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Sample records for whisker-reinforced dental composites

  1. Inorganic-whisker-reinforced polymer composites synthesis, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Qiuju

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic-Whisker-Reinforced Polymer Composites: Synthesis, Properties and Applications gives a comprehensive presentation of inorganic microcrystalline fibers, or whiskers, a polymer composite filler. It covers whisker synthesis, surface modification, applications for reinforcing polymer-matrix composites, and analysis of resulting filled polymer composites. It focuses on calcium carbonate whiskers as a primary case study, introducing surface treatment methods for calcium carbonate whiskers and factors that influence them. Along with calcium carbonate, the book discusses potassium titanate and aluminum borate whiskers, which also comprise the new generation of inorganic whiskers. According to research results, composites filled by inorganic whiskers show improved strength, wear-resistance, thermal conductivity, and antistatic properties. It explains the importance of modifying polymer materials for use with inorganic whiskers and describes preparation and evaluation methods of polymers filled with inorganic ...

  2. Investigation into ramie whisker reinforced arylated soy protein composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available isolate (SPI). Thiodiglycol was used as a plasticizer for the preparation of SW composites. The SW composites were arylated with 2,2-diphenyl-2-hydroxyethanoic acid through the process of “dip-coating” and coded as SW-B. In this paper, the characterization...

  3. Silicon carbide whisker reinforced composites and method for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-02-09

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of ceramic composites which possess improved mechanical properties, especially increased fracture toughness. In the formation of these ceramic composites, the single-crystal SiC whiskers are mixed with fine ceramic powders of a ceramic material such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, mullite, or B/sub 4/C. The mixtures which contain a homogeneous dispersion of the SiC whiskers are hot pressed at pressures in a range of about 28 to 70 MPa and temperatures in the range of about 1600 to 1950/sup 0/C with pressing times varying from about 0.75 to 2.5 hours. The resulting ceramic composites show an increase in fracture toughness of up to about 9 MPa.m/sup 1/2/ which represents as much as a two-fold increase over that of the matrix material.

  4. Preparation of mullite whiskers reinforced SiC/Al2O3 composites by microwave sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mullite whiskers reinforced SiC/Al2O3 composites were prepared by microwave sintering in a microwave chamber with TE666 resonant mode. Original SiC particles were coated with SiO2 using sol-gel processing and mixed with Al2O3 particles. Mullite was formed in the reaction between SiO2 and Al2O3. The isostatically pressed cylindrical pellets were sintered from 1350 °C to 1600 °C for 30 min. Physical and chemical responses were investigated by detecting changes in reflected power during the microwave sintering process. XRD was carried out to characterize the samples and showed that mullite could be formed at 1200 °C. Bridging of mullite whiskers between Al2O3 and SiC particles was observed by SEM and is due to a so-called local hot spot effect, which was the unique feature for microwave sintering. The optimized microwave sintering temperature was 1500 °C corresponding to the maximum amount of mullite whiskers within SiC/Al2O3 composites. The high electro-magnetic field enhanced the decomposition of mullite at higher temperatures above 1550 °C. The mechanical properties of mullite whiskers reinforced SiC/Al2O3 composites are much better than the SiC/Al2O3 composites without mullite whiskers.

  5. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the toughening behavior of whisker reinforcement in ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becher, P.F.; Hsueh, C.H.; Angelini, P.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical solutions are presented describing the experimentally verified toughening of whisker reinforced ceramics. Clear insights are provided into the interrelationships of whiskers, matrices, and interfaces in the case of strong interfaces with minimized whisker pullout

  6. Zirconia toughened SiC whisker reinforced alumina composites small business innovation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutfy, R. O.; Stuffle, K. L.; Withers, J. C.; Lee, C. T.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this phase 1 project was to develop a ceramic composite with superior fracture toughness and high strength, based on combining two toughness inducing materials: zirconia for transformation toughening and SiC whiskers for reinforcement, in a controlled microstructure alumina matrix. The controlled matrix microstructure is obtained by controlling the nucleation frequency of the alumina gel with seeds (submicron alpha-alumina). The results demonstrate the technical feasibility of producing superior binary composites (Al2O3-ZrO2) and tertiary composites (Al2O3-ZrO2-SiC). Thirty-two composites were prepared, consolidated, and fracture toughness tested. Statistical analysis of the results showed that: (1) the SiC type is the key statistically significant factor for increased toughness; (2) sol-gel processing with a-alumina seed had a statistically significant effect on increasing toughness of the binary and tertiary composites compared to the corresponding mixed powder processing; and (3) ZrO2 content within the range investigated had a minor effect. Binary composites with an average critical fracture toughness of 6.6MPam sup 1/2, were obtained. Tertiary composites with critical fracture toughness in the range of 9.3 to 10.1 MPam sup 1/2 were obtained. Results indicate that these composites are superior to zirconia toughened alumina and SiC whisker reinforced alumina ceramic composites produced by conventional techniques with similar composition from published data.

  7. High-temperature deformation of SiC-whisker-reinforced MgO-PSZ/mullite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthasarathy, T.A.; Hay, R.S.; Ruh, R.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of 33.5 vol% SiC whisker loading on high-temperature deformation of 1 wt% MgO-38.5 wt% zirconia-mullite composites was studied between 1,300 and 1,400 C. At strain rates of 10 -6 to 5 x 10 -4 /s the creep resistance of zirconia-mullite composites without SiC reinforcement was inferior to monolithic mullite of similar grain size. Analysis of the results suggested that the decreased creep resistance of mullite-zirconia composites compared to pure mullite could be at least partially explained by mechanical effects of the weaker zirconia phase, increased effective diffusivity of mullite by zirconia addition, and to the differences in mullite grain morphology. With SiC whisker reinforcement, the deformation rate at high stress was nearly the same as that of the unreinforced material, but at low stress the creep rates of the SiC-reinforced material were significantly lowered. The stress dependence of the creep rate of unreinforced material suggested that diffusional creep was the operative mechanism, while the reinforced material behaved as if a threshold stress for creep existed. The threshold stress could be rationalized based on a whisker network model. This was supported by data on other whisker-containing materials; however, the threshold stress had a temperature dependence that was orders of magnitude higher than the elastic constants, leaving the physical model incomplete. The effects of residual stresses and amorphous phases at whisker/matrix interfaces are invoked to help complete the physical model for creep threshold stress

  8. Microstructure and fracture in SiC whisker reinforced 2124 aluminum composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, T. G.; Raninen, R. A.; Chellman, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The microstructures of extruded and hot-rolled 2124 Al-15 percent (by weight) SiC whisker composites have been investigated, experimentally. Among the specific factors studied were: the strength of the whisker-matrix interfaces; (2) the presence of oxides; (3) the presence of defective whiskers; (4) and the presence of distribution of intermetallic compounds, impurities in the SiC(w) powder, and microstructural inhomogeneities. Modifications in the microstructure of the SiC/AL composites due to hot rolling and extrusion are illustrated in a series of microphotographs. It was found that hot rolling along the axis of extrusion was associated with some types of whisker damage, while the whiskers still retain their original orientation. Hot-rolling perpendicular to the axis of extrusion, however, tended to rotate the whiskers and produced a nearly isotropic material. Whisker free zones were virtually eliminated or reduced in size by hot rolling. In situ Auger fractography of the composite showed that the interfacial bonding between the SiC and the Al matrix was good and that Al2O2 had no significant influence on the fracture mechanics of the composite.

  9. Strain gradient plasticity effects in whisker-reinforced metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2002-01-01

    A metal reinforced by fibers in the micron range is studied using the strain gradient plasticity theory of Fleck and Hutchinson (2001). Cell-model analyzes are used to study the influence of the material length parameters numerically. Different higher order boundary conditions are considered...... at the fiber-matrix interface. The results are presented as overall stress-strain curves for the whisker-reinforced metal, and also contour plots of effective plastic strain are shown. The strain gradient plasticity theory predicts a significant stiffening effect when compared to conventional models...

  10. Fabrication of α-chitin whisker-reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) nanocomposite nanofibres by electrospinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkasem, Jirawut; Rujiravanit, Ratana; Supaphol, Pitt

    2006-01-01

    The present contribution reports, for the first time, the successful fabrication of α-chitin whisker-reinforced poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanocomposite nanofibres by electrospinning. The α-chitin whiskers were prepared from α-chitin flakes from shrimp shells by acid hydrolysis. The as-prepared chitin whiskers exhibited lengths in the range 231-969 nm and widths in the range 12-65 nm, with the average length and width being about 549 and 31 nm, respectively. Successful incorporation of the chitin whiskers within the as-spun PVA/chitin whisker nanocomposite nanofibres was verified by infrared spectroscopic and thermogravimetric methods. The incorporation of chitin whiskers within the as-spun nanocomposite fibre mats increased the Young's modulus by about 4-8 times over that of the neat as-spun PVA fibre mat

  11. Performance of Silicon carbide whisker reinforced ceramic inserts on Inconel 718 in end milling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, M M; Joshua, C X H

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation is planned in order to study the machinability of Inconel 718 with silicon carbide whisker reinforced ceramic inserts in end milling process. The relationship between the cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut against the response factors are studied to show the level of significance of each parameter. The cutting parameters are optimized by using Taguchi method. Implementing analysis of variance, the parameter which influences the surface roughness the most is determined to be the cutting speed, followed by the feed rate and depth of cut. Meanwhile, the optimal cutting condition is determined to have high cutting speed, low feed rate, and high depth of cut in the range of selected parameters. (paper)

  12. Radio-opaque dental compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temin, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    Thorium oxide or tantalum oxide, or combinations thereof are used as the x-ray material for radio-opaque filler compositions having particular applicability in dental restorative compositions. The filler compositions contain from about 3% by weight to about 10% by weight, based on the total filler composition, of the x-ray absorbing materials and the remainder being conventional particulate glass or silica, quarts or ceramic filler material. The radio opaque filler compositions are insoluble and non-leachable in alkaline, acidic or neutral aqueous environments, are essentially non-toxic, are either essentially colorless or translucent, and are compatible with acrylic monomers and other polymerizable binder systems

  13. Characterization of microstructure of Si3N4 whisker reinforced glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Byoung Sung; Choi, Shung Shaon

    1993-01-01

    Glass ceramics, especially fiber-reinforced composite ceramics, have attracted a great deal of attention in improving the reliability of ceramic components because of the improvement in various mechanical properties. Through hot-pressing and sintering, 225 cordierite was transformed with glass ceramic and mullite phase. Particularly glass glain size increased with the increasing of the sintering temperature and the heat treatment enhance the toughness and hardness of materials. Like the increased sintering temperature, the roughness increased with increasing whisker vol.%. In case of whisker-rinforced glass ceramic, the fracture surface of samples has been associated with a whisker orientation of samples. (Author)

  14. Nonlocal plasticity effects on fibre debonding in a whisker-reinforced metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2002-01-01

    Numerical cell-model analyses for the matrix-fibre debonding in a metal matrix composite are used to study the effect of a characteristic material length in the plasticity description of the matrix material deformations. Characteristic material lengths are already present in the model problem...... in the problem. The nonlocal plasticity effect tends to increase the stress level at a given overall strain, which clearly tends to promote the onset of debonding......., in the form of fibre sizes and the length associated with the debonding process, so the nonlocal plasticity model brings in an additional material length. The analyses for metal reinforced by aligned short fibres are used to obtain an understanding of the interaction of the different length scales...

  15. Synthesis and characterization of dental composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djustiana, Nina; Greviana, Nadia; Faza, Yanwar; Sunarso

    2018-02-01

    During the last few decades, the increasing demands in esthetic dentistry have led to the development of dental composites material that provide similar appearance to the natural teeth. Recently, esthetic trend was an issue which increase the demand for teeth restorations that is similar with the origin. The esthetics of dental composite are more superior compared to amalgam, since its color look similar with natural teeth. Various dental composites have been developed using many type of fillers such as amorphous silica, quartz), borosilicate, Li-Sr-Ba-Al glass and oxide: zirconia and alumina. Researchers in Faculty of Dentistry University of Padjadjaran have prepared dental composites using zirconia-alumina-silica (ZAS) system as the filler. The aim is to improve the mechanical properties and the esthetic of the dental composites. The ZAS was obtained from chemical grade purity chemicals and Indonesia's natural sand as precursors its characterization were also presented. This novel method covers the procedure to synthesis and characterize dental composites in Padjadjaran University and some review about dental composites in global research.

  16. Improved mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite whisker-reinforced poly(L-lactic acid) scaffold by surface modification of hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhou; Feng, Qingling

    2014-02-01

    To improve the mechanical properties of porous hydroxyapatite/poly(L-lactic acid) (HA/PLLA) composites, HA whiskers with high crystallinity and high aspect ratio were synthesized. HA whiskers were modified with γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to improve the interface between HA whiskers and PLLA. The composite scaffold consists of a porous PLLA matrix with HA whiskers distributed homogeneously. The morphology and the distributions of pore sizes of PLLA scaffold was not influenced by introducing HA whiskers, while the mechanical properties were improved. Both the compressive strength and compressive modulus were increased with the weight ratio of APTES-modified HA whiskers up to 30 wt.%, but only up to 15 wt.% for non-modified HA whiskers. With more than 15 wt.% HA whiskers, the mechanical properties of HA/PLLA scaffold were better improved with APTES-modified HA whiskers than non-modified. The HA whisker/PLLA scaffold with high porosity and improved mechanical properties is attractive in the application of tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical behaviour of dental composite filling materials using digital holography

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, J.M.; Lopes, H.; Vaz, M.A.P.; Campos, J.C. Reis

    2010-01-01

    One of the most common clinical problems in dentistry is tooth decay. Among the dental filling materials used to repair tooth structure that has been destroyed by decay are dental amalgam and composite materials based on acrylics. Dental amalgam has been used by dentists for the past 150 years as a dental restorative material due to its low cost, ease of application, strength, durability, and bacteriostatic effects. However its safety as a filling material has been questioned due to th...

  18. Nanomechanical properties of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Akhtar, R; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2012-12-01

    To determine by nanoindentation the hardness and elastic modulus of resin-composites, including a series with systematically varied filler loading, plus other representative materials that fall into the categories of flowable, bulk-fill and conventional nano-hybrid types. Ten dental resin-composites: three flowable, three bulk-fill and four conventional were investigated using nanoindentation. Disc specimens (15mm×2mm) were prepared from each material using a metallic mold. Specimens were irradiated in the mold at top and bottom surfaces in multiple overlapping points (40s each) with light curing unit at 650mW/cm(2). Specimens were then mounted in 3cm diameter phenolic ring forms and embedded in a self-curing polystyrene resin. After grinding and polishing, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were investigated using an Agilent Technologies XP nanoindenter equipped with a Berkovich diamond tip (100nm radius). Each specimen was loaded at one loading rate and three different unloading rates (at room temperature) with thirty indentations, per unloading rate. The maximum load applied by the nanoindenter to examine the specimens was 10mN. Dependent on the type of the resin-composite material, the mean values ranged from 0.73GPa to 1.60GPa for nanohardness and from 14.44GPa to 24.07GPa for elastic modulus. There was a significant positive non-linear correlation between elastic modulus and nanohardness (r(2)=0.88). Nonlinear regression revealed a significant positive correlation (r(2)=0.62) between elastic moduli and filler loading and a non-significant correlation (r(2)=0.50) between nanohardness and filler loading of the studied materials. Varying the unloading rates showed no consistent effect on the elastic modulus and nanohardness of the studied materials. For a specific resin matrix, both elastic moduli and nanohardness correlated positively with filler loading. For the resin-composites investigated, the group-average elastic

  19. Interface structure and strength in model dental resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Skovgaard

    . This will facilitate discoloration by colorants from e.g. coffee and red wine entering the crack, or even worse lead to secondary caries and infection of dental pulp due to bacteria. The aim of this study was to develop a low shrinkage dental composite based on an expandable metastable zirconia filler A metastable...

  20. Composition of Mineral Produced by Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volponi, A A; Gentleman, E; Fatscher, R; Pang, Y W Y; Gentleman, M M; Sharpe, P T

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from different dental tissues have been described to have osteogenic/odontogenic-like differentiation capacity, but little attention has been paid to the biochemical composition of the material that each produces. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to analyze the mineralized materials produced in vitro by different dental cell populations, and we compared them with the biochemical composition of native dental tissues. We show that different dental stem cell populations produce materials that differ in their mineral and matrix composition and that these differ from those of native dental tissues. In vitro, BCMP (bone chip mass population), SCAP (stem cells from apical papilla), and SHED (stem cells from human-exfoliated deciduous teeth) cells produce a more highly mineralized matrix when compared with that produced by PDL (periodontal ligament), DPA (dental pulp adult), and GF (gingival fibroblast) cells. Principal component analyses of Raman spectra further demonstrated that the crystallinity and carbonate substitution environments in the material produced by each cell type varied, with DPA cells, for example, producing a more carbonate-substituted mineral and with SCAP, SHED, and GF cells creating a less crystalline material when compared with other dental stem cells and native tissues. These variations in mineral composition reveal intrinsic differences in the various cell populations, which may in turn affect their specific clinical applications. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  1. Development of 9Al2O3{center_dot}2B2O3 whiskers reinforced piston by squeeze casting. Manufacturing process and characteristics of whiskers preform; Squeeze cast ho ni yoru 9Al2O3{center_dot}2B2O3 whisker kyoka piston no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, T; Suzuki, M; Takahashi, M; Takada, I; Toda, M [Suzuki Motor Co. Ltd., Shizuoka (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The properties of 9Al2O3 {center_dot} 2B2O3 whisker reinforced aluminum alloy is excellent compared with conventional material at elevated temperatures. 9Al2O3 {center_dot} 2B2O3 whisker reinforced aluminum alloy was applied to the piston head of two cycle engines. This piston was produced by a squeeze casting process with the granulated whiskers preform which was infiltrated by a molten aluminum alloy under high pressure. Since the permeability of the granulated whiskers preform is larger than that of the uniform preform in which whiskers are distributed randomly and uniformly, it became possible to suppress the preform deformation using the developed preform. 7 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Effects of chemical composition on the corrosion of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Rocha, Luís Augusto; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the oral environment on the corrosion of dental alloys with different compositions, using electrochemical methods. The corrosion rates were obtained from the current-potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of artificial saliva on the corrosion of dental alloys was dependent on alloy composition. Dissolution of the ions occurred in all tested dental alloys and the results were strongly dependent on the general alloy composition. Regarding the alloys containing nickel, the Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Ti alloys released 0.62 mg/L of Ni on average, while the Co-Cr dental alloy released ions between 0.01 and 0.03 mg/L of Co and Cr, respectively.The open-circuit potential stabilized at a higher level with lower deviation (standard deviation: Ni-Cr-6Ti = 32 mV/SCE and Co-Cr = 54 mV/SCE). The potenciodynamic curves of the dental alloys showed that the Ni-based dental alloy with >70 wt% of Ni had a similar curve and the Co-Cr dental alloy showed a low current density and hence a high resistance to corrosion compared with the Ni-based dental alloys. Some changes in microstructure were observed and this fact influenced the corrosion behavior for the alloys. The lower corrosion resistance also led to greater release of nickel ions to the medium. The quantity of Co ions released from the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was relatively small in the solutions. In addition, the quantity of Cr ions released into the artificial saliva from the Co-Cr alloy was lower than Cr release from the Ni-based dental alloys.

  3. Improving subcritical crack growth resistance for alumina glass dental composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Q.; With, de G.

    2005-01-01

    The improvement of subcritical crack growth (SCG) resistance for alumina glass dental composites was explored in this study. The addition of nitrogen to the glass phases in the composite was found to increase the SCG resistance, where the SCG exponent n increases from 22 for the oxide glass

  4. Bioinspired Catecholic Primers for Rigid and Ductile Dental Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Eeseul; Ju, Sung Won; An, Larry; Ahn, Eungjin; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Kim, Byeong-Su; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2018-01-17

    In the construction of dental restorative polymer composite materials, surface priming on mineral fillers is essential to improve the mechanical performance of the composites. Here we present bioinspired catechol-functionalized primers for a tougher dental resin composite containing glass fillers. The catecholic primers with different polymerizable end groups were designed and then coated on glass surfaces using a simple drop-casting or dip-coating process. The surface binding ability and possible cross-linking (coupling or chemical bridging between the glass substrate and the dental resin) of the catecholic bifunctional primers were evaluated using atomic force microscopy, contact angle measurements, and the knife shear bonding test and compared to a state-of-the-art silane-based coupling agent. Various mechanical tests including shrinkage and compression tests of the dental resin composites were also conducted. Compression tests of the composites containing the catecholic primed fillers exhibited enhanced mechanical properties, owing to the bidentate hydrogen bonding of catechol moieties to the oxide mineral surface. Furthermore, the superior biocompatibility of the primed surface was confirmed via cell attachment assay, thus providing applicability of catecholic primers for practical dental and biomedical applications.

  5. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  6. Fast XRF analysis of mineral elements in dental composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoteasa, E. A.; Constantinescu, B.; Preoteasa, E.

    2001-01-01

    Dental composites, made of particles of glass, ceramics or quartz embedded in an organic polymer matrix, extensively replaced silver amalgam in tooth fillings and enabled new applications for restorative dentistry. Long-term alteration of dental fillings together with market pressure motivates the development of composites at a high rate, largely by progress of materials forming their mineral phase. Therefore, dental composites constantly bring at the interface with enamel and dentine new elements foreign to the organism, whose biological action has not been studied. Atomic and nuclear methods for surface multielemental analysis have been used in dental research but not for composites. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is suited for the fast microanalytical screening of the elements and of their changes at the biomaterial's surface. The potential of radioisotope-excited XRF for the analysis of dental composites has been examined. Flat disk-shaped samples of composites have been prepared and polymerized chemically or by irradiation with intense 420-500 nm light. The measurements were performed with a spectrometric chain containing a 30 mCi source of 241 Am, a Si(Li) detector, and a multichannel analyzer. The spectra were built up for 2000-6000 sec. The characteristic X lines were integrated and normalized to source lines. The following Z ≥ 20 elements were detected in the studied composites: Ba only in Charisma (Kulzer) and Pekafill (Bayer); Zr, Ba, Yb in Tetric Ceram, and Ca, Ba, Yb together with traces of possibly Ti and Fe in Ariston (both from Vivadent); Zr, Hf in Valux Plus (3M Dental); and Sr, Ba together with some trace element, seemingly Cu, in F2000 Compomer (3M Dental) and with other trace elements like Ca, Fe in Surefil (Dentsply). Among older materials, Concise (3M Dental) contained only light (Z 3 that releases F for protection of enamel and dentine. Yb, Zr, Ba, Hf improve the radiological opacity of the materials. Some elements may accompany others as

  7. Laboratory tests for assessing adaptability and stickiness of dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosentritt, Martin; Buczovsky, Sebastian; Behr, Michael; Preis, Verena

    2014-09-01

    Handling (stickiness, adaptability) of a dental composite does strongly influence quality and success of a dental restoration. The purpose was to develop an in vitro test, which allows for evaluating adaptability and stickiness. 15 dentists were asked for providing individual assessment (school scores 1-6) of five dental composites addressing adaptability and stickiness. Composites were applied with a dental plugger (d=1.8 mm) in a class I cavity (human tooth 17). The tooth was fixed on a force gauge for simultaneous determination of application forces with varying storage (6/25°C) and application temperatures (6/25°C). On basis of these data tensile tests were performed with a dental plugger (application force 1N/2N; v=35 mm/min) on PMMA- or human tooth plates. Composite was dosed onto the tip of the plugger and applied. Application and unplugging was performed once and unplugging forces (UF) and length of the adhesive flags (LAF) were determined at different storage (6/25°C) and application temperatures (25/37°C). Unplugging work (UW) was calculated from area of UF and LAF data. The individual assessment revealed significantly different temperature-dependent application forces between 0.58 N and 2.23 N. Adaptability was assessed between 2.1 and 2.8 school scores. Stickiness varied significantly between the materials (scores: 2-3.2). UW differed significantly between the materials with values between 3.20 N mm and 37.83 N mm. Between PMMA substrate or tooth slides and between 1N or 2N application force only small UW differences were found. The presented in vitro unplugging work allows for an in vitro estimation of the handling parameters adaptability and stickiness. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Degradation of dental resin composites during intra-oral wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yulianto, Heribertus Dedy Kusuma

    2017-01-01

    Dental resin composites have become an integral part of modern dentistry and used worldwide to restore missing tooth structures, to modify tooth color and anatomical contour, and to enhance aesthetics and function. The dentist should be aware that, the aggressive complexity of the oral environment

  9. High performance dental resin composites with hydrolytically stable monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Huyang, George; Palagummi, Sri Vikram; Liu, Xiaohui; Skrtic, Drago; Beauchamp, Carlos; Bowen, Rafael; Sun, Jirun

    2018-02-01

    The objectives of this project were to: 1) develop strong and durable dental resin composites by employing new monomers that are hydrolytically stable, and 2) demonstrate that resin composites based on these monomers perform superiorly to the traditional bisphenol A glycidyl dimethacrylate/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA/TEGDMA) composites under testing conditions relevant to clinical applications. New resins comprising hydrolytically stable, ether-based monomer, i.e., triethylene glycol divinylbenzyl ether (TEG-DVBE), and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) were produced via composition-controlled photo-polymerization. Their composites contained 67.5wt% of micro and 7.5wt% of nano-sized filler. The performances of both copolymers and composites were evaluated by a battery of clinically-relevant assessments: degree of vinyl conversion (DC: FTIR and NIR spectroscopy); refractive index (n: optical microscopy); elastic modulus (E), flexural strength (F) and fracture toughness (K IC ) (universal mechanical testing); Knoop hardness (HK; indentation); water sorption (W sp ) and solubility (W su ) (gravimetry); polymerization shrinkage (S v ; mercury dilatometry) and polymerization stress (tensometer). The experimental UDMA/TEG-DVBE composites were compared with the Bis-GMA/TEGDMA composites containing the identical filler contents, and with the commercial micro hybrid flowable composite. UDMA/TEG-DBVE composites exhibited n, E, W sp , W su and S v equivalent to the controls. They outperformed the controls with respect to F (up to 26.8% increase), K IC (up to 27.7% increase), modulus recovery upon water sorption (full recovery vs. 91.9% recovery), and stress formation (up to 52.7% reduction). In addition, new composites showed up to 27.7% increase in attainable DC compared to the traditional composites. Bis-GMA/TEGDMA controls exceeded the experimental composites with respect to only one property, the composite hardness. Significantly, up to 18.1% lower HK values in

  10. Detection of Nanoparticles Released at Finishing of Dental Composite Materials.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bradna, P.; Ondráčková, Lucie; Ždímal, Vladimír; Navrátil, Tomáš; Pelclová, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 148, č. 3 (2017), s. 531-537 ISSN 0026-9247. [International Conference on Modern Electrochemical Methods /36./. Jetřichovice, 23.05.2016-27.05.2016] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : dental composite * grinding * nanoparticles * aerosol * health risk Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) OBOR OECD: Public and environmental health; Physical chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  11. Qualitative PIXE analysis of mineral elements in some dental composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoteasa, E.A.; Iordan, Andreea; Harangus, Livia; Ciortea, C.; Gugiu, M.; Moldovan, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Dental composites, made by particles of glass, ceramics and quartz embedded in an organic polymer, develop at a high rate. However, commercial composites are expensive and recently the 'Restacril' biomaterials company became prepared to offer a low-cost alternative. The durability of dental fillings depends not only on biomaterial's gross chemical composition, but also on impurities. These may influence the chemical, mechanical and surface properties of the inorganic particles and modify the composites' clinical behavior. Thus elemental analysis is necessary to improve the biomaterials' quality. Nuclear and atomic methods allow sensitive multielement detection, and we previously analyzed some commercial composites by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Here we applied PIXE in the qualitative analysis of six new Romanian biomaterials, aiming to compare their nominal and detected composition and paying attention to the impurities. The PIXE measurements were performed with 3 MeV protons at the 8.5 MV NIPNE-HH tandem accelerator, using a hyper pure Ge detector, normal to the beam and connected to a multichannel analyzer and to a computer. Solid samples of composites with a flat surface were fixed at 45 angle, absorber foil of Al 30 mm thick was used, and integration of beam current was done. In all composites PIXE detected mineral elements with Z > 19 down to trace levels. All major nominal elements with Z > 20 - Ca, Sr, Zr, Ba, and Yb - were detected by PIXE. In addition, many minor and trace elements absent from the nominal formulations were seen, including K, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ag, Cd, Hf, and As/Pb. Such impurities may come from rough materials and preparative technologies. The impurities in Romanian composites are comparable to those in some commercial biomaterials but higher than in other ones. Thus PIXE analysis of mineral elements in Romanian composites, even qualitative, appears useful for quality control and improvement. (authors)

  12. Interfacial reaction effects on erosion of aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, J.P.; Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima; Matsumura, M.

    1999-01-01

    Alumina borate (A 18 B 4 O 33 ) whisker reinforced aluminum composites have attracted interest because of their high specific strength, high modulus and low cost. An obvious feature of the microstructure in A 18 B 4 O 33 /Al composite is that an interfacial reaction exists between the whisker and the aluminum alloy. In order to discuss the influence of interface interaction between the whisker and matrix on the erosion resistance of composites, two reaction treatments are conducted. From the results of the treated composites, it can be obtained about the erosion characteristics of the composite materials under steady-state conditions

  13. Recent advances and developments in composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, N B; Stansbury, J W; Bowman, C N

    2011-04-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance.

  14. Dental Composites with Calcium / Strontium Phosphates and Polylysine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyaphong Panpisut

    Full Text Available This study developed light cured dental composites with added monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM, tristrontium phosphate (TSrP and antimicrobial polylysine (PLS. The aim was to produce composites that have enhanced water sorption induced expansion, can promote apatite precipitation and release polylysine.Experimental composite formulations consisted of light activated dimethacrylate monomers combined with 80 wt% powder. The powder phase contained a dental glass with and without PLS (2.5 wt% and/or reactive phosphate fillers (15 wt% TSrP and 10 wt% MCPM. The commercial composite, Z250, was used as a control. Monomer conversion and calculated polymerization shrinkage were assessed using FTIR. Subsequent mass or volume changes in water versus simulated body fluid (SBF were quantified using gravimetric studies. These were used, along with Raman and SEM, to assess apatite precipitation on the composite surface. PLS release was determined using UV spectroscopy. Furthermore, biaxial flexural strengths after 24 hours of SBF immersion were obtained.Monomer conversion of the composites decreased upon the addition of phosphate fillers (from 76 to 64% but was always higher than that of Z250 (54%. Phosphate addition increased water sorption induced expansion from 2 to 4% helping to balance the calculated polymerization shrinkage of ~ 3.4%. Phosphate addition promoted apatite precipitation from SBF. Polylysine increased the apatite layer thickness from ~ 10 to 20 μm after 4 weeks. The novel composites showed a burst release of PLS (3.7% followed by diffusion-controlled release irrespective of phosphate addition. PLS and phosphates decreased strength from 154 MPa on average by 17% and 18%, respectively. All formulations, however, had greater strength than the ISO 4049 requirement of > 80 MPa.The addition of MCPM with TSrP promoted hygroscopic expansion, and apatite formation. These properties are expected to help compensate polymerization shrinkage and

  15. Longevity of dental amalgam in comparison to composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windisch, Friederike

    2008-11-01

    fillings in posterior teeth is difficult. Apart from the difficulties in conducting a randomized, controlled long-term study comparing the longevity of direct fillings, the fact that composites and adhesives used in a study have often already been replaced by the next generation of the product at the time of study publication presents an additional problem. Not only the filling material, but also patient parameters and local, intraoral factors (e. g. localisation of the filling as well as the treating dentist have an impact on the longevity of dental fillings. In evaluating economic studies, one has to refer to the heterogeneity of data on longevity in the medical evaluation. The only effect parameter used in the studies is longevity, other aspects (e. g. long-term functionality are only referred to in discussions. Extensive counselling of patients regarding the selection of the appropriate filling material is important. Conclusions: Amalgam fillings show a longer longevity than composite fillings. Two out of six systematic reviews conclude that the expected survival time of composite fillings can be comparable to amalgam fillings. However, these conclusions are based on the results of short-term studies which usually overestimate the longevity of filling materials. From an economic standpoint, amalgam is the more economic filling material compared to direct composite fillings in posterior teeth when considering longevity as the only result parameter. Other aspects than longevity need to be considered in individually choosing the appropriate dental filling material. For future studies aiming to compare the longevity of amalgam and composite fillings, a sufficient sample size and study period, preferably in the setting of a private dental practice, should be aimed for. An evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of amalgam and composite fillings should take the functionality of teeth over a longer time period into account, as well as patients’ preferences. The rapid

  16. Characterization of Dentine to Assess Bond Strength of Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Liaqat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to develop alternating dentine adhesion models that could help in the evaluation of a self-bonding dental composite. For this purpose dentine from human and ivory was characterized chemically and microscopically before and after acid etching using Raman and SEM. Mechanical properties of dentine were determined using 3 point bend test. Composite bonding to dentine, with and without use of acid pre-treatment and/or the adhesive, were assessed using a shear bond test. Furthermore, micro gap formation after restoration of 3 mm diameter cavities in dentine was assessed by SEM. Initial hydroxyapatite level in ivory was half that in human dentine. Surface hydroxyapatites decreased by approximately half with every 23 s of acid etch. The human dentine strength (56 MPa was approximately double that of ivory, while the modulus was almost comparable to that of ivory. With adhesive use, average shear bond strengths were 30 and 26 MPa with and without acid etching. With no adhesive, average bond strength was 6 MPa for conventional composites. This, however, increased to 14 MPa with a commercial flowable “self–bonding” composite or upon addition of low levels of an acidic monomer to the experimental composite. The acidic monomer additionally reduced micro-gap formation with the experimental composite. Improved bonding and mechanical properties should reduce composite failures due to recurrent caries or fracture respectively.

  17. Electrospun nanofiber reinforcement of dental composites with electromagnetic alignment approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uyar, Tansel; Çökeliler, Dilek; Doğan, Mustafa; Koçum, Ismail Cengiz; Karatay, Okan; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2016-01-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is commonly used as a base acrylic denture material with benefits of rapid and easy handling, however, when it is used in prosthetic dentistry, fracturing or cracking problems can be seen due to the relatively low strength issues. Besides, acrylic resin is the still prominent material for denture fabrication due to its handy and low cost features. Numerous proposed fillers that are used to produce PMMA composites, however electrospun polyvinylalcohol (PVA) nanofiber fillers for production of PMMA composite resins are not studied as much as the others. The other focus of the practice is to compare both mechanical properties and efficiency of aligned fibers versus non-aligned PVA nanofibers in PMMA based dental composites. Field-controlled electrospinning system is manufactured and provided good alignment in lab scale as one of contributions. Some novel auxiliary electrodes in controlled structure are augmented to obtain different patterns of alignment with a certain range of fiber diameters. Scanning electron microscopy is used for physical characterization to determine the range of fiber diameters. Non-woven fiber has no unique pattern due to chaotic nature of electrospinning process, but aligned fibers have round pattern or crossed lines. These produced fibers are structured as layer-by-layer form with different features, and these features are used in producing PMMA dental composites with different volume ratios. The maximum flexural strength figure shows that fiber load by weight of 0.25% w/w and above improves in the maximum level. As a result, mechanical properties of PMMA dental composites are improved by using PVA nanofibers as a filler, however the improvement was higher when aligned PVA nanofibers are used. The maximum values were 5.1 MPa (flexural strength), 0.8 GPa (elastic modulus), and 170 kJ/m 3 (toughness) in three-point bending test. In addition to the positive results of aligned and non-aligned nanofibers it was found

  18. Electrospun nanofiber reinforcement of dental composites with electromagnetic alignment approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uyar, Tansel [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Başkent University Bağlıca Campus, 06530 Ankara (Turkey); Çökeliler, Dilek, E-mail: cokeliler@baskent.edu.tr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Başkent University Bağlıca Campus, 06530 Ankara (Turkey); Doğan, Mustafa [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Başkent University, Ankara 06180 (Turkey); Koçum, Ismail Cengiz [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Başkent University Bağlıca Campus, 06530 Ankara (Turkey); Karatay, Okan [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Başkent University, Ankara 06180 (Turkey); Denkbaş, Emir Baki [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-05-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is commonly used as a base acrylic denture material with benefits of rapid and easy handling, however, when it is used in prosthetic dentistry, fracturing or cracking problems can be seen due to the relatively low strength issues. Besides, acrylic resin is the still prominent material for denture fabrication due to its handy and low cost features. Numerous proposed fillers that are used to produce PMMA composites, however electrospun polyvinylalcohol (PVA) nanofiber fillers for production of PMMA composite resins are not studied as much as the others. The other focus of the practice is to compare both mechanical properties and efficiency of aligned fibers versus non-aligned PVA nanofibers in PMMA based dental composites. Field-controlled electrospinning system is manufactured and provided good alignment in lab scale as one of contributions. Some novel auxiliary electrodes in controlled structure are augmented to obtain different patterns of alignment with a certain range of fiber diameters. Scanning electron microscopy is used for physical characterization to determine the range of fiber diameters. Non-woven fiber has no unique pattern due to chaotic nature of electrospinning process, but aligned fibers have round pattern or crossed lines. These produced fibers are structured as layer-by-layer form with different features, and these features are used in producing PMMA dental composites with different volume ratios. The maximum flexural strength figure shows that fiber load by weight of 0.25% w/w and above improves in the maximum level. As a result, mechanical properties of PMMA dental composites are improved by using PVA nanofibers as a filler, however the improvement was higher when aligned PVA nanofibers are used. The maximum values were 5.1 MPa (flexural strength), 0.8 GPa (elastic modulus), and 170 kJ/m{sup 3} (toughness) in three-point bending test. In addition to the positive results of aligned and non-aligned nanofibers it was

  19. Repair bond strength of resin composite to bilayer dental ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various surface treatments (ST) on the shear bond strength of resin composite to three bilayer dental ceramics made by CAD/CAM and two veneering ceramics. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different bilayer dental ceramics and two different veneering ceramics were used (Group A: IPS e.max CAD+IPS e.max Ceram; Group B: IPS e.max ZirCAD+IPS e.max Ceram, Group C: Vita Suprinity+Vita VM11; Group D: IPS e.max Ceram; Group E: Vita VM11). All groups were divided into eight subgroups according to the ST. Then, all test specimens were repaired with a nano hybrid resin composite. Half of the test specimens were subjected to thermocycling procedure and the other half was stored in distilled water at 37℃. Shear bond strength tests for all test specimens were carried out with a universal testing machine. RESULTS There were statistically significant differences among the tested surface treatments within the all tested fracture types (P.00125). CONCLUSION This study revealed that HF etching for glass ceramics and sandblasting for zirconia ceramics were adequate for repair of all ceramic restorations. The effect of ceramic type exposed on the fracture area was not significant on the repair bond strength of resin composites to different ceramic types. PMID:29713430

  20. Elution of monomer from different bulk fill dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Mehmet Ata; Cebe, Fatma; Cengiz, Mehmet Fatih; Cetin, Ali Rıza; Arpag, Osman Fatih; Ozturk, Bora

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the elution of Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, HEMA, and Bis-EMA monomers from six bulk fill composite resins over four different time periods, using HPLC. Six different composite resin materials were used in the present study: Tetric Evo Ceram Bulk Fill (Ivoclar Vivadent, Amherst, NY), X-tra Fill (VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany), Sonic Fill (Kerr, Orange, CA, USA), Filtek Bulk Fill (3M ESPE Dental Product, St. Paul, MN), SDR (Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany), EQUIA (GC America INC, Alsip, IL). The samples (4mm thickness, 5mm diameter) were prepared and polymerized for 20s with a light emitted diode unit. After fabrication, each sample was immediately immersed in 75wt% ethanol/water solution used as extraction fluid and stored in the amber colored bottles at room temperature. Ethanol/water samples were taken (0.5mL) at predefined time intervals:10m (T1), 1h (T2), 24h (T3) and 30 days (T4). These samples were analyzed by HPLC. The obtained data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD at significance level of pcomposites (pcomposite resins in all time periods and the amount of eluted monomers was increased with time. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The importance of the biomimetic composites components for recreating the optical properties and molecular composition of intact dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredin, P. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Gushchin, M. S.; Ippolitov, Y. A.; Prutskij, T.

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate whether it is possible to obtain biomimetic materials recreating the luminescent properties and molecular composition of intact dental tissues. Biomimetic materials were produced and their properties compared with native dental tissues. In addition, the overall contribution of the organic and non-organic components in the photoluminescence band was investigated. The results showed that it is possible to develop biomimetic materials with similar molecular composition and optical properties to native dental tissues for the early identification of dental caries.

  2. Longevity of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth in Public Dental Health Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W V; Halken, Jette

    2013-01-01

    To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service.......To investigate in a prospective follow up the longevity of posterior resin composites (RC) placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service....

  3. Synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray micro-computed tomography reveals dental bur debris under dental composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Assem; Nagy, Nicole; Packota, Garnet; Monteith, Judy; Allen, Darcy; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Zhu, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Dental burs are used extensively in dentistry to mechanically prepare tooth structures for restorations (fillings), yet little has been reported on the bur debris left behind in the teeth, and whether it poses potential health risks to patients. Here it is aimed to image dental bur debris under dental fillings, and allude to the potential health hazards that can be caused by this debris when left in direct contact with the biological surroundings, specifically when the debris is made of a non-biocompatible material. Non-destructive micro-computed tomography using the BioMedical Imaging & Therapy facility 05ID-2 beamline at the Canadian Light Source was pursued at 50 keV and at a pixel size of 4 µm to image dental bur fragments under a composite resin dental filling. The bur's cutting edges that produced the fragment were also chemically analyzed. The technique revealed dental bur fragments of different sizes in different locations on the floor of the prepared surface of the teeth and under the filling, which places them in direct contact with the dentinal tubules and the dentinal fluid circulating within them. Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis of the dental bur edges revealed that the fragments are made of tungsten carbide-cobalt, which is bio-incompatible.

  4. Resin Composites Reinforced by Nanoscaled Fibers or Tubes for Dental Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Liu, Wei; Sun, Lianwen; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Yu, Bo; Fan, Yubo; Cui, Fuzhai; Watari, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    It has been stated clearly that nanofillers could make an enhancement on the mechanical performances of dental composites. In order to address current shortage of traditional dental composites, fillers in forms of nanofibers or nanotubes are broadly regarded as ideal candidates to greatly increase mechanical performances of dental composites with low content of fillers. In this review, the efforts using nanofibers and nanotubes to reinforce mechanical performances of dental composites, including polymeric nanofibers, metallic nanofibers or nanotubes, and inorganic nanofibers or nanotubes, as well as their researches related, are demonstrated in sequence. The first purpose of current paper was to confirm the enhancement of nanofibers or nanotubes' reinforcement on the mechanical performances of dental restorative composite. The second purpose was to make a general description about the reinforcement mechanism of nanofibers and nanotubes, especially, the impact of formation of interphase boundary interaction and nanofibers themselves on the advanced mechanical behaviors of the dental composites. By means of the formation of interface interaction and poststretching nanofibers, reinforced effect of dental composites by sorts of nanofibers/nanotubes has been successfully obtained. PMID:24982894

  5. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2 investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC; the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU, and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1, and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05. Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1. In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  6. Microstructure and orientation effects on properties of discontinuous silicon carbide/aluminum composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdanels, D. L.; Hoffman, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Composite panels containing up to 40 vol % discontinuous silicon carbide SiC whisker, nodule, or particulate reinforcement in several aluminum matrices are commercially fabricated and the mechanical properties and microstructual characteristics are evaluated. The yield and tensile strengths and the ductility are controlled primarily by the matrix alloy, the temper condition, and the reinforcement content. Particulate and nodule reinforcements are as effective as whisker reinforcement. Increased ductility is attributed to purer, more uniform starting materials and to more mechanical working during fabrication. Comparing mechanical properties with those of other aluminum alloys shows that these low cost, lightweight composites demonstrate very good potential for application to aerospace structures.

  7. Subcritical crack growth behavior of AI2O3-Glass dental composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Q.; With, G. de; Dortmans, L.J.M.G.; Feenstra, F.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the subcritical crack growth (SCG) behavior of alumina-glass dental composites. Alumina-glass composites were fabricated by infiltrating molten glass to porous alumina preforms. Rectangular bars of the composite were subject to dynamic loading in air, with

  8. Study of filling material of dental composites. An analytical approach using radio-activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eke, Canel [Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Nuclear Sciences Application and Research Center; Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Div. of Physics Education; Er, Kursat [Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Dept. of Endodontics; Segebade, Christian [Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Nuclear Sciences Application and Research Center; Boztosun, Ismail [Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Nuclear Sciences Application and Research Center; Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Dept. of Physics

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study is to carry out elemental analyses of dental composites acquired from different producers using photoactivation analysis (PAA). High energy electrons produced by an electron linear accelerator are absorbed by a tungsten disk (Bremsstrahlung converter) thereby producing high energy X-rays (bremsstrahlung). The dental composite materials under study were exposed to the bremsstrahlung radiation whereby radionuclides were produced through photonuclear reactions. Their radioactivities were measured using high resolution semiconductor spectrometers equipped with high purity germanium detectors (HPGe). The spectra were analysed using appropriate computer software. As a result, photonuclear reactions of 12 stable elements were detected in different dental composite species, and the elemental concentrations were calculated. For comparison, the dental composites were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). Various sizes and shapes of dental composites were observed using SEM. However, contents of dental composites, e.g. Mg, Ni, Ba and Sr were obtained by PAA whilst C, O, Al, S, Ba and Sr were detected by EDXRF spectrometry. The results for Ba and Sr obtained using the two techniques show considerable difference.

  9. Composition, production rate and characterization of Greek dental solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalidis, Alexandros; Topalidis, Antonios; Voudrias, Evangelos A; Iosifidis, Nikolaos

    2018-05-01

    The overall objective of this work is to determine the composition, characterization and production rate of Greek dental solid waste (DSW). This information is important to design and cost management systems for DSW, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 141 kg of DSW produced by a total of 2542 patients in 20 dental practices from Xanthi, Greece was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of four working weeks. The waste was separated in 19 sub fractions, which were classified in 2 major categories, according to Greek regulations: Domestic-type waste comprising 8% and hazardous waste comprising 92% by weight of total DSW. The latter was further classified in infectious waste, toxic waste and mixed type waste (infectious and toxic together), accounting for 88.5%, 3.5% and 0.03% of total DSW by weight, respectively. The overall unit production rates (mean ± standard error of the mean) were 381 ± 15 g/practice/d and 53.3 ± 1.4 g/patient/d for total DSW, 337 ± 14 g/practice/d and 46.6 ± 1.2 g/patient/d for total infectious DSW, 13.4 ± 0.7 g/practice/d and 2.1 ± 0.1 g/patient/d for total toxic DSW and 30.4 ± 2.5 g/practice/d and 4.6 ± 0.4 g/patient/d for domestic-type waste. Daily DSW production was correlated with daily number of patients and regression correlations were produced. DSW was subject to laboratory characterization in terms of bulk density, calorific value, moisture, ash and volatile solids content. Measured calorific values were compared to predictions from empirical models. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Dental Restorative Material Type and Shade on Characteristics of Two-Layer Dental Composite Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Karimzadeh

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of shade and material type and shape in dental polymer composites on the hardness and shrinkage stress of bulk and two-layered restoration systems. For this purpose, some bulk and layered specimens from three different shades of dental materials were prepared and light-cured. The experiments were carried out on three types of materials: conventional restorative composite, nanohybrid composite and nanocomposite. Micro-indentation experiment was performed on the bulk and also on each layer of layered restoration specimens using a Vicker's indenter. The interface between the two layers was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results revealed significant differences between the values of hardness for different shades in the conventional composite and also in the nanohybrid composite. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between the hardness values for different shades in the nanocomposite samples. The layered restoration specimens of different restorative materials exhibited lower hardness values with respect to their bulk specimens. The reduction in the hardness value of the layered conventional composite samples was higher than those of the nanocomposite and nanohybrid composite specimens indicating more shrinkage stresses generated in the conventional composite restorations. According to the SEM images, a gap was observed between the two layers in the layered restorations.

  11. Mechanical properties of MeV ion-irradiated SiC/SiC composites characterized by indentation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.Y.; Park, K.H.; Kim, W.; Kishimoto, H.; Kohyama, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: SiC/SiC composites have been considered as a structural material for advanced fusion concepts. In the core of fusion reactor, those SiC/SiC composites are experienced the complex attacks such as strong neutron, high temperature and transmuted gases. One of the vital data for designing the SiC/SiC composites to the fusion reactor is mechanical properties under the severe neutron irradiation. In this work, various SiC/SiC composites were prepared by the different fabrication processes like CVI (chemical vapor infiltration), WA-CVI (SiC whisker assisted CVI) and hot-pressed method. The expected neutron irradiation was simulated by a silicon self-ion irradiation at a DuET facility; Dual-beam for Energy Technologies, Kyoto University. The irradiation temperature were 600 deg. C and 1200 deg. C, and the irradiation does were 5 dpa and 20 dpa, respectively. The 5.1 MeV Si ions were irradiated to the intrinsic CVI-SiC, SiC whisker reinforced SiC and SiC composites produced by hot-press method. The mechanical properties like hardness, elastic modulus and fracture toughness were characterized by an indentation technique. The ion irradiation caused the increase of the hardness and fracture toughness, which was dependent on the irradiation temperature. SiC whisker reinforcement in the SiC matrix accelerated the increase of the fracture toughness by the ion irradiation. For SiC/SiC composites after the ion irradiation, this work will provide the additional data for the mechanical properties as well as the effect of SiC whisker reinforcement. (authors)

  12. State-of-the-art techniques in operative dentistry: contemporary teaching of posterior composites in UK and Irish dental schools.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, C D

    2010-08-14

    Advances of composite systems and their application have revolutionised the management of posterior teeth affected by caries, facilitating a minimally invasive approach. Previous surveys have indicated that the teaching of posterior composites within dental schools was developing, albeit not keeping pace with clinical evidence and the development of increasingly predictable techniques and materials. Concurrently, surveys of dental practice indicate that dental amalgam still predominates as the \\'material of choice\\' for the restoration of posterior teeth within UK general dental practice. In light of such considerations, the aim of this study was to investigate current teaching of posterior composites in Irish and UK dental schools.

  13. Fiber optics reflectance spectroscopy (45°x: 45°) for color analysis of dental composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Marco; Ludwig, Nicola; Federighi, Veronica; Sykes, Ros; Lodi, Giovanni; Sardella, Andrea; Carrassi, Antonio; Varoni, Elena M

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the application of a fiber optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) prototype probe for 45°x: 45° FORS for determining color of dental materials. A portable spectrophotometer with a highly manageable fiber optics co-axial probe was used to apply 45°x: 45° FORS for color matching in restorative dentistry. The color coordinates in CIELAB space of two dental shade guides and of the corresponding photopolymerized composites were collected and compared. The 45°x: 45° FORS with the co-axial probe (test system), the integrating sphere spectroscopy (reference system) and a commercial dental colorimeter (comparator system) were used to collect data and calculate color differences (ΔE and ΔE00). FORS system displayed high repeatability, reproducibility and accuracy. ΔE and ΔE00 values between the shade-guide, each other, and the corresponding composites resulted above the clinically acceptable limit. The 45°x: 45° FORS test system demonstrated suitable in vitro performance for dental composite color evaluation. 45°x: 45° fiber optic reflectance spectroscopy allows reliable color analysis of small surfaces of dental composites, favoring the color matching of material with the closely surrounding dental tissue, and confirming significant color differences between shade guide tabs and photo-polymerized composites.

  14. Site specific mineral composition and microstructure of human supra-gingival dental calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashizaki, Junko; Ban, Seiji; Nakagaki, Haruo; Okumura, Akihiko; Yoshii, Saori; Robinson, Colin

    2008-02-01

    Dental calculus has been implicated in the aetiology of several periodontal conditions. Its prevention and removal are therefore desirable clinical goals. While it is known that calculus is very variable in chemical composition, crystallinity and crystallite size little is known about site specific variability within a dentition and between individuals. With this in mind, a study was undertaken to investigate the comparative site specific nature and composition of human dental supra-gingival dental calculus obtained from 66 male patients visiting for their dental check-up using fluorescent X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The supra-gingival dental calculus formed on the lingual surfaces of lower anterior teeth and the buccal surfaces of upper molar teeth were classified into four types based on calcium phosphate phases present. There was significant difference in composition of the crystal phase types between lower and upper teeth (pdental calculus on anterior or molar teeth of all samples. The degree of crystallinity of dental calculus formed on the upper molar teeth was higher than that formed on the lower anterior teeth (pdental calculus formed on the lower anterior teeth were higher than on upper molar teeth (pdental supra-gingival dental calculus is related to its location in the mouth.

  15. An overview of development and status of fiber-reinforced composites as dental and medical biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallittu, Pekka K

    2018-01-01

    Fibr-reinforced composites (FRC) have been used successfully for decades in many fields of science and engineering applications. Benefits of FRCs relate to physical properties of FRCs and versatile production methods, which can be utilized. Conventional hand lamination of prefabricated FRC prepregs is utilized still most commonly in fabrication of dental FRC devices but CAD-CAM systems are to be come for use in certain production steps of dental constructions and medical FRC implants. Although metals, ceramics and particulate filler resin composites have successfully been used as dental and medical biomaterials for decades, devices made out of these materials do not meet all clinical requirements. Only little attention has been paid to FRCs as dental materials and majority of the research in dental field has been focusing on particulate filler resin composites and in medical biomaterial research to biodegradable polymers. This is paradoxical because FRCs can potentially resolve many of the problems related to traditional isotropic dental and medical materials. This overview reviews the rationale and status of using biostable glass FRC in applications from restorative and prosthetic dentistry to cranial surgery. The overview highlights also the critical material based factors and clinical requirement for the succesfull use of FRCs in dental reconstructions.

  16. Development and Validation of a Constitutive Model for Dental Composites during the Curing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham Kolstad, Lauren

    Debonding is a critical failure of a dental composites used for dental restorations. Debonding of dental composites can be determined by comparing the shrinkage stress of to the debonding strength of the adhesive that bonds it to the tooth surface. It is difficult to measure shrinkage stress experimentally. In this study, finite element analysis is used to predict the stress in the composite during cure. A new constitutive law is presented that will allow composite developers to evaluate composite shrinkage stress at early stages in the material development. Shrinkage stress and shrinkage strain experimental data were gathered for three dental resins, Z250, Z350, and P90. Experimental data were used to develop a constitutive model for the Young's modulus as a function of time of the dental composite during cure. A Maxwell model, spring and dashpot in series, was used to simulate the composite. The compliance of the shrinkage stress device was also taken into account by including a spring in series with the Maxwell model. A coefficient of thermal expansion was also determined for internal loading of the composite by dividing shrinkage strain by time. Three FEA models are presented. A spring-disk model validates that the constitutive law is self-consistent. A quarter cuspal deflection model uses separate experimental data to verify that the constitutive law is valid. Finally, an axisymmetric tooth model is used to predict interfacial stresses in the composite. These stresses are compared to the debonding strength to check if the composite debonds. The new constitutive model accurately predicted cuspal deflection data. Predictions for interfacial bond stress in the tooth model compare favorably with debonding characteristics observed in practice for dental resins.

  17. Equivalent Young's modulus of composite resin for simulation of stress during dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Nak-Sam

    2017-02-01

    For shrinkage stress simulation in dental restoration, the elastic properties of composite resins should be acquired beforehand. This study proposes a formula to measure the equivalent Young's modulus of a composite resin through a calculation scheme of the shrinkage stress in dental restoration. Two types of composite resins remarkably different in the polymerization shrinkage strain were used for experimental verification: the methacrylate-type (Clearfil AP-X) and the silorane-type (Filtek P90). The linear shrinkage strains of the composite resins were gained through the bonded disk method. A formula to calculate the equivalent Young's moduli of composite resin was derived on the basis of the restored ring substrate. Equivalent Young's moduli were measured for the two types of composite resins through the formula. Those values were applied as input to a finite element analysis (FEA) for validation of the calculated shrinkage stress. Both of the measured moduli through the formula were appropriate for stress simulation of dental restoration in that the shrinkage stresses calculated by the FEA were in good agreement within 3.5% with the experimental values. The concept of equivalent Young's modulus so measured could be applied for stress simulation of 2D and 3D dental restoration. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fracture resistance curves and toughening mechanisms in polymer based dental composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Souza, J.A.; Goutianos, Stergios; Skovgaard, M.

    2011-01-01

    The fracture resistance (R-curve behaviour) of two commercial dental composites (Filtek Z350® and Concept Advanced®) were studied using Double Cantilever Beam sandwich specimens loaded with pure bending moments to obtain stable crack growth. The experiments were conducted in an environmental...... significantly higher fracture resistance than the composite with the coarser microstructure. The fracture properties were related to the flexural strength of the dental composites. The method, thus, can provide useful insight into how the microstructure enhances toughness, which is necessary for the future...

  19. A comparative evaluation of microleakage of restorations using silorane-based dental composite and methacrylate-based dental composites in Class II cavities: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jambai Sampath Kumar Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the microleakage of restorations using low shrinkage silorane-based dental composite and methacrylate-based dental composites in Class II cavity at the occlusal and gingival margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty mandibular molars were collected and divided into three experimental groups and one negative control group. Class II slot cavity was prepared on the mesial surface. Experimental groups were restored with Group I: silorane-based microhybrid composite, Group II: methacrylate-based nanohybrid composite, and Group III: Methacrylate-based microhybrid composite, respectively. Group IV: negative control. The samples were thermocycled, root apices were sealed with sticky wax and coated with nail varnish except 1 mm around the restoration. This was followed by immersion in 2% Rhodamine-B dye solution under vacuum at room temperature for 24 h. Then, the samples were sectioned longitudinally in the mesiodistal direction and evaluated under stereomicroscope ×40 magnification. Scoring was done according to the depth of dye penetration in to the cavity. Statistical analysis of the data was done. Results: The results were that no statistically significant difference in the microleakage at the occlusal margin for all the restorative materials, whereas at the gingival margin, silorane-based microhybrid composite showed less microleakage than the methacrylate-based nano- and micro-hybrid composites. Conclusion: In general, silorane-based microhybrid composite had less microleakage among the other materials used in this in vitro study.

  20. PIXE analysis of trace and other mineral elements in Romanian dental composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoteasa, E. A.; Iordan, Andreea; Harangus, Livia; Ciortea, C.; Moldovan, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Dental composites made of silicates and oxides particles embedded in an organic polymer, show a dynamic evolution but are rather expensive. Recently, the Romanian biomaterial 'Restacril' offered a low-cost alternative. Because the durability of the composite dental fillings depends both on the main chemical composition and on the impurities that may influence the inorganic particles' properties and thus modifying the bio material clinical behaviour, the elemental analysis of the material is necessary for improving its quality. Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE), a sensitive method for multielemental trace detection widely used in biomedical applications, allowed us to evidence 21 mineral elements with Z > 14 in some commercial dental composites. Here we evaluate the performances of PIXE for the control of dental composites by carrying out qualitative analysis of three Romanian biomaterials. PIXE measurements on thick composite samples with a flat surface were done with 3 MeV protons at the NIPNE-HH (Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering) tandem accelerator, using a hyper-pure Ge detector, 30 mm thick Al absorber foil and integration of beam current. Up to 21 elements with Z > 19 were detected: K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Ga, Sr, Zr, Nb, Ru, Ag, Ba, Yb, Nd, Hf, Au, As and Pb. The orders of magnitude of relative concentrations were evaluated using X-ray yields obtained for another light element thick composite target. The Romanian composites have specific and diverse compositions, containing a great number of minor and trace elements, many of whom are impurities. Use of higher purity raw materials is suggested to reduce the latter and improve the materials' quality. Refinement of X-ray yields by better matching matrixes calculations and use of concentration standards are proposed for quantitative PIXE analysis of the dental composites. (authors)

  1. Composition, Production Rate and Management of Dental Solid Waste in 2017 in Birjand, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibe Momeni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of toxic and pathogenic agents in the dental waste products has made it to be classified as “hazardous waste.” Objective: To assess dental waste production rate and composition and approaches used to manage these waste products in 2017 in Birjand, Iran. Methods: 48 dental clinics were evaluated in two months of 2017. Sampling was performed from each clinic 3 times a week. Samples were manually divided into 5 categories of chemical-pharmaceutical, infectious, semi-household, sharp and cutting materials, and toxic waste products, and weighed. A checklist containing 25 questions was used to evaluate the aspects of waste management in dental clinics. Results: The total amount of waste products generated in dental clinics was 7848.02 kg/ year in which semi-household waste had the highest quantity (4263.411 kg/year and toxic waste had the lowest quantity (9.275 kg/year. Components with the highest amounts in dentistry waste products were nylon gloves (16.7%, paper and cardboard (13.4%, latex gloves (10.8%, and pharmaceuticals (10.2%. Waste separation was restricted to sharp and cutting waste. More than half (57% of dental units were equipped with amalgam filter. Fixing solutions were directly discharged to sewage in 48.6% of clinics. There was no program to reduce waste generation in 54% of the clinics. Autoclave was the main tool for sterilizing dental instruments. Conclusion: This study showed a remarkable share of recyclable materials in the composition of dental waste and lack of special approach to manage waste in dental clinics. It is necessary to plan for minimizing generation of, separating, and recycling waste at source.

  2. Composition, Production Rate and Management of Dental Solid Waste in 2017 in Birjand, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Habibe; Tabatabaei Fard, Seyyedeh Fatemeh; Arefinejad, Aliye; Afzali, Afsane; Talebi, Farkhonde; Rahmanpour Salmani, Elham

    2018-01-01

    The presence of toxic and pathogenic agents in the dental waste products has made it to be classified as "hazardous waste." To assess dental waste production rate and composition and approaches used to manage these waste products in 2017 in Birjand, Iran. 48 dental clinics were evaluated in two months of 2017. Sampling was performed from each clinic 3 times a week. Samples were manually divided into 5 categories of chemical-pharmaceutical, infectious, semi-household, sharp and cutting materials, and toxic waste products, and weighed. A checklist containing 25 questions was used to evaluate the aspects of waste management in dental clinics. The total amount of waste products generated in dental clinics was 7848.02 kg/ year in which semi-household waste had the highest quantity (4263.411 kg/year) and toxic waste had the lowest quantity (9.275 kg/year). Components with the highest amounts in dentistry waste products were nylon gloves (16.7%), paper and cardboard (13.4%), latex gloves (10.8%), and pharmaceuticals (10.2%). Waste separation was restricted to sharp and cutting waste. More than half (57%) of dental units were equipped with amalgam filter. Fixing solutions were directly discharged to sewage in 48.6% of clinics. There was no program to reduce waste generation in 54% of the clinics. Autoclave was the main tool for sterilizing dental instruments. This study showed a remarkable share of recyclable materials in the composition of dental waste and lack of special approach to manage waste in dental clinics. It is necessary to plan for minimizing generation of, separating, and recycling waste at source.

  3. Nanotechnology strategies for antibacterial and remineralizing composites and adhesives to tackle dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Ke; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H K

    2015-03-01

    Dental caries is the most widespread disease and an economic burden. Nanotechnology is promising to inhibit caries by controlling biofilm acids and enhancing remineralization. Nanoparticles of silver were incorporated into composites/adhesives, along with quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs), to combat biofilms. Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) released calcium/phosphate ions, remineralized tooth-lesions and neutralized acids. By combining nanoparticles of silver/QAM/NACP, a new class of composites and adhesives with antibacterial and remineralization double benefits was developed. Various other nanoparticles including metal and oxide nanoparticles such as ZnO and TiO2, as well as polyethylenimine nanoparticles and their antibacterial capabilities in dental resins were also reviewed. These nanoparticles are promising for incorporation into dental composites/cements/sealants/bases/liners/adhesives. Therefore, nanotechnology has potential to significantly improve restorative and preventive dentistry.

  4. Nanotechnology strategies for antibacterial and remineralizing composites and adhesives to tackle dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Ke; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin HK

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is the most widespread disease and an economic burden. Nanotechnology is promising to inhibit caries by controlling biofilm acids and enhancing remineralization. Nanoparticles of silver were incorporated into composites/adhesives, along with quaternary ammonium methacrylates (QAMs), to combat biofilms. Nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) released calcium/phosphate ions, remineralized tooth-lesions and neutralized acids. By combining NAg/QAM/NACP, a new class of composites and adhesives with antibacterial and remineralization double benefits was developed. Various other nanoparticles including metal and oxide nanoparticles such as ZnO and TiO2, as well as polyethylenimine nanoparticles and their antibacterial capabilities in dental resins were also reviewed. These nanoparticles are promising for incorporation into dental composites/cements/sealants/bases/liners/adhesives. Therefore, nanotechnology has potential to significantly improve restorative and preventive dentistry. PMID:25723095

  5. The preparation of dental glass-ceramic composites with controlled fraction of leucite crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Mrázová

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is dealing with synthesis of leucite powder, which can be used for the preparation of dental glassceramic composites by subsequent thermal treatment. Newly developed procedure is based on preparation of dental raw material as a mixture of two separate compounds: the crystalline leucite powder prepared at relatively low temperature and a commercial matrix powder.Hydrothermal synthesis of tetragonal leucite particles (KAlSi2O6 with the average size of about 3 μm was developed in our laboratory. The leucite dental raw material was prepared by mixing of 20 wt.% of synthetic tetragonal leucite with commercial matrix. Dental composites were prepared from the dental raw material by uniaxial pressing and firing up to 960°C. Dilatometric measurements confirmed that the coefficient of thermal expansion increased by 32% when 20 wt.% of the tetragonal leucite was added into the basic matrix. In addition, it was showed that the synthesized leucite powder was suitable for the preparation of leucite composites with controlled coefficient of thermal expansion. High value of the thermal expansion coefficient enables application of prepared composite in metal-ceramics restorations.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of a Polyimide-Epoxy Composite for Dental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, An; Xu, Chun

    2018-03-01

    Epoxy (EP) resins have been employed in dentistry for years, but their intrinsic brittleness demands a reinforcement to make them an ideal dental material that combines strength, toughness, and aesthetics. In this study, an EP resin was reinforced with a low-molecular-weight polyimide (PI). The PI/EP composites were subjected to three-point bending tests and examined by the scanning electron microscopy. It was found that blending PI with EP in proper proportions strengthened EP without sacrificing its toughness. The PI/EP composite could be employed in dentistry as the matrix of fiber-reinforced dental root canal posts.

  7. Synthesis of wrinkled mesoporous silica and its reinforcing effect for dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruili; Habib, Eric; Zhu, X X

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the reinforcing effect of wrinkled mesoporous silica (WMS), which should allow micromechanical resin matrix/filler interlocking in dental resin composites, and to investigate the effect of silica morphology, loading, and compositions on their mechanical properties. WMS (average diameter of 496nm) was prepared through the self-assembly method and characterized by the use of the electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and the N 2 adsorption-desorption measurements. The mechanical properties of resin composites containing silanized WMS and nonporous smaller silica were evaluated with a universal mechanical testing machine. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to study the fracture morphology of dental composites. Resin composites including silanized silica particles (average diameter of 507nm) served as the control group. Higher filler loading of silanized WMS substantially improved the mechanical properties of the neat resin matrix, over the composites loaded with regular silanized silica particles similar in size. The impregnation of smaller secondary silica particles with diameters of 90 and 190nm, denoted respectively as Si90 and Si190, increased the filler loading of the bimodal WMS filler (WMS-Si90 or WMS-Si190) to 60wt%, and the corresponding composites exhibited better mechanical properties than the control fillers made with regular silica particles. Among all composites, the optimal WMS-Si190- filled composite (mass ratio WMS:Si190=10:90, total filler loading 60wt%) exhibited the best mechanical performance including flexural strength, flexural modulus, compressive strength and Vickers microhardness. The incorporation of WMS and its mixed bimodal fillers with smaller silica particles led to the design and formulation of dental resin composites with superior mechanical properties. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Infrared spectroscopy: a tool for determination of the degree of conversion in dental composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Gonçalves Palmeira Moraes

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Infrared spectroscopy is one of the most widely used techniques for measurement of conversion degree in dental composites. However, to obtain good quality spectra and quantitative analysis from spectral data, appropriate expertise and knowledge of the technique are mandatory. This paper presents important details to use infrared spectroscopy for determination of the conversion degree.

  9. Curing kinetics of visible light curing dental resin composites investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Großgarten, Mandy; Möginger, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    During the curing process of light curing dental composites the mobility of molecules and molecule segments is reduced leading to a significant increase of the viscosity as well as the ion viscosity. Thus, the kinetics of the curing behavior of 6 different composites was derived from dielectric analysis (DEA) using especially redesigned flat sensors with interdigit comb electrodes allowing for irradiation at the top side and measuring the ion viscosity at the bottom side. As the ion viscosities of dental composites change 1-3 orders of magnitude during the curing process, DEA provides a sensitive approach to evaluate their curing behavior, especially in the phase of undisturbed chain growth. In order to determine quantitative kinetic parameters a kinetic model is presented and examined for the evaluation of the ion viscosity curves. From the obtained results it is seen that DEA might be employed in the investigation of the primary curing process, the quality assurance of ingredients as well as the control of processing stability of the light curing dental composites. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The development of a composite bone model for training on placement of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhodary, Mohamed Ahmed; Abdelraheim, Abdelraheim Emad Eldin; Elsantawy, Abd Elaleem Hassan; Al Dahman, Yousef Hamad; Al-Mershed, Mohammed

    2015-04-01

    It takes a lot of training on patients for both undergraduate to develop clinical sense as regards to the placement of dental implants in the jaw bones, also, the models provided by the dental implant companies for training are usually made of strengthened synthetic foams, which are far from the composition, and tactile sense provided by natural bone during drilling for clinical placement of dental implants. This is an in-vitro experimental study which utilized bovine femur bone, where the shaft of the femur provided the surface compact layer, and the head provided the cancellous bone layer, to provide a training model similar to jaw bones macroscopic anatomy. Both the compact and cancellous bone samples were characterized using mechanical compressive testing. The elastic moduli of the cancellous and cortical femur bone were comparable to those of the human mandible, and the prepared training model provided a more lifelike condition during the drilling and placement of dental implants. The composite bone model developed simulated the macroscopic anatomy of the jaw bones having a surface layer of compact bone, and a core of cancellous bone, and provided a better and a more natural hands-on experience for placement of dental implants as compared to plastic models made of polyurethane.

  11. Evaluation of the filler packing structures in dental resin composites: From theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruili; Habib, Eric; Zhu, X X

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the packing properties of uniform silica particles and their mixture with secondary particles yielding maximally loaded dental composites. We intend to verify the difference between the idealized models (the close-packed structures and the random-packed structures) and the actual experimental results, in order to provide guidance for the preparation of dental composites. The influence of secondary particle size and the resin composition on the physical-mechanical properties and the rheological properties of the experimental dental composites was also investigated. Silica particles (S-920, S-360, and S-195) with average diameters of 920, 360, and 195nm were synthesized via the Stöber process. Their morphology and size distribution were determined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and laser particle sizer. A series of silica fillers, S-920, S-920+195, S-920+360, and S-920+360+195, were then formulated with two Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resins (weight ratios of 70:30 and 50:50). For these experimental dental composites, their maximum filler loadings were assessed and compared to the theory. The mechanical properties, degree of conversion, depth of cure, and polymerization shrinkage of these composites were then evaluated. Their rheological behaviors were measured with a rheometer. Unimodal S-920 had the maximally filler loading of 70.80wt% with the 5B5T resin, close to the theoretical estimation of the random loose packing (71.92wt%). The maximum loading of the S-920+360+195 filled composite was 72.92wt% for the same resin, compared to the theoretical estimation of 89.29wt% obtained for the close-packed structures. These findings indicate that random loose packing matches more closely to the real packing state for the filler formulations used. When maximally loaded, the composite with S-920+360+195 produced the best mechanical properties and the lowest polymerization shrinkage. The degree of conversion and depth of cure were

  12. Studies on the composition of human dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molokhia, A.; Nixon, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    The concentrations of Ca, Mg, Na, K, Cl, Zn, Sr, Mn, Ba, Br and Au were determined in individual samples of dental calculus collected from patients resident in the Manchester area. The method used was instrumental neutron activation analysis, combined with gamma-spectrometry. The highest and lowest values of Sr were found in calculus from patients of Asian origin. No differences were found in the elements studied with regard to sex or age. Individual variations were highest in Au and lowest in Ca. (author)

  13. Mineral elements in dental composites by atomic and nuclear analytical methods. II. Improved analysis by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoteasa, E.A.; Ciortea, C.; Fluerasu, D.; Enescu, S.E.; Preoteasa, Elena

    2000-01-01

    In the corrosive environment of the mouth, a diversity of interactions take place at the solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces of a tooth's filling. Moreover, the mineral elements of the restorative material may induce a complex response of the organism. The approach of these problems requires sensitive surface elemental analysis of the composite and of the dental enamel and dentine. Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) is such a method and has been applied in investigations of hard dental tissues; however, it was not used so far in the study of dental composites. We continue our study by evaluating the potential of PIXE for analysis of these materials. Three types of composites with two color shades each have been studied. The measurements were performed with 3 MeV protons, using a hyperpure Ge detector in a spectroscopic chain connected to a computer. The spectra were processed with the dedicated program Leone. PIXE without additional Al absorbent foil allowed the detection of Z > 14 elements in composites. In two glass- and ceramics-based materials we found: Ca, Zr, Ba, Yb and traces of Sr and In in Tetric Ceram (Vivadent); and Ca, Zr, Ba, Hf, possibly Mn, and traces of Ni, Ho, Ti, Fe, Cr in Valux Plus (3M Dental), after elimination of the escape peaks. In quartz-based Evicrol (Spofa), Si, Ca, Ti, Fe and traces of K, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn were seen. Materials with different color shades showed variations of Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni and Cu in Evicrol, as contrasted to Tetric Ceram and Valux Plus whose spectra were color-invariant. By its sensitivity and low background, PIXE enables the detection of many trace elements in dental composites; it could serve also in new materials' development and forensic expertise. (authors)

  14. Mucosal pH, dental findings, and salivary composition in pediatric liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovich, Esti; Asher, Ran; Shapira, Joseph; Brand, Henk S; Veerman, Enno C I; Shapiro, Rivka

    2013-07-15

    Oral health and dental maintenance have become part of the standard of care for pediatric liver transplant recipients. These individuals tend to suffer particularly from dental problems, such as gingival enlargement, gingivitis, poor oral hygiene, dental hypoplasia, and caries. Saliva composition influences oral hygiene and disease states. We investigated saliva composition and its association with the oral health of young recipients of liver transplants. In 70 patients, 36 liver transplant recipients (ages 2-23 years) and 34 healthy controls (ages 4-21 years), we measured the following variables: (a) oral hygiene, (b) gingival inflammation, (c) caries status, (d) dental calculus formation, (e) oral mucosal pH, and (f) salivary protein composition. Lower mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth index (P=0.0038), higher mean gingival index (P=0.0001), and higher mean calculus score (P=0.003) were found in the transplanted study group compared with the control. The mean mucosal pH for seven intraoral sites was higher in the transplant group (P=0.0006). The median salivary albumin concentration was significantly lower in the transplant group (P=0.01), as was the median salivary albumin/total protein ratio (P=0.0002). In post-liver transplant pediatric recipients, low incidence of caries, together with high incidence of dental calculus, could be attributed to elevated oral mucosal pH. Salivary albumin and immunoglobulin A levels were relatively low in these patients. Clinicians should pay particular attention to the oral health and dental care of liver transplanted children.

  15. Interpenetrating network ceramic-resin composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, M V; Coldea, A; Bilkhair, A; Guess, P C

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the structure and some properties of resin infiltrated ceramic network structure materials suitable for CAD/CAM dental restorative applications. Initially the basis of interpenetrating network materials is defined along with placing them into a materials science perspective. This involves identifying potential advantages of such structures beyond that of the individual materials or simple mixing of the components. Observations from a number of recently published papers on this class of materials are summarized. These include the strength, fracture toughness, hardness and damage tolerance, namely to pointed and blunt (spherical) indentation as well as to burr adjustment. In addition a summary of recent results of crowns subjected to simulated clinical conditions using a chewing simulator are presented. These results are rationalized on the basis of existing theoretical considerations. The currently available ceramic-resin IPN material for clinical application is softer, exhibits comparable strength and fracture toughness but with substantial R-curve behavior, has lower E modulus and is more damage tolerant than existing glass-ceramic materials. Chewing simulation observations with crowns of this material indicate that it appears to be more resistant to sliding/impact induced cracking although its overall contact induced breakage load is modest. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Composition of enamel pellicle from dental erosion patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, G; Cotroneo, E; Moazzez, R; Rojas-Serrano, M; Donaldson, N; Austin, R; Zaidel, L; Bartlett, D; Proctor, G

    2014-01-01

    Oral health is dependent upon a thin mobile film of saliva on soft and hard tissues. Salivary proteins adhere to teeth to form the acquired enamel pellicle which is believed to protect teeth from acid erosion. This study investigated whether patients suffering diet-induced dental erosion had altered enamel pellicles. Thirty patients suffering erosion were compared to healthy age-matched controls. Subjects wore a maxillary splint holding hydroxyapatite and human enamel blocks for 1 h. The acquired enamel pellicle was removed from the blocks and compared to the natural incisor pellicle. Basic Erosive Wear Examination scores confirmed that dental erosion was present in erosion patients and absent from healthy age-matched controls. Erosion patients had half the amount of proteins (BCA assay) within the acquired pellicle forming on splint blocks compared to normal controls (p erosion patients (p erosion patients and healthy controls. In summary, the formation of new acquired pellicles on surfaces was reduced in erosion patients, which may explain their greater susceptibility to acid erosion of teeth. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Incorporation of antibacterial agent derived deep eutectic solvent into an active dental composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Dong, Xiaoqing; Yu, Qingsong; Baker, Sheila N; Li, Hao; Larm, Nathaniel E; Baker, Gary A; Chen, Liang; Tan, Jingwen; Chen, Meng

    2017-12-01

    To incorporate an antibacterial agent derived deep eutectic solvent (DES) into a dental resin composite, and investigate the resulting mechanical properties and antibacterial effects. The DES was derived from benzalkonium chloride (BC) and acrylic acid (AA) and was incorporated into the dental resin composite through rapid mixing. A three-point bending test was employed to measure the flexural strength of the composite. An agar diffusion test was used to investigate antibacterial activity. Artificial (accelerated) aging was undertaken by immersing the composites in buffer solutions at an elevated temperature for up to 4 weeks. UV-vis spectrophotometry and NMR analysis were conducted to study BC release from the composite. Finally, the biocompatibility of the composite materials was evaluated using osteoblast cell culture for 7 days. Results were compared to those of a control composite which contained no BC. The DES-incorporated composite (DES-C) displayed higher flexural strength than a similar BC-incorporated composite BC (BC-C) for the same level of BC. The inclusion of BC conferred antibacterial activity to both BC-containing composites, although BC-C produced larger inhibition halos than DES-C at the same loading of BC. Control composites which contained no BC showed negligible antibacterial activity. After artificial aging, the DES-C composite showed better maintenance of the mechanical properties of the control compared with BC-C, although a decrease was observed during the three-point bending test, particularly upon storage at elevated temperatures. No BC release was detected in the aged solutions of DES-C, whereas the BC-C showed a linear increase in BC release with storage time. Significantly, cell viability results indicated that DES-C has better biocompatibility than BC-C. The incorporation of a BC-based DES into a dental resin composite provides a new strategy to develop antibacterial dental materials with better biocompatibility and longer effective

  18. Rugometric and microtopographic non-invasive inspection in dental-resin composites and zirconia ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Costa, Manuel F. M.; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María. M.

    2013-11-01

    Surface properties are essential for a complete characterization of biomaterials. In restorative dentistry, the study of the surface properties of materials meant to replace dental tissues in an irreversibly diseased tooth is important to avoid harmful changes in future treatments. We have experimentally analyzed the surface characterization parameters of two different types of dental-resin composites and pre-sintered and sintered zirconia ceramics. We studied two shades of both composite types and two sintered zirconia ceramics: colored and uncolored. Moreover, a surface treatment was applied to one specimen of each dental-resin. All the samples were submitted to rugometric and microtopographic non-invasive inspection with the MICROTOP.06.MFC laser microtopographer in order to gather meaningful statistical parameters such as the average roughness (Ra), the root-mean-square deviation (Rq), the skewness (Rsk), and the kurtosis of the surface height distribution (Rku). For a comparison of the different biomaterials, the uncertainties associated to the surface parameters were also determined. With respect to Ra and Rq, significant differences between the composite shades were found. Among the dental resins, the nanocomposite presented the highest values and, for the zirconia ceramics, the pre-sintered sample registered the lowest ones. The composite performance may have been due to cluster-formation variations. Except for the composites with the surface treatment, the sample surfaces had approximately a normal distribution of heights. The surface treatment applied to the composites increased the average roughness and moved the height distribution farther away from the normal distribution. The zirconia-sintering process resulted in higher average roughness without affecting the height distribution.

  19. Relationship between Color and Translucency of Multishaded Dental Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homan Naeimi Akbar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the translucency of different shades of two highly aesthetic multilayered restorative composite resins. In total nine shades from Esthet.X and ten shades from Filtek Supreme composite resins were chosen. Discs of each shade were prepared (N=3 and light-cured. Total and diffuse transmittance values for each sample were measured. Statistical analysis showed that the opaque dentine shades of both composites were the least translucent and the enamel shades had the highest translucency. There was a significant decrease in translucency from A2 to C2 of regular body shades and also from A4 to C4 of opaque dentine shades of Esthet.X composite resin. Grey enamel shade had a significantly higher diffuse translucency compared to clear and yellow enamel shades. There was a significant decrease in translucency from A2B to D2B and also in diffuse translucency from A4D to C6D shades of Filtek Supreme composite resin. It can be concluded that the color of the composite resins tested in this study had a significant effect on their translucency. Information on the translucency of different shades of composite resins can be very useful for the clinicians in achieving optimal esthetic restorative outcome.

  20. Systematic approach to preparing ceramic-glass composites with high translucency for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Humberto N; Chimanski, Afonso; Cesar, Paulo F

    2015-10-01

    Ceramic composites are promising materials for dental restorations. However, it is difficult to prepare highly translucent composites due to the light scattering that occurs in multiphase ceramics. The objective of this work was to verify the effectiveness of a systematic approach in designing specific glass compositions with target properties in order to prepare glass infiltrated ceramic composites with high translucency. First it was necessary to calculate from literature data the viscosity of glass at the infiltration temperature using the SciGlass software. Then, a glass composition was designed for targeted viscosity and refractive index. The glass of the system SiO2-B2O3-Al2O3-La2O3-TiO2 prepared by melting the oxide raw materials was spontaneously infiltrated into porous alumina preforms at 1200°C. The optical properties were evaluated using a refractometer and a spectrophotometer. The absorption and scattering coefficients were calculated using the Kubelka-Munk model. The light transmittance of prepared composite was significantly higher than a commercial ceramic-glass composite, due to the matching of glass and preform refractive indexes which decreased the scattering, and also to the decrease in absorption coefficient. The proposed systematic approach was efficient for development of glass infiltrated ceramic composites with high translucency, which benefits include the better aesthetic performance of the final prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct spectrometry: a new alternative for measuring the fluorescence of composite resins and dental tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Tm; de Oliveira, Hpm; Severino, D; Balducci, I; Huhtala, Mfrl; Gonçalves, Sep

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluorescence intensity of different composite resins and compare those values with the fluorescence intensity of dental tissues. Different composite resins were used to make 10 discs (2 mm in depth and 4 mm in diameter) of each brand, divided into groups: 1) Z (Filtek Z350, 3M ESPE), 2) ES (Esthet-X, Dentsply), 3) A (Amelogen Plus, Ultradent), 4) DVS (Durafill-VS, Heraeus Kulzer) with 2 mm composite resin for enamel (A2), 5) OES ([Esthet-X] opaque-OA [1 mm] + enamel-A2 [1 mm]); 6) ODVSI ([Charisma-Opal/Durafill-VSI], opaque-OM (1 mm) + translucent [1mm]), and 7) DVSI ([Durafill- VSI] translucent [2 mm]). Dental tissue specimens were obtained from human anterior teeth cut in a mesiodistal direction to obtain enamel, dentin, and enamel/dentin samples (2 mm). The fluorescence intensity of specimens was directly measured using an optic fiber associated with a spectrometer (Ocean Optics USB 4000) and recorded in graphic form (Origin 8.0 program). Data were submitted to statistical analysis using Dunnet, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests. Light absorption of the composite resins was obtained in a spectral range from 250 to 450 nm, and that of dental tissues was between 250 and 300 nm. All composite resins were excited at 398 nm and exhibited maximum emissions of around 485 nm. Fluorescence intensity values for all of the resins showed statistically significant differences (measured in arbitrary units [AUs]), with the exception of groups Z and DVS. Group DVSI had the highest fluorescence intensity values (13539 AU), followed by ODVS (10440 AU), DVS (10146 AU), ES (3946 AU), OES (3841 AU), A (3540 AU), and Z (1146 AU). The fluorescence intensity values for the composite resins differed statistically from those of dental tissues (E=1380 AU; D=6262 AU; E/D=3251 AU). The opacity interfered with fluorescence intensity, and group Z demonstrated fluorescence intensity values closest to that of tooth enamel. It is concluded that the

  2. Swept source optical coherence tomography for quantitative and qualitative assessment of dental composite restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Mayoral, Juan Ricardo; Hariri, Ilnaz; Bakhsh, Turki A.; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the utility of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) for quantitative evaluation of dental composite restorations. The system (Santec, Japan) with a center wavelength of around 1300 nm and axial resolution of 12 μm was used to record data during and after placement of light-cured composites. The Fresnel phenomenon at the interfacial defects resulted in brighter areas indicating gaps as small as a few micrometers. The gap extension at the interface was quantified and compared to the observation by confocal laser scanning microscope after trimming the specimen to the same cross-section. Also, video imaging of the composite during polymerization could provide information about real-time kinetics of contraction stress and resulting gaps, distinguishing them from those gaps resulting from poor adaptation of composite to the cavity prior to polymerization. Some samples were also subjected to a high resolution microfocus X-ray computed tomography (μCT) assessment; it was found that differentiation of smaller gaps from the radiolucent bonding layer was difficult with 3D μCT. Finally, a clinical imaging example using a newly developed dental SS-OCT system with an intra-oral scanning probe (Panasonic Healthcare, Japan) is presented. SS-OCT is a unique tool for clinical assessment and laboratory research on resin-based dental restorations. Supported by GCOE at TMDU and NCGG.

  3. Mineral elements in dental composites by atomic and nuclear analytical methods. I. Fast analysis by XRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoteasa, E.A.; Constantinescu, B.; Preoteasa, Elena

    2000-01-01

    Composite materials replaced silver amalgam in many applications for restorative dentistry. Among biomaterials their production develops at a high rate, due especially to the progress of materials forming their mineral filling. However they bring at the interface with enamel and dentine elements foreign to the organism, of whom not all are specified by manufacturers; also, some of these elements' biological action has not been studied. Due to its ability to analyze the elemental composition at the biomaterial's surface, as well as the concentration changes that may occur in the mouth or in model systems, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a method suited to approach such problems. Here we examined the potential of XRF for fast analysis of some dental composite materials. Flat disk-shaped samples have been prepared by polymerization and the measurements have been performed with a spectrometric chain containing a 241 Am source, a Si(Li) detector and a multichannel analyzer. The radioisotope-excited XRF detected the following Z > 20 elements in the studied composite materials: Ba in Charisma (Kulzer) and Pekafill (Bayer); Zr, Ba, Yb [and traces of In] in Tetric Ceram (Vivadent); Zr, Hf in Valux Plus and Sr, Ba and traces of Cu in F2000 compomer (both from 3M Dental). Among older materials, Evicrol (Spofa) and Alphaplast (DGM) showed Ca and Fe, while Concise (3M Dental) contained only undetectable (Z < 20) elements. XRF proved valuable especially for analysis of major and minor inorganic elements in the dental composite materials. The method could be used also in fast expertise of these biomaterials (e.g. in customs and commercial applications). (authors)

  4. 3D-WOVEN FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITE FOR CAD/CAM DENTAL APPLICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D)-woven noncrimp fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) was tested for mechanical properties in the two principal directions of the main XY plane and compared to different Computer-Aided-Design/Computer-Aided-Machining (CAD/CAM) Dental Materials. The Dental Materials included ceramic with Vitablock Mark II®, ProCAD®, InCeram® Spinel, InCeram® Alumina and InCeram® Zirconia in addition to a resin-based 3M Corp. Paradigm® particulate-filled composite. Alternate material controls included Coors 300 Alumina Ceramic and a tungsten carbide 22% cobalt cermet. The 3D-woven FRC was vacuum assisted resin transfer molding processed as a one-depth-thickness ~19-mm preform with a vinyl-ester resin and cut into blocks similar to the commercial CAD/CAM Dental Materials. Mechanical test samples prepared for a flexural three-point span length of 10.0 mm were sectioned for minimum-depth cuts to compare machinability and fracture resistance between groups. 3D-woven FRC improved mechanical properties with significant statistical differences over all CAD/CAM Dental Materials and Coors Alumina Ceramic for flexural strength (p<0.001), resilience (p<0.05), work of fracture (p<0.001), strain energy release (p<0.05), critical stress intensity factor (p<0.001) and strain (p<0.001).

  5. Composite smile designs: the key to dental artistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portalier, L

    1997-01-01

    Patients seeking to improve the appearance of their smiles have driven the profession toward more challenges in esthetic dentistry to answer their needs. Better smiles are being equated with better living. Direct composite veneering has gained tremendous popularity over the past few years because the procedure can be done in one single appointment for a reasonable fee with acceptable results. Materials recently put on the market require stratification build-up techniques to allow for the best natural results. In addition, the procedure gives patients the freedom of live communication and dentists the emotive artistic recreation of a smile composition in which anterior teeth can be designed and redesigned through freehand craftmanship, until both patient and dentist are pleased with the results. This review highlights the benefits of direct composite veneering, a very unique process to investigate more about tooth and smile designs, and suggests more effective communication between patient and dentist in order to achieve predictable results.

  6. REE compositions in fossil vertebrate dental tissues indicate biomineral preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žigaite, Ž.; Kear, B.; Pérez-Huerta, A.; Jeffries, T.; Blom, H.

    2012-04-01

    Rare earth element (REE) abundances have been measured in a number of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic dental tissues using Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Fossil vertebrates analysed comprise scales and tesserae of Silurian and Devonian acanthodians, chondrichthyans, galeaspids, mongolepids, thelodonts, as well as teeth of Cretaceous lungfish and marine reptiles. The evaluation of fossil preservation level has been made by semi-quantitative spot geochemistry analyses on fine polished teeth and scale thin sections, using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Fossil teeth and scales with significant structure and colour alteration have shown elevated heavy element concentrations, and the silicification of bioapatite has been common in their tissues. Stable oxygen isotope measurements (δ18O) of bulk biomineral have been conducted in parallel, and showed comparatively lower heavy oxygen values in the same fossil tissues with stronger visible alteration. Significant difference in REE concentrations has been observed between the dentine and enamel of Cretaceous plesiosaurs, suggesting the enamel to be more geochemically resistant to diagenetic overprint.

  7. Flight-vehicle materials, structures, and dynamics - Assessment and future directions. Vol. 3 - Ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present volume discusses ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites in prospective aerospace systems, monolithic ceramics, transformation-toughened and whisker-reinforced ceramic composites, glass-ceramic matrix composites, reaction-bonded Si3N4 and SiC composites, and chemical vapor-infiltrated composites. Also discussed are the sol-gel-processing of ceramic composites, the fabrication and properties of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites with directed metal oxidation, the fracture behavior of ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs), the fatigue of fiber-reinforced CMCs, creep and rupture of CMCs, structural design methodologies for ceramic-based materials systems, the joining of ceramics and CMCs, and carbon-carbon composites.

  8. BACTERIAL ADHESION TO DENTAL AMALGAM AND 3 RESIN COMPOSITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SULJAK, JP; REID, G; WOOD, SM; MCCONNELL, RJ; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    Objectives: The ability of three oral bacteria to adhere to hydrophobic amalgam (water contact angle 60 degrees) and hydrophobic resin composites (Prisma-AP.H 56 degrees, Herculite XRV 82 degrees and Z100 89 degrees) was compared using an in vitro assay. Methods and results: Following preincubation

  9. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... produce dental materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental... materials such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other... Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix...

  10. Effect of three filler types on mechanical properties of dental composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahlavan A.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Despite the improvements achieved in the field of dental composites, their strength, longevity, and service life specially in high stress areas is not confirmed. Finding better fillers can be a promising step in this task. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the filler type on the mechanical properties of a new experimental dental composite and compare these with the properties of composite containing conventional glass filler. Materials and Methods: Experimental composites were prepared by mixing silane-treated fillers with monomers, composed of 70% Bis-GMA and 30% TEGDMA by weight. Fillers were different among the groups. Glass, leucite ceramic and lithium disilicate were prepared as different filler types. All three groups contained 73% wt filler. Comphorquinone and amines were chosen as photo initiator system. Post curing was done for all groups. Diametral tensile strength (DTS, flexural strength and flexural modulus were measured and compared among groups. Data were analyzed with SPSS package using one-way ANOVA test with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: The results showed that the stronger ceramic fillers have positive effect on the flexural strength. Ceramic fillers increased the flexural strength significantly. No significant differences could be determined in DTS among the groups. Flexural modulus can be affected and increased by using ceramic fillers. Conclusion: Flexural strength is one of the most significant properties of restorative dental materials. The higher flexural strength and flexural modulus can be achieved by stronger ceramic fillers. Any further investigation in this field would be beneficial in the development of restorative dental materials.

  11. Hardness of model dental composites - the effect of filler volume fraction and silanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, J F; Wassell, R W

    1999-05-01

    The relationship between structure and mechanical properties for dental composites has often proved difficult to determine due to the use of commercially available materials having a number of differences in composition i.e. different type of resin, different type of filler, etc. This makes a scientific study of any one variable such as filler content difficult if not impossible. In the current study it was the aim to test the hypothesis that hardness measurements of dental composites could be used to monitor the status of the resin-filler interface and to determine the efficacy of any particle silanation process. Ten model composites formulated from a single batch of resin and containing a common type of glass filler were formulated to contain varying amounts of filler. Some materials contained silanated filler, others contained unsilanated filler. Specimens were prepared and stored in water and hardness (Vickers') was determined at 24 h using loads of 50, 100, 200 and 300 g. Composites containing silanated fillers were significantly harder than materials containing unsilanated fillers. For unsilanated products hardness was independent of applied load and in this respect they behaved like homogeneous materials. For composites containing silanated fillers there was a marked increase in measured hardness as applied load was increased. This suggests that the hardness-load profile could be used to monitor the status of the resin-filler interface. Copyright 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers

  12. Local viscoelastic response of direct and indirect dental restorative composites measured by AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattarola, Laura; Derchi, Giacomo; Diaspro, Alberto; Gambaro, Carla; Salerno, Marco

    2018-06-08

    We investigated the viscoelastic response of direct and indirect dental restorative composites by the novel technique of AM-FM atomic force microscopy. We selected four composites for direct restorations (Adonis, Optifil, EPH, CME) and three composites for indirect restorations (Gradia, Estenia, Signum). Scanning electron microscopy with micro-analysis was also used to support the results. The mean storage modulus of all composites was in the range of 10.2-15.2 GPa. EPH was the stiffest (pcomposites but Adonis and Estenia), while no significant difference was observed between direct and indirect group (p≥0.05). For the loss tangent, Gradia had the highest value (~0.3), different (pcomposites showed higher loss tangent (pcomposites. All composites exhibited minor contrast at the edge of fillers, showing that these are pre-polymerized, as confirmed by EDS.

  13. Effect of in-office bleaching agents on physical properties of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourouzis, Petros; Koulaouzidou, Elisabeth A; Helvatjoglu-Antoniades, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The physical properties of dental restorative materials have a crucial effect on the longevity of restorations and moreover on the esthetic demands of patients, but they may be compromised by bleaching treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of in-office bleaching agents on the physical properties of three composite resin restorative materials. The bleaching agents used were hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide at high concentrations. Specimens of each material were prepared, cured, and polished. Measurements of color difference, microhardness, and surface roughness were recorded before and after bleaching and data were examined statistically by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD post-hoc test at P composite resin altered after the bleaching procedure (P composite resins tested (P > .05). The silorane-based composite resin tested showed some color alteration after bleaching procedures. The bleaching procedure did not alter the microhardness and the surface roughness of all composite resins tested.

  14. Effect of resin chemistry on depth of cure and cytotoxicity of dental resin composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susila Anand, V.; Balasubramanian, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dental composites have differences in polymerization within 2 mm thickness. • Degree of conversion alone may not affect the biocompatibility of composite. • Unreacted double bonds in dental composites may influence biocompatibility. • Magnitude of double bonds depends on the polymerization and chemical composition. • These influence biocompatibility especially if they possess lipophylic properties. -- Abstract: New dental composite restorative materials are being introduced aiming to overcome the disadvantages of contemporary materials. Hence there is a need to analyze the critical properties of these composites to aid in clinical application. This study aims to comparatively analyze the degree of conversion (DC), residual reactivity (DBC/reactivity) and cytotoxicity of 2 composites based on different resin chemistry. Ceram X and Filtek P90 were used in the study to prepare disc shaped samples of 2 mm thickness and 4 mm diameter. The samples for cytotoxicity were cured for 40 s and those of Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) (DBC/reactivity and DC) for 5 s, 10 s, 20 s and 40 s, at an average intensity of 800 mW/cm 2 with Quartz–Tungsten–Halogen (QTH) light. DC was calculated in 60–100 μm thick and 6 mm diameter samples. Double bonds concentration/reactivity was measured in approximately 80 μm thick sections prepared from the 2 mm thick discs using a hard tissue microtome. The cell viability was scored by Trypan blue exclusion staining technique at 24 h and 48 h. Both composites showed a progressive increase in double bonds/reactivity as the distance from curing probe increased which was inversely proportional to the curing time. The DC of Filtek P90 was 20% and 96% and that of Ceram X 33% and 50% at 5 s and 40 s, respectively. Ceram X showed statistically significantly higher cell viability score at both 24 h and 48 h than Filtek P90. The results were statistically analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal–Wallis, Mann

  15. Effect of resin chemistry on depth of cure and cytotoxicity of dental resin composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susila Anand, V. [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College, Saveetha University, Chennai 600077 (India); Balasubramanian, Venkatesh, E-mail: chanakya@iitm.ac.in [Rehabilitation Bioengineering Group, Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Dental composites have differences in polymerization within 2 mm thickness. • Degree of conversion alone may not affect the biocompatibility of composite. • Unreacted double bonds in dental composites may influence biocompatibility. • Magnitude of double bonds depends on the polymerization and chemical composition. • These influence biocompatibility especially if they possess lipophylic properties. -- Abstract: New dental composite restorative materials are being introduced aiming to overcome the disadvantages of contemporary materials. Hence there is a need to analyze the critical properties of these composites to aid in clinical application. This study aims to comparatively analyze the degree of conversion (DC), residual reactivity (DBC/reactivity) and cytotoxicity of 2 composites based on different resin chemistry. Ceram X and Filtek P90 were used in the study to prepare disc shaped samples of 2 mm thickness and 4 mm diameter. The samples for cytotoxicity were cured for 40 s and those of Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR) (DBC/reactivity and DC) for 5 s, 10 s, 20 s and 40 s, at an average intensity of 800 mW/cm{sup 2} with Quartz–Tungsten–Halogen (QTH) light. DC was calculated in 60–100 μm thick and 6 mm diameter samples. Double bonds concentration/reactivity was measured in approximately 80 μm thick sections prepared from the 2 mm thick discs using a hard tissue microtome. The cell viability was scored by Trypan blue exclusion staining technique at 24 h and 48 h. Both composites showed a progressive increase in double bonds/reactivity as the distance from curing probe increased which was inversely proportional to the curing time. The DC of Filtek P90 was 20% and 96% and that of Ceram X 33% and 50% at 5 s and 40 s, respectively. Ceram X showed statistically significantly higher cell viability score at both 24 h and 48 h than Filtek P90. The results were statistically analyzed using non-parametric Kruskal

  16. Scanning electron microscopy and roughness study of dental composite degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Cortez, Louise Ribeiro; Zarur, Raquel de Oliveira; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-04-01

    Our aim was to test the hypothesis that the use of mouthwashes, consumption of soft drinks, as well as the type of light curing unit (LCU), would change the surface roughness (Ra) and morphology of a nanofilled composite resin (Z350® 3M ESPE). Samples (80) were divided into eight groups: Halogen LCU, group 1, saliva (control); group 2, Pepsi Twist®; group 3, Listerine®; group 4, Colgate Plax®; LED LCU, group 5, saliva; group 6, Pepsi Twist®; group 7, Listerine®; group 8, Colgate Plax®. Ra values were measured at baseline, and after 7 and 14 days. One specimen of each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis after 14 days. The data were subjected to multifactor analysis of variance at a 95% confidence followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference post-hoc test. All the treatments resulted in morphological changes in composite resin surface, and the most significant change was in Pepsi Twist® groups. The samples of G6 had the greatest increase in Ra. The immersion of nanofilled resin in mouthwashes with alcohol and soft drink increases the surface roughness. Polymerization by halogen LCU (reduced light intensity) associated with alcohol contained mouthwash resulted in significant roughness on the composite.

  17. Effect of filler type on 3-body abrasion of dental composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasini E.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The relatively poor wear resistance of dental composite in stress bearing posterior situations has restricted wider clinical application of this restorative material. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the three body abrasive wear of a dental composite based on a new filler (leucite: KAl Si2O6 and to compare it with the wear resistance of a composite based on commonly used Aluminium – Barium Silicate filler. Materials and Methods: This research was an interventional study done in Iran polymer institute. Five specimens were considered in each group. All ceramic IPS Empress® (Ivoclar- Vivadent ingots based on leucite crystals were ball milled, passed through an 800 sieve and used as filler. Experimental composites were prepared by mixing the silane- treated fillers with monomers (BisGMA and TEGDMA. Camphorquinone and amine were used as photoinitiator system. Degree of conversion of the light-cured and post-cured composites was measured using FTIR spectroscopy. The prepared pastes were inserted into plexy-glass mold and light cured (700 mw/cm2, 40 s. Then for maximum degree of conversion specimens were post- cured (120ºC, 5 hours. Three body abrasion wear testing was performed using a wear machine with 50 rpm rotational movement. In this machine, pumice (150 meshes was used as the third body. Weight loss of specimens in each group was measured by balance after each 50 hours. After wear testing SEM examination was made specimens in each group. The data were analyzed and compared using ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (P<0.05. Tetric Ceram was tested as commercial composite. Results: There were significantly differences between three body abrasive wear of composites. The ranking from lowest to highest was as follows: leucite composite (19% < Tetric Ceram (22% < glass composite (28%. leucite composite showed the highest wear resistance value, propably due to the crystalliniy and hardness of filler. Conclusion

  18. Efficacy of Octacalcium Phosphate Collagen Composite for Titanium Dental Implants in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Kawai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies showed that octacalcium (OCP collagen composite (OCP/Col can be used to repair human jaw bone defects without any associated abnormalities. The present study investigated whether OCP/Col could be applied to dental implant treatment using a dog tooth extraction socket model. Methods: The premolars of dogs were extracted; each extraction socket was extended, and titanium dental implants were placed in each socket. OCP/Col was inserted in the space around a titanium dental implant. Autologous bone was used to fill the other sockets, while the untreated socket (i.e., no bone substitute material served as a control. Three months after the operation, these specimens were analyzed for the osseointegration of each bone substitute material with the surface of the titanium dental implant. Results: In histomorphometric analyses, the peri-implant bone areas (BA% and bone-implant contact (BIC% were measured. There was no difference in BA% or BIC% between OCP/Col and autologous bone. Conclusion: These results suggested that OCP/Col could be used for implant treatment as a bone substitute.

  19. Polymerization stresses in low-shrinkage dental resin composites measured by crack analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Kubota, Yu; Momoi, Yasuko; Ferracane, Jack L

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare several dental restoratives currently advertised as low-shrinkage composites (Clearfil Majesty Posterior, Kalore, Reflexions XLS Dentin and Venus Diamond) with a microfill composite (Heliomolar) in terms of polymerization stress, polymerization shrinkage and elastic modulus. Cracks were made at several distances from the edge of a precision cavity in a soda-lime glass disk. The composites were placed into the cavity and lengths of the cracks were measured before and after light curing. Polymerization stresses generated in the glass at 2 and 10 min after the irradiation were calculated from the crack lengths and K(c) of the glass. Polymerization shrinkage and elastic modulus of the composites also were measured at 2 and 10 min after irradiation using a video-imaging device and a nanoindenter, respectively. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVAs and Tukey's test (pelastic moduli of Clearfil Majesty Posterior and Reflexions XLS Dentin were greatest at 2 and 10 min, respectively. Among the four low-shrinkage composites, two demonstrated significantly reduced polymerization stress compared to Heliomolar, which has previously been shown in in vitro tests to generate low curing stress. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationship of periodontal clinical parameters with bacterial composition in human dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujinaka, Hidetake; Takeshita, Toru; Sato, Hirayuki; Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Nakamura, Junji; Hase, Tadashi; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2013-06-01

    More than 600 bacterial species have been identified in the oral cavity, but only a limited number of species show a strong association with periodontitis. The purpose of the present study was to provide a comprehensive outline of the microbiota in dental plaque related to periodontal status. Dental plaque from 90 subjects was sampled, and the subjects were clustered based on bacterial composition using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of 16S rRNA genes. Here, we evaluated (1) periodontal clinical parameters between clusters; (2) the correlation of subgingival bacterial composition with supragingival bacterial composition; and (3) the association between bacterial interspecies in dental plaque using a graphical Gaussian model. Cluster 1 (C1) having high prevalence of pathogenic bacteria in subgingival plaque showed increasing values of the parameters. The values of the parameters in Cluster 2a (C2a) having high prevalence of non-pathogenic bacteria were markedly lower than those in C1. A cluster having low prevalence of non-pathogenic bacteria in supragingival plaque showed increasing values of the parameters. The bacterial patterns between subgingival plaque and supragingival plaque were significantly correlated. Chief pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, formed a network with other pathogenic species in C1, whereas a network of non-pathogenic species, such as Rothia sp. and Lautropia sp., tended to compete with a network of pathogenic species in C2a. Periodontal status relates to non-pathogenic species as well as to pathogenic species, suggesting that the bacterial interspecies connection affects dental plaque virulence.

  1. Mechanochemically synthesized kalsilite based bioactive glass-ceramic composite for dental vaneering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pattem Hemanth; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2017-08-01

    Kalsilite glass-ceramic composites have been prepared by a mechanochemical synthesis process for dental veneering application. The aim of the present study is to prepare bioactive kalsilite composite material for application in tissue attachment and sealing of the marginal gap between fixed prosthesis and tooth. Mechanochemical synthesis is used for the preparation of microfine kalsilite glass-ceramic. Low temperature frit and bioglass have been prepared using the traditional quench method. Thermal, microstructural and bioactive properties of the composite material have been examined. The feasibility of the kalsilite to be coated on the base commercial opaque as well as the bioactive behavior of the coated specimen has been confirmed. This study indicates that the prepared kalsilite-based composites show similar structural, morphological and bioactive behavior to that of commercial VITA VMK95 Dentin 1M2.

  2. Antimicrobial and mechanical properties of dental resin composite containing bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Emre; Torlak, Emrah; Altunsoy, Mustafa

    2016-07-26

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy and mechanical properties of dental resin composites containing different amounts of microparticulate bioactive glass (BAG). Experimental resin composites were prepared by mixing resin matrix (70% BisGMA and 30% TEGDMA) and inorganic filler with various fractions of BAG to achieve final BAG concentrations of 5, 10 and 30 wt%. Antimicrobial efficacy was assessed in aqueous suspension against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans and in biofilm against S. mutans. The effect of incorporation of BAG on the mechanical properties of resin composite was evaluated by measuring the surface roughness, compressive strength and flexural strength. Under the dynamic contact condition, viable counts of E. coli, S. aureus and S. mutans in suspensions were reduced up to 78%, 57% and 50%, respectively, after 90 minutes of exposure to disc-shaped composite specimens, depending on the BAG contents. In 2-day-old S. mutans biofilm, incorporation of BAG into composite at ratios of 10% and 30% resulted in 0.8 and 1.4 log reductions in the viable cell counts compared with the BAG-free composite, respectively. The surface roughness values of composite specimens did not show any significant difference (p>0.05) at any concentration of BAG. However, compressive and flexural strengths of composite were decreased significantly with addition of 30% BAG (p<0.05). The results demonstrated the successful utilization of BAG as a promising biomaterial in resin composites to provide antimicrobial function.

  3. Structural, Surface, in vitro Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation Analysis of Three Dental Restorative Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T. Azam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between dental materials and bacterial adhesion on the grounds of their chemical composition and physical properties. Three commercially available dental restorative materials (Filtek™Z350, Filtek™P90 and Spectrum®TPH® were structurally analyzed and their wettability and surface roughness were evaluated by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Contact Angle Measurement and Atomic Force Microscopy, respectively. These materials were molded into discs and tested with three bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia for microbial attachment. The bacterial adhesion was observed at different time intervals, i.e., 0 h, 8 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h, along with Colony Forming Unit Count and Optical Density measurement of the media. It was found that all materials showed a degree of conversion with time intervals, i.e., 0 h, 8 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h, which led to the availability of functional groups (N–H and C–H that might promote adhesion. The trend in difference in the extent of bacterial adhesion can be related to particle size, chemical composition and surface wettability of the dental materials.

  4. Processing and properties of ceramic matrix-polymer composites for dental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsuan Yao

    The basic composite structure of natural hard tissue was used to guide the design and processing of dental restorative materials. The design incorporates the methodology of using inorganic minerals as the main structural phase reinforced with a more ductile but tougher organic phase. Ceramic-polymer composites were prepared by slip casting a porous ceramic structure, heating and chemical treating the porous preform, infiltrating with monomer and then curing. The three factors that determined the mechanical properties of alumina-polymer composites were the type of polymer used, the method of silane treatments, and the type of bond between particles in the porous preforms. Without the use of silane coupling agents, the composites were measured to have a lower strength. The composite with a more "flexible" porous alumina network had a greater ability to plastically dissipate the energy of propagating cracks. However, the aggressive nature of the alumina particles on opposing enamel requires that these alumina-polymer composites have a wear compatible coating for practical application. A route to dense bioactive apatite wollastonite glass ceramics (AWGC)-polymer composites was developed. The problems associated with glass dissolution into the aqueous medium for slip casting were overcome with the use of silane. The role of heating rate and development of ceramic compact microstructure on composite properties was explored. In general, if isothermal heating was not applied, decreasing heating rate increased glass crystallinity and particle-particle fusion, but decreased pore volume. Also composite strength and fracture toughness decreased while modulus and hardness increased with decreasing heating rate. If isothermal heating was applied, glass crystallinity, pore content, and composite mechanical properties showed relatively little change regardless of the initial heating rate. The potential of AWGC-polymer composites for dental and implant applications was explored

  5. A new fluorinated urethane dimethacrylate with carboxylic groups for use in dental adhesive compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buruiana, Tinca, E-mail: tbur@icmpp.ro [Polyaddition and Photochemistry Department, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Melinte, Violeta [Polyaddition and Photochemistry Department, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Aldea, Horia [Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Dentistry, 16 University Str., 700115 Iasi (Romania); Pelin, Irina M.; Buruiana, Emil C. [Polyaddition and Photochemistry Department, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

    2016-05-01

    A urethane macromer containing hexafluoroisopropylidene, poly(ethylene oxide) and carboxylic moieties (UF-DMA) was synthesized and used in proportions varying between 15 and 35 wt.% (F1–F3) in dental adhesive formulations besides BisGMA, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The FTIR and {sup 1}H ({sup 13}C) NMR spectra confirmed the chemical structure of the UF-DMA. The experimental adhesives were characterized with regard to the degree of conversion, water sorption/solubility, contact angle, diffusion coefficient, Vickers hardness, and morphology of the crosslinked networks and compared with the specimens containing 10 wt.% hydroxyapatite (HAP) or calcium phosphate (CaP). The conversion degree (after 180 s of irradiation with visible light) ranged from 59.5% (F1) to 74.8% (F3), whereas the water sorption was between 23.15 μg mm{sup −3} (F1) and 40.52 μg mm{sup −3} (F3). Upon the addition of HAP or CaP this parameter attained values of 37.82–49.14 μg mm{sup −3} (F1–F3-HAP) and 34.58–45.56 μg mm{sup −3}, respectively. Also, the formation of resin tags through the infiltration of a dental composition (F3) was visualized by SEM analysis. The results suggest that UF-DMA taken as co-monomer in dental adhesives of acrylic type may provide improved properties in the moist environment of the mouth. - Highlights: • Fluorinated urethane dimethacrylate with carboxylic units (UF-DMA) was proposed as co-monomer in dental adhesives. • UF-DMA exhibits good photoreactivity in mixture with commercial dental monomers. • Water sorption/solubility and diffusion coefficient depend on the amount of UF-DMA. • The infiltration of adhesive mixture into the dentin tubules was evidenced by SEM.

  6. Effects of age condition on the distribution and integrity of inorganic fillers in dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Svizero, Nádia da Rocha; Bim Júnior, Odair; Valduga, Claudete Justina; Graeff, Carlos Frederico de Oliveira; Sauro, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the distribution of the filler size along with the zeta potential, and the integrity of silane-bonded filler surface in different types of restorative dental composites as a function of the material age condition. Filtek P60 (hybrid composite), Filtek Z250 (small-particle filled composite), Filtek Z350XT (nanofilled composite), and Filtek Silorane (silorane composite) (3M ESPE) were tested at different stage condition (i.e., fresh/new, aged, and expired). Composites were submitted to an accelerated aging protocol (Arrhenius model). Specimens were obtained by first diluting each composite specimen in ethanol and then dispersed in potassium chloride solution (0.001 mol%). Composite fillers were characterized for their zeta potential, mean particle size, size distribution, via poly-dispersion dynamic light scattering. The integrity of the silane-bonded surface of the fillers was characterized by FTIR. The material age influenced significantly the outcomes; Zeta potential, filler characteristics, and silane integrity varied both after aging and expiration. Silorane presented the broadest filler distribution and lowest zeta potential. Nanofilled and silorane composites exhibited decreased peak intensities in the FTIR analysis, indicating a deficiency of the silane integrity after aging or expiry time. Regardless to the material condition, the hybrid and the small-particle-filled composites were more stable overtime as no significant alteration in filler size distribution, diameter, and zeta potential occurred. A deficiency in the silane integrity in the nanofilled and silorane composites seems to be affected by the material stage condition. The materials conditions tested in this study influenced the filler size distribution, the zeta potential, and integrity of the silane adsorbed on fillers in the nanofilled and silorane composites. Thus, this may result in a decrease of the clinical performance of aforementioned composites, in

  7. EVALUATION OF DIELECTRIC CURING MONITORING INVESTIGATING LIGHT-CURING DENTAL FILLING COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Steinhaus

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the evaluation of a dielectric analysis (DEA method monitoring the curing behaviour of a light curing dental filling material in real-time. The evaluation is to extract the influence of light intensity on the photo-curing process of dental composite filling materials. The intensity change is obtained by measuring the curing process at different sample depth. It could be shown that increasing sample thickness, and therefore exponentially decreasing light intensity, causes a proportional decrease in the initial curing rate. Nevertheless, the results give rise to the assumption that lower illumination intensities over a long period cause higher overall conversion, and thus better mechanical properties. This would allow for predictions of the impact of different curing-rates on the final mechanical properties.

  8. Improving mechanical properties of flowable dental composite resin by adding silica nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baloš Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The main drawback of flowable dental composite resin is low strength compared to conventional composite resin, due to a low amount of filler, neccessary for achieving low viscosity and ease of handling. The aim of this study was to improve mechanical properties of flowable dental composite resin by adding small amount of nanoparticles, which would not compromise handling properties. Methods. A commercially available flowable dental composite resin material was mixed with 7 nm aftertreated hydrophobic fumed silica and cured by an UV lamp. Four sets of samples were made: control sample (unmodified, the sample containing 0.05%, 0.2% and 1% nanosilica. Flexural modulus, flexural strength and microhardness were tested. One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test with the significance value of p < 0.05 was performed to statistically analyze the obtained results. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and SEM analysis were performed. To asses handling properties, slumping resistance was determined. Results. It was found that 0.05% is the most effective nanosilica content. All the tested mechanical properties were improved by a significant margin. On the other hand, when 0.2% and 1% nanosilica content was tested, different results were obtained, some of the mechanical properties even dropped, while some were insignificantly improved. The difference between slumping resistance of unmodified and modified samples was found to be statistically insignificant. Conclusions. Low nanosilica addition proved more effective in improving mechanical properties compared to higher additions. Furthermore, handling properties are unaffected by nanosilica addition.

  9. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on dental composite resins by silicon–oxygen thin film coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandracci, Pietro; Pirri, Candido F; Mussano, Federico; Ceruti, Paola; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion of bacteria on dental materials can be reduced by modifying the physical and chemical characteristics of their surfaces, either through the application of specific surface treatments or by the deposition of thin film coatings. Since this approach does not rely on the use of drugs or antimicrobial agents embedded in the materials, its duration is not limited by their possible depletion. Moreover it avoids the risks related to possible cytotoxic effects elicited by antibacterial substances released from the surface and diffused in the surrounding tissues. In this work, the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis was studied on four composite resins, commonly used for manufacturing dental prostheses. The surfaces of dental materials were modified through the deposition of a-SiO x thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The chemical bonding structure of the coatings was analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology of the dental materials before and after the coating deposition was assessed by means of optical microscopy and high-resolution mechanical profilometry, while their wettability was investigated by contact angle measurements. The sample roughness was not altered after coating deposition, while a noticeable increase of wettability was detected for all the samples. Also, the adhesion of S. mitis decreased in a statistically significant way on the coated samples, when compared to the uncoated ones, which did not occur for S. mutans. Within the limitations of this study, a-SiO x coatings may affect the adhesion of bacteria such as S. mitis, possibly by changing the wettability of the composite resins investigated. (paper)

  10. Reduction of bacterial adhesion on dental composite resins by silicon-oxygen thin film coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracci, Pietro; Mussano, Federico; Ceruti, Paola; Pirri, Candido F; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-01-29

    Adhesion of bacteria on dental materials can be reduced by modifying the physical and chemical characteristics of their surfaces, either through the application of specific surface treatments or by the deposition of thin film coatings. Since this approach does not rely on the use of drugs or antimicrobial agents embedded in the materials, its duration is not limited by their possible depletion. Moreover it avoids the risks related to possible cytotoxic effects elicited by antibacterial substances released from the surface and diffused in the surrounding tissues. In this work, the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis was studied on four composite resins, commonly used for manufacturing dental prostheses. The surfaces of dental materials were modified through the deposition of a-SiO(x) thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The chemical bonding structure of the coatings was analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology of the dental materials before and after the coating deposition was assessed by means of optical microscopy and high-resolution mechanical profilometry, while their wettability was investigated by contact angle measurements. The sample roughness was not altered after coating deposition, while a noticeable increase of wettability was detected for all the samples. Also, the adhesion of S. mitis decreased in a statistically significant way on the coated samples, when compared to the uncoated ones, which did not occur for S. mutans. Within the limitations of this study, a-SiO(x) coatings may affect the adhesion of bacteria such as S. mitis, possibly by changing the wettability of the composite resins investigated.

  11. Strain gradient plasticity effects in whisker-reinforced metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2003-01-01

    A metal reinforced by fibers in the micron range is studied using the strain gradient plasticity theory of Fleck and Hutchinson (J. Mech. Phys. Solids 49 (2001) 2245). Cell-model analyses are used to study the influence of the material length parameters numerically, for both a single parameter...

  12. Antibacterial agents in composite restorations for the prevention of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cenci, Maximiliano S; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Azevedo, Marina

    2013-12-17

    Dental caries is a multifactorial disease in which the fermentation of food sugars by bacteria from the biofilm (dental plaque) leads to localised demineralisation of tooth surfaces, which may ultimately result in cavity formation. Resin composites are widely used in dentistry to restore teeth. These restorations can fail for a number of reasons, such as secondary caries, and restorative material fracture and other minor reasons. From these, secondary caries, which are caries lesions developed adjacent to restorations, is the main cause for restorations replacement. The presence of antibacterials in both the filling material and the bonding systems would theoretically be able to affect the initiation and progression of caries adjacent to restorations. This is an update of the Cochrane review published in 2009. To assess the effects of antibacterial agents incorporated into composite restorations for the prevention of dental caries. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 23 July 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 6), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 23 July 2013) and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 23 July 2013). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (http://clinicaltrials.gov), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (www.controlled-trials.com) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform (www.who.int/trialsearch) for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials comparing resin composite restorations containing antibacterial agents with composite restorations not containing antibacterial agents. Two review authors conducted screening of studies in duplicate and independently, and although no eligible trials were identified, the two authors had planned to extract data independently and

  13. Microtomography evaluation of dental tissue wear surface induced by in vitro simulated chewing cycles on human and composite teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Bedini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a 3D microtomography display of tooth surfaces after in vitro dental wear tests has been obtained. Natural teeth have been compared with prosthetic teeth, manufactured by three different polyceramic composite materials. The prosthetic dental element samples, similar to molars, have been placed in opposition to human teeth extracted by paradontology diseases. After microtomography analysis, samples have been subjected to in vitro fatigue test cycles by servo-hydraulic mechanical testing machine. After the fatigue test, each sample has been subjected again to microtomography analysis to obtain volumetric value changes and dental wear surface images. Wear surface images were obtained by 3D reconstruction software and volumetric value changes were measured by CT analyser software. The aim of this work has been to show the potential of microtomography technique to display very clear and reliable wear surface images. Microtomography analysis methods to evaluate volumetric value changes have been used to quantify dental tissue and composite material wear.

  14. Improved PIXE analysis of micro- and trace elements in dental composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoteasa, E. A.; Ciortea, C.; Fluerasu, D.; Enescu, S. E.; Preoteasa, E.

    2001-01-01

    Due to the interactions occurring at the solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces of a tooth's filling, the mineral elements of the restorative composite may induce a complex response of the organism. To study such problems, sensitive surface trace element analysis is required. Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has a detection limit one order of magnitude lower than XRF and has been used for hard dental tissues, but not yet for dental composites. We evaluated the potential of PIXE in a study of ten types of composites used in restorative dentistry, some of them with two color shades each. The samples were prepared as described for XRF. The measurements were performed with 3 MeV protons from a van de Graaff tandem linear accelerator, using a hyper pure Ge detector and collecting the spectra for 1.5-4 hours. The spectra were processed with the program Leone. The proton route in the sample calculated with the Trim program (∼ 50-100 μm) exceeded the size of mineral particles (0.02-30 μm), thus granularity did not affect the analysis. The PIXE analysis detected Z ≥ 19 elements in all composites, and Z≥14 elements in only one low Z material. PIXE detected generally the same dominant elements, but many more trace elements than XRF. Thus both Charisma (Kulzer) and Pekafill (Bayer) contained Ba as the major element, but trace elements were Ni, Zn, In, in the first, and Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ag in the second. In other glass- and ceramics-based materials we found: Ca, Zr, Ba, Yb and traces of Sr, In, and possibly Ti in Tetric Ceram and in Ariston (both from Vivadent); Ca, Zr, Ba, Hf, possibly Mn, and traces of Ni, Ho, Ti, Fe, Cr in Valux Plus (3M Dental); Sr, Ba (major), K, Fe, Mn (minor), and traces of Ni, Zn, In, in F2000 Compomer (3M Dental); Ba (major) and traces of Fe, Ni, Sr in Surefil (Dentsply). In quartz-based materials we detected: Si, Ca, Ti, Fe and traces of K, Cl, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn in Evicrol (Spofa); low and trace levels of Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu in

  15. Effect of Opalescence® bleaching gels on the elution of dental composite components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Lena; Rothmund, Lena; He, Xiuli; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Schweikl, Helmut; Hellwig, Elmar; Carell, Thomas; Hickel, Reinhard; Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Högg, Christof

    2015-06-01

    Bleaching treatments can affect on the polymer network of dental composites. This study was performed to evaluate the influence of different bleaching treatments on the elution of composite components. The composites Tetric EvoCeram(®), CLEARFIL™ AP-X, Tetric EvoFlow(®), Filtek™ Supreme XT, Ceram X(®) mono+, Admira and Filtek™ Silorane were treated with the bleaching gels Opalescence PF 15% (PF 15%) for 5h and PF 35% (PF 35%) for 30 min and then stored in methanol and water for 24h and 7 d. The eluates were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Unbleached specimens were used as control group. A total of 16 different elutable substances have been identified from the investigated composites after bleaching-treatment. Six of them were methacrylates: 1,10-decandioldimethacrylate (DDDMA), 1,12-dodekandioldimethacrylate (DODDMA), ethylenglycoldimethacrylate (EGDMA), 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), triethylenglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and urethandimethacrylate (UDMA). Compared with the unbleached controls the composites Tetric EvoCeram(®), CLEARFIL™ AP-X and Tetric EvoFlow(®) showed a reduced elution of UDMA, TEGDMA and HEMA after bleaching-treatment. Compared with the unbleached controls an increase elution of UDMA, DMABEE, BPA and TEGDMA for the composites Filtek™ Supreme XT, Ceram X(®) mono+, Admira and Filtek™ Silorane after bleaching-treatment has been detected. The highest concentration of UDMA was 0.01 mmol/l (Tetric EvoCeram(®), water, 24h, controls), the highest concentration of TEGDMA was 0.28 mmol/l (CLEARFIL™ AP-X, water, 7 d, controls), the highest concentration of HEMA was 0.74 mmol/l (Tetric EvoFlow(®), methanol, 7 d, PF 35%), the highest concentration of DMABEE was 0.10 mmol/l (Ceram X(®) mono+, water, 7 d, PF 35%) and the highest concentration of BPA was 0.01 mmol/l (Admira, methanol, 7 d, controls). Bleaching treatments can lead to a reduced or an increased elution of substances from the dental composites

  16. Deposition of lead and cadmium released by cigarette smoke in dental structures and resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Cristina Yoshie Garcia; Corrêa-Afonso, Alessandra Marques; Pedrazzi, Hamilton; Dinelli, Welingtom; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka

    2011-03-01

    Cigarette smoke is a significant source of cadmium, lead, and toxic elements, which are absorbed into the human organism. In this context, the aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the presence of toxic elements, cadmium, and lead deriving from cigarette smoke in the resin composite, dentine, and dental enamel. Eight cylindrical specimens were fabricated from resin composite, bovine enamel, and root dentin fragments that were wet ground and polished with abrasive paper to obtain sections with 6-mm diameter and 2-mm thickness. All specimens were exposed to the smoke of 10 cigarettes/day during 8 days. After the simulation of the cigarette smoke, the specimens were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. In the photomicrographic analysis in SEM, no morphological alterations were found; however, the microanalysis identified the presence of cadmium, arsenic, and lead in the different specimens. These findings suggest that the deposition of these elements derived from cigarette smoke could be favored by dental structures and resin composite. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Fabrication of superhydrophobic coating for preventing microleakage in a dental composite restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Danfeng; Zhang, Yingchao; Li, Yao; Shi, Xiaoyu; Gong, Haihuan; Feng, Dan; Guo, Xiaowei; Shi, Zuosen; Zhu, Song; Cui, Zhanchen

    2017-09-01

    Superhydrophobic coatings were successfully fabricated by photo-crosslinked polyurethane (PU) and organic fluoro group-functionalized SiO 2 nanoparticles (F-SiO 2 NPs), and were introduced for preventing microleakage in a dental composite restoration. The F-SiO 2 NPs possessed low surface energy and the PU can not only improve the mechanical stability but also promote F-SiO 2 NPs to form multiscale structure, which could facilitate the properties of the as-prepared superhydrophobic coating by synergetic effect. The morphology and properties of the resulted superhydrophobic coatings with different PU/F-SiO 2 ratios were studied using 1 H NMR spectrum, fourier transform infrared spectra, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The results showed that the superhydrophobic coatings with low PU/F-SiO 2 ratio (1:3) possessed excellent hierarchical papillae structure with trapped air pockets, high contact angle (160.1°), low sliding angle (superhydrophobic property, the as-prepared superhydrophobic coatings effectively prevented water permeation in resin composite restoration evaluation. This research may provide an effective method to solve the problem of microleakage and will efficiently increase the success rate of dental composite restorations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of different opacifiers on the translucency of experimental dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Karine; Azhar, Gulelala; Wood, Duncan J; Moharamzadeh, Keyvan; van Noort, Richard

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different opacifiers on the translucency of experimental dental composite-resins. Three metal oxides that are used as opacifiers were tested in this study: titanium oxide (TiO 2 ), aluminium oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) and zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ). Experimental composite-resins were fabricated containing 25wt.% urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA)-based resin matrix and 75% total filler including different concentrations of metal oxides (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1wt.%) blended into silane treated barium-silicate filler. The specimens (15.5mm diameter and 1mm thickness) were light-cured and tested in the transmittance mode using a UV/VIS spectrophotometer at wavelengths from 380 to 700nm under a standard illuminant D65. The color differences (ΔE* ab) between different concentrations of opacifiers were also measured in transmittance mode based on their Lab values. Statistical analysis by ANOVA and Tukey's test showed a significant decrease (pcomposite-resins. There was a linear correlation between different concentrations of TiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 and total transmittance. Total transmittance was also found to be wavelength dependent. The color differences for the concentrations of 0-1wt.% of the opacifiers were above 1 ΔE* unit, with Al 2 O 3 showing the smallest color shift. The type and the amount of the opacifiers used in this study had a significant effect on the translucency of the experimental UDMA-based dental composite resins. The most effective opacifier was TiO 2 , followed by ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 in decreasing order, respectively. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bisphenol A Release: Survey of the Composition of Dental Composite Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Elisabeth; Fron-Chabouis, Hélène; Attal, Jean-Pierre; Raskin, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor with potential toxicity. Composite resins may not contain pure BPA, but its derivatives are widely used. Several studies found doses of BPA or its derivatives in saliva or urine of patients after composite resin placement. The aims of this study were to establish an exhaustive list of composite resins marketed in Europe and their composition, and to assess the extent of BPA derivatives used. A research on manufacturers' websites was performed to reference all composite resins marketed in Europe, then their composition was determined from both material safety data sheets and a standardized questionnaire sent to manufacturers. Manufacturers had to indicate whether their product contained the monomers listed, add other monomers if necessary, or indicate "not disclosed". 160 composite resins were identified from 31 manufacturers and 23 manufacturers (74.2%) responded to the survey. From the survey and websites, the composition of 130 composite resins (81.2%) was: 112 (86.2%) based on BPA derivatives, 97 (74.7%) on bis-GMA, 17 (13.1%) without monomer derived from BPA (UDMA, sometimes with TEGDMA) and 6 (4.6%) with UDMA (only); 1 (0.8%) did not contain a BPA derivative or UDMA or TEGDMA. Pure BPA was never reported. This work has established a list of 18 composite resins that contain no BPA derivative. Manufacturers should be required to report the exact composition of their products as it often remains unclear or incomplete.

  20. Mechanical fatigue degradation of ceramics versus resin composites for dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Geinzer, Eva; Muschweck, Anna; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    For posterior partial restorations an overlap of indication exists where either ceramic or resin-based composite materials can be successfully applied. The aim of this study was to compare the fatigue resistance of modern dental ceramic materials versus dental resin composites in order to address such conflicts. Bar specimens of five ceramic materials and resin composites were produced according to ISO 4049 and stored for 14 days in distilled water at 37°C. The following ceramic materials were selected for testing: a high-strength zirconium dioxide (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar), a machinable lithium disilicate (e.max CAD, Ivoclar), a pressable lithium disilicate ceramic (e-max Press, Ivoclar), a fluorapatite-based glass-ceramic (e.max Ceram, Ivoclar), and a machinable color-graded feldspathic porcelain (Trilux Forte, Vita). The composite materials selected were: an indirect machinable composite (Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) and four direct composites with varying filler nature (Clearfil Majesty Posterior, Kuraray; GrandioSO, Voco; Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar-Vivadent; and CeramX Duo, Dentsply). Fifteen specimens were tested in water for initial strength (σin) in 4-point bending. Using the same test set-up, the residual flexural fatigue strength (σff) was determined using the staircase approach after 10(4) cycles at 0.5 Hz (n=25). Weibull parameters σ0 and m were calculated for the σin specimens, whereas the σff and strength loss in percentage were obtained from the fatigue experiment. The zirconium oxide ceramic showed the highest σin and σff (768 and 440 MPa, respectively). Although both lithium disilicate ceramics were similar in the static test, the pressable version showed a significantly higher fatigue resistance after cyclic loading. Both the fluorapatite-based and the feldspathic porcelain showed equivalent initial and cyclic fatigue properties. From the composites, the highest filled direct material Clearfil Majesty Posterior showed superior fatigue performance

  1. Investigation of mechanical properties of modern dental composites after artificial aging for one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, Sebastian; Henrich, Anne; Bürgers, Ralf; Handel, Gerhard; Rosentritt, Martin

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the aging behavior of dental composites with regard to surface roughness (SR), Vickers hardness (VH) and flexural strength (FS), and the study elucidated the impact of artificial aging parameters. One hundred and sixty-five rectangular specimens were prepared from five composites (Filtek Supreme XT, Filtek Silorane, CeramX, Quixfil, experimental ormocer) and subjected to various artificial aging protocols (storage in distilled water/ethanol/artificial saliva for 7, 90 and 365 days; thermal cycling, 2 x 3000 cycles 5/55 degrees C). SR, VH and FS were determined at baseline and after each aging treatment. Means and standard deviations were calculated; statistical analysis was performed using three-way ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison test (alpha=.05). The results showed a significant influence in the composite and aging duration on mechanical parameters; the aging medium did not have a significant influence on VH and FS, but there was a significant influence on SR. The highest overall VH was found for theexperimental ormocer; Filtek Silorane yielded the lowest values. For FS, the significantly highest values were found for Filtek Silorane, and the lowest values were found for the experimental ormocer. Prolonged aging periods (90 or 365 days) or thermal cycling led to significant decreases in both VH and FS and significant increases in SR. The findings of the current study indicate that composites differ significantly for SR and its mechanical properties with regard to FS and VH, as well as in aging behavior. Generally, artificial aging leads to a significant decrease in mechanical properties, which underlines the relevance of continuous improvement of dental composites.

  2. Effect of bench time polymerization on depth of cure of dental composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, K.; Yudhit, A.; Sari, F.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of bench time before light cured polymerization on the depth of cure of dental composite resin. Nanofiller composite resin (Filtek Z350 XT,3M, ESPE,China) was used in this study. Sixty samples of nanofiller composite resin were made and divided into control and test groups with bench time for 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. For the test group, composite resins were stored in refrigerator with 4°C temperatures. Meanwhile, for the control groups, the composite resin was stored at room temperature. The samples were prepared using metal mould with size diameter of 6 mm and 4 mm in thickness. Samples were cured for 20 s by using visible blue light curing unit. Part of samples that unpolymerized were removed by using a plastic spatula. The remaining parts of samples were measured by digital caliper and noted as depth of cure (mm). Data were analyzed to one-way ANOVA and LSD tests (p≤0.05). Results showed there was no significance differences between test groups (p=0.5). A 60 minutes bench time group showed the highest depth of cure value among test group, and it was almost similar with control group value. It can be concluded that longer bench time can increase the depth of cure of composite resin.

  3. Bacterial adhesion on direct and indirect dental restorative composite resins: An in vitro study on a natural biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derchi, Giacomo; Vano, Michele; Barone, Antonio; Covani, Ugo; Diaspro, Alberto; Salerno, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Both direct and indirect techniques are used for dental restorations. Which technique should be preferred or whether they are equivalent with respect to bacterial adhesion is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the affinity of bacterial biofilm to dental restorative composite resins placed directly and indirectly. Five direct composite resins for restorations (Venus Diamond, Adonis, Optifil, Enamel Plus HRi, Clearfil Majesty Esthetic) and 3 indirect composite resins (Gradia, Estenia, Signum) were selected. The materials were incubated in unstimulated whole saliva for 1 day. The biofilms grown were collected and their bacterial cells counted. In parallel, the composite resin surface morphology was analyzed with atomic force microscopy. Both bacterial cell count and surface topography parameters were subjected to statistical analysis (α=.05). Indirect composite resins showed significantly lower levels than direct composite resins for bacterial cell adhesion, (Pcomposite resins (P>.05). However, within the indirect composite resins a significantly lower level was found for Gradia than Estenia or Signum (Pcomposite resin roughness and bacterial adhesion when the second and particularly the third-order statistical moments of the composite resin height distributions were considered. Indirect dental restorative composite resins were found to be less prone to biofilm adhesion than direct composite resins. A correlation of bacterial adhesion to surface morphology exists that is described by kurtosis; thus, advanced data analysis is required to discover possible insights into the biologic effects of morphology. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of light intensity and irradiation time on the polymerization process of a dental composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Discacciati José Augusto César

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymerization shrinkage is a critical factor affecting the longevity and acceptability of dental composite resins. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of light intensity and irradiation time on the polymerization process of a photo cured dental composite resin by measuring the Vickers hardness number (VHN and the volumetric polymerization shrinkage. Samples were prepared using a dental manual light-curing unit. The samples were submitted to irradiation times of 5, 10, 20 and 40 s, using 200 and 400 mW.cm-2 light intensities. Vickers hardness number was obtained at four different moments after photoactivation (immediate, 1 h, 24 h and 168 h. After this, volumetric polymerization shrinkage values were obtained through a specific density method. The values were analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan's (p = 0.05. Results showed increase in hardness values from the immediate reading to 1 h and 24 h readings. After 24 h no changes were observed regardless the light intensities or activation times. The hardness values were always smaller for the 200 mW.cm-2 light intensity, except for the 40 s irradiation time. No significant differences were detected in volumetric polymerization shrinkage considering the light intensity (p = 0.539 and the activation time (p = 0.637 factors. In conclusion the polymerization of the material does not terminate immediately after photoactivation and the increase of irradiation time can compensate a lower light intensity. Different combinations between light intensity and irradiation time, i.e., different amounts of energy given to the system, have not affected the polymerization shrinkage.

  5. Microstructure and properties of ceramics and composites joined by plastic deformation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goretta, K. C.; Singh, D.; Chen, N.; Gutierrez-Mora, F.; Lorenzo-Martin, M. de la, Cinta; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; Routbort, J. L.; Energy Systems; Univ. of Seville

    2008-12-01

    A review is presented of the design of suitable materials systems for joining by high-temperature plastic deformation, details of the joining techniques, microstructures and properties of the resulting composite bodies, and prospects and limitation for this type of joining technology. Joining parameters and resulting forms are discussed for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/mullite particulate composites, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} particulate/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulate and whisker-reinforced composites, hydroxyapatite bioceramics, La{sub 0.85}Sr{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} electronic ceramics, MgF{sub 2} optical ceramics, and Ni{sub 3}Al intermetallics. Results are contrasted with those obtained by other methods of joining brittle, high-temperature materials, with special focus on durability and mechanical properties.

  6. Microstructure and properties of ceramics and composites joined by plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goretta, K.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4838 (United States)], E-mail: ken.goretta@aoard.af.mil; Singh, D.; Chen Nan [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4838 (United States); Gutierrez-Mora, F.; Cinta Lorenzo-Martin, M. de la [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4838 (United States); University of Seville, Seville 41080 (Spain); Dominguez-Rodriguez, A. [University of Seville, Seville 41080 (Spain); Routbort, J.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4838 (United States)

    2008-12-20

    A review is presented of the design of suitable materials systems for joining by high-temperature plastic deformation, details of the joining techniques, microstructures and properties of the resulting composite bodies, and prospects and limitation for this type of joining technology. Joining parameters and resulting forms are discussed for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/mullite particulate composites, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} particulate/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulate and whisker-reinforced composites, hydroxyapatite bioceramics, La{sub 0.85}Sr{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} electronic ceramics, MgF{sub 2} optical ceramics, and Ni{sub 3}Al intermetallics. Results are contrasted with those obtained by other methods of joining brittle, high-temperature materials, with special focus on durability and mechanical properties.

  7. TEGDMA and UDMA monomers released from composite dental material polymerized with diode and halogen lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacławczyk, Agnieszka; Postek-Stefańska, Lidia; Pietraszewska, Daria; Birkner, Ewa; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Wysoczańska-Jankowicz, Iwona

    2018-03-20

    More than 35 substances released from composite fillings have been identified. Among these, basic monomers and the so-called co-monomers are most often reported. The substances released from polymer-based materials demonstrate allergenic, cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, embryotoxic, teratogenic, and estrogenic properties. The aim of this study was to measure the amounts of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) monomers released from composite dental fillings to citrate-phosphate buffer with the pH of 4, 6, 8 after 24 h and 6 months from the polymerization. Ten samples for each polymerization method had been made from the composite material (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, USA), which underwent polymerization using the following lamps: halogen lamp (Translux CL, Heraeus Kulzer, Hanau, Germany) (sample H) and diode lamp (Elipar Freelight 2, 3M ESPE), with soft start function (group DS) and without that function (group DWS). It has been demonstrated that the type of light-curing units has a significant impact on the amount of TEGDMA and UDMA released. The amount of UDMA and TEGDMA monomers released from composite fillings differed significantly depending on the source of polymerization applied, as well as the pH of the solution and sample storage time. Elution of the monomers from composite material polymerized using halogen lamp was significantly greater as compared to curing with diode lamps.

  8. Mechanical properties of dental resin composites by co-filling diatomite and nanosized silica particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hua; Zhu Meifang; Li Yaogang; Zhang Qinghong; Wang Hongzhi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical property effects of co-filling dental resin composites with porous diatomite and nanosized silica particles (OX-50). The purification of raw diatomite by acid-leaching was conducted in a hot 5 M HCl solution at 80 deg. C for 12 h. Both diatomite and nanosized SiO 2 were silanized with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The silanized inorganic particles were mixed into a dimethacrylate resin. Purified diatomite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and an N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherm. Silanized inorganic particles were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a thermogravimetric analysis. The mechanical properties of the composites were tested by three-point bending, compression and Vicker's microhardness. Scanning electron microscopy was used to show the cross-section morphologies of the composites. Silanization of diatomite and nanosized silica positively reinforced interactions between the resin matrix and the inorganic particles. The mechanical properties of the resin composites gradually increased with the addition of modified diatomite (m-diatomite). The fracture surfaces of the composites exhibited large fracture steps with the addition of m-diatomite. However, when the mass fraction of m-diatomite was greater than 21 wt.% with respect to modified nanosized silica (mOX-50) and constituted 70% of the resin composite by weight, the mechanical properties of the resin composites started to decline. Thus, the porous structure of diatomite appears to be a crucial factor to improve mechanical properties of resin composites.

  9. Mechanical properties of dental resin composites by co-filling diatomite and nanosized silica particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hua; Zhu Meifang [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Li Yaogang [Engineering Research Center of Advanced Glasses Manufacturing Technology, MOE, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhang Qinghong, E-mail: zhangqh@dhu.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Advanced Glasses Manufacturing Technology, MOE, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang Hongzhi, E-mail: wanghz@dhu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2011-04-08

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical property effects of co-filling dental resin composites with porous diatomite and nanosized silica particles (OX-50). The purification of raw diatomite by acid-leaching was conducted in a hot 5 M HCl solution at 80 deg. C for 12 h. Both diatomite and nanosized SiO{sub 2} were silanized with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The silanized inorganic particles were mixed into a dimethacrylate resin. Purified diatomite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and an N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherm. Silanized inorganic particles were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a thermogravimetric analysis. The mechanical properties of the composites were tested by three-point bending, compression and Vicker's microhardness. Scanning electron microscopy was used to show the cross-section morphologies of the composites. Silanization of diatomite and nanosized silica positively reinforced interactions between the resin matrix and the inorganic particles. The mechanical properties of the resin composites gradually increased with the addition of modified diatomite (m-diatomite). The fracture surfaces of the composites exhibited large fracture steps with the addition of m-diatomite. However, when the mass fraction of m-diatomite was greater than 21 wt.% with respect to modified nanosized silica (mOX-50) and constituted 70% of the resin composite by weight, the mechanical properties of the resin composites started to decline. Thus, the porous structure of diatomite appears to be a crucial factor to improve mechanical properties of resin composites.

  10. Structure-Composition-Property Relationships in Polymeric Amorphous Calcium Phosphate-Based Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Skrtic

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our studies of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP-based materials over the last decade have yielded bioactive polymeric composites capable of protecting teeth from demineralization or even regenerating lost tooth mineral. The anti-cariogenic/remineralizing potential of these ACP composites originates from their propensity, when exposed to the oral environment, to release in a sustained manner sufficient levels of mineral-forming calcium and phosphate ions to promote formation of stable apatitic tooth mineral. However, the less than optimal ACP filler/resin matrix cohesion, excessive polymerization shrinkage and water sorption of these experimental materials can adversely affect their physicochemical and mechanical properties, and, ultimately, limit their lifespan. This study demonstrates the effects of chemical structure and composition of the methacrylate monomers used to form the matrix phase of composites on degree of vinyl conversion (DVC and water sorption of both copolymers and composites and the release of mineral ions from the composites. Modification of ACP surface via introducing cations and/or polymers ab initio during filler synthesis failed to yield mechanically improved composites. However, moderate improvement in composite’s mechanical stability without compromising its remineralization potential was achieved by silanization and/or milling of ACP filler. Using ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate or urethane dimethacrylate as base monomers and adding moderate amounts of hydrophilic 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate or its isomer ethyl-α-hydroxymethacrylate appears to be a promising route to maximize the remineralizing ability of the filler while maintaining high DVC. Exploration of the structure/composition/property relationships of ACP fillers and polymer matrices is complex but essential for achieving a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that govern dissolution/re-precipitation of bioactive ACP fillers, and

  11. Bacterial viability and physical properties of antibacterially modified experimental dental resin composites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Rüttermann

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the antibacterial effect and the effect on the material properties of a novel delivery system with Irgasan as active agent and methacrylated polymerizable Irgasan when added to experimental dental resin composites. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A delivery system based on novel polymeric hollow beads, loaded with Irgasan and methacrylated polymerizable Irgasan as active agents were used to manufacture three commonly formulated experimental resin composites. The non-modified resin was used as standard (ST. Material A contained the delivery system providing 4 % (m/m Irgasan, material B contained 4 % (m/m methacrylated Irgasan and material C 8 % (m/m methacrylated Irgasan. Flexural strength (FS, flexural modulus (FM, water sorption (WS, solubility (SL, surface roughness Ra, polymerization shrinkage, contact angle Θ, total surface free energy γS and its apolar γS (LW, polar γS (AB, Lewis acid γS (+and base γS (- term as well as bacterial viability were determined. Significance was p < 0.05. RESULTS: The materials A to C were not unacceptably influenced by the modifications and achieved the minimum values for FS, WS and SL as requested by EN ISO 4049 and did not differ from ST what was also found for Ra. Only A had lower FM than ST. Θ of A and C was higher and γS (AB of A and B was lower than of ST. Materials A to C had higher γS (+ than ST. The antibacterial effect of materials A to C was significantly increased when compared with ST meaning that significantly less vital cells were found. CONCLUSION: Dental resin composites with small quantities of a novel antibacterially doped delivery system or with an antibacterial monomer provided acceptable physical properties and good antibacterial effectiveness. The sorption material being part of the delivery system can be used as a vehicle for any other active agent.

  12. Synthesis of iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes for using as radiopacifiers in dental composite resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Lan, Jinle; Wang, Xiaoyan; Deng, Xuliang; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a strategy of using iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes as radiopacifiers for dental composite resin was evaluated. It was hypothesized that cyclophosphazenes bearing both iodine and acrylate group swere able to endow composite resins radiopacity without compromising mechanical properties. The cyclophosphazene compounds were synthesized by subsequently nucleophilic substitution of hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene with hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and 4-iodoaniline. Cyclotriphosphazenes containing two different molar ratios of HEMA to 4-iodoaniline (1:5 and 2:4) were obtained, and were identified with 1 H NMR, FT-IR, UV and mass spectroscopy. The iodine-containing cyclophosphazenes were able to dissolve well in bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin, and were added at two contents (10 or 15%wt. of the resin). The resins were photo-cured and post-thermal treated before characterizations. The resulting composite resins demonstrated the ability of blocking X-ray. And the addition of HEMA-co-iodoaniline substituted cyclotriphosphazenes caused minor adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resins because the cyclotriphosphazenes could mix well and react with the resins. The presence of rigid phosphazene rings between resin backbones displayed an effective function of decreasing polymerization shrinkage. In summary, soluble and reactive iodine-containing cyclotriphosphazenes demonstrated advantages over traditional heavy metals or metal oxides in being used as additives for producing radiopaque dental resins. - Highlights: • Iodine-containing cyclotriphosphazenes were prepared via nucleophilic substitution. • The cyclotriphosphazenes endowed Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resins radiopacity. • The cyclotriphosphazenes caused a minor adverse effect on mechanical properties

  13. Simplified treatment of severe dental erosion with ultrathin CAD-CAM composite occlusal veneers and anterior bilaminar veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Luís Henrique; Resende, Tayane Holz; Reis, Kátia Rodrigues; Magne, Pascal

    2016-10-01

    Restorative treatment for patients with dental erosion requires an analysis of the degree of structural damage. Patients affected by moderate to severe dental erosion are particularly challenging because complex occlusal reconstruction will be needed. Ultrathin bonded occlusal veneers represent a conservative alternative to traditional onlays and complete coverage crowns for the treatment of severe erosion. This article describes a complete mouth rehabilitation with ultrathin computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) composite resin occlusal veneers in a patient with a severely eroded dentition. In the maxillary anterior teeth, the bilaminar approach was chosen with lingual composite resin veneers and labial porcelain veneers. The main benefit of this approach is the possibility of using additive adhesive techniques, allowing only strategic reduction of sound dental structure or no preparation. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Surface modification of quartz fibres for dental composites through a sol-gel process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazi; Wang, Renlin; Habib, Eric; Wang, Ruili; Zhang, Qinghong; Sun, Bin; Zhu, Meifang

    2017-05-01

    In this study, quartz fibres (QFs) surface modification using a sol-gel method was proposed and dental posts reinforced with modified QFs were produced. A silica sol (SS) was prepared using tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (γ-MPS) as precursors. The amount of γ-MPS in the sol-gel system was varied from 0 to 24wt.% with a constant molar ratio of TEOS, ethanol, deionized water, and HCl. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and contact angle (CA) measurements were used to characterize the modified QFs, which confirmed that SS had successfully coated the surface of QFs. SEM images showed good interfacial bonding between the modified QFs and the resin matrix. The results of three-point bending tests of the fibre reinforced composite (FRC) posts showed that the QFs modified by SS with 12wt.% γ-MPS presented the best mechanical properties, demonstrating improvements of 108.3% and 89.6% for the flexural strength and flexural modulus, respectively, compared with untreated QFs. Furthermore, the sorption and solubility of the prepared dental posts were also studied by immersing the posts in artificial saliva (AS) for 4weeks, and yielded favourable results. This sol-gel surface modification method promises to resolve interfacial bonding issues of fibres with the resin matrix, and produce FRC posts with excellent properties. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Phase composition of rapidly solidified Ag-Sn-Cu dental alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecong Dzuong; Do Minh Nghiep; Nguyen van Dzan; Cao the Ha

    1996-01-01

    The phase composition of some rapidly solidified Ag-Sn-Cu dental alloys with different copper contents (6.22 wtpct) has been studied by XRD, EMPA and optical microscopy. The samples were prepared from melt-spun ribbons. The microstructure of the as-quenched ribbons was microcrystalline and consisted of the Ag sub 3 Sn, Ag sub 4 Sn, Cu sub 3 Sn and Cu sub 3 Sn sub 8 phases. Mixing with mercury (amalgamation) led to formation of the Ag sub 2 Hg sub 3, Sn sub 7 Hg and Cu sub 6 Sn sub 5 phases. The amount of copper atoms in the alloys played an important role in phase formation in the amalgams

  16. The effect of orthodontic bonding materials on dental plaque accumulation and composition in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, H; Evans, R D; Wilson, M; Ready, D; Noar, J H; Pratten, J

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accumulation and composition of microcosm dental plaque on different orthodontic bonding materials using an in vitro model. Microcosm plaques were grown on discs of a range of bonding materials in a constant depth film fermentor. The biofilms were derived from human saliva and supplied with artificial saliva as a source of nutrients. The number of viable bacteria in the biofilms was determined and the streptococci present were identified to species level. The results showed that there was no significant difference in bacterial accumulation between different bonding materials, however, biofilms grown on materials which were fluoride releasing, did not contain Streptococcus mutans. This in vitro study has shown that the use of fluoride-releasing bonding materials may support the growth of supragingival plaque, which does not contain S. mutans.

  17. Correlation between chemical composition of dental calculus and bone samples in ancient human burials: perspectives in paleonutritional studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capasso, L.; Di Tota, G.; Bondioli, L.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The authors describe the results of an assay based on the comparison between chemical composition of dental calculus and bone respectively obtained from teeth and bones of ancient skeletons. The chemical analysis has been performed by synchrotron light. The concentrations of the following oligoelements having paleonutritional correlations were analysed: Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Sr and Ca. The authors demonstrate that- in a given individual the concentration of such elements in the bone sample were in the range of those obtained for the same elements in the sample of dental calculus. Such correspondence suggests that the chemical analysis of dental calculus may give paleonutritional indications analogous to those deriving from the analysis of bone samples. The authors underline also that the use of dental calculus has a distinct advantage over the use of bone samples, since it may allow a diachronic investigation. In fact, dental calculus typically presents a concentric pattern of growth, and the chemical composition of each layer may vary in accordance with temporal dietary variations. This is not the case for bone. This fact is the theoretical basis for the possible future development of techniques directed to the reconstruction of variations in the dietary habits of ancient individuals, possibly in relation to environmental seasonal changes

  18. Comparison of chemical composition of materials used in dental restorations 08 years after the irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maio, Mireia Florencio; Santos, Adimir dos; Fernandes, Marco A.R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on the materials commonly used in dental restorations (amalgam, composite resin and Compomer), to mitigate the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, observed when the teeth are restored within the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to the beam of radiation from a source of cobalt-therapy, and analyzed by a X-ray fluorescence technique, by comparing the chemical composition of samples before and after irradiation. Gamma spectrometry was performed with detector of NaI and HPGe in the same samples. Then, the samples were kept in an appropriate place and after 08 years is repeated the same analysis. With these tests, it was possible to verify small changes in the composition of bodies of evidence due to the interaction 08 years after exposure to gamma radiation beams, simulating a patient who develops deleterious effects of radiation after the end radiotherapy treatment. (author)

  19. Comparison of chemical composition of materials used in dental restorations 08 years after the irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maio, Mireia Florencio; Santos, Adimir dos, E-mail: mfmaio@ipen.b, E-mail: asantos@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: marcosrf@salesiano-ata.b [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work consisted of quantitative studies of the effects caused by ionizing radiation on the materials commonly used in dental restorations (amalgam, composite resin and Compomer), to mitigate the deleterious effects of radiotherapy when patients with tumors in head and neck, observed when the teeth are restored within the field of radiation. Samples were submitted to the beam of radiation from a source of cobalt-therapy, and analyzed by a X-ray fluorescence technique, by comparing the chemical composition of samples before and after irradiation. Gamma spectrometry was performed with detector of NaI and HPGe in the same samples. Then, the samples were kept in an appropriate place and after 08 years is repeated the same analysis. With these tests, it was possible to verify small changes in the composition of bodies of evidence due to the interaction 08 years after exposure to gamma radiation beams, simulating a patient who develops deleterious effects of radiation after the end radiotherapy treatment. (author)

  20. Evaluation of linear polymerization shrinkage, flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of dental composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Queiroz de Melo Monteiro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Linear polymerization shrinkage (LPS, flexural strength (FS and modulus of elasticity (ME of 7 dental composites (Filtek Z350™, Filtek Z250™/3M ESPE; Grandio™, Polofil Supra™/VOCO; TPH Spectrum™, TPH3™, Esthet-X™/Denstply were measured. For the measurement of LPS, composites were applied to a cylindrical metallic mold and polymerized (n = 8. The gap formed at the resin/mold interface was observed using scanning electron microscopy (1500×. For FS and ME, specimens were prepared according to the ISO 4049 specifications (n = 10. Statistical analysis of the data was performed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey test. TPH Spectrum presented significantly higher LPS values (29.45 µm. Grandio had significantly higher mean values for FS (141.07 MPa and ME (13.91 GPa. The relationship between modulus of elasticity and polymerization shrinkage is the main challenge for maintenance of the adhesive interface, thus composites presenting high shrinkage values, associated with a high modulus of elasticity tend to disrupt the adhesive interface under polymerization.

  1. The Impact of Maltitol-Sweetened Chewing Gum on the Dental Plaque Biofilm Microbiota Composition

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    Bart J. F. Keijser

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The oral cavity harbors a complex microbial ecosystem, intimately related to oral health and disease. The use of polyol-sweetened gum is believed to benefit oral health through stimulation of salivary flow and impacting oral pathogenic bacteria. Maltitol is often used as sweetener in food products. This study aimed to establish the in vivo effects of frequent consumption of maltitol-sweetened chewing gum on the dental plaque microbiota in healthy volunteers and to establish the cellular and molecular effects by in vitro cultivation and transcriptional analysis.Results: An intervention study was performed in 153 volunteers, randomly assigned to three groups (www.trialregister.nl; NTR4165. One group was requested to use maltitol gum five times daily, one group used gum-base, and the third group did not use chewing gum. At day 0 and day 28, 24 h-accumulated supragingival plaque was collected at the lingual sites of the lower jaw and the buccal sites of the upper jaw and analyzed by 16S ribosomal rRNA gene sequencing. At day 42, 2 weeks after completion of the study, lower-jaw samples were collected and analyzed. The upper buccal plaque microbiota composition had lower bacterial levels and higher relative abundances of (facultative aerobic species compared to the lower lingual sites. There was no difference in bacterial community structure between any of the three study groups (PERMANOVA. Significant lower abundance of several bacterial phylotypes was found in maltitol gum group compared to the gum-base group, including Actinomyces massiliensis HOT 852 and Lautropia mirabilis HOT 022. Cultivation studies confirmed growth inhibition of A. massiliensis and A. johnsonii by maltitol at levels of 1% and higher. Transcriptome analysis of A. massiliensis revealed that exposure to maltitol resulted in changes in the expression of genes linked to osmoregulation, biofilm formation, and central carbon metabolism.Conclusion: The results showed that

  2. The Impact of Maltitol-Sweetened Chewing Gum on the Dental Plaque Biofilm Microbiota Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijser, Bart J F; van den Broek, Tim J; Slot, Dagmar E; van Twillert, Lodewic; Kool, Jolanda; Thabuis, Clémentine; Ossendrijver, Michel; van der Weijden, Fridus A; Montijn, Roy C

    2018-01-01

    Background: The oral cavity harbors a complex microbial ecosystem, intimately related to oral health and disease. The use of polyol-sweetened gum is believed to benefit oral health through stimulation of salivary flow and impacting oral pathogenic bacteria. Maltitol is often used as sweetener in food products. This study aimed to establish the in vivo effects of frequent consumption of maltitol-sweetened chewing gum on the dental plaque microbiota in healthy volunteers and to establish the cellular and molecular effects by in vitro cultivation and transcriptional analysis. Results: An intervention study was performed in 153 volunteers, randomly assigned to three groups (www.trialregister.nl; NTR4165). One group was requested to use maltitol gum five times daily, one group used gum-base, and the third group did not use chewing gum. At day 0 and day 28, 24 h-accumulated supragingival plaque was collected at the lingual sites of the lower jaw and the buccal sites of the upper jaw and analyzed by 16S ribosomal rRNA gene sequencing. At day 42, 2 weeks after completion of the study, lower-jaw samples were collected and analyzed. The upper buccal plaque microbiota composition had lower bacterial levels and higher relative abundances of (facultative) aerobic species compared to the lower lingual sites. There was no difference in bacterial community structure between any of the three study groups (PERMANOVA). Significant lower abundance of several bacterial phylotypes was found in maltitol gum group compared to the gum-base group, including Actinomyces massiliensis HOT 852 and Lautropia mirabilis HOT 022. Cultivation studies confirmed growth inhibition of A. massiliensis and A. johnsonii by maltitol at levels of 1% and higher. Transcriptome analysis of A. massiliensis revealed that exposure to maltitol resulted in changes in the expression of genes linked to osmoregulation, biofilm formation, and central carbon metabolism. Conclusion: The results showed that chewing itself

  3. The Impact of Maltitol-Sweetened Chewing Gum on the Dental Plaque Biofilm Microbiota Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijser, Bart J. F.; van den Broek, Tim J.; Slot, Dagmar E.; van Twillert, Lodewic; Kool, Jolanda; Thabuis, Clémentine; Ossendrijver, Michel; van der Weijden, Fridus A.; Montijn, Roy C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: The oral cavity harbors a complex microbial ecosystem, intimately related to oral health and disease. The use of polyol-sweetened gum is believed to benefit oral health through stimulation of salivary flow and impacting oral pathogenic bacteria. Maltitol is often used as sweetener in food products. This study aimed to establish the in vivo effects of frequent consumption of maltitol-sweetened chewing gum on the dental plaque microbiota in healthy volunteers and to establish the cellular and molecular effects by in vitro cultivation and transcriptional analysis. Results: An intervention study was performed in 153 volunteers, randomly assigned to three groups (www.trialregister.nl; NTR4165). One group was requested to use maltitol gum five times daily, one group used gum-base, and the third group did not use chewing gum. At day 0 and day 28, 24 h-accumulated supragingival plaque was collected at the lingual sites of the lower jaw and the buccal sites of the upper jaw and analyzed by 16S ribosomal rRNA gene sequencing. At day 42, 2 weeks after completion of the study, lower-jaw samples were collected and analyzed. The upper buccal plaque microbiota composition had lower bacterial levels and higher relative abundances of (facultative) aerobic species compared to the lower lingual sites. There was no difference in bacterial community structure between any of the three study groups (PERMANOVA). Significant lower abundance of several bacterial phylotypes was found in maltitol gum group compared to the gum-base group, including Actinomyces massiliensis HOT 852 and Lautropia mirabilis HOT 022. Cultivation studies confirmed growth inhibition of A. massiliensis and A. johnsonii by maltitol at levels of 1% and higher. Transcriptome analysis of A. massiliensis revealed that exposure to maltitol resulted in changes in the expression of genes linked to osmoregulation, biofilm formation, and central carbon metabolism. Conclusion: The results showed that chewing itself

  4. Temperature-dependence of creep behaviour of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2013-04-01

    To determine the effect of temperature, over a clinically relevant range, on the creep behaviour of a set of conventional and flowable resin-composites including two subgroups having the same resin matrix and varied filler loading. Eight dental resin-composites: four flowable and four conventional were investigated. Stainless steel split moulds (4 mm × 6 mm) were used to prepare cylindrical specimens for creep examination. Specimens were irradiated in the moulds in layers of 2mm thickness (40s each), as well as from the radial direction after removal from the moulds, using a light-curing unit with irradiance of 650 mW/cm(2). A total of 15 specimens from each material were prepared and divided into three groups (n=5) according to the temperature; Group I: (23°C), Group II: (37°C) and Group III: (45°C). Each specimen was loaded (20 MPa) for 2h and unloaded for 2h. Creep was measured continuously over the loading and unloading periods. At higher temperatures greater creep and permanent set were recorded. The lowest mean creep occurred with GS and GH resin-composites. Percentage of creep recovery decreased at higher temperatures. At 23°C, the materials exhibited comparable creep. At 37°C and 45°C, however, there was a greater variation between materials. For all resin-composites, there was a strong linear correlation with temperature for both creep and permanent set. Creep parameters of resin-composites are sensitive to temperature increase from 23 to 45°C, as can occur intra-orally. For a given resin matrix, creep decreased with higher filler loading. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mucosal pH, dental findings, and salivary composition in pediatric liver transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidovich, E.; Asher, R.; Shapira, J.; Brand, H.S.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Shapiro, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oral health and dental maintenance have become part of the standard of care for pediatric liver transplant recipients. These individuals tend to suffer particularly from dental problems, such as gingival enlargement, gingivitis, poor oral hygiene, dental hypoplasia, and caries. Saliva

  6. Post-cure depth of cure of bulk fill dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrahlah, A; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2014-02-01

    To determine the post-cure depth of cure of bulk fill resin composites through using Vickers hardness profiles (VHN). Five bulk fill composite materials were examined: Tetric EvoCeram(®) Bulk Fill, X-tra base, Venus(®) Bulk Fill, Filtek™ Bulk Fill, SonicFill™. Three specimens of each material type were prepared in stainless steel molds which contained a slot of dimensions (15 mm × 4 mm × 2 mm), and a top plate. The molds were irradiated from one end. All specimens were stored at 37°C for 24h, before measurement. The Vickers hardness was measured as a function of depth of material, at 0.3mm intervals. Data were analysed by one-way ANOVA using Tukey post hoc tests (α=0.05). The maximum VHN ranged from 37.8 to 77.4, whilst the VHN at 80% of max.VHN ranged from 30.4 to 61.9. The depth corresponding to 80% of max.VHN, ranged from 4.14 to 5.03 mm. One-way ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between materials for all parameters tested. SonicFill exhibited the highest VHN (pFill the lowest (p≤0.001). SonicFill and Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill had the greatest depth of cure (5.03 and 4.47 mm, respectively) and was significant's different from X-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill and Filtek Bulk Fill (p≤0.016). Linear regression confirmed a positive regression between max.VHN and filler loading (r(2)=0.94). Bulk fill resin composites can be cured to an acceptable post-cure depth, according to the manufacturers' claims. SonicFill and Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill had the greatest depth of cure among the composites examined. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of food simulating liquids on release of monomers from two dental resin composites

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    Ghavam M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: The elution of residual monomers from cured dental composites to oral cavity has a harmful effect on human health and can affect their clinical durability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the amount of eluted monomers (Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, UDMA from two types of composites (Gradia and P60 after exposure to food simulating liquids such as ethanol (25, 50, 75 % and heptane 50 % for 24 hours and 7 days. "nMaterials and Methods: Forty specimens of each composite were prepared. Equal numbers of each composite were immersed in tubes containing 2cc volumes of 25, 50, 75 % ethanole and 50 % heptane. The amount of eluted monomers in standard condition such as Bis-GMA, TEGDMA and UDMA was measured by GC/MS (Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy and results were statistically analysed by three way and one way ANOVA. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significancy. "nResults: The results showed that Gradia released more TEGDMA than P60. In assessing the effect of environment, the result showed that ethanol caused releasing monomers more than heptane and the concentration rate of 75 % ethanole resulted in most releasing of monomers. In assessing the effect of time, the observation showed that more monomers were released 7 days compared to 24 hours. Bis-GMA and UDMA were not detected in any solutions in these conditions. "nConclusion: Ethanole caused more release of monomers than heptane and 75 % ethanole released the most amount of monomers. Gradia released more amount of TEGDMA than P60.

  8. Polymerization shrinkage kinetics and shrinkage-stress in dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sunbul, Hanan; Silikas, Nick; Watts, David C

    2016-08-01

    To investigate a set of resin-composites and the effect of their composition on polymerization shrinkage strain and strain kinetics, shrinkage stress and the apparent elastic modulus. Eighteen commercially available resin-composites were investigated. Three specimens (n=3) were made per material and light-cured with an LED unit (1200mW/cm(2)) for 20s. The bonded-disk method was used to measure the shrinkage strain and Bioman shrinkage stress instrument was used to measure shrinkage stress. The shrinkage strain kinetics at 23°C was monitored for 60min. Maximum strain and stress was evaluated at 60min. The shrinkage strain rate was calculated using numerical differentiation. The shrinkage strain values ranged from 1.83 (0.09) % for Tetric Evoceram (TEC) to 4.68 (0.04) % for Beautifil flow plus (BFP). The shrinkage strain rate ranged from 0.11 (0.01%s(-1)) for Gaenial posterior (GA-P) to 0.59 (0.07) %s(-1) for BFP. Shrinkage stress values ranged from 3.94 (0.40)MPa for TET to 10.45 (0.41)MPa for BFP. The apparent elastic modulus ranged from 153.56 (18.7)MPa for Ever X posterior (EVX) to 277.34 (25.5) MPa for Grandio SO heavy flow (GSO). The nature of the monomer system determines the amount of the bulk contraction that occurs during polymerization and the resultant stress. Higher values of shrinkage strain and stress were demonstrated by the investigated flowable materials. The bulk-fill materials showed comparable result when compared to the traditional resin-composites. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Influence of Water Sorption of Dental Light-Cured Composites on Shrinkage Stress

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    Kinga Bociong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The contraction stress generated during the photopolymerization of resin dental composites is the major disadvantage. The water sorption in the oral environment should counteract the contraction stress. The purpose was to evaluate the influence of the water sorption of composite materials on polymerization shrinkage stress generated at the restoration-tooth interface. The following materials were tested: Filtek Ultimate, Gradia Direct LoFlo, Heliomolar Flow, Tetric EvoCeram, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Tetric EvoFlow, Tetric EvoFlow Bulk Fill, X-tra Base, Venus BulkFil, and Ceram.X One. The shrinkage stress was measured immediately after curing and after: 0.5 h, 24 h, 72 h, 96 h, 168 h, 240 h, 336 h, 504 h, 672 h, and 1344 h by means of photoelastic study. Moreover, water sorption and solubility were evaluated. Material samples were weighted on scale in time intervals to measure the water absorbency and the dynamic of this process. The tested materials during polymerization generated shrinkage stresses ranging from 6.3 MPa to 12.5 MPa. Upon water conditioning (56 days, the decrease in shrinkage strain (not less than 48% was observed. The decrease in value stress in time is material-dependent.

  10. Development of rampant dental caries, and composition of plaque fluid and saliva in irradiated primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgar, W M; Bowen, W H; Cole, M F [National Caries Program, National Institute of Dental Research, Maryland USA

    1981-01-01

    Co-60 gamma irradiation of the salivary glands of Macaca mulata monkeys fed a cariogenic diet led to the rapid onset of dental caries resembling that in irradiated human patients. Plaque fluid and saliva were sampled from irradiated monkeys, nonirradiated controls and a group of animals fed a noncariogenic diet in order to look for changes which might occur in inorganic composition related to the caries development and to dietary differences. Salivary calcium and phosphate levels were not markedly changed after irradiation: iodide levels were raised, while thiocyanate levels fell. In plaque fluid, calcium concentrations were not affected by irradiation, but were higher in animals fed a noncariogenic diet. Phosphate levels were higher with a cariogenic diet and further increased in irradiated animals. Magnesium levels were occasionally higher than those of calcium. Other differences in plaque fluid composition may be related to secondary effects of the concomitant gingival disease. The results do not point clearly a specific change in the quality of the saliva produced by the residual gland tissue after irradiation which precipitates the rampant caries. It is more likely that the grat reduction in the quantity of saliva with its protective constituents is responsible.

  11. Development of rampant dental caries, and composition of plaque fluid and saliva in irradiated primates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgar, W.M.; Bowen, W.H.; Cole, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    Co-60 gamma irradiation of the salivary glands of Macaca mulata monkeys fed a cariogenic diet led to the rapid onset of dental caries resembling that in irradiated human patients. Plaque fluid and saliva were sampled from irradiated monkeys, nonirradiated controls and a group of animals fed a noncariogenic diet in order to look for changes which might occur in inorganic composition related to the caries development and to dietary differences. Salivary calcium and phosphate levels were not markedly changed after irradiation: iodide levels were raised, while thiocyanate levels fell. In plaque fluid, calcium concentrations were not affected by irradiation, but were higher in animals fed a noncariogenic diet. Phosphate levels were higher with a cariogenic diet and further increased in irradiated animals. Magnesium levels were occasionally higher than those of calcium. Other differences in plaque fluid composition may be related to secondary effects of the concomitant gingival disease. The results do not point clearly a specific change in the quality of the saliva produced by the residual gland tissue after irradiation which precipitates the rampant caries. It is more likely that the grat reduction in the quantity of saliva with its protective constituents is responsible. (author)

  12. Nanoindentation creep versus bulk compressive creep of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Silikas, N; Akhtar, R; Watts, D C

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate nanoindentation as an experimental tool for characterizing the viscoelastic time-dependent creep of resin-composites and to compare the resulting parameters with those obtained by bulk compressive creep. Ten dental resin-composites: five conventional, three bulk-fill and two flowable were investigated using both nanoindentation creep and bulk compressive creep methods. For nano creep, disc specimens (15mm×2mm) were prepared from each material by first injecting the resin-composite paste into metallic molds. Specimens were irradiated from top and bottom surfaces in multiple overlapping points to ensure optimal polymerization using a visible light curing unit with output irradiance of 650mW/cm(2). Specimens then were mounted in 3cm diameter phenolic ring forms and embedded in a self-curing polystyrene resin. Following grinding and polishing, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h. Using an Agilent Technologies XP nanoindenter equipped with a Berkovich diamond tip (100nm radius), the nano creep was measured at a maximum load of 10mN and the creep recovery was determined when each specimen was unloaded to 1mN. For bulk compressive creep, stainless steel split molds (4mm×6mm) were used to prepare cylindrical specimens which were thoroughly irradiated at 650mW/cm(2) from multiple directions and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h. Specimens were loaded (20MPa) for 2h and unloaded for 2h. One-way ANOVA, Levene's test for homogeneity of variance and the Bonferroni post hoc test (all at p≤0.05), plus regression plots, were used for statistical analysis. Dependent on the type of resin-composite material and the loading/unloading parameters, nanoindentation creep ranged from 29.58nm to 90.99nm and permanent set ranged from 8.96nm to 30.65nm. Bulk compressive creep ranged from 0.47% to 1.24% and permanent set ranged from 0.09% to 0.38%. There was a significant (p=0.001) strong positive non-linear correlation (r(2)=0.97) between bulk

  13. Ion irradiation effects on the matrix phase of SiCf/SiC composites prepared by the whisker growing assisted CVI process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyeong Hwan; Park, Ji Yeon; Kang, Suk Min; Kim, Weon Ju; Jung, Choong Hwan; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2005-01-01

    SiC f /SiC composites are one of promising candidates for structural material of the next generation energy system such as GFR and fusion reactors. A number of fabrication methods have been studied for obtaining an outstanding SiC f /SiC composite with a high density, high crystallinity and purity. SiC f /SiC composites consisted of whisker-reinforced matrix have a great potential at the viewpoint both of the fabrication process and the mechanical properties. SiC whiskers formed between SiC fibers improve the densification of SiC matrix during CVI process. In addition, the reinforced whiskers would be likely to enhance the mechanical properties of matrix and SiC f /SiC composite. While there has been significant developmental work on manufacturing the SiC f /SiC composite by the whisker growing assisted CVI process, detailed understanding of what effects the complex in the operating conditions combined with realistic materials property data is not adequately understood. Especially, its irradiation effects are even less clear and not well understood. A method of charged-particle irradiation is the most important R and D topics for simulating the core conditions of the advanced nuclear systems. Many studies on radiation effects of SiC and SiC f /SiC composites using a method of ion irradiation have in progress for R and D of the advanced nuclear systems. In this present work, changes of the mechanical property of SiC whisker-reinforced matrix in SiC f /SiC composite were evaluated by means of the depth sensing indentation method before and after chargedparticle irradiation

  14. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Dental Composites Cured with CAD/CAM Assisted Solid-State Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto De Santis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades, it has been frequently reported that the properties of dental restorative composites cured with argon laser are similar or superior to those achieved with conventional halogen and light emitting diode (LED curing units. Whereas laser curing is not dependent on the distance between the curing unit and the material, such distance represents a drawback for conventional curing units. However, a widespread clinical application of this kind of laser remains difficult due to cost, heavy weight, and bulky size. Recently, with regard to the radiation in the blue region of the spectrum, powerful solid-state lasers have been commercialized. In the current research, CAD (computer-aided design/CAM (computer-aided manufacturing assisted solid-state lasers were employed for curing of different dental restorative composites consisting of micro- and nanoparticle-reinforced materials based on acrylic resins. Commercial LED curing units were used as a control. Temperature rise during the photopolymerisation process and bending properties were measured. By providing similar light energy dose, no significant difference in temperature rise was observed when the two light sources provided similar intensity. In addition, after 7 days since curing, bending properties of composites cured with laser and LED were similar. The results suggested that this kind of laser would be suitable for curing dental composites, and the curing process does not suffer from the tip-to-tooth distance.

  15. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Dental Composites Cured with CAD/CAM Assisted Solid-State Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Roberto; Gloria, Antonio; Maietta, Saverio; Martorelli, Massimo; De Luca, Alessandro; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Riccitiello, Francesco; Rengo, Sandro

    2018-01-01

    Over the last three decades, it has been frequently reported that the properties of dental restorative composites cured with argon laser are similar or superior to those achieved with conventional halogen and light emitting diode (LED) curing units. Whereas laser curing is not dependent on the distance between the curing unit and the material, such distance represents a drawback for conventional curing units. However, a widespread clinical application of this kind of laser remains difficult due to cost, heavy weight, and bulky size. Recently, with regard to the radiation in the blue region of the spectrum, powerful solid-state lasers have been commercialized. In the current research, CAD (computer-aided design)/CAM (computer-aided manufacturing) assisted solid-state lasers were employed for curing of different dental restorative composites consisting of micro- and nanoparticle-reinforced materials based on acrylic resins. Commercial LED curing units were used as a control. Temperature rise during the photopolymerisation process and bending properties were measured. By providing similar light energy dose, no significant difference in temperature rise was observed when the two light sources provided similar intensity. In addition, after 7 days since curing, bending properties of composites cured with laser and LED were similar. The results suggested that this kind of laser would be suitable for curing dental composites, and the curing process does not suffer from the tip-to-tooth distance. PMID:29584683

  16. Analytical methods for the measurement of polymerization kinetics and stresses of dental resin-based composites: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrsima Ghavami-Lahiji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resin-based composites are commonly used restorative materials in dentistry. Such tooth-colored restorations can adhere to the dental tissues. One drawback is that the polymerization shrinkage and induced stresses during the curing procedure is an inherent property of resin composite materials that might impair their performance. This review focuses on the significant developments of laboratory tools in the measurement of polymerization shrinkage and stresses of dental resin-based materials during polymerization. An electronic search of publications from January 1977 to July 2016 was made using ScienceDirect, PubMed, Medline, and Google Scholar databases. The search included only English-language articles. Only studies that performed laboratory methods to evaluate the amount of the polymerization shrinkage and/or stresses of dental resin-based materials during polymerization were selected. The results indicated that various techniques have been introduced with different mechanical/physical bases. Besides, there are factors that may contribute the differences between the various methods in measuring the amount of shrinkages and stresses of resin composites. The search for an ideal and standard apparatus for measuring shrinkage stress and volumetric polymerization shrinkage of resin-based materials in dentistry is still required. Researchers and clinicians must be aware of differences between analytical methods to make proper interpretation and indications of each technique relevant to a clinical situation.

  17. Characterization of Morphology and Composition of Inorganic Fillers in Dental Alginates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Danil Guiraldo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy microanalysis (EDX, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Archimedes’ Principle were used to determine the characteristics of inorganic filler particles in five dental alginates, including Cavex ColorChange (C, Hydrogum 5 (H5, Hydrogum (H, Orthoprint (O, and Jeltrate Plus (JP. The different alginate powders (0.5 mg were fixed on plastic stubs (n=5 and sputter coated with carbon for EDX analysis, then coated with gold, and observed using SEM. Volume fractions were determined by weighing a sample of each material in water before and after calcining at 450°C for 3 h. The alginate materials were mainly composed of silicon (Si by weight (C—81.59%, H—79.89%, O—78.87%, H5—77.95%, JP—66.88%, wt. The filler fractions in volume (vt were as follows: H5—84.85%, JP—74.76%, H—70.03%, O—68.31%, and C—56.10%. The tested materials demonstrated important differences in the inorganic elemental composition, filler fraction, and particle morphology.

  18. Wear mechanisms of dental composite restorative materials by two different in-vitro methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Antonino de Souza

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work two very simple apparatuses, namely the ball crater (or ball-on-plate and the linear reciprocating (or pin-on-plate tests, were used in order to investigate the wear mechanisms of TPH Spectrum® and Resilab Master® dental composite resins. Loads in the range of 100 g to 1 kg and a total number of up to 24000 cycles were employed. During some of these tests, aqueous aluminum oxide suspensions were used as abrasive agent either diluted or not in distilled water. In case of the ball-on-plate test wear is dominated by abrasive and/or adhesive mechanisms, and is characterized by scratches which are composed of wear defects comprising particle detachment, wear of the polymer matrix and ceramic particle abrasion. However, the relative contributions of the two wear mechanisms could not be determined separately. In case of the pin-on-plate test wear is governed by the fatigue mechanism, although abrasive and adhesive wear mechanism are also present. After a certain number of cycles fatigue wear dominates the wear behavior and results in severe material loss. This mechanism seems to be more important in case of more brittle materials and when higher loads are employed. Qualitative analysis of the results suggests that the combination of these two very simple methods under appropriate conditions can yield sound results which may be representative of a number of clinical situations.

  19. Wear mechanisms of dental composite restorative materials by two different in-vitro methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Antonino de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work two very simple apparatuses, namely the ball crater (or ball-on-plate and the linear reciprocating (or pin-on-plate tests, were used in order to investigate the wear mechanisms of TPH Spectrum® and Resilab Master® dental composite resins. Loads in the range of 100 g to 1 kg and a total number of up to 24000 cycles were employed. During some of these tests, aqueous aluminum oxide suspensions were used as abrasive agent either diluted or not in distilled water. In case of the ball-on-plate test wear is dominated by abrasive and/or adhesive mechanisms, and is characterized by scratches which are composed of wear defects comprising particle detachment, wear of the polymer matrix and ceramic particle abrasion. However, the relative contributions of the two wear mechanisms could not be determined separately. In case of the pin-on-plate test wear is governed by the fatigue mechanism, although abrasive and adhesive wear mechanism are also present. After a certain number of cycles fatigue wear dominates the wear behavior and results in severe material loss. This mechanism seems to be more important in case of more brittle materials and when higher loads are employed. Qualitative analysis of the results suggests that the combination of these two very simple methods under appropriate conditions can yield sound results which may be representative of a number of clinical situations.

  20. Microstructure and mechanical properties of 2.5 vol. % TiBw/Ti6Al4V composites plates fabricated by hot-hydrostatic canned extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wencong; Zhang, Lingjia; Feng, Yangju; Cui, Guorong; Chen, Wenzhen

    2018-04-01

    Plates of 2.5 vol. % TiB whisker-reinforced Ti6Al4V titanium matrix composites (TiBw/Ti64) with network structure were successfully fabricated by hot-hydrostatic extrusion with steel cup at 1100 °C. The dimensions of plates were about 150mm in length, 27mm in width and 2mm in thickness. After extrusion, the original equiaxed-network structure formed by TiB whiskers still existed, but was compressed in cross-section and stretched in longitudinal section and then the TiB whiskers were directional distribution along the extrusion direction. Furthermore, the mechanical properties results showed that the strength, hardness and ductility of the plates were significantly improved compared to as-sintered composites.

  1. Development of dental composites with reactive fillers that promote precipitation of antibacterial-hydroxyapatite layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabo, Anas; Abou Neel, Ensanya A; Knowles, Jonathan C; Young, Anne M

    2016-03-01

    The study aim was to develop light-curable, high strength dental composites that would release calcium phosphate and chlorhexidine (CHX) but additionally promote surface hydroxyapatite/CHX co-precipitation in simulated body fluid (SBF). 80 wt.% urethane dimethacrylate based liquid was mixed with glass fillers containing 10 wt.% CHX and 0, 10, 20 or 40 wt.% reactive mono- and tricalcium phosphate (CaP). Surface hydroxyapatite layer thickness/coverage from SEM images, Ca/Si ratio from EDX and hydroxyapatite Raman peak intensities were all proportional to both time in SBF and CaP wt.% in the filler. Hydroxyapatite was, however, difficult to detect by XRD until 4 weeks. XRD peak width and SEM images suggested this was due to the very small size (~10 nm) of the hydroxyapatite crystallites. Precipitate mass at 12 weeks was 22 wt.% of the sample CaP total mass irrespective of CaP wt.% and up to 7 wt.% of the specimen. Early diffusion controlled CHX release, assessed by UV spectrometry, was proportional to CaP and twice as fast in water compared with SBF. After 1 week, CHX continued to diffuse into water but in SBF, became entrapped within the precipitating hydroxyapatite layer. At 12 weeks CHX formed 5 to 15% of the HA layer with 10 to 40 wt.% CaP respectively. Despite linear decline of strength and modulus in 4 weeks from 160 to 101 MPa and 4 to 2.4 GPa, respectively, upon raising CaP content, all values were still within the range expected for commercial composites. The high strength, hydroxyapatite precipitation and surface antibacterial accumulation should reduce tooth restoration failure due to fracture, aid demineralised dentine repair and prevent subsurface carious disease respectively. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dielectric analysis of depth dependent curing behavior of dental resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Moeginger, Bernhard; Grossgarten, Mandy; Rosentritt, Martin; Hausnerova, Berenika

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate depth dependent changes of polymerization process and kinetics of visible light-curing (VLC) dental composites in real-time. The measured quantity - "ion viscosity" determined by dielectric analysis (DEA) - provides the depth dependent reaction rate which is correlated to the light intensity available in the corresponding depths derived from light transmission measurements. The ion viscosity curves of two composites (VOCO Arabesk Top and Grandio) were determined during irradiation of 40s with a light-curing unit (LCU) in specimen depths of 0.5/0.75/1.0/1.25/1.5/1.75 and 2.0mm using a dielectric cure analyzer (NETZSCH DEA 231 with Mini IDEX sensors). The thickness dependent light transmission was measured by irradiation composite specimens of various thicknesses on top of a radiometer setup. The shape of the ion viscosity curves depends strongly on the specimen thickness above the sensor. All curves exhibit a range of linear time dependency of the ion viscosity after a certain initiation time. The determined initiation times, the slopes of the linear part of the curves, and the ion viscosities at the end of the irradiation differ significantly with depth within the specimen. The slopes of the ion viscosity curves as well as the light intensity values decrease with depth and fit to the Lambert-Beer law. The corresponding attenuation coefficients are determined for Arabesk Top OA2 to 1.39mm(-1) and 1.48mm(-1), respectively, and for Grandio OA2 with 1.17 and 1.39mm(-1), respectively. For thicknesses exceeding 1.5mm a change in polymerization behavior is observed as the ion viscosity increases subsequent to the linear range indicating some kind of reaction acceleration. The two VLC composites and different specimen thicknesses discriminate significantly in their ion viscosity evolution allowing for a precise characterization of the curing process even with respect to the polymerization mechanism. Copyright © 2014. Published by

  3. Determinación de la profundidad de curado y propiedades mecánicas de composites dentales fotopolimerizables experimentales

    OpenAIRE

    Veranes-Pantoja, Yaimarilis; Autran-Mateu, Fernando; Álvarez-Brito, Rubén; Gil-Mur, Francisco Javier

    2005-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se estudian la resistencia a la compresión, módulo en compresión, resistencia a la compresión diametral, dureza, desgaste y profundidad de curado de seis formulaciones de composites dentales fotopolimerizables. Los composites fueron preparados usando como matrices combinaciones de Bis-GMA/DMATEEG, Bis-GMA/MPS, Bis-GMA/DMATEEG/MPS. Como relleno se utilizó cuarzo del yacimiento "El Cacahual" y la combinación de cuarzo/aerosil 200. La resina VenusTM Heraus Kulzer fue utili...

  4. Compressive strength measurements of hybrid dental composites treated with dry heat and light emitting diodes (LED post cure treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Krisnawaty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid composites are mostly used on large cavities as restorative dental materials, whether it is used directly or indirectly. The mechanical properties of composite resin shall increase if it is treated with post cure treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate compressive strength differences between dry heat and Light Emitting Diodes (LED treatment on the hybrid dental composite. A quasi-experimental was applied on this research with a total of 30 samples that were divided into two groups. Each sample was tested using LLOYD Universal Testing Machine with 1 mm/min speed to evaluate the compressive strength. The compressive strength results were marked when the sample was broken. The results of two groups were then analyzed using t-test statistical calculation. The results of this study show that post cure treatment on hybrid composite using LED light box (194.138 MPa was lower than dry heat treatment (227.339 MPa, which was also significantly different from statistical analysis. It can be concluded that compressive strength of LED light box was lower than dry heat post-cure treatment on the hybrid composite resin.

  5. Controlled release of metronidazole from composite poly-ε-caprolactone/alginate (PCL/alginate) rings for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shih-Feng; Kehinde, Timilehin; Zhang, Xiangming; Khajotia, Sharukh; Schmidtke, David W; Starly, Binil

    2013-06-01

    Dental implants provide support for dental crowns and bridges by serving as abutments for the replacement of missing teeth. To prevent bacterial accumulation and growth at the site of implantation, solutions such as systemic antibiotics and localized delivery of bactericidal agents are often employed. The objective of this study was to demonstrate a novel method of controlled localized delivery of antibacterial agents to an implant site using a biodegradable custom fabricated ring. The study involved incorporating a model antibacterial agent (metronidazole) into custom designed poly-ε-caprolactone/alginate (PCL/alginate) composite rings to produce the intended controlled release profile. The rings can be designed to fit around the body of any root form dental implants of various diameters, shapes and sizes. In vitro release studies indicate that pure (100%) alginate rings exhibited an expected burst release of metronidazole in the first few hours, whereas Alginate/PCL composite rings produced a medium burst release followed by a sustained release for a period greater than 4 weeks. By varying the PCL/alginate weight ratios, we have shown that we can control the amount of antibacterial agents released to provide the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) needed for adequate protection. The fabricated composite rings have achieved a 50% antibacterial agent release profile over the first 48 h and the remaining amount slowly released over the remainder of the study period. The PCL/alginate agent release characteristic fits the Ritger-Peppas model indicating a diffusion-based mechanism during the 30-day study period. The developed system demonstrates a controllable drug release profile and the potential for the ring to inhibit bacterial biofilm growth for the prevention of diseases such as peri-implantitis resulting from bacterial infection at the implant site. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Full in-vitro analyses of new-generation bulk fill dental composites cured by halogen light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Tuçe Hazal; Kantürk Figen, Aysel; Yılmaz Atalı, Pınar; Coşkuner Filiz, Bilge; Pişkin, Mehmet Burçin

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the full in-vitro analyses of new-generation bulk-fill dental composites cured by halogen light (HLG). Two types' four composites were studied: Surefill SDR (SDR) and Xtra Base (XB) as bulk-fill flowable materials; QuixFill (QF) and XtraFill (XF) as packable bulk-fill materials. Samples were prepared for each analysis and test by applying the same procedure, but with different diameters and thicknesses appropriate to the analysis and test requirements. Thermal properties were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TG/DTG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis; the Vickers microhardness (VHN) was measured after 1, 7, 15 and 30days of storage in water. The degree of conversion values for the materials (DC, %) were immediately measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The surface morphology of the composites was investigated by scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) analyses. The sorption and solubility measurements were also performed after 1, 7, 15 and 30days of storage in water. In addition to his, the data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, and both the Newman Keuls and Tukey multiple comparison tests. The statistical significance level was established at pfill, resin-based dental composites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Correlation of shear and dielectric ion viscosity of dental resins - Influence of composition, temperature and filler content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Selig, Daniela; Duvenbeck, Fabian; Moeginger, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    Shear viscosity and ion viscosity of uncured visible light-curing (VLC) resins and resin based composites (RBC) are correlated with respect to the resin composition, temperature and filler content to check where Dielectric Analysis (DEA) investigations of VLC RBC generate similar results as viscosity measurements. Mixtures of bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) as well as the pure resins were investigated and compared with two commercial VLC dental resins and RBCs (VOCO, Arabesk Top and Grandio). Shear viscosity data was obtained using a Haake Mars III, Thermo Scientific. Ion viscosity measurements performed by a dielectric cure analyzer (DEA 231/1 Epsilon with Mini IDEX-Sensor, Netzsch-Gerätebau). Shear viscosity depends reciprocally on the mobility of molecules, whereas the ion viscosity also depends on the ion concentration as it is affected by both ion concentration and mixture viscosity. Except of pure TEGDMA, shear and ion viscosities depend on the resin composition qualitatively in a similar manner. Furthermore, shear and ion viscosities of the commercial VLC dental resins and composites exhibited the same temperature dependency regardless of filler content. Application of typical rheological models (Kitano and Quemada) revealed that ion viscosity measurements can be described with respect to filler contents of up to 30vol.%. Rheological behavior of a VLC RBC can be characterized by DEA under the condition that the ion concentration is kept constant. Both methods address the same physical phenomenon - motion of molecules. The proposed relations allows for calculating the viscosity of any Bis-GMA-TEGDMA mixture on the base of the viscosities of the pure components. This study demonstrated the applicability of DEA investigations of VLC RBCs with respect to quality assurance purposes. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Amount of 3-Methacryloxy Propyl Thrimethoxysilane Coupling Agent and Nano Filling Structure on Physic-Mechanical Properties of Dental Resin Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farbod Tondnevis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers in the field of dental polymeric base nano composite investigated the effect filling morphology and filling material content on mechanical and physical properties of construction after setting reaction. Our present study concentrated on the effect of ϒ metacryloxy propyloxt tri metoxy silane (ϒ MPS content as coupling agent (orgnic material on physical and mechanical performance of nano composite material. It was shown that despite of contraction after setting reaction, all this properties improved and efficient silanization can efficiently affect structural integrity of dental filling nano composite

  9. Saliva composition in three selected groups with normal stimulated salivary flow rates, but yet major differences in caries experience and dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardow, Allan; Lykkeaa, Joan; Qvist, Vibeke; Ekstrand, Kim; Twetman, Svante; Fiehn, Niels-Erik

    2014-08-01

    It was hypothesized that, by comparing matched subjects with major differences in these dental diseases, but yet normal saliva flow rates, it would be possible to obtain data on the effect of saliva composition on dental disease isolated from the effect of the flow rate. Thus, the aim of the study was to compare the major physicochemical characteristics of stimulated whole saliva in three groups of 85 subjects, each with normal saliva flow rates and at least 24 remaining teeth. A group with very little dental disease (healthy), a group with dental erosion (erosion) and a group with very high caries experience (caries) were chosen. Furthermore, the aim was to determine whether differences among groups could also be found on an individual level. Although it was not possible to retrieve three groups whose members were completely identical, the present study points in the direction that, on a group level, subjects with very little dental disease seemed to have a more favorable physicochemical saliva composition with respect to higher calcium, phosphate, bicarbonate, pH, degree of saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite and a lower critical pH (p dental erosion (p dental caries and erosion in single individuals.

  10. [Effect of amount of silane coupling agent on flexural strength of dental composite resins reinforced with aluminium borate whisker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming-yi; Zhang, Xiu-yin

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of amount of silane coupling agent on flexural strength of dental composite resins reinforced with aluminium borate whisker (ABW). ABW was surface-treated with 0%, 1%, 2%, 3% and 4% silan coupling agent (γ-MPS), and mixed with resin matrix to synthesize 5 groups of composite resins. After heat-cured at 120 degrees centigrade for 1 h, specimens were tested in three-point flexure to measure strength according to ISO-4049. One specimen was selected randomly from each group and observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The data was analyzed with SAS 9.2 software package. The flexural strength (117.93±11.9 Mpa) of the group treated with 2% silane coupling agent was the highest, and significantly different from that of the other 4 groups (α=0.01). The amount of silane coupling agent has impact on the flexural strength of dental composite resins reinforced with whiskers; The flexual strength will be reduced whenever the amount is higher or lower than the threshold. Supported by Research Fund of Science and Technology Committee of Shanghai Municipality (08DZ2271100).

  11. Effect of maltitol-containing chewing gum use on the composition of dental plaque microbiota in subjects with active dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosdocimi, Erica M; Kistler, James O; Moazzez, Rebecca; Thabuis, Clementine; Perreau, Caroline; Wade, William G

    2017-01-01

    Background : Sugar alcohols such as xylitol are incorporated in a number of oral hygiene products for their anti-cariogenic properties while chewing gum is known to be beneficial to oral hygiene. Objective : The aim of this study was to determine the composition of the dental plaque microbiota in patients with active caries before and after using a chewing gum supplemented with maltitol. Design : Forty subjects with active caries were randomly allocated to chew maltitol gum or gum base for two weeks. A healthy control group used gum base for two weeks. Plaque samples were collected before and after treatment and the microbiota analysed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Results : A total of 773,547 sequences were obtained from 117 samples. There was no difference in structure of the bacterial communities between groups (AMOVA). There was a significant difference in community membership between groups, (AMOVA, p=0.009). There was a significant difference between the control group after treatment and the maltitol patient group after treatment (p<0.001). A. naeslundii HOT-176 and Actinomyces HOT-169 were significantly reduced following use of maltitol chewing gum in patients. Conclusions : This study has shown that chewing gum containing maltitol had minor effects on the composition of the plaque microbiome.

  12. Layered Manufacturing of Dental Ceramics: Fracture Mechanics, Microstructure, and Elemental Composition of Lithography-Sintered Ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçar, Yurdanur; Aysan Meriç, İpek; Ekren, Orhun

    2018-02-11

    To compare the fracture mechanics, microstructure, and elemental composition of lithography-based ceramic manufacturing with pressing and CAD/CAM. Disc-shaped specimens (16 mm diameter, 1.2 mm thick) were used for mechanical testing (n = 10/group). Biaxial flexural strength of three groups (In-Ceram alumina [ICA], lithography-based alumina, ZirkonZahn) were determined using the "piston on 3-ball" technique as suggested in test Standard ISO-6872. Vickers hardness test was performed. Fracture toughness was calculated using fractography. Results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunnett T3 (α = 0.05). Weibull analysis was conducted. Polished and fracture surface characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used for elemental analysis. Biaxial flexural strength of ICA, LCM alumina (LCMA), and ZirkonZahn were 147 ± 43 MPa, 490 ± 44 MPa, and 709 ± 94 MPa, respectively, and were statistically different (P ≤ 0.05). The Vickers hardness number of ICA was 850 ± 41, whereas hardness values for LCMA and ZirkonZahn were 1581 ± 144 and 1249 ± 57, respectively, and were statistically different (P ≤ 0.05). A statistically significant difference was found between fracture toughness of ICA (2 ± 0.4 MPa⋅m 1/2 ), LCMA (6.5 ± 1.5 MPa⋅m 1/2 ), and ZirkonZahn (7.7 ± 1 MPa⋅m 1/2 ) (P ≤ 0.05). Weibull modulus was highest for LCMA (m = 11.43) followed by ZirkonZahn (m = 8.16) and ICA (m = 5.21). Unlike LCMA and ZirkonZahn groups, a homogeneous microstructure was not observed for ICA. EDS results supported the SEM images. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that LCM seems to be a promising technique for final ceramic object manufacturing in dental applications. Both the manufacturing method and the material used should be improved. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Comment: low dental caries rate in Neandertals: the result of diet or the oral flora composition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sołtysiak, Arkadiusz

    2012-04-01

    Dental caries is an infectious disease caused by oral acidophilic bacteria feeding on fermentable sugars, e.g. Streptococcus mutans. The frequency of dental caries in Neandertals was very low. This was usually explained as the result of a low-sugar diet. Recent research, however, revealed some regional differences between European and Near Eastern Neandertals, with the latter consuming considerable amounts of plants including highly cariogenic dates. This discovery, compared with the results of research on genetic diversity of S. mutans, may suggest that this species, and perhaps other most virulent species, were absent in the oral flora of Neandertals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluating the Whitening and Microstructural Effects of a Novel Whitening Strip on Porcelain and Composite Dental Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takesh, Thair; Sargsyan, Anik; Lee, Matthew; Anbarani, Afarin; Ho, Jessica; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this project was to evaluate the effects of 2 different whitening strips on color, microstructure and roughness of tea stained porcelain and composite surfaces. 54 porcelain and 72 composite chips served as samples for timed application of over-the-counter (OTC) test or control dental whitening strips. Chips were divided randomly into three groups of 18 porcelain and 24 composite chips each. Of these groups, 1 porcelain and 1 composite set served as controls. The remaining 2 groups were randomized to treatment with either Oral Essentials ® Whitening Strips or Crest ® 3D White Whitestrips™. Sample surface structure was examined by light microscopy, profilometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Additionally, a reflectance spectrophotometer was used to assess color changes in the porcelain and composite samples over 24 hours of whitening. Data points were analyzed at each time point using ANOVA. In the light microscopy and SEM images, no discrete physical defects were observed in any of the samples at any time points. However, high-resolution SEM images showed an appearance of increased surface roughness in all composite samples. Using profilometry, significantly increased post-whitening roughness was documented in the composite samples exposed to the control bleaching strips. Composite samples underwent a significant and equivalent shift in color following exposure to Crest ® 3D White Whitestrips™ and Oral Essentials ® Whitening Strips. A novel commercial tooth whitening strip demonstrated a comparable beaching effect to a widely used OTC whitening strip. Neither whitening strip caused physical defects in the sample surfaces. However, the control strip caused roughening of the composite samples whereas the test strip did not.

  15. Influence of the photoinitiator system and light photoactivation units on the degree of conversion of dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Isabel Cristina Celerino de Moraes; Soares, Luis Eduardo Silva; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Cavalli, Vanessa; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane Suzy

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the influence of two light polymerization units (LED or halogen light) on the degree of conversion (DC) of three dental composites with lighter shades and a different photoinitiator system. The top (T) and bottom (B) surfaces of 60 discs of composite resin (Filtek™ Supreme, Filtek™ Z250, Tetric™ Ceram Bleach) cured either by LED or by halogen lamp (HL) were studied using an FT-Raman spectrometer. The degree of conversion (DC) was evaluated by following the changes in the intensity of the methacrylate C=C stretching mode at 1640 cm⁻¹. The calculated DC ranged from 54.2% (B) to 73.4% (T) and from 60.2% (B) to 76.6% (T) for the LED and HL, respectively. LED and halogen devices were able to produce an adequate DC for all the resins tested.

  16. Influence of the photoinitiator system and light photoactivation units on the degree of conversion of dental composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Celerino de Moraes Porto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe the influence of two light polymerization units (LED or halogen light on the degree of conversion (DC of three dental composites with lighter shades and a different photoinitiator system. The top (T and bottom (B surfaces of 60 discs of composite resin (Filtek™ Supreme, Filtek™ Z250, Tetric™ Ceram Bleach cured either by LED or by halogen lamp (HL were studied using an FT-Raman spectrometer. The degree of conversion (DC was evaluated by following the changes in the intensity of the methacrylate C=C stretching mode at 1640 cm-1. The calculated DC ranged from 54.2% (B to 73.4% (T and from 60.2% (B to 76.6% (T for the LED and HL, respectively. LED and halogen devices were able to produce an adequate DC for all the resins tested.

  17. Formation of functionalized nanoclusters by solvent evaporation and their effect on the physicochemical properties of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Henry A; Giraldo, Luis F; Casanova, Herley

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of silica nanoclusters (SiNC), obtained by a solvent evaporation method and functionalized by 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and MPS+octyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS) (50/50wt/wt), on the rheological, mechanical and sorption properties of urethane dimethylacrylate (UDMA)/triethylenglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (80/20wt/wt) resins blend. Silica nanoparticles (SiNP) were silanized with MPS or MPS+OTMS (50/50wt/wt) and incorporated in an UDMA-isopropanol mix to produce functionalized silica nanoclusters after evaporating the isopropanol. The effect of functionalized SiNC on resins rheological properties was determined by large and small deformation tests. Mechanical, thermal, sorption and solubility properties were evaluated for composite materials. The UDMA/TEGDMA (80/20wt/wt) resins blend with added SiNC (ca. 350nm) and functionalized with MPS showed a Newtonian flow behavior associated to their spheroidal shape, whereas the resins blend with nanoclusters silanized with MPS+OTMS (50/50wt/wt) (ca. 400nm) showed a shear-thinning behavior due to nanoclusters irregular shape. Composite materials prepared with bare silica nanoclusters showed lower compressive strength than functionalized silica nanoclusters. MPS functionalized nanoclusters showed better mechanical properties but higher water sorption than functionalized nanoclusters with both silane coupling agents, MPS and OTMS. The solvent evaporation method applied to functionalized nanoparticles showed to be an alternative way to the sinterization method for producing nanoclusters, which improved some dental composite mechanical properties and reduced water sorption. The shape of functionalized silica nanoclusters showed to have influence on the rheological properties of SiNC resin suspensions and the mechanical and sorption properties of light cured composites. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Towards long lasting zirconia-based composites for dental implants: Transformation induced plasticity and its consequence on ceramic reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveron, Helen; Fornabaio, Marta; Palmero, Paola; Fürderer, Tobias; Adolfsson, Erik; Lughi, Vanni; Bonifacio, Alois; Sergo, Valter; Montanaro, Laura; Chevalier, Jérôme

    2017-01-15

    Zirconia-based composites were developed through an innovative processing route able to tune compositional and microstructural features very precisely. Fully-dense ceria-stabilized zirconia ceramics (84vol% Ce-TZP) containing equiaxed alumina (8vol%Al 2 O 3 ) and elongated strontium hexa-aluminate (8vol% SrAl 12 O 19 ) second phases were obtained by conventional sintering. This work deals with the effect of the zirconia stabilization degree (CeO 2 in the range 10.0-11.5mol%) on the transformability and mechanical properties of Ce-TZP-Al 2 O 3 -SrAl 12 O 19 materials. Vickers hardness, biaxial flexural strength and Single-edge V-notched beam tests revealed a strong influence of ceria content on the mechanical properties. Composites with 11.0mol% CeO 2 or above exhibited the classical behaviour of brittle ceramics, with no apparent plasticity and very low strain to failure. On the contrary, composites with 10.5mol% CeO 2 or less showed large transformation-induced plasticity and almost no dispersion in strength data. Materials with 10.5mol% of ceria showed the highest values in terms of biaxial bending strength (up to 1.1GPa) and fracture toughness (>10MPa√m). In these ceramics, as zirconia transformation precedes failure, the Weibull modulus was exceptionally high and reached a value of 60, which is in the range typically reported for metals. The results achieved demonstrate the high potential of using these new strong, tough and stable zirconia-based composites in structural biomedical applications. Yttria-stabilized (Y-TZP) zirconia ceramics are increasingly used for developing metal-free restorations and dental implants. Despite their success related to their excellent mechanical resistance, Y-TZP can undergo Low Temperature Degradation which could be responsible for restoration damage or even worst the failure of the implant. Current research is focusing on strategies to improve the LTD resistance of Y-TZP or to develop alternative composites with better

  19. Fiscal 1991-1993 summary report on R and D on new forming technology of composite materials; Fukugo zairyo shinseikei gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu 1991 nendo - 1993 nendo sokatsu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    Developed were the materials which can be easily formed by manifesting superplasticity simultaneously with high toughness and high strength through selection of material composition and micronizing of the structure, in regard to composite materials answering to high strength and resistance to high temperature suitable for engines or the like. Developed for ceramic matrix composite materials were composite technology of silicon nitride matrix composites by a casting method, composite technology of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiC matrix composites by a material preparation method using aqueous slurry, and superplastic forming technology of yttria stabilized zirconia/alumina matrix composites; developed for metallic matrix composite materials were composite technology of reinforced ceramics particulate aluminum alloy matrix composites by a voltex method, composite technology of ceramic short fibers reinforced aluminum alloy composites by a high pressure casting method under reduced pressure, composite technology of titanium matrix composites by a mechanical alloying method, and composite technology of aluminum alloy composites by ceramics particles, superplastic forming technology of SiC whisker reinforced aluminum alloy reinforced composites, and superplastic forming technology of aluminum alloy matrix reinforced composites reinforced by SiC particles. (NEDO)

  20. Scientific composition and review of manuscripts for publication in peer-reviewed dental journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, Stephen C; McGivney, Glen P; Mazer, Sarah C

    2003-02-01

    This article provides an extensive tutorial for writers and reviewers involved with the preparation and evaluation of manuscripts submitted for publication in dental journals. The contents were compiled from the Instructions for Authors printed in various peer-reviewed dental journals and from feedback from 10 workshops conducted for the Editorial Review Board of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. The 10 major sections of a scientific manuscript are reviewed in detail in terms of content, format, and common errors; examples of good content are provided. The review process is described, and instructions on conducting fair and expeditious manuscript evaluations are provided for reviewers. In addition, a number of special topics are addressed, including potential conflicts of interest for an author, institutional review of experiments that involve human subjects or animals, and the reproduction of photographs and other images in color versus black and white. In summary, this article presents key guidelines to ensure compliance with the principles of sound scientific writing and the expeditious review of manuscripts prepared for publication in peer-reviewed dental journals.

  1. Nanomodified Peek Dental Implants: Bioactive Composites and Surface Modification—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shariq Najeeb

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this review is to summarize and evaluate the relevant literature regarding the different ways how polyetheretherketone (PEEK can be modified to overcome its limited bioactivity, and thereby making it suitable as a dental implant material. Study Selection. An electronic literature search was conducted via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases using the keywords “PEEK dental implants,” “nano,” “osseointegration,” “surface treatment,” and “modification.” A total of 16 in vivo and in vitro studies were found suitable to be included in this review. Results. There are many viable methods to increase the bioactivity of PEEK. Most methods focus on increasing the surface roughness, increasing the hydrophilicity and coating osseoconductive materials. Conclusion. There are many ways in which PEEK can be modified at a nanometer level to overcome its limited bioactivity. Melt-blending with bioactive nanoparticles can be used to produce bioactive nanocomposites, while spin-coating, gas plasma etching, electron beam, and plasma-ion immersion implantation can be used to modify the surface of PEEK implants in order to make them more bioactive. However, more animal studies are needed before these implants can be deemed suitable to be used as dental implants.

  2. Composition of dental plaque formed in the presence of sucrose and after its interruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cury Jaime Aparecido

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Since dental plaque reservoirs of fluoride (F, calcium (Ca and inorganic phosphorus (Pi are susceptible to decreases in pH, this in situ crossover study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the low concentration of these ions in plaque, formed in the presence of sucrose, could be attributed merely to the fermentation of this sugar. Eleven volunteers wore palatal appliances containing 6 human enamel blocks during two stages. In each stage, the treatments were either 20% sucrose solution or distilled deionized water, which were dripped onto the blocks 8 times a day. After 28 days, in each stage, the dental plaque formed on two blocks was collected, the treatment was inverted and after a further 24 and 48 h, the biofilm formed was collected from the other blocks. The concentration of acid-soluble F, Ca and Pi, and the concentration of insoluble polysaccharide (IP were determined in the dental plaque. Statistically lower concentrations of F, Ca and Pi, and a higher concentration of IP were found in the 28-day biofilm formed in the presence of sucrose than in its absence; after the treatment inversion the change in F, Ca and Pi was not statistically significant, but the IP concentration changed significantly. The hypothesis was rejected because change in concentration of F, Ca and Pi is not due to fermentation of the sucrose.

  3. Rapid proto typing of dental prosthesis by means of a feldspathic glass composite mixed with muscovite mica via CAD/CAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Junior, E.S.; Gomes Junior, G.G.; Fonseca, M.D.; Moraes, E.E.S.; Ogasawara, T.

    2010-01-01

    The work consists in the use and integration of CAD/CAM tools as a process of design and manufacture of a rapid prototyping of dental prosthesis by machining using a CNC milling machine. The material machined to obtain the dental prosthesis were cylindrical blocks of a Feldspathic glass composite mixed with muscovite mica in various percentages (15%, 40% and 80%), which was resigned under biaxial pressing and sintered in vacuum at temperatures from 800 to 1100 deg C. The composite was characterized by XRD and SEM. The results show that increasing the crystallization of leucite is consequent to the temperature increase, and that the use of CAD/CAM system using a CNC milling machine is feasible to obtain dental prosthesis. (author)

  4. Effect of elasticity on stress distribution in CAD/CAM dental crowns: Glass ceramic vs. polymer-matrix composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yuanyuan; Griggs, Jason A

    2015-06-01

    Further investigations are required to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of newly developed polymer-matrix composite (PMC) blocks for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of elasticity on the stress distribution in dental crowns made of glass-ceramic and PMC materials using finite element (FE) analysis. Elastic constants of two materials were determined by ultrasonic pulse velocity using an acoustic thickness gauge. Three-dimensional solid models of a full-coverage dental crown on a first mandibular molar were generated based on X-ray micro-CT scanning images. A variety of load case-material property combinations were simulated and conducted using FE analysis. The first principal stress distribution in the crown and luting agent was plotted and analyzed. The glass-ceramic crown had stress concentrations on the occlusal surface surrounding the area of loading and the cemented surface underneath the area of loading, while the PMC crown had only stress concentration on the occlusal surface. The PMC crown had lower maximum stress than the glass-ceramic crown in all load cases, but this difference was not substantial when the loading had a lateral component. Eccentric loading did not substantially increase the maximum stress in the prosthesis. Both materials are resistant to fracture with physiological occlusal load. The PMC crown had lower maximum stress than the glass-ceramic crown, but the effect of a lateral loading component was more pronounced for a PMC crown than for a glass-ceramic crown. Knowledge of the stress distribution in dental crowns with low modulus of elasticity will aid clinicians in planning treatments that include such restorations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effect of Aging and Silanization on the Mechanical Properties of Fumed Silica-based Dental Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaje S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Mechanical strength and durability of dental composites are the main topics studied in this field of science today. This study examined fumed silica-based composite as a strong and durable restorative material through flexural and cycling test methods. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of silanization, ageing, cycling and hybridizing on mechanical properties of fumed silica-based resin composite. Materials and Methods: Composites were made of light-cured copolymer based on Bisphenol A glycolmethacrylate (Bis-GMA and Triethylene glycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA at proportion of 50:50 which reinforced by fumed silica filler. For each composite sample, 5 specimen bars were made using Teflon mould (2 x 2 x 25 mm3. The samples with 12 wt% fumed silica (FS were considered as a base line group. The samples were exposed to cyclic cold water (FS-CCW and hot water (FS-CHW. The effect of silanization and adding more filler was studied together with samples containing 12 wt% (FS-S (12, 16 wt% (FS-S (16 and 20 wt% (FS-S (20 fumed silica filler. The filler was silanized with (γ-MPS. The degree of conversion was assessed with Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy. Flexural properties were evaluated with the Three-Point Bending test. Flexural data were analyzed with Excel software. Hardness was measured with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM. Results: The degree of conversion of the resin reached 74% within 24 hrs. Salinization allowed more filler to be wetted by resin. Addition of silanized particles from sample FS-S (12 to sample FS-S (20 improved the mechanical strength. Hybridizing fumed silica with nano-silica (FS-N had no significant effect on the strength, but nano-hardness improved greatly. Ageing and cycling had adverse effects on the strength of the sample FS. The flexural strength of FS-CHW was 72% less than FS sample. Conclusions: Sample FS-N with low diluent and filler percentage complied with the

  6. Calculation of contraction stresses in dental composites by analysis of crack propagation in the matrix surrounding a cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Ferracane, Jack L; Sakaguchi, Ronald L; Swain, Michael V

    2009-04-01

    Polymerization contraction of dental composite produces a stress field in the bonded surrounding substrate that may be capable of propagating cracks from pre-existing flaws. The objectives of this study were to assess the extent of crack propagation from flaws in the surrounding ceramic substrate caused by composite contraction stresses, and to propose a method to calculate the contraction stress in the ceramic using indentation fracture. Initial cracks were introduced with a Vickers indenter near a cylindrical hole drilled into a glass-ceramic simulating enamel. Lengths of the radial indentation cracks were measured. Three composites having different contraction stresses were cured within the hole using one- or two-step light-activation methods and the crack lengths were measured. The contraction stress in the ceramic was calculated from the crack length and the fracture toughness of the glass-ceramic. Interfacial gaps between the composite and the ceramic were expressed as the ratio of the gap length to the hole perimeter, as well as the maximum gap width. All groups revealed crack propagation and the formation of contraction gaps. The calculated contraction stresses ranged from 4.2 MPa to 7.0 MPa. There was no correlation between the stress values and the contraction gaps. This method for calculating the stresses produced by composites is a relatively simple technique requiring a conventional hardness tester. The method can investigate two clinical phenomena that may occur during the placement of composite restorations, i.e. simulated enamel cracking near the margins and the formation of contraction gaps.

  7. Effect of various rinsing protocols after use of amine fluoride/stannous fluoride toothpaste on the bacterial composition of dental plaque

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loveren, C.; Gerardu, V.A.M.; Sissons, C.H.; van Bekkum, M.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the effect of different oral hygiene protocols on the bacterial composition of dental plaque. After a 2-week period of using fluoride-free toothpaste, 30 participants followed three 1-week experimental protocols, each followed by 2-week fluoride-free washout periods in

  8. Simultaneous determination of components released from dental composite resins in human saliva by liquid chromatography/multiple-stage ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Yi; Wang, Ven-Shing; Lai, Chien-Chen; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2012-02-01

    Dental composite resins are widely used for fixing teeth; however, the monomers used in dental composite resins have been found to be cytotoxic and genotoxic, namely triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), and bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA). In this study, we incubated dental composite resins with human saliva for demonstrating the released monomers and biodegradation products. A simple saliva sample dilution method without purification or derivatization was used for quantification. We found that liquid chromatography coupled with multiple-stage ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n) ) operated in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode was able to separate the three monomers within 10 min. The calibration curves were linear (R² >0.996) over a wide range for each monomer in saliva: TEGDMA, 5-500 ppb; UDMA, 5-100 ppb, and Bis-GMA, 5-700 ppb. Furthermore, several biodegradation products were discovered with data-dependent MS/MS scan techniques. Although TEGMA degradation products have previously been reported, we identified two previously unknown UDMA degradation products. The LC-MS/MS method developed in this study was able to successfully quantify monomers and their principal biodegradation products from dental composite resins in human saliva. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Salivary antimicrobial proteins associate with age-related changes in streptococcal composition in dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, J; Sherriff, A; Lappin, D F; Ramage, G; Conway, D I; Macpherson, L M D; Culshaw, S

    2014-12-01

    Secretion of antimicrobial proteins (AMPs) and salivary antibodies can modify biofilm formation at host body surfaces. In adolescents, associations have been reported between dental caries and salivary AMPs. AMPs demonstrate direct antimicrobial effects at high concentrations, and at lower more physiological concentrations they mediate changes in host cell defenses, which may alter the local environment and indirectly shape local biofilm formation. The expression of salivary AMPs in preschool children, at an age when the oral bacteria are known to change, has not been investigated. We sought to investigate salivary AMP expression in the context of previously well-documented changes in the oral cavities of this age group including salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA), oral bacteria and dental caries. Dental plaque and saliva were collected from 57 children aged 12-24 months at baseline, of whom 23 children were followed-up at 3 years of age. At each time, saliva was assessed for LL37, human neutrophil peptides 1-3, calprotectin, lactoferrin, salivary IgA, total plaque bacteria and Streptococcus mutans. Over time, concentrations of AMPs, S. mutans and bacteria-specific salivary IgA increased. Caries experience was also recorded when children were 3 years old. Concentrations of AMPs were highest in the saliva of 3-year-old children with the greatest burden of S. mutans. These data suggest that salivary AMPs are variable over time and between individuals, and are linked with bacterial colonization. At follow up, the majority of children remained caries free. Larger longitudinal studies are required to confirm whether salivary AMP levels are predictive of caries and whether their modulation offers therapeutic benefit. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effect of an essential oil-containing dentifrice on dental plaque microbial composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, C H; Vincent, J W; Borycheski, L; Amatnieks, Y; Sarina, M; Qaqish, J; Proskin, H M

    2000-09-01

    To determine the effect of 6 months use of an essential oil-containing (EO) antiplaque/antigingivitis fluoride dentifrice on the balance of the oral microbial flora and on the emergence of resistant microbial forms by analysis of dental plaque and saliva. The dentifrice essential oils consisted of a fixed combination of thymol, menthol, methyl salicylate, and eucalyptol. An identical fluoride-containing dentifrice without the essential oils served as the control. A subgroup of 66 subjects from a clinical trial population of 321 was randomly selected for characterization of their dental plaque microflora. Saliva was also cultured to monitor for the emergence of opportunistic pathogens. Supragingival plaque and saliva were harvested at baseline, after which subjects received a dental prophylaxis. Subjects were sampled again after 3 and 6 months of product use prior to clinical examination. Plaque was characterized for microbial content by phase contrast microscopy for recognizable cellular morphotypes and by cultivation on nonselective and selective culture media. Determination of the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the test agent against selected Actinomyces and Veillonella isolated bacterial species was conducted at all time points to monitor for the potential development of bacterial resistance. There were no statistically significant differences between the microbial flora obtained from subjects using the essential oil-containing dentifrice and the vehicle control for all parameters and time periods except for the percentage of spirochetes at 6 months and for percentage of "other" microorganisms at 3 months. The EO group exhibited a lower adjusted mean for both parameters. Additionally, there was no evidence of the development of bacterial resistance to the antimicrobial activity of the essential oils or the emergence of opportunistic pathogens.

  11. Calculation of optical properties of dental composites as a basis for determining color impression and penetration depth of laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weniger, Kirsten K.; Muller, Gerhard J.

    2005-03-01

    In order to achieve esthetic dental restorations, there should be no visible difference between restorative material and treated teeth. This requires a match of the optical properties of both restorative material and natural teeth. These optical properties are determined by absorption and scattering of light emerging not only on the surface but also inside the material. Investigating different dental composites in several shades, a method has been developed to calculate the optical parameters absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, anisotropy factor g and reduced scattering coefficient μs'. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer, followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Determination of optical properties is more precise and comprehensive than with the previously used Kubelka Munk theory because scattering can be looked at separated into pure scattering with the scattering coefficient μs and its direction with the anisotropy factor g. Moreover the use of the inverse Monte Carlo simulation not only minimizes systematic errors and considers the scattering phase function, but also takes into account the measuring geometry. The compilation of a data pool of optical parameters now enables the application of further calculation models as a basis for optimization of the composition of new materials. For example, a prediction of the general color impression for multiple layers can be carried out as well as the calculation of the wavelength dependent penetration depths of light with regard to photo polymerization. Further applications are possible in the area of laser ablation.

  12. Effect of chemical composition of Ni-Cr dental casting alloys on the bonding characterization between porcelain and metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H-H; Lin, M-C; Lee, T-H; Yang, H-W; Chen, F-L; Wu, S-C; Hsu, C-C

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chemical composition of Ni-Cr dental casting alloys on the bonding behaviour between porcelain and metal. A three-point bending test was used to measure the fracture load of alloy after porcelain firing. A scanning electron microscope, accompanied by an energy dispersion spectrometer, was used to analyse the morphology and chemical composition of the fracture surface. An X-ray photoelectron spectrometer and glow discharge spectrometer were used to identify the structure and cross-sectional chemical composition, respectively, of oxide layers on Ni-Cr alloys after heat treatment at 990 degrees C for 5 min. Results showed that the oxide layers formed on all Ni-Cr alloys contained mainly Cr2O3, NiO, and trace MoO3. The Ni-Cr alloy with a higher Cr content had a thicker oxide layer, as well as a weaker bonding behaviour of porcelain/metal interface. The presence of Al (as Al2O3) and Be (as BeO) on the oxide layer suppressed the growth of the oxide layer, leading to a better porcelain/metal bonding behaviour. However, the presence of a small amount of Ti (as TiO2) on the oxide layer did not have any influence on the bonding behaviour. The fracture propagated along the interface between the opaque porcelain and metal, and exhibited an adhesive type of fracture morphology.

  13. Influence of light energy density on heat generation during photoactivation of dental composites with different dentin and composite thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Danil Guiraldo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the influence of different energy densities on the heat generated during photoactivation of Filtek Z250 (3M/ESPE and Z100 (3M/ESPE composite resins with different dentin and composite thickness. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The temperature increase was registered with a type-K thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46. A chemically polymerized acrylic resin base was prepared to serve as a guide for the thermocouple and as a support for 0.5-, 1.0-, and 1.5-mm-thick bovine dentin discs. Circular elastomer molds (1.0 mm-height x 3.0-mm diameter or 2.0-mm height x 3.0-mm diameter were adapted on the acrylic resin base to standardize the composite resin thickness. A conventional halogen light-curing unit (XL 2500, 3M/ESPE was used with light intensity of 700 mW/cm². Energy density was calculated by the light intensity applied during a certain time with values of 28 J/cm² for Z100 and 14 J/cm² for Filtek Z250. The temperature change data were subjected to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% level. RESULTS: The higher energy density (Z100 promoted greater temperature increase (p<0.05 than the lower energy density (Filtek Z250. For both composites and all composite thicknesses, the lowest dentin thickness (0.5 mm yielded significantly higher (p<0.05 temperature increase than the other two dentin thicknesses. The 1-mm-thick composite resin layer yielded significantly higher (p<0.05 temperature changes for both composites and all dentin thicknesses. CONCLUSIONS: Temperature increase was influenced by higher energy density and dentin/composite thickness.

  14. Mechanical and Morphology Properties of Feather Fiber Composite for Dental Post Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Maizatul Farhain Salehuddin; Mohammed Rafiq Abdul Kadir; Eshamsul Sulaiman; Noor Hayaty Abu Kasim

    2014-01-01

    Feather/plastic composite material was fabricated from polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), feather fiber (FF) and montmorillonite (MMT) using brabender internal mixer. PMMA based composites were produced with 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 phr composite of mass feather fiber with and without 4 % of montmorillonite (MMT). Alkali treatment was used to improve the interfacial adhesion among the feather fiber (FF) and the PMMA. Flexural properties of FF/ PMMA and FF/ PMMA/ MMT composites were investigated. Composites were analyzed by Scanning Electron (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy techniques. The result showed that, the addition of FF significantly increased the flexural strength of the composites. The hydrophobic nature of feather fiber displayed an excellent compatibility among fibers and PMMA matrix. (author)

  15. Characterization of dimethacrylate polymeric networks: a study of the crosslinked structure formed by monomers used in dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Carmem S; Shelton, Zachary R; Braga, Roberto R; Windmoller, Dario; Machado, José C; Stansbury, Jeffrey W

    2011-02-01

    The resin phase of dental composites is mainly composed of combinations of dimethacrylate comonomers, with final polymeric network structure defined by monomer type/reactivity and degree of conversion. This fundamental study evaluates how increasing concentrations of the flexible triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) influences void formation in bisphenol A diglycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA) co-polymerizations and correlates this aspect of network structure with reaction kinetic parameters and macroscopic volumetric shrinkage. Photopolymerization kinetics was followed in real-time by a near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic technique, viscosity was assessed with a viscometer, volumetric shrinkage was followed with a linometer, free volume formation was determined by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and the sol-gel composition was determined by extraction with dichloromethane followed by (1)H-NMR analysis. Results show that, as expected, volumetric shrinkage increases with TEGDMA concentration and monomer conversion. Extraction/(1)H-NMR studies show increasing participation of the more flexible TEGDMA towards the limiting stages of conversion/crosslinking development. As the conversion progresses, either based on longer irradiation times or greater TEGDMA concentrations, the network becomes more dense, which is evidenced by the decrease in free volume and weight loss after extraction in these situations. For the same composition (BisGMA/TEGDMA 60-40 mol%) light-cured for increasing periods of time (from 10 to 600 s), free volume decreased and volumetric shrinkage increased, in a linear relationship with conversion. However, the correlation between free volume and macroscopic volumetric shrinkage was shown to be rather complex for variable compositions exposed for the same time (600 s). The addition of TEGDMA decreases free-volume up to 40 mol% (due to increased conversion), but above that concentration, in spite of the increase in conversion

  16. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  17. Fracture strength and fatigue resistance of dental resin-based composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, F.; Palav, P.; Aboushelib, M.M.N.; van Dalen, A.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of fiber-reinforcement on the fracture strength and fatigue resistance of resin-based composites. Methods: One hundred rectangular bar-shaped specimens (2 mm × 2 mm × 25 mm) made of resin-based composite were prepared in a

  18. Shrinkage reduction of dental composites by addition of expandable zirconia filler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, M.; Almdal, Kristoffer; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2011-01-01

    . The shrinkage of the composite was calculated from density measurements using Archimedes method. The rate of the phase transformation in resin was measured by determining the volume fraction of monoclinic zirconia (vm). The composite had a vm of 0.5 after 8 h of water storage. The overall shrinkage...

  19. Effect of an oxygenating agent on oral bacteria in vitro and on dental plaque composition in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez y Mostajo, Mercedes; van der Reijden, Wil A; Buijs, Mark J; Beertsen, Wouter; Van der Weijden, Fridus; Crielaard, Wim; Zaura, Egija

    2014-01-01

    Oral bacteria live in symbiosis with the host. Therefore, when mouthwashes are indicated, selective inhibition of taxa contributing to disease is preferred instead of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The potential selectivity of an oxygenating mouthwash, Ardox-X® (AX), has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial potential of AX and the effects of a twice-daily oral rinse on dental plaque composition. In vitro, 16 oral bacterial strains were tested using agar diffusion susceptibility, minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentration tests. A pilot clinical study was performed with 25 healthy volunteers. Clinical assessments and microbiological sampling of supragingival plaque were performed at 1 month before the experiment (Pre-exp), at the start of the experiment (Baseline) and after the one-week experimental period (Post-exp). During the experiment individuals used AX mouthwash twice daily in absence of other oral hygiene measures. The microbiological composition of plaque was assessed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. AX showed high inter-species variation in microbial growth inhibition. The tested Prevotella strains and Fusobacterium nucleatum showed the highest sensitivity, while streptococci and Lactobacillus acidophilus were most resistant to AX. Plaque scores at Pre-exp and Baseline visits did not differ significantly (p = 0.193), nor did the microbial composition of plaque. During a period of 7-days non-brushing but twice daily rinsing plaque scores increased from 2.21 (0.31) at Baseline to 2.43 (0.39) Post-exp. A significant microbial shift in composition was observed: genus Streptococcus and Veillonella increased while Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Leptotrichia, Cardiobacterium and Capnocytophaga decreased (p ≤ 0.001). AX has the potential for selective inhibition of oral bacteria. The shift in oral microbiome after 1 week of rinsing deserves further research.

  20. Effect of an oxygenating agent on oral microorganisms in vitro and on dental plaque composition in healthy young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes eFernandez y Mostajo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral bacteria live in symbiosis with the host. Therefore, when mouthwashes are indicated, selective inhibition of taxa contributing to disease is preferred instead of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The potential selectivity of an oxygenating mouthwash, Ardox-X® (AX, has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial potential of AX and the effects of a twice-daily oral rinse on dental plaque composition. Material and methods: In vitro, 16 oral bacterial strains were tested using agar diffusion susceptibility, minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentration tests. A pilot clinical study was performed with 25 healthy volunteers. Clinical assessments and microbiological sampling of supragingival plaque were performed at one month before the experiment (Pre-exp, at the start of the experiment (Baseline and after the one-week experimental period (Post-exp. During the experiment individuals used AX mouthwash twice daily in absence of other oral hygiene measures. The microbiological composition of plaque was assessed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Results: AX showed high inter-species variation in microbial growth inhibition. The tested Prevotella strains and Fusobacterium nucleatum showed the highest sensitivity, while streptococci and Lactobacillus acidophilus were most resistant to AX. Plaque scores at Pre-exp and Baseline visits did not differ significantly (p = 0.193, nor did the microbial composition of plaque during a period of 7-days non-brushing but twice daily rinsing. Plaque scores increased from 2.21 (0.31 at Baseline to 2.43 (0.39 Post-exp. A significant microbial shift in composition was observed: genus Streptococcus and Veillonella increased while Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Leptotrichia, Cardiobacterium and Capnocytophaga decreased (p ≤ 0.001. Conclusion: AX has the potential for selective inhibition of oral bacteria. The shift in oral microbiome after one week of rinsing deserves

  1. Adherence of Streptococcus Mutans to Microhybrid and Nanohybrid Resin Composites and Dental Amalgam: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Motevasselian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans is a cariogenic microorganism. The restorative materials which harbor a biofilm with high levels of S. mutans can accelerate the occurrence of dental caries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different restorative materials on S. mutans colonization in a simple in-vitro biofilm formation model.Materials and Methods: Thirteen discs of each material (nanohybrid resin composite, microhybrid resin composite, and amalgam were prepared, polished, and sterilized in a gamma radiation chamber. The saliva-free specimens were exposed to the S. mutans bacterial suspension (0.5 McFarland and were incubated for 4 hours. Afterwards, the specimens were rinsed and sonicated in normal saline. 10µl of the obtained suspension was cultured in a sterile blood agar medium. After 24 hours, the number of colony forming units (CFU of S. mutans was counted. A sterility test control was considered for each group of materials. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA at 5% significance level.Results: The means and standard deviations of the logarithmic values of the colonies on the surfaces of amalgam, microhybrid, and nanohybrid resin composites were equal to 3.76±0.64, 3.91±0.52 and 3.34±0.74, respectively.Conclusions: There were no significant differences between the restorative materials in terms of S. mutans adhesion rate. The evaluated resin composites showed comparable numbers of CFUs, which could imply the importance of the polishing procedures.

  2. Compatibility between dental adhesive systems and dual-polymerizing composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Pierre-Luc; MacKenzie, Alexandra

    2016-10-01

    Information is lacking about incompatibilities between certain types of adhesive systems and dual-polymerizing composite resins, and universal adhesives have yet to be tested with these resins. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the bonding outcome of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins by using different categories of adhesive solutions and to determine whether incompatibilities were present. One hundred and eighty caries-free, extracted third molar teeth were allocated to 9 groups (n=20), in which 3 different bonding agents (Single Bond Plus [SB]), Scotchbond Multi-purpose [MP], and Scotchbond Universal [SU]) were used to bond 3 different composite resins (CompCore AF [CC], Core Paste XP [CP], and Filtek Supreme Ultra [FS]). After restorations had been fabricated using an Ultradent device, the specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours. The specimens were tested under shear force at a rate of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis tests and post hoc pairwise comparisons (α=.05). All 3 composite resins produced comparable shear bond strengths when used with MP (P=.076). However, when either SB or SU was used, the light-polymerized composite resin (FS) and 1 dual-polymerized foundation composite resin (CC) bonded significantly better than the other dual-polymerized foundation composite resin (CP) (Pincompatibilities exist between different products. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antimicrobial Effect of Nano-Zinc Oxide and Nano-Chitosan Particles in Dental Composite Used in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AmirHossein Mirhashemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incidence of  white  spots due  to  demineralization of  enamel  and  gingival problems  is  an  unacceptable  result  of  orthodontic  treatment.  Plaque  accumulation  and bacterial biofilm growth are responsible for these phenomena. The resin-based dental composites used as bonding agents in orthodontics play a major role in mentioned problems. As recent researches assert the antimicrobial effects of chitosan (CS and zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles  (NPs,  it  seems  that  adding  these  nanoparticles  to  the  composite  can  be beneficial in reducing the number and function of microorganisms. The aim of this study was to  evaluate  the  antimicrobial  effects  of  ZnO-NP  and  CS-NP-containing  orthodontic composite.Methods: Antibacterial effectiveness of ZnO-NPs and CS-NPs was assessed in four groups against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis and Lactobacillus acidophilus grown both planktonic and as a biofilm on composites. One group as the unmodified control group and  three  groups  consisting  of  three  different  concentrations of  ZnO-NPs  and  CS-NPs mixture: 1%, 5% and 10% (1:1 w/w. 108 CFU/ml microorganism suspensions were provided with spectrophotometer. Biofilm formation was quantified by viable counts. Disc agar diffusion (DAD test was carried out to determine antimicrobial effects of nanoparticles by measuring the inhibition diameter on brain heart infusion agar plates. Finally,viable counts of microorganisms on days 3, 15 and 30 were collected for the antimicrobial effects of eluted components from composite discs.Results: In biofilm formation test, a reduction in bacterial counts was observed with 10% nanoparticle-containing composites compared with their unmodified counterpart. In the DAD test only 10% nanoparticle-containing specimens showed statistically significant inhibition. The only noticeable datain eluted component test was on day 30 for 10

  4. Mechanical characterization and ion release of bioactive dental composites containing calcium phosphate particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Livia C; Rodrigues, Marcela C; Alania, Yvette; Chiari, Marina D S; Boaro, Leticia C C; Cotrim, Marycel; Vega, Oscar; Braga, Roberto R

    2018-08-01

    to verify the effect of the addition of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) particles functionalized with di- or triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (DEGDMA or TEGDMA) on the degree of conversion (DC), post-gel shrinkage (PS), mechanical properties, and ion release of experimental composites. Four composites were prepared containing a BisGMA/TEGDMA matrix and 60 vol% of fillers. The positive control contained only barium glass fillers, while in the other composites 15 vol% of the barium was replaced by DCPD. Besides the functionalized particles, non-functionalized DCPD was also tested. DC after 24 h (n = 3) was determined by FTIR spectroscopy. The strain gage method was used to obtain PS 5 min after photoactivation (n = 5). Flexural strength and modulus (n = 10) were calculated based on the biaxial flexural test results, after specimen storage for 24 h or 60 days in water. The same storage times were used for fracture toughness testing (FT, n = 10). Calcium and phosphate release up to 60 days was quantified by ICP-OES (n = 3). Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey test (alpha: 5%). Composites containing functionalized DCPD presented higher DC than the control (p composites (p composite with DEGDMA-functionalized DCPD presented fracture strength similar to the control, while for flexural modulus only the composite with TEGDMA-functionalized particles was lower than the control (p composites containing DCPD was higher than the control after 60 days (p composite with non-functionalized DCPD at 15 days and no significant reductions were observed for composites with functionalized DCPD during the observation period (p composites, phosphate release was higher at 15 days than in the subsequent periods, and no difference among them was recorded at 45 and 60 days (p composite with DEGDMA-functionalized particles was the only material with strength similar to the control after 60 days in water; however, it also presented the highest

  5. Clinical Effect of Dental Adhesive on Marginal Integrity in Class I And Class II Resin-Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manchorova-Veleva Neshka A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dental adhesives are believed to influence marginal adaptation and marginal discoloration when used under posterior resin-based composite restorations. Studies on the latest adhesive systems reveal that the group of the three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (3-E&RA and the one-step self-etch adhesive (1-SEA have entirely different bonding mechanisms, as well as different bond strength and resistance to chemical, thermal and mechanical factors. STUDY OBJECTIVES: A hypothesis that a 1-SEA would result in greater enamel marginal discoloration and poorer marginal adaptation than a 3-E&RA was tested. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred restorations were placed with a 1-SEA and 100 restorations with a 3-E&RA. Teeth were restored with Filtek Supreme nanofilled resin-composite and were evaluated for marginal adaptation and marginal discoloration at baseline, and 6 months, 12 months, and 36 months postoperatively. RESULTS: The statistical analysis revealed significant differences in marginal integrity between test groups. The 1-SEA resulted in greater enamel marginal discoloration and poorer marginal adaptation than the 3-E&RA at any recall time. CONCLUSIONS: Marginal adaptation and marginal discoloration depend on the type of dentin adhesive used. The restorations with Filtek Supreme and Scotchbond MP are better than the restorations with Adper Prompt L-Pop with regard to the marginal adaptation and marginal discoloration at 6-, 12- and 36-month evaluations.

  6. Effects of molecular structure of the resins on the volumetric shrinkage and the mechanical strength of dental restorative composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, L U; Kim, J W; Kim, C K

    2006-09-01

    To prepare a dental composite that has a low amount of curing shrinkage and excellent mechanical strength, various 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxy propoxy) phenyl] propane (Bis-GMA) derivatives were synthesized via molecular structure design, and afterward, properties of their mixtures were explored. Bis-GMA derivatives, which were obtained by substituting methyl groups for hydrogen on the phenyl ring in the Bis-GMA, exhibited lower curing shrinkage than Bis-GMA, whereas their viscosities were higher than that of Bis-GMA. Other Bis-GMA derivatives, which contained a glycidyl methacrylate as a molecular end group exhibited reduced curing shrinkage and viscosity. Methoxy substitution for hydroxyl groups on the Bis-GMA derivatives was performed for the further reduction of the viscosity and curing shrinkage. Various resin mixtures, which had the same viscosity as the commercial one, were prepared, and their curing shrinkage was examined. A resin mixture containing 2,2-bis[3,5-dimethyl, 4-(2-methoxy-3-methacryloyloxy propoxy) phenyl] propane] (TMBis-M-GMA) as a base resin and 4-tert-butylphenoxy-2-methyoxypropyl methacrylate (t-BP-M-GMA) as a diluent exhibited the lowest curing shrinkage among them. The composite prepared from this resin mixture also exhibited the lowest curing shrinkage along with enhanced mechanical properties.

  7. SORPTION AND SOLUBILITY OF LOW-SHRINKAGE RESIN-BASED DENTAL COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevda Yantcheva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-based composites are well-established restorative materials. However, these materials may absorb significant amounts of water when exposed to aqueous environments. Sorption and solubility are affecting composite restorations by two different mechanisms; the first is the up taking of water producing an increased weight and the second is the dissolution of materials in water, leading to a weight reduction of the final conditioned samples. Objective: To measure the water sorption and solubility of different low-shrinkage resin-based composites. Six materials were selected: Filtek P60, Filtek Ultimate, SonicFill, Filtek Silorane, Kalore and Venus Diamond. Materials and methods: Five disc specimens were prepared of each material and polymerized with diode light-curing unit. Water sorption and solubility of the different materials were were calculated by means of weighting the samples before and after water immersion and desiccation. Data were statistically analyzed using Shapiro-Wilk One Way Analysis of Variance followed by the Holm-Sidak comparison test . Results: There were significant differences (p<=0.001 between materials regarding sorption and solubility. Regarding sorption F. Silorane showed lowest values, followed by SonicFill, without significant difference between them. Statistical significant differences exist between F. Silorane and F.P60, F. Ultimate, Kalore. Significant differences exist between SonicFill and F. Ultimate. F.Silorane (-0.018 and Kalore (-0.010 showed lowest values of solubility but there were marginal difference among all composites investigated. Conclusions: 1.The material with lowest values of sorption and solubility was F.Silorane. 2. The attained sorption and solubility values for composites are influenced by the differences in resin matrix composition and filler contend. 3. Modifications of dimethacrylate matrix did not minimize significantly sorption and solubility of composites. 4. Besides water

  8. Comparative study of the fluorescence intensity of dental composites and human teeth submitted to artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Tatiana; Takahashi, Marcos Kenzo; Brum, Rafeal Torres; Rached, Rodrigo Nunes; Souza, Evelise M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the fluorescence of resin composites and human teeth, and to determine the stability of fluorescence after aging. Ten specimens were built using a 1 mm thick increment of dentin composite overlapped by a 0.5 mm thick increment of enamel composite. Ten sound human molars were sectioned and silicon carbide-polished to obtain enamel and dentin slabs 1.5 mm in thickness. Fluorescence measurements were carried out by a fluorescence spectrophotometer before and after thermocycling (2000 cycles, 5°C and 55°C). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures and Tukey's test were performed at a significance level of 5%. Most of the tested composites showed significant differences in fluorescence both before and after aging (P 0.05), and was the only composite that showed comparable results of fluorescence to the tooth structure before and after thermocycling. With the exception of Filtek Supreme, there were significant reductions in fluorescence intensity for all the tested composites (P < 0.05).

  9. FY 1991 report on the results of the surveys on the technologies for forming composite materials. Research and development of the new technologies for forming composite materials (Comprehensive surveys and researches); 1991 nendo fukugo zairyo seikei gijutsu chosa hokokusho. Fukugo zairyo shinseikei gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu (sogo chosa kenkyu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-03-01

    This project is aimed at development of new technologies for forming composite materials by studying the methods for controlling structures of ceramic- and metal-based composite materials, and also at development of the technologies for forming near-net shapes utilizing the phenomenon of superplasticity. The literature survey is conducted to help promote the developments, and the abstracts of the major papers are pigeonholed into 4 general categories; (1) production and properties of ceramic-based composite materials, (2) superplasticity of ceramic-based composite materials, (3) production and properties of metal-based composite materials, and (4) superplasticity of metal-based composite materials. This paper summarizes the abstract of these papers. The category (1) includes carbon fiber reinforced Sialon composites produced by polymer pyrolysis, the category (2) includes superplasticity of functional ceramics, and comparison of tensile and compressive creep behavior of a superplastic yttria-stabilized zirconia-20 wt.% alumina composite, the category (3) includes in-situ metal matrix composite, and the category (4) includes high strain rate superplasticity in whisker-reinforced alumina composites, and application of superplasticity to fabrication of metal matrix composites. (NEDO)

  10. The effect of alumina nanofillers size and shape on mechanical behavior of PMMA matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Hasan Somaya Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Composites with the addition of alumina nanofillers show improvement in mechanical properties. The PMMA polymer was used as a matrix and two different types of nanofillers, having extremely different shapes were added in the matrix to form the composite. Reinforcements were based on alumina nanoparticles having either spherical shape or whiskers having the length to diameter ratio of 100. The influence of alumina fillers size, shape and fillers loading on mechanical properties of prepared composite were studied using the nanoindentation measurements and dynamic mechanical analysis. It was observed that both alumina whiskers and alumina spherical nanoparticles added in the PMMA matrix improved the mechanical properties of the composite but the improvement was significantly higher with alumina whisker reinforcement. The concentration of the reinforcing alumina spherical nanoparticles and alumina whiskers in PMMA matrix varied up to 5 wt. %. The best performance was obtained by the addition of 3 wt. % of alumina whiskers in the PMMA matrix with regard to mechanical properties of the obtained composite.

  11. Effect of zirconium nanoparticles on the mechanical properties of light-cured resin based dental composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afza, N.; Anis, I.; Aslam, M.; Shah, M.R.; Hussain, M.T.; Bokhari, T.H.; Hussain, A.; Safdar, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of conventional composite resins (Solare-P) and the modified composite resin having mixed with zirconium nanoparticles. The composite resins are used to replace the missing tooth structure and improve esthetics. In this study, the composite was filled with increments in a mould which was 4 mm in depth and 3 mm in diameter. After filling, it was polymerized with halogen light curing unit for 20 seconds for each increment. In other experiments, the composite was mixed with zirconium nanoparticles and filled in the moulds with increments and polymerized for 20 seconds with halogen light curing unit for each increment. After keeping the moulds at 37 deg. C for 24 hours their mechanical properties including compressive force, %age elongation, compressive strength and hardness were evaluated. It was seen that by adding zirconium nanoparticles, compressive force, %age elongation, compressive strength and hardness increased significantly. Thus it was concluded that the new materials are better than the conventional compomers. (author)

  12. The Nanomechanical and Tribological Properties of Restorative Dental Composites after Exposure in Different Types of Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yi Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various acidic solutions on the surface mechanical properties of commercial resin composites with different microstructures (Filtek Z350 XT, TPH3, Durafill, and Superlux. Specimens were immersed in orange juice, cola, and distilled water for 5 days and the nanohardness, elastic modulus, and wear behavior of the samples were determined via the nanoindentation test and a reciprocating nanoscratch test. The nanoscratch morphology was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the wear depth was recorded by scanning probe microscopy (SPM. The results indicate that the nanofilled resin composites had the greatest hardest and highest elastic modulus, whereas the microfilled composites exhibited the lowest nanohardness and elastic modulus values. SEM observations showed that all resin composites underwent erosion and surface degradation after immersion in acidic solutions. Furthermore, the wear resistance was influenced by the composition of the acidic solution and was correlated with the nanohardness and elastic modulus. The dominant wear mechanism changed from plastic deformation to delamination after immersion in acidic solutions.

  13. Evaluation of mechanical and optical behavior of current esthetic dental restorative CAD/CAM composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Liebermann, Anja; Eichberger, Marlis; Güth, Jan-Frederik

    2015-03-01

    To determine the mechanical and optical properties of CAD/CAM composites (LAVA Ultimate, Cerasmart, Shofu Block and two exp. CAD/CAM composites), a hybrid material (VITA Enamic), a leucite (IPS Empress CAD) and a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max CAD). Three-point flexural strength (FS) was investigated according ISO 6872:2008 (N=240/n=30). Two-body wear (TBW) was analyzed in a chewing simulator (1,200,000 cycles, 50N, 5°/55°C) using human teeth as antagonists (N=120/n=15). Quantitative analysis of wear was carried out with a 3D-scanner and associated matching software. Discoloration rate (DR) after 14 days of storage in cress, curry, red wine, and distilled water (N=384/n=12), and translucency (T) (N=384/n=48) of CAD/CAM materials were measured in a spectrophotometer (400-700nm wavelength). Data were analyzed using two-/one-way ANOVA with Scheffé post-hoc test, Kruskal-Wallis-H test, and linear mixed models (α=0.05). IPS e.max CAD showed the highest FS (pCAD/CAM composites (exception: Shofu Block). The lowest FS showed VITA Enamic and IPS Empress CAD (pCAD, VITA Enamic, exp. CAD/CAM composite 2, followed by IPS e.max presented lower material TBW than the remaining CAD/CAM materials (pcurry>cress>distilled water) exerted the highest influence on DR (pCAD/CAM material. Glass-ceramics showed lower DR than CAD/CAM composites (pCAD/CAM composites presented moderate FS, high T and antagonist friendly behavior. Glass-ceramic demonstrated the most favorable DR and lowest TBW on the material side. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of light-curing units on microleakage under dental composite resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, R. S.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Saade, E. G.; Nadalin, M. R.; Andrade, M. F.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of two light-curing units (QTH and LED) on microleakage of Class II composite resin restorations with dentin cavosurface margins. Twenty extracted mandibular first premolars, free of caries and fractures were prepared two vertical “slot” cavities in the occluso-mesial and -destal surfaces (2 mm buccal-lingually, 2 mm proximal-axially and cervical limit in enamel) and divided into 4 equal groups ( n = 8): GI and GII: packable posterior composite light-activated with LED and QTH, respectively; GIII and GIV: micro-hybrid composite resin light-activated with LED and QTH, respectively. The composite resins were applied following the manufacturer’s instructions. After 24 h of water storage specimens were subjected to thermocycling for a total of 500 cycles at 5 and 55°C and the teeth were then sealed with impermeable material. Teeth were immersed in 0.5% Basic fuchsin during 24 h at room temperature, and zero to three levels of penetration score were attributed. The Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests showed significant statistically similar ( P > 0.05) from GI to GII and GIII to GIV, which the GII (2.750) had the highest mean scores and the GIII and GIV (0.875) had lowest mean scores. The use of different light-curing units has no influence on marginal integrity of Class II composite resin restorations and the proprieties of composite resins are important to reduce the microleakage.

  15. Compressive strength of dental composites photo-activated with different light tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvão, M R; Campos, E A; Rastelli, A N S; Andrade, M F; Caldas, S G F R; Calabrez-Filho, S; Bagnato, V S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the compressive strength of microhybrid (Filtek™ Z250) and nanofilled (Filtek™ Supreme XT) composite resins photo-activated with two different light guide tips, fiber optic and polymer, coupled with one LED. The power density was 653 mW cm −2 when using the fiber optic light tip and 596 mW cm −2 with the polymer. After storage in distilled water at 37 ± 2 °C for seven days, the samples were subjected to mechanical testing of compressive strength in an EMIC universal mechanical testing machine with a load cell of 5 kN and speed of 0.5 mm min −1 . The statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA with a confidence interval of 95% and Tamhane’s test. The results showed that the mean values of compressive strength were not influenced by the different light tips (p > 0.05). However, a statistical difference was observed (p < 0.001) between the microhybrid composite resin photo-activated with the fiber optic light tip and the nanofilled composite resin. Based on these results, it can be concluded that microhybrid composite resin photo-activated with the fiber optic light tip showed better results than nanofilled, regardless of the tip used, and the type of the light tip did not influence the compressive strength of either composite. Thus, the presented results suggest that both the fiber optic and polymer light guide tips provide adequate compressive strength to be used to make restorations. However, the fiber optic light tip associated with microhybrid composite resin may be an interesting option for restorations mainly in posterior teeth. (paper)

  16. Mechanical properties of polymer-infiltrated-ceramic (sodium aluminum silicate) composites for dental restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bencang; Li, Jing; Wang, Huining; Lin, Yuanhua; Shen, Yang; Li, Ming; Deng, Xuliang; Nan, Cewen

    2017-07-01

    To fabricate indirect restorative composites for CAD/CAM applications and evaluate the mechanical properties. Polymer-infiltrated-ceramic composites were prepared through infiltrating polymer into partially sintered sodium aluminum silicate ceramic blocks and curing. The corresponding samples were fabricated according to standard ISO-4049 using for mechanical properties measurement. The flexural strength and fracture toughness were measured using a mechanical property testing machine. The Vickers hardness and elastic modulus were calculated from the results of nano-indentation. The microstructures were investigated using secondary electron detector. The density of the porous ceramic blocks was obtained through TG-DTA. The conversion degrees were calculated from the results of mid-infrared spectroscopy. The obtained polymer infiltrated composites have a maximum flexural strength value of 214±6.5MPa, Vickers hardness of 1.76-2.30GPa, elastic modulus of 22.63-27.31GPa, fracture toughness of 1.76-2.35MPam 1/2 and brittleness index of 0.75-1.32μm -1/2 . These results were compared with those of commercial CAD/CAM blocks. Our results suggest that these materials with good mechanical properties are comparable to two commercial CAD/CAM blocks. The sintering temperature could dramatically influence the mechanical properties. Restorative composites with superior mechanical properties were produced. These materials mimic the properties of natural dentin and could be a promising candidate for CAD/CAM applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The translucency of dental composites investigated by UV-VIS spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrescu, L. Silaghi; Pastrav, O.; Prejmerean, C.; Prodan, D.; Boboia, S.; Codruta, S.; Moldovan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Translucency is the property of a material to partially transmit and diffuse incident light, and can be described as a partial opacity or a state between complete opacity and complete transparency. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the translucency index of resin composites according to their chemical structure and to the light source used for curing. Our study was achieved on four commercial composite samples (30 mm × 2 mm) cured with two different lamps (Optilux - halogen bulb and Ultralight - LED). Measurements were made with a UV-VIS spectrophotometer, and the reflection spectrum was recorded in the 380-770 nm region on white and black, compared with a SPECTRALON standard white. For all materials cured with the LED lamp on the glossy sides, the best results were given by Tetric Evo Ceram followed by Filtek Supreme, Restacril RO and Premise. The measurements made on samples cured with an Optilux lamp, to the smooth and rough sides of the samples, revealed that the highest index of translucency is provided by Tetric Evo Ceram on the smooth side, followed by Filtek Supreme, Restacril RO and Premises. We can say that the translucency of the composites is mostly determined by the chemical composition of the material, which is observed from transmittance values recorded for each sample, and by the source of radiation applied on the sample

  18. The translucency of dental composites investigated by UV-VIS spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, L. Silaghi; Pastrav, O.; Prejmerean, C.; Prodan, D.; Boboia, S.; Codruta, S.; Moldovan, M.

    2013-11-01

    Translucency is the property of a material to partially transmit and diffuse incident light, and can be described as a partial opacity or a state between complete opacity and complete transparency. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the translucency index of resin composites according to their chemical structure and to the light source used for curing. Our study was achieved on four commercial composite samples (30 mm × 2 mm) cured with two different lamps (Optilux - halogen bulb and Ultralight - LED). Measurements were made with a UV-VIS spectrophotometer, and the reflection spectrum was recorded in the 380-770 nm region on white and black, compared with a SPECTRALON standard white. For all materials cured with the LED lamp on the glossy sides, the best results were given by Tetric Evo Ceram followed by Filtek Supreme, RestacrilRO and Premise. The measurements made on samples cured with an Optilux lamp, to the smooth and rough sides of the samples, revealed that the highest index of translucency is provided by Tetric Evo Ceram on the smooth side, followed by Filtek Supreme, RestacrilRO and Premises. We can say that the translucency of the composites is mostly determined by the chemical composition of the material, which is observed from transmittance values recorded for each sample, and by the source of radiation applied on the sample.

  19. Evaluation of wear rate of dental composites polymerized by halogen or LED light curing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaghehmand H.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Sufficient polymerization is a critical factor to obtain optimum physical properties and clinical efficacy of resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate wear rates of composite resins polymerized by two different systems Light Emitting Diodes (LED to and Halogen lamps. Materials and Methods: In this laboratory study, 20 specimens of A3 Tetric Ceram composite were placed in brass molds of 2*10*10 mm dimensions and cured for 40 seconds with 1 mm distance from surface. 10 specimens were cured with LED and the other 10 were cured with Halogen unit. A device with the ability to apply force was developed in order to test the wear of composites. After storage in distilled water for 10 days, the specimens were placed in the wear testing machine. A chrome cobalt stylus with 1.12 mm diameter was applied against the specimens surfaces with a load of 2 kg. The weight of each samples before and after 5000, 10000, 20000, 40000, 80000 and 120000 cycles was measured using an electronic balance with precision of 10-4 grams. Data were analyzed using t test and paired t test. P0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, LED and halogen light curing units resulted in a similar wear rate in composite resin restorations.

  20. Diametral tensile strength of two dental composites when immersed in ethanol, distilled water and artificial saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Abdur; Amin, Faiza; Abbas, Muhammad

    2014-11-01

    To examine the effect of distilled water, artificial saliva and ethanol on the tensile strength of direct tooth-coloured restorative material. The study was conducted at Dr. Ishrat ul Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), Karachi, from April 2011 to September 2012. The testing was performed at the Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (PCSIR) laboratories. Two composite resins Filtek Z250 and Spectrum TPH were tested. Specimens (13 mm x 3 mm x 2 mm) of each material were prepared in the stainless steel mould according to the manufacturers' instructions and distributed into 3 equal groups: one immersed in distilled water, the other in artificial saliva, and the last one in ethanol for 24 hours. Tensile strength was determined after 24 hours in universal Instron Testing Machine. There were 72 specimens in all; 36 (50%) each for Filtek Z250 and Spectrum TPH. The three sub-groups in each case had 12 (33.3%) specimens. For the Filtek Z250, there was no statistically significant difference between immersion in distilled water and artificial saliva, but the ethanol group presented lower tensile strength (ptensile strength compared to distilled water (ptested composite resins were affected by the immersion media and adversely affected the mechanical properties of composite resins.

  1. Candida albicans adherence to resin-composite restorative dental material: influence of whole human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, José Luis; Elguezabal, Natalia; Prado, Carlota; Ellacuría, Joseba; Soler, Iñaki; Pontón, José

    2002-11-01

    Attachment of Candida albicans to oral surfaces is believed to be a critical event in the colonization of the oral cavity and in the development of oral diseases such as Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Although there is considerable information about the adhesion of C albicans to buccal epithelial cells and prosthetic materials, there is very little information about the adhesion of C albicans to composite restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of adhesion of C albicans to a resin-composite restorative material (Herculite). The adhesion of 2 strains of C albicans, a germinative and a germ tube-deficient mutant, was studied by a visual method after incubating the fungus and the resin with and without human whole saliva. In absence of saliva, the adhesion of the C albicans germinative isolate to the resin showed an increase in parallel with the germination, reaching a maximum at the end of the experiment (120 minutes). However, no significant differences were observed in the adhesion of the agerminative mutant during the period of time studied. In the presence of saliva, the adhesion of both isolates to the resin was significantly lowered. Germination and the presence of human whole saliva are important factors in the adhesion of C albicans to the resin-composite restorative material Herculite.

  2. Effect of the functionalization of silica nanoparticles as a reinforcing agent on dental composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Alberto Rodríguez-Quirós

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio evaluó el efecto del estado de agregación de nanopartículas de sílica en la reflectancia y cristalinidad de materiales compuestos de uso dental. Se emplearon dos tipos de sílica nanométrica (ca. 10 nm: Aerosil 200  no funcionalizado y Aerosil DT4  funcionalizado con 3-metacriloxipropiltrimetoxisilano. Las nanopartículas de sílica fueron dispersas en una mezcla de monómeros de Uretano Dimetilacrilato (UDMA y Etilenglicol Dimetacrilato (EGDMA en una relación 80:20 en masa. El tamaño de partícula de la silica y su estado de agregación fue determinado mediante microscopía electrónica de barrido (SEM y microscopía electrónica de transmisión (TEM, mostrando que el Aerosil DT4  presentó agregados densos de tamaño superior a 1 μm; en tanto el Aerosil 200  presentó una estructura agregada tipo gel de partículas. El grado de funcionalización del Aerosil DT4  fue determinado mediante análisis termogravimétrico (TGA, obteniendo un valor de 7.57% w/w. Los materiales compuestos fueron evaluados mediante calorimetría diferencial de barrido (DSC para determinar su cristalidad. El material compuesto reforzado con Aerosil DT4  presentó una menor cristalinidad que el sistema con Aerosil 200  , debido a la mayor interacción de la matriz polimérica con la superficie funcionalizada del Aerosil DT4  . El efecto de la agregación de las nanopartículas de silica en las propiedades ópticas del material compuesto fue determinado mediante análisis de reflectancia. La muestra de Aerosil 200  presentó un menor estado de agregación de las nanopartículas y mayor reflectancia que el sistema con Aerosil DT4  . La funcionalización de la superficie del Aerosil DT4  propició la aglomeración de las nanopartículas deteriorando las propiedades ópticas del material compuesto.

  3. Structural optimization of the fibre-reinforced composite substructure in a three-unit dental bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li; Fok, Alex S L

    2009-06-01

    Failures of fixed partial dentures (FPDs) made of fibre-reinforced composites (FRC) have been reported in many clinical and in vitro studies. The types of failure include debonding at the composite-tooth interface, delamination of the veneering material from the FRC substructure and fracture of the pontic. The design of the FRC substructure, i.e. the position and orientation of the fibres, will affect the fracture resistance of the FPD. The purpose of this study was to find an optimal arrangement of the FRC substructure, by means of structural optimization, which could minimize the failure-initiating stresses in a three-unit FPD. A structural optimization method mimicking biological adaptive growth was developed for orthotropic materials such as FRC and incorporated into the finite element (FE) program ABAQUS. Using the program, optimization of the fibre positions and directions in a three-unit FPD was carried out, the aim being to align the fibre directions with those of the maximum principal stresses. The optimized design was then modeled and analyzed to verify the improvements in mechanical performance of the FPD. Results obtained from the optimization suggested that the fibres should be placed at the bottom of the pontic, forming a U-shape substructure that extended into the connectors linking the teeth and the pontic. FE analyses of the optimized design indicated stress reduction in both the veneering composite and at the interface between the veneer and the FRC substructure. The optimized design obtained using FE-based structural optimization can potentially improve the fracture resistance of FPDs by reducing some of the failure-initiating stresses. Optimization methods can therefore be a useful tool to provide sound scientific guidelines for the design of FRC substructures in FPDs.

  4. Designing, preparing and evaluation of novel HA/Ti composite coating for endodontic dental implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi MH.

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, application of implants as a new method for replacing extracted teeth have been improved. So, many researches have been performed for improving the characteristics of implants. The aim of this study was to design and produce a desired coating in order to obtaining two goals including; improvement of the corrosion behavior of metallic endodontic implant and the bone osseointegration simultaneously. Stainless steel 316L (SS, cobalt-chromium alloy (Vit and commercial pure titanium (cpTi were chosen as metallic substrates and hydroxyapatite coating (HAC were performed by plasma-spraying (PS process on three different substrates. A novel double layer Hydroxyapatite/Titanium (HA/Ti composite coating composed of a HA top layer and a Ti under layer was prepared using PS and physical vapor deposition (PVD process respectively on SS. Structural characterization techniques including XRD, SEM and EDX were utilized to investigate the microstructure, morpholgy and crystallinity of the coatings. Electrochemical potentiodynamic tests were performed in physiological solutions in order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of the coated and uncoated specimens behavior as an indication of biocmpatibility. Results indicated that the cpTi possesses the highest and SS the lowest corrosion resistance (highest corrosion current density between uncoated substrates. This trend was independent to the type of physiological environment. The HA coating decreased the corrosion current density of HA coated metallic implants but did not change that trend. HAC acted as a mechanical barrier on the metallic substrate but could not prevent the interaction between metallic substrate and environment completely. The HA/Ti composite coating improved the corrosion behavior of SS. The corrosion current density of HA/Ti coated SS decreased and was exactly similar to single HA coated cpTi in physiological solutions. The results indicated that HA/Ti composite coated SS

  5. Cytotoxicity of dental composite (co)monomers and the amalgam component Hg{sup 2+} in human gingival fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Simon, Sabine; Esters, Magalie; Seiss, Mario [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Walther-Straub-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Kehe, Kai [Bundeswehr Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Munich (Germany); Kleinsasser, Norbert [University of Regensburg, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Regensburg (Germany); Hickel, Reinhard [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Munich (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    Unpolymerized resin (co)monomers or mercury (Hg) can be released from restorative dental materials (e.g. composites and amalgam). They can diffuse into the tooth pulp or the gingiva. They can also reach the gingiva and organs by the circulating blood after the uptake from swallowed saliva. The cytotoxicity of dental composite components hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), urethanedimethacrylate (UDMA), and bisglycidylmethacrylate (Bis-GMA) as well as the amalgam component Hg{sup 2+} (as HgCl{sub 2}) and methyl mercury chloride (MeHgCl) was investigated on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) at two time intervals. To test the cytotoxicity of substances, the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assay and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay were used. The test substances were added in various concentrations and cells were incubated for 24 or 48 h. The EC{sub 50} values were obtained as half-maximum-effect concentrations from fitted curves. Following EC{sub 50} values were found [BrdU: mean (mmol/l); SEM in parentheses; n=12]: (24 h/48 h) HEMA 8.860 (0.440)/6.600(0.630), TEGDMA 1.810(0.130)/1.220(0.130), UDMA 0.120(0.010)/0.140(0.010), BisGMA 0.060(0.004)/0.040(0.002), HgCl{sub 2} 0.015(0.001)/0.050(0.006), and MeHgCl 0.004(0.001)/0.005(0.001). Following EC{sub 50} values were found [LDH: mean (mmol/l); SEM in parentheses; n=12]: (24 h/48 h) HEMA 9.490(0.300)/7.890(1.230), TEGDMA 2.300(0.470)/1.950(0.310), UDMA 0.200(0.007)/0.100(0.007), BisGMA 0.070(0.005)/0.100(0.002), and MeHgCl 0.014(0.006)/0.010(0.003). In both assays, the following range of increased toxicity was found for composite components (24 and 48 h): HEMA < TEGDMA < UDMA < BisGMA. In both assays, MeHgCl was the most toxic substance. In the BrdU assay, Hg{sup 2+} was about fourfold less toxic than MeHgCl but Hg{sup 2+} was about fourfold more toxic than BisGMA. In the BrdU test, a significantly (P<0.05) decreased toxicity was observed for Hg{sup 2+} at 48 h, compared to the 24 h

  6. Modeling the Residual Stresses in Reactive Resins-Based Materials: a Case Study of Photo-Sensitive Composites for Dental Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Residual stresses in reactive resins-based composites are associated to the net volumetric contraction (shrinkage) arising during the cross-linking reactions. Depending on the restoration geometry (the ratio of the free surface area to the volume of the cavity) the frozen-in stresses can be as high as the strength of the dental composites. This is the main reason why the effectiveness and then the durability of restorations with composites remains quite lower than those realized with metal alloys based materials. In this paper we first explore the possibility to circumvent the mathematical complexity arising from the determination of residual stresses in reactive systems three-dimensionally constrained. Then, the results of our modeling approach are applied to a series of commercially available composites showing that almost all samples develop residual stresses such that the restoration undergoes failure as soon as it is realized.

  7. Combining Bioactive Multifunctional Dental Composite with PAMAM for Root Dentin Remineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimeng Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a bioactive multifunctional composite (BMC via nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC, dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM and nanoparticles of silver (NAg; and (2 investigate the effects of combined BMC + poly (amido amine (PAMAM on remineralization of demineralized root dentin in a cyclic artificial saliva/lactic acid environment for the first time. Methods. Root dentin specimens were prepared and demineralized with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s. Four groups were prepared: (1 root dentin control; (2 root dentin with BMC; (3 root dentin with PAMAM; (4 root dentin with BMC + PAMAM. Specimens were treated with a cyclic artificial saliva/lactic acid regimen for 21 days. Calcium (Ca and phosphate (P ion concentrations and acid neutralization were determined. The remineralized root dentin specimens were examined via hardness testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results. Mechanical properties of BMC were similar to commercial control composites (p = 0.913. BMC had excellent Ca and P ion release and acid-neutralization capability. BMC or PAMAM alone each achieved slight mineral regeneration in demineralized root dentin. The combined BMC + PAMAM induced the greatest root dentin remineralization, and increased the hardness of pre-demineralized root dentin to match that of healthy root dentin (p = 0.521. Significance. The excellent root dentin remineralization effects of BMC + PAMAM were demonstrated for the first time. BMC + PAMAM induced effective and complete root dentin remineralization in an acid challenge environment. The novel BMC + PAMAM method is promising for Class V and other restorations to remineralize and protect tooth structures.

  8. The effect of CHA-doped Sr addition to the mechanical strength of metakaolin dental implant geopolymer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunendar, Bambang; Fathina, Afiya; Harmaji, Andrie; Mardhian, Deby Fajar; Asri, Lia; Widodo, Haris Budi

    2017-09-01

    The prospective material for implant plate required sufficient mechanical properties to maintain fracture fixation and resist physiological stress until bone healing process finished. Various problem implant plate based on metal and polymer materials when used as fixation for bone defect case induced developmental of bioceramic for implant plate materials. Materials that now has been attract a lot of attention is carbonate apatite and strontium as doping which known to have good biocompability along with biointegrity and mechanical charateristics. Other materials that have been known to have good mechanical properties are metakaolin and use of chitosan as coupling agent. Metakaolin and carbonate apatite can be produced by sol-gel methode which simpler, economical and energy-saving procedure furthermore use of chitosan which is widely found in the nature of Indonesia can be used to encourage the utilization of natural resources. The aim fo this paper is to investigated effect of CHA-doped Sr 5 (%) mol addition to the mechanical strength of metakaolin dental implant geoploymer composite. In this paper metakaolin is used as geopolymerization precursors. The test results have shown that addition of filler of apatite carbonate doped 5% mol strontium can be said to increase the value of mechnical properties but high concentration of calcium in the nanocomposite also can complicate the equilibrium of the geopolymerization process and induce alkali aggregate reactivity (AAR). The sample group of nanocomposite of metakaolin and carbonate apatite-doped 5% mol strontium (2: 1% wt) with 2% chitosan as a coupling agent based on geopolymerization for implant plate application has the best mechanical properties among all sample groups but does not qualify as an implant plate on cortical bone but can be used for the application of the implant plate on the trabecular bone specifically and potentially as a bone initiator.

  9. Effects of Hot-Hydrostatic Canned Extrusion on the Stock Utilization, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of TiBw/TC4 Composites with Quasi-Continuous Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yangju; Li, Bing; Cui, Guorong; Zhang, Wencong

    2017-10-25

    In-situ TiB whisker-reinforced Ti-6Al-4V (TC4) titanium matrix composites (TiBw/TC4) with quasi-continuous networks were successfully fabricated by vacuum hot-pressing sintering. The effects of the hot-hydrostatic canned extrusion on stock utilization, microstructure and mechanical properties of the TiBw/TC4 composites were investigated. It was satisfactory that the utilization of composites could be obviously improved by canned extrusion compared to that extruded without canned extrusion. The microstructure results showed that after canned extrusion the grain was refined and the TiB whiskers were distributed from a random array state to a state in which the whiskers were distributed along the extrusion direction. The properties testing results revealed that the tensile strength, the hardness and the ductility of the composites all significantly improved after extrusion due to the grain refinement and orientation of the TiB whisker caused by extrusion. Tensile fracture results showed that when the TiB whiskers were randomly distributed only part of them played a role in strengthening the matrix during the deformation process (as-sintered composites), while when the TiB whiskers were oriented all whiskers could strengthen the matrix during the tensile testing process (as-extruded composites).

  10. Structure and Properties of Chitin Whisker Reinforced Papers for Food Packaging Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihan Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, concerns about environmental waste caused by petroleum-derived chemicals as well as the consumer's demand for high quality food products, have prompted people to pay more attention to developing biodegradable food packaging materials using natural resources such as cellulose fibers and chitin derivatives. In this study, chitin whiskers have been successfully generated by hydrolyzing the α-chitin sample. Then the synthesized nano-sized chitin whiskers were used at ratios from 0.1% to 2% (wt% for improving strength properties of paper sheets by the dip-coating method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM were used to investigate the morphology of chitin whiskers and cellulose fiber compounds. The results showed that coating with chitin whiskers brought about an increase in tear strength, burst strength, and wet and dry tensile strength, with a decrease in Zeta-potential value.

  11. Effect of In-Office Carbamide Peroxide-Based Tooth Bleaching System on Wear Resistance of Silorane-Based and Methacrylate-Based Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Several studies have assessed the characteristics and properties of silorane-based composites and adhesive systems. Considering the extensive application of tooth-whitening agents, possible deteriorative effects of tooth bleaching agents on these restorative materials must be studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an in-office carbamide peroxide-based tooth bleaching agent on the wear resistance of a silorane-based and a conventional microhybrid dimethyl methacrylate-based dental composite with two different application times.  Materials and Methods: Thirty cylindrical specimens were made of Z250 and P90 dental composite resins (n=15 for each composite. Samples made of each composite were divided into three groups (n=5 for immersion in an in-office bleaching agent (Opalescence® Quick 45% for either three or eight hours or saline solution (control. Wear tests were conducted after bleaching using a pin-on disk apparatus under the load of 40N at a constant sliding speed of 0.5 ms-1 for a sliding distance of 300 m. The samples were weighed before and after the wear test. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the obtained data (α=0.05.Results: There was a significant decrease in the weight of samples after the wear test (P<0.001. However, no significant difference was found among groups in the mean weight of samples before and after the wear test (P>0.05. Conclusion: Bleaching for three or eight hours using 45% carbamide peroxide had no deteriorative effect on the wear resistance of Z250 and P90 composites.

  12. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  13. Dental onlay bridge-like prosthesis in three koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus): the use of Premise trimodal composite to prevent interproximal Eucalyptus spp. retention and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Sean M; Pye, Geoffrey W; Fagan, David A

    2014-06-01

    Three koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) presented with moderate to severe interproximal space accumulation with Eucalyptus spp. at the San Diego Zoo. Premise trimodal composite was used to create dental onlay bridge-like prostheses to eliminate open, enlarged interproximal spaces. The prostheses prevented further leaf material accumulation within the interproximal spaces and consequently reduced periodontal disease. Aesthetically, the prosthesis replicates normal tooth coloration and appearance and wears at a similar rate to surrounding teeth. Prosthetic repair or replacement may be required, so periodic examination every 3-6 mo is recommended.

  14. The antifungal effects and mechanical properties of silver bromide/cationic polymer nano-composite-modified Poly-methyl methacrylate-based dental resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Yin-Yan; Huang, Li; Chai, Zhi-Guo; Shen, Li-Juan; Xiao, Yu-Hong

    2017-05-08

    Poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based dental resins with strong and long-lasting antifungal properties are critical for the prevention of denture stomatitis. This study evaluated the antifungal effects on Candida albicans ATCC90028, the cytotoxicity toward human dental pulp cells (HDPCs), and the mechanical properties of a silver bromide/cationic polymer nano-composite (AgBr/NPVP)-modified PMMA-based dental resin. AgBr/NPVP was added to the PMMA resin at 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 wt%, and PMMA resin without AgBr/NPVP served as the control. Fungal growth was inhibited on the AgBr/NPVP-modified PMMA resin compared to the control (P  0.05) between the experimental and control groups. These data indicate that the incorporation of AgBr/NPVP conferred strong and long-lasting antifungal effects against Candida albicans to the PMMA resin, and it has low toxicity toward HDPCs, and its mechanical properties were not significantly affected.

  15. Current State of Dental Education: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formicola, Allan J

    2017-08-01

    This executive summary for Section 1 of the "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century" project provides a composite picture of information from 12 background articles on the current state of dental education in the United States. The summary includes the following topics: the current status of the dental curriculum, the implications of student debt and dental school finances, the expansion of enrollment, student diversity, pre- and postdoctoral education, safety net status of dental school clinics, and trends in faculty.

  16. Effect of Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief paste on the strength of adhesion of composite resin in dental pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davila Rodriguez, Amanda; Sas Rosero, Cristina de

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the toothpaste Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief on the strength of adhesion was analyzed, through in vitro studies, in dental pieces that have been previously treated with a protocol that simulates dental hypersensitivity. Several dental pieces were taken as study samples and divided into groups. The Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief TM desensitizing paste was applied to the non-crown surfaces of the teeth, with the exception of the negative control group which remained without the application. Positive control protocols, prophylaxis with the use of fluorinated prophylactic paste, 400 grit sandpaper, phosphoric acid and negative control were applied. Subsequently, a Brilliant NG TM dentin photocurable resin crown was constructed for the groups to which the indicated protocols were applied. The greatest strength of adhesion was presented by the group Prophylaxis. It is assumed that a second application of orthophosphoric acid is able to de-blot even more the dental tubules and with this improve the adhesion. An improvement in the adhesion of resin on the tooth surface is provided when performing a dental prophylaxis using prophylactic paste and a rubber cup, before restoring a tooth. Sandpaper 400 prevents an improvement in the adhesion of resins. The results with the negative control group were unexpected and may be due to errors in the treatment process [es

  17. Comments on Soltysiak's paper: "Comment: low dental caries rate in Neandertals: the result of diet or the oral flora compositions?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, Jacek

    2012-08-01

    A low frequency of dental caries in Neandertal population is still puzzling. Many authors stress that the lower frequency of dental caries was related to a meat diet. However, a recent publication in HOMO - Journal Comparative Human Biology presented a new interpretation of dental caries in Neandertals. In this article, Soltysiak supports the thesis that the lower frequency of caries in the Neandertal population from the Near East could not be related to the low-sugar diet, but rather to the absence of cariogenic bacteria species (S. mutans). Although this hypothesis is interesting, I suspect it to be based on several erroneous assumptions, and a misunderstanding of caries as a disease. Although he stressed that the caries lesion is related to many different factors, in his argument he considers one of two alternatives "a low-sugar diet or a lack of cariogenic bacterial species". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF COMPOSITE RESIN TO DENTAL ENAMEL CONDITIONED WITH PHOSPHORIC ACID OR Nd: YAG LASER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO Carlos de Paula

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has been focused on a comparison between the shear bond strength of a composite resin attached to dental enamel surface, after a 35% phosphoric acid etching and after a Nd:YAG laser irradiation with 165.8 J/cm2 of energy density per pulse. After etching and attaching resin to these surfaces, the specimens were thermocycled and then underwent the shearing bond strength tests at a speed of 5 mm/min. The results achieved, after statistical analysis with Student's t-test, showed that the adhesion was significantly greater in the 35% phosphoric acid treated group than in the group treated with the Nd:YAG laser, thus demonstrating the need for developing new studies to reach the ideal parameters for an effective enamel surface conditioning as well as specific adhesives and composite resins when Nd:YAG laser is used

  19. A prospective 8-year follow-up of posterior resin composite restorations in permanent teeth of children and adolescents in Public Dental Health Service: reasons for replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan W.V.; Halken, Jette

    2014-01-01

    in general practice showed a good durability with annual failure rates of 2 %. The main reason for failure was secondary caries followed by post-operative sensitivity and resin composite fracture. A high proportion of replaced/repaired RC restorations were caused by primary caries in a non-filled surface......Objectives: the aim of the study was to investigate reasons for replacement and repair of posterior resin composite (RC) restorations placed in permanent teeth of children and adolescents attending Public Dental Health Service in Denmark. Material and method: all posterior RC placed consecutively...... by 115 dentists over a period of 4 years were evaluated at baseline and up to 8 years later. The endpoint of each restoration was defined when repair or replacement was performed. The influence of patient, dentist and material factors on reasons for repair or replacement was investigated. Results...

  20. Potential of biocomposites for economic development in Southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anandjiwala, R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available of agave fibre (South African) reinforced thermoplastic composites for industrial applications © CSIR 2012 Slide 23 Failure under 3 kg load at various temperature and humidity conditions for 80 hrs Impression mark visible after load testing... whisker reinforced poly (lactic acid) (PLA) nanocomposite fibres by melt spinning in filament extruder Extruded PLA and cellulose whisker reinforced pellets PLA PLA-CNW-1% PLA-CNW-3% Bio-Whiskers Reinfroced PLA Filaments (SA – Sweden Project...

  1. Synthesis and ceramic processing of alumina and zirconia based composites infiltrated with glass phase for dental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Daniel Gomes

    2009-01-01

    The interest for the use of ceramic materials for dental applications started due to the good aesthetic appearance promoted by the similarity to natural teeth. However, the fragility of traditional ceramics was a limitation for their use in stress conditions. The development of alumina and zirconia based materials, that associate aesthetic results, biocompatibility and good mechanical behaviour, makes possible the employment of ceramics for fabrication of dental restorations. The incorporation of vitreous phase in these ceramics is an alternative to minimize the ceramic retraction and to improve the adhesion to resin-based cements, necessary for the union of ceramic frameworks to the remaining dental structure. In the dentistry field, alumina and zirconia ceramic infiltrated with glassy phase are represented commercially by the In-Ceram systems. Considering that the improvement of powder's synthesis routes and of techniques of ceramic processing contributes for good performance of these materials, the goal of the present work is the study of processing conditions of alumina and/or 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia ceramics infiltrated with aluminum borosilicate lanthanum glass. The powders, synthesized by hydroxide coprecipitation route, were pressed by uniaxial compaction and pre-sintered at temperature range between 950 and 1650 degree C in order to obtain porous ceramics bodies. Vitreous phase incorporation was performed by impregnation of aluminum borosilicate lanthanum powder, also prepared in this work, followed by heat treatment between 1200 and 1400 degree C .Ceramic powders were characterized by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, gaseous adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. Sinterability of alumina and /or stabilized zirconia green pellets was evaluated by dilatometry. Pre-sintered ceramics were characterized by apparent density measurements (Archimedes method), X-ray diffraction and scanning electron

  2. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  3. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  4. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  5. Dental negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, C S

    2000-02-01

    Medical and dental errors and negligence are again in the spotlight in recent news report. Dead because of doctor's bad handwriting Prescribing drug overdoses Germ-infested soap pumps--infections in hospitals This articles explains dental negligence including dental duty of care and the standard of care expected of dentists in relation to the Bolam principle.

  6. A Novel HA/β-TCP-Collagen Composite Enhanced New Bone Formation for Dental Extraction Socket Preservation in Beagle Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Ning Ho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Past studies in humans have demonstrated horizontal and vertical bone loss after six months following tooth extraction. Many biomaterials have been developed to preserve bone volume after tooth extraction. Type I collagen serves as an excellent delivery system for growth factors and promotes angiogenesis. Calcium phosphate ceramics have also been investigated because their mineral chemistry resembles human bone. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of a novel bioresorbable purified fibrillar collagen and hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP ceramic composite versus collagen alone and a bovine xenograft-collagen composite in beagles. Collagen plugs, bovine graft-collagen composite and HA/β-TCP-collagen composite were implanted into the left and right first, second and third mandibular premolars, and the fourth molar was left empty for natural healing. In total, 20 male beagle dogs were used, and quantitative and histological analyses of the extraction ridge was done. The smallest width reduction was 19.09% ± 8.81% with the HA/β-TCP-collagen composite at Week 8, accompanied by new bone formation at Weeks 4 and 8. The HA/β-TCP-collagen composite performed well, as a new osteoconductive and biomimetic composite biomaterial, for socket bone preservation after tooth extraction.

  7. High Temperature Chemistry of Fibers and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    important, the potential health hazards from dealing with such fine, sometimes dendritic materials. Discussed in the following section are some...alternative approaches to obtaining materials with the advantages of whisker- reinforced structures bu. without the handling problems and health hazards...coritarikilned with ocygmn, and (b) sil- con ntride powder heated wio addives ar 10 hours at 1600PC in pure nirogren, scAning eecton p RAIIcoWe, Reotf. 12

  8. Influence of retainer design on two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses: an in vitro and finite element analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulemans, Filip; De Jager, Niek; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Feilzer, Albert J

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Four retainer designs were tested: a proximal box, a step-box, a dual wing, and a step-box-wing. Of each design on 8 human mandibular molars, FRC-FDPs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin impregnated unidirectional glass fibers (Estenia C&B EG Fiber, Kuraray) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Estenia C&B, Kuraray). Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FDPs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test were used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FDPs (proximal box: 300 +/- 65 N; step-box: 309 +/- 37 N) compared to wing-retained FDPs (p optimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FDPs.

  9. How Group Size and Composition Influences the Effectiveness of Collaborative Screen-Based Simulation Training: A Study of Dental and Nursing University Students Learning Radiographic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Söderström

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses how changes in the design of screen-based computer simulation training influence the collaborative training process. Specifically, this study examine how the size of a group and a group’s composition influence the way these tools are used. One case study consisted of 18+18 dental students randomized into either collaborative 3D simulation training or conventional collaborative training. The students worked in groups of three. The other case consisted of 12 nursing students working in pairs (partners determined by the students with a 3D simulator. The results showed that simulation training encouraged different types of dialogue compared to conventional training and that the communication patterns were enhanced in the nursing students ́ dyadic simulation training. The concrete changes concerning group size and the composition of the group influenced the nursing students’ engagement with the learning environment and consequently the communication patterns that emerged. These findings suggest that smaller groups will probably be more efficient than larger groups in a free collaboration setting that uses screen-based simulation training.

  10. Effect of various rinsing protocols after use of amine fluoride/stannous fluoride toothpaste on the bacterial composition of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loveren, C; Gerardu, V A M; Sissons, C H; van Bekkum, M; ten Cate, J M

    2009-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the effect of different oral hygiene protocols on the bacterial composition of dental plaque. After a 2-week period of using fluoride-free toothpaste, 30 participants followed three 1-week experimental protocols, each followed by 2-week fluoride-free washout periods in a randomized crossover examiner-blind controlled trial. The 1-week experimental protocols comprised the use of AmF/SnF(2) toothpaste twice daily, after which participants either (1) rinsed with tap water, (2) did not rinse but only spat out the toothpaste, or (3) rinsed with an AmF/SnF(2) mouthwash. In the fluoride-free washout periods, the participants brushed their teeth with fluoride-free toothpaste without further instructions. Six hours after the last brushing (+/- rinsing) of each period, buccal plaque samples in the upper molar region were taken. The microbiota composition of the plaque samples was analyzed by checkerboard DNA:DNA hybridization. A statistically significant reduction was found in the total amount of DNA of the 39 major plaque species measured, and in the proportions of some acid-producing bacterial strains after the period having used the AmF/SnF(2) toothpaste + AmF/SnF(2) mouthrinsing. The results indicate that using the AmF/SnF(2) toothpaste and rinse combination could result in plaque of lower cariogenicity. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Evaluation of fracture toughness and mechanical properties of ternary thiol-ene-methacrylate systems as resin matrix for dental restorative composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Saeed; Yeganeh, Hamid; Atai, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Study and evaluation of fracture toughness, flexural and dynamic mechanical properties, and crosslink density of ternary thiol-ene-methacrylate systems and comparison with corresponding conventional methacrylate system were considered in the present study. Urethane tetra allyl ether monomer (UTAE) was synthesized as ene monomer. Different formulations were prepared based on combination of UTAE, BisGMA/TEGDMA and a tetrathiol monomer (PETMP). The photocuring reaction was conducted under visible light using BD/CQ combination as photoinitiator system. Mechanical properties were evaluated via measuring flexural strength, flexural modulus and fracture toughness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to study the morphology of the fractured specimen's cross section. Viscoelastic properties of the samples were also determined by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The same study was performed on a conventional methacrylate system. The data were analyzed and compared by ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (significance level=0.05). The results showed improvement in fracture toughness of the specimens containing thiol-ene moieties. DMTA revealed a lower glass transition temperature and more homogenous structure for thiol-ene containing specimens in comparison to the system containing merely methacrylate monomer. The flexural modulus and flexural strength of the specimens with higher thiol-ene content were lower than the neat methacrylate system. The SEM micrographs of the fractured surface of specimens with higher methacrylate content were smooth and mirror-like (shiny) which represent brittle fracture. The thiol-ene-methacrylate system can be used as resin matrix of dental composites with enhanced fracture toughness in comparison to the methacrylate analogous. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of polishing technique on 3-D surface roughness and gloss of dental restorative resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereifej, N S; Oweis, Y G; Eliades, G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare surface roughness and gloss of resin composites polished using different polishing systems. Five resin composites were investigated: Filtek Silorane (FS), IPS Empress Direct (IP), Clearfil Majesty Posterior (CM), Premise (PM), and Estelite Sigma (ES). Twenty-five disk specimens were prepared from each material, divided into five groups, each polished with one of the following methods: Opti1Step (OS), OptiDisc (OD), Kenda CGI (KD), Pogo (PG), or metallurgical polishing (ML). Gloss and roughness parameters (Sa, Sz, Sq, and St) were evaluated by 60°-angle glossimetry and white-light interferometric profilometry. Two-way analysis of variance was used to detect differences in different materials and polishing techniques. Regression and correlation analyses were performed to examine correlations between roughness and gloss. Significant differences in roughness parameters and gloss were found according to the material, type of polishing, and material/polishing technique (pgloss was recorded for PM/ML (88.4 [2.3]) and lowest for FS/KD (30.3 [5.7]). All roughness parameters were significantly correlated with gloss (r= 0.871, 0.846, 0.713, and 0.707 for Sa, Sq, Sz, St, and gloss, respectively). It was concluded that the polishing procedure and the type of composite can have significant impacts on surface roughness and gloss of resin composites.

  13. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  14. Milestones of dental history

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Mahant; S Vineet Agrawal; Sonali Kapoor; Isha Agrawal

    2017-01-01

    Since ages, human beings suffer from the dental problems. With the journey as time elapsed the person treating the teeth changed (i.e., from barbers and monks to present dentists), equipment changed (i.e., from bow drills to airotor and laser handpieces), materials changed (i.e., from ground mastic alum/honey to tooth colored composite and ceramics). There has been drastic change in treatment planning from extraction to the conservation of teeth and from manual restoration to computerized res...

  15. Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasen, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter discusses the roles of composite laminates and aggregates in cryogenic technology. Filamentary-reinforced composites are emphasized because they are the most widely used composite materials. Topics considered include composite systems and terminology, design and fabrication, composite failure, high-pressure reinforced plastic laminates, low-pressure reinforced plastics, reinforced metals, selectively reinforced structures, the effect of cryogenic temperatures, woven-fabric and random-mat composites, uniaxial fiber-reinforced composites, composite joints in cryogenic structures, joining techniques at room temperature, radiation effects, testing laminates at cryogenic temperatures, static and cyclic tensile testing, static and cyclic compression testing, interlaminar shear testing, secondary property tests, and concrete aggregates. It is suggested that cryogenic composite technology would benefit from the development of a fracture mechanics model for predicting the fitness-for-purpose of polymer-matrix composite structures

  16. Evaluation of microshear bond strength of resin composites to enamel of dental adhesive systems associated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassimiro-Silva, Patricia F.; Zezell, Denise M.; Monteiro, Gabriela Q. d. M.; Benetti, Carolina; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of resin composite to enamel etching by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with the use of two differents adhesives systems. Fifty freshly extracted human molars halves were embedded in acrylic resin before preparation for the study, making a total of up to 100 available samples. The specimens were randomly assigned into six groups (η=10) according to substrate pre-treatment and adhesive system on the enamel. A two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond) and a universal adhesive used as an etch-andrinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Universal) were applied to the nonirradiated enamel surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups (Control CF and Control SB, respectively). For the other groups, enamel surfaces were previously irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 0.5 W, 75 mJ and 66 J/cm2 (CF 5 Hz and SB 5 Hz) and 1.25 W, 50 mJ and 44 J/cm2 (CF 15 Hz and SB 15 Hz). Irradiation was performed under air (50%) and water (50%) cooling. An independent t-test was performed to compare the adhesive systems. Mean μSBS ± sd (MPa) for each group was 16.857 +/- 2.61, 17.87 +/- 5.83, 12.23 +/- 2.02, 9.88 +/- 2.26, 15.94 +/- 1.98, 17.62 +/- 2.10, respectively. The control groups and the 50 mJ laser groups showed no statistically significant differences, regardless of the adhesive system used. The results obtained lead us to affirm that the bonding interaction of adhesives to enamel depends not only on the morphological aspects of the dental surface, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed and the parameters of the laser.

  17. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  18. Adhesive dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlu, N.

    2005-01-01

    Two main classes of material are involved, the glass-ionomer cements and the composite resins. This investigation describes the way they are bonded to the tooth and highlights their differences. Glass ionomers develop a zone of interaction with the tooth as they age which ultimately gives an extremely strong bond, and results in excellent retention rates. By contrast, bonding of composite resins is more complicated and possibly less effective, though these materials have better wear resistance and better aesthetics than glass ionomers. Assessment of bond durability is difficult. This is because a dental restorative can fail by a number of mechanisms apart from de bonding: for example, through wear or fracture

  19. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Strategies are open compositions to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them in full...

  20. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Memory Pieces are open compositions to be realised solo by an improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them...

  1. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human t...

  2. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life......, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  3. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H; Rams, Thomas E

    An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  4. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  5. Dental responsibility loadings and the relative value of dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, D N; Ju, X; Brennan, D S

    2017-09-01

    To estimate responsibility loadings for a comprehensive list of dental services, providing a standardized unit of clinical work effort. Dentists (n = 2500) randomly sampled from the Australian Dental Association membership (2011) were randomly assigned to one of 25 panels. Panels were surveyed by questionnaires eliciting responsibility loadings for eight common dental services (core items) and approximately 12 other items unique to that questionnaire. In total, loadings were elicited for 299 items listed in the Australian Dental Schedule 9th Edition. Data were weighted to reflect the age and sex distribution of the workforce. To assess reliability, regression models assessed differences in core item loadings by panel assignment. Estimated loadings were described by reporting the median and mean. Response rate was 37%. Panel composition did not vary by practitioner characteristics. Core item loadings did not vary by panel assignment. Oral surgery and endodontic service areas had the highest proportion (91%) of services with median loadings ≥1.5, followed by prosthodontics (78%), periodontics (76%), orthodontics (63%), restorative (62%) and diagnostic services (31%). Preventive services had median loadings ≤1.25. Dental responsibility loadings estimated by this study can be applied in the development of relative value scales. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  6. Monomer conversion, dimensional stability, strength, modulus, surface apatite precipitation and wear of novel, reactive calcium phosphate and polylysine-containing dental composites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanokrat Kangwankai

    Full Text Available The aim was to assess monomer conversion, dimensional stability, flexural strength / modulus, surface apatite precipitation and wear of mono / tri calcium phosphate (CaP and polylysine (PLS-containing dental composites. These were formulated using a new, high molecular weight, fluid monomer phase that requires no polymerisation activator.Urethane and Polypropylene Glycol Dimethacrylates were combined with low levels of an adhesion promoting monomer and a light activated initiator. This liquid was mixed with a hybrid glass containing either 10 wt% CaP and 1 wt% PLS (F1 or 20 wt% CaP and 2 wt% PLS (F2. Powder to liquid mass ratio was 5:1. Commercial controls included Gradia Direct Posterior (GD and Filtek Z250 (FZ. Monomer conversion and polymerisation shrinkage were calculated using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR. Subsequent volume increases in water over 7 weeks were determined using gravimetric studies. Biaxial flexural strength (BFS / modulus (BFM reduction and surface apatite precipitation upon 1 and 4 weeks immersion in water versus simulated body fluid (SBF were assessed using a mechanical testing frame and scanning electron microscope (SEM. Mass / volume loss and surface roughness (Ra following 7 weeks water immersion and subsequent accelerated tooth-brush abrasion were examined using gravimetric studies and profilometer.F1 and F2 exhibited much higher monomer conversion (72% than FZ (54% and low calculated polymerization shrinkage (2.2 vol%. Final hygroscopic expansions decreased in the order; F2 (3.5 vol% > F1 (1.8 vol% ~ Z250 (1.6 vol% > Gradia (1.0 vol%. BFS and BFM were unaffected by storage medium type. Average BFS / BFM upon 4 weeks immersion reduced from 144 MPa / 8 GPa to 107 MPa / 5 GPa for F1 and 105 MPa / 6 GPa to 82 MPa / 4 GPa for F2. Much of this change was observed in the first week of immersion when water sorption rate was high. Surface apatite layers were incomplete at 1 week, but around 2 and 15 micron thick for F1 and

  7. [The future of dental amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a comment on 'The enigma of dental amalgam' by Carl Leinfelder published in 2004 in the Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry. In that paper a warning is stated against a too abrupt change from amalgam towards resin composite, because this will bring a lot of clinical problems

  8. Biofilm and Dental Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Øilo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All treatment involving the use of biomaterials in the body can affect the host in positive or negative ways. The microbiological environment in the oral cavity is affected by the composition and shape of the biomaterials used for oral restorations. This may impair the patients’ oral health and sometimes their general health as well. Many factors determine the composition of the microbiota and the formation of biofilm in relation to biomaterials such as, surface roughness, surface energy and chemical composition, This paper aims to give an overview of the scientific literature regarding the association between the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of dental biomaterials and oral biofilm formation, with emphasis on current research and future perspectives.

  9. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Cue Rondo is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound/video files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample, or the visuals will not appear at all....... Please DOWNLOAD them to see/hear them in full length! This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You may for non-commercial purposes use and distribute it, performance instructions as well as specially designated recordings, as long as the author is mentioned. Please see http...

  10. Clareamento Dental

    OpenAIRE

    Sossai, Najara; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR; Verdinelli, Ellen Carla; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR; Bassegio, Wagner; Universidade Paranaense - UNIPAR

    2011-01-01

    O clareamento dental já é utilizado há bastante tempo na Odontologia e atualmente é um dos tratamentos odontológicos mais solicitados para obtenção de um sorriso mais estético. Classificado em clareamento caseiro e/ou de consultório, ambas as técnicas são motivo de polêmica quanto aos seus benefícios, riscos, limitações e efeito clareador, bem como sobre qual é a melhor técnica existente para a promoção de um clareamento dental eficaz e seguro. Neste contexto, o presente estudo tem por objeti...

  11. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, ... to find out more. Wisdom Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can damage neighboring ...

  12. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  13. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  14. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  15. An in vitro study to evaluate the effect of two ethanol-based and two acetone-based dental bonding agents on the bond strength of composite to enamel treated with 10% carbamide peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Basavaraj Benni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Carbamide peroxide bleaching has been implicated in adversely affecting the bond strength of composite to enamel. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-based (Clearfil S 3 bond, Kuraray, Adper Single bond 2, 3M ESPE dental products and acetone-based (Prime and Bond NT, Dentsply, One Step, Bisco bonding agents on the shear bond strength of composite to enamel treated with 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 extracted human noncarious permanent incisors were randomly divided into two groups (control and experimental. Experimental group specimens were subjected to a bleaching regimen with a 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching system (Opalescence; Ultradent Products Inc, South Jordan, USA. Composite resin cylinders were bonded to the specimens using four bonding agents and shear bond strength was determined with universal testing machine. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the shear bond strength between control and experimental groups with both ethanol-based (Clearfil S 3 Bond and Adper Single Bond 2 and acetone-based bonding agent (Prime and Bond NT and One Step. Interpretation and Conclusion: The adverse effect of bleaching on bonding composite to enamel can be reduced or eliminated by using either ethanol- or acetone-based bonding agent. Clinical Significances: Immediate bonding following bleaching procedure can be done using ethanol- or acetone-based bonding agent without compromising bond strength.

  16. Rapid proto typing of dental prosthesis by means of a feldspathic glass composite mixed with muscovite mica via CAD/CAM; Prototipagem rapida de proteses dentarias por meio de um composito de vidro feldspatico misturado com mica moscovita via CAD/CAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Junior, E.S.; Gomes Junior, G.G.; Fonseca, M.D.; Moraes, E.E.S.; Ogasawara, T., E-mail: edil@metalmat.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais

    2010-07-01

    The work consists in the use and integration of CAD/CAM tools as a process of design and manufacture of a rapid prototyping of dental prosthesis by machining using a CNC milling machine. The material machined to obtain the dental prosthesis were cylindrical blocks of a Feldspathic glass composite mixed with muscovite mica in various percentages (15%, 40% and 80%), which was resigned under biaxial pressing and sintered in vacuum at temperatures from 800 to 1100 deg C. The composite was characterized by XRD and SEM. The results show that increasing the crystallization of leucite is consequent to the temperature increase, and that the use of CAD/CAM system using a CNC milling machine is feasible to obtain dental prosthesis. (author)

  17. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  18. Dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhdar, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dental radiography must comply with the same regulations with which conventional radiography complies. Radiation doses to individual patients are low but, because of the large number of patients X-rayed, the collective dose to the population is not negligible. Care in siting and regular maintenance of the equipment will reduce doses to both staff and patients. To produce X-ray films with a good image quality using a low radiation dose requires attention to film processing; this is often a neglected area. (Author)

  19. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni

  20. Future perspectives of resin-based dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandt, Klaus D; Sigusch, Bernd W

    2009-08-01

    This concise review and outlook paper gives a view of selected potential future developments in the area of resin-based biomaterials with an emphasis on dental composites. A selection of key publications (1 book, 35 scientific original publications and 1 website source) covering the areas nanotechnology, antimicrobial materials, stimuli responsive materials, self-repairing materials and materials for tissue engineering with direct or indirect relations and/or implications to resin-based dental materials is critically reviewed and discussed. Connections between these fields and their potential for resin-based dental materials are highlighted and put in perspective. The need to improve shrinkage properties and wear resistance is obvious for dental composites, and a vast number of attempts have been made to accomplish these aims. Future resin-based materials may be further improved in this respect if, for example nanotechnology is applied. Dental composites may, however, reach a completely new quality by utilizing new trends from materials science, such as introducing nanostructures, antimicrobial properties, stimuli responsive capabilities, the ability to promote tissue regeneration or repair of dental tissues if the composites were able to repair themselves. This paper shows selected potential future developments in the area of resin-based dental materials, gives basic and industrial researchers in dental materials science, and dental practitioners a glance into the potential future of these materials, and should stimulate discussion about needs and future developments in the area.

  1. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  2. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT–ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  3. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT-ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  4. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT–ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  5. Management of dental erosion induced by gastro-esophageal reflux disorder with direct composite veneering aided by a flexible splint matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chockattu, Sherin Jose; Deepak, Byathnal Suryakant; Sood, Anubhav; Niranjan, Nandini T; Jayasheel, Arun; Goud, Mallikarjun K

    2018-02-01

    Dental erosion is frequently overlooked in clinical practice. The management of erosion-induced damage to the dentition is often delayed, such that extensive occlusal rehabilitation is required. These cases can be diagnosed by a careful clinical examination and a thorough review of the patient's medical history and/or lifestyle habits. This case report presents the diagnosis, categorization, and management of a case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease-induced palatal erosion of the maxillary teeth. The early management of such cases is of utmost importance to delay or prevent the progression of damage both to the dentition and to occlusal stability. Non-invasive adhesively bonded restorations aid in achieving this goal.

  6. Effect of TiO2 nanoparticles incorporation on antibacterial properties and shear bond strength of dental composite used in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Sodagar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Plaque accumulation and bond failure are drawbacks of orthodontic treatment, which requires composite for bonding of brackets. As the antimicrobial properties of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs have been proven, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and mechanical properties of composite resins modified by the addition of TiO2 NPs. Methods: Orthodontics composite containing 0%, 1%, 5% and 10% NPs were prepared. 180 composite disks were prepared for elution test, disk agar diffusion test and biofilm inhibition test to collect the counts of microorganisms on three days, measure the inhibition diameter and quantify the viable counts of colonies consequently. For shear bond strength (SBS test, 48 intact bovine incisors were divided into four groups. Composites containing 0%, 1%, 5% and 10% NPs were used for bonding of bracket. The bracket/tooth SBS was measured by using an universal testing machine. Results: All concentration of TiO2 NPs had a significant effect on creation and extension of inhibition zone. For S. mutans and S. sanguinis, all concentration of TiO2 NPs caused reduction of the colony counts. Composite containing 10% TiO2 NPs had significant effect on reduction of colony counts for S. mutans and S. sanguinis in all three days. The highest mean shear bond strength belonged to the control group, while the lowest value was seen in 10% NPs composite. Conclusions: Incorporating TiO2 nanoparticles into composite resins confer antibacterial properties to adhesives, while the mean shear bond of composite containing 1% and 5% NPs still in an acceptable range.

  7. Fine-Tuning of Polymeric Resins and their Interfaces with Amorphous Calcium Phosphate. A Strategy for Designing Effective Remineralizing Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Skrtic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available For over a decade our group has been designing, preparing and evaluating bioactive, remineralizing composites based on amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP fillers embedded in polymerized methacrylate resin matrices. In these studies a major focus has been on exploring structure-property relationships of the matrix phase of these composites on their anti-cariogenic potential. The main challenges were to gain a better understanding of polymer matrix/filler interfacial properties through controlling the surface properties of the fillers or through fine-tuning of the resin matrix. In this work, we describe the effect of chemical structure and composition of the resin matrices on some of the critical physicochemical properties of the copolymers and their ACP composites. Such structure-property studies are essential in formulating clinically effective products, and this knowledge base is likely to have strong impact on the future design of therapeutic materials, appropriate for mineral restoration in defective tooth structures.

  8. Investigation into nanocellulosics versus acacia reinforced acrylic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunqiao Pu; Jianguo Zhang; Thomas Elder; Yulin Deng; Paul Gatenholm; Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2007-01-01

    Three closely related cellulosic acrylic latex films were prepared employing acacia pulp fibers, cellulose whiskers and nonocellulose balls and their respective strength properties were determined. Cellulose whisker reinforced composites had enhanced strength properties compared to the acacia pulp and nanoball composites. AFM analysis indicated that the cellulose...

  9. Dental erosion: understanding this pervasive condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida e Silva, Júnio S; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Araujo, Edson; Widmer, Nicolas

    2011-08-01

    Dental erosion is a contemporary disease, mostly because of the change of the eating patterns that currently exist in society. It is a "silent" and multifactorial disease, and is highly influenced by habits and lifestyles. The prevalence of dental erosion has considerably increased, with this condition currently standing as a great challenge for the clinician, regarding the diagnosis, identification of the etiological factors, prevention, and execution of an adequate treatment. This article presents a dental erosion review and a case report of a restorative treatment of dental erosion lesions using a combination of bonded ceramic overlays to reestablish vertical dimension and composite resin to restore the worn palatal and incisal surfaces of the anterior upper teeth. Adequate function and esthetics can be achieved with this approach. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  11. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  12. American Dental Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CE providers and find CE courses. Commission on Dental Accreditation Explore CODA's role and find accredited schools and programs Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations Learn about the examinations used in licensing ...

  13. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes: Dental Tips For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse ... damage the gum and bone that hold your teeth in place and may lead to painful chewing ...

  14. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Now Autumn Giving: ‘Fall’ into the Future of Dental Hygiene Support the Institute for Oral Health! Give ... best for your patients! Learn More Sidebar Menu Dental Hygiene Programs Continuing Education Career Center Annual Conference ...

  15. Dental Effluent Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview and documents for Dental Office Category regulation (40 CFR Part 441); comprising pretreatment standards for discharges of dental amalgam pollutants, including mercury, into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

  16. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  17. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  18. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Share Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  19. Microbiologic aspects of dental plaque and dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, P D

    1999-10-01

    Dental plaque is an example of a microbial biofilm with a diverse microbial composition; it is found naturally on teeth and confers advantages to the host, for example, by preventing colonization by exogenous, and often pathogenic, micro-organisms. In individuals with a high frequency sugar diet, or with a severely compromised saliva flow, the levels of potentially cariogenic bacteria (acid-producing and acid-tolerating species) can increase beyond those compatible with enamel health. This article discusses antimicrobial strategies to control dental caries, including; reducing plaque levels, in general or specific cariogenic bacteria in particular, by antiplaque or antimicrobial agents; reducing bacterial acid production by replacing fermentable carbohydrates in the diet with sugar substitutes, or by interfering with bacterial metabolism with fluoride or antimicrobial agents.

  20. Influence of the number of cycles on shear fatigue strength of resin composite bonded to enamel and dentin using dental adhesives in self-etching mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-01-30

    The influence of the number of cycles on shear fatigue strength to enamel and dentin using dental adhesives in self-etch mode was investigated. A two-step self-etch adhesive and two universal adhesives were used to bond to enamel and dentin in self-etch mode. Initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength to enamel and dentin using the adhesive in self-etch mode were determined. Fatigue testing was used with 20 Hz frequency and cycling periods of 50,000, 100,000 and 1,000,000 cycles, or until failure occurred. For each of the cycling periods, there was no significant difference in shear fatigue strength across the cycling periods for the individual adhesives. Differences in shear fatigue strength were found between the adhesives within the cycling periods. Regardless of the adhesive used in self-etch mode for bonding to enamel or dentin, shear fatigue strength was not influenced by the number of cycles used for shear fatigue strength testing.

  1. Evaluation of Candida Albicans Biofilm Formation on Various Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-24

    Jun 24, 2016 ... This study compared the susceptibility of six dental restorative materials to Candida albicans adhesion. ... found for the composite and the compomer samples. ..... Candida colonization on acrylic resins and denture liners:.

  2. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  3. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to

  4. Marketing Dental Services | Tuominen | Tanzania Dental Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tanzania Dental Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 1 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Marketing Dental Services. R Tuominen. Abstract. No Abstract.

  5. Dental Radiographs Ordered by Dental Professionals: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Even in resource limited settings dental caries is still the regular indication for taking dental radiographs, and periapical views are the most frequent type of radiograph ordered. Maxillary central incisors and mandibular molars were types of teeth commonly x-rayed mainly due to the aesthetic importance of the ...

  6. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROSA, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; SILVA, Tiago Machado; LIMA, Giana da Silveira; SILVA, Adriana Fernandes; PIVA, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. Material and Methods This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). Results A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Conclusions Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in

  7. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; Silva, Tiago Machado; Lima, Giana da Silveira; Silva, Adriana Fernandes; Piva, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in countries such as Brazil.

  8. Dental calculus formation in children and adolescents undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Carla; Siqueira, Walter Luiz; Oliveira, Elizabeth; Nicolau, José; Primo, Laura Guimarães

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to determine whether dental calculus formation is really higher among patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis than among controls. Furthermore, the study evaluated correlations between dental calculus formation and dental plaque, variables that are related to renal disease and/or saliva composition. The Renal Group was composed of 30 patients undergoing hemodialysis, whereas the Healthy Group had 30 clinically healthy patients. Stimulated whole saliva and parotid saliva were collected. Salivary flow rate and calcium and phosphate concentrations were determined. In the Renal Group the saliva collection was carried out before and after a hemodialysis session. Patients from both groups received intraoral exams, oral hygiene instructions, and dental scaling. Three months later, the dental calculus was measured by the Volpe-Manhold method to determine the rate of dental calculus formation. The Renal Group presented a higher rate of dental calculus formation (p dental calculus formation and whole saliva flow rate in the Renal Group after a hemodialysis session (r = 0.44, p dental calculus was associated with phosphate concentration in whole saliva from the Renal Group (p dental calculus formation, probably due to salivary variables.

  9. Dental education in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Sato, Manuel; Rodiguez, Lyly; Sato, Doris; Bird, William F

    2008-09-01

    This paper provides information about Peru's dental history and dental school system, including the curriculum and dental licensure. With the increase in the number of dental schools in Peru, the number of dentists is also increasing. Until 1965, Peru had only three dental schools; currently, there are 14. Four of these dental schools are public, and ten are private. A five- or six-year dental program leads to the B.D.S. degree. After successful completion of a thesis defense or competency examination, the D.D.S. degree is awarded. The D.D.S. is mandatory for practicing dentistry in Peru. Currently, there are approximately 14,000 active dentists, with a dentist-patient ratio of approximately 1:2,000.

  10. Dental therapeutic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zeenat; Jain, Nilu; Jain, Gaurav K; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Ahuja, Alka; Khar, Roop K; Ahmad, Farhan J

    2008-01-01

    The recognition of periodontal diseases as amenable to local antibiotherapy has resulted in a paradigmatic shift in treatment modalities of dental afflictions. Moreover the presence of antimicrobial resistance, surfacing of untoward reactions owing to systemic consumption of antibiotics has further advocated the use of local delivery of physiologically active substances into the periodontal pocket. While antimicrobials polymerized into acrylic strips, incorporated into biodegradable collagen and hollow permeable cellulose acetate fibers, multiparticulate systems, bio-absorbable dental materials, biodegradable gels/ointments, injectables, mucoadhesive microcapsules and nanospheres will be more amenable for direct placement into the periodontal pockets the lozenges, buccoadhesive tablets, discs or gels could be effectively used to mitigate the overall gingival inflammation. Whilst effecting controlled local delivery of a few milligram of an antibacterial agent within the gingival crevicular fluid for a longer period of time, maintaining therapeutic concentrations such delivery devices will circumvent all adverse effects to non- oral sites. Since the pioneering efforts of Goodson and Lindhe in 1989, delivery at gingival and subgingival sites has witnessed a considerable progress. The interest in locally active systems is evident from the patents being filed and granted. The present article shall dwell in reviewing the recent approaches being proffered in the field. Patents as by Shefer, et al. US patent, 6589562 dealing with multicomponent biodegradable bioadhesive controlled release system for oral care products, Lee, et al. 2001, US patent 6193994, encompassing a locally administrable, biodegradable and sustained-release pharmaceutical composition for periodontitis and process for preparation thereof and method of treating periodontal disease as suggested by Basara in 2004via US patent 6830757, shall be the types of intellectual property reviewed and presented in

  11. Efeito de um dentifrício fluoretado contendo bicarbonato de sódio na contagem de estreptococos do grupo mutans, acidogenicidade e composição da placa dental Effect of a fluorated dentifrice containing baking soda on mutans counting, acidogenicity and dental plaque composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Fernanda IGNÁCIO

    1999-01-01

    ílica como abrasivo.This investigation evaluated the effect of a fluoride baking soda-containing dentifrice on mutans streptococci counting, acidogenicity and composition of dental plaque. Twenty-three volunteers brushing their teeth 3 times a day, tested 3 formulations of fluoride (1500 ppm F, containing or sodium bicarbonate (12% associated with calcium carbonate (CARB/BICAR, or calcium carbonate (CARBONATE, or silica (SILICA, in a double blind crossover trial, done in 3 phases of 30 days each. On the 28th day, 8-10 hours after the last brushing, a counting of mutans streptococci in saliva (SMS was made. On the 30th day (after 48 hours during which the subjects were instructed to rinse with a slurry of toothpaste/water 3 times a day and sucrose 10% 6 times a day, the effect was analyzed in dental plaque, 10-12 hours after the last rinse: a mutans streptococci (PMS; b polysaccharide alkali-soluble (ASP; c acid-soluble F (ASF and d pH in T0 (T0, 5 min. after cariogenic challenge (T5, calculating DpH (T0 - T5. The results (mean + SE according to the treatments with dentifrices SILICA, CARBONATE and CARB/BICAR, were respectively: 1 SMS (x 106 UFC/mL saliva = 11.43 + 7.62 A; 2,33 + 1.04 A; 2.07 + 1.10 A; 2 PMS (x 106 UFC/mg = 0.099 + 0.095 A; 0.027 + 0.018 A; 0.007 + 0.003 A; 3 ASP (mg/mg = 6.89 + 0.62 AC; 8.46 + 0.80 AB; 6.11 + 0.59 C; 4 ASF (mg/g = 36.67 + 10.10 A; 48.12 + 19.23 A; 52.21 + 15.12 A; 5 T0 = 6.72 + 0.12 A; 6.88 + 0.13 A; 6.65 + 0.11 A; 6 T5 = 5.61 + 0.13 A; 5.71 + 0.13 A; 5.70 + 0.12 A; 7 DpH = 1.12 + 0.11 A; 1.17 + 0.11 A; 0.95 + 0.10 A. Means followed by the same letter do not differ significantly (P < 0.05. The data show that although the baking soda-containing dentifrice demonstrated, collectively, a trend to influence positively the various factors of dental caries, it did not differ significantly from SILICA and CARBONATE dentifrices.

  12. Superplasticity in fine-grained ceramics. Final report, 1 July 1993--31 December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieh, T.G.

    1994-01-31

    Progress has been summarized in three papers: biaxial gas-pressure forming of a superplastic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/YTZP; mechanical properties of a 20 vol% SiC whisker-reinforced yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia composite at elevated temperatures; and gas- pressure forming of ceramic sheet.

  13. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  14. Fracture-resistant monolithic dental crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Mai, Zhisong; Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark; Lawn, Brian

    2016-03-01

    To quantify the splitting resistance of monolithic zirconia, lithium disilicate and nanoparticle-composite dental crowns. Fracture experiments were conducted on anatomically-correct monolithic crown structures cemented to standard dental composite dies, by axial loading of a hard sphere placed between the cusps. The structures were observed in situ during fracture testing, and critical loads to split the structures were measured. Extended finite element modeling (XFEM), with provision for step-by-step extension of embedded cracks, was employed to simulate full failure evolution. Experimental measurements and XFEM predictions were self-consistent within data scatter. In conjunction with a fracture mechanics equation for critical splitting load, the data were used to predict load-sustaining capacity for crowns on actual dentin substrates and for loading with a sphere of different size. Stages of crack propagation within the crown and support substrate were quantified. Zirconia crowns showed the highest fracture loads, lithium disilicate intermediate, and dental nanocomposite lowest. Dental nanocomposite crowns have comparable fracture resistance to natural enamel. The results confirm that monolithic crowns are able to sustain high bite forces. The analysis indicates what material and geometrical properties are important in optimizing crown performance and longevity. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. All rights reserved.

  15. Preparation and characterization of TiO2 and Si-doped octacalcium phosphate composite coatings on zirconia ceramics (Y-TZP) for dental implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lei; Liu, Jingxiao; Shi, Fei; Jiang, Yanyan; Liu, Guishan

    2014-01-01

    In order to prevent the low temperature degradation and improve the bioactivity of zirconia ceramic implants, TiO2 and Si-doped octacalcium phosphate composite coating was prepared on zirconia substrate. The preventive effect on low temperature degradation and surface morphology of the TiO2 layer were studied. Meanwhile, the structure and property changes of the bioactive coating after doping Si were discussed. The results indicate that the dense TiO2 layer, in spite of some microcracks, inhibited the direct contact of the water vapor with the sample's surface and thus prevented the low temperature degradation of zirconia substrates. The acceleration aging test shows that the ratio of the monoclinic phase transition decreased from 10% for the original zirconia substrate to 4% for the TiO2-coated substrate. As to the Si-doped octacalcium phosphate coating prepared by biomimetic method, the main phase composition of the coating was octacalcium phosphate. The morphology of the coating was lamellar-like, and the surface was uniform and continuous with no cracks being observed. It is suggested that Si was added into the coating both through substituting for PO43- and doping as NaSiO3.

  16. Bio-inspired dental fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyhle, Hans; Bunk, Oliver; Buser, Stefan; Krastl, Gabriel; Zitzmann, Nicola U.; Ilgenstein, Bernd; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weiger, Roland; Müller, Bert

    2009-08-01

    Human teeth are anisotropic composites. Dentin as the core material of the tooth consists of nanometer-sized calcium phosphate crystallites embedded in collagen fiber networks. It shows its anisotropy on the micrometer scale by its well-oriented microtubules. The detailed three-dimensional nanostructure of the hard tissues namely dentin and enamel, however, is not understood, although numerous studies on the anisotropic mechanical properties have been performed and evaluated to explain the tooth function including the enamel-dentin junction acting as effective crack barrier. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with a spatial resolution in the 10 μm range allows determining the size and orientation of the constituents on the nanometer scale with reasonable precision. So far, only some dental materials, i.e. the fiber reinforced posts exhibit anisotropic properties related to the micrometer-size glass fibers. Dental fillings, composed of nanostructures oriented similar to the natural hard tissues of teeth, however, do not exist at all. The current X-ray-based investigations of extracted human teeth provide evidence for oriented micro- and nanostructures in dentin and enamel. These fundamental quantitative findings result in profound knowledge to develop biologically inspired dental fillings with superior resistance to thermal and mechanical shocks.

  17. Towards building the oral health care workforce: who are the new dental therapists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christine M; Lopez, Naty

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, Minnesota Governor Pawlenty signed into law a bill approving the creation of a new dental team member: the dental therapist. The intent of this legislation was to address oral health disparities by creating a dental professional who would expand access to dental care in Minnesota. This study aimed to describe the characteristics of the first class of dental therapy students at the University of Minnesota and to ascertain the values and motivations that led them to choose a career in dental therapy. Four surveys were used to create the composite profile of the ten students in this first dental therapy class: 1) the California Critical Thinking Skills Test, 2) the Learning Type Measure, 3) the Attitudes Toward Healthcare Survey, and 4) a values and motivation survey that included demographic data. The results of the surveys revealed interacting influences of the students' background, personal self-concept, and environment leading to a career decision to pursue dental therapy.

  18. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    .... FDA-2008-N-0163] (formerly Docket No. 2001N-0067) RIN 0910-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam... the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which classified dental amalgam as a class II...

  19. Case based dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is quickly becoming integral to the standard of care in veterinary dentistry. This is not only because it is critical for proper patient care, but also because client expectations have increased. Furthermore, providing dental radiographs as a routine service can create significant practice income. This article details numerous conditions that are indications for dental radiographs. As you will see, dental radiographs are often critical for proper diagnosis and treatment. These conditions should not be viewed as unusual; they are present within all of our practices. When you choose not to radiograph these teeth, you leave behind painful pathology. Utilizing the knowledge gained from dental radiographs will both improve patient care and increase acceptance of treatment recommendations. Consequently, this leads to increased numbers of dental procedures performed at your practice.

  20. The 'simple' general dental anaesthetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dental anaesthesia should not be underestimated. Eddie Oosthuizen .... dental surgeon has limited training in airway management. ... primary teeth to hours for extensive dental conservation .... options after the extraction of permanent teeth ...

  1. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  2. Dental radiology for children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The benefit for the child from the judicious use of diagnostic dental radiography is improved dental health. The risk to the child from dental diagnostic radiation exposure appears to be extremely low. Despite the low risk, the dentist must minimize the child's exposure to ionizing radiation by using sound clinical judgment to determine what radiographs are necessary and to provide children with optimal protection from ionizing radiation

  3. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  4. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  5. Microbiological changes associated with dental prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, J Max; Palys, Michael D; Carpino, Elizabeth; Regan, Elizabeth O; Sweeney, Michael; Socransky, Sigmund S

    2004-11-01

    Despite the common application of dental prophylaxis as part of patient therapy, there is little reported that describes the microbiological impact of this treatment. The authors gave 20 healthy college-aged subjects three dental prophylaxes with a fluoride-containing prophylaxis paste during a two-week period and instructed them in oral hygiene. They evaluated the microbiological composition of dental plaque samples collected before and after treatment using DNA probe analysis. They analyzed 40 representative bacterial species in seven bacterial complexes by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization assay techniques. After three dental prophylaxes, the patients' mean Gingival Index score decreased from 0.82 to 0.77, the mean Plaque Index score decreased from 0.72 to zero, and the total number of bacteria per tooth decreased to approximately one-third of the original number. The authors computed two different measures of bacterial presence. The reduction in bacterial numbers was statistically significant and occurred in many species. Bacterial proportion (DNA percentage or percentage of the bacteria per tooth) did not change significantly. Greater reductions in bacterial count occurred in species that showed high numbers before treatment. The total bacterial count decreased by approximately 72 percent of its original level before prophylaxis was initiated. Professional dental prophylaxis did not target any particular bacteria or bacterial groups but removed bacteria nonspecifically and in proportion to their initial numbers. Repeated dental prophylaxes effect a reduction in bacterial amount that is commensurate with the initial amount, but they do does not alter composition. This suggests that mild gingivitis may be a bacterially nonspecific effect of plaque accumulation and emphasizes the need for regular plaque removal to maintain optimal gingival health.

  6. Tanzania Dental Association

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Committee of Tanzania Dental. Association would like to Thank. [fUfNJfNJU[[j)~ for its magnanimity towards meeting the cost of this Journal ... ceps is token out of the dental kit and the tooth is removed out of its socket. The tooth is dropped into the waste bucket. The fareceps is placed in the water basin. The socket site is ...

  7. Nigerian Dental Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... needs of dental practitioners in Nigeria, Africa and international community interested in the dental practice in the developing world. The NDJ is published biannually and accepts reports of original research, review articles, clinical case reports and innovations in surgical techniques related to dentistry and allied subjects ...

  8. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...

  9. Patients' satisfaction with dental care provided by public dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Tanzania, patient satisfaction with dental services has received only minor attention. Objective: To assess patients' satisfaction with public dental health services in Dar es Salaam. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Five public dental clinics randomly selected from a list of all the nine public dental ...

  10. Dental fluorosis and dental caries prevalence among 12 and 15 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Fluoride is a double edged sword. The assessment of dental caries and fluorosis in endemic fluoride areas will facilitate in assessing the relation between fluoride concentrations in water with dental caries, dental fluorosis simultaneously. Aim: The objective of the following study is to assess the dental caries ...

  11. Awareness of dental implants among dental patients in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of awareness of dental implant in Nigerian patients and their willingness to choose dental implant as a tooth replacement option. A survey was conducted among patients presenting for dental treatment in 3 teaching hospitals and private dental clinics in 3 urban cities of ...

  12. What is dental ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Forensic considerations when dealing with incinerated human dental remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reesu, Gowri Vijay; Augustine, Jeyaseelan; Urs, Aadithya B

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the human dental identification process relies upon sufficient post-mortem data being recovered to allow for a meaningful comparison with ante-mortem records of the deceased person. Teeth are the most indestructible components of the human body and are structurally unique in their composition. They possess the highest resistance to most environmental effects like fire, desiccation, decomposition and prolonged immersion. In most natural as well as man-made disasters, teeth may provide the only means of positive identification of an otherwise unrecognizable body. It is imperative that dental evidence should not be destroyed through erroneous handling until appropriate radiographs, photographs, or impressions can be fabricated. Proper methods of physical stabilization of incinerated human dental remains should be followed. The maintenance of integrity of extremely fragile structures is crucial to the successful confirmation of identity. In such situations, the forensic dentist must stabilise these teeth before the fragile remains are transported to the mortuary to ensure preservation of possibly vital identification evidence. Thus, while dealing with any incinerated dental remains, a systematic approach must be followed through each stage of evaluation of incinerated dental remains to prevent the loss of potential dental evidence. This paper presents a composite review of various studies on incinerated human dental remains and discusses their impact on the process of human identification and suggests a step by step approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. Urease and Dental Plaque Microbial Profiles in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morou-Bermudez, Evangelia; Rodriguez, Selena; Bello, Angel S; Dominguez-Bello, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    Urease enzymes produced by oral bacteria generate ammonia, which can have a significant impact on the oral ecology and, consequently, on oral health. To evaluate the relationship of urease with dental plaque microbial profiles in children as it relates to dental caries, and to identify the main contributors to this activity. 82 supragingival plaque samples were collected from 44 children at baseline and one year later, as part of a longitudinal study on urease and caries in children. DNA was extracted; the V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced using 454 pyrosequencing. Urease activity was measured using a spectrophotometric assay. Data were analyzed with Qiime. Plaque urease activity was significantly associated with the composition of the microbial communities of the dental plaque (Baseline P = 0.027, One Year P = 0.012). The bacterial taxa whose proportion in dental plaque exhibited significant variation by plaque urease levels in both visits were the family Pasteurellaceae (Baseline Purease and positively associated with dental caries (Bonferroni Purease enzymes primarily from species in the family Pasteurellaceae can be an important ecological determinant in children's dental plaque. Further studies are needed to establish the role of urease-associated bacteria in the acid/base homeostasis of the dental plaque, and in the development and prediction of dental caries in children.

  15. Dental Anomalies: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Jahanimoghadam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental anomalies are usual congenital malformation that can happen either as isolated findings or as a part of a syndrome. Developmental anomalies influencing the morphology exists in both deciduous and permanent dentition and shows different forms such as gemination, fusion, concrescence, dilaceration, dens evaginatus (DE, enamel pearls, taurodontism or peg-shaped laterals. All These anomalies have clinical significance concerning aesthetics, malocclusion and more necessary preparing of the development of dental decays and oral diseases. Through a search in PubMed, Google, Scopus and Medline, a total of eighty original research papers during 1928-2016 were found with the keywords such as dental anomaly, syndrome, tooth and hypodontia. One hundred review titles were identified, eighty reviews were retrieved that were finally included as being relevant and of sufficient quality. In this review, dental anomalies including gemination, fusion, concrescence, dilaceration, dens invaginatus, DE, taurodontism, enamel pearls, fluorosis, peg-shaped laterals, dentinal dysplasia, regional odontodysplasia and hypodontia are discussed. Diagnosing dental abnormality needs a thorough evaluation of the patient, involving a medical, dental, familial and clinical history. Clinical examination and radiographic evaluation and in some of the cases, specific laboratory tests are also needed. Developmental dental anomalies require careful examination and treatment planning. Where one anomaly is present, clinicians should suspect that other anomalies may also be present. Moreover, careful clinical and radiographical examination is required. Furthermore, more complex cases need multidisciplinary planning and treatment.

  16. Equine dental advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S K

    2001-08-01

    The reintroduction and development of safe motorized instruments, the increased availability of continuing education, and the understanding and implementation of appropriate procedures allow practitioners to provide better dental care. Veterinarians realize that sedation, analgesia, a full-mouth speculum, and proper instrumentation are necessary to provide these services. Continued instrument design, future research, and new treatment and prophylactic protocols should have a positive impact on the future of equine dental health. New and rediscovered procedures for equilibrating equine occlusion are allowing horses to masticate more efficiently, carry a bit more comfortably, and experience improved performance. The horse, the horse owner, and the veterinary profession all benefit from providing complete equine dental care.

  17. Dental biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2017-01-01

    and cause gingival inflammation and breakdown of supporting periodontal fibers and bone and ultimately tooth loss, i.e., gingivitis, chronic or aggressive periodontitis, and around dental implants, peri-implantitis. Furthermore, bacteria from the dental biofilm may spread to other parts of the body......-fermenting bacteria causing demineralization of teeth, dental caries, which may further lead to inflammation and necrosis in the pulp and periapical region, i.e., pulpitis and periapical periodontitis. In supra- and subgingival biofilms, predominantly gram-negative, anaerobic proteolytic bacteria will colonize...

  18. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.Dental...

  19. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  20. Economic impact of dental hygienists on solo dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Beazoglou, Tryfon J

    2012-08-01

    The fact that a significant percentage of dentists employ dental hygienists raises an important question: Are dental practices that utilize a dental hygienist structurally and operationally different from practices that do not? This article explores differences among dental practices that operate with and without dental hygienists. Using data from the American Dental Association's 2003 Survey of Dental Practice, a random sample survey of U.S. dentists, descriptive statistics were used to compare selected characteristics of solo general practitioners with and without dental hygienists. Multivariate regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of dental hygienists on the gross billings and net incomes of solo general practitioners. Differences in practice characteristics--such as hours spent in the practice and hours spent treating patients, wait time for a recall visit, number of operatories, square feet of office space, net income, and gross billings--were found between solo general practitioners who had dental hygienists and those who did not. Solo general practitioners with dental hygienists had higher gross billings. Higher gross billings would be expected, as would higher expenses. However, net incomes of those with dental hygienists were also higher. In contrast, the mean waiting time for a recall visit was higher among dentists who employed dental hygienists. Depending on personal preferences, availability of qualified personnel, etc., dentists who do not employ dental hygienists but have been contemplating that path may want to further research the benefits and opportunities that may be realized.

  1. Dental education in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbehani, J M

    2003-01-01

    For a long time there has been a need to establish a dental school in Kuwait, due to the fact that the majority of dentists working in Kuwait are expatriates from various countries. An Amiri decree in 1996 made it possible, and the first dental students were admitted to the Kuwait University Faculty of Dentistry in 1998. The mission of the Faculty of Dentistry is 'to promote oral health in Kuwait through education, research and cooperation with other professional health care institutions as well as the community at large'. A 6.5-year dental curriculum was completed after 2 years of committee work and was accepted by the University Council in 2001. This curriculum incorporates current trends in medical and dental education, such as the evidence-based and community-based approaches, problem-solving methodology for outcome-based learning, and competency achieved through comprehensive patient care. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  3. Advances in dental imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J E

    2001-04-01

    The number of dental radiographs taken in the UK has steadily increased over the past 20 years--recently estimating around 18 million taken in the general dental services alone, and dental radiographs now account for nearly 25% of all medical radiographic exposures. Radiographs remain our most useful diagnostic aid. Their strength is in demonstrating hard tissue pathology, which makes radiographs particularly effective in the maxillofacial region. Although well accepted in this capacity, there remain a number of limitations and drawbacks to conventional radiographs which recent developments have begun to overcome. There have been improvements in the scope and capabilities of dental imaging equipment. There has also been a continuing effort to reduce radiation-induced harm by limiting our exposure to it. This has been possible both through the introduction of new methods and protocols for reducing individual radiation exposures and by the creation of guidelines for selecting radiographs more effectively and thereby reducing the total number of radiographs taken.

  4. Glossary of Dental Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more... Coffee and Doughnuts: A Disastrous Combo for Teeth? The sugars in doughnuts have been identified as ... More print this article enlarge text Glossary of Dental Terms Oral Health Defined Amalgam silver/mercury alloy ...

  5. Dental care - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002213.htm Dental care - child To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Proper care of your child's teeth and gums includes brushing and rinsing daily. It ...

  6. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risks associated with tobacco, substance abuse and oral piercings. Why it's done Regular dental exams help protect ... sugary beverages Smoking Chewing tobacco Eating disorders Oral piercings Not wearing a mouthguard during contact sports The ...

  7. Nigerian Dental Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR AUTHORS AND CONTRIBUTORS The Nigerian Dental ... review articles, clinical case reports and innovations in surgical techniques ... figures and illustrations, including one copy stored in a 3.5” floppy should be sent to ...

  8. Dental Assisting Program Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This publication contains statewide standards for the dental assisting program in Georgia. The standards are divided into 12 categories: foundations (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions (admission requirements, provisional admission requirements, recruitment, evaluation and planning); program…

  9. Panoramic dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, R.H.; Kircher, D.R.; Hart, F.W.; Ciavattoni, A.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for improving the handling rate of patients in panoramic dental radiography when tube head-camera assembly of a low silhouette panoramic dental X-ray machine is rotated for a scan in one direction only. This is effected by fast return of the tube head-camera assembly with its simultaneous elevation, thus facilitating the radiographed patient's exit from the machine and the entrance of another patient. Fast speed is about twice the scanning speed. (author)

  10. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  11. Saliva and dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Hannas, Angélicas Reis; Kato, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  12. Managing dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Donald A; Jayanetti, Jay; Chu, Raymond; Staninec, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The clinical signs of dental erosion are initially subtle, yet often progress because the patient remains asymptomatic, unaware and uninformed. Erosion typically works synergistically with abrasion and attrition to cause loss of tooth structure, making diagnosis and management complex. The purpose of this article is to outline clinical examples of patients with dental erosion that highlight the strategy of early identification, patient education and conservative restorative management. Dental erosion is defined as the pathologic chronic loss of dental hard tissues as a result of the chemical influence of exogenous or endogenous acids without bacterial involvement. Like caries or periodontal disease, erosion has a multifactorial etiology and requires a thorough history and examination for diagnosis. It also requires patient understanding and compliance for improved outcomes. Erosion can affect the loss of tooth structure in isolation of other cofactors, but most often works in synergy with abrasion and attrition in the loss of tooth structure (Table 1). Although erosion is thought to be an underlying etiology of dentin sensitivity, erosion and loss of tooth structure often occurs with few symptoms. The purpose of this article is threefold: first, to outline existing barriers that may limit early management of dental erosion. Second, to review the clinical assessment required to establish a diagnosis of erosion. And third, to outline clinical examples that review options to restore lost tooth structure. The authors have included illustrations they hope will be used to improve patient understanding and motivation in the early management of dental erosion.

  13. [Influence of the fluoride releasing dental materials on the bacterial flora of dental plaque].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płuciennik, Małgorzata; Sakowska, Danuta; Krzemiński, Zbigniew; Piatowska, Danuta

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of influence of silver-free, fluor releasing dental materials on dental plaque bacteria quantity. 17 patients were included into the study. 51 restorations were placed following manufacturers recommendations. Following materials were used: conventional glassionomer Ketac-Molar ESPE, resin modified glassionomer Fuji II LC GC and fluor containing composite Charisma Heraeus Kulzer Class V restorations were placed in following teeth of upper and lower jaw: canines, first bicuspids, second bicuspids. Sound enamel was a control. After 10 weeks the 72 hours old dental plaque was collected from surface of restorations and control using sterile probe. Total amount of 68 dental plaques were investigated. Each plaque was placed on scaled and sterile aluminum foil. The moist weight of dental plaque was scaled. Dental plaque was moved into 7 ml 0.85% NaCl solution reduced by cystein chlorine hydrogen and disintegrated by ultrasounds (power:100 Watt, wave amplitude: 5 micorm). The suspension of dental plaque was serially diluted from 10(-4) to 10(-5) in sterile 0,85% NaCl solution, and seeded with amount of 0.1 ml on appropriate base. In dental plaque trials the amount of cariogenic bacteria was calculated--Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Neisseria, and also total amount of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was measured. Microbiologic studies were performed in Institute of Microbiology, Medical University, Łódź. Statistical analysis of collected data was accomplished. In 72 hours old dental plaques collected from the surfaces of Ketac -Molar, Fuji II LC, Charisma after 10 weeks since being placed into the class V cavity, results show no statistically significant differences in the amount of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus spp., Lactobacillus spp., Veillonella spp., Neisseria spp, in total amount of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and in the quantity proportion of Streptococcus mutans versus Streptococcus spp. in comparison

  14. American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... New Research AADSM Highlights Members More news... Dental Sleep Medicine: An area of dental practice that focuses on ... SomnoMed Silver Sponsors Copyright © American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, All Rights Reserved. American Academy of Dental Sleep ...

  15. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and \\'dental tourism\\'.

  16. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section...

  17. Dental school finances: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, W H

    1986-05-01

    Total expenditures and revenues of 58 US dental school were derived from reports of the ADA Division of Educational Measurements. These financial data were studied by type of dental school (public, state-related private, and private) and by expenditure/revenue categories. Dental schools showed little diversity in expenditures: most were directed toward instruction; few were directed toward research or continuing education. Several distinctive patterns among the three types of dental schools in revenues were observed. Two configurations emerged: public and state-related private dental schools receive more than 75% of their revenues from government and tuition, and private dental schools, more than 50%.

  18. Patient Satisfaction in Military Dental Treatment Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-07

    the variance in regards to overall satisfaction. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Dentistry, Patient Satisfaction, Military, Consumer Satisfaction, Dental... patient satisfaction in military dental treatment facilities. Dental health is extremely important for the military as dental assets are not always... customer satisfaction is an important component of military dental care. Quarterly patient satisfaction reports are generated for each dental treatment

  19. History of dental hygiene research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  20. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  1. Hand hygiene amongst dental professionals in a tertiary dental clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate hand washing attitude and practices among Dentists and Dental Students treating patients in a Nigerian Tertiary Dental Clinic. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of Dentists and Dental Students treating patients in University of Benin Teaching Hospital was conducted between February ...

  2. Reasons for late seeking of dental care among dental patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reasons for delayed reporting for oral care were negligence (53.5%); poor dental services or visited but not treated (19.4%); financial reasons (14.8%); and dental fear (12.3%). Seventy seven percent of respondents who had toothache due to advanced dental caries were aware that the aching tooth was decayed, of which, ...

  3. Diagnostic methods for dental caries used by private dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the preference profiles of various types of diagnostic tools and methods used by private dental practitioners in Ankara for detecting dental caries. Methods: Private dental practitioners, in five districts of Ankara, were provided with questionnaires comprising demographic ...

  4. Failure analysis of various monolithic posterior aesthetic dental crowns using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porojan, Liliana; Topală, Florin

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of material stiffness and load on the biomechanical performance of the monolithic full-coverage posterior aesthetic dental crowns using finite element analysis. Three restorative materials for monolithic dental crowns were selected for the study: zirconia; lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, and resin-based composite. Stresses were calculated in the crowns for all materials and in the teeth structures, under different load values. The experiments show that dental crowns made from all this new aesthetic materials processed by CAD/CAM technologies would be indicated as monolithic dental crowns for posterior areas.

  5. Dental Education in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Dental education in the Netherlands is reviewed in terms of dental practice, overall development, structure and functioning of a typical school of dentistry, admissions, student finances, curriculum, certification, postgraduate education, and education for related professions. (MSE)

  6. Medical and Dental Patient Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A RadiationAnswers.org Ask the Experts Medical and Dental Patient Issues What's My Risk? The risks of ... developed by our topic editors for this category: Dental-Patient Issues Medical CT Reference Books and Articles ...

  7. Dental Care - Medicaid and Chip

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dental health is an important part of peoples overall health. States are required to provide dental benefits to children covered by Medicaid and the Childrens Health...

  8. Dental modification in the past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Pia; Alexandersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction......Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction...

  9. Dental Health: The Basic Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Health THE BASIC FACTS MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS Kim, diagnosed in 1986 People with a chronic disease may neglect their general health and wellness, research shows. Dental care is no exception. A tendency to focus ...

  10. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing ... a sticky substance that collects around and between teeth. The home dental plaque identification test shows where ...

  11. Radiation protection in dental practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide provides the dentist and dental support personnel with basic information on the safe use of x-rays in dental radiography. Included in this CODE are specific recommendations for eliminating unnecessary radiation exposure of both patients and staff

  12. Visualisation of dental images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Saion Salikin; Azuhar Ripin; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Asmaliza Hashim; Norriza Mohd Isa; Suriany Sarmid

    2005-01-01

    Since the invention and the discovery of x-rays, physicians, surgeons and life scientists have been using images to diagnose and subsequently treat diseases. X-ray is also widely used in many imaging techniques to better understand basics anatomy, physiology and biology as well as testing and analytical work in physical science. In dentistry, x-ray technique has been employed to get a panoramic view of the whole teeth of a particular patient. A panoramic dental radiograph is very useful in dentistry for diagnostic purpose, denture preparation, as well as for orthodontic. Image visualisation is an important aspect especially for the dentists to analyse and proceed with a particulate dental treatment. In this project panoramic dental image obtained by using a standard phantom is visualised by using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software. A panoramic dental x-ray machine, Cranex3, is used to get a panoramic radiograph, which is subsequently digitized, by using Vidar digitizer (Sierra Plus). The 2D digitized image is enhance and apply other visualising techniques such as surface rendering and volume rendering technique using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software as a first step in 3D visualisation. In this paper, visualising of panoramic dental radiograph by using IDL is discussed in brief. (Author)

  13. Metal-composite adhesion based on diazonium chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oweis, Yara; Alageel, Omar; Kozak, Paige; Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Retrouvey, Jean-Marc; Cerruti, Marta; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-11-01

    Composite resins do not adhere well to dental alloys. This weak bond can result in failure at the composite-metal interface in fixed dental prostheses and orthodontic brackets. The aim of this study was to develop a new adhesive, based on diazonium chemistry, to facilitate chemical bonding between dental alloys and composite resin. Samples of two types of dental alloys, stainless steel and cobalt chromium were primed with a diazonium layer in order to create a surface coating favorable for composite adhesion. Untreated metal samples served as controls. The surface chemical composition of the treated and untreated samples was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the tensile strength of the bond with composite resin was measured. The diazonium adhesive was also tested for shear bond strength between stainless steel orthodontic brackets and teeth. XPS confirmed the presence of a diazonium coating on the treated metals. The coating significantly increased the tensile and shear bond strengths by three and four folds respectively between the treated alloys and composite resin. diazonium chemistry can be used to develop composite adhesives for dental alloys. Diazonium adhesion can effectively achieve a strong chemical bond between dental alloys and composite resin. This technology can be used for composite repair of fractured crowns, for crown cementation with resin based cements, and for bracket bonding. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Does dental caries affect dental development in children and adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamo, Brunilda; Elezi, Besiana; Kragt, Lea; Wolvius, Eppo B; Ongkosuwito, Edwin M

    2018-01-01

    Although a link between dietary changes, caries, and dental development has been observed, the literature provides little insight about this relationship. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between dental caries and dental development in a clinical sample of Albanian children and adolescents. In total, 118 children and adolescents, born between 1995 and 2004 and aged 6–15 years, were included. Dental caries in the deciduous dentition was assessed using the Decayed, Filled Teeth (dft) index and dental caries in the permanent dentition was assessed using the Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth (DMFT) index. Dental development during the permanent dentition was determined using the Demirjian method. Linear and ordinal regression models were applied to analyze the associations of dental caries with dental age and developmental stages of each left mandibular tooth. Dental caries in the deciduous dentition, estimated as a median dft of 2.0 (90% range, 0.0–9.1), was significantly associated with lower dental age (β = -0.21; 90% CI: -0.29, -0.12) and with delayed development of the canine, both premolars, and the second molar. Untreated dental caries (dt) was associated with lower dental age (β = -0.19; 90% CI: -0.28, -0.10). Dental caries in the permanent dentition, estimated as a median DMFT of 1.0 (90% range, 0.0–8.0), was not significantly associated with dental age (β = 0.05; 90% CI: -0.04, 0.14). However, the DMFT was associated with the advanced stages of development of both premolars and the second molar. The untreated dental caries in the deciduous dentition delays the development of permanent teeth. PMID:29659350

  15. Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice.

  16. The Primary Dental Care Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neenan, M. Elaine; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study describes the characteristics of the current primary dental care workforce (dentists, hygienists, assistants), its distribution, and its delivery system in private and public sectors. Graduate dental school enrollments, trends in patient visits, employment patterns, state dental activities, and workforce issues related to health care…

  17. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  18. 76 FR 14600 - Dental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... qualify for VHA dental treatment, including any claim for treatment of periodontal disease or calculus... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN28 Dental Conditions AGENCY: Department of... its adjudication regulations regarding service connection of dental conditions for treatment purposes...

  19. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  20. 77 FR 4469 - Dental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN28 Dental Conditions AGENCY: Department of... rule the proposal to amend its adjudication regulations regarding service connection of dental... Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) for service connection of dental conditions for the purpose of...

  1. Dental therapists: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A; Friedman, Jay W; Kardos, Thomas B; Kardos, Rosemary L; Schwarz, Eli; Satur, Julie; Berg, Darren G; Nasruddin, Jaafar; Mumghamba, Elifuraha G; Davenport, Elizabeth S; Nagel, Ron

    2008-04-01

    In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental therapists, with a description of the training that therapists receive in these countries, and the context in which they practice. Based on available demographic information, it also updates the number of dental therapists practising globally, as well as the countries in which they practice. In several countries, dental therapy is now being integrated with dental hygiene in training and practice to create a new type of professional complementary to a dentist. Increasingly, dental therapists are permitted to treat adults as well as children. The paper also describes the status of a current initiative to introduce dental therapy to the United States. It concludes by suggesting that dental therapists can become valued members of the dental team throughout the world, helping to improve access to care and reducing existing disparities in oral health.

  2. Stereoscopy in Dental Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kreiborg, Sven

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether stereoscopy can play a meaningful role in dental education. The study used an anaglyph technique in which two images were presented separately to the left and right eyes (using red/cyan filters), which, combined in the brain, give enhanced depth...... perception. A positional judgment task was performed to assess whether the use of stereoscopy would enhance depth perception among dental students at Osaka University in Japan. Subsequently, the optimum angle was evaluated to obtain maximum ability to discriminate among complex anatomical structures. Finally...... practice, they did recognize its merits for education. These results suggest that using stereoscopic images in dental education can be quite valuable as stereoscopy greatly helped these students' understanding of the spatial relationships in complex anatomical structures....

  3. Risks from dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Tamara Goularte

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate the risks and consequences of exposure to dental X-ray. The methodology used was the survey of bibliographic literature on this matter. First, we tried to understand the operation and characteristics of dental X-rays. Afterwards, we tried to know about the risks that this procedure offers to workers and patients. And concluded with the consequences of such exposure. The results showed that dental x-rays only offer risks in prolonged exposure, can affect the worker or patient to pathologies such as cancer or a life-time decreased due to the stochastic effect. Therefore, radiological protection standards must be respected and practised. (author)

  4. Dental implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Dental formulations for the prevention of dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a therapeutic method for preventing and/or inhibiting dental erosion in a mammalian subject, and the provision of a dental care product for performing the method. The dental care product of the invention comprises a starch-degrading enzyme of E. C. 3.2.1.1, wherein said...... product comprises less than 1 wt.% ionic surfactant, and preferably is substantially free of endoprotease and/or lipase. The properties of the dental care product serve to prevent and/or inhibit dental erosion in a subject that typically results from repeated exposure of the patient's tooth surfaces...

  6. Syllabus of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    Rubberloid Van R Dental Prod. Surgident Lactona Corp. Alginates Coe Alginate Coe Labs o Jeltrate L.D. Caulk Kerr Alginate Kerr/Sybron Alginate S.S. White Co...Surgident- Alginate Lactona Corp. Unijel II Unitek Corp. O Combination Agar/a ig inate Colloid 80 U.S. Shiza Corp. Dentloid Denterials, Ltd...66061 (215) 277-3800 (913) 782-2200 Shofu Dental Corp. Lactona Corp. (subsidary of 4025 Bohannon Dr. Warner-Lambert Co.) Menlo Park, CA 94025 . Academy

  7. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  8. Perceived Dentist and Dental Hygienist Task Distribution After Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' Team Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Schans, Cees P.

    2017-01-01

    Attitudes of dental students regarding the provision of treatment tend to be dentist-centered; however, facilitating mixed student group formation could change such perceptions. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived scope of practice of dental and dental hygiene students and whether

  9. Perceived dentist and dental hygienist task distribution after dental and dental hygiene students' team intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J; Krijnen, Wim P; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Schans, Cees P

    Attitudes of dental students regarding the provision of treatment tend to be dentist-centered; however, facilitating mixed student group formation could change such perceptions. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived scope of practice of dental and dental hygiene students and whether

  10. Career choice and perceptions of dental hygiene students and applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Susan; Dean, Kim; Pace, Cherin

    2003-01-01

    As the number of dental hygiene programs across the country continues to increase, educational opportunities for prospective students have flourished, resulting in increased competition among dental hygiene programs for qualified applicants. The purpose of this study was to provide a current description of dental hygiene students and applicants, assess the reasons for choosing the career, and evaluate the perceptions of both applicants and enrolled students with regard to specific aspects of the profession. A questionnaire was mailed to 142 prospective dental hygiene students who met the minimal requirements for admission to either of the two dental hygiene programs in Arkansas. The prospective students had been invited for an admissions interview. The questionnaire also was administered during class to 80 students currently enrolled in one of the two programs. An overall response rate of 71% (n = 157) was achieved. The average respondent was 22 years old, female, and Caucasian with a grade point average of 3.5 and a composite ACT score of 23. Dental hygiene was also the first career choice and most respondents had prior dental assisting experience. Dental hygienists and dentists were reported as providing the most career guidance, while high school and college guidance counselors were least influential. Respondents chose the profession in order to work with and help people, have flexible work schedules, and receive good salaries. Respondents typically viewed dental hygiene as offering a bright future in terms of job security, good salaries, flexible work schedules, diverse career opportunities, and personal responsibility. No significant difference in overall perceptions of the profession was found between applicants and those enrolled in dental hygiene programs, although the strength of individual perceptions of the profession differed between applicant and first-year students compared to second-year students. Dental hygiene programs can use the findings of this

  11. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska's Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  12. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  13. Effect of dental restorative materials on total antioxidant capacity and calcium concentration of unstimulated saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Gholam H; Moghadam, Mona-Momeni; Saghiri, Mohammad-Ali; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Asatourian, Armen; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Scarbecz, Mark; Sheibani, Nader

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of dental amalgam and composite restorations on total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and calcium (Ca) ion concentration of unstimulated saliva. Forty-eight children aged 6-10 years selected and divided into three groups of sixteen (8 males, 8 females). In group A and B, samples consisted of two class II dental composite or amalgam restorations, while in group C samples were caries-free (control group). Unstimulated saliva from all samples was collected and TAC was measured by spectrophotometry using an adaptation of 2, 2'-azino-di-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS) assay. The Ca ion level was estimated by an auto- analyzer. Data were analyzed with one- and two-way ANOVA test, at a p difference between groups ( p differences within and between groups ( p Gender is an effective factor in changes induced in oral cavity as females showed more emphatic reaction to dental filling materials than males. Patients who have dental restorations, especially dental composites, should pay more attention to their dental hygiene, because dental restorations can increase oxidative stress and decrease Ca ion level in saliva, which might jeopardize remineralization process of tooth structures after demineralization. Key words: Amalgam, caries, composite, saliva, total antioxidant capacity.

  14. Dental Radiology I Student Guide [and Instructor Guide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox Valley Technical Coll., Appleton, WI.

    The dental radiology student and instructor guides provide instruction in the following units: (1) x-ray physics; (2) x-ray production; (3) radiation health and safety; (4) radiographic anatomy and pathology; (5) darkroom setup and chemistry; (6) bisecting angle technique; (7) paralleling technique; (8) full mouth survey technique--composition and…

  15. Novel surface coating materials for endodontic dental implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathi, M.H.; Mortazavi, V.; Moosavi, S.B.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and produce novel coating materials in order to obtain two goals including; improvement of the corrosion behavior of metallic dental endodontic implant and the bone osteointegration simultaneously. Stainless steel 316L (SS) was used as a metallic substrate and a novel Hydroxyapatite/Titanium (HA/Ti) composite coating was prepared on it. Structural characterization techniques including XRD, SEM and EDX were utilized to investigate the microstructure and morphology of the coating. Electrochemical tests were performed in physiological solutions in order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of the coated and uncoated specimens as an indication of biocompatibility. Two types of endodontic implants including; SS with and without (HA/Ti) composite coating were prepared and subsequently implanted in the mandibular canine of 20 cats after completion of root canal treatment and osseous preparation. After a healing period of 4 months, osteointegration evaluation and histopathological interpretation was carried out using SEM and optical microscopy. Results indicate that the novel HA/Ti composite coating improves the corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of SS endodontic dental implant. The clinical evaluation (in vivo test) results showed that there was significant difference in osteointegration between coated and uncoated endodontic dental implants and average bone osteointegration of coated implants were more than uncoated implants. The histopathological results and bone tissue response to the coated implants was acceptable and it was concluded that HA/Ti composite coated SS could be used as well as an endodontic dental implant. (author)

  16. A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis: A clinical report

    OpenAIRE

    Tanoue, Naomi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    A direct bonded fixed partial dental prosthesis, with a composite resin denture tooth as a pontic, a tri-n-butylborane initiated adhesive resin, and screw posts for reinforcement, was still functioning after an observation period of 20 years. The prosthesis was found to be reliable for long-term clinical use when chemically and mechanically reinforced.

  17. Effect of dental materials on gluconeogenesis in rat kidney tubules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichl, F.X.; Durner, J.; Mückter, H.; Elsenhans, B.; Forth, W.; Kunzelmann, K.H.; Hickel, R.; Spahl, W.; Hume, W.R.; Moes, G.W.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of dental composite components triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) as well as mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) on gluconeogenesis was investigated in isolated rat kidney tubules. From starved rats kidney tubules were

  18. Dental PACS development in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung

    2008-01-01

    Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is an image information technology system for the transmission and storage of medical images. In Korea the first full PACS was installed at Samsung Medical Center in 1994, but, the rate of distribution was very slow. The government's approval for the medical insurance reimbursement for full PACS examinations in November 1999 became the turning point. Thereafter the number of hospitals with full PACS has steeply increased. In September of this year, PACS was installed at 906 medical institutes, including most of university hospitals and general hospitals. The first full dental PACS was installed at Wonkwang University Dental Hospital in 2002. Now ten out of eleven university dental hospitals implemented full dental PACS. The current status and technological factors of dental PACS in Korean university dental hospitals and the future perspectives of dental PACS are described.

  19. Dental Hygiene Student Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynda J.; Fellows, Avis L.

    1981-01-01

    A study to determine differences between graduating and withdrawing students in the University of Minnesota Dental Hygiene program is discussed. The identification of differences may prove useful in the selection process for future classes through identification of students likely to complete their education. (MLW)

  20. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Advances in dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  2. [Instruction in dental radiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Kreulen, C.M.; Berkhout, W.E.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive

  3. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more impressions made of your mouth and remaining teeth. These impressions are used to make the crown — your realistic-looking artificial tooth. The crown can't be placed until your jawbone is strong ... and your dental specialist can choose artificial teeth that are either ...

  4. Mouth and dental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baat, C.; van der Waal, I.; Jackson, S.H.D.; Jansen, P.A.F.; Mangoni, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: • Introduction • Periodontal disease • Dental caries • Odontogenic infections • Alveolar osteitis • Xerostomia and hyposalivation • Candidiasis • Angular cheilitis • Denture stomatitis • Burning mouth syndrome • Recurrent aphthous stomatitis • Recurrent

  5. Dental Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Resource Center Burmese (myanma bhasa) Expand Section Betel Nut - English PDF Betel Nut - myanma bhasa (Burmese) PDF Orange County North ... California Dental Association Karen (S’gaw Karen) Expand Section Betel Nut - English PDF Betel Nut - S’gaw Karen (Karen) ...

  6. Dental anxiety and salivary cortisol levels before urgent dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegane, Kazue; Penha, Sibele S; Munhoz, Carolina D; Rocha, Rodney G

    2009-12-01

    Dental anxiety is still prevalent, despite advances in treatment, and affects the utilization of health care services. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine if patients with different degrees of dental anxiety and pain undergoing emergency dental care have different stress reactions as measured by salivary cortisol. Seventy three patients completed the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS), and described any previous dental traumatic experience. Their socio-demographic characteristics were also recorded. They also rated pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). A saliva sample was collected before the procedure, and analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. Thirty patients were dentally anxious and forty one complained of pain. In this sample, dental anxiety was not related to gender, age, educational level and family income; however, a previous traumatic event was related to dental anxiety. There was no association between salivary cortisol concentrations and gender or dental anxiety. Patients with pain showed higher cortisol levels. When gathering patient information, the dentist should note patients' negative dental experiences in order to provide more effective, less traumatic treatment.

  7. Exploring Dental Providers' Workflow in an Electronic Dental Record Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Cooper, Ryan; Mahnke, Andrea N; Ye, Zhan; Acharya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    A workflow is defined as a predefined set of work steps and partial ordering of these steps in any environment to achieve the expected outcome. Few studies have investigated the workflow of providers in a dental office. It is important to understand the interaction of dental providers with the existing technologies at point of care to assess breakdown in the workflow which could contribute to better technology designs. The study objective was to assess electronic dental record (EDR) workflows using time and motion methodology in order to identify breakdowns and opportunities for process improvement. A time and motion methodology was used to study the human-computer interaction and workflow of dental providers with an EDR in four dental centers at a large healthcare organization. A data collection tool was developed to capture the workflow of dental providers and staff while they interacted with an EDR during initial, planned, and emergency patient visits, and at the front desk. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was conducted on the observational data. Breakdowns in workflow were identified while posting charges, viewing radiographs, e-prescribing, and interacting with patient scheduler. EDR interaction time was significantly different between dentists and dental assistants (6:20 min vs. 10:57 min, p = 0.013) and between dentists and dental hygienists (6:20 min vs. 9:36 min, p = 0.003). On average, a dentist spent far less time than dental assistants and dental hygienists in data recording within the EDR.

  8. Radiographic Assessment of Dental Maturation in Children With Dental Agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Aida Carolina; Pozo, Rodrigo Del; de Cedres, Lucila Blanco

    Dental agenesis is the most common developmental anomaly in humans, frequently associated with disorders in dental development and maturation. The purpose of this study is to determine radiographic variations in dental maturation in a group of Venezuelan children with dental agenesis. 1,188 panoramic radiographs, from healthy patients ages 5 to 12 years old were studied for agenesis of permanent teeth. Dental maturation was assessed by relative eruption and dental age according to Nolla, comparing children affected with dental agenesis to a stratified control group selected from the same population, excluding children with premature loss of primary teeth in the left quadrants and unclear radiographs. Descriptive analysis, and differences between means and medians (Student t test, Kruskall-Wallis p=0.05) were performed. Medians for Nolla stages were similar between groups, with delay in tooth formation in the agenesis group for second molars (p<0.05) and maxillary lateral incisors and second premolars. Dental age was significantly underestimated for both groups, -0.89 (±0.78) for the control group and -1.20 (±0.95) for the study group. Tooth eruption was similar between groups. Dental age was significantly delayed in Venezuelan children with dental agenesis, with variable significance for tooth formation of studied teeth.

  9. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a rotary... materials intended for use in the fabrication of dental devices. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a... dental cavity or a broken tooth. (b) Classification. Class I. ...

  11. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQs Home › Medicaid › Benefits › Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Related Resources Learn How to Report the ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  12. Gloss measurements and rugometric inspection in dental biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Costa, Manuel F. M.; Yebra, Ana; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María. M.

    2013-11-01

    In dental applications, optimizing appearance is desirable and increasingly demanded by patients. The specular gloss is among the major appearance properties of dental biomaterials, and its relationship with surface roughness has been reported. Roughness and gloss are key surface aspects that complement each other. We have experimentally analyzed the specular gloss and surface roughness of two different types of dental-resin composites and pre-sintered and sintered zirconia ceramics. We have studied two shades of both composite types and two sintered zirconia ceramics: colored and uncolored. Moreover, a surface treatment was applied to one specimen of each dental resin. Gloss measurements were performed with a standardized reflectometer and the corresponding gloss percentages were calculated. All the samples were submitted to rugometric non-invasive inspection with the MICROTOP.06.MFC laser microtopographer in order to determine meaningful statistical parameters such as the average roughness (Ra) and the root-mean-square deviation (Rq). For a comparison of the different biomaterials, the uncertainties associated to the measure of the surface gloss and roughness were also determined. The differences between the two shades of both kinds of composites proved significant in the case of the roughness parameters but not for the specular gloss. The surface treatment applied to the dental-resin composites increased the average roughness but the changes in the specular gloss were significant only for the A2 enamel nano-composite. For the zirconia ceramic the sintered process resulted in an increase in the surface roughness with a decrease of the specular gloss, corroborating that the relationship between the gloss and the roughness shows the expected behavior.

  13. Developing a flexible core Dental Public Health curriculum for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Bhoopathi, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for graduating dental and dental hygiene students must prepare them to contribute to the improvement or maintenance of health for individual patient's and the public's health. The objective is to describe the background for and the process used to develop a core Dental Public Health Curriculum for such students. The process used was to solicit and review existing dental public health curriculum in dental and dental hygiene schools; review curriculum for other health professionals; identify the themes needed to frame the curriculum; select usable materials and identify gaps in existing curricular materials; and develop appropriate curriculum materials that would embody the competencies developed for undergraduate dental and dental hygiene education. Twenty-three topics were identified as embodying the eight competencies. Based on these topics, six courses, Principles of Dental Public Health, Evidence-Based Dentistry, Ethics and Dental Public Health, Dental Public Health Policy and Advocacy, Oral Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Oral Health Literacy and Dental Public Health, were prepared. Each course includes syllabus, PowerPoint presentations, student assignments and activities, instructor guide, and classroom discussion points. Depending on the hours available in the existing curriculum at the dental or hygiene school, lecture presentations and take home assignments/discussions may be used independently or in combination with presentations from other courses. In addition, individual discussions and activities may be used to integrate dental public health materials into other courses. A flexible curriculum is available at the AAPHD website to enable the incorporation of DPH topics into the curriculum. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  14. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  15. Advancing education in dental hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battrell, Ann; Lynch, Ann; Steinbach, Pam; Bessner, Sue; Snyder, Josh; Majeski, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The changing health care environment and societal imperatives indicate the need for transformative change within the dental hygiene profession to serve the emerging needs of the public. The American Dental Hygienists' Association is leading the way toward meaningful change. The American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA) has as its vision the integration of dental hygienists into the health care delivery system as essential primary care providers to expand access to oral health care. This article provides data on current dental hygiene education programs and those in development. Also included is a discussion regarding how the dental hygiene profession can better serve the health and wellness needs of society by transforming the way graduates are prepared for the future. ADHA's dental hygiene survey center data, policies and a futuristic analysis plus a review of the professional literature describe the current state of dental hygiene education and the profession. A discussion of societal, health care and educational trends that creates the imperative for transformation of the dental hygiene profession is provided. Ultimately, the purpose of advancing education in dental hygiene is to achieve better oral and overall health for more people. The profession's responsibility to the public includes evaluating its own ability to provide care and taking the steps necessary to ensure its maximum effectiveness. ADHA is leading this process for dental hygienists in diverse ways. It is imperative that the dental hygiene profession understands and embraces the changing health care environment. Through open dialog and the sharing of evidence the professional path will be determined along with forward movement for the benefit of society and the dental hygiene profession. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Usage of demineralized bone powder in dental implant surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Joon Yim

    1999-01-01

    While there is much concern in the dental community about the risk of disease transfer with processed bone a] iografts, there has never been a case of disease transfer with DFDB. Exclusionary techniques and chemical processing of the allogeneic bone has rendered these grafts safe for human implantation. The literature indicates that there has been considerable interest in the biology and applied science of osteoinduction. The accumulated evidence supports the concept of cartilage and bone cell differentiation induced by a unique bone motphogenetic protein (BMP). Currently clinical usage has been focused on the alveolar bone defects associated with the dental implant surgery, which has become one of the most important areas in dental outpatient clinic. Increased application of the endosseous dental implant system results in a lot of demands to regenerate the alveolar bone defects around the dental implants. Anderegg et al.(1991) reported the excellent results from the combination of DFDB powder and expanded PTFE (polytetrafluorethylene) membranes. Since 1980 the author experienced the human DFDB powders for the oral and maxillofacial surgery and the dental implant surgery. Yim and Kim(1993) evaluated 93 surgical sites where DFDB was used and found 96.7% of success rates at re-entry surgery. Mellonig and Triplett (1993) reported 97% of success rates, and Gelb (1993) obtained 98% of success rates. Fugazzotto (1994) placed 59 dental implants at the time of sinus lifts with the composite graft of DFDB and resorbable tricalcium phosphate and none of implants was lost on uncovering and only one was lost while functioning. Yim (1994) placed 44 dental implants at the time of sinus lifts with DFDB, and none of implants was lost on uncovering. Zinner and Small (1996) placed 215 dental implants at the time of sinus lifts (52 sinuses) with the composite graft of DFDB, and other materials, 3 implants of which were failed on uncovering. To date, maxillary sinus lift graft with

  17. What I wish I'd learned at dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, G R; Lynch, C D; Chadwick, B L; Santini, A; Wilson, N H F

    2016-08-26

    Background Much concern appears to exist as to the scope and content of contemporary dental school programmes, with the oft-cited criticism being made that dental graduates are 'no longer as good as they used to be'.Aim The aim of this project was to survey the views of dentists - both new graduates and more established practitioners - on aspects of their own dental school training they felt had been deficient as well as commenting on what aspects of dental school education they would like to see improved/enhanced in current times.Methods An invitation to complete an Internet-based questionnaire was emailed to the Fellows and Members of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK). Topics in the questionnaire included the respondent's own dental education history, how well they felt their dental school training had covered certain clinical and non-clinical topics; and their opinions on areas they felt should be included in contemporary dental school programmes.Results Six hundred and forty-nine responses were received from 3,348 emailed invitations (response rate = 19.4%). Sixty-one percent (395) of respondents were qualified for 10 years or more. Among clinical skills and techniques, a majority of respondents reported they felt they had not had sufficient teaching/training in dental school in surgical endodontics (76%), conscious sedation (72%), root surface debridement (71%), fixed orthodontic appliances (68%), porcelain veneers (63%), implants (56%) and posterior composites (53%). If designing a new dental school programme, the most common topics respondents would seek to include/increase were business and practice management (21%), communication skills (including patient management and leadership skills) (10%), and increased clinical time and experience (8%).Conclusions The findings of this project are of interest and relevance to those working with student dentists and young dental practitioners. A greater emphasis is needed on the teaching of certain non

  18. A systematic review of dental disease management in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Catherine H L; Hu, Shijia; Haverman, Thijs

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This systematic review aims to update on the prevalence of odontogenic-related infections and the efficacy of dental strategies in preventing dental-related complications in cancer patients since the 2010 systematic review. REVIEW METHOD: A literature search was conducted in the dat....../treatment protocols. The use of chlorhexidine, fluoride mouth rinses as well as composite resin, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GIC), and amalgam restorations over conventional GIC in post head and neck radiation patients who are compliant fluoride users is recommended....

  19. Diabetes, Gum Disease, and Other Dental Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too ... What if my mouth is sore after my dental work? A sore mouth is common after dental ...

  20. Teething & Dental Hygiene for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Dental Health & Hygiene for Young Children Page Content Article ... and lead to future dental problems. Teaching Good Dental Habits The best way to protect your child's ...

  1. Ergonomics in dental pratice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Quaresemin de Oliveira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The application of ergonomics is critical so that you can get a suitable working environment for professional, it is safe, healthy and comfortable. The objective was to identify whether the dental students followed the principles of ergonomics during clinical visits, evaluating, through photographs, compliance with ergonomic principles applied in dental practice, and finally identify the most affected sites by RSI / WMSDs of students enrolled in the dental clinic of the Faculdade IMED. Snapshots were made and only considered the position of the student operator, the same taken by the researcher using the mobile device. For each clinical procedure were taken two photographs in hidden angles to the student operator so that it did not change its ergonomic position to be observed. After obtaining the photos, they were evaluated and classified in scores from 0 to 3 according to the adequacy of the work placement, and then inserted into Excel and later in a database (SPSS 15.0. The following work is a cross-sectional, observational study, they were conducted in dental clinics IMED college. Among the 66 respondents, 14 were male and 52 female. It was found that 57 (86,3% reported feeling pain somewhere in the body, being the most affected sites neck (36.4%, and consecutively lower back (30.3% and higher than the back (27.3%. The results of the 63 procedures performed by the photographic shots were classified as “inadequate” in 49 procedures, “partially adequate” in 12 and “impossible to evaluate” in 2 procedures. The research results have shown a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and do not follow the ergonomic principles, emphasizing the need for more attention to ergonomics of the students.

  2. Dental amalgam and mercury vapor release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, J W

    1992-09-01

    Dental diseases are among the most common ailments, and dentists in the United States spend over 50% of their time in dental practice rebuilding carious, malformed, and traumatically injured teeth. It is logical, therefore, that the majority of the dental school curriculum is devoted to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of teeth with anomalies. Dentists have several choices of materials they can use to accomplish the task of rebuilding teeth. Besides amalgam, they have ceramic materials, resin composites, base-metal and noble casting alloys, and glass-ionomer cements to use to restore the posterior dentition. Each of these restorative materials has advantages and disadvantages, and the clinical judgment as to when a particular material should be used is given a high priority in dental education. Amalgam is the most widely used of these restorative materials, with 92% of dentists listing it as the material of choice in the posterior of the mouth (Clinical Research Associates, 1990). Dentists have been placing amalgams for over 150 years in the US. They placed 150 million last year, which represents over 75 tons of amalgam alloy. The reasons that dentists use this restorative material so frequently are its durability, ease of manipulation, and low cost. Numerous clinical studies have been conducted on the serviceability of amalgam. Most of these have been on the old, low-copper alloys, and results indicate that they last from 8 to 15 years (Bailit et al., 1979; Osborne et al., 1980; Qvist et al., 1986). In the past 20 years, vast improvements have been made in amalgams with the development of the high-copper systems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Treatment of radiation dental caries with fixed dental prosthetic constructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dachev, B [Vissh Meditsinski Inst., Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1974-01-01

    On the basis of clinical observations for many years the author established that the covering of the teeth, progressively developing radiation caries, with crowns of precious metal and plastics is a safe way for their protection. The crown isolates the teeth from the saliva with its changed composition, quantity and changed pH. A prophylactic effect is obtained with the covering of the morbid teeth with radiation caries, concerning the possibilities of osteoradionecrosis development, due to the restriction of the ways of secondary infection penetration. The carried out treatment with fixed crowns preserves the anatomical teeth shape, radiation caries stops its development and the masticatory function of the dentition is recovered. After radiation treatment in the maxillofacial region with hard dental tissues affection which cannot be restored by way of ordinary definite fillings--indications for crown covering exist. The carried out observations reveal that complex cares are necessary in the radiation caries treatment on the part of specialists in therapeutic and orthopedic stomatology with consultations with radiologists. (auth)

  4. Ethical checklist for dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinchuse, D J; Rinchuse, D J; Deluzio, C

    1995-01-01

    A checklist for verification of unethical business practices, originally formulated by Drs. Blanchard and Peale, is adapted to dental practice. A scenario is used as a model to demonstrate the applicability of this instrument to dental practice. The instrument asks three questions in regards to an ethical dilemma: 1) Is it legal? 2) Is it fair? 3) How does it make you feel? The paper concludes the giving of gifts to general dentists by dental specialists for the referral of patients is unethical.

  5. Confronting shibboleths of dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2005-10-01

    Shibboleths are common expressions presented as indisputable truths. When used in educational discussions, they reflect "motherhood and apple pie" viewpoints and tend to bring debate to a halt. Use of shibboleths may precede a desired imposition of "locksteps" in educational programming and are easily perceived as paternalistic by recipients. Nine shibboleths are presented as common beliefs of dental faculty and administrators. Evidence contradicting the veracity of the "obvious truths" is offered. The traditional "splendid isolation" of dentistry contributes to parochialism and belief in false shibboleths. Sound principles of higher and health professions education, student learning, and dental practice apply to dental education as to all health disciplines. Student passivity in dental education is not the best preparation for proficiency in dental practice. The master teacher possesses a repertoire of methodologies specific to meeting defined educational objectives. Active learning experiences bear close resemblances to professional duties and responsibilities and internally motivate future doctors of dental medicine. The difficulty in achieving curricular change leads to curricular entrenchment. Dentistry and dental education should not trade their ethical high ground for the relatively low ethical standards of the business world. Principles of professional ethics should govern relationships between dentists, whether within the dental school workplace or in practice. Suggestions are made on how to confront shibboleths in dental school settings.

  6. Children's experiences of dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Annie G; Rodd, Helen D; Porritt, Jenny M; Baker, Sarah R; Creswell, Cathy; Newton, Tim; Williams, Chris; Marshman, Zoe

    2017-03-01

    Dental anxiety is common among children. Although there is a wealth of research investigating childhood dental anxiety, little consideration has been given to the child's perspective. This qualitative study sought to explore with children their own experiences of dental anxiety using a cognitive behavioural therapy assessment model. Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with dentally anxious children aged 11-16 years. The Five Areas model was used to inform the topic guide and analysis. Data were analysed using a framework approach. In total, 13 children were interviewed. Participants described their experiences of dental anxiety across multiple dimensions (situational factors and altered thoughts, feelings, physical symptoms, and behaviours). Participants placed considerable value on communication by dental professionals, with poor communication having a negative influence on dental anxiety and the dentist-patient relationship. This study confirms the Five Areas model as an applicable theoretical model for the assessment of childhood dental anxiety. Children provided insights about their own dental anxiety experiences that have not previously been described. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Medical emergencies in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, M H

    2009-06-01

    Serious medical emergencies are fortunately a rare occurrence in the dental practice environment; however, if an emergency situation is encountered a delay in treatment may result in potentially avoidable consequences. The risk of mortality or serious morbidity can be reduced by ensuring that basic emergency equipment and medications are in place, and that the dental team is appropriately trained in basic life support measures. This article aims to provide an overview of the basic emergency medications and equipment that should be present in dental practices, and to discuss specific responses to some of the more common adverse medical events that can present while providing dental treatment.

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of abnormal dental pain

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuda, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Most dental pain is caused by an organic problem such as dental caries, periodontitis, pulpitis, or trauma. Diagnosis and treatment of these symptoms are relatively straightforward. However, patients often also complain of abnormal dental pain that has a non-dental origin, whose diagnosis is challenging. Such abnormal dental pain can be categorized on the basis of its cause as referred pain, neuromodulatory pain, and neuropathic pain. When it is difficult to diagnose a patient's dental pain, ...

  9. The attitudes of dental interns to the use of the rubber dam at Riyadh dental colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bander Mohammed Al-Abdulwahhab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The rubber dam is one of the best tools for tooth isolation and infection control in the dental field. Our aim is to evaluate the attitudes toward the use of rubber dams by dental interns in Riyadh Dental Colleges (RCsDP and determine the barriers to their use. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and used for data collection. 150 questionnaires were distributed by hand to the dental interns of RCsDP over a period of two weeks. Information sought included the attitudes toward and difficulties for the use of the rubber dam, the time needed to apply the rubber dam, and the patients′ allergic history of the rubber dam. Respondents were asked to state their preference on a five point Likert type scale ranging from "strongly dislike" to "strongly like". The information and data of the completed questionnaires were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test and Friedman test. Results: Of 150 questionnaires distributed, 150 were completed and returned (response rate = 100%. Of those, 46.7% were males and 53.3% were females. In general; (43.3%, interns strongly liked the use of the rubber dam and the rest (46.7% liked the use of the rubber dam. The majority of respondents liked to use rubber dam in direct restorations more than in indirect restorations and 46.7% strongly liked to use it in posterior teeth for composite restoration. Most dental interns felt that they would strongly like to use a rubber dam for endodontic treatment whether in posterior teeth (73.3% or anterior teeth (68.7%. 66.7% of interns asked their patients if they had an allergy to latex prior to the use of the rubber dam. Child behavior (mean rank about seven is the most important reason for not using rubber dam. The time is taken to apply the rubber dam was less than five minutes in most cases. Conclusion: Most dental interns prefer to use rubber dams in the general dental field and are enthusiastic to use it in future.

  10. Esthetic management of anterior dental anomalies: A clinical case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafaie, Amir

    2016-09-01

    Many types of dental abnormality can be observed in the anterior sectors, where they can cause genuine esthetic problems for our patients. While conventional prosthetic treatments offer the best solutions in terms of esthetic result and durability, they involve the sacrifice of significant quantities of mineralized dental material and cannot be undertaken before the periodontal tissues are mature. Other less invasive alternatives should be envisaged as transitional, or sometimes even permanent, solutions for the management of these anomalies in children and adolescents. This article discusses these options and presents a clinical case where composite resin veneers and microabrasion of the enamel were used to treat dental agenesis and enamel dysplasia. Copyright © 2016 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Applications of Nanomaterials in Dental Science: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Jitendra; Singh, Shivani; Lale, Shantanu V; Mishra, Monu; Koul, Veena; Kharbanda, P

    2017-04-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized health care industry in a large scale and its applications are a boon to modern medicine and dental science. It is expected to pervade and further revolutionize the art and science of dentistry and may well have important applications spanning all the aspects of oral diseases, diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Materials science in dentistry has embraced the technology to produce nanomaterials that are being used in caries inhibitors, antimicrobial resins, hard tissue remineralizing agents, targeted drug delivery, scaffolds, bio-membranes, nanocrystalline hydroxyl apatite, restorative cements, adhesion promoters and boosters, bioactive glass, tissue conditioners, reinforced methacrylate resins, root canal disinfectants, friction free orthodontic arch wires and nano composites life. These upcoming technologies have potential to bring about significant benefits in the form of improvement in dental science and to society. The present review presents the latest recent developments in this interdisciplinary field bridging nanotechnology and dental science.

  12. Mandatory Clinical Practice for Dental and Dental Hygiene Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Dental and dental hygiene faculty should maintain their clinical skills through regular practice, to improve their ability to relate to students through instruction, provide an additional source of income, and improve their image in the community. Institutional policies fostering and regulating faculty practice plans are suggested. (Author/MSE)

  13. Pattern of dental caries in Mulago Dental School clinic, Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information on dental caries among patients attending Mulago Hospital is scarce. Yet knowledge of the pattern of caries can be used to plan preventive and treatment interventions. This study describes the pattern of dental caries (in terms of age group, tooth and tooth surface and gender) among patients attending the ...

  14. The Swedish national dental insurance and dental health care policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1981-01-01

    Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described.......Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described....

  15. Exploring Dental Providers’ Workflow in an Electronic Dental Record Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwei, Kelsey M; Cooper, Ryan; Mahnke, Andrea N.; Ye, Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background A workflow is defined as a predefined set of work steps and partial ordering of these steps in any environment to achieve the expected outcome. Few studies have investigated the workflow of providers in a dental office. It is important to understand the interaction of dental providers with the existing technologies at point of care to assess breakdown in the workflow which could contribute to better technology designs. Objective The study objective was to assess electronic dental record (EDR) workflows using time and motion methodology in order to identify breakdowns and opportunities for process improvement. Methods A time and motion methodology was used to study the human-computer interaction and workflow of dental providers with an EDR in four dental centers at a large healthcare organization. A data collection tool was developed to capture the workflow of dental providers and staff while they interacted with an EDR during initial, planned, and emergency patient visits, and at the front desk. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was conducted on the observational data. Results Breakdowns in workflow were identified while posting charges, viewing radiographs, e-prescribing, and interacting with patient scheduler. EDR interaction time was significantly different between dentists and dental assistants (6:20 min vs. 10:57 min, p = 0.013) and between dentists and dental hygienists (6:20 min vs. 9:36 min, p = 0.003). Conclusions On average, a dentist spent far less time than dental assistants and dental hygienists in data recording within the EDR. PMID:27437058

  16. Recent Advances in Material and Geometrical Modelling in Dental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed M. S. Al Qahtani

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This article touched, in brief, the recent advances in dental materials and geometric modelling in dental applications. Most common categories of dental materials as metallic alloys, composites, ceramics and nanomaterials were briefly demonstrated. Nanotechnology improved the quality of dental biomaterials. This new technology improves many existing materials properties, also, to introduce new materials with superior properties that covered a wide range of applications in dentistry. Geometric modelling was discussed as a concept and examples within this article. The geometric modelling with engineering Computer-Aided-Design (CAD system(s is highly satisfactory for further analysis or Computer-Aided-Manufacturing (CAM processes. The geometric modelling extracted from Computed-Tomography (CT images (or its similar techniques for the sake of CAM also reached a sufficient level of accuracy, while, obtaining efficient solid modelling without huge efforts on body surfaces, faces, and gaps healing is still doubtable. This article is merely a compilation of knowledge learned from lectures, workshops, books, and journal articles, articles from the internet, dental forum, and scientific groups' discussions.

  17. Dental solid waste characterization and management in Iran: a case study of Sistan and Baluchestan Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrafshan, Edris; Mohammadi, Leili; Mostafapour, Ferdos Kord; Moghaddam, Alireza Ansari

    2014-02-01

    The management of dental solid waste continues to be a major challenge, particularly in most healthcare facilities of the developing world. In Iran, few studies on management of dental solid waste and its composition are available. An effort has been made through this study to evaluate the hazardous and infectious status of dental solid waste, keeping in mind its possible role in cross-infection chain. For this study, 123 private dental centres and 36 public dental centres were selected and the composition and generation rate of dental solid waste produced were measured. Dental solid waste was classified to four main categories: (i) domestic-type; (ii) potentially infectious; (iii) chemical and pharmaceutical; and (iv) toxic, which constituted 11.7, 80.3, 6.3, and 1.7%, respectively, of the total. Also, the results indicated that the dental solid waste per patient per day generation rate for total, domestic-type, potentially infectious, chemical and pharmaceutical, and toxic wastes were 169.9, 8.6, 153.3, 11.2, and 3.3 g/patient/d, respectively. Furthermore, the per day generation rates for total, domestic-type, potentially infectious, chemical and pharmaceutical, and toxic wastes were 194.5, 22.6, 156.1, 12.3, and 3.4 kg/d, respectively. According to findings of this study, for best management of dental waste it is suggested that source reduction, separation, reuse, and recycling programmes be implemented and each section of dental waste be collected and disposed of separately and in accordance with related criteria.

  18. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

  19. Dental Chairside Technique. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, Maura; Weaver, Trudy Karlene

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: local anesthesia; dental office emergencies; oral hygiene;…

  20. Dental technician of the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, W.; Wismeijer, D.; Hanssen, S.; Tahmaseb, A.

    2015-01-01

    The new technologies in the field of dental science have not only changed the way in which dentists run their practice but have also dramatically changed the procedures carried out in dental laboratories. Mechanical engineering, incorporated CMM, laser milling, 3D printing and 3D design in a

  1. New dental applications with LEDs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, A.; Ou, Yiyu; Petersen, Paul Michael

    Visible and ultraviolet LEDs will in the future give rise to new dental applications. Fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for diagnostics and treatment in dentistry.......Visible and ultraviolet LEDs will in the future give rise to new dental applications. Fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy and photoactivated disinfection are important future candidates for diagnostics and treatment in dentistry....

  2. EAMJ Jan. Dental 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... Oral diseases qualify as a major public health concern owing to their high prevalence and incidence in all regions of the world (1). Dental caries and gingivitis are the two most common dental diseases affecting children worldwide. These two diseases are, to a large extent, the result of the presence of ...

  3. Drawing Links within Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines results of a practical drawing task given to a cohort of first year dental surgery students at Kings College Dental Institute, London. It compares and relates their success in drilling and removing caries and pulp tissue from a virtual tooth using the hapTEL virtual learning system, with each individuals' drawing skills.…

  4. Music interventions for dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, J; Teague, A

    2018-04-01

    Anxiety is a significant issue in the dental care of adults and children. Dental anxiety often leads to avoidance of dental care which may result in significant deterioration of oral and dental health. Non-pharmacological anxiety management interventions such as music listening are increasingly used in dental care. Although efficacy for music's anxiolytic effects has been established for pre-operative anxiety, findings regarding the use of music listening for dental anxiety are inconclusive, especially for children. The use of music for passive distraction may not be adequate for children and highly anxious adults. Instead, interventions offered by a trained music therapist may be needed to optimize music's anxiolytic impact. Music therapy interventions are individualized to the patient's presenting needs and geared at enhancing patients' active engagement in the management of their anxiety. Interventions may include (i) active refocusing of attention, (ii) music-guided deep breathing, (iii) music-assisted relaxation, and (iv) music-guided imagery. In addition, music therapists can teach patients music-based anxiety management skills prior to dental treatments, offer them the opportunity to express emotions related to the upcoming procedure, and help them gain a sense of control and safety. Clinical guidelines for the use of music listening by dental practitioners are offered. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [The impact of dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the introduction of dental implants can only be understood when the historical context is clarified. In the past, the main treatment carried out by dentists consisted of filling or, in unfortunate cases, removal of painful teeth. Only since the introduction of dental implants did

  6. Dental, Dental Hygiene, and Advanced Dental Students' Use, Knowledge, and Beliefs Regarding Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearston, Jenni A; Shah, Krina; Cheng, Eric; Moosvi, Rizvan; Park, Su Hyun; Patel, Naiya; Spielman, Andrew I; Weitzman, Michael L

    2017-11-01

    Using cigarettes and alternative tobacco products (ATPs) is associated with negative oral health outcomes, and dental health professionals are poised to help patients quit. The aim of this study was to determine dental, dental hygiene, and advanced dental students' use, knowledge, and beliefs about cigarettes and ATPs, including perceptions about their education in tobacco dependence treatment and counseling experience. All 1,783 students enrolled in the dental, dental hygiene, and postdoctoral dental programs at the New York University College of Dentistry were invited to participate in the survey in 2016. A total of 708 students at least partially completed the survey, for a response rate of 39.7%. In the results, 146 of the students (20.1%) reported ever using cigarettes, while 253 (35.7%) reported ever using any ATP. Regarding tobacco use intervention, the students reported they had not received enough training on ATPs, were neutral about cigarettes, and were somewhat confident and not so confident counseling a cigarette smoker or ATP user, respectively. By their fourth year, 77.8% of the dental students reported they had counseled someone to stop smoking cigarettes, but only 40.7% had counseled someone to stop using ATPs. Overall, all groups of students reported feeling more confident and had received more education on interventions for cigarettes than for ATPs (ptobacco and did not perceive they had received enough training on intervening with patients on use of cigarettes and ATPs. These findings call for a revised tobacco education curriculum for dental, dental hygiene, and advanced dental students, focused on building knowledge and confidence for promoting tobacco dependence treatment.

  7. Competition and dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytten, J; Sørensen, R

    2000-07-01

    Dental services for adults are different from all other Norwegian health services in that they are provided by private producers (dentists) who have full freedom to establish a practice. They have had this freedom since the end of World War II. A further liberalization of the market for dental services occurred in November 1995, when the so-called normal tariff was repealed. The system changed from a fixed fee system to a deregulated fee system. In principle, the market for dental services for adults operates as a free competitive market, in which dentists must compete for a market share. The aim of this study was to study the short-term effects of competition. A comprehensive set of data on fees, practice characteristics, treatment profiles and factors that dentists take into account when determining fees was analysed. The main finding was that competition has a weak effect. No support was found for the theory that the level of fees is the result of monopolistic competition or monopoly. The results also provided some evidence against the inducement hypothesis. At this stage, it is interesting to notice that dentists do not seem to exploit the power they have to control the market. One explanation, which is consistent with the more recent literature, is that physicians' behaviour to a large extent is influenced by professional norms and caring concerns about their patients. Financial incentives are important, but these incentives are constrained by norms other than self-interest. The interpretation of the results should also take into account that the deregulation has operated for a short time and that dentists and patients may not yet have adjusted to changes in the characteristics of the market. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  9. Ergonomic design for dental offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, David J; Sanders, Martha J; Turcotte, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    The increasing complexity of the dental office environment influences productivity and workflow for dental clinicians. Advances in technology, and with it the range of products needed to provide services, have led to sprawl in operatory setups and the potential for awkward postures for dental clinicians during the delivery of oral health services. Although ergonomics often addresses the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders for specific populations of workers, concepts of workflow and productivity are integral to improved practice in work environments. This article provides suggestions for improving workflow and productivity for dental clinicians. The article applies ergonomic principles to dental practice issues such as equipment and supply management, office design, and workflow management. Implications for improved ergonomic processes and future research are explored.

  10. The american dental dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The American Dental Dream-the cultural desire for straight, white teeth-is difficult, if not impossible, for poor and working-class people to achieve. Using ethnographic fiction, autoethnography, poetry, and qualitative interviewing, I brush away the taken-for-granted assumptions about teeth. I explore the personal, relational, and structural consequences of this cultural desire, and show how social class writes itself on our bodies. I write these culture-centered teeth tales to show how one might cope with their teeth.

  11. Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate reduces polymerization shrinkage and increases the hardness of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yih-Dean Jan

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Conjugation of diisocyanate side chains to dimethacrylate represents an effective means of reducing polymerization shrinkage and increasing the surface hardness of dental composite resins.

  12. SCHOOL DIETARY HABITS AND INCIDENCE OF DENTAL CARIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteagudo, Celia; Téllez, Francisco; Heras-González, Leticia; Ibañez-Peinado, Diana; Mariscal-Arcas, Miguel; Olea-Serrano, Fatima

    2015-07-01

    healthy dietary habits are considered to improve oral health and tooth quality. Caries treatment comprises tooth restoration with dental composites and sealants, almost all (> 90%) of which contain bisphenol A (BPA). Study hypotheses were: a) breakfast and oral hygiene habits are important factors in dental caries development; and b) dental caries treatment with epoxy-resins entails a risk of oral exposure to monomers migrating from the polymeric material. We evaluated caries in the teeth of a Spanish school population and determined the percentage treated with dental composites. to relate consumption of breakfast components and oral hygiene habits to dental caries and determine the presence of sealants/composites as potential sources of BPA exposure. subjects: 582 schoolchildren from Granada city (Southern Spain) aged 7 yrs; mean (SD) of 7.55 (0.64) yrs. caries was detected in 21.7% of their teeth. Mean breakfast quality index (BQI) score, based on nutritional questionnaires, was 5.18 (1.29). Breakfast with foods rich in simple sugars representing > 5% of total daily energy was consumed by 24% of the population and was significantly associated with caries frequency in binary logistic regression analysis. Biscuit consumption was reported by 35.8% and significantly associated with caries frequency. Breakfast intake of bakery products/ cereals and of dairy products showed a significant inverse association with caries frequency. No significant relationship was observed between caries and BQI score or oral hygiene factors. further research is required to elucidate the role of diet in caries and the associated risk of exposure to estrogenic xenobiotics such as BPA. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. A review of nanostructured surfaces and materials for dental implants: surface coating, patterning and functionalization for improved performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Rahimeh; Barhoum, Ahmed; Uludag, Hasan

    2018-05-10

    The emerging field of nanostructured implants has enormous scope in the areas of medical science and dental implants. Surface nanofeatures provide significant potential solutions to medical problems by the introduction of better biomaterials, improved implant design, and surface engineering techniques such as coating, patterning, functionalization and molecular grafting at the nanoscale. This review is of an interdisciplinary nature, addressing the history and development of dental implants and the emerging area of nanotechnology in dental implants. After a brief introduction to nanotechnology in dental implants and the main classes of dental implants, an overview of different types of nanomaterials (i.e. metals, metal oxides, ceramics, polymers and hydrides) used in dental implant together with their unique properties, the influence of elemental compositions, and surface morphologies and possible applications are presented from a chemical point of view. In the core of this review, the dental implant materials, physical and chemical fabrication techniques and the role of nanotechnology in achieving ideal dental implants have been discussed. Finally, the critical parameters in dental implant design and available data on the current dental implant surfaces that use nanotopography in clinical dentistry have been discussed.

  14. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas Hian da; Lima, Erick de; Miranda, Ranulfo Benedito de Paula; Favero, Stéphanie Soares; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2017-08-28

    The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I) monolithic zirconia restorations; II) multilayered dental prostheses; III) new glass-ceramics; IV) polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V) novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  15. Management of periodontal destruction caused by overhanging dental restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misnova Misnova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal tissue inflammations are occasionally caused by positions of restoration margins, particularly if they are placed subgingivally. A 44-year old male was referred to the Dental and Mouth Hospital of Dentistry Faculty Hasanuddin University with the chief complaint of severe pain at right posterior maxillary. Clinical examinations demonstrate a 7-mm periodontal pocket at buccal aspect of 16 teeth with tooth mobility °2. Overhanging dental composite restorations of Class V were detected at the subgingival areas of 15, 16, and 17. Radiographic results show vertically and horizontally alveolar bone loss. This case report is aimed to describe the management of periodontal tissue destruction as a result of overhanging dental composite restorations. Scaling and root planing were conducted as the initial therapy. The periodontal surgery was performed a week after the initial therapy. A full-thickness flap design with sulcular incision from 14 to 18 was made before the pocket curretage and necrotic tissue debridement along with restoration recontouring. The flap was sutured with simple suture technique. Periodontal dressing was packed for a week. Antibiotics, analgetics and antiinflammatory drugs were prescribed per orally. There was no history of pain a week after the surgical procedure. Tooth mobility was decreased to °1 and the periodontal pocket was reduced to 3 mm. Overhanging dental restorations may lead to periodontal tissue destruction. The subgingivally placement of those restorations should consider the health of periodontal tissues.

  16. Dental ceramics: a review of new materials and processing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Hian da SILVA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of computerized systems for the production of dental restorations associated to the development of novel microstructures for ceramic materials has caused an important change in the clinical workflow for dentists and technicians, as well as in the treatment options offered to patients. New microstructures have also been developed by the industry in order to offer ceramic and composite materials with optimized properties, i.e., good mechanical properties, appropriate wear behavior and acceptable aesthetic characteristics. The objective of this literature review is to discuss the main advantages and disadvantages of the new ceramic systems and processing methods. The manuscript is divided in five parts: I monolithic zirconia restorations; II multilayered dental prostheses; III new glass-ceramics; IV polymer infiltrated ceramics; and V novel processing technologies. Dental ceramics and processing technologies have evolved significantly in the past ten years, with most of the evolution being related to new microstructures and CAD-CAM methods. In addition, a trend towards the use of monolithic restorations has changed the way clinicians produce all-ceramic dental prostheses, since the more aesthetic multilayered restorations unfortunately are more prone to chipping or delamination. Composite materials processed via CAD-CAM have become an interesting option, as they have intermediate properties between ceramics and polymers and are more easily milled and polished.

  17. Oro-Dental Health Status and Salivary Characteristics in Children with Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mashayekhi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Children suffering from decreased renal function may demand unique considerations regarding special oral and dental conditions they are encountered to. It is mentioned that renal function deterioration may affect the hard or soft tissues of the mouth. Havingknowledge about the high prevalence of dental defects, calculus, gingival hyperplasia, modified salivary composition and tissue responses to the dental plaque may aid the physician and the dentist to help nurture the patient with chronic renal failure through the crisis, with an aesthetically satisfying and functioning dentition.

  18. Investigation of the mechanism of mercury removal from a silver dental amalgam alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. DJURDJEVIC

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of silver dental amalgam decomposition and the mercury removal mechanism was performed. The decomposition process was analysed during thermal treatment in the temperature interval from 400 °C to 850 °C and for times from 0.5 to 7.5 h. The chemical compositions of the silver dental amalgam alloy and the treated alloy were tested and microstructure analysis using optical and scanning electron microscopy was carried out. The phases were identified using energy disperse electron probe microanalysis. A mechanism for the mercury removal process from silver dental amalgam alloy is suggested.

  19. General dental practitioner's views on dental general anaesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threlfall, A G; King, D; Milsom, K M; Blinkhom, A S; Tickle, M

    2007-06-01

    Policy has recently changed on provision of dental general anaesthetic services in England. The aim of this study was to investigate general dental practitioners' views about dental general anaesthetics, the reduction in its availability and the impact on care of children with toothache. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and clinical case scenarios. General dental practitioners providing NHS services in the North West of England. 93 general dental practitioners were interviewed and 91 answered a clinical case scenario about the care they would provide for a 7-year-old child with multiple decayed teeth presenting with toothache. Scenario responses showed variation; 8% would immediately refer for general anaesthesia, 25% would initially prescribe antibiotics, but the majority would attempt to either restore or extract the tooth causing pain. Interview responses also demonstrated variation in care, however most dentists agree general anaesthesia has a role for nervous children but only refer as a last resort. The responses indicated an increase in inequalities, and that access to services did not match population needs, leaving some children waiting in pain. Most general dental practitioners support moving dental general anaesthesia into hospitals but some believe that it has widened health inequalities and there is also a problem associated with variation in treatment provision. Additional general anaesthetic services in some areas with high levels of tooth decay are needed and evidence based guidelines about caring for children with toothache are required.

  20. Radiation-induced dental caries, prevention and treatment - A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nishtha; Pal, Manoj; Rawat, Sheh; Grewal, Mandeep S; Garg, Himani; Chauhan, Deepika; Ahlawat, Parveen; Tandon, Sarthak; Khurana, Ruparna; Pahuja, Anjali K; Mayank, Mayur; Devnani, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck cancers (HNCs) involves radiotherapy. Patients undergoing radiotherapy for HNCs are prone to dental complications. Radiotherapy to the head and neck region causes xerostomia and salivary gland dysfunction which dramatically increases the risk of dental caries and its sequelae. Radiation therapy (RT) also affects the dental hard tissues increasing their susceptibility to demineralization following RT. Postradiation caries is a rapidly progressing and highly destructive type of dental caries. Radiation-related caries and other dental hard tissue changes can appear within the first 3 months following RT. Hence, every effort should be focused on prevention to manage patients with severe caries. This can be accomplished through good preoperative dental treatment, frequent dental evaluation and treatment after RT (with the exception of extractions), and consistent home care that includes self-applied fluoride. Restorative management of radiation caries can be challenging. The restorative dentist must consider the altered dental substrate and a hostile oral environment when selecting restorative materials. Radiation-induced changes in enamel and dentine may compromise bonding of adhesive materials. Consequently, glass ionomer cements have proved to be a better alternative to composite resins in irradiated patients. Counseling of patients before and after radiotherapy can be done to make them aware of the complications of radiotherapy and thus can help in preventing them.

  1. Quantity and quality of solid wastes produced in dental offices of babol city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoliman Amouei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental wastes due to having bacterial disease-causing agents and toxic chemicals are categorized in hazardous wastes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quantity and composition of dental waste produced by general and specialized dental offices in babol city. Materials &Methods: From all dental offices (170 and 40 dental offices were related to general and specialized respectively in Babol city, 20 general and 5 specialized offices were randomly selected. Waste samples were collected three times a week (Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, 50 sub-groups were separated and weighted by a digital scale with accuracy of 0.01 gram. The data were presented by excel and word software in figures and tables. Results: The total wastes of general and specialized offices were 11829 and 2831.5 kg/year, respectively. The percentages of domestic-type, infectious, pharmaceutical and toxic wastes in general dental offices were 52.5%, 42.5%, 4.7% and 0.3%; and in specialized offices were 42.5%, 50%, 7% and 0.5%, respectively. Most components in a variety of dental waste included plastic, paper, plaster molds, glass and metal. Conclusion: Due to the large contents of plastic, paper, plaster molds, glass and metals in domestic- type and infectious wastes produced in the general and specialized dental offices, it is necessary to manage the wastes and their separation and recycling in source place.

  2. Performance assessment of Vita Easy Shade spectrophotometer on colour measurement of aesthetic dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhazali, N; Burnside, G; Smith, R W; Preston, A J; Jarad, F D

    2011-12-01

    Four different shades were used to produce 20 samples of resin-based composite and 20 samples of porcelain to evaluate the performance ability of an intra oral test spectrophotometer compared to a reference spectrophotometer. The absolute colour coordinates CIELAB values measured with both spectrophotometers were significantly different (p spectrophotometers (p < 0.05). Therefore, the Easy Shade can be used in dental practice and dental research with some limitations.

  3. Intergrated dental care in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, P.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with integrated dental care in nursing homes. First, the dental treatment needs were ascertained of 432 residents in three Dutch nursing homes that offer integrated dental care. Dentist researchers intra-orally examined the residents and found that 72% required dental treatment.

  4. Involving Parents in Their Children's Dental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Donna

    1998-01-01

    Asserts that parent education is vital to good dental hygiene for the whole family. Discusses what Head Start staffers can do to ensure that children's dental needs are being met, particularly in assisting parents with taking responsibility for children's dental hygiene. Covers dental care tips for parents, questions and answers about dental…

  5. Dental photography today. Part 1: basic concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaglia, A; DE Dominicis, P; Arcuri, L; Gargari, M; Ottria, L

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the first article in a new series on digital dental photography. Part 1 defines the aims and objectives of dental photography for examination, diagnosis and treatment planning, legal and forensic documentation, publishing, education, marketing and communication with patients, dental team members, colleagues and dental laboratory.

  6. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section 872.6390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is a...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  8. Dental Curriculum Development in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phantumvanit, Prathip

    1996-01-01

    Since establishment of formal dental education in Southeast Asia, changes stemming from research and technology have led to dental curriculum changes. Development of the dental curriculum can be divided into three phases: disease oriented; health oriented; and community oriented. Evolution of these phases is traced in the dental curricula of Laos,…

  9. In vitro fabrication of dental filling nanopowder by green route and its antibacterial activity against dental pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Ho; Velmurugan, Palanivel; Park, Jung-Hee; Lee, Kui-Jae; Jin, Jong-Sik; Park, Yool-Jin; Bang, Keuk-Soo; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce novel Sn, Cu, Hg, and Ag nanopowders (NPs) and a composite nanopowder (NP) synthesized using Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (SM) root extract as a reducing and capping agent to improve the antibacterial property of dental filling materials. All of the NPs obtained were characterized using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrum imaging was performed to map the elemental distributions of the NP composite. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was performed to identify the role of various functional groups in all of the obtained NPs and the phyto-compound responsible for the reduction of various metal ions. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns clearly illustrated the crystalline phase of the synthesized NP. The antibacterial properties of the synthesized Sn, Cu, Hg, Ag, composite NP, SM root extract, and commercial amalgam powder were evaluated. The Cu, composite NP, SM root extract and Ag NP displayed excellent antibacterial activity against dental bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus. The results of this study require further evaluation for signs of metal toxicity in appropriate animal models. However, the results are encouraging for the application of metal NPs as suitable alternatives for antibiotics and disinfectants, especially in dental filling materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Maintenance care for dental implant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, K

    1989-10-01

    Dental implant has tried at the early stage in 19th century recovering an oral function and esthetics. Technological revolutions in biochemical and new materials have developed on the remarkable change in the dental implants, nowadays we call the three generation therapy for dental implantology. There are many kinds of methods and techniques in dental implants, however a lot of troublesome complication on the process of surgical phase, construction of prothodontics and prognosis of maintenance care. In the proceedings of this symposium, I would like to propose you how to manage the maintenance care for various kind of dental implants through the methodology and case presentations. Tendenay and future for dental implants The current outlook of dental implant has increasing supply and demand not only dentists but also patients. According to Japanese Welfare Ministry's report in 1987, average missing teeth over sixty years old generations are approximately 42% in accordance with NIDR (U.S.A.) research. They are missed on ten over teeth in full 28th teeth dentitions owing to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Generally speaking, latent implant patients are occupied on the same possibility of needs for dental implants both Japan and U.S.A. Management of maintenance care The patients hardly recognized the importance of plaque control for the maintenance care in the intraoral condition after implantation. Dentists and dental staffs must be instruct patients for importance of plaque removal and control, because they already had forgotten the habit of teeth cleaning, especially in the edenturous conditions. 1) Concept of establishment in oral hygiene. Motivation and instruction for patients include very important factors in dental implants as well as in periodontal diseases. Patients who could not achieve on good oral hygiene levels obtained no good results in the long term observations. To establish good oral hygiene are how to control supra plaque surrounding tissues

  11. Cones for dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M J [National Radiological Protection Board, Harwell (UK)

    1977-04-01

    Dental radiographic techniques are summarized. The advantages and disadvantages of the use of both the conventional plastic pointer cone and the open-ended cylinders or divergent cones favoured both by the ICRP (Protection against Ionizing Radiation from External Sources, Oxford, Pergamon Press, 1973, ICRP Publication 15), and in the Code of Practice for the Protection of Persons against Ionizing Radiation arising from Medical and Dental Use (1972, 3rd edition, London, HMSO) are discussed. The use of the word 'should' in these recommendations to signify a desirable requirement, not an essential one, is noted. This wording is currently of interest both nationally and internationally in relation to regulations, standards and notes for guidance. The National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) has been reviewing the position, and has concluded that open-ended cones have disadvantages which may sometimes outweigh their advantages. Although open-ended cones are preferable under some circumstances, the recommendation that they should be used ought not to be followed without an understanding of the issues involved. The hazards associated with the use of interchangeable cones are considered. The NRPB now proposes that the requirement for the replacement of pointer cones (for both new and existing equipment) should be withdrawn.

  12. On dental caries and dental erosion in Swedish young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Helén

    2013-01-01

    All children in Sweden are entitled to regular, free dental care up to 20 years of age. While dental caries generally continues to decline, still there is a pronounced skewness in caries prevalence. Furthermore, the reported increase in dental erosion in young adults is cause for concern. The aim was to study the prevalence of dental caries and dental erosion in a cohort of Swedish 20 year-olds, with special reference to the influence of previous caries experience and lifestyle as well as parental, socioeconomic and psychosocial factors. The study was prospective, longitudinal and cross-sectional in design and based on registration of caries lesions, dental erosion, body adiposity status, saliva sampling, interviews, and questionnaires at 20 years of age. Data were available for the same cohort at 1, 3, 6 and 15 years of age. 499 subjects (74 percent of the original cohort) were included. Five individuals were subsequently excluded, leaving a final sample of 494. 74 percent of the subjects had initial and/or manifest caries lesions and/or restorations. The mean number of DimFS was 5.8 and the mean number of DmFS on occlusal surfaces of molars was 1.1. There was a strong relationship between caries activity at 3 and 6 years of age and approximal caries prevalence in premolars and molars at 20 years of age. Overweight/obese individuals had significantly higher caries prevalence than normal weight individuals. Parental, socioeconomic and psychosocial factors during infancy were related to approximal caries at age 20. Dental erosion was found in 75 percent of the individuals: 18 percent of these had extensive erosion. There was a significant association between caries and dental erosion. A relationship was found between dental erosion and lifestyle factors and overweight/obesity. There is a strong relationship between caries prevalence at age 20 and caries experience in early childhood. Young adults show a high prevalence of dental erosion, but the severity is

  13. Clinical use of dental classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    The Dental Classification system used by the uniformed services is supposed to predict the incidence of dental emergencies in the operational setting, at least on the unit level. Since most Sailors and Marines are deployed without close dental support, the sea services have adopted a policy of early treatment of class 3 dental conditions during recruit training. The other services are beginning to do the same. Recently, two factors have emerged that are affecting this early dental class 3 treatment. These factors must be considered when planning to provide early dental treatment. First, changing population and dentist provider demographics in the civilian sector are beginning to affect the class 3 treatment needs of incoming military recruits. Second, attrition from recruit training results in treatment provided to recruits who leave military service before finishing their training. Some view this as a waste of resources, others as a cost of doing business. As operational jointness increases, the three services must develop and use a single dental classification terminology, as well as unified standards and guidelines, both for better research in this area and for the readiness and well-being of our patients.

  14. Dental imaging characterization of micropigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.Y.; Choi, M.H.; Chang, J.H.; Jung, J.H.; Kim, M.E.; Lee, N.S.; Kim, J.Y.; Choi, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Recently the micropig has been developed as human disease model. The dental and orofacial region of micropig is similar to that of humans, so it has been used for testing implant materials and techniques. The purpose of this study is on dental image at each age using radiography and computed tomography. Total twenty-two male micropigs, two or three animals of each 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months old, were given radiographic examinations. After general anesthesia, extra- and intra-oral radiographic technique and computed tomographic scans were performed to assess the dental characterization of micropigs. The total deciduous dental formula comprised 28 teeth and was depicted as Di 3/3, Dc 1/1, Dp 3/3. The total permanent dental formula comprised 44 teeth and was depicted as I 3/3, C 1/1, P 4/4, M 3/3. Hypodontia of the first premolars was common in the micropig. The permanent teeth erupted from 3 to 24 month after birth. The sequence of eruption of the permanent teeth was M1, P1, I3, C, M2, I1 + P3 + P4, P2, I2, M3. Dental imaging enables visualization of the unerupted teeth and gives more information about the development of the teeth. The growth pattern of the teeth obtained through radiographic and computed tomographic examination provides basic data in the micropig as animal model for dental research

  15. [Conservative treatment of upper anterior dental discrepancy during orthodontic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, G; Verzì, P; Pappalardo, S

    1999-06-01

    The orthodontic therapeutic sequence used in cases with dento-dental discrepancy for reduced mesiodistal size and congenital absent lateral upper incisors, is described. The importance of correct conoid tooth replacement in the programmed space between the other teeth and its restorative treatment in order to obtain the best biomechanical control is stressed. The contemporaneous presence of the form and volume anomaly of the 12th and the missing 22nd due to agenesia demanded an interdisciplinary approach. For the restoration of the conoid tooth the authors used a microhybrid composite for the alloy properties with the grain size of the inorganic particles. In fact this type of composite responds well to mechanical stress and has a high shining capacity and good aesthetical rendering. Meanwhile the temporary dental prothesis solution of the 22nd in this case has suggested the application of the artificial element on the superior Hawley holding plaque.

  16. BisGMA/TEGDMA dental nanocomposites containing glyoxylic acid modified high-aspect ratio hydroxyapatite nanofibers with enhanced dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Xu, Changqi; Wang, Yong; Shi, Jian; Yu, Qingsong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of the glyoxylic acid (GA) modification of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanofibers on their dispersion in bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) dental composites and also investigate the mechanical properties, water absorption, and water solubility of the resulting dental resins and composites. Scanning/Transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images showed that microsized HAP nanofiber bundles could be effectively broken down to individual HAP nanofibers with an average length of ~15 μm after the surface modification process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) characterization confirmed glyoxylic acid was chemically grafted on the HAP nanofiber surface, hypothetically by reacting with the amine group on HAP nanofiber surface. The enhanced dispersion of HAP nanofibers in dental matrix led to increased biaxial flexural strength (BFS) compared with the corresponding dental resins and composites filled with untreated HAP nanofibers. In addition, impregnation of small mass fractions of the glyoxylic acid modified HAP nanofibers into the BisGMA/TEGDMA dental resins (5wt%, 10wt%) or composites (2wt%, 3wt%) could also substantially improve the BFS in comparison with the controls(pure resins or dental composites filled with silica particles alone). Larger mass fractions could not further increase the mechanical property or even degrade the BFS values. Water behavior testing results indicated that the addition of glyoxylic acid modified HAP nanofibers resulted in higher water absorption and water solubility values which is not preferred for clinical application. In summary, well dispersed HAP nanofibers and their dental composites with enhanced mechanical property have been successfully fabricated but the water absorption and water solubility of such dental composites need to be

  17. BisGMA/TEGDMA dental nanocomposites containing glyoxylic acid-modified high-aspect ratio hydroxyapatite nanofibers with enhanced dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liang; Yu Qingsong; Li Hao; Xu Changqi; Wang Yong; Shi Jian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of the glyoxylic acid (GA) modification of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanofibers on their dispersion in bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (BisGMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) dental composites and also to investigate the mechanical properties, water absorption and water solubility of the resulting dental resins and composites. Scanning/transmission electron microscopy images showed that microsized HAP nanofiber bundles could be effectively broken down into individual HAP nanofibers with an average length of ∼15 µm after the surface modification process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis characterization confirmed that GA was chemically grafted on the HAP nanofiber surface, hypothetically by reacting with the amine group on the HAP nanofiber surface. The enhanced dispersion of HAP nanofibers in the dental matrix led to increased biaxial flexural strength (BFS) compared with the corresponding dental resins and composites filled with untreated HAP nanofibers. In addition, impregnation of small mass fractions of the GA-modified HAP nanofibers into the BisGMA/TEGDMA dental resins (5 wt%, 10 wt%) or composites (2 wt%, 3 wt%) could also substantially improve the BFS in comparison with the controls (pure resins or dental composites filled with silica particles alone). Larger mass fractions could not increase the mechanical property further or even degraded the BFS values. Water behavior testing results indicated that the addition of the GA-modified HAP nanofibers resulted in higher water absorption and water solubility values, which are not preferred for clinical application. In summary, well-dispersed HAP nanofibers and their dental composites with enhanced mechanical properties have been successfully fabricated, but the water absorption and water solubility of such dental composites need to be further improved. (paper)

  18. Low-dose Dental-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, A.; Imhof, H.; Homolka, P.; Fuerhauser, R.; Freudenthaler, J.; Watzek, G.

    2000-01-01

    Dental-CT is a relatively new, increasingly used investigation technique in dental radiology. Several authors have stated that the indication for Dental-CT has to be chosen on a strict basis, due to high dose values. This article describes the technique of performing dental-CT and calculates the effective dose based on published data and own measurements as well as the dose reduction potential to achieve an optimized protocol for Dental-CT investigations. (orig.) [de

  19. Dental implants in growing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of teeth by implants is usually restricted to patients with completed craniofacial growth. The aim of this literature review is to discuss the use of dental implants in normal growing patients and in patients with ectodermal dysplasia and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. It is recommended that while deciding the optimal individual time point of implant insertion, the status of skeletal growth, the degree of hypodontia, and extension of related psychological stress should be taken into account, in addition to the status of existing dentition and dental compliance of a pediatric patient.

  20. Advances in dental public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, R D

    2001-07-01

    Dental public health has been defined as 'the science and art of preventing oral diseases, promoting oral health and improving the quality of life through the organised efforts of society'. Dental practitioners most often have the oral health of individual patients as their primary focus but the aim of public health is to benefit populations. Early developments in dental public health were concerned largely with demonstrating levels of disease and with treatment services. With greater appreciation of the nature of oral health and disease, and of their determinants has come recognition of the need for wider public health action if the effects of prevention and oral health promotion are to be maximized.

  1. The Dental Trauma Internet Calculator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Prediction tools are increasingly used to inform patients about the future dental health outcome. Advanced statistical methods are required to arrive at unbiased predictions based on follow-up studies. Material and Methods The Internet risk calculator at the Dental Trauma Guide...... provides prognoses for teeth with traumatic injuries based on the Copenhagen trauma database: http://www.dentaltraumaguide.org The database includes 2191 traumatized permanent teeth from 1282 patients that were treated at the dental trauma unit at the University Hospital in Copenhagen (Denmark...

  2. Bioinspired design of dental multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M; Wang, R; Thompson, V; Rekow, D; Soboyejo, W O

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the use of bioinspired functionally graded structures in the design of dental multi-layers that are more resistant to sub-surface crack nucleation. Unlike existing dental crown restorations that give rise to high stress concentration, the functionally graded layers (between crown materials and the joins that attach them to dentin) are shown to promote significant reductions in stress and improvements in the critical crack size. Special inspiration is drawn from the low stress concentrations associated with the graded distributions in the dentin-enamel-junction (DEJ). The implications of such functionally graded structures are also discussed for the design of dental restorations.

  3. General evaluation of hard dental tissue and risk factors of dental caries in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Антоніна Михайлівна Політун

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The prognostication of caries in youth is important for determination and prescription of individual prophylactic arrangements and its further influence on mineralization of the hard dental tissues.Aim of the work: the study of the prevalence and intensity of caries among the young people and determination of possible connection with the risk factor of caries development for further choice of the reasonable prophylactic arrangement.Materials and methods of research: epidemiological, clinical, statistic ones.Results of research: The article describes results of the comprehensive dental examination of 135 persons18-25 years old. There was determined the high prevalence of caries (96,3±0,74 % with considerable intensity (8,87±0,39. The main etiological factors among youth are: poor nutrition with prevalence of carbohydrate (74,81±0,56 %, lack of oral hygiene (59,27±0,73 %, quantitative and qualitative composition of oral fluid, presence of somatic diseases (40±0,30 %, bad habits (31,85±0,24 %, neglect of the sport (48,88±0,36 %, chronic emotional stress (38,51±0,29 %, due to the increased workload and related stress factors.Conclusions: the high prevalence (96,3±0,74 % and intensity of carious process (8,87±0,39 is caused by the unsatisfactory state of oral cavity, (1,91±0,06, under the influence of general factors (somatic diseases, stress, poor nutrition the reactivity of protective mechanisms is lowered and the risk of dental morbidity of youth increases. So, it proves the necessity of elaboration and introduction of the active arrangements of primary prophylaxis directed on the raise of caries resistance of the hard dental tissues in young people

  4. Entrepreneurship in continuing dental education: a dental school perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberto, Vincent N

    2005-01-01

    The definition of continuing dental education is presented, along with its benefits to the profession. The preeminence of dental schools in providing lifelong learning opportunities and freedom from commercial involvement that existed even twenty years ago has changed. Less than a quarter of CE takes place in school, and the focus there is increasingly on material with deep scientific background and hands-on learning. The newest innovations and those with the greatest commercial potential are taught elsewhere. Proposed changes in the ADA CERP standards would take on a "purist" approach that could place dental schools at a severe disadvantage while allowing "for profit" institutes to flourish and thus further undermine the role dental schools can play in providing quality professional development experiences.

  5. Dental anxiety among patients visiting a University Dental Centre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Dental Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. An audit of dental prescriptions between clinics and dental laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, C A

    2011-08-12

    To discover the quality of written instructions from dentists to dental technicians and the nature of non-compliant prescriptions. An audit of laboratory prescription compliance was conducted within an NHS Trust Dental Teaching Hospital to determine the level of communication between dentists and dental technicians. One hundred and fifty prescriptions were audited from dental undergraduates and qualified dentists throughout the different departments. A total of two-thirds of prescriptions were considered non-compliant and failed to meet relevant ethical and legal guidelines. This problem was seen throughout all departments and at all professional levels. A breakdown in communication between dentists and technicians through the use of prescriptions is evident even within a close working environment.

  7. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and red...

  8. Dental Mold: A Novel Formulation to Treat Common Dental Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Soma; Roy, Gopa; Mukherjee, Biswajit

    2009-01-01

    Oral administration of antibiotics to treat dental problems mostly yields slow actions due to slow onset and hepatic “first-pass.” Again, commonly used dental paints are generally washed out by saliva within few hours of application. To overcome the challenges, polymeric molds to be placed on an affected tooth (during carries and gum problems) were prepared and evaluated in vitro for sustained drug release for prolonged local action. Here, amoxicillin trihydrate and lidocaine hydrochloride we...

  9. Magnetic resonance tomography and dental radiology (Dental-MRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, A.; Wien Univ.; Solar, P.; Ertl, L.; Nasel, C.; Homolka, P.; Youssefzadeh, S.; Schick, S.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the usefulness of Dental-MRT for imaging of anatomic and pathologic conditions of the mandible and maxilla. Methods: Seven healthy volunteers, 5 patients with pulpitis, 9 patients with dentigerous cysts, 5 patients after tooth transplantation and 12 patients with atrophic mandibles were evaluated. Studies of the jaws using axial T1- and T2-weighted gradient echo and spin echo sequences in 2D and 3D technique have been to performed. The acquired images were reconstructed with a standard dental software package on a workstation as panoramic and cross sectional views of the mandible or maxilla. Results: The entire maxilla and mandibula, teeth, dental pulp and the content of the mandibular canal were well depicted. Patients with inflammatory disease of the pulp chamber demonstrate bone marrow edema in the periapical region. Dentigerous cysts and their relation to the surrounding structures are clearly shown. After contrast media application marked enhancement of the dental pulp can be found. Conclusion: Dental-MRT provides a valuable tool for visualization and detection of dental diseases. (orig.) [de

  10. CT in dental osseointegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, D.

    1992-01-01

    Computerised tomography (CT) plays a key role in the pre-surgical evaluation of the alveolar process for titanium dental implants. The successful replacement of lost teeth by tissue integrated tooth root implants is a major advance in clinical dentistry. The paper will discuss briefly the history of osseointegration and how CT is now involved in helping the edentulous patient. CT is considered as a quick and convenient method of obtaining excellent anatomical information about the maxilla. Conventional tomography is difficult to obtain and does not provide valuable cross-sectional images. Exact height and width calculations can be made as well as screening out patients with advanced bone resorption. 3 refs. 6 figs

  11. Dental plaque microcosm biofilm behavior on calcium phosphate nanocomposite with quaternary ammonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D; Zhang, Ke; Wu, Eric J; Xu, Sarah M; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H K

    2012-08-01

    Half of dental restorations fail in 10 years, with secondary caries as the main reason. Calcium phosphate composites could remineralize tooth lesions. The objectives of this study were to: (1) impart antibacterial activity to a composite with nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP); and (2) investigate the effect of quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM) on mechanical and dental plaque microcosm biofilm properties for the first time. The NACP and glass particles were filled into a dental resin that contained bis(2-methacryloyloxy-ethyl) dimethyl-ammonium bromide, the QADM. NACP nanocomposites containing 0%, 7%, 14%, and 17.5% of QADM by mass, respectively, were photo-cured. A commercial composite with no antibacterial activity was used as control. Mechanical properties were measured in three-point flexure. A human saliva microcosm model was used to grow biofilms on composites. Live/dead assay, metabolic activity, colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, and lactic acid production of biofilms on the composites were measured. Increasing QADM mass fraction monotonically reduced the biofilm viability, CFU and lactic acid. Biofilms on NACP nanocomposite with 17.5% QADM had metabolic activity that was 30% that on a commercial composite control (pbacterial cells with normal short-rod shapes, while some cells on NACP-QADM nanocomposites disintegrated into pieces. Adding QADM to NACP did not decrease the composite strength and elastic modulus, which matched (p>0.1) those of a commercial composite without Ca-PO(4) or antibacterial activity. A dental plaque microcosm model was used to evaluate the novel NACP-QADM nanocomposite. The nanocomposite greatly reduced the biofilm viability, metabolic activity and lactic acid, while its mechanical properties matched those of a commercial composite. NACP-QADM nanocomposite with calcium phosphate fillers, good mechanical properties and a strong antibacterial activity may have potential for anti-biofilm and anti

  12. Scattering and Absorption Properties of Biomaterials for Dental Restorative Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Oliveras, A.; Rubiño, M.; Pérez, M. M.

    2013-08-01

    The physical understanding of the optical properties of dental biomaterials is mandatory for their final success in restorative applications.Light propagation in biological media is characterized by the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the scattering phase function,the refractive index, and the surface conditions (roughness). We have employed the inverse adding-doubling (IAD) method to combine transmittance and reflectance measurements performed using an integrating-sphere setup with the results of the previous scattering-anisotropygoniometric measurements. This has led to the determination of the absorption and the scattering coefficients. The aim was to optically characterize two different dental-resin composites (nanocomposite and hybrid) and one type of zirconia ceramic, and comparatively study them. The experimental procedure was conducted under repeatability conditions of measurement in order to determine the uncertainty associated to the optical properties of the biomaterials. Spectral variations of the refraction index and the scattering anisotropy factor were also considered. The whole experimental procedure fulfilled all the necessary requirements to provide optical-property values with lower associated uncertainties. The effective transport coefficient presented a similar spectral behavior for the two composites but completely different for the zirconia ceramic. The results demonstrated that the scattering anisotropy exerted a clearly distinct impact on the optical properties of the zirconia ceramic compared with those of the dental-resin composites.

  13. Dental Fear and Delayed Dental Care in Appalachia-West Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, R Constance

    2015-08-01

    The people of Appalachia-West Virginia are culturally unique and are known to have oral health disparities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental fear in relation to delayed dental care as a factor influencing oral health behaviors within this culture. A cross sectional study design was used. Participants were urgent care patients in a university dental clinic. The sample included 140 adults over age 18 years. The Dental Fear Survey was used to determine dental fear level. Self-report of delayed dental care was provided by the participants. The Dental Fear Survey was dichotomized at score 33, with higher scores indicating dental fear. The prevalence of dental fear was 47.1% (n=66). There was a significant association of dental fear and dental delay. The unadjusted odds ratio was 2.87 (95% CI: 1.17, 7.04; p=0.021). The adjusted odds ratio was 3.83 (95%CI: 1.14, 12.82; p=0.030), controlling for tobacco use, perceived oral health status, pain, and last dental visit. A difference in dental delay between men and women was not present in this sample. The only significant variable in delayed dental care was dental fear. In Appalachia-West Virginia, there remains a high level of dental fear, despite advances in dental care, techniques, and procedures. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  14. Dental bioaerosol as an occupational hazard in a dentist's workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Jolanta

    2007-01-01

    Many-year studies on aerosols as an infection vector, despite their wide range, ignored dental aerosol. All procedures performed with the use of dental unit handpieces cause the formation of aerosol and splatter which are commonly contaminated with bacteria, viruses, fungi, often also with blood. Aerosols are liquid and solid particles, 50 microm or less in diameter, suspended in air. Splatter is usually described as a mixture of air, water and/or solid substances; water droplets in splatter are from 50 microm to several millimetres in diameter and are visible to the naked eye. The most intensive aerosol and splatter emission occurs during the work of an ultrasonic scaler tip and a bur on a high-speed handpiece. Air-water aerosol produced during dental treatment procedures emerges from a patient's mouth and mixes with the surrounding air, thus influencing its composition. Because air contained in this space is the air breathed by both dentist and patient, its composition is extremely important as a potential threat to the dentist's health. According to the author, insufficient awareness of health risk, working habits, and economic factors are the reasons why dentists do not apply the available and recommended methods of protection against the influence of bioaerosol and splatter. Behaviour protecting a dentist and an assistant from the threat resulting from the influence of dental aerosol cannot be limited to isolated actions. The author, on the basis of the literature and own research, characterizes bioaerosol and splatter in a dental surgery and reviews a full range of protective measures against these risk factors.

  15. The Phenomenon of Dental Fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle...... of dental fear (see fig. 1). The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists (see table 1 for examples). The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2......) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has...

  16. Blood Thinners and Dental Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of contact after hours (i.e.: office or cell phone number, on-call pager), and failing that, you ... Eric Stoopler Featured in the Bulletin of Dental Education AAOM Board Member Featured in PennCurrent AAOM Featured ...

  17. Musculoskeletal dysfunction in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakim A. Larbi and Dmitry Ye. Suyetenkov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights the comparative statistics of musculoskeletal system deseases depending on a type of dental method. The practical recommendations on prevention of diseases of joints, ligaments and spine were done.

  18. Dental insurance! Are we ready?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi SS Toor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental insurance is insurance designed to pay the costs associated with dental care. The Foreign Direct Investment (FDI bill which was put forward in the winter session of the Lok Sabha (2008 focused on increasing the foreign investment share from the existing 26% to 49% in the insurance companies of India. This will allow the multibillion dollar international insurance companies to enter the Indian market and subsequently cover all aspects of insurance in India. Dental insurance will be an integral a part of this system. Dental insurance is a new concept in Southeast Asia as very few countries in Southeast Asia cover this aspect of insurance. It is important that the dentists in India should be acquainted with the different types of plans these companies are going to offer and about a new relationship which is going to emerge in the coming years between dentist, patient and the insurance company.

  19. ARUSHA SCHOOL DENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS. 1. Pain due to ... increased intake of sweets and sweet snacks, ... to restrain production, import and marketing of modern sweets ... STRATEGY .... water we drink and bathe In. They are always ready to heip us or ...

  20. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed.