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Sample records for white dot syndrome

  1. Near-infrared fundus autofluorescence in multiple evanescent white-dot syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Iacono, Pierluigi; Falcomatà, Bruno; Bolognesi, Gianluigi; Bandello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    To report the near-infrared fundus autofluorescence (NIR-FAF) pattern in 2 cases of multiple evanescent white-dot syndrome (MEWDS). Three consecutive patients with MEWDS underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination, including color photograph, blue-light fundus autofluorescence, NIR-FAF, fluorescein angiography, and indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). Main outcome measure was the identification of NIR-FAF pattern. Fluorescein angiography showed patchy hyperfluorescence of the whitish dots. Indocyanine green angiography showed hypofluorescent spots throughout the examination. Blue-light fundus autofluorescence disclosed a speckled pattern without extension to the foveal area, whereas NIR-AF showed several hypoautofluorescent lesions involving also the fovea, which corresponded to the whitish dots visible on biomicroscopy and to the hypofluorescent lesions detectable on ICGA. Near-infrared fundus autofluorescence is characterized by hypoautofluorescent spots corresponding to the inflammatory lesions typical of MEWDS and can be considered as a valuable noninvasive technique to diagnose and monitor patients with MEWDS.

  2. The white dot syndromes Síndromes dos pontos brancos retinianos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Nunes Galvarro Vianna

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Several entities must be considered when a patient presents with a white dot syndrome. In most cases these can be distinguished from one another based on the appearance or distribution of the lesions, the clinical course, or patient variables such as age, sex, laterality, and functional and image examinations. In this paper we review the distinctive and shared features of the white dot syndromes, highlighting the clinical findings, diagnostic test results, proposed etiologies, treatment, and prognosis.Várias doenças devem ser consideradas quando nos deparamos com paciente com uma entidade clínica incluída no grupo das "síndromes dos pontos brancos retinianos". O diagnóstico diferencial na maioria das vezes é baseado na aparência e/ou na distribuição das lesões, no curso clínico, ou por algumas variáveis relacionadas ao paciente, tais como idade, sexo, lateralidade, bem como por meio de exames funcionais e de imagem. O presente artigo revisa os achados clínicos das doenças que fazem parte do grupo das "síndromes dos pontos brancos retinianos", enfatizando as similaridades e as diferenças entre essas entidades. Os exames complementares, bem como a etiologia, o tratamento e o prognóstico de cada uma delas são descritos e comentados.

  3. White dots do matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soeken, Mathias; Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal

    2013-01-01

    Toffoli circuits. We also show how to use these rules to derive more complex formulas. The major difference compared to existing approaches is the use of negative controls (white dots), which significantly increases the algebraic strength. We show how existing optimisation approaches can be adapted...

  4. Recurrent focal choroidal excavation following multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) associated with acute idiopathic blind spot enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbarpoor Bonyadi, Mohammad Hossein; Hassanpour, Kiana; Soheilian, Masoud

    2017-04-03

    To present a recurrent case of conforming focal choroidal excavation (FCE) following multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) in a 25-year-old woman. Following spontaneous MEWDS sings resolution our patient noted a recurrent decrease in vision. Repeated OCT revealed elevation and mild disruption of RPE layer at fovea without previous angiographic MEWDS signs. At this time, short-term systemic steroid therapy was started and visual acuity became normal. Following quiescence of the new-onset phase, the conforming type of FCE located in inferior macula appeared in OCT. In the following next 2 years recurrence of presumptive focal subfoveal choriocapillaritis occurred for three times presenting with blurred vision. During every acute attack, above-mentioned FCE disappeared and returned back again after resolution of presumptive focal choriocapillaritis. This is the first and unique case of recurrent type of FCE following MEWDS. It seems to disappear during active phase of presumptive focal choriocapillaritis and then returns after the eye has become quiescent.

  5. IMAGING WITH MULTIMODAL ADAPTIVE-OPTICS OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IN MULTIPLE EVANESCENT WHITE DOT SYNDROME: THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labriola, Leanne T; Legarreta, Andrew D; Legarreta, John E; Nadler, Zach; Gallagher, Denise; Hammer, Daniel X; Ferguson, R Daniel; Iftimia, Nicusor; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the location of pathological changes in multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) with the use of multimodal adaptive optics (AO) imaging. A 5-year observational case study of a 24-year-old female with recurrent MEWDS. Full examination included history, Snellen chart visual acuity, pupil assessment, intraocular pressures, slit lamp evaluation, dilated fundoscopic exam, imaging with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT), blue-light fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography. Three distinct acute episodes of MEWDS occurred during the period of follow-up. Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and adaptive-optics imaging showed disturbance in the photoreceptor outer segments (PR OS) in the posterior pole with each flare. The degree of disturbance at the photoreceptor level corresponded to size and extent of the visual field changes. All findings were transient with delineation of the photoreceptor recovery from the outer edges of the lesion inward. Hyperautofluorescence was seen during acute flares. Increase in choroidal thickness did occur with each active flare but resolved. Although changes in the choroid and RPE can be observed in MEWDS, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography, and multimodal adaptive optics imaging localized the visually significant changes seen in this disease at the level of the photoreceptors. These transient retinal changes specifically occur at the level of the inner segment ellipsoid and OS/RPE line. En face optical coherence tomography imaging provides a detailed, yet noninvasive method for following the convalescence of MEWDS and provides insight into the structural and functional relationship of this transient inflammatory retinal disease.

  6. Posterior microphthalmos, retinitis pigmentosa and optic disc drusen with white dots. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, P; Iturralde, O; Abascal, C

    2017-11-01

    To present the case of a patient with a posterior microphthalmos-optic disc drusen-retinitis pigmentosa syndrome associated, for the first time, with white dots in the posterior pole. The posterior microphthalmos, retinitis pigmentosa and optic disc drusen syndrome was described for the first time in literature in 1991. Later, it was associated with a pattern of foveal thickening and/or foveoschisis. Different forms of mutations on chromosomes 11 and 14 have been identified as being responsible for the appearance of this syndrome, but the inheritance pattern is unknown. The case is reported of a 37 year-old man, with no personal or family history of interest, diagnosed with this syndrome in association with white dots in the posterior pole. Such a morphological association has never been published before in literature. The posterior microphthalmos, retinitis pigmentosa and optic disc drusen syndrome is a very rare entity, and has never been described associated with white dots in the posterior pole. More case reports are needed to establish clear patterns of both the disease and inheritance. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. [The "lethal white foal" syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blendinger, C; Müller, G; Bostedt, H

    1994-06-01

    The lethal white foal syndrome (congenital intestinal aganglionosis) was diagnosed by history, clinical signs and pathological findings in a female foal, born in March 1992, that was an offspring of two overo-spotted paint horses. The syndrome is a congenital innervation defect of the gastrointestinal tract. A literature review of this condition, relatively unknown in Germany, is given.

  8. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Accessory Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome and Accessory Pathways James Kulig , Bruce ... rate, which can be dangerous. What is Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome? Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) is ...

  9. White-Nose Syndrome of bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessie A. Glaeser; Martin J. Pfeiffer; Daniel L. Lindner

    2016-01-01

    Devastating. Catastrophic. Unprecedented. This is how white-nose syndrome of bats (WNS) is characterized. It is one of the deadliest wildlife diseases ever observed and could have significant impacts on outdoor recreation, agriculture and wildlife management.

  10. Overset Wolff-Parkinson-White-syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Dalager, Søren; Larsen, Maiken Kudahl

    2010-01-01

    An autopsy in a 28-year-old man did not explain the cause of sudden unexpected death. However, a history of episodes with tachycardia and dizziness and a reassessed previous electrocardiogram exhibiting ventricular pre-excitation was consistent with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. In this p......An autopsy in a 28-year-old man did not explain the cause of sudden unexpected death. However, a history of episodes with tachycardia and dizziness and a reassessed previous electrocardiogram exhibiting ventricular pre-excitation was consistent with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome...

  11. Overset Wolff-Parkinson-White-syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Dalager, Søren; Larsen, Maiken Kudahl

    2010-01-01

    An autopsy in a 28-year-old man did not explain the cause of sudden unexpected death. However, a history of episodes with tachycardia and dizziness and a reassessed previous electrocardiogram exhibiting ventricular pre-excitation was consistent with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. In this p...

  12. Inherited Wolff–Parkinson–White Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu, MD, PhD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Wolff–Parkinson–White (WPW syndrome is a congenital disorder of cardiac conduction system characterized by electrocardiographic preexcitation and episodes of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. It is caused by a cardiac developmental defect in the electrical insulation between the atria and the ventricles due to the presence of an accessory pathway. WPW syndrome is a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia with benign prognosis. However, this clinical entity also predisposes patients to an increased risk of sudden cardiac death, especially in the setting of preexcited atrial fibrillation. WPW syndrome is usually sporadic and of unknown etiology in most cases. During the past 10 years, a significant heritable factor is increasingly recognized. Identification of the genetic basis among patients with WPW syndrome has important implications for understanding the molecular mechanism of ventricular preexcitation and the development of therapeutic strategies for risk stratification and management. The goal of this review is to examine the previous studies on hereditary variants, as well as to outline potential future avenues toward defining the heritability of WPW syndrome.

  13. Luminescent carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as a single white converter for white light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X. T.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, X. G., E-mail: liuxuguang@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, F.; Wang, Y. L.; Yang, Y. Z., E-mail: yyztyut@126.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Research Center on Advanced Materials Science and Technology, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2015-11-23

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with high quantum yield (51.4%) were synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal method using thiosalicylic acid and ethylenediamine as precursor. The CQDs have the average diameter of 2.3 nm and possess excitation-independent emission wavelength in the range from 320 to 440 nm excitation. Under an ultraviolet (UV) excitation, the CQDs aqueous solutions emit bright blue fluorescence directly and exhibit broad emission with a high spectral component ratio of 67.4% (blue to red intensity to total intensity). We applied the CQDs as a single white-light converter for white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) using a UV-LED chip as the excitation light source. The resulted WLED shows superior performance with corresponding color temperature of 5227 K and the color coordinates of (0.34, 0.38) belonging to the white gamut.

  14. White wines countering the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir I. Mizin

    2017-12-01

    specified – MS” and b540 “General metabolic functions” and some less beneficial effects (including ICF domains b2401 “Dizziness”, b28010 “Pain in head and neck” and b455 “Exercise tolerance functions”, than consumption of RA. A lot of beneficial effects of syringic (lilac acid were observed in patients with MS. Conclusion — The moderate consumption of white wines can be recommended to AH patients with MS in a greater extent than to patients without this syndrome.

  15. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: Electrocardiogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Miner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 26-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented to the emergency department with palpitations. The patient experienced these symptoms five times before in his life, but they had self-resolved with squatting or raising his arms. He denied chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, syncope, or pre-syncope symptoms. He denied any recent illnesses, cough, chest pain, drug use, or infections. Significant findings: The initial EKG showed wide complex, irregular tachycardia > 200 bpm (EKG 1. Given the possibility of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW, procainamide was given to the patient. The patient’s heart rate responded and decreased to 120-140 bpm with narrowing of the QRS complex. A repeat EKG showed narrow complex tachycardia without P waves approximately 120 bpm (EKG 2. Once the procainamide infusion was complete, the patient had converted to sinus rhythm with a delta wave now apparent, consistent with WPW (EKG 3. Discussion: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a combination of the presence of a certain congenital accessory pathway (Bundle of Kent and episodes of tachyarrhythmia.1 The incidence is less than one percent of the general population,2 but it is associated with the risk of sudden cardiac death, making the diagnosis imperative. When examining a wide-based tachycardia, it is important to consider WPW when choosing medications for rate control or chemical cardioversion. The first EKG shows an example of atrial fibrillation with WPW. While procainamide blocks the accessory pathway, other drugs such as beta blockers and calcium channel blockers can inhibit the AV node resulting in increased use of the accessory pathway. This can worsen the tachyarrhythmia and potentially lead to ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, or asystole.

  16. Histopathology confirms white-nose syndrome in bats in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikula, J.; Bandouchova, H.; Novotny, L.; Meteyer, C.U.; Zukal, J.; Irwin, N.R.; Zima, J.; Martinkova, N.

    2012-01-01

    White-nose syndrome, associated with the fungal skin infection geomycosis, caused regional population collapse in bats in North America. Our results, based on histopathology, show the presence of white-nose syndrome in Europe. Dermatohistopathology on two bats (Myotis myotis) found dead in March 2010 with geomycosis in the Czech Republic had characteristics resembling Geomyces destructans infection in bats confirmed with white-nose syndrome in US hibernacula. In addition, a live M. myotis, biopsied for histopathology during hibernation in April 2011, had typical fungal infection with cupping erosion and invasion of muzzle skin diagnostic for white-nose syndrome and conidiospores identical to G. destructans that were genetically confirmed as G. destructans. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2012.

  17. Characterization of a tailless white spot syndrome virus from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-17

    , Yangzhou, China. Accepted 15 July, 2011. In this study, a virus similar to the causative agent of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) but without tail-like extension was identified and characterized from diseased Penaeus ...

  18. Oscillator strength of impurity doped quantum dots: Influence of Gaussian white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Suvajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Saha, Surajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2015-10-01

    We make a rigorous analysis of profiles of oscillator strength of a doped quantum dot in the presence and absence of noise. The noise employed here is a Gaussian white noise. The quantum dot is doped with repulsive Gaussian impurity. Noise has been administered additively and multiplicatively to the system. A perpendicular magnetic field is also present and a static external electric field has been applied. Profile of OS has been minutely monitored with variation of several important quantities such as confinement energy, electric field strength, dopant location, magnetic field strength, dopant potential, noise strength, Al concentration, and mode of application of noise. The profiles are enriched with significant subtleties and often reveal enhancement and maximization of oscillator strength in the presence of noise. These observations are indeed useful in the study of linear and nonlinear optical properties of doped QD systems which bear sufficient technological importance.

  19. Origin of White Electroluminescence in Graphene Quantum Dots Embedded Host/Guest Polymer Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyu Kim, Jung; Bae, Sukang; Yi, Yeonjin; Jin Park, Myung; Jin Kim, Sang; Myoung, Nosoung; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Hee Hong, Byung; Hyeok Park, Jong

    2015-06-01

    Polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) using quantum dots (QDs) as emissive materials have received much attention as promising components for next-generation displays. Despite their outstanding properties, toxic and hazardous nature of QDs is a serious impediment to their use in future eco-friendly opto-electronic device applications. Owing to the desires to develop new types of nano-material without health and environmental effects but with strong opto-electrical properties similar to QDs, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted great interest as promising luminophores. However, the origin of electroluminescence from GQDs incorporated PLEDs is unclear. Herein, we synthesized graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) using a modified hydrothermal deoxidization method and characterized the PLED performance using GOQDs blended poly(N-vinyl carbazole) (PVK) as emissive layer. Simple device structure was used to reveal the origin of EL by excluding the contribution of and contamination from other layers. The energy transfer and interaction between the PVK host and GOQDs guest were investigated using steady-state PL, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Experiments revealed that white EL emission from the PLED originated from the hybridized GOQD-PVK complex emission with the contributions from the individual GOQDs and PVK emissions.

  20. Origin of White Electroluminescence in Graphene Quantum Dots Embedded Host/Guest Polymer Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyu Kim, Jung; Bae, Sukang; Yi, Yeonjin; Jin Park, Myung; Jin Kim, Sang; Myoung, NoSoung; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Hee Hong, Byung; Hyeok Park, Jong

    2015-01-01

    Polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) using quantum dots (QDs) as emissive materials have received much attention as promising components for next-generation displays. Despite their outstanding properties, toxic and hazardous nature of QDs is a serious impediment to their use in future eco-friendly opto-electronic device applications. Owing to the desires to develop new types of nano-material without health and environmental effects but with strong opto-electrical properties similar to QDs, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted great interest as promising luminophores. However, the origin of electroluminescence from GQDs incorporated PLEDs is unclear. Herein, we synthesized graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) using a modified hydrothermal deoxidization method and characterized the PLED performance using GOQDs blended poly(N-vinyl carbazole) (PVK) as emissive layer. Simple device structure was used to reveal the origin of EL by excluding the contribution of and contamination from other layers. The energy transfer and interaction between the PVK host and GOQDs guest were investigated using steady-state PL, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Experiments revealed that white EL emission from the PLED originated from the hybridized GOQD-PVK complex emission with the contributions from the individual GOQDs and PVK emissions. PMID:26067060

  1. Alterations in white matter pathways in Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sarika U; Kaufmann, Walter E; Bacino, Carlos A; Anderson, Adam W; Adapa, Pavani; Chu, Zili; Yallampalli, Ragini; Traipe, Elfrides; Hunter, Jill V; Wilde, Elisabeth A

    2011-04-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability, absent speech, seizures, and outbursts of laughter. The aim of this study was to utilize diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine alterations in white matter pathways in Angelman syndrome, with an emphasis on correlations with clinical severity. DTI was used to examine the arcuate fasciculus (AF), uncinate fasciculus (UF), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF), and the corpus callosum (CC). We enrolled 14 children aged 8 to 17 years (mean age 10y 8mo; SD 2y 7mo) with Angelman syndrome (seven male; seven female) and 13 typically developing children, aged 8 to 17 years, for comparison (five male; eight female; mean age 12y; SD 2y 9mo). Individuals with Angelman syndrome were assessed using standardized measures of development, language, and behaviour. The children with Angelman syndrome exhibited lower fractional anisotropy and increased radial diffusivity values than the comparison group for the AF, UF, ILF, and CC (p Angelman syndrome had significantly higher apparent diffusion coefficient values in the AF, CC, ILF, and the left IFOF (p Angelman syndrome suggest decreased/delayed myelination, decreased axonal density or diameter, or aberrant axonal organization. Our findings suggest a generalized white matter alteration throughout the brain in those with Angelman syndrome; however, only the alterations in temporal white matter pathways were associated with language and cognitive and social functioning. © The Authors. Journal compilation © Mac Keith Press 2010.

  2. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Mimics a Conduction Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marrakchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is important to recognise Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome in electrocardiograms (ECG, as it may mimic ischaemic heart disease, ventricular hypertrophy, and bundle branch block. Recognising WPW syndrome allows for risk stratification, the identification of associated conditions, and the institution of appropriate management. Objective. The present case showed that electrophysiological study is indicated in patients with abnormal ECG and syncope. Case Report. A 40-year-old man with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was presented to emergency with syncope. A baseline ECG was a complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock. He was admitted to the cardiac care unit for pacemaker implantation. The atypical figure of complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock was thought to be a “false positive” of conduction abnormality. But the long anterograde refractory period of the both accessory pathway and atrioventricular conduction may cause difficulty in diagnosing Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, Conclusion. A Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome may mimic a conduction disease. No reliable algorithm exists for making an ECG diagnosis of a preexcitation syndrome with conduction disorders. This can lead to diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas in the context of syncope.

  3. R/G/B/natural white light thin colloidal quantum dot-based light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Wan Ki; Lim, Jaehoon; Lee, Donggu; Park, Myeongjin; Lee, Hyunkoo; Kwak, Jeonghun; Char, Kookheon; Lee, Changhee; Lee, Seonghoon

    2014-10-08

    Bright, low-voltage driven colloidal quantum dot (QD)-based white light-emitting devices (LEDs) with practicable device performances are enabled by the direct exciton formation within quantum-dot active layers in a hybrid device structure. Detailed device characterization reveals that white-QLEDs can be rationalized as a parallel circuit, in which different QDs are connected through the same set of electrically common organic and inorganic charge transport layers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A case of Jacobsen syndrome with multifocal white matter lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; Carter, John E; Bazan, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Jacobsen syndrome is a rare disorder caused by partial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 11. The phenotype is variable with involvement of multiple organ systems, resulting in congenital heart defects, blood dyscrasias, and impaired growth. We describe a case of a 30-year-old man with multiple ophthalmic manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that was remarkable for multiple T2-hyperintense subcortical white matter lesions. It is important to be aware that patients with Jacobsen syndrome may have nonspecific white changes seen on MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Recent Progress in Quantum Dot Based White Light-Emitting Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yu; Rogach, Andrey L

    2016-08-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been widely employed as components of white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) due to their excellent optical properties (highly saturated emission color, high luminescence quantum yield) as well as thermal and chemical stability. Much effort has been devoted to realize efficient QD-based WLEDs, including the synthesis of superior luminescent nanomaterials with excellent stabilities, and the design of advanced devices structures. In this paper, after introducing photometric parameters of the contemporary QD-based WLEDs, we highlight the recent progress in these devices grouped according to three main mechanisms for white light generation: optical excitation, direct charge carrier injection, and Förster resonance energy transfer. The methods to generate white light, the design of QD emitters and QD-based devices, as well as their fabrication techniques are considered, and the key scientific and technological challenges in the QD-based WLEDs are highlighted. Novel light-emitting materials for WLEDs such as carbon-based nanoparticles are also considered.

  6. Design of a High-Power White Light Source with Colloidal Quantum Dots and Non-Rare-Earth Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicanic, Kristopher T.

    This thesis describes the design process of a high-power white light source, using novel phosphor and colloidal quantum dot materials. To incorporate multiple light emitters, we generalized and extended a down-converting layer model. We employed a phosphor mixture comprising of YAG:Ce and K2TiF 6:Mn4+ powders to illustrate the effectiveness of the model. By incorporating experimental photophysical results from the phosphors and colloidal quantum dots, we modeled our system and chose the design suitable for high-power applications. We report a reduction in the correlated color temperature by 600K for phosphor and quantum dot systems, enabling the creation of a warm white light emission at power densities up to 5 kW/cm 2. Furthermore, at this high-power, their emission achieves the digital cinema initiative (DCI) requirements with a luminescence efficacy improvement up to 32% over the stand-alone ceramic YAG:Ce phosphor.

  7. Exploring electro-optic effect of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of Gaussian white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Suvajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Saha, Surajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-01-01

    We explore the profiles of electro-optic effect (EOE) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in presence and absence of noise. We have invoked Gaussian white noise in the present study. The quantum dot is doped with Gaussian impurity. Noise has been administered to the system additively and multiplicatively. A perpendicular magnetic field acts as a confinement source and a static external electric field has been applied. The EOE profiles have been followed as a function of incident photon energy when several important parameters such as electric field strength, magnetic field strength, confinement energy, dopant location, relaxation time, Al concentration, dopant potential, and noise strength possess different values. In addition, the role of mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) on the EOE profiles has also been scrutinized. The EOE profiles are found to be adorned with interesting observations such as shift of peak position and maximization/minimization of peak intensity. However, the presence of noise and also the pathway of its application bring about rich variety in the features of EOE profiles through some noticeable manifestations. The observations indicate possibilities of harnessing the EOE susceptibility of doped QD systems in presence of noise.

  8. Exploring optical refractive index change of impurity doped quantum dots driven by white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Surajit; Pal, Suvajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2015-12-01

    We make an extensive exploration of total refractive index (RI) change of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in presence and absence of noise. The noise invoked in the present study is a Gaussian white noise. The quantum dot is doped with repulsive Gaussian impurity. Noise has been incorporated to the system additively and multiplicatively. A perpendicular magnetic field acts as a source of confinement and a static external electric field has been applied. The total RI change profiles have been studied as a function of incident photon energy when several important parameters such as optical intensity, electric field strength, magnetic field strength, confinement energy, dopant location, relaxation time, Al concentration, dopant potential, and noise strength assume different values. Additionally, the role of mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) on the total RI change profiles has also been examined minutely. The total RI change profiles mainly comprise of interesting observations such as shift of total RI change peak position and maximization/minimization of peak intensity. However, presence of noise conspicuously alters the features of total RI change profiles through some interesting manifestations. Moreover, the mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) also governs the total RI change profiles in diverse as well as often contrasting manners. The observations indicate possibilities of tailoring the linear and nonlinear optical properties of doped QD systems in presence of noise.

  9. Exploring diamagnetic susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of Gaussian white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Aindrila; Saha, Surajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-11-01

    We explore diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of impurity doped quantum dot (QD) in presence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been introduced to the system additively and multiplicatively. In view of these profiles of DMS have been pursued with variations of several important quantities e.g. magnetic field strength, confinement frequency, dopant location, dopant potential, and aluminium concentration, both in presence and absence of noise. We have invariably envisaged noise-induced suppression of DMS. Moreover, the extent of suppression noticeably depends on mode of application (additive/multiplicative) of noise. The said mode of application also plays a governing role in the onset of saturation of DMS values. The present study provides a deep insight into the promising role played by noise in controlling effective confinement imposed on the system which bears significant relevance.

  10. Surgery for the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Cryo- ablation of the accessory pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome: initial resulrs and long-term follow-up. Br Heart J 1988; 59: 453-457. 14. Cox JL, Ferguson TB: Cardiac arrhythmia surgery. Curr Prob! Surg 1989;-. 26: 206-232.

  11. Surgical cure ofthe Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome a comparison ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical cure ofthe Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome a comparison oftwo techniques. u. o. VON OPPELL, R. N. SCOTT MILLAR, D. A. MILNE. TABLE!. Characteristics of WPW patients referred for surgical ablation of their aberrant atrioventricular pathways. Patient population and methods. We' retrospectively reviewed 19 ...

  12. On the vaccination of shrimp against white spot syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveldt, J.

    2006-01-01

    More than a decade after its discovery inSouth-East Asia, White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) is still the most important (viral) pathogen in the shrimp culture industry. Despite the shift from culturingPenaeusmonodon

  13. Genetic variation among isolates of White Spot Syndrome Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marks, H.; Goldbach, R.W.; Vlak, J.M.; Hulten, van M.C.W.

    2004-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), member of a. new virus family called Nimaviridae, is a major scourge in worldwide shrimp, cultivation. Geographical isolates of WSSV identified so far are very similar in morphology and proteome, and show little difference in restriction fragment length polymorphism

  14. White Spot Syndrome Virus infection in Penaeus monodon is ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 38; Issue 5. White Spot Syndrome Virus infection in ... Molecular Biology Research Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Centre for Advance Studies, University of Pune, Pune 411 007, India; These authors contributed equally to this work. National Institute of Virology, Microbial ...

  15. Can white spot syndrome virus be transmitted through the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The transmission of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in the aquatic environment by the pathway of phytoplankton through rotifer to artemia and shrimp was investigated. The phytoplankton Alexandrium tamarense and Alexandrium minutum were co-cultured with adult Fenneropenaeus chinensis infected with WSSV and ...

  16. Multiple proteins of White spot syndrome virus involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The recognition and attachment of virus to its host cell surface is a critical step for viral infection. Recent research revealed that -integrin was involved in White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. In this study, the interaction of -integrin with structure proteins of WSSV and motifs involved in WSSV infection was ...

  17. Multiple proteins of White spot syndrome virus involved in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-20

    Mar 20, 2014 ... The recognition and attachment of virus to its host cell surface is a critical step for viral infection. Recent research revealed that β-integrin was involved in White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. In this study, the interaction of β-integrin with structure proteins of WSSV and motifs involved in WSSV ...

  18. Genomics and transcriptomics of White spot syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marks, H.

    2005-01-01

    White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) is a large enveloped DNA virus that infects shrimp and other crustaceans. The virions are approximately 275 x 120 nm in size and have an ovoid to bacilliform shape and a tail-like appendage at one end. Sequencing revealed that the circular, double stranded (ds) DNA

  19. Pseudogymnoascus destructans transcriptome changes during white-nose syndrome infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophia M. Reeder; Jonathan M. Palmer; Jenni M. Prokkola; Thomas M. Lilley; DeeAnn M. Reeder; Kenneth A. Field

    2017-01-01

    White nose syndrome (WNS) is caused by the psychrophilic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans that can grow in the environment saprotrophically or parasitically by infecting hibernating bats. Infections are pathological in many species of North American bats, disrupting hibernation and causing mortality. To determine what fungal pathways are...

  20. Malignant vasovagal syndrome in two patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, N M; Bennett, D H

    2004-04-01

    The presence of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome in patients presenting with syncope suggests that tachyarrhythmia may be the cause. However, the symptoms require careful evaluation. Two young patients presented with syncope and were found to have WPW syndrome on their ECG. In both patients symptoms were suggestive of vasovagal syncope. During tilt testing, both the patients developed their typical symptoms with a fall in blood pressure and heart rate confirming the diagnosis of malignant vasovagal syndrome.

  1. High color rendering index white light emitting diodes fabricated from a combination of carbon dots and zinc copper indium sulfide quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chun; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yu; Liu, Wenyan; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Kershaw, Stephen V.; Zhang, Tieqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Jun; Yu, William W.; Rogach, Andrey L.

    2014-06-01

    In a line with most recent trends in developing non-toxic fluorescent nanomaterials, we combined blue emissive carbon dots with green and red emissive zinc copper indium sulfide (ZCIS) core/shell quantum dots (QDs) to achieve white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) with a high color rendering index of 93. This indicates that ZCIS QDs, with their broad emission bands, can be employed to effectively make up the emission of carbon dots in the yellow and red regions to produce WLEDs in the wide region of color temperature by tuning the volume ratio of these constituting luminophores. Their electroluminescence characteristics including color rendering index, Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates, and color temperatures were evaluated as a function of forward current. The CIE-1931 chromaticity coordinates of the as-prepared WLEDs, exhibiting good stability, were slightly shifted from (0.321, 0.312) at 10 mA to (0.351, 0.322) at 30 mA, which was mainly caused by the different thermal quenching coefficients of carbon dots and ZCIS QDs.

  2. Phacoemulsification in total white cataract with Stevens-Johnson syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract surgery with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (S-J is associated with a high incidence of complications and can worsen the primary disease. We report a case of phacoemulsification of a total, white cataract barely visible through the vascularized, keratinized cornea in the only seeing eye of a patient with S-J syndrome. We describe the intra-operative difficulties encountered during phacoemulsification and the surgical tools and techniques employed to overcome the surgical difficulties. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient regained useful, navigational vision.

  3. Tuning third harmonic generation of impurity doped quantum dots in the presence of Gaussian white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Surajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-03-01

    We perform a broad exploration of profiles of third harmonic generation (THG) susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in the presence and absence of noise. We have invoked Gaussian white noise in the present study. A Gaussian impurity has been introduced into the QD. Noise has been applied to the system additively and multiplicatively. A perpendicular magnetic field emerges out as a confinement source and a static external electric field has been applied. The THG profiles have been pursued as a function of incident photon energy when several important parameters such as electric field strength, magnetic field strength, confinement energy, dopant location, Al concentration, dopant potential, relaxation time and noise strength assume different values. Moreover, the role of the pathway through which noise is applied (additive/multiplicative) on the THG profiles has also been deciphered. The THG profiles are found to be decorated with interesting observations such as shift of THG peak position and maximization/minimization of THG peak intensity. Presence of noise alters the characteristics of THG profiles and sometimes enhances the THG peak intensity. Furthermore, the mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) also regulates the THG profiles in a few occasions in contrasting manners. The observations highlight the possible scope of tuning the THG coefficient of doped QD systems in the presence of noise and bears tremendous technological importance.

  4. Foal with Overo lethal white syndrome born to a registered quarter horse mare

    OpenAIRE

    Lightbody, Tamara

    2002-01-01

    A 16-hour-old white foal, born to a registered quarter horse mare, was examined for signs of colic. The foal had Overo lethal white syndrome, which causes ileocolonic agangliosis. This was confirmed by DNA testing. Since there is no treatment for Overo lethal white syndrome, the foal was euthanized.

  5. Foal with Overo lethal white syndrome born to a registered quarter horse mare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Tamara

    2002-09-01

    A 16-hour-old white foal, born to a registered quarter horse mare, was examined for signs of colic. The foal had Overo lethal white syndrome, which causes ileocolonic agangliosis. This was confirmed by DNA testing. Since there is no treatment for Overo lethal white syndrome, the foal was euthanized.

  6. Foal with Overo lethal white syndrome born to a registered quarter horse mare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Tamara

    2002-01-01

    A 16-hour-old white foal, born to a registered quarter horse mare, was examined for signs of colic. The foal had Overo lethal white syndrome, which causes ileocolonic agangliosis. This was confirmed by DNA testing. Since there is no treatment for Overo lethal white syndrome, the foal was euthanized. PMID:12240532

  7. Malignant vasovagal syndrome in two patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhi, N M; Bennett, D H

    2004-01-01

    The presence of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome in patients presenting with syncope suggests that tachyarrhythmia may be the cause. However, the symptoms require careful evaluation. Two young patients presented with syncope and were found to have WPW syndrome on their ECG. In both patients symptoms were suggestive of vasovagal syncope. During tilt testing, both the patients developed their typical symptoms with a fall in blood pressure and heart rate confirming the diagnosis of malignant...

  8. Utilization behavior as a white matter disconnection syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kenji; Nishino, Hiroshi; Maki, Toshiyuki; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Murayama, Shigeo

    2002-06-01

    We report a case of utilization behavior that was examined neuropathologically. A 72-year-old right-handed male patient, who was admitted with a complaint of transient loss of consciousness, displayed utilization behavior several times. He used daily objects that were placed in front of him, such as a teacup and a toothbrush, without instructions to do so. If the examiner asked the patient not to use the objects, the patient did not use them. MRI revealed acute infarction of the left superior frontal gyrus, where decreased blood flow was revealed by SPECT. The patient died of an acute worsening of dilated cardiomyopathy. Neuropathological examination demonstrated an acute phase infarction of the subcortical white matter of the left superior frontal lobe, which correlated well with neuroradiological findings. Utilization behavior has been thought a "frontal lobe symptom". However, we propose that utilization behavior might be considered a white matter disconnection syndrome.

  9. Fabrication of white light-emitting diodes based on solvothermally synthesized copper indium sulfide quantum dots as color converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woo-Seuk; Yang, Heesun

    2012-04-01

    A facile, large-scalable solvothermal synthesis of copper indium sulfide (CIS) quantum dots (QDs) and their application to the fabrication of QD-based white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are reported. Depending on CIS QD growth time of 2 versus 5 h, the core/shell structured QDs of CIS/ZnS exhibit tunable emissions of yellow-orange with excellent quantum yields of 55%-91%. A white QD-LED is realized by applying CIS (2 h)/ZnS QD as a blue-to-yellow color converter. Furthermore, a white QD-LED having a blend of yellow and orange QDs is fabricated to improve a color rendering property through spectral extension, and its electroluminescent properties are evaluated.

  10. Rare-Earth Free Self-Activated Graphene Quantum Dots and Copper-Cysteamine Phosphors for Enhanced White Light-Emitting-Diodes under Single Excitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wubin Dai; Yifeng Lei; Man Xu; Pei Zhao; Zhanhui Zhang; Jia Zhou

    2017-01-01

    .... On the contrary, as for phosphor-convert white light-emitting-diodes (pc-WLEDs), a solution-processed tunable warm white emission LED composite is fabricated in this study under single excitation, with both RE free phosphors graphene quantum dots (GQDs...

  11. Coral disease physiology: the impact of Acroporid white syndrome on Symbiodinium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roff, G.; Kvennefors, E. C. E.; Ulstrup, Karin Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Acroporid white syndrome, a disease-like syndrome from the Great Barrier Reef, results from degenerative host tissue at lesion borders. Tissue preceding lesion borders appears visually healthy, but it is currently unclear whether the endosymbiotic zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium) are physiologically...

  12. 53% Efficient Red Emissive Carbon Quantum Dots for High Color Rendering and Stable Warm White-Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zifei; Yuan, Fanglong; Li, Xiaohong; Li, Yunchao; Zhong, Haizheng; Fan, Louzhen; Yang, Shihe

    2017-10-01

    Red emissive carbon quantum dots (R-CQDs) with quantum yield of 53% is successfully prepared. An ultraviolet (UV)-pumped CQD phosphors-based warm white light-emitting diode (WLED) is realized for the first time and achieves a color rendering index of 97. This work provides a new avenue for the exploration of low cost, environment-friendly, and high-performance CQD phosphors-based warm WLEDs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Trichoscopy findings in loose anagen hair syndrome: rectangular granular structures and solitary yellow dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowska, Adriana; Zadurska, Malgorzata; Czuwara, Joanna; Warszawik-Hendzel, Olga; Kurzeja, Marta; Maj, Malgorzata; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2015-03-31

    Loose anagen hair syndrome (LAHS) is typically diagnosed in girls older than 2 years who present with hair that "will not grow". Hair microscopic examination shows absent inner and outer root sheaths, ruffling of the cuticle on the proximal hair shaft and deformed pigmented anagen bulbs. The aim of the study was to assess whether there are characteristic trichoscopic features favoring the diagnosis of LAHS. Eighty nine children patients were included into the study (24 girls with LAHS, 25 with alopecia areata, 20 with telogen effluvium and 20 healthy children). In all groups trichoscopy was performed. Trichoscopy images were analyzed for abnormalities in the hairs shafts, the hair follicle openings and the interfollicular area. Dirty dots were present in all groups. A unique feature of LAHS was the presence of rectangular black granular structures which differs from dense black dots seen in patients with alopecia areata. This feature was observed in 71% of patients with LAHS. Follicular units with single hairs constituted 92,9% of hair units in these patients (65,5% in telogen effluvium and 53% in the control group). Solitary yellow dots were found in 50% of patient with LAHS and in 24% of patients with alopecia areata, but was not found in control group or in patients with telogen effluvium. The trichoscopy features favoring the diagnosis of LAHS are: rectangular black granular structures, solitary yellow dots and major predominance of follicular units with single hairs.

  14. White Light Electroluminescence by Organic-Inorganic Heterostructures with CdSe Quantum Dots as Red Light Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Oner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a white organic light-emitting diode featuring a double emission layer comprising a blue light-emitting conductive polymer as a host material for Cadmium Selenide (CdSe quantum dots as red light emitters and tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminium thin layer for green light emission. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of the emitting light of the device were found to be (0.32, 0.40 which were only slightly changed over a range of applied voltages between 5 and 10 volts. The use of CdSe nanocrystalline quantum dots (surface-stabilized with hexadecylamine/trioctylphosphine oxide ligands in the hybrid heterostructure with poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl conductive polymer was studied for a variety of CdSe concentrations developing the performance of the device in means of overcoming segregation problems in the blend. Besides, constituents' ratio was further examined for the exploration of possible energy transfer from polymer host material to the CdSe quantum dots as a key factor for well-balanced emission in the electroluminescent devices.

  15. White spot syndrome virus: an overview on an emergent concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Paz, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are ubiquitous and extremely abundant in the marine environment. One of such marine viruses, the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), has emerged globally as one of the most prevalent, widespread and lethal for shrimp populations. However, at present there is no treatment available to interfere with the unrestrained occurrence and spread of the disease. The recent progress in molecular biology techniques has made it possible to obtain information on the factors, mechanisms and strategies used by this virus to infect and replicate in susceptible host cells. Yet, further research is still required to fully understand the basic nature of WSSV, its exact life cycle and mode of infection. This information will expand our knowledge and may contribute to developing effective prophylactic or therapeutic measures. This review provides a state-of-the-art overview of the topic, and emphasizes the current progress and future direction for the development of WSSV control strategies. © INRA, EDP Sciences, 2010.

  16. The relationship between physical activity levels and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Kwang-Jun; Kim, Eon-Ho; Baek, Un-Hyo; Gang, Zhao; Kang, Seol-Jung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physical activity is important for preventing and managing metabolic syndrome. White-collar workers can be inherently predisposed to chronic diseases, as their jobs are primarily sedentary. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers. [Subjects and Methods] Physical activity and metabolic syndrome factors were measured in 331 male public office workers. Physical activity was classified as hig...

  17. The History of the Wolff–Parkinson–White Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin M. Scheinman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available While Drs Wolff, Parkinson, and White fully described the syndrome in 1930, prior case reports had described the essentials. Over the ensuing century this syndrome has captivated the interest of anatomists, clinical cardiologists, and cardiac surgeons. Stanley Kent described lateral muscular connections over the atrioventricular (AV groove which he felt were the normal AV connections. The normal AV connections were, however, clearly described by His and Tawara. True right-sided AV connections were initially described by Wood et al., while Öhnell first described left free wall pathways. David Scherf is thought to be the first to describe our current understanding of the pathogenesis of the WPW syndrome in terms of a re-entrant circuit involving both the AV node–His axis as well as the accessory pathway. This hypothesis was not universally accepted, and many theories were applied to explain the clinical findings. The basics of our understanding were established by the brilliant work of Pick, Langendorf, and Katz who by using careful deductive analysis of ECGs were able to define the basic pathophysiological processes. Subsequently, Wellens and Durrer applied invasive electrical stimulation to the heart in order to confirm the pathophysiological processes. Sealy and his colleagues at Duke University Medical Center were the first to successfully surgically divide an accessory pathway and ushered in the modern era of therapy for these patients. Morady and Scheinman were the first to successfully ablate an accessory pathway (posteroseptal using high-energy direct-current shocks. Subsequently Jackman, Kuck, Morady, and a number of groups proved the remarkable safety and efficiency of catheter ablation for pathways in all locations using radiofrequency energy. More recently, Gollob et al. first described the gene responsible for a familial form of WPW. The current ability to cure patients with WPW is due to the splendid contributions of individuals

  18. The performance of quantum dots-based white light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Lin; Chung, Shu-Ru

    2017-08-01

    Recently, the investigation of quantum dots (QDs) as a color converter for white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) application has attracted a great deal of attention. Because the narrow emission wavelength of QDs can be controlled by their particle sizes and compositions, which is facilitated to improve the color gamut of display as well as color rendering index (CRI) and the correlated color temperature (CCT) of WLEDs. In a typical commercially available LCD display, the color gamut is approximately to 75 % which is defined by the National Television System Committee (NTSC). In order to enhance NTSC, the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of color converter should be less than 30 nm. Therefore, the QDs are the best choice for display application due to the FWHM of QDs is meet the demand of display application. In this study, the hot injection method with one-pot process is used to synthesis of colloidal ternary ZnCdSe green (G-) and red-emission (R-) QDs with a narrow emission wavelength around 537 and 610 nm. By controlling the complex reagents-stearic acid (SA) and lauric acid (LA), high performance of G- and R-QDs can be prepared. The quantum yields (QYs), particle sizes and FWHM for G- and R-QDs are 70, 30 %, 3.2 +/- 0.5, 4.1 +/- 0.5 nm and 25, 26 nm, respectively. In order to explore the performance of QDs-based WLEDs, mixing ratios effect between G-QD and R-QD are studied and the WLED is packed as conformal-type. Different ratios of R-QD and G-QD (1:10, 1:20 and 1:30) are mixed and fill up the 3020 SMD blue-InGaN LED, and named as LED-10, LED-20 and LED-30. After that, UV curable gel is deposited on the top of QD layer to form WLED and named as LED-10*, LED-20* and LED-30*. The results show that the Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates, color rendering index (CRI), luminous efficacy of LED-10*, LED-20* and LED-30* are (0.27, 0.21), 53, 1.9 lm/W, (0.29, 0.30), 72, 3.3 lm/W and (0.25, 0.34), 45, 6.8 lm/W, respectively. We can find

  19. Comparison of MRI white matter changes with neuropsychologic impairment in Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, K; Takanashi, J; Ishii, M; Niimi, H

    1992-01-01

    The neuropsychologic function and white matter changes observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in Cockayne syndrome were studied. MRI with T2-weighted sequences revealed periventricular hyperintensity and white matter hyperintensity in all 3 Cockayne syndrome patients examined; in contrast, 8 age-matched controls had no periventricular or white matter hyperintensity. MRI scans were graded according to the severity of periventricular or white matter hyperintensity using a scale applied to an elderly patient population. There was no difference in the severity of MRI white matter changes in these 3 Cockayne syndrome patients, 2 of whom had severe neuropsychologic functions and one a relatively milder one. There was no correlation between neuropsychologic impairment and MRI white matter changes.

  20. Exciton energy recycling from ZnO defect levels: towards electrically driven hybrid quantum-dot white light-emitting-diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Liu, Weizhen; Chen, Rui; Gao, Yuan; Zhu, Binbin; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Wang, Shijie; Sun, Handong

    2016-03-01

    An electrically driven quantum-dot hybrid white light-emitting diode is fabricated via spin coating CdSe quantum dots onto a GaN/ZnO nanorod matrix. For the first time, quantum dots are excited by fluorescence resonance energy transfer from the carriers trapped at surface defect levels. The prototype device exhibits achromatic emission, with a chromaticity coordinate of (0.327, 0.330), and correlated color temperature similar to sunlight.An electrically driven quantum-dot hybrid white light-emitting diode is fabricated via spin coating CdSe quantum dots onto a GaN/ZnO nanorod matrix. For the first time, quantum dots are excited by fluorescence resonance energy transfer from the carriers trapped at surface defect levels. The prototype device exhibits achromatic emission, with a chromaticity coordinate of (0.327, 0.330), and correlated color temperature similar to sunlight. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr09261b

  1. Selecting the optimal synthesis parameters of InP/CdxZn1-xSe quantum dots for a hybrid remote phosphor white LED for general lighting applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryckaert, Jana; Correia, António; Tessier, Mickael D; Dupont, Dorian; Hens, Zeger; Hanselaer, Peter; Meuret, Youri

    2017-11-27

    Quantum dots can be used in white LEDs for lighting applications to fill the spectral gaps in the combined emission spectrum of the blue pumping LED and a broad band phosphor, in order to improve the source color rendering properties. Because quantum dots are low scattering materials, their use can also reduce the amount of backscattered light which can increase the overall efficiency of the white LED. The absorption spectrum and narrow emission spectrum of quantum dots can be easily tuned by altering their synthesis parameters. Due to the re-absorption events between the different luminescent materials and the light interaction with the LED package, determining the optimal quantum dot properties is a highly non-trivial task. In this paper we propose a methodology to select the optimal quantum dot to be combined with a broad band phosphor in order to realize a white LED with optimal luminous efficacy and CRI. The methodology is based on accurate and efficient simulations using the extended adding-doubling approach that take into account all the optical interactions. The method is elaborated for the specific case of a hybrid, remote phosphor white LED with YAG:Ce phosphor in combination with InP/CdxZn1-xSe type quantum dots. The absorption and emission spectrum of the quantum dots are generated in function of three synthesis parameters (core size, shell size and cadmium fraction) by a semi-empirical 'quantum dot model' to include the continuous tunability of these spectra. The sufficiently fast simulations allow to scan the full parameter space consisting of these synthesis parameters and luminescent material concentrations in terms of CRI and efficacy. A conclusive visualization of the final performance allows to make a well-considered trade-off between these performance parameters. For the hybrid white remote phosphor LED with YAG:Ce and InP/CdxZn1-xSe quantum dots a CRI Ra = 90 (with R9>50) and an overall efficacy of 110 lm/W is found.

  2. Rapid microwave-assisted synthesis of highly luminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for white light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaling; Zheng, Jingxia; Wang, Junli; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2017-11-01

    Highly luminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) were synthesized rapidly by one-step microwave-assisted hydrothermal method using citric acid as carbon source and ethylenediamine as dopant. The influences of reaction temperature, reaction time and raw material ratio on the fluorescence performance of N-CDs were investigated. Then N-CDs with the highest quantum yield were selected as fluorescent materials for fabricating white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Highly luminescent N-CDs with the quantum yield of 75.96% and blue-to-red spectral composition of 51.48% were obtained at the conditions of 180 °C, 8 min and the molar ratio of citric acid to ethylenediamine 2:1. As-prepared highly luminescent N-CDs have an average size of 6.06 nm, possess extensive oxygen- and nitrogen-containing functional groups on their surface, and exhibit strong absorption in ultraviolet region. White LEDs based on the highly luminescent N-CDs emit warm white light with color coordinates of (0.42, 0.40) and correlated color temperature of 3416 K.

  3. Incidence of the endothelin receptor B mutation that causes lethal white foal syndrome in white-patterned horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santschi, E M; Vrotsos, P D; Purdy, A K; Mickelson, J R

    2001-01-01

    To determine incidence of the Ile118Lys endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) mutation responsible for overo lethal white syndrome (OLWS) and its association with specific types of white patterning. 945 horses of white-patterned bloodlines and 55 solid-colored horses of other breeds. Horses were genotyped by use of allele-specific polymerase chain reaction to determine incidence of the Ile118Lys EDNRB mutation. Genotypes detected were homozygous Ile118, homozygous Lys118, and heterozygous. All foals with OLWS were homozygous for the Ile118Lys EDNRB mutation, and adults that were homozygous were not found. White patterning was strongly associated with EDNRB genotype. Color patterns with highest incidence (> 94%) of heterozygotes were frame overo, highly white calico overo, and frame blend overo. White-patterned bloodlines with lowest incidence of heterozygotes (white calico overo, splashed white overo, nonframe blend overo, and breeding-stock solid. The mutation was not detected in solid-colored horses from breeds without white patterning. In homozygotes, the Ile118Lys EDNRB mutation causes OLWS. In heterozygotes, the mutation is usually responsible for a frame overo phenotype. The frame pattern can be combined with other white patterns, making accurate estimation of EDNRB genotype by visual inspection difficult. Wide range of incidence of heterozygotes in various subtypes of white-patterned horses indicates different genetic control of these color patterns. Determination of EDNRB genotype by use of a DNA-based test is the only way to determine with certainty whether white-patterned horses can produce a foal affected with OLWS.

  4. Effect of nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots on the fibrillation of hen egg-white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hua-Jin; Miao, Min; Liu, Zhe; Yang, Ran; Qu, Ling-Bo

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the fibrillation of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) in the absence and presence of different amount of nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) was studied by Thioflavin T (ThT) spectroscopy, Congo red (CR) binding assays, 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence assay, circular dichroism (CD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental results indicated that not only the fibrillation of HEWL at high temperature (65°C) and low pH (pH=2.0) could be inhibited effectively by N-GQDs, but the inhibition of HEWL by N-GQDs followed a dose-dependent manner. The results of this work suggested that the N-GQDs had a great potential for designing new therapeutic agents and were promising for future treatment of amyloid-related diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The panzootic white-nose syndrome: an environmentally constrained disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, T G; Federico, P

    2012-06-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emerging disease of hibernating bats probably caused by a pathogenic fungus, Geomyces destructans. The fungus has dispersed rapidly in the Northeastern United States and Canada and is presently a serious risk to hibernating bats of the mid-southern United States. Our objectives were to investigate how the environmental factors of temperature and resources impact the physiology of bats and apply this to explore possible effects of the fungus G. destructans on bats. Using a dynamic, physiologically based model parameterized for little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), we found that the survival region defined in terms of minimal and maximal cave temperatures and bat lipid reserve levels exhibits plasticity as a function of cave temperature. During the pre-hibernation period, constellations of increased availability of fall and winter prey, reduced energy expenditure and lipogenic factors provide fat deposition in hibernator species that engender survival throughout the hibernation period. The model-derived survival region is used to demonstrate that small increases in lipid reserves allow survival under increasing maximum temperatures, which provides flexibility of bat persistence at the higher cave temperature ranges that may occur in the Southern United States. Antipodally, the lower-temperature survival range is bounded with minimum temperatures. Our results suggest that there is an environmental distinction between survival of bats in Southern and Northern US states, a relationship that could prove very important in managing WNS and its dispersal. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Datasheet: Pseudogymnoascus destructans (white-nose syndrome fungus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blehert, David; Lankau, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is a psychrophilic (cold-loving) fungus that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS), an emerging disease of North American bats that has caused unprecedented population declines. The fungus is believed to have been introduced to North America from Europe or Asia (where it is present but does not cause significant mortality), but the full extent of its native range is unknown. The route of introduction is also unknown. In North America, hibernating bats become infected with P. destructans when body temperature decreases during winter torpor into the range permissive for growth of this fungus. Infected bats may develop visible fungal growth on the nose or wings, awaken more frequently from torpor, and experience a cascade of physiologic changes that result in weight loss, dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, and death. P. destructans persists in the environments of underground bat hibernation sites (hibernacula) and is believed to spread primarily by natural movements of infected bats. The first evidence of WNS in North America is from a photograph of a hibernating bat taken during winter of 2005-2006 in a hibernaculum near Albany, New York. P. destructans subsequently spread rapidly from the northeastern United States throughout much of the eastern portions of the United States and Canada, and most recently (as of May 2017) was detected in Washington State. It has killed millions of bats, threatening some species with regional extirpation and putting at risk the valuable environmental services that bats provide by eating harmful insects.

  7. Medical image of the week: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Hook C

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 38-year-old man developed sustained rapid heart rate while rock climbing. The patient reported that he had experienced rare bouts of self-limited palpitations in the past. Blood pressure on arrival to the emergency department was 112/ 65 mm Hg. The patient’s initial EKG demonstrated a regular, narrow complex supraventricular tachycardia, with a rate of 232 (Figure 1. Intravenous adenosine was administered with no change in his rate or rhythm. The patient then received amiodarone by intravenous bolus, with subsequent conversion to sinus rhythm (Figure 2. Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome is a congenital cardiac condition present in approximately 0.15% of the general population. WPW is characterized by the abnormal presence of conduction tissue that creates an accessory atrioventricular pathway and thus potentiates reentrant tachycardia (1. The classic resting EKG findings in WPW are: a shortened PR interval (less than 0.12 seconds, an indistinct initial upslope of the QRS complex (known as the …

  8. Deep insight into white spot syndrome virus vaccines: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Badhul Haq

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV, the causative virus of the disease, is found in most shrimp farming areas of the world, where it causes large economic losses to the shrimp farming industry. The potentially fatal virus has been found to be a threat not only to all shrimp species, but also to other marine and freshwater crustaceans, such as crab and crayfish. To date, no effective prophylactic treatment measures are available for viral infections in shrimp and other crustaceans. Due to current aquaculture practices and the broad host range of WSSV, intervention strategies including vaccination against this virus would be pivotal to save and protect shrimp farming. Several achievements have been attained in the search of novel vaccines for WSSV. DNA vaccination, recombinant vaccines, oral vaccination techniques and gene therapy are some of the thrust areas of focus for scientists and researchers. This review article highlights the recent trends in the development of WSSV vaccines either as DNA vaccines or recombinant vaccines and their functioning strategies as suggested by the researchers worldwide.

  9. MRI of white matter changes in the Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, M.Z. [Dept. of Radiology, Yamanashi Medical Coll., Yamanashi (Japan); Oba, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Yamanashi Medical Coll., Yamanashi (Japan); Ohtomo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Yamanashi Medical Coll., Yamanashi (Japan); Aihara, M. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Yamanashi Medical Coll., Tamahocho, Yamanashi (Japan); Hayashibe, H. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Yamanashi Medical Coll., Tamahocho, Yamanashi (Japan); Nakazawa, S. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Yamanashi Medical Coll., Tamahocho, Yamanashi (Japan); Uchiyama, G. [Dept. of Radiology, Yamanashi Medical Coll., Yamanashi (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    We report a case of Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome with spastic diplegia and conduction aphasia. MRI demonstrated the white matter changes deep in the cerebral hemispheres. We analyse the MRI findings and compare the results with neuropsychological signs. (orig.)

  10. Screening for the metabolic syndrome using simple anthropometric measurements in south Asian and white Europeans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khunti, Kamlesh; Taub, Nick; Tringham, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a general population sample of south Asians and white Europeans and compare predictors of metabolic syndrome, using ethnic specific definitions of obesity. Methods: 3099 participants (71.4% white European, 28.6% south Asian) aged 40-75 years...... were screened using a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Metabolic syndrome was defined using National Cholesterol Education Programme and International Diabetes Federation definitions. We compared sensitivity, specificity and area under the curve of waist circumference, body mass index and waist......-hip ratio. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome using the definitions above was 29.9% (29.2% south Asian, 30.2% white European), and 34.4% (34.2% south Asian, 34.5% white European), respectively. Using the National Cholesterol Education Programme definition, waist circumference was significantly...

  11. Effects of white-nose syndrome on regional population patterns of 3 hibernating bat species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Thomas E; Sewall, Brent J; Amelon, Sybill K

    2016-10-01

    Hibernating bats have undergone severe recent declines across the eastern United States, but the cause of these regional-scale declines has not been systematically evaluated. We assessed the influence of white-nose syndrome (an emerging bat disease caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, formerly Geomyces destructans) on large-scale, long-term population patterns in the little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus), the northern myotis (Myotis septentrionalis), and the tricolored bat (Perimyotis subflavus). We modeled population trajectories for each species on the basis of an extensive data set of winter hibernacula counts of more than 1 million individual bats from a 4-state region over 13 years and with data on locations of hibernacula and first detections of white-nose syndrome at each hibernaculum. We used generalized additive mixed models to determine population change relative to expectations, that is, how population trajectories differed with a colony's infection status, how trajectories differed with distance from the point of introduction of white-nose syndrome, and whether declines were concordant with first local observation of the disease. Population trajectories in all species met at least one of the 3 expectations, but none met all 3. Our results suggest, therefore, that white-nose syndrome has affected regional populations differently than was previously understood and has not been the sole cause of declines. Specifically, our results suggest that in some areas and species, threats other than white-nose syndrome are also contributing to population declines, declines linked to white-nose syndrome have spread across large geographic areas with unexpected speed, and the disease or other threats led to declines in bat populations for years prior to disease detection. Effective conservation will require further research to mitigate impacts of white-nose syndrome, renewed attention to other threats to bats, and improved surveillance efforts to ensure

  12. Early White-Matter Abnormalities of the Ventral Frontostriatal Pathway in Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Brian W.; Barnea-Goraly, Naama; Lightbody, Amy A.; Patnaik, Swetapadma S.; Hoeft, Fumiko; Hazlett, Heather; Piven, Joseph; Reiss, Allan L.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Fragile X syndrome is associated with cognitive deficits in inhibitory control and with abnormal neuronal morphology and development. Method: In this study, we used a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography approach to reconstruct white-matter fibers in the ventral frontostriatal pathway in young males with fragile X syndrome (n = 17;…

  13. The relationship between physical activity levels and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang-Jun; Kim, Eon-Ho; Baek, Un-Hyo; Gang, Zhao; Kang, Seol-Jung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physical activity is important for preventing and managing metabolic syndrome. White-collar workers can be inherently predisposed to chronic diseases, as their jobs are primarily sedentary. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers. [Subjects and Methods] Physical activity and metabolic syndrome factors were measured in 331 male public office workers. Physical activity was classified as high (N=101), moderate (N=115), or low (N=111) using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. To diagnose metabolic syndrome, the U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program’s standard was used. [Results] Waist circumference and triglyceride levels, factors of metabolic syndrome, were significantly higher in the low physical activity group than in the moderate or high activity group. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly lower in the low physical activity group than in the moderate or high activity group. Waist circumference and fasting glucose were negatively correlated with physical activity level, and HDL cholesterol showed a positive correlation with waist circumference. The odds ratios for metabolic syndrome were 2.03 times higher (95% confidence interval, 1.01–4.09) in the low physical activity group than in the high physical activity group. [Conclusion] Low physical activity was a risk factor for metabolic syndrome in white-collar workers. Therefore, increasing physical activity in daily life may prevent metabolic syndrome in white-collar workers. PMID:27942116

  14. The relationship between physical activity levels and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwang-Jun; Kim, Eon-Ho; Baek, Un-Hyo; Gang, Zhao; Kang, Seol-Jung

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] Physical activity is important for preventing and managing metabolic syndrome. White-collar workers can be inherently predisposed to chronic diseases, as their jobs are primarily sedentary. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome in male white-collar workers. [Subjects and Methods] Physical activity and metabolic syndrome factors were measured in 331 male public office workers. Physical activity was classified as high (N=101), moderate (N=115), or low (N=111) using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. To diagnose metabolic syndrome, the U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program's standard was used. [Results] Waist circumference and triglyceride levels, factors of metabolic syndrome, were significantly higher in the low physical activity group than in the moderate or high activity group. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly lower in the low physical activity group than in the moderate or high activity group. Waist circumference and fasting glucose were negatively correlated with physical activity level, and HDL cholesterol showed a positive correlation with waist circumference. The odds ratios for metabolic syndrome were 2.03 times higher (95% confidence interval, 1.01-4.09) in the low physical activity group than in the high physical activity group. [Conclusion] Low physical activity was a risk factor for metabolic syndrome in white-collar workers. Therefore, increasing physical activity in daily life may prevent metabolic syndrome in white-collar workers.

  15. Polycystic ovary syndrome and the peripheral blood white cell count.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Herlihy, A C

    2012-02-01

    This retrospective cross-sectional study examined if the white cell count (WCC) is increased in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and if so, is it due to PCOS or to the associated obesity? Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and body composition was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Of the 113 women studied, 36 had PCOS and 77 did not. The mean WCC was higher in the PCOS group compared with the non-PCOS group (8.9 x 10(9)\\/l vs 7.4 x 10(9)\\/l p = 0.002). This increase was due to a higher neutrophil count (5.6 x 10(9)\\/l vs 4.3 x 10(9)\\/l; p = 0.003). There was a leucocytosis (WCC >11 x 10(9)\\/l) present in 19% of the PCOS group compared with 1% in the non-PCOS group (p < 0.001). The neutrophil count was abnormally high (>7.7 x 10(9)\\/l) in 14% of the PCOS group compared with 4% in the non-PCOS group (p < 0.001). On regression analysis, however, the only independent variable which explained both the increased WCC and the increased neutrophil count was PCOS. We found that PCOS is associated with an increased WCC due to increased neutrophils, which supports the evidence that PCOS is associated with low-grade inflammation. The increase appears to be due to the underlying PCOS, and not to the increased adiposity associated with PCOS.

  16. White-nose syndrome in bats: Illuminating the darkness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryan, Paul M.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Boyles, Justin G.; Blehert, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Happy ten-year anniversary to BMC Biology! We can attest to the effectiveness of the journal in reaching a great diversity of scientists based on reader responses to our commentary [1] about bat white-nose syndrome (WNS) two years ago. WNS is still on course to rank among the most destructive wildlife diseases to emerge in recent history, and it has continued to have unprecedented effects on populations of hibernating bats in eastern North America. At the time of our last writing in November 2010, the cold-adapted fungus then presumed to cause WNS (Geomyces destructans) had spread about 1,300 km from an index site in New York (Figure 1). In those early years of the epizootic, WNS caused a staggering wave of mass mortality among all six species of hibernating bats that occur in north-eastern North America. Since November 2010, WNS has spread into eight additional US states and two more Canadian provinces (Figure 1), and has continued to cause mortality in those six species most affected during the early years of the epizootic. Although part of a mostly tragic story has continued to unfold as new areas are affected, anecdotal signs are emerging that all may not be lost when it comes to hibernating bats and WNS. Amid the continued large-scale population declines of certain species, we have yet to see mass mortality in some of the more westerly areas where the fungus was detected two winters ago (Figure 1). Also, recently disease without obvious mortality was diagnosed in gray bats (Myotis grisescens) - an endangered species thought by many two years ago to be at high risk of extinction from WNS. Clearly, large gaps in our understanding of WNS remain, but some have been filled since we last communicated with readers of BMC Biology.

  17. Stability Test of White LED with Bilayer Structure of Red InP Quantum Dots and Yellow YAG:Ce3+ Phosphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwangwon; Deressa, Gemechu; Kim, Daehan; Kim, Jongsu; Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Taehoon

    2016-02-01

    The white-light-emitting diode (white LED), based on the bilayer structure of red InP quantum dots (QDs) with 610 nm peak, and yellow YAG:Ce3+ phosphor with 550 nm peak, were fabricated through a conventional 5050 type LED fabrication process. The white LED exhibited high luminous efficiency of >130 Im/W and high color rendering index of >80 under operating current of 60 mA and color temperature of 5800 K. As an increase of QDs concentrations, the white LED showed higher color rendering index along with lower luminous efficiency, and the energy loss in the reabsorption process between yellow YAG:Ce3+ emission and red QD absorption was observed. As the temperature increases, the x-color coordinates were significantly changed, indicating that the InP QDs still have lower thermal stability. Also our white LED showed about 50% lumen maintenance after 45,000 hours of normal operation.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and CRISPR-Cas9? What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Leprosy Polycystic ovary syndrome Gorlin-Chaudhry-Moss syndrome All New & Updated Pages ...

  19. Reversible white matter lesions during ketogenic diet therapy in glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiohama, Tadashi; Fujii, Katsunori; Takahashi, Satoru; Nakamura, Fumito; Kohno, Yoichi

    2013-12-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is caused by brain energy failure resulting from a disturbance in glucose transport. We describe a 4-year-old boy with classical type glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome with a heterozygous splice acceptor site mutation (c.517-2A>G) in the SLCA2A1 gene. We initiated a ketogenic diet at 4 months of age. However, even though his condition was good during ketogenic diet therapy, multiple cerebral white matter and right cerebellum lesions appeared at 9 months of age. The lesions in the cerebral white matter subsequently disappeared, indicating that white matter lesions during diet therapy may be reversible and independent of the ketogenic diet. This is the first report of reversible white matter lesions during ketogenic diet therapy in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. White matter integrity in Asperger syndrome: a preliminary diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, Oswald J N; Deeley, Quinton; Sundram, Fred; Daly, Eileen M; Barker, Gareth J; Jones, Derek K; van Amelsvoort, Therese A M J; Schmitz, Nicole; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Kieran C; Murphy, Declan G M

    2010-10-01

    Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD), including Asperger syndrome and autism, is a highly genetic neurodevelopmental disorder. There is a consensus that ASD has a biological basis, and it has been proposed that it is a "connectivity" disorder. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DT-MRI) allows measurement of the microstructural integrity of white matter (a proxy measure of "connectivity"). However, nobody has investigated the microstructural integrity of whole brain white matter in people with Asperger syndrome. We measured the fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD) and radial diffusivity (RD) of white matter, using DT-MRI, in 13 adults with Asperger syndrome and 13 controls. The groups did not differ significantly in overall intelligence and age. FA, MD and RD were assessed using whole brain voxel-based techniques. Adults with Asperger syndrome had a significantly lower FA than controls in 13 clusters. These were largely bilateral and included white matter in the internal capsule, frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes, cingulum and corpus callosum. Adults with Asperger syndrome have widespread significant differences from controls in white matter microstructural integrity.

  1. Rare-Earth Free Self-Activated Graphene Quantum Dots and Copper-Cysteamine Phosphors for Enhanced White Light-Emitting-Diodes under Single Excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Wubin; Lei, Yifeng; Xu, Man; Zhao, Pei; Zhang, Zhanhui; Zhou, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Rare-earth (RE) based phosphors are attractive due to their potential applications. However, owing to the resource issue, these kinds of phosphors are expensive and costly. On the contrary, as for phosphor-convert white light-emitting-diodes (pc-WLEDs), a solution-processed tunable warm white emission LED composite is fabricated in this study under single excitation, with both RE free phosphors graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and Copper-Cysteamine (Cu-Cy). By using microwave-assisted wet-chemica...

  2. Realization of wide circadian variability by quantum dots-luminescent mesoporous silica-based white light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin; Zhang, Jingjing; Chen, Wei; Hao, Junjie; Cheng, Yanhua; Hu, Run; Wu, Dan; Wang, Kai; Luo, Xiaobing

    2017-10-01

    Human comfort has become one of the most important criteria in modern lighting architecture. Here, we proposed a tuning strategy to enhance the non-image forming photobiological effect on the human circadian rhythm based on quantum-dots-converted white light-emitting diodes (QDs-WLEDs). We introduced the limiting variability of the circadian action factor (CAF), defined as the ratio of circadian efficiency and luminous efficiency of radiation. The CAF was deeply discussed and was found to be a function of constraining the color rendering index (CRI) and correlated color temperatures. The maximum CAF variability of QDs-WLEDs was found to be dependent on the QDs’ peak wavelength and full width at half maximum. With the optimized parameters, the packaging materials were synthesized and WLEDs were packaged. Experimental results show that at CRI > 90, the maximum CAF variability can be tuned by 3.83 times (from 0.251 at 2700 K to 0.961 at 6500 K), which implies that our approach could reduce the number of tunable channels, and could achieve wider CAF variability.

  3. Chip-scale white flip-chip light-emitting diode containing indium phosphide/zinc selenide quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Bingfeng; Yan, Linchao; Lao, Yuqin; Ma, Yanfei; Chen, Zimin; Ma, Xuejin; Zhuo, Yi; Pei, Yanli; Wang, Gang

    2017-08-01

    A method for preparing a quantum dot (QD)-white light-emitting diode (WLED) is reported. Holes were etched in the SiO2 layer deposited on the sapphire substrate of the flip-chip LED by inductively coupled plasma, and these holes were then filled with QDs. An ultraviolet-curable resin was then spin-coated on top of the QD-containing SiO2 layer, and the resin was cured to act as a protecting layer. The reflective sidewall structure minimized sidelight leakage. The fabrication of the QD-WLED is simple in preparation and compatible with traditional LED processes, which was the minimum size of the WLED chip-scale integrated package. InP/ZnS core-shell QDs were used as the converter in the WLED. A blue light-emitting diode with a flip-chip structure was used as the excitation source. The QD-WLED exhibited color temperatures from 5900 to 6400 K and Commission Internationale De L'Elcairage color coordinates from (0.315, 0.325) to (0.325, 0.317), under drive currents from 100 to 400 mA. The QD-WLED exhibited stable optoelectronic properties.

  4. Fabricating third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots in the presence of Gaussian white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Saha, Surajit; Pal, Suvajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-03-01

    We perform a meticulous analysis of profiles of third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility (TONOS) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in the presence and absence of noise. We have invoked Gaussian white noise in the present study and noise has been introduced to the system additively and multiplicatively. The QD is doped with a Gaussian impurity. A magnetic field applied perpendicularly serves as a confinement source and the doped system has been exposed to a static external electric field. The TONOS profiles have been monitored against a continuous variation of incident photon energy when several important parameters such as electric field strength, magnetic field strength, confinement energy, dopant location, Al concentration, dopant potential, relaxation time, anisotropy, and noise strength assume different values. Moreover, the influence of mode of introduction of noise (additive/multiplicative) on the TONOS profiles has also been addressed. The said profiles are found to be consisting of interesting observations such as shift of TONOS peak position and maximization/minimization of TONOS peak intensity. The presence of noise alters the features of TONOS profiles and sometimes enhances the TONOS peak intensity from that of noise-free state. Furthermore, the mode of application of noise also often tailors the TONOS profiles in diverse fashions. The observations accentuate the possibility of tuning the TONOS of doped QD systems in the presence of noise.

  5. Surgery for the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The association of paroxysmal tachycardias in otherwise healthy young people with the characteristic ECG pattern of a short. P-R interval and a wide QRS complex with slurred upstroke. (delta wave) (Fig. 1) was described in 1930 by the authors whose names are now indelibly attached to this syndrome.s It has fascinated ...

  6. Characterization of a tailless white spot syndrome virus from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    WSSV) but without tail-like extension was identified and characterized from diseased Penaeus vannamei and moribund Procambarus clarkia. Contrary to previous reports, white spots were not observed on the carapace of the diseased P.

  7. Field-Usable Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Rapid Detection of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV)

    OpenAIRE

    Kulabhusan, Prabir Kumar; Rajwade, Jyutika M.; Sugumar, Vimal; Taju, Gani; Sahul Hameed, A. S.; Paknikar, Kishore M.

    2017-01-01

    Background White spot disease (WSD), a major threat to sustainable aquaculture worldwide, is caused by White spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The diagnosis of WSD relies heavily on molecular detection of the virus by one-step PCR. These procedures are neither field-usable nor rapid enough considering the speed at which the virus spreads. Thus, development of a rapid, reliable and field-usable diagnostic method for the detection of WSSV infection is imperative to prevent huge economic losses. Metho...

  8. Depression masquerading as chest pain in a patient with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Madabushi, Rajashree; Agarwal, Anil; Tewari, Saipriya; Gautam, Sujeet K S; Khuba, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Wolff Parkinson White (WPW) syndrome is a condition in which there is an aberrant conduction pathway between the atria and ventricles, resulting in tachycardia. A 42-year-old patient, who was treated for WPW syndrome previously, presented with chronic somatic pain. With her cardiac condition in mind, she was thoroughly worked up for a recurrence of disease. As part of routine screening of all patients at our pain clinic, she was found to have severe depression as per the Patient Health Questi...

  9. Overo lethal white foal syndrome: equine model of aganglionic megacolon (Hirschsprung disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, L; Griffin, L D; Kinzer, A; Chandler, M; Beckwith, J B; McCabe, E R

    1990-07-01

    The lethal white foal syndrome (LWFS) is a congenital abnormality of overo spotted horses which is a model for human aganglionic megacolon or Hirschsprung disease. Foals with LWFS have an all white, or nearly all white, coat. They also present clinically with an intestinal obstruction that proves fatal within the first few days of life. The LWFS involves both melanocytes and intestinal ganglion cells, and appears to result from a genetic defect involving neural crest cells. This report describes pathologic studies of two recent cases of LWFS. Two different hypothetical models of inheritance of LWFS are presented and discussed.

  10. Miller-Fisher syndrome associated with unilateral cerebral white matter lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongfeng; Liu, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS) is characterized by classical triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and areflexia. The involvement of cerebral white matter in MFS is very rare. We report a typical MFS patient whose brain MRI showed unilateral and extensive involvement in cerebral white matter. We also found mild pleocytosis and raised protein concentration in cerebrospinal fluid. Deficits resolved completely after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins. Subsequent brain MRI shows cavity formation in involved white matter. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. White matter microstructure and cognitive decline in metabolic syndrome: a review of diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Freddy J; Gavrieli, Anna; Saade-Lemus, Patricia; Lioutas, Vasileios-Arsenios; Upadhyay, Jagriti; Novak, Vera

    2018-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors defined by the presence of abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertension and/or dyslipidemia. It is a major public health epidemic worldwide, and a known risk factor for the development of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Several studies have demonstrated a positive association between the presence of metabolic syndrome and worse cognitive outcomes, however, evidence of brain structure pathology is limited. Diffusion tensor imaging has offered new opportunities to detect microstructural white matter changes in metabolic syndrome, and a possibility to detect associations between functional and structural abnormalities. This review analyzes the impact of metabolic syndrome on white matter microstructural integrity, brain structure abnormalities and their relationship to cognitive function. Each of the metabolic syndrome components exerts a specific signature of white matter microstructural abnormalities. Metabolic syndrome and its components exert both additive/synergistic, as well as, independent effects on brain microstructure thus accelerating brain aging and cognitive decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The evidence of bacilliform virus a causative agent of white spot syndrome of white shrimp Penaeus merguiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Suprapto

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The rod-shape virus particles were found in the hyperthrophied nucleus and cytoplasm of diseased white shrimpPenaeus merguiensis naturally infected by White spot syndrome (WSBV. In natural infection cumulative mortality of shrimp werevery high, 95% of population were dead in 3-7 days, and 5% of shrimp population survived. The disease was outbreak in intensiveculture farms used the closed circulation sea water system. Others crustacean such as crabs and bentatos were not infected by WSBVat time of sampling. The virus particle were rod-shape ranging from 78 ± 10 nm in diameter and 280 ± 10 nm in length. The pathogenicbacteria mainly dominated by genus Vibrio sp were isolated from shrimp.

  13. Tuning shades of white light with multi-color quantum-dot quantum-well emitters based on onion-like CdSe ZnS heteronanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Nizamoglu, Sedat; Mutlugun, Evren; Ozel, Tuncay; Sapra, Sameer; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2008-08-01

    We present white light generation controlled and tuned by multi-color quantum-dot-quantum-well emitters made of onion-like CdSe/ZnS/CdSe core/shell/shell heteronanocrystals integrated on InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We demonstrate hybrid white LEDs with (x, y) tristimulus coordinates tuned from (0.26, 0.33) to (0.37, 0.36) and correlated color temperatures from 27 413 to 4192 K by controlling the number of their integrated red-green-emitting heteronanocrystals. We investigate the modification of in-film emission from these multi-layered heteronanocrystals with respect to their in-solution emission, which plays a significant role in hybrid LED applications. Our proof-of-principle experiments indicate that these complex heteronanocrystals hold promise for use as nanoluminophors in future hybrid white LEDs.

  14. Quantum dots and photonic crystals for white light generation and extraction in gallium nitride-based LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Frederic Stephane

    This thesis investigates the possibility to use two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals (PhCs) fabricated by nano-imprint lithography (NIL) to increase the extraction of multiple-wavelength guided modes (or guided white-light) outside of semiconductor or hybrid inorganic/organic (polymer) planar layers with refraction indices > 1 containing light-emissive components, pumped optically (such as colloidal quantum dots (QDs)) or electrically (such as GaN/InGaN quantum wells (QWs)). The optical properties of InGaP colloidal QDs into different matrices were studied. These efficient light-emitting species are prone to oxidation and methods to improve their passivation are presented. White-light was generated by combining red and green-emitting CdSe/ZnS core/shell colloidal QDs in PMMA polymer films simultaneously pumped by blue-emitting GaN LEDs. Numerical simulations were used to show that when positioned in or in the vicinity of planar layers or optical cavities, a large part of the light emitted from horizontal or vertical oscillating dipole sources is propagating only inside the layers, and is progressively attenuated there when absorbing layers are present. Other numerical simulations demonstrated the potential of 2D PhCs to extract most if not all of the guided modes. Processing steps used for the fabrication of large-area 2D PhCs making use of NIL and dry-etching are described. Results collected from a broad set of samples including 2D PhCs, both photoluminescent (PL) and electroluminescent (EL), are presented. Angular-resolved PL and EL measurements demonstrate that 2D PhCs etched into MOCVD-grown GaN layers on sapphire substrates can efficiently extract guided modes emitted from GaN/InGaN QWs and from colloidal QDs. Damage-free 2D PhCs integration was proposed and implemented using the self-assembly property of TiO2 sol-gel precursors onto polymer layers patterned by NIL on MOCVD-grown GaN layers on sapphire. This allowed to demonstrate an enhancement in light

  15. Virion composition and genomics of white spot syndrome virus of shrimp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.

    2001-01-01


    Since its first discovery in Taiwan in 1992, White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has caused major economic damage to shrimp culture. The virus has spread rapidly through Asia and reached the Western Hemisphere in 1995 (Texas), where it continued its devastating effect

  16. Effects of white-nose syndrome on regional population patterns of 3 hibernating bat species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas E. Ingersoll; Brent J. Sewall; Sybill K. Amelon

    2016-01-01

    Hibernating bats have undergone severe recent declines across the eastern United States, but the cause of these regional-scale declines has not been systematically evaluated. We assessed the influence of white-nose syndrome (an emerging bat disease caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, formerly Geomyces destructans...

  17. Surgery for the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome - the Groote Schuur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical division of accessory atrioventricular (AV) connections has been performetl on 9 patients with the WolffParkinson- White (WPW) syndrome at Groote Schuur Hospital. All patients had symptomatic paroxysmal tachycardia. The indication for surgery in 5 patients was poor control on antiarrhythmic drugs. Surgery was ...

  18. Treatment of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in penaeid shrimp aquaculture using plant extract

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.; Desai, U.M.

    The white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is causing a serious concern and threat to the shrimp aquaculture production in India since 1994. In this paper, the result of a successful attempt made in formulating a plant extract for treating the WSSV...

  19. Identification and phylogeny of a protein kinase gene of white spot syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.; Vlak, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a virus infecting shrimp and other crustaceans, which is unclassified taxonomically. A 2193 bp long open reading frame, encoding a putative protein kinase (PK), was found on a 8.4 kb EcoRI fragment of WSSV proximal to the gene for the major envelope protein

  20. Identification of two major virion protein genes of white spot syndrome virus of shrimp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.; Westenberg, M.; Goodall, S.D.; Vlak, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) is an invertebrate virus, causing considerable mortality in shrimp. Two structural proteins of WSSV were identified. WSSV virions are enveloped nucleocapsids with a bacilliform morphology with an approximate size of 275 x 120 nm, and a tail-like extension at one end.

  1. Three functionally diverged major White Spot Syndrome Virus structural proteins evolved by gene duplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M.C.W.; Goldbach, R.W.; Vlak, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is an invertebrate virus causing considerable mortality in penaeid shrimp. The oval-to-bacilliform shaped virions, isolated from infected Penaeus monodon, contain four major proteins: VP28, VP26, VP24 and VP19 (28, 26, 24 and 19 kDa, respectively). VP26 and VP24 are

  2. White-nose syndrome pathology grading in Nearctic and Palearctic bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiri Pikula; Sybill K. Amelon; Hana Bandouchova; Tomáš Bartonička; Hana Berkova; Jiri Brichta; Sarah Hooper; Tomasz Kokurewicz; Miroslav Kolarik; Bernd Köllner; Veronika Kovacova; Petr Linhart; Vladimir Piacek; Gregory G. Turner; Jan Zukal; Natália Martínková; Sharon Swartz

    2017-01-01

    While white-nose syndrome (WNS) has decimated hibernating bat populations in the Nearctic, species from the Palearctic appear to cope better with the fungal skin infection causing WNS. This has encouraged multiple hypotheses on the mechanisms leading to differential survival of species exposed to the same pathogen. To facilitate intercontinental comparisons, we...

  3. In silico identification of putative promoter motifs of White Spot syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marks, H.; Ren, X.Y.; Sandbrink, H.; Hulten, van M.C.W.; Vlak, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: White Spot Syndrome Virus, a member of the virus family Nimaviridae, is a large dsDNA virus infecting shrimp and other crustacean species. Although limited information is available on the mode of transcription, previous data suggest that WSSV gene expression occurs in a coordinated and

  4. Transmission of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) from Dendronereis spp. (Peters) (Nereididae) to penaeid shrimp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haryadi, D.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Vlak, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Dendronereis spp. (Peters) (Nereididae) is a common polychaete in shrimp ponds built on intertidal land and is natural food for shrimp in traditionally managed ponds in Indonesia. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), an important viral pathogen of the shrimp, can replicate in this polychaete (Desrina

  5. Evolutionary trajectory of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) genome shrinkage during spread in Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, M.P.; Bui Thi Minh Dieu,; Hemerik, L.; Vlak, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background - White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the sole member of the novel Nimaviridae family, and the source of major economic problems in shrimp aquaculture. WSSV appears to have rapidly spread worldwide after the first reported outbreak in the early 1990s. Genomic deletions of various sizes

  6. Population-level impact of white-nose syndrome on the endangered Indiana bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thogmartin, Wayne E.; King, R. Andrew; McKann, Patrick C.; Szymanski, Jennifer A.; Pruitt, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Establishing status and trend for an endangered species is critical to recovery, especially when it is faced with a nascent extinction agent. We calculated, with hierarchical log-linear change-point models, hibernaculum-level population trends between 1983 and 2009 for the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) now subjected to the fast-spreading fungal disease white-nose syndrome. We combined trends from 222 wintering populations before and after onset of the disease to determine trend for clusters of interacting wintering populations, recovery units, and the species. Before onset of the disease, a west-to-east gradient in trends existed, with westernmost populations declining and easternmost populations increasing in abundance. The species as a whole, however, was stationary between 1983 and 2005 (-0.5% mean annual change; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.8, +1.8%). Estimated mean population size in 2009 was 377,124 bats (195,398-957,348), with large variance apparently caused by white-nose syndrome. With the onset of white-nose syndrome (2006-2009), the species exhibited a 10.3% annual decline (95% CI = -21.1, +2.0%). White-nose syndrome is having an appreciable influence on the status and trends of Indiana bat populations, stalling and in some cases reversing population gains made in recent years.

  7. White-nose syndrome in bats: an overview of current knowledge for land managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger W. Perry

    2013-01-01

    White-nose syndrome recently emerged as a disease affecting bats that hibernate in caves and abandoned mines during winter. This disease is caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, and has caused the death of millions of bats in the Eastern United States and Canada. This fungus grows in relatively cold conditions with high humidity, which...

  8. Sudden death in a young competitive athlete with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedermann, C. J.; Becker, A. E.; Hopferwieser, T.; Mühlberger, V.; Knapp, E.

    1987-01-01

    The case history is documented of a young competitive athlete known to have the electrocardiographic pattern of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, but considered asymptomatic. On that basis competitive sport was not proscribed. In retrospect, he had experienced occasional tachycardias which were of

  9. Extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light in the fungal pathogen causing white-nose syndrome of bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan M. Palmer; Kevin P. Drees; Jeffrey T. Foster; Daniel L. Lindner

    2018-01-01

    Bat white-nose syndrome (WNS), caused by the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has decimated North American hibernating bats since its emergence in 2006. Here, we utilize comparative genomics to examine the evolutionary history of this pathogen in comparison to six closely related nonpathogenic species....

  10. Phylogenetics of a fungal invasion: origins and widespread dispersal of white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin P. Drees; Jeffrey M. Lorch; Sebastien J. Puechmaille; Katy L. Parise; Gudrun Wibbelt; Joseph R. Hoyt; Keping Sun; Ariunbold Jargalsaikhan; Munkhnast Dalannast; Jonathan M. Palmer; Daniel L. Lindner; A. Marm Kilpatrick; Talima Pearson; Paul S. Keim; David S. Blehert; Jeffrey T. Foster; Joseph. Heitman

    2017-01-01

    Globalization has facilitated the worldwide movement and introduction of pathogens, but epizoological reconstructions of these invasions are often hindered by limited sampling and insufficient genetic resolution among isolates. Pseudogymnoascus destructans, a fungal pathogen causing the epizootic of white-nose syndrome in North American bats, has...

  11. Platelets and white blood cells in acute coronary syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jaap Jan Johannes

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, we have studied the role of leukocytes and platelets as methods to measure platelets aggregation, in the clinical management of presenting with acute coronary syndromes. We have tried to incidence and to identify predictors of adverse cardiac events with function tests or

  12. White Light-Emitting Diodes Based on AgInS2/ZnS Quantum Dots with Improved Bandwidth in Visible Light Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng Ruan; Yu Zhang; Min Lu; Changyin Ji; Chun Sun; Xiongbin Chen; Hongda Chen; Colvin, Vicki L.; Yu, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dot white light-emitting diodes (QD-WLEDs) were fabricated from green- and red-emitting AgInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs coated on GaN LEDs. Their electroluminescence (EL) spectra were measured at different currents, ranging from 50 mA to 400 mA, and showed good color stability. The modulation bandwidth of previously prepared QD-WLEDs was confirmed to be much wider than that of YAG:Ce phosphor-based WLEDs. These results indicate that the AgInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs are good color-converting ma...

  13. Optical efficiency enhancement in white organic light-emitting diode display with high color gamut using patterned quantum dot film and long pass filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo-Jun; Shin, Min-Ho; Kim, Young-Joo

    2016-08-01

    A new structure for white organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays with a patterned quantum dot (QD) film and a long pass filter (LPF) was proposed and evaluated to realize both a high color gamut and high optical efficiency. Since optical efficiency is a critical parameter in white OLED displays with a high color gamut, a red or green QD film as a color-converting component and an LPF as a light-recycling component are introduced to be adjusted via the characteristics of a color filter (CF). Compared with a conventional white OLED without both a QD film and the LPF, it was confirmed experimentally that the optical powers of red and green light in a new white OLED display were increased by 54.1 and 24.7% using a 30 wt % red QD film and a 20 wt % green QD film with the LPF, respectively. In addition, the white OLED with both a QD film and the LPF resulted in an increase in the color gamut from 98 to 107% (NTSC x,y ratio) due to the narrow emission linewidth of the QDs.

  14. Controlling reabsorption effect of bi-color CdSe quantum dots-based white light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siao, Cyuan-Bin; Chung, Shu-Ru; Wang, Kuan-Wen

    2017-08-01

    The colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have the potentials to be used in white light-emitting diode (WLED) as a down-converting component to replace incandescent lamps, because the traditional WLED composed of Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ (YAG:Ce) phosphor lack of red color emissions and shows low color quality. Among various QDs, CdSe has been extensively studied because it possesses attractive characteristics such as high quantum yields (QYs), narrow emission spectral bandwidth, as well as size-tunable optical characteristics. However, in order to enhance the color rendering index (CRI) of WLED, blending materials with different emission wavelengths has been used frequently. Unfortunately, these procedures are complex and time-consuming, and the emission energy of smaller QDs can be reabsorbed by larger QDs, resulting in decreasing the excitation intensity in yellowish-green region. Therefore, in this study, in order to decrease the reabsorption effect and to simplify the procedures, we have demonstrated a facile thermal pyrolyzed route to prepare bicolor CdSe QDs with dual-wavelengths. The emission wavelengths, particle sizes, and QYs of QDs can be tuned from 537/595 to 537/602 nm, 2.59/3.92 to 2.59/4.01 nm, and 27 to 40 %, for GR1 to 3 samples, respectively when the amount of Se precursor is decreased from 1.5 to 0.75 mmol. Meanwhile, the area ratio of green to red (Ag/Ar) in fluorescence spectra is gradually increased, due to the increase in growth rate, and decrease in nuclei formation in red emission. The GR1, GR2, and GR3 QDs are then encapsulated by convert types to form the LED, in which the QDs are deposited on the blue-emitting InGaN LED chip (λem = 450 nm). After encapsulation, the devices properties of Commission International d'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity and Ag/Ar area ratio are (0.40, 0.24), 0.28/1, (0.40, 0.31), 0.52/1, and (0.40, 0.38), 1.02/1, respectively for GR1, GR2, and GR3. The results show that the green emission intensity are strongly

  15. Liquid-type AgInS2/ZnS quantum dot-based warm white light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Min; Bai, Xue; Lin, Yijun; Ji, Changyin; Wu, Hua; Ruan, Cheng; Gao, Wenzhu; Wang, Yiding; Du, Qiaoling

    2016-09-01

    We here report a warm white light-emitting diode (WLED) by employing the red-emitting liquid layer of AgInS2/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) over the yellow-emitting YAG:Ce phosphor-based WLEDs. Compared to the commercial WLEDs, our liquid-type QD-WLEDs exhibit a color temperature of 3500 K and an improved color rendering index of 85. In addition, the experimental results indicate that the liquid structure warm white light device has a higher luminous efficiency of 72.1 lm/W and a better color stability against the extended working time in comparison to the solid-type QD-WLEDs.

  16. Cold white light generation through the simultaneous emission from Ce{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} in 90Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2CeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}3DyCl{sub 3}{center_dot}5MnCl{sub 2} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, W. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Alvarez, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora (UNISON), Boulevard Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000 (Mexico); Martinez-Martinez, R.; Yescas-Mendoza, E. [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Tecnologica de la Mixteca, Carretera a Acatlima Km. 2.5, Huajuapan de Leon, Oaxaca 69000 (Mexico); Camarillo, I. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Caldino, U., E-mail: cald@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico)

    2012-08-15

    The photoluminescence of a CeCl{sub 3}, DyCl{sub 3} and MnCl{sub 2} doped aluminum oxide film deposited by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis was characterized by excitation, emission and decay time spectroscopy. A nonradiative energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} is observed upon UV excitation at 278 nm (peak emission wavelength of AlGaN-based LEDs). Such energy transfer leads to a simultaneous emission of these ions in the blue, green, yellow and red regions, resulting in white light emission with CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, x=0.34 and y=0.23, which correspond to cold white light with a color temperature of 4900 K. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 90Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2CeCl{sub 3}{center_dot}3DyCl{sub 3}{center_dot}5MnCl{sub 2} thin film (AOCDM) could be prepared by spray pyrolysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-radiative energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Dy{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} takes place in AOCDM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AOCDM (pumped with 278 nm-UV light) can generate 4900 K cold white light.

  17. Reduced white matter connectivity in the corpus callosum of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Grüner, Renate; Lundervold, Arvid

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain imaging studies have revealed anatomical anomalies in the brains of individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS). Prefrontal regions have been found to be larger and the corpus callosum (CC) area smaller in children and young adults with TS compared with healthy control subjects......: Our findings of a reduced interhemispheral white matter connectivity add to the understanding of neural connectivity and plasticity in the brains of children who have TS....

  18. White spot syndrome virus infection: Threat to crustacean biodiversity in Vembanad Lake, India

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Toms C.; James, Roswin; Rajan, L. Anbu; Surendran, P.K.; Lalitha, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    The Vembanad Lake located on the south-west coast of India, an ecological hotspot is the nursing ground of many economically important crustaceans. The prevalence of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) among crustaceans from farmed, estuarine and marine environments surrounding the Vembanad Lake, India was detected using PCR. A total of 308 samples from aquaculture ponds consisting of six species of crustaceans collected from five different farms were tested for the presence of WSSV. Of these, 6...

  19. Surgical Repair of Bland-White-Garland Syndrome With Giant Right Coronary Artery Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Zheng, Xiaomei; Liu, Kexiang

    2017-11-01

    A 61-year-old man was diagnosed with adult-type anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery (or Bland-White-Garland syndrome) and a giant right coronary artery aneurysm. He underwent a thorough anatomic correction to excise the aneurysm and reconstruct a coronary system of two vessels. The postoperative period of this patient was uneventful. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. White-nose syndrome pathology grading in Nearctic and Palearctic bats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pikula, J.; Amelon, S. K.; Banďouchová, H.; Bartonička, T.; Berková, Hana; Brichta, J.; Hooper, S.; Kokurewicz, T.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Köllner, B.; Kováčová, V.; Linhart, P.; Piacek, V.; Turner, G. G.; Zukal, Jan; Martínková, Natália

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 8 (2017), č. článku e0180435. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP506/12/1064; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-20286S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : white-nose syndrome * bats Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  1. Rare-Earth Free Self-Activated Graphene Quantum Dots and Copper-Cysteamine Phosphors for Enhanced White Light-Emitting-Diodes under Single Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wubin; Lei, Yifeng; Xu, Man; Zhao, Pei; Zhang, Zhanhui; Zhou, Jia

    2017-10-09

    Rare-earth (RE) based phosphors are attractive due to their potential applications. However, owing to the resource issue, these kinds of phosphors are expensive and costly. On the contrary, as for phosphor-convert white light-emitting-diodes (pc-WLEDs), a solution-processed tunable warm white emission LED composite is fabricated in this study under single excitation, with both RE free phosphors graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and Copper-Cysteamine (Cu-Cy). By using microwave-assisted wet-chemical method and with graphite as raw material, cold white fluorescence of the GQDs is obtained. Cu-Cy which shows intense photoluminescence in the red region has the structure where both the thio and amine groups connected with copper and forming cysteamine. Warm white light is achieved by mixing the two self-activated RE free phosphors at the weight ratio of 1: 1.7 under the excitation at 365 nm. The designed optimal LED device has the properties of CIE (x, y) = (0.341, 0.327), T = 4436 K, R = 87.9 EQE = 0.31%. The experimental results demonstrate that RE free phosphor(s) excited under a single chip can open up a new avenue to develop much lower device for warm WLEDs.

  2. Sudden death in a young competitive athlete with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedermann, C J; Becker, A E; Hopferwieser, T; Mühlberger, V; Knapp, E

    1987-06-01

    The case history is documented of a young competitive athlete known to have the electrocardiographic pattern of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, but considered asymptomatic. On that basis competitive sport was not proscribed. In retrospect, he had experienced occasional tachycardias which were of short duration and ended spontaneously. He never requested medical advice. The boy was first admitted for an attack of rapid heart beating which did not readily subside. He was medicated with prajmalium and left the hospital in stable condition. He died suddenly 10 days after discharge. Autopsy examination of the heart revealed an accessory atrioventricular connection in the posterior septal region. The case history underlines that in some patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome the clinical manifestation can be minimal and may be easily ignored by the patient. In retrospect, benign episodes of rapid heart beating most likely were due to a circus movement tachycardia, related to an accessory atrioventricular connection. The sudden death can be attributed to atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response via the anomalous connection, despite medical treatment. The observation endorses the potential danger of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in patients with minimal clinical manifestations. A meticulous histologic study of the atrioventricular junction in hearts of young athletes with sudden and unexplained death is a necessity.

  3. Spread of white-nose syndrome on a network regulated by geography and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Sean P; Kramer, Andrew M; Pulliam, J Tomlin; Zokan, Marcus A; Bowden, Sarah E; Barton, Heather D; Magori, Krisztian; Drake, John M

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife and plant diseases can reduce biodiversity, disrupt ecosystem services and threaten human health. Emerging pathogens have displayed a variety of spatial spread patterns due to differences in host ecology, including diffusive spread from an epicentre (West Nile virus), jump dispersal on a network (foot-and-mouth disease), or a combination of these (Sudden oak death). White-nose syndrome is a highly pathogenic infectious disease of bats currently spreading across North America. Understanding how bat ecology influences this spread is crucial to management of infected and vulnerable populations. Here we show that white-nose syndrome spread is not diffusive but rather mediated by patchily distributed habitat and large-scale gradients in winter climate. Simulations predict rapid expansion and infection of most counties with caves in the contiguous United States by winter 2105-2106. Our findings show the unique pattern of white-nose syndrome spread corresponds to ecological traits of the host and suggest hypotheses for transmission mechanisms acting at the local scale.

  4. White lighting device from composite films embedded with hydrophilic Cu(In, Ga)S2/ZnS and hydrophobic InP/ZnS quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Yang, Heesun

    2014-06-06

    Two types of non-Cd quantum dots (QDs)-In/Ga ratio-varied, green-to-greenish-yellow fluorescence-tuned Cu-In-Ga-S (CIGS) alloy ones, and red-emitting InP ones-are synthesized for use as down-converters in conjunction with a blue light-emitting diode (LED). Among a series of Ga-rich CI1-xGxS/ZnS core/shell QDs (x = 0.7, 0.8, and 0.9), CI0.2G0.8S/ZnS QD is chosen for the hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic surface modification via an in-situ ligand exchange and then embedded in a water-soluble polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). This free-standing composite film is utilized as a down-converter for the fabrication of a remote-type white QD-LED, but the resulting bi-colored device exhibits a cool white light with a limited color rendering index property. To improve white light qualities, another QD-polymer film of hydrophobic red InP/ZnS QD-embedding polyvinylpyrrolidone is sequentially stacked onto the CI0.2G0.8S/ZnS QD-PVA film, producing a unique dual color-emitting, flexible and transparent bilayered composite film. Tri-colored white QD-LED integrated with the bilayered QD film possesses an exceptional color rendering property through reinforcing a red spectral component and balancing a white spectral distribution.

  5. Warm White Light Emitting Diodes with Gelatin-Coated AgInS2/ZnS Core/Shell Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaojiao; Yang, Yanchun; Wang, Lan; Wei, Song; Pan, Daocheng

    2015-12-23

    Cadmium-free and water-soluble AgInS2/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) with a cost of 2.5 $/g are synthesized in an electric pressure cooker. The QD powders with different Ag/In ratios exhibit bright yellow, orange, and orange-red luminescence under UV light. Their absolute photoluminescence quantum yields (PLQYs) can reach as high as 50.5, 57, and 52%, respectively. Because gelatin is used as the capping agent, the concentrated QDs/gelatin solution can be directly utilized as phosphor for the fabrication of white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by a simple drop-drying process without the need of resin package. Warm-white LEDs are obtained by combining orange-emitting QDs with blue InGaN chip. As-fabricated warm-white LED exhibits a luminous efficacy of 39.85 lm/W, a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2634 K and a color rendering index (CRI) of 71 at a drive current of 20 mA. Furthermore, the electroluminescence (EL) stability of LED device and thermal stability of as-prepared QDs are evaluated.

  6. Endothelin receptor B polymorphism associated with lethal white foal syndrome in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santschi, E M; Purdy, A K; Valberg, S J; Vrotsos, P D; Kaese, H; Mickelson, J R

    1998-04-01

    Overo lethal white syndrome (OLWS) is an inherited syndrome of foals born to American Paint Horse parents of the overo coat-pattern lineage. Affected foals are totally or almost totally white and die within days from complications due to intestinal aganglionosis. Related conditions occur in humans and rodents in which mutations in the endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) gene are responsible. EDNRB is known to be involved in the developmental regulation of neural crest cells that become enteric ganglia and melanocytes. In this report we identify a polymorphism in the equine EDNRB gene closely associated with OLWS. This Ile to Lys substitution at codon 118 is located within the first transmembrane domain of this seven-transmembrane domain G-protein-coupled receptor protein. All 22 OLWS-affected foals examined were homozygous for the Lys118 EDNRB allele, while all available parents of affected foals were heterozygous. All but one of the parents also had an overo white body-spot phenotype. Solid-colored control horses of other breeds were homozygous for the Ile118 EDNRB allele. Molecular definition of the basis for OLWS in Paint Horses provides a genetic test for the presence of the Lys118 EDNRB allele and adds to our understanding of the basis for coat color patterns in the horse.

  7. White Light-Emitting Diodes Based on AgInS2/ZnS Quantum Dots with Improved Bandwidth in Visible Light Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Cheng; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Min; Ji, Changyin; Sun, Chun; Chen, Xiongbin; Chen, Hongda; Colvin, Vicki L.; Yu, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dot white light-emitting diodes (QD-WLEDs) were fabricated from green- and red-emitting AgInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs coated on GaN LEDs. Their electroluminescence (EL) spectra were measured at different currents, ranging from 50 mA to 400 mA, and showed good color stability. The modulation bandwidth of previously prepared QD-WLEDs was confirmed to be much wider than that of YAG:Ce phosphor-based WLEDs. These results indicate that the AgInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs are good color-converting materials for WLEDs and they are capable in visible light communication (VLC). PMID:28344270

  8. White Light-Emitting Diodes Based on AgInS₂/ZnS Quantum Dots with Improved Bandwidth in Visible Light Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Cheng; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Min; Ji, Changyin; Sun, Chun; Chen, Xiongbin; Chen, Hongda; Colvin, Vicki L; Yu, William W

    2016-01-08

    Quantum dot white light-emitting diodes (QD-WLEDs) were fabricated from green- and red-emitting AgInS₂/ZnS core/shell QDs coated on GaN LEDs. Their electroluminescence (EL) spectra were measured at different currents, ranging from 50 mA to 400 mA, and showed good color stability. The modulation bandwidth of previously prepared QD-WLEDs was confirmed to be much wider than that of YAG:Ce phosphor-based WLEDs. These results indicate that the AgInS₂/ZnS core/shell QDs are good color-converting materials for WLEDs and they are capable in visible light communication (VLC).

  9. White Light-Emitting Diodes Based on AgInS2/ZnS Quantum Dots with Improved Bandwidth in Visible Light Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Ruan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot white light-emitting diodes (QD-WLEDs were fabricated from green- and red-emitting AgInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs coated on GaN LEDs. Their electroluminescence (EL spectra were measured at different currents, ranging from 50 mA to 400 mA, and showed good color stability. The modulation bandwidth of previously prepared QD-WLEDs was confirmed to be much wider than that of YAG:Ce phosphor-based WLEDs. These results indicate that the AgInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs are good color-converting materials for WLEDs and they are capable in visible light communication (VLC.

  10. Blue crabs Callinectes sapidus as potential biological reservoirs for white spot syndrome virus (WSSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, James W B; Browdy, Craig L; Burge, Erin J

    2015-03-09

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a virulent pathogen of cultured shrimp and was first detected in farms in South Carolina (USA) in 1997 and subsequently in wild shrimp in 1999. We screened groups of 1808 wild Atlantic white shrimp Litopenaeus setiferus and 300 blue crabs Callinectes sapidus collected from South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida for the presence of WSSV using the Shrimple® immunoassay-strip test, with all positives and random subsets of negatives tested by TaqMan real-time PCR and in infectivity bioassays. Of 87 shrimp and 11 crabs that tested positive using the Shrimple® test, only a single C. sapidus was confirmed to be infected with WSSV by PCR and the infectivity bioassay. The data indicate that the prevalence of WSSV in these species is low in these southeastern US regions, but that C. sapidus may serve as a biological reservoir.

  11. White-light-emitting CdSe quantum dots with ''magic size'' via one-pot synthesis approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xinmei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China); Department of Biological and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University of Technology, Liuzhou, Guangxi 545006 (China); Jiang, Yang; Wang, Chun; Li, Shanying; Lan, Xinzheng; Chen, Yan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China)

    2010-11-15

    Two stable magic-sized CdSe families were simply and reproducibly synthesized at different growth temperature via a one-pot approach, in which N-oleoylmorpholine was used as reaction medium, and cadmium acetate dehydrate and Se powder as precursors. The pure 392 family obtained by surface passivation with either lauric acid or stearic acid at 150 C exhibits strong white-light emission with a maximum quantum yield (QY) up to 27%. The broadband emission (370-680 nm), which is responsible for the white-light, is attributed to photoluminescence from both excitons and surface states. High-quality white-light emission can be stable for a long growth period (about 120 min) and at least a 2-month storage period. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images verify the presence of the small size distribution and good crystallinity of the quantum dots (QDs) with a size range of 1.7-2.0 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) confirm that the magic-sized CdSe QDs have a zincblende crystal structure. The energy-dispersed spectrometry (EDS) measurement indicates the as-prepared CdSe QDs have a cadmium-rich surface. The as-prepared CdSe QDs exhibit sharp and fixed absorption features and the white-light emitting from QDs can be retained for quite long reaction and storage periods. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Primary Sjögren's Syndrome White Matter Changes and Cognitive Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dess, Mary; Heidenreich, Wayne F

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a 52-year-old, female applicant for long term-care insurance with a history of an autoimmune connective tissue disease initially diagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Over several years, the signs and symptoms evolved into a clear diagnosis of primary Sjögren's syndrome (PSS). The specific criteria for this diagnosis are reviewed including the symptoms, antinuclear antibodies (ANA), extractable nuclear antigen antibodies (ENA), abnormal salivary scintigraphy and positive Schirmer test. Symptoms of neuropathy and the possibility of a cognitive dysfunction are discussed as part of PSS. The association of white matter lesions (WML) with PSS is significant for underwriting consideration.

  13. Wing pathology of white-nose syndrome in bats suggests life-threatening disruption of physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryan, Paul M.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Boyles, Justin G.; Blehert, David S.

    2010-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is causing unprecedented declines in several species of North American bats. The characteristic lesions of WNS are caused by the fungus Geomyces destructans, which erodes and replaces the living skin of bats while they hibernate. It is unknown how this infection kills the bats. We review here the unique physiological importance of wings to hibernating bats in relation to the damage caused by G. destructans and propose that mortality is caused by catastrophic disruption of wing-dependent physiological functions. Mechanisms of disease associated with G. destructans seem specific to hibernating bats and are most analogous to disease caused by chytrid fungus in amphibians.

  14. Utilization of solvothermally grown InP/ZnS quantum dots as wavelength converters for fabrication of white light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eun-Pyo; Yang, Heesun

    2013-09-01

    This work reports on a simple solvothermal synthesis of InP/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) using a much safer and cheaper phosphorus precursor of tris(dimethylamino)phosphine than the most popularly chosen tris(trimethylsilyl)phosphine. The band gap of InP QDs is facilely controlled by varying the solvothermal core growth time (4 vs. 6 h) with a fixed temperature of 150 degrees C, and the successive solvothermal ZnS shelling at 220 degrees C for 6 h results in green- and yellow-emtting InP/ZnS QD with emission quantum yield of 41-42%. The broad size distribution of as-synthesized InP/ZnS QDs, which appears to be inherent in the current solvothermal approach, is improved by a size-selective sorting procedure, and the emission properties of the resulting size-sorted QD fractions are investigated. To produce white emission for general lighting source, a blue light-emitting diode (LED) is combined with non-size-soroted green or yellow QDs as wavelength converters. Furthermore, the QD-LED that includes a blend of green and yellow QDs is fabricated to generate a white lighting source with an enhanced color rendering performance, and its electroluminescent properties are characterized in detail.

  15. Cd-free Cu-Zn-In-S/ZnS quantum dots@SiO2 multiple cores nanostructure: preparation and application for white LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tongtong; Shen, Mohan; Dai, Peng; Wu, Mingzai; Yu, Xinxin; Li, Guang; Xu, Xiaoliang; Zeng, Haibo

    2017-10-01

    The work reports the fabrication of Cu doped Zn-In-S (CZIS) alloy quantum dots (QDs) using dodecanethiol and oleic acid as stabilizing ligands. With the increase of doped Cu element, the photoluminescence (PL) peak is monotonically red shifted. After coating ZnS shell, the PL quantum yield of CZIS QDs can reach 78%. Using reverse micelle microemulsion method, CZIS/ZnS QDs@SiO2 multi-core nanospheres were synthesized to improve the colloidal stability and avoid the aggregation of QDs. The obtained multi-core nanospheres were dispersed in curing adhesive, and applied as a color conversion layer in down converted light-emitting diodes. After encapsulation in curing adhesive, the newly designed LEDs show artifically regulated color coordinates with varying the weight ratio of green QDs and red QDs, and the concentrations of these two types of QDs. Moreover, natural white and warm white LEDs with correlated color temperature of 5287, 6732, 2731, and 3309 K can be achieved, which indicates that CZIS/ZnS QDs@SiO2 nanostructures are promising color conversion layer material for solid-state lighting application.

  16. White syndrome on massive corals: A case study in Paiton power plant, East Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzaki, Farid Kamal; Saptarini, Dian; Riznawati, Aida Efrini

    2017-06-01

    As a stenothermal organism, coral easily affected by high-temperature cooling water discharged by a power plant into surrounding waters; which may lead to a rapid spread and transmission of coral disease, including White Syndrome. This study aimed to measure the prevalence of WS on massive corals in Paiton Power Plant waters. Research was conductedduring May 2015 at three observation stations; west and east side of water discharge canal (DB and DT) and water intake canal (WI). Observed parameters including ambient environmental variables (sea surface and bottom temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen/DO, pH, and visibility); the cover of life corals (percent and genera composition) and prevalence of coral disease at 5 m depth. One-way ANOVA (analysis of variance, p=0.05) was performed to test the difference of coral disease prevalence from different observation stations. As the results, Coral coverage percentage in WI (85.75%), DB (60.75%), and DT (40.8%). Prevalence of WS in DB was highest (40.49±2.12% in DB, 13.53±11.5% in DT and 6.44±3.6 %, respectively). It can be assumed that prevalence of White Syndrome in those locations may be correlated to temperature which highest average temperature occurred in DB stations.

  17. CNS involvement in primary Sjogren Syndrome: assessment of gray and white matter changes with MRI and voxel-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzarouchi, Loukia C; Tsifetaki, Niki; Konitsiotis, Spyridon; Zikou, Anastasia; Astrakas, Loukas; Drosos, Alexandros; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate with MRI the involvement of gray matter and white matter structures in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome. Fifty-three patients with primary Sjögren syndrome, 18 age- and disease duration-matched patients with systemic sclerosis, and 35 age-matched control subjects were examined for differences in white matter hyperintensities (WMHIs) detected on FLAIR MR images. Differences in brain volume between patients with primary Sjögren syndrome and controls were studied by application of voxel-based morphometry to a 3D T1-weighted sequence. WMHIs were observed in 38 of the 53 patients with primary Sjögren syndrome, six of 18 patients with systemic sclerosis, and 17 of 35 controls. The numbers of WMHIs 2 mm or larger and the number smaller than 2 mm were higher in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome than in controls (≥ 2 mm, p = 0.004; primary Sjögren syndrome patients and that in systemic sclerosis patients. After control for age, a positive relation was found between disease duration and total number of WMHIs (p = 0.037) and number of WMHIs 2 mm or larger (p = 0.023) in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome. In comparison with the controls, patients with primary Sjögren syndrome had decreased gray matter volume in the cortex, deep gray matter, and cerebellum. Associated loss of white matter volume was observed in areas corresponding to gray matter atrophy and in the corpus callosum (p primary Sjögren syndrome have WMHIs and gray and white matter atrophy, probably related to cerebral vasculitis.

  18. Pathology in euthermic bats with white nose syndrome suggests a natural manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteyer, Carol U.; Barber, Daniel; Mandl, Judith N.

    2012-01-01

    White nose syndrome, caused by Geomyces destructans, has killed more than 5 million cave hibernating bats in eastern North America. During hibernation, the lack of inflammatory cell recruitment at the site of fungal infection and erosion is consistent with a temperature-induced inhibition of immune cell trafficking. This immune suppression allows G. destructans to colonize and erode the skin of wings, ears and muzzle of bat hosts unchecked. Yet, paradoxically, within weeks of emergence from hibernation an intense neutrophilic inflammatory response to G. destructans is generated, causing severe pathology that can contribute to death. We hypothesize that the sudden reversal of immune suppression in bats upon the return to euthermia leads to a form of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), which was first described in HIV-infected humans with low helper T lymphocyte counts and bacterial or fungal opportunistic infections. IRIS is a paradoxical and rapid worsening of symptoms in immune compromised humans upon restoration of immunity in the face of an ongoing infectious process. In humans with HIV, the restoration of adaptive immunity following suppression of HIV replication with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can trigger severe immune-mediated tissue damage that can result in death. We propose that the sudden restoration of immune responses in bats infected with G. destructans results in an IRIS-like dysregulated immune response that causes the post-emergent pathology.

  19. Heritability of the Severity of the Metabolic Syndrome in Whites and Blacks in 3 Large Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musani, Solomon K; Martin, Lisa J; Woo, Jessica G; Olivier, Michael; Gurka, Matthew J; DeBoer, Mark D

    2017-04-01

    Although dichotomous criteria for the metabolic syndrome (MetS) appear heritable, it is not known whether MetS severity as assessed by a continuous MetS score is heritable and whether this varies by race. We used SOLAR (Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines) to evaluate heritability of Adult Treatment Panel-III MetS and a sex- and race-specific MetS severity Z score among 3 large familial cohorts: the JHS (Jackson Heart Study, 1404 black participants), TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly, 1947 white participants), and PLRS (Princeton Lipid Research Study, 229 black and 527 white participants). Heritability estimates were larger for Adult Treatment Panel-III MetS among black compared with white cohort members (JHS 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28-0.68 and PLRS blacks 0.93 [95% CI, 0.73-1.13] versus TOPS 0.21 [95% CI, -0.18 to 0.60] and PLRS whites 0.27 [95% CI, -0.04 to 0.58]). The difference by race narrowed when assessing heritability of the MetS severity score (JHS 0.52 [95% CI, 0.38, 0.66] and PLRS blacks 0.64 [95% CI, 0.13-1.15] versus TOPS 0.23 [95% CI, 0.15-0.31] and PLRS whites 0.60 [95% CI, 0.33-0.87]). There was a high degree of genetic and phenotypic correlation between MetS severity and the individual components of MetS among all groups, although the genetic correlations failed to reach statistical significance among PLRS blacks. Meta-analyses revealed a combined heritability estimate for Adult Treatment Panel-III MetS of 0.24 (95% CI, 0.11-0.36) and for the MetS severity score of 0.50 (95% CI, -0.05 to 0.99). MetS severity seems highly heritable among whites and blacks. This continuous MetS severity Z score may provide a more useful means of characterizing phenotypic MetS in genetic studies by minimizing racial differences. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Acute tissue death (white syndrome) affects the microenvironment of tabular Acropora corals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sandra Breum; Vestergaard, Maj; Ainsworth, Tracy D.

    2010-01-01

    White syndrome (WS) is a collective term for coral diseases that cause acute tissue loss, resulting in apparently healthy tissue bordering on exposed skeleton. In this study, the microenvironmental condition and tissue structure of WS-affected tabular acroporid corals were assessed by O2...... microelectrodes and histological techniques. The high spatial resolution of the microelectrode measurements enabled an evaluation of the extent of physiological changes at, and 2 cm away from, the WS border. Respiration of the coral host was decreased on the skeleton-tissue border but was comparable...... to that of healthy corals only 2 cm away from the border. Histological data, however, showed a decrease in mesogloea thickness on and 2 cm away from the WS border, which correlates with a previously observed allocation of photoassimilates away from the WS border. We suggest that there are colony-wide negative...

  1. [Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome. Intensive physical activity: the value of fulguration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warin, J F; Haissaguerre, M; Le Métayer, P; Montserrat, P

    1989-08-01

    In subjects with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome an intense physical activity or the practice of sports may not only trigger off cardiac arrhythmias but also worsen their consequences and become life-threatening. A full electrophysiological study, including measurement of the anterograde refractory period of the accessory pathway, induction of atrial fibrillation and study of the effects of isoprenaline, seems to be indispensable to detect those patients who are most at risk. When the risk of potentially serious arrhythmia appears to be confirmed, catheter ablation of the accessory pathway may be the ideal solution, as it may cure the disease without the sequelae inherent in surgery. The results obtained in 19 athletes or subjects with intense physical activity (19) successes without preventive anti-arrhythmic treatment and at the cost of a single case of asymptomatic atrioventricular block) suggest that the catheter ablation technique will greatly benefit such patients.

  2. Pathophysiology of white-nose syndrome in bats: a mechanistic model linking wing damage to mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnecke, Lisa; Turner, James M.; Bollinger, Trent K.; Misra, Vikram; Cryan, Paul M.; Blehert, David S.; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Willis, Craig K.R.

    2013-01-01

    White-nose syndrome is devastating North American bat populations but we lack basic information on disease mechanisms. Altered blood physiology owing to epidermal invasion by the fungal pathogen Geomyces destructans (Gd) has been hypothesized as a cause of disrupted torpor patterns of affected hibernating bats, leading to mortality. Here, we present data on blood electrolyte concentration, haematology and acid–base balance of hibernating little brown bats, Myotis lucifugus, following experimental inoculation with Gd. Compared with controls, infected bats showed electrolyte depletion (i.e. lower plasma sodium), changes in haematology (i.e. increased haematocrit and decreased glucose) and disrupted acid–base balance (i.e. lower CO2 partial pressure and bicarbonate). These findings indicate hypotonic dehydration, hypovolaemia and metabolic acidosis. We propose a mechanistic model linking tissue damage to altered homeostasis and morbidity/mortality.

  3. Kualitas Lingkungan Tambak Insentif Litapenaeus Vannamei Dalam Kaitannya Dengan Prevalensi Penyakit White Spot Syndrome Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunita Maimunah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing number of vannamei shrimp (Litapenaeus vannamei ponds are switching from traditional to intensive farming systems, the more impact resulting among other potential environmental pollution. Pollution of the environment can directly degrade water quality cultivation and facilitate access of pathogens to infect the host. In this study examines how the quality of the environment, population and genetic characteristics of shrimp that live in some intensive pond associated with a disease that often affects farmed shrimp is White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV. Acquisition and primary data collection is done by conducting interviews and direct observation in the measurement of water quality parameters of both physics and chemistry and morphology observation of shrimp as well as the ICP11 gene expression detection of WSSV disease in vannamei shrimp DNA in the laboratory.

  4. Binding of white spot syndrome virus to Artemia sp. cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuying; Li, Guangda; Feng, Wenpo; Huang, Jie

    2013-10-01

    Using differential velocity centrifugation, cell membranes of Artemia sp. were prepared, and their binding to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) was analyzed in vitro. The results indicated that WSSV can specifically bind to Artemia cell membranes, and that WSSV receptor very likely existed in this membrane, which suggested that Artemia sp. may be a reservoir of WSSV. This study investigated the specific WSSV binding site by performing competitive inhibition experiments using shrimp gill cell membranes to bind WSSV to Artemia cell membranes. The results showed that shrimp gill cell membranes had a distinct inhibition effect on the specific binding of Artemia cell membranes to WSSV. Thus, potentially similar WSSV receptors or binding sites existed on Artemia sp. cell membranes and shrimp gill cell membranes. Taken together, these findings may provide experimental basis for the development of an effective approach to controlling WSSV, and theoretical basis for the study of WSSV receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Reduced white matter connectivity in the corpus callosum of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Grüner, Renate; Lundervold, Arvid

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain imaging studies have revealed anatomical anomalies in the brains of individuals with Tourette syndrome (TS). Prefrontal regions have been found to be larger and the corpus callosum (CC) area smaller in children and young adults with TS compared with healthy control subjects...... and 20 age- and gender-matched controls. RESULTS: The hypothesis that children with TS would show reduced measures of connectivity in CC fibers was confirmed for all subregions of the CC. There was no significant interaction of TS and region. Reductions in FA in CC regions may reflect either fewer......: Our findings of a reduced interhemispheral white matter connectivity add to the understanding of neural connectivity and plasticity in the brains of children who have TS....

  6. Pathology of tissue loss (white syndrome) in Acropora sp. corals from the Central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Aeby, Greta S.

    2011-01-01

    We performed histological examination of 69 samples of Acropora sp. manifesting different types of tissue loss (Acropora White Syndrome-AWS) from Hawaii, Johnston Atoll and American Samoa between 2002 and 2006. Gross lesions of tissue loss were observed and classified as diffuse acute, diffuse subacute, and focal to multifocal acute to subacute. Corals with acute tissue loss manifested microscopic evidence of necrosis sometimes associated with ciliates, helminths, fungi, algae, sponges, or cyanobacteria whereas those with subacute tissue loss manifested mainly wound repair. Gross lesions of AWS have multiple different changes at the microscopic level some of which involve various microorganisms and metazoa. Elucidating this disease will require, among other things, monitoring lesions over time to determine the pathogenesis of AWS and the potential role of tissue-associated microorganisms in the genesis of tissue loss. Attempts to experimentally induce AWS should include microscopic examination of tissues to ensure that potentially causative microorganisms associated with gross lesion are not overlooked.

  7. Heterogeneity in sex differences in the metabolic syndrome in Dutch white, Surinamese African and South Asian populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyemang, C.; van Valkengoed, I. G.; van den Born, B. J.; Bhopal, R.; Stronks, K.

    2012-01-01

    Diabet. Med. 29, 1159-1164 (2012) Abstract Aim To determine whether sex differences in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its components differ among different ethnic groups. Methods A random sample of non-institutionalized adults aged 3560 years in Amsterdam, the Netherlands (white Dutch

  8. Molecular characterization of a heterothallic mating system in Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the fungus causing white-nose syndrome of bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan M. Palmer; Alena Kubatova; Alena. Novakova; Andrew M. Minnis; Miroslav Kolarik; Daniel L. Lindner

    2014-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) of bats has devastated bat populations in eastern North America since its discovery in 2006. WNS, caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has spread quickly in North America and has become one of the most severe wildlife epidemics of our time. While P. destructans is spreading rapidly in North...

  9. U.S. Forest Service Research and Development (USFS R/D) national science strategy on White Nose Syndrome (WNS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybill Amelon; Robert T. Brooks; Jessie Glaeser; Megan Friggens; Daniel Lindner; Susan C. Loeb; Ann Lynch; Drew Minnis; Roger Perry; Mary M. Rowland; Monica Tomosy; Ted Weller

    2012-01-01

    The National Plan for Assisting States, Federal Agencies, and Tribes in Managing White-Nose Syndrome in Bats (National WNS Plan), is a document prepared jointly by the U.S. Departments of the Interior, Agriculture, and Defense, along with the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. This document provides a strategic framework for the investigation and management of...

  10. Horizontal transmission dynamics of White spot syndrome virus by cohabitation trials in juvenile Penaeus monodon and P. vannamei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngo Xuan, T.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Vlak, J.M.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), a rod-shaped double-stranded DNA virus, is an infectious agent causing fatal disease in shrimp farming around the globe. Within shrimp populations WSSV is transmitted very fast, however, the modes and dynamics of transmission of this virus are not well understood.

  11. Identification of Stressors that Affect White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) Infection and Outbreak in Pond Cultured Penaeus monodon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tendencia Alapide, E.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has been a big problem to the worldwide shrimp industry. Exposure to stressors related to physicochemical water parameters affect WSSV infection but not all WSSV infections result in outbreaks. This paper describes a detailed monitoring of important physicochemical

  12. Protein profiling in the gut of Penaeus monodon gavaged with oral WSSV-vaccines and live white spot syndrom virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulkarni, A.D.; Kiron, V.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Brinchmann, M.; Fernandes, J.M.O.; Sudheer, N.S.; Singh, B.I.S.

    2014-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a pathogen that causes considerable mortality of the farmed shrimp, Penaeus monodon. Candidate ‘vaccines’, WSSV envelope protein VP28 and formalin-inactivated WSSV, can provide short-lived protection against the virus. In this study, P. monodon was orally

  13. siRNA injection induces sequence-independent protection in Penaeus monodon against white spot syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenberg, M.; Heinhuis, B.; Zuidema, D.; Vlak, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major disease in crustaceans, particularly shrimp, due to the current intensity of aquaculture practices. Novel strategies including vaccination to control this virus would be highly desirable. However, invertebrates lack a true adaptive immune response system

  14. Using a Novel Partitivirus in Pseudogymnoascus destructans to Understand the Epidemiology of White-Nose Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Vaskar; Turner, Gregory G; Hafenstein, Susan; Overton, Barrie E; Vanderwolf, Karen J; Roossinck, Marilyn J

    2016-12-01

    White-nose syndrome is one of the most lethal wildlife diseases, killing over 5 million North American bats since it was first reported in 2006. The causal agent of the disease is a psychrophilic filamentous fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans. The fungus is widely distributed in North America and Europe and has recently been found in some parts of Asia, but interestingly, no mass mortality is observed in European or Asian bats. Here we report a novel double-stranded RNA virus found in North American isolates of the fungus and show that the virus can be used as a tool to study the epidemiology of White-nose syndrome. The virus, termed Pseudogymnoascus destructans partitivirus-pa, contains 2 genomic segments, dsRNA 1 and dsRNA 2 of 1.76 kbp and 1.59 kbp respectively, each possessing a single open reading frame, and forms isometric particles approximately 30 nm in diameter, characteristic of the genus Gammapartitivirus in the family Partitiviridae. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus is closely related to Penicillium stoloniferum virus S. We were able to cure P. destructans of the virus by treating fungal cultures with polyethylene glycol. Examination of 62 isolates of P. destructans including 35 from United States, 10 from Canada and 17 from Europe showed virus infection only in North American isolates of the fungus. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis using nucleotide sequences of the viral coat protein geographically clustered North American isolates indicating fungal spread followed by local adaptation of P. destructans in different regions of the United States and Canada. This is the first demonstration that a mycovirus potentially can be used to study fungal disease epidemiology.

  15. Lack of prognostic value of syncope in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auricchio, A; Klein, H; Trappe, H J; Wenzlaff, P

    1991-01-01

    Syncope in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome may be considered a premonitory event heralding the future development of sudden death. Therefore, the clinical and electrophysiologic data of 101 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome referred for invasive evaluation of known arrhythmias were reviewed to assess the incidence and clinical relevance of syncope. Thirty-six patients reported the occurrence of one or more syncopal episodes (group 1) and 65 patients had no syncope (group 2). These two groups did not differ significantly with regard to age, gender, incidence and characteristics of arrhythmia, clinical history, frequency of arrhythmic events and presence of associated cardiac disease. There were 10 patients in group 1 and 12 in group 2 who had ventricular fibrillation. There were no statistical differences between the two groups with respect to the effective refractory period of the right atrium, atrioventricular node, accessory pathway and right ventricle. Furthermore, no differences between the two groups were noted with respect to cycle length of circus movement tachycardia, mean heart rate during atrial fibrillation, and minimum RR interval during atrial fibrillation. In addition, the accessory pathway location was not significantly different between group 1 and group 2. The occurrence of syncope could not be predicted from any electrophysiologic finding and this symptom had a low sensitivity and specificity for recognition of dangerous rapid heart rates. Furthermore, the prognostic value of syncope was less accurate and predictive than the shortest RR interval during atrial fibrillation and the anterograde effective refractory period of the accessory pathway for aborted sudden death occurrence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. High color rendering index white LED based on nano-YAG:Ce3+ phosphor hybrid with CdSe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Changyu; Chu, Jinlei; Qian, Feng; Zou, Xin; Zhong, Chuan; Li, Ke; Jin, Shangzhong

    2012-08-01

    To improve the poor color rendering index (CRI) of YAG:Ce-based white light-emitting diode (LED) due to the lack of red spectral component, core/shell/shell CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized and blended into nano-YAG:Ce3+ phosphors. Prominent spectral evolution has been achieved by increasing the content of QDs. A white LED combining a blue LED with the blends of nano-YAG phosphors and orange- and red-emission QDs with a weight ratio of 1:1:1 was obtained. This kind of white LED showed excellent white light with luminescent efficiency, color coordinates, CRI and correlated color temperature (CCT) of 82.5 lm/W, (0.3264, 0.3255), 91 and 4580 K, respectively.

  17. Bacterial communities associated with healthy and Acropora white syndrome-affected corals from American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bryan; Aeby, Greta S.; Work, Thierry M.; Bourne, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Acropora white syndrome (AWS) is characterized by rapid tissue loss revealing the white underlying skeleton and affects corals worldwide; however, reports of causal agents are conflicting. Samples were collected from healthy and diseased corals and seawater around American Samoa and bacteria associated with AWS characterized using both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods, from coral mucus and tissue slurries, respectively. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries derived from coral tissue were dominated by the Gammaproteobacteria, and Jaccard's distances calculated between the clone libraries showed that those from diseased corals were more similar to each other than to those from healthy corals. 16S rRNA genes from 78 culturable coral mucus isolates also revealed a distinct partitioning of bacterial genera into healthy and diseased corals. Isolates identified as Vibrionaceae were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing, revealing that whilst several Vibrio spp. were found to be associated with AWS lesions, a recently described species, Vibrio owensii, was prevalent amongst cultured Vibrio isolates. Unaffected tissues from corals with AWS had a different microbiota than normal Acropora as found by others. Determining whether a microbial shift occurs prior to disease outbreaks will be a useful avenue of pursuit and could be helpful in detecting prodromal signs of coral disease prior to manifestation of lesions.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection and Perspectives on Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Bas; Bickley, Lisa K; van Aerle, Ronny; Bateman, Kelly S; Stentiford, Grant D; Santos, Eduarda M; Tyler, Charles R

    2016-01-18

    Since its emergence in the 1990s, White Spot Disease (WSD) has had major economic and societal impact in the crustacean aquaculture sector. Over the years shrimp farming alone has experienced billion dollar losses through WSD. The disease is caused by the White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV), a large dsDNA virus and the only member of the Nimaviridae family. Susceptibility to WSSV in a wide range of crustacean hosts makes it a major risk factor in the translocation of live animals and in commodity products. Currently there are no effective treatments for this disease. Understanding the molecular basis of disease processes has contributed significantly to the treatment of many human and animal pathogens, and with a similar aim considerable efforts have been directed towards understanding host-pathogen molecular interactions for WSD. Work on the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis in aquatic crustaceans has been restricted by a lack of sequenced and annotated genomes for host species. Nevertheless, some of the key host-pathogen interactions have been established: between viral envelope proteins and host cell receptors at initiation of infection, involvement of various immune system pathways in response to WSSV, and the roles of various host and virus miRNAs in mitigation or progression of disease. Despite these advances, many fundamental knowledge gaps remain; for example, the roles of the majority of WSSV proteins are still unknown. In this review we assess current knowledge of how WSSV infects and replicates in its host, and critique strategies for WSD treatment.

  19. An update on mechanism of entry of white spot syndrome virus into shrimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Arunima Kumar; Gupta, Shipra; Singh, Shivesh Pratap; Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao

    2017-08-01

    Host-parasite relationships can be best understood at the level of protein-protein interaction between host and pathogen. Such interactions are instrumental in understanding the important stages of life cycle of pathogen such as adsorption of the pathogen on host surface followed by effective entry of pathogen into the host body, movement of the pathogen across the host cytoplasm to reach the host nucleus and replication of the pathogen within the host. White Spot Disease (WSD) is a havoc for shrimps and till date no effective treatment is available against the disease. Moreover information regarding the mechanism of entry of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) into shrimps, as well as knowledge about the protein interactions occurring between WSSV and shrimp during viral entry are still at very meagre stage. A cumulative and critically assessed information on various viral-shrimp interactions occurring during viral entry can help to understand the exact pathway of entry of WSSV into the shrimp which in turn can be used to device drugs that can stop the entry of virus into the host. In this context, we highlight various WSSV and shrimp proteins that play role in the entry mechanism along with the description of the interaction between host and pathogen proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection and Perspectives on Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Verbruggen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its emergence in the 1990s, White Spot Disease (WSD has had major economic and societal impact in the crustacean aquaculture sector. Over the years shrimp farming alone has experienced billion dollar losses through WSD. The disease is caused by the White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV, a large dsDNA virus and the only member of the Nimaviridae family. Susceptibility to WSSV in a wide range of crustacean hosts makes it a major risk factor in the translocation of live animals and in commodity products. Currently there are no effective treatments for this disease. Understanding the molecular basis of disease processes has contributed significantly to the treatment of many human and animal pathogens, and with a similar aim considerable efforts have been directed towards understanding host–pathogen molecular interactions for WSD. Work on the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis in aquatic crustaceans has been restricted by a lack of sequenced and annotated genomes for host species. Nevertheless, some of the key host–pathogen interactions have been established: between viral envelope proteins and host cell receptors at initiation of infection, involvement of various immune system pathways in response to WSSV, and the roles of various host and virus miRNAs in mitigation or progression of disease. Despite these advances, many fundamental knowledge gaps remain; for example, the roles of the majority of WSSV proteins are still unknown. In this review we assess current knowledge of how WSSV infects and replicates in its host, and critique strategies for WSD treatment.

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of Litopenaeus vannamei in Response to White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiuli; Xie, Daxiang; Zhao, Yongzhen; Yang, Chunling; Li, Yongmei; Ma, Ning; Li, Ming; Yang, Qiong; Liao, Zhenping; Wang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) is the most extensively farmed crustacean species in the world. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the major pathogens in the cultured shrimp. However, the molecular mechanisms of the host-virus interaction remain largely unknown. In this study, the impact of WSSV infection on host gene expression in the hepatopancreas of L. vannamei was investigated through the use of 454 pyrosequencing-based RNA-Seq of cDNA libraries developed from WSSV-challenged shrimp or normal controls. By comparing the two cDNA libraries, we show that 767 host genes are significantly up-regulated and 729 genes are significantly down-regulated by WSSV infection. KEGG analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that the distribution of gene pathways between the up- and down-regulated genes is quite different. Among the differentially expressed genes, several are found to be involved in various processes of animal defense against pathogens such as apoptosis, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, Wnt signaling and antigen processing and presentation pathways. The present study provides valuable information on differential expression of L. vannamei genes following WSSV infection and improves our current understanding of this host-virus interaction. In addition, the large number of transcripts obtained in this study provides a strong basis for future genomic research on shrimp. PMID:23991181

  2. Elevated white cell count in acute coronary syndromes: relationship to variants in inflammatory and thrombotic genes

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    Cannon Christopher P

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated white blood cell counts (WBC in acute coronary syndromes (ACS increase the risk of recurrent events, but it is not known if this is exacerbated by pro-inflammatory factors. We sought to identify whether pro-inflammatory genetic variants contributed to alterations in WBC and C-reactive protein (CRP in an ACS population. Methods WBC and genotype of interleukin 6 (IL-6 G-174C and of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN intronic repeat polymorphism were investigated in 732 Caucasian patients with ACS in the OPUS-TIMI-16 trial. Samples for measurement of WBC and inflammatory factors were taken at baseline, i.e. Within 72 hours of an acute myocardial infarction or an unstable angina event. Results An increased white blood cell count (WBC was associated with an increased C-reactive protein (r = 0.23, p 3 (95% CI = -0.41, 0.77, and -0.03/mm3 (95% CI = -0.55, 0.86 for IL1RN. Moreover, the composite endpoint was not significantly affected by an interaction between WBC and the IL1 (p = 0.61 or IL6 (p = 0.48 genotype. Conclusions Cytokine pro-inflammatory genetic variants do not influence the increased inflammatory profile of ACS patients.

  3. Transient Global Amnesia with Reversible White Matter Lesions: A Variant of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome?

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    Tomoki Nakamizo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient global amnesia (TGA is a self-limited disease characterized by isolated amnesia, which resolves within 24 h. In contrast, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a potentially life-threatening disease that usually presents with seizures, altered mental status, headache, and visual disturbances. It is characterized by reversible vasogenic edema that predominantly involves the parieto-occipital subcortical white matter as shown by neuroimaging studies. To date, there have been no reported cases of PRES with a clinical course resembling TGA. Here we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented with isolated amnesia and headache. On admission, her blood pressure was 187/100 mmHg. She had complete anterograde amnesia and slight retrograde amnesia without other neurological findings. After the treatment of her hypertension, the amnesia resolved within 24 h. Although the initial magnetic resonance image (MRI was almost normal, the fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR images of the MRI on the next day revealed several small foci of high intensity areas in the fronto-parieto-occipital subcortical white matter, presumed to be vasogenic edema in PRES. The lesions disappeared one month later. This case suggests that PRES can mimic the clinical course of TGA. PRES should be considered in the differential diagnosis for TGA.

  4. Successive and large-scale synthesis of InP/ZnS quantum dots in a hybrid reactor and their application to white LEDs.

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    Kim, Kyungnam; Jeong, Sohee; Woo, Ju Yeon; Han, Chang-Soo

    2012-02-17

    We report successive and large-scale synthesis of InP/ZnS core/shell nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) using a customized hybrid flow reactor, which is based on serial combination of a batch-type mixer and a flow-type furnace. InP cores and InP/ZnS core/shell QDs were successively synthesized in the hybrid reactor in a simple one-step process. In this reactor, the flow rate of the solutions was typically 1 ml min(-1), 100 times larger than that of conventional microfluidic reactors. In order to synthesize high-quality InP/ZnS QDs, we controlled both the flow rate and the crystal growth temperature. Finally, we obtained high-quality InP/ZnS QDs in colors from bluish green to red, and we demonstrated that these core/shell QDs could be incorporated into white-light-emitting diode (LED) devices to improve color rendering performance.

  5. Preparation of a photo-degradation- resistant quantum dot-polymer composite plate for use in the fabrication of a high-stability white-light-emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eun-Pyo; Song, Woo-Seuk; Lee, Ki-Heon; Yang, Heesun

    2013-02-01

    We report on the synthesis of highly fluorescent double-ZnS-shell-capped, yellow-emitting Cu-In-S quantum dots (QDs) with a surprisingly high quantum yield of 92%, the preparation of a free-standing QD-polymethylmethacrylate composite plate, and the application of the QD plate in the fabrication of QD-based white-light-emitting diodes (WLEDs). A free-standing QD plate with QDs embedded uniformly inside a polymeric matrix is used to fabricate a remote-type, resin-free WLED. The QD plate-based WLED displays a high luminous efficiency; however, it suffers from a significantly unstable device performance due to QD degradation upon prolonged photo-excitation. An exceptional operational stability of the QD plate-based WLED is realized by generating hybrid double layers of an organic adhesion layer and a gas barrier layer of sol-gel-derived silica, rendering the QD plate impermeable to oxygen. Our success in achieving a color converter robust against photo-degradation and applying it in the fabrication of a reliable QD-based LED is greatly encouraging as regards the development of next-generation QD-based LED lighting sources.

  6. Circadian-tunable Perovskite Quantum Dot-based Down-Converted Multi-Package White LED with a Color Fidelity Index over 90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hee Chang; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Soyoung; Park, Jae Byung; Do, Young Rag

    2017-06-05

    New metrics of the color and circadian performances of down-converted white light-emitting diodes (DC-WLEDs) are rapidly becoming popular in smart lighting systems. This is due to the increased desire for accurate analytical methods to measure the effects of newly developed quantum dot (QD)-based lighting on the vision, color, and circadian sensors of retina cells in the human eye. In this regard, a two-measure system known as technical memorandum TM-30-2015 (Illuminating Engineering Society of North America), encompassing the color fidelity index (CFI, R f ) and the color gamut index (CGI, R g ), has been developed as a new metrics of color to replace the currently utilized color rendering index (CRI, R a ). In addition, the tunability of the circadian efficacy of radiation (CER) is now more important due to its effect on the control of melatonin suppression/secretion, resetting of the central/local clocks of individuals given their daily cycles, and benefits to human health. In this paper, we developed and analyzed six-colored perovskite (Pe; cyan, green, yellowish green, amber, orange, and red colors) QDs-based multi-package WLED, and optimized the SPDs of tunable PeQD-based multi-package WLEDs in terms of promising human-centric lighting device, given its optimized visual energy, color qualities and health-promoting effects.

  7. Aneurysm of the Left Coronary Artery in Postoperative Bland-White-Garland Syndrome

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    Nathalie Jeanne Magioli Bravo-Valenzuela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA or Bland-White-Garland syndrome, present the challenges of performing a differential diagnosis, and discuss the treatment of the syndrome. Although ALCAPA is a rare congenital heart disease, it is one of the most common causes of myocardial ischemia in childhood and presents a diagnostic challenge. A four-year-old girl was referred to a pediatric cardiologist for evaluation of mitral valve regurgitation murmur and heart failure. The transthoracic echocardiogram demonstrated the left coronary artery (LCA not arising from the aorta, presence of coronary collateral circulation, and moderate mitral valve regurgitation. ALCAPA was confirmed using angiotomography. The LCA was surgically reimplanted into the aorta. After 3 years of postoperative follow-up, the patient developed an LCA aneurysm. Diagnosis of cardiac ischemia in childhood remains a challenge, and careful evaluation of coronary arteries on the echocardiogram is an important tool. In this report, we present a case of ALCAPA with an uncommon postoperative outcome.

  8. White-nose syndrome in bats: U.S. Geological Survey updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogall, Gail Moede; Verant, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a devastating disease that has killed millions of hibernating bats since it first appeared in New York in 2007 and has spread at an alarming rate from the northeastern to the central United States and Canada. The disease is named for the white fungus Geomyces destructans that infects the skin of the muzzle, ears, and wings of hibernating bats. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC), the USGS Fort Collins Science Center, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and other partners continue to play a primary role in WNS research. Studies conducted at the NWHC led to the discovery (Blehert and others, 2009), characterization, and naming (Gargas and others, 2009) of the cold-loving fungus G. destructans and to the development of standardized criteria for diagnosing the disease (Meteyer and others, 2009). Additionally, scientists at the NWHC have pioneered laboratory techniques for studying the effects of the fungus on hibernating bats (Lorch and others, 2011). To determine if bats are affected by white-nose syndrome, scientists look for a characteristic microscopic pattern of skin erosion caused by G. destructans (Meteyer and others, 2009). Field signs of WNS can include visible white fungal growth on the bat's muzzle, wings, or both, but these signs alone are not a reliable disease indicator - laboratory examination and testing are required for disease confirmation. Infected bats also arouse from hibernation more frequently than uninfected bats (Warnecke and others, 2012) and often display abnormal behaviors in their hibernation sites, such as congregating at or near cave openings and daytime flights during winter. These abnormal behaviors may contribute to the bat's accelerated consumption of stored fat reserves, causing emaciation, a characteristic documented in some of the bats that die with WNS. During hibernation, bats likely have lowered immunity (Bouma and others, 2010), which may facilitate the ability

  9. Field-Usable Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Rapid Detection of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulabhusan, Prabir Kumar; Rajwade, Jyutika M; Sugumar, Vimal; Taju, Gani; Sahul Hameed, A S; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2017-01-01

    White spot disease (WSD), a major threat to sustainable aquaculture worldwide, is caused by White spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The diagnosis of WSD relies heavily on molecular detection of the virus by one-step PCR. These procedures are neither field-usable nor rapid enough considering the speed at which the virus spreads. Thus, development of a rapid, reliable and field-usable diagnostic method for the detection of WSSV infection is imperative to prevent huge economic losses. Here, we report on the development of a lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) employing gold nanoparticles conjugated to a polyclonal antibody against VP28 (envelope protein of WSSV). The LFIA detected WSSV in ~20 min and showed no cross-reactivity with other shrimp viruses, viz. Monodon Baculovirus (MBV), Hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV) and Infectious Hypodermal and Hematopoietic Necrosis virus (IHHNV). The limit of detection (LOD) of the assay, as determined by real-time PCR, was 103 copies of WSSV. In a time course infectivity experiment, ~104 WSSV particles were injected in Litopenaeus vannamei. The LFIA could rapidly (~ 20 min) detect the virus in different tissues after 3 h (hemolymph), 6 h (gill tissue) and 12 h (head soft tissue, eye stalk, and pleopod) of infection. Based on these findings, a validation study was performed using 75 field samples collected from different geographical locations in India. The LFIA results obtained were compared with the conventional "gold standard test", viz. one-step PCR. The analysis of results in 2x2 matrix indicated very high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (96.77%) of LFIA. Similarly, Cohen's kappa coefficient of 0.983 suggested "very good agreement" between the developed LFIA and the conventional one-step PCR. The LFIA developed for the rapid detection of WSSV has an excellent potential for use in the field and could prove to be a boon to the aquaculture industry.

  10. Transcriptome profiling of white adipose tissue in a mouse model for 15q duplication syndrome

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    Xiaoxi Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is not only associated with unhealthy lifestyles, but also linked to genetic predisposition. Previously, we generated an autism mouse model (patDp/+ that carries a 6.3 Mb paternal duplication homologous to the human 15q11–q13 locus. Chromosomal abnormalities in this region are known to cause autism spectrum disorder, Prader–Willi syndrome, and Angelman syndrome in humans. We found that, in addition to autistic-like behaviors, patDp/+ mice display late-onset obesity and hypersensitivity to a high-fat diet. These phenotypes are likely to be the results of genetic perturbations since the energy expenditures and food intakes of patDp/+ mice do not significantly differ from those of wild-type mice. Intriguingly, we found that an enlargement of adipose cells precedes the onset of obesity in patDp/+ mice. To understand the underlying molecular networks responsible for this pre-obese phenotype, we performed transcriptome profiling of white adipose tissue from patDp/+ and wild-type mice using microarray. We identified 230 genes as differentially expressed genes. Sfrp5 — a gene whose expression is positively correlated with adipocyte size, was found to be up-regulated, and Fndc5, a potent inducer of brown adipogenesis was identified to be the top down-regulated gene. Subsequent pathway analysis highlighted a set of 35 molecules involved in energy production, lipid metabolism, and small molecule biochemistry as the top candidate biological network responsible for the pre-obese phenotype of patDp/+. The microarray data were deposited in NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database with accession number GSE58191. Ultimately, our dataset provides novel insights into the molecular mechanism of obesity and demonstrated that patDp/+ is a valuable mouse model for obesity research.

  11. Transcriptome profiling of white adipose tissue in a mouse model for 15q duplication syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Tamada, Kota; Kishimoto, Rui; Okubo, Hiroko; Ise, Satoko; Ohta, Hisashi; Ruf, Sandra; Nakatani, Jin; Kohno, Nobuoki; Spitz, François; Takumi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is not only associated with unhealthy lifestyles, but also linked to genetic predisposition. Previously, we generated an autism mouse model (patDp/+) that carries a 6.3 Mb paternal duplication homologous to the human 15q11–q13 locus. Chromosomal abnormalities in this region are known to cause autism spectrum disorder, Prader–Willi syndrome, and Angelman syndrome in humans. We found that, in addition to autistic-like behaviors, patDp/+ mice display late-onset obesity and hypersensitivity to a high-fat diet. These phenotypes are likely to be the results of genetic perturbations since the energy expenditures and food intakes of patDp/+ mice do not significantly differ from those of wild-type mice. Intriguingly, we found that an enlargement of adipose cells precedes the onset of obesity in patDp/+ mice. To understand the underlying molecular networks responsible for this pre-obese phenotype, we performed transcriptome profiling of white adipose tissue from patDp/+ and wild-type mice using microarray. We identified 230 genes as differentially expressed genes. Sfrp5 — a gene whose expression is positively correlated with adipocyte size, was found to be up-regulated, and Fndc5, a potent inducer of brown adipogenesis was identified to be the top down-regulated gene. Subsequent pathway analysis highlighted a set of 35 molecules involved in energy production, lipid metabolism, and small molecule biochemistry as the top candidate biological network responsible for the pre-obese phenotype of patDp/+. The microarray data were deposited in NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database with accession number GSE58191. Ultimately, our dataset provides novel insights into the molecular mechanism of obesity and demonstrated that patDp/+ is a valuable mouse model for obesity research. PMID:26484295

  12. Anesthetic management of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in a pregnant patient posted for emergency caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaria, Urmila; Rasheed, Mohd A; Jain, Geeta; Sinha, A K

    2013-01-01

    The most common arrhythmia seen during pregnancy is paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome accounts for majority of this in such population. The presence of pre-disposing factors may facilitate the onset of tachyarrhythmias in previously asymptomatic parturients with the WPW syndrome such as increased hemodynamic, hormonal, autonomic, and emotional changes. Therefore, meticulous monitoring is essential perioperatively. Epidural anesthesia providing added advantage of hemodynamic stability and post-operative analgesia is preferred in such pregnant patients undergoing emergency cesarean section.

  13. Effect of Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation on Quality of Life in Patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

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    Shokhrukh Erkaboev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome is one of several disorders of the conduction system of the heart that are commonly referred to as pre-excitation syndromes. As the syndrome significantly reduces the patients’ quality of life (QoL, the purpose of the current study was to compare QoL scores in patients with WPW syndrome before and after a radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA procedure. To assess the patients’ QoL, the MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey was used. Immediate and long-term outcomes of radiofrequency catheter ablation were analyzed in 60 patients diagnosed with WPW syndrome, 41(68.3% men and 19(31.7% women. As compared with the controls (28 apparently healthy persons, patients with WPW syndrome before RFA experienced significant reduction in both physical and mental health components. RFA was found effective in 93.3% of patients with WPW syndrome. At 3 months after RFA, patients showed significant improvement in both physical (13.5% and mental (17.2% health components; at 12 months, QoL parameters reached those of the controls.

  14. White spot syndrome virus infection: Threat to crustacean biodiversity in Vembanad Lake, India

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    Toms C. Joseph

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Vembanad Lake located on the south-west coast of India, an ecological hotspot is the nursing ground of many economically important crustaceans. The prevalence of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV among crustaceans from farmed, estuarine and marine environments surrounding the Vembanad Lake, India was detected using PCR. A total of 308 samples from aquaculture ponds consisting of six species of crustaceans collected from five different farms were tested for the presence of WSSV. Of these, 67% were found to carry the virus. A total of 258 samples of crustaceans from the Cochin backwater system that forms a part of the Vembanad lake viz., Metapenaeus dobsoni, Metapenaeus monoceros, Penaeus monodon and Penaeus indicus were found to contain WSSV in 62% of the samples. Fifteen species of crustaceans caught from the seas off Cochin were also screened for the presence of WSSV. Out of these, twelve species had WSSV incidence levels ranging from 6–23%. WSSV was not detected from three species of deep sea crustaceans tested. The black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon had the highest incidence of WSSV among the species screened in farmed, estuarine and marine environments.

  15. Phylogenetics of a fungal invasion: Origins and widespread dispersal of white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drees, Kevin P.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Puechmaille, Sebastein J.; Parise, Katy L.; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Hoyt, Joseph R.; Sun, Keping; Jargalsaikhan, Ariunbold; Dalannast, Munkhnast; Palmer, Jonathan M.; Linder, Daniel L.; Kilpatrick, Marm; Pearson, Talima; Keim, Paul S.; Blehert, David; Foster, Jeffrey T.

    2017-01-01

    Globalization has facilitated the worldwide movement and introduction of pathogens, but epizoological reconstructions of these invasions are often hindered by limited sampling and insufficient genetic resolution among isolates. Pseudogymnoascus destructans, a fungal pathogen causing the epizootic of white-nose syndrome in North American bats, has exhibited few genetic polymorphisms in previous studies, presenting challenges for both epizoological tracking of the spread of this fungus and for determining its evolutionary history. We used single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from whole-genome sequencing and microsatellites to construct high-resolution phylogenies of P. destructans. Shallow genetic diversity and the lack of geographic structuring among North American isolates support a recent introduction followed by expansion via clonal reproduction across the epizootic zone. Moreover, the genetic relationships of isolates within North America suggest widespread mixing and long-distance movement of the fungus. Genetic diversity among isolates of P. destructans from Europe was substantially higher than in those from North America. However, genetic distance between the North American isolates and any given European isolate was similar to the distance between the individual European isolates. In contrast, the isolates we examined from Asia were highly divergent from both European and North American isolates. Although the definitive source for introduction of the North American population has not been conclusively identified, our data support the origin of the North American invasion by P. destructans from Europe rather than Asia.

  16. White spot syndrome virus strains of different virulence induce distinct immune response in Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meiling; Li, Fang; Xu, Limei; Zhu, Xiaoming

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we identified three white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) strains (WSSV-CN01, WSSV-CN02 and WSSV-CN03) with significant differences in virulence. Among them, WSSV-CN01 caused significant higher and earlier mortality in redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, thus was determined as high-virulent, while WSSV-CN02 and WSSV-CN03 were moderate-virulent and low-virulent. By investigating the total number of the circulating haemocytes and the activity of immune relative enzymes, we demonstrated that the different virulent WSSV strains induced distinct immune response in the host. Notably, a dramatic reduction of circulating haemocytes was observed in the crayfish infected with WSSV-CN01 and WSSV-CN02 but not WSSV-CN03. Further analysis revealed that cell death induced by WSSV-CN01 and WSSV-CN02 might be responsible for the decrease of circulating haemocytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic product response profiles of Cherax quadricarinatus towards white spot syndrome virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weiwei; Ye, Yangfang; Chen, Zhen; Shao, Yina; Xie, Xiaolu; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Hai-Peng; Li, Chenghua

    2016-08-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the most devastating viral pathogens in both shrimp and crayfish farms, which often causes disease outbreak and leads to massive moralities with significant economic losses of aquaculture. However, limited research has been carried out on the intrinsic mechanisms toward WSSV challenge at the metabolic level. To gain comprehensive insight into metabolic responses induced by WSSV, we applied an NMR approach to investigate metabolic changes of crayfish gill and hepatopancreas infected by WSSV for 1, 6 and 12 h. In gill, an enhanced energy metabolism was observed in WSSV-challenged crayfish samples at 1 h, as marked by increased glucose, alanine, methionine, glutamate and uracil. Afterwards, energy metabolism, lipid metabolism as well as osmoregulation were markedly increased at 6 hpi, as shown by elevated glucose, alanine, methionine, fumarate, tyrosine, tryptophan, histidine, phosphorylcholine, betaine and uracil, whereas no obvious metabolites change was detected at 12 hpi. As for hepatopancreas, disturbed lipid metabolism and induced osmotic regulation was found at 6 hpi based on the metabolic biomarkers such as branched chain amino acids, threonine, alanine, methionine, glutamate, glutamine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, lactate and lipid. However, no obvious metabolic change was shown in hepatopancreas at both 1 hpi and 12 hpi. Taken together, our present results provided essential metabolic information about host-pathogen interactions in crayfish, which shed new light on our understanding of WSSV infection at metabolic level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. OIE white spot syndrome virus PCR gives false-positive results in Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, Kerry; Cullen, Bradford; Owens, Leigh

    2004-12-13

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is an intranuclear bacilliform virus (IBV) that is a serious, notifiable crustacean pathogen. The Office International des Epizooties (OIE) PCR protocol for WSSV uses primer sets initially developed by Lo et al. (1996). It yields a first-step PCR amplicon of 1441 bp and a nested PCR amplicon of 941 bp. An amplicon (941 bp) purported to specifically detect WSSV was obtained when using template DNA extracted from Cherax quadricarinatus in a WSSV PCR detection protocol recommended by the OIE. Sequencing and analysis of the 941 bp amplicon and an occasional 550 bp amplicon from C. quadricarinatus revealed no phylogenetic relationship with WSSV, and suggested a possible lack of sufficient primer specificity for WSSV in the OIE test. This suggestion was supported by the fact that the OIE outer primer sequence (146F1) was present in both the forward and reverse position of the 941 bp and the forward position of the 550 bp nested amplicons from C. quadricarinatus. As WSSV is a notifiable pathogen, the consequences of false-positive results are harsh in WSSV-free zones and can lead to incorrect quarantine and unnecessary destruction of animals. Therefore, urgent attention and revision is necessary for the current OIE PCR protocol for WSSV detection.

  19. Increased nucleoside diphosphate kinase activity induces white spot syndrome virus infection in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Fei Liu

    Full Text Available Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDK, which has the same sequence as oncoprotein (OP in humans, can induce nucleoside triphosphates in DNA replication by maintenance of the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP's and is known to be regulated by viral infection in the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. This paper describes the relationship between NDK and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV infection. The recombinant NDK was produced by a prokaryotic expression system. WSSV copy numbers and mRNA levels of IE1 and VP28 were significantly increased in shrimp injected with recombinant NDK at 72 h after WSSV infection. After synthesizing dsRNA-NDK and confirming the efficacy of NDK silencing, we recorded the cumulative mortality of WSSV-infected shrimp injected with NDK and dsRNA-NDK. A comparison between the results demonstrated that silencing NDK delayed the death of shrimps. These findings indicate that NDK has an important role influencing the replication of WSSV replication in shrimp. Furthermore, NDK may have potential target as a new therapeutic strategy against WSSV infection in shrimp.

  20. MRI gray and white matter measures in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Neeraj; Suppa, Antonio; Piattella, Maria Cristina; Bologna, Matteo; Di Stasio, Flavio; Formica, Alessandra; Tona, Francesca; Colosimo, Carlo; Berardelli, Alfredo; Pantano, Patrizia

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated MRI measures of gray and white matter damages in 19 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 11 with corticobasal syndrome (CBS), and 14 healthy subjects (HS) to differentiate patients with PSP from those with CBS. We calculated surface-based maps of the cortical volume, cortical thickness, surface area, and voxel level maps of sub-cortical volume, and diffusion tensor imaging parameters using automated scripts implemented in FreeSurfer and FSL toolboxes. No significant differences in cortical volume loss were observed between PSP and CBS. When cortical volume was divided into cortical thickness and surface area, cortical thickness in peri-rolandic brain regions was significantly smaller in CBS than in PSP patients, whereas surface area was significantly smaller in PSP than HS. We also found widespread volume loss in sub-cortical structures in patients with PSP and CBS in comparison to HS. Both patient groups displayed diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities: compared to HS, widespread fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity changes were observed in PSP, whereas axial and radial diffusivity changes were prominent in CBS. Mini-mental state examination positively correlated with diffusion changes in patients with PSP. In conclusion, cortical thickness, surface area, and diffusion tensor imaging parameters may be sensitive enough to help differentiate patients with PSP from those with CBS.

  1. Hypoxia increases susceptibility of Pacific white shrimp to whitespot syndrome virus (WSSV

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    M. Lehmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate the mortality, reactive oxygen species production (ROS and total hemocyte counts (THC of the marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei infected with the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV at three levels of oxygen saturation. For this, 360 shrimp (20±2g were distributed in 24 tanks (60L, divided in two groups (infected and non-infected, which were subjected to 30, 60 and 100% of dissolved oxygen saturation (in quadruplicate. During 96 hours after infection, daily hemolymph samples were collected for hemato-immunological parameter evaluation (THC and ROS and dead animals were removed and computed to assess cumulative mortality rates. In the infected group, animals subjected to 100% saturation showed higher ROS production (P<0.05 after 48 hours, while THC was significantly reduced (P<0.05, regardless of oxygen saturation. The hypoxia resulted in high mortality when compared to 100% saturation condition. In the uninfected group, no significant differences were observed in all evaluated parameters. Thus, the hypoxia condition increased the susceptibility of shrimp to the infection of WSSV, which may be partly related to the low ROS production showed by the animals subjected to 30% oxygen saturation.

  2. Selection of shrimp breeders free of white spot syndrome and infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis

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    Carlos Cesar de Mello Junior

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to select surviving breeders of Litopenaeus vannamei from white spot syndrome virus (WSSV outbreak, adapted to local climatic conditions and negatively diagnosed for WSSV and infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV, and to evaluate if this strategy is a viable alternative for production in Santa Catarina, Brazil. A total of 800 males and 800 females were phenotypically selected in a farm pond. Nested-PCR analyses of 487 sexually mature females and 231 sexually mature males showed that 63% of the females and 55% of the males were infected with IHHNV. Animals free of IHHNV were tested for WSSV, and those considered double negative were used for breeding. The post-larvae produced were stocked in nine nursery tanks for analysis. From the 45 samples, with 50 post-larvae each, only two were positive for IHHNV and none for WSSV. Batches of larvae diagnosed free of virus by nested-PCR were sent to six farms. A comparative analysis was carried out in growth ponds, between local post-larvae and post-larvae from Northeast Brazil. Crabs (Chasmagnathus granulata, blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus, and sea hares (Aplysia brasiliana, which are possible vectors of these viruses, were also evaluated. The mean survival was 55% for local post-larvae against 23.4% for post-larvae from the Northeast. Sea hares showed prevalence of 50% and crabs of 67% of WSSV.

  3. Effect of passive acoustic sampling methodology on detecting bats after declines from white nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Laci S.; Ford, W. Mark; Dobony, Christopher A.; Britzke, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant with the emergence and spread of white-nose syndrome (WNS) and precipitous decline of many bat species in North America, natural resource managers need modified and/or new techniques for bat inventory and monitoring that provide robust occupancy estimates. We used Anabat acoustic detectors to determine the most efficient passive acoustic sampling design for optimizing detection probabilities of multiple bat species in a WNS-impacted environment in New York, USA. Our sampling protocol included: six acoustic stations deployed for the entire duration of monitoring as well as a 4 x 4 grid and five transects of 5-10 acoustic units that were deployed for 6-8 night sample durations surveyed during the summers of 2011-2012. We used Program PRESENCE to determine detection probability and site occupancy estimates. Overall, the grid produced the highest detection probabilities for most species because it contained the most detectors and intercepted the greatest spatial area. However, big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) and species not impacted by WNS were detected easily regardless of sampling array. Endangered Indiana (Myotis sodalis) and little brown (Myotis lucifugus) and tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) showed declines in detection probabilities over our study, potentially indicative of continued WNS-associated declines. Identification of species presence through efficient methodologies is vital for future conservation efforts as bat populations decline further due to WNS and other factors.   

  4. Disease dynamics of Montipora white syndrome within Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii: distribution, seasonality, virulence, and transmissibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeby, G S; Ross, M; Williams, G J; Lewis, T D; Works, T M

    2010-07-26

    We report on an investigation of Montipora white syndrome (MWS), which is a coral disease reported from Hawaii, U.S.A., that results in tissue loss. Disease surveys of Montipora capitata within Kaneohe Bay (Oahu) found colonies that were affected by MWS on 9 reefs within 3 regions of Kaneohe Bay (south, central, north). Mean MWS prevalence ranged from 0.02 to 0.87% and average number of MWS cases per survey site ranged from 1 to 28 colonies. MWS prevalence and number of cases were significantly lower in the central region as compared to those in the north and south regions of Kaneohe Bay. There was a positive relationship between host abundance and MWS prevalence, and differences in host abundance between sites explained approximately 27% of the variation in MWS prevalence. Reefs in central Kaneohe Bay had lower M. capitata cover and lower MWS levels. MWS prevalence on reefs was neither significantly different between seasons (spring versus fall) nor among 57 tagged colonies that were monitored through time. MWS is a chronic and progressive disease causing M. capitata colonies to lose an average of 3.1% of live tissue mo(-1). Case fatality rate was 28% after 2 yr but recovery occurred in some colonies (32%). Manipulative experiments showed that the disease is acquired through direct contact. This is the first study to examine the dynamics of MWS within Hawaii, and our findings suggest that MWS has the potential to degrade Hawaii's reefs through time.

  5. The microsporidian Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei is not the cause of white feces syndrome in whiteleg shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei

    OpenAIRE

    Tangprasittipap, Amornrat; Srisala, Jiraporn; Chouwdee, Saisunee; Somboon, Montagan; Chuchird, Niti; Limsuwan, Chalor; Srisuvan, Thinnarat; Timothy W Flegel; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya

    2013-01-01

    Background The microsporidian Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei was first described from Thailand in 2009 in farmed, indigenous giant tiger shrimp Penaeus (Penaeus) monodon. The natural reservoir for the parasite is still unknown. More recently, a microsporidian closely resembling it in morphology and tissue preference was found in Thai-farmed, exotic, whiteleg shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei exhibiting white feces syndrome (WFS). Our objective was to compare the newly found pathogen with E. ...

  6. Bacterial communities associated with Porites white patch syndrome (PWPS on three western Indian Ocean (WIO coral reefs.

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    Mathieu G Séré

    Full Text Available The scleractinian coral Porites lutea, an important reef-building coral on western Indian Ocean reefs (WIO, is affected by a newly-reported white syndrome (WS the Porites white patch syndrome (PWPS. Histopathology and culture-independent molecular techniques were used to characterise the microbial communities associated with this emerging disease. Microscopy showed extensive tissue fragmentation generally associated with ovoid basophilic bodies resembling bacterial aggregates. Results of 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed a high variability between bacterial communities associated with PWPS-infected and healthy tissues in P. lutea, a pattern previously reported in other coral diseases such as black band disease (BBD, white band disease (WBD and white plague diseases (WPD. Furthermore, substantial variations in bacterial communities were observed at the different sampling locations, suggesting that there is no strong bacterial association in Porites lutea on WIO reefs. Several sequences affiliated with potential pathogens belonging to the Vibrionaceae and Rhodobacteraceae were identified, mainly in PWPS-infected coral tissues. Among them, only two ribotypes affiliated to Shimia marina (NR043300.1 and Vibrio hepatarius (NR025575.1 were consistently found in diseased tissues from the three geographically distant sampling localities. The role of these bacterial species in PWPS needs to be tested experimentally.

  7. Bacterial communities associated with Porites white patch syndrome (PWPS) on three western Indian Ocean (WIO) coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séré, Mathieu G; Tortosa, Pablo; Chabanet, Pascale; Turquet, Jean; Quod, Jean-Pascal; Schleyer, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    The scleractinian coral Porites lutea, an important reef-building coral on western Indian Ocean reefs (WIO), is affected by a newly-reported white syndrome (WS) the Porites white patch syndrome (PWPS). Histopathology and culture-independent molecular techniques were used to characterise the microbial communities associated with this emerging disease. Microscopy showed extensive tissue fragmentation generally associated with ovoid basophilic bodies resembling bacterial aggregates. Results of 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed a high variability between bacterial communities associated with PWPS-infected and healthy tissues in P. lutea, a pattern previously reported in other coral diseases such as black band disease (BBD), white band disease (WBD) and white plague diseases (WPD). Furthermore, substantial variations in bacterial communities were observed at the different sampling locations, suggesting that there is no strong bacterial association in Porites lutea on WIO reefs. Several sequences affiliated with potential pathogens belonging to the Vibrionaceae and Rhodobacteraceae were identified, mainly in PWPS-infected coral tissues. Among them, only two ribotypes affiliated to Shimia marina (NR043300.1) and Vibrio hepatarius (NR025575.1) were consistently found in diseased tissues from the three geographically distant sampling localities. The role of these bacterial species in PWPS needs to be tested experimentally.

  8. Mud crab susceptibility to disease from white spot syndrome virus is species-dependent

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    Sritunyalucksana Kallaya

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on a report for one species (Scylla serrata, it is widely believed that mud crabs are relatively resistant to disease caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. We tested this hypothesis by determining the degree of susceptibility in two species of mud crabs, Scylla olivacea and Scylla paramamosain, both of which were identified by mitochondrial 16 S ribosomal gene analysis. We compared single-dose and serial-dose WSSV challenges on S. olivacea and S. paramamosain. Findings In a preliminary test using S. olivacea alone, a dose of 1 × 106 WSSV copies/g gave 100% mortality within 7 days. In a subsequent test, 17 S. olivacea and 13 S. paramamosain were divided into test and control groups for challenge with WSSV at 5 incremental, biweekly doses starting from 1 × 104 and ending at 5 × 106 copies/g. For 11 S. olivacea challenged, 3 specimens died at doses between 1 × 105 and 5 × 105 copies/g and none died for 2 weeks after the subsequent dose (1 × 106 copies/g that was lethal within 7 days in the preliminary test. However, after the final challenge on day 56 (5 × 106 copies/g, the remaining 7 of 11 S. olivacea (63.64% died within 2 weeks. There was no mortality in the buffer-injected control crabs. For 9 S. paramamosain challenged in the same way, 5 (55.56% died after challenge doses between 1 × 104 and 5 × 105 copies/g, and none died for 2 weeks after the challenge dose of 1 × 106 copies/g. After the final challenge (5 × 106 copies/g on day 56, no S. paramamosain died during 2 weeks after the challenge, and 2 of 9 WSSV-infected S. paramamosain (22.22% remained alive together with the control crabs until the end of the test on day 106. Viral loads in these survivors were low when compared to those in the moribund crabs. Conclusions S. olivacea and S. paramamosain show wide variation in response to challenge with WSSV. S. olivacea and S. paramamosain are susceptible to white spot disease, and S. olivacea is more

  9. Mud crab susceptibility to disease from white spot syndrome virus is species-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somboonna, Naraporn; Mangkalanan, Seksan; Udompetcharaporn, Attasit; Krittanai, Chartchai; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Flegel, Tw

    2010-11-20

    Based on a report for one species (Scylla serrata), it is widely believed that mud crabs are relatively resistant to disease caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). We tested this hypothesis by determining the degree of susceptibility in two species of mud crabs, Scylla olivacea and Scylla paramamosain, both of which were identified by mitochondrial 16 S ribosomal gene analysis. We compared single-dose and serial-dose WSSV challenges on S. olivacea and S. paramamosain. In a preliminary test using S. olivacea alone, a dose of 1 × 106 WSSV copies/g gave 100% mortality within 7 days. In a subsequent test, 17 S. olivacea and 13 S. paramamosain were divided into test and control groups for challenge with WSSV at 5 incremental, biweekly doses starting from 1 × 104 and ending at 5 × 106 copies/g. For 11 S. olivacea challenged, 3 specimens died at doses between 1 × 105 and 5 × 105 copies/g and none died for 2 weeks after the subsequent dose (1 × 106 copies/g) that was lethal within 7 days in the preliminary test. However, after the final challenge on day 56 (5 × 106 copies/g), the remaining 7 of 11 S. olivacea (63.64%) died within 2 weeks. There was no mortality in the buffer-injected control crabs. For 9 S. paramamosain challenged in the same way, 5 (55.56%) died after challenge doses between 1 × 104 and 5 × 105 copies/g, and none died for 2 weeks after the challenge dose of 1 × 106 copies/g. After the final challenge (5 × 106 copies/g) on day 56, no S. paramamosain died during 2 weeks after the challenge, and 2 of 9 WSSV-infected S. paramamosain (22.22%) remained alive together with the control crabs until the end of the test on day 106. Viral loads in these survivors were low when compared to those in the moribund crabs. S. olivacea and S. paramamosain show wide variation in response to challenge with WSSV. S. olivacea and S. paramamosain are susceptible to white spot disease, and S. olivacea is more susceptible than S. paramamosain. Based on our single

  10. White matter alterations in the brains of patients with active, remitted, and cured cushing syndrome: a DTI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, P; Santos, A; Vives-Gilabert, Y; Webb, S M; Sainz-Ruiz, A; Resmini, E; Crespo, I; de Juan-Delago, M; Gómez-Anson, B

    2015-06-01

    Cushing syndrome appears after chronic exposure to elevated glucocorticoid levels. Cortisol excess may alter white matter microstructure. Our purpose was to study WM changes in patients with Cushing syndrome compared with controls by using DTI and the influence of hypercortisolism. Thirty-five patients with Cushing syndrome and 35 healthy controls, matched for age, education, and sex, were analyzed through DTI (tract-based spatial statistics) for fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity (general linear model, family-wise error, and threshold-free cluster enhancement corrections, P Cushing syndrome with active hypercortisolism, 7 with Cushing syndrome with medication-remitted cortisol, 20 surgically cured, and 35 controls. Cardiovascular risk factors were used as covariates. In addition, correlations were analyzed among DTI values, concomitant 24-hour urinary free cortisol levels, and disease duration. There were widespread alterations (reduced fractional anisotropy, and increased mean diffusivity, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity values; P Cushing syndrome compared with controls, independent of the cardiovascular risk factors present. Both active and cured Cushing syndrome subgroups showed similar changes compared with controls. Patients with medically remitted Cushing syndrome also had reduced fractional anisotropy and increased mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity values, compared with controls. No correlations were found between DTI maps and 24-hour urinary free cortisol levels or with disease duration. Diffuse WM alterations in patients with Cushing syndrome suggest underlying loss of WM integrity and demyelination. Once present, they seem to be independent of concomitant hypercortisolism, persisting after remission/cure. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. Variant Type of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome with Diffuse Cerebral White Matter and Brainstem Involvement Associated with Intracranial Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin-Xi; Zheng, Yang; Zhang, Bi-Jun; Zhang, Yun; Ding, Mei-Ping; Zhang, Bao-Rong

    2016-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical-radiological syndrome characterized by reversible vasogenic edema typically at a posterior location of the cerebrum. PRES with prominent brainstem or basal ganglia involvement is defined as central-variant, which is rare. We herein report an atypical case of a 35-year-old man with a 2-year history of untreated hypertension who complained of recurrent dizziness. The patient presented with brainstem and diffuse white matter involvement associated with intracranial hemorrhage and recovered fully after therapy. Recognition of this uncommon benign syndrome as a potentially treatable disorder can be of great importance. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental transmission of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) from crabs to shrimp Penaeus monodon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanaphum, P; Wongteerasupaya, C; Sitidilokratana, N; Boonsaeng, V; Panyim, S; Tassanakajon, A; Withyachumnarnkul, B; Flegel, T W

    1998-09-11

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) of the black tiger prawn Penaeus monodon is a recently discovered baculo-like virus disease which is currently the cause of very serious and widespread losses in the shrimp industry in Thailand and elsewhere in Asia. Three suspected crab carriers of this virus commonly found in shrimp-rearing areas were investigated. These were Sesarma sp., Scylla serrata and Uca pugilator. All these crabs could be infected with WSSV by injection and they sustained heavy viral infections for up to 45 d (confirmed by normal histology, specific in situ DNA hybridization and PCR amplification) without visible signs of disease or mortality. All of them also transferred the disease to P. monodon via water while physically separated in aquarium cohabitation tests. Transfer of the virus to the shrimp was monitored using in situ DNA hybridization and PCR assay at 12 h intervals after cohabitation began. With U. pugilator, WSSV could be detected in the shrimp cohabitants after 24 h using PCR amplification and after 60 h using in situ hybridization. With S. serrata, the shrimp were positive for WSSV after 36 h using PCR and after 60 h using DNA in situ hybridization. With Sesarma sp. they were positive after 48 h using PCR and 72 h using in situ hybridization. These laboratory studies demonstrated that crab carriers of WSSV may pose a real threat to cultivated shrimp. However, the studies were carried out in containers with a small volume and with relatively clean sea water as compared to shrimp cultivation ponds. Pond-based studies are now needed to determine whether factors such as pond volume, pond water quality and shrimp and crab behavior can influence the rate and success of transfer.

  13. Conservation implications of physiological carry-over effects in bats recovering from white-nose syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Christina M; Mastromonaco, Gabriela F; Riley, Julia L; Baxter-Gilbert, James H; Mayberry, Heather; Willis, Craig K R

    2017-06-01

    Although it is well documented that infectious diseases can pose threats to biodiversity, the potential long-term consequences of pathogen exposure on individual fitness and its effects on population viability have rarely been studied. We tested the hypothesis that pathogen exposure causes physiological carry-over effects with a pathogen that is uniquely suited to this question because the infection period is specific and time limited. The fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans causes white-nose syndrome (WNS) in hibernating bats, which either die due to the infection while hibernating or recover following emergence from hibernation. The fungus infects all exposed individuals in an overwintering site simultaneously, and bats that survive infection during hibernation clear the pathogen within a few weeks following emergence. We quantified chronic stress during the active season, when bats are not infected, by measuring cortisol in bat claws. Free-ranging Myotis lucifugus who survived previous exposure to P. destructans had significantly higher levels of claw cortisol than naïve individuals. Thus, cryptic physiological carry-over effects of pathogen exposure may persist in asymptomatic, recovered individuals. If these effects result in reduced survival or reproductive success, they could also affect population viability and even act as a third stream in the extinction vortex. For example, significant increases in chronic stress, such as those indicated here, are correlated with reduced reproductive success in a number of species. Future research should directly explore the link between pathogen exposure and the viability of apparently recovered populations to improve understanding of the true impacts of infectious diseases on threatened populations. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  14. The resistance of a North American bat species (Eptesicus fuscus to White-nose Syndrome (WNS.

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    Craig L Frank

    Full Text Available White-nose Syndrome (WNS is the primary cause of over-winter mortality for little brown (Myotis lucifugus, northern (Myotis septentrionalis, and tricolored (Perimyotis subflavus bats, and is due to cutaneous infection with the fungus Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces destructans (Pd. Cutaneous infection with P. destructans disrupts torpor patterns, which is thought to lead to a premature depletion of body fat reserve. Field studies were conducted at 3 WNS-affected hibernation sites to determine if big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus are resistant to Pd. Radio telemetry studies were conducted during 2 winters to determine the torpor patterns of 23 free-ranging E. fuscus hibernating at a site where Pd occurs. The body fat contents of free-ranging E. fuscus and M. lucifugus during hibernation at 2 different WNS-affected sites were also determined. The numbers of bats hibernating at the same site was determined during both: a 4-7 years prior to the arrival of Pd, and, b 2-3 years after it first appeared at this site. The torpor bouts of big brown bats hibernating at a WNS-affected site were not significantly different in length from those previously reported for this species. The mean body fat content of E. fuscus in February was nearly twice that of M. lucifugus hibernating at the same WNS-affected sites during this month. The number of M. lucifugus hibernating at one site decreased by 99.6% after P. destructans first appeared, whereas the number of E. fuscus hibernating there actually increased by 43% during the same period. None of the E. fuscus collected during this study had any visible fungal growth or lesions on their skin, whereas virtually all the M. lucifugus collected had visible fungal growth on their wings, muzzle, and ears. These findings indicate that big brown bats are resistant to WNS.

  15. White-nose syndrome pathology grading in Nearctic and Palearctic bats.

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    Jiri Pikula

    Full Text Available While white-nose syndrome (WNS has decimated hibernating bat populations in the Nearctic, species from the Palearctic appear to cope better with the fungal skin infection causing WNS. This has encouraged multiple hypotheses on the mechanisms leading to differential survival of species exposed to the same pathogen. To facilitate intercontinental comparisons, we proposed a novel pathogenesis-based grading scheme consistent with WNS diagnosis histopathology criteria. UV light-guided collection was used to obtain single biopsies from Nearctic and Palearctic bat wing membranes non-lethally. The proposed scheme scores eleven grades associated with WNS on histopathology. Given weights reflective of grade severity, the sum of findings from an individual results in weighted cumulative WNS pathology score. The probability of finding fungal skin colonisation and single, multiple or confluent cupping erosions increased with increase in Pseudogymnoascus destructans load. Increasing fungal load mimicked progression of skin infection from epidermal surface colonisation to deep dermal invasion. Similarly, the number of UV-fluorescent lesions increased with increasing weighted cumulative WNS pathology score, demonstrating congruence between WNS-associated tissue damage and extent of UV fluorescence. In a case report, we demonstrated that UV-fluorescence disappears within two weeks of euthermy. Change in fluorescence was coupled with a reduction in weighted cumulative WNS pathology score, whereby both methods lost diagnostic utility. While weighted cumulative WNS pathology scores were greater in the Nearctic than Palearctic, values for Nearctic bats were within the range of those for Palearctic species. Accumulation of wing damage probably influences mortality in affected bats, as demonstrated by a fatal case of Myotis daubentonii with natural WNS infection and healing in Myotis myotis. The proposed semi-quantitative pathology score provided good agreement

  16. Post-White-nose syndrome trends in Virginia’s cave bats, 2008-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Karen E.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Orndorff, Wil; Ford, W. Mark; Hobson, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Since its 2009 detection in Virginia hibernacula, the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans causing White-nose Syndrome (WNS) has had a marked impact on cave bats locally. From 2008-2013, we documented numeric and physiologic changes in cave bats through fall swarm (FS), early hibernation (EH), and late hibernation (LH) capture and banding surveys at 18 hibernacula in western Virginia. We coupled active surveys with passive biennial winter counts in 2009, 2011, and 2013. We compared individual body mass index (BMI) across years for FS, EH, and LH hibernation to determine if WNS impacts on extant bats would be manifested by changes in body condition (as anecdotally observed elsewhere for WNS-impacted bats) as well as a population reduction. To estimate percent declines in bat presence or relative activity, we used FS capture per-unit-effort data, and the winter hibernacula absolute counts. We captured 4,524 bats of eight species, with species-specific capture success declining by 75-100% post-WNS. Little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) exhibited the greatest declines in winter hibernacula counts (AVG. = 99.0% decline), followed by tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus; 89.5% decline) and Indiana bats (M. sodalis; 33.5% decline). Graphical analyses of captures-per-trap-hour in FS showed declines for little brown bats, tri-colored bats, and northern long-eared bats (M. septentrionalis), but suggest a modest rebound of Indiana bat numbers. Fall swarm trends in BMI suggested some drops post-WNS exposure, but these trends were not consistent across sexes or seasonal time blocks. Our inconclusive BMI metrics and little brown bat band recapture data suggest little competitive advantage or selection for surviving bats. Lesser (but apparent) declines in Indiana bat numbers mirrors trends seen elsewhere regionally, and band recoveries do show that some individuals are persisting. Additional surveys will determine if bats in Virginia will persist or face extirpation due

  17. Toll receptor response to white spot syndrome virus challenge in giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinling; Zhao, Lingling; Jin, Min; Li, Tingting; Wu, Lei; Chen, Yihong; Ren, Qian

    2016-10-01

    Toll receptors are evolutionary ancient families of pattern recognition receptors with crucial roles in invertebrate innate immune response. In this study, we identified a Toll receptor (MrToll) from giant freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). The full-length cDNA of MrToll is 4257 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 1367 amino acids. MrToll contains 17 LRR domains, a transmembrane domain, and a TIR domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MrToll was grouped with Drosophila Toll7 and other arthropod Tolls. The transcripts of MrToll are mainly distributed in the heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. A low level of MrToll expression can be detected in hemocytes and the lymphoid organ. MrToll expression in gills was gradually upregulated to the highest level from 24 h to 48 h during the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. The expression levels of the crustin (Cru) genes Cru3 and Cru7 in gills were relatively lower than those of Cru2 and Cru4. The expression levels of Cru3 and Cru7 were inhibited after the RNA interference of MrToll in gills during the WSSV challenge. The anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) genes ALF2, ALF3, ALF4, and ALF5 were also regulated by MrToll in gills during the virus challenge. These findings suggest that MrToll may contribute to the innate immune defense of M. rosenbergii against WSSV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A transcriptome study on Macrobrachium rosenbergii hepatopancreas experimentally challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rama; Bhassu, Subha; Bing, Robin Zhu Ya; Alinejad, Tahereh; Hassan, Sharifah Syed; Wang, Jun

    2016-05-01

    The world production of shrimp such as the Malaysian giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii is seriously affected by the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). There is an urgent need to understand the host pathogen interaction between M. rosenbergii and WSSV which will be able to provide a solution in controlling the spread of this infectious disease and lastly save the aquaculture industry. Now, using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), we will be able to capture the response of the M. rosenbergii to the pathogen and have a better understanding of the host defence mechanism. Two cDNA libraries, one of WSSV-challenged M. rosenbergii and a normal control one, were sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. After de novo assembly and clustering of the unigenes from both libraries, 63,584 standard unigenes were generated with a mean size of 698bp and an N50 of 1137bp. We successfully annotated 35.31% of all unigenes by using BLASTX program (E-value <10-5) against NCBI non-redundant (Nr), Swiss-Prot, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome pathway (KEGG) and Orthologous Groups of proteins (COG) databases. Gene Ontology (GO) assessment was conducted using BLAST2GO software. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) by using the FPKM method showed 8443 host genes were significantly up-regulated whereas 5973 genes were significantly down-regulated. The differentially expressed immune related genes were grouped into 15 animal immune functions. The present study showed that WSSV infection has a significant impact on the transcriptome profile of M. rosenbergii's hepatopancreas, and further enhanced the knowledge of this host-virus interaction. Furthermore, the high number of transcripts generated in this study will provide a platform for future genomic research on freshwater prawns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Coral pathogens identified for White Syndrome (WS epizootics in the Indo-Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meir Sussman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: White Syndrome (WS, a general term for scleractinian coral diseases with acute signs of advancing tissue lesions often resulting in total colony mortality, has been reported from numerous locations throughout the Indo-Pacific, constituting a growing threat to coral reef ecosystems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bacterial isolates were obtained from corals displaying disease signs at three ws outbreak sites: Nikko Bay in the Republic of Palau, Nelly Bay in the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR and Majuro Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and used in laboratory-based infection trials to satisfy Henle-Koch's postulates, Evan's rules and Hill's criteria for establishing causality. Infected colonies produced similar signs to those observed in the field following exposure to bacterial concentrations of 1x10(6 cells ml(-1. Phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene analysis demonstrated that all six pathogens identified in this study were members of the gamma-Proteobacteria family Vibrionacae, each with greater than 98% sequence identity with the previously characterized coral bleaching pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. Screening for proteolytic activity of more than 150 coral derived bacterial isolates by a biochemical assay and specific primers for a Vibrio family zinc-metalloprotease demonstrated a significant association between the presence of isolates capable of proteolytic activity and observed disease signs. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to provide evidence for the involvement of a unique taxonomic group of bacterial pathogens in the aetiology of Indo-Pacific coral diseases affecting multiple coral species at multiple locations. Results from this study strongly suggest the need for further investigation of bacterial proteolytic enzymes as possible virulence factors involved in Vibrio associated acute coral infections.

  20. Summer hot snaps and winter conditions: modelling white syndrome outbreaks on Great Barrier Reef corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott F Heron

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are under increasing pressure in a changing climate, one such threat being more frequent and destructive outbreaks of coral diseases. Thermal stress from rising temperatures has been implicated as a causal factor in disease outbreaks observed on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and elsewhere in the world. Here, we examine seasonal effects of satellite-derived temperature on the abundance of coral diseases known as white syndromes on the Great Barrier Reef, considering both warm stress during summer and deviations from mean temperatures during the preceding winter. We found a high correlation (r(2 = 0.953 between summer warm thermal anomalies (Hot Snap and disease abundance during outbreak events. Inclusion of thermal conditions during the preceding winter revealed that a significant reduction in disease outbreaks occurred following especially cold winters (Cold Snap, potentially related to a reduction in pathogen loading. Furthermore, mild winters (i.e., neither excessively cool nor warm frequently preceded disease outbreaks. In contrast, disease outbreaks did not typically occur following warm winters, potentially because of increased disease resistance of the coral host. Understanding the balance between the effects of warm and cold winters on disease outbreak will be important in a warming climate. Combining the influence of winter and summer thermal effects resulted in an algorithm that yields both a Seasonal Outlook of disease risk at the conclusion of winter and near real-time monitoring of Outbreak Risk during summer. This satellite-derived system can provide coral reef managers with an assessment of risk three-to-six months in advance of the summer season that can then be refined using near-real-time summer observations. This system can enhance the capacity of managers to prepare for and respond to possible disease outbreaks and focus research efforts to increase understanding of environmental impacts on coral disease in

  1. Clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of multiple sclerosis: voxelwise regional investigation of white and gray matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Eytan; Cercignani, Mara; Sbardella, Emilia; Totaro, Porzia; Pozzilli, Carlo; Bozzali, Marco; Pantano, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    To quantify white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) damage in patients who presented with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), which is suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS), by combining volume-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). This prospective HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. In this study, 34 consecutive patients (21 women, 13 men; mean age, 31.7 years +/- 7.7 [standard deviation]) who presented with CIS were recruited. The magnetic resonance (MR) examination included dual-echo fast spin-echo, three-dimensional T1, and diffusion-tensor imaging. Sixteen matched healthy volunteers served as control subjects. T2 lesion volumes were assessed with a semiautomatic technique. VBM and TBSS were used for the GM and WM analyses, respectively, to compare regional GM volumes and fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the two groups. TBSS analysis revealed a pattern of diffuse FA reductions in patients with CIS at the cluster level (P < .05). Regions of decreased FA involved most of the WM pathways, including the corticospinal tracts, corpus callosum, and superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of global GM, WM, or cerebrospinal fluid volume or in terms of regional GM volume. Diffuse WM damage not accompanied by any change in GM or WM volume is observed in patients with CIS. This suggests that WM involvement plays a relevant role in the early phases of MS. Subsequently detected GM damage may be secondary to WM alterations.

  2. Molecular immune response of the American lobster (Homarus americanus) to the White Spot Syndrome Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K Fraser; Greenwood, Spencer J; Acorn, Adam R; Byrne, Philip J

    2013-11-01

    The adult American lobster (Homarus americanus) is susceptible to few naturally occurring pathogens, and no viral pathogen is known to exist. Despite this, relatively little is known about the H. americanus immune system and nothing is known about its potential viral immune response. Hundreds of rural communities in Atlantic Canada rely on the lobster fishery for their economic sustainability and could be devastated by large-scale pathogen-mediated mortality events. The White Spot Syndrome Virus is the most economically devastating viral pathogen to global shrimp aquaculture production and has been proposed to be capable of infecting all decapod crustaceans including the European Lobster. An in vivo WSSV injection challenge was conducted in H. americanus and WSSV was found to be capable of infecting and replicating within lobsters held at 20°C. The in vivo WSSV challenge also generated the first viral disease model of H. americanus and allowed for the high-throughput examination of transcriptomic changes that occur during viral infection. Microarray analysis found 136 differentially expressed genes and the expression of a subset of these genes was verified using RT-qPCR. Anti-lipopolysaccharide isoforms and acute phase serum amyloid protein A expression did not change during WSSV infection, contrary to previous findings during bacterial and parasitic infection of H. americanus. This, along with the differential gene expression of thioredoxin and trypsin isoforms, provides compelling evidence that H. americanus is capable of mounting an immune response specific to infection by different pathogen classes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. White matter water diffusion changes in primary Sjögren syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tzarouchi, L C; Zikou, A K; Tsifetaki, N; Astrakas, L G; Konitsiotis, S; Voulgari, P; Drosos, A; Argyropoulou, M I

    2014-01-01

    Histopathologic studies have demonstrated WM damage in primary Sjögren syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate WM microstructural changes by use of DTI-derived parameters in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome...

  4. Mutation of the MYH7 gene in a child with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkowski, Waldemar; Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata; Turska-Kmieć, Anna; Nowak, Agnieszka; Jagielski, Józef; Gonerska, Marzena; Lebioda, Arleta; Siwińska, Aldona

    2007-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) displays autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetration of defective genes. Data concerning the familial occurrence of ventricular preexcitation, i.e. Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, also indicate autosomal dominant inheritance. In the literature, only a gene mutation on chromosome 7q3 has been described in familial HCM coexisting with WPW syndrome to date. The present paper describes the case of a 7-year-old boy with HCM and coexisting WPW syndrome. On his chromosome 14, molecular diagnostics revealed a C 9123 mutation (arginine changed into cysteine in position 453) in exon 14 in a copy of the gene for beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7). It is the first known case of mutation of the MYH7 gene in a child with both HCM and WPW. Since no linkage between MYH7 mutation and HCM with WPW syndrome has been reported to date, we cannot conclude whether the observed mutation is a common cause for both diseases, or this patient presents an incidental co-occurrence of HCM (caused by MYH7 mutation) and WPW syndrome.

  5. White matter lesions as a feature of cognitive impairment, low vitality and other symptoms of geriatric syndrome in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonohara, Kazuki; Kozaki, Koichi; Akishita, Masahiro; Nagai, Kumiko; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Yokote, Koutaro; Toba, Kenji

    2008-06-01

    White matter lesions (WML) are common findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in elderly persons. In this study, we analyzed the relation of WML with global cognitive function, depression, vitality/volition, and 19 symptoms of geriatric syndrome in Japanese elderly patients who attended three university geriatric outpatient clinics. Two hundred and eighty-six subjects (103 men and 183 women; mean +/- standard deviation age, 74.5 +/- 7.8 years) were included in this study. MRI scans were performed for the diagnosis of WML, and the severity of periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensities (PVH and DWMH) was rated semiquantitatively. Concurrently, all subjects underwent tests of cognitive function, depressive state and vitality, and were examined for 19 symptoms of geriatric syndrome. The study subjects showed cognitive decline, depression and low vitality, all to a mild extent. Univariate linear regression analysis showed a negative correlation between the severity of WML and cognitive function or vitality. Multiple logistic analysis revealed that the severity of WML was a significant determinant of cognitive impairment and low vitality, after adjustment for confounding factors such as age, sex and concomitant diseases. PVH and/or DWMH score was significantly greater in subjects who exhibited 13 out of 19 symptoms of geriatric syndrome. Logistic regression analysis indicated that WML were associated with psychological disorders, gait disturbance, urinary problems and parkinsonism. WML were associated with various symptoms of functional decline in older persons. Evaluating WML in relation to functional decline would be important for preventing disability in elderly people.

  6. Comparison of Platelet Reactivity in Black Versus White Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes After Treatment With Ticagrelor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglia, Michael A; Lipinski, Michael J; Lhermusier, Thibault; Steinvil, Arie; Kiramijyan, Sarkis; Pokharel, Shreejana; Torguson, Rebecca; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Wallentin, Lars; Storey, Robert F; Waksman, Ron

    2017-04-15

    Ticagrelor, a potent platelet inhibitor, has primarily been studied in white patients. Platelet reactivity among black patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) on ticagrelor, however, is unknown. Our objective was to compare platelet reactivity in black versus white patients with ACS treated with ticagrelor. We conducted a prospective, pharmacodynamic study of 29 black patients with ACS treated with ticagrelor. Platelet reactivity was assessed at 1, 4, and 8 hours after a loading dose of ticagrelor 180 mg and at 30 days on a maintenance dose of ticagrelor 90 mg twice daily. Assays included light transmission aggregometry, VerifyNow P2Y12, and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein. We provided comparison with a historical white cohort. Platelet reactivity among blacks with ACS on ticagrelor was similar to that in whites, except that blacks had lower values at 4 hours, 8 hours, and on maintenance therapy for light transmission aggregometry with 20 μmol/L adenosine diphosphate. Among blacks, high-on-treatment platelet reactivity for all 3 assays was uncommon at 1 hour and nonexistent at 4 hours, 8 hours, and while on maintenance therapy. Blacks preloaded with clopidogrel (n = 17) had significantly lower results of VerifyNow (64 ± 65 vs 198 ± 86, p ticagrelor, levels of platelet reactivity in blacks are similar to that in whites. This suggests that the cardiovascular benefits of ticagrelor observed in the platelet inhibition and patient outcomes (PLATO) trial are likely to be observed in blacks and whites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in the era of catheter ablation: insights from a registry study of 2169 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappone, Carlo; Vicedomini, Gabriele; Manguso, Francesco; Saviano, Massimo; Baldi, Mario; Pappone, Alessia; Ciaccio, Cristiano; Giannelli, Luigi; Ionescu, Bogdan; Petretta, Andrea; Vitale, Raffaele; Cuko, Amarild; Calovic, Zarko; Fundaliotis, Angelica; Moscatiello, Mario; Tavazzi, Luigi; Santinelli, Vincenzo

    2014-09-02

    The management of Wolff-Parkinson-White is based on the distinction between asymptomatic and symptomatic presentations, but evidence is limited in the asymptomatic population. The Wolff-Parkinson-White registry was an 8-year prospective study of either symptomatic or asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White patients referred to our Arrhythmology Department for evaluation or ablation. Inclusion criteria were a baseline electrophysiological testing with or without radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA). Primary end points were the percentage of patients who experienced ventricular fibrillation (VF) or potentially malignant arrhythmias and risk factors. Among 2169 enrolled patients, 1001 (550 asymptomatic) did not undergo RFA (no-RFA group) and 1168 (206 asymptomatic) underwent ablation (RFA group). There were no differences in clinical and electrophysiological characteristics between the 2 groups except for symptoms. In the no-RFA group, VF occurred in 1.5% of patients, virtually exclusively (13 of 15) in children (median age, 11 years), and was associated with a short accessory pathway antegrade refractory period (PParkinson-White syndrome essentially depends on intrinsic electrophysiological properties of AP rather than on symptoms. RFA performed during the same procedure after electrophysiological testing is of benefit in improving the long-term outcomes. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Chronic fatigue syndrome: comparing outcomes in White British and Black and minority ethnic patients after cognitive-behavioural therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingman, Tom; Ali, Sheila; Bhui, Kamaldeep; Chalder, Trudie

    2016-09-01

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is one of the most promising treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). It is unclear whether CBT is effective for Black and minority ethnic (BME) groups. To assess the effectiveness of CBT in BME patients compared with White British patients presenting to a specialist CFS service. Data from 67 (19.0%) BME participants and 285 (81.0%) White British participants referred to a specialist CFS service in the UK were collected at baseline and after CBT treatment. Pairwise comparisons revealed that both BME participants and White British participants significantly improved on measures of fatigue severity (P<0.001), physical functioning (P<0.001) and work/social adjustment (P<0.001). Independent samples t-tests showed that BME participants improved despite exhibiting significantly higher baseline damage beliefs (P = 0.009), catastrophising (P = 0.024), all-or-nothing behaviour (P = 0.036) and avoidance/resting behaviour (P = 0.001), compared with White British participants. To our knowledge, this study is the first to indicate that CBT is effective for treating CFS in a group of patients from diverse BME backgrounds. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  9. Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors in Blacks and Whites: Dissecting Racial Paradox of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Osei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVD remain as the leading cause of mortality in the western world and have become a major health threat for developing countries. There are several risk factors that account for the CVD and the associated mortality. These include genetics, type 2 diabetes (T2DM, obesity, physical inactivity, hypertension, and abnormal lipids and lipoproteins. The constellation of these risk factors has been termed metabolic syndrome (MetS. MetS varies among racial and ethnic populations. Thus, race and ethnicity account for some of the differences in the MetS and the associated CVD and T2DM. Furthermore, the relationships among traditional metabolic parameters and CVD differ, especially when comparing Black and White populations. In this regard, the greater CVD in Blacks than Whites have been partly attributed to other non-traditional CVD risk factors, such as subclinical inflammation (C-reactive protein, homocysteine, increased low-density lipoprotein oxidation, lipoprotein a, adiponectin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, etc. Thus, to understand CVD and T2DM differences in Blacks and Whites with MetS, it is essential to explore the contributions of both traditional and non-traditional CVD and T2DM risk factors in Blacks of African ancestry and Whites of Europoid ancestry. Therefore, in this mini review, we propose that non-traditional risk factors should be integrated in defining MetS as a predictor of CVD and T2DM in Blacks in the African diaspora in future studies.

  10. Altered white matter microstructure is associated with social cognition and psychotic symptoms in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eJalbrzikowski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome (22q11DS is a highly penetrant genetic mutation associated with a significantly increased risk for psychosis. Aberrant neurodevelopment may lead to inappropriate neural circuit formation and cerebral dysconnectivity in 22q11DS, which may contribute to symptom development. Here we examined: 1 differences between 22q11DS participants and typically developing controls in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI measures within white matter tracts; 2 whether there is an altered age-related trajectory of white matter pathways in 22q11DS; and 3 relationships between DTI measures, social cognition task performance and positive symptoms of psychosis in 22q11DS and typically developing controls. Sixty-four direction diffusion weighted imaging data were acquired on 65 participants (36 22q11DS, 29 controls. We examined differences between 22q11DS vs. controls in measures of fractional anisotropy (FA, axial (AD and radial diffusivity (RD, using both a voxel-based and region of interest approach. Social cognition domains assessed were: Theory of Mind and emotion recognition. Positive symptoms were assessed using the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes. Compared to typically developing controls, 22q11DS participants showed significantly lower AD and RD in multiple white matter tracts, with effects of greatest magnitude for AD in the superior longitudinal fasciculus. Additionally, 22q11DS participants failed to show typical age-associated changes in FA and RD in the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Higher AD in the left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and left uncinate fasciculus was associated with better social cognition in 22q11DS and controls. In contrast, greater severity of positive symptoms was associated with lower AD in bilateral regions of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus in 22q11DS. White matter microstructure in tracts relevant to social cognition is disrupted in 22q11DS, and may contribute to

  11. Dot gain compensation in the blue noise mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Meng; Parker, Kevin J.

    1995-04-01

    Frequency modulated (FM) halftoning or 'stochastic screening,' has attracted a great deal of attention in the printing industry in recent years. It has several advantages over conventional halftoning. But one serious problem that arises in FM halftoning is dot gain. One approach to stochastic screening uses a specially constructed halftone screen, the blue noise mask (BNM), to produce an unstructured and visually appealing pattern of halftone dots at any gray level. In this paper, we will present methods to correct dot gain with the BNM. Dot gain is related to the area-to-perimeter ration of printed spots. We can exploit this feature in different ways. At a medium level, a B>NM pattern will have 'connected' as well as 'isolated' dots. Normally, as we build down BNM patterns to lower levels, a specific number of white dots will be replace by black dots. Since connected white dots are more likely to be picked than isolated white dots, this will results in substantial dot gain because of the increasing number of isolated white dots. We show that it is possible to constrain the process of constructing a BNM such that isolated dots are preferentially removes, thus significantly reducing dot gain in a BNM.

  12. Effects of wind energy generation and white-nose syndrome on the viability of the Indiana bat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Erickson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy generation holds the potential to adversely affect wildlife populations. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range. One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis, which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States. In addition to mortality from wind energy generation, the species also faces range-wide threats from the emerging infectious fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS. White-nose syndrome, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans, disturbs hibernating bats leading to high levels of mortality. We used a spatially explicit full-annual-cycle model to investigate how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect population dynamics of this species. In the simulation, wind turbine mortality impacted the metapopulation dynamics of the species by causing extirpation of some of the smaller winter colonies. In general, effects of wind turbines were localized and focused on specific spatial subpopulations. Conversely, WNS had a depressive effect on the species across its range. Wind turbine mortality interacted with WNS and together these stressors had a larger impact than would be expected from either alone, principally because these stressors together act to reduce species abundance across the spectrum of population sizes. Our findings illustrate the importance of not only prioritizing the protection of large winter colonies as is currently done, but also of protecting metapopulation dynamics and migratory connectivity.

  13. Effects of wind energy generation and white-nose syndrome on the viability of the Indiana bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Richard A; Thogmartin, Wayne E; Diffendorfer, Jay E; Russell, Robin E; Szymanski, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Wind energy generation holds the potential to adversely affect wildlife populations. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range. One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat ( Myotis sodalis ), which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States. In addition to mortality from wind energy generation, the species also faces range-wide threats from the emerging infectious fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS). White-nose syndrome, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans , disturbs hibernating bats leading to high levels of mortality. We used a spatially explicit full-annual-cycle model to investigate how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect population dynamics of this species. In the simulation, wind turbine mortality impacted the metapopulation dynamics of the species by causing extirpation of some of the smaller winter colonies. In general, effects of wind turbines were localized and focused on specific spatial subpopulations. Conversely, WNS had a depressive effect on the species across its range. Wind turbine mortality interacted with WNS and together these stressors had a larger impact than would be expected from either alone, principally because these stressors together act to reduce species abundance across the spectrum of population sizes. Our findings illustrate the importance of not only prioritizing the protection of large winter colonies as is currently done, but also of protecting metapopulation dynamics and migratory connectivity.

  14. Effects of wind energy generation and white-nose syndrome on the viability of the Indiana bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Richard A.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Diffendorfer, James E.; Russell, Robin E.; Szymanski, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Wind energy generation holds the potential to adversely affect wildlife populations. Species-wide effects are difficult to study and few, if any, studies examine effects of wind energy generation on any species across its entire range. One species that may be affected by wind energy generation is the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), which is found in the eastern and midwestern United States. In addition to mortality from wind energy generation, the species also faces range-wide threats from the emerging infectious fungal disease, white-nose syndrome (WNS). White-nose syndrome, caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans, disturbs hibernating bats leading to high levels of mortality. We used a spatially explicit full-annual-cycle model to investigate how wind turbine mortality and WNS may singly and then together affect population dynamics of this species. In the simulation, wind turbine mortality impacted the metapopulation dynamics of the species by causing extirpation of some of the smaller winter colonies. In general, effects of wind turbines were localized and focused on specific spatial subpopulations. Conversely, WNS had a depressive effect on the species across its range. Wind turbine mortality interacted with WNS and together these stressors had a larger impact than would be expected from either alone, principally because these stressors together act to reduce species abundance across the spectrum of population sizes. Our findings illustrate the importance of not only prioritizing the protection of large winter colonies as is currently done, but also of protecting metapopulation dynamics and migratory connectivity.

  15. Unique oxide overcoating of CuInS2/ZnS core/shell quantum dots with ZnGa2O4 for fabrication of white light-emitting diode with improved operational stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woo-Seuk; Jang, Eun-Pyo; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Jang, Ho Seong; Yang, Heesun

    2013-02-01

    CuInS2 quantum dots (QDs) have been recently highlighted as blue-to-yellow color converters for the demonstration of QD-based white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) owing to their advantageous fluorescent attributes including a broadband yellow emission and exceptional quantum yield. Similar to other types of elaborate core/shell structured QDs, however, core/shell QDs of CuInS2/ZnS are also susceptible to the photo-induced degradation, rendering them inappropriate for the practical application to high operational stability white LED. In this study, CuInS2/ZnS QDs are overcoated with the unprecedented oxide phase of ZnGa2O4 to enhance their photostability, and the resulting CuInS2/ZnS/ZnGa2O4 QDs are characterized with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. The operational stability test of CuInS2/ZnS/ZnGa2O4 QD-based white LED is performed and compared with that of uncoated CuInS2/ZnS QD-based one, and the efficacy of ZnGa2O4 overlayer is proved in mitigating the photodegradation of QDs and thus improving the device stability.

  16. Advances in the processing of policromat images as diagnostic method to determine white spot syndrome virus in white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Sanchez, Cristina M.; Alvarez-Borrego, Josue; Montoya-Rodriguez, L.; Garcia-Gasca, A.; Fajer Avila, Emma J.; Pacheco-Marges, R.

    2004-10-01

    White spot syndrome (WSSV) is a viral disease which affects many crustacean species including commercial shrimps. Adequate, precise and quick methods to diagnose on time the presence of the disease in order to apply different strategies to avoid the dispersion and to reduce mortalities is necessary. Histopathology is an important diagnostic method. However, histopathology has the problem that requires time to prepare the histological slides and time to arrive to some diagnosis because this depend on the nature of the tissues, the pathogen(s) to find, the number of organisms, number of slides to analyze and the skill of the technician. This paper try to demonstrate the sensibility of one digital system of processing and recognition of images using color correlation with phase filters, to identify inclusion bodies of WSSV. Infected tissues were processed to obtain histological slides and to verify that the inclusion bodies observed were of WSV, in situ hybridization were carried out. The sensibility results of the recognition of the inclusion bodies of WSSV with the color correlation program was 86.1%. The highest percentage of recognition was in nervous system and tegument glands with 100%. The values in the stomach epithelium and heart tissue was 78.45% of recognition. Tissues with the lowest recognition values were lymphoid organ and hematopoietic tissue. It is necessary further studies to increase the sensibility and to obtain the specificity.

  17. White matter water diffusion changes in primary Sjögren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzarouchi, L C; Zikou, A K; Tsifetaki, N; Astrakas, L G; Konitsiotis, S; Voulgari, P; Drosos, A; Argyropoulou, M I

    2014-04-01

    Histopathologic studies have demonstrated WM damage in primary Sjögren syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate WM microstructural changes by use of DTI-derived parameters in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome. DTI was performed in 19 patients with primary Sjögren syndrome (age, 64.73 ± 9.1 years; disease duration, 11.5 ± 7.56 years) and 16 age-matched control subjects. Exclusion criteria were a history of major metabolic, neurologic, or psychiatric disorder and high risk for cardiovascular disease. Data were analyzed by use of tract-based spatial statistics, for which the WM skeleton was created, and a permutation-based inference with 5000 permutations was used with a threshold of P primary Sjögren syndrome compared with control subjects, located mainly in the corticospinal tract, superior longitudinal fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, uncinate fasciculus, and inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Increased mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity and decreased axial diffusivity were observed in most of the fiber tracts of the brain in patients with primary Sjögren syndrome, compared with control subjects. Patients with primary Sjögren syndrome show loss of WM microstructural integrity, probably related to both Wallerian degeneration and demyelination.

  18. Antiviral property of marine actinomycetes against white spot syndrome virus in penaeid shrimps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, S.S.; Philip, R.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    and are continually being screened for new compounds. In this communication, the results of a study made to determine the effectiveness of marine actinomycetes against the white spot disease in penaeid shrimps are presented. Twenty-five isolates of actinomycetes were...

  19. Synthesis and characterization of green Zn-Ag-In-S and red Zn-Cu-In-S quantum dots for ultrahigh color quality of down-converted white LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hee Chang; Oh, Ji Hye; Ko, Minji; Yoo, Heeyeon; Do, Young Rag

    2015-04-08

    Eco-friendly green Zn-Ag-In-S (ZAIS) and red Zn-Cu-In-S (ZCIS) core/shell-like alloyed quantum dots (QDs) have been synthesized by a facile hot-injection method with a multiple injection approach. Broad full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) of the photoluminescence (PL) emission and tunability of the green ZAIS and red ZCIS QDs were obtained by adopting a low-temperature core growth and high-temperature multiple alloyed reaction. The alloyed green ZAIS and red ZCIS QDs reached PL quantum yields as high as 0.61 and 0.53; fwhm of the PL peaks were as wide as 81 and 106 nm, respectively. This demonstrates the practical realization of white down-converted light-emitting diodes (DC-LEDs), fully covering the whole visible wavelength range and the cyan gap, using two broad fwhm green ZAIS and red ZCIS QDs. We also characterized the vision and color performance using luminous efficacy (LE), color rendering index (CRI), special CRI for strong red (R9), and color quality scale (CQS) of white DC-LEDs incorporated with green ZAIS and red ZCIS QDs at the correlated color temperature (CCT) range of 2700-10 000 K. The tricolor white DC-LED using broad fwhm green-emitting ZAIS and red-emitting ZCIS core/shell-like alloyed QDs exhibits a moderate LE (31.2 lm/W) and ultrahigh color qualities (CRI = 97, R9 = 97, and CQS = 94) with warm white at a CCT of 3500 K.

  20. Transcriptome profiling of white adipose tissue in a mouse model for 15q duplication syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Tamada, Kota; Kishimoto, Rui; Okubo, Hiroko; Ise, Satoko; Ohta, Hisashi; Ruf, Sandra; Nakatani, Jin; Kohno, Nobuoki; Spitz, François; Takumi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is not only associated with unhealthy lifestyles, but also linked to genetic predisposition. Previously, we generated an autism mouse model (patDp/+) that carries a 6.3 Mb paternal duplication homologous to the human 15q11–q13 locus. Chromosomal abnormalities in this region are known to cause autism spectrum disorder, Prader–Willi syndrome, and Angelman syndrome in humans. We found that, in addition to autistic-like behaviors, patDp/+ mice display late-onset obesity and hypersensitivi...

  1. The eye amputated - consequences of eye amputation with emphasis on clinical aspects, phantom eye syndrome and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie Louise Roed

    2010-01-01

    used with an increasing tendency until 2003. The Phantom eye syndrome is frequent among EA patients. Visual hallucinations were described by 42% of the patients. The content were mainly elementary visual hallucinations, with white or colored light as a continuous sharp light or as moving dots. The most...

  2. Relationships of three species of bats impacted by white-nose syndrome to forest condition and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvis, Alexander; Perry, Roger W.; Ford, W. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Forest management activities can have substantial effects on forest structure and community composition and response of wildlife therein. Bats can be highly influenced by these structural changes, and understanding how forest management affects day-roost and foraging ecology of bats is currently a paramount conservation issue. With populations of many cave-hibernating bat species in eastern North America declining as a result of white-nose syndrome (WNS), it is increasingly critical to understand relationships among bats and forest-management activities. Herein, we provide a comprehensive literature review and synthesis of: (1) responses of northern long-eared (Myotis septentrionalis) and tri-colored (Perimyotis subflavus) bats—two species affected by WNS that use forests during summer—to forest management, and (2) an update to a previous review on the ecology of the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis).

  3. Geomyces and Pseudogymnoascus: Emergence of a primary pathogen, the causative agent of bat white-nose syndrome: Chapter 28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verant, Michelle L.; Minnis, Andrew M.; Lindner, Daniel L.; Blehert, David

    2017-01-01

    Geomyces and Pseudogymnoascus (Fungi, Ascomycota, Leotiomycetes, aff. Thelebolales) are closely related groups of globally occurring soil-associated fungi. Recently, these genera of fungi have received attention because a newly identified species, Pseudogymnoascus (initially classified as Geomyces) destructans, was discovered in association with significant and unusual mortality of hibernating bats in North America (Blehert et al. 2009; Gargas et al. 2009; Minnis and Linder 2013). This emergent disease called bat white-nose syndrome (WNS), has since caused drastic declines in populations of hibernating bats in the United States and Canada (Turner, Reeder, and Coleman 2011; Thogmartin et al. 2012) and threatens some species with regional extinction (Frick et al. 2010; Langwig et al. 2012; Thogmartin et al. 2013). As primary predators of insects and keystone species for cave ecosystems, the loss of bats due to WNS has important economic and ecological implications.

  4. Indel-II region deletion sizes in the white spot syndrome virus genome correlate with shrimp disease outbreaks in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran Thi Tuyet, H.; Zwart, M.P.; Phuong, N.T.; Oanh, D.T.H.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Vlak, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Sequence comparisons of the genomes of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) strains have identified regions containing variable-length insertions/deletions (i.e. indels). Indel-I and Indel-II, positioned between open reading frames (ORFs) 14/15 and 23/24, respectively, are the largest and the most

  5. Determinants of Pseudogymnoascus destructans within bat hibernacula: Implications for surveillance and management of white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verant, Michelle L.; Bohuski, Elizabeth A.; Richgels, Katherine L. D.; Olival, Kevin J.; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Blehert, David

    2018-01-01

    Fungal diseases are an emerging global problem affecting human health, food security and biodiversity. Ability of many fungal pathogens to persist within environmental reservoirs can increase extinction risks for host species and presents challenges for disease control. Understanding factors that regulate pathogen spread and persistence in these reservoirs is critical for effective disease management.White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a disease of hibernating bats caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), a fungus that establishes persistent environmental reservoirs within bat hibernacula, which contribute to seasonal disease transmission dynamics in bats. However, host and environmental factors influencing distribution of Pdwithin these reservoirs are unknown.We used model selection on longitudinally collected field data to test multiple hypotheses describing presence–absence and abundance of Pd in environmental substrates and on bats within hibernacula at different stages of WNS.First detection of Pd in the environment lagged up to 1 year after first detection on bats within that hibernaculum. Once detected, the probability of detecting Pd within environmental samples from a hibernaculum increased over time and was higher in sediment compared to wall surfaces. Temperature had marginal effects on the distribution of Pd. For bats, prevalence and abundance of Pd were highest on Myotis lucifugus and on bats with visible signs of WNS.Synthesis and applications. Our results indicate that distribution of Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) within a hibernaculum is driven primarily by bats with delayed establishment of environmental reservoirs. Thus, collection of samples from Myotis lucifugus, or from sediment if bats cannot be sampled, should be prioritized to improve detection probabilities for Pd surveillance. Long-term persistence of Pd in sediment suggests that disease management for white-nose syndrome should address risks of sustained

  6. First characterization of bacterial pathogen, Vibrio alginolyticus, for Porites andrewsi White syndrome in the South China Sea.

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    Xie Zhenyu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: White syndrome, a term for scleractinian coral disease with progressive tissue loss, is known to cause depressed growth and increased morality of coral reefs in the major oceans around the world, and the occurrence of this disease has been frequently reported in the past few decades. Investigations during April to September in both 2010 and 2011 identified widespread Porites andrewsi White syndrome (PAWS in Xisha Archipelago, South China Sea. However, the causes and etiology of PAWS have been unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A transmission experiment was performed on P. andrewsi in the Qilianyu Subgroup (QLY. The results showed that there was a significant (P ≤ 0.05 difference between test and control groups after 28 days if the invalid replicates were excluded. Rates of tissue loss ranged from 0.90-10.76 cm(2 d(-1 with a mean of 5.40 ± 3.34 cm(2 d(-1 (mean ± SD. Bacterial strains were isolated from the PAWS corals at the disease outbreak sites in QLY of the Xisha Archipelago, South China Sea, and included in laboratory-based infection trials to satisfy Koch's postulates for establishing causality. Following exposure to bacterial concentrations of 10(5 cells mL(-1, the infected colonies exhibited similar signs to those observed in the field. Using phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene analysis, classical phenotypic trait comparison, Biolog automatic identification system, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and MALDI Biotyper method, two pathogenic strains were identified as Vibrio alginolyticus . CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of V. alginolyticus as a pathogenic agent of PAWS in the South China Sea. Our results point out an urgent need to develop sensitive detection methods for V. alginolyticus virulence strains and robust diagnostics for coral disease caused by this and Vibrio pathogenic bacterium in the South China Sea.

  7. First characterization of bacterial pathogen, Vibrio alginolyticus, for Porites andrewsi White syndrome in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenyu, Xie; Shaowen, Ke; Chaoqun, Hu; Zhixiong, Zhu; Shifeng, Wang; Yongcan, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    White syndrome, a term for scleractinian coral disease with progressive tissue loss, is known to cause depressed growth and increased morality of coral reefs in the major oceans around the world, and the occurrence of this disease has been frequently reported in the past few decades. Investigations during April to September in both 2010 and 2011 identified widespread Porites andrewsi White syndrome (PAWS) in Xisha Archipelago, South China Sea. However, the causes and etiology of PAWS have been unknown. A transmission experiment was performed on P. andrewsi in the Qilianyu Subgroup (QLY). The results showed that there was a significant (P ≤ 0.05) difference between test and control groups after 28 days if the invalid replicates were excluded. Rates of tissue loss ranged from 0.90-10.76 cm(2) d(-1) with a mean of 5.40 ± 3.34 cm(2) d(-1) (mean ± SD). Bacterial strains were isolated from the PAWS corals at the disease outbreak sites in QLY of the Xisha Archipelago, South China Sea, and included in laboratory-based infection trials to satisfy Koch's postulates for establishing causality. Following exposure to bacterial concentrations of 10(5) cells mL(-1), the infected colonies exhibited similar signs to those observed in the field. Using phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene analysis, classical phenotypic trait comparison, Biolog automatic identification system, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and MALDI Biotyper method, two pathogenic strains were identified as Vibrio alginolyticus . This is the first report of V. alginolyticus as a pathogenic agent of PAWS in the South China Sea. Our results point out an urgent need to develop sensitive detection methods for V. alginolyticus virulence strains and robust diagnostics for coral disease caused by this and Vibrio pathogenic bacterium in the South China Sea.

  8. Surveillance for White-Nose Syndrome in the bat community at El Malpais National Monument, New Mexico, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Ernest W.

    2012-01-01

    From late winter to summer 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey Arid Lands Field Station conducted mist-netting efforts at El Malpais National Monument and on adjacent lands belonging to Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service to detect the occurrence of white-nose syndrome or causal fungal agent (Geomyces destructans). During this assessment, 421 bats belonging to 8 species were documented at El Malpais National Monument and adjacent lands. None of these captures showed evidence for the presence of white-nose syndrome or G. destructans, but it is possible that the subtle signs of some infections may not have been observed. Throughout the field efforts, Laguna de Juan Garcia was the only water source located on El Malpais National Monument and was netted on June 20 and 27, July 25, and August 2, 2011. During these dates, a total of 155 bats were captured, belonging to eight species including: Corynorhinus townsendii (Townsend's Big-Eared Bat), Eptesicus fuscus (Big Brown Bat), Lasionycterics noctivagans (Silver-Haired Bat), Myotis ciliolabrum (Small-Footed Myotis), M. evotis (Long-eared myotis), M. thysanodes (Fringed Myotis), M. volans (Long-Legged Myotis), and Tadarida brasiliensis (Brazilian Free-Tailed Bat). Overall, Laguna de Juan Garcia had the greatest number of captures (79 bats) during one night compared to the other sites netted on adjacent lands and had the greatest species diversity of 8 species netted, not including Euderma maculatum (Spotted Bat) that was detected by its audible calls as it flew overhead. Laguna de Juan Garcia is an important site to bats because of its accessibility by all known occurring species, including the less-maneuverable T. brasiliensis that is known to form large colonies in the park. Laguna de Juan Garcia is also important as a more permanent water source during drought conditions in the earlier part of the spring and summer, as observed in 2011.

  9. [Fragile X syndrome and white matter abnormalities: Case study of two brothers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, E; Bieth, E; Sevely, A; Cances, C

    2017-03-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most usual cause of hereditary intellectual deficiency. Typical symptoms combine intellectual deficiency, social anxiety, intense emotional vigilance, and a characteristic facial dysmorphy. This is subsequent to a complete mutation of the FMR1 gene, considering a semidominant transmission linked to the unstable X. The expansion of the CGG triplet greater than 200 units combined with a high methylation pattern lead to a transcriptional silence of the FMR1 gene, and the protein product, the FMRP, is not synthesized. This protein is involved in synaptic plasticity. Brain MRI can show an increased volume of the caudate nucleus and hippocampus, combined with hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. Fragile X Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS) syndrome is a neurodegenerative disorder occurring in carriers of the premutation in FMR1. Brain MRI shows an increased T2 signal in the middle cerebellar peduncles. This syndrome is linked to a premutation in the FMR1 gene. We report here the case of two brothers presenting a typical fragile X symptomatology. Brain MRI showed hyperintensities of the middle cerebellar peduncles. Such MRI findings support the assumption of a genetic mosaicism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. White Matter Integrity in Asperger Syndrome: A Preliminary Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, Oswald J. N.; Deeley, Quinton; Sundram, Fred; Daly, Eileen M.; Barker, Gareth J.; Jones, Derek K.; van Amelsvoort, Therese A. M. J.; Schmitz, Nicole; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murphy, Declan G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD), including Asperger syndrome and autism, is a highly genetic neurodevelopmental disorder. There is a consensus that ASD has a biological basis, and it has been proposed that it is a "connectivity" disorder. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  11. Antiphospholipid Syndrome With a Distinctive Constellation of Neurological Manifestations: Blue Toes, Red Valves, White Retinal Spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Brandon T; Dumitrascu, Oana M; Shamoun, Fadi E; OʼCarroll, Cumara B

    2017-07-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) encompasses a hypercoagulable state with a markedly increased risk for cerebrovascular complications. In addition to the classic stroke features of APS, however, there are numerous recently described "non-criteria" neurological conditions such as headaches, seizures, and cognitive impairment. We present a case of APS with uncommon neurological manifestations.

  12. Molecular modeling and expression of the Litopenaeus vannamei proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) after white spot syndrome virus shrimp infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-la-Re-Vega, Enrique; Muhlia-Almazan, Adriana; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A; Islas-Osuna, Maria A; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria; Brieba, Luis G; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2011-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the eukaryotic sliding clamp that tethers DNA polymerase to DNA during replication. The full-length cDNA of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei PCNA (LvPCNA) was cloned and encoded a protein of 260 amino acids that is highly similar to other Crustacean PCNAs. The theoretical shrimp PCNA structure has all the domains that are necessary for its interaction with template DNA and DNA polymerase. RT-PCR analysis showed that LvPCNA is expressed mainly in muscle and hemocytes and much less in hepatopancreas and gills. LvPCNA mRNA levels are not statistically different in muscle from healthy and challenged shrimp with the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). In contrast, the mRNA levels of the viral DNA polymerase show a biphasic pattern with expression at 6 h post-infection and later at 24 and 48 h. These results suggest that in shrimp muscle LvPCNA levels are steadily kept to allow viral replication and that WSSV DNA polymerase (WSSV-DNApol) is more responsive towards later stages of infection. More knowledge of the DNA replication machinery would result in a better understanding of the mechanism and components of viral replication, since the WSSV genome does not have all the components required for assembly of a fully functional replisome.

  13. Sequencing and de novo analysis of the hemocytes transcriptome in Litopenaeus vannamei response to white spot syndrome virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxia Xue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: White spot syndrome virus (WSSV is a causative pathogen found in most shrimp farming areas of the world and causes large economic losses to the shrimp aquaculture. The mechanism underlying the molecular pathogenesis of the highly virulent WSSV remains unknown. To better understand the virus-host interactions at the molecular level, the transcriptome profiles in hemocytes of unchallenged and WSSV-challenged shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei were compared using a short-read deep sequencing method (Illumina. RESULTS: RNA-seq analysis generated more than 25.81 million clean pair end (PE reads, which were assembled into 52,073 unigenes (mean size = 520 bp. Based on sequence similarity searches, 23,568 (45.3% genes were identified, among which 6,562 and 7,822 unigenes were assigned to gene ontology (GO categories and clusters of orthologous groups (COG, respectively. Searches in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG mapped 14,941 (63.4% unigenes to 240 KEGG pathways. Among all the annotated unigenes, 1,179 were associated with immune-related genes. Digital gene expression (DGE analysis revealed that the host transcriptome profile was slightly changed in the early infection (5 hours post injection of the virus, while large transcriptional differences were identified in the late infection (48 hpi of WSSV. The differentially expressed genes mainly involved in pattern recognition genes and some immune response factors. The results indicated that antiviral immune mechanisms were probably involved in the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. CONCLUSIONS: This study provided a global survey of host gene activities against virus infection in a non-model organism, pacific white shrimp. Results can contribute to the in-depth study of candidate genes in white shrimp, and help to improve the current understanding of host-pathogen interactions.

  14. CLUSTER MODEL FOR EXTENSIVE GIANT TIGER SHRIMP (Penaeus monodon Fab. TO PREVENT TRANSMISSION OF WHITE SPOT SYNDROME VIRUS

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    Arief Taslihan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV has become epidemic in Indonesia and affecting shrimp aquaculture interm of its production. White spot syndrome virus is transmitted from one to other ponds, through crustacean, included planktonic copepode as carrier for WSSV and through water from affected shrimp pond. A cluster model, consist of shrimp grow out ponds surrounded by non-shrimp pond as a role of biosecurity has been developed. The model aimed to prevent white spot virus transmission in extensive giant tiger shrimp pond. The study was conducted in two sites at Demak District, Central Java Province. As the treatment, a cluster consist of three shrimp ponds in site I, and two shrimp ponds in site II, each was surrounded by buffer ponds rearing only finfish. As the control, five extensive shrimp grow out ponds in site I and three shrimp grow out ponds in site II, with shrimp pond has neither applied biosecurity nor surrounded by non-shrimp pond as biosecurity as well considered as control ponds. The results found that treatment of cluster shrimp ponds surrounded by non-shrimp ponds could hold shrimp at duration of culture in the grow out pond (DOC 105.6±4.5 days significantly much longer than that of control that harvested at 60.9±16.0 days due to WSSV outbreak. Survival rate in trial ponds was 77.6±3.6%, significantly higher than that of control at 22.6±15.8%. Shrimp production in treatment ponds has total production of 425.1±146.6 kg/ha significantly higher than that of control that could only produced 54.5±47.6 kg/ha. Implementation of Better Management Practices (BMP by arranging shrimp ponds in cluster and surrounding by non-shrimp ponds proven effectively prevent WSSV transmission from traditional shrimp ponds in surrounding area.

  15. Red but not white meat consumption is associated with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and lipid peroxidation in Brazilian middle-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocate, Paula G; Natali, Antônio José; de Oliveira, Alessandro; Alfenas, Rita de Cássia G; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo G; Longo, Giana Z; dos Santos, Eliziária C; Buthers, Jéssica M; de Oliveira, Leandro L; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana M

    2015-02-01

    The influence of diet on metabolic syndrome and oxidative stress are not completely known. This cross-sectional study assessed the association of red meat and white meat consumption with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and lipid peroxidation in Brazilian middle-aged men. A total of 296 subjects (age: 50.5 ± 5.0 years, body mass index: 25.8 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)) were evaluated. Anthropometry, lifestyle features, blood biochemical parameters, diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance, a lipid peroxidation marker (oxidized low-density lipoprotein) and triglycerides:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio were assessed. Dietary intake was estimated by a food frequency questionnaire. The subjects included in the highest tertile red meat (≥81.5 g/d) and saturated fatty acid from red meat consumption (≥4.3 g/d) had higher occurrence of central obesity (nearly 60%, p metabolic syndrome (35%, p insulin resistance, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, regardless of interfering factors. There were no associations of highest white meat tertile (≥39.4 g/d) and saturated fatty acid from white meat (≥1.0 g/d) consumption with the assessed parameters (p > 0.05). Red meat consumption was cross-sectionally associated with the occurrence of central obesity, hypertriglyceridaemia, and metabolic syndrome as well as with higher homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance, oxidized low-density lipoprotein concentrations and triglycerides:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio. The content of saturated fatty acid from red meat consumption may be a factor that contributed to this relationship, while white meat consumption was not associated with metabolic syndrome and the assessed biomarkers. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  16. A missense mutation in the endothelin-B receptor gene is associated with Lethal White Foal Syndrome: an equine version of Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallinos, D L; Bowling, A T; Rine, J

    1998-06-01

    Lethal White Foal Syndrome is a disease associated with horse breeds that register white coat spotting patterns. Breedings between particular spotted horses, generally described as frame overo, produce some foals that, in contrast to their parents, are all white or nearly all white and die shortly after birth of severe intestinal blockage. These foals have aganglionosis characterized by a lack of submucosal and myenteric ganglia from the distal small intestine to the large intestine, similar to human Hirschsprung Disease. Some sporadic and familial cases of Hirschsprung Disease are due to mutations in the endothelin B receptor gene (EDNRB). In this study, we investigate the role of EDNRB in Lethal White Foal Syndrome. A cDNA for the wild-type horse endothelin-B receptor gene was cloned and sequenced. In three unrelated lethal white foals, the EDNRB gene contained a 2-bp nucleotide change leading to a missense mutation (I118K) in the first transmembrane domain of the receptor, a highly conserved region of this protein among different species. Seven additional unrelated lethal white foal samples were found to be homozygous for this mutation. No other homozygotes were identified in 138 samples analyzed, suggesting that homozygosity was restricted to lethal white foals. All (40/40) horses with the frame overo pattern (a distinct coat color pattern that is a subset of overo horses) that were tested were heterozygous for this allele, defining a heterozygous coat color phenotype for this mutation. Horses with tobiano markings included some carriers, indicating that tobiano is epistatic to frame overo. In addition, horses were identified that were carriers but had no recognized overo coat pattern phenotype, demonstrating the variable penetrance of the mutation. The test for this mutant allele can be utilized in all breeds where heterozygous animals may be unknowingly bred to each other including the Paint Horse, Pinto horse, Quarter Horse, Miniature Horse, and Thoroughbred.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION AND CORRELATION OF "JAMPOL DOTS" ON ADAPTIVE OPTICS WITH FOVEAL GRANULARITY ON CONVENTIONAL FUNDUS IMAGING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Alex C; Roberts, Philipp K; Jampol, Lee M; Nesper, Peter L; Fawzi, Amani A

    2017-11-22

    To describe features characteristic of multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO). Six women (seven eyes) who presented with MEWDS between June 2014 and April 2017 underwent ophthalmologic examinations and multimodal imaging including infrared, AOSLO, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Bright hyperreflective lesions on AOSLO throughout the course of MEWDS could be correlated to the hyperreflective dots of foveal granularity on infrared imaging without apparent corresponding changes on spectral domain optical coherence tomography. During the acute phase of MEWDS, extrafoveal hyperreflective dots were also visible on AOSLO and infrared and were associated with accumulations of hyperreflective material above the retinal pigment epithelium on spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Foveal granularity on conventional fundus imaging could be correlated with hyperreflective lesions visible on AOSLO. We hypothesize that these hyperreflective lesions, "Jampol dots," are the foveal corollaries of the same process associated with the classic "dot" lesions in MEWDS. Based on the intact photoreceptor mosaic on AOSLO, we surmise that this material is accumulating at the level of the retinal pigment epithelium.

  18. Skin lesions in European hibernating bats associated with Geomyces destructans, the etiologic agent of white-nose syndrome.

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    Gudrun Wibbelt

    Full Text Available White-nose syndrome (WNS has claimed the lives of millions of hibernating insectivorous bats in North America. Its etiologic agent, the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans, causes skin lesions that are the hallmark of the disease. The fungal infection is characterized by a white powdery growth on muzzle, ears and wing membranes. While WNS may threaten some species of North American bats with regional extinction, infection in hibernating bats in Europe seems not to be associated with significant mortality. We performed histopathological investigations on biopsy samples of 11 hibernating European bats, originating from 4 different countries, colonized by G. destructans. One additional bat was euthanized to allow thorough examination of multiple strips of its wing membranes. Molecular analyses of touch imprints, swabs and skin samples confirmed that fungal structures were G. destructans. Additionally, archived field notes on hibernacula monitoring data in the Harz Mountains, Germany, over an 11-year period (2000-2011 revealed multiple capture-recapture events of 8 banded bats repeatedly displaying characteristic fungal colonization. Skin lesions of G. destructans-affected hibernating European bats are intriguingly similar to the epidermal lesions described in North American bats. Nevertheless, deep invasion of fungal hyphae into the dermal connective tissue with resulting ulceration like in North American bats was not observed in the biopsy samples of European bats; all lesions found were restricted to the layers of the epidermis and its adnexae. Two bats had mild epidermal cupping erosions as described for North American bats. The possible mechanisms for any difference in outcomes of G. destructans infection in European and North American bats still need to be elucidated.

  19. Pan-European distribution of white-nose syndrome fungus (Geomyces destructans not associated with mass mortality.

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    Sébastien J Puechmaille

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The dramatic mass mortalities amongst hibernating bats in Northeastern America caused by "white nose-syndrome" (WNS continue to threaten populations of different bat species. The cold-loving fungus, Geomyces destructans, is the most likely causative agent leading to extensive destruction of the skin, particularly the wing membranes. Recent investigations in Europe confirmed the presence of the fungus G. destructans without associated mass mortality in hibernating bats in six countries but its distribution remains poorly known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We collected data on the presence of bats with white fungal growth in 12 countries in Europe between 2003 and 2010 and conducted morphological and genetic analysis to confirm the identity of the fungus as Geomyces destructans. Our results demonstrate the presence of the fungus in eight countries spanning over 2000 km from West to East and provide compelling photographic evidence for its presence in another four countries including Romania, and Turkey. Furthermore, matching prevalence data of a hibernaculum monitored over two consecutive years with data from across Europe show that the temporal occurrence of the fungus, which first becomes visible around February, peaks in March but can still be seen in some torpid bats in May or June, is strikingly similar throughout Europe. Finally, we isolated and cultured G. destructans from a cave wall adjacent to a bat with fungal growth. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: G. destructans is widely found over large areas of the European continent without associated mass mortalities in bats, suggesting that the fungus is native to Europe. The characterisation of the temporal variation in G. destructans growth on bats provides reference data for studying the spatio-temporal dynamic of the fungus. Finally, the presence of G. destructans spores on cave walls suggests that hibernacula could act as passive vectors and/or reservoirs for G. destructans and

  20. Skin lesions in European hibernating bats associated with Geomyces destructans, the etiologic agent of white-nose syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibbelt, Gudrun; Puechmaille, Sébastien J; Ohlendorf, Bernd; Mühldorfer, Kristin; Bosch, Thijs; Görföl, Tamás; Passior, Karsten; Kurth, Andreas; Lacremans, Daniel; Forget, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) has claimed the lives of millions of hibernating insectivorous bats in North America. Its etiologic agent, the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans, causes skin lesions that are the hallmark of the disease. The fungal infection is characterized by a white powdery growth on muzzle, ears and wing membranes. While WNS may threaten some species of North American bats with regional extinction, infection in hibernating bats in Europe seems not to be associated with significant mortality. We performed histopathological investigations on biopsy samples of 11 hibernating European bats, originating from 4 different countries, colonized by G. destructans. One additional bat was euthanized to allow thorough examination of multiple strips of its wing membranes. Molecular analyses of touch imprints, swabs and skin samples confirmed that fungal structures were G. destructans. Additionally, archived field notes on hibernacula monitoring data in the Harz Mountains, Germany, over an 11-year period (2000-2011) revealed multiple capture-recapture events of 8 banded bats repeatedly displaying characteristic fungal colonization. Skin lesions of G. destructans-affected hibernating European bats are intriguingly similar to the epidermal lesions described in North American bats. Nevertheless, deep invasion of fungal hyphae into the dermal connective tissue with resulting ulceration like in North American bats was not observed in the biopsy samples of European bats; all lesions found were restricted to the layers of the epidermis and its adnexae. Two bats had mild epidermal cupping erosions as described for North American bats. The possible mechanisms for any difference in outcomes of G. destructans infection in European and North American bats still need to be elucidated.

  1. Morphological and molecular characterizations of psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans from New York bats with White Nose Syndrome (WNS.

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    Vishnu Chaturvedi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Massive die-offs of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus have been occurring since 2006 in hibernation sites around Albany, New York, and this problem has spread to other States in the Northeastern United States. White cottony fungal growth is seen on the snouts of affected animals, a prominent sign of White Nose Syndrome (WNS. A previous report described the involvement of the fungus Geomyces destructans in WNS, but an identical fungus was recently isolated in France from a bat that was evidently healthy. The fungus has been recovered sparsely despite plentiful availability of afflicted animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated 100 bat and environmental samples from eight affected sites in 2008. Our findings provide strong evidence for an etiologic role of G. destructans in bat WNS. (i Direct smears from bat snouts, Periodic Acid Schiff-stained tissue sections from infected tissues, and scanning electron micrographs of bat tissues all showed fungal structures similar to those of G. destructans. (ii G. destructans DNA was directly amplified from infected bat tissues, (iii Isolations of G. destructans in cultures from infected bat tissues showed 100% DNA match with the fungus present in positive tissue samples. (iv RAPD patterns for all G. destructans cultures isolated from two sites were indistinguishable. (v The fungal isolates showed psychrophilic growth. (vi We identified in vitro proteolytic activities suggestive of known fungal pathogenic traits in G. destructans. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Further studies are needed to understand whether G. destructans WNS is a symptom or a trigger for bat mass mortality. The availability of well-characterized G. destructans strains should promote an understanding of bat-fungus relationships, and should aid in the screening of biological and chemical control agents.

  2. Contributions of the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología in the diagnosis and treatment of the Wolff-Parkinson - White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturralde-Torres, Pedro; Márquez, Manlio F

    2010-01-01

    Since the first description of the disease now known as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, much knowledge has been gained through several experimental and clinical studies all over the world. The Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez in Mexico City has not been the exception. In this report, we describe the clinical, electrocardiographic and electrophysiologic contributions of past and present researchers at the Institute, as well as the experience in the diagnosis and treatment of the W-P-W syndrome at this Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez.

  3. Should radiofrequency current ablation be performed in asymptomatic patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, G

    1993-03-01

    The exiting new method of ablation of accessory pathways using radiofrequency current applied by catheters will dramatically change our therapeutic decisions in these patients in the near future. This brief survey reviews the existing literature about the risk of the disease as well as of the procedure of catheter ablation. From these data, the risk of sudden death appears to be extremely low in asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) individuals. Side effects of catheter ablation may result from the invasive procedure as well as from radiation exposure (the latter to the patient as well as to operating physicians). While the complication rate in experienced centers is extremely low, a multicenter registry of the success and complication rate is urgently needed in view of the many centers starting with catheter ablation. Based on a subjective benefit-to-risk analysis, asymptomatic WPW individuals should be offered catheter ablation only under special circumstances (high risk profession, athletes, family history of sudden death). On the other hand, catheter ablation need not be and should not be considered generally in asymptomatic individuals with WPW pattern. Finally, this author cannot imagine that the energy, time, and money spent for mass screening and eventual catheter ablation of asymptomatic WPW individuals with its attending risks can be outweighed by the potential benefits for these asymptomatic individuals.

  4. Shrimp miR-12 Suppresses White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection by Synchronously Triggering Antiviral Phagocytosis and Apoptosis Pathways

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    Le Shu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence has indicated that the innate immune system can be regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs. However, the mechanism underlying miRNA-mediated simultaneous activation of multiple immune pathways remains unknown. To address this issue, the role of host miR-12 in shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus antiviral immune responses was characterized in the present study. The results indicated that miR-12 participated in virus infection, host phagocytosis, and apoptosis in defense against white spot syndrome virus invasion. miR-12 could simultaneously trigger phagocytosis, apoptosis, and antiviral immunity through the synchronous downregulation of the expression of shrimp genes [PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog and BI-1(transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing 6] and the viral gene (wsv024. Further analysis showed that miR-12 could synchronously mediate the 5′–3′ exonucleolytic degradation of its target mRNAs, and this degradation terminated in the vicinity of the 3′ untranslated region sequence complementary to the seed sequence of miR-12. Therefore, the present study showed novel aspects of the miRNA-mediated simultaneous regulation of multiple immune pathways.

  5. Conservation Physiology and Conservation Pathogens: White-Nose Syndrome and Integrative Biology for Host-Pathogen Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Craig K R

    2015-10-01

    Conservation physiology aims to apply an understanding of physiological mechanisms to management of imperiled species, populations, or ecosystems. One challenge for physiologists hoping to apply their expertise to conservation is connecting the mechanisms we study, often in the laboratory, with the vital rates of populations in the wild. There is growing appreciation that infectious pathogens can threaten populations and species, and represent an important issue for conservation. Conservation physiology has much to offer in terms of addressing the threat posed to some host species by infectious pathogens. At the same time, the well-developed theoretical framework of disease ecology could provide a model to help advance the application of physiology to a range of other conservation issues. Here, I use white-nose syndrome (WNS) in hibernating North American bats as an example of a conservation problem for which integrative physiological research has been a critical part of research and management. The response to WNS highlights the importance of a well-developed theoretical framework for the application of conservation physiology to a particular threat. I review what is known about physiological mechanisms associated with mortality from WNS and emphasize the value of combining a strong theoretical background with integrative physiological studies in order to connect physiological mechanisms with population processes and thereby maximize the potential benefits of conservation physiology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Selective Impact of Disease on Coral Communities: Outbreak of White Syndrome Causes Significant Total Mortality of Acropora Plate Corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Frisch, Ashley J; Newman, Stephen J; Wakefield, Corey B

    2015-01-01

    Coral diseases represent a significant and increasing threat to coral reefs. Among the most destructive diseases is White Syndrome (WS), which is increasing in distribution and prevalence throughout the Indo-Pacific. The aim of this study was to determine taxonomic and spatial patterns in mortality rates of corals following the 2008 outbreak of WS at Christmas Island in the eastern Indian Ocean. WS mainly affected Acropora plate corals and caused total mortality of 36% of colonies across all surveyed sites and depths. Total mortality varied between sites but was generally much greater in the shallows (0-96% of colonies at 5 m depth) compared to deeper waters (0-30% of colonies at 20 m depth). Site-specific mortality rates were a reflection of the proportion of corals affected by WS at each site during the initial outbreak and were predicted by the initial cover of live Acropora plate cover. The WS outbreak had a selective impact on the coral community. Following the outbreak, live Acropora plate coral cover at 5 m depth decreased significantly from 7.0 to 0.8%, while the cover of other coral taxa remained unchanged. Observations five years after the initial outbreak revealed that total Acropora plate cover remained low and confirmed that corals that lost all their tissue due to WS did not recover. These results demonstrate that WS represents a significant and selective form of coral mortality and highlights the serious threat WS poses to coral reefs in the Indo-Pacific.

  7. Dampak Stres Salinitas Terhadap Prevalensi White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV dan Survival Rate Udang Vannamei (Litopenaeus vannamei Pada Kondisi Terkontrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attabik Mukhammad Amrillah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome (WSS adalah penyakit yang secara signifikan menyebabkan tingginya mortalitas dan kerusakan parah pada budidaya udang. Penelitian ini bertujuan mengetahui dampak stres salinitas terhadap prevalensi WSSV dan survival rate udang vannamei (Litopenaeus vannamei. Penelitian ini menggunakan udang vannamei ukuran PL 40 yang diinfeksi WSSV dengan konsentrasi virus 20 μg/ml pada tiga rentang salinitas yang berbeda 0-10 ppt, 11-20 ppt, 21–30 ppt dan di rendam selama 4 jam kemudian dilakukan pengamatan selama 7 hari pasca infeksi dan diukur survival rate dan kuaitas airnya. Hasil pengamatan menunjukkan bahwa seluruh sampel terinfeksi oleh WSSV, ditunjukkan hasil analisa PCR dan gejala klinis yang timbul. Salinitas 0-10 ppt memberikan hasil persentase survival rate terendah jika dibandingkan dengan rentang salinitas yang lainnya yaitu sebesar 7 ekor atau 33% dari jumlah total sampel yang digunakan. Persentase survival rate udang tertinggi pasca infeksi virus WSSV terdapat pada perlakuan salinitas 21-30 ppt yaitu sebesar 13 ekor atau 63% dari jumlah total individu, dan salinitas 11-20 ppt memiliki persentase survival rate medium yaitu sebesar 10 ekor atau 49% dari jumlah total sampel. Stres salinitas mempengaruhi prevalensi WSSV dengan semakin tingginya tingkat infeksi seiring menurunnya rentang salinitas, akan tetapi survival rate semakin tinggi seiring dengan bertambahnya rentang salinitas.

  8. Assessing Virulence and Transmission Rates of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) in Two Ecologically Important Palaemonid Shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, C.; Keesee, B.; Philippoff, C.; Curran, S.; Lotz, J.; Powell, E.

    2016-02-01

    Investigators, including three REU interns, conducted an experiment to quantify parameters for an epidemiological model designed to estimate disease transmission in marine invertebrates. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a highly pathogenic disease affecting commercially important penaeid shrimp fisheries worldwide. The virus devastates penaeid shrimp but other varieties of decapods may serve as reservoirs for disease by being less susceptible to WSSV or refractory to disease. Non-penaeid crustaceans are less susceptible to WSSV, and different species have variable resistance to the disease leading to different potential to serve as reservoirs for transmission of the disease to coastal penaeid fisheries. This study investigates virulence and transmission rates of WSSV in two palaemonid shrimp which are keystone members of coastal food webs, and effects of species interactions on transmission rates of WSSV are estimated in a laboratory setting as a proxy for natural habitats. Two species of grass shrimp were exposed to a Chinese strain of WSSV through feeding the test individuals with previously prepared, inoculated penaeid shrimp. Replicated tanks containing 30 animals were exposed to the virus in arenas containing one or both species for 24 hours, then isolated in 1 liter tanks and monitored. During the isolation period moribund individuals were preserved for later analysis. After 7 days all test individuals were analyzed using qPCR to determine WSSV presence and load in DNA. From these data transmission rates, mortality, and viral concentration were quantified and used as parameters in a simple epidemiological model.

  9. Investigating and managing the rapid emergence of white-nose syndrome, a novel, fatal, infectious disease of hibernating bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Janet; Clifford, Deana; Castle, Kevin; Cryan, Paul M.; Ostfeld, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a fatal disease of bats that hibernate. The etiologic agent of WNS is the fungus Geomyces destructans, which infects the skin and wing membranes. Over 1 million bats in six species in eastern North America have died from WNS since 2006, and as a result several species of bats may become endangered or extinct. Information is lacking on the pathogenesis of G. destructans and WNS, WNS transmission and maintenance, individual and site factors that contribute to the probability of an outbreak of WNS, and spatial dynamics of WNS spread in North America. We considered how descriptive and analytical epidemiology could be used to fill these information gaps, including a four-step (modified) outbreak investigation, application of a set of criteria (Hill's) for assessing causation, compartment models of disease dynamics, and spatial modeling. We cataloged and critiqued adaptive-management options that have been either previously proposed for WNS or were helpful in addressing other emerging diseases of wild animals. These include an ongoing program of prospective surveillance of bats and hibernacula for WNS, treatment of individual bats, increasing population resistance to WNS (through vaccines, immunomodulators, or other methods), improving probability of survival from starvation and dehydration associated with WNS, modifying hibernacula environments to eliminate G. destructans, culling individuals or populations, controlling anthropogenic spread of WNS, conserving genetic diversity of bats, and educating the public about bats and bat conservation issues associated with WNS.

  10. An Investigation into Occasional White Spot Syndrome Virus Outbreak in Traditional Paddy Cum Prawn Fields in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Gnana Selvam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A yearlong (September 2009–August 2010 study was undertaken to find out possible reasons for occasional occurrence of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV outbreak in the traditional prawn farms adjoining Cochin backwaters. Physicochemical and bacteriological parameters of water and sediment from feeder canal and four shrimp farms were monitored on a fortnightly basis. The physicochemical parameters showed variation during the two production cycles and between the farms studied. Dissolved oxygen (DO content of water from feeder canal showed low oxygen levels (as low as 0.8 mg/L throughout the study period. There was no disease outbreak in the perennial ponds. Poor water exchange coupled with nutrient loading from adjacent houses resulted in phytoplankton bloom in shallow seasonal ponds which led to hypoxic conditions in early morning and supersaturation of DO in the afternoon besides considerably high alkaline pH. Ammonia levels were found to be very high in these ponds. WSSV outbreak was encountered twice during the study leading to mass mortalities in the seasonal ponds. The hypoxia and high ammonia content in water and abrupt fluctuations in temperature, salinity and pH might lead to considerable stress in the shrimps triggering WSSV infection in these traditional ponds.

  11. Outbreaks of Acropora white syndrome and Terpios sponge overgrowth combined with coral mortality in Palk Bay, southeast coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinesh, T; Mathews, G; Diraviya Raj, K; Edward, J K P

    2017-09-20

    Acropora white syndrome (AWS) and Terpios sponge overgrowth (TSO) are serious threats to coral communities in various regions; however, information on these 2 lesions in the Indian Ocean is much more limited than in the Indo-Pacific. The present study revealed the impact of these lesions on the Palk Bay reef, India, and covered an area of 7 km2. In total, 1930 colonies were permanently monitored to assess incidences of AWS and TSO and consequent mortality for a period of 1 yr. TSO affected 5 coral genera and caused 20.7% mortality; overall prevalence increased from 1.3% (n = 25) to 25.5% (n = 492). In contrast, AWS only affected Acropora colonies and caused a mortality of 8%; overall prevalence increased from 0.9% (n = 17) to 12.9% (n = 249). Year-round monitoring revealed an increasing trend of both AWS and TSO, followed by temperature rise. These results add to the known geographic distribution of these coral diseases and reveal the impacts of AWS and TSO on coral reefs in the Indian Ocean.

  12. Preliminary study on haemocyte response to white spot syndrome virus infection in black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Braak, C B T; Botterblom, M H A; Huisman, E A; Rombout, J H W M; van der Knaap, W P W

    2002-08-29

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has been a major cause of shrimp mortality in aquaculture in the past decade. In contrast to extensive studies on the morphology and genome structure of the virus, little work has been done on the defence reaction of the host after WSSV infection. Therefore, we examined the haemocyte response to experimental WSSV infection in the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. Haemolymph sampling and histology showed a significant decline in free, circulating haemocytes after WSSV infection. A combination of in situ hybridisation with a specific DNA probe for WSSV and immuno-histochemistry with a specific antibody against haemocyte granules in tissue sections indicated that haemocytes left the circulation and migrated to tissues where many virus-infected cells were present. However, no subsequent haemocyte response to the virus-infected cells was detected. The number of granular cells decreased in the haematopoietic tissue of infected shrimp. In addition, a fibrous-like immuno-reactive layer appears in the outer stromal matrix of tubule walls in the lymphoid organ of infected shrimp. The role of haemocytes in shrimp defence after viral infection is discussed.

  13. An Elegant Analysis of White Spot Syndrome Virus Using a Graphene Oxide/Methylene Blue based Electrochemical Immunosensor Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Anusha; Devi, K. S. Shalini; Raja, Sudhakaran; Senthil Kumar, Annamalai

    2017-04-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major devastating virus in aquaculture industry. A sensitive and selective diagnostic method for WSSV is a pressing need for the early detection and protection of the aquaculture farms. Herein, we first report, a simple electrochemical immunosensor based on methylene blue dye (MB) immobilized graphene oxide modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE/GO@MB) for selective, quick (35 ± 5 mins) and raw sample analysis of WSSV. The immunosensor was prepared by sequential modification of primary antibody, blocking agent (bovine serum album), antigen (as vp28 protein), secondary antibody coupled with horseradish peroxidase (Ab2-HRP) on the GCE/GO@MB. The modified electrode showed a well-defined redox peak at an equilibrium potential (E1/2), -0.4 V vs Ag/AgCl and mediated H2O2 reduction reaction without any false positive result and dissolved oxygen interferences in pH 7 phosphate buffer solution. Under an optimal condition, constructed calibration plot was linear in a range of 1.36 × 10-3 to 1.36 × 107 copies μL-1 of vp28. It is about four orders higher sensitive than that of the values observed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot based WSSV detection techniques. Direct electrochemical immunosensing of WSSV in raw tissue samples were successfully demonstrated as a real sample system.

  14. Highly Sensitive Detection of Low-Abundance White Spot Syndrome Virus by a Pre-Amplification PCR Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yanfang; Sha, Xuejiao; Wang, Jing; Li, Jing; Dong, Ping; Liang, Xingguo

    2017-03-28

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major threat to the shrimp farming industry and so far there is no effective therapy for it, and thus early diagnostic of WSSV is of great importance. However, at the early stage of infection, the extremely low-abundance of WSSV DNA challenges the detection sensitivity and accuracy of PCR. To effectively detect low-abundance WSSV, here we developed a pre-amplification PCR (pre-amp PCR) method to amplify trace amounts of WSSV DNA from massive background genomic DNA. Combining with normal specific PCR, 10 copies of target WSSV genes were detected from ~1010 magnitude of backgrounds. In particular, multiple target genes were able to be balanced amplified with similar efficiency due to the usage of the universal primer. The efficiency of the pre-amp PCR was validated by nested-PCR and quantitative PCR, and pre-amp PCR showed higher efficiency than nested-PCR when multiple targets were detected. The developed method is particularly suitable for the super early diagnosis of WSSV, and has potential to be applied in other low-abundance sample detection cases.

  15. Novel Insights into Antiviral Gene Regulation of Red Swamp Crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, Infected with White Spot Syndrome Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaokui Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV, one of the major pathogens of Procambarus clarkii, has caused severe disruption to the aquaculture industry of P. clarkii in China. To reveal the gene regulatory mechanisms underlying WSSV infection, a comparative transcriptome analysis was performed among WSSV-infected susceptible individuals (GS, viral resistant individuals (GR, and a non-infected control group (GC. A total of 61,349 unigenes were assembled from nine libraries. Subsequently, 515 and 1033 unigenes exhibited significant differential expression in sensitive and resistant crayfish individuals compared to the control group (GC. Many differentially expressed genes (e.g., C-type lectin 4, Peroxinectin, Prophenoloxidase, and Serine/threonine-protein kinase observed in GR and GS play critical roles in pathogen recognition and viral defense reactions after WSSV infection. Importantly, the glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis-chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate pathway was identified to play critical roles in defense to WSSV infection for resistant crayfish individuals by upregulating the chondroitin sulfate related genes for the synthesis of WSSV-sensitive, functional chondroitin sulfate chains containing E units. Numerous genes and the key pathways identified between resistant and susceptible P. clarkii individuals provide valuable insights regarding antiviral response mechanisms of decapoda species and may help to improve the selective breeding of P. clarkii WSSV-resistance.

  16. Host, pathogen, and environmental characteristics predict white-nose syndrome mortality in captive little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus.

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    Joseph S Johnson

    Full Text Available An estimated 5.7 million or more bats died in North America between 2006 and 2012 due to infection with the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS during hibernation. The behavioral and physiological changes associated with hibernation leave bats vulnerable to WNS, but the persistence of bats within the contaminated regions of North America suggests that survival might vary predictably among individuals or in relation to environmental conditions. To investigate variables influencing WNS mortality, we conducted a captive study of 147 little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus inoculated with 0, 500, 5000, 50,000, or 500,000 Pd conidia and hibernated for five months at either 4 or 10°C. We found that female bats were significantly more likely to survive hibernation, as were bats hibernated at 4°C, and bats with greater body condition at the start of hibernation. Although all bats inoculated with Pd exhibited shorter torpor bouts compared to controls, a characteristic of WNS, only bats inoculated with 500 conidia had significantly lower survival odds compared to controls. These data show that host and environmental characteristics are significant predictors of WNS mortality, and that exposure to up to 500 conidia is sufficient to cause a fatal infection. These results also illustrate a need to quantify dynamics of Pd exposure in free-ranging bats, as dynamics of WNS produced in captive studies inoculating bats with several hundred thousand conidia may differ from those in the wild.

  17. Increased coherence of white matter fiber tract organization in adults with Asperger syndrome: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roine, Ulrika; Roine, Timo; Salmi, Juha; Nieminen-Von Wendt, Taina; Leppämäki, Sami; Rintahaka, Pertti; Tani, Pekka; Leemans, Alexander; Sams, Mikko

    2013-12-01

    To investigate whether there are global white matter (WM) differences between autistic and healthy adults, we performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in 14 male adults with Asperger syndrome (AS) and 19 gender-, age-, and intelligence quotient-matched controls. We focused on individuals with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD), AS, to decrease heterogeneity caused by large variation in the cognitive profile. Previous DTI studies of ASD have mainly focused on finding local changes in fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), two indexes used to characterize microstructural properties of WM. Although the local or voxel-based approaches may be able to provide detailed information in terms of location of the observed differences, such results are known to be highly sensitive to partial volume effects, registration errors, or placement of the regions of interest. Therefore, we performed global histogram analyses of (a) whole-brain tractography results and (b) skeletonized WM masks. In addition to the FA and MD, the planar diffusion coefficient (CP) was computed as it can provide more specific information of the complexity of the neural structure. Our main finding indicated that adults with AS had higher mean FA values than controls. A less complex neural structure in adults with AS could have explained the results, but no significant difference in CP was found. Our results suggest that there are global abnormalities in the WM tissue of adults with AS. © 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The cerebro-morphological fingerprint of a progeroid syndrome: white matter changes correlate with neurological symptoms in xeroderma pigmentosum.

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    Jan Kassubek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare autosomal recessive progeroid syndrome. It has recently been shown that the underlying DNA repair defect plays a central role in the aging process. In addition to skin symptoms, various premature neurological abnormalities have been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present the clinical neurological phenotype in 14 XP patients (seven subtypes, in seven of these patients together with conventional and multiparametric advanced MRI data to assess the macrostructural and microstructural cerebral morphology in comparison to controls, including volumetric measurements, MR spectroscopy ((1H MRS, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Clinical hallmarks were spinocerebellar ataxia, pyramidal tract signs, and mild cognitive deficits. DTI demonstrated significantly reduced WM directionality in all regions investigated, i.e. the thalamus, the corticospinal tracts and the dorsal corpus callosum. Single patients showed a marked relative hippocampal volume reduction, but the patients were not different from controls in the volumetric measurements of hippocampal and whole brain volumes at group level. However, (1H MRS demonstrated that the hippocampal formation was metabolically altered. CONCLUSIONS: The most prominent feature was the white matter affectation, as assessed by DTI, with volume and directionality reductions of the fiber projections involving both the craniocaudal fibers and the interhemispheric connections. These findings, although heterogeneous among the study sample, could be correlated with the clinico-neurological symptoms. The imaging findings support the position that myelin structures degrade prematurely in the brain of XP patients.

  19. The Cerebro-Morphological Fingerprint of a Progeroid Syndrome: White Matter Changes Correlate with Neurological Symptoms in Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassubek, Jan; Sperfeld, Anne-Dorte; Pinkhardt, Elmar H.; Unrath, Alexander; Müller, Hans-Peter; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Ludolph, Albert C.; Berneburg, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive progeroid syndrome. It has recently been shown that the underlying DNA repair defect plays a central role in the aging process. In addition to skin symptoms, various premature neurological abnormalities have been reported. Methodology/Principal Findings We present the clinical neurological phenotype in 14 XP patients (seven subtypes), in seven of these patients together with conventional and multiparametric advanced MRI data to assess the macrostructural and microstructural cerebral morphology in comparison to controls, including volumetric measurements, MR spectroscopy (1H MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Clinical hallmarks were spinocerebellar ataxia, pyramidal tract signs, and mild cognitive deficits. DTI demonstrated significantly reduced WM directionality in all regions investigated, i.e. the thalamus, the corticospinal tracts and the dorsal corpus callosum. Single patients showed a marked relative hippocampal volume reduction, but the patients were not different from controls in the volumetric measurements of hippocampal and whole brain volumes at group level. However, 1H MRS demonstrated that the hippocampal formation was metabolically altered. Conclusions The most prominent feature was the white matter affectation, as assessed by DTI, with volume and directionality reductions of the fiber projections involving both the craniocaudal fibers and the interhemispheric connections. These findings, although heterogeneous among the study sample, could be correlated with the clinico-neurological symptoms. The imaging findings support the position that myelin structures degrade prematurely in the brain of XP patients. PMID:22363517

  20. Relationship between energy dense diets and white adipose tissue inflammation in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, Marià

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a widespread pathologic state that manifests as multiple intertwined diseases affecting the entire body. This review analyzes the contribution of adipose tissue inflammation to its development. The main factor in the appearance of MS is an excess of dietary energy (largely fats), eliciting insulin resistance and creating the problem of excess energy disposal. Under these conditions, amino acid catabolism is diminished, which indirectly alters the production of nitric oxide and affects blood flow regulation. The oxidation of nitric oxide to nitrite and nitrate affects microbiota composition and functions. Adipose tissue cannot incorporate excessive nutrients after cell enlargement and loss of function. Tissue damage is a form of aggression, and the response is proinflammatory cytokine release. Cytokines favor the massive penetration of immune system cells, such as macrophages, which unsuccessfully try to fight an elusive danger for which they are not prepared. The consequence is low-level maintenance of the inflammatory state, which affects endoplasmic reticulum function and the endothelial response to excess regulatory mechanisms affecting blood flow and substrate/oxygen supply. When inflammation becomes chronic, the pathologic consequences are disseminated throughout the body because unused substrates and signals from adipose tissue affect energy partitioning and organ function. This maintenance of an unbalanced state ultimately results in the establishment of MS and associated pathologies. New research should focus on identifying ways to disarm the inflammatory response of adipose tissue when the dangers of dietary excess have already been controlled. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Contributions of the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología in the diagnosis and treatment of the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Iturralde-Torres,Pedro; Márquez,Manlio F.

    2010-01-01

    Since the first description of the disease now known as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, much knowledge has been gained through several experimental and clinical studies all over the world. The Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez in Mexco City has not been the exception. In this report, we describe the clinical, electrocardiographic and electrophysiologic contributions of past and present researchers at the Institute, as well as the experience in the diagnosis and treatment of the...

  2. Bat white-nose syndrome: A real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura K Muller; Jeffrey M. Lorch; Daniel L. Lindner; Michael O' Connor; Andrea Gargas; David S. Blehert

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Geomyces destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed millions of North American hibernating bats. We describe a real-time TaqMan PCR test that detects DNA from G. destructans by targeting a portion of the multicopy intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene complex. The...

  3. Virulence of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) isolates may be correlated with the degree of replication in gills of Penaeus vannamei juveniles

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, M.M; Corteel, M.; Escobedo-Bonilla, C.M.; Wille, M.; Alday-Sanz, V.; Pensaert, M. B.; Sorgeloos, P.; Nauwynck, H J

    2008-01-01

    A standardized inoculation model was used in 2 separate experiments to gauge the virulence of 3 white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) isolates from Thailand and Vietnam (WSSV Thai-1, WSSV Thai-2, and WSSV Viet) in Penaeus vannamei juveniles. Mortality patterns (Expt 1) were compared and WSSV-positive cells quantified (Expt 2) in tissues following intramuscular inoculation of shrimp with the most (WSSV Thai-1) and least (WSSV Viet) virulent isolates as determined by Expt 1. The results of Expt 1 de...

  4. White LED based on CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+} Mn{sup 2+} phosphor and CdS/ZnS quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Changyu; Zhong Chuan; Hou Qianglong; Li Ke, E-mail: shenchangyu@gmail.com [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2011-02-01

    Core/shell CdS/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with the emission wavelength of 610nm, was synthesized by thermal deposition using cadmium oxide and selenium as precursors in a hot lauric acid and hexadecylamine trioctylphosphine oxide hybrid. CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+} Mn{sup 2+} phosphor was synthesized by high-temperature solid state reaction at 1290 deg. C for 2 hours under the H{sub 2} reducing atmosphere, and X-ray powder diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of it. It has two emission bands peaking at 420 nm and 580nm originated from the transition 5d to 4f of Eu{sup 2+} and {sup 4}T{sub 1-}{sup 6}A{sub 1} of Mn{sup 2+}, respectively. Blends of CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+},Mn{sup 2+} phosphor and CdS/ZnS QDs exhibited the prominent spectral evolution with an increasing content of QDs. A hybrid white LED, which combines a blue LED with the blend of CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+} Mn{sup 2+} phosphor and QDs with a weight ratio of 2:1, with the CIE coordinate of (0.3183, 0.3036) and CRI of 85 was obtained.

  5. Resistive switching effect in the planar structure of all-printed, flexible and rewritable memory device based on advanced 2D nanocomposite of graphene quantum dots and white graphene flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muqeet Rehman, Muhammad; Uddin Siddiqui, Ghayas; Kim, Sowon; Choi, Kyung Hyun

    2017-08-01

    Pursuit of the most appropriate materials and fabrication methods is essential for developing a reliable, rewritable and flexible memory device. In this study, we have proposed an advanced 2D nanocomposite of white graphene (hBN) flakes embedded with graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as the functional layer of a flexible memory device owing to their unique electrical, chemical and mechanical properties. Unlike the typical sandwich type structure of a memory device, we developed a cost effective planar structure, to simplify device fabrication and prevent sneak current. The entire device fabrication was carried out using printing technology followed by encapsulation in an atomically thin layer of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) for protection against environmental humidity. The proposed memory device exhibited attractive bipolar switching characteristics of high switching ratio, large electrical endurance and enhanced lifetime, without any crosstalk between adjacent memory cells. The as-fabricated device showed excellent durability for several bending cycles at various bending diameters without any degradation in bistable resistive states. The memory mechanism was deduced to be conductive filamentary; this was validated by illustrating the temperature dependence of bistable resistive states. Our obtained results pave the way for the execution of promising 2D material based next generation flexible and non-volatile memory (NVM) applications.

  6. Multi-threshold white matter structural networks fusion for accurate diagnosis of Tourette syndrome children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hongwei; Liu, Yue; Wang, Shengpei; Li, Zuoyong; Zhang, Jishui; Peng, Yun; He, Huiguang

    2017-03-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neurobehavioral disorder. To date, TS is still misdiagnosed due to its varied presentation and lacking of obvious clinical symptoms. Therefore, studies of objective imaging biomarkers are of great importance for early TS diagnosis. As tic generation has been linked to disturbed structural networks, and many efforts have been made recently to investigate brain functional or structural networks using machine learning methods, for the purpose of disease diagnosis. However, few studies were related to TS and some drawbacks still existed in them. Therefore, we propose a novel classification framework integrating a multi-threshold strategy and a network fusion scheme to address the preexisting drawbacks. Here we used diffusion MRI probabilistic tractography to construct the structural networks of 44 TS children and 48 healthy children. We ameliorated the similarity network fusion algorithm specially to fuse the multi-threshold structural networks. Graph theoretical analysis was then implemented, and nodal degree, nodal efficiency and nodal betweenness centrality were selected as features. Finally, support vector machine recursive feature extraction (SVM-RFE) algorithm was used for feature selection, and then optimal features are fed into SVM to automatically discriminate TS children from controls. We achieved a high accuracy of 89.13% evaluated by a nested cross validation, demonstrated the superior performance of our framework over other comparison methods. The involved discriminative regions for classification primarily located in the basal ganglia and frontal cortico-cortical networks, all highly related to the pathology of TS. Together, our study may provide potential neuroimaging biomarkers for early-stage TS diagnosis.

  7. Atlas-based white matter analysis in individuals with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (22q11.2 deletion syndrome) and unaffected siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoeva, Petya D; Coman, Ioana L; Antshel, Kevin M; Fremont, Wanda; McCarthy, Christopher S; Kotkar, Ashwini; Wang, Dongliang; Shprintzen, Robert J; Kates, Wendy R

    2012-08-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS, MIM#192430, 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome) is a genetic disorder caused by a deletion of about 40 genes at the q11.2 band of one copy of chromosome 22. Individuals with VCFS present with deficits in cognition and social functioning, high risk of psychiatric disorders, volumetric reductions in gray and white matter (WM) and some alterations of the WM microstructure. The goal of the current study was to characterize the WM microstructural differences in individuals with VCFS and unaffected siblings, and the correlation of WM microstructure with neuropsychological performance. We hypothesized that individuals with VCFS would have decreased indices of WM microstructure (fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD)), particularly in WM tracts to the frontal lobe, and that these measures would be correlated with cognitive functioning. Thirty-three individuals with VCFS (21 female) and 16 unaffected siblings (8 female) participated in DTI scanning and neuropsychological testing. We performed an atlas-based analysis, extracted FA, AD, and RD measures for 54 WM tracts (27 in each hemisphere) for each participant, and used MANOVAs to compare individuals with VCFS to siblings. For WM tracts that were statistically significantly different between VCFS and siblings (pFDR <0.05), we assessed the correlations between DTI and neuropsychological measures. In VCFS individuals as compared to unaffected siblings, we found decreased FA in the uncinate fasciculus, and decreased AD in multiple WM tracts (bilateral superior and posterior corona radiata, dorsal cingulum, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, superior longitudinal fasciculus, superior cerebellar peduncle, posterior thalamic radiation, and left anterior corona radiata, retrolenticular part of the internal capsule, external capsule, sagittal stratum). We also found significant correlations of AD with measures of executive function, IQ, working memory, and

  8. Atlas-based white matter analysis in individuals with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (22q11.2 deletion syndrome and unaffected siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoeva Petya D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS, MIM#192430, 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by a deletion of about 40 genes at the q11.2 band of one copy of chromosome 22. Individuals with VCFS present with deficits in cognition and social functioning, high risk of psychiatric disorders, volumetric reductions in gray and white matter (WM and some alterations of the WM microstructure. The goal of the current study was to characterize the WM microstructural differences in individuals with VCFS and unaffected siblings, and the correlation of WM microstructure with neuropsychological performance. We hypothesized that individuals with VCFS would have decreased indices of WM microstructure (fractional anisotropy (FA, axial diffusivity (AD and radial diffusivity (RD, particularly in WM tracts to the frontal lobe, and that these measures would be correlated with cognitive functioning. Methods Thirty-three individuals with VCFS (21 female and 16 unaffected siblings (8 female participated in DTI scanning and neuropsychological testing. We performed an atlas-based analysis, extracted FA, AD, and RD measures for 54 WM tracts (27 in each hemisphere for each participant, and used MANOVAs to compare individuals with VCFS to siblings. For WM tracts that were statistically significantly different between VCFS and siblings (pFDR  Results In VCFS individuals as compared to unaffected siblings, we found decreased FA in the uncinate fasciculus, and decreased AD in multiple WM tracts (bilateral superior and posterior corona radiata, dorsal cingulum, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, superior longitudinal fasciculus, superior cerebellar peduncle, posterior thalamic radiation, and left anterior corona radiata, retrolenticular part of the internal capsule, external capsule, sagittal stratum. We also found significant correlations of AD with measures of executive function, IQ, working memory, and/or social cognition. Conclusions Our

  9. The Mechanism of Synchronous Precise Regulation of Two Shrimp White Spot Syndrome Virus Targets by a Viral MicroRNA

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    Yaodong He

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs, important factors in animal innate immunity, suppress the expressions of their target genes by binding to target mRNA’s 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs. However, the mechanism of synchronous regulation of multiple targets by a single miRNA remains unclear. In this study, the interaction between a white spot syndrome virus (WSSV miRNA (WSSV-miR-N32 and its two viral targets (wsv459 and wsv322 was characterized in WSSV-infected shrimp. The outcomes indicated that WSSV-encoded miRNA (WSSV-miR-N32 significantly inhibited virus infection by simultaneously targeting wsv459 and wsv322. The silencing of wsv459 or wsv322 by siRNA led to significant decrease of WSSV copies in shrimp, showing that the two viral genes were required for WSSV infection. WSSV-miR-N32 could mediate 5′–3′ exonucleolytic digestion of its target mRNAs, which stopped at the sites of target mRNA 3′UTRs close to the sequence complementary to the miRNA seed sequence. The complementary bases (to the target mRNA sequence of a miRNA 9th–18th non-seed sequence were essential for the miRNA targeting. Therefore, our findings presented novel insights into the mechanism of miRNA-mediated suppression of target gene expressions, which would be helpful for understanding the roles of miRNAs in innate immunity of invertebrate.

  10. A 3D model of the membrane protein complex formed by the white spot syndrome virus structural proteins.

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    Yun-Shiang Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of white spot disease have had a large negative economic impact on cultured shrimp worldwide. However, the pathogenesis of the causative virus, WSSV (whit spot syndrome virus, is not yet well understood. WSSV is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV virion has three structural layers surrounding its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. In this study, we investigated the protein-protein interactions of the major WSSV structural proteins, including several envelope and tegument proteins that are known to be involved in the infection process. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, we used coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid assays to elucidate and/or confirm all the interactions that occur among the WSSV structural (envelope and tegument proteins VP51A, VP19, VP24, VP26 and VP28. We found that VP51A interacted directly not only with VP26 but also with VP19 and VP24. VP51A, VP19 and VP24 were also shown to have an affinity for self-interaction. Chemical cross-linking assays showed that these three self-interacting proteins could occur as dimers. CONCLUSIONS: From our present results in conjunction with other previously established interactions we construct a 3D model in which VP24 acts as a core protein that directly associates with VP26, VP28, VP38A, VP51A and WSV010 to form a membrane-associated protein complex. VP19 and VP37 are attached to this complex via association with VP51A and VP28, respectively. Through the VP26-VP51C interaction this envelope complex is anchored to the nucleocapsid, which is made of layers of rings formed by VP664. A 3D model of the nucleocapsid and the surrounding outer membrane is presented.

  11. Nutritional Capability of and Substrate Suitability for Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Causal Agent of Bat White-Nose Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudabaugh, Daniel B.; Miller, Andrew N.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the causal agent of bat white-nose syndrome, has caused nearly six million deaths in North American bats since its introduction into the United States in 2006. Current research has shown that caves can harbor P. destructans even after the infected bats are removed and bats no longer visit or inhabit previously infected caves. Our research focuses on elucidating reservoir requirements by investigating the nutritional capabilities of and substrate suitability requirements for six different P. destructans isolates from various localities including Illinois, Indiana, New York (Type specimen), and Pennsylvania. Enzyme assays implicate that both urease and b-glucosidase appear to be constitutive, lipase and esterase activity were more rapid than proteinase activity on 6% gelatin, gelatin degradation was accompanied by medium alkalinization, the reduction of thiosulfate generated hydrogen sulfide gas, chitinase and manganese dependent peroxidase activity were not visually demonstrated within eight weeks, and keratinase activity was not evident at pH 8 within eight weeks. We demonstrate that all P. destructans isolates are capable of growth and sporulation on dead fish, insect, and mushroom tissues. Sole nitrogen source assays demonstrated that all P. destructans isolates exhibit Class 2 nitrogen utilization and that growth-dependent interactions occur among different pH and nitrogen sources. Substrate suitability assays demonstrated that all isolates could grow and sporulate on media ranging from pH 5–11 and tolerated media supplemented with 2000 mg/L of calcium and 700 mg/L of three separated sulfur compounds: thiosulfate L-cysteine, and sulfite. All isolates were intolerant to PEG-induced matric potential with delayed germination and growth at −2.5 MPa with no visible germination at −5 MPa. Interestingly, decreasing the surface tension with Tween 80 permitted germination and growth of P. destructans in −5 MPa PEG medium within 14

  12. White blood cell counts as risk markers of developing metabolic syndrome and its components in the PREDIMED study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babio, Nancy; Ibarrola-Jurado, Núria; Bulló, Mònica; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Wärnberg, Julia; Salaverría, Itziar; Ortega-Calvo, Manuel; Estruch, Ramón; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Covas, Maria Isabel; Sorli, José Vicente; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    The Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that includes hyperglucemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia and central obesity, conferring an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The white blood cell (WBC) count has been proposed as a marker for predicting cardiovascular risk. However, few prospective studies have evaluated the relationship between WBC subtypes and risk of MetS. Participants were recruited from seven PREDIMED study centers. Both a baseline cross-sectional (n = 4,377) and a prospective assessment (n = 1,637) were performed. Participants with MetS at baseline were excluded from the longitudinal analysis. The median follow-up was 3.9 years. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, fasting glucose, lipid profile and WBC counts were assessed at baseline and yearly during the follow-up. Participants were categorized by baseline WBC and its subtype count quartiles. Adjusted logistic regression models were fitted to assess the risk of MetS and its components. Of the 4,377 participants, 62.6% had MetS at baseline. Compared to the participants in the lowest baseline sex-adjusted quartile of WBC counts, those in the upper quartile showed an increased risk of having MetS (OR, 2.47; 95%CI, 2.03-2.99; P-trendcomponents hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol. Likewise, lymphocyte counts were found to be associated with the incidence of the MetS components low HDL-cholesterol and high fasting glucose. An increase in the total WBC during the follow-up was also associated with an increased risk of MetS. Total WBC counts, and some subtypes, were positively associated with MetS as well as hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL-cholesterol and high fasting glucose, all components of MetS. Controlled-Trials.comISRCTN35739639.

  13. Effects of white spot syndrome virus infection on immuno-enzyme activities and ultrastructure in gills of Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan-Li; Zuo, Di; Wang, Lan-Mei; Sun, Ting; Wang, Qun; Zhao, Yun-Long

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we explored the pathogenic mechanism of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus, by investigating activities of enzymes related to innate immune function during infection. After 6-12 h of exposure to WSSV, the activities of four enzymes, phenoloxidase (PO), peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lysozyme (LSZ), increased in the gills of C. quadricarinatus but then sharply decreased during longer infection times. Except for PO, the activities of other enzymes in the WSSV-infected crayfish (Group II) were significantly lower than those of the controls at 72 h post-exposure (P < 0.01). Interestingly, the enzyme activities in the group treated with polysaccharides before challenge with WSSV (Group III) were higher than those in Group II. This phenomenon demonstrated that the polysaccharides could improve the immuno-enzyme activities and enhance the organism's antiviral defenses. Morphological examination by transmission electron microscopy revealed abundant WSSV particles and significant damage in the gills of infected crayfish. WSSV infection caused parts of the gill epithelium and microvilli to be reduced in number and size or damaged; meanwhile, the mitochondria morphology changed, with parts of the cristae diminished leaving large vacuoles. Moreover, electron dense deposits appeared and heterochromatinized nuclei could be seen in blood cells with ruptured nuclear membranes and outflow of nucleoplasm. The findings of this study furthers our understanding of the biochemical alterations induced by viral infections, including changes in the antioxidant status, oxidative stress and lysozyme activity, which could help to advance strategies for control of WSSV in crayfish. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Novel Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Participates in White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection in Litopenaeus vannamei

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    Shihao Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signaling pathway is known to play key roles in endothelial cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, vascular permeability, inhibition of apoptosis, and virus infection. In the present study, a novel VEGFR gene (LvVEGFR2 was identified and characterized from Litopenaeus vannamei. The deduced amino acid sequence of LvVEGFR2 possessed typical features of VEGFRs reported in other species, including six IG-like domains, a transmembrane motif, a protein kinase (PK domain, and one tyrosine-PK active site. The transcripts of LvVEGFR2 were mainly detected in hemocytes and lymphoid organ (Oka. Subcellular localization analysis showed that LvVEGFR2 was a membrane protein. Its expression level was obviously upregulated in hemocytes and Oka of the shrimp after white spot syndrome virus (WSSV infection. Knockdown of LvVEGFR2 gene expression by double-strand RNA mediated interference could lead to a decrease of virus copy number in WSSV-infected shrimp. The interaction between LvVEGFR2 and different LvVEGFs (LvVEGF1, LvVEGF2, and LvVEGF3 in shrimp was analyzed at the transcription level and protein level, respectively. Knockdown of LvVEGF2 or LvVEGF3 could downregulate the expression level of LvVEGFR2, and injection of the recombinant LvVEGF2 or LvVEGF3 could upregulate the expression level of LvVEGFR2. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that LvVEGFR2 could interact with LvVEGF2 and LvVEGF3 directly. The study improved our understanding on the VEGF signaling pathway of shrimp and its role during WSSV infection.

  15. [Expression of single chain fragment variable P1D3 antibody against shrimp white spot syndrome virus in Pichia pastoris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Zhang, Min; Yuan, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Dai, He-Ping

    2006-11-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in aquaculture penaeid shrimp, which caused catastrophic economic losses in the worldwide. No adequate treatments against WSSV are available. In order to study infection mechanism of WSSV, a phage display scFv cDNA library against WSSV was constructed and a neutralizing antibody of scFv P1D3 was selected in our lab previously. In this study, scFv P1D3 was expressed successfully in yeast. Firstly, the original expression vector of P1D3, M13 phagmid, was used as a template to design primers with restriction sites of SnaB I and EcoR I . Then the gene of P1D3 was amplified by PCR. After digested by SnaB I and EcoR I , the fragment of scFv P1D3 with E-tag was inserted into yeast and E. coli shuttle plasmid pPIC9k. The recombinant plasmid pPIC9k-scFv P1D3-Etag was linearized with Bgl II and then transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115 by electroporation. Positive clones were selected and verified by PCR and DNA sequencing. The scFv PID3 was induced to express in yeast by methanol. The results of ELISA demonstrate that scFv P1D3 expressed in yeast still has high specificity to bind on WSSV and the binding activity is higher than that expressed in E. coli TG1. After several optimizing experiments, the results show that the expression amount of scFv P1D3 can reach to 302 mg/L in yeast culture supernatant. This experiment has offered a new source of antibody for the researches on passive immunology for shrimp.

  16. Horizontal transmission dynamics of White spot syndrome virus by cohabitation trials in juvenile Penaeus monodon and P. vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyen, N X; Verreth, J; Vlak, J M; de Jong, M C M

    2014-11-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), a rod-shaped double-stranded DNA virus, is an infectious agent causing fatal disease in shrimp farming around the globe. Within shrimp populations WSSV is transmitted very fast, however, the modes and dynamics of transmission of this virus are not well understood. In the current study the dynamics of disease transmission of WSSV were investigated in small, closed populations of Penaeus monodon and Penaeus vannamei. Pair cohabitation experiments using PCR as a readout for virus infection were used to estimate transmission parameters for WSSV in these two species. The mortality rate of contact-infected shrimp in P. monodon was higher than the rate in P. vannamei. The transmission rate parameters for WSSV were not different between the two species. The relative contribution of direct and indirect transmission rates of WSSV differed between the two species. For P. vannamei the direct contact transmission rate of WSSV was significantly lower than the indirect environmental transmission rate, but for P. monodon, the opposite was found. The reproduction ratio R0 for WSSV for these two species of shrimp was estimated to be above one: 2.07 (95%CI 1.53, 2.79) for P. monodon and 1.51 (95%CI 1.12, 2.03) for P. vannamei. The difference in R0 between the two species is due to a lower host mortality and hence a longer infectious period of WSSV in P. monodon. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) co-infection on survival of penaeid shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Song, Xiaoling; Huang, Jie

    2016-11-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is an important viral pathogen that infects farmed penaeid shrimp, and the threat of Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection to shrimp farming has become increasingly severe. Viral and bacterial cross or superimposed infections may induce higher shrimp mortality. We used a feeding method to infect Litopenaeus vannamei with WSSV and then injected a low dose of V. parahaemolyticus (WSSV+Vp), or we first infected L. vannamei with a low-dose injection of V. parahaemolyticus and then fed the shrimp WSSV to achieve viral infection (Vp+WSSV). The eff ect of V. parahaemolyticus and WSSV co-infection on survival of L. vannamei was evaluated by comparing cumulative mortality rates between experimental and control groups. We also spread L. vannamei hemolymph on thiosulfate citrate bile salt sucrose agar plates to determine the number of Vibrio, and the WSSV copy number in L. vannamei gills was determined using an absolute quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. LvMyD88 and Lvakt gene expression levels were detected in gills of L. vannamei by real-time PCR to determine the cause of the diff erent mortality rates. Our results show that (1) the cumulative mortality rate of L. vannamei in the WSSV+Vp group reached 100% on day 10 after WSSV infection, whereas the cumulative mortality rate of L. vannamei in the Vp+WSSV group and the WSSV-alone control group approached 100% on days 11 and 13 of infection; (2) the number of Vibrio in the L. vannamei group infected with V. parahaemolyticus alone declined gradually, whereas the other groups showed significant increases in the numbers of Vibrio ( Pvannamei and vice versa. The combined accelerated proliferation of both V. parahaemolyticus and WSSV led to massive death of L. vannamei.

  18. White matter fractional anisotropy is related to processing speed in metabolic syndrome patients: a case-control study

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    Bargalló Núria

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic Syndrome (MetSd is a cluster of vascular risk factors that may influence cerebrovascular pathology during aging. Recently, microstructural white matter (WM changes detected by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and processing speed deficits have been reported in MetSd patients. We aimed to test the relationship between WM alteration and cognitive impairment in these patients. Methods The sample comprised 38 subjects (19 patients aged between 50 and 80 years old, and 19 controls. All patients fulfilled National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP-III criteria for MetSd. Speed of information processing was measured by the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT and reaction time (RT on the Continuous Performance Test (CPT-II and the Grooved Pegboard Test (GPT. DTI images were acquired in a 3 Tesla Siemens Trio scanner. Voxelwise statistical analysis of the fractional anisotropy (FA data was performed using the Tract-Based Spatial Statistics part of the FMRIB Software Library. A correlation analysis was performed between processing speed variables and FA values. Results There was a larger proportion of slow subjects (percentile below 25th in the patient group (Chi2 = 7.125 p = 0.008. FA values correlated positively with SDMT in anterior and posterior parts of the corpus callosum, and RT CPT-II correlated negatively with FA values in the anterior corpus callosum (p Conclusion We found significant correlations between WM alterations and cognitive impairment in MetSd patients, especially in the frontal lobe. These findings highlight the importance of MetSd prevention and control due to its association with structural and functional damage in the central nervous system.

  19. Influence of white spot syndrome virus infection on hepatopancreas gene expression of `Huanghai No. 2' shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xianhong; Shi, Xiaoli; Kong, Jie; Luan, Sheng; Luo, Kun; Cao, Baoxiang; Liu, Ning; Lu, Xia; Li, Xupeng; Deng, Kangyu; Cao, Jiawang; Zhang, Yingxue; Zhang, Hengheng

    2017-10-01

    To elucidate the molecular response of shrimp hepatopancreas to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, microarray was applied to investigate the differentially expressed genes in the hepatopancreas of `Huanghai No. 2' ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis). A total of 59137 unigenes were designed onto a custom-made 60K Agilent chip. After infection, the gene expression profiles in the hepatopancreas of the shrimp with a lower viral load at early (48-96 h), peak (168-192 h) and late (264-288 h) infection phases were analyzed. Of 18704 differentially expressed genes, 6412 were annotated. In total, 5453 differentially expressed genes (1916 annotated) expressed at all three phases, and most of the annotated were either up- or down-regulated continuously. These genes function diversely in, for example, immune response, cytoskeletal system, signal transduction, stress resistance, protein synthesis and processing, metabolism among others. Some of the immune-related genes, including antilipopolysaccharide factor, Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor, C-type lectin and serine protease encoding genes, were up-regulated after WSSV infection. These genes have been reported to be involved in the anti-WSSV responses. The expression of genes related to the cytoskeletal system, including β-actin and myosin but without tubulin genes, were down-regulated after WSSV infection. Astakine was found for the first time in the WSSV-infected F. chinensis. To further confirm the expression of differentially expressed genes, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to test the expression of eight randomly selected genes and verified the reliability and accuracy of the microarray expression analysis. The data will provide valuable information to understanding the immune mechanism of shrimp's response to WSSV.

  20. Comparison of white spot syndrome virus infection resistance between Exopalaemon carinicauda and Litopenaeus vannamei under different salinity stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qianqian; Yu, Ge; Sun, Ming; Li, Jitao; Li, Jian

    2017-12-01

    Exopalaemon carinicauda is one of the important economic shrimp species in China, and can tolerate a wide range of salinities. However, its disease resistance remains to be unclear in comparison with other shrimp species under salinity stress. In this study, the resistance to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) of E. carinicauda and Litopenaeus vannamei was determined by comparing their hemocyanin (Hc) and phenoloxidase (PO) activities under different salinity stresses. In E. carinicauda, the PO activity and Hc gene transcript abundance showed a coherent pattern of increase and decrease while Hc content showed a slightly decrease with Vibrio anguillarum and WSSV infections. For both E. carinicauda and L. vannamei under salinity stress, the PO activity showed a positive correlation with the salinity while the Hc content and expression level of its gene increased significantly in salinities of 5, 15 and 25 g L-1. The survival rate of E. carinicauda with WSSV infection was higher than that of L. vannamei in the first 24 h under different salinity stresses. Drastic mortality of E.carinicauda and L. vannamei appeared at 48 h and 3 h post-injection, respectively. Furthermore, compared with L. vannamei, E. carinicauda displayed higher PO activity, Hc content and abundance of Hc gene mRNA. The results collectively indicated that Hc and PO have obviously functional connection in resisting pathogens and tolerating salinity stress, and PO activity and Hc gene mRNA abundance may reflect the resistance of shrimp to disease. E. carinicauda has higher level of immune potential than L. vannamei, suggesting its greater capacity in resisting pathogens under salinity stresses.

  1. White Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    't see . . . things like information about what kinds of minerals make up the landforms. Mars scientists once thought, for instance, that these unusual features might be vast hills of salt, the dried up remains of a long-ago, evaporated lake. Not so, said an instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, which revealed that the bright material is probably made up of volcanic ash or windblown dust instead. And talk about a cyclical 'ashes to ashes, dust to dust' story! Particles of this material fell and fell until they built up quite a sedimentary deposit, which was then only eroded away again by the wind over time, leaving the spiky terrain seen today. It looks white, but its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the surrounding material is so dark. Of course, good eyesight always helps in understanding. A camera on Mars Global Surveyor with close-up capabilities revealed that sand dunes are responsible for the smudgy dark material in the bright sediment and around it. But that's not all. The THEMIS camera on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft that took this image reveals that this ashy or dusty deposit once covered a much larger area than it does today. Look yourself for two small dots of white material on the floor of a small crater nearby (center right in this image). They preserve a record that this bright deposit once reached much farther. Since so little of it remains, you can figure that the material probably isn't very hard, and simply blows away. One thing's for sure. No one looking at this image could ever think that Mars is a boring place. With all of its bright and dark contrasts, this picture would be perfect for anyone who loves Ansel Adams and his black-and-white photography.

  2. DOT's CAFE rulemaking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    Presentation discusses what DOT needs to consider in setting CAFE standards. How DOT's use of the CAFE Compliance and Effects Modeling System helps to analyze potential CAFE Standards. How DOT might approach the next round of CAFE standards for model...

  3. Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome in young men presenting with palpitation: the pattern of delta waves in predicting location of accessory pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miryanti Cahyaningtias

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Palpitation is a common presenting symptom in the emergency department. Wolf-Parkinson White (WPW syndrome is a cardiac conduction disorder that may present with palpitation and lead to sudden cardiac death. WPW could be detected by  electrocardiogram (ECG. In this case report, we present two young male patients with WPW syndrome admitted to our hospital with history of repeated and progressive palpitation. ECG of the first patient revealed supraventricular tachycardia which converted to sinus rhythm after propanolol treatment. ECG showed sinus rhythm with delta wave in lead II,III,aVF, V1 suggesting the presence of accessory pathway (AP in left lateral wall. Electrophysiology study confirmed the presence of AP and radio frequency catheter ablation was successfully done resulted in disappearance of delta on outpatient clinic ECG. Patient has no symptom and he do not have to take medication. ECG of the second patient revealed supraventricular tachycardia with abberancy. After amiodarone infusion, ECG showed sinus rhythm with delta wave in lead I,II,aVL suggesting the presence of accessory pathway in anteroseptal wall. Electrophysiology study and catheter ablation did not perform for this patient because of financial problem, however amidarone has to be taken regularly to prevent the recurrence of supraventricular tachycardia. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:298-301Keywords: ECG, palpitation, supraventricular tachycardia, Wolf- Parkinson White syndrome

  4. Notes on the geology and meteorology of sites infected with white-nose syndrome before July 2010 in Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swezey, Christopher S.; Garrity, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2006, numerous bat colonies in North America have experienced unusually high incidences of mortality. In these colonies, bats are infected by a white fungus named Geomyces destructans, which has been observed on bat muzzles, noses, ears, and (or) wings. Although it is not exactly certain how and why these bats are dying, this condition has been named white-nose syndrome (WNS). WNS appears to have spread from an initial infection site at a cave in New York, and was first identified south of Pennsylvania during January 2009. By the end of June 2010, 41 infected sites had identified in the states of West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, and Tennessee. Most of these sites are natural caves in limestone of either Cambrian-Ordovician age or Silurian-Devonian age. Published air temperature values in these WNS-infected caves range from -3.3 to 15.6 °C, and humidity measurements range from 68 to 100 %.

  5. Mild developmental foreign accent syndrome and psychiatric comorbidity: Altered white matter integrity in speech and emotion regulation networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L Berthier

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Foreign accent syndrome (FAS is a speech disorder that is defined by the emergence of a peculiar manner of articulation and intonation which is perceived as foreign. In most cases of acquired FAS (AFAS the new accent is secondary to small focal lesions involving components of the bilaterally distributed neural network for speech production. In the past few years FAS has also been described in different psychiatric conditions (conversion disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia as well as in developmental disorders (specific language impairment, apraxia of speech. In the present study, two adult males, one with atypical phonetic production and the other one with cluttering, reported having developmental FAS (DFAS since their adolescence. Perceptual analysis by naïve judges could not confirm the presence of foreign accent, possibly due to the mildness of the speech disorder. However, detailed linguistic analysis provided evidence of prosodic and segmental errors previously reported in AFAS cases. Cognitive testing showed reduced communication in activities of daily living and mild deficits related to psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric evaluation revealed long-lasting internalizing disorders (neuroticism, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, depression, alexithymia, hopelessness, and apathy in both subjects. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data from each subject with DFAS were compared with data from a group of 21 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Diffusion parameters (MD, AD, and RD in predefined regions of interest showed changes of white matter microstructure in regions previously related with AFAS and psychiatric disorders. In conclusion, the present findings militate against the possibility that these two subjects have FAS of psychogenic origin. Rather, our findings provide evidence that mild DFAS occurring in the context of subtle, yet persistent, developmental speech disorders may be associated with

  6. Capture and reproductive trends in summer bat communities in West Virginia: Assessing the impact of white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francl, Karen E.; Ford, W. Mark; Sparks, Dale W.; Brack, Virgil

    2012-01-01

    Although it has been widely documented that populations of cave-roosting bats rapidly decline following the arrival of white-nose syndrome (WNS), longer term reproductive effects are less well-known and essentially unexplored at the community scale. In West Virginia, WNS was first detected in the eastern portion of the state in 2009 and winter mortality was documented in 2009 and 2010. However, quantitative impacts on summer bat communities remained unknown. We compared “historical” (pre-WNS) capture records and reproductive rates from 11,734 bats captured during summer (15 May to 15 August) of 1997–2008 and 1,304 captures during 2010. We predicted that capture rates (number of individuals captured/net-night) would decrease in 2010. We also expected the energetic strain of WNS would cause delayed or reduced reproduction, as denoted by a greater proportion of pregnant or lactating females later in the summer and a lower relative proportion of juvenile captures in the mid–late summer. We found a dramatic decline in capture rates of little brown Myotis lucifugus, northern long-eared M. septentrionalis, small-footed M. leibii, Indiana M. sodalis, tri-colored Perimyotis subflavus, and hoary Lasiurus cinereus bats after detection of WNS in 2009. For these six species, 2010 capture rates were 10–37% of pre-WNS rates. Conversely, capture rates of big brown bats Eptesicus fuscus increased by 17% in 2010, whereas capture rates of eastern red bats Lasiurus borealis did not change. Together, big brown and eastern red bats were 58% of all 2010 captures but only 11% of pre-WNS captures. Reproductive data from 12,314 bats showed shifts in pregnancy and lactation dates, and an overall narrowing in the windows of time of each reproductive event, for northern-long-eared and little brown bats. Additionally, the proportion of juvenile captures declined in 2010 for these species. In contrast, lactation and pregnancy rates of big brown and eastern red bats, and the

  7. The microsporidian Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei is not the cause of white feces syndrome in whiteleg shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangprasittipap, Amornrat; Srisala, Jiraporn; Chouwdee, Saisunee; Somboon, Montagan; Chuchird, Niti; Limsuwan, Chalor; Srisuvan, Thinnarat; Flegel, Timothy W; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya

    2013-07-15

    The microsporidian Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei was first described from Thailand in 2009 in farmed, indigenous giant tiger shrimp Penaeus (Penaeus) monodon. The natural reservoir for the parasite is still unknown. More recently, a microsporidian closely resembling it in morphology and tissue preference was found in Thai-farmed, exotic, whiteleg shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei exhibiting white feces syndrome (WFS). Our objective was to compare the newly found pathogen with E. hepatopenaei and to determine its causal relationship with WFS. Generic primers used to amplify a fragment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (ssu rRNA) gene for cloning and sequencing revealed that the new parasite from WFS ponds had 99% sequence identity to that of E. hepatopenaei, suggesting it was conspecific. Normal histological analysis using tissue sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) revealed that relatively few tubule epithelial cells exhibited spores, suggesting that the infections were light. However, the H&E results were deceptive since nested PCR and in situ hybridization analysis based on the cloned ssu rRNA gene fragment revealed very heavy infections in tubule epithelial cells in the central region of the hepatopancreas in the absence of spores. Despite these results, high prevalence of E. hepatopenaei in shrimp from ponds not exhibiting WFS and a pond that had recovered from WFS indicated no direct causal association between these infections and WFS. This was supported by laboratory oral challenge trials that revealed direct horizontal transmission to uninfected shrimp but no signs of WFS. The microsporidian newly found in P. vannamei is conspecific with previously described E. hepatopenaei and it is not causally associated with WFS. However, the deceptive severity of infections (much greater than previously reported in P. monodon) would undoubtedly have a negative effect on whiteleg shrimp growth and production efficiency and this could be exacerbated by the

  8. Winter Activity of Coastal Plain Populations of Bat Species Affected by White-Nose Syndrome and Wind Energy Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grider, John F; Larsen, Angela L; Homyack, Jessica A; Kalcounis-Rueppell, Matina C

    2016-01-01

    Across the entire distribution of a species, populations may have variable responses to environmental perturbations. Many bat species experience mortality in large portions of their range during hibernation and along migratory paths to and from wintering grounds, from White-nose syndrome (WNS) and wind energy development, respectively. In some areas, warm temperatures may allow bats to remain active through winter, thus decreasing their susceptibility to WNS and/or mortality associated with migration to wintering grounds. These areas could act as a refugia and be important for the persistence of local populations. To determine if warmer temperatures affect bat activity, we compared year-round activity of bat populations in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont of North Carolina, USA, two regions that differ in winter temperature. We established six recording stations, four along a 295-kilometer north-south transect in the Coastal Plain, and two in the Piedmont of North Carolina. We recorded bat activity over two years. We supplemented our recordings with mist-net data. Although bat activity was lower during winter at all sites, the odds of recording a bat during winter were higher at Coastal Plain sites when compared with Piedmont sites. Further, bats in the Piedmont had a lower level of winter activity compared to summer activity than bats in the Coastal Plain that had more similar levels of activity in the winter and summer. We found high bat species richness on the Coastal Plain in winter, with winter-active species including those known to hibernate throughout most of their range and others known to be long distance migrants. In particular, two species impacted by WNS, the northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis) and tricolored bat (Perimyotis subflavus), were present year round in the Coastal Plain. The tricolored bat was also present year-round in the Piedmont. In the Coastal Plain, the long distance migratory hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) was active in the

  9. Winter Activity of Coastal Plain Populations of Bat Species Affected by White-Nose Syndrome and Wind Energy Facilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Grider

    Full Text Available Across the entire distribution of a species, populations may have variable responses to environmental perturbations. Many bat species experience mortality in large portions of their range during hibernation and along migratory paths to and from wintering grounds, from White-nose syndrome (WNS and wind energy development, respectively. In some areas, warm temperatures may allow bats to remain active through winter, thus decreasing their susceptibility to WNS and/or mortality associated with migration to wintering grounds. These areas could act as a refugia and be important for the persistence of local populations. To determine if warmer temperatures affect bat activity, we compared year-round activity of bat populations in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont of North Carolina, USA, two regions that differ in winter temperature. We established six recording stations, four along a 295-kilometer north-south transect in the Coastal Plain, and two in the Piedmont of North Carolina. We recorded bat activity over two years. We supplemented our recordings with mist-net data. Although bat activity was lower during winter at all sites, the odds of recording a bat during winter were higher at Coastal Plain sites when compared with Piedmont sites. Further, bats in the Piedmont had a lower level of winter activity compared to summer activity than bats in the Coastal Plain that had more similar levels of activity in the winter and summer. We found high bat species richness on the Coastal Plain in winter, with winter-active species including those known to hibernate throughout most of their range and others known to be long distance migrants. In particular, two species impacted by WNS, the northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis and tricolored bat (Perimyotis subflavus, were present year round in the Coastal Plain. The tricolored bat was also present year-round in the Piedmont. In the Coastal Plain, the long distance migratory hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus

  10. The microsporidian Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei is not the cause of white feces syndrome in whiteleg shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The microsporidian Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei was first described from Thailand in 2009 in farmed, indigenous giant tiger shrimp Penaeus (Penaeus) monodon. The natural reservoir for the parasite is still unknown. More recently, a microsporidian closely resembling it in morphology and tissue preference was found in Thai-farmed, exotic, whiteleg shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei exhibiting white feces syndrome (WFS). Our objective was to compare the newly found pathogen with E. hepatopenaei and to determine its causal relationship with WFS. Results Generic primers used to amplify a fragment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (ssu rRNA) gene for cloning and sequencing revealed that the new parasite from WFS ponds had 99% sequence identity to that of E. hepatopenaei, suggesting it was conspecific. Normal histological analysis using tissue sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) revealed that relatively few tubule epithelial cells exhibited spores, suggesting that the infections were light. However, the H&E results were deceptive since nested PCR and in situ hybridization analysis based on the cloned ssu rRNA gene fragment revealed very heavy infections in tubule epithelial cells in the central region of the hepatopancreas in the absence of spores. Despite these results, high prevalence of E. hepatopenaei in shrimp from ponds not exhibiting WFS and a pond that had recovered from WFS indicated no direct causal association between these infections and WFS. This was supported by laboratory oral challenge trials that revealed direct horizontal transmission to uninfected shrimp but no signs of WFS. Conclusions The microsporidian newly found in P. vannamei is conspecific with previously described E. hepatopenaei and it is not causally associated with WFS. However, the deceptive severity of infections (much greater than previously reported in P. monodon) would undoubtedly have a negative effect on whiteleg shrimp growth and production efficiency and

  11. Mild Developmental Foreign Accent Syndrome and Psychiatric Comorbidity: Altered White Matter Integrity in Speech and Emotion Regulation Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, Marcelo L; Roé-Vellvé, Núria; Moreno-Torres, Ignacio; Falcon, Carles; Thurnhofer-Hemsi, Karl; Paredes-Pacheco, José; Torres-Prioris, María J; De-Torres, Irene; Alfaro, Francisco; Gutiérrez-Cardo, Antonio L; Baquero, Miquel; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; Dávila, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Foreign accent syndrome (FAS) is a speech disorder that is defined by the emergence of a peculiar manner of articulation and intonation which is perceived as foreign. In most cases of acquired FAS (AFAS) the new accent is secondary to small focal lesions involving components of the bilaterally distributed neural network for speech production. In the past few years FAS has also been described in different psychiatric conditions (conversion disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia) as well as in developmental disorders (specific language impairment, apraxia of speech). In the present study, two adult males, one with atypical phonetic production and the other one with cluttering, reported having developmental FAS (DFAS) since their adolescence. Perceptual analysis by naïve judges could not confirm the presence of foreign accent, possibly due to the mildness of the speech disorder. However, detailed linguistic analysis provided evidence of prosodic and segmental errors previously reported in AFAS cases. Cognitive testing showed reduced communication in activities of daily living and mild deficits related to psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric evaluation revealed long-lasting internalizing disorders (neuroticism, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, depression, alexithymia, hopelessness, and apathy) in both subjects. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from each subject with DFAS were compared with data from a group of 21 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Diffusion parameters (MD, AD, and RD) in predefined regions of interest showed changes of white matter microstructure in regions previously related with AFAS and psychiatric disorders. In conclusion, the present findings militate against the possibility that these two subjects have FAS of psychogenic origin. Rather, our findings provide evidence that mild DFAS occurring in the context of subtle, yet persistent, developmental speech disorders may be associated with structural brain

  12. Mild Developmental Foreign Accent Syndrome and Psychiatric Comorbidity: Altered White Matter Integrity in Speech and Emotion Regulation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, Marcelo L.; Roé-Vellvé, Núria; Moreno-Torres, Ignacio; Falcon, Carles; Thurnhofer-Hemsi, Karl; Paredes-Pacheco, José; Torres-Prioris, María J.; De-Torres, Irene; Alfaro, Francisco; Gutiérrez-Cardo, Antonio L.; Baquero, Miquel; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; Dávila, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Foreign accent syndrome (FAS) is a speech disorder that is defined by the emergence of a peculiar manner of articulation and intonation which is perceived as foreign. In most cases of acquired FAS (AFAS) the new accent is secondary to small focal lesions involving components of the bilaterally distributed neural network for speech production. In the past few years FAS has also been described in different psychiatric conditions (conversion disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia) as well as in developmental disorders (specific language impairment, apraxia of speech). In the present study, two adult males, one with atypical phonetic production and the other one with cluttering, reported having developmental FAS (DFAS) since their adolescence. Perceptual analysis by naïve judges could not confirm the presence of foreign accent, possibly due to the mildness of the speech disorder. However, detailed linguistic analysis provided evidence of prosodic and segmental errors previously reported in AFAS cases. Cognitive testing showed reduced communication in activities of daily living and mild deficits related to psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric evaluation revealed long-lasting internalizing disorders (neuroticism, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, depression, alexithymia, hopelessness, and apathy) in both subjects. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from each subject with DFAS were compared with data from a group of 21 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Diffusion parameters (MD, AD, and RD) in predefined regions of interest showed changes of white matter microstructure in regions previously related with AFAS and psychiatric disorders. In conclusion, the present findings militate against the possibility that these two subjects have FAS of psychogenic origin. Rather, our findings provide evidence that mild DFAS occurring in the context of subtle, yet persistent, developmental speech disorders may be associated with structural brain

  13. Yeast Surface Display of Two Proteins Previously Shown to Be Protective Against White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV in Shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorawit Ananphongmanee

    Full Text Available Cell surface display using the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris has been extensively developed for application in bioindustrial processes. Due to the rigid structure of their cell walls, a number of proteins have been successfully displayed on their cell surfaces. It was previously reported that the viral binding protein Rab7 from the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (PmRab7 and its binding partner envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV could independently protect shrimp against WSSV infection. Thus, we aimed to display these two proteins independently on the cell surfaces of 2 yeast clones with the ultimate goal of using a mixture of the two clones as an orally deliverable, antiviral agent to protect shrimp against WSSV infection. PmRab7 and VP28 were modified by N-terminal tagging to the C-terminal half of S. cerevisiae α-agglutinin. DNA fragments, harboring fused-gene expression cassettes under control of an alcohol oxidase I (AOX1 promoter were constructed and used to transform the yeast cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies specific to both proteins demonstrated that mutated PmRab7 (mPmRab7 and partial VP28 (pVP28 were localized on the cell surfaces of the respective clones, and fluorescence intensity for each was significantly higher than that of control cells by flow cytometry. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA using cells displaying mPmRab7 or pVP28 revealed that the binding of specific antibodies for each was dose-dependent, and could be saturated. In addition, the binding of mPmRab7-expressing cells with free VP28, and vice versa was dose dependent. Binding between the two surface-expressed proteins was confirmed by an assay showing agglutination between cells expressing complementary mPmRab7 and pVP28. In summary, our genetically engineered P. pastoris can display biologically active mPmRab7 and pVP28 and is now ready for evaluation of efficacy in protecting shrimp against

  14. Diffuse alterations in grey and white matter associated with cognitive impairment in Shwachman–Diamond syndrome: Evidence from a multimodal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Perobelli

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in Shwachman–Diamond syndrome subjects is associated with diffuse brain anomalies in the grey matter (verbal skills with BA44 and BA20 in the right hemisphere; perceptual skills with BA5, 37, 20, 21, 42 in the left hemisphere and white matter connectivity (verbal skills with alterations in the fronto-occipital fasciculus and with the inferior-longitudinal fasciculus; perceptual skills with the arcuate fasciculus, limbic and ponto-cerebellar fasciculus; memory skills with the arcuate fasciculus; executive functions with the anterior cingulated and arcuate fasciculus.

  15. [Treatment of patients with different degree of acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by inhalation of white smoke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F W; Xin, H M; Zhu, J H; Feng, X Y; Jiang, X C; Gong, Z Y; Tong, Y L

    2017-12-20

    Objective: To summarize the treatment experience of patients with different degree of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by inhalation of white smoke from burning smoke bomb. Methods: A batch of 13 patients with different degree of ARDS caused by inhalation of white smoke from burning smoke bomb, including 2 patients complicated by pulmonary fibrosis at the late stage, were admitted to our unit in February 2016. Patients were divided into mild (9 cases), moderate (2 cases), and serious (2 cases) degree according to the ARDS Berlin diagnostic criteria. Patients with mild and moderate ARDS were conventionally treated with glucocorticoid. Patients with severe ARDS were sequentially treated with glucocorticoid and pirfenidone, and ventilator-assisted breathing, etc. were applied. The vital signs, arterial oxygenation index, changes of lung imaging, pulmonary ventilation function, general condition, and the other important organs/systems function were timely monitored according to the condition of patients. The above indexes were also monitored during the follow-up time of 10-15 months post injury. Data were processed with SPSS 18.0 statistical software. Results: (1) The symptoms of respiratory system of patients with mild and moderate ARDS almost disappeared after 3 days' treatment. Their arterial oxygenation index was decreased from post injury day 1 to 4, which almost recovered on post injury day 7 and completely recovered one month post injury. The symptoms of respiratory system of patients with severe ARDS almost disappeared at tranquillization condition 1-3 month (s) post injury. Their arterial oxygenation index was decreased from post injury day 3 to 21, which gradually recovered 1-3 month (s) post injury and was normal 15 months post injury. (2) Within 24 hours post injury, there was no obvious abnormality or only a little texture enlargement of lung in image of chest CT or X-rays of patients with mild and moderate ARDS. One patient with moderate

  16. Aberrant White Matter Microstructure in Children and Adolescents With the Subtype of Prader-Willi Syndrome at High Risk for Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoshe, Akvile; van den Bosch, Gerbrich E; van der Lugt, Aad; Kushner, Steven A; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C; White, Tonya

    2017-09-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a complex neurogenetic disorder caused by loss of the paternal 15q11.2-q13 locus, due to deletion (DEL), maternal uniparental disomy (mUPD), or imprinting center defects. Individuals with mUPD have up to 60% risk of developing psychosis in early adulthood. Given the increasing evidence for white matter abnormalities in psychotic disorders, we investigated white matter microstructure in children and adolescents with PWS, with a particular emphasis on the DEL and mUPD subtypes. Magnetic resonance diffusion weighted images were acquired in 35 directions at 3T and analyzed using fractional anisotropy (FA), mean, axial, and radial diffusivity (MD, AD, RD) values obtained by tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) in 28 children and adolescents with PWS and 61 controls. In addition, we employed a recently developed white matter pothole approach, which does not require local FA differences to be spatially co-localized across subjects. After accounting for age and gender, individuals with PWS had significantly lower global FA and higher MD, compared with controls. Individuals with mUPD had lower FA in multiple regions including the corpus callosum, cingulate, and superior longitudinal fasciculus and larger potholes, compared with DEL and controls. The observed differences in individuals with mUPD are similar to the white matter abnormalities in individuals with psychotic disorders. Conversely, the subtle white matter abnormalities in individuals with DEL are consistent with their substantially lower risk of psychosis. Future studies to investigate the specific neurobiological mechanism underlying the differential psychosis risk between the DEL and mUPD subtypes of PWS are highly warranted. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. White blood cell and platelet count as adjuncts to standard clinical evaluation for risk assessment in patients at low probability of acute aortic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Fulvio; Cavalot, Giulia; Giachino, Francesca; Tizzani, Maria; Nazerian, Peiman; Carbone, Federica; Pivetta, Emanuele; Mengozzi, Giulio; Moiraghi, Corrado; Lupia, Enrico

    2017-08-01

    Pre-test probability assessment is key in the approach to suspected acute aortic syndromes (AASs). However, most patients with AAS-compatible symptoms are classified at low probability, warranting further evaluation for decision on aortic imaging. White blood cell count, platelet count and fibrinogen explore pathophysiological pathways mobilized in AASs and are routinely assayed in the workup of AASs. However, the diagnostic performance of these variables for AASs, alone and as a bundle, is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that white blood cell count, platelet count and/or fibrinogen at presentation may be applied as additional tools to standard clinical evaluation for pre-test risk assessment in patients at low probability of AAS. This was a retrospective observational study conducted on consecutive patients managed in our Emergency Department from 2009 to 2014 for suspected AAS. White blood cell count, platelet count and fibrinogen were assayed during evaluation in the Emergency Department. The final diagnosis was obtained by computed tomography angiography. The pre-test probability of AAS was defined according to guidelines. Of 1210 patients with suspected AAS, 1006 (83.1%) were classified at low probability, and 271 (22.4%) were diagnosed with AAS. Within patients at low probability, presence of at least one alteration among white blood cell count >9*10 3 /µl, platelet count 9*10 3 /µl and platelet count 9*10 3 /µl and platelet count evaluation, white blood cell count and platelet count may be used in patients at low pre-test probability to fine-tune risk assessment of AAS.

  18. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...... of quantum dots, however, results in a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum dot spectra.Work on self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots will be presented. Properties of atom-like single-dots states are investigated optically using high spatial and spectral resolution. Single-dot spectra can be used...

  19. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid-state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...... of quantum dots, however, results in a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum dot spectra. Work on self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots will be presented. Properties of atom-like single-dot states are investigated optically using high spatial and spectral resolution. Single-dot spectra can be used...

  20. Differential expression profiles of microRNA in the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) associated with white nose syndrome affected and unaffected individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, D.D.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Hitt, N.P.; King, T.L.

    2013-01-01

    First documented in New York State in 2006, white nose syndrome (WNS) quickly became the leading cause of mortality in hibernating bat species in the United States. WNS is caused by a psychrophilic fungus, Geomyces destructans. Clinical signs of this pathogen are expressed as a dusty white fungus predominately around the nose and on the wings of affected bats. Relatively new biomarkers, such as microRNAs (miRNAs) are being targeted as markers to predict the syndrome prior to the clinical manifestation. The primary objective of this study was to identify miRNAs that could serve as biomarkers and proxies of little brown bat health. Bats were collected from hibernacula that had tested positive and negative for WNS. Genetic sequencing was completed using the Ion Torrent platform. A number of miRNAs were identified from the liver as putative biomarkers of WNS. However, given the small sample size for each treatment, this data set has only coarsely identified miRNAs indicative of WNS, and further validation is required.

  1. Application of Spirulina platensis for prevention of white spot syndrome virus in post larvae and juvenile black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemtanon, P.

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the extract of Spirulina platensis were examined in vitro to inhibit white spot syndrome virus (WSSV and application of dry S. platensis in diet for prevention of white spot syndrome (WSS in post larvae and juvenile black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon. The results showed that the lowest concentration of the extract for inhibiting WSSV was 0.01 mg/ml, while the optimum concentration was found to be 0.1 mg/ ml in which the mortality rate of the shrimp was 4 percents and infection was not detected from survivalshrimp by the immunohistochemistry method.Furthermore, The results showed that the survival rate of the post larvae fed on steamed egg containing dry S. platensis 5 g/kg of diet was higher than that of the control (p<0.05 when challenged with WSSV and no WSSV infected shrimp examine by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. In the case of juvenile shrimp, the survival rate of shrimp fed pellets containing dry S. platensis 10 g/kg of diet was higher than that of the control group (p<0.05 after challenging with WSSV. Moreover percent of WSSV infection in the survival shrimp using the immunohistochemistry method was lower than that of the control group.

  2. Dietary Administration of Yeast β 1,3 1,6 Glucan on Immunity and Survival Rate of White Indian Shrimp, Fennerpenaeus indicus Challenged with White Spot Syndrome Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Ghaednia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The potency of dietary β 1,3 1,6 glucan (BG, derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in stimulating the non-specific immunity of white Indian shrimp, Fennerpenaeus indicus (Milne-Edwards, 1837 and improving its resistance to white spot syndrome disease were investigated. F. indicus (11.32±1.20 g were fed for 20 days on a series of treatment diets containing graded levels of BG (blank control, 0 as control, 2, 10, 20 g kg-1 feed and were then challenged by injection of WSSV virus. Total haemocyte count (THC, total plasma protein (TPP, phagocytic activity (PA and Bacterial Clearance activity (BC were measured at days 0, 7, 14, 21 after BG feeding, and shrimp survival rate was also recorded daily after challenge. THC, TPP, PA and BC of the 10 and 20 g kg-1 BG treatments were significantly higher (P<0.05 by day 14 than control and 2 g kg-1 treatment shrimp. Survival rate of shrimp fed with the diet containing 10 and 20 g kg-1 BG after 21 days, were 53.32±5.77 and 48.32±5.77%, respectively. Accordingly, oral administration of BG at an optimal level of 10 g kg-1 diet for 20 days efficaciously stimulate the immune defense and improve the survival rate of WSV-infected F. indicus.

  3. Connecting dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Kyoko; Jacobs, Rachel L.

    2017-01-01

    and Middleton, 1995). A reminiscence conversation is a dynamic talk-in-interaction, which can produce valuable learning experience for the participants involved. Reminiscence talk contains rich, personal, historic data that can reveal and inform family members of an unknown past. In this seminar/chapter, we......Reminiscence is a self-reflecting process on past events and experiences. Not only does it enable past experiences to be brought to light through talk, but it also creates an affective environment, which allows participants to explore and construct a representation of the self (Buchanan...... of connecting the dots of recalled moments of individual family members lives and is geared towards building a family’s shared future for posterity. Lastly, we consider a wider implication of family reminiscence in terms of human development. http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Memory-Practices-and-Learning...

  4. Decreased Axon Caliber Underlies Loss of Fiber Tract Integrity, Disproportional Reductions in White Matter Volume, and Microcephaly in Angelman Syndrome Model Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Matthew C; Burette, Alain C; Thaxton, Courtney L; Pribisko, Alaine L; Shen, Mark D; Rumple, Ashley M; Del Cid, Wilmer A; Paniagua, Beatriz; Styner, Martin; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2017-08-02

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss of function of the maternally inherited UBE3A allele. It is currently unclear how the consequences of this genetic insult unfold to impair neurodevelopment. We reasoned that by elucidating the basis of microcephaly in AS, a highly penetrant syndromic feature with early postnatal onset, we would gain new insights into the mechanisms by which maternal UBE3A loss derails neurotypical brain growth and function. Detailed anatomical analysis of both male and female maternal Ube3a -null mice reveals that microcephaly in the AS mouse model is primarily driven by deficits in the growth of white matter tracts, which by adulthood are characterized by densely packed axons of disproportionately small caliber. Our results implicate impaired axon growth in the pathogenesis of AS and identify noninvasive structural neuroimaging as a potentially valuable tool for gauging therapeutic efficacy in the disorder. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT People who maternally inherit a deletion or nonfunctional copy of the UBE3A gene develop Angelman syndrome (AS), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder. To better understand how loss of maternal UBE3A function derails brain development, we analyzed brain structure in a maternal Ube3a knock-out mouse model of AS. We report that the volume of white matter (WM) is disproportionately reduced in AS mice, indicating that deficits in WM development are a major factor underlying impaired brain growth and microcephaly in the disorder. Notably, we find that axons within the WM pathways of AS model mice are abnormally small in caliber. This defect is associated with slowed nerve conduction, which could contribute to behavioral deficits in AS, including motor dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/377347-15$15.00/0.

  5. Corrected QT dispersion as a predictor of the frequency of paroxysmal tachyarrhythmias in patients with Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome

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    Eid M. Daoud

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Calculation of QTcd in patients with WPW syndrome presented with paroxysmal tachyarrhythmias is a simple noninvasive clinical test for risk stratification of those patients and hence detecting patients at higher risk for frequent and recurrent tachyarrhythmias.

  6. Cell cycle–related genes as modifiers of age of onset of colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome: a large-scale study in non-Hispanic white patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyun; Pande, Mala

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity in age of onset of colorectal cancer in individuals with mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) suggests the influence of other lifestyle and genetic modifiers. We hypothesized that genes regulating the cell cycle influence the observed heterogeneity as cell cycle–related genes respond to DNA damage by arresting the cell cycle to provide time for repair and induce transcription of genes that facilitate repair. We examined the association of 1456 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 128 cell cycle–related genes and 31 DNA repair–related genes in 485 non-Hispanic white participants with Lynch syndrome to determine whether there are SNPs associated with age of onset of colorectal cancer. Genotyping was performed on an Illumina GoldenGate platform, and data were analyzed using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis, Cox regression analysis and classification and regression tree (CART) methods. Ten SNPs were independently significant in a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model after correcting for multiple comparisons (P Lynch syndrome. PMID:23125224

  7. Cell cycle-related genes as modifiers of age of onset of colorectal cancer in Lynch syndrome: a large-scale study in non-Hispanic white patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyun; Pande, Mala; Huang, Yu-Jing; Wei, Chongjuan; Amos, Christopher I; Talseth-Palmer, Bente A; Meldrum, Cliff J; Chen, Wei V; Gorlov, Ivan P; Lynch, Patrick M; Scott, Rodney J; Frazier, Marsha L

    2013-02-01

    Heterogeneity in age of onset of colorectal cancer in individuals with mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) suggests the influence of other lifestyle and genetic modifiers. We hypothesized that genes regulating the cell cycle influence the observed heterogeneity as cell cycle-related genes respond to DNA damage by arresting the cell cycle to provide time for repair and induce transcription of genes that facilitate repair. We examined the association of 1456 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 128 cell cycle-related genes and 31 DNA repair-related genes in 485 non-Hispanic white participants with Lynch syndrome to determine whether there are SNPs associated with age of onset of colorectal cancer. Genotyping was performed on an Illumina GoldenGate platform, and data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Cox regression analysis and classification and regression tree (CART) methods. Ten SNPs were independently significant in a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model after correcting for multiple comparisons (P Lynch syndrome.

  8. Prevention of White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection on Penaeus monodon by Immersion in CEPM Extract of Avicennia sp. and Sonneratia sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wahjuningrum

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality and survival rate are still being the problem that hampers the productivity of black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon culture.  Impaired quality of larval shrimp and environmental conditions can confer shrimp be infected by diseases, including viruses such as white spot syndrome virus (WSSV.  Prevention of disease infection using chemicals can offer negative impacts on water, pathogen resistance and consumers.  This study was conducted to examine the efficacy of an alternative prevention compound as liquid mangrove extract (CEPM from Avicennia sp. and Sonneratia sp. By immersion in different dose of CEPM, i.e. 250, 500, 750 and 1000 ppm, the patogenicity of WSSV was found to be different.  Patogenicity of WSSV decreased after treatment by CEPM, hence this could be used to induce shrimp immunity.  Optimum dose of CEPM was 250 ppm, which could increased survival rate of shrimp after challenging by WSSV, up to 98.4% shrimp survived. Keywrods: WSSV, black tiger shrimp, extract, Avicennia sp., Sonneratia sp.   ABSTRAK Kualitas dan kelangsungan hidup merupakan masalah yang masih membatasi produktivitas budidaya udang windu Penaeus monodon. Kondisi udang dan kualitas lingkungan yang kurang baik dapat menyebabkan udang terserang penyakit, termasuk yang disebabkan oleh virus termasuk white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. Upaya pengendaliannya menggunakan bahan kimia secara berlebih dapat menimbulkan dampak negatif bagi lingkungan perairan, kesehatan konsumen dan menimbulkan resistensi patogen. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui efektivitas bahan alternatif berupa cairan ekstrak pohon mangrove (CEPM dari jenis Avicennia sp. dan Sonneratia sp. sebagai upaya pencegahan. Dengan perendaman beberapa konsentrasi yang berbeda (250, 500, 750 dan 1000 ppm penggunaan cairan ekstrak pohon mangrove (CEPM Avicennia sp. dan Sonneratia sp., memberikan pengaruh yang berbeda terhadap patogenitas WSSV dan udang uji pada setiap perlakuan. Tingkat

  9. Molecular cloning and recombinant expression of the VP28 carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic region from a brazilian white spot syndrome virus isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Braunig

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a fragment of the VP28 coding sequence from a Brazilian WSSV isolate (BrVP28 was cloned, sequenced and expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3 pLysS strain in order to produce the VP28 carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic region. The expression resulted in a protein of about 21 kDa, which was purified under denaturing conditions, resulting in a final highly purified BrVP28 preparation. The recombinant protein obtained can be used in several biotechnology applications, such as the production of monoclonal antibodies which could be used in the development of diagnostic tools as well as in the studies on the characterization of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV isolated in Brazil.

  10. Direct detection of fungal siderophores on bats with white-nose syndrome via fluorescence microscopy-guided ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascuch, Samantha J.; Moree, Wilna J.; Cheng-Chih Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Turner, Gregory G.; Cheng, Tina L.; Blehert, David S.; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Frick, Winifred F.; Meehan, Michael J.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Gerwick, Lena

    2015-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) caused by the pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans is decimating the populations of several hibernating North American bat species. Little is known about the molecular interplay between pathogen and host in this disease. Fluorescence microscopy ambient ionization mass spectrometry was used to generate metabolic profiles from the wings of both healthy and diseased bats of the genus Myotis. Fungal siderophores, molecules that scavenge iron from the environment, were detected on the wings of bats with WNS, but not on healthy bats. This work is among the first examples in which microbial molecules are directly detected from an infected host and highlights the ability of atmospheric ionization methodologies to provide direct molecular insight into infection.

  11. RNA-Seq analysis reveals genes associated with resistance to Taura syndrome virus (TSV) in the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookruksawong, Suchonma; Sun, Fanyue; Liu, Zhanjiang; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2013-12-01

    Outbreak of Taura syndrome virus (TSV) is one of the major pathogens of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. Although selective breeding for improvement of TSV resistance in L. vannamei has been successfully developed and has led to a great benefit to the shrimp farming industry worldwide. The molecular mechanisms underlying the viral resistance in shrimp remain largely unknown. In the present study, we conducted the first transcriptomic profiling of host responses in hemolymph and hemocytes in order to identify the differentially expressed genes associated with resistance to TSV in L. vannamei. High-throughput RNA-Seq was employed, obtaining 193.6 and 171.2 million high-quality Illumina reads from TSV-resistant and susceptible L. vannamei lines respectively. A total of 61,937 contigs were generated with an average length of 546.26 bp. BLASTX-based gene annotation (E-value vannamei. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct detection of fungal siderophores on bats with white-nose syndrome via fluorescence microscopy-guided ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascuch, Samantha J; Moree, Wilna J; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Turner, Gregory G; Cheng, Tina L; Blehert, David S; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Frick, Winifred F; Meehan, Michael J; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Gerwick, Lena

    2015-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) caused by the pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans is decimating the populations of several hibernating North American bat species. Little is known about the molecular interplay between pathogen and host in this disease. Fluorescence microscopy ambient ionization mass spectrometry was used to generate metabolic profiles from the wings of both healthy and diseased bats of the genus Myotis. Fungal siderophores, molecules that scavenge iron from the environment, were detected on the wings of bats with WNS, but not on healthy bats. This work is among the first examples in which microbial molecules are directly detected from an infected host and highlights the ability of atmospheric ionization methodologies to provide direct molecular insight into infection.

  13. Direct detection of fungal siderophores on bats with white-nose syndrome via fluorescence microscopy-guided ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Mascuch

    Full Text Available White-nose syndrome (WNS caused by the pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans is decimating the populations of several hibernating North American bat species. Little is known about the molecular interplay between pathogen and host in this disease. Fluorescence microscopy ambient ionization mass spectrometry was used to generate metabolic profiles from the wings of both healthy and diseased bats of the genus Myotis. Fungal siderophores, molecules that scavenge iron from the environment, were detected on the wings of bats with WNS, but not on healthy bats. This work is among the first examples in which microbial molecules are directly detected from an infected host and highlights the ability of atmospheric ionization methodologies to provide direct molecular insight into infection.

  14. Validation of a commercial insulated isothermal PCR-based POCKIT test for rapid and easy detection of white spot syndrome virus infection in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Long Tsai

    Full Text Available Timely pond-side detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV plays a critical role in the implementation of bio-security measures to help minimize economic losses caused by white spot syndrome disease, an important threat to shrimp aquaculture industry worldwide. A portable device, namely POCKIT™, became available recently to complete fluorescent probe-based insulated isothermal PCR (iiPCR, and automatic data detection and interpretation within one hour. Taking advantage of this platform, the IQ Plus™ WSSV Kit with POCKIT system was established to allow simple and easy WSSV detection for on-site users. The assay was first evaluated for its analytical sensitivity and specificity performance. The 95% limit of detection (LOD of the assay was 17 copies of WSSV genomic DNA per reaction (95% confidence interval [CI], 13 to 24 copies per reaction. The established assay has detection sensitivity similar to that of OIE-registered IQ2000™ WSSV Detection and Protection System with serial dilutions of WSSV-positive Litopenaeus vannamei DNA. No cross-reaction signals were generated from infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV, monodon baculovirus (MBV, and hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV positive samples. Accuracy analysis using 700 L. vannamei of known WSSV infection status shows that the established assayhassensitivity93.5% (95% CI: 90.61-95.56% and specificity 97% (95% CI: 94.31-98.50%. Furthermore, no discrepancy was found between the two assays when 100 random L. vannamei samples were tested in parallel. Finally, excellent correlation was observed among test results of three batches of reagents with 64 samples analyzed in three different laboratories. Working in a portable device, IQ Plus™ WSSV Kit with POCKIT system allows reliable, sensitive and specific on-site detection of WSSV in L. vannamei.

  15. Efficacy of double-stranded RNA against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV non-structural (orf89, wsv191 and structural (vp28, vp26 genes in the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

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    César M. Escobedo-Bonilla

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV is a major pathogen in shrimp aquaculture. RNA interference (RNAi is a promising tool against viral infections. Previous works with RNAi showed different antiviral efficacies depending on the silenced gene. This work evaluated the antiviral efficacy of double-stranded (ds RNA against two non-structural (orf89, wsv191 WSSV genes compared to structural (vp26, vp28 genes to inhibit an experimental WSSV infection. Gene orf89 encodes a putative regulatory protein and gene white spot virus (wsv191 encodes a nonspecific nuclease; whereas genes vp26 and vp28 encode envelope proteins, respectively. Molecules of dsRNA against each of the WSSV genes were intramuscularly injected (4 μg per shrimp into a group of shrimp 48 h before a WSSV challenge. The highest antiviral activity occurred with dsRNA against orf89, vp28 and vp26 (cumulative mortalities 10%, 10% and 21%, respectively. In contrast, the least effective treatment was wsv191 dsRNA (cumulative mortality 83%. All dead animals were WSSV-positive by one-step PCR, whereas reverse-transcription PCR of all surviving shrimp confirmed inhibition of virus replication. This study showed that dsRNA against WSSV genes orf89, vp28 and vp26 were highly effective to inhibit virus replication and suggest an essential role in WSSV infection. Non-structural WSSV genes such as orf89 can be used as novel targets to design therapeutic RNAi molecules against WSSV infection.

  16. A dinucleotide mutation in the endothelin-B receptor gene is associated with lethal white foal syndrome (LWFS); a horse variant of Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, G C; Croaker, D; Zhang, A L; Manglick, P; Cartmill, T; Cass, D

    1998-06-01

    Lethal white foal syndrome (LWFS) is a congenital anomaly of horses characterized by a white coat colour and aganglionosis of the bowel, which is similar to Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). We decided to investigate possible mutations of the endothelin-B receptor gene ( EDNRB ) in LWFS as recent studies in mutant rodents and some patients have demonstrated EDNRB defects. First, we identified a full-length cDNA for horse EDNRB . This cDNA fragment contained a 1329 bp open reading frame which encoded 443 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence was 89, 91 and 85% identical to human, bovine and mouse as well as rat EDNRB respectively, but only 55% identical to the human, bovine and rat endothelin A receptor (EDNRA). Secondly, sequence analysis, together with allele-specific PCR and the amplification-created restriction site (ACRS) technique, revealed a dinucleotide TC-->AG mutation, which changed isoleucine to lysine in the predicted first transmembrane domain of the EDNRB protein. This was associated with LWFS when homozygous and with the overo phenotype when heterozygous.

  17. LV dyssynchrony as assessed by phase analysis of gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun; Li, Dianfu; Miao, Changqing; Zhou, Yanli; Cao, Kejiang [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Feng, Jianlin [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Lloyd, Michael S. [Emory University School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chen, Ji [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome pre- and post-radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) using phase analysis of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Forty-five WPW patients were enrolled and had gated SPECT MPI pre- and 2-3 days post-RFA. Electrophysiological study (EPS) was used to locate accessory pathways (APs) and categorize the patients according to the AP locations (septal, left and right free wall). Electrocardiography (ECG) was performed pre- and post-RFA to confirm successful elimination of the APs. Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI was used to assess LV dyssynchrony pre- and post-RFA. Among the 45 patients, 3 had gating errors, and thus 42 had SPECT phase analysis. Twenty-two patients (52.4 %) had baseline LV dyssynchrony. Baseline LV dyssynchrony was more prominent in the patients with septal APs than in the patients with left or right APs (p < 0.05). RFA improved LV synchrony in the entire cohort and in the patients with septal APs (p < 0.01). Phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI demonstrated that LV mechanical dyssynchrony can be present in patients with WPW syndrome. Septal APs result in the greatest degree of LV mechanical dyssynchrony and afford the most benefit after RFA. This study supports further investigation in the relationship between electrical and mechanical activation using EPS and phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI. (orig.)

  18. Assessment of atrial fibrillation and vulnerability in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Jie Li

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim was to assess atrial fibrillation (AF and vulnerability in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome patients using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2D-STE. METHODS: All patients were examined via transthoracic echocardiography and 2D-STE in order to assess atrial function 7 days before and 10 days after RF catheter ablation. A postoperative 3-month follow-up was performed via outpatient visit or telephone calls. RESULTS: Results showed significant differences in both body mass index (BMI and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT duration between WPW patients and DAVNP patients (both P<0.05. Echocardiography revealed that the maximum left atrial volume (LAVmax and the left ventricular mass index (LVMI in diastole increased noticeably in patients with WPW compared to patients with DAVNP both before and after ablation (all P<0.05. Before ablation, there were obvious differences in the levels of SRs, SRe, and SRa from the 4-chamber view (LA in the WPW patients group compared with patients in the DAVNP group (all P<0.05. In the AF group, there were significant differences in the levels of systolic strain rate (SRs, early diastolic strain rate (SRe, and late diastolic strain rate (SRa from the 4-chamber view (LA both before and after ablation (all P<0.05. In the non-AF group, there were decreased SRe levels from the 4-chamber view (LA/RA pre-ablation compared to post-ablation (all P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Our findings provide convincing evidence that WPW syndrome may result in increased atrial vulnerability and contribute to the development of AF. Further, RF catheter ablation of AAV pathway can potentially improve atrial function in WPW syndrome patients. Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography imaging in WPW patients would be necessary in the evaluation and improvement of the overall function of RF catheter ablation in a long-term follow-up period.

  19. The impact of B-type natriuretic peptide levels on the suppression of accompanying atrial fibrillation in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome patients after accessory pathway ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Mihoko; Goya, Masahiko; Takagi, Takamitsu; Yamashita, Shu; Iwai, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Masahito; Takamiya, Tomomasa; Nakamura, Tomofumi; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Yagishita, Atsuhiko; Sasaki, Takeshi; Takahashi, Yoshihide; Ono, Yuhichi; Hachiya, Hitoshi; Yamauchi, Yasuteru; Otomo, Kenichiro; Nitta, Junichi; Okishige, Kaoru; Nishizaki, Mitsuhiro; Iesaka, Yoshito; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Hirao, Kenzo

    2016-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) often coexists with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. We compared the efficacy of Kent bundle ablation alone and additional AF ablation on accompanying AF, and examined which patients would still have a risk of AF after successful Kent bundle ablation. This retrospective multicenter study included 96 patients (56±15 years, 72 male) with WPW syndrome and AF undergoing Kent bundle ablation. Some patients underwent simultaneous pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) for AF. The incidence of post-procedural AF was examined. Sixty-four patients underwent only Kent bundle ablation (Kent-only group) and 32 also underwent PVI (+PVI group). There was no significant difference in the basic patient characteristics between the groups. Additional PVI did not improve the freedom from residual AF compared to Kent bundle ablation alone (p=0.53). In the Kent-only group, AF episodes remained in 25.0% during the follow-up (709 days). A univariate analysis showed that age ≥60 years, left atrial dimension ≥38mm, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) ≥40pg/ml, and concomitant hypertension were predictive factors for residual AF. However, in the multivariate analysis, only BNP ≥40pg/ml remained as an independent predictive factor (HR=17.1 and CI: 2.3-128.2; p=0.006). Among patients with WPW syndrome and AF, Kent bundle ablation alone may have a sufficient clinical impact of preventing recurrence of AF in select patients. Screening the BNP level would help decide the strategy to manage those patients. Copyright © 2016 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Geographical and geological data from caves and mines infected with white-nose syndrome (WNS) before September 2009 in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swezey, Christopher S.; Garrity, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2006, a white fungus named Geomyces destructans has been observed on the muzzles, noses, ears, and (or) wings of bats in the eastern United States, and bat colonies that are infected with this fungus have experienced dramatic incidences of mortality. Although it is not exactly certain how and why these bats are dying, this condition has been named white-nose syndrome (WNS). WNS appears to have spread from an initial infection site at a cave that is connected to a commercial cave in New York, and by the end of August 2009 was identified in at least 74 other sites in the eastern United States. Although detailed geographical and geological data are limited, a review of the available data shows that sites infected with WNS before September 2009 include both natural caves and mines. These infected sites extend from New Hampshire to Virginia, and known site elevations range from 84 to 2693 feet above sea level. In terms of geological setting, the infected sites include sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks of ages ranging from Precambrian to Jurassic. However, by the end of August 2009, no infected sites had been identified in strata of Mississippian, Cretaceous, or Triassic age. Meteorological data are sparse, but most of the recorded air temperatures in the known WNS-infected caves and mines range from 0 to 13.9 degrees C, and humidity measurements range from 68 to 100 percent. Although it is not certain which environmental parameters are important for WNS, it is hoped that the geographical and geological information presented in this paper will inform and clarify some of the debate about WNS, lead to greater understanding of the environmental parameters associated with WNS, and highlight the paucity of scientific data from caves in the eastern United States.

  1. Lateral flow assay for rapid detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using a phage-displayed peptide as bio-recognition probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulabhusan, Prabir Kumar; Rajwade, Jyutika M; Sahul Hameed, A S; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2017-06-01

    White spot disease caused by the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has a major socio-economic impact on shrimp farming in India. It has been realized that a field-usable diagnostic capable of rapid detection of WSSV can prevent huge economic losses in disease outbreaks. In this work, we explored the possibility of using a peptide as bio-recognition probe in a field-usable device for the detection of WSSV from infected shrimps and prawns. A commercially available random phage-display library was screened against rVP28 (a major structural protein of WSSV, expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli). A bacteriophage clone VP28-4L was obtained, and its binding to purified rVP28 protein as well as WSSV from infected shrimp Litopaeneus vannamei tissue was confirmed by ELISA and western blot. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (K d ,app) was calculated to be 810 nM. VP28-4L did not show cross-reactivity with any other shrimp viruses. A 12-mer peptide (pep28, with the sequence 'TFQAFDLSPFPS') displayed on the VP28-4L was synthesized, and its diagnostic potential was evaluated in a lateral flow assay (LFA). Visual detection of WSSV could be achieved using biotinylated-pep28 and streptavidin-conjugated gold nanoparticles. In LFA, 12.5 μg/mL of the virus could be detected from L. vannamei gill tissue homogenate within 20 min. Pep28 thus becomes an attractive candidate in bio-recognition of WSSV in field-usable diagnostic platforms benefitting the aquaculture sector.

  2. The effects of low-intensity narrow-band blue-light treatment compared to bright white-light treatment in sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Ybe; Winthorst, Wim H; Duijzer, Wianne B; Hommes, Vanja

    2016-02-18

    The discovery of a novel photoreceptor in the retinal ganglion cells with a highest sensitivity of 470-490 nm blue light has led to research on the effects of short-wavelength light in humans. Several studies have explored the efficacy of monochromatic blue or blue-enriched light in the treatment of SAD. In this study, a comparison has been made between the effects of broad-wavelength light without ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths compared to narrow-band blue light in the treatment of sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder (Sub-SAD). In a 15-day design, 48 participants suffering from Sub-SAD completed 20-minute sessions of light treatment on five consecutive days. 22 participants were given bright white-light treatment (BLT, broad-wavelength light without UV 10 000 lux, irradiance 31.7 Watt/m(2)) and 26 participants received narrow-band blue light (BLUE, 100 lux, irradiance 1.0 Watt/m(2)). All participants completed daily and weekly questionnaires concerning mood, activation, sleep quality, sleepiness and energy. Also, mood and energy levels were assessed by means of the SIGH-SAD, the primary outcome measure. On day 15, SIGH-SAD ratings were significantly lower than on day 1 (BLT 54.8 %, effect size 1.7 and BLUE 50.7 %, effect size 1.9). No statistically significant differences were found on the main outcome measures. Light treatment is an effective treatment for Sub-SAD. The use of narrow-band blue-light treatment is equally effective as bright white-light treatment. This study was registered in the Dutch Trial Register (Nederlands Trial Register TC =  4342 ) (20-12-2013).

  3. White Toenails

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page. Please enable Javascript in your browser. White Toenails White toenails can develop for several reasons. Trauma, such ... trauma does not cause broken blood vessels, a white spot may appear under the nail. The spot ...

  4. White-spot syndrome virus (WSSV) introduction into the Gulf of Mexico and Texas freshwater systems through imported, frozen bait-shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, K W; Fan, Y; Reisinger, T; Venuti, J; Varner, P W

    2006-07-25

    We analysed 20 boxes of, frozen imported bait-shrimp (China: Parapenaeopsis sp. and Metapenaeopsis sp.) and 8 boxes of native, frozen bait-shrimp (Gulf of Mexico: Litopenaeus setiferus and Farfantepenaeus duorarum) by RT-PCR or PCR for Taura syndrome virus (TSV), yellowhead virus/gill-associated virus (YHV/GAV), white-spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV). All 28 boxes of shrimp were negative for TSV, YHV/GAV and IHHNV; 2 boxes of imported bait-shrimp were WSSV-positive by 3 different PCR assays. Intramuscular injection of replicate groups of SPF (specific pathogen-free) L. vannamei juveniles with 2 different tissue homogenates prepared from the 2 WSSV-positive bait boxes resulted in 100% mortality of the test shrimp within 48 to 72 h post-injection. No mortality occurred among injected negative control groups. Histological and in situ hybridization analyses of 20 moribund treatment-shrimp demonstrated severe WSSV infections in each sample. Oral exposure of SPF L. vannamei postlarvae, PL (PL 25 to 30 stage; approximately 0.02 g) to minced tissue prepared from the 2 WSSV-positive bait-lots did not induce infection, possibly because of an insufficient infectious dose and/or viral inactivation resulting from multiple freeze-thaw cycles of the bait-shrimp during PCR testing. Use of an electric drill and collection of drill-tailings (tissue from approximately 20 to 30 shrimp) from frozen blocks of shrimp was successfully employed as an alternate tissue-sampling method without thawing. Our findings indicate that imported WSSV-infected bait shrimp, originating from China, are being sold in Texas for the purpose of sport fishing and represent a potential threat to freshwater and marine crustacean fisheries, as well as to coastal US shrimp farms.

  5. From DOT to Dotty

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    - Module types are interfaces, which can be abstracted. In this talk Martin will present DOT, a particularly simple calculus that can express systems following these principles. DOT has been developed as the foundation of the next version of Scala. He will also report on dotty, a new Scala compiler that implements the constructs of DOT in its core data structures and that uses the lessons learned to drive Scala’s evolution.

  6. Effects of training on the electrophysiologic properties of atrium and accessory pathway in athletes with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzani, A; Giovannini, T; Michelucci, A; Padeletti, L; Resina, A; Cupelli, V; Musante, R

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-two subjects with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) electrocardiographic pattern performing agonistic physical activity were referred to our laboratory to assess arrhythmogenic risk (group 1). This allowed us to evaluate a less known aspect, namely that of effects of training on the electrophysiologic properties of the atrium and accessory pathway. This was done utilizing a control group of 10 WPW patients who did not perform agonistic physical activity (group 2). All subjects were symptom free, and without signs of associated cardiopathy if we exclude 1 patient of group 1, who presented moderate mitral valve prolapse. Group 1 patients showed significantly higher mean values for basic cycle length (p less than 0.001), atrial effective (p less than 0.04) and functional (p less than 0.02) refractory period, and anterograde effective refractory period of the accessory pathway (p less than 0.02). The different behavior observed in group 1 patients could be explained considering the known influence of training on the equilibrium of the autonomic nervous system. Moreover, it is noteworthy that the two groups did not differ for inducibility of atrial fibrillation (AF). This should be taken into account considering the importance of AF in WPW. In conclusion, our study does not demonstrate any negative electrophysiologic effects of training in patients with WPW.

  7. Pseudoalteromonas piratica strain OCN003 is a coral pathogen that causes a switch from chronic to acute Montipora white syndrome in Montipora capitata.

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    Silvia Beurmann

    Full Text Available Reports of mass coral mortality from disease have increased over the last two decades. Montipora white syndrome (MWS is a tissue loss disease that has negatively impacted populations of the coral Montipora capitata in Kāne'ohe Bay, Hawai'i. Two types of MWS have been documented; a progressive disease termed chronic MWS (cMWS, that can be caused by Vibrio owensii strain OCN002, and a comparatively faster disease termed acute MWS (aMWS, that can be caused by Vibrio coralliilyticus strain OCN008. M. capitata colonies exhibiting cMWS can spontaneously switch to aMWS in the field. In this study, a novel Pseudoalteromonas species, P. piratica strain OCN003, fulfilled Koch's postulates of disease causation as another etiological agent of aMWS. Additionally, OCN003 induced a switch from cMWS to aMWS on M. capitata in laboratory infection trials. A comparison of OCN003 and Vibrio coralliilyticus strain OCN008, showed that OCN003 was more effective at inducing the cMWS to aMWS switch in M. capitata than OCN008. This study is the first to demonstrate that similar disease signs on one coral species (aMWS on M. capitata can be caused by multiple pathogens, and describes the first Pseudoalteromonas species that infects coral.

  8. Host MicroRNA-217 Promotes White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection by Targeting Tube in the Chinese Mitten Crab (Eriocheir sinensis

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    Ying Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a group of small molecule non-encoding RNAs, are key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that are implicated in many biological processes. In the current study, miR-217 from Eriocheir sinensis was selected for studying its roles during host–virus interaction. Overexpression or silencing of miR-217 led to considerable effects on white spot syndrome virus (WSSV replication, implying that miR-217 played a positive role in WSSV infection. In insect High Five cells, miR-217 significantly inhibited Tube gene expression by binding to the 3′-untranslated region of the Tube. Overexpression of miR-217 in crab led to downregulation of tube expression. Knockdown of Tube in vivo led to significant enhancement of WSSV infection and inhibited the expression of five antimicrobial peptide (AMP genes (Anti-lipopolysaccharide factor ALF1, ALF2, ALF3; Crustin Crus1, Crus2 in WSSV-challenged crabs. Overexpression of miR-217 also led to downregulation of these AMP genes in WSSV-challenged crabs. Our results showed that host miRNA played positive roles in virus infection by regulation of host tube gene, which is the key component of Toll signaling pathway.

  9. A 5-year-old white girl with Prader-Willi syndrome and a submicroscopic deletion of chromosome 15q11q13

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    Butler, M.G. [Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Christian, S.L.; Kubota, T.; Ledbetter, D.H. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-10-16

    We report on a 5-year-old white girl with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and a submicroscopic deletion of 15q11q13 of approximately 100-200 kb in size. High resolution chromosome analysis was normal but fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), Southern hybridization, and microsatellite data from the 15q11q13 region demonstrated that the deletion was paternal in origin and included the SNRPN, PAR-5, and PAR-7 genes from the proximal to distal boundaries of the deletion segment. SNRPN and PW71B methylation studies showed an abnormal pattern consistent with the diagnosis of PWS and supported the presence of a paternal deletion of 15q11q13 or an imprinting mutation. Biparental (normal) inheritance of PW71B (D15S63 locus) and a deletion of the SNRPN gene were observed by microsatellite, quantitative Southern hybridization, and/or FISH analyses. Our patient met the diagnostic criteria for PWS, but has no reported behavior problems, hyperphagia, or hypopigmentation. Our patient further supports SNRPN and possibly other genomic sequences which are deleted as the cause of the phenotype recognized in PWS patients. 21 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Identification of a novel shrimp protein phosphatase and its association with latency-related ORF427 of white spot syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liqun; Kwang, Jimmy

    2004-11-05

    To characterize the role of latency-associated ORF427 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), a shrimp cDNA library was constructed to screen interacting proteins of ORF427. Employing the yeast two-hybrid system, a novel shrimp protein phosphatase (named PPs), sharing 93% homology with human protein phosphatase 1, has been identified able to bind ORF427 in yeast. Through co-immunoprecipitation assays, the interaction between PPs and ORF427 was further confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, the novel shrimp protein phosphatase consists of only 199 aa and contains almost all the functional catalytic domains of human protein phosphatase, while it lacks the corresponding C-terminal non-catalytic sequence. Transcription and translation products of the identified cDNA can be detected in both normal and WSSV-infected shrimps; and PPs was found to localize mainly in the lysosome of shrimp cells. To characterize its function, the PPs cDNA was highly expressed in bacteria and the purified protein showed phosphatase activity when tested against pNPP in a standard phosphatase assay. Our results suggest that the identified protein phosphatase, PPs, may represent a novel member of protein phosphatase family and might be involved in the regulation of WSSV's life cycle through interaction with latency-related ORF427 of WSSV.

  11. Optimized methods for total nucleic acid extraction and quantification of the bat white-nose syndrome fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, from swab and environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verant, Michelle; Bohuski, Elizabeth A.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Blehert, David

    2016-01-01

    The continued spread of white-nose syndrome and its impacts on hibernating bat populations across North America has prompted nationwide surveillance efforts and the need for high-throughput, noninvasive diagnostic tools. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis has been increasingly used for detection of the causative fungus, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, in both bat- and environment-associated samples and provides a tool for quantification of fungal DNA useful for research and monitoring purposes. However, precise quantification of nucleic acid fromP. destructans is dependent on effective and standardized methods for extracting nucleic acid from various relevant sample types. We describe optimized methodologies for extracting fungal nucleic acids from sediment, guano, and swab-based samples using commercial kits together with a combination of chemical, enzymatic, and mechanical modifications. Additionally, we define modifications to a previously published intergenic spacer–based qPCR test for P. destructans to refine quantification capabilities of this assay.

  12. A Patient with Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome Presenting with Executive Cognitive Deficits and Cerebral White Matter Lesions

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    Kensaku Kasuga

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects males who are carriers of a premutation of a CGG expansion in the FMR1 gene. In Asian populations, FXTAS has rarely been reported. Here, we report the case of a Japanese FXTAS patient who showed predominant executive cognitive deficits as the main feature of his disease. In contrast, the patient exhibited only very mild symptoms of intention tremor and ataxia, which did not interfere with daily activities. A gene analysis revealed that the patient carried a premutation of a CGG expansion (111 CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene. The mRNA expression level of FMR1 in the patient was 1.5-fold higher than in controls. On brain MRI scans, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showed high-intensity lesions in the middle cerebellar peduncles and the cerebral white matter, with a frontal predominance. The present case extends previous notions regarding the cognitive impairment in FXTAS patients. Recognizing FXTAS patients with predominant cognitive impairment from various ethnic backgrounds would contribute to our understanding of the phenotypic variation of this disease.

  13. Indel-II region deletion sizes in the white spot syndrome virus genome correlate with shrimp disease outbreaks in southern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, Tran Thi Tuyet; Zwart, Mark P; Phuong, Nguyen T; Oanh, Dang T H; de Jong, Mart C M; Vlak, Just M

    2012-06-13

    Sequence comparisons of the genomes of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) strains have identified regions containing variable-length insertions/deletions (i.e. indels). Indel-I and Indel-II, positioned between open reading frames (ORFs) 14/15 and 23/24, respectively, are the largest and the most variable. Here we examined the nature of these 2 indel regions in 313 WSSV-infected Penaeus monodon shrimp collected between 2006 and 2009 from 76 aquaculture ponds in the Mekong Delta region of Vietnam. In the Indel-I region, 2 WSSV genotypes with deletions of either 5950 or 6031 bp in length compared with that of a reference strain from Thailand (WSSV-TH-96-II) were detected. In the Indel-II region, 4 WSSV genotypes with deletions of 8539, 10970, 11049 or 11866 bp in length compared with that of a reference strain from Taiwan (WSSV-TW) were detected, and the 8539 and 10970 bp genotypes predominated. Indel-II variants with longer deletions were found to correlate statistically with WSSV-diseased shrimp originating from more intensive farming systems. Like Indel-I lengths, Indel-II lengths also varied based on the Mekong Delta province from which farmed shrimp were collected.

  14. Bat white-nose syndrome: a real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructanstructans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Laura K.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Lindner, Daniel L.; O'Connor, Michael; Gargas, Andrea; Blehert, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Geomyces destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed millions of North American hibernating bats. We describe a real-time TaqMan PCR test that detects DNA from G. destructans by targeting a portion of the multicopy intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene complex. The test is highly sensitive, consistently detecting as little as 3.3 fg of genomic DNA from G. destructans. The real-time PCR test specifically amplified genomic DNA from G. destructans but did not amplify target sequence from 54 closely related fungal isolates (including 43 Geomyces spp. isolates) associated with bats. The test was further qualified by analyzing DNA extracted from 91 bat wing skin samples, and PCR results matched histopathology findings. These data indicate the real-time TaqMan PCR method described herein is a sensitive, specific, and rapid test to detect DNA from G. destructans and provides a valuable tool for WNS diagnostics and research.

  15. White spot syndrome virus entry is dependent on multiple endocytic routes and strongly facilitated by Cq-GABARAP in a CME-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong-yuan; Shen, Kai-li; Chen, Zhen; Fan, Wei-wei; Xie, Xiao-lu; Meng, Chuang; Chang, Xue-jiao; Zheng, Li-bing; Jeswin, Joseph; Li, Cheng-hua; Wang, Ke-jian; Liu, Hai-peng

    2016-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a lethal pathogen of shrimp and many other crustaceans, including crayfish. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cellular entry remains elusive due to the lack of shrimp cell lines for viral propagation. Crayfish hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cell culture was recently established as a good model for WSSV infection study. Here, we showed that multiple endocytic routes, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), macropinocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, were indispensably employed for the viral entry into Hpt cell of the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Intriguingly, cellular autophagic activity was positively correlated with efficient viral entry, in which a key autophagy-related protein, γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-associated protein (Cq-GABARAP), that not only localized but also co-localized with WSSV on the Hpt cell membrane, strongly facilitated WSSV entry by binding to the viral envelope VP28 in a CME-dependent manner that was negatively regulated by Cq-Rac1. Furthermore, cytoskeletal components, including Cq-β-tubulin and Cq-β-actin, bound to both recombinant rCq-GABARAP and WSSV envelope proteins, which likely led to viral entry promotion via cooperation with rCq-GABARAP. Even under conditions that promoted viral entry, rCq-GABARAP significantly reduced viral replication at an early stage of infection, which was probably caused by the formation of WSSV aggregates in the cytoplasm. PMID:27385304

  16. Proteomic analysis by iTRAQ in red claw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus, hematopoietic tissue cells post white spot syndrome virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeswin, Joseph; Xie, Xiao-lu; Ji, Qiao-lin; Wang, Ke-jian; Liu, Hai-peng

    2016-03-01

    To elucidate proteomic changes of Hpt cells from red claw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus, we have carried out isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) of cellular proteins at both early (1 hpi) and late stage (12 hpi) post white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. Protein database search revealed 594 protein hits by Mascot, in which 17 and 30 proteins were present as differentially expressed proteins at early and late viral infection, respectively. Generally, these differentially expressed proteins include: 1) the metabolic process related proteins in glycolysis and glucogenesis, DNA replication, nucleotide/amino acid/fatty acid metabolism and protein biosynthesis; 2) the signal transduction related proteins like small GTPases, G-protein-alpha stimulatory subunit, proteins bearing PDZ- or 14-3-3-domains that help holding together and organize signaling complexes, casein kinase I and proteins of the MAP-kinase signal transduction pathway; 3) the immune defense related proteins such as α-2 macroglobulin, transglutaminase and trans-activation response RNA-binding protein 1. Taken together, these protein information shed new light on the host cellular response against WSSV infection in a crustacean cell culture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Monitoring the status of Gray Bats (Myotis grisescens) in Virginia, 2009-2014, and potential impacts of White-nose Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Karen E.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Orndorff, Wil; Hyzy, Brenna A.; Hobson, Christopher S.; Ford, W. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Myotis grisescens (Gray Bat) is a federally endangered species distributed over the mid-South with a summer range that extends across the upper Tennessee River Basin, including southwest Virginia. Given the onset of White-nose Syndrome (WNS) in the Commonwealth in the winter of 2009, we initiated yearly surveys in late summer 2009 to monitor the status of known summer populations. Our objectives were to examine the relative health of these bats using body mass index (BMI), and determine any changes in juvenile recruitment across sites and years. We did not find any marked changes in BMI across years after WNS for Gray Bats. This finding suggests that surviving bats are either not negatively impacted by WNS or have recovered sufficiently by late summer as to not document obvious differences across years. After limiting our analyses of juvenile recruitment to only the individuals that we had definitively aged via backlit photos (2010–2014), we found a non-significant declining trend in juvenile recruitment; a trend that merits continued monitoring in the years to come. As Gray Bats have only recently shown to be susceptible to WNS infection, it is possible that observable population declines are forthcoming.

  18. Identification and characterization of intestine microRNAs and targets in red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii infected with white spot syndrome virus.

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    Zhi-Qiang Du

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding endogenous RNA molecules that play important roles in the innate immunity system of invertebrates, especially in the aspect of antivirus. In the present study, high-throughput small RNA Illumina sequencing systems were used to identify differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs from the intestines of Procambarus clarkii that were infected with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. As a result, 39 known and 12 novel miRNAs were identified in both NG and WG small RNA libraries. Seven DEMs were determined to be involved in the antiviral innate immunity in the intestines of P. clarkii. The results of the target gene predictions of the DEMs showed that the putative target genes of these 7 DEMs are related to tight junctions, vascular smooth muscle contraction regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, RNA transport, mRNA surveillance, viral carcinogenesis, and Salmonella infection. These results provide theoretical insights for future studies on the antiviral immunity of crustaceans.

  19. Transcriptome Differences in Porcine Alveolar Macrophages from Tongcheng and Large White Pigs in Response to Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV Infection

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    Wan Liang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus that can cause devastating reproductive failure and respiratory tract lesions, which has led to serious damage to the swine industry worldwide. Our previous studies have indicated that Tongcheng (TC pigs, a Chinese local breed, have stronger resistance or tolerance to PRRSV infection than Large White (LW pigs. This study aims to investigate their host transcriptome differences in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs at 7 days post challenge. Transcriptome profiling of PAMs from PRRSV infected and control pigs of these two breeds were performed using RNA-sequencing. For both breeds, there were 1257 common differentially expressed genes (DEGs in response to PRRSV infection, involving hepatic fibrosis/hepatic stellate cell activation, phospholipase C, and granulocyte adhesion and diapedesis pathways. For TC pig, 549 specific DEGs were identified, including VAV2, BCL2 and BAX, which were enriched in activation of leukocyte extravasation and suppression of apoptosis. While, 898 specific DEGs were identified in LW pigs, including GNAQ, GNB5, GNG2, CALM4 and RHOQ, which were involved in suppression of Gαq and PI3K-AKT signaling. This study provides an insight into the transcriptomic comparison of resistant and susceptible pigs to PRRSV infection. TC pigs may promote the extravasation and migration of leukocytes to defend against PRRSV infections and suppress apoptosis of the infected macrophages to increase antigen presentation, thereby reducing the lung lesions.

  20. Peritrophin-like protein from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvPT) involved in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection in digestive tract challenged with reverse gavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shijun; Li, Fuhua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jiquan; Xiang, Jianhai

    2017-05-01

    The peritrophic membrane plays an important role in the defense system of the arthropod gut. The digestive tract is considered one of the major tissues targeted by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in shrimp. In this study, the nucleotide sequence encoding peritrophin-like protein of Litopenaeus vannamei (LvPT) was amplified from a yeast two-hybrid library of L. vannamei. The epitope peptide of LvPT was predicted with the GenScript OptimumAntigen™ design tool. An anti-LvPT polyclonal antibody was produced and shown to specifically bind a band at 27 kDa, identified as LvPT. The LvPT protein was expressed and its concentration determined. LvPT dsRNA (4 μg per shrimp) was used to inhibit LvPT expression in shrimp, and a WSSV challenge experiment was then performed with reverse gavage. The pleopods, stomachs, and guts were collected from the shrimp at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h post-infection (hpi). Viral load quantification showed that the levels of WSSV were significantly lower in the pleopods, stomachs, and guts of shrimp after LvPT dsRNA interference than in those of the controls at 48 and 72 hpi. Our results imply that LvPT plays an important role during WSSV infection of the digestive tract.

  1. Peritrophin-like protein from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvPT) involved in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection in digestive tract challenged with reverse gavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shijun; Li, Fuhua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jiquan; Xiang, Jianhai

    2017-11-01

    The peritrophic membrane plays an important role in the defense system of the arthropod gut. The digestive tract is considered one of the major tissues targeted by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in shrimp. In this study, the nucleotide sequence encoding peritrophin-like protein of Litopenaeus vannamei (LvPT) was amplified from a yeast two-hybrid library of L. vannamei. The epitope peptide of LvPT was predicted with the GenScript OptimumAntigen™ design tool. An anti-LvPT polyclonal antibody was produced and shown to specifically bind a band at 27 kDa, identified as LvPT. The LvPT protein was expressed and its concentration determined. LvPT dsRNA (4 μg per shrimp) was used to inhibit LvPT expression in shrimp, and a WSSV challenge experiment was then performed with reverse gavage. The pleopods, stomachs, and guts were collected from the shrimp at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h post-infection (hpi). Viral load quantification showed that the levels of WSSV were significantly lower in the pleopods, stomachs, and guts of shrimp after LvPT dsRNA interference than in those of the controls at 48 and 72 hpi. Our results imply that LvPT plays an important role during WSSV infection of the digestive tract.

  2. BatTool: an R package with GUI for assessing the effect of White-nose syndrome and other take events on Myotis spp. of bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Richard A.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Szymanski, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Myotis species of bats such as the Indiana Bat and Little Brown Bat are facing population declines because of White-nose syndrome (WNS). These species also face threats from anthropogenic activities such as wind energy development. Population models may be used to provide insights into threats facing these species. We developed a population model, BatTool, as an R package to help decision makers and natural resource managers examine factors influencing the dynamics of these species. The R package includes two components: 1) a deterministic and stochastic model that are accessible from the command line and 2) a graphical user interface (GUI). Results: BatTool is an R package allowing natural resource managers and decision makers to understand Myotis spp. population dynamics. Through the use of a GUI, the model allows users to understand how WNS and other take events may affect the population. The results are saved both graphically and as data files. Additionally, R-savvy users may access the population functions through the command line and reuse the code as part of future research. This R package could also be used as part of a population dynamics or wildlife management course. Conclusions: BatTool provides access to a Myotis spp. population model. This tool can help natural resource managers and decision makers with the Endangered Species Act deliberations for these species and with issuing take permits as part of regulatory decision making. The tool is available online as part of this publication.

  3. Bat white-nose syndrome: a real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction test targeting the intergenic spacer region of Geomyces destructans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Laura K; Lorch, Jeffrey M; Lindner, Daniel L; O'Connor, Michael; Gargas, Andrea; Blehert, David S

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Geomyces destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that has killed millions of North American hibernating bats. We describe a real-time TaqMan PCR test that detects DNA from G. destructans by targeting a portion of the multicopy intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene complex. The test is highly sensitive, consistently detecting as little as 3.3 fg genomic DNA from G. destructans. The real-time PCR test specifically amplified genomic DNA from G. destructans but did not amplify target sequence from 54 closely related fungal isolates (including 43 Geomyces spp. isolates) associated with bats. The test was qualified further by analyzing DNA extracted from 91 bat wing skin samples, and PCR results matched histopathology findings. These data indicate the real-time TaqMan PCR method described herein is a sensitive, specific and rapid test to detect DNA from G. destructans and provides a valuable tool for WNS diagnostics and research.

  4. Distribution and environmental persistence of the causative agent of white-nose syndrome, Geomyces destructans, in bat hibernacula of the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Muller, Laura K.; Russell, Robin E.; O'Connor, Michael; Lindner, Daniel L.; Blehert, David S.

    2012-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emerging disease of hibernating bats caused by the recently described fungus Geomyces destructans. First isolated in 2008, the origins of this fungus in North America and its ability to persist in the environment remain undefined. To investigate the correlation between manifestation of WNS and distribution of G. destructans in the U.S., we analyzed sediment samples collected from 55 bat hibernacula (caves and mines) both within and outside the known range of WNS using a newly developed real-time PCR assay. Geomyces destructans was detected in 17 of 21 sites within the known range of WNS at the time the samples were collected; the fungus was not found in 28 sites beyond the known range of the disease at the time that environmental samples were collected. These data indicate that distribution of G. destructans is correlated with disease in hibernating bats and support the hypothesis that the fungus is likely an exotic species in North America. Additionally, we examined whether G. destructans persists in infested bat hibernacula when bats are absent. Sediment samples were collected from 14 WNS-positive hibernacula, and the samples were screened for viable fungus using a culture technique. Viable G. destructans was cultivated from 7 of the 14 sites sampled during late summer when bats were no longer in hibernation, suggesting the fungus can persist in the environment in the absence of bat hosts for long periods of time.

  5. Diffusion tractography and graph theory analysis reveal the disrupted rich-club organization of white matter structural networks in early Tourette Syndrome children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hongwei; Liu, Yue; Wang, Shengpei; Zhang, Jishui; Peng, Yun; He, Huiguang

    2017-03-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neurobehavioral disorder. At present, the topological disruptions of the whole brain white matter (WM) structural networks remain poorly understood in TS children. Considering the unique position of the topologically central role of densely interconnected brain hubs, namely the rich club regions, therefore, we aimed to investigate whether the rich club regions and their related connections would be particularly vulnerable in early TS children. In our study, we used diffusion tractography and graph theoretical analyses to explore the rich club structures in 44 TS children and 48 healthy children. The structural networks of TS children exhibited significantly increased normalized rich club coefficient, suggesting that TS is characterized by increased structural integrity of this centrally embedded rich club backbone, potentially resulting in increased global communication capacity. In addition, TS children showed a reorganization of rich club regions, as well as significantly increased density and decreased number in feeder connections. Furthermore, the increased rich club coefficients and feeder connections density of TS children were significantly positively correlated to tic severity, indicating that TS may be characterized by a selective alteration of the structural connectivity of the rich club regions, tending to have higher bridging with non-rich club regions, which may increase the integration among tic-related brain circuits with more excitability but less inhibition for information exchanges between highly centered brain regions and peripheral areas. In all, our results suggest the disrupted rich club organization in early TS children and provide structural insights into the brain networks.

  6. An Asymptomatic Case of Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome with Right-sided Free-wall Accessory Pathway and Left Ventricular Dysfunction

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    Takanao Mine, MD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old girl with a known history of asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome exhibited signs of left ventricular (LV septal akinesia and LV dysfunction during routine follow-up. A 12-lead surface ECG showed pre-excitation, a predominantly negative delta wave in V1 and left axis deviation, which was consistent with the presence of a right free-wall accessory pathway. Radiofrequency ablation of the anterolateral right atrium around the local shortest atrium-to-ventricle interval created the accessory pathway block. An echocardiogram taken one month after the procedure revealed that LV septal wall motion had normalized and that LV ejection fraction had improved from 50% before the ablation to 64% after the ablation. Most previous reports of asymptomatic patients of WPW with LV septal dyskinesia and dysfunction have described right septal or posteroseptal accessory pathways. This patient reported here represents a rare case with right free-wall accessory pathway and LV dysfunction without tachycardia.

  7. Molecular docking and simulation studies of 3-(1-chloropiperidin-4-yl)-6-fluoro benzisoxazole 2 against VP26 and VP28 proteins of white spot syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudharsana, S; Rajashekar Reddy, C B; Dinesh, S; Rajasekhara Reddy, S; Mohanapriya, A; Itami, T; Sudhakaran, R

    2016-10-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), an aquatic virus infecting shrimps and other crustaceans, is widely distributed in Asian subcontinents including India. The infection has led to a serious economic loss in shrimp farming. The WSSV genome is approximately 300 kb and codes for several proteins mediating the infection. The envelope proteins VP26 and VP28 play a major role in infection process and also in the interaction with the host cells. A comprehensive study on the viral proteins leading to the development of safe and potent antiviral therapeutic is of adverse need. The novel synthesized compound 3-(1-chloropiperidin-4-yl)-6-fluoro benzisoxazole 2 is proved to have potent antiviral activity against WSSV. The compound antiviral activity is validated in freshwater crabs (Paratelphusa hydrodomous). An in silico molecular docking and simulation analysis of the envelope proteins VP26 and VP28 with the ligand 3-(1-chloropiperidin-4-yl)-6-fluoro benzisoxazole 2 are carried out. The docking analysis reveals that the polar amino acids in the pore region of the envelope proteins were involved in the ligand binding. The influence of the ligand binding on the proteins is validated by the molecular dynamics and simulation study. These in silico approaches together demonstrate the ligand's efficiency in preventing the trimers from exhibiting their physiological function. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Changes in rates of capture and demographics of Myotis septentrionalis (Northern Long-eared Bat) in Western Virginia before and after onset of white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Richard J.; Powers, Karen E.; Orndorff, Wil; Ford, W. Mark; Hobson, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Documenting the impacts of white-nose syndrome (WNS) on demographic patterns, such as annual survivorship and recruitment, is important to understanding the extirpation or possible stabilization and recovery of species over time. To document demographic impacts of WNS on Myotis septentrionalis (Northern Long-eared Bat), we mistnetted at sites in western Virginia where Northern Long-eared Bats were captured in summer before (1990–2009) and after (2011–2013) the onset of WNS. Our mean capture rates per hour, adjusted for area of net and sampling duration, declined significantly from 0.102 bats/ m2/h before WNS to 0.005 bats/m2/h (-95.1%) by 2013. We noted a time lag in the rate of decline between published data based on bats captured during the swarming season and our summer mist-netting captures from the same geographic area. Although proportions of pregnant or lactating females did not vary statistically in samples obtained before and after the onset of WNS, the proportion of juvenile bats declined significantly (-76.7%), indicating that the viability of Northern Long-eared Bats in western Virginia is tenuous.

  9. The Effect of Resveratrol and Quercetin Treatment on PPAR Mediated Uncoupling Protein (UCP- 1, 2, and 3 Expression in Visceral White Adipose Tissue from Metabolic Syndrome Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Castrejón-Tellez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling proteins (UCPs are members of the mitochondrial anion carrier superfamily involved in the control of body temperature and energy balance regulation. They are currently proposed as therapeutic targets for treating obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS. We studied the gene expression regulation of UCP1, -2, and -3 in abdominal white adipose tissue (WAT from control and MetS rats treated with two doses of a commercial mixture of resveratrol (RSV and quercetin (QRC. We found that UCP2 was the predominantly expressed isoform, UCP3 was present at very low levels, and UCP1 was undetectable. The treatment with RSV + QRC did not modify UCP3 levels; however, it significantly increased UCP2 mRNA in control and MetS rats in association with an increase in oleic and linoleic fatty acids. WAT from MetS rats showed a significantly increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-α and PPAR-γ when compared to the control group. Furthermore, PPAR-α protein levels were increased by the highest dose of RSV + QRC in the control and MetS groups. PPAR-γ expression was only increased in the control group. We conclude that the RSV + QRC treatment leads to overexpression of UCP2, which is associated with an increase in MUFA and PUFA, which might increase PPAR-α expression.

  10. Depletion of white adipose tissue in cancer cachexia syndrome is associated with inflammatory signaling and disrupted circadian regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tsoli

    Full Text Available Involuntary weight loss in patients with cancer is the hallmark of cancer cachexia. The etiology of cachexia is multifactorial involving loss of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue associated with high systemic levels of acute phase proteins and inflammatory cytokines. While muscle wasting overtly impacts on cancer patient quality of life, loss of lipid depots represents a sustained energy imbalance. In this study fat depletion was examined in Colon-26 model of cancer cachexia, which is a widely used rodent model of this syndrome. We investigated diurnal expression of circadian rhythm regulators as well as key mediators of energy metabolism and cytokine signaling. Mice bearing the C26 tumour exhibited reduced adipose mass, elevated adipose tissue lipolysis and a 5-fold increase in plasma levels of free fatty acids. These changes were associated with activated IL-6 signaling in WAT through a 3-fold increase in phosphorylated STAT3 and high SOCS3 gene expression levels. In addition perturbations in circadian regulation of lipid metabolism were also observed. Lipid catabolism did not appear to be influenced by the classical PKA pathway activating the lipase HSL. ATGL protein levels were elevated 2-fold in cachectic mice while 4-fold increase phosphorylated ACC and a 2-fold decrease in phosphorylated 4EBP1 was observed indicating that lipid metabolism is modulated by the ATGL & AMPK/mTOR pathways. This study provides evidence for activation of cytokine signaling and concomitant alterations in circadian rhythm and regulators of lipid metabolism in WAT of cachectic animals.

  11. Depletion of White Adipose Tissue in Cancer Cachexia Syndrome Is Associated with Inflammatory Signaling and Disrupted Circadian Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoli, Maria; Schweiger, Martina; Vanniasinghe, Anne S.; Painter, Arran; Zechner, Rudolf; Clarke, Stephen; Robertson, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Involuntary weight loss in patients with cancer is the hallmark of cancer cachexia. The etiology of cachexia is multifactorial involving loss of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue associated with high systemic levels of acute phase proteins and inflammatory cytokines. While muscle wasting overtly impacts on cancer patient quality of life, loss of lipid depots represents a sustained energy imbalance. In this study fat depletion was examined in Colon-26 model of cancer cachexia, which is a widely used rodent model of this syndrome. We investigated diurnal expression of circadian rhythm regulators as well as key mediators of energy metabolism and cytokine signaling. Mice bearing the C26 tumour exhibited reduced adipose mass, elevated adipose tissue lipolysis and a 5-fold increase in plasma levels of free fatty acids. These changes were associated with activated IL-6 signaling in WAT through a 3-fold increase in phosphorylated STAT3 and high SOCS3 gene expression levels. In addition perturbations in circadian regulation of lipid metabolism were also observed. Lipid catabolism did not appear to be influenced by the classical PKA pathway activating the lipase HSL. ATGL protein levels were elevated 2-fold in cachectic mice while 4-fold increase phosphorylated ACC and a 2-fold decrease in phosphorylated 4EBP1 was observed indicating that lipid metabolism is modulated by the ATGL & AMPK/mTOR pathways. This study provides evidence for activation of cytokine signaling and concomitant alterations in circadian rhythm and regulators of lipid metabolism in WAT of cachectic animals. PMID:24667661

  12. U.S. DOT support to the president's innovation agenda : briefing and discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-27

    1. Introduction and Overview of DOT Organization, Mission, and Goals)(Peter Appel, RITA) : 2. White House Perspective on Innovation (Tom Kalil, OSTP) : 3. Briefings on Highlighted Innovations : -Intelligent Transportation Systems (Shelley Row, RITA) ...

  13. Dissociating Statistically-Determined Alzheimer's Disease/Vascular Dementia Neuropsychological Syndromes Using White and Gray Neuroradiological Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Catherine C; Tanner, Jared J; Schmalfuss, Ilona M; Brumback, Babette; Heilman, Kenneth M; Libon, David J

    2015-01-01

    There is remarkable heterogeneity in clinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) or vascular dementia (VaD). 1) To statistically examine neuropsychological data to determine dementia subgroups for individuals clinically diagnosed with AD or VaD and then 2) examine group differences in specific gray/white matter regions of interest. A k-means cluster analysis requested a 3-group solution from neuropsychological data acquired from individuals diagnosed clinically with AD/VaD. MRI measures of hippocampal, caudate, ventricular, subcortical lacunar infarction, whole brain volume, and leukoaraiosis (LA) were analyzed. Three regions of LA volumes were quantified and these included the periventricular (5 mm around the ventricles), infracortical (5 mm beneath the gray matter), and deep (between periventricular and infracortical) regions. Cluster analysis sorted AD/VaD patients into single domain amnestic (n = 41), single-domain dysexecutive (n = 26), and multi-domain (n = 26) phenotypes. Multi-domain patients exhibited worst performance on language tests; however, multi-domain patients were equally impaired on memory tests when compared to amnestic patients. Statistically-determined groups dissociated using neuroradiological parameters: amnestic and multi-domain groups presented with smaller hippocampal volume while the dysexecutive group presented with greater deep, periventricular, and whole brain LA. Neither caudate nor lacunae volume differed by group. Caudate nucleus volume negatively correlated with total LA in the dysexecutive and multi-domain groups. There are at least three distinct subtypes embedded within patients diagnosed clinically with AD/VaD spectrum dementia. We encourage future research to assess a) the neuroradiological substrates underlying statistically-determined AD/VaD spectrum dementia and b) how statistical modeling can be integrated into existing diagnostic criteria.

  14. White Ring; White ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, H.; Yuzawa, H. [Nikken Sekkei Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-01-05

    White Ring is a citizen`s gymnasium used for figure skating and short track speed skating games of 18th Winter Olympic Games in 1998. White Ring is composed of a main-arena and a sub-arena. For the main-arena with an area 41mtimes66m, an ice link can be made by disengaging the potable floor and by flowing brine in the bridged polystyrene pipes embedded in the concrete floor. Due to the fortunate groundwater in this site, well water is used for the outside air treatment energy in 63% during heating and in 35% during cooling. Ammonia is used as a cooling medium for refrigerating facility. For the heating of audience area in the large space, heat load from the outside is reduced by enhancing the heat insulation performance of the roof of arena. The audience seats are locally heated using heaters. For the White Ring, high quality environment is realized for games through various functions of the large-scale roof of the large space. Success of the big event was expected. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. European Society for Swallowing Disorders – European Union Geriatric Medicine Society white paper: oropharyngeal dysphagia as a geriatric syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baijens, Laura WJ; Clavé, Pere; Cras, Patrick; Ekberg, Olle; Forster, Alexandre; Kolb, Gerald F; Leners, Jean-Claude; Masiero, Stefano; Mateos-Nozal, Jesús; Ortega, Omar; Smithard, David G; Speyer, Renée; Walshe, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This position document has been developed by the Dysphagia Working Group, a committee of members from the European Society for Swallowing Disorders and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society, and invited experts. It consists of 12 sections that cover all aspects of clinical management of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) related to geriatric medicine and discusses prevalence, quality of life, and legal and ethical issues, as well as health economics and social burden. OD constitutes impaired or uncomfortable transit of food or liquids from the oral cavity to the esophagus, and it is included in the World Health Organization’s classification of diseases. It can cause severe complications such as malnutrition, dehydration, respiratory infections, aspiration pneumonia, and increased readmissions, institutionalization, and morbimortality. OD is a prevalent and serious problem among all phenotypes of older patients as oropharyngeal swallow response is impaired in older people and can cause aspiration. Despite its prevalence and severity, OD is still underdiagnosed and untreated in many medical centers. There are several validated clinical and instrumental methods (videofluoroscopy and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing) to diagnose OD, and treatment is mainly based on compensatory measures, although new treatments to stimulate the oropharyngeal swallow response are under research. OD matches the definition of a geriatric syndrome as it is highly prevalent among older people, is caused by multiple factors, is associated with several comorbidities and poor prognosis, and needs a multidimensional approach to be treated. OD should be given more importance and attention and thus be included in all standard screening protocols, treated, and regularly monitored to prevent its main complications. More research is needed to develop and standardize new treatments and management protocols for older patients with OD, which is a challenging mission for our societies

  16. Quantum Dots: Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-11-10

    This review covers the description of the methodologies typically used for the calculation of the electronic structure of self-assembled and colloidal quantum dots. These are illustrated by the results of their application to a selected set of physical effects in quantum dots.

  17. Hybrid Double Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherman, D.; Yodh, J. S.; Albrecht, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Epitaxial semiconductor-superconductor hybrid materials are an excellent basis for studying mesoscopic and topological superconductivity, as the semiconductor inherits a hard superconducting gap while retaining tunable carrier density. Here, we investigate double-quantum-dot devices made from InA...... that the individual dots host weakly hybridized Majorana modes....

  18. Synthesis of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Hunter

    2017-10-17

    Common approaches to synthesizing alloyed quantum dots employ high-cost, air-sensitive phosphine complexes as the selenium precursor. Disclosed quantum dot synthesis embodiments avoid these hazardous and air-sensitive selenium precursors. Certain embodiments utilize a combination comprising a thiol and an amine that together reduce and complex the elemental selenium to form a highly reactive selenium precursor at room temperature. The same combination of thiol and amine acts as the reaction solvent, stabilizing ligand, and sulfur source in the synthesis of quantum dot cores. A non-injection approach may also be used. The optical properties of the quantum dots synthesized by this new approach can be finely tuned for a variety of applications by controlling size and/or composition of size and composition. Further, using the same approach, a shell can be grown around a quantum dot core that improves stability, luminescence efficiency, and may reduce toxicity.

  19. Chiral quantum dot based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the use of stereospecific chiral stabilising molecules has also opened another avenue of interest in the area of quantum dot (QD) research. The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important quantum dot materials containing chiral defects, study their properties and explore their applications. The utilisation of chiral penicillamine stabilisers allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS quantum nanostructures which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. It was also demonstrated that all three types of QDs (D-, L-, and Rac penicillamine stabilised) show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. In this work the chiral CdS based quantum nanostructures have also been doped by copper metal ions and new chiral penicilamine stabilized CuS nanoparticles have been prepared and investigated. It was found that copper doping had a strong effect at low levels in the synthesis of chiral CdS nanostructures. We expect that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in biotechnology, sensing and asymmetric synthesis.

  20. European Society for Swallowing Disorders – European Union Geriatric Medicine Society white paper: oropharyngeal dysphagia as a geriatric syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baijens LW

    2016-10-01

    from the oral cavity to the esophagus, and it is included in the World Health Organization’s classification of diseases. It can cause severe complications such as malnutrition, dehydration, respiratory infections, aspiration pneumonia, and increased readmissions, institutionalization, and morbimortality. OD is a prevalent and serious problem among all phenotypes of older patients as oropharyngeal swallow response is impaired in older people and can cause aspiration. Despite its prevalence and severity, OD is still underdiagnosed and untreated in many medical centers. There are several validated clinical and instrumental methods (videofluoroscopy and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing to diagnose OD, and treatment is mainly based on compensatory measures, although new treatments to stimulate the oropharyngeal swallow response are under research. OD matches the definition of a geriatric syndrome as it is highly prevalent among older people, is caused by multiple factors, is associated with several comorbidities and poor prognosis, and needs a multidimensional approach to be treated. OD should be given more importance and attention and thus be included in all standard screening protocols, treated, and regularly monitored to prevent its main complications. More research is needed to develop and standardize new treatments and management protocols for older patients with OD, which is a challenging mission for our societies. Keywords: Swallowing disorders, malnutrition, aged, frail elderly, quality of life, healthy aging, sarcopenia

  1. Analysis of variable genomic loci in white spot syndrome virus to predict its origins in Procambarus clarkii crayfish farmed in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Zeng, Yong; Fei, Rong-Mei; Zeng, Ling-Bing; Wei, Kai-Jin

    2011-09-09

    Variable genomic loci were examined in 4 white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) isolates (08HB, 09HB, 08JS and 09JS) from Procambarus clarkii crayfish collected from Jiangsu and Hubei Provinces in China in 2008 and 2009. In ORF75, sequence variation detected in the 4 isolates, as well as in isolates sequenced previously, suggested that WSSV might have segregated into 2 lineages since first emerging as a serious pathogen of farmed shrimp in East Asia in the early-mid 1990s, with one lineage remaining in East Asia and the other separating to South Asia. In ORF23/24, deletions of 9.31, 10.97, or 11.09 kb were evident compared to a reference isolate from Taiwan (WSSV-TW), and, in ORF14/15, deletions of 5.14 or 5.95 kb were evident compared to a reference isolate from Thailand with the largest genome size (TH-96-II). With respect to these genome characteristics, the crayfish isolates 08HB, 09HB and 08JS were similar to WSSV-TW and the isolate 09JS was similar to a reference isolate from China (WSSV-CN). In addition to these loci, sequence variation was evident in ORF94 and ORF125 that might be useful for differentiating isolates and in epidemiological tracing of WSSV spread in crayfish farmed in China. However, as all 4 crayfish isolates possessed a Homologous Region 9 sequence identical to isolate WSSV-TW and another Thailand isolate (WSSV-TH), and as their transposase sequence was identical to isolates WSSV-CN and WSSV-TH, these 2 loci were not useful in predicting their origins.

  2. Characterization of microRNAs by deep sequencing in red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus haematopoietic tissue cells after white spot syndrome virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-Ru; Meng, Chuang; Xie, Xiao-Lu; Li, Cheng-Hua; Liu, Hai-Peng

    2016-12-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the most prevalent and widespread viruses in both shrimp and crayfish aquaculture. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial post-transcriptional regulators and play critical roles in cell differentiation and proliferation, apoptosis, signal transduction and immunity. In this study, miRNA expression profiles were identified via deep sequencing in red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus haematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cell cultures infected with WSSV at both early (i.e., 1 hpi) and late (i.e., 12 hpi) infection stages. The results showed that 2 known miRNAs, namely, miR-7 and miR-184 play key roles in immunity. Meanwhile, 106 novel miRNA candidates were predicted by software in these combined miRNA transcriptomes. Compared with two control groups, 36 miRNAs showed significantly different expression levels after WSSV challenge. Furthermore, 10 differentially expressed miRNAs in WSSV-exposed Hpt cells were randomly selected for expression analysis by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Consistent with the expression profiles identified by deep sequencing, RT-PCR showed a significant increase or decrease in miRNA expression in Hpt cells after WSSV infection. Prediction of targets of miRNAs such as miR-7, cqu-miR-52, cqu-miR-126 and cqu-miR-141 revealed that their target genes have diverse biological roles, including not only immunity but also transcriptional regulation, energy metabolism, cell communication, cell differentiation, cell death, autophagy, endocytosis and apoptosis. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism of WSSV infection and highlight the function of miRNAs in the regulation of the immune response against WSSV infection in crustaceans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A laminin-receptor-like protein regulates white spot syndrome virus infection by binding to the viral envelope protein VP28 in red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling-Ke; Li, Wei-Dong; Gao, Yan; Chen, Rong-Yuan; Xie, Xiao-Lu; Hong, Heng; Wang, Ke-Jian; Liu, Hai-Peng

    2018-02-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a lethal pathogen of shrimp and many other crustaceans, which has been causing huge economic losses in global aquaculture. Laminin receptor (LR) is a cell surface receptor which participates in the interactions between cells as well as cells and extracellular matrix. Previously, we found that a CqLR-like gene was responsive to WSSV infection in the hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cells from red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. To further reveal the role of CqLR-like gene involved in WSSV infection, the full-length cDNA of CqLR-like gene was cloned with 1000 bp, and the open reading frame encoded 308 amino acids with a conserved laminin-binding domain. Importantly, both the WSSV entry and viral replication were strongly reduced in Hpt cells after loss-of-function of CqLR-like gene by gene silencing. Protein interaction assay demonstrated that the recombinant CqLR-like protein could bind to WSSV virion in vitro by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the binding affinity was in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, recombinant CqLR-like protein was found to bind to WSSV envelop protein VP28, but not other envelop proteins tested including VP19, VP24, and VP26, by pull down assay in HEK293T cells. In regarding to that LR is mainly localized on many types of cells' membrane, these data together suggested that CqLR-like protein was likely to function as a putative recognition molecule towards WSSV and act in the viral entry into a crustacean host cell, which may benefit the elucidation of the WSSV pathogenesis and further the pharmaceutical target for the possibly effective control of WSSV disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. CqToll participates in antiviral response against white spot syndrome virus via induction of anti-lipopolysaccharide factor in red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Yao; Chen, Xiao-Xiao; Lin, Feng-Yu; Chen, Qiu-Fan; Ma, Xing-Yuan; Liu, Hai-Peng

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that Tolls/Toll like receptors (TLRs), a family of pattern recognition receptors, play important roles in immune responses. Previously, we found that a Toll transcript was increased in a transcriptome library of haematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cells from the red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus post white spot syndrome virus infection. In the present study, a full-length cDNA sequence of Toll receptor (named as CqToll) was identified with 3482 bp which contained an open reading frame of 3021 bp encoding 1006 amino acids. The predicted structure of CqToll protein was composed of three domains, including an extracellular domain of 19 leucine-rich repeats residues, a transmembrane domain and an intracellular domain of 138 amino acids. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that CqToll was expressed widely in various tissues determined from red claw crayfish with highest expression in haemocyte but lowest expression in eyestalk. Importantly, significant lower expression of the anti-lipopolysacchride factor (CqALF), an antiviral antimicrobial peptide (AMP) in crustaceans, but not CqCrustin was observed after gene silencing of CqToll in crayfish Hpt cell cultures, indicating that the CqALF was likely to be positively regulated via Toll pathway in red claw crayfish. Furthermore, the transcription of both an immediate early gene and a late envelope protein gene VP28 of WSSV were clearly enhanced in Hpt cells if silenced with CqToll, suggesting that the increase of WSSV replication was likely to be caused by the lower expression of the CqALF resulted from the loss-of-function of CqToll. Taken together, these data implied that CqToll might play a key role in anti-WSSV response via induction of CqALF in a crustacean C. quadricarinatus. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Litopenaeus vannamei tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) responds to Vibrio alginolyticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection and activates antimicrobial peptide genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Wan, Ding-Hui; Gu, Zhi-Hua; Deng, Xie-Xiong; Weng, Shao-Ping; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; He, Jian-Guo

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is a key signaling adaptor protein not only for the TNFR superfamily but also for the Interleukin-1 receptor/Toll-like receptor (IL-1/TLR) superfamily. To investigate TRAF6 function in invertebrate innate immune responses, Litopenaeus vannamei TRAF6 (LvTRAF6) was identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA of LvTRAF6 is 2823bp long, with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a putative protein of 594 amino acids, including a RING-type Zinc finger, two TRAF-type Zinc fingers, a coiled-coil region, and a meprin and TRAF homology (MATH) domain. The overall amino acid sequence identity between LvTRAF6 and other known TRAF6s is 22.2-33.3%. Dual luciferase reporter assays in Drosophila S2 cells revealed that LvTRAF6 could activate the promoters of antimicrobial peptide genes (AMPs), including Drosophila Attacin A and Drosomycin, and shrimp Penaeidins. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that LvTRAF6 was constitutively expressed in various tissues of L. vannamei. After Vibrio alginolyticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge, LvTRAF6 was down-regulated, though with different expression patterns in the intestine compared to other tissues. After WSSV challenge, LvTRAF6 was up-regulated 2.7- and 2.3-fold over the control at 3h in gills and hepatopancreas, respectively. These results indicated that LvTRAF6 may play a crucial role in antibacterial and antiviral responses via regulation of AMP gene expression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Emerging coral diseases in Kāne'ohe Bay, O'ahu, Hawai'i (USA): two major disease outbreaks of acute Montipora white syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeby, Greta S.; Callahan, Sean; Cox, Evelyn F.; Runyon, Christina M.; Smith, Ashley; Stanton, Frank G.; Ushijima, Blake; Work, Thierry M.

    2016-01-01

    In March 2010 and January 2012, we documented 2 widespread and severe coral disease outbreaks on reefs throughout Kāne‘ohe Bay, Hawai‘i (USA). The disease, acute Montipora white syndrome (aMWS), manifested as acute and progressive tissue loss on the common reef coral M. capitata. Rapid visual surveys in 2010 revealed 338 aMWS-affected M. capitata colonies with a disease abundance of (mean ± SE) 0.02 ± 0.01 affected colonies per m of reef surveyed. In 2012, disease abundance was significantly higher (1232 aMWS-affected colonies) with 0.06 ± 0.02 affected colonies m-1. Prior surveys found few acute tissue loss lesions in M. capitata in Kāne‘ohe Bay; thus, the high number of infected colonies found during these outbreaks would classify this as an emerging disease. Disease abundance was highest in the semi-enclosed region of south Kāne‘ohe Bay, which has a history of nutrient and sediment impacts from terrestrial runoff and stream discharge. In 2010, tagged colonies showed an average tissue loss of 24% after 1 mo, and 92% of the colonies continued to lose tissue in the subsequent month but at a slower rate (chronic tissue loss). The host-specific nature of this disease (affecting only M. capitata) and the apparent spread of lesions between M. capitatacolonies in the field suggest a potential transmissible agent. The synchronous appearance of affected colonies on multiple reefs across Kāne‘ohe Bay suggests a common underlying factor. Both outbreaks occurred during the colder, rainy winter months, and thus it is likely that some parameter(s) associated with winter environmental conditions are linked to the emergence of disease outbreaks on these reefs.

  7. SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2 UBC9 mediates viral immediate-early protein SUMOylation in crayfish to facilitate reproduction of white spot syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, An-Jing; Gao, Lu; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Successful viruses have evolved superior strategies to escape host defenses or exploit host biological pathways. Most of the viral immediate-early (ie) genes are essential for viral infection and depend solely on host proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the modification of viral IE proteins by the crayfish small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) and investigated the role of SUMOylation during the viral life cycle. SUMO and SUMO ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (UBC9) involved in SUMOylation were identified in red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). Both SUMO and UBC9 were upregulated in crayfish challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Replication of WSSV genes increased in crayfish injected with recombinant SUMO or UBC9, but injection of mutant SUMO or UBC9 protein had no effect. Subsequently, we analyzed the mechanism by which crayfish SUMOylation facilitates WSSV replication. Crayfish UBC9 bound to all three WSSV IE proteins tested, and one of these IE proteins (WSV051) was covalently modified by SUMO in vitro. The expression of viral ie genes was affected and that of late genes was significantly inhibited in UBC9-silenced or SUMO-silenced crayfish, and the inhibition effect was rescued by injection of recombinant SUMO or UBC9. The results of this study demonstrate that viral IE proteins can be modified by crayfish SUMOylation, prompt the expression of viral genes, and ultimately benefit WSSV replication. Understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses exploit host components will greatly improve our knowledge of the virus-host "arms race" and contribute to the development of novel methods against virulent viruses.

  8. The White-Nose Syndrome Transcriptome: Activation of Anti-fungal Host Responses in Wing Tissue of Hibernating Little Brown Myotis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A Field

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available White-nose syndrome (WNS in North American bats is caused by an invasive cutaneous infection by the psychrophilic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd. We compared transcriptome-wide changes in gene expression using RNA-Seq on wing skin tissue from hibernating little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus with WNS to bats without Pd exposure. We found that WNS caused significant changes in gene expression in hibernating bats including pathways involved in inflammation, wound healing, and metabolism. Local acute inflammatory responses were initiated by fungal invasion. Gene expression was increased for inflammatory cytokines, including interleukins (IL IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17C, IL-20, IL-23A, IL-24, and G-CSF and chemokines, such as Ccl2 and Ccl20. This pattern of gene expression changes demonstrates that WNS is accompanied by an innate anti-fungal host response similar to that caused by cutaneous Candida albicans infections. However, despite the apparent production of appropriate chemokines, immune cells such as neutrophils and T cells do not appear to be recruited. We observed upregulation of acute inflammatory genes, including prostaglandin G/H synthase 2 (cyclooxygenase-2, that generate eicosanoids and other nociception mediators. We also observed differences in Pd gene expression that suggest host-pathogen interactions that might determine WNS progression. We identified several classes of potential virulence factors that are expressed in Pd during WNS, including secreted proteases that may mediate tissue invasion. These results demonstrate that hibernation does not prevent a local inflammatory response to Pd infection but that recruitment of leukocytes to the site of infection does not occur. The putative virulence factors may provide novel targets for treatment or prevention of WNS. These observations support a dual role for inflammation during WNS; inflammatory responses provide protection but excessive inflammation may contribute to mortality

  9. Changes in body condition of hibernating bats support the thrifty female hypothesis and predict consequences for populations with white-nose syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin A Jonasson

    Full Text Available White-nose syndrome (WNS is a new disease of bats that has devastated populations in eastern North America. Infection with the fungus, Geomyces destructans, is thought to increase the time bats spend out of torpor during hibernation, leading to starvation. Little is known about hibernation in healthy, free-ranging bats and more data are needed to help predict consequences of WNS. Trade-offs presumably exist between the energetic benefits and physiological/ecological costs of torpor, leading to the prediction that the relative importance of spring energy reserves should affect an individual's use of torpor and depletion of energy reserves during winter. Myotis lucifugus mate during fall and winter but females do not become pregnant until after spring emergence. Thus, female reproductive success depends on spring fat reserves while male reproductive success does not. Consequently, females should be "thrifty" in their use of fat compared to males. We measured body condition index (BCI; mass/forearm length of 432 M. lucifugus in Manitoba, Canada during the winter of 2009/2010. Bats were captured during the fall mating period (n = 200, early hibernation (n = 125, and late hibernation (n = 128. Adult females entered hibernation with greater fat reserves and consumed those reserves more slowly than adult males and young of the year. Consequently, adult females may be more likely than males or young of the year to survive the disruption of energy balance associated with WNS, although surviving females may not have sufficient reserves to support reproduction.

  10. Responses of three very large inducible GTPases to bacterial and white spot syndrome virus challenges in the giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Jin, Min; Yin, Shaowu; Ding, Zhengfeng; Wang, Wen; Ren, Qian

    2016-04-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines secreted by cells in response to invasion by pathogens, such as viruses, bacteria, parasites, or tumor cells. Very large inducible GTPases (VLIG) are the latest IFN-inducible GTPase family to be discovered and are the largest known GTPases of any species. However, VLIG proteins from invertebrates have yet to be characterized. In this study, three forms of VLIGs designated as MrVLIG1, MrVLIG2, and MrVLIG3 were cloned from the giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. MrVLIG1 has a 5445 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding an 1814-amino acid protein. The complete nucleotide sequence of MrVLIG2 cDNA is 7055 bp long consisting of a 5757 bp ORF encoding a protein with 1918 amino acids. The full length of the MrVLIG3 gene consists of 5511 bp with a 3909 bp ORF encoding a peptide with 1302 amino acids. BLASTP and phylogenetic tree analyses showed that the three MrVLIGs are clustered into one subgroup and, together with other vertebrate VLIGs, into a branch. Tissue distribution analysis indicated that the mRNAs of the three MrVLIGs were widely expressed in almost all detected tissues, including the hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine, with the highest expression in the hepatopancreas. They were also detected in the intestine but with relatively low expression levels. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the mRNA transcripts of the MrVLIGs in the hepatopancreas were significantly expressed at various time points after infection with Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus. In summary, the three isoforms of VLIG genes participate in the innate immune response of the shrimps to bacterial and viral infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ontogenetic changes in the expression of immune related genes in response to immunostimulants and resistance against white spot syndrome virus in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, T; Taju, G; Abdul Majeed, S; Sinwan Sajid, M; Santhosh Kumar, S; Sivakumar, S; Thamizhvanan, S; Vimal, S; Sahul Hameed, A S

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, researchers have focused on viral and plant immunostimulants which could have beneficial effects in disease prevention and control in shrimp culture. At present, the application of the recombinant VP28 protein (r-VP28) and herbal immunostimulant has been considered as a more effective approach to prevent white spot syndrome (WSS) by enhancing the immune response in shrimp. In the present study, expression of selected immune related genes in response to r-VP28 and herbal immunostimulant mix (HIM) were separately studied qualitatively and quantitatively by RT-PCR and real time PCR, respectively during ontogenetic development from nauplius to juvenile stage in Litopenaeus vannamei. The mRNA expression level of immune related genes such as anti-lipopolysaccharides (ALF), Lysozyme, cMnSOD, Crustin, Prophenoloxidase, Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and Haemocyanin were found to be up-regulated significantly in different ontogenetic development stages of shrimp fed with r-VP28 and HIM formulated diets. Relative percent survival (RPS) was determined in shrimp fed with immunostimulants formulated diets after oral challenge with WSSV. The survival of WSSV challenged shrimp was found to be higher in immunostimulants treated groups when compared to untreated group. The results of PCR, ELISA and real time PCR revealed the absence of WSSV in WSSV-challenged shrimp after 20 days of treatment with immunostimulants. Among these immunostimulants, HIM was found to be more effective when compared to r-VP28. After a survey of literature, we are of the opinion that this might be the first report on the expression of immune genes during ontogenetic development of L. vannamei in response to immunostimulants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mycobiome of the bat white nose syndrome affected caves and mines reveals diversity of fungi and local adaptation by the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces destructans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    Full Text Available Current investigations of bat White Nose Syndrome (WNS and the causative fungus Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces destructans (Pd are intensely focused on the reasons for the appearance of the disease in the Northeast and its rapid spread in the US and Canada. Urgent steps are still needed for the mitigation or control of Pd to save bats. We hypothesized that a focus on fungal community would advance the understanding of ecology and ecosystem processes that are crucial in the disease transmission cycle. This study was conducted in 2010-2011 in New York and Vermont using 90 samples from four mines and two caves situated within the epicenter of WNS. We used culture-dependent (CD and culture-independent (CI methods to catalogue all fungi ('mycobiome'. CD methods included fungal isolations followed by phenotypic and molecular identifications. CI methods included amplification of DNA extracted from environmental samples with universal fungal primers followed by cloning and sequencing. CD methods yielded 675 fungal isolates and CI method yielded 594 fungal environmental nucleic acid sequences (FENAS. The core mycobiome of WNS comprised of 136 operational taxonomic units (OTUs recovered in culture and 248 OTUs recovered in clone libraries. The fungal community was diverse across the sites, although a subgroup of dominant cosmopolitan fungi was present. The frequent recovery of Pd (18% of samples positive by culture even in the presence of dominant, cosmopolitan fungal genera suggests some level of local adaptation in WNS-afflicted habitats, while the extensive distribution of Pd (48% of samples positive by real-time PCR suggests an active reservoir of the pathogen at these sites. These findings underscore the need for integrated disease control measures that target both bats and Pd in the hibernacula for the control of WNS.

  13. Potent Inhibition of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Causative Agent of White-Nose Syndrome in Bats, by Cold-Pressed, Terpeneless, Valencia Orange Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boire, Nicholas; Zhang, Sean; Khuvis, Joshua; Lee, Rick; Rivers, Jennifer; Crandall, Philip; Keel, M Kevin; Parrish, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The causative agent of White-nose Syndrome (WNS), Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has been shown to be fatal to several species of bats in North America. To date, no compounds or chemical control measures have been developed which eliminates the growth of the fungus in the environment or in affected animals. In the current study, we evaluated the activity of cold-pressed, terpeneless orange oil (CPT) against multiple isolates of P. destructans in vitro. For all assays, a modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay was used. Standardized spore suspensions were prepared, adjusted to a specific optical density, and used to plate fungal lawns. Plates were incubated at either 15°C or 4°C for up to 6 months and checked at regular intervals for growth. Once controls had grown, zones of inhibition were measured (mm) on test plates and compared to those obtained using current antifungal drugs. All P. destructans isolates were completely inhibited by 100% CPT (10 μL) at 1 month of incubation regardless of temperature (4°C and 15°C). Complete inhibition persisted up to 6 months following a single exposure at this concentration. Of the standard antifungals, only amphotericin B demonstrated any activity, resulting in zone diameters ranging from 58 mm to 74 mm. CPT, at the highest concentration tested (100%), had no significant effect against a variety of other environmental organisms including various filamentous fungi, bacteria and aerobic actinomycetes. Given that CPT is relatively non-toxic, the possibility exists that the all-natural, mixture could be used as an environmental pre-treatment to eradicate P. destructans from bat habitats. Additional studies are needed to assess any undesirable effects of CPT on bat behavior and health and overall impacts on other members of the interconnected ecosystem(s).

  14. Potent Inhibition of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Causative Agent of White-Nose Syndrome in Bats, by Cold-Pressed, Terpeneless, Valencia Orange Oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Boire

    Full Text Available The causative agent of White-nose Syndrome (WNS, Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has been shown to be fatal to several species of bats in North America. To date, no compounds or chemical control measures have been developed which eliminates the growth of the fungus in the environment or in affected animals. In the current study, we evaluated the activity of cold-pressed, terpeneless orange oil (CPT against multiple isolates of P. destructans in vitro. For all assays, a modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay was used. Standardized spore suspensions were prepared, adjusted to a specific optical density, and used to plate fungal lawns. Plates were incubated at either 15°C or 4°C for up to 6 months and checked at regular intervals for growth. Once controls had grown, zones of inhibition were measured (mm on test plates and compared to those obtained using current antifungal drugs. All P. destructans isolates were completely inhibited by 100% CPT (10 μL at 1 month of incubation regardless of temperature (4°C and 15°C. Complete inhibition persisted up to 6 months following a single exposure at this concentration. Of the standard antifungals, only amphotericin B demonstrated any activity, resulting in zone diameters ranging from 58 mm to 74 mm. CPT, at the highest concentration tested (100%, had no significant effect against a variety of other environmental organisms including various filamentous fungi, bacteria and aerobic actinomycetes. Given that CPT is relatively non-toxic, the possibility exists that the all-natural, mixture could be used as an environmental pre-treatment to eradicate P. destructans from bat habitats. Additional studies are needed to assess any undesirable effects of CPT on bat behavior and health and overall impacts on other members of the interconnected ecosystem(s.

  15. Virulence of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) isolates may be correlated with the degree of replication in gills of Penaeus vannamei juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Corteel, M; Escobedo-Bonilla, C M; Wille, M; Alday-Sanz, V; Pensaert, M B; Sorgeloos, P; Nauwynck, H J

    2008-05-08

    A standardized inoculation model was used in 2 separate experiments to gauge the virulence of 3 white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) isolates from Thailand and Vietnam (WSSV Thai-1, WSSV Thai-2, and WSSV Viet) in Penaeus vannamei juveniles. Mortality patterns (Expt 1) were compared and WSSV-positive cells quantified (Expt 2) in tissues following intramuscular inoculation of shrimp with the most (WSSV Thai-1) and least (WSSV Viet) virulent isolates as determined by Expt 1. The results of Expt 1 demonstrated that mortalities began at 36 h post inoculation (hpi) for both Thai isolate groups and at 36 to 60 hpi for the Viet isolate group. Cumulative mortality reached 100% 96 to 240 h later in shrimp challenged with the WSSV Viet isolate compared to shrimp challenged with the Thai isolates. WSSV infection was verified in all groups by indirect immunofluorescence. In Expt 2, WSSV-infected cells were quantified by immunohistochemical analysis of both dead and time-course sampled shrimp. WSSV-positive cells were detected in tissues of Thai-1 inoculated dead and euthanized shrimp from 24 hpi onwards and from 36 hpi onwards in shrimp injected with the Viet isolate. Significantly more infected cells were found in tissues of dead shrimp inoculated with the Thai-1 than in Viet isolate-inoculated shrimp. In these experiments, substantial differences in virulence were demonstrated between the WSSV isolates. The Vietnamese isolate induced a more chronic disease and mortality pattern than was found for the Thai isolates, possibly because it infected fewer cells. This difference was most pronounced in gills.

  16. Dot-Projection Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry of Gossamer Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Black, Jonathan T.; Blandino, Joseph R.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.; Dorrington, Adrian A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper documents the technique of using hundreds or thousands of projected dots of light as targets for photogrammetry and videogrammetry of gossamer space structures. Photogrammetry calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of each target on the structure, and videogrammetry tracks the coordinates versus time. Gossamer structures characteristically contain large areas of delicate, thin-film membranes. Examples include solar sails, large antennas, inflatable solar arrays, solar power concentrators and transmitters, sun shields, and planetary balloons and habitats. Using projected-dot targets avoids the unwanted mass, stiffness, and installation costs of traditional retroreflective adhesive targets. Four laboratory applications are covered that demonstrate the practical effectiveness of white-light dot projection for both static-shape and dynamic measurement of reflective and diffuse surfaces, respectively. Comparisons are made between dot-projection videogrammetry and traditional laser vibrometry for membrane vibration measurements. The paper closes by introducing a promising extension of existing techniques using a novel laser-induced fluorescence approach.

  17. White lies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erat, S.; Gneezy, U.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we distinguish between two types of white lies: those that help others at the expense of the person telling the lie, which we term altruistic white lies, and those that help both others and the liar, which we term Pareto white lies. We find that a large fraction of participants are

  18. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  19. Graphene quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Güçlü, Alev Devrim; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    This book reflects the current status of theoretical and experimental research of graphene based nanostructures, in particular quantum dots, at a level accessible to young researchers, graduate students, experimentalists and theorists. It presents the current state of research of graphene quantum dots, a single or few monolayer thick islands of graphene. It introduces the reader to the electronic and optical properties of graphite, intercalated graphite and graphene, including Dirac fermions, Berry's phase associated with sublattices and valley degeneracy, covers single particle properties of

  20. [Macular crystalline dystrophy in Sjögren-Larsson syndrome: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, David Leonardo Cruvinel; Queiroz, Gustavo Henrique Medeiros; Feres, Caroline Campelo; Avila, Marcos

    2009-01-01

    Presentation of a case of crystalline macular distrophy diagnosed in a female patient with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome. The disease consists of clinical findings of spastic diplegia or tetraplegia, mental retardation, and congential ichthyosis. The eyes are affected in up to 100% of cases, and crystalline maculopathy is the main finding as described in this case report. On fundus examination multiple white dots were observed at ophthalmoscopy. The optical coherence tomography has shown not only the hipereflexive intraretinal spots but also macular atrophy with macular thickness reduction. The tomographic findings were first described in our country.

  1. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicines, particularly antiarrhythmic drugs such as procainamide or amiodarone, may be used to control or prevent a ... failure Reduced blood pressure (caused by rapid heart rate ) Side ... which may rapidly lead to shock or death. It can sometimes occur in people with WPW, ...

  2. SUMO and SUMO-Conjugating Enzyme E2 UBC9 Are Involved in White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection in Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoqian; Li, Wei; Xing, Jing; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    In previous work, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) in hemocytes of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis was found to be up-regulated post-white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection using proteomic approach. However, the role of SUMO in viral infection is still unclear. In the present work, full length cDNAs of SUMO (FcSUMO) and SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2 UBC9 (FcUBC9) were cloned from F. chinensis using rapid amplification of cDNA ends approach. The open reading frame (ORF) of FcSUMO encoded a 93 amino acids peptide with the predicted molecular weight (M.W) of 10.55 kDa, and the UBC9 ORF encoded a 160 amino acids peptide with the predicted M.W of 18.35 kDa. By quantitative real-time RT-PCR, higher mRNA transcription levels of FcSUMO and FcUBC9 were detected in hemocytes and ovary of F. chinensis, and the two genes were significantly up-regulated post WSSV infection. Subsequently, the recombinant proteins of FcSUMO and FcUBC9 were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and employed as immunogens for the production of polyclonal antibody (PAb). Indirect immunofluorescence assay revealed that the FcSUMO and UBC9 proteins were mainly located in the hemocytes nuclei. By western blotting, a 13.5 kDa protein and a 18.7 kDa protein in hemocytes were recognized by the PAb against SUMO or UBC9 respectively. Furthermore, gene silencing of FcSUMO and FcUBC9 were performed using RNA interference, and the results showed that the number of WSSV copies and the viral gene expressions were inhibited by knockdown of either SUMO or UBC9, and the mortalities of shrimp were also reduced. These results indicated that FcSUMO and FcUBC9 played important roles in WSSV infection.

  3. SUMO and SUMO-Conjugating Enzyme E2 UBC9 Are Involved in White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection in Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqian Tang

    Full Text Available In previous work, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO in hemocytes of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis was found to be up-regulated post-white spot syndrome virus (WSSV infection using proteomic approach. However, the role of SUMO in viral infection is still unclear. In the present work, full length cDNAs of SUMO (FcSUMO and SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2 UBC9 (FcUBC9 were cloned from F. chinensis using rapid amplification of cDNA ends approach. The open reading frame (ORF of FcSUMO encoded a 93 amino acids peptide with the predicted molecular weight (M.W of 10.55 kDa, and the UBC9 ORF encoded a 160 amino acids peptide with the predicted M.W of 18.35 kDa. By quantitative real-time RT-PCR, higher mRNA transcription levels of FcSUMO and FcUBC9 were detected in hemocytes and ovary of F. chinensis, and the two genes were significantly up-regulated post WSSV infection. Subsequently, the recombinant proteins of FcSUMO and FcUBC9 were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3, and employed as immunogens for the production of polyclonal antibody (PAb. Indirect immunofluorescence assay revealed that the FcSUMO and UBC9 proteins were mainly located in the hemocytes nuclei. By western blotting, a 13.5 kDa protein and a 18.7 kDa protein in hemocytes were recognized by the PAb against SUMO or UBC9 respectively. Furthermore, gene silencing of FcSUMO and FcUBC9 were performed using RNA interference, and the results showed that the number of WSSV copies and the viral gene expressions were inhibited by knockdown of either SUMO or UBC9, and the mortalities of shrimp were also reduced. These results indicated that FcSUMO and FcUBC9 played important roles in WSSV infection.

  4. Role of Litopenaeus vannamei Yin Yang 1 in the Regulation of the White Spot Syndrome Virus Immediate Early Gene ie1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping-Han; Huang, Ting-Yi; Cai, Pei-Si; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2017-03-15

    Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is a multifunctional zinc finger transcription factor that regulates many key cellular processes. In this study, we report the cloning of YY1 from Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp (LvYY1). This study shows that LvYY1 is ubiquitously expressed in shrimp tissues, and knockdown of LvYY1 expression by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) injection in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-infected shrimp reduced both mRNA levels of the WSSV immediate early gene ie1 as well as overall copy numbers of the WSSV genome. The cumulative mortality rate of infected shrimp also declined with LvYY1 dsRNA injection. Using an insect cell model, we observed that LvYY1 activates ie1 expression, and a mutation introduced into the ie1 promoter subsequently repressed this capability. Moreover, reporter assay results suggested that LvYY1 is involved in basal transcriptional regulation via an interaction with L. vannamei TATA-binding protein (LvTBP). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) results further indicated that LvYY1 binds to a YY1-binding site in the region between positions -119 and -126 in the ie1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis also confirmed that LvYY1 binds to the ie1 promoter in WSSV-infected shrimp. Taken together, these results indicate that WSSV uses host LvYY1 to enhance ie1 expression via a YY1-binding site and the TATA box in the ie1 promoter, thereby facilitating lytic activation and viral replication.IMPORTANCE WSSV has long been a scourge of the shrimp industry and remains a serious global threat. Thus, there is a pressing need to understand how the interactions between WSSV and its host drive infection, lytic development, pathogenesis, and mortality. Our successful cloning of L. vannamei YY1 (LvYY1) led to the elucidation of a critical virus-host interaction between LvYY1 and the WSSV immediate early gene ie1 We observed that LvYY1 regulates ie1 expression via a consensus YY1-binding site and TATA box. LvYY1 was also found to interact with L

  5. The c-Fos and c-Jun from Litopenaeus vannamei play opposite roles in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Wang, Sheng; Song, Xuan; Zhang, Zijian; Qian, Zhe; Zuo, Hongliang; Xu, Xiaopeng; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo

    2015-09-01

    Growing evidence indicates that activator protein-1 (AP-1) plays a major role in stimulating the transcription of immune effector molecules in cellular response to an incredible array of stimuli, including growth factors, cytokines, cellular stresses and bacterial and viral infection. Here, we reported the isolation and characterization of a cDNA from Litopenaeus vannamei encoding the full-length c-Fos protein (named as Lvc-Fos). The predicted amino acid sequences of Lvc-Fos contained a basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) domain, which was characteristic of members of the AP-1 family. Immunoprecipitation and native-PAGE assays determined that Lvc-Fos could interact with the Lvc-Jun, a homolog of c-Jun family in L. vannamei, in a heterodimer manner. Further investigation demonstrated that Lvc-Fos and Lvc-Jun were expressed in all tested tissues and located in the nucleus. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed both Lvc-Fos and Lvc-Jun in gills were up-regulated during Vibrio parahaemolyticus and white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenges. In addition, reporter gene assays indicated Lvc-Fos and Lvc-Jun could activate the expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of Drosophila and shrimp, as well as WSSV immediate early (IE) genes wsv069 and wsv249, in a different manner. Knockdown of Lvc-Fos or Lvc-Jun by RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in higher mortalities of L. vannamei after infection with V. parahaemolyticus, suggesting that Lvc-Fos and Lvc-Jun might play protective roles in bacterial infection. However, silencing of Lvc-Fos or Lvc-Jun in shrimp caused lower mortalities and virus loads under WSSV infection, suggesting that Lvc-Fos and Lvc-Jun could be engaged for WSSV replication and pathogenesis. In conclusion, our results provided experimental evidence and novel insight into the roles of L. vannamei AP-1 in bacterial and viral infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sex based levels of C-reactive protein and white blood cell count in subjects with metabolic syndrome: Isfahan Healthy Heart Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Gharipour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: C-reactive protein (CRP and white blood cell (WBC are proinflammatory markers. They are major pathophysiological for the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS. This study aimed to address the independent associations between MetS and WBC counts and serum CRP levels and evaluation of their magnitude in relation to the MetS, based on the sex in the Iranian adults. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, subjects who met the MetS criteria, based on the Adult Treatment Panel III were selected from the Isfahan Healthy Heart Program database. A questionnaire containing the demographic data, weight, height, waist, and hip circumference of the respondents was completed for each person. Blood pressure was measured and the anthropometric measurements were done, and fasting blood samples were taken for 2 h postload plasma glucose (2 hpp. Serum [total, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, and low-density lipoprotein] levels of cholesterol, triglyceride, and CRP as well as WBC counts were determined. The univariate analyses were carried out to assess the relation between the CRP levels, WBC counts with the MetS in both sexes the. Results: In men with the abdominal obesity, the higher levels of WBC count, high serum triglyceride and blood glucose levels, a low serum HDL level, and raised systolic and diastolic blood pressure were observed. However, the higher serum CRP levels were only observed in those with the low serum HDL-cholesterol levels. The mean values of the WBC counts were statistically different between the men with and without MetS, but the mean values of the CRP levels were similar between the two groups. In women, the mean values of WBC count and CRP levels were statistically different in the subjects with and without a MetS components (except for the low serum HDL levels and high diastolic blood pressure for the WBC measures and abdominal obesity for the CRP measures and for those with and without MetS. The age and

  7. Double quantum dot memristor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Holloway, Gregory W.; Benjamin, Simon C.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Baugh, Jonathan; Mol, Jan A.

    2017-08-01

    Memristive systems are generalizations of memristors, which are resistors with memory. In this paper, we present a quantum description of quantum dot memristive systems. Using this model we propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple and practical scheme for realizing memristive systems with quantum dots. The approach harnesses a phenomenon that is commonly seen as a bane of nanoelectronics, i.e., switching of a trapped charge in the vicinity of the device. We show that quantum dot memristive systems have hysteresis current-voltage characteristics and quantum jump-induced stochastic behavior. While our experiment requires low temperatures, the same setup could, in principle, be realized with a suitable single-molecule transistor and operated at or near room temperature.

  8. Hexagonal graphene quantum dots

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sumit

    2016-12-05

    We study hexagonal graphene quantum dots, using density functional theory, to obtain a quantitative description of the electronic properties and their size dependence, considering disk and ring geometries with both armchair and zigzag edges. We show that the electronic properties of quantum dots with armchair edges are more sensitive to structural details than those with zigzag edges. As functions of the inner and outer radii, we find in the case of armchair edges that the size of the band gap follows distinct branches, while in the case of zigzag edges it changes monotonically. This behaviour is further analyzed by studying the ground state wave function and explained in terms of its localisation.

  9. Quantum dot solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The third generation of solar cells includes those based on semiconductor quantum dots. This sophisticated technology applies nanotechnology and quantum mechanics theory to enhance the performance of ordinary solar cells. Although a practical application of quantum dot solar cells has yet to be achieved, a large number of theoretical calculations and experimental studies have confirmed the potential for meeting the requirement for ultra-high conversion efficiency. In this book, high-profile scientists have contributed tutorial chapters that outline the methods used in and the results of variou

  10. ANALISIS KEJADIAN SERANGAN WHITE SPOT SYNDROME VIRUS (WSSV DENGAN BEBERAPA PARAMETER KUALITAS AIR PADA BUDI DAYA UDANG WINDU MENGGUNAKAN SISTEM TANDON DAN PROBIOTIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunarto Gunarto

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Munculnya serangan White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV pada udang yang dibudidayakan kemungkinan sebagai akibat menurunnya kualitas lingkungan tambak.  Data diperoleh dari penelitian budi daya udang windu yang dilakukan Balai Riset Perikanan Budidaya Air Payau, Maros menggunakan 8 unit tambak ukuran 500 m2. Tokolan udang windu PL-25 dengan padat tebar 10 dan 20 ekor/m2 ditebar dalam petak tambak tersebut serta penambahan probiotik setiap minggu sebanyak 1 mg/L  berlangsung selama pemeliharaan udang dan tanpa pemberian probiotik sebagai kontrol merupakan perlakuan yang diuji. Masing-masing perlakuan dengan dua ulangan. Setelah penebaran, beberapa petak terserang WSSV dan menyebabkan kematian total yaitu pada hari ke-27, 30, 41, dan 47. Serangan WSSV terus berlanjut selama pemeliharaan udang di tambak berlangsung. Pada petak menggunakan probiotik mempunyai  kecenderungan terserang WSSV lebih lambat daripada yang tidak menggunakan probiotik. Semakin tinggi padat tebar udang windu di tambak, maka semakin rentan terhadap serangan WSSV. Padat tebar 10 ekor/m2 menggunakan probiotik produksinya cenderung lebih baik daripada padat tebar 20 ekor/m2. Peningkatan populasi Vibrio sp., peningkatan konsentrasi nitrit dan tingginya populasi awal Vibrio sp. di air melebihi 103 cfu/mL dan di sedimen 104 cfu/g diduga erat kaitan dengan munculnya serangan WSSV pada udang yang dipelihara di tambak pada penelitian ini. The outbreak of WSSV infection on tiger shrimp culture was thought to be an impact of its pond environmental depletion. The data was obtained from the study of tiger shrimp culture conducted in ponds Research Station of RICA Maros using 8 unit of  brackishwater ponds compartment of 500 m2 each size. The PL-25 were stocked in the ponds at the density of 10 pieces and 20 pieces/m2 and on  the otherhand, ponds also were treated with 1 mg/L commercial probiotics applicated in every week during culture period and no probiotics application as control. Each

  11. RedDots Replayed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnunen, Tomi; Sahidullah, Md; Falcone, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    the protection of text-dependent ASV systems from replay attacks in the face of variable recording and playback conditions. Derived from the re-recording of the original RedDots database, the effort is aligned with that in text-dependent ASV and thus well positioned for future assessments of replay spoofing...

  12. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small

  13. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Wood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI. We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs – optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection – that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt. We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs.

  14. Nanocrystal quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    ""Soft"" Chemical Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, J.A. Hollingsworth and V.I. Klimov Electronic Structure in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Optical Experiment, D.J. NorrisFine Structure and Polarization Properties of Band-Edge Excitons in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, A.L. EfrosIntraband Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots, P. Guyot-Sionnest, M. Shim, and C. WangMultiexciton Phenomena in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, V.I. KlimovOptical Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Quantum Do

  15. Pelacakan Virus Bercak Putih pada Udang Vaname (Litopenaeus vannamei di Lombok dengan Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (DETECTION OF WHITE SPOT SYNDROME VIRUS IN LITOPENAEUS VANNAMEI IN LOMBOK ISLAND USING REAL-TIME POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Arafani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV is one of the most threatening diseases in shrimp and othercrustaceans affecting global shrimp farming. Since firstly detected in Taiwan in 1992, the disease hasspread globally and followed with considerable socio-economic consequences. This research was performedto detect the WSSV infection in shrimp farming in Lombok Island’s (West Nusa Tenggara using real-timepolymerase chain reaction. Samples of vaname (Litopenaeus vannamei were collected from several shrimpfarming in Lombok. Results indicated that the spread of WSSV has reached shrimp farms in Lombok,especially in Lendang Jae, West Lombok. Therefore, a biosurveillance program is strongly recommendedto government to avoid and halt the spread of the disease in East Indonesia region .

  16. European Whiteness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    2008-01-01

    Born out of the United States’ (U.S.) history of slavery and segregation and intertwined with gender studies and feminism, the field of critical whiteness studies does not fit easily into a European setting and the particular historical context that entails. In order for a field of European...... critical whiteness studies to emerge, its relation to the U.S. theoretical framework, as well as the particularities of the European context need to be taken into account.. The article makes a call for a multi-layered approach to take over from the identity politics so often employed in the fields of U...

  17. Stochastic clustered-dot dithering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostromoukhov, Victor; Hersch, Roger D.

    1999-10-01

    A new technique for building stochastic clustered-dot screens is being proposed. A large dither matrix comprising thousands of stochastically laid out screen dots is constructed by first laying out the screen dot centers. Screen dot centers are obtained by placing discrete disks of a chosen radius at free cell locations when traversing the dither array cells according to either a discretely rotated Hilbert space-filling curve or a random space-filling curve. After Delauney triangulation of the screen dot centers, the maximal surface of each screen dot is computed and isointensity regions are created. This isointensity map is converted into an antialiased gray scale image, i.e., into an array of preliminary threshold values. These threshold values are renumbered to obtain the threshold values of the final dither threshold array. By changing the disk radius, the screen dot size can be adapted to the characteristics of particular printing devices. Larger screen dots may improve the one reproduction of printers having important dot gain.

  18. Red Dot Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Red dot basal cell carcinoma, a distinctive morphologic variant of basal cell carcinoma that presents as a small red macule (dot) or papule, is described on a woman’s thigh. A high index of suspicion is necessary to consider the diagnosis since the tumor mimics a telangiectasia or an angioma. PMID:28670359

  19. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  20. U.S. DOT roadway transportation data business plan (phase 1) : data business plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In 2010 the FHWA Office of Operations, Office of Transportation Management (HOTM) commissioned the development of a white paper, Data Capture and Management: Needs and Gaps in the Operation and Coordination of U.S. DOT Data Capture and Management Pro...

  1. DOT Official County Highway Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The County Highway Map theme is a scanned and rectified version of the original MnDOT County Highway Map Series. The cultural features on some of these maps may be...

  2. Marvelous applications of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheki, M; Moslehi, M; Assadi, M

    2013-05-01

    Nanotechnology is developed to convert research, prevention, and treatment of cancer through the novel diagnostic imaging techniques and therapies. In particular, the imaging nanotechnology has gained substantial momentum in recent years. The main progress in nanotechnology has led to the production of novel fluorescent probes named quantum dots (QDs). Quantum dots develop a revolution in the molecular tagging processes within research, in vivo and in vitro studies. Due to unique physical and chemical features of QD probes, new possible techniques of early cancer detection and therapeutic management are being surveyed. Quantum dots have also dissolved many of the restrictions of organic fluorophores and are a talented option as a research tool. This review addresses on the present status of research, preclinical applications and also future visions of quantum dots.  

  3. PennDOT : fact book

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    PennDOT was created in 1970 when the former : Department of Highways was merged with transportation related : functions from the Departments of Revenue, : Commerce, Community Affairs and Military Affairs. With : an annual budget of about $5.4 billion...

  4. Implementace hry Dots and Boxes

    OpenAIRE

    Balko, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Title: Dots and Boxes implementation Author: Martin Balko Department: Department of Applied Mathematics Supervisor: RNDr. Ondřej Pangrác, Ph.D. Supervisor's email address: Abstract: The presented thesis deals with the analysis of a popular logical game Dots and Boxes and its generalized versions. It focuses on the different methods and algorithms of opponent's artificial intelligence. The result of the work is implementation of the generalized version of this game in w...

  5. Quantum dots in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Margarida M

    2011-03-01

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that have broad excitation spectra, narrow emission spectra, tunable emission peaks, long fluorescence lifetimes, negligible photobleaching, and ability to be conjugated to proteins, making them excellent probes for bioimaging applications. Here the author reviews the advantages and disadvantages of using quantum dots in bioimaging applications, such as single-particle tracking and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, to study receptor-mediated transport.

  6. Sjogren-Larsson syndrome: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uppal Monica

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of Sjogren-Larsson syndrome are discussed along with a review of the literature. Both the patients had generalized ichthyosis, spastic paraplegia, mental retardation and ophthalmologic examination showing glistening foveal and parafoveal dots.

  7. The role of the accessory pathway radiofrequency catheter ablation in the secondary prevention of the malignant tachyarrhythmias in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujović Nebojša

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The occurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF in the presence of an accessory pathway (AP that conducts rapidly is potentially lethal because the rapid ventricular response may lead to ventricular fibrillation (VF. The aim of the study was to determine long-term efficacy of AP catheter-ablation using radiofrequency (RF current in secondary prevention of VF in WPW patients. Methods. Study included a total of 192 symptomatic WPW patients who underwent RF catheter-ablation of AP in our institution from 1994 to 2007 and were available for clinical follow-up for more than 3 months after procedure. Results. Before ablation, VF was recorded in total of 27 patients (14.1%. In 14 of patients (51.9% VF was the first clinical manifestation of WPW syndrome. A total of 35 VF episodes were identified in 27 patients. The occurrence of VF was preceded by physical activity or emotional stress in 17.1% of cases, by alcohol abuse in 2.9% and by inappropriate intravenous drug administration in 28.6%. In addition, no clear precipitating factor was identified in 40% of VF cases, while informations about activities preceding 11.4% of VF episodes were not available. The follow-up of 5.7 ± 3.3 years was obtained in all of 27 VF patients. Of the 20 patients who underwent successful AP ablation, all were alive, without syncope or ventricular tachyarrhythmias during long-term follow-up. In 4 of 7 unsuccessfully treated patients, recurrence of supraventricular tachycardia and/or preexcited atrial fibrillation were recorded; one of these patients suddenly died of VF, 6 years after procedure. Conclusion. In significant proportion of WPW patients, VF was the first clinical manifestation of WPW syndrome, often precipitated by physical activity, emotional stress or inappropriate drug administration. Successful elimination of AP by percutaneous RF catheter-ablation is highly effective in secondary prevention of life-threatening tachyarrhythmias in patients with

  8. Numerical Simulations of Gaseous Disks Generated from Collisional Cascades at the Roche Limits of White Dwarf Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Bromley, Benjamin C.

    2017-11-01

    We consider the long-term evolution of gaseous disks fed by the vaporization of small particles produced in a collisional cascade inside the Roche limit of a 0.6 {M}⊙ white dwarf. Adding solids with radius {r}0 at a constant rate {\\dot{M}}0 into a narrow annulus leads to two distinct types of evolution. When {\\dot{M}}0≳ {\\dot{M}}0,{crit}≈ 3× {10}4 {({r}0/1{km})}3.92 {{g}} {{{s}}}-1, the cascade generates a fairly steady accretion disk where the mass transfer rate of gas onto the white dwarf is roughly {\\dot{M}}0 and the mass in gas is {M}g≈ 2.3× {10}22 ({\\dot{M}}0/{10}10 {{g}} {{{s}}}-1) (1500 {{K}}/{T}0) ({10}-3/α ) g, where T 0 is the temperature of the gas near the Roche limit and α is the dimensionless viscosity parameter. If {\\dot{M}}0≲ {\\dot{M}}0,{crit}, the system alternates between high states with large mass transfer rates and low states with negligible accretion. Although either mode of evolution adds significant amounts of metals to the white dwarf photosphere, none of our calculations yield a vertically thin ensemble of solids inside the Roche limit. X-ray observations can place limits on the mass transfer rate and test this model for metallic line white dwarfs.

  9. Coral diversity and the severity of disease outbreaks: a cross-regional comparison of Acropora white syndrome in a species-rich region (American Samoa) with a species-poor region (Northwestern Hawaiian Islands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeby, G.S.; Bourne, D.G.; Wilson, B.; Work, Thierry M.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of the coral disease, Acropora white syndrome (AWS), was directly compared on reefs in the species-poor region of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) and the species-rich region of American Samoa (AS) with results suggesting that biodiversity, which can affect the abundance of susceptible hosts, is important in influencing the impacts of coral disease outbreaks. The diversity-disease hypothesis predicts that decreased host species diversity should result in increased disease severity of specialist pathogens. We found that AWS was more prevalent and had a higher incidence within the NWHI as compared to AS. Individual Acropora colonies affected by AWS showed high mortality in both regions, but case fatality rate and disease severity was higher in the NWHI. The site within the NWHI had a monospecific stand of A. cytherea; a species that is highly susceptible to AWS. Once AWS entered the site, it spread easily amongst the abundant susceptible hosts. The site within AS contained numerous Acropora species, which differed in their apparent susceptibility to infection and disease severity, which in turn reduced disease spread. Manipulative studies showed AWS was transmissible through direct contact in three Acropora species. These results will help managers predict and respond to disease outbreaks.

  10. Development of a rapid method for identifying carryover contamination of positive control DNA, using a chimeric positive control and restriction enzyme for the diagnosis of white spot syndrome virus by nested PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Jun; Kwon, Se Ryun

    2014-12-01

    Chimeric positive plasmids have been developed to minimize false-positive reactions caused by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) contamination. Here, we developed a rapid method for identifying false-positive results while detecting white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) by nested PCR, using chimeric positive plasmids. The results of PCRs using WSSV diagnostic primer sets showed PCR products of a similar size (WSSV 1st PCR product, 1,447 bp; WSSV 2nd PCR product, 941 bp) using WSSV chimeric plasmids or DNA from shrimp infected with WSSV. The PCR products were digested with DraI for 1 h at 37 °C. The digested chimeric DNA separated into two DNA bands; however, the WSSV-infected shrimp DNA did not separate. Thus, chimeric plasmid DNA may be used as positive control DNA instead of DNA from WSSV-infected shrimp, in order to prevent PCR contamination. Thus, the use of restriction enzyme digestion allowed us to rapidly distinguish between WSSV DNA and WSSV chimeric plasmid DNA.

  11. A culture-based survey of fungi in soil from bat hibernacula in the eastern United States and its implications for detection of Geomyces destructans, the causal agent of bat white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Jeffrey M.; Lindner, Daniel L.; Gargas, Andrea; Muller, Laura K.; Minnis, Andrew M.; Blehert, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The recent emergence of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease causing unprecedented mortality among hibernating bats of eastern North America, has revealed a knowledge gap regarding fungal communities associated with bats and their hibernacula. We used culture-based techniques to investigate the diversity of fungi in soil samples collected from 24 bat hibernacula in the eastern United States. Ribosomal RNA regions (internal transcribed spacer and partial intergenic spacer) were sequenced to preliminarily characterize isolates. Geomyces species were one of the most abundant and diverse groups cultured, representing approximately 33% of all isolates. Geomyces destructans was isolated from soil samples from three hibernacula in states where WNS is known to occur, and many of the other cultured Geomyces isolates likely represent undescribed taxa. Further characterization of the diversity of fungi that occur in hibernacula will both facilitate an improved understanding of the ecology of G. destructans within this complex fungal community and provide an opportunity to identify characteristics that differentiate G. destructans from non-pathogenic relatives.

  12. A culture-based survey of fungi in soil from bat hibernacula in the eastern United States and its implications for detection of Geomyces destructans, the causal agent of bat white-nose syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, Jeffrey M; Lindner, Daniel L; Gargas, Andrea; Muller, Laura K; Minnis, Andrew M; Blehert, David S

    2013-01-01

    The recent emergence of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a fungal disease causing unprecedented mortality among hibernating bats of eastern North America, has revealed a knowledge gap regarding fungal communities associated with bats and their hibernacula. We used culture-based techniques to investigate the diversity of fungi in soil samples collected from 24 bat hibernacula in the eastern United States. Ribosomal RNA regions (internal transcribed spacer and partial intergenic spacer) were sequenced to preliminarily characterize isolates. Geomyces species were one of the most abundant and diverse groups cultured, representing approximately 33% of all isolates. Geomyces destructans was isolated from soil samples from three hibernacula in states where WNS is known to occur, and many of the other cultured Geomyces isolates likely represent undescribed taxa. Further characterization of the diversity of fungi that occur in hibernacula both will facilitate an improved understanding of the ecology of G. destructans within this complex fungal community and provide an opportunity to identify characteristics that differentiate G. destructans from non-pathogenic relatives.

  13. A Black Swan in a Sea of White Noise: Using Technology-Enhanced Learning to Afford Educational Inclusivity for Learners with Asperger’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James McDowell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Against a backdrop of increasingly vocation-focussed course provision within higher education, of widening participation initiatives intended to promote greater inclusion for learners affected by learning difficulties, and of moves towards greater use of social and collaborative forms of learning, this paper discusses the case of an undergraduate Computing student affected by Asperger’s Syndrome (AS.While there is recognition in the literature of problems associated with face-to-face dialogue for persons affected by AS, there is a paucity of research both into the experience of students in higher education, and around the issue of participation in group-work activities increasingly found in creative aspects of computing. This paper highlights a tension between moves towards collaborative learning and UK disabilities legislation in relation to learners with AS. Employing a qualitative case-study methodology, the investigation revealed how a technology-enhanced learning intervention afforded an AS-diagnosed learner greater opportunities to participate in group-work in a higher education context. The findings suggest that not only can computer-mediated communications afford AS-diagnosed learners opportunities to participate meaningfully in group-work, but also that the learner demonstrated higher levels of collective-inclusive versus individual-exclusive phraseology than neurotypical peers, thereby challenging assumptions around participation in collaborative learning activities and assimilation of peer-feedback.

  14. Stability of quantum dots in live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zheng-Jiang; Yeh, Yi-Cheun; Tang, Rui; Yan, Bo; Tamayo, Joshua; Vachet, Richard W.; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2011-12-01

    Quantum dots are highly fluorescent and photostable, making them excellent tools for imaging. When using these quantum dots in cells and animals, however, intracellular biothiols (such as glutathione and cysteine) can degrade the quantum dot monolayer, compromising function. Here, we describe a label-free method to quantify the intracellular stability of monolayers on quantum dot surfaces that couples laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Using this new approach we have demonstrated that quantum dot monolayer stability is correlated with both quantum dot particle size and monolayer structure, with appropriate choice of both particle size and ligand structure required for intracellular stability.

  15. Imaging and Manipulating Energy Transfer Among Quantum Dots at Individual Dot Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nguyen, Huy A; Lyding, Joseph W; Gruebele, Martin

    2017-06-27

    Many processes of interest in quantum dots involve charge or energy transfer from one dot to another. Energy transfer in films of quantum dots as well as between linked quantum dots has been demonstrated by luminescence shift, and the ultrafast time-dependence of energy transfer processes has been resolved. Bandgap variation among dots (energy disorder) and dot separation are known to play an important role in how energy diffuses. Thus, it would be very useful if energy transfer could be visualized directly on a dot-by-dot basis among small clusters or within films of quantum dots. To that effect, we report single molecule optical absorption detected by scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM) to image energy pooling from donor into acceptor dots on a dot-by-dot basis. We show that we can manipulate groups of quantum dots by pruning away the dominant acceptor dot, and switching the energy transfer path to a different acceptor dot. Our experimental data agrees well with a simple Monte Carlo lattice model of energy transfer, similar to models in the literature, in which excitation energy is transferred preferentially from dots with a larger bandgap to dots with a smaller bandgap.

  16. Induction of supraventricular tachyarrhythmia at rest and during exercise with transoesophageal atrial pacing in the electrophysiological evaluation of asymptomatic athletes with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, G; Furlanello, F; Disertori, M; Inama, G; Guarnerio, M; Bettini, R; Cozzi, F

    1988-10-01

    Even today there is controversy as regards the best approach to asymptomatic or slightly symptomatic athletes with the WPW syndrome as regards fitness for sports activity, especially in some countries where the doctor is responsible for certifying sports fitness. This study concerns 84 asymptomatic or slightly symptomatic athletes (66 males, 18 females, mean age 21.7 years, range 12-44 years) who underwent a stimulation protocol the end-point of which was the induction of atrial fibrillation (or, if not possible, atrial tachyarrhythmia) in the basal state and during bicycle stress test with transesophageal atrial pacing. The 81 athletes in whom the end-point was reached were divided into two groups: Group I includes the 32 athletes with the shortest R-R interval between pre-excited beats less than or equal to 240 ms in the basal state and/or less than or equal to 210 ms during bicycle ergometer test, Group II includes the other 49 patients. The evaluation during exercise was not carried out in four athletes because of serious haemodynamic compromise due to the arrhythmia induced in the basal state. Only 21/32 athletes would have been included in Group I if only evaluated in the basal state. In 30/81 athletes (37%), there was discrepancy between the result of stimulation and the result of the usual non-invasive evaluation (Holter monitoring, ergometric stress test, ajmaline test). On average, 40 min are required for the performance of the study protocol except when the induced arrhythmia lasts more than 5 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Replacing red meat and processed red meat for white meat, fish, legumes or eggs is associated with lower risk of incidence of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Tomás, Nerea; Babio, Nancy; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Corella, Dolores; Estruch, Ramon; Ros, Emilio; Fitó, Montserrat; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Salaverria, Itziar; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M; Lapetra, José; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miguel; Toledo, Estefanía; Sorlí, José V; Pedret-Llaberia, Maria Roser; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2016-12-01

    Few studies have assessed the association between consumption of red meat (RM) and processed red meats (PRM) and the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and results have been inconsistent. We investigated associations between total consumption of meat and its subtypes and incident MetS and estimated the effect of substituting RM or PRM for alternative protein-rich foods. We analyzed 1868 participants (55-80 years-old) recruited into the PREDIMED study who had no MetS at baseline and were followed for a median of 3.2 years. MetS was defined using updated harmonized criteria. Anthropometric variables, dietary habits, and blood biochemistry were determined at baseline and yearly thereafter. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of MetS were estimated for the two upper tertiles (versus the lowest one) of mean consumption of meat and its subtypes during the follow-up as exposure. Comparing the highest vs the lowest tertile of consumption, we observed an increased risk of MetS incidence, with HRs of 1.23 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.45) and 1.46 (CI: 1.22-1.74) for total meat and pooled RM and PRM, respectively. Compared with participants in the lowest tertile, those in the highest tertile of poultry and rabbit consumption had a lower risk of MetS incidence. The risk of MetS was lower when one-serving/day of RM or PRM was replaced by legumes, poultry and rabbit, fish or eggs. RM and PRM consumption was associated with higher risk of MetS. Replacing RM or PRM with other protein-rich foods related to a lower risk of MetS and should, therefore, be encouraged. This trial was registered at controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN35739639. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  18. Inter-dot coupling effects on transport through correlated parallel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of inter-dot tunnelling on transport properties has been explored. Results, in intermediate inter-dot coupling regime show signatures of merger of two dots to form a single composite dot and in strong coupling regime the behaviour of the system resembles the two decoupled dots. Keywords. Coupled quantum dots ...

  19. Transport through graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güttinger, J.; Molitor, F.; Stampfer, C.; Schnez, S.; Jacobsen, A.; Dröscher, S.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.

    2012-12-01

    We review transport experiments on graphene quantum dots and narrow graphene constrictions. In a quantum dot, electrons are confined in all lateral dimensions, offering the possibility for detailed investigation and controlled manipulation of individual quantum systems. The recently isolated two-dimensional carbon allotrope graphene is an interesting host to study quantum phenomena, due to its novel electronic properties and the expected weak interaction of the electron spin with the material. Graphene quantum dots are fabricated by etching mono-layer flakes into small islands (diameter 60-350 nm) with narrow connections to contacts (width 20-75 nm), serving as tunneling barriers for transport spectroscopy. Electron confinement in graphene quantum dots is observed by measuring Coulomb blockade and transport through excited states, a manifestation of quantum confinement. Measurements in a magnetic field perpendicular to the sample plane allowed to identify the regime with only a few charge carriers in the dot (electron-hole transition), and the crossover to the formation of the graphene specific zero-energy Landau level at high fields. After rotation of the sample into parallel magnetic field orientation, Zeeman spin splitting with a g-factor of g ≈ 2 is measured. The filling sequence of subsequent spin states is similar to what was found in GaAs and related to the non-negligible influence of exchange interactions among the electrons.

  20. Expression of inflammation-related miRNAs in white blood cells from subjects with metabolic syndrome after 8 wk of following a Mediterranean diet-based weight loss program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Rocha, José Luiz; Milagro, Fermin I; Mansego, Maria Luisa; Zulet, Maria Angeles; Bressan, Josefina; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a dietary strategy for weight loss (the RESMENA [reduction of metabolic syndrome in Navarra, Spain] diet) on the expression of inflammation-related microRNAS (miRNAs) and genes in white blood cells (WBC) from individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS). The clinical, anthropometric, and biochemical characteristics of 40 individuals with MetS (20 men and 20 women; age: 48.84 ± 10.02 y; body mass index: 35.41 ± 4.42 kg/m(2)) were evaluated before and after an 8-wk hypocaloric diet based on the Mediterranean dietary pattern. Nutrient intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire and 48-h weighed food records. Total RNA was isolated from WBC and the expression of some inflammation-related miRNAs and mRNAs (IL-6, TNF-α, ICAM-1, IL-18, SERPINE1, VCAM-1, GAPDH) was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The RESMENA nutritional intervention improved most anthropometric and biochemical features. The expression of miR-155-3p was decreased in WBC, whereas Let-7b was strongly upregulated as a consequence of the dietary treatment. However, they were not correlated with the expression of the proinflammatory genes in the same cells. The changes in the expression of let-7b, miR-125b, miR-130a, miR-132-3p, and miR-422b were significantly associated with changes in diet quality when assessed by the Healthy Eating Index. Moreover, low consumption of lipids and saturated fat (g/d) were associated with higher expression of let-7b after the nutritional intervention. The Mediterranean-based nutritional intervention was able to induce changes in the expression of let-7b and miR-155-3p in WBC from patients with MetS after 8 wk. Moreover, the quality of the diet has an important effect on the miRNAs expression changes. These results should be highlighted because these miRNAs have been associated with inflammatory gene regulation and important human diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrafast spectroscopy of quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Foo, E

    2001-01-01

    exchange-correlation interactions among the confined carriers inside the dots are suggested to be responsible. A density functional calculation for BGR of the ground state transition shows good agreement with our experimental results, especially in the high dot occupancy regime. Many-particle state scattering gives rise to large homogeneous spectral broadening of the PL peaks, from which an intradot relaxation time approx 300 fs is estimated. This observation supports the results obtained by direct excitation of carriers within the QDs. Femtosecond time-resolved photoluminescence measured by frequency up-conversion has been used to investigate carrier dynamics in InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots (QDs). Our results reveal ultrafast carrier relaxation and sequential state filling. Carrier relaxation is proposed to occur by Auger-type processes, and the sequential state filling suggests that intradot relaxation is much faster than carrier capture from the InAs wetting layer. Measurements obtained by direct ...

  2. Quantum-dot emitters in photonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous emission from self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots is strongly influenced by the environment in which they are placed. This can be used to determine fundamental optical properties of the quantum dots as well as to manipulate and control the quantum-dot emission itself....

  3. The extent of P2Y12 inhibition by clopidogrel in diabetes mellitus patients with acute coronary syndrome is not related to glycaemic control: roles of white blood cell count and body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Olivier; El Ghannudi, Soraya; Hess, Sebastien; Reydel, Antje; Crimizade, Ulun; Jesel, Laurence; Radulescu, Bogdan; Wiesel, Marie L; Gachet, Christian; Ohlmann, Patrick

    2012-08-01

    It was the study objective to determine whether glycaemic control affects the extent of platelet inhibition by thienopyridines as assessed by vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein flow cytometry (VASP-FCT) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) during acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Although the proportion of high on-treatment residual platelet reactivity is higher in DM, the contributions of glycaemic control and other factors associated with DM, such as excess body weight and inflammation, to this impaired platelet inhibition by thienopyridines have not yet been fully characterised. In this study, the extent of P2Y12 ADP receptor pathway inhibition was evaluated by the VASP-FCT. Platelet activation was expressed as the platelet reactivity index (PRI). Low response to clopidogrel (LR) was defined as a PRI of >61%. Four hundred forty-five consecutive ACS patients (DM = 160, NDM = 285) were enrolled. The proportion of LR was higher in DM patients (50 vs. 37.5%). In DM, PRI was not correlated with glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) or glycaemia. In a univariate analysis, LR was associated with age, male sex, overweight, and white blood cell count (WBC). In a multivariate analysis, WBC >10,000 and body weight >80 kg were the sole independent predictors of LR to clopidogrel (hazard ratio (HR) 3.02 [1.36-6.68], p=0.006 and HR 2.47 [1.14-5.35], p = 0.021, respectively). Conversely, in non-DM patients, ST-elevation myocardial infarction was the sole independent predictor of LR. In conclusion, in ACS DM patients undergoing PCI, the extent of P2Y12 inhibition by clopidogrel is not related to glycaemic control but is related to body weight and inflammatory status as assessed by the WBC.

  4. Enhancement of superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in juvenile brown shrimp, Farfantepenaeus californiensis (Holmes, 1900, fed β-1.3 glucan vitamin E, and β-carotene and infected with white spot syndrome virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Pacheco

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dietary β-Ο-glucan, vitamin E, and β-carotene supplements in juvenile brown shrimp, Farfantepenaeus californiensis, inoculated with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV was evaluated. Groups of 30 organisms (weighing 1 ± 0.5 g were cultured in 60 L fiberglass tanks and fed daily with β-1.3-glucan (0.1%, vitamin E (0.01%, and β-carotene (0.01% for 23 days; the specimens were then inoculated with WSSV. The antioxidant activity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT were determined in the hepatopancreas and muscle at 0, 1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after inoculation. Shrimp fed with β-1.3-glucan, vitamin E, and β-carotene significantly increased SOD activity in the hepatopancreas and muscle at 12 and 24 h post-infection, respectively. Shrimp fed with vitamin E and β-1.3-glucan registered an increment in SOD activity from 12 to 48 h post-infection. Shrimp fed with β-carotene increased SOD activity before infection with WSSV, and shrimp fed with β-1.3-glucan and vitamin E increased CAT activity, also before infection. The CAT activity response in shrimp muscle increased with respect to the control group for all treatments tested from 1 to 6 h after inoculation with WSSV. The highest antioxidant response was registered in shrimp fed with vitamin E. Juvenile shrimp fed with vitamin E and later inoculated with WSSV registered 100% mortality at 72 h, but shrimp fed with β-Ο-glucan and β-carotene showed greater resistance to WSSV, with mortality at 144 h post-infection. This study demonstrated the capacity of juvenile Farfantepenaeus californiensis fed β-Ο-glucan, vitamin E, or β-carotene to increase the antioxidant response before and after viral infection.

  5. Hand-arm vibration syndrome and dose-response relation for vibration induced white finger among quarry drillers and stonecarvers. Italian Study Group on Physical Hazards in the Stone Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovenzi, M

    1994-09-01

    To investigate the occurrence of disorders associated with the hand arm vibration syndrome in a large population of stone workers in Italy. The dose-response relation for vibration induced white finger (VWF) was also studied. The study population consisted of 570 quarry drillers and stonecarvers exposed to vibration and 258 control stone workers who performed only manual activity. Each subject was interviewed with health and workplace assessment questionnaires. Sensorineural and VWF disorders were staged according to the Stockholm workshop scales. Vibration was measured on a representative sample of percussive and rotary tools. The 8 h energy equivalent frequency weighted acceleration (A (8)) and lifetime vibration doses were calculated for each of the exposed stone workers. Sensorineural and musculoskeletal symptoms occurred more frequently in the workers exposed to vibration than in the controls, but trend statistics did not show a linear exposure-response relation for these disorders. The prevalence of VWF was found to be 30.2% in the entire group exposed to vibration. Raynaud's phenomenon was discovered in 4.3% of the controls. VWF was strongly associated with exposure to vibration and a monotonic dose-response relation was found. According to the exposure data of this study, the expected percentage of stone workers affected with VWF tends to increase roughly in proportion to the square root of A(8) (for a particular exposure period) or in proportion to the square root of the duration of exposure (for a constant magnitude of vibration). Even although limited to a specific work situation, the dose-response relation for VWF estimated in this study suggests a time dependency such that halving the years of exposure allows a doubling of the energy equivalent vibration. According to these findings, the vibration exposure levels currently under discussion within the European Community seem to represent reasonable exposure limits for the protection of workers against

  6. Spin storage in quantum dot ensembles and single quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, Dominik

    2009-10-15

    This thesis deals with the investigation of spin relaxation of electrons and holes in small ensembles of self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques. Furthermore, a method to detect the spin orientation in a single quantum dot was developed in the framework of this thesis. A spin storage device was used to optically generate oriented electron spins in small frequency selected quantum dot ensembles using circularly polarized optical excitation. The spin orientation can be determined by the polarization of the time delayed electroluminescence signal generated by the device after a continuously variable storage time. The degree of spin polarized initialization was found to be limited to 0.6 at high magnetic fields, where anisotropic effects are compensated. The spin relaxation was directly measured as a function of magnetic field, lattice temperature and s-shell transition energy of the quantum dot by varying the spin storage time up to 30 ms. Very long spin lifetimes are obtained with a lower limit of T{sub 1}=20 ms at B=4 T and T=1 K. A strong magnetic field dependence T{sub 1}{proportional_to}B{sup -5} has been observed for low temperatures of T=1 K which weakens as the temperature is increased. In addition, the temperature dependence has been determined with T{sub 1}{proportional_to}T{sup -1}. The characteristic dependencies on magnetic field and temperature lead to the identification of the spin relaxation mechanism, which is governed by spin-orbit coupling and mediated by single phonon scattering. This finding is qualitatively supported by the energy dependent measurements. The investigations were extended to a modified device design that enabled studying the spin relaxation dynamics of heavy holes in self-assembled quantum dots. The measurements show a polarization memory effect for holes with up to 0.1 degree of polarization. Furthermore, investigations of the time dynamics of the hole spin relaxation reveal surprisingly long lifetimes T{sub 1}{sup h

  7. Diamond LED substrate and novel quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, James C; Sung, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Nitride LED (e.g., GaN) has become the mainstream of blue light source. The blue light can be converted to white light by exciting a phosphor (e.g., Nichia's YAG or Osram's TAG) with the complementary yellow emission. However, GaN is typically deposited on sapphire (Al2O3) substrates formed by crystal pulling or hexagonal (e.g., 4 H or 6 H) SiC wafers condensed from SiC vapor. In either case, the nitride lattice is ridden (e.g., 10(9)/cm2) with dislocations. The high dislocation density with sapphire is due to the large (>13%) lattice mismatch; and with hexagonal SiC, because of intrinsic defects. Cubic (beta) SiC may be deposited epitaxially using a CVD reactor onto silicon wafer by diffusing the interface and by chemical gradation. A reactive echant (e.g., hydrogen or fluorine) can be introduced periodically to gasify mis-aligned atoms. In this case, large single crystal wafers would be available for the manufacture of high bright LED with superb electro-optical efficiency. The SiC wafer may be coated with diamond film that can eliminate heat in real time. As a result of lower temperature, the nitride LED can be brighter and it will last longer. The blue light of GaN LED formed on SiC on Diamond (SiCON) LED may also be scattered by using novel quantum dots (e.g., 33 atom pairs of CdSe) to form a broad yellow light that blend in with the original blue light to form sunlight-like white light. This would be the ideal source for general illumination (e.g., for indoor) or backlighting (e.g., for LCD).

  8. Hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications : Mammographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Hyeon; Park, Jeong Mi; Goo, Hyun Woo; Bang, Sun Woo [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    To differentiate fine hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications from true microcalcifications on mammography. Mammograms showing hyperdense dots in ten patients (mean age, 59 years) were evaluated. Two radiologists were asked to differentiate with the naked eye the hyperdense dots seen on ten mammograms and proven microcalcifications seen on ten mammograms. Densitometry was also performed for all lesions and the contrast index was calculated. The shape and distribution of the hyperdense dots were evaluated and enquires were made regarding any history of breast disease and corresponding treatment. Biopsies were performed for two patients with hyperdense dots. Two radiologists made correct diagnoses in 19/20 cases(95%). The contrast index was 0.10-0.88 (mean 0.58) for hyperdense dots and 0.02-0.45 (mean 0.17) for true microcalcifications. The hyperdense dots were finer and homogeneously rounder than the microcalcifications. Distribution of the hyperdense dots was more superficial in subcutaneous fat (seven cases) and subareolar area (six cases). All ten patients with hyperdense dots had history of mastitis and abscesses and had been treated by open drainage (six cases) and/or folk remedy (four cases). In eight patients, herb patches had been attached. Biopsies of hyperdense dots did not show any microcalcification or evidence of malignancy. These hyperdense dots were seen mainly in older patients. Their characteristic density, shape, distribution and clinical history makes differential diagnosis from true microcalcifications easy and could reduce unnecessary diagnostic procedures such as surgical biopsy.

  9. Optophononics with Coupled Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-18

    single InAs/GaAs quantum dots. Phys. Rev. B 68, 233301 (2003). 9. Bennemann, K.-H. & Ketterson, J. B. (eds), Superconductivity : Conventional and...superlattices. Science 338, 935–939 (2012). 17. Kim, J.-H. et al. Coherent phonons in carbon nanotubes and graphene . Chem. Phys. 413, 55–80 (2013). 18

  10. DOT strategies versus orbiter strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope is a high-resolution solar imager coming on-line at La Palma. The definition of the DOT science niche, strategies, and requirements resemble Solar Orbiter considerations and deliberations. I discuss the latter in the light of the former, and claim that multi-line observation

  11. Luminescent Surface Quaternized Carbon Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Bourlinos, Athanasios B.

    2012-01-10

    Thermal oxidation of a salt precursor made from the acid base combination of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and betaine hydrochloride results in light-emitting surface quaternized carbon dots that are water-dispersible, display anion exchange properties, and exhibit uniform size/surface charge. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Polymer-coated quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomczak, N.; Liu, Rongrong; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with distinct photophysical properties finding applications in biology, biosensing, and optoelectronics. Polymeric coatings of QDs are used primarily to provide long-term colloidal stability to QDs dispersed in solutions and also as a source of

  13. Nuclear Spins in Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erlingsson, S.I.

    2003-01-01

    The main theme of this thesis is the hyperfine interaction between the many lattice nuclear spins and electron spins localized in GaAs quantum dots. This interaction is an intrinsic property of the material. Despite the fact that this interaction is rather weak, it can, as shown in this thesis,

  14. Silicon quantum dots: surface matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohnalová, K.; Gregorkiewicz, T.; Kůsová, K.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) hold great promise for many future technologies. Silicon is already at the core of photovoltaics and microelectronics, and SiQDs are capable of efficient light emission and amplification. This is crucial for the development of the next technological frontiers—silicon

  15. Tuning the Lattice Parameter of InxZnyP for Highly Luminescent Lattice-Matched Core/Shell Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pietra, Francesca|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/355358395; De Trizio, Luca; Hoekstra, Anne W.; Renaud, Nicolas; Prato, Mirko; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Baesjou, Patrick J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/157416933; Koole, Rolf; Manna, Liberato; Houtepen, Arjan J.

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) show great promise as LED phosphors due to their tunable narrow-band emission and ability to produce high-quality white light. Currently, the most suitable QDs for lighting applications are based on cadmium, which presents a toxicity problem for consumer applications.

  16. Entanglement probabilities of polymers: a white noise functional approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bernido, C C

    2003-01-01

    The entanglement probabilities for a highly flexible polymer to wind n times around a straight polymer are evaluated using white noise analysis. To introduce the white noise functional approach, the one-dimensional random walk problem is taken as an example. The polymer entanglement scenario, viewed as a random walk on a plane, is then treated and the entanglement probabilities are obtained for a magnetic flux confined along the straight polymer, and a case where an entangled polymer is subjected to the potential V = f-dot(s)theta. In the absence of the magnetic flux and the potential V, the entanglement probabilities reduce to a result obtained by Wiegel.

  17. Probing silicon quantum dots by single-dot techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychugov, Ilya; Valenta, Jan; Linnros, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Silicon nanocrystals represent an important class of non-toxic, heavy-metal free quantum dots, where the high natural abundance of silicon is an additional advantage. Successful development in mass-fabrication, starting from porous silicon to recent advances in chemical and plasma synthesis, opens up new possibilities for applications in optoelectronics, bio-imaging, photovoltaics, and sensitizing areas. In this review basic physical properties of silicon nanocrystals revealed by photoluminescence spectroscopy, lifetime, intensity trace and electrical measurements on individual nanoparticles are summarized. The fabrication methods developed for accessing single Si nanocrystals are also reviewed. It is concluded that silicon nanocrystals share many of the properties of direct bandgap nanocrystals exhibiting sharp emission lines at low temperatures, on/off blinking, spectral diffusion etc. An analysis of reported results is provided in comparison with theory and with direct bandgap material quantum dots. In addition, the role of passivation and inherent interface/matrix defects is discussed.

  18. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  19. CdSe/ZnS quantum dot films for high performance flexible lighting and display applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Yemliha; Genc, Sinan; Talpur, Mohammad Younis; Mutlugun, Evren

    2016-07-22

    Colloidal quantum dots have attracted significant interest in recent years for lighting and display applications and have recently appeared in high-end market products. The integration of quantum dots with light emitting diodes has made them promising candidates for superior lighting applications with tunable optical characteristics. In this work we propose and demonstrate high quality colloidal quantum dots in their novel free-standing film forms to allow high quality white light generation to address flexible lighting and display applications. High quality quantum dots have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, steady state and time resolved photoluminescence and dynamic light scattering methods. The engineering of colloidal quantum dot composition and its optical properties in stand-alone film form has led to the experimentally high NTSC color gamut of 122.5 (CIE-1931) for display applications, color rendering index of 88.6, luminous efficacy of optical radiation value of 290 lm/Wopt and color temperature of 2763 K for lighting applications.

  20. White matter involvement in mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Watemberg, Nathan; Luckman, Yehudit; Lev, Dorit

    2005-02-01

    White matter involvement is recently being realized as a common finding in mitochondrial disorders. It is considered an inherent part of the classical mitochondrial syndromes which are usually associated with alterations in the mitochondrial DNA such as: Leigh disease, Kearns-Sayre syndrome, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy lactic acidosis, and stroke like episodes, mitochondrial neuro-gastro-intestinal encephalomyopathy and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. White matter involvement is also described in mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in the nuclear DNA which are transmitted in an autosomal pattern. MRI findings suggestive of a mitochondrial disease are: small cyst-like lesions in abnormal white matter, involvement of both cerebral and cerebellar white matter, and a combination of a leukoencephalopathy with bilateral basal ganglia lesions. The clinical manifestations may be disproportionate to the extent of white matter involvement. Other organs may frequently be involved. The onset is often in infancy with a neurodegenerative course. The finding of a leukoencephalopathy in a patient with a complex neurologic picture and multisystem involvement should prompt a thorough mitochondrial evaluation.

  1. Dot-in-Well Quantum-Dot Infrared Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunapala, Sarath; Bandara, Sumith; Ting, David; Hill, cory; Liu, John; Mumolo, Jason; Chang, Yia Chung

    2008-01-01

    Dot-in-well (DWELL) quantum-dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) [DWELL-QDIPs] are subjects of research as potentially superior alternatives to prior QDIPs. Heretofore, there has not existed a reliable method for fabricating quantum dots (QDs) having precise, repeatable dimensions. This lack has constituted an obstacle to the development of uniform, high-performance, wavelength-tailorable QDIPs and of focal-plane arrays (FPAs) of such QDIPs. However, techniques for fabricating quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) having multiple-quantum- well (MQW) structures are now well established. In the present research on DWELL-QDIPs, the arts of fabrication of QDs and QWIPs are combined with a view toward overcoming the deficiencies of prior QDIPs. The longer-term goal is to develop focal-plane arrays of radiationhard, highly uniform arrays of QDIPs that would exhibit high performance at wavelengths from 8 to 15 m when operated at temperatures between 150 and 200 K. Increasing quantum efficiency is the key to the development of competitive QDIP-based FPAs. Quantum efficiency can be increased by increasing the density of QDs and by enhancing infrared absorption in QD-containing material. QDIPs demonstrated thus far have consisted, variously, of InAs islands on GaAs or InAs islands in InGaAs/GaAs wells. These QDIPs have exhibited low quantum efficiencies because the numbers of QD layers (and, hence, the areal densities of QDs) have been small typically five layers in each QDIP. The number of QD layers in such a device must be thus limited to prevent the aggregation of strain in the InAs/InGaAs/GaAs non-lattice- matched material system. The approach being followed in the DWELL-QDIP research is to embed In- GaAs QDs in GaAs/AlGaAs multi-quantum- well (MQW) structures (see figure). This material system can accommodate a large number of QD layers without excessive lattice-mismatch strain and the associated degradation of photodetection properties. Hence, this material

  2. Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith Kahen

    2008-07-31

    The project objective is to create low cost coatable inorganic light emitting diodes, composed of quantum dot emitters and inorganic nanoparticles, which have the potential for efficiencies equivalent to that of LEDs and OLEDs and lifetime, brightness, and environmental stability between that of LEDs and OLEDs. At the end of the project the Recipient shall gain an understanding of the device physics and properties of Quantum-Dot LEDs (QD-LEDs), have reliable and accurate nanocrystal synthesis routines, and have formed green-yellow emitting QD-LEDs with a device efficiency greater than 3 lumens/W, a brightness greater than 400 cd/m2, and a device operational lifetime of more than 1000 hours. Thus the aim of the project is to break the current cost-efficiency paradigm by creating novel low cost inorganic LEDs composed of inorganic nanoparticles.

  3. Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahen, Keith

    2008-07-31

    The project objective is to create low cost coatable inorganic light emitting diodes, composed of quantum dot emitters and inorganic nanoparticles, which have the potential for efficiencies equivalent to that of LEDs and OLEDs and lifetime, brightness, and environmental stability between that of LEDs and OLEDs. At the end of the project the Recipient shall gain an understanding of the device physics and properties of Quantum-Dot LEDs (QD-LEDs), have reliable and accurate nanocrystal synthesis routines, and have formed green-yellow emitting QD-LEDs with a device efficiency greater than 3 lumens/W, a brightness greater than 400 cd/m{sup 2}, and a device operational lifetime of more than 1000 hours. Thus the aim of the project is to break the current cost-efficiency paradigm by creating novel low cost inorganic LEDs composed of inorganic nanoparticles.

  4. Optical and Micro-Structural Characterization of MBE Grown Indium Gallium Nitride Polar Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    El Afandy, Rami

    2011-07-07

    properties compared to other nanostructures. Excitation power dependent PL measurements reveal an increase in the excitonic confinements and hence higher quantum efficiencies compared to lower dimensional nanostructures. Finally it is argued that such characteristics allows quantum dots based InGaN structures to become potentially a strong candidate for high quantum efficiency white solid-state light emitting diodes and ultra-violet/blue laser diode operating at room temperature.

  5. Quantum dots: lasers and amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bimberg, Dieter; Ledentsov, Nikolai [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, PN5-2, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 (Germany)

    2003-06-25

    Continuous wave room-temperature output power of {approx} 3 W for edge emitters and of 1.2 mW for vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers is realized for GaAs-based devices using InAs quantum dots (QDs) operating at 1.3 {mu}m. Characteristic temperatures up to 170 K below 330 K are realized. Simultaneously, differential efficiency exceeds 80% for these devices. Lasers emitting up to 12 W at 1140-1160 nm are useful as pump sources for Tm{sup 3+}-doped fibres for frequency up-conversion to 470 nm. Both types of lasers show transparency current densities of 6 A cm{sup -2} per dot layer, {eta}{sub int} = 98% and {alpha}{sub i} around 1.5 cm{sup -1}. Long operation lifetimes (above 3000 h at 50 deg C heatsink temperature at 1.5 W CW) and improved radiation hardness as compared to quantum well (QW) devices are manifested. Cut-off frequencies of about 10 GHz at 1100 nm and 6 GHz at 1300 nm and low {alpha} factors resulting in reduced filamentation and improved M{sup 2} values in single-mode operation are realized. Quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD SOAs) demonstrate gain recovery times of 120-140 fs, 4-7 times faster than bulk/QW SOAs. The breakthrough became possible due to the development of self-organized growth in QD technology. (topical review)

  6. Vanishing White Matter Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In Memory Of Obituaries Contact Us Donate Vanishing White Matter Disease What is Vanishing White Matter Disease? ... of the genetic basis of VWM was a great step forward. First of all, it allows genetic ...

  7. Barrier Engineered Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2015-0111 TR-2015-0111 BARRIER ENGINEERED QUANTUM DOT INFRARED PHOTODETECTORS Sanjay Krishna Center for High Technology...2011 – 22 May 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Barrier Engineered Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetectors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-12-1-0336 5b. GRANT...is Unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT To investigate barrier engineered designs to reduce the dark current in quantum dot infrared

  8. Today's DOT and the quest for more accountable organizational structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    This study investigates the impact of DOT organizational structures on effective transportation planning and performance. A review of the 50 state DOT authorizing statutes and DOT organizational charts found minimal differences in organizational stru...

  9. Gorlin‑Goltz Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder.[1] It is characterized by basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs), palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri.[2] It was first reported by Jarisch and White in 1894. Ljubenovi.

  10. Spin Switching via Quantum Dot Spin Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergs, N. M.; Bender, S. A.; Duine, R. A.; Schuricht, D.

    2018-01-01

    We develop a theory for spin transport and magnetization dynamics in a quantum dot spin valve, i.e., two magnetic reservoirs coupled to a quantum dot. Our theory is able to take into account effects of strong correlations. We demonstrate that, as a result of these strong correlations, the dot gate voltage enables control over the current-induced torques on the magnets and, in particular, enables voltage-controlled magnetic switching. The electrical resistance of the structure can be used to read out the magnetic state. Our model may be realized by a number of experimental systems, including magnetic scanning-tunneling microscope tips and artificial quantum dot systems.

  11. Quantum dots for quantum information technologies

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book highlights the most recent developments in quantum dot spin physics and the generation of deterministic superior non-classical light states with quantum dots. In particular, it addresses single quantum dot spin manipulation, spin-photon entanglement and the generation of single-photon and entangled photon pair states with nearly ideal properties. The role of semiconductor microcavities, nanophotonic interfaces as well as quantum photonic integrated circuits is emphasized. The latest theoretical and experimental studies of phonon-dressed light matter interaction, single-dot lasing and resonance fluorescence in QD cavity systems are also provided. The book is written by the leading experts in the field.

  12. Preparation of tin oxide quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, N. F. S. M.; Kamarulzaman, N.; Kasim, M. F.; Chayed, N. F.; Aziz, N. D. A.

    2017-09-01

    Quantum dots are interesting nanostructures with have novel physical and chemical characteristics. It is not an easy task to obtain quantum dots because materials tend to agglomerate. In this work, SnO2 quantum dots have been successfully synthesized via a simple and low cost method which is the sol-gel method. Thermal analysis of the precursors were carried out using a Simultaneous Thermogravimetric Analyzer (STA). The annealed samples were characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) for phase studies. Finally, the crystallite size and morphology of tin oxide quantum dots were determined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM).

  13. POLARON IN CYLINDRICAL AND SPHERICAL QUANTUM DOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C.Fai

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polaron states in cylindrical and spherical quantum dots with parabolic confinement potentials are investigated applying the Feynman variational principle. It is observed that for both kinds of quantum dots the polaron energy and mass increase with the increase of Frohlich electron-phonon coupling constant and confinement frequency. In the case of a spherical quantum dot, the polaron energy for the strong coupling is found to be greater than that of a cylindrical quantum dot. The energy and mass are found to be monotonically increasing functions of the coupling constant and the confinement frequency.

  14. Transmission and scarring in graphene quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Liang; Lai Yingcheng; Ferry, David K; Akis, Richard; Goodnick, Stephen M [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2009-08-26

    We study electronic transport in quantum-dot structures made of graphene. Focusing on the rectangular dot geometry and utilizing the non-equilibrium Green's function to calculate the transmission in the tight-binding framework, we find significant fluctuations in the transmission as a function of the electron energy. The fluctuations are correlated with the formation of quantum scarring states, or pointer states in the dot. Both enhancement and suppression of transmission have been observed. As the size of the quantum dot is increased, more scarring states can be formed, leading to stronger transmission or conductance fluctuations.

  15. Mixed-quantum-dot solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenyu; Fan, James Z; Proppe, Andrew H; Arquer, F Pelayo García de; Rossouw, David; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Lan, Xinzheng; Liu, Min; Walters, Grant; Quintero-Bermudez, Rafael; Sun, Bin; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Botton, Gianluigi A; Kelley, Shana O; Sargent, Edward H

    2017-11-06

    Colloidal quantum dots are emerging solution-processed materials for large-scale and low-cost photovoltaics. The recent advent of quantum dot inks has overcome the prior need for solid-state exchanges that previously added cost, complexity, and morphological disruption to the quantum dot solid. Unfortunately, these inks remain limited by the photocarrier diffusion length. Here we devise a strategy based on n- and p-type ligands that judiciously shifts the quantum dot band alignment. It leads to ink-based materials that retain the independent surface functionalization of quantum dots, and it creates distinguishable donor and acceptor domains for bulk heterojunctions. Interdot carrier transfer and exciton dissociation studies confirm efficient charge separation at the nanoscale interfaces between the two classes of quantum dots. We fabricate the first mixed-quantum-dot solar cells and achieve a power conversion of 10.4%, which surpasses the performance of previously reported bulk heterojunction quantum dot devices fully two-fold, indicating the potential of the mixed-quantum-dot approach.

  16. Quantum Dot Spectrum Converters for Enhanced High Efficiency Photovoltaics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research proposes to enhance solar cell efficiency, radiation resistance and affordability. The Quantum Dot Spectrum Converter (QDSC) disperses quantum dots...

  17. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots for "green" Quantum Dot Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Sun, Pengfei; Cong, Shan; Wu, Jiang; Gao, Lijun; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Yi, Qinghua; Zou, Guifu

    2016-12-01

    Considering the environment protection, "green" materials are increasingly explored for photovoltaics. Here, we developed a kind of quantum dots solar cell based on nitrogen-doped carbon dots. The nitrogen-doped carbon dots were prepared by direct pyrolysis of citric acid and ammonia. The nitrogen-doped carbon dots' excitonic absorption depends on the N-doping content in the carbon dots. The N-doping can be readily modified by the mass ratio of reactants. The constructed "green" nitrogen-doped carbon dots solar cell achieves the best power conversion efficiency of 0.79 % under AM 1.5 G one full sun illumination, which is the highest efficiency for carbon dot-based solar cells.

  18. Building Magnetic Fields in White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    white dwarf forms a solid, oxygen-rich core with a liquid, carbon-rich mantle thats Rayleigh-Taylor unstable: as crystallization continues, the solids continue to sink out of the mantle.By analytically modeling this process, Isern and collaborators demonstrate that the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the convective mantle can drive a dynamo large enough to generate the magnetic field strengths weve observed in white dwarfs.Magnetic field density as a function of the dynamo energy density. The plots show Earth and Jupiter (black dots), T Tauri stars (cyan), M dwarf stars (magenta), and two types of white dwarfs (blue and red). Do these lie on the same scaling relation? [Isern et al. 2017]A Universal Process?This setup the solid core with an unstable liquid mantle on top is exactly the structure expected to occur in planets such as Earth and Jupiter. These planets magnetic fields are similarly thought to be generated by convective dynamos powered by the cooling and chemical separation of their interiors and the process can also be scaled up to account for the magnetic fields of fully convective objects like T Tauri stars, as well.If white-dwarf magnetic fields are generated by the same type of dynamo, this may be a universal process for creating magnetic fields in astrophysical objects though other processes may well be at work too.CitationJordi Isern et al 2017 ApJL 836 L28. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa5eae

  19. Adiabatic pumping through interacting quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Splettstoesser, Janine; Governale, Michele; König, Jürgen; Fazio, Rosario

    2005-01-01

    We present a general formalism to study adiabatic pumping through interacting quantum dots. We derive a formula that relates the pumped charge to the local, instantaneous Green function of the dot. This formula is then applied to the infinite-U Anderson model both for weak and strong tunnel-coupling strengths.

  20. Semiconductor quantum-dot lasers and amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Borri, Paola; Ledentsov, N. N.

    2002-01-01

    We have produced GaAs-based quantum-dot edge-emitting lasers operating at 1.16 mu m with record-low transparency current, high output power, and high internal quantum efficiencies. We have also realized GaAs-based quantum-dot lasers emitting at 1.3 mu m, both high-power edge emitters and low...

  1. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A [Los Alamos, NM; Chen, Yongfen [Eugene, OR; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos, NM; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos, NM; Vela, Javier [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  2. Optical Properties of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perinetti, U.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents different optical experiments performed on semiconductor quantum dots. These structures allow to confine a small number of electrons and holes to a tiny region of space, some nm across. The aim of this work was to study the basic properties of different types of quantum dots

  3. Quantum Dots Coupled to a Superconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellinggaard, Anders Robert

    are tuned electrostatically. This includes tuning the odd occupation of the dot through a quantum phase transition, where it forms a singlet with excitations in the superconductor. We detail the fabrication of these bottom gated devices, which additionally feature ancillary sensor dots connected...

  4. Effect of temperature on quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MAHDI AHMADI BORJI

    2017-07-12

    Jul 12, 2017 ... applications. Quantum dot semiconductor lasers, due to the discrete density of states, low threshold current and temperature dependence, high optical gain and quan- tum efficiency and high modulation speed, ... elastic properties of neighbour materials, lattice mis- match, and geometry of the quantum dot ...

  5. Surround-gated vertical nanowire quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Weert, M.H.M.; Den Heijer, M.; Van Kouwen, M.P.; Algra, R.E.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Zwiller, V.

    2010-01-01

    We report voltage dependent photoluminescence experiments on single indium arsenide phosphide (InAsP) quantum dots embedded in vertical surround-gated indium phosphide (InP) nanowires. We show that by tuning the gate voltage, we can access different quantum dot charge states. We study the

  6. Optical studies of capped quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuister, S.F.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis and spectroscopy of CdSe and CdTe semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The first chapter gives an introduction into the unique size dependent properties of semiconductor quantum dots. Highly luminescent QDs of CdSe and CdTe were prepared via a high temperature method

  7. Many electron effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 26; Issue 1. Many electron effects in ... Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) exhibit shell structures, very similar to atoms. Termed as 'artificial atoms' by some, ... Our calculations have been performed in a three-dimensional quantum dot. We have carried out a study of ...

  8. Coherent control of quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Lodahl, Peter; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the use of semiconductor quantum dotsystems as building blocks for solid-state-based quantum logic devices. One importantparameter for such devices is the coherence time, which determines the number ofpossible quantum operations. From earlier...... measurements the coherence time of the selfassembledquantum dots (QDs) has been reported to be limited by the spontaneousemission rate at cryogenic temperatures1.In this project we propose to alter the coherence time of QDs by taking advantage of arecent technique on modifying spontaneous emission rates...

  9. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Mintzer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications.

  10. Exciton in closed and opened quantum dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V.Tkach

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of exciton spectrum in spherically symmetric states for the three- shell closed spherical quantum dot is proposed. The evolution of the exciton spectrum while varying the outer well thickness from zero (stationary spectrum of single closed spherical quantum dot to infinity (quasistationary spectrum of a single open spherical quantum dot is investigated. The mechanism of damping (semiwidth of quasistationary states due to the redistribution over the energy levels of probability of exciton location in the space of two inner shells of nanosystem is studied. It is shown that the three shell closed spherical quantum dot of a rather big thickness of the outer well quite sufficiently and exactly reflects the basic properties of the quasistationary exciton spectrum in a single open spherical quantum dot.

  11. Biocompatible Quantum Dots for Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Sandra J.; Chang, Jerry C.; Kovtun, Oleg; McBride, James R.; Tomlinson, Ian D.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are quickly becoming a critical diagnostic tool for discerning cellular function at the molecular level. Their high brightness, long-lasting, sizetunable, and narrow luminescence set them apart from conventional fluorescence dyes. Quantum dots are being developed for a variety of biologically oriented applications, including fluorescent assays for drug discovery, disease detection, single protein tracking, and intracellular reporting. This review introduces the science behind quantum dots and describes how they are made biologically compatible. Several applications are also included, illustrating strategies toward target specificity, and are followed by a discussion on the limitations of quantum dot approaches. The article is concluded with a look at the future direction of quantum dots. PMID:21276935

  12. Biocompatible quantum dots for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Sandra J; Chang, Jerry C; Kovtun, Oleg; McBride, James R; Tomlinson, Ian D

    2011-01-28

    Semiconductor quantum dots are quickly becoming a critical diagnostic tool for discerning cellular function at the molecular level. Their high brightness, long-lasting, size-tunable, and narrow luminescence set them apart from conventional fluorescence dyes. Quantum dots are being developed for a variety of biologically oriented applications, including fluorescent assays for drug discovery, disease detection, single protein tracking, and intracellular reporting. This review introduces the science behind quantum dots and describes how they are made biologically compatible. Several applications are also included, illustrating strategies toward target specificity, and are followed by a discussion on the limitations of quantum dot approaches. The article is concluded with a look at the future direction of quantum dots. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hole spin relaxation in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, L. M.; Reinecke, T. L.; Kotlyar, R.

    2004-03-01

    We present results for relaxation of the spin of a hole in a cylindrical quantum dot due to acoustic phonon assisted spin flips at low temperatures with an applied magnetic field. The hole dispersion is calculated by numerical diagonalization of the Luttinger Hamiltonian and applying perturbation theory with respect to the magnetic field, and the hole-phonon coupling is described by the Bir-Pikus Hamiltonian. We find that the decoherence time for hole spins for dots ≲20 nm is on the order of 10-8 s. This is several orders smaller than the decoherence time due to phonon assisted processes for electron spins in similar dots and is comparable to the total decoherence time of an electron spin in a quantum dot, which is controlled by the hyperfine interaction with nuclei. We obtain the dependence of the relaxation rate of the hole spin on dot size and hole mass.

  14. Characteristics of sites and trees affected by rapid white oak mortality as reported by forestry professionals in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon E. Reed; James T. English; Rose-Marie Muzika; John M. Kabrick; Simeon. Wright

    2017-01-01

    A new syndrome was named rapid white oak mortality in 2011 to describe the rapid death of white oak trees (Quercus alba L.) within one growing season. A survey with 24 questions about stand and site characteristics, site history, and symptoms was distributed to forestry professionals to gather information about the new syndrome. Sixty-three reports...

  15. Stark shift of impurity doped quantum dots: Role of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Sk. Md.; Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Anuja; Ghosh, Manas

    2018-02-01

    Present study makes a punctilious investigation of the profiles of Stark shift (SS) of doped GaAs quantum dot (QD) under the supervision of Gaussian white noise. A few physical parameters have been varied and the consequent variations in the SS profiles have been monitored. The said physical parameters comprise of magnetic field, confinement potential, dopant location, dopant potential, noise strength, aluminium concentration (only for AlxGa1-x As alloy QD), position-dependent effective mass (PDEM), position-dependent dielectric screening function (PDDSF), anisotropy, hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature. The SS profiles unfurl interesting features that heavily depend upon the particular physical quantity concerned, presence/absence of noise and the manner (additive/multiplicative) noise enters the system. The study highlights feasible means of maximizing SS of doped QD in presence of noise by suitable adjustment of several control parameters. The study deems importance in view of technological applications of QD devices where noise plays some prominent role.

  16. Rapid Rotation of a Heavy White Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    New Kepler observations of a pulsating white dwarf have revealed clues about the rotation of intermediate-mass stars.Learning About ProgenitorsStars weighing in at under 8 solar masses generally end their lives as slowly cooling white dwarfs. By studying the rotation of white dwarfs, therefore, we are able to learn about the final stages of angular momentum evolution in these progenitor stars.Most isolated field white dwarfs cluster in mass around 0.62 solar masses, which corresponds to a progenitor mass of around 2.2 solar masses. This abundance means that weve already learned a good deal about the final rotation of low-mass (13 solar-mass) stars. Our knowledge about the angular momentum of intermediate-mass (38 solar-mass) stars, on the other hand, remains fairly limited.Fourier transform of the pulsations from SDSSJ0837+1856. The six frequencies of stellar variability, marked with red dots, reveal a rotation period of 1.13 hours. [Hermes et al. 2017]Record-Breaking FindA newly discovered white dwarf, SDSSJ0837+1856, is now helping to shed light on this mass range. SDSSJ0837+1856 appears to be unusually massive: its measured at 0.87 solar masses, which corresponds to a progenitor mass of roughly 4.0 solar masses. Determining the rotation of this white dwarf would therefore tell us about the final stages of angular momentum in an intermediate-mass star.In a new study led by J.J. Hermes (Hubble Fellow at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), a team of scientists presents a series of measurements of SDSSJ0837+1856 that suggest its the highest-mass and fastest-rotating isolated pulsating white dwarf known.Histogram of rotation rates determined from the asteroseismology of pulsating white dwarfs (marked in red). SDSSJ0837+1856 (indicated in black) is more massive and rotates faster than any other known pulsating white dwarf. [Hermes et al. 2017]Rotation from PulsationsWhy pulsating? In the absence of measurable spots and other surface features, the way we

  17. Constraining the neutrino magnetic dipole moment from white dwarf pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córsico, A. H.; Althaus, L. G.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Kepler, S. O.; García-Berro, E.

    2014-08-01

    Pulsating white dwarf stars can be used as astrophysical laboratories to constrain the properties of weakly interacting particles. Comparing the cooling rates of these stars with the expected values from theoretical models allows us to search for additional sources of cooling due to the emission of axions, neutralinos, or neutrinos with magnetic dipole moment. In this work, we derive an upper bound to the neutrino magnetic dipole moment (μν) using an estimate of the rate of period change of the pulsating DB white dwarf star PG 1351+489. We employ state-of-the-art evolutionary and pulsational codes which allow us to perform a detailed asteroseismological period fit based on fully DB white dwarf evolutionary sequences. Plasmon neutrino emission is the dominant cooling mechanism for this class of hot pulsating white dwarfs, and so it is the main contributor to the rate of change of period with time (Pi dot) for the DBV class. Thus, the inclusion of an anomalous neutrino emission through a non-vanishing magnetic dipole moment in these sequences notably influences the evolutionary timescales, and also the expected pulsational properties of the DBV stars. By comparing the theoretical Pi dot value with the rate of change of period with time of PG 1351+489, we assess the possible existence of additional cooling by neutrinos with magnetic dipole moment. Our models suggest the existence of some additional cooling in this pulsating DB white dwarf, consistent with a non-zero magnetic dipole moment with an upper limit of μν lesssim 10-11 μB. This bound is somewhat less restrictive than, but still compatible with, other limits inferred from the white dwarf luminosity function or from the color-magnitude diagram of the Globular cluster M5. Further improvements of the measurement of the rate of period change of the dominant pulsation mode of PG 1351+489 will be necessary to confirm our bound.

  18. Electron transport in quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    When I was contacted by Kluwer Academic Publishers in the Fall of 200 I, inviting me to edit a volume of papers on the issue of electron transport in quantum dots, I was excited by what I saw as an ideal opportunity to provide an overview of a field of research that has made significant contributions in recent years, both to our understanding of fundamental physics, and to the development of novel nanoelectronic technologies. The need for such a volume seemed to be made more pressing by the fact that few comprehensive reviews of this topic have appeared in the literature, in spite of the vast activity in this area over the course of the last decade or so. With this motivation, I set out to try to compile a volume that would fairly reflect the wide range of opinions that has emerged in the study of electron transport in quantum dots. Indeed, there has been no effort on my part to ensure any consistency between the different chapters, since I would prefer that this volume instead serve as a useful forum for the...

  19. Quantum dots: lasers and amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Bimberg, D

    2003-01-01

    Continuous wave room-temperature output power of approx 3 W for edge emitters and of 1.2 mW for vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers is realized for GaAs-based devices using InAs quantum dots (QDs) operating at 1.3 mu m. Characteristic temperatures up to 170 K below 330 K are realized. Simultaneously, differential efficiency exceeds 80% for these devices. Lasers emitting up to 12 W at 1140-1160 nm are useful as pump sources for Tm sup 3 sup + -doped fibres for frequency up-conversion to 470 nm. Both types of lasers show transparency current densities of 6 A cm sup - sup 2 per dot layer, eta sub i sub n sub t = 98% and alpha sub i around 1.5 cm sup - sup 1. Long operation lifetimes (above 3000 h at 50 deg C heatsink temperature at 1.5 W CW) and improved radiation hardness as compared to quantum well (QW) devices are manifested. Cut-off frequencies of about 10 GHz at 1100 nm and 6 GHz at 1300 nm and low alpha factors resulting in reduced filamentation and improved M sup 2 values in single-mode operation are ...

  20. Peptide dot immunoassay and immunoblotting: electroblotting from aluminum thin-layer chromatography plates and isoelectric focusing gels to activated nitrocellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, O.J.; Holm, A.; Lauritzen, Edgar

    1993-01-01

    Peptide dot immunoassay, electroblotting, activated nitrocellulose, dot blot, membranes, peptides and proteins......Peptide dot immunoassay, electroblotting, activated nitrocellulose, dot blot, membranes, peptides and proteins...

  1. Photoluminescent (PL) or electroluminescent (EL) quantum dots for display, lighting, and photomedicine (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yajie

    2017-02-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have gone through a long journey before finding their ways into the display field. This talk will briefly touch on the history before trying to answer several key questions related to QDs applications in display: What are QDs? How are they made? What properties do they have and Why? How can these properties be used to improve color and efficiency of display, in either photoluminescence (PL) or electroluminescence (EL) mode? And what are the remaining challenges for QDs wide adoption in display industry? Lastly, some most recent progresses in our UCF lab at both PL and EL fronts will be highlighted. For PL, a cadmium-free perovskite-polymer composite films with exceptionally narrow emission green peaks (FWHM 20 nm) and good water and thermal stability will be reported. Together with red quantum dots or PFS/KSF phosphors as down-converters for blue LEDs, a white-light source with 95% Rec. 2020 color gamut was demonstrated [1]. For EL, red quantum dot light emitting devices (QLEDs) with record luminance of 165,000 Cd/m2 has been obtained at a current density of 1000 mA/cm2 with a low driving voltage of 5.8 V and CIE coordinates of (0.69, 0.31). [2] The potential of using these QLEDs for light sources for integrated sensing platform [3] or high efficiency, high color quality hybrid white OLED [4] will be discussed. [1] Y. N. Wang, J. He, H. Chen, J. S. Chen, R. D. Zhu, P. Ma, A. Towers, Y. Lin, A. J. Gesquiere, S. T. Wu, Y. J. Dong. Ultrastable, Highly Luminescent Organic-Inorganic Perovskite - Polymer Composite Films, Advanced Materials, accepted, (2016). [2] Y. J. Dong, J.M. Caruge, Z. Q. Zhou, C. Hamilton, Z. Popovic, J. Ho, M. Stevenson, G. Liu, V. Bulovic, M. Bawendi, P. T. Kazlas, S. Coe-Sullivan, and J. Steckel Ultra-bright, Highly Efficient, Low Roll-off Inverted Quantum-Dot Light Emitting Devices (QLEDs). SID Symp. Dig. Tech. Pap. 46, 270-273 (2015). [3] J. He, H. Chen, S. T. Wu, and Y. J. Dong, Integrated Sensing Platform Based on Quantum

  2. Plummer-Vinson syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novacek Gottfried

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plummer-Vinson or Paterson-Kelly syndrome presents as a classical triad of dysphagia, iron-deficiency anemia and esophageal webs. Exact data about epidemiology of the syndrome are not available; the syndrome is extremely rare. Most of the patients are white middle-aged women, in the fourth to seventh decade of life but the syndrome has also been described in children and adolescents. The dysphagia is usually painless and intermittent or progressive over years, limited to solids and sometimes associated with weight loss. Symptoms resulting from anemia (weakness, pallor, fatigue, tachycardia may dominate the clinical picture. Additional features are glossitis, angular cheilitis and koilonychia. Enlargement of the spleen and thyroid may also be observed. One of the most important clinical aspects of Plummer-Vinson syndrome is the association with upper alimentary tract cancers. Etiopathogenesis of Plummer-Vinson syndrome is unknown. The most important possible etiological factor is iron deficiency. Other possible factors include malnutrition, genetic predisposition or autoimmune processes. Plummer-Vinson syndrome can be treated effectively with iron supplementation and mechanical dilation. In case of significant obstruction of the esophageal lumen by esophageal web and persistent dysphagia despite iron supplementation, rupture and dilation of the web are necessary. Since Plummer-Vinson syndrome is associated with an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx and the esophagus, the patients should be followed closely.

  3. Inter-dot coupling effects on transport through correlated parallel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transport through symmetric parallel coupled quantum dot system has been studied, using non-equilibrium Green function formalism. The inter-dot tunnelling with on-dot and inter-dot Coulomb repulsion is included. The transmission coefficient and Landaur–Buttiker like current formula are shown in terms of internal states ...

  4. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... called exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, ...

  5. Quantum dots with single-atom precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fölsch, Stefan; Martínez-Blanco, Jesús; Yang, Jianshu; Kanisawa, Kiyoshi; Erwin, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Quantum dots are often called artificial atoms because, like real atoms, they confine electrons to quantized states with discrete energies. However, although real atoms are identical, most quantum dots comprise hundreds or thousands of atoms, with inevitable variations in size and shape and, consequently, unavoidable variability in their wavefunctions and energies. Electrostatic gates can be used to mitigate these variations by adjusting the electron energy levels, but the more ambitious goal of creating quantum dots with intrinsically digital fidelity by eliminating statistical variations in their size, shape and arrangement remains elusive. We used a scanning tunnelling microscope to create quantum dots with identical, deterministic sizes. By using the lattice of a reconstructed semiconductor surface to fix the position of each atom, we controlled the shape and location of the dots with effectively zero error. This allowed us to construct quantum dot molecules whose coupling has no intrinsic variation but could nonetheless be tuned with arbitrary precision over a wide range. Digital fidelity opens the door to quantum dot architectures free of intrinsic broadening-an important goal for technologies from nanophotonics to quantum information processing as well as for fundamental studies of confined electrons.

  6. Investigation on DOT guided FMT: Whether the FMT image quality is robust to the priori DOT information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daifa; Bai, Jing

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) image quality could be improved significantly with reconstructed optical properties using diffuse optical tomography (DOT). However, different DOT algorithms and different constraint parameters usually lead to DOT images of obvious different image quality. In this paper, simulation experiment results demonstrate that the FMT image quality is robust to the great variation in DOT image quality.

  7. X-H{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}{pi} and X-H{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}N hydrogen bonds - Acetylene and hydrogen cyanide as proton acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domagala, Malgorzata, E-mail: mdomagala@uni.lodz.pl [Department of Chemistry, University of Lodz, ul.Pomorska 149/153, 90-236 Lodz (Poland); Grabowski, Slawomir J., E-mail: slagra@uni.lodz.pl [Department of Chemistry, University of Lodz, ul.Pomorska 149/153, 90-236 Lodz (Poland)

    2009-09-18

    The hydrogen-bonded systems were considered where acetylene or hydrogen cyanide acts as a proton acceptor and different proton donating molecules are taken into account. The B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and MP2/6-311++G(d,p) calculations were performed for the systems considered; for HCN{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}HF and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot}HF complexes various levels of approximation were applied up to CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd)//CCSD/6-311++G(3df,3pd). The Quantum Theory of 'Atoms in Molecules' (QTAIM) was also applied. It was found that {pi}-electrons of acetylene might act as the proton accepting centers and the found complex conformations are T-shaped ones. For hydrogen cyanide molecule the nitrogen atom acts as the proton acceptor center but not {pi}-electrons. The characteristics of the bond critical points were also considered for the analyzed interactions and numerous correlations were found between geometrical, energetic and QTAIM parameters. The decomposition of the interaction energy for the systems analyzed was also applied.

  8. Moment of inertia in elliptical quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Llorenç; Puente, Antonio; Lipparini, Enrico

    The moment of inertia of deformed quantum dots and its experimental relevance in relation to the dot spectroscopic features is theoretically investigated. A strong link to the low-energy orbital current mode that manifests in the magnetic dipole (M1) spectrum is stressed. The moment of inertia is obtained by solving the cranked Kohn-Sham equations within the local-spin-density approximation and the results discussed in comparison with the predictions of an analytical non-interacting model. The results as a function of deformation and size indicate that the existence of spin transitions in the dot ground state has an important effect on the moment of inertia.

  9. Odd triplet superconductivity in ultrasmall quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Stephan; Koenig, Juergen [Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen and CENIDE (Germany); Sothmann, Bjoern [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We report on the possibility to create odd frequency Cooper pairs in proximized interacting quantum dots attached to ferromagnetic leads. Spin blockade effects together with induced superconductivity allow electron pairs with same spin at different times to carry superconducting correlations. Besides the conventional finite singlet pairing amplitude on the dot, only odd frequency triplet pairing is possible here. This is in contrast to the double dot case. We demonstrate how the order parameter for odd-frequency triplet pairing as well as the differential Andreev conductance are influenced when tuning gate and/or bias voltages, the angle of magnetizations of the leads and the coupling to the nearby superconductor.

  10. Excitonic quasimolecules in nanosystems of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokutnyi, Sergey I.

    2017-09-01

    The theory of excitonic quasimolecules (biexcitons) (formed of spatially separated electrons and holes) in a nanosystem that consists of semiconductor quantum dots synthesized in a borosilicate glass matrix is presented. It is shown that exciton quasimolecule formation is of a threshold character and is possible in nanosystem, if the spacing between the quantum dots surfaces is larger than a certain critical spacing. It was found that the binding energy of the singlet ground state of an exciton quasimolecule, consisting of two semiconductor quantum dots is a significant large values, larger than the binding energy of the biexciton in a semiconductor single crystal by almost two orders of magnitude.

  11. Fluorescent Quantum Dots for Biological Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Gene; Nadeau, Jay; Nealson, Kenneth; Storrie-Lomardi, Michael; Bhartia, Rohit

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots that can serve as "on/off" labels for bacteria and other living cells are undergoing development. The "on/off" characterization of these quantum dots refers to the fact that, when properly designed and manufactured, they do not fluoresce until and unless they come into contact with viable cells of biological species that one seeks to detect. In comparison with prior fluorescence-based means of detecting biological species, fluorescent quantum dots show promise for greater speed, less complexity, greater sensitivity, and greater selectivity for species of interest. There are numerous potential applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and detection of bioterrorism.

  12. Sailing to White Boat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This is a composite red-green-blue image of the rock called White Boat. It is the first rock target that Spirit drove to after finishing a series of investigations on the rock Adirondack. White Boat stood out to scientists due to its light color and more tabular shape compared to the dark, rounded rocks that surround it.

  13. Creating White Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLisky, Claire Louise; Carey, Jane

    Vedtagelsen af White Australien som regeringens politik i 1901 viser, at hvidheden var afgørende for den måde, hvorpå den nye nation i Australien blev konstitueret. Og alligevel har historikere i vid udstrækning overset hvidhed i deres studier af Australiens race fortid. 'Creating White Australia...

  14. White Teachers Talking Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, Avner; Garrett, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the increasing racial diversity in American schools and the consistently homogenous teacher workforce in the United States, understanding the ways white teachers consider and attend to racial issues is of crucial importance to the educational landscape. This paper, based on a qualitative study, explores five white American teachers'…

  15. Analysis list: DOT1L [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DOT1L Pluripotent stem cell + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/DOT1...L.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/DOT1L.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosc...iencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/DOT1L.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/DOT1L.Plu

  16. Parallel carbon nanotube quantum dots and their interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Goss K.; Leijnse M.; Smerat S.; Wegewijs M.R.; Schneider C.M.; Meyer C

    2012-01-01

    We present quantum transport measurements of interacting parallel quantum dots formed in the strands of a carbon nanotube rope. In this molecular quantum dot system, transport is dominated by one quantum dot, while additional resonances from parallel side dots appear, which exhibit a weak gate coupling. This differential gating effect provides a tunability of the quantum dot system with only one gate electrode and provides control over the carbon nanotube strand that carries the current. By t...

  17. Scanning gate microscopy of ultra clean carbon nanotube quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Jiamin; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; LeRoy, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    We perform scanning gate microscopy on individual suspended carbon nanotube quantum dots. The size and position of the quantum dots can be visually identified from the concentric high conductance rings. For the ultra clean devices used in this study, two new effects are clearly identified. Electrostatic screening creates non-overlapping multiple sets of Coulomb rings from a single quantum dot. In double quantum dots, by changing the tip voltage, the interactions between the quantum dots can b...

  18. Formations of magnetic vortices in a chain array of triangle Py dots and an isosceles triangle Py dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, M.; Kiseki, K.; Yakata, S.; Wada, H.; Kimura, T.

    2012-04-01

    We have studied the magnetic domain structures in a magneto-statically-coupled chain array of the triangle dots and an isosceles triangle dot by means of magnetic force microscopy (MFM). Despite the strong magneto-static interaction in the chain array of the dots, each triangle dot takes a single vortex structure. The chirality of each dot is found to behave similarly to that for the isolated triangle dot. We also demonstrated that single-vortex and double-vortex structures with the desired chiralities can be stabilized in an isosceles triangle dot.

  19. SPECTRAL-LUMINESCENT CHARACTERISTICS OF FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES ACTIVATED WITH MANGANESE AND CADMIUM SULPHIDE QUANTUM DOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna O. Lipatova

    2014-11-01

    glasses doped with manganese and CdS quantum dots are perspective materials for phosphors in white LEDs.

  20. Thermoelectric transport through quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merker, Lukas Heinrich

    2016-06-30

    In this thesis the thermoelectric properties (electrical conductance, Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductance)of quantum dots described by the Anderson impurity model have been investigated by using the numerical renormalization group (NRG) method. In order to make accurate calculations for thermoelectric properties of quantum impurity systems, a number of recent developments and refinements of the NRG have been implemented. These include the z-averaging and Campo discretization scheme, which enable the evaluation of physical quantities on an arbitrary temperature grid and at large discretization parameter Λ and the full density matrix (FDM) approach, which allows a more accurate calculation of spectral functions and transport coefficients. The implementation of the z-averaging and Campo discretization scheme has been tested within a new method for specific heats of quantum impurities. The accuracy of this new method was established by comparison with the numerical solution of the Bethe-ansatz equations for the Anderson model. The FDM approach was implemented and tested within a new approach to the calculation of impurity contributions to the uniform susceptibilities. Within this method a non-negligible contribution from the ''environmental'' degrees of freedom needs to be taken into account to recover the correct susceptibility, as shown by comparison with the Bethe-ansatz approach. An accurate method to calculate the conductance of a quantum dot is implemented, enabling the extraction of the Fermi liquid scaling coefficients c{sub T} and c{sub B} to high accuracy, being able to verify the results of the renormalized super perturbation theory approach (within its regime of validity). The method was generalized to higher order moments of the local level spectral function. This, as well as reduction of the SU(2) code to the U(1) symmetry, enabled the investigation of the effect of a magnetic field on the thermoelectric properties of quantum