Optical Coherence Tomography, Infrared Spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, Protein Loss, Electrophoresis, color and brightness, thermal analysis and measuring mechanical resistance to combing and elasticity. The methodology used to test hair fibers must be selected according to the property being evaluated, such as sensory characteristics, determination of brightness, resistance to rupture, elasticity and integrity of hair strain and cortex, among others. If equipment is appropriate and accurate, reproducibility and ease of employment of the analytical methodology will be possible. Normally, the data set must be discussed in order to obtain conclusive answers to the test.

  8. Identification of hair shaft progenitors that create a niche for hair pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chung-Ping; Booker, Reid C; Morrison, Sean J; Le, Lu Q

    2017-04-15

    Hair differentiates from follicle stem cells through progenitor cells in the matrix. In contrast to stem cells in the bulge, the identities of the progenitors and the mechanisms by which they regulate hair shaft components are poorly understood. Hair is also pigmented by melanocytes in the follicle. However, the niche that regulates follicular melanocytes is not well characterized. Here, we report the identification of hair shaft progenitors in the matrix that are differentiated from follicular epithelial cells expressing transcription factor KROX20. Depletion of Krox20 lineage cells results in arrest of hair growth, confirming the critical role of KROX20 + cells as antecedents of structural cells found in hair. Expression of stem cell factor (SCF) by these cells is necessary for the maintenance of differentiated melanocytes and for hair pigmentation. Our findings reveal the identities of hair matrix progenitors that regulate hair growth and pigmentation, partly by creating an SCF-dependent niche for follicular melanocytes. © 2017 Liao et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. Tarantula Hairs as Corneal Foreign Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Stagg

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of tarantula hairs found in the cornea and discuss treatment. Case Report: A 16-year-old male presented with a 6-week history of right ocular irritation that began after letting his pet tarantula crawl on his face. Slit-lamp examination of the right eye revealed the presence of approximately 16 dark foreign bodies that had the appearance of small hairs. The foreign bodies were removed from the nasal region of the right cornea using Jewelers forceps, and the patient was prescribed a combination neomycin, polymyxin B, and dexamethasone ointment (Maxitrol®, given 4 times per day. Results: The patient presented for follow-up 2 weeks later, with resolution of symptoms. Conclusion: Effective treatment of keratitis caused by tarantula hairs includes taking a detailed history, conducting a careful slit-lamp examination, removal of any accessible hairs, and initiation of treatment with a topical steroid as determined by the clinical picture.

  10. Soft materials: A remedy for thinning hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhar, Mitul

    2017-10-01

    Vast beds of 'hair' coat many living systems, and usually exhibit shear-thinning behaviour -- their flow resistance lessens with speed. But with geometric tweaks, such beds can also show shear-thickening and asymmetric ratchet-like behaviour.

  11. Hair Mesotherapy in Treatment of Alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selcuk Ozdogan

    2011-01-01

    mesotherapy in any form. Material and Methods: In this study, we evaluate the clinical changes of mesotherapy formulation on 15 men and 8 women patients, which consists of minoxidil, biotin, dexpantenol, herbal complex and procain and which is applied for androgenetic alopecia in our clinic every week. Results: In the analysis done before and after the mesotherapy, when the hair quantity, hair thickness, scalp state and hair loss are compared, the difference between them was statistically meaningful (p<0,05. There was no side effect during and after the application. Conclusion: In the hair mesotherapy, there is lack of mixture and application scheme whose effectiveness has been proved scientifically. We approve this study to be published that it supports the few  issues.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: keratoderma with woolly hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Registry: Palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly hair Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (4 links) GeneReview: Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy GeneReview: Dilated Cardiomyopathy Overview National Heart, Lung, and ...

  13. Excessive or unwanted hair in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Most of the time, hirsutism does not cause health problems. But many women find it bothersome or embarrassing. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if: The hair ...

  14. Cortisol in Hair and the Metabolic Syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stalder, Tobias; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Alexander, Nina; Bornstein, Stefan R; Gao, Wei; Miller, Robert; Stark, Sabine; Bosch, Jos A; Fischer, Joachim E

    2013-01-01

    ...), the importance of physiological variation in basal cortisol secretion is less clear. This issue can be addressed by using hair cortisol analysis, which for the first time allows the assessment of long-term integrated hormone levels...

  15. Hair loss and herbs for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourith, Nattaya; Kanlayavattanakul, Mayuree

    2013-09-01

    or androgenetic alopecia directly distresses self-confidence affecting the individual's quality of life. Hair loss is therefore a significant psychosocial manifestation that worth much expense on treatment. Androgenetic alopecia is noticed as a slow transformation of large scalp terminal hair follicles to shorter, thinner, and less deep vellus hair with a much shorter anagen. Although minoxidil, finasteride, and dutasteride including other synthetic therapeutic agents are mostly used for alopecia treatment, their adverse effects encourage sorting of alternative efficient treatment agent with a limited side effect particularly herbs. Thus, this review briefly summarized causes of hair loss and emphasized on active ingredients for treatment in particular currently used herbs and the potential candidates. Treatment choices will be further wider and conclusively select herbs that fitting the consumers' preference. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Management of advanced hair loss patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beehner, Michael L

    2013-08-01

    This article covers how to manage patients with extensive hair loss in whom complete, dense coverage is not possible. In addition to discussing planning a transplant pattern for already bald men, I discuss a conservative approach for recognizing and transplanting younger patients who have telltale warning signs that may evolve to extensive hair loss. For both groups, a variant of a frontal forelock-type pattern is usually the best course to follow. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Body esteem in adolescent hair pullers

    OpenAIRE

    ALTENBURGER, ERIN M.; Tung, Esther S.; Keuthen, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Trichotillomania (TTM) often first presents in adolescence, a developmental period marked by vulnerability in body image. To date, no one has studied the relationship between this disorder and body esteem. Methods: 49 adolescents with DSM-IV TTM or chronic hair pulling (HP) and 23 control adolescents were administered diagnostic assessments and self-report measures of hair pulling and body esteem. Results: HP youth vs. controls reported lower levels of body esteem on all ...

  18. Paraphenylenediamine: Blackening more than just hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Gude

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraphenylenediamine is an important constituent of hair dye toxicity of which one could herald fatal complications such as rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, angioneurotic edema, and respiratory failure. We present a case of hair dye poisoning that presented with respiratory distress due to laryngeal edema and later developed trismus, subclinical tetany, apnea, and conduction abnormality on electrocardiogram. This case report highlights the need for a thorough toxicological review of the components of any ingested substance.

  19. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S.; Pei, X.; Hasnain, Q.; Nie, L.; Lu, X.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6 mm discharge gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using dry air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-Streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBD. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and discharge develops in streamer, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initial electron density by pre-ionization may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also found that the dependence of homogeneity upon PRF is a non-monotonic one.

  20. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sizhe; Lu, Xinpei

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6mm gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using synthetic air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the DBD mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBDs. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave, due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and DBD develops in streamer instead, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initiatory electron density by pre-ionization methods may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also find that the dependence of uniformity upon PRF is non-monotonic.

  1. Differential wetting characterization of hair fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaynberg, Abe; Stuart, Mark; Wu, Xiang-Fa

    2012-01-01

    Surface wetting is one of the key properties of human hair used to indicate the extent of chemical/mechanical damage and the outcome of conditioning treatment. Characterization of hair wetting property is a challenging task due to the non-homogeneous nature of hair fibers and the requirement for sensitive equipment. Motivated by these considerations, we developed a new methodology, termed a differential wetting characterization (DWC), which would allow rapid and reliable characterization of the wetting property of hair fibers. This method is based on observation of a number of droplets suspended on a pair of parallel fibers stretched in a horizontal plane. The wetting behavior of the fibers can be deduced from the shape assumed by the droplets. When the wetting properties of the two hair fibers are identical, the droplets suspended between the fibers assume a symmetric configuration. In contrast, on the fibers with dissimilar wetting characteristics, the droplets will assume a skewed configuration towards a more hydrophilic fiber. This makes it possible to differentiate the hydrophobicities of the tested fibers. In this paper it is demonstrated that the proposed DWC method is capable of differentiating the changes in wetting property of hair surfaces in response to either chemical or physical treatment. Results of the paper indicate that the DWC method is applicable for broad wetting differentiation of various fibers.

  2. What is a Caucasian 'fine' hair? Comparing instrumental measurements, self-perceptions and assessments from hair experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouabbache, S; Galliano, A; Littaye, P; Leportier, M; Pouradier, F; Gillot, E; Panhard, S; Loussouarn, G

    2016-12-01

    To determine the various factors contributing to what Caucasian women describe as 'fine hair'. Three complementary approaches were used, namely self-evaluation by the volunteer, assessment by a sensorial expert and instrumental measurements, in order to determine some of the possible parameters taken into account by Caucasian women when they describe the notion of fine hair. One hundred fifty one women of Caucasian origin participated in the study. They varied in age, and varied in that some considered themselves as having fine hair, and others not. The instrumental measurements carried out included hair diameter measurements, hair density measurements, hair breakage force, hair flexibility and scalp sebum levels. From six parameters defined initially, four parameters were found to be in common with the three approaches: hair abundance (density), hair thickness, hair resistance and the volume of the hair on the head. The commonly used term 'body' was only common to self and expert evaluation, whereas the influence of curliness was only common to expert evaluation and instrumental measurements. This study has shown close agreement between sensorial and instrumental findings, and also illustrates how the women participating can subtly and adequately describe their own hair. It is important to note that the words 'fine hair' describes a lot more than just physically thin hair fibres. Ageing is an additional factor that clearly impacts certain parameters associated with 'fine hair' among the volunteers. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  3. Protective effect of conditioner agents on hair treated with oxidative hair dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Gama, Robson M; França-Stefoni, Simone A; Sá-Dias, Tânia C; Bedin, Valcinir; Baby, André R; Velasco, Maria Valéria R

    2018-01-07

    Hair coloring is broadly used by women and men either to change their natural hair color or to delay the onset of gray hair. Oxidative dyes may damage the hair, as chemical and physical processes are required to convert the fiber structure and, consequently, alterations in its mechanical and surface properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of silanetriol (and) Panthenol, PEG-12 dimethicone, and hydrolyzed silk (and) hydrolyzed milk protein (and) lactose as conditioner agents on hair treated with oxidative hair dye by protein loss, combability, and breaking strength. In this research, we analyzed the untreated hair (sample I) and the effect of oxidative hair dye emulsions, with or without conditioner agents (sample II) silanetriol (and) Panthenol (sample III), PEG-12 dimethicone (sample IV), and hydrolyzed silk (and) hydrolyzed milk protein (and) lactose (sample V) on Caucasian hair. The hair samples were submitted to protein loss quantification, breaking strength, and combing analysis. For protein loss, the results were: II a  = V a  > IV b  > III c  > I d . For the breaking strength: I e  = II e  = III e  = IV e  = V e . For the combing analysis for wet and dry hair, the results were, respectively: II a  > III b  = IV b  > V c  > I d and II A  > III b  = V b  > IV  c = I c . Data classified by different letters presented statistically significant alterations, α = 5, P ≤ . 05, n = 15. Based on these results, the incorporation of conditioner agents into emulsion blond color decreased the damage caused by the coloring process. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Ethosomes in hair dye products as carriers of the major compounds of black tea extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Meng-I; Huang, Hsiu-Chin; Liaw, Jia-Horng; Huang, Min-Chuan; Wu, Tzu-Hua; Huang, Kuei-Fen; Hsu, Feng-Lin

    2013-07-01

    This study describes a novel carrier, the ethosome-based system, which is composed of non-ionic surfactants, ethanol, and water. Brij(®) 52 (non-ionic surfactants), soya phosphatidylcholine (PC), cholesterol, and the major compounds (caffeine and gallic acid) of black tea extracts were dissolved in the ethanolic phase. The aqueous phase containing Paragon III was heated to 60 °C and mixed with the previous solution. Finally, 3.4 ml NaOH (6.5 N) was added to adjust the pH level to 4.05. The mixture was centrifuged at 2000 g for two minutes, and the precipitate was taken as the end product. Black tea extracts were applied in ethosome-based formulations, and the efficacy of these formulations in penetrating nude mouse skin and in dyeing white hairs was investigated. Compared with an ethanolic solution and black tea extracts, the non-ionic ethosomal delivery system dramatically enhanced the adsorption of black tea extracts onto hair surfaces in vitro. The non-ionic ethosomal system was much more efficient in delivering and facilitating the adsorption of black tea extracts to the hair surface than hydroalcoholic black tea extracts. This formulation may have potential for development as a hair dye and protective agent. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  5. Over-expression of thymosin beta 4 promotes abnormal tooth development and stimulation of hair growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hee-Jae; Philp, Deborah; Lee, Soo-Hyun; Moon, Hye-Sung; Kleinman, Hynda K; Nakamura, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 has multi-functional roles in cell physiology. It accelerates wound healing, hair growth and angiogenesis, and increases laminin-5 expression in corneal epithelium. Furthermore, thymosin beta 4 stimulates tumor growth and metastasis by induction of cell migration and vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis. Using a construct on the skin-specific keratin-5 promoter, we have developed thymosin beta 4 over-expressing transgenic mice to further study its functional roles. Thymosin beta 4 in adult skin and in embryonic stages of the transgenic mouse was analyzed by both Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The over-expression of thymosin beta 4 was observed especially around hair follicles and in the teeth in the transgenic mice. We examined the phenotype of the thymosin beta 4 over-expressing mice. Hair growth was accelerated. In addition, the transgenic mice had abnormally-shaped white teeth and dull incisors. We found that the expression of laminin-5 was up-regulated in the skin of the transgenic mice. We conclude that thymosin beta 4 has an important physiological role in hair growth and in tooth development.

  6. Hair radioactivity as a measure of exposure to radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, W. H.; Pories, W. J.; Fratianne, R. B.; Flynn, A.

    1972-01-01

    Since many radioisotopes accumulate in hair, this tropism was investigated by comparing the radioactivity of shaved with plucked hair collected from rats at various time intervals up to 24 hrs after intravenous injection of the ecologically important radioisotopes, iodine-131, manganese-54, strontium-85, and zinc-65. The plucked hair includes the hair follicles where biochemical transformations are taking place. The data indicate a slight surge of each radioisotpe into the hair immediately after injection, a variation of content of each radionuclide in the hair, and a greater accumulation of radioactivity in plucked than in shaved hair. These results have application not only to hair as a measure of exposure to radioisotopes, but also to tissue damage and repair at the hair follicle.

  7. Effect of a nutritional supplement on hair loss in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floc'h, Caroline; Cheniti, Ahsène; Connétable, Sophie; Piccardi, Nathalie; Vincenzi, Colombina; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-03-01

    Female pattern hair loss is a frequent and distressing condition. To evaluate vs. control, the effects on hair loss of a 6-month supplementation with specific omega 3&6 and antioxidants. One hundred and twenty healthy female subjects participated in this 6-month, randomized, comparative study. The primary endpoint was the change in hair density evaluated on standardized photographs. Secondary endpoints included changes in telogen hair percentage and diameter distribution of anagen hair (>40 µm vs. ≤40 µm) measured by trichogram. Overall changes in hair density and diameter were also measured by trichometer and by subjects' self-assessment. After 6 months of treatment, photograph assessment demonstrated a superior improvement in the supplemented group (P hair percentage was significantly (P hair (>40 µm) increased compared to the control group. The trichometer index increased in the supplemented group, while it decreased in the control group. A large majority of supplemented subjects reported a reduction in hair loss (89.9% of subjects at 6 months), as well as an improvement in hair diameter (86.1%) and hair density (87.3%). A 6-month supplementation with omega 3&6 and antioxidants acts efficiently against hair loss in improving hair density and reducing the telogen percentage and the proportion of miniaturized anagen hair. Objectively measured improvements were confirmed by the subjects' perception of efficacy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Perception of Hair Transplant for Androgenetic Alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bater, Kristin L; Ishii, Masaru; Joseph, Andrew; Su, Peiyi; Nellis, Jason; Ishii, Lisa E

    2016-12-01

    Hair transplant is among the most common cosmetic services sought by men, with more than 11 000 procedures performed in 2014. Despite its growing popularity, the effect of hair transplant on societal perceptions of youth, attractiveness, or facets of workplace and social success is unknown. To determine whether hair transplant improves observer ratings of age, attractiveness, successfulness, and approachability in men treated for androgenetic alopecia and to quantify the effect of hair transplant on each of these domains. A randomized controlled experiment was conducted from November 10 to December 6, 2015, using web-based surveys featuring photographs of men before and after hair transplant. One hundred twenty-two participants recruited through various social media platforms successfully completed the survey. Observers were shown 2 side-by-side images of each man and asked to compare the image on the left with the one on the right. Of 13 pairs of images displayed, 7 men had undergone a hair transplant procedure and 6 had served as controls. Observers evaluated each photograph using various metrics, including age, attractiveness, successfulness, and approachability. A multivariate analysis of variance was performed to understand the effect of hair transplant on observer perceptions. Planned posthypothesis testing was used to identify which variables changed significantly as a result of the transplant. Observer ratings of age (in number of years younger) and attractiveness, successfulness, and approachability (on a scale of 0 to 100; scores higher than 50 indicate a positive change). Of the 122 participants in the survey, 58 were men (47.5%); mean (range) age was 27.1 (18-52) years. The initial multivariate analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant multivariate effect for transplant (Wilks λ = 0.9646; P < .001). Planned posthypothesis analyses were performed to examine individual differences across the 4 domains. Findings determined with t

  9. Hair loss and hair-pulling in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Corrine K; Coleman, Kristine; Worlein, Julie; Novak, Melinda A

    2013-07-01

    Alopecia is a common problem in rhesus macaque colonies. A possible cause of this condition is hair-pulling; however the true relationship between hair-pulling and alopecia is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between hair loss and hair-pulling in 1258 rhesus macaques housed in 4 primate colonies across the United States. Alopecia levels ranged from 34.3% to 86.5% (mean, 49.3%) at the primate facilities. At facilities reporting a sex-associated difference, more female macaques were reported to exhibit alopecia than were males. In contrast, more males were reported to hair-pull. Animals reported to hair-pull were significantly more likely to have some amount of alopecia, but rates of hair-pulling were substantially lower than rates of alopecia, ranging from 0.6% to 20.5% (mean, 7.7%) of the populations. These results further demonstrate that hair-pulling plays only a small role in alopecia in rhesus macaques.

  10. Hair root characteristics of the human scalp hair in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D.R. Peereboom-Wynia

    1982-01-01

    textabstractMorphological data on hair follicles have been available for over a hundred years, but only in recent years has a substantial advance been made in our knowledge of types and distribution of hair, its structure, metabolism, biochemistry and clinical patterns, and hormonal influences on

  11. Hair loss and hyperprolactinemia in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In the literature of the past 30 years there are only some publications concerned with hair loss and hyperprolactinemia in women. Therefore, the relevance of hyperprolactinemia was evaluated in 40 women with diffuse alopecia. Hair loss was assessed by clinical appearance and the pluck trichogram. 82.5% of the female patients had diffuse hair loss and 17.5% had androgenetic alopecia. The highest prolactin values measured were 1390 ng/ml and 255 ng/ml. Six patients had values between 150–80.4 ng/ml and 10 between 79.1–51.7 ng/ml. All others had prolactin values below 50 ng/ml. Fifteen untreated patients with elevated prolactin levels could be followed up. Without any prolactin-inhibiting drugs, reductions and normalizations beside moderate fluctuations could be detected. Thyroid-specific diagnostics showed in 95% of the patients a normal thyroid function. 2.5% had a slight hyperthyreoidism and 2.5% had a slight hypothyreoidism. No female patient had clinical signs of androgenization and the determined androgens testosterone, androstendione and dihydroepiandrostendione were in the normal range. According to these results, moderate elevated prolactin levels in association with diffuse or androgenetic hair loss can be neglected as causative for the hair loss, because there is no evidence that they have an influence to the pattern, the extent or the duration of the hair loss. These results are supported by investigations of other authors who described only in high doses of prolactin an inhibiting effect on human hair follicles in vitro. Nevertheless, moderate constantly elevated prolactin levels should induce further diagnostics to exclude a prolactin-producing tumor of the pituitary gland. PMID:22870355

  12. Predicting tooth color from facial features and gender: results from a white elderly cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Alexander J; Nitschke, Ina; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Wegener, Ina; Rammelsberg, Peter; Hassel, Jessica C

    2008-02-01

    Clinicians providing edentulous patients with complete dentures are often confronted with the problem of not knowing the patient's natural tooth color. It would be valuable to be able to determine this from other facial features. The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of predicting tooth color in the elderly from hair and eye color, facial skin complexion, and gender. The lightness (L*), chroma (C*), and hue (h*) of the color of 541 natural teeth were measured for a white study population (94 subjects, 75 to 77 years old, 55.3% male) by means of a single measurement with a clinically applicable spectrophotometer. Hair and eye color and facial skin complexion were recorded in categories. Mixed-effects regression models were calculated for each L*, C*, and h* value with hair and eye color, facial skin complexion, and gender as independent variables (alpha=.05). Only gender and hair color in univariate analysis and, additionally, eye color in multivariate analysis, were significant predictors of tooth color. Higher L* values (lighter color) were associated with lighter eye color and with female gender. The C* value was lower (less saturated) for women. More yellow/green than yellow/red h* values were associated with hair colors other than black and with female gender. However, the parameter estimates of the variables were rather low. Determination of tooth color from hair and eye color and from gender in the white elderly was only partially possible.

  13. Hair Growth Promotion Activity and Its Mechanism of Polygonum multiflorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polygonum multiflorum Radix (PMR has long history in hair growth promotion and hair coloring in clinical applications. However, several crucial problems in its clinic usage and mechanisms are still unsolved or lack scientific evidences. In this research, C57BL/6J mice were used to investigate hair growth promotion activity and possible mechanism of PMR and Polygonum multiflorum Radix Preparata (PMRP. Hair growth promotion activities were investigated by hair length, hair covered skin ratio, the number of follicles, and hair color. Regulation effects of several cytokines involved in the hair growth procedure were tested, such as fibroblast growth factor (FGF-7, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH, β-catenin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. Oral PMR groups had higher hair covered skin ratio (100 ± 0.00% than oral PMRP groups (48%~88%. However, topical usage of PMRP had about 90% hair covered skin ratio. Both oral administration of PMR and topically given PMRP showed hair growth promotion activities. PMR was considered to be more suitable for oral administration, while PMRP showed greater effects in external use. The hair growth promotion effect of oral PMR was most probably mediated by the expression of FGF-7, while topical PMRP promoted hair growth by the stimulation of SHH expression.

  14. Hair Growth Promotion Activity and Its Mechanism of Polygonum multiflorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunfei; Han, Mingnuan; He, Yanran; Zhao, Ronghua

    2015-01-01

    Polygonum multiflorum Radix (PMR) has long history in hair growth promotion and hair coloring in clinical applications. However, several crucial problems in its clinic usage and mechanisms are still unsolved or lack scientific evidences. In this research, C57BL/6J mice were used to investigate hair growth promotion activity and possible mechanism of PMR and Polygonum multiflorum Radix Preparata (PMRP). Hair growth promotion activities were investigated by hair length, hair covered skin ratio, the number of follicles, and hair color. Regulation effects of several cytokines involved in the hair growth procedure were tested, such as fibroblast growth factor (FGF-7), Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), β-catenin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Oral PMR groups had higher hair covered skin ratio (100 ± 0.00%) than oral PMRP groups (48%~88%). However, topical usage of PMRP had about 90% hair covered skin ratio. Both oral administration of PMR and topically given PMRP showed hair growth promotion activities. PMR was considered to be more suitable for oral administration, while PMRP showed greater effects in external use. The hair growth promotion effect of oral PMR was most probably mediated by the expression of FGF-7, while topical PMRP promoted hair growth by the stimulation of SHH expression. PMID:26294926

  15. "I think gorilla-like back effusions of hair are rather a turn-off": 'Excessive hair' and male body hair (removal) discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Gareth; Braun, Virginia

    2016-06-01

    Men's hair removal practices are becoming mainstream, seen as a consequence of changing masculine norms and men's relationships to their bodies. This is often presented as a straightforward 'shift' from men's ideal bodies as naturally hairy, to increased hairlessness, and the consequence on men's body concerns as inevitable. This paper analyses qualitative survey data from Aotearoa/New Zealand using critical thematic analysis, and describes three themes. Two themes capture contradictory ideas: that men's body hair is natural, and that men's body hair is unpleasant. A third theme introduces the concept of 'excess' hair, which allowed sense-making of this contradiction, mandating men's grooming of 'excessive' hair. However its vagueness as a concept may provoke anxiety for men resulting in hair removal. This paper adds to a body of research demonstrating a cultural transition: the ways changing masculinities, increased commodification of male bodies, and shifting gender roles impact on men's hair removal practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Torsional method for evaluating hair damage and performance of hair care ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, D; Kamath, Y K

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a single hair fiber torsional pendulum method to determine the role of the cuticle and the cortex on torsional properties with respect to fiber cross-sectional area, fiber rigidity, and energy dissipation at 65% RH and in the wet state. Our results demonstrate that in fine diameter fibers with a high cuticle-to-cortex ratio, the cuticula exert a significant effect on the torsional deformation behavior of hair fibers at both normal humidities and in the wet condition. In addition, our data indicate that energy dissipation is confined to fibers with a high cuticle-to-cortex ratio, and the amount of energy dissipated becomes more pronounced with increasing water content. The torsional properties of hair spray-treated fibers suggest that the deposited hair spray film masks the properties of the base fiber and imparts its own dissipative character to the measurement. Since tensile mechanical properties are often used to make claims about the performance of hair care products, we have compared the results obtained from torsional and tensile measurements on over-processed bleached hair fibers conditioned with Polyquaternium-10 and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CETAB) to evaluate which method is more advantageous. Our data demonstrate that torsional measurements can distinguish hair care products which reinforce the cuticle from those which affect the cortex, while tensile measurements showed no significant differences.

  17. A survey of the awareness, knowledge and behavior of hair dye use in a korean population with gray hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Jung, Hee Dam; Kang, Hoon

    2012-08-01

    Gray hair naturally develops in the process of human aging. Many people with gray hair periodically dye their hair. Hair dyeing products are widely used and they can cause adverse effects. Therefore, the user's knowledge and recognition about hair dyeing and related side effects are important. The goal of this study was to lay the foundation for understanding, preventing and treating side effects caused by hair coloring products. We conducted a questionnaire survey for adult males and females aged over 20 who had gray hair. A total of 500 subjects were included in this study and statistical analysis was performed. Large numbers of the people who had experience with hair dye (233 out of 319 people, 73.0%) did not know about the exact brand name of the hair dye product that they were using. Of 319 hair dye users, 23.8% (76 out of 319) people stated that they experienced side effects. Despite the occurrence of side effects from hair dyeing products, it seems they did not realize the seriousness of the side effects or the need for treatment. It is advisable to introduce a system that enables users to become aware of the ingredients and side effects of hair coloring products and give opportunities for users to become aware of the side effects of hair coloring through education, publicity and publication of an informational booklet.

  18. Trichogram To Monitor Therapeutic Benefit In Hair Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uppal Monica

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichogram is a method of quantifying hair. We report 3 cases of diffuse hair loss of varying etiology in whom the improvement after therapeutic intervention could be objectively documented using trichogram.

  19. The morphology of hairs in Plantago famarae Svent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Andrzejewska-Golec

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a part of a series of investigations on hairs in the genus Plantago L. It deals with an endemic taxon - Plantago famarae Svent. which has not been investigated yet in respect to hairs. The presence of two types of headless hairs and two types of headed hairs was observed. The results of this study are compared to those of another work on two other species from the Canary Islands. P. famarae does not differ from P. arborescens by either hair type or distribution. However, in contrast to P. webbii it has no web-like hairs while hairs with a multicellular stalk and unicellular head hairs (characteristic for the taxa of subgenus Psyllium are distributed in a different way.

  20. Eyelash Transplantation Using Leg Hair by Follicular Unit Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanusi Umar, MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Fine hairs of the head and nape areas have been used as donor sources in eyelash transplantation but are straight, coarse, and grow rapidly, requiring frequent eyelash maintenance. This is the first reported case of eyelash transplantation by follicular unit extraction using leg hair as a donor source; findings were compared with that of another patient who underwent a similar procedure with donor hairs from the nape area. Although both patients reported marked improvement in fullness of eyelashes within 3 months postsurgery, the transplanted leg hair eyelashes required less frequent trimming (every 5–6 weeks compared with nape hair eyelashes (every 2–3 weeks. Additionally, in leg hair eyelashes, the need for perming to sustain a natural looking eyelash curl was eliminated. Eyelash transplantation using leg donor hair in hirsute women may result in good cosmetic outcomes and require less maintenance compared with nape donor hair.

  1. Mutual Inductance and Magnetic Force Calculations for Bitter Disk Coil (Pancake with Nonlinear Radial Current and Filamentary Circular Coil with Azimuthal Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Babic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bitter coils are electromagnets used for the generation of extremely strong magnetic fields superior to 30 T. In this paper we calculate the mutual inductance and the magnetic force between Bitter disk (pancake coil with the nonlinear radial current and the circular filamentary coil with the azimuthal current. The close form expressed over complete elliptic integrals of the first and second kind as well as Heuman’s Lambda function is obtained for this configuration either for the mutual inductance or for the magnetic force. The results of this method are compared with those obtained by the improved modified filament method for the presented configuration. All results are in an excellent agreement.

  2. Methodological Considerations for Hair Cortisol Measurements in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Radomir; Rovnaghi, Cynthia R.; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hair cortisol levels are used increasingly as a measure for chronic stress in young children. We propose modifications to the current methods used for hair cortisol analysis to more accurately determine reference ranges for hair cortisol across different populations and age groups. Methods The authors compared standard (finely cutting hair) vs. milled methods for hair processing (n=16), developed a 4-step extraction process for hair protein and cortisol (n=16), and compared liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LCMS) vs. ELISA assays for measuring hair cortisol (n=28). The extraction process included sequential incubations in methanol and acetone, repeated twice. Hair protein was measured via spectrophotometric ratios at 260/280 nm to indicate the hair dissolution state using a BioTek® plate reader and dedicated software. Hair cortisol was measured using an ELISA assay kit. Individual (n=13), pooled hair samples (n=12) with high, intermediate, and low cortisol values and the ELISA assay internal standards (n=3) were also evaluated by LCMS. Results Milled and standard methods showed highly correlated hair cortisol (rs=0.951, pLCMS and ELISA were correlated (rs=0.737; pLCMS (38.7 [14.4, 136] ng/ml) were lower than by ELISA (172.2 [67.9, 1051] ng/ml). LCMS also detected cortisone, which comprised 13.4% (3.7%, 25.9%) of the steroids detected. Conclusion Methodological studies suggest that finely cutting hair with sequential incubations in methanol and acetone, repeated twice, extracts greater yields of cortisol than does milled hair. Based on these findings, at least three incubations may be required to extract most of the cortisol in human hair samples. In addition, ELISA-based assays showed greater sensitivity for measuring hair cortisol levels than LCMS-based assays. PMID:25811341

  3. Why neutron stars have three hairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Leo; Yagi, Kent; Pappas, George; Yunes, Nicolas; Apostolatos, Theocharis

    2015-04-01

    Neutron stars have recently been found to enjoy a certain `baldness' in their multipolar structure which is independent of the equation of state (EoS) of dense nuclear matter. This is reminiscent of the black hole no-hair relations, and in stark contrast to regular stars. Why is this? Is it because realistic EoSs are sufficiently similar, or because GR effects are especially important, or because the nuclear matter is `cold'? We explore the physics behind these and more hypotheses, and give a convincing explanation for the true origin of the three-hair relations.

  4. Fabrication of a Microneedle Using Human Hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Takei, Tamotsu

    2009-09-01

    In this study, we developed a novel microneedle design to inject medication into the skin and to remove blood from a blood vessel. A drilling machine and chemicals were used to drill a hollow needle bore into the center of a strand of human hair. Our results demonstrate that a pen-shaped microneedle has been fabricated at a length of 1.1 mm, a base diameter of 80 µm, and a tip diameter of 40 µm. The hair microneedle was sufficiently strong to insert into the meat of a chicken leg.

  5. The elusive mechanotransduction machinery of hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Müller, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Hair cells in the mammalian cochlea are specialized sensory cells that convert mechanical signals evoked by sound waves into electrochemical signals. Several integral membrane proteins have recently been identified that are closely linked to the mechanotransduction process. Efforts are under way to determine the extent to which they are subunits of the long thought-after mechanotransduction channel. Recent findings also suggest that mechanotransduction may have a role in fine tuning the length of the stereocilia and thus in the regulation of morphological features of hair cells that are inherently linked to the mechanotransduction process. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Hair product artifact in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenji, Sneha; Wilman, Alan H; Mah, Dennell; Seres, Peter; Genge, Angela; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    The presence of metallic compounds in facial cosmetics and permanent tattoos may affect the quality of magnetic resonance imaging. We report a case study describing a signal artifact due to the use of a leave-on powdered hair dye. On reviewing the ingredients of the product, it was found to contain several metallic compounds. In lieu of this observation, we suggest that MRI centers include the use of metal- or mineral-based facial cosmetics or hair products in their screening protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Grey Hair Evlsion Technique For Evaluating the Effect of Drugs For the Treatment of Premature Grey Hairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Pasricha

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved method for evaluating the effect of treatment for premature grey hairs is described. The method consists of pulling out all the grey hairs in a patient and counting the number removed. Simultaneously, the converted hairs are also snipped at the grey-black junction and counted. After a gap of 3 months, the survey is repeated to count the number of hairs which have regrowing as grey hairs, the hairs which have become grey and also the hairs which have got converted into black during this period. Such surveys are repeated at 3 months intervals over a period of several years to see the progress of greying of hair in an individual and to evaluate the effect of various therapeutic procedures.

  8. Matting Of Hair Due To ′Sunsilk′ Shampoo

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem Mohd

    1995-01-01

    Matting of hair been reported from time to time due to treatment of hair with detergent, shampoos, waving lotions, setting lotions and bleaches. A case of matting of hairs in a young girl due to a change in the brand of shampoo is reported.

  9. An approach to unsupervised hair removal from skin melanoma image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng-Ying; Qin, Shi-Yin; Jiang, Zhi-Guo; Meng, Ru-Song; Xu, Bin

    2008-10-01

    Hair removal from skin melanoma image is one of the key problems for the precise segmentation and analysis of the skin malignant melanoma. In this paper, an automatically hair removal algorithm in dermoscopy images of pigmented skin lesions is proposed. This algorithm includes three steps: firstly, the melanoma image with hairs are enhanced by morphologic closing-based top-hat operator and then segmented through statistic threshold; secondly, the hairs are extracted based on the elongate of connected region; thirdly, the hair-occluded information is repaired by replacing the hair pixels with the nearby non-hair pixels. As a matter of fact, with the morphologic closing-based top-hat operator both strong and weak hairs can be enhanced simultaneously, and the elongate state of band-like connected region can be correctly described by the elongate function proposed in this paper so as to measure the hair effectively. Therefore, the unsupervised hair removal problem in dermoscopy melanoma image can be resolved very well through combining the hair extraction with information repair. The experiment results show that various hairs can be extracted accurately and the repaired effect of textures can satisfy the requirement of medical diagnosis.

  10. Manganese Concentrations In Hair and Fingernail of Some Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manganese concentrations in hair and fingernails were determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS).The mean manganese in hair and fingernail were 0.54 ± 0.35mg/g and 0.68 ± 0.30mg/g respectively. A progressive decrease in manganese concentrations in hair and fingernails with age indicated no ...

  11. Focal Atrichia: A Diagnostic Clue in Female Pattern Hair Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Elise A; Whiting, David A

    2017-10-07

    Focal atrichia is a common clinical finding in female pattern hair loss whose specificity and histologic findings need further clarification. To determine the frequency of focal atrichia in various types of hair loss and its histologic characteristics in female pattern hair loss. Part 1: Review of 250 consecutive female patients seen with hair loss for the presence of focal atrichia and Part 2: paired biopsies of haired areas vs focal atrichia in 18 subjects with female pattern hair loss RESULTS: Focal atrichia was seen in 46/104 (44%) of women with female pattern hair loss, including 67% of late onset vs 15% of early onset, compared to 3/146 (2%) of those with other hair disorders Biopsy findings of focal atrichia in female pattern hair loss showed primarily a more progressive miniaturization process than that of haired areas of the scalp. Some women with female pattern hair loss may have had concomitant chronic telogen effluvium CONCLUSIONS: When present, focal atrichia is a clinical clue to the diagnosis of female pattern hair loss, particularly late onset subtype. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Matting Of Hair Due To ′Sunsilk′ Shampoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Mohd

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Matting of hair been reported from time to time due to treatment of hair with detergent, shampoos, waving lotions, setting lotions and bleaches. A case of matting of hairs in a young girl due to a change in the brand of shampoo is reported.

  13. Hair Growth Promotant Activity of Petroleum Ether Root Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of Glycyrrhiza glabra root extract on hair growth in female Wistar rats. Methods: Female Wistar rats were used for the hair growth promotion studies. They were divided into three groups(n = 6) and their dorsal skin was completely denuded to completely remove hair. Paraffin oil (control), 2 ...

  14. A case report and clinical approach to silver blonde hair

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the RAB27A gene. It is characterized by pigmentary dilution of the skin and hair causing silvery gray hair, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and characteristic light microscopy findings in scalp hair shaft seen as large irregular clumps ...

  15. Supramolecular hair dyes: a new application of cocrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delori, Amit; Urquhart, Andrew; Oswald, Iain D. H.

    2016-01-01

    The manuscript presents the first report of hair dyes of various colors formed by cocrystallization. Unlike the most popular oxidative hair dye (OHD) products, these dyes are NH3 free and do not require H2O2 as a color developer. The importance of these new hair dyes products is further enhanced...

  16. African-American Hair: Tips for Everyday Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty skin Eczema / dermatitis Hair and scalp problems ... part of your hair. Use a hot oil treatment twice a month: This adds ... hair. Use a heat protecting product before styling: Adding this to wet ...

  17. A close shave: The taboo on female body hair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelik, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    In the past two decades body hair has fast become a taboo for women. The empirical data of sociological and medical research reveal that the vast majority of women remove most of their body hair since the beginning of this century. Body hair is typically a marker that polices significant boundaries:

  18. Attitudes toward Women's Body Hair: Relationship with Disgust Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggemann, Marika; Lewis, Christine

    2004-01-01

    We aimed to further investigate the "hairlessness" norm that is the common practice of body hair removal among women. A sample of 198 undergraduate students (91 men, 107 women) completed questionnaires asking about attitudes toward women's body hair and the reasons women remove this hair, as well as a measure of disgust sensitivity. It was found…

  19. Aqueous Extract of Red Deer Antler Promotes Hair Growth by Regulating the Hair Cycle and Cell Proliferation in Hair Follicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-jie Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deer antlers are the only mammalian appendage capable of regeneration. We aimed to investigate the effect of red deer antler extract in regulating hair growth, using a mouse model. The backs of male mice were shaved at eight weeks of age. Crude aqueous extracts of deer antler were prepared at either 4°C or 100°C and injected subcutaneously to two separate groups of mice (n=9 at 1 mL/day for 10 consecutive days, with water as a vehicle control group. The mice skin quantitative hair growth parameters were measured and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine was used to identify label-retaining cells. We found that, in both the 4°C and the 100°C deer antler aqueous extract-injection groups, the anagen phase was extended, while the number of BrdU-incorporated cells was dramatically increased. These results indicate that deer antler aqueous extract promotes hair growth by extending the anagen phase and regulating cell proliferation in the hair follicle region.

  20. White piedra: molecular identification of Trichosporon inkin in members of the same family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richini-Pereira, Virgínia Bodelão; Camargo, Rosângela Maria Pires de; Bagagli, Eduardo; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2012-06-01

    White piedra is a superficial mycosis caused by the genus Trichosporon and characterized by nodules on hair shaft. The authors report a family referred to as pediculosis. Mycological culture on Mycosel® plus molecular identification was performed to precisely identify the etiology. A Trichosporon spp. infection was revealed. The molecular procedure identified the agent as Trichosporon inkin. White piedra and infection caused by T. inkin are rarely reported in Southern Brazil. The molecular tools are essentials on identifying the Trichosporon species.

  1. Towards a body hair atlas of women of caucasian ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, D; Hoff, A; Scheede, S; Fischer, F; Tilsner, J; Lüttke, J; Neumann, Y; Hagens, R

    2016-08-01

    A preliminary study was conducted in 17 female volunteers (mean age 29.8 years) to gain deeper insights into the characteristics of terminal Caucasian female body hair of different body parts. The focus on Caucasian women was driven by the high number of different scalp hair phenotypes in this ethnicity and intended to identify relevant differences between body areas to improve body hair removal approaches. Multiple growth parameters and structural parameters were assessed for hair on the upper arm, forearm, upper leg, lower leg, axilla and intimate area and compared to scalp data. In particular, macroscopic and much less microscopic or hair surface properties differ strikingly in the investigated body areas. Hair density on the body is much lower than on scalp with the highest hair density in the axilla and intimate area. Multihair follicular units are described for scalp but were also found to a smaller proportion in the axilla and the intimate area. Substantial percentages of hair triplets are only found on the scalp and intimate area. Hair diameter is highest in the intimate area, followed by axillary and lower leg hair and correlates with a faster hair growth rate. The angle of emerging hair is smallest in the intimate area, axilla and on the lower leg. Hair shafts on the lower leg and in the axilla have most overlapping cuticle layers, but independent of body region, no significant differences in the mean thickness of cuticle layers were detectable. In addition, no differences were found in the mean distance between cuticle layer edges along the hair shaft and the hair surface roughness. Hair on the scalp, forearm, upper arm and upper leg had an almost round shape, whereas hair of the lower leg, intimate area and axilla had more elliptical shape. Hairs on the arm showed the highest luminance values and no visible medulla. The darkest hairs were in the axilla and intimate area containing the highest level of visible medulla in hair shafts. To our knowledge

  2. An overview of chemical straightening of human hair: technical aspects, potential risks to hair fibre and health and legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Vilela, A L; Botelho, A J; Muehlmann, L A

    2014-02-01

    Personal image, as it relates to external beauty, has attracted much attention from the cosmetic industry, and capillary aesthetics is a leader in consumption in this area. There is a great diversity of products targeting both the treatment and beautification of hair. Among them, hair straighteners stand out with a high demand by costumers aiming at beauty, social acceptance and ease of daily hair maintenance. However, this kind of treatment affects the chemical structure of keratin and of the hair fibre, bringing up some safety concerns. Moreover, the development of hair is a dynamic and cyclic process, where the duration of growth cycles depends not only on where hair grows, but also on issues such as the individual's age, dietary habits and hormonal factors. Thus, although hair fibres are composed of dead epidermal cells, when they emerge from the scalp, there is a huge variation in natural wave and the response to hair cosmetics. Although it is possible to give the hair a cosmetically favourable appearance through the use of cosmetic products, for good results in any hair treatment, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of the process. Important information, such as the composition and structure of the hair fibres, and the composition of products and techniques available for hair straightening, must be taken into account so that the straightening process can be designed appropriately, avoiding undesirable side effects for hair fibre and for health. This review aims to address the morphology, chemical composition and molecular structure of hair fibres, as well as the products and techniques used for chemical hair relaxing, their potential risk to hair fibre and to health and the legal aspects of their use. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  3. Hair analysis for drugs of abuse. III. Movement and stability of methoxyphenamine (as a model compound of methamphetamine) along hair shaft with hair growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Y; Shimamine, M; Takahashi, K

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the movement of methoxyphenamine (MOP, a model compound of methamphetamine) along the hair shaft at the rate of hair growth and the stability of drugs in hair for several months. Five healthy subjects (3 males and 2 females) took 50 mg of methoxyphenamine orally once a day for 7 days. Scalp hairs from the posterior vertex were collected every 2 weeks or every 8 weeks after the first dosage. The hairs were cut into 1-cm sections and extracted with methanol-5N HCl (20:1). MOP in the extract was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with tetradeuterium labeled MOP as an internal standard. The drug moved along hair shaft at the rate of 2.8-3.2 mm/week, according to hair growth, without diffusion. When drug bands were extrapolated according to the sections in which drug was detected, the bands were approximately 5 mm wide, equivalent to 1.7-2.4 periods of 7-day hair growth. In the case of identical doses, the drug level was highest in the root side and lowest in the distal side. In our data, we found that the drug level in hair had decreased approximately 50% five months later. The ratio of drug levels in corresponding sections correlated well to the ratio of doses, except where the hair shafts had been damaged or the drugs had decomposed.

  4. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar

    2016-01-01

    to being combed flat. Until now, both simplex and familial UHS-affected case subjects with autosomal-dominant as well as -recessive inheritance have been reported. However, none of these case subjects were linked to a molecular genetic cause. Here, we report the identification of UHS-causative mutations......Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant...... located in the three genes PADI3 (peptidylarginine deiminase 3), TGM3 (transglutaminase 3), and TCHH (trichohyalin) in a total of 11 children. All of these individuals carry homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in one of these three genes, indicating an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern...

  5. Tufted Hair Folliculitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev Eken

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tufted hair folliculitis (THF is a recurrent and progressive folliculitis of the scalp that resolves with irregular areas of scarring alopecia within which numerous hair tufts emerge from dilated follicular openings. A 14-year-old female presented with pruritic, inflammatory and exudating wounds on the scalp which appeared ten years ago. Dermatological examination revealed tufts of 10 to 15 apparently normal hair shafts in a sclerotic plaque measuring 15x25 cm on the parieto-occipital region of the scalp that emerge through dilated follicular openings. The patient was diagnosed by histopathological examination as having THF. Oral rifampicin 600 mg/day, cephalexin 1500 mg/day and vitamin C 1000 mg/day for 3 weeks were not effective, then, he was treated with isotretinoin 0.6 mg/kg/day for six months. The inflammation and exudation decreased by this treatment while hair tufting was persisting. We report this case since THF is rarely encountered disease and is difficult to be treated.

  6. Body esteem in adolescent hair pullers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenburger, Erin M; Tung, Esther S; Keuthen, Nancy J

    2014-06-01

    Trichotillomania (TTM) often first presents in adolescence, a developmental period marked by vulnerability in body image. To date, no one has studied the relationship between this disorder and body esteem. 49 adolescents with DSM-IV TTM or chronic hair pulling (HP) and 23 control adolescents were administered diagnostic assessments and self-report measures of hair pulling and body esteem. HP youth vs. controls reported lower levels of body esteem on all Body-Esteem Scale for Adolescents and Adults (BESAA) subscales (appearance, attribution and weight satisfaction). HP contributed to lowered body esteem, independent of comorbid anxiety or depression. As expected, HP youth with vs. without comorbid anxiety or depression reported lowered levels of body esteem. Further, greater HP severity and distress were significantly associated with lower levels of body esteem. HP severity alone but not distress/impairment predicted lower levels of body esteem, independent of comorbid anxiety and depression. Both hair pulling and comorbid anxiety and depression can independently impact body esteem in adolescent hair pullers.

  7. Mohair, cashmere and other animal hair fibres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hunter, L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available animal hair fibres L Hunter, CSIR and Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), South Africa Although luxury animal fibres, excluding silk, represent far less than 0.1% of global fibre production, they play a very significant role in the luxury...

  8. The Egyptian Hair Pin: practical, sacred, fatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joann Fletcher

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Generally regarded as little more than a mundane tool employed in daily life, the humble hairpin occasionally played a rather more prominent role in history than has perhaps been appreciated. As the most ancient implements associated with hair styling, simple pins of bone and ivory were commonly employed in Egypt by c.4000 BC as a means of securing long hair in an upswept style (e.g. Petrie and Mace 1901, 21, 34. Although their occasional use by men undermines the assumption that hairpins are 'a relatively certain example of a “gendered” artefact' (Wilfong 1997, 67, the vast majority have been found in female burials. They can be made of bone and ivory, wood, steatite, glass, gold, silver and bronze, and two 12cm long bronze examples were found within the hair of Princess Ahmosi c.1550 BC (Fletcher 1995, 376, 441 while the hair of an anonymous woman at Gurob c.AD 110 had been secured in a bun with pins of bone, tortoiseshell and silver (Walker and Bierbrier 1997, 209.

  9. Structure and mechanical behavior of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Yang, Wen; Wang, Bin; Meyers, Marc André

    2017-04-01

    The understanding of the mechanical behavior of hair under various conditions broadens our knowledge in biological materials science and contributes to the cosmetic industry. The hierarchical organization of hair is studied from the intermediate filament to the structural levels. The effects of strain rate, relative humidity, and temperature are evaluated. Hair exhibits a high tensile strength, 150-270MPa, which is significantly dependent on strain rate and humidity. The strain-rate sensitivity, approximately 0.06-0.1, is comparable to that of other keratinous materials and common synthetic polymers. The structures of the internal cortex and surface cuticle are affected by the large tensile extension. One distinguishing feature, the unwinding of the α-helix and the possible transformation to β-sheet structure of keratin under tension, which affects the ductility of hair, is analytically evaluated and incorporated into a constitutive equation. A good agreement with the experimental results is obtained. This model elucidates the tensile response of the α-keratin fibers. The contributions of elastic and plastic strains on reloading are evaluated and correlated to structural changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Inside black holes with synchronized hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Brihaye

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, various examples of asymptotically flat, rotating black holes (BHs with synchronized hair have been explicitly constructed, including Kerr BHs with scalar or Proca hair, and Myers–Perry BHs with scalar hair and a mass gap, showing there is a general mechanism at work. All these solutions have been found numerically, integrating the fully non-linear field equations of motion from the event horizon outwards. Here, we address the spacetime geometry of these solutions inside the event horizon. Firstly, we provide arguments, within linear theory, that there is no regular inner horizon for these solutions. Then, we address this question fully non-linearly, using as a tractable model five dimensional, equal spinning, Myers–Perry hairy BHs. We find that, for non-extremal solutions: (1 the inside spacetime geometry in the vicinity of the event horizon is smooth and the equations of motion can be integrated inwards; (2 before an inner horizon is reached, the spacetime curvature grows (apparently without bound. In all cases, our results suggest the absence of a smooth Cauchy horizon, beyond which the metric can be extended, for hairy BHs with synchronized hair.

  11. Inside black holes with synchronized hair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brihaye, Yves, E-mail: yves.brihaye@umons.ac.be [Physique-Mathématique, Universite de Mons-Hainaut, Mons (Belgium); Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen [Departamento de Física da Universidade de Aveiro and Centre for Research and Development in Mathematics and Applications (CIDMA), Campus de Santiago, 3810-183 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-09-10

    Recently, various examples of asymptotically flat, rotating black holes (BHs) with synchronized hair have been explicitly constructed, including Kerr BHs with scalar or Proca hair, and Myers–Perry BHs with scalar hair and a mass gap, showing there is a general mechanism at work. All these solutions have been found numerically, integrating the fully non-linear field equations of motion from the event horizon outwards. Here, we address the spacetime geometry of these solutions inside the event horizon. Firstly, we provide arguments, within linear theory, that there is no regular inner horizon for these solutions. Then, we address this question fully non-linearly, using as a tractable model five dimensional, equal spinning, Myers–Perry hairy BHs. We find that, for non-extremal solutions: (1) the inside spacetime geometry in the vicinity of the event horizon is smooth and the equations of motion can be integrated inwards; (2) before an inner horizon is reached, the spacetime curvature grows (apparently) without bound. In all cases, our results suggest the absence of a smooth Cauchy horizon, beyond which the metric can be extended, for hairy BHs with synchronized hair.

  12. (Hair-dye) and Renal Impairment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Paraphenylenediamine (PPD) is widely used in hair dyes and cosmetic skin application. PPD intoxication following oral ingestion could be an important cause of ARF in Sudan, Morocco and the Indian Subcontinent. Repeated and prolonged exposure to PPD may also be associated with Chronic Kidney ...

  13. Copper and calcium uptake in colored hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, K E; Kilburn, M; Schroeder, M; Martin, B G H; Hawes, C; Marsh, J M; Grovenor, C R M

    2009-01-01

    During hair coloring a number of disulfide bonds in cystine are oxidized (1) to create cysteic acid, forming binding sites for metal ions such as Ca(2+ )and Cu(2+ )from tap water (2). The increased uptake of these metals can have a detrimental impact on fiber properties-for example, reducing shine and causing a poor wet and dry feel (3). In addition, the increased uptake of copper can also contribute to further fiber damage during subsequent coloring due to its ability to take part in metal-induced radical chemistry (4). It is important to know where in the fibers these metals are located in order to either effectively remove these metals or control their chemistry. Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) has been used to locate the calcium and copper within hair that has been treated with a colorant and washed multiple times in tap water containing these ions. Untreated hair is used as a baseline standard material. Images with up to 50-nm spatial resolution of the preferential locations of calcium uptake were obtained, showing a high concentration of calcium in the cuticle region of colored hair, specifically in the sulfur-rich regions (A-layer and exocuticle).

  14. Pigmentary changes after alexandrite laser hair removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Noah Kawika; Greenbaum, Steven S

    2003-04-01

    Postinflammatory pigmentary changes are a frequently encountered problem with numerous dermatologic procedures. Limited literature is available that documents this complication with laser hair removal. It is important for all physicians performing laser hair removal to be aware of this potential complication. We present our experience with postinflammatory pigmentary change and discuss some potential etiologic factors. Seven patients who experienced postinflammatory complications after alexandrite laser hair removal are presented. These are all the patients who developed this complication in our office over the past 2.5 years. The patients who we describe in this article all developed a similar pattern of initial hyperpigmented rings, later developing into a thin wafer-like crust followed by hypopigmentation with gradual return to their normal skin color. In general, the alexandrite laser is both safe and effective for hair removal in patients of varying skin types. Complication rates will increase as skin pigment increases and as the power used increases. However, even in light-skinned individuals without recent pretreatment or posttreatment sun exposure, with proper treatment parameters, complications, and side effects can arise. We have found this to be especially true when treating areas other than the face.

  15. Hair-offerings: an enigmatic Egyptian custom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Tassie

    1996-11-01

    Full Text Available The Egyptians did not record the reasons that lay behind the offering of hair. Using an holistic approach, which combines both ethnographic and ethnohistoric evidence, insights may be gained into the ancient remains of these rituals and practices.

  16. Two Cases of Hair Balls in Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Shcherbak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes two cases of hair balls in girls between aged 2.5 and 12 years. The reason for this quite rare disease may be trichotillomania (compulsive desire to pull out own hair and trichophagia (compulsive or impulsive desire to pull out, and then to swallow own or someone's hair typical for Rapunzel syndrome. Initially, the children were enrolled in the Oncology Centre in view of suspected abdominal tumour. After detection of foreign bodies in the stomach, they were transferred to the Department of Clean Surgery. The following surgeries were performed: median laparotomy, gastrotomy on the front wall of the stomach, bezoar removal. Hair balls were dense felt-like conglomerates with a strong offensive odour. Bezoar dimensions of the younger girl were 855, the elder one — 20108 cm. Postoperative period was uneventful. The children were discharged in a satisfactory condition to be followed up by a surgeon, paediatrician, and psychiatrist in their community.

  17. Penile hair coil strangulation of the child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    shanker

    amputation of the corpus spongiosum. Grade IV corresponds to the section of the glans [8]. In the majority of the reported cases, the constrictive injury is located in the coronal sulcus. The coil of hair can be so deeply embedded in the skin that the physical examination shows no foreign body coiled around the penis.

  18. Cortisol in hair and the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalder, T.; Kirschbaum, C.; Alexander, N.; Bornstein, S.R.; Gao, W.; Miller, R.; Stark, S.; Bosch, J.A.; Fischer, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Although exposure to supraphysiological levels of glucocorticoids is known to contribute to the development of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), the importance of physiological variation in basal cortisol secretion is less clear. This issue can be addressed by using hair cortisol analysis,

  19. Imitating cricket mechanosensory hairs: dream or reality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Casas, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    MEMS offers exciting possibilities for bio-inspired mechanosensors. Over the last years we have been working on cricket inspired hair-sensors for flow observations. In stimulating interactions within EU consortia important insights have surfaced and MEMS sensors with demonstrated acoustic

  20. Ratchet effect for nanoparticle transport in hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Matthias; Patzelt, Alexa; Knorr, Fanny; Lademann, Jürgen; Netz, Roland R

    2017-07-01

    The motion of a single rigid nanoparticle inside a hair follicle is investigated by means of Brownian dynamics simulations. The cuticular hair structure is modeled as a periodic asymmetric ratchet-shaped surface. Induced by oscillating radial hair motion we find directed nanoparticle transport into the hair follicle with maximal velocity at a specific optimal frequency and an optimal particle size. We observe flow reversal when switching from radial to axial oscillatory hair motion. We also study the diffusion behavior and find strongly enhanced diffusion for axial motion with a diffusivity significantly larger than for free diffusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Advances in Understanding Hair Growth [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno A. Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this short review, I introduce an integrated vision of human hair follicle behavior and describe opposing influences that control hair follicle homeostasis, from morphogenesis to hair cycling. The interdependence and complementary roles of these influences allow us to propose that the hair follicle is a true paradigm of a “Yin Yang” type, that is a cold/slow-hot/fast duality. Moreover, a new promising field is emerging, suggesting that glycans are key elements of hair follicle growth control.

  2. Morphology and ultrastructure of antler velvet hair and body hair from red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J L; Harland, D P; Vernon, J A; Krsinic, G L; Walls, R J

    2011-01-01

    We provide a detailed description of the ultrastructure of deer hair fibers. Guard hairs and underhairs from the winter coat of red deer (Cervus elaphus), and antler velvet hairs from the same species were examined. All fibers displayed the typical keratin fiber morphology of overlapping cuticle cells surrounding a core of cortex cells, and often a centrally-located medulla, but there were considerable differences in the diameter, cuticle thickness, and scale pattern, and in the relative amounts of cortex and medulla along individual fibers, and between the different types of fiber. In addition, closer examination of cortex cells using transmission electron microscopy revealed considerable differences in the arrangement of intermediate filaments in the different fiber types. Fine underhairs appeared similar to fine wool fibers from sheep because intermediate filament arrangements were very similar to those found in wool orthocortex cells and paracortex cells. In addition, a similar bilateral distribution of these cell types was evident. However, in the antler velvet hairs and the guard hairs, intermediate filament arrangements were more variable and complex, and showed similarities to those in heterotype cortex cells described for human hair. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Hair dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA concentrations in newborn dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bolis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last intrauterine fetal stage of development and the neonatal period the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA is a key system. Apart of cortisol, the adrenals produce dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, the major steroid produced by the fetus itself, so that it could be considered as a marker of offspring HPA activity. Non invasive, long time-frame retrospective hormonal levels analysis were performed in the hair of humans and animals, but not in newborn puppies, and DHEA never investigated in puppies. This study was aimed to assess DHEA concentrations in the hair of newborn puppies, and to evaluate the influence of newborn age, gender, and breed size on DHEA concentrations. The study enrolled 116 spontaneously dead puppies, grouped on the base of mother bodyweight to small or medium-large breeds, and on the base of age at death. Hair samples were collected by shaving, and stored at room temperature until RIA analysis. The overall hair DHEA concentrations were 46.8±14.8 pg/mg. DHEA levels were 48.6±15.66 pg/mg in females vs 45.1±13.73 pg/mg in males, without significant differences. DHEA levels were 45.5±13.61 pg/mg in small size puppies and 47.8±15.61 pg/mg in medium-large size puppies, with no significant differences. DHEA concentrations in premature puppies (52.5±15.12 pg/mg were significant higher (p<0.05 than in puppies dead between 1 and 30 days after birth (44.5±17.78 pg/mg, but similar to fresh term born-dead puppies (46.2±16.5 pg/mg.  This study demonstrated that DHEA is quantifiable in the hair of newborn dogs, and that DHEA levels are significantly influenced by the puppies age.

  4. Loss of normal anagen hair in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpazhooh, M; Mahmoudi, H R; Rezakhani, S; Valikhani, M; Naraghi, Z S; Mohammadi, Y; Habibi, A; Chams-Davatchi, C

    2015-07-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a known cause of loss of 'normal' anagen hair; that is, shedding of intact anagen hairs covered by root sheaths. However, studies on this subject are limited. To investigate anagen hair shedding in patients with PV, and ascertain its association with disease severity. In total, 96 consecutive patients with PV (new patients or patients in relapse) who were admitted to the dermatology wards of a tertiary hospital were enrolled in this study. Demographic data, PV phenotype, disease severity and presence of scalp lesions were recorded. A group of 10-20 hairs were pulled gently from different areas of the scalp (lesional and nonlesional skin) in all patients, and anagen hairs were counted. Disease severity was graded according to Harman score. Anagen hair was obtained by pull test in 59 of the 96 patients (61.5%), of whom 2 had normal scalp. The mean ± SD anagen hair count was 5.9 ± 7.6 (range 0-31). In univariate analysis, anagen hair loss (P hair count was significantly higher in the severe (mean 6.83 ± 7.89) than the moderate (mean 1.06 ± 1.94) subgroup (P hair loss (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.05-1.28, P hair loss was an independent predictor of the disease severity. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  5. Tiger hair morphology and its variations for wildlife forensic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thitika Kitpipit

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tiger population has dramatically decreased due to illegal consumption and commercialisation of their body parts. Frequently, hair samples are the only evidence found in the crime scene. Thus, they play an important role in species identification for wildlife forensic investigation. In this study, we provide the first in-depth report on a variety of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of tiger guard hairs (24 hairs per individual from four individuals. The proposed method could reduce subjectivity of expert opinions on species identification based on hair morphology. Variations in 23 hair morphological characteristics were quantified at three levels: hair section, body region, and intra-species. The results indicate statistically significant variations in most morphological characteristics in all levels. Intra-species variations of four variables, namely hair length, hair index, scale separation and scale pattern, were low. Therefore, identification of tiger hairs using these multiple features in combination with other characteristics with high inter-species variations (e.g. medulla type should bring about objective and accurate tiger hair identification. The method used should serve as a guideline and be further applied to other species to establish a wildlife hair morphology database. Statistical models could then be constructed to distinguish species and provide evidential values in terms of likelihood ratios.

  6. Hair iron and other minerals' level in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Nam-Seok; Kim, Sang-Man; Jung, Yong-Sik; Kim, Kwang-Min

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about hair minerals in cancer patients, and serum iron level has been shown to be elevated in breast cancer patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate hair iron and hair minerals' level related to hair iron in breast cancer patients compared to controls. We compared hair mineral analysis data of 40 breast cancer subjects with age and body mass index-matched normal control data (n = 144) by cross-sectional analysis. All breast cancer patients were newly diagnosed at one Breast Cancer Center in Ajou University and had their hair cut before anti-cancer chemotherapy, and the normal controls (without breast cancer) also had their hair cut for various reasons in out-patient clinics of the Department of Family Practice and Community Health. Breast cancer patients had low calcium, magnesium, iron, copper, manganese, and zinc, whereas they had high arsenic, sodium, and potassium compared with the normal control. The hair iron level was positively correlated with hair calcium (r = 0.761, P arsenic (r = -0.537, P breast cancer patients compared to normal controls. Especially, hair iron level was significantly reduced and associated with hair calcium and manganese levels.

  7. Ultraviolet damage on natural gray hair and its photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, T; Bedell, A

    2001-01-01

    The physicochemical properties of natural gray hair obtained from the heads of individuals and as well as commercial samples were investigated. No statistically significant differences were observed in terms of their central maximum diameter, central cross-sectional area, central ellipticity, average tensile strength, and average extent of transverse swelling between gray and black hair. The correlation between the elongation and the contraction of the cross-sectional area of hair fibers during extension was established as a statistically linear function, with a coefficient of 0.758. The damage on natural gray hair from ultraviolet (UV) irradiation were assessed by measuring the following parameters: hair color, Young's modulus, stress-to-break, wet combing force, dynamic advancing contact angle, tryptophan damage, cuticle abrasion, and transverse swelling of hair fiber in 0.1 N NaOH solution. It has been found that gray hair undergoes more severe UV damage and needs more UV protection than dark brown hair. Experimental results indicate that the quaternized UV absorber, cinnamidopropyltrimonium chloride (CATC), delivered from a simple shampoo system, is more substantive on hair and more effective in protecting hair from UV damage than a conventional UV filter. CATC also provided an additional conditioning benefit on hair.

  8. Hair, Death, and Memory: The Making of an American Relic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Heiniger

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the transformation of hairworks in America during the mid-nineteenth-century. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin transformed the meaning of hair and hairworks in the American cultural imaginary by endowing Little Evangeline St. Clare’s hair with sacred, moralizing power. Likewise, after the Emancipation Proclamation was issued in 1863, President Abraham Lincoln’s hair achieved nationwide, relic-like significance. The Abraham Lincoln Papers contains six hair requests; these letters demonstrate that the cultural meaning of Lincoln’s hair resembles the fictional power of Eva’s hair in Stowe’s novel. Analyzing this phenomena of relic-like hair modifies our understanding of the unprecedented sentimental reaction to Lincoln’s assassination and particularly the fascination with seeing and approaching the president’s body.

  9. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function.

  10. Interaction between arthropod filiform hairs in a fluid enviroment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Bree; Gedeon, Tomáš; Klapper, Isaac; Cortez, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Many arthropods use filiform hairs as mechanoreceptors to detect air motion. In common house crickets (Acheta domestica) the hairs cover two antenna-like appendages called cerci at the rear of the abdomen. The biomechanical stimulus-response properties of individual filiform hairs have been investigated and modeled extensively in several earlier studies. However, only a few previous studies have considered viscosity-mediated coupling between pairs of hairs, and only in particular configurations. Here we present a model capable of calculating hair-to-hair coupling in arbitrary configurations. We simulate the coupled motion of a small group of mechanosensory hairs on a cylindrical section of cercus. We have found that the coupling effects are non-negligible, and likely constrain the operational characteristics of the cercal sensory array. PMID:17434184

  11. Effects of solar radiation on hair and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dario, Michelli F; Baby, André R; Velasco, Maria Valéria R

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the negative effects of solar radiation (ultraviolet, visible and infrared wavelengths) on hair properties like color, mechanical properties, luster, protein content, surface roughness, among others, will be discussed. Despite knowing that radiation damages hair, there are no consensus about the particular effect of each segment of solar radiation on the hair shaft. The hair photoprotection products are primarily targeted to dyed hair, specially auburn pigments, and gray shades. They are usually based on silicones, antioxidants and quaternary chemical UV filters that have more affinity for negatively charged hair surface and present higher efficacy. Unfortunately, there are no regulated parameters, like for skin photoprotection, for efficacy evaluation of hair care products, which makes impossible to compare the results published in the literature. Thus, it is important that researchers make an effort to apply experimental conditions similar to a real level of sun exposure, like dose, irradiance, time, temperature and relative humidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection analysis of human hair: comparison of hair from breast cancer patients with hair from healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Donald J; Murray-Wijelath, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    A comparative study of Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectra of 32 scalp and pubic hair samples from individuals diagnosed with breast cancer and those who were negative for breast cancer showed increases in the beta-sheet/disorder structures (relative to alpha-helix structures) and C-H lipid content of hair from breast cancer patients. Thus, the presence of breast cancer appears to alter the hair growth process, resulting in changes in the composition and conformation of cell membrane and matrix materials of hair fiber. These appear to be consistent with the changes observed in X-ray diffraction patterns for hair from breast cancer patients. A blind study of 12 additional hair samples using these FTIR-ATR spectral differences as markers correctly identified all four hair samples from cancer patients (100%). Two of these samples were from breast cancer patients. Of the remaining two samples analyzing positive for cancer, one was from a prostate cancer patient and one from a lung cancer patient. Thus, it appears that the mechanism that alters hair fiber synthesis in the three types of cancer may be similar. The blind study incorrectly identified as positive for cancer three hair samples from two apparently healthy individuals and one patient considered cured from prostate cancer.

  13. A review of hair product use on breast cancer risk in African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Laura; Adkins-Jackson, Paris B; Clark, Phyllis; Mitchell, Eudora; Montgomery, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    The incidence rate of breast cancer for African American women has recently converged with that of non-Hispanic White women in the United States, although African Americans have a higher mortality rate due to this disease. Although most research exploring health disparities associated with this phenomenon has focused on differences between women based on biology and behavior, both the academic and lay communities have begun to explore the potential role of environmental exposure to estrogen and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). This study reviews the current state of the science associating one such means of exposure, hair products containing EDCs, with breast cancer risk in African American women. We found a growing body of evidence linking: (1) environmental estrogen and EDC exposures to breast cancer risk, (2) the presence of such chemicals in personal care products, including hair products, and (3) the use of certain hair products with potential breast cancer risk in African Americans. At the same time, there is also increasing concern in the lay community about this risk. These results indicate the need for additional research, and the opportunity to benefit from strategic partnerships in community-collaborative approaches in order to better understand the potential "cost of beauty." © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Interventions for female pattern hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zuuren, Esther J; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Schoones, Jan

    2016-05-26

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL), or androgenic alopecia, is the most common type of hair loss affecting women. It is characterised by progressive shortening of the duration of the growth phase of the hair with successive hair cycles, and progressive follicular miniaturisation with conversion of terminal to vellus hair follicles (terminal hairs are thicker and longer, while vellus hairs are soft, fine, and short). The frontal hair line may or may not be preserved. Hair loss can have a serious psychological impact on women. To determine the efficacy and safety of the available options for the treatment of female pattern hair loss in women. We updated our searches of the following databases to July 2015: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library (2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1872), AMED (from 1985), LILACS (from 1982), PubMed (from 1947), and Web of Science (from 1945). We also searched five trial registries and checked the reference lists of included and excluded studies. We included randomised controlled trials that assessed the efficacy of interventions for FPHL in women. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality, extracted data and carried out analyses. We included 47 trials, with 5290 participants, of which 25 trials were new to this update. Only five trials were at 'low risk of bias', 26 were at 'unclear risk', and 16 were at 'high risk of bias'.The included trials evaluated a wide range of interventions, and 17 studies evaluated minoxidil. Pooled data from six studies indicated that a greater proportion of participants (157/593) treated with minoxidil (2% and one study with 1%) reported a moderate to marked increase in their hair regrowth when compared with placebo (77/555) (risk ratio (RR) = 1.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.51 to 2.47; moderate quality evidence). These results were confirmed by the investigator-rated assessments in seven studies with 1181

  15. [Body hair and advertising in French magazines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héas, S; Bodin, D; Robène, L; Misery, L

    2007-10-01

    Sociological analysis of advertising reveals the currently operative body codes within a society, and more fundamentally, depicts the (ideal) relationships between men and women, between generations, and so on. To demonstrate that sports advertising based largely on trichological stereotypes. The idealised portrayal of human relations in advertisements (N=700) taken from French magazines was analysed by means of systematic coding and use of analytical software. This approach allowed characterisation of each advertisement in relation to the entire sample, with identification of significant elements (dominant colour, stature of models, setting, etc.), and determination of frequency of appearance and occurrence as well as testing of dependency relations. There were significant differences in the portrayal of men and women in advertisements. In the 700 advertisements in the series we examined, male subjects very often had short hair (231 cases, 33%) or shaved heads (33 cases, 4.7%) while women were shown with long hair, either free (80 cases) or tied (73 cases). Women with short hair were rarely portrayed (4.3%), as were men with long hair (42 cases, 6%). Above all, with the exception of eyebrows and eyelashes, no other body hair was seen in male and female athletic figures in 238 advertisements, being visible in only 60 cases (8.6%). Facial stubble, and more particularly beards and moustaches, was fairly infrequent, despite the omnipresence of male models. The majority of advertising situations involving sporting figures show clear stereotyping. Body hair is a pertinent pointer to understanding of contemporary sports models. A clear overall male/female distinction was present throughout. Men were presented in these adverts as active figures, leaders, etc. while women tended to be passive, spectators, and in some cases, admiring onlookers. A degree of confusion between genders was noticeable as a result of the shaving and depilation trends currently in vogue in the

  16. Cutaneous metabolic pathway of tyrosine as a precursor to melanin in Asinara’s white donkey, Equus asinus L., 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Cappai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available L-tyrosine (L-Tyr is a conditionally indispensable amino acid for Equids. The biologic role of L-Tyr is ubiquitous, being involved in the production of hair and skin pigments. The white donkeys of Asinara island display a peculiar white coat, with life-long hypopigmentation of skin, hairs and eyes. Our results underline how the white phenotype is due to a disorder of melanin biosynthesis, detected in skin biopsies and on hair bulbs through immunohistochemical and enzymatic assays. The metabolic pathway of L-Tyr is compatible with the clinical frame of ocular-cutaneous albinism (OCA. The enzymatic activity in hair bulbs for the conversion of L-Tyr to L-3,4-dihydroxyphenilalanine (L-DOPA tested negative, but positive for L-DOPA conversion into eumelanin in the 100% of the Asinara’s white donkey. This is the case of a negative-tyrosinase albinism, which contemporarily excludes dietary deficiencies of phenylalanine (Phe or L-Tyr and potential incapability of Tyr intestinal uptake or Tyr conversion from Phe. The tyrosinase (TYR residual activity positively and significantly (P=0.012 correlates (P=0.897 with the albino phenotype of the Asinara’s white donkey. These results definitely point to the fact that Asinara’s white donkey population owes its phenotype to TYR residual activity, thus on genetic basis. From a comparative point of view, the albino form of the Asinara’s white donkeys is similar to the human OCA type 1, from which however differs for positively testing to L-DOPA conversion, upon incubation of hair bulbs in L-DOPA solutions.

  17. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) in paired human hair and serum from e-waste recycling workers: source apportionment of hair PBDEs and relationship between hair and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jing; Chen, Ke-Hui; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Yan, Xiao; He, Chun-Tao; Yu, Yun-Jiang; Hu, Guo-Cheng; Peng, Xiao-Wu; Ren, Ming-Zhong; Yang, Zhong-Yi; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Human hair has been widely used as a bioindicator for human persistent organic pollutants (POPs) exposure, but studies on the sources of hair POPs and the relationship between hair and body burden are limited. This study analyzed the possible source apportionment of hair PBDEs and examined the relationship between PBDE concentrations in paired hair and serum from e-waste recycling workers. Using the ratio of BDE 99/47 and BDE 209/207 as indices, we calculated that only 15% of the highly brominated congeners (nona- and deca-BDE congeners) comes from exogenous (external) exposure for both female and male hair, but an average of 64% and 55% of the lower-brominated congeners (tetra- to penta-BDE congeners) come from exogenous exposure for female and male hair, respectively. The higher contribution of exogenous exposure for less-brominated congeners could be related to their relatively lower log KOW and higher volatility than higher-brominated congeners, which make them more readily to evaporate from dust and then to be adsorbed on hair. Higher hair PBDE levels and higher exogenous exposure of less-brominated congeners in females than in males can be attributed to a longer exogenous exposure time for females than males. Significant positive relationships were found in tri- to hepta-BDE congeners (BDE 28, 47, 66, 85, 100, 153, 154, and 183) (R = 0.36-0.55, p hair and serum, but this relationship was not found for octa- to deca-BDE. Difference in the half-lives between highly brominated congeners and less-brominated congeners could be a reason. This result also implied that we should treat the results of correlation analyses between hair and other organs cautiously.

  18. Hair analysis for drugs of abuse. XI. Disposition of benzphetamine and its metabolites into hair and comparison of benzphetamine use and methamphetamine use by hair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikura, R; Nakahara, Y

    1995-12-01

    In order to study the disposition of benzphetamine (BZP) and its metabolites, desmethyl benzphetamine (norBZP), p-hydroxy desmethyl benzphetamine (OHnorBZP), methamphetamine (MA) and amphetamine (AP), from plasma to hair in rats, an analytical method for identifying these drugs in plasma, urine and hair was developed with selected ion monitoring of gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS-SIM) results. After the intraperitoneal administration of BZP to rats (10 mg/kg/d, 10d, n = 3), concentrations of BZP and its metabolites in rat hair newly grown for 4 weeks were compared to the areas under the concentration versus time curve (AUCs) of these drugs in the rat plasma. The concentrations of BZP, norBZP, OHnorBZP, MA and AP in the rat hair were 14.8 +/- 1.4, 6.1 +/- 0.3, 2.6 +/- 0.5, 2.3 +/- 0.1 and 9.2 +/- 0.3 ng/mg, and the ratio of the concentrations in the hair to AUCs in the rat plasma was 3.0:0.1:0.1:0.6:0.2, respectively. This fact suggested that BZP tends to be readily incorporated into hair from blood. The method was applied to the determination of the metabolites in scalp hair and pubic hair of humans who orally ingested BZP (30 mg/d, 5d, n = 2). BZP, norBZP, MA and AP were detected at 0.14-0.56, 0.29-0.63, 0.10 and 1.06-1.66 ng/mg in the scalp hair and at 0.10-0.20, 0.13-0.18, trace-0.15 and 0.23 ng/mg in the pubic hair, respectively. It was shown that BZP use could be retrospectively distinguished from MA use by the detection of BZP and/or norBZP in hair.

  19. Standard guidelines of care: Laser and IPL hair reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buddhadev Rajesh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser-assisted hair removal, Laser hair removal, Laser and light-assisted hair removal, Laser and light-assisted, long-term hair reduction, IPL photodepilation, LHE photodepilation; all these are acceptable synonyms. Laser (Ruby, Nd Yag, Alexandrite, Diode, intense pulse light, light and heat energy system are the different light-/Laser-based systems used for hair removal; each have its advantages and disadvantages. The word "LONG-TERM HAIR REDUCTION" should be used rather than permanent hair removal. Patient counseling is essential about the need for multiple sessions. Physicians′ qualifications: Laser hair removal may be practiced by any dermatologist, who has received adequate background training during postgraduation or later at a centre that provides education and training in Lasers or in focused workshops providing such training. The dermatologist should have adequate knowledge of the machines, the parameters and aftercare. The physician may allow the actual procedure to be performed under his/her direct supervision by a trained nurse assistant/junior doctor. However, the final responsibility for the procedure would lie with the physician. Facility: The procedure may be performed in the physician′s minor procedure room. Investigations to rule out any underlying cause for hair growth are important; concurrent drug therapy may be needed. Laser parameters vary with area, type of hair, and the machine used. Full knowledge about the machine and cooling system is important. Future maintenance treatments may be needed.

  20. Impulse control disorders in non-treatment seeking hair pullers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Liana R N; Lust, Katherine; Odlaug, Brian; Derbyshire, Katherine L; Grant, Jon

    2013-06-01

    Background and aims Hair pulling is a common body focused repetitive behavior. The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders (as defined in DSM-IV-TR) in a non-treatment seeking sample of hair pullers. Methods 1,717 college students with (n = 44) and without (n = 1673) hair pulling completed a mental health survey. The college students were sent an online survey assessing hair pulling behavior and other impulse control disorders using the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview. Results Students with hair pulling were significantly more likely to have a co-occurring impulse control disorder (20.5% vs. 8.9%, p = 0.009, OR = 2.71, CI = 1.28-5.75) and were significantly more likely to meet criteria for compulsive buying, compulsive sexual behavior and intermittent explosive disorder than students without hair pulling. Differences seemed to be moderated by the male gender among students with hair pulling. Discussion and conclusions Hair pulling is often comorbid with another impulse control disorder, which suggests that elements of impulsivity may be important in our understanding of hair pulling. Furthermore, gender may moderate impulse control comorbidity in hair pulling disorder.

  1. The uptake of water hardness metals by human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, A O; Marsh, J M; Wickett, R R

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to examine the variables that influence the interaction between water hardness metals and human hair. Hair extracts various constituents from the tap water used during daily hygiene practices and chemical treatments. Calcium and magnesium metal ions are the most prevalent and give water "hardness." Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) was employed to quantify the metal content of hair, which was studied as a function of the following variables: hair condition (oxidative damage), level of water hardness, and water pH. We have demonstrated that these variables impact water hardness metal uptake to varying extents, and the effects are driven primarily by the binding capacity (available anionic sites) of the hair. The condition of the hair, a key representation of the binding capacity, was most influential. Interestingly, water hardness levels had only a small effect on uptake; hair became saturated with notable amounts of water hardness metals even after repeated exposure to soft water. Water pH influenced metal uptake since side chains of hair proteins deprotonate with increasing alkalinity. These insights highlight the importance to the hair care industry of understanding the interaction between water hardness metals and hair.

  2. Mechanobiology and cell tensegrity: the root of ethnic hair curling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Paquet, Philippe; Quatresooz, Pascale; Piérard, Gérald E

    2011-06-01

    The hair shape, either straight, crimp, or curly, is basically under genetic influence. It is possibly altered by some drugs such as cytostatic agents. In addition, specific innate molecular characteristics are modulated by some cosmetic procedures to reshape the hair shafts. To revisit the possible implication of mechanobiology and cell tensegrity in shaping ethnic hair. Optical and scanning electron microscopy of hairs. It is generally held that the cross-section shape of hair is related to differences in the global aspect of the hair shaft. A possible biologic link between these features may rely on shaping cell tensegrity at any portion of the hair shaft. Cell tensegrity encompasses all intrinsic and extrinsic forces responsible for the three-dimensional arrangement of intracellular macromolecules. We offer as a hypothesis that the hair shape in part depends on the organization of the cell proliferation in the hair matrix. This review gathers observations supporting the involvement of cell tensegrity in shaping the hair shaft. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Standard guidelines of care: laser and IPL hair reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddhadev, Rajesh M

    2008-01-01

    Laser-assisted hair removal, Laser hair removal, Laser and light-assisted hair removal, Laser and light-assisted, long-term hair reduction, IPL photodepilation, LHE photodepilation; all these are acceptable synonyms. Laser (Ruby, Nd Yag, Alexandrite, Diode), intense pulse light, light and heat energy system are the different light-/Laser-based systems used for hair removal; each have its advantages and disadvantages. The word "LONG-TERM HAIR REDUCTION" should be used rather than permanent hair removal. Patient counseling is essential about the need for multiple sessions. PHYSICIANS' QUALIFICATIONS: Laser hair removal may be practiced by any dermatologist, who has received adequate background training during postgraduation or later at a centre that provides education and training in Lasers or in focused workshops providing such training. The dermatologist should have adequate knowledge of the machines, the parameters and aftercare. The physician may allow the actual procedure to be performed under his/her direct supervision by a trained nurse assistant/junior doctor. However, the final responsibility for the procedure would lie with the physician. The procedure may be performed in the physician's minor procedure room. Investigations to rule out any underlying cause for hair growth are important; concurrent drug therapy may be needed. Laser parameters vary with area, type of hair, and the machine used. Full knowledge about the machine and cooling system is important. Future maintenance treatments may be needed.

  4. A STUDY ON BRAND PREFERNCE OF CONSUMERS IN PURCHASING HAIR DYE IN TIRUNELVELI CITY

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. A. Hamil; Muniswari.M

    2017-01-01

    Hair dye use is very common among both Men & Women. Hair dye users are increasing day by day coloring of hair is performed not only by professionals but also a popular cosmetic product. Hair dye is used mostly to change gray hair, since gray hair is a sign of an advanced age. Most of them are using hair dye in our home. Earlier natural hair dyes were used but now due to advancement in cosmetic industry, different types have been developed. There has been concern about hair dye since scientist...

  5. Hair structures are effectively altered during 810 nm diode laser hair epilation at low fluences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelles, Mario A; Urdiales, Fernándo; Al-Zarouni, Marwan

    2010-03-01

    Diode lasers with high fluence and cooling technology are effective at removing unwanted hair but are also associated with discomfort and morbidity, especially when treating dark or tanned skins. Thirty patients with skin phototypes IV and V (range: 23-62 years of age; average: 39 years) underwent a single hair removal treatment using a new diode laser (810 nm) technology that incorporates low fluence but very high average power. The treatment technique employed multiple, in-motion, repetitive laser passes on a 100 cm(2) area of the skin. A 5mm punch biopsy was carried out before and after a single treatment. Tissue samples were harvested and stained with haematoxylin-eosin. The physical integrity of hair follicles was altered with inflammatory infiltrate, hair shaft detachment from its sheath, and perifollicular oedema, related to incipient necrosis. Low fluence but high average power diode laser technology yields significant changes in hair structure and architecture in patients with dark skin types. The procedure caused low levels of discomfort and was well tolerated.

  6. Scalp melanoma after anti hair loss mesotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenbergerova, M; Arenberger, P; Gkalpakiotis, S; Dahmen, R A; Sticova, E; Fialova, A

    2017-11-14

    Scalp melanoma comprises 3-5% of all cutaneous melanomas. The median age of the patients is 53 years and males are more frequently affected. The scalp melanomas tend to have nodular histology with a higher mitotic rate (>3/mm) and poorer prognosis (1). The risk factors for development of this tumor are still not defined but UV light and baldness may play a significant role (2-4). Mesotherapy is a non-surgical procedure currently being used to combat hair loss and promote hair growth. Usually a mixture of vitamins, minerals, growth factors, DHT blockers and/or stem cells extracts is injected into the dermal layer of skin (5,6). Although it is a widely used method, the safety profile of this procedure hasn't been studied yet (7,8). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Hair transplantation: Preventing post-operative oedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Gholamali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Swelling or oedema of forehead or eyelids is a common consequence of hair transplantation surgery. However, this results in increased morbidity and absence from work due to unaesthetic appearance. To study various physical and therapeutic modalities to reduce or completely prevent the occurrence of such oedema. Three hundred forty hair transplant patients were recruited in the study and were categorized into 8 groups depending upon the intervention employed. There were 32 dropouts in the study due to various reasons. Patients who were administered steroid with tumescent solution had the highest number of patients without oedema, with only 3 out of 117 patients developing oedema. Physical measures like position of head during sleeping, application of occlusion bands or ice packs did not show satisfactory results. Addition of triamcinolone to tumescent anaesthetic solution is a very effective technique of preventing post-operative swelling.

  8. Sonography in pathologies of scalp and hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortsman, X; Wortsman, J; Matsuoka, L; Saavedra, T; Mardones, F; Saavedra, D; Guerrero, R; Corredoira, Y

    2012-01-01

    Disorders of the scalp often result in severe cosmetic interference with quality of life, creating the need for optimal medical surveillance. We tested the latest generation of ultrasound machines in patients with scalp pathology and prepared a cross-sectional library encompassing a wide assortment of conditions. Normative data on the sonographic anatomy of scalp and human hair, and important methodological considerations, are also included. PMID:22253348

  9. Bitemporal hair loss related to traction alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Moreno-Arrones, Oscar; Vañó-Galván, Sergio

    2016-09-15

    We present a 24-year-old woman that had received a diagnosis of alopecia areata in the past and was treated with topical 19 corticosteroids with little improvement. Instead, the patient exhibited bitemporal alopecia of one year of evolution related to 20 traction alopecia. Traction alopecia is characterized by localized hair loss related to persistent excessive traction. Although it is 21 initially a reversible condition, if this excessive traction is not removed permanent alopecia may develop.

  10. Prevention of hair graying by factors that promote the growth and differentiation of melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endou, Mariko; Aoki, Hitomi; Kobayashi, Tatsushi; Kunisada, Takahiro

    2014-08-01

    Epidermal melanocyte precursors migrate into developing hair follicles to form the melanocyte stem cell system required to supply pigmented melanocytes necessary for hair pigmentation in repetitive hair cycles. Hair graying is caused by irreversible defects in the self-renewal and/or development of follicular melanocyte stem cells in the hair follicles. To investigate the mechanism(s) of hair graying during the normal aging process, we established a hair graying model in mice by repeatedly plucking or shaving trunk hairs. We repeatedly plucked or shaved trunk hairs to induce and accelerate the hair graying and counted the gray hairs. By using this functional model of hair graying in mice, we assessed the effects of genes known to affect melanocyte development, such as Kitl, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and endotheline 3 (ET3). After increasing the total numbers of cumulative hair cycles by plucking or shaving, we observed a significant increase in the gray hair of C57BL/6 mice. Kitl expression in the skin was the most effective for preventing hair graying and a significant effect was also confirmed for HGF and ET3 expression. The repeated hair plucking or shaving led to hair graying without any genetic lesion. Kitl is a more effective factor for prevention of hair graying than HGF or ET3. Our simple model of hair graying may provide a basic tool for screening the molecules or reagents preventing the progression of hair graying. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  11. Hair Loss after Varicella Zoster Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara El Hayderi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV cutaneous infection occurs predominantly in epidermal and infundibular keratinocytes and accessorily in dermal dendritic cells. These latter cells play a role in cicatricial processes. Two patients are presented with localized alopecia after VZV infection. A 4-year-old girl presented localized hair loss affecting about 20% of her upper right eyelash immediately following the resolution of the varicella skin lesions. No regrowth was observed after 3 months. An 80-year-old woman with a prior history of localized alopecia areata of the left occipital area presented severe left herpes zoster affecting the V1 and V2 dermatomes. At precisely the same site of the previous episode, a localized plaque of alopecia areata recurred. After topical corticosteroid therapy, a progressive hair regrowth occurred after about 3 months. These case reports are the first relating cutaneous VZV infection as the origin for permanent cicatricial alopecia and transitory alopecia areata. Localized hair loss should be added to the cutaneous complications of VZV skin infection.

  12. A new oxidant for hair coloring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jennifer; Dahlgren, R Marc; Clarke, Colin; Stonehouse, Jonathan; Nunn, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Coloring hair using a level 3 permanent colorant involves two processes, lightening the underlying melanin and information of the colored chromophores inside the hair. In a typical in-market products the oxidant used to achieve these changes is hydrogen peroxide buffered at pH 10 with an alkalizer such as ammonium hydroxide. A new oxidant has been developed based on the combination of ammonium carbonate, hydrogen peroxide and glycine at pH 9 that can match the lightening and color performance of the current oxidant. It has the advantage that both the carbonate and hydrogen peroxide concentrations can be changed to alter the lightening performance making it a more flexible oxidant. This allows the capability to lighten the hair in a shorter time, or with lower hydrogen peroxide levels. This paper discusses the key oxidizing species that are present in both systems and the mechanisms of melanin lightening. In addition, the lightening performance will be assessed as a function of time, pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration and carbonate concentration. The importance of glycine to the oxidant is also described along with a proposal for its mechanism of action. It has been demonstrated that the addition of glycine can control the undesired formation of carbonate radicals that can be generated from the oxidant. The control of these radicals enables the oxidant to deliver excellent lightening with no negatives in fiber damage bs. conventional oxidants.

  13. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geim, A K; Dubonos, S V; Grigorieva, I V; Novoselov, K S; Zhukov, A A; Shapoval, S Yu

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force approximately 10(-7) N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of approximately 10 N x cm(-2): sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  14. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  15. Clinical applications of cortisol measurements in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Vincent L; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C

    2015-10-01

    Cortisol measurements in blood, saliva and urine are frequently used to examine the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in clinical practice and in research. However, cortisol levels are subject to variations due to acute stress, the diurnal rhythm and pulsatile secretion. Cortisol measurements in body fluids are not always a reflection of long-term cortisol exposure. The analysis of cortisol in scalp hair is a relatively novel method to measure cumulative cortisol exposure over months up to years. Over the past years, hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) have been examined in association with a large number of somatic and mental health conditions. HCC can be used to evaluate disturbances of the HPA axis, including Cushing's syndrome, and to evaluate hydrocortisone treatment. Using HCC, retrospective timelines of cortisol exposure can be created which can be of value in diagnosing cyclic hypercortisolism. HCC have also been shown to increase with psychological stressors, including major life events, as well as physical stressors, such as endurance exercise and shift work. Initial studies show that HCC may be increased in depression, but decreased in general anxiety disorder. In posttraumatic stress disorder, changes in HCC seem to be dependent on the type of traumatic experience and the time since traumatization. Increased hair cortisol is consistently linked to obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Potentially, HCC could form a future marker for cardiovascular risk stratification, as well as serve as a treatment target. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  16. Feasibility of rat hair as a quality control material for the determination of methamphetamine and amphetamine in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sooyeun; Park, Yonghoon; Kim, Jihyun; In, Sanghwan; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2011-04-01

    A quality control material (QCM) is a necessity in hair drug analysis, but it is not always easy to have an authentic hair sample containing various target drugs and metabolites. In the present study, the feasibility of rat hair as a QCM was examined for its application in the determination of methamphetamine (MA) and amphetamine (AP) in human hair. MA was administered to lean Zucker rats, from which only pigmented hair was collected for the preparation of a QCM. The rat hair was then washed, homogenized and finally bottled. Both homogeneity and stability were examined in order to demonstrate the suitability of rat hair as a QCM in hair drug analysis. The concentrations of MA and AP in each bottle were determined using extraction with 1% HCl in methanol at 38°C followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after derivatization with trifluoroacetic anhydride. Furthermore, the prepared QCM was used in an inter-laboratory quality assurance program. In the homogeneity test, no significant difference was observed between bottles of the QCM. The statistical results also showed no significant trends in stability for three months at room temperature. An inter-laboratory quality assurance program was also performed successfully using this material. Thus, rat hair will be useful as an alternative QCM sample for the determination of a variety of drugs and their metabolites in human hair.

  17. Health status by gender, hair color, and eye color: Red-haired women are the most divergent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Frost

    Full Text Available Red hair is associated in women with pain sensitivity. This medical condition, and perhaps others, seems facilitated by the combination of being red-haired and female. We tested this hypothesis by questioning a large sample of Czech and Slovak respondents about the natural redness and darkness of their hair, their natural eye color, their physical and mental health (24 categories, and other personal attributes (height, weight, number of children, lifelong number of sexual partners, frequency of smoking. Red-haired women did worse than other women in ten health categories and better in only three, being particularly prone to colorectal, cervical, uterine, and ovarian cancer. Red-haired men showed a balanced pattern, doing better than other men in three health categories and worse in three. Number of children was the only category where both male and female redheads did better than other respondents. We also confirmed earlier findings that red hair is naturally more frequent in women than in men. Of the 'new' hair and eye colors, red hair diverges the most from the ancestral state of black hair and brown eyes, being the most sexually dimorphic variant not only in population frequency but also in health status. This divergent health status may have one or more causes: direct effects of red hair pigments (pheomelanins or their by-products; effects of other genes that show linkage with genes involved in pheomelanin production; excessive prenatal exposure to estrogen (which facilitates expression of red hair during fetal development and which, at high levels, may cause health problems later in life; evolutionary recentness of red hair and corresponding lack of time to correct negative side effects; or genetic incompatibilities associated with the allele Val92Met, which seems to be of Neanderthal origin and is one of the alleles that can cause red hair.

  18. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Song, Shuangqi

    2015-12-22

    A hair treatment process for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction including (a) coating the hair with a material comprising a polymer, (b) pressing the hair with a pressing device including one or more surfaces, and (c) forming a secondary nanostructured surface pattern on the hair that is complementary to the primary nanostructured surface pattern on the one or more surfaces of the pressing device. The secondary nanostructured surface pattern diffracts light into dispersed colors that are visible on the hair. The section of the hair is pressed with the pressing device for from about 1 to 55 seconds. The polymer has a glass transition temperature from about 55.degree. C. to about 90.degree. C. The one or more surfaces include a primary nanostructured surface pattern.

  19. Functional calcium imaging in zebrafish lateral-line hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q X; He, X J; Wong, H C; Kindt, K S

    2016-01-01

    Sensory hair-cell development, function, and regeneration are fundamental processes that are challenging to study in mammalian systems. Zebrafish are an excellent alternative model to study hair cells because they have an external auxiliary organ called the lateral line. The hair cells of the lateral line are easily accessible, which makes them suitable for live, function-based fluorescence imaging. In this chapter, we describe methods to perform functional calcium imaging in zebrafish lateral-line hair cells. We compare genetically encoded calcium indicators that have been used previously to measure calcium in lateral-line hair cells. We also outline equipment required for calcium imaging and compare different imaging systems. Lastly, we discuss how to set up optimal imaging parameters and how to process and visualize calcium signals. Overall, using these methods, in vivo calcium imaging is a powerful tool to examine sensory hair-cell function in an intact organism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. From conditioning shampoo to nanomechanics and haptics of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Claudia; Sugiharto, Albert Budiman; Max, Eva; Fery, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Shampoo treatment and hair conditioning have a direct impact on our wellbeing via properties like combability and haptic perception of hair. Therefore, systematic investigations leading to quality improvement of hair care products are of major interest. The aim of our work is a better understanding of complex testing and the correlation with quantitative parameters. The motivation for the development of physical testing methods for hair feel relates to the fact that an ingredient supplier like BASF can only find new, so far not yet toxicologically approved chemistries for hair cosmetics, if an in-vitro method exists.In this work, the effects of different shampoo treatments with conditioning polymers are investigated. The employed physical test method, dry friction measurements and AFM observe friction phenomena on a macroscopic as well as on a nanoscale directly on hair. They are an approach to complement sensoric evaluation with an objective in-vitro method.

  1. Sensory hair cell development and regeneration: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Patrick J; Huarcaya Najarro, Elvis; Sayyid, Zahra N; Cheng, Alan G

    2015-05-01

    Sensory hair cells are mechanoreceptors of the auditory and vestibular systems and are crucial for hearing and balance. In adult mammals, auditory hair cells are unable to regenerate, and damage to these cells results in permanent hearing loss. By contrast, hair cells in the chick cochlea and the zebrafish lateral line are able to regenerate, prompting studies into the signaling pathways, morphogen gradients and transcription factors that regulate hair cell development and regeneration in various species. Here, we review these findings and discuss how various signaling pathways and factors function to modulate sensory hair cell development and regeneration. By comparing and contrasting development and regeneration, we also highlight the utility and limitations of using defined developmental cues to drive mammalian hair cell regeneration. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. A model of filiform hair distribution on the cricket cercus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Heys

    Full Text Available Crickets and other orthopteran insects sense air currents with a pair of abdominal appendages resembling antennae, called cerci. Each cercus in the common house cricket Acheta domesticus is covered with between 500 to 750 filiform mechanosensory hairs. The distribution of the hairs on the cerci, as well as the global patterns of their movement axes, are very stereotypical across different animals in this species, and the development of this system has been studied extensively. Although hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying pattern development of the hair array have been proposed in previous studies, no quantitative modeling studies have been published that test these hypotheses. We demonstrate that several aspects of the global pattern of mechanosensory hairs can be predicted with considerable accuracy using a simple model based on two independent morphogen systems. One system constrains inter-hair spacing, and the second system determines the directional movement axes of the hairs.

  3. A Model of Filiform Hair Distribution on the Cricket Cercus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heys, Jeffrey J.; Rajaraman, Prathish K.; Gedeon, Tomas; Miller, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Crickets and other orthopteran insects sense air currents with a pair of abdominal appendages resembling antennae, called cerci. Each cercus in the common house cricket Acheta domesticus is covered with between 500 to 750 filiform mechanosensory hairs. The distribution of the hairs on the cerci, as well as the global patterns of their movement axes, are very stereotypical across different animals in this species, and the development of this system has been studied extensively. Although hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying pattern development of the hair array have been proposed in previous studies, no quantitative modeling studies have been published that test these hypotheses. We demonstrate that several aspects of the global pattern of mechanosensory hairs can be predicted with considerable accuracy using a simple model based on two independent morphogen systems. One system constrains inter-hair spacing, and the second system determines the directional movement axes of the hairs. PMID:23056357

  4. Histological study of white rhinoceros integument.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H Plochocki

    Full Text Available In this study, we report findings from a microscopic analysis of the white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum integumentary ultrastructure. Skin samples from the cheek, shoulder, flank and rump were taken from a 46-year-old female southern white rhinoceros and examined using H&E and elastic histological stains. The epidermis was thickest in the flank (1.003 mm followed by the rump, cheek and shoulder. The stratum corneum comprised more than half the epidermal thickness. Numerous melanin granules were found in the basal and spinosum layers. The epidermal-dermal junction was characterized by abundant papillary folds increasing surface contact between integument layers. Most of the dermal thickness consisted of organized collagen bundles with scattered elastic fibers. Collagen fiber bundles were thickest in the flank (210.9 μm followed by shoulder, rump and cheek. Simple coiled sweat glands were present in the dermis, but hair and sebaceous glands were absent. Together, these data suggest the white rhinoceros has a unique integumentary system among large terrestrial herbivores.

  5. Vanishing White Matter Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In Memory Of Obituaries Contact Us Donate Vanishing White Matter Disease What is Vanishing White Matter Disease? ... of the genetic basis of VWM was a great step forward. First of all, it allows genetic ...

  6. HISTOLOGICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE HAIR FOLLICLE IN THE YOUNG ALPACA

    OpenAIRE

    Badajoz L., Elmer; Laboratorio de Histología, Embriología y Patología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima-Perú.; Sandoval Ch., Nieves; Laboratorio de Histología, Embriología y Patología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima-Perú.; García V., Wilber; Estación Experimental del Centro de Investigación IVITA-La Raya, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima-Perú.; Pezo C., Danilo; Estación Experimental del Centro de Investigación IVITA-La Raya, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima-Perú.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was carried out to characterize the distribution and an association of hair follicles of alpaca skin. Samples were collected from 42 young Suri and Huacaya alpacas, of both sexes and with various hair colours. Samples were collected by punch skin biopsy in the middle costal zone and processed for histological study using H-E staining. Hair follicles formed follicular nests distributed as a compound follicle group (CFG) and simple follicle group (SFG). The first was composed ...

  7. Hair cortisol in the evaluation of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodes, Aaron; Lodish, Maya B; Tirosh, Amit; Meyer, Jerrold; Belyavskaya, Elena; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Rosenberg, Kendra; Demidowich, Andrew; Swan, Jeremy; Jonas, Nichole; Stratakis, Constantine A; Zilbermint, Mihail

    2017-04-01

    Hair cortisol evaluation has been used to help detect patients with suspected Cushing syndrome. Our goal was to correlate segmental hair cortisol with biochemical testing in patients with Cushing syndrome and controls. This study was a prospective analysis of hair cortisol in confirmed Cushing syndrome cases over 16 months. Thirty-six subjects (26.5 ± 18.9 years, 75% female, and 75% Caucasian) were analyzed by diurnal serum cortisol, 24 h urinary free cortisol corrected for body surface area (UFC/BSA), and 24 h urinary 17-hydroxysteroids corrected for creatinine (17OHS/Cr). Thirty patients were diagnosed with Cushing syndrome, and six were defined as controls. 3-cm hair samples nearest to the scalp, cut into 1-cm segments (proximal, medial, and distal), were analyzed for cortisol by enzyme immunoassay and measured as pmol cortisol/g dry hair. Hair cortisol levels were compared with laboratory testing done within previous 2 months of the evaluation. Proximal hair cortisol was higher in Cushing syndrome patients (266.6 ± 738.4 pmol/g) than control patients (38.9 ± 25.3 pmol/g) (p = 0.003). Proximal hair cortisol was highest of all segments in 25/36 (69%) patients. Among all subjects, proximal hair cortisol was strongly correlated with UFC/BSA (r = 0.5, p = 0.005), midnight serum cortisol (r = 0.4, p = 0.03), and 17OHS/Cr, which trended towards significance (r = 0.3, p = 0.06). Among the three examined hair segments, proximal hair contained the highest cortisol levels and correlated the most with the initial biochemical tests for Cushing syndrome in our study. Further studies are needed to validate proximal hair cortisol in the diagnostic workup for Cushing syndrome.

  8. A feature-preserving hair removal algorithm for dermoscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Qaisar; Garcia, Irene Fondón; Emre Celebi, M; Ahmad, Waqar

    2013-02-01

    Accurate segmentation and repair of hair-occluded information from dermoscopy images are challenging tasks for computer-aided detection (CAD) of melanoma. Currently, many hair-restoration algorithms have been developed, but most of these fail to identify hairs accurately and their removal technique is slow and disturbs the lesion's pattern. In this article, a novel hair-restoration algorithm is presented, which has a capability to preserve the skin lesion features such as color and texture and able to segment both dark and light hairs. Our algorithm is based on three major steps: the rough hairs are segmented using a matched filtering with first derivative of gaussian (MF-FDOG) with thresholding that generate strong responses for both dark and light hairs, refinement of hairs by morphological edge-based techniques, which are repaired through a fast marching inpainting method. Diagnostic accuracy (DA) and texture-quality measure (TQM) metrics are utilized based on dermatologist-drawn manual hair masks that were used as a ground truth to evaluate the performance of the system. The hair-restoration algorithm is tested on 100 dermoscopy images. The comparisons have been done among (i) linear interpolation, inpainting by (ii) non-linear partial differential equation (PDE), and (iii) exemplar-based repairing techniques. Among different hair detection and removal techniques, our proposed algorithm obtained the highest value of DA: 93.3% and TQM: 90%. The experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm is highly accurate, robust and able to restore hair pixels without damaging the lesion texture. This method is fully automatic and can be easily integrated into a CAD system. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. [Inhibition effect of 6-gingerol on hair growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yong; Sun, Ya-Bin; Wang, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Jiang, Jin-Dou; Li, Ze-Hua; Hu, Zhi-Qi

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the effect of 6-gingerol, the main active component of ginger, on hair shaft elongation in vitro and hair growth in vivo. Firstly, Hair follicles were co-cultured with 3 different concentration of 6-gingerol for 5 days and hair elongation in three groups was measured. Secondly, The proliferative effect of 6-gingerol on DPCs was measured using MTT assay. Thirdly, the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in DPCs were measured using Western blotting. In vivo study, the influence of 6-gingerol on hair growth in C57BL/6 rats was measured through topical application of 6-gingerol on the dorsal skin of each animal. The length of hair shaft in 20 microg/ml 6-Gingerol group (0.50 +/- 0.08 mm) is less than 0 microg/ml (0.66 +/- 0.19) mm and 10 microg/ml (0.64 +/- 0.03) mm 6-Gingerol group (P Gingerol, 10 microg/ml 6-Gingerol can significantly inhibited the proliferation of DPCs (P gingerol, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio increased obviously. In vivo study, the hair length and density decreased a lot after using 1 mg/ml 6-gingerol. 6-Gingerol can suppress human hair shaft elongation because it has pro-apoptotic effects on DPCs via increasing Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. It might inhibit hair growth by prolonging the telogen stage in vivo.

  10. Serum Biotin Levels in Women Complaining of Hair Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2016-01-01

    Biotin is a coenzyme for carboxylase enzymes that assist various metabolic reactions involved in fatty acid synthesis, branched-chain amino acid catabolism, and gluconeogenesis important for maintenance of healthy skin and hair. Due to its availability, affordability, and effective marketing for this purpose, biotin is a popular nutritional supplement for treatment of hair loss. However, there are little data on the frequency of biotin deficiency in patients complaining of hair loss and on the value of oral biotin for treatment of hair loss that is not due to an inborn error of biotin metabolism or deficiency. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and significance of biotin deficiency in women complaining of hair loss. Biotin deficiency was found in 38% of women complaining of hair loss. Of those showing diffuse telogen effluvium in trichograms (24%), 35% had evidence of associated seborrheic-like dermatitis. About 11% of patients with biotin deficiency had a positive personal history for risk factors for biotin deficiency. The custom of treating women complaining of hair loss in an indiscriminate manner with oral biotin supplementation is to be rejected, unless biotin deficiency and its significance for the complaint of hair loss in an individual has been demonstrated on the basis of a careful patient history, clinical examination, determination of serum biotin levels, and exclusion of alternative factors responsible for hair loss.

  11. Current hair mercury levels in Japanese: survey in five districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutake, Akira; Matsumoto, Miyuki; Yamaguchi, Masako; Hachiya, Noriyuki

    2003-03-01

    To understand the current Japanese hair mercury levels, we planned a survey of hair mercury among the general populations of different regions in Japan. The present paper, as the first report of the survey, summarized the results obtained in five districts, Minamata, Kumamoto, Tottori, Wakayama and Chiba. Hair samples were collected at beauty salons, barbershops and primary schools in each district with questionnaires on age, sex, amount and species of fish usually consumed, hair-dyed and artificial hair waving "permanent wave." The total mercury levels of 3686 hair samples collected were analyzed by an oxygen combustion-gold amalgamation method. The geometric mean of the total mercury concentration was significantly higher in males than in females, i.e., 2.55 microg/g and 1.43 microg/g, respectively. The sex difference was also observed on hair samples without artificial waving, i.e., 2.64 microg/g and 1.64 microg/g, respectively. The geometric mean in each district varied from 2.23 to 4.79 microg/g for males and from 1.23 to 2.50 microg/g for females. The average hair mercury levels were highest in Chiba among the five districts both in males and females. A multiple regression analysis revealed a significant correlation of the mercury level with age, sex, amount of daily fish consumption, tuna and bonito as usually consumed fish, artificial waving and Chiba as a residential area. In the laboratory experiment, we found that the treatment of hair samples with a lotion for artificial waving caused a 30%-reduction in the mercury content. Furthermore, longitudinal hair analysis showed a marked difference in the concentration between the hair root and the tip of the hair taken from artificially waved females; higher values were observed at the hair root. These results suggested that artificial waving significantly removes hair mercury and that hair analysis at the hair root should be necessary to estimate an accurate methylmercury exposure for waved persons.

  12. The Association Between Men's Sexist Attitudes and Facial Hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldmeadow, Julian A; Dixson, Barnaby J

    2016-05-01

    Facial hair, like many masculine secondary sexual traits, plays a significant role in perceptions of an array of sociosexual traits in men. While there is consensus that beards enhance perceptions of masculinity, age, social dominance, and aggressiveness, the perceived attractiveness of facial hair varies greatly across women. Given the ease with which facial hair can be groomed and removed entirely, why should some men retain beards and others choose to remove them? We hypothesized that men with relatively sexist attitudes would be more likely to allow their facial hair to grow than men with less sexist attitudes. Men from the USA (n = 223) and India (n = 309) completed an online survey measuring demographic variables, ambivalent sexism, and facial hair status. After controlling for demographic variables, men with facial hair were significantly higher in hostile sexism than clean-shaven men; hostile sexism was a significant predictor of facial hair status over and above demographic variables; and facial hair was more frequent among ambivalent and hostile sexists than among benevolent and non-sexists. It is suggested that sexist men choose to grow facial hair because it maximizes sexual dimorphism and augments perceived masculinity and dominance.

  13. Dynamic signals for hair follicle development and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xusheng; Tredget, Edward E; Wu, Yaojiong

    2012-01-01

    Hair follicles form during embryonic development and, after birth, undergo recurrent cycling of growth, regression, and relative quiescence. As a functional mini-organ, the hair follicle develops in an environment with dynamic and alternating changes of diverse molecular signals. Over the past decades, genetically engineered mouse models have been used to study hair follicle morphogenesis and significant advances have been made toward the identification of key signaling pathways and the regulatory genes involved. In contrast, much less is understood in signals regulating hair follicle regeneration. Like hair follicle development, hair follicle regeneration probably relies on populations of stem cells that undergo a highly coordinated and stepwise program of differentiation to produce the completed structure. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the molecular signals underlying hair follicle morphogenesis and regeneration, with a focus on the initiation of the primary hair follicle structure placode. Knowledge about hair follicle morphogenesis may help develop novel therapeutic strategies to enhance cutaneous regeneration and improve wound healing.

  14. Detection of oxidative hair treatment using fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Silvana; Wunder, Cora; Paulke, Alexander; Verhoff, Marcel A; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-08-01

    In assessing abstinence from drug or alcohol abuse, hair analysis plays an important role. Cosmetic hair treatment influences the content of deposited drugs which is not always detectable during analysis. Since oxidation of melanin leads to an increase in fluorescence, a microscopic method was developed to distinguish natural from cosmetically treated hair. For validation, natural hair samples were treated with different types of cosmetics and inspected by fluorescence microscopy. Hair samples from 20 volunteers with documented cosmetic treatment and as a proof of concept 100 hair samples from forensic cases were analyzed by this method. Apart from autofluorescence with excitation at 365 nm, no obvious fluorescence was observed in untreated hair samples. Tinting and a natural plant product had no influence on fluorescence, but dyeing procedures including oxidation led to a marked increase in fluorescence. Proof of cosmetic treatment was achieved in hair samples from the 20 volunteers. In 100 forensic cases, 13 samples were characterized as oxidatively treated, which was in accordance with the respective disclosure except for one case where treatment was not admitted. This fluorescence microscopic procedure proved to be fast, easy, and reliable to identify oxidatively treated hair samples, which must be considered especially in evaluating cases of negative drug results. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Development of a Single-Sampling Noninvasive Hair Snare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremner-Harrison, Samantha; Harrison, Stephen W. R.; Cypher, Brian L.

    2006-01-01

    Noninvasive hair and fecal DNA sampling provides a means of collecting information on elusive species, while causing little or no disturbance. However, current methods of hair collection do not preclude multiple sampling, thus risking sample contamination. We developed a hair snare that prevents...... multiple sampling, is cost-effective, easy to construct, and safe for target and nontarget species. Our initial field tests on endangered San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and swift foxes (Vulpes velox) suggest that this hair snare may be effective in collecting uncontaminated samples for DNA...

  16. Development and Evaluation of Herbal Formulations for Hair Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipi Purwal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair formulation of Emblica officinalis (Euphorbiaceae, Bacopa, monnieri (Scrophulariaceae, Trigonella foenumgraecum (Leguminosae, Murraya koenigii (Rutaceae in various concentrations in the form of herbal oil were studied for their hair growth activity. Each drug was tested for their hair growth activity in a concentration range for 1-10% separately. Based on these results mixture of crude drugs Murraya koeniigi, leaf (Rutaceae, Bacopa monnieri, leaf (Scrophulariaceae, Trigonella foenumgraecum (Leguminosae, Murraya koenigii (Rutaceae were prepared in varying concentration in the form of herbal hair oil by three different oils preparation techniques and were tested for hair growth activity. The result revealed that the hair growth activity of each drug was found proportional to the concentration range tested. Similarly higher concentrations of drug in the formulation were found to have higher hair growth activities. But looking towards the formulation viscosity the maximum concentration of combined drug was found to be 30% at their maximum level. The formulation containing 7.5% of each drug used for the study and showed excellent hair growth activity with standard (2% minoxidil ethanolic solution by an enlargement of follicular size and prolongation of the anagen phase. It holds the promise of potent herbal alternative for minoxidil. Excellent results of hair growth were seen in formulation prepared by cloth pouch decoction method of oils preparation technique.

  17. Sensory hair cell death and regeneration in fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Monroe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensory hair cells are specialized mechanotransductive receptors required for hearing and vestibular function. Loss of hair cells in humans and other mammals is permanent and causes reduced hearing and balance. In the early 1980’s, it was shown that hair cells continue to be added to the inner ear sensory epithelia in cartilaginous and bony fishes. Soon thereafter, hair cell regeneration was documented in the chick cochlea following acoustic trauma. Since then, research using chick and other avian models has led to great insights into hair cell death and regeneration. However, with the rise of the zebrafish as a model organism for studying disease and developmental processes, there has been an increased interest in studying sensory hair cell death and regeneration in its lateral line and inner ears. Advances derived from studies in zebrafish and other fish species include understanding the effect of ototoxins on hair cells and finding otoprotectants to mitigate ototoxin damage, the role of cellular proliferation versus direct transdifferentiation during hair cell regeneration, and elucidating cellular pathways involved in the regeneration process. This review will summarize research on hair cell death and regeneration using fish models, indicate the potential strengths and weaknesses of these models, and discuss several emerging areas of future studies.

  18. The role of neprilysin in regulating the hair cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Morisaki

    Full Text Available In most mammals, each hair follicle undergoes a cyclic process of growing, regressing and resting phases (anagen, catagen, telogen, respectively called the hair cycle. Various biological factors have been reported to regulate or to synchronize with the hair cycle. Some factors involved in the extracellular matrix, which is a major component of skin tissue, are also thought to regulate the hair cycle. We have focused on an enzyme that degrades elastin, which is associated with skin elasticity. Since our previous study identified skin fibroblast elastase as neprilysin (NEP, we examined the fluctuation of NEP enzyme activity and its expression during the synchronized hair cycle of rats. NEP activity in the skin was elevated at early anagen, and decreased during catagen to telogen. The expression of NEP mRNA and protein levels was modulated similarly. Immunostaining showed changes in NEP localization throughout the hair cycle, from the follicular epithelium during early anagen to the dermal papilla during catagen. To determine whether NEP plays an important role in regulating the hair cycle, we used a specific inhibitor of NEP (NPLT. NPLT was applied topically daily to the dorsal skin of C3H mice, which had been depilated in advance. Mice treated with NPLT had significantly suppressed hair growth. These data suggest that NEP plays an important role in regulating the hair cycle by its increased expression and activity in the follicular epithelium during early anagen.

  19. [The development of the method for enzymatic hydrolysis for the extraction of toxic substances from the hair samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slustovskaya, Yu V; Krys'ko, M V; Strelova, O Yu

    The objective of the present study was to develop and validate the method for the extraction of toxic substances from the hair samples as exemplified by enzymatic hydrolysis of barbituric acid derivatives. The experiments were carried out with the use of laboratory animals (white female rats and albino guinea pigs) that had been daily given a phenobarbital solution per os during 4 months preceding the study. The hairs obtained from the experimental animals were subjected to acid hydrolysis with a 6 mole hydrochloric acid and enzymatic hydrolysis with the use of chymopsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and papain solutions. The analysis of the extracted materials was performed by means of gas chromatography with mass-selective detection. The application of the proposed method for enzymatic hydrolysis produced the better results than acid hydrolysis. This technique was validated. The results of the study made possible the comparative characteristic of the effectiveness of acid and enzymatic hydrolysis.

  20. Effects of topical application of EGCG on testosterone-induced hair loss in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Young; Up No, Sun; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Hei Sung; Kang, Hoon; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the effect of topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on testosterone (T)-induced hair loss in mice. Marked hair loss was observed at the T-injected site, and topical EGCG significantly reduced the hair loss (P hair loss by apoptosis of the hair follicles rather than through the androgen metabolic pathway and also saw that T-induced apoptosis of hair follicles was reduced by topical EGCG. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Molecular evolution of HR, a gene that regulates the postnatal cycle of the hair follicle

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Ali Abbasi

    2011-01-01

    Hair is a unique mammalian trait that is absent in all other animal forms. Hairlessness is rare in mammals and humans are exceptional among primates in lacking dense layer of hair covering. HR was the first gene identified to be implicated in hair-cycle regulation. Point mutations in HR lead to congenital human hair loss, which results in the complete loss of body and scalp hairs. HR functions are indispensable for initiation of postnatal hair follicular cycling. This study investigates the p...

  2. Gel network shampoo formulation and hair health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, J M; Brown, M A; Felts, T J; Hutton, H D; Vatter, M L; Whitaker, S; Wireko, F C; Styczynski, P B; Li, C; Henry, I D

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this work was to create a shampoo formula that contains a stable ordered gel network structure that delivers fatty alcohols inside hair. X-ray diffraction (SAXS and WAXS), SEM and DSC have been used to confirm formation of the ordered Lβ gel network with fatty alcohol (cetyl and stearyl alcohols) and an anionic surfactant (SLE1S). Micro-autoradiography and extraction methods using GC-MS were used to confirm penetration of fatty alcohols into hair, and cyclic fatigue testing was used to measure hair strength. In this work, evidence of a stable Lβ ordered gel network structure created from cetyl and stearyl alcohols and anionic surfactant (SLE1S) is presented, and this is confirmed via scanning electron microscopy images showing lamella layers and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showing new melting peaks vs the starting fatty alcohols. Hair washed for 16 repeat cycles with this shampoo showed penetration of fatty alcohols from the gel network into hair as confirmed by a differential extraction method with GC-MS and by radiolabelling of stearyl alcohol and showing its presence inside hair cross-sections. The gel network role in delivering fatty alcohol inside hair is demonstrated by comparing with a shampoo with added fatty alcohol not in an ordered gel network structure. The hair containing fatty alcohol was measured via the Dia-stron cyclic fatigue instrument and showed a significantly higher number of cycles to break vs control. The formation of a stable gel network was confirmed in the formulated shampoo, and it was demonstrated that this gel network is important to deliver cetyl and stearyl alcohols into hair. The presence of fatty alcohol inside hair was shown to deliver a hair strength benefit via cyclic fatigue testing. © 2017 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  3. Anticancer properties of peptide fragments of hair proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiusz Markowicz

    Full Text Available The primary function of hair and fur covering mammalian skin is to provide mechanical and thermal protection for the body. The proteins that constitute hair are extremely resistant to degradation by environmental factors. However, even durable materials can be slowly broken down by mechanical stresses, biodegradation mediated by endogenous enzymes in the skin or host microbes. We hypothesised that the biodegradation products of hair may possess bioprotective properties, which supplement their physical protective properties. Although evolutionary processes have led to a reduction in the amount of hair on the human body, it is possible that the bioprotective properties of hair biodegradation products have persisted. The human skin is exposed to various environmental carcinogenic factors. Therefore, we hypothesised that the potential bioprotective mechanisms of hair degradation products affect melanoma growth. We used pepsin to partially digest hair enzymatically, and this process produced a water-soluble lysate containing a mixture of peptides, including fragments of keratin and keratin-associated proteins. We found out that the mixtures of soluble peptides obtained from human hair inhibited the proliferation of human melanoma cells in vitro. Moreover, the hair-derived peptide mixtures also inhibited the proliferation of B lymphoma cells and urinary bladder cancer cells. Normal human cells varied in their susceptibility to the effects of the lysate; the hair-derived peptide mixtures modulated the proliferation of normal human fibroblasts but did not inhibit the proliferation of human mesenchymal cells derived from umbilical cord stromal cells. These results suggest that hair-derived peptides may represent a new class of anti-proliferative factors derived from basically structural proteins. Identification of active regulatory compounds and recognition of the mechanism of their action might pave the way to elaboration of new anticancer drugs.

  4. Gating energies and forces of the mammalian hair cell transducer channel and related hair bundle mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, SM; Kros, CJ

    2000-01-01

    We quantified the molecular energies and forces involved in opening and closing of mechanoelectrical transducer channels in hair cells using a novel generally applicable method. It relies on a thermodynamic description of the free energy of an ion channel in terms of its open probability. The

  5. Hair fiber characteristics and methods to evaluate hair physical and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valéria Robles Velasco

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The hair thread is a natural fiber formed by keratin, a protein containing high concentration of sulfur coming from the amino acid cystine. The main physical proprieties of the hair depend mostly on its geometry; the physical and mechanical properties of hair involve characteristics to improve: elasticity, smoothness, volume, shine, and softness due to both the significant adherence of the cuticle scales and the movement control (malleability, as well as the easiness of combing, since they reduce the fibers static electricity. The evaluation of these effects on hair may be carried out by several methods, as: optical and electron microscopy, mechanical resistance measuring, shine evaluation and optical coherence tomography (OCT.O cabelo é uma fibra natural formada por queratina, uma proteína composta por teor elevado de enxofre proveniente da cistina. As propriedades principais do cabelo dependem de sua geometria, estrutura física. Características físicas e mecânicas das fibras capilares envolvem propriedades que melhoram: elasticidade, maciez, volume, maleabilidade, facilidade para o ato de pentear e brilho. A avaliação de tais propriedades do cabelo pode ser obtida por métodos diversos, como: microscopia óptica e eletrônica, mensuração da resistência mecânica, determinação do brilho e tomografia por coerência óptica (OCT.

  6. Paradoxical hypertrichosis and terminal hair change after intense pulsed light hair removal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmanesh, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Although complications such as blister formation, erosion, and post-inflammatory hypo- and hyperpigmentation are well-known side effects of intense pulsed light (IPL) photoepilation, little is known about the paradoxical hypertrichosis after therapy. To report the paradoxically increased hair density and coarseness after IPL photoepilation. Within a period of 23 months, a total of 991 hirsute female patients were treated with IPL for photoepilation. The IPL system used was the Vasculight-SR, a multifunctional laser and IPL system (Lumenis Inc., Santa Clara, CA, USA). The cut-off filters frequently used were 695, 755 and 645 nm. Paradoxical hypertrichosis and terminal hair change were detected after a few sessions of IPL therapy among 51 out of 991 patients. Our serial digital photographs, schematic diagrams, and hair counts before and after treatment confirmed the patients' claims. The other more commonly seen complications were epidermal burning with blisters, erosion, and crust formation followed by post-inflammatory hypo- and/or hyperpigmentation. Paradoxical hypertrichosis and terminal hair change is a common complication of IPL photoepilation.

  7. Modeling the vivid white color of the beetle Calothyrza margaritifera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafait, J., E-mail: jacques.lafait@insp.jussieu.fr [Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, CNRS-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, INSP - 140, rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Andraud, C.; Berthier, S.; Boulenguez, J. [Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, CNRS-Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, INSP - 140, rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Callet, P.; Dumazet, S. [Lab. Mathematiques Appliquees aux Systemes, Ecole Centrale Paris (France); Rassart, M.; Vigneron, J.-P. [Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, Namur (Belgium)

    2010-05-25

    The elytra of the longhorn Calothyrza margaritifera exhibit bright white zones which appear, under SEM, to be composed of structures looking like long white hairs: flat cone-shaped rods of 100-200 {mu}m in length and a base of 10-20 {mu}m. Each hair is composed of an envelope of chitin or chitin and associated proteins, filled with small agglomerated spheres of the same material, of mean diameter 550 nm. The optical properties of this multiscale structure have been characterized: hemispherical reflectance spectra, bidirectional reflectance spectra, spatial scattering maps. A multiscale optical model, taking into account this complex structure has been developed for predicting the optical properties. Starting from the SEM image, the representative basic scattering structure is extracted, from the scale of the nanometer to the millimeter. By using the Mie theory and solving the Radiative Transfer Equation, the local optical properties of this structure are calculated. Thanks to a 3D modeler the basic structural element is then duplicated with small deviations in its shape, position and orientation for reproducing the overall SEM image. A photon-mapping is then implemented on this 3D structure with a spectral evaluation of illumination maps based on Monte-Carlo ray shooting. The first predictions of this multiscale model are in qualitative and almost quantitative agreement with the white color measured on the elytron of this insect and of its spatial dispersion. The brightness of the visual effect is explained by considerations about the human vision.

  8. The effects of puberty on white matter development in boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Menzies

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies demonstrate considerable changes in white matter volume and microstructure during adolescence. Most studies have focused on age-related effects, whilst puberty-related changes are not well understood. Using diffusion tensor imaging and tract-based spatial statistics, we investigated the effects of pubertal status on white matter mean diffusivity (MD and fractional anisotropy (FA in 61 males aged 12.7–16.0 years. Participants were grouped into early-mid puberty (≤Tanner Stage 3 in pubic hair and gonadal development; n = 22 and late-post puberty (≥Tanner Stage 4 in pubic hair or gonadal development; n = 39. Salivary levels of pubertal hormones (testosterone, DHEA and oestradiol were also measured. Pubertal stage was significantly related to MD in diverse white matter regions. No relationship was observed between pubertal status and FA. Regression modelling of MD in the significant regions demonstrated that an interaction model incorporating puberty, age and puberty × age best explained our findings. In addition, testosterone was correlated with MD in these pubertally significant regions. No relationship was observed between oestradiol or DHEA and MD. In conclusion, pubertal status was significantly related to MD, but not FA, and this relationship cannot be explained by changes in chronological age alone.

  9. Perioperative hair removal in the 21st century: utilizing an innovative vacuum-assisted technology to safely expedite hair removal before surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Edmiston, Charles E.; Griggs, Russell K.; Tanner, Judith; Spencer, Maureen; Seabrook, Gary R.; Leaper, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perioperative hair removal using clippers requires lengthy cleanup to remove loose hairs contaminating the operative field. We compared the amount of hair debris and associated microbiologic contamination produced during clipping of surgical sites using standard surgical clippers (SSC) or clippers fitted with a vacuum-assisted hair collection device (SCVAD).\\ud Methods: Trained nurses conducted bilateral hair clipping of the chest and groin of 18 male subjects using SSC or SCVAD. ...

  10. Hair pull test: Evidence-based update and revision of guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Katherine A; Shelley, Amanda J; Colantonio, Sophia; Beecker, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    The hair pull test lacks validation and has unclear pretest guidelines. We sought to quantify normal hair pull test values and elucidate the effect of pretest hair washing and brushing. The impact of hair texture and lifestyle was also examined. Participants (n = 181) completed a questionnaire recording demographics, medications, and hair health/history. A single hair pull test (scalp vertex) was performed. The mean number of hairs removed per pull was 0.44 (SD 0.75). There was no significant difference in the mean number of hairs removed regardless of when participants washed (P = .20) or brushed (P = .25) their hair. Hair pull test values were similar between Caucasian-, Asian-, and Afro-textured hair. There was no significant difference in hair pull values between participants taking medications affecting hair loss and participants not taking these medications (P = .33). Tight hairstyles did not influence hair pull test values. Participant hair washing and brushing could not be controlled during the study, but this information was documented and analyzed. Normal values for the hair pull test should be reduced to 2 hairs or fewer (97.2% of participants). The current 5-day restriction on pretest hair washing can be reduced and brushing be made permissible. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Contactless decontamination of hair samples: cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restolho, José; Barroso, Mário; Saramago, Benilde; Dias, Mário; Afonso, Carlos A M

    2017-02-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have already been shown to provide efficient extraction media for several systems, and to capture volatile compounds, namely opiates. In this work, a novel, contactless, artefact-free extraction procedure for the removal of Δ 9 -tetrahrydrocannabinol (THC) from the surface of human hair is presented. To prepare in vitro cannabinoids-contaminated hair, samples were flushed with hashish smoke for 7 h. The decontamination experiments were carried at 100 °C for 24 h, according to the procedure previously described. Fifty-three ILs were screened and presented decontamination efficiencies ranging from 0 to 96 %. Although the majority of the ILs presented efficiencies above 90%, the 1-ethanol-3-methyl tetrafluoroborate (96%) was chosen for further process optimization. The Design of Experiments results demonstrated that all studied variables were significant for the process and the obtained optimum conditions were: 100 °C, 13 h and 175 mg of IL. In the work of Perrotin-Brunel et al. (J. Mol. Struct. 2011, 987, 67), it is demonstrated that, at 100 °C, full conversion of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) into THC is obtained after 60 min. Since our decontamination takes place over 13 h at 100 °C, full conversion of THCA into THC is expected. Additionally, our method was compared with the method proposed by Cairns et al. (Forensic Sci. Int. 2004, 145, 97), through the analysis of 15 in vitro contaminated hair samples. The results demonstrated that with our method a mean extraction efficiency of 11 % higher was obtained. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Hairs of discrete symmetries and gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Sin Choi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gauge symmetries are known to be respected by gravity because gauge charges carry flux lines, but global charges do not carry flux lines and are not conserved by gravitational interaction. For discrete symmetries, they are spontaneously broken in the Universe, forming domain walls. Since the realization of discrete symmetries in the Universe must involve the vacuum expectation values of Higgs fields, a string-like configuration (hair at the intersection of domain walls in the Higgs vacua can be realized. Therefore, we argue that discrete charges are also respected by gravity.

  13. Hair Follicle Nevus: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnci Mevlitoğlu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hair follicle nevus (HFN is a rare hamartoma showing follicular differentiation. Hamartomas are benign tumoral formations caused by overproduction of normal tissues and cells. HFN was first introduced by Gans et al in 1928. There are a few reports in literature on HFN appearing as multiple lesions, which is often observed as a single papule or nodule. We are hereby present our patient having complaints beginning in early childhood as his lesions might be confused with other dermatoses located on face area. As far as we know, our patient is the first HFN case with bilateral, multiple, perioral, perinasal, periorbital and genital involvements.

  14. Hairs of discrete symmetries and gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kang Sin [Scranton Honors Program, Ewha Womans University, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 03760 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Fields, Gravity and Strings, CTPU, Institute for Basic Sciences, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34047 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jihn E., E-mail: jihnekim@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Kyung Hee University, 26 Gyungheedaero, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul 02447 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research (IBS), 291 Daehakro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Kyae, Bumseok [Department of Physics, Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehakro-63-Gil, Geumjeong-Gu, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Soonkeon [Department of Physics, Kyung Hee University, 26 Gyungheedaero, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul 02447 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-10

    Gauge symmetries are known to be respected by gravity because gauge charges carry flux lines, but global charges do not carry flux lines and are not conserved by gravitational interaction. For discrete symmetries, they are spontaneously broken in the Universe, forming domain walls. Since the realization of discrete symmetries in the Universe must involve the vacuum expectation values of Higgs fields, a string-like configuration (hair) at the intersection of domain walls in the Higgs vacua can be realized. Therefore, we argue that discrete charges are also respected by gravity.

  15. Twist-off purification of hair bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Bum; Pagana, James; Gillespie, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Purification of hair bundles from inner-ear organs allows biochemical analysis of bundle constituents, including proteins and lipids. We describe here the "twist-off" method of bundle isolation, where dissected inner-ear organs are embedded in agarose, then subjected to a mechanical disruption that shears off bundles and leaves them in agarose blocks. With care in the dissection and in clean-up of the isolated bundles, contamination from cell bodies can be kept to a minimum. Isolated bundles can be analyzed by a variety of techniques, including immunocytochemistry, SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry.

  16. Body hair counts during hair length reduction procedures: a comparative study between Computer Assisted Image Analysis after Manual Processing (CAIAMP) and Trichoscan(™).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, D J J

    2015-08-01

    To compare two measurement methods for body hair. Calibration of computer assisted image analysis after manual processing (CAIAMP) showed variation body sites with 'good natural contrast between hair and skin' were taken before hair dye, after hair dye or after hair length reduction without hair extraction or destruction. Data in the same targets were compared with Trichoscan(™) quoted for 'unambiguous evaluation of the hair growth after shaving'. CAIAMP detected a total of 337 hair and showed no statistically significant differences with the three procedures confirming 'good natural contrast between hair and skin' and that reduction methods did not affect hair counts. While CAIAMP found a mean number of 19 thick hair (≥30 μm) before dye, 18 after dye and 20 after hair reduction, Trichoscan(™) found in the same sites respectively 44, 73 and 61. Trichoscan(™) generated counts differed statistically significantly from CAIAMP-data. Automated analyses were considered un-specifically influenced by hair medulla and natural or artificial skin background. Quality control including all steps of human intervention and measurement technology are mandatory for body hair measurements during experimental or clinical trials on body hair grooming, shaving or removal. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Geometric classification of scalp hair for valid drug testing, 6 more reliable than 8 hair curl groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Mkentane

    Full Text Available Curly hair is reported to contain higher lipid content than straight hair, which may influence incorporation of lipid soluble drugs. The use of race to describe hair curl variation (Asian, Caucasian and African is unscientific yet common in medical literature (including reports of drug levels in hair. This study investigated the reliability of a geometric classification of hair (based on 3 measurements: the curve diameter, curl index and number of waves.After ethical approval and informed consent, proximal virgin (6cm hair sampled from the vertex of scalp in 48 healthy volunteers were evaluated. Three raters each scored hairs from 48 volunteers at two occasions each for the 8 and 6-group classifications. One rater applied the 6-group classification to 80 additional volunteers in order to further confirm the reliability of this system. The Kappa statistic was used to assess intra and inter rater agreement.Each rater classified 480 hairs on each occasion. No rater classified any volunteer's 10 hairs into the same group; the most frequently occurring group was used for analysis. The inter-rater agreement was poor for the 8-groups (k = 0.418 but improved for the 6-groups (k = 0.671. The intra-rater agreement also improved (k = 0.444 to 0.648 versus 0.599 to 0.836 for 6-groups; that for the one evaluator for all volunteers was good (k = 0.754.Although small, this is the first study to test the reliability of a geometric classification. The 6-group method is more reliable. However, a digital classification system is likely to reduce operator error. A reliable objective classification of human hair curl is long overdue, particularly with the increasing use of hair as a testing substrate for treatment compliance in Medicine.

  18. Hair analysis for drugs of abuse. Hair color and race differentials or systematic differences in drug preferences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R C; Mieczkowski, T; Sweeney, S A; Bourland, J A

    2000-01-10

    There is currently a debate in the literature on chemical drug analysis concerning the contribution of biophysical attributes associated with specimens and specimen donors to assay outcome. In recent years this debate has focused on hair analysis, but has in the past also been raised in urinalysis interpretation. In this article we examine several aspects of that controversy. First, we present data regarding the effects of hair color on the distribution of positive hair testing results for three drug classes. We compare these results to negative hair samples from comparable donors. This data is derived from head hair from preemployment donors that was classified according to seven visual color categories. We determined the distribution of colors for hair samples devoid of any of three assayed drugs (amphetamines, cocaine, and cannabinoids). Subsequently, this distribution was compared with the distributions for hairs that had tested positive for amphetamines, cocaine or cannabinoids. We examined a total of 2000 randomly selected samples; 500 negative hair samples and 500 positive samples for each of three drugs: cannabinoids, cocaine, and amphetamine. We also evaluated ethnic/racial factors in relation to positive urinalyses for various ethnic/racial groups. We examined approximately 4000 urine specimens from two different groups, each constituting around 2000 specimens. In addition to ethnicity/race and urinalysis outcome, we also examined the relationship between the hair color distributions of urine donors and the corresponding urinalysis results for the three drug classes. We also compared them to drug-negative samples. Our summary impression is that the observed outcome patterns were largely consistent with differences in drug preferences among the various societal groups. There was little evidence of a pattern attributable to hair color bias alone or selective binding of drugs to hair of a particular color. Likewise, there was no discernible pattern

  19. Genetic determinants of hair, eye and skin pigmentation in Europeans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulem, P.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Stacey, S.N.; Helgason, A.; Rafnar, T.; Magnusson, K.P.; Manolescu, A.; Karason, A.; Palsson, A.; Thorleifsson, G.; Jakobsdottir, M.; Steinberg, S.; Palsson, S.; Jonasson, F.; Sigurgeirsson, B.; Thorisdottir, K.; Ragnarsson, R.; Benediktsdottir, K.R.; Aben, K.K.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Olafsson, J.H.; Gulcher, J.R.; Kong, A.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.

    2007-01-01

    Hair, skin and eye colors are highly heritable and visible traits in humans. We carried out a genome-wide association scan for variants associated with hair and eye pigmentation, skin sensitivity to sun and freckling among 2,986 Icelanders. We then tested the most closely associated SNPs from six

  20. Diagnosis and management of hair loss in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo-Soccio, Leslie

    2016-08-01

    Hair loss is common in infants and children and the ability to distinguish why a child is losing hair enables providers to distinguish hair loss that is related to infection, autoimmune conditions, nutrition, medications, trauma/traction, or underlying genetic disorders such as ectodermal dysplasias. Making these distinctions leads to best management and guidance for patients and their families. Careful physical examination of the hair, scalp, skin, and nails coupled with dermoscopy or trichoscopy, or both, can yield more accurate and faster diagnosis. Biopsy is rarely needed in children for hair loss conditions. Hair loss, particularly on the scalp, can affect all ages and can impact patients socially and emotionally. The majority of hair loss in children is nonscarring. Diagnosis begins with a good history, including personal and family history, medication use, a thorough physical examination, and use of dermoscopy or trichoscopy, or both. With these, providers can begin to divide hair loss into congenital vs. acquired, and then further subdivide into focal vs. diffuse and scarring vs. nonscarring. Secondary change, including scale and erythema, can further help with diagnosis.

  1. Occupational Hand Dermatitis among Hair Dressers in a Semi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    potential irritation-causing hair beauty products and therefore, at a high risk of occupational hand dermatitis. This ... these beauty products. AIM. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of occupational hand ..... The standard is water and soap. However, improper hand washing after hair dressing may predispose ...

  2. comparative analysis of mercury content in human hair and cosmetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Highest T-Hg concentrations were found in females who work in beauty hair salons and the lowest concentrations were found among students. The average .... (SDE = Standard Error; d.l. = detection limit of 0.001 ppm; ** Mean was calculated from three replicates of each sample.) Table 2: T-Hg concentration in hair among ...

  3. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia: advice and support for hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Helen

    This article provides insight into the growth cycle of a hair follicle and the potential impact chemotherapy agents can have on this process, which often results in hair loss (alopecia). It explores the psychological consequences of chemotherapy-induced alopecia for an individual as a result of the perceptions of others as well as an individual's perception of his or her self-image. Despite the development of various forms of scalp cooling, chemotherapy-induced alopecia remains a major side effect for patients receiving chemotherapy; however, there have been improvements in wig provision and changing public opinion relating to baldness. Although chemotherapy-induced alopecia affects both males and females and all age groups, this article focuses on the potential impact for patients receiving chemotherapy as a form of treatment for breast cancer. As professionals we need to understand the social significance of hair in relation to a person's outward presentation and social interactions, along with the possible psychological implications of a person losing his or her bodily hair, and not just the head hair. We must aim to minimize the distress alopecia can cause by: ensuring we provide patients with up-to-date verbal and written information to enable them to prepare for losing their hair; helping them to preserve their self-image and minimize the psychological consequences of hair loss while receiving chemotherapy; and preparing them for their hair re-growth following completion of chemotherapy.

  4. Aberration corrected STEM to study an ancient hair dyeing formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriarche, G.; Van Elslande, E.; Castaing, J.; Walter, P.

    2014-05-01

    Lead-based chemistry was initiated in ancient Egypt for cosmetic preparation more than 4000 years ago. Here, we study a hair-dyeing recipe using lead salts described in text since Greco-Roman times. We report direct evidence about the shape and distribution of PbS nanocrystals that form within the hair during blackening.

  5. Toxic Trace Elements in the Hair of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fido, Abdullahi; Al-Saad, Samira

    2005-01-01

    Excess or deficiency of natural trace elements has been implicated in the etiology of autism. This study explores whether concentration levels of toxic metals in the hair of children with autism significantly differ from those of age- and sex-matched healthy controls. In-hair concentration levels of antimony, uranium, arsenic, beryllium, mercury,…

  6. Efficacy of lures and hair snares to detect lynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory W. McDaniel; Kevin S. McKelvey; John R. Squires; Leonard F. Ruggiero

    2000-01-01

    Resource managers lack an inexpensive and quantifiable method to detect lynx presence across large landscapes. We tested efficacy of a protocol based on hair snagging to detect presence of lynx (Lynx canadensis). We tested 2 key elements of the protocol: 1) a hair-snaring device and 2) commercial lures used to attract and elicit rubbing behavior in lynx. The...

  7. Towards a characterization of fields leading to black hole hair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a characterization of the fields leading to a black hole hair. Keywords. Black hole; No Hair Theorem. PACS Nos 04.20.−q; 04.70.Bw. 1. Introduction. Black holes are easily amongst the most fascinating offshoots of General Theory of Rel- ativity. One important question asked about a black hole is regarding the information ...

  8. Premature graying of hair: An independent risk marker for coronary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Premature graying of hair as a risk marker among young smokers has a potential of identifying coronary artery disease (CAD) at a very early stage. There is absence of literature that assesses premature graying of hair as an independent marker of CAD in smokers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The present ...

  9. Pregnancy folklore revisited: the case of heartburn and hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigan, Kathleen A; Sipsma, Heather L; DiPietro, Janet A

    2006-12-01

    Folklore can originate by detection of actual associations between seemingly unrelated events and perpetuated through oral tradition. The objective of this study was to determine whether a common pregnancy belief that women who experience a lot of heartburn give birth to newborns with a lot of hair is accurate. Sixty-four pregnant women ranked the severity of their degree of heartburn during pregnancy. Independent coders rated newborn hair volume using 2 photographs of the infant's head, taken shortly after birth. Most (78%) women reported some degree of heartburn. Symptom severity was unrelated to fetal sex and maternal characteristics including parity, age, or weight. The simple linear relationship between heartburn severity and hair volume was significant r(s)(62) = 0.40, p < 0.001. Categorical analysis by severity score and hair ranking revealed a similar association (chi(2)= 23.93, p < 0.05). Most (23/28) women who reported moderate or severe heartburn gave birth to babies with average or above average amounts of hair, and conversely, most (10/12) women reporting no heartburn had babies with less than average or no hair. Contrary to expectations, it appears that an association between heartburn severity during pregnancy and newborn hair does exist. We propose a shared biologic mechanism involving a dual role of pregnancy hormones in both the relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and the modulation of fetal hair growth.

  10. Functional hair cell mechanotransducer channels are required for aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman Alharazneh

    Full Text Available Aminoglycosides (AG are commonly prescribed antibiotics with potent bactericidal activities. One main side effect is permanent sensorineural hearing loss, induced by selective inner ear sensory hair cell death. Much work has focused on AG's initiating cell death processes, however, fewer studies exist defining mechanisms of AG uptake by hair cells. The current study investigated two proposed mechanisms of AG transport in mammalian hair cells: mechanotransducer (MET channels and endocytosis. To study these two mechanisms, rat cochlear explants were cultured as whole organs in gentamicin-containing media. Two-photon imaging of Texas Red conjugated gentamicin (GTTR uptake into live hair cells was rapid and selective. Hypocalcemia, which increases the open probability of MET channels, increased AG entry into hair cells. Three blockers of MET channels (curare, quinine, and amiloride significantly reduced GTTR uptake, whereas the endocytosis inhibitor concanavalin A did not. Dynosore quenched the fluorescence of GTTR and could not be tested. Pharmacologic blockade of MET channels with curare or quinine, but not concanavalin A or dynosore, prevented hair cell loss when challenged with gentamicin for up to 96 hours. Taken together, data indicate that the patency of MET channels mediated AG entry into hair cells and its toxicity. Results suggest that limiting permeation of AGs through MET channel or preventing their entry into endolymph are potential therapeutic targets for preventing hair cell death and hearing loss.

  11. A dual porosity model of nutrient uptake by root hairs

    KAUST Repository

    Zygalakis, K. C.

    2011-08-09

    Summary: • The importance of root hairs in the uptake of sparingly soluble nutrients is understood qualitatively, but not quantitatively, and this limits efforts to breed plants tolerant of nutrient-deficient soils. • Here, we develop a mathematical model of nutrient uptake by root hairs allowing for hair geometry and the details of nutrient transport through soil, including diffusion within and between soil particles. We give illustrative results for phosphate uptake. • Compared with conventional \\'single porosity\\' models, this \\'dual porosity\\' model predicts greater root uptake because more nutrient is available by slow release from within soil particles. Also the effect of soil moisture is less important with the dual porosity model because the effective volume available for diffusion in the soil is larger, and the predicted effects of hair length and density are different. • Consistent with experimental observations, with the dual porosity model, increases in hair length give greater increases in uptake than increases in hair density per unit main root length. The effect of hair density is less in dry soil because the minimum concentration in solution for net influx is reached more rapidly. The effect of hair length is much less sensitive to soil moisture. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Could Certain Hair Dyes, Relaxers Raise Breast Cancer Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lifestyle other than use of hair products could affect breast cancer risk. A toxicologist for the Personal Care Products Council, a trade group, countered that no studies have shown that hair dyes or relaxers cause cancer. "Those who use cosmetics and personal care products can feel confident that ...

  13. Comparative analysis of mercury content in human hair and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total mercury (T-Hg) concentrations were analysed in human hairs and cosmetic products sold in Dar es Salaam Tanzania. The average total mercury (T-Hg) concentrations in the scalp hair of females using mercury based cosmetic creams and soaps ranged from 7.0 ± 0.4 to 880 ± 12 ppm. Highest T-Hg concentrations ...

  14. The actin Cytoskeleton in Root Hairs: a cell elongation device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2009-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays an important role in root hair development. It is involved in both the delivery of growth materials to the expanding tip of root hairs and the regulation of the area of tip growth. This review starts with a discussion of the techniques that are available to visualize the

  15. Hair morphology in androgenetic alopecia: sonographic and electron microscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortsman, Ximena; Guerrero, Robinson; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2014-07-01

    To assess hair morphology in androgenetic alopecia on sonography and electron microscopy. A prospective study was performed in 33 patients with androgenetic alopecia and 10 unaffected control participants. In vivo sonography of the hair follicles of the scalp and in vitro sonography and electron microscopy of the hair shafts were performed according to a standardized protocol that included analysis of the right frontal and occipital regions. The upper frequency limit of the ultrasound probes ranged between 15 and 18 MHz. Scalp hair follicles and hair shafts were recognizable on sonography in all cases. Hair follicles in alopecia cases had significantly lower depths (P alopecia also had a different distribution of their laminar pattern on in vitro sonography, with a greater presence of mixed (trilaminar and bilaminar) and solely bilaminar tracts in comparison with the controls (mostly trilaminar). On electron microscopy, the alopecia hair tracts showed irregularities and commonly a "melted candle" appearance of the cuticle. Sonography and electron microscopy uncover distinct abnormalities in the morphology of hair in androgenetic alopecia, which may potentially support the diagnosis and management of this common condition. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  16. Effects of shampoo and water washing on hair cortisol concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Amanda F; Meyer, Jerrold S; Henchey, Elizabeth; Dettmer, Amanda M; Suomi, Stephen J; Novak, Melinda A

    2011-01-30

    Measurement of cortisol in hair is an emerging biomarker for chronic stress in human and nonhuman primates. Currently unknown, however, is the extent of potential cortisol loss from hair that has been repeatedly exposed to shampoo and/or water. Pooled hair samples from 20 rhesus monkeys were subjected to five treatment conditions: 10, 20, or 30 shampoo washes, 20 water-only washes, or a no-wash control. For each wash, hair was exposed to a dilute shampoo solution or tap water for 45 s, rinsed 4 times with tap water, and rapidly dried. Samples were then processed for cortisol extraction and analysis using previously published methods. Hair cortisol levels were significantly reduced by washing, with an inverse relationship between number of shampoo washes and the cortisol concentration. This effect was mainly due to water exposure, as cortisol levels following 20 water-only washes were similar to those following 20 shampoo treatments. Repeated exposure to water with or without shampoo appears to leach cortisol from hair, yielding values that underestimate the amount of chronic hormone deposition within the shaft. Collecting samples proximal to the scalp and obtaining hair washing frequency data may be valuable when conducting human hair cortisol studies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Study of blood and pubic hair mineralograms of alcoholic people ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quantification of minerals present in the blood and pubic hair of alcoholic people is of paramount importance, since the excessive consumption of liquor over several years can cause an imbalance of minerals. In this sense, the present study sought to compare the mineralograms of pubic hair and blood of alcoholic and ...

  18. The bacterial and physico-chemical properties of hair salon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bacterial and physico-chemical properties of hair salon wastewater and contaminated soil in Benin metropolis were investigated. Investigations were carried out on five hair salons from different locations in Benin City. The physico chemical analysis showed that Ugbowo samples had the highest chemical oxygen ...

  19. Near total penile amputation caused by hair tourniquet, managed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hair tourniquet syndrome is an unusual phenomenon which can cause severe damage to the affected organ, sometimes even its loss. This problem requires urgent attention and prompt management to ensure anatomical and functional preservation. Herein we report a case of penile hair tourniquet which was ...

  20. Toxic Metals Profiles in Hair Samples from Street Roaming Animals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of toxic metals profiles in hair samples from street roaming animals in Yelwa-Yauri town, North Western, Nigeria was carried out. Hair samples for the analyses were collected from 108 animal (54 sheep and 54 goats) roaming the street of Yelwa-Yauri town and 45 samples from animals in the neighboring ...

  1. Hair bundles are specialized for ATP delivery via creatine kinase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, J.B.; Streijger, F.; Beynon, A.J.; Peters, T.; Gadzala, L.; McMillen, D.; Bystrom, C.; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der; Wallimann, T.; Gillespie, P.G.

    2007-01-01

    When stimulated strongly, a hair cell's mechanically sensitive hair bundle may consume ATP too rapidly for replenishment by diffusion. To provide a broad view of the bundle's protein complement, including those proteins participating in energy metabolism, we used shotgun mass spectrometry methods to

  2. Advancements in Biomimetic Hair Flow-Sensor Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagamseh, A.M.K.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    In this paper we present the latest developments in the design, fabrication and application of single and arrays of biomimetic hair flow-sensors towards high-resolution air-flow imaging. Redesigning the electrode system of the hair sensor (using SOI wafer technology) has led to improve the detection

  3. Braid My Hair - Randy Owen sings out for sick children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about a young girl who has lost her hair due to illness. Chris Gray and Brent Wilson wrote the song. Gray had been a teacher at St. Jude helping kids there who were being treated for ... girls longed to have hair to braid again. The songwriters managed to get ...

  4. Chemotherapy and Hair Loss: What to Expect during Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sometimes your eyelash, eyebrow, armpit, pubic and other body hair also falls out. Some chemotherapy drugs are more ... dose of chemotherapy as the rest of your body. People undergoing scalp hypothermia ... a drug approved for hair loss — to your scalp before and during chemotherapy ...

  5. Iron Status in Diffuse Telogen Hair Loss among Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moeinvaziri, Mojdeh; Mansoori, Parvin; Holakooee, Koorosh; Naraghi, Zahra Safaee; Abbasi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between iron body status and different types of hair loss has been investigated in a number of studies, however, with relatively discrepant findings. Therefore we conducted an analytical case-control study to assess whether diffuse telogen hair loss in women of childbearing age (15

  6. Quantifying variation in human scalp hair fiber shape and pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasisi, Tina; Ito, Shosuke; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Shaw, Colin N

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of quantitative methods of measuring variation in scalp hair fiber shape and pigmentation and carry out exploratory data analysis on a limited sample of individuals from diverse populations in order to inform future avenues of research for the evolution of modern human hair variation. Cross-sectional area and shape and average curvature of scalp hair fibers were quantified using ImageJ. Pigmentation was analyzed using chemical methods estimating total melanin content through spectrophotometric methods, and eumelanin and pheomelanin content through HLPC analysis of melanin-specific degradation products. The initial results reinforced findings from earlier, traditional studies. African and African Diaspora scalp hair was significantly curled, (East) Asian hair was significantly thick, and European hair was significantly lighter in color. However, pigmentation analyses revealed a high level of variability in the melanin content of non-European populations and analysis of curvature found a large range of variation in the average curvature of East African individuals. Overall, these results suggest the usefulness of chemical methods for the elucidation of nonperceptible differences in scalp hair color and highlight the need for improvements in our assessment and understanding of hair fiber curvature. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:341-352, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Mycorrhiza alters the profile of root hairs in trifoliate orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang-Sheng; Liu, Chun-Yan; Zhang, De-Jian; Zou, Ying-Ning; He, Xin-Hua; Wu, Qing-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Root hairs and arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) coexist in root systems for nutrient and water absorption, but the relation between AM and root hairs is poorly known. A pot study was performed to evaluate the effects of four different AM fungi (AMF), namely, Claroideoglomus etunicatum, Diversispora versiformis, Funneliformis mosseae, and Rhizophagus intraradices on root hair development in trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings grown in sand. Mycorrhizal seedlings showed significantly higher root hair density than non-mycorrhizal seedlings, irrespective of AMF species. AMF inoculation generally significantly decreased root hair length in the first- and second-order lateral roots but increased it in the third- and fourth-order lateral roots. AMF colonization induced diverse responses in root hair diameter of different order lateral roots. Considerably greater concentrations of phosphorus (P), nitric oxide (NO), glucose, sucrose, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) were found in roots of AM seedlings than in non-AM seedlings. Levels of P, NO, carbohydrates, IAA, and MeJA in roots were correlated with AM formation and root hair development. These results suggest that AMF could alter the profile of root hairs in trifoliate orange through modulation of physiological activities. F. mosseae, which had the greatest positive effects, could represent an efficient AM fungus for increasing fruit yields or decreasing fertilizer inputs in citrus production.

  8. HPLC/Chemiluminescence Detection of Methamphetamine and Amphetamine in Hair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takayama, Nariaki; Tanaka, Seishi; Kizu, Ryoichi; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    1998-01-01

    ...) for determining methamphetamine (MA) and its metabolite, amphetamine (AP), in a single hair. MA and AP were extracted from a single hair with a solution of methanol and hydrochloric acid, evaporated to dryness, dansylated, and subjected to CL-HPLC. Bis...

  9. Intergalactic medium emission observations with the cosmic web imager. I. The circum-QSO medium of QSO 1549+19, and evidence for a filamentary gas inflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, D. Christopher; Chang, Daphne; Matuszewski, Matt; Morrissey, Patrick; Rahman, Shahin [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Mail Code 278-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Moore, Anna [Caltech Optical Observatories, Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Mail Code 11-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Steidel, Charles C., E-mail: cmartin@srl.caltech.edu [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Mail Code 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    The Palomar Cosmic Web Imager (PCWI), an integral field spectrograph designed to detect and map low surface brightness emission, has obtained imaging spectroscopic maps of Lyα from the circum-QSO medium (CQM) of QSO HS1549+19 at redshift z = 2.843. Extensive extended emission is detected from the CQM, consistent with fluorescent and pumped Lyα produced by the ionizing and Lyα continuum of the QSO. Many features present in PCWI spectral images match those detected in narrow-band images. Filamentary structures with narrow line profiles are detected in several cases as long as 250-400 kpc. One of these is centered at a velocity redshifted with respect to the systemic velocity, and displays a spatially collimated and kinematically cold line profile increasing in velocity width approaching the QSO. This suggests that the filament gas is infalling onto the QSO, perhaps in a cold accretion flow. Because of the strong ionizing flux, the neutral column density is low, typically N(H I)∼10{sup 12}--10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}, and the line center optical depth is also low (typically τ{sub 0} < 10), insufficient to display well separated double peak emission characteristic of higher line optical depths. With a simple ionization and cloud model we can very roughly estimate the total gas mass (log M {sub gas} = 12.5 ± 0.5) and the total (log M {sub tot} = 13.3 ± 0.5). We can also calculate a kinematic mass from the total line profile (2 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉}), which agrees with the mass estimated from the gas emission. The intensity-binned spectrum of the CQM shows a progression in kinematic properties consistent with heirarchical structure formation.

  10. The identification of filaments on far-infrared and submillimiter images: Morphology, physical conditions and relation with star formation of filamentary structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schisano, E.; Carey, S.; Paladini, R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rygl, K. L. J. [European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA-ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, P.O. Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Molinari, S.; Elia, D.; Pestalozzi, M. [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Busquet, G. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía, s/n, E-18008, Granada (Spain); Polychroni, D. [Departement of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Faculty of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Billot, N. [Instituto de RadioAstronomía Milimétrica Avenida Divina Pastora, 7, Núcleo Central, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Noriega-Crespo, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Moore, T. J. T. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Plume, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Institute for Space Imaging Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N IN4 (Canada); Glover, S. C. O. [Zentrüm für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Vázquez-Semadeni, E., E-mail: eugenio@ipac.caltech.edu [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica (CRyA), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CP 58190 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-08-10

    Observations of molecular clouds reveal a complex structure, with gas and dust often arranged in filamentary, rather than spherical geometries. The association of pre- and proto-stellar cores with the filaments suggests a direct link with the process of star formation. Any study of the properties of such filaments requires representative samples from different environments for an unbiased detection method. We developed such an approach using the Hessian matrix of a surface-brightness distribution to identify filaments and determine their physical and morphological properties. After testing the method on simulated, but realistic, filaments, we apply the algorithms to column-density maps computed from Herschel observations of the Galactic plane obtained by the Hi-GAL project. We identified ∼500 filaments, in the longitude range of l = 216.°5 to l = 225.°5, with lengths from ∼1 pc up to ∼30 pc and widths between 0.1 pc and 2.5 pc. Average column densities are between 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2} and 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}. Filaments include the majority of dense material with N{sub H{sub 2}} > 6 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}. We find that the pre- and proto-stellar compact sources already identified in the same region are mostly associated with filaments. However, surface densities in excess of the expected critical values for high-mass star formation are only found on the filaments, indicating that these structures are necessary to channel material into the clumps. Furthermore, we analyze the gravitational stability of filaments and discuss their relationship with star formation.

  11. Planck intermediate results. XXXVIII. E- and B-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    The quest for a B-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. We present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the 353 GHz Planck Stokes maps at high Galactic latitude, relevant to the study of dust emission as a polarized foreground to the CMB. We filter the intensity and polarization maps to isolate filaments in the range of angular scales where the power asymmetry between E-modes and B-modes is observed. Using the Smoothed Hessian Major Axis Filament Finder (SMAFF), we identify 259 filaments at high Galactic latitude, with lengths larger or equal to 2° (corresponding to 3.5 pc in length for a typical distance of 100 pc). Thesefilaments show a preferred orientation parallel to the magnetic field projected onto the plane of the sky, derived from their polarization angles. We present mean maps of the filaments in Stokes I, Q, U, E, and B, computed by stacking individual images rotated to align the orientations of the filaments. Combining the stacked images and the histogram of relative orientations, we estimate the mean polarization fraction of the filaments to be 11%. Furthermore, we show that the correlation between the filaments and the magnetic field orientations may account for the E and B asymmetry and the CℓTE/CℓEE ratio, reported in the power spectra analysis of the Planck353 GHz polarization maps. Future models of the dust foreground for CMB polarization studies will need to take into account the observed correlation between the dust polarization and the structure of interstellar matter.

  12. Hair diseases: a big problem on a small surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wcisło-Dziadecka, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Civilizational progress initially contributes to the problem of hair loss and then to alopecia as regards both frequency and therapeutic dilemmas. The work presents trichological problems which occur more rarely, i.e. drug-induced, anagen and telogen alopecia, congenital and acquired structural hair disorders, psychic disturbances concerning the hair as well as the hair during menopause. Then, the article briefly describes contagious (infectious) diseases as well as diseases with inflammatory etiology which are accompanied by exfoliation and (frequently) pruritus. Finally, alopecia cicatricans is discussed. Alopecia areata and androgenetic alopecia are omitted herein because they occur more often and will be described in another work. Any disproportions and upset balance concerning correct functioning of mechanisms within the scalp hair system are the evidence of pathologies. PMID:27881935

  13. Mechanosensory hair cells express two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zizhen; Grillet, Nicolas; Zhao, Bo; Cunningham, Christopher; Harkins-Perry, Sarah; Coste, Bertrand; Ranade, Sanjeev; Zebarjadi, Navid; Beurg, Maryline; Fettiplace, Robert; Patapoutian, Ardem; Mueller, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Auditory hair cells contain mechanotransduction channels that rapidly open in response to sound-induced vibrations. We report here that auditory hair cells contain two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels. One ion channel is activated by sound and is responsible for sensory transduction. This sensory transduction channel is expressed in hair cell stereocilia, and previous studies show that its activity is affected by mutations in the genes encoding the transmembrane proteins TMHS, TMIE, TMC1 and TMC2. We show here that the second ion channel is expressed at the apical surface of hair cells and that it contains the Piezo2 protein. The activity of the Piezo2-dependent channel is controlled by the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and can be recorded following disruption of the sensory transduction machinery or more generally by disruption of the sensory epithelium. We thus conclude that hair cells express two molecularly and functionally distinct mechanotransduction channels with different subcellular distributions.

  14. Topographical and Tribological Characteristics of Asian Human Hair Cuticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ling Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The topography and frictional force of Asian black male and female hair cuticles at different locations are determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM and friction force microscopy (FFM. The frictional values, mapped for comparison with surface morphology, corresponded qualitatively with the structures’ plane surface characteristics. The results indicate that the hair surface was damaged and modified at different temperatures and heating times. The height of the female hair at a blowing temperature of 60°C after a duration of 2 min between the cuticle edge and cuticle surface was approximately 440–556 nm. The adhesion phenomenon occurs on the hair surface and interface. The cuticles do not vary after the heating; however, the hair damage sustained increases with serious deterioration.

  15. Development and regeneration of vestibular hair cells in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph C; Stone, Jennifer S

    2017-05-01

    Vestibular sensation is essential for gaze stabilization, balance, and perception of gravity. The vestibular receptors in mammals, Type I and Type II hair cells, are located in five small organs in the inner ear. Damage to hair cells and their innervating neurons can cause crippling symptoms such as vertigo, visual field oscillation, and imbalance. In adult rodents, some Type II hair cells are regenerated and become re-innervated after damage, presenting opportunities for restoring vestibular function after hair cell damage. This article reviews features of vestibular sensory cells in mammals, including their basic properties, how they develop, and how they are replaced after damage. We discuss molecules that control vestibular hair cell regeneration and highlight areas in which our understanding of development and regeneration needs to be deepened. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Break dancing: a new risk factor for scarring hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monselise, Assaf; Chan, Lisa J Y; Shapiro, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    We report on a first case of lichen planopilaris (LPP) mimicking androgenetic alopecia (AGA) in an individual who has been break-dancing on his head for many years. LPP is an autoimmune inflammatory scalp condition that when left untreated can result in scarring and irreversible hair loss. The etiology of LPP is unknown. Different treatment modalities are used for LPP and AGA. To increase the awareness of physicians to the possibility of scarring hair loss (LPP) presenting like AGA. Scalp examination showed scarring patches of hair loss. A scalp biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of LPP. Chronic scalp trauma due to break dancing may be a trigger for LPP. A meticulous scalp examination should be performed before making a diagnosis of nonscarring conditions of hair loss such as AGA. Early recognition of LPP and appropriate treatment are important before scarring and irreversible hair loss ensue.

  17. Analysis of psilocin, bufotenine and LSD in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rafaela; Schürenkamp, Jennifer; Gasse, Angela; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Köhler, Helga

    2015-03-01

    A method for the simultaneous extraction of the hallucinogens psilocin, bufotenine, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) as well as iso-LSD, nor-LSD and O-H-LSD from hair with hydrochloride acid and methanol is presented. Clean-up of the hair extracts is performed with solid phase extraction using a mixed-mode cation exchanger. Extracts are measured with liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The method was successfully validated according to the guidelines of the 'Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry' (GTFCh). To obtain reference material hair was soaked in a solution of the analytes in dimethyl sulfoxide/methanol to allow incorporation into the hair. These fortified hair samples were used for method development and can be employed as quality controls. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Analysis of methamphetamine and its metabolites in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Nariaki; Iio, Reiko; Tanaka, Seishi; Chinaka, Satoshi; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2003-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a sympathomimetic amine whose abuse has become a serious problem in Japan, Korea, Taiwan and other Southeast Asian countries. The use of hair for the determination of MA use has become more commonplace. The maximum period in which MA and its main metabolites (amphetamine and p-hydroxymethamphetamine) can be detected in urine is about 10 days after its use. However, proof of MA use is possible in hair even several years after its use if the part of the hair that grew in the period of its use is available. In addition, segmental analysis of hair is capable of clarifying the history of MA abuse. This paper reviews the clean-up, extraction, analytical method and distribution of MA and its metabolites in hair from reports published in the last 20 years. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Black women's hair: the main scalp dermatoses and aesthetic practices in women of African ethnicity *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanus, Aline; Oliveira, Camila Caberlon Cruz; Villarreal, Delky Johanna Villarreal; Sanchez, Fernando Andres Vargas; Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni

    2015-01-01

    Afro-ethnic hair is different from Caucasian and Asian hair and has unique features. Ethnic hair is more prone to certain conditions or diseases. Such diseases are not only related to the fragile inner structure of the hair, but also to the cultural habits of hairstyles that often exert traction forces upon the pilosebaceous follicle. Women with African hair subject their hair to chemical treatments such as hair straightening and relaxing, and thus modify the structure of their hair shaft, making it more susceptible to damage. For this reason, hair complaints are common among black women and represent a diagnostic challenge to the dermatologist, requiring a thorough clinical examination of the hair and scalp, and a detailed medical history of the patient. The purpose of this review is to warn of the potential side effects and sequelae related to hairstyles and hair treatments used by black women, and to highlight the major diseases that affect this ethnicity. PMID:26375213

  20. The Seahorse Nebula: New views of the filamentary infrared dark cloud G304.74+01.32 from SABOCA, Herschel, and WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, O.

    2018-02-01

    Context. Filamentary molecular clouds, such as many of the infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), can undergo hierarchical fragmentation into substructures (clumps and cores) that can eventually collapse to form stars. Aims: We aim to determine the occurrence of fragmentation into cores in the clumps of the filamentary IRDC G304.74+01.32 (hereafter, G304.74). We also aim to determine the basic physical characteristics (e.g. mass, density, and young stellar object (YSO) content) of the clumps and cores in G304.74. Methods: We mapped the G304.74 filament at 350 μm using the Submillimetre APEX Bolometer Camera (SABOCA) bolometer. The new SABOCA data have a factor of 2.2 times higher resolution than our previous Large APEX BOlometer CAmera (LABOCA) 870 μm map of the cloud (9″ vs. 19\\farcs86). We also employed the Herschel far-infrared (IR) and submillimetre, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) IR imaging data available for G304.74. The WISE data allowed us to trace the IR emission of the YSOs associated with the cloud. Results: The SABOCA 350 μm data show that G304.74 is composed of a dense filamentary structure with a mean width of only 0.18 ± 0.05 pc. The percentage of LABOCA clumps that are found to be fragmented into SABOCA cores is 36% ± 16%, but the irregular morphology of some of the cores suggests that this multiplicity fraction could be higher. The WISE data suggest that 65% ± 18% of the SABOCA cores host YSOs. The mean dust temperature of the clumps, derived by comparing the Herschel 250, 350, and 500 μm flux densities, was found to be 15.0 ± 0.8 K. The mean mass, beam-averaged H2 column density, and H2 number density of the LABOCA clumps are estimated to be 55 ± 10M⊙, (2.0 ± 0.2) × 1022 cm-2, and (3.1 ± 0.2) × 104 cm-3. The corresponding values for the SABOCA cores are 29 ± 3M⊙, (2.9 ± 0.3) × 1022 cm-2, and (7.9 ± 1.2) × 104 cm-3. The G304.74 filament is estimated to be thermally supercritical by a factor of ≳ 3.5 on the scale

  1. Artificial Hair Cells for Sensing Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jack

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present additional information about the flow-velocity sensors described briefly in the immediately preceding article. As noted therein, these sensors can be characterized as artificial hair cells that implement an approximation of the sensory principle of flow-sensing cilia of fish: A cilium is bent by an amount proportional to the flow to which it is exposed. A nerve cell at the base of the cilium senses the flow by sensing the bending of the cilium. In an artificial hair cell, the artificial cilium is a microscopic cantilever beam, and the bending of an artificial cilium is measured by means of a strain gauge at its base (see Figure 1). Figure 2 presents cross sections of a representative sensor of this type at two different stages of its fabrication process. The process consists of relatively- low-temperature metallization, polymer-deposition, microfabrication, and surface-micromachining subprocesses, including plastic-deformation magnetic assembly (PDMA), which is described below. These subprocesses are suitable for a variety of substrate materials, including silicon, some glasses, and some polymers. Moreover, because it incorporates a polymeric supporting structure, this sensor is more robust, relative to its silicon-based counterparts.

  2. Kerr black holes with scalar hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R; Radu, Eugen

    2014-06-06

    We present a family of solutions of Einstein's gravity minimally coupled to a complex, massive scalar field, describing asymptotically flat, spinning black holes with scalar hair and a regular horizon. These hairy black holes (HBHs) are supported by rotation and have no static limit. Besides mass M and angular momentum J, they carry a conserved, continuous Noether charge Q measuring the scalar hair. HBHs branch off from the Kerr metric at the threshold of the superradiant instability and reduce to spinning boson stars in the limit of vanishing horizon area. They overlap with Kerr black holes for a set of (M, J) values. A single Killing vector field preserves the solutions, tangent to the null geodesic generators of the event horizon. HBHs can exhibit sharp physical differences when compared to the Kerr solution, such as J/M^{2}>1, a quadrupole moment larger than J^{2}/M, and a larger orbital angular velocity at the innermost stable circular orbit. Families of HBHs connected to the Kerr geometry should exist in scalar (and other) models with more general self-interactions.

  3. Hair cortisol measurement in mitotane-treated adrenocortical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenschijn, L; Quinkler, M; van Rossum, E F C

    2014-04-01

    The only approved drug for the treatment of adrenocortical cancer (ACC) is mitotane. Mitotane is adrenolytic and therefore, hydrocortisone replacement therapy is necessary. Since mitotane increases cortisol binding globulin (CBG) and induces CYP3A4 activity, high doses of hydrocortisone are thought to be required. Evaluation of hydrocortisone therapy in mitotane-treated patients has been difficult since there is no good marker to evaluate hydrocortisone therapy. Measurement of cortisol in scalp hair is a novel method that offers the opportunity to measure long-term cortisol levels. Our aim was to evaluate whether hair cortisol measurements could be useful in evaluating recent hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. Hair cortisol levels were measured in 15 mitotane-treated ACC patients on hydrocortisone substitution and 96 healthy individuals. Cortisol levels were measured in 3 cm hair segments, corresponding to a period of 3 months. Hair cortisol levels were higher in ACC patients compared to healthy individuals (pcortisol levels above the reference range. None of the patients had hair cortisol levels below normal. In contrast to hydrocortisone doses (β=0.03, p=0.93), hair cortisol levels were associated with BMI (β=0.53, p=0.042). There was no correlation between hair cortisol levels and hydrocortisone doses (β=0.41, p=0.13). Almost half of the ACC patients had high hair cortisol levels, suggesting long-term over-substitution of hydrocortisone in some of the patients, whereas none of the patients was under-substituted. Hair cortisol measurements might be useful in long-term monitoring hydrocortisone treatment in mitotane-treated ACC patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Medicinal Herbs Affecting Gray Hair in Iranian Traditional Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameshk, Maryam; Khandani, Shahram Kalantari; Raeiszadeh, Mahboobeh

    2016-05-01

    The presence of hair plays an important role in people's overall physical appearance and self-perception. As a result of increased life expectancy, the desire to look youthful plays a bigger role than ever.The use of medicinal plants is as old as mankind and the market will face many new products containing natural oils and herbs in coming years. In traditional Iranian medicine, many plants and herbal formulations are reported for hair growth as well as the improvement in hair quality. The aim of this article is to introduce effective medicinal plants in traditional Iranian medicine to prevent gray hair and advocate them as the new products. The present investigation is an overview study and has been codified by library search in the main sources of traditional Iranian medicine. In traditional Iranian medicine, three types of formulations are proposed to prevent gray hair, namely (i) treatment compounds, (ii) preventive compounds, and (iii) hair dyes to color gray hairs. Our search showed that the main parts of a plant that is used in the treatment and preventive compounds are seeds and fruits. These are primarily in the form of topical oil or oral compound (electuary). The majority of plant parts used in hair dyes is from the fruit and/or leaves. Natural products are highly popular and the use of plant extracts in formulations is on the rise. This is because synthetic based product may cause health hazards with several side effects. Considering the increased popularity of herbal drugs in hair care, it is worthwhile to conduct systemic investigation on the production and efficacy of these drugs. We trust that our investigation would encourage the use of traditional Iranian medicine in future hair care products.

  5. Segmental hair analysis and estimation of methamphetamine use pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eunyoung; Yang, Heejin; Seol, Ilung; Park, Yunshin; Lee, Bongwoo; Song, Joon Myong

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the results of segmental hair analysis can be used to estimate patterns of methamphetamine (MA) use. Segmental hair analysis for MA and amphetamine (AP) was performed. Hair was cut into the hair root, consecutive 1 cm length segments and 1-4 cm length segments. Whole hair was also analyzed. The hair samples were incubated for 20 h in 1 mL methanol containing 1 % hydrochloric acid after washing the hair samples. Hair extracts were evaporated and derivatization was performed using trifluoroacetic anhydride in ethylacetate at 65 °C for 30 min. Derivatized extract was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The 15 subjects consisted of 13 males and two females and their ages ranged from 25 to 42 (mean, 32). MA and AP concentrations in the whole hair ranged from 3.00 to 105.10 ng/mg (mean, 34.53) and from 0.05 to 4.76 ng/mg (mean, 2.42), respectively. Based on the analysis of the 1 cm length segmental hair, the results were interpreted in a way to distinguish between continuous use of MA (n = 10), no recent but previous use of MA (n = 3), and recent but no previous use of MA (n = 2). Furthermore, the individuals were interpreted as light, moderate, and heavy users based on concentration ranges previously published.

  6. Preclinical and Clinical Studies Demonstrate That the Proprietary Herbal Extract DA-5512 Effectively Stimulates Hair Growth and Promotes Hair Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Young Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The proprietary DA-5512 formulation comprises six herbal extracts from traditional oriental plants historically associated with therapeutic and other applications related to hair. Here, we investigated the effects of DA-5512 on the proliferation of human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs in vitro and on hair growth in C57BL/6 mice and conducted a clinical study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of DA-5512. DA-5512 significantly enhanced the viability of hDPCs in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05, and 100 ppm of DA-5512 and 1 μM minoxidil (MXD significantly increased the number of Ki-67-positive cells, compared with the control group (p<0.05. MXD (3% and DA-5512 (1%, 5% significantly stimulated hair growth and increased the number and length of hair follicles (HFs versus the controls (each p<0.05. The groups treated with DA-5512 exhibited hair growth comparable to that induced by MXD. In clinical study, we detected a statistically significant increase in the efficacy of DA-5512 after 16 weeks compared with the groups treated with placebo or 3% MXD (p<0.05. In conclusion, DA-5512 might promote hair growth and enhance hair health and can therefore be considered an effective option for treating hair loss.

  7. Effect of the multifunctional cosmetic ingredient sphinganine on hair loss in males and females with diffuse hair reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Nicole; Mentel, Matthias; Köhler, Tim; Tuchscherer, Benjamin; Garbe, Birgit; Ülker, Jasmina; Tronnier, Hagen; Heinrich, Ulrike; Farwick, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids are well known to promote keratinocyte differentiation and to induce ceramide production. In addition, they show anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate the potential effect of sphinganine on prolonging the hair anagen rate and improving the overall hair quality and scalp health. The inhibitory potential of sphinganine toward 5-α-reductase was studied using an in vitro assay. The stimulation of the antimicrobial peptide HBD2 by sphinganine was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining. Sphinganine bioavailability was studied ex vivo using a pig skin model. A placebo-controlled, double-blind study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of sphinganine on hair loss and hair/scalp quality in vivo. In vitro results showed that sphinganine is a potent inhibitor of 5-α-reductase type I that prevents the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, a key factor of androgenetic male baldness. In vivo results demonstrated efficacy in reducing non-illness-related hair loss among males. In terms of expert rating, all hair quality and scalp parameters improved after application of sphinganine. Improved scalp health might be linked to the observed increase of the antimicrobial peptide HBD2. Thus, sphinganine is well suited as a topical alternative for the improvement of scalp health and hair quality and anti-hair loss application.

  8. Estimation of squeeze film damping in artificial hair-sensor towards the detection-limit of crickets' hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagamseh, A.M.K.

    2014-01-01

    The filliform hairs of crickets are among the most sensitive flow sensing elements in nature. The high sensitivity of these hairs enables crickets in perceiving tiny air-movements which are only just distinguishable from noise. This forms our source of inspiration to design highly-sensitive array

  9. Hair cell mechano-transduction : Its influence on the gross mechanical characteristics of a hair cell sense organ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanNetten, Sietse M.

    1997-01-01

    The complex mechanical behaviour of a hair cell bundle appears to be a direct consequence of the gating forces on the individual transduction channels. The mechanical molecular interactions involved in transduction channel gating, therefore, also bear a reciprocal influence, via the hair bundles; on

  10. The Interviewer Wore a Flower in Her Hair: The Effect of Hair Ornamentation on Compliance to a Survey Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Jordy; Jacob, Céline; Guéguen, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that restaurant waitresses with hair ornamentation receive higher tips than waitresses without ornaments. However, the effect of such ornamentation on other behaviors has never been explored. In this study, the effect of a female interviewer's hair ornamentation on compliance with a survey request was examined. Male and female…

  11. Distribution of two basement membrane proteoglycans through hair follicle development and the hair growth cycle in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; King, J L; McCarthy, K J

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of two distinct populations of basement membrane proteoglycans has been monitored through hair growth development in the rat embryo and subsequent hair growth cycle. An antiserum against a small heparan sulfate proteoglycan uniformly stained the dermal-epidermal junction...... of embryonic rats throughout the period of hair follicle formation. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies recognizing a basement membrane-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan only weakly stained 16-d embryo dermal-epidermal junction, but strong staining was associated with hair follicle buds...... as they developed. Through the hair growth cycle, it was found that the heparan sulfate proteoglycan persisted around the follicles, while the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan decreased in amount through catagen until it was undetectable at the base and dermal papilla of the telogen follicle. As anagen commenced...

  12. Histopathological insights into hair loss in Cronkhite-Canada syndrome: diffuse anagen-telogen conversion precedes clinical hair loss progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe-Okada, Emiko; Inazumi, Toyoko; Matsukawa, Hidehiko; Ohyama, Manabu

    2014-05-01

    Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS) is a rare disorder characterised by gastrointestinal polyposis and ectodermal changes, represented by extensive alopecia. Detailed histopathological investigations of alopecic lesions in two female CCS patients with severe hair loss revealed a marked increase in telogen hair follicles with no sign of loss or of the minaturisation or atrophy of hair follicle structures and the absence of inflammatory change, despite severe inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. These findings suggested that hair regrowth can be expected without systemic corticosteroids, if they are not necessary for treatment of the gastrointestinal tract, and that anagen-telogen transition is an early event preceding clinical hair loss in CCS. © 2013 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  13. Genomic DNA extraction protocols from ovine hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Nonato da Silva Prate

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA extracted from animal cells can be used for several purposes, for example, to know genetic variability and genetic relationships between individuals, breeds and/or species, paternity tests, to describe the genetic profile for registration of the animal at association of breeders, detect genetic polymorphisms (SNP related to characteristics of commercial interest, disease diagnose, assess resistance or susceptibility to pathogens, etc. For such evaluations, in general, DNA is amplified by PCR (polymerase chain reaction, and then subjected to various techniques as RFLP (restriction fragments length polymorphism, SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism, and sequencing. The DNA may be obtained from blood, buccal swabs, meat, cartilage or hair bulb. Among all, the last biological material has been preferred by farmers for its ease acquisition. Several methods for extracting DNA from hair bulb were reported without any consensus for its implementation. This study aimed to optimize a protocol for efficient DNA extraction for use in PCR-RFLP analysis of the Prion gene. For this study, were collected hair samples containing hair bulb from 131 Santa Inês sheep belonging to the Institute of Zootechny, Nova Odessa - SP. Two DNA extraction protocols were evaluated. The first, called phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol (PCIA has long been used by Animal Genetic Laboratories, whose procedures are described below: in each microtube (1.5 mL containing 500 µL of TE-Tween solution (Tris-HCl 50 mM, EDTA 1 mM and 0.5% Tween 20 were added to approximately 30 hair bulb per animal which was incubated at 65°C with shaking at 170 rpm for 2 hours. Then was added 15 µL of proteinase K [10 mg mL-1] and incubated at 55°C at 170 rpm for 6-12 hours. At the end of digestion was added 1 volume of solution phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol (25:24:1 followed by vigorous shaking for 10 seconds and centrifuged at 8000 rpm and 4°C for 10 minutes. The upper phase

  14. Functional recovery of anterior semicircular canal afferents following hair cell regeneration in birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M.; Carey, John P.; Xu, Jinping

    2002-01-01

    Streptomycin sulfate (1.2 g/kg i.m.) was administered for 5 consecutive days to 5-7-day-old white Leghorn chicks; this causes damage to semicircular canal hair cells that ultimately regenerate to reform the sensory epithelium. During the recovery period, electrophysiological recordings were taken sequentially from anterior semicircular canal primary afferents using an indentation stimulus of the canal that has been shown to mimic rotational stimulation. Chicks were assigned to an early (14-18 days; n = 8), intermediate (28-34 days; n = 5), and late (38-58 days; n = 4) period based on days after treatment. Seven untreated chicks, 15-67 days old, provided control data. An absence of background and indent-induced discharge was the prominent feature of afferents in the early period: only "silent" afferents were encountered in 5/8 experiments. In several of these chicks, fascicles of afferent fibers were seen extending up to the epithelium that was void of hair cells, and intra- and extracellular biocytin labeling revealed afferent processes penetrating into the supporting cell layer of the crista. In 3/8 chicks 74 afferents could be characterized, and they significantly differed from controls (n = 130) by having a lower discharge rate and a negligible response to canal stimulation. In the intermediate period there was considerable variability in discharge properties of 121 afferents, but as a whole the number of "silent" fibers in the canal nerve diminished, the background rate increased, and a response to canal stimulation detected. Individually biocytin-labeled afferents had normal-appearing terminal specializations in the sensory epithelium by 28 days poststreptomycin. In the late period, afferents (n = 58) remained significantly different from controls in background discharge properties and response gain. The evidence suggests that a considerable amount of variability exists between chicks in the return of vestibular afferent function following ototoxic injury and

  15. Genetics of human isolated hereditary hair loss disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, S; Khan, S; Ahmad, W

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary hair loss in human is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders. It is characterized by sparse to complete absence of hair on the scalp and other parts of the body. In few cases tightly curled twisted wooly hair (WH) on the scalp has been reported as well. The hair loss disorders, including both syndromic and non-syndromic (isolated) forms, segregate either in autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern. To date, seven autosomal dominant and equal numbers of autosomal recessive isolated forms of hair loss disorders have been characterized. Genes responsible for causing most of these disorders have been identified. In this review, we have provided an update on clinical and genetic aspects of isolated hereditary hair loss disorders manifesting with hypotrichosis and/or WHs. Because most of the recessive genes have been mapped using consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, therefore emphasis is given to mutations identified in these families. OMIM nomenclature has been followed to indicate different forms of hair loss disorders. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Comparison of Plasma, Saliva, and Hair Levetiracetam Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaś-Ruszczyk, Katarzyna; Kuczyńska, Julita; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, Halina; Kurkowska-Jastrzębska, Iwona; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw; Restel, Magdalena; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Mierzejewski, Pawel

    2017-06-01

    Previous findings revealed high correlations between serum/plasma and saliva levetiracetam concentrations, indicating saliva as an alternative matrix for monitoring levetiracetam therapy. Levetiracetam concentration in the hair, which could reflect long-term drug exposure and patients' compliance, has not been systematically tested, as yet. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between plasma, saliva, and hair levetiracetam concentrations in 47 patients with epilepsy. Plasma, saliva, and hair levetiracetam concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with positive ionization. Levetiracetam saliva and plasma concentrations were highly correlated (r = 0.93). Plasma concentrations were not influenced by sex, age, and other concomitant antiepileptic drugs. Levetiracetam hair concentrations correlated with plasma concentrations (r = 0.36) but not daily dose (mg/kg). Drug hair concentrations were not influenced by hair color or treatment (dyed). The results tend to indicate that saliva may be a reliable alternative to plasma for monitoring levetiracetam concentrations. Levetiracetam can also be detected in human hair.

  17. Selective hair therapy: bringing science to the fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Annika; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2014-02-01

    Investigations on carrier-based drug delivery systems for higher selectivity in hair therapy have clearly evolved from dye release and model studies to highly sophisticated approaches, many of which specifically tackle hair indications and the delivery of hair-relevant molecules. Here, we group recent hair disease-oriented work into efforts towards (i) improved delivery of conventional drugs, (ii) delivery of novel drug classes, for example biomolecules and (iii) targeted delivery on the cellular/molecular level. Considering the solid foundation of experimental work, it does not take a large step outside the current box of thinking to follow the idea of using large carriers (>500 nm, unlikely to penetrate as a whole) for follicular penetration, retention and protection of sensitive compounds. Yet, reports on particles <200 nm being internalized by keratinocytes and dendritic cells at sites of barrier disruption (e.g., hair follicles) combined with recent advances in nanodermatology add interesting new facets to the possibilities carrier technologies could offer, for example, unprecedented levels of selectivity. The authors provide thought-provoking ideas on how smart delivery technologies and advances in our molecular understanding of hair pathophysiology could result in a whole new era of hair therapeutics. As the field still largely remains in preclinical investigation, determined efforts towards production of medical grade material and truly translational work are needed to demonstrate surplus value of carrier systems for clinical applications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Sensory hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lush, Mark E; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2014-10-01

    Damage or destruction of sensory hair cells in the inner ear leads to hearing or balance deficits that can be debilitating, especially in older adults. Unfortunately, the damage is permanent, as regeneration of the inner ear sensory epithelia does not occur in mammals. Zebrafish and other non-mammalian vertebrates have the remarkable ability to regenerate sensory hair cells and understanding the molecular and cellular basis for this regenerative ability will hopefully aid us in designing therapies to induce regeneration in mammals. Zebrafish not only possess hair cells in the ear but also in the sensory lateral line system. Hair cells in both organs are functionally analogous to hair cells in the inner ear of mammals. The lateral line is a mechanosensory system found in most aquatic vertebrates that detects water motion and aids in predator avoidance, prey capture, schooling, and mating. Although hair cell regeneration occurs in both the ear and lateral line, most research to date has focused on the lateral line due to its relatively simple structure and accessibility. Here we review the recent discoveries made during the characterization of hair cell regeneration in zebrafish. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Influence of Body Mass Index on Hair Ethyl Glucuronide Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crunelle, Cleo L; Neels, Hugo; Maudens, Kristof; De Doncker, Mireille; Cappelle, Delphine; Matthys, Frieda; Dom, Geert; Fransen, Erik; Michielsen, Peter; De Keukeleire, Steven; Covaci, Adrian; Yegles, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) concentrations in hair is increasingly used to estimate the consumption of alcohol of the prior months. Linear correlations between the amount of alcohol consumed and the concentration of EtG in hair have been reported, and several variables that may influence this correlation have been investigated: e.g. cosmetic hair treatments, gender influences or hair color. Here, we investigate the influence of body mass index (BMI) on this correlation. A post hoc analysis on the influence of BMI on the relation between amounts of alcohol consumed and the measured EtG concentrations in hair in 199 participants. Our data show higher EtG concentrations in participants with high BMI (≥25) compared to participants with low BMI (hair EtG concentrations. Ethyl glucuronide concentrations in hair (hEtG) can be used to estimate the consumption of alcohol of the prior months. Body mass index (BMI) influences this relation and BMI should be taken into account when interpreting hEtG concentrations in participants with high BMI (≥25) compared to participants with low BMI (<25). © The Author 2016. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural changes in cuticles on violin bow hair caused by wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    A bow with horse tail hair is used to play the violin. New and worn-out bow hairs were observed by atomic force microscopy. The cuticles of the new bow hair were already damaged by bleach and delipidation, however the worn-out bow hairs were much more damaged and broken off by force, which relates to wearing out.