WorldWideScience

Sample records for whey powder modification

  1. Acid whey powder modification of gari from cassava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okezie, B.O.; Kosikowski, F.V.

    1981-01-01

    Gari, a staple food consumed in Nigeria, is made from peeled and ground cassava tubers. The ground material is pressed with a stone slab for 2-4 days to remove moisture, and the partially fermented product is then baked over an open fire. Since gari mainly contributes energy to the diet, attempts were made to develop a more nutritious product without altering organoleptic and textural properties. In laboratory tests, ground cassava was fermented in stainless steel cheese vats for 4 days (to produce gari flavour) and then partially dehydrated by pressing in cheese cloth. A reduction in HCN content from 6.2 to 3.4 mg/100 g resulted. Various combinations of spray-dried acid whey, soya protein and freeze-dried Candida tropicalis were added to the fermented cassava, which was then pressure-cooked for 10 minutes at 121 degrees Celcius, dried and ground in a hammer mill. Product (i), made with gari fortified with 15% soya concentrate and 5% dried acid whey, was as acceptable as traditional gari and had a protein score of 75.8 vs. 9.91 for traditional gari. Product (ii), gari fortified with 20% yeast and 10% dried acid whey, had significantly lower scores for flavour and texture than traditional gari and the protein score was only 29.45. Supplementing gari with relatively inexpensive whey concentrates appears to be a means of overcoming protein energy malnutrition in children.

  2. Whey powder: glassy state and spray drying conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ítalo Tuler Perrone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge on spray drying of whey has significantly changed during the last 20 years. Industries started to apply more technical and scientific information for whey powder production. The main problems in whey powder are: sticking and caking during production and storage, which lead to decrease of the yield. These problems are based on the control of the glassy state during the dehydration process and storage. Due to the importance of the glass transition, spray drying parameters should be adjusted to improve whey powder production. This review highlights the scientific research that deal with the impact of these factors on spray drying of whey. To conclude, in order to improve the spray drying of whey the industries should: apply thermohygrometers to measure the air properties; to stablish the relation between water activity and outlet air relative humidity; and to adjust spray drying parameters based on the properties of the air and whey.

  3. Whey powder: glassy state and spray drying conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Ítalo Tuler Perrone; Arlan Caldas Pereira Silveira; Evandro Martins; Antônio Fernandes de Carvalho; Pierre Schuck,

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge on spray drying of whey has significantly changed during the last 20 years. Industries started to apply more technical and scientific information for whey powder production. The main problems in whey powder are: sticking and caking during production and storage, which lead to decrease of the yield. These problems are based on the control of the glassy state during the dehydration process and storage. Due to the importance of the glass transition, spray drying parameters should b...

  4. optimizing soybean flour., whey powder. and colostrum ratios for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SUMMARY: The object of the study was to determine diet combinations consisting of soybean flour, whey powder and colostrum that can be em- ... of the liquid diets varied from l0 to 2A9;, the whey powder content from 40 to 609oand the colostrum content from 20 to 509e, on a dry mass ..... Although pancreatic iuice flow.

  5. An X-ray diffraction analysis of crystallised whey and whey-permeate powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijdam, Justin; Ibach, Alexander; Eichhorn, Klaus; Kind, Matthias

    2007-11-26

    Amorphous whey, whey-permeate and lactose powders have been crystallised at various air temperatures and humidities, and these crystallised powders have been examined using X-ray diffraction. The most stable lactose crystal under normal storage conditions, alpha-lactose monohydrate, forms preferentially in whey and whey-permeate powders at 50 degrees C, provided sufficient moisture is available, whereas anhydrous beta-lactose and mixed anhydrous lactose crystals, which are unstable under normal storage conditions, form preferentially at 90 degrees C. Thus, faster crystallisation at higher temperatures is offset by the formation of lactose-crystal forms that are less stable under normal storage conditions. Very little alpha-lactose monohydrate crystallised in the pure lactose powders over the range of temperatures and humidities tested, because the crystallisation of alpha- and beta-lactose is considerably more rapid than the mutarotation of beta- to alpha-lactose in the amorphous phase and the hydration of alpha-lactose during crystallisation. Protein and salts hinder the crystallisation process, which provides more time for mutarotation and crystal hydration in the whey and whey-permeate powders.

  6. Nutritional Potential and Functionality of Whey Powder Influenced by Different Processing Temperature and Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Zarmina Gillani; Nuzhat Huma; Aysha Sameen; Mulazim Hussain Bukhari

    2017-01-01

    Whey is an excellent food ingredient owing to its high nutritive value and its functional properties. However, composition of whey varies depending on composition of milk, processing conditions, processing method, and its whey protein content. The aim of this study was to prepare a whey powder from raw whey and to determine the influence of different processing temperatures (160 and 180 °C) on the physicochemical, functional properties during storage of 180 days and on whey protein denaturati...

  7. optimizing soybean flour., whey powder. and colostrum ratios for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the liquid diets varied from l0 to 2A9;, the whey powder content from 40 to 609oand the colostrum content from 20 to 509e, on a ... a bulk tank to obtain a homogeneous composition. It .... increase relevant to elevated levels of soybean flour and ..... Availability, storage, treatment, composition, and feeding value of surplus.

  8. optimizing soybean flour., whey powder. and colostrum ratios for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion increased systematicalty in proportion to decreasing soybean flour- and whey powder contents of the diet and a corresponding increase of the ... dry matter basis. The soybean flour was a defatted product of which the trypsin inhibitor was inactivated by heat treatment. Colostrum from the first 8 milkings posl partum was.

  9. Use of whey powder and skim milk powder for the production of fermented cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren AKAL

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study is about the production of fermented cream samples having 18% fat by addition of starter cultures. In order to partialy increase non-fat solid content of fermented cream samples, skim milk powder and demineralized whey powder in two different rates (50% and 70% were used. Samples were analyzed for changes in their biochemical and physicochemical properties (total solid, ash, fat, titratable acidity, pH value, total nitrogen, viscosity, tyrosine, acid number, peroxide and diacetyl values during 29-day of storage period. Samples tested consisted of 7 different groups; control group (without adding any powder, skim milk powder, 50% demineralized whey powder and 70% demineralized whey powder samples were in two different addition rate (2% and 4%. Also samples were analyzed for sensory properties. According to the results obtained, the addition of milk powder products affected titratable acidity and tyrosine values of fermented cream samples. Although powder addition and/or storage period didn’t cause significant variations in total solid, ash, fat, pH value, viscosity, acid number, peroxide, tyrosine and diacetyl values; sensory properties of fermented cream samples were influenced by both powder addition and storage period. Fermented cream containing 2% skim milk powder gets the top score of sensory evaluation among the samples.

  10. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of bovine rennet whey powder in milk powder and buttermilk powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, M.G.E.G.; Kemmers-Voncken, A.; Boers, E.A.M.; Frankhuizen, R.; Haasnoot, W.

    2008-01-01

    An inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of bovine rennet whey (BRW) solids in skim milk powders (SMP) and buttermilk powders is presented. The BRW content was determined in a neutralised trichloroacetic acid sample extract by binding of the dissolved

  11. Photoacoustic study of heated binary mixtures containing whey and skimmed-milk powders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doka, O.; Bicanic, D.; Frankhuizen, R.

    1999-01-01

    A novel methodology is proposed to determine the amount of whey powder in a binary mixture containing whey and skimmed-milk powders. This new approach is based on measurement of the amplitude of the photoacoustic (PA) signal obtained when the mixture is exposed to a controlled thermal treatment; the

  12. Formulation, characterisation and topical application of oil powders from whey protein stabilised emulsions / Magdalena Kotze

    OpenAIRE

    Kotze, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The available literature indicates that to date, few research has been performed on oil powders for topical delivery. The aim of this project was to investigate the release characteristics of oil powder formulations, as well as their dermal and transdermal delivery properties. Whey protein-stabilised emulsions were used to develop oil powders. Whey protein was used alone, or in combination with chitosan or carrageenan. Nine oil powders, with salicylic acid as the active ingredient, were fo...

  13. Determination of whey adulteration in milk powder by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Gonca; Sezer, Banu; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Berberoglu, Halil; Topcu, Ali; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2016-12-01

    A rapid and in situ method has been developed to detect and quantify adulterated milk powder through adding whey powder by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The methodology is based on elemental composition differences between milk and whey products. Milk powder, sweet and acid whey powders were produced as standard samples, and milk powder was adulterated with whey powders. Based on LIBS spectra of standard samples and commercial products, species was identified using principle component analysis (PCA) method, and discrimination rate of milk and whey powders was found as 80.5%. Calibration curves were obtained with partial least squares regression (PLS). Correlation coefficient (R(2)) and limit of detection (LOD) values were 0.981 and 1.55% for adulteration with sweet whey powder, and 0.985 and 0.55% for adulteration with acid whey powder, respectively. The results were found to be consistent with the data from inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of preheating and other process parameters on whey protein reactions during skim milk powder manufacture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oldfield, D.J; Taylor, M.W; Singh, H

    2005-01-01

    ... to a large extent to control the functional properties of the powder. A number of changes occur in milk during preheating: whey protein denaturation, association of denatured whey proteins with the casein micelle, transfer of soluble calcium and phosphate to the colloidal phase, destruction of bacteria and inactivation of enzymes ( Singh & Newstea...

  15. Authentication of Whey Protein Powders by Portable Mid-Infrared Spectrometers Combined with Pattern Recognition Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Tan, Siow Ying; Mutilangi, William; Aykas, Didem P; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a simple and rapid method to differentiate whey protein types (WPC, WPI, and WPH) used for beverage manufacturing by combining the spectral signature collected from portable mid-infrared spectrometers and pattern recognition analysis. Whey protein powders from different suppliers are produced using a large number of processing and compositional variables, resulting in variation in composition, concentration, protein structure, and thus functionality. Whey protein powders including whey protein isolates, whey protein concentrates and whey protein hydrolysates were obtained from different suppliers and their spectra collected using portable mid-infrared spectrometers (single and triple reflection) by pressing the powder onto an Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) diamond crystal with a pressure clamp. Spectra were analyzed by soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) generating a classification model showing the ability to differentiate whey protein types by forming tight clusters with interclass distance values of >3, considered to be significantly different from each other. The major bands centered at 1640 and 1580 cm(-1) were responsible for separation and were associated with differences in amide I and amide II vibrations of proteins, respectively. Another important band in whey protein clustering was associated with carboxylate vibrations of acidic amino acids (∼1570 cm(-1)). The use of a portable mid-IR spectrometer combined with pattern recognition analysis showed potential for discriminating whey protein ingredients that can help to streamline the analytical procedure so that it is more applicable for field-based screening of ingredients. A rapid, simple and accurate method was developed to authenticate commercial whey protein products by using portable mid-infrared spectrometers combined with chemometrics, which could help ensure the functionality of whey protein ingredients in food applications. © 2015

  16. Evaluation of milk powder quality by protein oxidative modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidegger, Dana; Radici, Paola M; Vergara-Roig, Víctor A; Bosio, Noelia S; Pesce, Silvia F; Pecora, Rolando P; Romano, José C P; Kivatinitz, Silvia C

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the present research was to evaluate commercially available milk powders according to their protein oxidative modifications and antioxidant capacity, and to evaluate if these characteristics are related to physical quality parameters such as dispersibility or stability during storage. Fifteen commercially processed spray-dried milk powders were evaluated: 6 whole milk powders (WMP), 4 skim milk powders (SMP), and 5 infant formula powders (IFP). Protein oxidative status was measured as protein carbonyl (PC) content, dityrosine content, and extent of protein polymerization. The level of PC was slightly lower in SMP than in WMP, whereas IFP had more than twice as much PC as WMP (2.8 ± 0.4, 2.1 ± 0.2, and 6.5 ± 1.3 nmol/mg of protein for WMP, SMP, and IFP, respectively). No differences were detected in dityrosine accumulation. Although all the possible pairs of parameters were tested for correlations, we found that 4 parameters were linked: PC, whey content, protein aggregate level, and dispersibility. After 9 mo of storage at -20°C or room temperature, all milk samples were analyzed to evaluate changes in protein oxidative status (PC, dityrosine, and protein integrity) and related parameters. Compared with the initial condition, PC increased in all tested samples after 9 mo of storage at -20°C or at room temperature. Stored milk powders had increased PC and decreased dispersibility compared with prestorage levels. Our results highlight the importance of protein oxidative status in milk powder and its relationship to other related quality parameters, such as protein integrity and dispersibility. Our findings suggest that the understanding of such relationships could help in developing quality differentiation for different types of milk powders in the product market. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of ultrasound on the physical and functional properties of reconstituted whey protein powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisu, Bogdan; Lee, Judy; Chandrapala, Jayani; Bhaskaracharya, Raman; Palmer, Martin; Kentish, Sandra; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2011-05-01

    Aqueous solutions of reconstituted whey protein- concentrate (WPC) & isolate (WPI) powders were sonicated at 20 kHz in a batch process for 1-60 min. Sonication at 20 kHz increased the clarity of WPC solutions largely due to the reduction in the size of the suspended insoluble aggregates. The gel strength of these solutions when heated at 80°C for 20 min also increased with sonication, while gelation time and gel syneresis were reduced. These improvements in gel strength were observed across a range of initial pH values, suggesting that the mechanism for gel promotion is different from the well known effects of pH. Examining the microstructure of the whey protein gels indicated a compact network of densely packed whey protein aggregates arising from ultrasound treatment. Comparable changes were not observed with whey protein isolate solutions, which may reflect the absence of larger aggregates in the initial solution or differences in composition.

  18. Improved ethanol production from cheese whey, whey powder, and sugar beet molasses by "Vitreoscilla hemoglobin expressing" Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Meltem Yesilcimen; Sar, Taner; Ozcelik, Busra

    2014-01-01

    This work investigated the improvement of ethanol production by engineered ethanologenic Escherichia coli to express the hemoglobin from the bacterium Vitreoscilla (VHb). Ethanologenic E. coli strain FBR5 and FBR5 transformed with the VHb gene in two constructs (strains TS3 and TS4) were grown in cheese whey (CW) medium at small and large scales, at both high and low aeration, or with whey powder (WP) or sugar beet molasses hydrolysate (SBMH) media at large scale and low aeration. Culture pH, cell growth, VHb levels, and ethanol production were evaluated after 48 h. VHb expression in TS3 and TS4 enhanced their ethanol production in CW (21-419%), in WP (17-362%), or in SBMH (48-118%) media. This work extends the findings that "VHb technology" may be useful for improving the production of ethanol from waste and byproducts of various sources.

  19. Structural markers of the evolution of whey protein isolate powder during aging and effects on foaming properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, E-A; Le Floch-Fouéré, C; Briard-Bion, V; Schuck, P; Croguennec, T; Jeantet, R

    2016-07-01

    The market for dairy powders, including high added-value products (e.g., infant formulas, protein isolates) has increased continuously over the past decade. However, the processing and storage of whey protein isolate (WPI) powders can result in changes in their structural and functional properties. It is therefore of great importance to understand the mechanisms and to identify the structural markers involved in the aging of WPI powders to control their end use properties. This study was performed to determine the effects of different storage conditions on protein lactosylations, protein denaturation in WPI, and in parallel on their foaming and interfacial properties. Six storage conditions involving different temperatures (θ) and water activities (aw) were studied for periods of up to 12mo. The results showed that for θ≤20°C, foaming properties of powders did not significantly differ from nonaged whey protein isolates (reference), regardless of the aw. On the other hand, powders presented significant levels of denaturation/aggregation and protein modification involving first protein lactosylation and then degradation of Maillard reaction products, resulting in a higher browning index compared with the reference, starting from the early stage of storage at 60°C. These changes resulted in a higher foam density and a slightly better foam stability (whisking) at 6mo. At 40°C, powders showed transitional evolution. The findings of this study will make it possible to define maximum storage durations and to recommend optimal storage conditions in accordance with WPI powder end-use properties. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The functional properties, modification and utilization of whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Venter

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein has an excellent nutritional value and exhibits a functional potential. In comparison with certain other food proteins, the whey protein content of essential amino acids is extremely favourable for human consumption. Depending on the heat-treatment history thereof, soluble whey proteins with utilizable functional properties, apart from high biological value, true digestibility, protein efficiency ratio and nett protein utilization, can be recovered. Various technological and chemical recovery processes have been designed. Chemically and enzymatically modified whey protein is manufactured to obtain technological and functional advantages. The important functional properties of whey proteins, namely hydration, gelation, emulsifying and foaming properties, are reviewed.

  1. Whey: technologies for coproducts production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Pinheiro Alves

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present article was to present the principles of whey processability. In order to reach these objectives, the article presents the whey proteins, the membrane filtration process and the spray drying technology. The main technologies for use whey are presented: whey protein beverages, whey powder, whey protein concentrate powder, whey protein isolate powder and powders of whey protein fractions.

  2. The use of whey or skimmed milk powder in fortified blended foods for vulnerable groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoppe, Camilla; Andersen, Gregers S; Jacobsen, Stine

    2008-01-01

    . Adding whey or skimmed milk powder to FBF improves the protein quality, allowing a reduction in total amount of protein, which could have potential metabolic advantages. It also allows for a reduced content of soy and cereal and thereby a reduction of potential antinutrients. It is possible that adding......Fortified blended foods (FBF), especially corn soy blend, are used as food aid for millions of people worldwide, especially malnourished individuals and vulnerable groups. There are only a few studies evaluating the effect of FBF on health outcomes, and the potential negative effect...... of antinutrients has not been examined. Different lines of evidence suggest that dairy proteins have beneficial effects on vulnerable groups. Here we review the evidence on the effects of adding whey or skimmed milk powder to FBF used for malnourished infants and young children or people living with HIV or AIDS...

  3. Moisture sorption and stickiness behaviour of hydrolysed whey protein/lactose powders

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, S; O’Callaghan, D.

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The potentially negative effects of low molecular weight disaccharides, especially lactose, on spray-drying efficiency and storage stability of dairy powders are often counterbalanced by the presence of intact milk proteins. Hydrolysis of proteins, however, may impair such protective effects and contribute to a loss in production performance. Hydrolysed or non-hydrolysed whey protein/lactose (WP/L) dispersions were spray dried, in order to examine the effects of protei...

  4. Whey Protein/Polysaccharide-Stabilized Oil Powders for Topical Application—Release and Transdermal Delivery of Salicylic Acid from Oil Powders Compared to Redispersed Powders

    OpenAIRE

    Kotzé, Magdalena; Otto, Anja; Jordaan, Anine; Du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2015-01-01

    Oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions are commonly converted into solid-like powders in order to improve their physical and chemical stabilities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized o/w emulsions could be converted into stable oil powders by means of freeze-drying. Moreover, during this study, the effects of pH and polymer type on release and trans(dermal) delivery of salicylic acid, a model drug, from these oil powders were investigated and compared...

  5. The use of whey or skimmed milk powder in fortified blended foods for vulnerable groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Camilla; Andersen, Gregers S; Jacobsen, Stine; Mølgaard, Christian; Friis, Henrik; Sangild, Per T; Michaelsen, Kim F

    2008-01-01

    Fortified blended foods (FBF), especially corn soy blend, are used as food aid for millions of people worldwide, especially malnourished individuals and vulnerable groups. There are only a few studies evaluating the effect of FBF on health outcomes, and the potential negative effect of antinutrients has not been examined. Different lines of evidence suggest that dairy proteins have beneficial effects on vulnerable groups. Here we review the evidence on the effects of adding whey or skimmed milk powder to FBF used for malnourished infants and young children or people living with HIV or AIDS. Adding whey or skimmed milk powder to FBF improves the protein quality, allowing a reduction in total amount of protein, which could have potential metabolic advantages. It also allows for a reduced content of soy and cereal and thereby a reduction of potential antinutrients. It is possible that adding milk could improve weight gain, linear growth, and recovery from malnutrition, but this needs to be confirmed. Bioactive factors in whey might have beneficial effects on the immune system and muscle synthesis, but evidence from vulnerable groups is lacking. Milk proteins will improve flavor, which is important for acceptability in vulnerable groups. The most important disadvantage is a considerable increase in price. Adding 10-15% milk powder would double the price, which means that such a product should be used only in well-defined vulnerable groups with special needs. The potential beneficial effects of adding milk protein and lack of evidence in vulnerable groups call for randomized intervention studies.

  6. Effective ethanol production from whey powder through immobilized E. coli expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sar, Taner; Stark, Benjamin C; Yesilcimen Akbas, Meltem

    2017-03-04

    Ethanol production from whey powder was investigated by using free as well as alginate immobilized E. coli and E. coli expressing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) in both shake flask and fermenter cultures. Media with varying levels of whey (lactose contents of 3%, 5%, 8% or 15%) and yeast extract (0.3% or 0.5%) were evaluated with fermentation times of 48-96 h. Immobilization and VHb expression resulted in higher ethanol production with all media; the increases ranged from 2% to 89% for immobilization and from 2% to 182% for VHb expression. It was determined that growth medium containing 8% lactose with 0.5% yeast extract yielded the highest ethanol production for free or immobilized strains, with or without VHb expression, in both shake flask and fermenter cultures. Immobilization with alginate was found to be a promising process for ethanol production by VHb-expressing ethanologenic E. coli.

  7. Stability of whey protein hydrolysate powders: effects of relative humidity and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Liu, Dasong; Chen, Xiaoxia; Chen, Yingjia; Labuza, Theodore P

    2014-05-01

    Whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) is now considered as an important and special dairy protein ingredient for its nutritional and functional properties. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effect of environmental relative humidity (RH) and storage temperature on the physicochemical stability of three WPH powders with hydrolysis degrees (DH) of 5.2%, 8.8% and 14.9%, respectively. The water sorption isotherms of the three WPH powders fitted the Guggenheim-Andersson-DeBoer model well. An increase in water content leaded to a decrease in glass transition temperature (Tg), following a linear Tg vs log water content relationship. Moreover, an increase in DH caused the decrease in Tg at the same water content. Changes in microstructure and colour occurred significantly when the WPH powders were stored at high environmental RH or temperature, especially for those with high DH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized oil powders for topical application-release and transdermal delivery of salicylic acid from oil powders compared to redispersed powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzé, Magdalena; Otto, Anja; Jordaan, Anine; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2015-08-01

    Oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions are commonly converted into solid-like powders in order to improve their physical and chemical stabilities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized o/w emulsions could be converted into stable oil powders by means of freeze-drying. Moreover, during this study, the effects of pH and polymer type on release and trans(dermal) delivery of salicylic acid, a model drug, from these oil powders were investigated and compared to those of the respective template emulsions and redispersed oil powders. Physical characterization of the various formulations was performed, such as droplet size analysis and oil leakage, and relationships drawn with regards to release and trans(dermal) delivery. The experimental outcomes revealed that the oil powders could be redispersed in water without changing the release characteristics of salicylic acid. pH and polymer type affected the release of salicylic acid from the oil powders, template emulsions, and redispersed powders similarly. Contrary, the transdermal delivery from the oil powders and from their respective redispersed oil powders was differently affected by pH and polymer type. It was hypothesized that the release had been influenced by the electrostatic interactions between salicylic acid and emulsifiers, whereas the transdermal performance could have been determined by the particle or aggregate sizes of the formulations.

  9. Effect of yogurt and bifidus yogurt fortified with skim milk powder, condensed whey and lactose-hydrolysed condensed whey on serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beena, A; Prasad, V

    1997-08-01

    The possible hypocholesterolaemic properties of milk and fermented milk products have been investigated in groups of albino rats given a basal diet, basal diet plus cholesterol, and basal diet plus cholesterol together with whole milk or standard or bifidus yogurt. The yogurts were fortified with skim milk powder, condensed whey or lactose-hydrolysed condensed whey. After 30 d, triacylglycerols, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were measured in serum. Whole milk and ordinary yogurt had no hypocholesterolaemic effect, but standard yogurt containing lactose-hydrolysed condensed whey and all bifidus yogurts lowered serum cholesterol. In general, yogurts changed HDL-cholesterol little, but tended to raise triacylglycerols. There was marked lowering of LDL-cholesterol in rats given either type of yogurt fortified with whey proteins. This study has demonstrated in a rat model that bifidus yogurts and yogurts fortified with whey proteins can reduce total and LDL-cholesterol, and suggests that if they have the same effect in human subjects they have potential value in cholesterol-lowering diets.

  10. Effects of whey or maltodextrin addition during production on physical quality of white cheese powder during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbay, Zafer; Koca, Nurcan

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing demand for cheese as a food ingredient, especially as a flavoring agent. One of the most important cheese flavoring agents is cheese powder. To obtain an intense cheese flavor, ripened cheese is used as a raw material in cheese powder but this increases production costs. Moreover, use of natural cheese decreases the physical quality of powder because of its high fat content. In this study, we evaluated opportunities to use whey or maltodextrin for improving the physical quality of powders in production of white cheese powder. We produced cheese powders with 3 different formulations-control (CON), whey-added (WACP), and maltodextrin-added (MACP)-and determined the effects of formulation on cheese powder quality. Physical quality parameters such as color, densities, reconstitution properties, free fat content, particle morphology, and sensory characteristics were investigated. The different cheese powders were stored for 12 mo at 20°C and we evaluated the effect of storage on powder quality. Addition of maltodextrin to cheese powder formulations significantly improved their physical quality. The densities and reconstitution properties of cheese powder were increased and free fat content was decreased by use of maltodextrin. The MACP particles were spherical with a uniform distribution and larger particle sizes, whereas CON and WACP particles were wrinkled, irregular shaped with deep surface dents, and variable in size. Although caking was observed in scanning electron micrographs after 12 mo of storage, it was not detected by sensory panelists. The color of cheese powders changed very slowly during storage but browning was detected. The results of this study show that it is possible to use maltodextrin or whey in production of white cheese powder to reduce production costs and improve the physical quality of powders. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunochromatographic Lateral-flow test strip for the rapid detection of added bovine rennet whey in milk and milk powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin-Hernandez, C.; Munoz, M.; Daury, C.; Weymuth, H.; Kemmers-Voncken, A.; Corbation, V.; Toribo, T.; Bremer, M.G.E.G.

    2009-01-01

    An immunochromatographic lateral-flow test dipstick test was developed for the fast detection of bovine rennet whey in liquid milk and milk powder. The test is based on the binding of casein glycomacropeptide (cGMP) by two specific anti-bovine ¿-casein monoclonal antibodies and has a visual

  12. Rheological, functional and thermo-physical properties of ultrasound treated whey proteins with addition of sucrose or milk powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anet Režek Jambrak

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound represents a non-thermal food processing technique and has great potential to be used in the food industry. The objective of this research was to observe ultrasound impact on physical properties of model systems prepared with whey protein isolates (WPI or whey protein concentrates (WPC with or without sucrose or milk powder addition. This kind of systems is often used in milk beverages and milk based products. Model systems with protein and milk powder or sucrose addition were treated with high power ultrasound (HPU probe of 30 kHz frequency for 5 and 10 minutes. After sonication several properties were determined and examined: solubility, emulsifying and foaming properties, rheological and thermophysical properties. Ultrasound treatment showed severe influence on all examined properties, caused by protein denaturation as a consequence of cavitation and microstreaming effects. Ultrasound treatment caused decrease in protein solubility for whey protein isolate and whey protein concentrates model systems, compared to untreated sample. There was statistically significant increase in foam volume of model systems, prepared with sucrose or milk powder and WPI after ultrasound treatment. Statistically significant decrease in emulsion activity and emulsion stability indices was observed for model systems prepared solely with isolates and concentrates. After treatment of whey protein model systems (with or without milk powder or sucrose with 30 kHz ultrasound, the changes in consistency coefficients (k were observed, but there were no significant changes in flow behaviour indices (n. After addition of milk powder or sucrose, statistically significant decrease in initial freezing and melting temperatures was observed due to the ultrasound treatment.

  13. Efficient production of lactulose from whey powder by cellobiose 2-epimerase in an enzymatic membrane reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lingtian; Xu, Cen; Li, Sha; Liang, Jinfeng; Xu, Hong; Xu, Zheng

    2017-06-01

    In this study, the gene encoding cellobiose 2-epimerase from Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus (CsCE) was successfully expressed in Bacillus subtilis WB800. After the fermentation medium optimization, the activity of recombinant strain was 4.5-fold higher than the original medium in a 7.5L fermentor. The optimal catalytic pH and temperature of crude CsCE were 7.0 and 80°C, respectively. An enzymatic synthesis of lactulose was developed using cheese-whey lactose as its substrate. The maximum conversion rate of whey powder obtained was 58.5% using 7.5 U/mL CsCE. The enzymatic membrane reactor system exhibited a great operational stability, confirmed with the higher lactose conversion (42.4%) after 10 batches. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of lactulose synthesis in food grade strain, which improve the food safety, and we not only realize the biological production of lactulose, but also make good use of industrial waste, which have positive impact on environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of SPME Methods for Determining Volatile Compounds in Milk, Cheese, and Whey Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Tunick

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS are commonly used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile compounds in various dairy products, but conditions have to be adjusted to maximize release while not generating new compounds that are absent in the original sample. Queso Fresco, a fresh non-melting cheese, may be heated at 60 °C for 30 min; in contrast, compounds are produced in milk when exposed to light and elevated temperatures, so milk samples are heated as little as possible. Products such as dehydrated whey protein are more stable and can be exposed to longer periods (60 min of warming at lower temperature (40 °C without decomposition, allowing for capture and analysis of many minor components. The techniques for determining the volatiles in dairy products by SPME and GC-MS have to be optimized to produce reliable results with minimal modifications and analysis times.

  15. The macro nutrient removal efficiencies of a vertical flow constructed wetland fed with demineralized cheese whey powder solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcuk, Arda

    2012-02-01

    This study aims to remove the macro-sized nutrients that are present in the cheese whey powder solution through the use of constructed wetland systems. For this purpose, 70% and 40% demineralized solutions of cheese whey powder were used. For both concentrations, control reactors are run in parallel with Typha angustifolia planted reactors for the duration of a 92 day period. Zeolite and gravel were used as the filling material. The planted reactor, which was fed with the 70% solution, was named as Cheese Whey Powder Solution (CWPS) 1 and its unplanted control was named CWPS 2 while the reactor, which was fed with the 40% solution, was named as CWPS 3 and its unplanted control was named CWPS 4. The removal of COD, PO4-P and NH4-N were obtained as 37.47%, 45.62%, and 68.88% in CWPS 1; 24.89%, 35.74%, and 63.15% in CWPS 2; 51.15%, 54.96%, and 64.13% in CWPS 3; and 28.35%, 23.99%, and 65.92% in CWPS 4, respectively.

  16. Skim milk powder enhances trabecular bone architecture compared with casein or whey in diet-induced obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Aviv; Manske, Sarah L; Eller, Lindsay K; Lorincz, Caeley; Reimer, Raylene A; Zernicke, Ronald F

    2012-03-01

    We previously showed that skim milk powder (SMP) prevents weight gain more so than casein or whey alone. Dairy foods and changes in body mass can affect bone architecture; therefore, our objective was to examine the effect of dairy proteins on bone structure in the tibia of dietary-induced obese rats. Twelve-week-old diet-induced obese Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to one of six diets that varied in protein source (casein, whey, or SMP), Ca level (0.67% or 2.4%), and energy density (high-fat/high-sucrose [HFHS], or normal energy density [NE]). After 8 wk, body composition was assessed via dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and trabecular and cortical bone parameters of the tibia were assessed using micro-computed tomography and mixed model analysis. Rats fed SMP with 2.4% calcium had significantly lower body mass and fat mass than all other groups. The ratio of bone volume to total volume (BV/TV) was significantly higher when the HFHS diet was supplemented with SMP and 2.4% calcium compared with whey (+66.7%) or casein (+32.6%). The HFHS diet group had 49.3% greater BV/TV compared with the NE groups. Increasing the amount of calcium resulted in a significant increase in BV/TV (188.9%) in the HFHS diet groups but not in the NE groups. The intake of skim milk powder supplemented with calcium enhances trabecular bone architecture in obese rats consuming HFHS diet to a greater extent than with either casein or whey protein alone. Bioactive ingredients in complete dairy may contribute to these effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High hydrostatic pressure modification of whey protein concentrate for improved body and texture of lowfat ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S-Y; Swanson, B G; Ross, C F; Clark, S

    2008-04-01

    Previous research demonstrated that application of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), particularly at 300 MPa for 15 min, can enhance foaming properties of whey protein concentrate (WPC). The purpose of this research was to determine the practical impact of HHP-treated WPC on the body and texture of lowfat ice cream. Washington State University (WSU)-WPC was produced by ultrafiltration of fresh separated whey received from the WSU creamery. Commercial whey protein concentrate 35 (WPC 35) powder was reconstituted to equivalent total solids as WSU-WPC (8.23%). Three batches of lowfat ice cream mix were produced to contain WSU-WPC without HHP, WSU-WPC with HHP (300 MPa for 15 min), and WPC 35 without HHP. All lowfat ice cream mixes contained 10% WSU-WPC or WPC 35. Overrun and foam stability of ice cream mixes were determined after whipping for 15 min. Ice creams were produced using standard ice cream ingredients and processing. The hardness of ice creams was determined with a TA-XT2 texture analyzer. Sensory evaluation by balanced reference duo-trio test was carried out using 52 volunteers. The ice cream mix containing HHP-treated WSU-WPC exhibited the greatest overrun and foam stability, confirming the effect of HHP on foaming properties of whey proteins in a complex system. Ice cream containing HHP-treated WSU-WPC exhibited significantly greater hardness than ice cream produced with untreated WSU-WPC or WPC 35. Panelists were able to distinguish between ice cream containing HHP-treated WSU-WPC and ice cream containing untreated WPC 35. Improvements of overrun and foam stability were observed when HHP-treated whey protein was used at a concentration as low as 10% (wt/wt) in ice cream mix. The impact of HHP on the functional properties of whey proteins was more pronounced than the impact on sensory properties.

  18. The effect of acidification of liquid whey protein concentrate on the flavor of spray-dried powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Curtis W; Bastian, Eric; Farkas, Brian; Drake, MaryAnne

    2014-07-01

    Off-flavors in whey protein negatively influence consumer acceptance of whey protein ingredient applications. Clear acidic beverages are a common application of whey protein, and recent studies have demonstrated that beverage processing steps, including acidification, enhance off-flavor production from whey protein. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of preacidification of liquid ultrafiltered whey protein concentrate (WPC) before spray drying on flavor of dried WPC. Two experiments were performed to achieve the objective. In both experiments, Cheddar cheese whey was manufactured, fat-separated, pasteurized, bleached (250 mg/kg of hydrogen peroxide), and ultrafiltered (UF) to obtain liquid WPC that was 13% solids (wt/wt) and 80% protein on a solids basis. In experiment 1, the liquid retentate was then acidified using a blend of phosphoric and citric acids to the following pH values: no acidification (control; pH 6.5), pH 5.5, or pH 3.5. The UF permeate was used to normalize the protein concentration of each treatment. The retentates were then spray dried. In experiment 2, 150 μg/kg of deuterated hexanal (D₁₂-hexanal) was added to each treatment, followed by acidification and spray drying. Both experiments were replicated 3 times. Flavor properties of the spray-dried WPC were evaluated by sensory and instrumental analyses in experiment 1 and by instrumental analysis in experiment 2. Preacidification to pH 3.5 resulted in decreased cardboard flavor and aroma intensities and an increase in soapy flavor, with decreased concentrations of hexanal, heptanal, nonanal, decanal, dimethyl disulfide, and dimethyl trisulfide compared with spray drying at pH 6.5 or 5.5. Adjustment to pH 5.5 before spray drying increased cabbage flavor and increased concentrations of nonanal at evaluation pH values of 3.5 and 5.5 and dimethyl trisulfide at all evaluation pH values. In general, the flavor effects of preacidification were consistent regardless of the pH to

  19. Health issues of whey proteins: 3. gut health promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gertjan Schaafsma

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential of whey protein to promote gut health. The high digestibility and specific amino acid composition of whey protein, as present in whey powder, whey protein concentrate and whey protein isolate, explain why ingestion of whey protein will exert this beneficial effect.

  20. Health issues of whey proteins: 3. Gut health promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential of whey protein to promote gut health. The high digestibility and specific amino acid composition of whey protei, as present in whey powder, whey protein concentrate and whey protein isolate, explain why ingestion of whey protein will exert this beneficial effect.

  1. Evaluation of folic acid release from spray dried powder particles of pectin-whey protein nano-capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadpour, Elham; Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Maghsoudlou, Yahya

    2017-02-01

    Our main goal was to evaluate release kinetics of nano-encapsulated folic acid within a double W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion. First, W 1 /O nano-emulsions loaded with folic acid were prepared and re-emulsified into an aqueous phase (W 2 ) containing single whey protein concentrate (WPC) layer or double layer complex of WPC-pectin to form W 1 /O/W 2 emulsions. Final double emulsions were spray dried and their microstructure was analyzed in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Also the release trends of folic acid were determined and fitted with experimental models of zero and first order, Higuchi, and Hixson-Crowell. It was revealed that folic acid nano-capsules made with Span as the surfactant had the lowest release rate in acidic conditions (pH=4) and highest release in the alkaline conditions (pH=11). The best model fitting for folic acid release data was observed for single layer WPC encapsulated powders with the highest R 2 . Our FTIR data showed there was no chemical interaction between WPC and pectin in double layered capsules and based on SEM results, single WPC layered capsules resulted in smooth and uniform particles which by incorporating pectin, some wrinkles and shrinkage were found in the surface of spray dried powder particles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protein daily for 2 years does not improve bone density in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Weight loss. Most research suggests that taking whey protein alone, along with diet modifications, or while following an exercise plan does not seem to reduce weight for ...

  3. [Nutritional physiology of whey and whey components].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, C A; Behnke, U

    1997-02-01

    Deriving from positive effects of whey drinking cures in antiquity, the Middle Ages and modern time, a review is given on nutritional significance of whey. The proteins are essential components of whey and belong to the proteins with highest biological value because of their amino acid composition. Besides, they show fundamental functional properties, which enable a varied application in foods, dietetic foods and beverages in form of different whey products (powder, protein concentrates and isolates). Whey proteins have found considerable usage in infant's nutrition as whey predominant formulas as well as whey protein hydrolysates in case of cow's milk protein intolerances. A recent field of research are biological active peptide sequences which become effective during digestion and are of importance for secretion of entero hormones as well as for immune enhancing effects. They may contribute to assess the biological value of whey proteins under enlarged points of view and to develop new application forms and areas. It is pointed to further fields of application (e.g. adipositas, gout, kidney insufficiency). Concerning the quantitatively most dominant lactose in whey, it is dealt with its importance for the healthy development of infants (adaptation to the increased lactose content of mother's milk) as well as with lactose intolerance and galactosaemia. In case of mineral salts of whey it is emphasized the high nutrient density of calcium (prophylaxis for osteoporosis), the beneficial Ca:P and Na:K proportions (antihypertensive in case of the last one), the promotion of absorption of mineral salts by lactose, and the high content of iodine. The whey is rich in B-vitamins, which contribute essentially for their satisfaction or requirement in case of a corresponding consumption. To be emphasized is the vitamin B12 in milk and whey, which is the sole source of this indispensable nutrient for blood-formation and cell division in lacto-ovo-vegetarian nutrition. In

  4. The biotechnological potential of whey

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Michael P.; Walsh, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Whey is a highly polluting by-product of cheese and casein powder manufacturing with worldwide production of whey is estimated at around 190×106 ton/year and growing. Historically whey was considered a burdensome, environmentally damaging by-product. In the last decades however, much research has gone into finding viable alternatives for whey rather than just disposing of it. Multiple biotechnological avenues have been explored and in some cases exploited to turn this waste product into a val...

  5. Effect of initial bacteria concentration on hydrogen gas production from cheese whey powder solution by thermophilic dark fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargi, Fikret; Eren, Nur Seza; Ozmihci, Serpil

    2012-07-01

    Dark fermentative hydrogen gas production from cheese whey powder solution was realized at 55°C. Experiments were performed at different initial biomass concentrations varying between 0.48 and 2.86 g L(-1) with a constant initial substrate concentration of 26 ± 2 g total sugar (TS) per liter. The highest cumulative hydrogen evolution (633 mL, 30°C), hydrogen yield (1.56 mol H(2) mol(-1) glucose), and H(2) formation rate (3.45 mL h(-1) ) were obtained with 1.92 g L(-1) biomass concentration. The specific H(2) production rate decreased with increasing biomasss concentration from the highest value (47.7 mL g(-1) h(-1) ) at 0.48 g L(-1) biomass concentration. Total volatile fatty acid concentration varied beetween 10 and 14 g L(-1) with the highest level of 14.2 g L(-1) at biomass concentration of 0.48 g L(-1) and initial TS content of 28.4 g L(-1) . The experimental data were correlated with the Gompertz equation and the constants were determined. The most suitable initial biomass to substrate ratio yielding the highest H(2) yield and formation rate was 0.082 g biomass per gram of TS. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  6. Antioxidant effects of rosemary extract and whey powder on the oxidative stability of wiener sausages during 10 months frozen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Stephanie A; Trout, Graham R; Dunshea, Frank R; Shah, Nagendra P

    2002-10-01

    Twelve (Large White×Landrace) gilts were randomly allotted in a 2×2 factorial design with the respective factors being dietary vitamin E (10 or 200 mg/kg feed) and dietary fishmeal (0 or 5%). Wiener sausages were manufactured with or without antioxidants such as rosemary extract and sweet whey powder from meat obtained from the animals after slaughter and stored for 5 days at 4 °C. The oxidative stability of the wieners was examined over ten months of frozen storage. Lipid oxidation in the product was measured by means of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and fluorescence shift. Sensory evaluation of the product to detect oxidative changes was also carried out. The fluorescence shift method was unsatisfactory in the case of wieners containing rosemary extract, as it appeared that the extract contained compounds that fluoresced and therefore interfered with the method. No lipid oxidation as measured by TBARS, fluorescence shift and sensory analysis was observed in wieners stored at -20 °C for 10 months. The oxidative stability of wieners was unaffected (P>0.05) by dietary treatments or by the addition of antioxidants. The high oxidative stability of the wieners, even in the absence of antioxidants, could be due to sodium erythorbate present in the formulation as an additional antioxidant.

  7. Emulsifying properties of tribomechanically treated whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Rimac Brnčić

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Whey proteins are used in a wide range of food products because of their high nutritional value and the ability to contribute to the unique functional properties of the final products. The functional properties of whey proteins are affected not only by the whey origin, season dependent variations of protein and non-protein components amount, but also by the conditions of processes involved in their isolation, purification and modification (temperature, pH, pressure, chemicals. In this research, tribomechanical micronization (TM was used as a technique that could be useful in modification of some functional properties of whey proteins. Therefore, two different commercial powdered whey protein isolates (WPI were used for analysis. Surface hydrophobicity and emulsifying properties (emulsifying activity and emulsion stability were determined before and after TM treatment. The results obtained showed increases in surface hydrophobicity of WPI after TM treatment indicating that TM could induce changes of protein conformation and increase exposure of the previously buried hydrophobic regions. Emulsions prepared with tribomechanically treated WPI showed higher emulsion activity and better emulsion stability. The results obtained suggest that TM can be useful and fast process technique for improvement of functional properties of WPI.

  8. Impact of Ovine Whey Protein Concentrates and Clarification By-Products on the Yield and Quality of Whey Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos D. Pereira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the addition of whey protein concentrates and clarification by-products obtained from ovine cheese whey and deproteinized whey (Sorelho on the yield and quality of the whey cheese (Requeijão have been evaluated. Whey protein concentrates were obtained by ultrafiltration of skimmed whey and Sorelho. The clarification by-products were obtained after the treatment of the skimmed whey and Sorelho by thermocalcic precipitation and microfiltration with two membranes (0.20 and 0.65 μm pore size. Next, the liophilization of the corresponding retentates was carried out. Each powder was added in three different mass ratios: 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 %. The addition of the powders caused higher yields of the whey cheese – mainly the one with the additional whey powder – but it did not affect the strength of the products. The retention of water and other components of whey and milk in the whey cheese was influenced by the protein composition of the powders. In relation to colour parameters, the whey cheese manufactured with ultrafiltration and microfiltration retentate powders showed lower values of ligthness than the control whey cheese – mainly the whey cheese with 1.5 % of added powders. The microstructure constituted of small aggregates in the whey cheese manufactured with ultrafiltration and 0.20-μm microfiltration retentate powders and also by large, smooth structures in the other whey cheeses, especially in batches with added Sorelho powders.

  9. Deproteinization: an integrated-solution approach to increase efficiency in β-galactosidase production using cheese whey powder (CWP) solution

    OpenAIRE

    Leandro Freire dos Santos; Cibely Maria Gonçalves; Priscila Lumi Ishii; Hélio Hiroshi Suguimoto

    2017-01-01

    Whey is the liquid that results from the coagulation of milk during cheese manufacture. Cheese whey is also an important environmental pollution source. The present experiment sought to compare β-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23) production by Aspergillus oryzae from deproteinized and un-deproteinized CWP solutions. β-galactosidase was produced by submerged fermentation in deproteinized or un-deproteinized CWP solutions. To determine the activity of the enzyme, a reaction mixture containing cell-fr...

  10. Modification of Functional Properties of Whey Protein Isolate Nanocomposite Films and Coatings with Nanoclays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Müller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein based films have received considerable attention to be used for environment friendly packaging applications. However, such biopolymers are prevented for use in commercial packaging due to their limited mechanical and barrier performance. The addition of nanofillers is a common method to overcome those drawbacks of biopolymers. Whey protein isolate (WPI based nanocomposite cast films and coatings were produced using montmorillonite and vermiculite clay as nanofiller in different concentrations. Uniform distribution of filler within the polymeric matrix was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties such as tensile strength as well as Young’s modulus were increased after increasing the filler content, while elongation at break values decreased. All samples showed weak barrier potential against water vapor. Nanoclay incorporation, however, reduced water vapor transmission rates by approximately 50%. The oxygen barrier performance was improved for all nanocomposites. Results also indicated proportionality with the filler ratio according to applied models. The highest barrier improvement factors (BIF were greater than five for the cast films and even greater than sixteen for the coatings. Developed WPI-based composites depicted nanoenhanced material properties representing a promising alternative to fossil-based packaging films.

  11. Deproteinization: an integrated-solution approach to increase efficiency in β-galactosidase production using cheese whey powder (CWP solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Freire dos Santos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Whey is the liquid that results from the coagulation of milk during cheese manufacture. Cheese whey is also an important environmental pollution source. The present experiment sought to compare β-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23 production by Aspergillus oryzae from deproteinized and un-deproteinized CWP solutions. β-galactosidase was produced by submerged fermentation in deproteinized or un-deproteinized CWP solutions. To determine the activity of the enzyme, a reaction mixture containing cell-free extract and ortho Nitrophenyl β galactoside (ONPG was used. The results indicated that β-galactosidase induction was greater when using deproteinized CWP solution compared to the un deproteinized CWP solution. These results may enable an alternative management of cheese whey, thereby decreasing its impact on the environment and producing value-added biomacromolecules.

  12. Isoenergic modification of whey protein structure by denaturation and crosslinking using transglutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stender, Emil G P; Koutina, Glykeria; Almdal, Kristoffer; Hassenkam, Tue; Mackie, Alan; Ipsen, Richard; Svensson, Birte

    2018-01-12

    Transglutaminase (TG) catalyzes formation of covalent bonds between lysine and glutamine side chains and has applications in manipulation of food structure. Physical properties of a whey protein mixture (SPC) denatured either at elevated pH or by heat-treatment and followed by TG catalyzed crosslinking, have been characterised using dynamic light scattering, size exclusion chromatography, flourescence spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The degree of enzymatic crosslinking appeared higher for pH- than for heat-denatured SPC. The hydrophobic surface properties depended on the treatment, thus heating caused the largest exposure of the hydrophobic core of SPC proteins, which was decreased by crosslinking. The particle size of the treated SPC samples increased upon crosslinking by TG. Moreover, the particle morphology depended on the type of denaturing treatment, thus heat-treated SPC contained fibrillar structures, while pH-denatured SPC remained globular as documented by using atomic force microscopy. Finally, the in vitro digestability of the different SPC samples was assessed under simulated gastric and intestinal conditions. Notably heat-treatment was found to lower the gastric digestion rate and enzymatic crosslinking reduced both the gastric and the intestinal rate of digestion. These characteristics of the various SPC samples provide a useful basis for design of isoenergic model foods applicable in animal and human studies on how food structure affects satiety.

  13. Utilization of whey powder as substrate for low-cost preparation of β-galactosidase as main product, and ethanol as by-product, by a litre-scale integrated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shengping; Chang, Hongxing; Yin, Qingdian; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2017-12-01

    Whey powder, a by-product of dairy industry, is an attractive raw material for value-added products. In this study, utilization of whey powder as substrate for low-cost preparation of β-galactosidase as main product and ethanol as by-product were investigated by a litre-scale integrated strategy, encompassing fermentation, isolation, permeabilization and spray drying. Firstly, through development of low-cost industrial culture and fed-batch strategies by Kluyveromyces lactis, 119.30U/mL β-galactosidase activity and 16.96mg/mL by-product ethanol were achieved. Afterward, an up-dated mathematic model for the recycling permeabilization was established successfully and 30.4g cells sediment isolated from 5L fermentation broth were permeabilized completely by distilled ethanol from broth supernatant. Then β-galactosidase product with 5.15U/mg from protection of gum acacia by spray drying was obtained. Furthermore, by-product ethanol with 31.08% (v/v) was achieved after permeabilization. Therefore, the integrated strategy using whey powder as substrate is a feasible candidate for industrial-scale implementation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Production and modification of hollow powders in plasma under controlled pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaev, Igor P.

    2013-06-01

    Conducting plasma processes under high or low pressure is an efficient way to affect the heat, mass and momentum exchange in a two-phase flow and this technique is widely used in such well-developed technologies as low-pressure plasma spraying (LPPS) and high pressure plasma-chemical processes. In addition operating pressure is a key parameter in novel plasma process for modification of hollow powders properties. Plasma processing of porous ceramic powders is an effective method of producing hollow spheres (HOSP) with predefined properties. Regardless the method hollow powders were produced their geometric and structural properties can be adjusted by re-melting in plasma of certain pressure: low pressure processing will expand hollow spheres and high pressure - contract it. Regulating the outer diameter of hollow sphere allows adjusting its shell thickness, apparent density, gas pressure in the cavity etc. Preliminary experiments with zirconia hollow powders demonstrated good agreement with theoretical estimations of HOSP properties. The same technique can be used for adjusting properties of ceramic hollow powders produced by different methods, including cost effective fly-ash particles (cenospheres).

  15. Improvement of flow and bulk density of pharmaceutical powders using surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallo, Laila J; Ghoroi, Chinmay; Gurumurthy, Lakxmi; Patel, Utsav; Davé, Rajesh N

    2012-02-28

    Improvement in flow and bulk density, the two most important properties that determine the ease with which pharmaceutical powders can be handled, stored and processed, is done through surface modification. A limited design of experiment was conducted to establish a standardized dry coating procedure that limits the extent of powder attrition, while providing the most consistent improvement in angle of repose (AOR). The magnetically assisted impaction coating (MAIC) was considered as a model dry-coater for pharmaceutical powders; ibuprofen, acetaminophen, and ascorbic acid. Dry coated drug powders were characterized by AOR, particle size as a function of dispersion pressure, particle size distribution, conditioned bulk density (CBD), Carr index (CI), flow function coefficient (FFC), cohesion coefficient using different instruments, including a shear cell in the Freeman FT4 powder rheometer, and Hansen flowability index. Substantial improvement was observed in all the measured properties after dry coating relative to the uncoated powders, such that each powder moved from a poorer to a better flow classification and showed improved dispersion. The material intrinsic property such as cohesion, plotted as a function of particle size, gave a trend similar to those of bulk flow properties, AOR and CI. Property improvement is also illustrated in a phase map of inverse cohesion (or FFC) as a function of bulk density, which also indicated a significant positive shift due to dry coating. It is hoped that such phase maps are useful in manufacturing decisions regarding the need for dry coating, which will allow moving from wet granulation to roller compaction or to direct compression based formulations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Instrumental texture and sensory evaluation of fermented dairy beverages processed with reconstituted goat whey powder and a co-culture of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus casei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Áurea Marcela de Souza Pereira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Lactobacillus casei BGP93 used as adjunct culture on the physicochemical, textural and sensory characteristics of a dairy beverage processed with goat Coalho cheese whey powder and Streptococcus thermophilus TA-40 as starter (ST-LC beverage were investigated in comparison to a control product (ST beverage without L. casei. No significant differences were observed between the ST and ST-LC trials concerning the acidification pattern throughout the fermentation process (P>0.05. Post-acidification was also not observed for both trials since their pH values were maintained stable, without significant differences during 21 days at 4 ± 1 °C. This pH stability reinforced the maintenance of firmness, consistency, cohesiveness and viscosity index without significant differences between the sampling periods throughout the whole storage in both trials, and also that no significant difference was verified between the ST and ST-LC beverages in the sensory evaluation (P>0.05.

  17. Fermentation of deproteinized cheese whey powder solutions to ethanol by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae: effect of supplementation with corn steep liquor and repeated-batch operation with biomass recycling by flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana Carina; Guimarães, Pedro M R; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2010-09-01

    The lactose in cheese whey is an interesting substrate for the production of bulk commodities such as bio-ethanol, due to the large amounts of whey surplus generated globally. In this work, we studied the performance of a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing the lactose permease and intracellular beta-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis in fermentations of deproteinized concentrated cheese whey powder solutions. Supplementation with 10 g/l of corn steep liquor significantly enhanced whey fermentation, resulting in the production of 7.4% (v/v) ethanol from 150 g/l initial lactose in shake-flask fermentations, with a corresponding productivity of 1.2 g/l/h. The flocculation capacity of the yeast strain enabled stable operation of a repeated-batch process in a 5.5-l air-lift bioreactor, with simple biomass recycling by sedimentation of the yeast flocs. During five consecutive batches, the average ethanol productivity was 0.65 g/l/h and ethanol accumulated up to 8% (v/v) with lactose-to-ethanol conversion yields over 80% of theoretical. Yeast viability (>97%) and plasmid retention (>84%) remained high throughout the operation, demonstrating the stability and robustness of the strain. In addition, the easy and inexpensive recycle of the yeast biomass for repeated utilization makes this process economically attractive for industrial implementation.

  18. Rapid non-invasive quality control of semi-finished products for the food industry by direct injection mass spectrometry headspace analysis: the case of milk powder, whey powder and anhydrous milk fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, Salim; Yener, Sine; Khomenko, Iuliia; Capozzi, Vittorio; Cappellin, Luca; Aprea, Eugenio; Scampicchio, Matteo; Gasperi, Flavia; Biasioli, Franco

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the suitability of direct injection mass spectrometry headspace analysis for rapid non-invasive quality control of semi-finished dairy ingredients, such as skim milk powder (SMP), whole milk powder (WMP), whey powder (WP) and anhydrous milk fat (AMF), which are widely used as ingredients in the food industry. In this work, for the first time, we applied proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) with a time-of-flight (ToF) analyzer for the rapid and non-invasive analysis of volatile compounds in different samples of SMP, WMP, WP and AMF. We selected different dairy ingredients in various concrete situations (e.g. same producer and different expiration times, different producers and same days of storage, different producers) based on their sensory evaluation. PTR-ToF-MS allowed the separation and characterization of different samples based on the volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles. Statistically significant differences in VOC content were generally coherent with differences in sensory evaluation, particularly for SMP, WMP and WP. The good separation of SMP samples from WMP samples suggested the possible application of PTR-ToF-MS to detect possible cases of adulteration of dairy ingredients for the food industry. Our findings demonstrate the efficient and rapid differentiation of dairy ingredients on the basis of the released VOCs via PTR-ToF-MS analysis and suggest this method as a versatile tool (1) for the facilitation/optimization of the selection of dairy ingredients in the food industry and (2) and for the prompt innovation in the production of dairy ingredients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Whey based beverages - new generation of dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jeličić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Whey is a by product in the process of cheese production. Composition and characteristics of whey are depending on the production technology, the end product and the quality of used milk. Liquid whey consists of approximately 93% water and contains almost 50% of total solids present in the milk of which lactose is main constituent. Lactose is the main constituent of whey while proteins represent less than 1% of total solids. Minerals and vitamins are present in fewer amounts also. Production of whey based beverages started in 1970's and until today a wide range of different whey based beverages has been developed. They can be produced from native sweet or acid whey, from deproteinised whey, from native whey which was diluted with water, from whey powder or by whey fermentation. Non alcoholic whey beverages include wide range of products obtained by mixing native sweet, diluted or acid whey with different additives like tropical fruits (but also other fruits like apples, pears, strawberries or cranberries, crops and their products (mainly bran, isolates of vegetable proteins, CO2, chocolate, cocoa, vanilla extracts and other aromatizing agents. Special attention is being paid to production of fermented whey beverages with probiotic bacteria where the most important step is the choice of suitable culture of bacteria in order to produce functional beverage with high nutritional value and acceptable sensory characteristics. Non alcoholic whey beverages also include dietetic beverages, drinks with hydrolyzed lactose, milk like drinks and powder drinks. Whey is a very good raw material for production of alcoholic beverages due to the fact that the main constituent of the solid content is lactose (about 70%. Alcoholic whey beverages include drinks with small amount of alcohol (up to 1,5%, whey beer and whey wine. Whey beverages are suitable for wide range of consumers – from children to the elderly ones. They have very high nutritional value and good

  20. Modification of the structural and optical properties of commercial ZnO powder by mechanical activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šćepanović M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical activation was used as a method for modification of the structural and optical properties of commercial ZnO powder. For this purpose zinc oxide powder was mechanically treated by grinding in a high-energy vibro-mill in a continual regime in air up to 300 minutes. Starting and modified ZnO samples were characterized using XRD, BET and TEM measurements. Optical properties of these samples were investigated by Raman and photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy. The color of commercial ZnO powder was white while mechanically activated ZnO powder was dark yellow, indicating the presence of nonstoichiometry. In the Raman spectra of non-activated sample Raman modes of bulk ZnO were observed, while the spectra of modified samples point out structural and stoichiometric changes. The PL spectra of modified samples excited by 325 and 442 nm lines of a He-Cd laser show great difference with respect to the spectra of the original sample. This study confirms that change in the defect structure of the ZnO crystal lattice introduced by mechanical activation affects the optical properties of this material.

  1. Fouling behavior of poly(ether)sulfone ultrafiltration membrane during concentration of whey proteins: Effect of hydrophilic modification using atmospheric pressure argon jet plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damar Huner, Irem; Gulec, Haci Ali

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of hydrophilic surface modification via atmospheric pressure jet plasma (ApJPls) on the fouling propensity of polyethersulfone (PES) ultrafiltration (UF) membranes during concentration of whey proteins. The distance from nozzle to substrate surface of 30mm and the exposure period of 5 times were determined as the most effective parameters enabling an increase in ΔGiwi value of the plain membrane from (-) 14.92±0.89mJ/m2 to (+) 17.57±0.67mJ/m2. Maximum hydrophilicity and minimum surface roughness achieved by argon plasma action resulted in better antifouling behavior, while the hydraulic permeability and the initial permeate flux were decreased sharply due to the plasma-induced surface cross-linking. A quite steady state flux was obtained throughout the UF with the ApJPls modified PES membrane. The contribution of Rfrev to Rt, which was 94% for the UF through the plain membrane, decreased to 43% after the plasma treatment. The overall results of this study highlighted the ApJPls modification decreased the fouling propensity of PES membrane without affecting the original protein rejection capability and improved the recovery of initial permeate flux after chemical cleaning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Powder modification technology used for the preparation of the hydrophilic decoction pieces of indigo naturalis and the modification principle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ding-Kun; Lin, Jun-Zhi; Liu, Jian-Yun; Qin, Chun-Feng; Guo, Zhi-Ping; Han, Li; Yang, Ming

    2013-07-01

    The hydrophilicity of the normal decoction pieces (NDP) of Indigo Naturalis is not good, therefore, it is not suit for decoctions. In this paper, powder modification technology is used and some NDP and alcohol are ground together in the vibromill to prepare the hydrophilic decoction pieces (HDP) of Indigo Naturalis. Initially, the properties of NDP, ultrafine decoction pieces (UDP) and HDP are compared, the hydrophilicity of UDP was promoted slightly, that of HDP is promoted dramatically. Then, three batches of Indigo Naturalis are prepared to HDP separately, but there is no obvious difference in the contact angle. Furthermore, the size distribution, surface area and micro-shape of HDP are bigger than that of UDP and smaller than NDP. The contents of indigo and indirubin in three decoction pieces are the same, as well as the species of inorganic substance, although there is a little difference in the proportion of five inorganic substances. The fact suggests the change of physical state and the qualitative and quantitative change of organism and inorganic substances are not the main factors to influence the hydrophilicity. In addition, hydroxyl, methylene and methyl can be identified at the wavenumber of 3 356 cm(-1) and 1 461 cm(-1) in infrared spectrum; the content of alcohol in HDP is 0.67% measured by gas chromatogram. The stability of HDP in the heating condition is studied, the fact suggests the hydrophilic effect of HDP at 40 degrees C is relatively stable. All above research suggests that the alcohol is the main factor to influence the hydrophilicity and maybe the intermolecular force which fixed alcohol molecule on the surface of Indigo Naturalis is the basic principle to produce the hydrophilicity.

  3. Cheese whey: A potential resource to transform into bioprotein, functional/nutritional proteins and bioactive peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Jay Shankar Singh; Yan, Song; Pilli, Sridhar; Kumar, Lalit; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2015-11-01

    The byproduct of cheese-producing industries, cheese whey, is considered as an environmental pollutant due to its high BOD and COD concentrations. The high organic load of whey arises from the presence of residual milk nutrients. As demand for milk-derived products is increasing, it leads to increased production of whey, which poses a serious management problem. To overcome this problem, various technological approaches have been employed to convert whey into value-added products. These technological advancements have enhanced whey utilization and about 50% of the total produced whey is now transformed into value-added products such as whey powder, whey protein, whey permeate, bioethanol, biopolymers, hydrogen, methane, electricity bioprotein (single cell protein) and probiotics. Among various value-added products, the transformation of whey into proteinaceous products is attractive and demanding. The main important factor which is attractive for transformation of whey into proteinaceous products is the generally recognized as safe (GRAS) regulatory status of whey. Whey and whey permeate are biotransformed into proteinaceous feed and food-grade bioprotein/single cell protein through fermentation. On the other hand, whey can be directly processed to obtain whey protein concentrate, whey protein isolate, and individual whey proteins. Further, whey proteins are also transformed into bioactive peptides via enzymatic or fermentation processes. The proteinaceous products have applications as functional, nutritional and therapeutic commodities. Whey characteristics, and its transformation processes for proteinaceous products such as bioproteins, functional/nutritional protein and bioactive peptides are covered in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phase modification of copper phthalocyanine semiconductor by converting powder to thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Xiaowei; Lin, Jiaxin; Chang, Yufang; Zhou, Lianqun; Zhang, Xianmin; Qin, Gaowu

    2018-01-01

    Thin films of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) semiconductor were deposited on glass substrates by a thermal evaporation system using the CuPc powder in a high vacuum. The crystal structures of both the films and the powder were measured by the X-ray diffraction spectroscopy technique. It is observed that CuPc films only show one peak at 6.84°, indicating a high texture of α phase along (200) orientation. In comparison, CuPc powder shows a series of peaks, which are confirmed from the mixture of both α and β phases. The effects of substrate anneal temperature on the film structure, grain size and optical absorption property of CuPc films were also investigated. All the films are of α phase and the full width of half maximum for (200) diffraction peak becomes narrow with increasing the substrate temperatures. The average grain size calculated by the Scherrer's formula is 33.63 nm for the film without anneal, which is increased up to 58.29 nm for the film annealed at 200 °C. Scanning electron microscope was further measured to prove the growth of crystalline grain and to characterize the morphologies of CuPc films. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra were employed to study the structure effect on the optical properties of both CuPc films and powder. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy was used to identify the crystalline nature of both CuPc powder and film.

  5. Surface modification of AISI H13 tool steel by laser cladding with NiTi powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhafzan, B.; Aqida, S. N.; Chikarakara, E.; Brabazon, D.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents laser cladding of NiTi powder on AISI H13 tool steel surface for surface properties enhancement. The cladding process was conducted using Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 laser system with wavelength of 10.6 µm. NiTi powder was pre-placed on H13 tool steel surface. The laser beam was focused with a spot size of 90 µm on the sample surface. Laser parameters were set to 1515 and 1138 W peak power, 18 and 24 % duty cycle and 2300-3500 Hz laser pulse repetition frequency. Hardness properties of the modified layer were characterized by Wilson Hardness tester. Metallographic study and chemical composition were conducted using field emission scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDXS) analysis. Results showed that hardness of NiTi clad layer increased three times that of the substrate material. The EDXS analysis detected NiTi phase presence in the modified layer up to 9.8 wt%. The metallographic study shows high metallurgical bonding between substrate and modified layer. These findings are significant to both increased hardness and erosion resistance of high-wear-resistant components and elongating their lifetime.

  6. Surface modification of M-Ba-ferrite powders by polyaniline: Towards improving microwave electromagnetic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Xin, E-mail: tungqin@126.com [School of Petroleum Enginering, Southwest Petroleum University, 8, Xindu Road, Xindu District, Chengdu 610500 (China); Yang Yuanguang [School of Petroleum Enginering, Southwest Petroleum University, 8, Xindu Road, Xindu District, Chengdu 610500 (China)

    2009-09-15

    A composite of polyaniline (PANI)-coated M-type hexagonal barium ferrite (M-Ba-ferrite) powder was prepared by an in situ polymerization of an aniline monomer in the presence of M-Ba-ferrite particles. The obtained composite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structure and microwave response properties were investigated. The continuous coverage of polyaniline has been produced on the platelet M-Ba-ferrite particle surface, and a core-shell structure has been formed. The results show that the coverage of polyaniline has a great influence on microwave response of M-Ba-ferrite particles. A polyaniline thin layer formed on the surface of a barium ferrite particle changes the character of frequency dispersion of microwave absorption. The results indicate the existence of an interaction at the interface of polyaniline macromolecule and barium ferrite particle, which influences the physical and chemical properties of the composite. The interaction and interfacial polarization are seen as important factors contributing to the influence on microwave response of the PANI-coated ferrite composite powders.

  7. Effect of filler loading and silane modification on the biodegradability of SBR composites reinforced with peanut shell powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaniba, V.; Balan, Aparna K.; Sreejith, M. P.; Jinitha, T. V.; Subair, N.; Purushothaman, E.

    2017-06-01

    The development of biocomposites and their applications are important in material science due to environmental and sustainability issues. The extent of degradation depends on the nature of reinforcing filler, particle size and their modification. In this article, we tried to focus on the biodegradation of composites of Styrene Butadiene Rubber (SBR) reinforced with Peanut Shell Powder (PSP) by soil burial test. The composites of SBR with untreated PSP (UPSP) and silane modified PSP (SPSP) of 10 parts per hundred rubber (phr) and 20 phr filler loading in two particle size were buried in the garden soil for six months. The microbial degradation were assessed through the measurement of weight loss, tensile strength and hardness at definite period. The study shows that degradation increases with increase in filler loading and particle size. The chemical treatment of filler has been found to resist the degradation. The analysis of morphological properties by the SEM also confirmed biodegradation process by the microorganism in the soil.

  8. Membrane processes in production of functional whey components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfiye Yilmaz-Ersan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, whey has been recognised as a major source of nutritional and functional ingredients for the food industry. Commercial whey products include various powders, whey protein concentrates and isolates, and fractionated proteins, such as a-lactalbumin and b-lactoglobulin. The increased interest in separation and fractionation of whey proteins arises from the differences in their functional, biological and nutritional properties. In response to concerns about environmental aspects, research has been focused on membrane filtration technology, which provides exciting new opportunities for large-scale protein and lactose fractionation. Membrane separation is such technique in which particles are separated according to their molecular size. The types of membrane processing techniques are ultrafiltration, microfiltration, reverse osmosis, pervaporation, electrodialysis and nanofiltration. A higher purification of whey proteins is possible by combining membrane separation with ion-exchange. This paper provides an overview of types and applications of membrane separation techniques

  9. Development of a high efficiency dry powder inhaler: effects of capsule chamber design and inhaler surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behara, Srinivas R B; Farkas, Dale R; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P Worth

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the performance of a high efficiency dry powder inhaler (DPI) intended for excipient enhanced growth (EEG) aerosol delivery based on changes to the capsule orientation and surface modifications of the capsule and device. DPIs were constructed by combining newly designed capsule chambers (CC) with a previously developed three-dimensional (3D) rod array for particle deagglomeration and a previously optimized EEG formulation. The new CCs oriented the capsule perpendicular to the incoming airflow and were analyzed for different air inlets at a constant pressure drop across the device. Modifications to the inhaler and capsule surfaces included use of metal dispersion rods and surface coatings. Aerosolization performance of the new DPIs was evaluated and compared with commercial devices. The proposed capsule orientation and motion pattern increased capsule vibrational frequency and reduced the aerosol MMAD compared with commercial/modified DPIs. The use of metal rods in the 3D array further improved inhaler performance. Coating the inhaler and capsule with PTFE significantly increased emitted dose (ED) from the optimized DPI. High efficiency performance is achieved for EEG delivery with the optimized DPI device and formulation combination producing an aerosol with MMAD  90%, and ED > 80%.

  10. Characterization of high-milk-protein powders upon rehydration under various salt concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, R; Gaiani, C; Aberkane, L; Scher, J

    2011-01-01

    Rehydration of native micellar casein and native whey isolate protein powders was followed in different ionic environments. Solutions of NaCl and CaCl2 in the concentration range of 0 to 12% (wt%) were used as rehydration media. The rehydration profiles obtained were interpreted in terms of wetting, swelling, and dispersion stages by using a turbidity method. Two behaviors were observed depending on the salt concentration. For native micellar casein powder, a significant change was observed between 3 and 6% NaCl and between 0.75 and 1.5% CaCl2. The first behavior (low salt concentration) presents a typical rehydration profile: quick wetting, swelling, and long dispersion stage. The dispersion stage of the second behavior (high salt concentration) was significantly shortened, indicating a strong modification of the protein backbone. The rehydration of whey protein powder was less influenced by salts. At low salt concentrations, a typical profile for whey powders was observed: wetting with lump formation and no swelling followed by a quick dispersion. At high CaCl2 concentrations, no turbidity stabilization was observed, indicating a possible protein unfolding and denaturation. Additionally, the changes in secondary structures of the 2 proteins upon salt increase were followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and confirmed the different profiles observed. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Design of sustained release fine particles using two-step mechanical powder processing: particle shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with polymer nanoparticle agglomerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Keita; Ito, Natsuki; Niwa, Toshiyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2013-09-10

    We attempted to prepare sustained release fine particles using a two-step mechanical powder processing method; particle-shape modification and dry particle coating. First, particle shape of bulk drug was modified by mechanical treatment to yield drug crystals suitable for the coating process. Drug crystals became more rounded with increasing rotation speed, which demonstrates that powerful mechanical stress yields spherical drug crystals with narrow size distribution. This process is the result of destruction, granulation and refinement of drug crystals. Second, the modified drug particles and polymer coating powder were mechanically treated to prepare composite particles. Polymer nanoparticle agglomerate obtained by drying poly(meth)acrylate aqueous dispersion was used as a coating powder. The porous nanoparticle agglomerate has superior coating performance, because it is completely deagglomerated under mechanical stress to form fine fragments that act as guest particles. As a result, spherical drug crystals treated with porous agglomerate were effectively coated by poly(meth)acrylate powder, showing sustained release after curing. From these findings, particle-shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with nanoparticle agglomerate using a mechanical powder processor is expected as an innovative technique for preparing controlled-release coated particles having high drug content and size smaller than 100 μm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ageing-induced solubility loss in milk protein concentrate powder: effect of protein conformational modifications and interactions with water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Enamul; Bhandari, Bhesh R; Gidley, Michael J; Deeth, Hilton C; Whittaker, Andrew K

    2011-11-01

    Protein conformational modifications and water-protein interactions are two major factors believed to induce instability of protein and eventually affect the solubility of milk protein concentrate (MPC) powder. To test these hypotheses, MPC was stored at different water activities (a(w) 0.0-0.85) and temperatures (25 and 45 °C) for up to 12 weeks. Samples were examined periodically to determine solubility, change in protein conformation by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and water status (interaction of water with the protein molecule/surface) by measuring the transverse relaxation time (T(2) ) with proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR). The solubility of MPC decreased significantly with ageing and this process was enhanced by increasing water activity (a(w) ) and temperature. Minor changes in protein secondary structure were observed with FTIR which indicated some degree of unfolding of protein molecules. The NMR T(2) results indicated the presence of three distinct populations of water molecules and the proton signal intensity and T(2) values of proton fractions varied with storage condition (humidity) and ageing. Results suggest that protein/protein interactions may be initiated by unfolding of protein molecules that eventually affects solubility. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Protein conformational modifications and kinetics of water-protein interactions in milk protein concentrate powder upon aging: effect on solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Enamul; Bhandari, Bhesh R; Gidley, Michael J; Deeth, Hilton C; Møller, Sandie M; Whittaker, Andrew K

    2010-07-14

    Protein conformational modifications and water-protein interactions are two major factors believed to induce instability of protein and eventually affect the solubility of milk protein concentrate (MPC) powder. To test these hypotheses, MPC was stored at different water activities (a(w) 0.0-0.85) and temperatures (25 and 45 degrees C) for up to 12 weeks. Samples were examined periodically to determine solubility, change in protein conformation by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and principal component analysis (PCA), and water status (interaction of water with the protein molecule/surface) by measuring the transverse relaxation time (T(2)) with proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). The solubility of MPC decreased significantly with aging, and this process was enhanced by increasing water activity (a(w)) and storage temperature. Minor changes in protein secondary structure were observed with FTIR, which indicated some degree of unfolding of protein molecules. PCA of the FTIR data was able to discriminate samples according to moisture content and storage period. Partial least-squares (PLS) analysis showed some correlation between FTIR spectral feature and solubility. The NMR T(2) results indicated the presence of three distinct populations of water molecules, and the proton signal intensity and T(2) values of proton fractions varied with storage conditions (humidity, temperature) and aging. Results suggest that protein/protein interactions may be initiated by unfolding of protein molecules that eventually affects solubility.

  14. Functional Foods Containing Whey Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whey proteins, modified whey proteins, and whey components are useful as nutrients or supplements for health maintenance. Extrusion modified whey proteins can easily fit into new products such as beverages, confectionery items (e.g., candies), convenience foods, desserts, baked goods, sauces, and in...

  15. Surface and chemical properties of surface-modified UHMWPE powder and mechanical and thermal properties of its impregnated PMMA bone cement, IV: effect of MMA/accelerator on the surface modification of UHMWPE powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dae Hyeok; Ko, Jong Tae; Kim, Yong Sik; Kim, Moon Suk; Shin, Hyung Sik; Rhee, John M; Khang, Gilson; Lee, Hai Bang

    2006-01-01

    In our previous study, we manufactured a reinforced poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement with 3 wt% of the surface-modified ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) powder to improve its poor mechanical and thermal properties resulting from unreacted methylmethacrylate (MMA), the generation of bubble and shrinkage, and high curing temperature. In the present study, the effect of ratios of MMA and N,N'-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMPT) solutions in redox polymerization system was investigated for the surface modification of UHMWPE powder. We characterized physical and chemical properties of surface-modified UHMWPE powder and reinforced bone cements by a scanning electron microscope, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and curing temperature (Tmax). It was found that UTSs (41.3-51.3 MPa) of the reinforced PMMA bone cements were similar to those (44.5 MPa) of conventional PMMA bone cement (control), as well as significantly higher (P redox polymerization system using MMA/DMPT solution was better than that of radical system using MMA/xylene solution. Also, Tmax of the reinforced PMMA bone cements decreased from 103 to 72-84 degrees C. From these results, we confirmed that the surface-modified UHMWPE powder can be used as reinforcing agent to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of conventional PMMA bone cement.

  16. The role of fines in the modification of the fluidization and dispersion mechanism within dry powder inhaler formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, Jagdeep; Harris, Haggis; Jones, Matthew D; Kaerger, J Sebastian; Price, Robert

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the role of in situ generated fine excipient particles on the fluidization and aerosolization properties of dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations. Carrier based DPI formulations were prepared under low and high shear blending. Powder rheometery was utilized to measure bulk powder properties in a consolidated and aerated state. Powder fluidization and aerosolization characteristics were related to bulk powder properties using high speed imaging and inertial impaction measurements. High shear blending of formulations resulted in the in situ generation of excipient fines, which corresponded to an increase in aerosolization efficiency. The generation of fines were shown to increase the tensile strength and free volume of the carrier, which resulted in a characteristic change in the fluidization properties, as observed by high speed imaging. The increase in minimum fluidization velocity and aerodynamic drag forces required to aerate the powder may provide the source of energy for the increase in fine particle re-suspension. The in situ generation of excipient fines affect bulk powder properties of DPI formulations, which directly affects fluidization and aerosolization behaviour of DPI formulations. The study suggests an alternative mode of action by which fines increase DPI formulation performance.

  17. Whey protein concentrate storage at elevated temperature and humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dairy processors are finding new export markets for whey protein concentrate (WPC), a byproduct of cheesemaking, but they need to know if full-sized bags of this powder will withstand high temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels during unrefrigerated storage under tropical conditions. To answ...

  18. Review: elimination of bacteriophages in whey and whey products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep eAtamer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available As the cheese market faces strong international competition, the optimization of production processes becomes more important for the economic success of dairy companies. In dairy productions, whey from former cheese batches is frequently re-used to increase the yield, to improve the texture and to increase the nutrient value of the final product. Recycling of whey cream and particulated whey proteins is also routinely performed. Most bacteriophages, however, survive pasteurization and may re-enter the cheese manufacturing process. There is a risk that phages multiply to high numbers during the production. Contamination of whey samples with bacteriophages may cause problems in cheese factories because whey separation often leads to aerosol-borne phages and thus contamination of the factory environment. Furthermore, whey cream or whey proteins used for recycling into cheese matrices may contain thermo-resistant phages. Drained cheese whey can be contaminated with phages as high as 109 phages per mL. When whey batches are concentrated, phage titers can increase significantly by a factor of 10 hindering a complete elimination of phages. To eliminate the risk of fermentation failure during recycling of whey, whey treatments assuring an efficient reduction of phages are indispensable. This review focuses on inactivation of phages in whey by thermal treatment, ultraviolet (UV light irradiation and membrane filtration. Inactivation by heat is the most common procedure. However, application of heat for inactivation of thermo-resistant phages in whey is restricted due to negative effects on the functional properties of native whey proteins. Therefore an alternative strategy applying combined treatments should be favoured - rather than heating the dairy product at extreme temperature/time combinations. By using membrane filtration or UV treatment in combination with thermal treatment, phage numbers in whey can be reduced sufficiently to prevent subsequent

  19. Review: elimination of bacteriophages in whey and whey products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamer, Zeynep; Samtlebe, Meike; Neve, Horst; J. Heller, Knut; Hinrichs, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    As the cheese market faces strong international competition, the optimization of production processes becomes more important for the economic success of dairy companies. In dairy productions, whey from former cheese batches is frequently re-used to increase the yield, to improve the texture and to increase the nutrient value of the final product. Recycling of whey cream and particulated whey proteins is also routinely performed. Most bacteriophages, however, survive pasteurization and may re-enter the cheese manufacturing process. There is a risk that phages multiply to high numbers during the production. Contamination of whey samples with bacteriophages may cause problems in cheese factories because whey separation often leads to aerosol-borne phages and thus contamination of the factory environment. Furthermore, whey cream or whey proteins used for recycling into cheese matrices may contain thermo-resistant phages. Drained cheese whey can be contaminated with phages as high as 109 phages mL-1. When whey batches are concentrated, phage titers can increase significantly by a factor of 10 hindering a complete elimination of phages. To eliminate the risk of fermentation failure during recycling of whey, whey treatments assuring an efficient reduction of phages are indispensable. This review focuses on inactivation of phages in whey by thermal treatment, ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, and membrane filtration. Inactivation by heat is the most common procedure. However, application of heat for inactivation of thermo-resistant phages in whey is restricted due to negative effects on the functional properties of native whey proteins. Therefore an alternative strategy applying combined treatments should be favored – rather than heating the dairy product at extreme temperature/time combinations. By using membrane filtration or UV treatment in combination with thermal treatment, phage numbers in whey can be reduced sufficiently to prevent subsequent phage accumulations

  20. Whey upgrading by enzyme biocatalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Illanes,Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Whey is a co-product of processes for the production of cheese and casein that retains most of the lactose content in milk. World production of whey is estimated around 200 million tons per year with an increase rate of about 2%/per year. Milk production is seasonal, so surplus whey is unavoidable. Traditionally, whey producers have considered it as a nuisance and strategies of whey handling have been mostly oriented to their more convenient disposal. This vision has been steadily evolving be...

  1. Comparative Analysis of Whey N-Glycoproteins in Human Colostrum and Mature Milk Using Quantitative Glycoproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xueyan; Song, Dahe; Yang, Mei; Yang, Ning; Ye, Qing; Tao, Dongbing; Liu, Biao; Wu, Rina; Yue, Xiqing

    2017-11-29

    Glycosylation is a ubiquitous post-translational protein modification that plays a substantial role in various processes. However, whey glycoproteins in human milk have not been completely profiled. Herein, we used quantitative glycoproteomics to quantify whey N-glycosylation sites and their alteration in human milk during lactation; 110 N-glycosylation sites on 63 proteins and 91 N-glycosylation sites on 53 proteins were quantified in colostrum and mature milk whey, respectively. Among these, 68 glycosylation sites on 38 proteins were differentially expressed in human colostrum and mature milk whey. These differentially expressed N-glycoproteins were highly enriched in "localization", "extracellular region part", and "modified amino acid binding" according to gene ontology annotation and mainly involved in complement and coagulation cascades pathway. These results shed light on the glycosylation sites, composition and biological functions of whey N-glycoproteins in human colostrum and mature milk, and provide substantial insight into the role of protein glycosylation during infant development.

  2. Effects of surface modification of Nd-Fe-B powders using parylene C by CVDP method on the properties of anisotropic bonded Nd–Fe–B magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Bin; Sun, Aizhi, E-mail: sunaizhi@126.com; Lu, Zhenwen; Cheng, Chuan; Xu, Chen

    2016-10-15

    This paper presents effects of surface modification of Nd–Fe–B powders using parylene C by means of chemical vapor deposition polymerization (CVDP) on the properties of anisotropic bonded Nd–Fe–B magnets. It can be well verified from SEM images and EDS analysis that the surface of Nd–Fe–B powder is coated with thin parylene C films. The maximum energy product ((BH)max), degree of alignment (DOA), actual density and corrosion resistance of parylene Nd–Fe–B magnets prepared at room temperature are much higher than that of non-parylene Nd–Fe–B magnets. (BH)max, DOA and actual density of parylene Nd–Fe–B magnets (70 kJ/m{sup 3}, 0.342, 5.82 g/cm{sup 3}) prepared at room temperature under 578 MPa are improved by 18.6%, 4.6%, 2.1% and 27.3%, 29.1%, 7.8% compared with non-parylene Nd‐Fe‐B magnets prepared at 140 °C (59 kJ/m{sup 3}, 0327, 5.70 g/cm{sup 3}) and room temperature (55 kJ/m{sup 3}, 0.265, 5.40 g/cm{sup 3}), respectively. Additional, the improvement of actual density and the room temperature process also solve problems such as powders’ sticking wall, non-uniform powder filling, non-uniform magnetic properties, seriously mould damage, short life cycle of mould and so on, which exists during warm compaction process. Parylene Nd–Fe–B magnets have better corrosion resistance and worse mechanical properties than that of non-parylene Nd–Fe–B magnets. The reason for the improvement of magnetic properties and actual density is the low friction cofficient of parylene C films, which results in lower frictional resistance and better lubricating property of parylene Nd–Fe–B powders. - Highlights: • Parylene Nd–Fe–B magnets prepared at room temperature show higher (BH)max and DOA. • Actual density of parylene Nd–Fe–B magnet is improved greatly. • Problems such as powders’ sticking wall, mould damage and so on are solved. • Parylene NdFeB magnets have better corrosion resistance. • Low friction cofficient of

  3. 7 CFR 58.717 - Whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....717 Whey. Whey used in cheese products should meet the requirements equivalent to USDA Extra Grade except that the moisture requirement for dry whey may be waived. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Whey. 58.717 Section 58.717 Agriculture Regulations of...

  4. Detection and quantitation of lactoferrin in bovine whey samples by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography on polystyrene-divinylbenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palman, Kate P; Elgar, David F

    2002-02-22

    An existing RP-HPLC method for the measurement of the major bovine whey proteins in bovine whey samples and powders has been extended to include the analysis of the minor bovine whey protein lactoferrin. Lactoferrin could be detected and quantitated at levels down to 0.2 microg and linear calibration was observed between 0.2 and 30 microg. Reliable quantitation of lactoferrin in whey samples could be achieved provided the bovine serum albumin to lactoferrin ratio did not exceed 10:1. Quantitative data obtained by the RP-HPLC method compared favourably with data obtained by Mono S analytical chromatography.

  5. Use of cheese whey for biomass production and spray drying of probiotic lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavari, Luisina; Páez, Roxana; Cuatrin, Alejandra; Reinheimer, Jorge; Vinderola, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    The double use of cheese whey (culture medium and thermoprotectant for spray drying of lactobacilli) was explored in this study for adding value to this wastewater. In-house formulated broth (similar to MRS) and dairy media (cheese and ricotta whey and whey permeate) were assessed for their capacity to produce biomass of Lactobacillus paracasei JP1, Lb. rhamnosus 64 and Lb. gasseri 37. Simultaneously, spray drying of cheese whey-starch solution (without lactobacilli cells) was optimised using surface response methodology. Cell suspensions of the lactobacilli, produced in in house-formulated broth, were spray-dried in cheese whey-starch solution and viability monitored throughout the storage of powders for 2 months. Lb. rhamnosus 64 was able to grow satisfactorily in at least two of the in-house formulated culture media and in the dairy media assessed. It also performed well in spray drying. The performance of the other strains was less satisfactory. The growth capacity, the resistance to spray drying in cheese whey-starch solution and the negligible lost in viability during the storage (2 months), makes Lb. rhamnosus 64 a promising candidate for further technological studies for developing a probiotic dehydrated culture for foods, utilising wastewaters of the dairy industry (as growth substrate and protectant) and spray drying (a low-cost widely-available technology).

  6. Transglutaminase catalysis of modified whey protein dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Debra A; Daubert, Christopher R

    2010-05-01

    Transglutaminase (TGase) cross-linking reactions were accomplished using a heat-modified whey protein concentrate (mWPC) substrate after pH adjustment to 8. Based on earlier reports, the degree of lactosylation with respect to beta-lactoglobulin was lower in mWPC dispersions than measured in commercial whey concentrate (cWPC) protein solutions. In this study, a higher concentration of free sulfhydryl groups was detected in soluble supernatant fractions. Both factors potentially impact the availability of reactive lysine/glutaminyl residues required for TGase reactivity. The addition of 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) to the substrate mix, CBZ-glutaminyl glycine and hydroxylamine, revealed a 3.6-fold increase in TGase activity, likely due in part to maintenance of the catalytic cysteine residue in a reduced state. Furthermore, inclusion of DTT to mWPC dispersions significantly raised the apparent viscosity, independently of enzyme modification, while the rate of polymerization increased 2-fold based on OPA assay measurements. Limited cross-linking slightly increased the apparent viscosity, whereas extensive coupling lowered these values compared to equivalent nonenzyme-treated mWPC samples. Carbohydrate-staining revealed formation of glyco-polymers due to covalent linkages between glucosamine and mWPC proteins after TGase processing. Again, the apparent viscosity decreased after extensive enzymatic modification. Larger particles, sized 11.28 mum, were observed in the structural matrix of TGase-mWPC-fixed samples compared to 8 mum particles in control mWPC samples as viewed in scanning electron micrographs. Ultimately, the functional characteristics of TGase-mWPC ingredients may be custom-designed to deliver alternative functional attributes by adjusting the experimental reaction conditions under which catalysis is achieved. Taken together, these results suggest that unique TGase-mWPC and/or TGase-mWPC-glucosamine ingredients may be designed to provide novel, value

  7. Impact of Ovine Whey Protein Concentrates and Clarification By-Products on the Yield and Quality of Whey Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos D. Pereira; Olga Díaz; Angel Cobos

    2007-01-01

    The effects of the addition of whey protein concentrates and clarification by-products obtained from ovine cheese whey and deproteinized whey (Sorelho) on the yield and quality of the whey cheese (Requeijão) have been evaluated. Whey protein concentrates were obtained by ultrafiltration of skimmed whey and Sorelho. The clarification by-products were obtained after the treatment of the skimmed whey and Sorelho by thermocalcic precipitation and microfiltration with two membranes (0.20 and 0.65 ...

  8. Moisture sorption isotherms of dehydrated whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Rimac Brnčić

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Moisture sorption isotherms describe the relation between the moisture content of the dry material (food and relative humidity of the surrounding environment. The data obtained are important in modelling of drying process conditions, packaging and shelf-life stability of food that will provide maximum retaining of aroma, colour and texture as well as nutritive and biological value. The objective of this research was to establish the equilibrium moisture content and water activity, as well as monolayer value of two commercial powdered whey protein isolates before and after tribomechanical micronisation and enzymatic hydrolysis, respectively. At the same time it was necessary to evaluate the best moisture sorption isotherm equation to fit the experimental data. The equilibrium moisture contents in investigated samples were determined using standard gravimetric method at 20 °C. The range of water activities was 0.11 to 0.75. The monolayer moisture content was estimated from sorption data using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET and Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB models. The results have shown that tribomechanically treated whey protein isolates as well as protein hydrolizates had lower monolayer moisture content values as well as higher corresponding water activity. Therefore, in spite of the fact that they have lower moisture content, they can be storage at higher relative humidity compared to untreated samples. BET model gave better fit to experimental sorption data for a water activity range from 0.11-0.54, while GAB model gave the closest fit for a water activity to 0.75.

  9. Metabolomics investigation of whey intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanstrup, Jan

    interest since it has been shown that it is possible to achieve greater weight loss on a high protein diet as oppose to a high carbohydrate diet. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that specifically milk-derived whey proteins have certain biological properties that might be beneficial in the treatment...... syndrome are complex disorders and are not caused by a high-calorie diet and low exercise level alone. The specific nature of the nutrients, independent of their caloric value, also play a role. The question is which. In the quest to answer this question the qualitative intake of protein is of special...... and prevention of the metabolic syndrome related to obesity and diabetes. In this thesis the effects of whey intake on the human metabolome was investigated using a metabolomics approach. We demonstrated that intake of whey causes a decreased rate of gastric emptying compared to other protein sources...

  10. Alternative bleaching methods for Cheddar cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, E J; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2012-07-01

    Residual annatto colorant (norbixin) in fluid Cheddar cheese whey can be bleached. The 2 approved chemical bleaching agents for whey, hydrogen peroxide (HP) and benzoyl peroxide (BP), negatively impact the flavor of dried whey protein. The objective of this study was to evaluate alternative methods for bleaching liquid whey: ultraviolet radiation (UV), acid-activated bentonite (BT), and ozone (OZ). Colored Cheddar cheese whey was manufactured followed by pasteurization and fat separation. Liquid whey was subjected to one of 5 treatments: control (CT) (no bleaching; 50 °C, 1 h), HP (250 mg/kg; 50 °C, 1 h), UV (1 min exposure; 50 °C), BT (0.5% w/w; 50 °C, 1 h), or OZ (2.2g/h, 50 °C, 1 h). The treated whey was then ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried to 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80). The entire experiment was replicated 3 times. Color (norbixin extraction and measurement), descriptive sensory, and instrumental volatile analyses were conducted on WPC80. Norbixin elimination was 28%, 79%, 39%, and 15% for HP, BT, UV, and OZ treatments, respectively. WPC80 from bleached whey, regardless of bleaching agent, had lower sweet aromatic and cooked/milky flavors compared to unbleached CT (P whey. The 2 approved chemical bleaching agents for whey, hydrogen peroxide (HP) and benzoyl peroxide (BP), negatively impact flavor of dried whey protein, and restrictions on these agents are increasing. This study evaluated 3 alternatives to chemical bleaching of fluid whey: UV radiation, ozone, and bentonite. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Antioxidant activity of whey protein fractions isolated by gel exclusion chromatography and protease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Tuğba; Pekmez, Murat; Arda, Nazli; Yalçin, A Süha

    2008-05-15

    Whey proteins were isolated from whey powder by a combination of gel exclusion chromatography and protease (pepsin or trypsin) treatment. Whey solution (6g/dl) was applied to Sephadex G-200 column chromatography and three fractions were obtained. Gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used to identify the fractions; the first one contained immunoglobulins and bovine serum albumin, the second contained beta-lactoglobulin and alpha-lactalbumin whereas the third fraction contained small peptides. We have also subjected the whey filtrate to proteases (pepsin and trypsin). Treatment with proteases showed that beta-lactoglobulin can be obtained after hydrolysis of the second fraction with pepsin. When the whey filtrate was treated with pepsin and then applied to Sephadex G-200 column chromatography three fractions were obtained; the first one was bovine serum albumin, the second was beta-lactoglobulin and the third fraction contained small peptides. After trypsin treatment only two fractions were obtained; the first one was serum albumin and the second fraction was an alpha-lactalbumin rich fraction. We have determined the antioxidant activity of the fractions using an assay based on the measurement of superoxide radical scavenging activity. Our results showed that among the three fractions, the first fraction had the highest superoxide radical scavenging activity. Also, protease treatment of the second fraction resulted in an increase in the antioxidant activity.

  12. KARAKTERISTIK FISIK, KIMIA, MIKROBIOLOGI WHEY KEFIR DAN AKTIVITASNYA TERHADAP PENGHAMBATAN ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME (ACE [Physical, Chemical and Microbiological Characteristics of Whey Kefir and Its Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE Inhibitory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Febrisiantosa*

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the characteristics of whey-based kefir products and their activity to inhibit the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE. Kefir was produced by using many types of whey, namely SK: skim milk based kefir (control; WK: gouda cheese whey based kefir; and WKB: commercial whey powder based kefir. The experimental design was a completely randomized design. Each treatment was conducted in triplicates. Kefirs were evaluated for physical and chemical properties (pH, total titratable acidity, viscosity, protein, fat, lactose, and alcohol, microbiological (lactic acid bacteria and yeast population, peptide concentration, ACE inhibition, IC50 and Inhibition Efficiency Ratio (IER. The results showed that the types of whey used for kefir productions significantly affected the physical and chemical characteristics of the products (p0.05. The peptide concentration and ACE inhibitory activity of WK, 1.54±0.02 mg/mL and 73.07±0.91%, was significantly higher (p0.05 from the control (47.19±0.09% per mg/mL but was significantly higher (p<0.05 than that of WKB (45.75±0.18% per mg/mL. This research indicated that whey kefir is a potential source of bioactive peptide for antihypertention agent.

  13. Nutritional and functional properties of whey proteins concentrate and isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Herceg

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein fractions represent 18 - 20 % of total milk nitrogen content. Nutritional value in addition to diverse physico - chemical and functional properties make whey proteins highly suitable for application in foodstuffs. In the most cases, whey proteins are used because of their functional properties. Whey proteins possess favourable functional characteristics such as gelling, water binding, emulsification and foaming ability. Due to application of new process techniques (membrane fractionation techniques, it is possible to produce various whey - protein based products. The most important products based on the whey proteins are whey protein concentrates (WPC and whey protein isolates (WPI. The aim of this paper was to give comprehensive review of nutritional and functional properties of the most common used whey proteins (whey protein concentrate - WPC and whey protein isolate - WPI in the food industry.

  14. Cheese whey management: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Ana R; Carvalho, Fátima; Rivas, Javier

    2012-11-15

    Cheese whey is simultaneously an effluent with nutritional value and a strong organic and saline content. Cheese whey management has been focused in the development of biological treatments without valorization; biological treatments with valorization; physicochemical treatments and direct land application. In the first case, aerobic digestion is reported. In the second case, six main processes are described in the literature: anaerobic digestion, lactose hydrolysis, fermentation to ethanol, hydrogen or lactic acid and direct production of electricity through microbial fuel cells. Thermal and isoelectric precipitation, thermocalcic precipitation, coagulation/flocculation, acid precipitation, electrochemical and membrane technologies have been considered as possible and attractive physicochemical processes to valorize or treat cheese whey. The direct land application is a common and longstanding practice, although some precautions are required. In this review, these different solutions are analyzed. The paper describes the main reactors used, the influence of the main operating variables, the microorganisms or reagents employed and the characterizations of the final effluent principally in terms of chemical oxygen demand. In addition, the experimental conditions and the main results reported in the literature are compiled. Finally, the comparison between the different treatment alternatives and the presentation of potential treatment lines are postulated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Casein - whey protein interactions in heated milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasbinder, Astrid Jolanda

    2002-01-01

    Heating of milk is an essential step in the processing of various dairy products, like for example yoghurt. A major consequence of the heat treatment is the denaturation of whey proteins, which either associate with the casein micelle or form soluble whey protein aggregates. By combination of

  16. Silicone-acrylic hybrid aqueous dispersions of core–shell particle structure and corresponding silicone-acrylic nanopowders designed for modification of powder coatings and plastics. Part III: Effect of modification with selected silicone-acrylic nanopowders on properties of polyurethane powder coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pilch-Pitera, B.; Kozakiewicz, J.; Ofat, I.; Trzaskowska, J.; Špírková, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, January (2015), s. 429-436 ISSN 0300-9440 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyurethanes * powder coating s * blocked polyisocyanates Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.632, year: 2015

  17. Functionality of whey protein isolates and hydrolyzed whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Herceg

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine functional properties: solubility, dispersibility, viscosity, emulsifiying, foaming and rheological properties of hydrolyzed whey protein (HWP and whey protein isolate (WPI. Particle size analysis and specific area of HWP and WPI were performed by «Mie – theory» of «light scatering» using «Malvern Mastersizer X». The results of this analysis have shown that HWP had higher particle size and specific area than WPI.By examing functional properties, it has been established that HWP has higher solubility, dispersibility, emulsifiying properties as well as foam stability (FSI and MFS compared to WPI. Rheological properties of protein suspensions were determined in 10, 15, and 18 % suspension of proteins (HWP and WPI by rotational viscosimeter, Brookfiel DV-III at 25°C. Apparent viscosity at 200 s-1 was calculated, using Newtonian law. On the basis of measured shear rate and shear stress, using least squere method, rheological parameters, flow behavior indeks (n and consistency coefficient (k were determined according to the Ostwald de Waele model. The highest viscosity was observed in 18% HWP model system while the least viscosity was found in a model system prepared with 10% WPI.

  18. Targeted Multiresidue Analysis of Veterinary Drugs in Milk-Based Powders Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, James B; Simon, Kelli A; Wong, Jon W

    2017-08-30

    An analytical method was developed and validated for the determination of 40 veterinary drugs in various milk-based powders. The method involves acetonitrile/water extraction, solid-phase filtration for lipid removal in fat-containing matrices, and analysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The limits of quantitation (LOQ) ranged from 0.02 to 82 ng/g. Acceptable recoveries (70-120%, RSD powder. Similar results were obtained for whole milk powder, milk protein concentrate, whey protein concentrate, and whey protein isolate. This new method will allow for better monitoring of a wide range of veterinary drugs in milk-based powders.

  19. Whey cheese: membrane technology to increase yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Francisco; González, Pablo; Muro, Claudia

    2016-02-01

    Sweet cheese whey has been used to obtain whey cheese without the addition of milk. Pre-treated whey was concentrated by nanofiltration (NF) at different concentration ratios (2, 2.5 and 2.8) or by reverse osmosis (RO) (2-3 times). After the concentration, whey was acidified with lactic acid until a final pH of 4.6-4.8, and heated to temperatures between 85 and 90 °C. The coagulated fraction (supernatant) was collected and freely drained over 4 h. The cheese-whey yield and protein, fat, lactose and ash recoveries in the final product were calculated. The membrane pre-concentration step caused an increase in the whey-cheese yield. The final composition of products was compared with traditional cheese-whey manufacture products (without membrane concentration). Final cheese yields found were to be between 5 and 19.6%, which are higher than those achieved using the traditional 'Requesón' process.

  20. Tuning aerosol performance using the multibreath Orbital® dry powder inhaler device: controlling delivery parameters and aerosol performance via modification of puck orifice geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing; Young, Paul M; Ong, Hui Xin; Crapper, John; Flodin, Carina; Qiao, Erin Lin; Phillips, Gary; Traini, Daniela

    2015-07-01

    The current study presents a new approach to tackle high-dose lung delivery using a prototype multibreath Orbital® dry powder inhaler (DPI). One of the key device components is the "puck" (aerosol sample chamber) with precision-engineered outlet orifice(s) that control the dosing rate. The influence of puck orifice geometry and number of orifices on the performance of mannitol aerosols were studied. Pucks with different orifice configurations were filled with 400 mg of spray-dried mannitol and tested in the Orbital® DPI prototype. The emitted dose and overall aerodynamic performance across a number of "breaths" were studied using a multistage liquid impinger. The aerosol performances of the individual actuations were investigated using in-line laser diffraction. The emptying rate of all pucks was linear between 20% and 80% cumulative drug released (R(2) > 0.98), and the amount of formulation released per breath could be controlled such that the device was empty after 2 to 11 breath maneuvers. The puck-emptying rate linearly related to the orifice hole length (R(2) > 0.95). Mass median aerodynamic diameters of the emitted aerosol ranged from 4.03 to 4.62 μm and fine particle fraction (≤6.4 μm) were 50%-66%. Laser diffraction suggested that the aerosol performance and emptying rates were not dependent on breath number, showing consistent size distribution profiles. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  1. Bioconversions for whey utilization and waste abatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mawson, A.J. (Massey Univ., Palmerston North (New Zealand). Dept. of Biotechnology)

    1994-01-01

    Whey arising from cheese and caesein manufacture has a BOD of 35-45 kg m[sup -3] and must be treated prior to disposal. Bioconversion of lactose in whey to ethanol, yeast biomass or methane has been used to produce saleable products whilst reducing the organic load by greater than 75%. Higher BOD reductions can be achieved by combined processes, such as methane production from whey distillery effluents, but in most cases some aerobic treatment prior to final disposal is also required. The economics of such bioconversions can be favourable but market opportunities for other products and the demands of whey processing have limited the adoption of these technologies by the dairy industry. (author)

  2. Protein-peptide interactions in mixtures of whey peptides and whey proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creusot, N.; Gruppen, H.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of several conditions on the amounts and compositions of aggregates formed in mixtures of whey protein hydrolysate, made with Bacillus licheniformis protease, and whey protein isolate were investigated using response surface methodology. Next, the peptides present in the aggregates were

  3. Influence of Tribomechanical Micronisation on the Rheological Properties of Whey Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Lelas

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations with powdered whey protein concentrates containing 60 % (WPC-60 or 80 % (WPC-80 of proteins were carried out. In this work proteins were treated using the laboratory equipment for tribomechanical micronisation with three different rotor speeds. Before and after the tribomechanical treatment, the analyses of the particle size and particle distribution as well as the specific area and scanning microscopy were carried out. The influence of tribomechanical treatment as well as hydrocolloid addition on the rheological properties of model systems of whey protein concentrate (10 % of total solid was studied. Rheological parameters, flow behavior index (n and consistency coefficient (k were determined by the power-law model. The results obtained showed that the tribomechanical treatment involves a significant decrease in particle size, a change in particle distribution and an increase in specific area of powdered whey proteins. Systems without hydrocolloid addition were Newtonian, but those with hydrocolloid addition exhibited pseudoplastic properties. The viscosity of model systems containingn tribomechanically treated whey protein concentrates (TWPC was greater in comparison with the same systems prepared with untreated WPC. Systems with greater amount of proteins (WPC-80 had higher viscosity than the same systems containing lower amount of proteins. Hydrocolloid addition affected an increase of viscosity of model systems prepared with untreated WPC. The most significant increase of consistency coefficient (k was observed in systems with carboxymethylcellulose (CMC and addition of a special type of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC E466 known as DIKO, icecream binder 0911-E. In systems containing tribomechanically treated TWPC hydrocolloids had various effects. In systems with guar gum, carragenan, inulin, pectin or amid pectin, viscosity increased in comparison with those prepared with untreated WPC. CMC and DIKO affected a significant

  4. Intakes of whey protein hydrolysate and whole whey proteins are discriminated by LC-MS metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanstrup, Jan; Rasmussen, Jakob Ewald; Ritz, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Whey protein improves fasting lipids and insulin response in overweight and obese individuals. Whey hydrolysate was recently shown to be more active than whole protein but the differences in metabolite profiles after intake remain unknown. This study discriminates plasma profiles after intake...... of four different whey protein fractions and establishes new hypotheses for the observed effects. Obese, non-diabetic subjects were included in the randomized, blinded, cross-over meal study. Subjects ingested a high-fat meal containing whey isolate (WI), whey concentrate hydrolysate (WH), α......-lactalbumin or caseinoglycomacropeptide as the protein source. Plasma samples were collected at five time points and metabolites analysed using LC-Q-TOF-MS. Plasma concentrations of ten amino acids (AAs) were different between the meals. The plasma levels of AAs and AA derivatives were generally directly related to the AA composition...

  5. Dietary cheese whey protein protects rats against mild dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis: role of mucin and microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprong, R C; Schonewille, A J; van der Meer, R

    2010-04-01

    Data from the literature suggest that the availability of the amino acids threonine, cysteine, or both, is limiting for mucin synthesis under conditions of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Unlike casein, cheese whey protein is rich in these amino acids. The protective effect of cheese whey protein was examined using dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced inflammation of the large intestine in rats that were fed a diet containing casein, cheese whey protein, or casein supplemented with threonine and cysteine. The clinical markers diarrhea and fecal blood were determined using biochemical assays, and gene expression of inflammation markers was used to quantify inflammation. The effect of dairy protein on mucin production was determined by gene expression of rat mucin 2 (MUC2) and by quantifying fecal mucin excretion. Fecal lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were determined using quantitative PCR. Dietary cheese whey protein reduced DSS-induced gene expression of the inflammation markers interleukin 1beta, calprotectin, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, and diminished the clinical symptoms diarrhea and fecal blood loss. Moreover, cheese whey protein increased fecal mucin secretion without affecting gene expression of MUC2, suggesting enhanced mucin synthesis. In addition, cheese whey protein increased fecal lactobacilli and bifidobacteria counts. Supplementation of threonine and cysteine showed comparable effects. In conclusion, cheese whey protein protected rats against DSS-induced gut inflammation. This can most likely be explained by its threonine and cysteine content. Protection can be the result of both the stimulation of intestinal mucin synthesis and modification of microflora composition. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Energy production by anaerobic treatment of cheese whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peano, L.; Ciciarelli, R.; Comino, E.; Gard, P. A.

    2009-07-01

    Anaerobic treatment and methane generation potential of cheese whey, diluted with mud, were determined in the digester of an existing wastewater treatment plant in Switzerland. Lactose, main sugar in cheese whey, can be a useful indicator to evaluate serum anaerobic treatment. Conventional parameters of anaerobic digestion (Volatile Matter, Dry Matter, Fatty Volatile Acids, total Alkali metric Title) were measured after the introduction of different whey/sludge ratio demonstrating that, despite an overcharge of whey digester, its stability is never compromised. (Author)

  7. Nutritional and functional properties of whey proteins concentrate and isolate

    OpenAIRE

    Zoran Herceg; Anet Režek

    2006-01-01

    Whey protein fractions represent 18 - 20 % of total milk nitrogen content. Nutritional value in addition to diverse physico - chemical and functional properties make whey proteins highly suitable for application in foodstuffs. In the most cases, whey proteins are used because of their functional properties. Whey proteins possess favourable functional characteristics such as gelling, water binding, emulsification and foaming ability. Due to application of new process techniques (membrane fract...

  8. Improved Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Hydrolysates in Food Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Jeewanthi, Renda Kankanamge Chaturika; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the enhanced functional characteristics of enzymatic hydrolysates of whey proteins (WPHs) in food applications compared to intact whey proteins (WPs). WPs are applied in foods as whey protein concentrates (WPCs), whey protein isolates (WPIs), and WPHs. WPs are byproducts of cheese production, used in a wide range of food applications due to their nutritional validity, functional activities, and cost effectiveness. Enzymatic hydrolysis yields improved functional and nutr...

  9. Valuation of milk composition and genotype in cheddar cheese production using an optimization model of cheese and whey production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, H A; Parvin, L; Garnett, I; DePeters, E J; Medrano, J F; Fadel, J G

    2007-02-01

    A mass balance optimization model was developed to determine the value of the kappa-casein genotype and milk composition in Cheddar cheese and whey production. Inputs were milk, nonfat dry milk, cream, condensed skim milk, and starter and salt. The products produced were Cheddar cheese, fat-reduced whey, cream, whey cream, casein fines, demineralized whey, 34% dried whey protein, 80% dried whey protein, lactose powder, and cow feed. The costs and prices used were based on market data from March 2004 and affected the results. Inputs were separated into components consisting of whey protein, ash, casein, fat, water, and lactose and were then distributed to products through specific constraints and retention equations. A unique 2-step optimization procedure was developed to ensure that the final composition of fat-reduced whey was correct. The model was evaluated for milk compositions ranging from 1.62 to 3.59% casein, 0.41 to 1.14% whey protein, 1.89 to 5.97% fat, and 4.06 to 5.64% lactose. The kappa casein genotype was represented by different retentions of milk components in Cheddar cheese and ranged from 0.715 to 0.7411 kg of casein in cheese/kg of casein in milk and from 0.7795 to 0.9210 kg of fat in cheese/kg of fat in milk. Milk composition had a greater effect on Cheddar cheese production and profit than did genotype. Cheese production was significantly different and ranged from 9,846 kg with a high-casein milk composition to 6,834 kg with a high-fat milk composition per 100,000 kg of milk. Profit (per 100,000 kg of milk) was significantly different, ranging from $70,586 for a high-fat milk composition to $16,490 for a low-fat milk composition. However, cheese production was not significantly different, and profit was significant only for the lowest profit ($40,602) with the kappa-casein genotype. Results from this model analysis showed that the optimization model is useful for determining costs and prices for cheese plant inputs and products, and that it can

  10. Cheese whey wastewater: characterization and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fátima; Prazeres, Ana R; Rivas, Javier

    2013-02-15

    Cheese whey wastewater (CWW) is a strong organic and saline effluent whose characterization and treatment have not been sufficiently addressed. CWW composition is highly variable due to raw milk used, the fraction of non valorized cheese whey and the amount of cleaning water used. Cheese whey wastewater generation is roughly four times the volume of processed milk. This research tries to conduct an exhaustive compilation of CWW characterization and a comparative study between the different features of CWW, cheese whey (CW), second cheese whey (SCW) and dairy industry effluents. Different CWW existing treatments have also been critically analyzed. The advantages and drawbacks in aerobic/anaerobic processes have been evaluated. The benefits of physicochemical pre-stages (i.e. precipitation, coagulation-flocculation) in biological aerobic systems are assessed. Pre-treatments based on coagulation or basic precipitation might allow the application of aerobic biodegradation treatments with no dilution requirements. Chemical precipitation with lime or NaOH produces a clean wastewater and a sludge rich in organic matter, N and P. Their use in agriculture may lead to the implementation of Zero discharge systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. How surface composition of high milk proteins powders is influenced by spray-drying temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiani, C; Morand, M; Sanchez, C; Tehrany, E Arab; Jacquot, M; Schuck, P; Jeantet, R; Scher, J

    2010-01-01

    High milk proteins powders are common ingredients in many food products. The surface composition of these powders is expected to play an essential role during their storage, handling and/or final application. Therefore, an eventual control of the surface composition by modifying the spray-drying temperature could be very useful in the improvement of powder quality and the development of new applications. For this purpose, the influence of five spray-drying temperatures upon the surface composition of the powders was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The major milk proteins were studied: native micellar casein and native whey, both more or less enriched in lactose. The results show a surface enrichment in lipids for all the powders and in proteins for many powders. Whatever the drying temperature, lipids and proteins are preferentially located near the surface whereas lactose is found in the core. This surface enrichment is also highly affected by the spray-drying temperature. More lipids, more proteins and less lactose are systematically observed at the surface of powders spray-dried at lower outlet air temperatures. The nature of proteins is also found essential; surface enrichment in lipids being much stronger for whey proteins containing powders than for casein containing powders. Additionally, we found a direct correlation between the lipids surface concentration and the wetting ability for the 25 powders studied.

  12. Effect of relative humidity on oxidation of flaxseed oil in spray dried whey protein emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Riitta; Raula, Janne; Seppänen, Rauni; Buchert, Johanna; Kauppinen, Esko; Forssell, Pirkko

    2008-07-23

    Flaxseed oil was emulsified in whey protein isolate (WPI) and spray-dried. Powder characteristics and oxidative stability of oil at relative humidities (RH) from RH approximately 0% to RH 91% at 37 degrees C were analyzed. Oil droplets retained their forms in drying and reconstitution, but the original droplet size of the emulsion was not restored when the powder was dispersed in water. The particles seemed to be covered by a protein-rich surface layer as analyzed by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). Oxidation of flaxseed oil dispersed in the WPI matrix was retarded from that of bulk oil but followed the same pattern as bulk oil with respect to humidity. A high rate of oxidation was found for both low and high humidity conditions. The lowest rate of oxidation as followed by peroxide values was found at RH 75%, a condition that is likely to diverge significantly from the monolayer moisture value. A weak baseline transition observed for the WPI matrix in a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermogram suggested a glassy state of the matrix at all storage conditions. This was not consistent with the observed caking of the powder at RH 91%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed a considerable structural change in the WPI matrix in these conditions, which was suggested to be linked with a higher rate of oxygen transport. Possible mechanisms for oxygen transport in the whey protein matrix under variable RHs are discussed.

  13. Targeted and Untargeted Detection of Skim Milk Powder Adulteration by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capuano, Edoardo; Boerrigter-Eenling, Rita; Koot, Alex; Ruth, van S.M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was explored as a fast and reliable screening method for the detection of adulteration of skim milk powder (SMP). Sixty genuine SMP were adulterated with acid whey (1–25 % w/w), starch (2 and 5 %) and maltodextrin (2 and 5 %) for a total of

  14. Effect of Rosemary Transglutaminase on Yoghurt Fortified with Whey Protein Isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Osama

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L. transglutaminase (RTGase was used to cross-link whey protein isolate (WPI and its ability to induce gelation was investigated. The rheological and textural properties of WPI were improved with RTGase treatment. Set-type yoghurts fortified with 1% WPI powder treated with RTGase at the level of 2.5 and 10 unit/g protein were studied. Chemical, rheological, textural and organoleptic properties of the yoghurt treated with RTGase were better than these of the control yoghurt.

  15. Powder diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, M.

    1995-12-31

    the importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940`s, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments.

  16. Production and characterisation of whey protein hydrolysate having antioxidant activity from cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athira, Syamala; Mann, Bimlesh; Saini, Prerna; Sharma, Rajan; Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Ashish Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Cheese whey is a rich by-product in nutritional terms, possessing components with high biological value, excellent functional properties, and an inert flavour profile. In the present study, mozzarella cheese whey was ultra-filtrated to remove lactose and mineral. The retentate was hydrolysed with food-grade enzyme alcalase and the hydrolysis conditions (pH, temperature and time) were optimised for maximum antioxidant activity using response surface methodology. Whey protein hydrolysed for 8 h at pH 9 and 55 °C showed a maximum antioxidant activity of 1.18 ± 0.015 µmol Trolox mg(-1) protein. The antioxidant peptides were further enriched by ultra-filtration through a 3 kDa membrane. Seven peptides - β-Lg f(123-131), β-Lg f(122-131), β-Lg f(124-131), β-Lg f(123-134), β-Lg f(122-131), β-Lg f(96-100) and β-Lg f(94-100) - were identified by LC-MS/MS in the 3 kDa permeate of the hydrolysate. The incorporation of whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) in lemon whey drink (5-10 g L(-1)) increased the antioxidant activity from 76% to 90% as compared to control. Hydrolysis of ultra-filtrated retentate of whey can be an energy- and cost-effective method for the direct production of WPH from whey compared to the industrial production of WPH from whey protein concentrate. This study suggests that WPH with good nutritional and biological properties can be effectively used in health-promoting foods as a biofunctional ingredient. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Whey Protein Concentrate and Dexamethasone Protected Rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    ABSTRACT. The possible radioprotective effect of Immunocal® (whey protein]) supplement and dexamethasone on gamma-irradiated cerebellar tissue of Wistar rat was investigated in this study. Forty male albino rats were acclimatized and randomized into four groups of 10 animals each. Group I rats served as control; ...

  18. Fibril assembly in whey protein mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to study fibril assembly in mixtures of whey proteins. The effect of the composition of the protein mixture on the structures and the resulting phase behaviour was investigated. The current work has shown that beta-lactoglobulin is responsible for the fibril assembly

  19. Whey protein concentrate and dexamethasone protected rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The possible radioprotective effect of Immunocal® (whey protein]) supplement and dexamethasone on gamma-irradiated cerebellar tissue of Wistar rat was investigated in this study. Forty male albino rats were acclimatized and randomized into four groups of 10 animals each. Group I rats served as control; Group II: ...

  20. Electrokinetic characterization of whey protein separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Kristian; Stougård, Anders; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    Cross flow filtration of whey protein has been performed on 3 different membranes. The rejections have been determined by HPLC analysis of the feed and permeate. The pure membranes as well as the fouled membranes have been characterized by measurements of the streaming potential along the membrane...

  1. Addition of whey protein to fresh cheese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Rafael Arce-Méndez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work has been conducted in order to assess the effect of adding whey protein (WP to fresh cheese. The yield, proximal chemical composition, tryptophan content,and texture and consumer sensorial acceptance were obtained. The study was conducted at a cheese factory located in San Carlos, Costa Rica, in 2011. The protein obtained from whey was added during the cheese manufacturing process, before adding the microbial rennet; and four enrichment levels were evaluated, including one control. The supplemented cheese showed an acceptance rating between 6.8 and 7.1. Products with 75 and 120 g of added whey protein per kilogram of milk showed no significant differences versus non-supplemented cheese, while the preference towards the cheese with 150 g WP/kg was less than that of the control (p<0.05. A cluster analysis revealed the existence of two consumer groups: one, accounting for 65% of the members of the panel, whose preference was unaffected by the protein supplemented; and, the other group where the added protein affected their liking negatively. Adding whey protein to the cheese resulted in a significant increase in yield and in the protein-to-water ratio, as well as a reduction in fat content (p<0.05. Nevertheless, there were structural changes in the cheese that caused the reduction of certain texture properties, generating changes in their sensory properties that reduced the preference of a representative group of consumers towards the product.

  2. Flavored whey drinks: preparation and evaluation of selected parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alica Bobková

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was the preparation of fermented flavored whey beverages using whey, probiotic cultures and suitable flavors. Whey fermentation by lactic acid bacteria appears to be an interesting alternative to improve the properties of whey and thus to offer its exceptional nutritional value, not only because of whey protein contained, but also due to the valuable products produced by microorganisms. Pasteurized whey was enriched by the addition of sheep culture ZS-25, which was isolated from sheep cheese and contains more varieties of species Lactococcus lactis, and also by the probiotic culture containing the microorganisms of Bifidobacterium sp., Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus thermophilus. We focused our attention to select the appropriate type and concentration of flavor as well. Sensory evaluation was performed by the committee consisting of five intentionally selected professionally qualified persons. Taste of fermented whey drink was main observed property. Assessment of prepared whey drinks was repeated four times, each group consisted of 5 samples according to the following structure: sample A - whey drink with culture without flavoring, sample B - whey drink with culture and exotic flavor, sample C - whey drink with the culture and flavor of cranberry-grape-strawberry, sample D - whey drink with the culture and peach-orange flavor, sample E - whey drink with the culture and strawberry flavor. Flavored fermented whey beverages were sensorially evaluated. The order of individual samples determined by the evaluators was statistically processed by the Friedman test. Table value for this test for five evaluators and 5 samples is 8.99. The calculated values for all four sensory evaluations we performed, were higher than 8.99, so we rejected the null hypothesis and proved that among the different flavored whey drinks it is statistically significant difference. Overall, the worst evaluated was whey drink without flavoring. As

  3. (YSZ) powders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    XRD pattern for YSZ gel calcined at 900°C. Figure 3. Particle size distribution of the dry and wet ground slurries (20 vol.% solid content at a pH of 3). A. powder dry ground for 1 h; B, C, D, E. wet ground for 1, 2, 4, 10 h, res- pectively. Figure 4. Zeta-potential variation with pH for aqueous sus- pensions of 900°C calcined YSZ ...

  4. Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Whey Cheese with Pine Nuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Anamaria Semeniuc

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a value-added whey cheese through addition of pine nuts. Therefore, different concentrations of pine nuts [2, 4, 6 and 8% (w/w] were added to whey cheese. The study was designed to evaluate the influence of pine nuts on physicochemical and sensory properties of whey cheese. The addition of pine nuts resulted in an increase in fat content and total solids and a decrease in moisture content. However, no statistically significant difference was found in pH values. Sensory analysis was performed using the 9-point hedonic scale, with selected assessors. The whey cheese sample with 4% pine nuts was the most appreciated (7.6 points, followed by the classic whey cheese, whey cheese with 6 and 8% pine nuts (7.4 points, and whey cheese with 2% pine nuts (7.3 points. Nevertheless, the sensory characteristics of whey cheese were not significantly influenced by the addition of pine nuts. Whey cheese sensory profiling was successful in differential characterization of whey cheese samples.

  5. CVD carbon powders modified by ball milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazmierczak Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon powders produced using a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD methods are an interesting subject of research. One of the most interesting methods of synthesizing these powders is using radio frequency plasma. This method, originally used in deposition of carbon films containing different sp2/sp3 ratios, also makes possible to produce carbon structures in the form of powder. Results of research related to the mechanical modification of these powders have been presented. The powders were modified using a planetary ball mill with varying parameters, such as milling speed, time, ball/powder mass ratio and additional liquids. Changes in morphology and particle sizes were measured using scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Phase composition was analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The influence of individual parameters on the modification outcome was estimated using statistical method. The research proved that the size of obtained powders is mostly influenced by the milling speed and the amount of balls. Powders tend to form conglomerates sized up to hundreds of micrometers. Additionally, it is possible to obtain nanopowders with the size around 100 nm. Furthermore, application of additional liquid, i.e. water in the process reduces the graphitization of the powder, which takes place during dry milling.

  6. Dietary whey supplementation in experimental models of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velioglu Ogünç, A; Manukyan, M; Cingi, A; Eksioglu-Demiralp, E; Ozdemir Aktan, A; Süha Yalçin, A

    2008-03-01

    Whey is a dairy product containing milk serum proteins with diverse biological effects. In this study, the effect of dietary whey supplementation on wound healing was investigated. Rats were fed a standard or whey-supplemented diet for three weeks. Wound healing parameters, glutathione, and lipid peroxide levels were determined three days after the application of two different models of wound healing, i.e. laparotomy and colonic anastomosis. Dietary whey supplementation significantly increased glutathione levels and suppressed lipid peroxidation after experimental laparotomy and colonic anastomosis. Bursting pressures, hydroxyproline, and cytokine levels were not changed. Our results show that dietary whey supplementation increases glutathione synthesis and cellular antioxidant defense. Long-term effects of whey feeding on wound healing remains to be investigated.

  7. Simple utilization of lactic acid whey in dairy processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csanádi J.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of ultra-filtered lactic acid whey retentate was investigated for the making of sour cream. The utilization of lactic acid whey is limited due to its special properties, so the logical utilization way is to use it in fermented products. First, we concentrated lactic acid whey collected from cottage cheese making by ultrafiltration (UF, then UF Whey Retentate (UFWR was added (by 2, 5, and 10% into fat standardized cream for sour cream making. We investigated the texture and sensory properties of the sour cream samples compared with the industrial products. Generally, we can state that the use of small portion of UF whey retentate did not result noticeable changes and did not reduce the sensory value of sour creams. Higher UF whey retentate addition improved some texture properties of experimental samples, but the summarized evaluation of UFWR addition was not unequivocal. Control samples showed better results. Based on our results, the sample, which contained 5% UF whey retentate, had good texture and acceptable sensory properties. Furthermore, more than 5% UF lactic acid whey retentate (coming from our own ultrafiltration process resulted remarkably worse sensory properties than the other samples. Further investigation is needed to find the optimal composition and sensory properties of UFWR. Furthermore, we have to perform technological investigation to reach a higher concentration factor using pre-treatment of whey and to avoid the precipitation of whey proteins during the high temperature pasteurization of cream, cream mixed with UFWR or diafiltered whey retentate. We guess that the use of one-stage diafiltration would already decrease the unfavourable sensory properties of lactic acid whey retentate.

  8. The influence of bleaching agent and temperature on bleaching efficacy and volatile components of fluid whey and whey retentate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, A J; Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2013-10-01

    Fluid whey or retentate are often bleached to remove residual annatto Cheddar cheese colorant, and this process causes off-flavors in dried whey proteins. This study determined the impact of temperature and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and volatile components in fluid whey and fluid whey retentate. Freshly manufactured liquid whey (6.7% solids) or concentrated whey protein (retentate) (12% solids, 80% protein) were bleached using benzoyl peroxide (BP) at 100 mg/kg (w/w) or hydrogen peroxide (HP) at 250 mg/kg (w/w) at 5 °C for 16 h or 50 °CC for 1 h. Unbleached controls were subjected to a similar temperature profile. The experiment was replicated three times. Annatto destruction (bleaching efficacy) among treatments was compared, and volatile compounds were extracted and separated using solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS). Bleaching efficacy of BP was higher than HP (P whey at both 5 and 50 °C. HP bleaching efficacy was increased in retentate compared to liquid whey (P whey retentate, there was no difference between bleaching with HP or BP at 50 or 5 °C (P > 0.05). Retentate bleached with HP at either temperature had higher relative abundances of pentanal, hexanal, heptanal, and octanal than BP bleached retentate (P wheys generally had lower concentrations of selected volatiles compared to retentates. These results suggest that the highest bleaching efficacy (within the parameters evaluated) in liquid whey is achieved using BP at 5 or 50 °C and at 50 °C with HP or BP in whey protein retentate. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Characterization of whey protein emulsion films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida C. M. P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Stearic acid was incorporated into whey protein through emulsification to produce films. Whey protein films were prepared by dispersing 6.5% protein in distilled water. Glycerol was the plasticizer agent. Stearic acid was added at different levels (0.0 to 1.0% and the films were analyzed at different pHs (5.0, 6.0, 7.0 and 9.0. The emulsion films were evaluated for mechanical properties, water vapor permeability and protein solubility. It was observed that water vapor permeability and protein solubility values for the film decreased with increasing fatty acid content in the film, but the mechanical properties also decreased.

  10. Enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose of whey permeate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Nascimento de Almeida

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The whey permeate is the residual of the concentration process of the whey proteins by ultrafiltration method. It contains important nutrients such as lactose, minerals and some proteins and lipids. It is without an ending industrial waste that causes serious damage to the environment. For its full use the lactose must be hydrolyzed to enable its consumption by intolerant people. The enzymatic hydrolysis by lactase (β-galactosidase of Kluyveromyces lactis yeast is a safe method that does not compromise the integrity of other nutrients, enabling further use of the permeate as a raw material. This study aimed to perform tests of enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose in whey permeate formulations in a concentration of 0.2%, 0.7% and 1% at 30, 60 and 90 minutes with pH 6.3 medium and 37 °C. The reactions were monitored by high performance liquid chromatography which showed that the enzyme concentration of 0.7% at time 30 minutes formulations became safe for consumption by lactose intolerant people, according to minimum levels established by law.

  11. Development of β-lactoglobulin-specific chimeric human IgEκ monoclonal antibodies for in vitro safety assessment of whey hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipping, Karen; Simons, Peter J; Buelens-Sleumer, Laura S; Cox, Linda; den Hartog, Marcel; de Jong, Niels; Teshima, Reiko; Garssen, Johan; Boon, Louis; Knippels, Léon M J

    2014-01-01

    Cow's milk-derived whey hydrolysates are nutritional substitutes for allergic infants. Safety or residual allergenicity assessment of these whey hydrolysates is crucial. Currently, rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells expressing the human IgE receptor α-chain (huFcεRIα-RBL-2H3), sensitized with serum IgE from cow's milk allergic children, are being employed to assess in vitro residual allergenicity of these whey hydrolysates. However, limited availability and inter-lot variation of these allergic sera impede standardization of whey hydrolysate safety testing in degranulation assays. An oligoclonal pool of chimeric human (chu)IgE antibodies against bovine β-lactoglobulin (a major allergen in whey) was generated to increase sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of existing degranulation assays. Mice were immunized with bovine β-lactoglobulin, and subsequently the variable domains of dissimilar anti-β-lactoglobulin mouse IgG antibodies were cloned and sequenced. Six chimeric antibodies were generated comprising mouse variable domains and human constant IgE/κ domains. After sensitization with this pool of anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs, huFcεRIα-expressing RBL-2H3 cells demonstrated degranulation upon cross-linking with whey, native 18 kDa β-lactoglobulin, and 5-10 kDa whey hydrolysates, whereas a 3 kDa whey hydrolysate and cow's milk powder (mainly casein) showed no degranulation. In parallel, allergic serum IgEs were less sensitive. In addition, our pool anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs recognized multiple allergenic immunodominant regions on β-lactoglobulin, which were also recognized by serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic children. Usage of our 'unlimited' source and well-defined pool of β-lactoglobulin-specific recombinant chuIgEs to sensitize huFcεRIα on RBL-2H3 cells showed to be a relevant and sensitive alternative for serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic patients to assess safety of whey-based non-allergic hydrolyzed formula.

  12. Development of β-lactoglobulin-specific chimeric human IgEκ monoclonal antibodies for in vitro safety assessment of whey hydrolysates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Knipping

    Full Text Available Cow's milk-derived whey hydrolysates are nutritional substitutes for allergic infants. Safety or residual allergenicity assessment of these whey hydrolysates is crucial. Currently, rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells expressing the human IgE receptor α-chain (huFcεRIα-RBL-2H3, sensitized with serum IgE from cow's milk allergic children, are being employed to assess in vitro residual allergenicity of these whey hydrolysates. However, limited availability and inter-lot variation of these allergic sera impede standardization of whey hydrolysate safety testing in degranulation assays.An oligoclonal pool of chimeric human (chuIgE antibodies against bovine β-lactoglobulin (a major allergen in whey was generated to increase sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of existing degranulation assays.Mice were immunized with bovine β-lactoglobulin, and subsequently the variable domains of dissimilar anti-β-lactoglobulin mouse IgG antibodies were cloned and sequenced. Six chimeric antibodies were generated comprising mouse variable domains and human constant IgE/κ domains.After sensitization with this pool of anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs, huFcεRIα-expressing RBL-2H3 cells demonstrated degranulation upon cross-linking with whey, native 18 kDa β-lactoglobulin, and 5-10 kDa whey hydrolysates, whereas a 3 kDa whey hydrolysate and cow's milk powder (mainly casein showed no degranulation. In parallel, allergic serum IgEs were less sensitive. In addition, our pool anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs recognized multiple allergenic immunodominant regions on β-lactoglobulin, which were also recognized by serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic children.Usage of our 'unlimited' source and well-defined pool of β-lactoglobulin-specific recombinant chuIgEs to sensitize huFcεRIα on RBL-2H3 cells showed to be a relevant and sensitive alternative for serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic patients to assess safety of whey-based non-allergic hydrolyzed formula.

  13. Functional Biomaterials: Solution Electrospinning and Gelation of Whey Protein and Pullulan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Stephanie Tolstedt

    soaking, and thereby making them potentially useful for tissue scaffolding applications. A fourth accomplishment was to utilize Near Infrared Reflectance (NIR) Spectroscopy and Chemometrics techniques to analyze commercial whey protein powder characteristics such as protein, fat and moisture content as well as pH. NIR has been utilized in the food and pharmaceutical industries for quality control as a valuable compliment to or replacement for more expensive testing such as High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Analysis resulted in the development of quantitative, linear regression models to correlate whey protein powder characteristics to NIR data. Whey protein's ability to form gels and pullulan's electrospinnability to form nanofibers is combined herein to form blends of both that can be changed with varying concentration, pH, temperature and supplementation with food-safe additives. The study correlates mechanical properties and microstructure of blend gels and nanofibers and provides a foundation for further study of swellable network for tissue application specifically in the use of pullulan-whey protein heat treated nanofiber mats.

  14. Talcum powder poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better the chance for recovery. Breathing in talcum powder can lead to very serious lung problems, even death. Use caution when using talcum powder on babies. Talc-free baby powder products are ...

  15. Antibacterial activity of papain hydrolysed camel whey and its fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdel-Hamid, Mahmoud; Goda, Hanan A.; De Gobba, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Camel whey (ON) was hydrolysed with papain from Carica papaya and fractionated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The antibacterial activity of the CW, camel whey hydrolysate (CWH) and the obtained SEC-fractions was assessed using the disc-diffusion method. The CWH exhibited significantly...

  16. Effect of whey storage on physicochemical properties, microstructure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sweet whey and acid whey were evaluated based on titratable acidity, pH, fat, cryoscopy, and density, while ricotta was based on yield, fat, protein, ash, acidity, pH, moisture, total solids, color, texture, and microstructure. This was done with analysis of variance in a completely randomized design using Tukey test at 5% ...

  17. Qualitative comparison of blackcurrant and blackcurrant--whey beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworska, G; Sady, M; Grega, T; Bernaś, E; Pogoń, K

    2011-08-01

    This study provides a qualitative comparison of blackcurrant and blackcurrant-whey beverages over a 12-month storage period. The amount of extract in the beverages was established as 12%, of which 25% was blackcurrant concentrate. Acid whey was used for the production of blackcurrant-whey beverages. In comparison to blackcurrant-whey beverages, blackcurrant beverages contained significantly more glucose, fructose, sucrose, polyphenols and vitamins C and B1. They also had a higher level of antioxidant activity against ABTS•+ and DPPH, with the difference ranging from 2% to 46%. On the other hand, blackcurrant-whey beverages contained more ash, proteins and vitamin B2 and the presence of lactose was detected. They were also characterized by higher color parameter values evaluated according to the CIE system. A general sensory evaluation awarded blackcurrant beverages with 0.5-1.3 more points than blackcurrant-whey beverages. A descriptive flavor analysis found that blackcurrant taste dominated in both types of beverages; however, in blackcurrant-whey beverages, the taste and smell of whey were also discernible. Changes in the quality of the beverages were observed during the storage period, notably a decrease in their antioxidant properties.

  18. Performance improvement of whey-driven microbial fuel cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various methods are available for the recycling and treatment of cheese whey with the objective of enhancing sustainable manufacturing. Currently, an increasing interest is on the anaerobic bioremediation of whey with the added benefit of generating electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Since microorganisms are the ...

  19. Citric acid production from whey with sugars and additives by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citric acid (CA) production by Aspergillus niger ATCC9642 from whey with different concentrations of sucrose, glucose, fructose, galactose riboflavin, tricalcium phosphate and methanol in surface culture process was studied. It was found that whey with 15% (w/v) sucrose with or without 1% methanol was the most ...

  20. Complex coacervation of whey proteins and gum arabic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinbreck, F.; Vries, de R.J.; Schrooyen, P.; Kruif, de C.G.

    2003-01-01

    Mixtures of gum arabic and whey protein (whey protein isolate, WP) form an electrostatic complex in a specific PH range. Three phase boundaries (PHc, pHphi(l), pHphi(2)) have been determined using an original titration method, newly applied to complex coacervation. It consists of monitoring the

  1. Cheese from ultrafiltered milk : whey proteins and chymosin activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijsse, C.A.P.

    1999-01-01

    The manufacture of (semi-)hard cheese from ultrafiltered milk (UF-cheese) enables the partial incorporation of whey proteins in the cheese, thereby increasing its yield. The transfer of whey proteins in curd from (UF-)milk was studied in relation to the degree of ultrafiltration of the milk

  2. Technological optimization of manufacture of probiotic whey cheese matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Ana R; Brandão, Teresa; Gomes, Ana M; Pintado, Manuela E; Malcata, F Xavier

    2011-03-01

    In attempts to optimize their manufacture, whey cheese matrices obtained via thermal processing of whey (leading to protein precipitation) and inoculated with probiotic cultures were tested. A central composite, face-centered design was followed, so a total of 16 experiments were run using fractional addition of bovine milk to feedstock whey, homogenization time, and storage time of whey cheese as processing parameters. Probiotic whey cheese matrices were inoculated with Lactobacillus casei LAFTIL26 at 10% (v/v), whereas control whey cheese matrices were added with skim milk previously acidified with lactic acid to the same level. All whey cheeses were stored at 7 °C up to 14 d. Chemical and sensory analyses were carried out for all samples, as well as rheological characterization by oscillatory viscometry and textural profiling. As expected, differences were found between control and probiotic matrices: fractional addition of milk and storage time were the factors accounting for the most important effects. Estimation of the best operating parameters was via response surface analysis: milk addition at a rate of 10% to 15% (v/v), and homogenization for 5 min led to the best probiotic whey cheeses in terms of texture and organoleptic properties, whereas the best time for consumption was found to be by 9 d of storage following manufacture.

  3. Whey proteins analysis in aqueous medium and in artificial gastric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whey proteins isolates (WPI) were treated in aqueous medium at various pH values. Zeta potential, turbidity and particle size measurement were determined as a function of pH. FTIR analysis was performed in ATR mode (attenuated total reflectance). Digestibility was assessed by treating whey proteins with artificial gastric ...

  4. Concentrated whey protein particle dispersions: Heat stability and rheological properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saglam, D.; Venema, P.; Vries, de R.J.; Shi, J.; Linden, van der E.

    2013-01-01

    In this work heat stability and rheological properties of concentrated whey protein particle dispersions in different dispersing media are studied. Whey protein particles (protein content ~20% w/v) having an average size of a few microns were formed using a combination of two-step emulsification and

  5. Comparison of blueberry powder produced via foam-mat freeze-drying versus spray-drying: evaluation of foam and powder properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darniadi, Sandi; Ho, Peter; Murray, Brent S

    2017-09-20

    Blueberry juice powder was developed via foam-mat freeze-drying (FMFD) and spray-drying (SD) via addition of maltodextrin (MD) and whey protein isolate (WPI) at weight ratios of MD/WPI = 0.4 to 3.2 (with a fixed solids content of 5 wt% for FMFD and 10 wt% for SD). Feed rates of 180 and 360 mL h-1 were tested in SD. The objective was to evaluate the effect of the drying methods and carrier agents on the physical properties of the corresponding blueberry powders and reconstituted products. Ratios of MD/WPI = 0.4, 1.0 and 1.6 produced highly stable foams most suitable for FMFD. FMFD gave high yields and low bulk density powders with flake-like particles of large size that were also dark purple with high red values. SD gave low powder recoveries. The powders had higher bulk density and faster rehydration times, consisting of smooth, spherical and smaller particles than in FMFD powders. The SD powders were bright purple but less red than FMFD powders. Solubility was greater than 95% for both FMFD and SD powders. The FMFD method is a feasible method of producing blueberry juice powder and gives products retaining more characteristics of the original juice than SD. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Cheese whey protein recovery by ultrafiltration through transglutaminase (TG) catalysis whey protein cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-Qiong, Wang; Lan-Wei, Zhang; Xue, Han; Yi, Lu

    2017-01-15

    In whey ultrafiltration (UF) production, two main problems are whey protein recovery and membrane fouling. In this study, membrane coupling protein transglutaminase (TG) catalysis protein cross-linking was investigated under different conditions to find out the best treatment. We found that the optimal conditions for protein recovery involved catalyzing whey protein cross-linking with TG (40U/g whey proteins) at 40°C for 60min at pH 5.0. Under these conditions, the recovery rate was increased 15-20%, lactose rejection rate was decreased by 10%, and relative permeate flux was increase 30-40% compared to the sample without enzyme treatment (control). It was noticeable that the total resistance and cake resistance were decreased after enzyme catalysis. This was mainly due to the increased particle size and decreased zeta potential. Therefore, membrane coupling enzyme catalysis protein cross-linking is a potential means for further use. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Whey-derived valuable products obtained by microbial fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescuma, Micaela; de Valdez, Graciela Font; Mozzi, Fernanda

    2015-08-01

    Whey, the main by-product of the cheese industry, is considered as an important pollutant due to its high chemical and biological oxygen demand. Whey, often considered as waste, has high nutritional value and can be used to obtain value-added products, although some of them need expensive enzymatic synthesis. An economical alternative to transform whey into valuable products is through bacterial or yeast fermentations and by accumulation during algae growth. Fermentative processes can be applied either to produce individual compounds or to formulate new foods and beverages. In the first case, a considerable amount of research has been directed to obtain biofuels able to replace those derived from petrol. In addition, the possibility of replacing petrol-derived plastics by biodegradable polymers synthesized during bacterial fermentation of whey has been sought. Further, the ability of different organisms to produce metabolites commonly used in the food and pharmaceutical industries (i.e., lactic acid, lactobionic acid, polysaccharides, etc.) using whey as growth substrate has been studied. On the other hand, new low-cost functional whey-based foods and beverages leveraging the high nutritional quality of whey have been formulated, highlighting the health-promoting effects of fermented whey-derived products. This review aims to gather the multiple uses of whey as sustainable raw material for the production of individual compounds, foods, and beverages by microbial fermentation. This is the first work to give an overview on the microbial transformation of whey as raw material into a large repertoire of industrially relevant foods and products.

  8. Viability and growth promotion of starter and probiotic bacteria in yogurt supplemented with whey protein hydrolysate during refrigerated storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dąbrowska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of whey protein hydrolysate (WPH addition on growth of standard yoghurt cultures and Bifidobacterium adolescentis during co-fermentation and its viability during storage at 4ºC in yoghurts has been evaluated. WPH was obtained with the use of serine protease from Y. lipolytica yeast. Stirred probiotic yoghurts were prepared by using whole milk standardized to 16% of dry matter with the addition of either whey protein concentrate, skim milk powder (SMP, WPH-SMP (ratio 1:1, WPH. The hydrolysate increased the yoghurt culture counts at the initial stage of fermentation and significantly inhibited the decrease in population viability throughout the storage at 4ºC in comparison to the control. The post-fermentation acidification was also retarded by the addition of WPH. The hydrolysate did not increase the Bifidobacterium adolescentis counts at the initial stage. However, the WPH significantly improved its viability. After 21 days of storage, in the yogurts supplemented with WPH, the population of these bacteria oscillated around 3.04 log10 CFU/g, while in samples where SMP or whey protein concentrate was used, the bacteria were no longer detected.

  9. Effect of casein to whey protein ratios on the protein interactions and coagulation properties of low-fat yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L L; Wang, X L; Tian, Q; Mao, X Y

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of casein (CN) to whey protein (WP) ratios (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, and 1:1) on gelation properties and microstructure of low-fat yogurt made with reconstituted skim milk with or without addition of whey protein concentrate. The rheological properties (storage modulus, G'; yield stress; and yield strain) of the obtained low-fat yogurt were greatly enhanced, the fermentation period was shortened, and the microstructure became more compact with smaller pores as the CN:WP ratio decreased. When CN:WP was 2:1 or 1:1, the obtained yogurt coagulum showed higher G' and greater yield stress, with more compact crosslinking and smaller pores. In addition, the more of skim milk powder was replaced by whey protein concentrate, the more disulfide bonds were formed and the greater the occurrence of hydrophobic interactions during heat treatment, which can improve the rheological properties and microstructure of low-fat yogurt. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationships between surface energy analysis and functional characteristics of dairy powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondor, Anett; Hogan, Sean A

    2017-12-15

    Surface energetics of demineralised whey (DMW), skimmed milk (SMP), phosphocasein (PCN) and infant milk formula (IMF) powders were determined by inverse gas chromatography (IGC). All four milk powders were amphoteric in nature with the dispersive (apolar) component of surface energy dominating the specific (polar) contribution. PCN and IMF had the highest and lowest extent of surface heterogeneity, respectively. PCN also demonstrated the poorest functional properties of the powders examined. In contrast, IMF had excellent flow and rehydration properties. Thermodynamic work of cohesion was highest in PCN and may have contributed to inadequate rehydration behaviour. Glass transition temperature of IMF powder, determined by IGC, suggested a surface dominated by lactose. Surface heterogeneity provided a better indicator of functional behaviour than total surface energy. IGC is a useful complementary technique for chemical and structural analysis of milk powders and allows improved insight into the contribution of surface and bulk factors to functionality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring of whey quality with NIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucheryavskiy, Sergey; Lomborg, Carina

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for monitoring of liquid whey quality parameters during protein production process has been tested. The parameters included total solids, lactose, protein and fat content. The samples for the experiment were taken from real industrial...... processes and had a large variability for most of the parameters. Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression was used to make the prediction models based on NIR spectra taken at 30 and 40 °C. Using proper wavelength range allowed to get models for prediction of fat, protein and amount of total solids with very...

  12. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  13. Physical and chemical changes in whey protein concentrate stored at elevated temperature and humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunick, Michael H; Thomas-Gahring, Audrey; Van Hekken, Diane L; Iandola, Susan K; Singh, Mukti; Qi, Phoebe X; Ukuku, Dike O; Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan; Onwulata, Charles I; Tomasula, Peggy M

    2016-03-01

    In a case study, we monitored the physical properties of 2 batches of whey protein concentrate (WPC) under adverse storage conditions to provide information on shelf life in hot, humid areas. Whey protein concentrates with 34.9 g of protein/100g (WPC34) and 76.8 g of protein/100g (WPC80) were stored for up to 18 mo under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and relative humidity. The samples became yellower with storage; those stored at 35 °C were removed from the study by 12 mo because of their unsatisfactory appearance. Decreases in lysine and increases in water activity, volatile compound formation, and powder caking values were observed in many specimens. Levels of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, coliforms, yeast, and mold were <3.85 log10 cfu/g in all samples. Relative humidity was not a factor in most samples. When stored in sealed bags, these samples of WPC34 and WPC80 had a shelf life of 9 mo at 35 °C but at least 18 mo at lower temperatures, which should extend the market for these products. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Brown pigment formation in heated sugar-protein mixed suspensions containing unmodified and peptically modified whey protein concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongsirikul, Narumol; Hongsprabhas, Parichat

    2016-01-01

    Commercial whey protein concentrate (WPC) was modified by heating the acidified protein suspensions (pH 2.0) at 80 °C for 30 min and treating with pepsin at 37 °C for 60 min. Prior to spray-drying, such modification did not change the molecular weights (MWs) of whey proteins determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). After spray-drying the modified whey protein concentrate with trehalose excipient (MWPC-TH), it was found that the α-lactalbumin (α-La) was the major protein that was further hydrolyzed the most. The reconstituted MWPC-TH contained β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) as the major protein and small molecular weight (MW) peptides of less than 6.5 kDa. The reconstituted MWPC-TH had higher NH2 group, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), lower exposed aromatic ring and thiol (SH) contents than did the commercial WPC. Kinetic studies revealed that the addition of MWPC-TH in fructose-glycine solution was able to reduce brown pigment formation in the mixtures heated at 80 to 95 °C by increasing the activation energy (Ea) of brown pigment formation due to the retardation of fluoresced advanced glycation end product (AGEs) formation. The addition of MWPC to reducing sugar-glycine/commercial WPC was also able to lower brown pigment formation in the sterilized (121 °C, 15 min) mixed suspensions containing 0.1 M reducing sugar and 0.5-1.0 % glycine and/or commercial (P < 0.05). It was demonstrated that the modification investigated in this study selectively hydrolyzed α-La and retained β-Lg for the production of antibrowning whey protein concentrate.

  15. Application of Acid Whey in Orange Drink Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Jaworska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare qualitative changes in orange and orange beverages containing whey during 12 months of storage. The beverages contained 12 % extract, half of which was orange concentrate, the rest was sugar or sugar and whey extract. Acid whey was used in the production of beverages, added at a rate of 50 % of the used water. Orange beverages with whey contained more protein, ash, glucose, lactose and vitamin B2 than the orange beverages, but less sucrose, fructose and vitamin C, and also showed lower antioxidant activity against the DPPH radical. No significant differences between the two types of beverages were found in the polyphenolic content or activity against the ABTS cation radical. The type of beverage had a significant effect on the colour parameter values under the CIELAB system, although no significant differences were found between the beverages in the sensory evaluation of colour desirability. The overall sensory evaluation of orange beverages with whey was 2–10 % lower than of other orange beverages. The intensity of orange, sweet and refreshing taste was greater in orange beverages, while that of sour and whey taste was greater in orange beverages containing whey. There were significant decreases in sucrose, lactose, all indicators of antioxidant activity and sensory quality during storage. Levels of glucose and fructose rose with the storage period, while the intensity of sour, orange and refreshing taste decreased.

  16. Chemical characterisation and application of acid whey in fermented milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievore, Paolla; Simões, Deise R S; Silva, Karolline M; Drunkler, Northon L; Barana, Ana C; Nogueira, Alessandro; Demiate, Ivo M

    2015-04-01

    Acid whey is a by-product from cheese processing that can be employed in beverage formulations due to its high nutritional quality. The objective of the present work was to study the physicochemical characterisation of acid whey from Petit Suisse-type cheese production and use this by-product in the formulation of fermented milk, substituting water. In addition, a reduction in the fermentation period was tested. Both the final product and the acid whey were analysed considering physicochemical determinations, and the fermented milk was evaluated by means of sensory analysis, including multiple comparison and acceptance tests, as well as purchase intention. The results of the physicochemical analyses showed that whey which was produced during both winter and summer presented higher values of protein (1.22 and 0.97 %, w/v, respectively), but there were no differences in lactose content. During the autumn, the highest solid extract was found in whey (6.00 %, w/v), with larger amounts of lactose (4.73 %, w/v) and ash (0.83 %, w/v). When analysing the fermented milk produced with added acid whey, the acceptance test resulted in 90 % of acceptance; the purchase intention showed that 54 % of the consumers would 'certainly buy' and 38 % would 'probably buy' the product. Using acid whey in a fermented milk formulation was technically viable, allowing by-product value aggregation, avoiding discharge, lowering water consumption and shortening the fermentation period.

  17. Synthesis, cellular uptake, and biodistribution of whey-rich nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xu; Wang, Xin; Yang, Chenchen; Liu, Qin; Wu, Wei; Liu, Baorui; Jiang, Xiqun

    2014-08-01

    Whey-poly(acrylic acid) (whey-PAA) nanoparticles are prepared by polymerizing acrylic acid (AA) monomer in the presence of whey protein in a complete aqueous medium. The properties, drug loading, and release as well as in vitro cytotoxicity of whey-PAA nanoparticles are examined. The cellular uptakes and penetration of nanoparticle in the SH-SY5Y monolayer cells and multicellular tumor spheroids are observed. The in vivo distribution of the nanoparticles in tumor-bearing mice is evaluated. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and co-localization images show that the nanoparticles are well internalized by the cells through the endocytosis mechanism. Drug-loaded whey-PAA nanoparticles can penetrate multicellular tumor spheroids more deeply. In vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging examination and in vivo DOX distribution show that the drug-loaded whey-PAA nanoparticles can well accumulated in the tumor site. Thus, these whey-rich nanoparticles seem to be very promising drug carriers for drug delivery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Short communication: Flavor and flavor stability of cheese, rennet, and acid wheys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2016-05-01

    Dried whey ingredients are valuable food ingredients but potential whey sources are underutilized. Previous work has established flavor and flavor stability differences in Cheddar and Mozzarella wheys, but little work has compared these whey sources to acid or rennet wheys. The objective of this study was to characterize and compare flavor and flavor stability among cheese, rennet, and acid wheys. Full-fat and fat-free Cheddar, rennet and acid casein, cottage cheese, and Greek yogurt fluid wheys were manufactured in triplicate. Wheys were fat separated and pasteurized followed by compositional analyses and storage at 4°C for 48 h. Volatile compound analysis and descriptive sensory analysis were evaluated on all liquid wheys initially and after 24 and 48 h. Greek yogurt whey contained almost no true protein nitrogen (0.02% wt/vol) whereas other wheys contained 0.58%±0.4% (wt/vol) true protein nitrogen. Solids and fat content were not different between wheys, with the exception of Greek yogurt whey, which was also lower in solids content than the other wheys (5.6 vs. 6.5% wt/vol, respectively). Fresh wheys displayed sweet aromatic and cooked milk flavors. Cheddar wheys were distinguished by diacetyl/buttery flavors, and acid wheys (acid casein, cottage cheese, and Greek yogurt) by sour aromatic flavor. Acid casein whey had a distinct soapy flavor, and acid and Greek yogurt wheys had distinct potato flavor. Both cultured acid wheys contained acetaldehyde flavor. Cardboard flavor increased and sweet aromatic and buttery flavors decreased with storage in all wheys. Volatile compound profiles were also distinct among wheys and changed with storage, consistent with sensory results. Lipid oxidation aldehydes increased in all wheys with storage time. Fat-free Cheddar was more stable than full-fat Cheddar over 48h of storage. Uncultured rennet casein whey was the most stable whey, as exhibited by the lowest increase in lipid oxidation products over time. These results

  19. Beverages formulated with whey protein and added lutein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Cássia Gomes Rocha

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study aimed to develop and characterize beverages formulated with whey protein and added lutein. Beverages formulated with 0.5 (F1, 2.0 (F2, 4.0 (F3 and 6.0% w/v (F4 whey protein were physicochemically and microbiologically characterized, and sensory evaluated. The physicochemical analyses indicated that the protein content significantly changed (P0.05 with increased protein content. The F2 formulation showed the highest sensory acceptance. Beverages offer a promising alternative to whey use and enhance the value of the product by the addition of lutein.

  20. Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Whey Cheese with Pine Nuts

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Anamaria Semeniuc; Laura Zăpărţan; Laura Stan; Carmen R. Pop; Maria Doiniţa Borş; Ancuţa M. Rotar

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a value-added whey cheese through addition of pine nuts. Therefore, different concentrations of pine nuts [2, 4, 6 and 8% (w/w)] were added to whey cheese. The study was designed to evaluate the influence of pine nuts on physicochemical and sensory properties of whey cheese. The addition of pine nuts resulted in an increase in fat content and total solids and a decrease in moisture content. However, no statistically significant difference was found in pH values. Se...

  1. Sonocrystallisation of lactose in concentrated whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisu, Bogdan; Sciberras, Michael; Jayasena, Vijay; Weeks, Mike; Palmer, Martin; Dincer, Tuna D

    2014-11-01

    Whey concentrated to 32% lactose was sonicated at 30°C in a non-contact approach at flow rates of up to 12L/min. Applied energy density varied from 3 to 16J/mL at a frequency of 20kHz. Sonication of whey initiated the rapid formation of a large number of lactose crystals in response to acoustic cavitation which increased the rate of crystallisation. The rate of sonocrystallisation was greater than stirring for approximately 180min but slowed down between 120 and 180min as the metastable limit was reached. A second treatment with ultrasound at 120min delivering an applied energy density of 4J/mL stimulated further nuclei formation and the rate of crystallisation was maintained for >300min. Yield on the other hand was limited by the solubility of lactose and could not be improved. The crystal size distribution was narrower than that with stirring and the overall crystal size was smaller. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Microencapsulation of avocado oil by spray drying using whey protein and maltodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, E K; Lee, S J

    2008-12-01

    Cold pressed avocado oil was microencapsulated by spray drying in four different wall systems consisting of whey protein isolate (WPI) alone or in combination with maltodextrin (MD) DE 5 at various ratios (90 : 10, 50 : 50 and 10 : 90). The WPI only or WPI/MD (90 : 10) powders were spherical and smooth, whereas the WPI/MD (50 : 50 and 10 : 90) powders exhibited pronounced surface collapse. Increasing the MD ratio resulted in higher bulk density and wettability, probably due to more compact physical structure and hydrophilic wall matrix. Surface free oil contents and microencapsulation efficiencies of powders were 11-16% and 45-66%, respectively, and no significant differences were observed between the samples. The crude avocado oil used in this study appeared to be stable against oxidation at cold and ambient temperatures, irrespective of microencapsulation. However, at high temperature of 60 degrees C, the oxidative stability decreased significantly in all cases but it was improved to some extent by microencapsulation.

  3. Evaluation of whey fermented by Enterococcus faecium in consortium with Veilonella parvula in ruminant feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Silva de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the whey fermented by Enterococcus faecium in consortium with Veilonella parvula on the in vitro growth of ruminal bacteria and as a supplement in the cattle diet. In the in vitro experiment, a randomized design, with the following combinations was used: ruminal bacteria; ruminal bacteria and inactive whey; ruminal bacteria and active whey; and active whey. In the in vivo experiment, five fistulated Zebu Holstein-Zebu crossbred heifers were distributed in a 5 × 5 Latin square. Supplements were formulated without the addition of whey, with the addition of two levels of unfermented whey (2.5 and 5 L/day or two levels of fermented whey (2.5 and 5 L/day. A positive effect of the whey fermentation was detected on the consumption of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, ether extract, non-fiber carbohydrates and neutral detergent fiber, corrected for ash and protein in kg/day. No effects of whey were observed on the pH and concentration of rumen ammonia nitrogen, serum concentration of urea and glucose, urinary excretion of urea or nutrient digestibility, except for the total digestible nutrients. Supplementation with whey improved the apparent nitrogen balance, but supplementation with fermented whey decreased the intestinal flow of microbial nitrogen and microbial synthesis efficiency in relation to the unfermented whey. The whey fermentation process does not optimize the physiological responses of heifers supplemented with 2.5 and 5.0 L of whey.

  4. Characteristics of whey proteinhydrolysates from cheese whey, favors onvarious food applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeewanthi Chaturika Renda Kankanamge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate theproduction of whey protein hydrolysates,examiningthe physiochemical properties withfive enzyme types named Alcalase, Protease S,Protease M, Trypsin, and Pepsin. Whey protein concentratewas adjusted by ultrafiltration,increasing the whey content to 135% that of initial levels. The hydrolysates have been shown to improve the characteristics of a number of food products, and the type of enzyme has a considerable influence on the end result of hydrolysatesproduction. Bulk density, Solubility, NPN, foaming capacity, and the degree of hydrolysis were increased with hydrolysis time. Maximum Bulk density was shownby Protease S. Pepsinand Alcalase, whichgraduallyincreasedthe foaming capacity, resulting in acomparatively lower pH and a lower degree of hydrolysis. The highestdegree of hydrolysiswas shown by Protease M. The highest NPN value was provided by Pepsin, which was much greater than that of other enzymes. There wasno significant difference in NPN according to the enzyme typeapplied. Allhydrolysates in alkaline media were shown more than 50% solubility. HMFcontents were also shown anobviousdifference with the enzyme type.

  5. Utilization of salt whey from Egyptian Ras (cephalotyre) cheese in microbial milk clotting enzymes production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tanboly, El-Sayed; El-Hofi, Mahmoud; Youssef, Youssef Bahr; El-Desoki, Wahed; Ismail, Azza

    2013-01-01

    Microbial milk-clotting enzymes are valued as calf rennet substitutes in the cheese industry. The worldwide increase of cheese production coupled with a reduced supply of calf rennet has prompted a search for calf rennet substitutes, including microbial and plant rennets. However, most plant rennets have proved unsuitable because they impart a bitter taste to the cheese. Microbial rennet appears to be more promising because its production is cheaper, biochemical diversity is greater, and genetic modification is easier. Most cheese manufacturing facilities in Egypt perform land spreading of salt whey. However, this practice increases the chloride levels of soil, and elevates the risk of crop damage. One possible application for salt whey is to use it as a whole medium for growth and production of milk clotting enzyme from fungi. Mucor pusillus QM 436 was identified to produce the highest milk-clotting activity during screening of 19 fungal strains. Salted whey results from Ras (Cephalotyre) cheese manufacture as a whole medium for growth of Mucor pusillus QM 436 and production of the enzyme. The milk-clotting enzyme from Mucor pusillus QM 436 was purified to 7.14-fold with 54.4% recovery by precipitation in ammonium sulfate, ethanol and fractionated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The enzyme was active in the pH range 5.5-7.5 and was inactivated completely by heating 5 min at 70°C and 30 min at 65°C. The highest level of enzyme activity was obtained at 60°C, pH 5.5. A positive and proportional relationship occurred in the presence of CaCl2 in milk, with inhibition which occurred in the presence of NaCl. The high level of milk-clotting activity coupled with a low level of thermal stability suggested that the milk-clotting enzyme from Mucor pusillus QM 436 should be considered as a potential substitute for calf rennet.

  6. The role of whey in functional dairy food production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Tratnik

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern life style also enhances a need for creation of better dairyproducts, in comparison with traditional ones, possessing functionalcharacteristics. Whey is consisted primarily of lactose, proteins of high nutritive value, important minerals and imunoactive compounds, as well as vitamins of B group. It can be used for fermented probiotic drinks and albumin cheese production. Using new methods of pressure membrane filtration and demineralisation the economic manufacture of whey, as a valuable source of nutrients, is enabled. The aim of this paper is to give an overview on the possibilities of sweet whey, especially whey protein concentrates, use in functional dairy products manufacture from cow’s and goat’s milk. The paper is based on the published scientific research performed in the Laboratory for Technology of Milk and Dairy Products of the Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology University of Zagreb.

  7. Chemical characterisation and application of acid whey in fermented milk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lievore, Paolla; Simões, Deise R S; Silva, Karolline M; Drunkler, Northon L; Barana, Ana C; Nogueira, Alessandro; Demiate, Ivo M

    2015-01-01

    .... The objective of the present work was to study the physicochemical characterisation of acid whey from Petit Suisse-type cheese production and use this by-product in the formulation of fermented milk, substituting water...

  8. Whey protein stories - an experiment in writing a multidisciplinary biography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tenna; Bechschøft, Rasmus L.; Giacalone, Davide

    2016-01-01

    This is an experimental, dual-purpose article about whey protein and how to conduct interdisciplinary analyses and writings. On the one hand, this article is a multidisciplinary commodity biography, which consists of five descriptions of whey protein written by the five different research groups...... contributes to the field of food studies with a multidisciplinary biography of whey protein - including its sensory qualities and challenges, insights into its cultural history, its nutritional value and effects on the human body and an analysis of how it is perceived by people who consume it. The biography...... thereby expands upon existing understandings of whey protein while discussing the usefulness of employing the commodity biography format in interdisciplinary writing. Moreover, the article contributes to the field of interdisciplinary research by providing a practical example of a joint publication...

  9. Analysis and Application of Whey Protein Depleted Skim Milk Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hanne

    homogenisation (UHPH). The microfiltration will result in a milk fraction more or less depleted from whey protein, and could probably in combination with UHPH treatment contribute to milk fractions and cheeses with novel micro and macrostructures. These novel fractions could be used as new ingredients to improve......-destructive methods for this purpose. A significant changed structure was observed in skim milk depleted or partly depleted for whey protein, acidified and UHPH treated. Some of the properties of the UHPH treated skim milk depleted from whey protein observed in this study support the idea, that UHPH treatment has...... this. LF-NMR relaxation were utilised to obtain information about the water mobility (relaxation time), in diluted skim milk systems depleted from whey protein. Obtained results indicate that measuring relaxation times with LF-NMR could be difficult to utilize, since no clear relationship between...

  10. Development of newly enriched bread with quinoa flour and whey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, D. M.; Naranjo, M.; Pérez, L. V.; Valencia, A. F.; Acurio, L. P.; Gallegos, L. M.; Alvarez, F. C.; Amancha, P. I.; Valencia, M. P.; Rodriguez, C. A.; Arancibia, M. Y.

    2017-07-01

    Ecuador, Bolivia, and Peru are countries with the highest amount of quinoa production in the world due to the proximity to the Andes. Further, Ecuador has a high production of dairy products, particularly fresh cheese of which production gives a high volume of whey, without further use, with the consequent loss of their nutritional value. The present study was performed to develop a new fortified bread through the incorporation of quinoa flour and whey at three different concentrations. The use of quinoa and whey improved the texture, shelf life and sensory characteristics of bread, compared to those prepared with wheat flour. This study shows the potential of quinoa flour and whey as ingredients in the development of baked products.

  11. Production of bioethanol from organic whey using Kluyveromyces marxianus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A.D.; Kádár, Zsófia; Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol production by K. marxianus in whey from organic cheese production was examined in batch and continuous mode. The results showed that no pasteurization or freezing of the whey was necessary and that K. marxianus was able to compete with the lactic acid bacteria added during cheese production...... ethanol yield (~0.50 g ethanol/g lactose) at both 30°C and 40°C using low pH (4.5) or no pH control. Continuous fermentation of nonsterilized whey was performed using Ca-alginate-immobilized K. marxianus. High ethanol productivity (2.5-4.5 g/l/h) was achieved at dilution rate of 0.2/h......, and it was concluded that K. marxianus is very suitable for industrial ethanol production from whey. © 2010 Society for Industrial Microbiology....

  12. Fermented dairy products based on ovine cheese whey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pereira, C D; Henriques, M; Gomes, D; Gouveia, R; Gomez-Zavaglia, A; de Antoni, G

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an alternative solution for ovine whey components recovery in medium/small cheese plants that predominate in the rural areas of Southern European countries, which are specialized...

  13. Enzymatic Hydrolysate of a Whey Protein Concentrate by Alcalase…

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Luciano

    2012-02-09

    Feb 9, 2012 ... results indicate that the hydrolysate obtained by treatment with alcalase demonstrated anti- inflammatory activity in the ... Abbreviations: WPH, Whey protein hydrolysate; LPS, ... and detected by UV (254 nm). Quantification ...

  14. SOVIET ABSTRACTS ON POWDER METALLURGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    CERMETS, * POWDER METALLURGY , ABSTRACTS, CERAMIC MATERIALS, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, PIEZOELECTRIC CRYSTALS, POLARIZATION, POROUS METALS, POWDER ALLOYS, POWDER METALS, SINTERING.

  15. Decolorization of Cheddar cheese whey by activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Campbell, Rachel; Drake, MaryAnne; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-05-01

    Colored Cheddar whey is a source for whey protein recovery and is decolorized conventionally by bleaching, which affects whey protein quality. Two activated carbons were studied in the present work as physical means of removing annatto (norbixin) in Cheddar cheese whey. The color and residual norbixin content of Cheddar whey were reduced by a higher level of activated carbon at a higher temperature between 25 and 55°C and a longer time. Activated carbon applied at 40g/L for 2h at 30°C was more effective than bleaching by 500mg/L of hydrogen peroxide at 68°C. The lowered temperature in activated-carbon treatments had less effect on protein structure as investigated for fluorescence spectroscopy and volatile compounds, particularly oxidation products, based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Activated carbon was also reusable, removing more than 50% norbixin even after 10 times of regeneration, which showed great potential for decolorizing cheese whey. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Minimising generation of acid whey during Greek yoghurt manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uduwerella, Gangani; Chandrapala, Jayani; Vasiljevic, Todor

    2017-08-01

    Greek yoghurt, a popular dairy product, generates large amounts of acid whey as a by-product during manufacturing. Post-processing treatment of this stream presents one of the main concerns for the industry. The objective of this study was to manipulate initial milk total solids content (15, 20 or 23 g/100 g) by addition of milk protein concentrate, thus reducing whey expulsion. Such an adjustment was investigated from the technological standpoint including starter culture performance, chemical and physical properties of manufactured Greek yoghurt and generated acid whey. A comparison was made to commercially available products. Increasing protein content in regular yoghurt reduced the amount of acid whey during whey draining. This protein fortification also enhanced the Lb. bulgaricus growth rate and proteolytic activity. Best structural properties including higher gel strength and lower syneresis were observed in the Greek yoghurt produced with 20 g/100 g initial milk total solid compared to manufactured or commercially available products, while acid whey generation was lowered due to lower drainage requirement.

  17. Sensory quality evaluation of whey-based beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Legarová

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Whey as a by-product of the cheese industry is a source of biological and functional valuable proteins. The aim of this research was to evaluate the commercial potential of whey-based dairy beverages containing a definite amount of semi-skimmed milk addition. The purpose of this paper was to improve the whey flavour via its fermentation by commercial yogurt starter cultures, and via 25 % and 50 % of milk addition. The course of fermentation was monitored by pH and titratable acidity changes. The sensory profile of non-fermented and fermented drinks was assessed using unstructured graphical scales. No significant differences in acidity were found between the samples which were fermented for 3 or 4 hours, but a significant difference was found between samples of whey drinks without milk and samples with milk addition. Fermentation by yoghurt culture did not bring statistically significant improvement of the whey drink organoleptic properties, while the addition of milk was the most important factor influencing not only the total sensory quality of the whey drinks but also their flavour, appearance, colour, viscosity and homogeneity.

  18. Biogas yield from Sicilian kitchen waste and cheese whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Comparetti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the chemical composition of kitchen waste and cheese whey, as well as the biogas yield obtained from the Anaerobic Digestion (AD tests of these two raw materials. Since the separated waste collection is performed in the town of Marineo (Palermo, a sample of kitchen waste, different from food industry one and included in the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW, was collected from the mass stored at the households of this town. Moreover, a sample of cheese whey was collected in a Sicilian mini dairy plant, where sheep milk is processed. This investigation was carried out inside laboratory digesters of Aleksandras Stulginskis University (Lithuania. Total Solids (TS resulted 15.6% in kitchen waste and 6% in cheese whey, while both the raw materials showed a high content of organic matter, 91.1% and 79.1%, respectively. The biogas yield resulted 104.6 l kg–1 from kitchen waste and 30.6 l kg–1 from cheese whey. The biogas yield from TS resulted 672.6 l kg–1 using kitchen waste and 384.7 l kg–1 using cheese whey. The biogas yield from Volatile Solids (VS resulted 738.9 l kg–1 using kitchen waste and 410.3 l kg–1 using cheese whey.

  19. Effects of Hydrolysed Whey Proteins on the Techno-Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein-Based Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Markus Schmid; Lesley-Virgina Hinz; Florian Wild; Klaus Noller

    2013-01-01

      Pure whey protein isolate (WPI)-based cast films are very brittle due to its strong formation of protein cross-linking of disulphide bonding, hydrogen bonding as well as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions...

  20. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  1. The use of lactoperoxidase for the bleaching of fluid whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R E; Kang, E J; Bastian, E; Drake, M A

    2012-06-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LP) is the second most abundant enzyme in bovine milk and has been used in conjunction with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and thiocyanate (SCN⁻) to work as an antimicrobial in raw milk where pasteurization is not feasible. Thiocyanate is naturally present and the lactoperoxidase system purportedly can be used to bleach dairy products, such as whey, with the addition of very little H₂O₂ to the system. This study had 3 objectives: 1) to quantify the amount of H₂O₂ necessary for bleaching of fluid whey using the LP system, 2) to monitor LP activity from raw milk through manufacture of liquid whey, and 3) to compare the flavor of whey protein concentrate 80% (WPC80) bleached by the LP system to that bleached by traditional H₂O₂ bleaching. Cheddar cheese whey with annatto (15 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk, annatto with 3% wt/vol norbixin content) was manufactured using a standard Cheddar cheesemaking procedure. Various levels of H₂O₂ (5-100 mg/kg) were added to fluid whey to determine the optimum concentration of H₂O₂ for LP activity, which was measured using an established colorimetric method. In subsequent experiments, fat-separated whey was bleached for 1h with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg (traditional) or 20 mg of H₂O₂/kg (LP system). The WPC80 was manufactured from whey bleached with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg or 20mg of H₂O₂/kg. All samples were subjected to color analysis (Hunter color values and norbixin extraction) and proximate analysis (fat, protein, and moisture). Sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were conducted on WPC80. Optimal LP bleaching in fluid whey occurred with the addition of 20mg of H₂O₂/kg. Bleaching of fluid whey at either 35 or 50°C for 1 h with LP resulted in > 99% norbixin destruction compared with 32 or 47% destruction from bleaching with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg, at 35 or 50°C for 1 h, respectively. Higher aroma intensity and increased lipid oxidation compounds were documented in WPC80 from

  2. Detection of cheese whey and caseinomacropeptide in fermented milk beverages using high performance liquid chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.H.P. Andrade

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cheese whey level and caseinomacropeptide (CMP index of fermented milk beverages added with four levels of cheese whey (0, 10, 20, and 40% and stored at 8-10oC for 0, 7, 14 and 21 days were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-gel filtration (HPLC-GF. Additionally, the interference of the starter culture and the storage time on the detection of cheese whey and CMP were investigated. Refrigerated storage up to 21 days did not affect (P>0.05 cheese whey and CMP amounts in milk (0% of cheese whey and in fermented milk beverages added with 10 and 20% of cheese whey (P>0.05. However, cheese whey and CMP amounts were higher than expected (P<0.05 in fermented milk beverages added with 40% of cheese whey and stored for 21 days.

  3. Effect of incorporation of mushroom (Pleurotus sajor-caju) powder on quality characteristics of Papad (Indian snack food).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, D N; Dhalagade, J R; Sahoo, A K; Ranveer, R C

    2012-11-01

    Papad is familiarly known as an Indian food adjunct or snack food. In this study, attempts have been made to increase the protein, minerals and crude fibre content of the papad with incorporation of Pleurotus sajor-caju powder to develop a novel snack food. Mushroom powder was added in different proportions with other ingredients of the papad and the prepared papad was subjected to physicochemical and sensorial analyses. Mushrooms pretreated with 1% potassium metabisulphite followed by whey treatment had better colour and reduced drying time. Drying at 50°C produced more amount of mushroom powder (350 μ) and had higher acceptability of rehydrated samples. The papad enriched with 20% mushroom powder showed increased values of protein (15.8%), minerals (38.87%) and crude fibre (218.18%) content and had maximum sensory score. Therefore, papad supplemented with oyster mushroom powder may help to reduce protein malnutrition, constipation and mineral deficiency disorders.

  4. Enzyme-induced aggregation of whey proteins with Bacillus licheniformis protease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creusot, N.P.

    2006-01-01

    Whey proteins are commonly used as ingredient in food. In relation with the gelation properties of whey proteins, this thesis deals with understanding the mechanism of peptide-induced aggregation of whey protein hydrolysates made with Bacillus licheniformis protease (BLP). The results show that BLP

  5. Exceptional heat stability of high protein content dispersions containing whey protein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saglam, D.; Venema, P.; Vries, de R.J.; Linden, van der E.

    2014-01-01

    Due to aggregation and/or gelation during thermal treatment, the amount of whey proteins that can be used in the formulation of high protein foods e.g. protein drinks, is limited. The aim of this study was to replace whey proteins with whey protein particles to increase the total protein content and

  6. Whey protein particles modulate mechanical properties of gels at high protein concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saglam, D.; Venema, P.; Vries, de R.J.; Berg, van den L.; Linden, van der E.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the influence of dense whey protein particles on the mechanical properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) gels at high protein concentrations (16–22% (w/w)). Incorporation of dense whey protein particles in the gel, while keeping the total protein concentration constant, leads to a

  7. Kinetics of anaerobic digestion of labaneh whey in a batch reactor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The modified Gompertz equation was used to describe the cumulative production of biogas with time. The equation kinetic constants were determined for labaneh whey and for diluted whey. Keywords: Labaneh whey, biogas, anaerobic digestion, methane production, dairy wastewater, modified Gompertz equation

  8. Polysaccharide production by kefir grains during whey fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimada, P S; Abraham, A G

    2001-11-01

    Fermentation of deproteinised whey with kefir grains CIDCA AGK1 was studied focusing on polysaccharide production from lactose. Kefir grains were able to acidify whey at different rates depending on the grain/whey ratio. During fermentation, kefir grains increased their weight and a water-soluble polysaccharide was released to the media. Exopolysaccharide concentration increased with fermentation time, reaching values of 57.2 and 103.4 mg/l after 5 days of fermentation in cultures with 10 and 100 g kefir grains/l, respectively. The polysaccharide fraction quantified after fermentation corresponded to the soluble fraction, because part of the polysaccharide became a component of the grain. Weight of kefir grains varied depending on the time of fermentation. Polysaccharide production was affected by temperature. Although the highest concentration of polysaccharide in the media was observed at 43 degrees C at both grain/whey ratios, the weight of the grains decreased in these conditions. In conclusion, kefir grains were able to acidify deproteinised whey, reducing lactose concentration, increasing their weight and producing a soluble polysaccharide.

  9. Evaluation of industrial dairy waste (milk dust powder) for acetone-butanol-ethanol production by solventogenic Clostridium species

    OpenAIRE

    Ujor, Victor; Bharathidasan, Ashok Kumar; Cornish, Katrina; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2014-01-01

    Readily available inexpensive substrate with high product yield is the key to restoring acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation to economic competitiveness. Lactose-replete cheese whey tends to favor the production of butanol over acetone. In the current study, we investigated the fermentability of milk dust powder with high lactose content, for ABE production by Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii. Both microorganisms produced 7.3 and 5.8 g/L of butanol respectively, w...

  10. Modified water solubility of milk protein concentrate powders through the application of static high pressure treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udabage, Punsandani; Puvanenthiran, Amirtha; Yoo, Jin Ah; Versteeg, Cornelis; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2012-02-01

    The effects of high pressure (HP) treatment (100-400 MPa at 10-60 °C) on the solubility of milk protein concentrate (MPC) powders were tested. The solubility, measured at 20 °C, of fresh MPC powders made with no HP treatment was 66%. It decreased by 10% when stored for 6 weeks at ambient temperature (~20 °C) and continued to decrease to less than 50% of its initial solubility after 12 months of storage. Of the combinations of pressure and heat used, a pressure of 200 MPa at 40 °C applied to the concentrate before spray drying was found to be the most beneficial for improved solubility of MPC powders. This combination of pressure/heat improved the initial cold water solubility to 85%. The solubility was maintained at this level after 6 weeks storage at ambient temperature and 85% of the initial solubility was preserved after 12 months. The improved solubility of MPC powders on manufacture and on storage are attributed to an altered surface composition arising from an increased concentration of non-micellar casein in the milk due to HP treatment prior to drying. The improved solubility of high protein powders (95% protein) made from blends of sodium caseinate and whey protein isolate compared with MPC powders (~85% protein) made from ultrafiltered/diafiltered milk confirmed the detrimental role of micellar casein on solubility. The results suggest that increasing the non-micellar casein content by HP treatment of milk or use of blends of sodium caseinate and whey proteins are strategies that may be used to obtain high protein milk powders with enhanced solubility.

  11. The Effect of BCAA and ISO-WHEY Oral Nutritional Supplements on Dialysis Adequacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaghi, Effat; Tayebi, Ali; Ebadi, Abbas; Sobhani, Vahid; Einollahi, Behzad; Tayebi, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is a common problem in hemodialysis patients and has different outcomes such as reduced quality of life, longer hospitalization time, lower dialysis adequacy, and higher mortality rate. Investigation of dialysis adequacy is an important method for assessing hemodialysis patients, and improving the dialysis adequacy is an important healthcare team goal. The present study aims to investigate and compare the effects of BCAA and ISO-WHEY oral nutritional supplements on dialysis adequacy. In a clinical trial study, 66 hemodialysis patients were randomly divided into three groups: Group A (n = 22), Group B (n = 22), and Group C or the control group (n = 22). In Groups A and B, as prescribed and controlled by nutritionists and nephrologists, respectively, ISO-WHEY and BCAA protein powder were used for 2 months on a daily basis. For all groups, before intervention and 1 and 2 months after intervention, the dialysis adequacy was measured using URR and Kt/V. Finally, the data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics Base 21.0 software. Out of 66 patients, 61 (19 in Group A, 20 in Group B, and 22 in Group C) completed the study period, and before intervention, all groups were equal in terms of quality and quantity variables (P > 0.05). After intervention, there was a significant difference between the three groups with regard to the variables of dialysis adequacy based on Kt/V and URR to independent-t test and repeated measures ANOVA (P < 0.05). Results show that the intake of oral nutritional supplements leads to an improvement in the dialysis adequacy of hemodialysis patients. Therefore, the use of nutritional supplements along with patients' training and regular consultation will be helpful in improving the nutritional status, dialysis adequacy, and eventually the quality of life.

  12. Influence of starter culture on flavor and headspace volatile profiles of fermented whey and whey produced from fermented milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Escamilla, F J; Kelly, A L; Delahunty, C M

    2005-11-01

    Rennet whey and skim milk were compared as media for fermentation by commercial cheese, yogurt, and probiotic starter cultures. Effect of culture, medium, and their interaction on flavor was assessed and compared by sensory descriptive analysis and headspace volatile analysis by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry. In general, the aroma of fermented whey was similar to that of whey separated from fermented milk, indicating a favorable possibility of substituting milk with whey in the manufacture of fermented milk-like beverages. Starter culture significantly affected most sensory characteristics of the products. Key volatile compounds for the characteristic flavor of yogurt, such as acetaldehyde and diacetyl, were not significantly affected by medium when fermented with the yogurt culture, and reached similar levels in both systems. Volatile analysis results were consistent with the results of the sensory evaluation, indicating the high reliability of proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry in detecting important volatile compounds for aroma. Integration of this sensory and chemical information allows a better understanding of how flavor and related compounds are affected by ingredients or processing, which may be useful for the development of value-added whey products.

  13. Titanium Powder Metallurgy Forgings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TITANIUM ALLOYS, *FORGING), (* POWDER METALLURGY , TITANIUM ALLOYS), ENGINE COMPONENTS, INLET GUIDE VANES, JET ENGINES, RINGS, AIRFRAMES, ANCHORS(STRUCTURAL), COLD WORKING, SINTERING, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES

  14. Functionalization of whey proteins by reactive supercritical fluid extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanitta Ruttarattanamongkol

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein, a by-product from cheese-making, is often used in a variety of food formulations due to its unsurpassednutritional quality and inherent functional properties. However, the possibilities for the improvement and upgrading of wheyprotein utilization still need to be explored. Reactive supercritical fluid extrusion (SCFX is a novel technique that has beenrecently reported to successfully functionalize commercially available whey proteins into a product with enhanced functionalproperties. The specific goal of this review is to provide fundamental understanding of the reinforcement mechanism andprocessing of protein functionalization by reactive SCFX process. The superimposed extrusion variables and their interactionmechanism affect the physico-chemical properties of whey proteins. By understanding the structure, functional properties andprocessing relationships of such materials, the rational design criteria for novel functionalized proteins could be developedand effectively utilized in food systems.

  15. Whey protein mouth drying influenced by thermal denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Stephanie P; Hong, Yuchun; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Parker, Jane K; Faka, Marianthi; Methven, Lisa

    2017-03-01

    Whey proteins are becoming an increasingly popular functional food ingredient. There are, however, sensory properties associated with whey protein beverages that may hinder the consumption of quantities sufficient to gain the desired nutritional benefits. One such property is mouth drying. The influence of protein structure on the mouthfeel properties of milk proteins has been previously reported. This paper investigates the effect of thermal denaturation of whey proteins on physicochemical properties (viscosity, particle size, zeta-potential, pH), and relates this to the observed sensory properties measured by qualitative descriptive analysis and sequential profiling. Mouthcoating, drying and chalky attributes built up over repeated consumption, with higher intensities for samples subjected to longer heating times (p denaturation is a contributing factor and a possible mucoadhesive mechanism is discussed.

  16. Biodiversity of Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages isolated from cheese whey starters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Miriam; Bonvini, Barbara; Rossetti, Lia; Meucci, Aurora; Giraffa, Giorgio; Carminati, Domenico

    2015-05-01

    Twenty-one Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages, 18 isolated from different cheese whey starters and three from CNRZ collection, were phenotypically and genetically characterised. A biodiversity between phages was evidenced both by host range and molecular (RAPD-PCR) typing. A more detailed characterisation of six phages showed similar structural protein profiles and a relevant genetic biodiversity, as shown by restriction enzyme analysis of total DNA. Latent period, burst time and burst size data evidenced that phages were active and virulent. Overall, data highlighted the biodiversity of Lb. helveticus phages isolated from cheese whey starters, which were confirmed to be one of the most common phage contamination source in dairy factories. More research is required to further unravel the ecological role of Lb. helveticus phages and to evaluate their impact on the dairy fermentation processes where whey starter cultures are used.

  17. Glycosylation and expanded utility of a modified whey protein ingredient via carbohydrate conjugation at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, J S; Clare, D A; Daubert, C R

    2009-01-01

    Whey protein, at one time considered a by-product of the cheese-making process, is now commonly used in foods for its thickening and emulsifying properties. Currently, approximately 30% of these proteinaceous resources remain under-utilized. Previously, an acidified, thermally treated whey protein concentrate (mWPC) was developed to produce a cold-set thickening ingredient. Mass spectroscopy revealed an approximate 2.5-fold decrease in the lactosylation of beta-lactoglobulin in mWPC starting materials compared with commercial whey protein concentrates, manufactured at a higher pH. Potentially, this should increase the number of reactive sites that remain available for carbohydrate attachment. With this study, the formation of glycoprotein complexes was demonstrated between the mWPC ingredient and lactose, naturally occurring in mWPC powders, or between mWPC protein components with dextran (35 to 45 and 100 to 200 kDa) materials at low pH. In fact, additional dry heating of mWPC powders showed a 3-fold increase in the amount of lactosylated beta-lactoglobulin. Evidence of Maillard reactivity was suggested using colorimetry, o-phthaldialdehyde assays, and sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE followed by glycoprotein staining. Resultant glycoprotein dispersions exhibited altered functionality, in which case steady shear and small amplitude oscillatory rheology parameters were shown to be dependent on the specific reducing sugar present. Furthermore, the emulsion stability of mWPC-dextran fractions was 2 to 3 times greater than either mWPC or commercial WPC dispersions based on creaming index values. The water-holding capacity of all test samples decreased with additional heating steps; however, mWPC-dextran powders still retained nearly 6 times their weight of water. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that mWPC-dextran conjugates formed a porous network that differed significantly from the dense network observed with mWPC samples. This porosity likely affected both the

  18. BIOACTIVE PEPTIDES OF THE COW MILK WHEY PROTEINS (Bos taurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Iukalo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Data on the biological functions of milk whey proteins, which are implemented at the level of their proteolytic degradation products — bioactive peptides have been reviewed. The main functions of these proteins is to provide the amino acid nutrition of mammals in the early stages of development, as well as the transport of fatty acids, retinol, involved in the synthesis of lactose, ions of calcium and iron, immune protection, antimicrobial action, etc. However, in recent years, it has been found that milk proteins like casein are precursors of biologically active peptides. Аngiotensin — converting enzyme, opioid peptides which are opiate receptor agonists, anti–microbial peptides, peptides with immunomodulatory and hypocholesterolemic action, and peptides affecting motility have been found among the products of proteolytic degradation of ?-lactoglobulin, ?-laktoalbumin, lactoferrin and milk whey albumin. Also data on the possible participation of peptides from milk whey proteins in the implementation of the biological functions of both the assimilation of calcium, antioxidant effect, the regulation of appetite, anticarcinogenic are provided. The authors assume that the phenomenon of bioactive peptides formation could be considered as an additional function of natural food proteins, which gives advantages to the mammals and has a positive effect on their development in the postnatal period. Ways of bioactive peptides formation, their resistance to action of proteolytic enzymes, the ability to cross into the bloodstream and have biological effects have been also discussed. Up to date, only a few products with bioactive peptides from milk whey proteins are obtained. Further studies of their structure, mechanism of action, ways of formation and methods of isolation are required for their wider use. Formation of functional products based on bioactive peptides from milk whey proteins will allow efficient use of milk whey, which is often a

  19. Sweet whey as a raw material for the dietary supplements obtaining with immunomodulatory effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Didukh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of the study of literary sources to prove the viability of the idea of using sweet whey to deep its fractionation, and to obtain biologically active proteins with immunomodulatory effect. We demonstrated methods for fractionation of milk whey (membrane and chromatographic, as well as the technological scheme of concentration of sweet whey. We introduced the composition of sweet whey and protein content of immunomodulatory action. Modern methods of processing whey, which include, basically, only the process of dehydration and concentration of whey and its use in the complete component composition, which limits its use for food purposes are shown. The necessity of processing of secondary resources in a catastrophic ecological situation on the planet and full use of the composite processing of raw materials for food purposes, and also shows properties of proteins immunomodulating actions which are part of the whey are grounded.

  20. Whey protein reduces early life weight gain in mice fed a high-fat diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranberg, Britt; Hellgren, Lars; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that dairy products, including whey protein, alleviate several disorders of the metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigated the effects of whey protein isolate (whey) in mice fed a high-fat diet hypothesising that the metabolic effects of whey would...... be associated with changes in the gut microbiota composition. Five-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet ad libitum for 14 weeks with the protein source being either whey or casein. Faeces were collected at week 0, 7, and 13 and the fecal microbiota was analysed by denaturing gradient gel...... weight gain was similar resulting in a 15% lower final body weight in the whey group relative to casein (34.0±1.0 g vs. 40.2±1.3 g, Pprotein source throughout the study period. Fasting insulin was lower in the whey group (P

  1. Whey and dry milk products as feedstocks for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T C

    1979-10-01

    Surplus whey and dry milk could have supplied about 1,383,723,000 lbs of lactose in 1978 for conversion to approximately 84,632,171 gallons of ethanol. This would be about .00085% of the total gasoline used in the US, or .0085% of the ethanol needed to produce a 10% ethanol/gasoline blend nationwide. To the extent that these are surpluses not desired for food purposes, whey and dry milk can contribute to ethanol supply in a small way. However, no energy or economic assessment has been made so the cost/benefit relationship is unknown.

  2. Comparison of methods for determining volatile compounds in milk, cheese, and whey powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) are commonly used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile compounds in various dairy products, but conditions have to be adjusted for optimal SPME release while not generating new compounds that are abs...

  3. Influence of tribomechanical micronization and hydrocolloids addition on enthalpy and apparent specific heat of whey protein model solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Herceg

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of thermophysical properties, especially the phase transitions temperature, specific heat and enthalpy, are essential in defining the freezing process parameters as well as storage conditions of frozen food. In this work thermophysical properties of 10% model solutions prepared with 60% whey protein concentrate (WPC with various hydrocolloids addition (HVEP, YO-EH, YO-L i YO-M were investigated. Powdered whey protein concentrate was treated in equipment for tribomechanical micronization and activation at 40000 rpm (Patent: PCT/1B99/00757 just before model solutions preparation. Particle size analysis was performed using Frich –laser particle sizer “analysette 22”. The phase transition temperatures were determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA, while specific heat and enthalpy were calculated according to several mathematical equations. The results have shown that, due to tribomechanical treatment, certain changes in thermophysical and energetic properties of materials occurred. Tribomechanical treatment affects changes in granulometrical composition of WPC which result in higher abilities of reactions with hydrocolloids in model solutions and significant changes in thermophysical properties of the mentioned models.

  4. Application of a Pivot Profile Variant Using CATA Questions in the Development of a Whey-Based Fermented Beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Miraballes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available During the development of a food product, the application of rapid descriptive sensory methodologies is very useful to determine the influence of different variables on the sensory characteristics of the product under development. The Pivot profile (PP and a variant of the technique that includes check-all-that-apply questions (PP + CATA were used for the development of a milk drink fermented from demineralised sweet whey. Starting from a base formula of partially demineralised sweet whey and gelatin, nine samples were elaborated, to which various concentrations of commercial sucrose, modified cassava starch, and whole milk powder were added. Differences in sucrose content affected the sample texture and flavour and the modified starch was able to decrease the fluidity and increase the texture of creaminess and firmness, of the samples. The two applied sensory methodologies achieved good discrimination between the samples and very similar results, although the data analysis was clearly simplified in relation to the difficulty and time consumed in the PP + CATA variant.

  5. Effect of Stirring and Seeding on Whey Protein Fibril Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Venema, P.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of stirring and seeding on the formation of fibrils in whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions was studied. More fibrils of a similar length are formed when WPI is stirred during heating at pH 2 and 80 C compared to samples that were heated at rest. Addition of seeds did not show an

  6. Effects of whey, molasses and exogenous enzymes on the ensiling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to assess the effects of whey, molasses and exogenous enzymes on fermentation, aerobic stability and nutrient composition of ensiled maize cobs. Five treatments were ensiled in 1.5 L anaerobic glass jars over 32 days, namely i) control (maize cobs without additives (CON); ii) maize cobs with ...

  7. Stability, Yield and Chemical Properties of Soymilk Whey from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soymilk whey was produced from sprouted soybeans of three different varieties, namely Samsoy 1, Samsoy 2 and TGX 1937-Is. They were separately sprouted in batches for 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 36 h and 48 h respectively. Each batch of the sprouted soybeans was used to produce soymilk. Each batch of soymilk was divided into ...

  8. Consumer perception of astringency in clear acidic whey protein beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Jessica L; Drake, MaryAnne

    2010-01-01

    Acidic whey protein beverages are a growing component of the functional food and beverage market. These beverages are also astringent, but astringency is an expected and desirable attribute of many beverages (red wine, tea, coffee) and may not necessarily be a negative attribute of acidic whey protein beverages. The goal of this study was to define the consumer perception of astringency in clear acidic whey protein beverages. Six focus groups (n=49) were held to gain understanding of consumer knowledge of astringency. Consumers were presented with beverages and asked to map them based on astringent mouthfeel and liking. Orthonasal thresholds for whey protein isolate (WPI) in water and flavored model beverages were determined using a 7-series ascending forced choice method. Mouthfeel/basic taste thresholds were determined for WPI in water. Acceptance tests on model beverages were conducted using consumers (n=120) with and without wearing nose clips. Consumers in focus groups were able to identify astringency in beverages. Astringency intensity was not directly related to dislike. The orthonasal threshold for WPI in water was lower (P Consumer acceptance of beverages containing WPI was lower (P consumers were not wearing nose clips compared to acceptance scores of beverages when consumers were wearing nose clips. These results suggest that flavors contributed by WPI in acidic beverages are more objectionable than the astringent mouthfeel and that both flavor and astringency should be the focus of ongoing studies to improve the palatability of these products. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. New insights on the formation of colloidal whey protein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsdijk, van L.E.; Snoeren, J.P.M.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.; Hamer, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the formation and properties of whey protein particle suspensions having different particle sizes and different abilities to form S–S bridges. Simple shear flow was used to control the protein particles size. The ability to form S–S bridges was steered by blocking the reactive

  10. Whey-protein / polysaccharide coacervates : structure and dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinbreck, Fanny Chantal Jacqueline

    2004-01-01

    This thesis studied the interactions between food ingredients under acidic conditions (like in yoghurt or in soft drinks for instance). In the chapters 2, 3, and 4, the author investigated the conditions under which a complex was formed between positively charged whey proteins (proteins derived from

  11. Whey protein stories - An experiment in writing a multidisciplinary biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Tenna; Bechshoeft, Rasmus L; Giacalone, Davide; Otto, Marie Haulund; Castro-Mejía, Josue; Bin Ahmad, Hajar Fauzan; Reitelseder, Søren; Jespersen, Astrid Pernille

    2016-12-01

    This is an experimental, dual-purpose article about whey protein and how to conduct interdisciplinary analyses and writings. On the one hand, this article is a multidisciplinary commodity biography, which consists of five descriptions of whey protein written by the five different research groups involved in the interdisciplinary research project CALM(Counteracting Age-related loss of Skeletal Muscle Mass). On the other hand, it is a meta-analysis, which aims to uncover and highlight examples of how the five descriptions contribute to each other with insights into the contextualisation of knowledge, contrasts between the descriptions and the new dimensions they bring to established fields of interest. The meta-analysis also contains a discussion of interdisciplinary study objects and the usefulness of the multidisciplinary commodity biography as a format for interdisciplinary publications. The article contributes to the field of food studies with a multidisciplinary biography of whey protein - including its sensory qualities and challenges, insights into its cultural history, its nutritional value and effects on the human body and an analysis of how it is perceived by people who consume it. The biography thereby expands upon existing understandings of whey protein while discussing the usefulness of employing the commodity biography format in interdisciplinary writing. Moreover, the article contributes to the field of interdisciplinary research by providing a practical example of a joint publication and reflections upon the existence, interaction and possibilities of monodisciplinary knowledge structures within interdisciplinary studies and publications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Hydrolysates in Food Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeewanthi, Renda Kankanamge Chaturika; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the enhanced functional characteristics of enzymatic hydrolysates of whey proteins (WPHs) in food applications compared to intact whey proteins (WPs). WPs are applied in foods as whey protein concentrates (WPCs), whey protein isolates (WPIs), and WPHs. WPs are byproducts of cheese production, used in a wide range of food applications due to their nutritional validity, functional activities, and cost effectiveness. Enzymatic hydrolysis yields improved functional and nutritional benefits in contrast to heat denaturation or native applications. WPHs improve solubility over a wide range of pH, create viscosity through water binding, and promote cohesion, adhesion, and elasticity. WPHs form stronger but more flexible edible films than WPC or WPI. WPHs enhance emulsification, bind fat, and facilitate whipping, compared to intact WPs. Extensive hydrolyzed WPHs with proper heat applications are the best emulsifiers and addition of polysaccharides improves the emulsification ability of WPHs. Also, WPHs improve the sensorial properties like color, flavor, and texture but impart a bitter taste in case where extensive hydrolysis (degree of hydrolysis greater than 8%). It is important to consider the type of enzyme, hydrolysis conditions, and WPHs production method based on the nature of food application. PMID:26761849

  13. Feasibility of cheese production and whey valorization in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problems associated with perishability and distribution of local milk and milk products by small-scale producers in the Adamawa province of Cameroon, justified development of an easy process for producing pressed-dough cheese and flavoured whey. Production from raw milk was technically profitable with mean cheese ...

  14. Acceptability of prebiotic fiber-treated whey drink fermented with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work aimed to develop a fermented drink by diversifying the quantities of Lactobacillus acidophilus inoculum and prebiotic fiber in the form of inulin and using the total dry extract of whey and sucrose. After fermentation, the following measurements were made after 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of storage at 6°C: titratable ...

  15. Acceptability of prebiotic fiber-treated whey drink fermented with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-18

    Jun 18, 2014 ... This work aimed to develop a fermented drink by diversifying the quantities of Lactobacillus acidophilus inoculum and prebiotic fiber in the form of inulin and using the total dry extract of whey and sucrose. After fermentation, the following measurements were made after 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of storage at.

  16. Improved Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Hydrolysates in Food Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeewanthi, Renda Kankanamge Chaturika; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the enhanced functional characteristics of enzymatic hydrolysates of whey proteins (WPHs) in food applications compared to intact whey proteins (WPs). WPs are applied in foods as whey protein concentrates (WPCs), whey protein isolates (WPIs), and WPHs. WPs are byproducts of cheese production, used in a wide range of food applications due to their nutritional validity, functional activities, and cost effectiveness. Enzymatic hydrolysis yields improved functional and nutritional benefits in contrast to heat denaturation or native applications. WPHs improve solubility over a wide range of pH, create viscosity through water binding, and promote cohesion, adhesion, and elasticity. WPHs form stronger but more flexible edible films than WPC or WPI. WPHs enhance emulsification, bind fat, and facilitate whipping, compared to intact WPs. Extensive hydrolyzed WPHs with proper heat applications are the best emulsifiers and addition of polysaccharides improves the emulsification ability of WPHs. Also, WPHs improve the sensorial properties like color, flavor, and texture but impart a bitter taste in case where extensive hydrolysis (degree of hydrolysis greater than 8%). It is important to consider the type of enzyme, hydrolysis conditions, and WPHs production method based on the nature of food application.

  17. Clinical Potential of Hyperbaric Pressure-Treated Whey Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André F. Piccolomini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein (WP from cow’s milk is a rich source of essential and branched chain amino acids. Whey protein isolates (WPI has been demonstrated to support muscle accretion, antioxidant activity, and immune modulation. However, whey is not readily digestible due to its tight conformational structure. Treatment of WPI with hyperbaric pressure results in protein unfolding. This enhances protein digestion, and results in an altered spectrum of released peptides, and greater release of essential and branched chain amino acids. Pressurized whey protein isolates (pWPI, through a series of cell culture, animal models and clinical studies, have been demonstrated to enhance muscle accretion, reduce inflammation, improve immunity, and decrease fatigue. It is also conceivable that pWPI would be more accessible to digestive enzymes, which would allow for a more rapid proteolysis of the proteins and an increased or altered release of small bioactive peptides. The altered profile of peptides released from WP digestion could thus play a role in the modulation of the immune response and tissue glutathione (GSH concentrations. The research to date presents potentially interesting applications for the development of new functional foods based on hyperbaric treatment of WPI to produce products with more potent nutritional and nutraceutical properties.

  18. Fermented whey as poultry feed additive to prevent fungal contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londero, Alejandra; León Peláez, María A; Diosma, Gabriela; De Antoni, Graciela L; Abraham, Analía G; Garrote, Graciela L

    2014-12-01

    Fungal contamination of poultry feed causes economic losses to industry and represents a potential risk to animal health. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effectiveness of whey fermented with kefir grains as additive to reduce fungal incidence, thus improving feed safety. Whey fermented for 24 h at 20 °C with kefir grains (100 g L(-1) ) reduced conidial germination of Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium crustosum, Trichoderma longibrachiatum and Rhizopus sp. Poultry feed supplemented with fermented whey (1 L kg(-1) ) was two to four times more resistant to fungal contamination than control feed depending on the fungal species. Additionally, it contained kefir microorganisms at levels of 1 × 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) kg(-1) of lactic acid bacteria and 6 × 10(7) CFU kg(-1) of yeasts even after 30 days of storage. Fermented whey added to poultry feed acted as a biopreservative, improving its resistance to fungal contamination and increasing its shelf life. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Effects of whey on the colonization and sporulation of arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... fungus (AMF) Glomus intraradices'(G.i.) inoculated to lentil plant and the effects of changing P ratio in the soil and plant as a result of whey application, changing salt, pH and CaCO3 values on AMF colonization and sporulation. It is found that macro and micro nutrient elements have increased significantly ...

  20. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  1. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerdemann, Stephen,J; Jablonski, Paul, J

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines<150 {micro}m,<75 {micro}m, and<45 {micro}m; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH]<75 {micro}m and<45 {micro}m; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  2. Time resolved fluorescence of cow and goat milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandao, Mariana P.; de Carvalho dos Anjos, Virgílio; Bell., Maria José V.

    2017-01-01

    Milk powder is an international dairy commodity. Goat and cow milk powders are significant sources of nutrients and the investigation of the authenticity and classification of milk powder is particularly important. The use of time-resolved fluorescence techniques to distinguish chemical composition and structure modifications could assist develop a portable and non-destructive methodology to perform milk powder classification and determine composition. This study goal is to differentiate milk powder samples from cows and goats using fluorescence lifetimes. The samples were excited at 315 nm and the fluorescence intensity decay registered at 468 nm. We observed fluorescence lifetimes of 1.5 ± 0.3, 6.4 ± 0.4 and 18.7 ± 2.5 ns for goat milk powder; and 1.7 ± 0.3, 6.9 ± 0.2 and 29.9 ± 1.6 ns for cow's milk powder. We discriminate goat and cow powder milk by analysis of variance using Fisher's method. In addition, we employed quadratic discriminant analysis to differentiate the milk samples with accuracy of 100%. Our results suggest that time-resolved fluorescence can provide a new method to the analysis of powder milk and its composition.

  3. Effect of whey fermented by Enterococcus faeciumin consortium with Veilonella parvulaon ruminal bacteria in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higor Fábio Carvalho Bezerra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of whey fermented by Enterococus faecium in consortium with Veilonella parvula in vitro on ruminal microorganisms in different substrates, with or without monensin. The first experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design, in a 6 × 3 factorial arrangement (six substrates × three whey levels with two replicates. In experiment two, a 2 × 3 × 4 factorial arrangement (with and without monensin, three foods and four levels of fermented whey was used, in a randomized design with four replicates, totaling 24 treatments. There was no interaction among the wheys and the substrates in the variable for pectin, starch, and carboxymethyl cellulose. There was a greater growth of amylolytic and pectinolytic microorganisms and a lower growth of proteolytic and cellulolytic microorganisms. A significant effect of optical density was found in the media without substrate and that containing trypticase and glucose due to the addition of fermented whey. There was interaction for the pH at 24 hours among whey, food and monensin. For ammonia at 24 hours there was effect for food, whey and monensin, and interaction among factors. For microbial protein at 24 hours, there was effect for food, whey, monensin and no interaction among sources of variation. The use of whey fermented by bacteria Enterococcus faeciumand Veilonella parvula improves microbial protein synthesis by ruminal bacteria in media containing different energy sources. The combination of fermented whey and monensin shows variable results in relation to microbial growth.

  4. Performance of broiler chickens given whey in the food and/or drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariatmadari, F; Forbes, J M

    2005-08-01

    1. The effects on food intake and weight gain of offering broiler chickens (2 to 7 weeks of age) dry food, wet food, wet food containing whey, whey as drinking liquid and combinations of two of these were studied in 5 experiments. 2. Wet feed generally improved both weight gain and feed efficiencies significantly. Feeding whey also improved weight gain and feed conversion efficiency, but whey offered as a drinking fluid had an adverse effect on broiler performance. 3. When whey was offered both as drinking liquid and added to the food it had a deleterious effect. 4. When whey was offered from 4 or 6 weeks of age, it had a better effect than when offered from 2 weeks of age. 5. There was better performance when whey in the drinking water was diluted and/or offered on alternate days or half-days. 6. Broilers allowed to choose between wet and dry feed when water was freely available chose mostly dry feed; in the absence of drinking water they chose mostly wet food. Birds offered water and liquid whey avoided whey completely. 7. It is concluded that whey can be used in diets for broiler chickens by incorporating it in the food as long as drinking water is offered ad libitum. Whey may be offered as a drink if the food is mixed with 1.8 times its weight of water but it is better to dilute the whey with an equal volume of water whether it is added to food or given as drink. Good results can also be obtained when undiluted whey is offered alternately with water, either in half-day or full-day periods.

  5. Qualitative improvement of rabbit burgers using Zingiber officinale Roscoe powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mancini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to evaluate the effect of Zingiber officinale powder on physical-chemical traits, microbiological growth and sensory properties of rabbit burger. Raw burgers (only meat and meat added with 1 and 2% w/w ginger powder were stored at 4°C for 1, 4 and 7 d and then cooked. Ginger modified the colour of both raw and cooked burgers, leading to more yellow hue and reducing lightness. Aspect of burgers were affected by ginger powder addition, leading to a noticeable difference between the samples. During storage time, the highest modifications were recorded for control samples, followed by burgers with added ginger. Sensory evaluation highlighted that ginger enhanced the juiciness of the burgers; moreover, burgers with ginger powder presented a significant delay in microbial growth. Ginger powder might be considered as a potential ingredient in rabbit meat products to increase their quality and extend their shelf-life.

  6. Inhibitory activity of cheese whey fermented with kefir grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londero, A; Quinta, R; Abraham, A G; Sereno, R; De Antoni, G; Garrote, G L

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the chemical and microbiological compositions of three types of whey to be used for kefir fermentation as well as the inhibitory capacity of their subsequent fermentation products against 100 Salmonella sp. and 100 Escherichia coli pathogenic isolates. All the wheys after fermentation with 10% (wt/vol) kefir grains showed inhibition against all 200 isolates. The content of lactic acid bacteria in fermented whey ranged from 1.04 × 10(7) to 1.17 × 10(7) CFU/ml and the level of yeasts from 2.05 × 10(6) to 4.23 × 10(6) CFU/ml. The main changes in the chemical composition during fermentation were a decrease in lactose content by 41 to 48% along with a corresponding lactic acid production to a final level of 0.84 to 1.20% of the total reaction products. The MIC was a 30% dilution of the fermentation products for most of the isolates, while the MBC varied between 40 and 70%, depending on the isolate. The pathogenic isolates Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis 2713 and E. coli 2710 in the fermented whey lost their viability after 2 to 7 h of incubation. When pathogens were deliberately inoculated into whey before fermentation, the CFU were reduced by 2 log cycles for E. coli and 4 log cycles for Salmonella sp. after 24 h of incubation. The inhibition was mainly related to lactic acid production. This work demonstrated the possibility of using kefir grains to ferment an industrial by-product in order to obtain a natural acidic preparation with strong bacterial inhibitory properties that also contains potentially probiotic microorganisms.

  7. Xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris using whey permeate medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvides, A L; Katsifas, E A; Hatzinikolaou, D G; Karagouni, A D

    2012-08-01

    Xanthan gum is a polysaccharide that is widely used as stabilizer and thickener with many industrial applications in food industry. Our aim was to estimate the ability of Xanthomonas campestris ATCC 13951 for the production of xanthan gum by using whey as a growth medium, a by-product of dairy industry. X. campestris ATCC 13951 has been studied in batch cultures using a complex medium for the determination of the optimal concentration of glucose, galactose and lactose. In addition, whey was used under various treatment procedures (de-proteinated, partially hydrolyzed by β-lactamase and partially hydrolyzed and de-proteinated) as culture medium, to study the production of xanthan in a 2 l bioreactor with constant stirring and aeration. A production of 28 g/l was obtained when partially hydrolysed β-lactamase was used, which proved to be one of the highest xanthan gum production reported so far. At the same time, an effort has been made for the control and selection of the most appropriate procedure for the preservation of the strain and its use as inoculant in batch cultures, without loss of its viability and its capability of xanthan gum production. The pre-treatment of whey (whey permeate medium hydrolyzed, WPH) was very important for the production of xanthan by the strain X. campestris ATCC 13951 during batch culture conditions in a 2 l bioreactor. Preservation methods such as lyophilization, cryopreservation at various glycerol solution and temperatures have been examined. The results indicated that the best preservation method for the producing strain X. campestris ATCC 13951 was the lyophilization. Taking into account that whey permeate is a low cost by-product of the dairy industry, the production of xanthan achieved under the studied conditions was considered very promising for industrial application.

  8. Effect of vegetable proteins on physical characteristics of spray-dried tomato powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontul, Ismail; Topuz, Ayhan; Ozkan, Ceren; Karacan, Merve

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, the effectiveness of different vegetable proteins (pea protein isolate, soy protein isolate and zein from maize) at two different ratios (1% and 5%) on product yield and physical properties of spray-dried pulpy tomato juice was investigated. Additionally, these proteins were compared with whey protein concentrate which has a superior effect on spray dried products at the same concentrations. Additionally, plain tomato juice was also spray dried for comparison with vegetable proteins. The product yield of the tomato powders dried with the vegetable proteins was lower than with the whey protein concentrate. Among vegetable proteins, the highest product yield was produced with 1% soy protein isolate. In all products, there was a slight colour difference between the reconstituted tomato powders and the raw tomato juice, which indicated that pulpy tomato juice can be spray dried with minor colour change. All powders had unique free-flowing properties estimated as Carr index and Hausner ratio due to their large particles. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Peptide-peptide and protein-peptide interactions in mixtures of whey protein isolate and whey protein isolate hydrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creusot, N.P.; Gruppen, H.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Kruif, de C.G.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2006-01-01

    The extent of aggregation in whey protein isolate (WPI) hydrolysates induced by Bacillus licheniformis protease was quantified as a function of degree of hydrolysis (DH), temperature and ionic strength. The capacity of the hydrolysates to aggregate added intact protein was also studied. The amount

  10. Straightforward process for removal of milk fat globule membranes and production of fat-free whey protein concentrate from cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Srinivasan

    2011-09-28

    A straightforward method for the separation of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) and production of fat-free whey protein concentrate/isolate from cheese whey has been developed. Lowering of the conductivity of the whey from its initial value of about 5600 μS cm(-1) to about 2000-500 μS cm(-1) via diafiltration with water caused selective precipitation of MFGM when incubated for 30 min at pH 4.2 and 35 °C. The whey proteins remained soluble in the supernatant under these conditions. Experimental evidence suggested that precipitation of MFGM at pH 4.2 was not due to a nonspecific effect of lowering of the conductivity of the whey but due to the specific effect of removal of Ca2+ from the whey. The lipid content of whey protein isolate obtained by this process was whey protein concentrate/isolate. The MFGM, which is reported to contain bioactive/nutraceutical lipids and proteins, is a valuable byproduct of the process.

  11. Powder Diffraction: By Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, William I. F.

    This introductory chapter reviews the first 100 years of powder diffraction, decade by decade, from the earliest X-ray powder diffraction measurements of the crystal structure of graphite through to the diversity and complexity of twenty-first century powder diffraction. Carbon features as an illustrative example throughout the discussion of these ten decades from graphite and the disorder of carbon black through to lonsdaleite, the elusive hexagonal polymorph of diamond, and C60, the most symmetrical of molecules. Electronics and computing have played a leading role in the development of powder diffraction, particularly over the past 60 years, and the Moore's Law decade-by-decade rise in computing power is clear in the increasing complexity of powder diffraction experiments and material systems that can be studied. The chapter concludes with a final discussion of decades - the four decades of length-scale from the ångstrom to the micron that not only represent the domain of powder diffraction but are also the distances that will dominate twenty-first century science and technology.

  12. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100} orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  13. Studies on formulation of whey protein enriched concentrated tomato juice beverage

    OpenAIRE

    Rajoria, Avneet; Chauhan, Anil K.; Kumar, Jitendra

    2013-01-01

    Whey protein components derived from cheese whey and heat and acid coagulated Indian products (paneer, chhana, chakka) possess valuable functional and nutritional properties. Tomato products rich in lycopene are reported to be anticarcinogenic and antioxidative. The main objective of this study was to formulate a whey protein enriched tomato juice concentrate for use as beverage by employing Response Surface Methodology (RSM) engaging the Central Composite Rotatable Design (CCRD). The ingredi...

  14. High Hydrostatic Pressure Pretreatment of Whey Protein Isolates Improves Their Digestibility and Antioxidant Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Michèle M. Iskandar; Lands, Larry C.; Kebba Sabally; Behnam Azadi; Brian Meehan; Nadir Mawji; Cameron D. Skinner; Stan Kubow

    2015-01-01

    Whey proteins have well-established antioxidant and anti-inflammatory bioactivities. High hydrostatic pressure processing of whey protein isolates increases their in vitro digestibility resulting in enhanced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. This study compared the effects of different digestion protocols on the digestibility of pressurized (pWPI) and native (nWPI) whey protein isolates and the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of the hydrolysates. The pepsin-pancreatin di...

  15. Compositional analysis of developed whey based fructooligosaccharides supplemented low- calorie drink

    OpenAIRE

    Yasmin, Adeela; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Yasin, Muhammad; Qaisrani, Tahira Batool

    2014-01-01

    Array of evidences have indicated that the supplementation of diet with functional and nutritional components to provide numerous health benefits. In this context, fortification with novel constituents as prebiotics i.e. fructooligosaccharides (FOS) is an encouraging trend all over the world. In the current exploration, FOS was used as a prebiotic in whey based functional drinks. For drink formulation, four samples were prepared i.e. whey based drink (T1) and FOS supplemented whey drinks @ 0....

  16. Whey protein hydrolysate augments tendon and muscle hypertrophy independent of resistance exercise contraction mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, S K; Vendelbo, M H

    2014-01-01

    In a comparative study, we investigated the effects of maximal eccentric or concentric resistance training combined with whey protein or placebo on muscle and tendon hypertrophy. 22 subjects were allocated into either a high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate + carbohydrate group (WHD...... or contraction mode effects. In conclusion, high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate augments muscle and tendon hypertrophy following 12 weeks of resistance training – irrespective of contraction mode....

  17. Influence of storage, heat treatment, and solids composition on the bleaching of whey with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomeng E; Campbell, Rachel E; Fox, Aaron J; Gerard, Patrick D; Drake, MaryAnne

    2012-07-01

    The residual annatto colorant in liquid whey is bleached to provide a desired neutral color in dried whey ingredients. This study evaluated the influence of starter culture, whey solids and composition, and spray drying on bleaching efficacy. Cheddar cheese whey with annatto was manufactured with starter culture or by addition of lactic acid and rennet. Pasteurized fat-separated whey was ultrafiltered (retentate) and spray dried to 34% whey protein concentrate (WPC34). Aliquots were bleached at 60 °C for 1 h (hydrogen peroxide, 250 ppm), before pasteurization, after pasteurization, after storage at 3 °C and after freezing at -20 °C. Aliquots of retentate were bleached analogously immediately and after storage at 3 or -20 °C. Freshly spray dried WPC34 was rehydrated to 9% (w/w) solids and bleached. In a final experiment, pasteurized fat-separated whey was ultrafiltered and spray dried to WPC34 and WPC80. The WPC34 and WPC80 retentates were diluted to 7 or 9% solids (w/w) and bleached at 50 °C for 1 h. Freshly spray-dried WPC34 and WPC80 were rehydrated to 9 or 12% solids and bleached. Bleaching efficacy was measured by extraction and quantification of norbixin. Each experiment was replicated 3 times. Starter culture, fat separation, or pasteurization did not impact bleaching efficacy (P > 0.05) while cold or frozen storage decreased bleaching efficacy (P whey or 34% (w/w) protein liquid retentate (P whey. Optimization of whey bleaching conditions is important to reduce the negative effects of bleaching on the flavor of dried whey ingredients. This study established that liquid storage and whey composition are critical processing points that influence bleaching efficacy. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Continuous hydrogen and methane production in a two-stage cheese whey fermentation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota-Navarro, C B; Carrillo-Reyes, J; Davila-Vazquez, G; Alatriste-Mondragón, F; Razo-Flores, E

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of integrating biological hydrogen and methane production in a two-stage process using mixed cultures and cheese whey powder (CWP) as substrate was studied. The effect of operational parameters such as hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR) on the volumetric hydrogen (VHPR) and methane (VMPR) production rates was assessed. The highest VHPR was 28 L H2/L/d, obtained during stable operation in a CSTR at HRT and OLR of 6 h and 142 g lactose/ L/d, respectively. Moreover, hydrogen (13 L/L/d) was produced even at HRT as low as 3.5 h and OLR of 163 g lactose/L/d, nonetheless, the reactor operation was not stable. Regarding methane production in an UASB reactor, the acidified effluent from the hydrogen-producing bioreactor was efficiently treated obtaining COD removals above 90% at OLR and HRT of 20 g COD/L/d and 6 h, respectively. The two-stage process for continuous production of hydrogen and methane recovered over 70% of the energy present in the substrate. This study demonstrated that hydrogen production can be efficiently coupled to methane production in a two-stage system and that CWP is an adequate substrate for energy production.

  19. Whey protein supplementation accelerates satellite cell proliferation during recovery from eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Knudsen, Inge Skovgaard

    2014-01-01

    well investigated. In a comparative human study, we investigated the effect of hydrolyzed whey protein supplementation following eccentric exercise on fiber type-specific SC accumulation. Twenty-four young healthy subjects received either hydrolyzed whey protein + carbohydrate (whey, n = 12) or iso...... of supplementation. In conclusion, whey protein supplementation may accelerate SC proliferation as part of the regeneration or remodeling process after high-intensity eccentric exercise.......Human skeletal muscle satellite cells (SCs) are essential for muscle regeneration and remodeling processes in healthy and clinical conditions involving muscle breakdown. However, the potential influence of protein supplementation on post-exercise SC regulation in human skeletal muscle has not been...

  20. Detection of cheese whey and caseinomacropeptide in fermented milk beverages using high performance liquid chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    E.H.P. Andrade; M.R. Souza; L.M. Fonseca; C.F.A.M. Penna; M.M.O.P. Cerqueira; T. Roza; B. Seridan; M.F.S. Resende; F.A. Pinto; C.N.B.C. Villanoeva; M.O. Leite

    2014-01-01

    Cheese whey level and caseinomacropeptide (CMP) index of fermented milk beverages added with four levels of cheese whey (0, 10, 20, and 40%) and stored at 8-10oC for 0, 7, 14 and 21 days were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-gel filtration (HPLC-GF). Additionally, the interference of the starter culture and the storage time on the detection of cheese whey and CMP were investigated. Refrigerated storage up to 21 days did not affect (P>0.05) cheese whey and CMP amounts in mi...

  1. Estudo do efeito da adição de soro de queijo na qualidade sensorial do doce de leite pastoso Study on the effect of the addition of whey in the sensorial quality of creamy dulce de leche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasiele Scaramal Madrona

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo realizar uma avaliação do perfil sensorial de cinco amostras de doce de leite pastoso formuladas com diferentes concentrações de soro de queijo em pó ou in natura. Os atributos sensoriais avaliados foram aparência, aspecto geral, cor, sabor, textura e intenção de compra. Os resultados foram analisados através de ANOVA e pelo teste de Tukey e mostraram que não houve diferença significativa entre as amostras, sendo assim, a utilização de soro de queijo na fabricação do doce de leite pastoso é uma ótima alternativa para a indústria de laticínios, pois possibilita a obtenção de um produto com qualidade nutricional, de baixo custo e infere ao soro não só caráter de efluente das indústrias alimentícias, mas complemento da alimentação humana.This study aimed to carry out an evaluation of the sensory profile of five samples of creamy dulce de leche made with different concentrations of whey powder or raw whey. The sensory attributes evaluated were appearance, general aspect, color, texture, and intention to purchase. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test and showed no significant difference between samples, and thus the use of whey powder or raw whey in the manufacture of creamy dulce de leche is a great alternative to the dairy industry since it enables the achievement of a product with nutritional quality, low cost evidencing the serum use in the food industry and as a nutritional supplement.

  2. Production of L(+ lactic acid using Lactobacillus casei from whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmjit S. Panesar

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the fermentation of whey for the production of L(+ lactic acid using Lactobacillus casei. The effect of different process parameters such as pH of the medium, temperature, inoculum size, age of inoculum, agitation and incubation time was monitored to enhance the lactose conversion in whey to L(+ lactic acid. Fermentations were performed without any pH control. The optimization of the fermentation conditions resulted in significant decrease in fermentation time, besides increase in lactose conversion to lactic acid. The optimized process conditions resulted in high lactose conversion (95.62% to L(+ lactic acid production (33.73 g/L after an incubation period of 36 h.

  3. Efficient lactulose production from cheese whey using sodium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Park, Gwon Woo; Han, Jong-In

    2015-04-15

    An economical method of lactulose production from cheese whey was developed using sodium carbonate (Na2CO3). Three parameters such as temperature, reaction time, and Na2CO3 concentration were identified as experimental factors, and yield was selected as a response parameter. The experimental factors were optimised employing Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Maximum yield of 29.6% was obtained at reaction time of 20.41 min, Na2CO3 of 0.51% at 90 °C. To overcome this limited lactulose yield, due to the conversion of lactulose to galactose, fed batch system was applied using dried cheese whey as lactose source. By this system, limit was broken, and 15.8 g/L of lactulose is produced in hour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Determinations of nonprotein nitrogen content of cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, S S; Josephson, R V

    1975-10-01

    Nonprotein nitrogen in pooled sweet (Cheddar and Dagano) and acid (cottage) wheys was estimated by currently proposed dialysis and chemical precipitation methods. Kjeldahl nitrogen analyses of (a) membrane retentates after water dialysis, and (b) 12% trichloroacetic acid plus .2% phosphotungstic acid filtrates indicated that nonprotein nitrogen values vary significantly with the method of sample preparation. Membrane porosity influence nonprotein nitrogen values for molecular weight cut-offs of 3500, 6000 to 8000 and 12,000 to 14,000. Dialyzable nitrogen values with all membranes were lower than 12% trichloroacetic acid soluble nitrogen for both wheys and higher than the 12% trichloroacetic acid + .2% phosphotungstic acid soluble nitrogen for all but the 3500 molecular weight cut-off membrane. The dialyzable nonprotein nitrogen fraction was heterogeneous but more that 80% was less than 3500 in molecular weight.

  5. Alkaline subcritical water gasification of dairy industry waste (Whey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangrat, Rattana; Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2011-05-01

    The near-critical water gasification of dairy industry waste in the form of Whey, a product composed of mixtures of carbohydrates (mainly lactose) and amino acids such as glycine and glutamic acid, has been studied. The gasification process involved partial oxidation with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of NaOH. The reactions were studied over the temperature range from 300°C to 390°C, corresponding pressures of 9.5-24.5 MPa and reaction times from 0 min to 120 min. Hydrogen production was affected by the presence of NaOH, the concentration of H(2)O(2), temperature, reaction time and feed concentration. Up to 40% of the theoretical hydrogen gas production was achieved at 390°C. Over 80% of the Whey nitrogen content was found as ammonia, mainly in the liquid effluent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of mechanical denaturation on surface free energy of protein powders

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin; Grimsey, Ian M.; Forbes, Robert T.; Blagbrough, Ian S.; Conway, Barbara R

    2016-01-01

    Globular proteins are important both as therapeutic agents and excipients. However, their fragile native\\ud conformations can be denatured during pharmaceutical processing, which leads to modification of\\ud the surface energy of their powders and hence their performance. Lyophilized powders of hen eggwhite\\ud lysozyme and �-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae were used as models to study the effects\\ud of mechanical denaturation on the surface energies of basic and acidic protein powders, r...

  7. Effects of whey on the colonization and sporulation of arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to research the effect of 2 different doses of whey [50 ml kg-1(W50) and 100 ml kg-1(W100)], an important organic waste, on colonization and sporulation of arbuscular mycorhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus intraradices'(G.i.) inoculated to lentil plant and the effects of changing P ratio in the soil and plant as ...

  8. Whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Prestes Lessa Fernandes Oliveira; Larissa Canhadas Bertan; Christiane Maciel Vasconcellos Barros De Rensis; Ana Paula Bilck; Priscila Cristina Bizam Vianna

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to prepare whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil at different concentrations, and evaluate their properties and antimicrobial activity. Films were more flexible with increasing the concentration of oregano oil and water vapor permeability was higher in the films with oregano oil. Increasing the concentration of essential oil decreased the water solubility. The solubility of control film and film with 1.5% oregano oil was 20.2 and 14.0%, res...

  9. Antioxidant activity of whey protein hydrolysates in milk beverage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Bimlesh; Kumari, Anuradha; Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, Rajan; Prajapati, Kishore; Mahboob, Shaik; Athira, S

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of flavoured milk enriched with antioxidative whey protein hydrolysates (WPHs) by radical scavenging method. Whey protein concentrate (WPC) was hydrolyzed by using three commercial proteases; flavouzyme, alcalase and corolase PP and these WPHs were analyzed for degree of hydrolysis and antioxidant activity. The antioxidant activities of these WPHs were evaluated using ABTS method. Trolox equivalent antioxidant activity of all the hydrolysates i.e. flavourzyme (0.81 ± 0.04), alcalase (1.16 ± 0.05) and corolase (1.42 ± 0.12) was higher than the WPC (0.19 ± 0.01). Among these, whey protein hydrolysates prepared using corolase showed maximum antioxidant activity. Total 15 β-lactoglobulin, 1 α-lactoalbumin, and 6 β-casein derived peptide fragments were identified in the WPHs by LC-MS/MS. Due to their size and characteristic amino acid composition, all the identified peptides may contribute for the antioxidant activity. The strawberry and chocolate flavoured milk was supplemented with WPC and WPHs and 2 % addition has shown increase in antioxidant activity upto 42 %. The result suggests that WPH could be used as natural biofunctional ingredients in enhancing antioxidant properties of food products.

  10. Enrichment of extruded snack products with whey protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Brnčić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Highest share in products with whey proteins addition belongs to aromatised drinks, aromatised protein bars and various dietetic preparations. In the last few years, there is increased use of the extrusion process for production of food products. This process is, besides other things, used for obtaining directly expanded products, which are immediately packed and sent on market after mechanical and thermal treatment in extruder, or after drying for a short time. One of these food products is “snack” food. Snack food is made with twin corotating screw extruders, in which raw materials are submitted to high temperatures and short time, with intensive expansion and rapid pressure drop. For the production of this category of food products, basic ingredients like corn, wheat, rye and rice, with the maximum of 9 % of proteins, are used. With the development of extrusion technology, special attention is focused on the enrichment of extruded products with different types of proteins, including proteins. In this paper, review of the newest research and achievements in embedding various types of whey concentrates in snack food will be represented. This category of food products for direct consummation is constantly increasing, and addition of whey protein concentrate adds better nutritional value and increased functionality.

  11. The impact of traditional cheeses and whey on health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Blažić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the modern world proper nutrition is becoming an issue of great importance and more and more effort and means are being channelled into finding a solution to it. Scientific researches in the field of nutrition have shown that high quality foods are not sufficiently present in our diet. The insufficient intake of milk and dairy products leads to protein, calcium, vitamin A and vitamin D deficiency, and thus leads to the development of various diseases and disorders. While in the past milk was considered a complete food that satisfies many nutritive needs in humans, today we can speak about yet another role of dairy products. They are believed to have a preventive role in the development of various diseases. Functional foods are becoming increasingly popular among consumers due to rising consumer health awareness. By introducing functional foods into our standard diet, many nutritional deficiencies in human organisms can be remedied. In today’s food market of functional foods, milk and dairy products are mostly present. Traditional cheeses and whey have high nutritive and health benefits. This paper deals with the nutritive benefits of traditional cheeses and whey, as well as their positive impact on human health. Products like traditional cheeses and whey are, due to their ideal ratio of nutrients, superior to other foods, while the new technological developments and enlarged assortment of foods enriched with high-quality proteins or with reduced levels of fat have made them irreplaceable in the modern diet.

  12. Modelling formulae of strawberry whey drinks of prophylactic application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tkachenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Expediency of the development of formulae and innovative technologies for production of prophylactic application drinks possessing antioxidant, probiotic and hepatoprotective properties with the use of the secondary dairy product – whey, as well as the domestic vegetable raw materials having a high content of bioactive substances has been substantiated.Formulation composition of the prophylactic drinks based on cheese whey, extract of Tagetes patula flowers and the berry filler “Strawberry” with the use of the response surface method has been developed. Bioactivity of the drinks and the complex quality indicator which accounts for the total influence of the bioactivity, organoleptic assessment and weight coefficients of the specified unit indicators were taken as the optimization criteria; as the independent factors that were varied in the course of the experiment, the mass fractions of the marigold flowers extract and the strawberries filler were selected. It is recommended that the mass fractions of the berry filler “Strawberry” and the extract of Tagetes patula flowers in the prophylactic drinks are set as 7 and 20 % of the finished product, accordingly. The practical mass fraction of the citric acid of 0.2 % was determined as it ensures high organoleptic characteristics of the finished drinks. Recommendations are given concerning development of innovative technologies of unfermented and fermented strawberry whey drinks of prophylactic application enriched with the extract of Tagetes patula flowers.

  13. Quantification of whey proteins by reversed phase-HPLC and effectiveness of mid-infrared spectroscopy for their rapid prediction in sweet whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturaro, Alba; De Marchi, Massimo; Masi, Antonio; Cassandro, Martino

    2016-01-01

    In the dairy industry, membrane filtration is used to reduce the amount of whey waste and, simultaneously, to recover whey proteins (WP). The composition of WP can strongly affect the filtration treatment of whey, and rapid determination of WP fractions would be of interest for dairy producers to monitor WP recovery. This study aimed to develop mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIRS) prediction models for the rapid quantification of protein in sweet whey, using a validated rapid reversed phase (RP)-HPLC as a reference method. Quantified WP included α-lactalbumin (α-LA), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) A and B, bovine serum albumin, caseinomacropeptides, and proteose peptone. Validation of RP-HPLC was performed by calculating the relative standard deviation (RSD) in repeatability and reproducibility tests for WP retention time and peak areas. Samples of liquid whey (n=187) were analyzed by RP-HPLC and scanned through MIRS to collect spectral information (900 to 4,000 cm(-1)); statistical analysis was carried out through partial least squares regression and random cross-validation procedure. Retention times in RP-HPLC method were stable (RSD between 0.03 and 0.80%), whereas the RSD of peak area (from 0.25 to 8.48%) was affected by WP relative abundance. Higher coefficients of determination in validation for MIRS model were obtained for protein fractions present in whey in large amounts, such as β-LG (0.58), total identified WP (0.58), and α-LA (0.56). Results of this study suggest that MIRS is an easy method for rapid quantification of detail protein in sweet whey, even if better resolution was achieved with the method based on RP-HPLC. The prediction of WP in sweet whey by MIRS might be used for screening and for classifying sweet whey according to its total and individual WP contents. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reducing metal alloy powder costs for use in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing: Improving the economics for production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Fransisco

    AM. Alternative powders can be made by blending or re-spheroidizing HDH and CPTi powders. Machine modifications were performed to allow the testing and manufacturing with these low cost alternative powders. A comparison was made between alternative powders and gas atomized powders. Powders were compared in terms of morphology and at the microstructural level. Flowability of different powder blends was also measured. Finally, a comparison of parts fabricated from the multiple powder blends and gas atomized powder was made. It has been demonstrated that powder blending can produce fully dense parts in the Arcam system by utilizing the double melt technique or HIPing the built pars. The double melt technique increased the density of the sample part and modified the microstructure into finer martensitic grains. The HIP process can make a part fully dense regardless of what percentage of HDH powder blending is used. The HIP process yielded the same microstructure, regardless of the grain structure it started with. This research allows for the reduction of costs using titanium powders in the EBM system, but can also be implemented with more costly elements and alloys using other metal AM technologies. This includes niobium, tantalum, and nickel-based superalloys for use in various industries.

  15. The effect of starter culture and annatto on the flavor and functionality of whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Drake, M A

    2011-03-01

    The flavor of whey protein can carry over into ingredient applications and negatively influence consumer acceptance. Understanding sources of flavors in whey protein is crucial to minimize flavor. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of annatto color and starter culture on the flavor and functionality of whey protein concentrate (WPC). Cheddar cheese whey with and without annatto (15 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk, annatto with 3% wt/vol norbixin content) was manufactured using a mesophilic lactic starter culture or by addition of lactic acid and rennet (rennet set). Pasteurized fat-separated whey was then ultrafiltered and spray dried into WPC. The experiment was replicated 4 times. Flavor of liquid wheys and WPC were evaluated by sensory and instrumental volatile analyses. In addition to flavor evaluations on WPC, color analysis (Hunter Lab and norbixin extraction) and functionality tests (solubility and heat stability) also were performed. Both main effects (annatto, starter) and interactions were investigated. No differences in sensory properties or functionality were observed among WPC. Lipid oxidation compounds were higher in WPC manufactured from whey with starter culture compared with WPC from rennet-set whey. The WPC with annatto had higher concentrations of p-xylene, diacetyl, pentanal, and decanal compared with WPC without annatto. Interactions were observed between starter and annatto for hexanal, suggesting that annatto may have an antioxidant effect when present in whey made with starter culture. Results suggest that annatto has a no effect on whey protein flavor, but that the starter culture has a large influence on the oxidative stability of whey. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimization of nisin production by Lactococcus lactis UQ2 using supplemented whey as alternative culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Toledo, S Y; Domínguez-Domínguez, J; García-Almendárez, B E; Prado-Barragán, L A; Regalado-González, C

    2010-08-01

    Lactococcus lactis UQ2 is a nisin A-producing native strain. In the present study, the production of nisin by L. lactis UQ2 in a bioreactor using supplemented sweet whey (SW) was optimized by a statistical design of experiments and response surface methodology (RSM). In a 1st approach, a fractional factorial design (FFD) of the order 2(5-1) with 3 central points was used. The effect on nisin production of air flow, SW, soybean peptone (SP), MgSO(4)/MnSO(4) mixture, and Tween 80 was evaluated. From FFD, the most significant factors affecting nisin production were SP (P = 0.011), and SW (P = 0.037). To find optimum conditions, a central composite design (CCD) with 2 central points was used. Three factors were considered, SW (7 to 10 g/L), SP (7 to10 g/L), and small amounts of added nisin as self-inducer (NI 34.4 to 74.4 IU/L). Nisin production was expressed as international units (IU). From RSM, an optimum nisin activity of 180 IU/mL was predicted at 74.4 IU/L NI, 13.8 g/L SP, and 14.9 or 5.11 g/L SW, while confirmatory experiments showed a maximum activity of 178 +/- 5.2 IU/mL, verifying the validity of the model. The 2nd-order model showed a coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.828. Optimized conditions were used for constant pH fermentations, where a maximum activity of 575 +/- 17 IU/mL was achieved at pH 6.5 after 12 h. The adsorption-desorption technique was used to partially purify nisin, followed by drying. The resulting powder showed an activity of 102150 IU/g. Practical Application: Nisin production was optimized using supplemented whey as alternative culture medium, using a native L. lactis UQ2 strain. Soybean peptone, SW, and subinhibitory amounts of nisin were successfully employed to optimize nisin production by L. lactis UQ2. Dried semipurified nisin showed an activity of 102150 IU/g.

  17. Demystifying Mystery Powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotar, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Describes science activities which use simple chemical tests to distinguish between materials and to determine some of their properties. Explains the water, iodine, heat, acid, baking soda, acid/base indicator, glucose, and sugar tests. Includes activities to enhance chemical testing and a list of suggested powders for use. (RT)

  18. Powder metallurgy of turbine disc alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingesten, N.G. (Dep. of Engineering Metals)

    1981-03-01

    The first part embraced a study of carbide precipitated in IN 100 and astrology powders. The powder was heat treated at temperatures between 950/sup 0/C and 1150/sup 0/C. After aging at 950-1100/sup 0/C the MC-carbides formed during atomization were replaced by M/sub 23/C/sub 6/-carbides. After 1150/sup 0/C treatments the MC carbides were present again. Precipitation comparable with that obtained in HIP:ed specimens was not observed at free particle surfaces. However, powder particles which had agglomerated during atomization often exhibited considerable precipitation at contiguous surfaces. Obviously, contact between the particles must occur if coarse precipitation at particle surfaces is to develop. Reduced PPB-precipitation was obtained by pre-heat- treatment of powder before compaction. It is suggested that the carbon otherwise available for PPB-precipitation forms carbides in the interior of the powder particles. The aim of the second part was to ..gamma..-strengthen a Co-based super-alloy (Co-15Cr-3Mo-5Ti). Here the Ti-addition gives a coherent and ordered ..gamma..-phase Co/sub 3/Ti. However, upon ageing the alloy is unstable in order to increase the stability modifications of the alloy were prepared by: leaving out the Mo-content, adding 10 % Ni and by decreasing the Ti-content to 4.2 %. In addition, the effect of enhanced grain size and of deformation was investigated. Significant reduction of the transformation rate was only obtained by decresing the Ti-content while deformation of the alloy greatly increased the transformation rate.(author).

  19. Stimulation of muscle protein synthesis by whey and caseinate ingestion after resistance exercise in elderly individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Kasper; Reitelseder, Søren; Petersen, S.G.

    2011-01-01

    before exercise (CasPre), caseinate intake immediately after exercise (CasPost), whey intake immediately after exercise (Whey), or intake of a non-caloric control drink (Control). Muscle myofibrillar and collagen fractional synthesis rates (FSR) were measured by a primed continuous infusion of L-[1...

  20. TRIXcell+, a new long-term boar semen extender containing whey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was the aim of the present study to test whey as protective protein for the sperm cell in the long-term boar semen preservation medium TRIXcell. Analyses of sperm cell motility using computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) indicated that the whey protein Porex has a similar protective effect as bovine serum albumin ...

  1. Comparison of the aggregation behavior of soy and bovine whey protein hydrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, B.J.H.; Alting, A.C.; Gruppen, H.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Soy-derived proteins (soy protein isolate, glycinin, and ß-conglycinin) and bovine whey-derived proteins (whey protein isolate, ¿-lactalbumin, ß-lactoglobulin) were hydrolyzed using subtilisin Carlsberg, chymotrypsin, trypsin, bromelain, and papain. The (in)solubility of the hydrolysates

  2. Ca2+-Induced Cold Set Gelation of Whey Protein Isolate Fibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.; Hendrickx, H.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we describe the rheological behaviour of Ca2+-induced cold-set gels of whey protein mixtures. Coldset gels are important applications for products with a low thermal stability. In previous work [1], we determined the state diagram for whey protein mixtures that were heated for 10 h at

  3. Cheese whey-induced high-cell-density production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of lactose-rich concentrates from dairy processes for the induction of recombinant gene's expression has not received much attention although they are interesting low cost substrates for production of recombinant enzymes. Applicability of dairy waste for induction of recombinant genes in Escherichia coli was studied. Clones expressing Lactobacillus phage muramidase and Lactobacillus alcohol dehydrogenase were used for the experiments. Results Shake flask cultivations in mineral salt medium showed that cheese whey or deproteinised whey induced gene expression as efficiently as IPTG (isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside or pure lactose. Addition of yeast extract or proteolytically degraded whey proteins did not improve the recombinant protein yield. In contrast, addition of yeast extract to the well-balanced mineral salt medium decreased the product yield. Feeding with glycerol provided sufficient amount of easily assimilable carbon source during the induction period without preventing lactose intake and induction by lactose. High-cell-density fed-batch cultivations showed that product yields comparable to IPTG-induction can be achieved by feeding bacteria with a mixture of glycerol and concentrated whey permeate during the induction. Conclusion Whey and concentrated whey permeate can be applied as an alternative inducer in recombinant high-cell-density fed-batch fermentations. The yield of the recombinant product was comparable to fermentations induced by IPTG. In low-cell-density shake flask experiments the yield was higher with whey or whey permeate than with IPTG.

  4. Analysis of free fatty acids in whey products by solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaino, R M; Parker, J D; Larick, D K

    2001-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of Cheddar cheese starter cultures on the level of free fatty acids in liquid whey, a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) technique was utilized. The determination of response factors relative to an internal standard and the verification of linearity over a wide concentration range allowed for the quantitation of free fatty acids in experimentally produced liquid whey and in a wide range of dry whey ingredients. Results indicated that whey produced with a Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis starter culture contained the highest level of total free fatty acids with significantly higher levels of lauric, myristic, and palmitic acids. Significant declines in oleic, linoleic, and palmitic acid occurred during storage. Commercial whey ingredients demonstrated a linear increase in free fatty acids with increasing percent protein, except for whey protein isolate, which had the lowest concentration. The use of SPME for the rapid analysis of free fatty acids in whey products should allow for further research to determine the importance of these compounds on the quality and stability of whey products.

  5. Correlations between biochemical characteristics and foam-forming and -stabilizing ability of whey and casein hydrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, van der C.; Bont, D.B.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Whey protein and casein were hydrolyzed with 11 commercially available enzymes. Foam properties of 44 samples were measured and were related to biochemical properties of the hydrolysates using statistical data analysis. All casein hydrolysates formed high initial foam levels, whereas whey

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Autoclaving Whey-Based Medium on Propionic Acid Production by Propionibacterium shermanii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Thomas M.; Bodie, Elizabeth A.; Goodman, Nelson; Schwartz, Robert D.

    1986-01-01

    Propionic acid production by Propionibacterium shermanii was compared in pasteurized and autoclaved whey-based media. Propionic acid production decreased with increasing whey concentration in autoclaved media but not in pasteurized media. Increasing the yeast extract concentration from 5 to 10 g/liter greatly reduced the inhibitory effect of autoclaving. PMID:16346998

  7. Inhibitory Effect of Autoclaving Whey-Based Medium on Propionic Acid Production by Propionibacterium shermanii

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Thomas M.; Bodie, Elizabeth A.; Goodman, Nelson; Schwartz, Robert D.

    1986-01-01

    Propionic acid production by Propionibacterium shermanii was compared in pasteurized and autoclaved whey-based media. Propionic acid production decreased with increasing whey concentration in autoclaved media but not in pasteurized media. Increasing the yeast extract concentration from 5 to 10 g/liter greatly reduced the inhibitory effect of autoclaving.

  8. Supercritical carbon dioxide fractionation of whey protein isolate for new food-grade ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new, environmentally benign whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical CO2 (SCO2) as an acid aggregating agent to separate a-lactalbumin (a-LA) aggregates from soluble beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) protein in concentrated whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions. The process e...

  9. Heat-induced whey protein isolate fibrils: Conversion, hydrolysis, and disulphide bond formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.; Vasbinder, A.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    Fibril formation of individual pure whey proteins and whey protein isolate (WPI) was studied. The heat-induced conversion of WPI monomers into fibrils at pH 2 and low ionic strength increased with heating time and protein concentration. Previous studies, using a precipitation method, size-exclusion

  10. Intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of goat whey on DNBS-induced colitis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daline F S Araújo

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of goat whey in a mouse model of colitis induced by 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid that resembles human IBD. At a concentration of 4 g/kg/day, the goat whey improved the symptoms of intestinal inflammation, namely by decreasing the disease activity index, colonic weight/length, and leukocyte infiltration. Moreover, goat whey inhibited NF-κB p65 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways and consequently down-regulated the gene expression of various proinflammatory markers such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, TNF-α, iNOS, MMP-9, ICAM-1. Also, goat whey increased the expression of proteins such as mucins, occludin proteins and cytokine signalling suppressors. The immunomodulatory properties of goat whey were also evaluated in vitro using the murine macrophage cell line Raw 264 and CMT-93 cells derived from mouse rectum carcinomas. The results revealed the ability of goat whey to inhibit the production of NO and reduce IL-6 production in LPS-stimulated cells. In conclusion, goat whey exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in the DNBS model of intestinal inflammation, and these observations were confirmed by its immunomodulatory properties in vitro. Together, our results indicate that goat whey could have applications for the treatment of IBD.

  11. Intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of goat whey on DNBS-induced colitis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Daline F. S.; Guerra, Gerlane C. B.; Pintado, Maria Manuela E.; Sousa, Yasmim R. F.; Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Araújo, Raimundo F.; Gálvez, Julio; Queiroga, Rita de Cássia R. E.; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of goat whey in a mouse model of colitis induced by 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid that resembles human IBD. At a concentration of 4 g/kg/day, the goat whey improved the symptoms of intestinal inflammation, namely by decreasing the disease activity index, colonic weight/length, and leukocyte infiltration. Moreover, goat whey inhibited NF-κB p65 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways and consequently down-regulated the gene expression of various proinflammatory markers such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17, TNF-α, iNOS, MMP-9, ICAM-1. Also, goat whey increased the expression of proteins such as mucins, occludin proteins and cytokine signalling suppressors. The immunomodulatory properties of goat whey were also evaluated in vitro using the murine macrophage cell line Raw 264 and CMT-93 cells derived from mouse rectum carcinomas. The results revealed the ability of goat whey to inhibit the production of NO and reduce IL-6 production in LPS-stimulated cells. In conclusion, goat whey exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in the DNBS model of intestinal inflammation, and these observations were confirmed by its immunomodulatory properties in vitro. Together, our results indicate that goat whey could have applications for the treatment of IBD. PMID:28957373

  12. Degradation of vitamin C in a product made from mango (Mangifera indica L. and whey protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Alonso Mendoza-Corvis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the kinetics of vitamin C degradation in a product made from mango pulp (Mangifera indica L. and whey protein powder, in order to determine the effect of temperature on its conservation and further evaluate the behavior of the L*, a*, b* and the total color difference (ΔE in the powder product. Vitamin C was determined by the aoac 967.21/90 method using 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol, and the color was quantified with a HunterLab Color Flex EZ colorimeter. Vitamin C showed greater stability in the powder product ResumoEsta pesquisa procurou determinar a cinética de degradação da vitamina C em um produto em pó elaborado a base de polpa de manga (Mangifera indica L. var. Hilacha e lactisoro, com o fim de conhecer o efeito da temperatura na sua conservação e ademais avaliar o comportamento dos parâmetros L*, a*, b* e a diferença total da cor (ΔE no produto. A vitamina C determinou-se mediante o método aoac 967.21/90, com 2,6-diclorofenol indofe-nol; enquanto que a cor se quantificou com um colorímetro cor Flex EZ marca HunterLab. A vitamina C exibiu maior estabilidade no produto em pó armazenado a uma temperatura de 4 °C, stored at 4 °C with a concentration at the end of the eighth sampling week of 13.94 ± 1.2 mg/10 0 g-1 sample and showing a first order degradation kinetics with k1 values of 0.014 and 0.041 mg/100 g/week at temperatures of 4 °C and 28 °C, respec-tively. The greatest variations in color occurred in samples stored at 28 °C, indicating the influence of the temperature change on the product compo-nents. In addition, L*, a* and b* parameters were less affected under storage temperature of 4 °C, and their values correspond to a second degree polynomial.

  13. Whey-reduced weight gain is associated with a temporary growth reduction in young mice fed a high-fat diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranberg, Britt; Madsen, Andreas N.; Hansen, Axel K.

    2015-01-01

    Whey protein consumption reportedly alleviates parameters of the metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigated the effects of whey protein isolate (whey) in young mice fed a high-fat diet. We hypothesized that whey as the sole protein source reduced early weight gain associated with retarded growth a...

  14. Comprehensive peptidomic and glycomic evaluation reveals that sweet whey permeate from colostrum is a source of milk protein-derived peptides and oligosaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallas, D.C.; Weinborn, V.; Moura Bell, de J.M.L.N.; Wang, M.; Parker, E.A.; Guerrero, A.; Hettinga, K.A.; Lebrilla, C.B.; German, J.B.; Barile, D.

    2014-01-01

    Whey permeate is a co-product obtained when cheese whey is passed through an ultrafiltration membrane to concentrate whey proteins. Whey proteins are retained by the membrane, whereas the low-molecular weight compounds such as lactose, salts, oligosaccharides and peptides pass through the membrane

  15. Using the extreme vertices mixture design approach to assess dulce de leche with whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson de Freitas Silva Valente

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to use extreme vertices design approach to find the best formulation for dulce de leche with added whey. The assays were carried out with three components, namely sugar, milk, and whey, with three repetitions in the central point for a total of 11 assays. The extremes for milk and whey were 0 and 0.86 in mass fraction, while for sugar the extremes were 0.09 and 0.14. After 15 days, the product’s acceptance was analyzed for color, consistency, and flavor using a 9-point hedonic scale. The results show that the increase in whey content reduces product acceptance but that, for a score above 7.0 in hedonic scale (I like moderately, 0.35 of the mass fraction can be used in relation to milk, whey, and sugar components.

  16. The functional and biological properties of whey proteins: prospects for the development of functional foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. T. KORHONEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in processing technologies and the accumulation of scientific data on the functional and biological properties of whey components have contributed to the growing commercial valuation of cheese whey over the last decade. New membrane separation and chromatographic techniques have made it possible to fractionate and enrich various components of whey more efficiently than before. The specific properties of these components can now be examined in greater detail and new applications developed accordingly. The utilisation of cheese whey is evolving into a new industry producing a multitude of purified ingredients for numerous purposes. The most significant areas of R&D related to whey proteins include functional foods, the rheological properties of foodstuffs, and biopharmaceuticals.

  17. Cheese whey: A cost-effective alternative for hyaluronic acid production by Streptococcus zooepidemicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Isabel R; Vázquez, José A; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Teixeira, José A

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the optimisation of cheese whey formulated media for the production of hyaluronic acid (HA) by Streptococcus zooepidemicus. Culture media containing whey (W; 2.1g/L) or whey hydrolysate (WH; 2.4 g/L) gave the highest HA productions. Both W and WH produced high yields on protein consumed, suggesting cheese whey is a good nitrogen source for S. zooepidemicus production of HA. Polysaccharide concentrations of 4.0 g/L and 3.2g/L were produced in W and WH in a further scale-up to 5L bioreactors, confirming the suitability of the low-cost nitrogen source. Cheese whey culture media provided high molecular weight (>3000 kDa) HA products. This study revealed replacing the commercial peptone by the low-cost alternative could reduce HA production costs by up to a 70% compared to synthetic media. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of natural whey proteins on mechanisms of blood pressure regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Car

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Whey is a rich natural source of peptides and amino acids. It has been reported in numerous studies that biological active peptides isolated from cow’s milk whey may affect blood pressure regulation. Studies on animals and humans have shown that α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin obtained from enzymatically hydrolysed whey inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, while lactorphins lower blood pressure by normalizing endothelial function or by opioid receptors dependent mechanism. Whey proteins or their bioactive fragments decrease total cholesterol, LDL fraction and triglycerides, thus reducing the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this review is to discuss the effects of whey proteins on the mechanisms of blood pressure regulation.

  19. Whey Protein Improves Marathon-Induced Injury and Exercise Performance in Elite Track Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Ching; Chang, Yung-Cheng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Huang, Chi-Chang; Kan, Nai-Wen; Chen, Sheng-Shih

    2017-01-01

    Whey protein has been widely applied to athletes and the fitness field for muscle growth and performance improvement. Limited studies focused on the beneficial effects of whey on aerobic exercise according to biochemical assessments. In the current study, 12 elite male track runners were randomly assigned to whey and maltodextrin groups for 5 weeks' supplementation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of whey protein on physiological adaptions and exercise performance. During this period, three time points (pre-, post-, and end-test) were used to evaluate related biochemical parameters, body composition, and performance. The post-test was set 1 day after a marathon for injury status evaluation and the end-test was also assessed after 1-week recovery from endurance test. The results showed that the whey group exhibited significantly lower aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase indicators after the marathon (post-test), as well as at the end-test (pamateur runners.

  20. Simultaneous hydrolysis and co-fermentation of whey lactose with wheat for ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yiqiong; Parashar, Archana; Mason, Beth; Bressler, David C

    2016-12-01

    Whey permeate was used as a co-substrate to replace part of the wheat for ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was achieved with β-galactosidase added at the onset of the fermentation to promote whey lactose hydrolysis. Aspergillus oryzae and Kluyveromyces lactis β-galactosidases were two enzymes selected and used in the co-fermentation of wheat and whey permeate for the comparison of their effectiveness on lactose hydrolysis. The possibility of co-fermentations in both STARGEN and jet cooking systems was investigated in 5L bioreactors. Ethanol yields from the co-fermentations of wheat and whey permeate were evaluated. It was found that A. oryzae β-galactosidase was more efficient for lactose hydrolysis during the co-fermentation and that whey permeate supplementation can contribute to ethanol yield in co-fermentations with wheat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Isoenergic modification of whey protein structure by denaturation and crosslinking using transglutaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Emil G. P.; Koutina, Glykeria; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2018-01-01

    digestion rate and enzymatic crosslinking reduced both the gastric and the intestinal rate of digestion. These characteristics of the various SPC samples provide a useful basis for design of isoenergic model foods applicable in animal and human studies on how food structure affects satiety....... contained fibrillar structures, while pH-denatured SPC remained globular as documented by using atomic force microscopy. Finally, the in vitro digestability of the different SPC samples was assessed under simulated gastric and intestinal conditions. Notably heat-treatment was found to lower the gastric...

  2. Functionalized hyperbranched polyethylene powder supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergbreiter, D E; Tao, G; Kippenberger, A M

    2000-09-07

    [reaction: see text] Polyethylene powders with useful loadings of functional groups are accessible by hyperbranched grafting chemistry. Using a 200 microm diameter high-density powder, loadings of up to 0.4 mmol/g of CO(2)H groups are attained. The carboxylic acid groups in the resulting powders can be further functionalized covalently or ionically and resulting powders have the physical durability and solvent resistance associated with polyethylene itself.

  3. Powder diffraction at ALBA synchrotron

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda, Miguel A. G.

    2017-01-01

    This talk is devoted to explain the uses of powder diffraction at MSPD (material science and powder diffraction) of ALBA synchrotron light source. General characteristics of the beamline are: Station 1 - High Pressure Diffraction on powders with diamond anvil cell (DAC) and CCD detector. Microdiffraction; and Station 2 - High Resolution Powder Diffraction with Multicrystal- and Silicon-Strip detector. Energy Range: 8-50keV; Typical beam size: 4x1mm; all typical sample geometries possible: cap...

  4. Effect of β-lactoglobulin A and B whey protein variants on cheese yield potential of a model milk system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza-Nieto, M A; González-Córdova, A F; Piloni-Martini, J; Vallejo-Cordoba, B

    2013-01-01

    Cheese yield mainly depends on the amount and proportion of milk constituents; however, genetic variants of the proteins present in milk may also have an important effect. The objective of this research was to study the effect of the variants A and B of β-lactoglobulin (LG) on cheese yield using a model system consisting of skim milk powder fortified with different levels of a mixture containing α-lactalbumin and β-LG genetic variants (A, B, or A-B) in a 1:2 ratio. Fortified milk samples were subjected to pasteurization at 65 °C for 30 min. Miniature cheeses were made by acidifying (pH=5.9) fortified milk and incubating with rennet for 1h at 32 °C. The clot formed was cut, centrifuged at 2,600 × g for 30 min at 20 °C and drained for determining cheese yield. Cheese-yielding capacity was expressed as actual yield (grams of cheese curd per 100g of milk) and dry weight yield (grams of dried cheese curd per 100g of milk). Free-zone capillary electrophoresis was used for determining β-LG A or B recovery in the curd during rennet-induced coagulation. The presence of β-LG variant B resulted in a significantly higher actual and dried weight cheese yield than when A or A-B were present at levels ≤ 0.675% of whey protein (WP) addition. Results of free-zone capillary electrophoresis allowed us to infer that β-LG B associates with the casein micelles during renneting, as shown by an increase in the recovery of this variant in the curd when β-LG B was added up to a maximum at 0.45% (equivalent to 0.675% WP). In general, actual or dried weight cheese yield increased as WP addition was increased from 0.225 to 0.675%. However, when WP addition ranged from 0.675 to 0.90%, a drastic drop in cheese yield was observed. This behavior may be because an increase in the aggregation of casein micelles with a concomitant inclusion of whey protein in the gel occurs at low levels of WP addition, whereas once the association of WP with the casein micelles reach a saturation point

  5. Advanced powder processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janney, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Gelcasting is an advanced powder forming process. It is most commonly used to form ceramic or metal powders into complex, near-net shapes. Turbine rotors, gears, nozzles, and crucibles have been successfully gelcast in silicon nitride, alumina, nickel-based superalloy, and several steels. Gelcasting can also be used to make blanks that can be green machined to near-net shape and then high fired. Green machining has been successfully applied to both ceramic and metal gelcast blanks. Recently, the authors have used gelcasting to make tooling for metal casting applications. Most of the work has centered on H13 tool steel. They have demonstrated an ability to gelcast and sinter H13 to near net shape for metal casting tooling. Also, blanks of H13 have been cast, green machined into complex shape, and fired. Issues associated with forming, binder burnout, and sintering are addressed.

  6. Dispersing powders in liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, RD

    1988-01-01

    This book provides powder technologists with laboratory procedures for selecting dispersing agents and preparing stable dispersions that can then be used in particle size characterization instruments. Its broader goal is to introduce industrial chemists and engineers to the phenomena, terminology, physical principles, and chemical considerations involved in preparing and handling dispersions on a commercial scale. The book introduces novices to: - industrial problems due to improper degree of dispersion; - the nomenclature used in describing particles; - the basic physica

  7. Sintering of HDH Ti Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kováčik Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Titanium powders prepared by hydro-dehydration process (HDH powder were pressure less sintered in vacuum oven at different temperatures, time and green density. The sintering properties of powders of two particle sizes - 30 and 150 microns were investigated. The usual powder metallurgical (PM results were observed, i.e., decreasing final porosity with increasing sintering temperature and time at constant heating rate. Higher green density leading to higher final density for both powder sizes was also observed. The obtained results will be used as comparative material for future sintering experiments of Ti based composites.

  8. Whey protein reduces early life weight gain in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt Tranberg

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies indicate that dairy products, including whey protein, alleviate several disorders of the metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigated the effects of whey protein isolate (whey in mice fed a high-fat diet hypothesising that the metabolic effects of whey would be associated with changes in the gut microbiota composition. Five-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet ad libitum for 14 weeks with the protein source being either whey or casein. Faeces were collected at week 0, 7, and 13 and the fecal microbiota was analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses of PCR-derived 16S rRNA gene (V3-region amplicons. At the end of the study, plasma samples were collected and assayed for glucose, insulin and lipids. Whey significantly reduced body weight gain during the first four weeks of the study compared with casein (P<0.001-0.05. Hereafter weight gain was similar resulting in a 15% lower final body weight in the whey group relative to casein (34.0±1.0 g vs. 40.2±1.3 g, P<0.001. Food intake was unaffected by protein source throughout the study period. Fasting insulin was lower in the whey group (P<0.01 and glucose clearance was improved after an oral glucose challenge (P<0.05. Plasma cholesterol was lowered by whey compared to casein (P<0.001. The composition of the fecal microbiota differed between high- and low-fat groups at 13 weeks (P<0.05 whereas no difference was seen between whey and casein. In conclusion, whey initially reduced weight gain in young C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet compared to casein. Although the effect on weight gain ceased, whey alleviated glucose intolerance, improved insulin sensitivity and reduced plasma cholesterol. These findings could not be explained by changes in food intake or gut microbiota composition. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms behind the metabolic effects of whey.

  9. Whey protein film with oxygen scavenging function by incorporation of ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjarasskul, Theeranun; Tananuwong, Kanitha; Krochta, John M

    2011-01-01

    Residual O(2) in a package headspace can be removed by an O(2)-absorbing sachet, which can be harmful if swallowed by the consumer, or by a chemically-active plastic packaging film, which is difficult to recycle. An edible, O(2)-absorbing film would avoid these disadvantages. The objective of our research was to assess the O(2)-scavenging potential of an edible whey protein isolate (WPI) film incorporating ascorbic acid (AA). AA at 0.05, 0.1, or 0.2 M was added to 5% (w/w) heat-denatured WPI film-forming solutions with WPI : glycerol (Gly) ratio of 1: 1.00, 1: 0.80, or 1: 0.67. The pH of solutions was then adjusted to 3.5 (below pK(a1) of AA), to stabilize AA against oxidation, before film casting. The mechanical properties, O(2) permeabilities, and thermal transitions of films were measured. Activation of the O(2)-scavenging function of the AA-incorporated films was accomplished by adjustment of the films to pH ≥ 7. O(2)-scavenging ability of AA-incorporated WPI films was determined by measuring residual O(2) in the headspace of a high-barrier container. Incorporation of AA into WPI film decreased film tensile strength and further reduced O(2) permeability at each WPI : Gly ratio. AA-containing films adjusted to pH ≥ 7 demonstrated O(2) absorption proportional to AA content, consistent with theoretical O(2)-scavenging capacity. Thermal transition measurements indicated that AA was involved in WPI structural modification and decreased the degradation temperature of WPI-based film. The demonstrated O(2)-scavenging function, improved O(2) barrier and acceptable mechanical properties of AA-incorporated films indicate potential commercial usefulness. Ascorbic acid-incorporated whey protein film with oxygen scavenging function can be used to extend shelf lives of a wide variety of oxygen-sensitive products by eliminating headspace oxygen as well as oxygen permeating through the packaging wall over time. Edible oxygen-scavenger film has the advantages of avoiding

  10. Features of the compost received by use of dairy whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Smolnikova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article features cjmposting of organic materials are considered at use of a traditional way and fermenting additives. Indicators of quality of the composts received with the use of dairy whey and a bacterial preparation as the fermenting additive are investigated. Comparison of the received samples of composts on such indicators of quality as is spent: humidity, acidity, the maintenance of organic substance in recalculation on dry weight, quantity of the general and fmmonium nitrogen.

  11. Microparticulated whey proteins for improving dairy product texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipsen, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Use of microparticulated whey protein (MWP) was patented in 1988; since then much research has been conducted on use of MWP. This review provides an overview of the use and functionality of MWP in dairy applications and discusses how MWP interacts with other components in dairy matrices...... weakening. Future research should focus on how raw material composition and processing affect the properties of MWP, on the role of particle characteristics on interactions with other dairy product components, and on how to develop particulated ingredients suitable for high protein products and further...

  12. Production of yeast extract from whey using Kluyveromyces marxianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revillion Jean P. de Palma

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 6556 was grown on whey to produce nucleotide-rich yeast extracts. Thermal treatments of cells at 35 or 50ºC for 15-30h resulted in yeast extracts containing about 20 g/L protein, with only the second treatment resulting in the presence of small amounts of RNA. In contrast, autolysis in buffered solution was the unique treatment that resulted in release of high amounts of intracellular RNA, being, therefore, the better procedure to produce 5'-nucletide rich extract with K. marxianus.

  13. Behavior of Heat-Denatured Whey:Buttermilk Protein Aggregates during the Yogurt-Making Process and Their Influence on Set-Type Yogurt Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffon, Maxime; Richard, Véronique; Jiménez-Flores, Rafael; Gauthier, Sylvie F.; Britten, Michel; Pouliot, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of using heat-denatured whey:buttermilk protein aggregate in acid-set type yogurt production. Whey and buttermilk (25:75) protein concentrate was adjusted to pH 4.6, heated at 90 °C for 5 min, homogenized and freeze-dried. Set-type yogurts were prepared from skim milk standardized to 15% (w/v) total solids and 4.2% (w/v) protein using different levels of powdered skim milk or freeze-dried protein aggregate. The use of the protein aggregate significantly modified yogurt texture, but did not affect the water-holding capacity of the gel. Confocal laser-scanning microscope images showed the presence of large particles in milk enriched with protein aggregate, which directly affected the homogeneity of the clusters within the protein matrix. Thiol groups were freed during heating of the protein aggregate suspended in water, suggesting that the aggregates could interact with milk proteins during heating. PMID:28239128

  14. Behavior of Heat-Denatured Whey: Buttermilk Protein Aggregates during the Yogurt-Making Process and Their Influence on Set-Type Yogurt Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Saffon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the impact of using heat-denatured whey:buttermilk protein aggregate in acid-set type yogurt production. Whey and buttermilk (25:75 protein concentrate was adjusted to pH 4.6, heated at 90 °C for 5 min, homogenized and freeze-dried. Set-type yogurts were prepared from skim milk standardized to 15% (w/v total solids and 4.2% (w/v protein using different levels of powdered skim milk or freeze-dried protein aggregate. The use of the protein aggregate significantly modified yogurt texture, but did not affect the water-holding capacity of the gel. Confocal laser-scanning microscope images showed the presence of large particles in milk enriched with protein aggregate, which directly affected the homogeneity of the clusters within the protein matrix. Thiol groups were freed during heating of the protein aggregate suspended in water, suggesting that the aggregates could interact with milk proteins during heating.

  15. Determination of bovine immunoglobulin G in bovine colostrum powders, bovine milk powders, and dietary supplements containing bovine colostrum products by an automated direct immunoassay with optical biosensor: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapper, Leyton

    2013-01-01

    Nine laboratories participated in an AOAC collaborative study to determine bovine immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in selected dairy powders and dietary supplements by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methodology. Each sample matrix was dissolved in buffer and suitably diluted to fit within the standard curve. The sample extract was injected over a surface functionalized with affinity-purified, polyclonal goat anti-bovine IgG (H+L) antibody; IgG was then detected. SPR detection was used for the direct immunoassay and quantification was made against a calibration curve prepared from bovine serum IgG. Between each standard and sample, the surface was regenerated using 10 mM glycine at pH 1.5. The samples analyzed included the likely matrixes for which the assay would find commercial use, namely, high- and low-protein-content colostrum powders, tablets containing colostrum powder, infant formula containing colostrum powder, and some IgG-containing dairy powders, i.e., milk protein isolate, whey protein concentrate, and skim milk powder. Each laboratory provided data for the study and assayed blind duplicates of seven materials. Due to gross outliers in the majority of results from one laboratory, the data from eight laboratories were used for the statistical analysis. The repeatability RSD (RSDr) values ranged from 3.2 to 7.3%, and the reproducibility RSDR values from 13.0 to 22.6%.

  16. Kefir grains as a starter for whey fermentation at different temperatures: chemical and microbiological characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londero, Alejandra; Hamet, María F; De Antoni, Graciela L; Garrote, Graciela L; Abraham, Analía G

    2012-08-01

    We report here a comparative analysis of the growth, acidification capacity, and chemical and microbiologic composition between kefir grains after 20 subcultures in whey at 20, 30, and 37°C and the original kefir grains coming from milk along with a determination of the microbiological composition of the fermented whey as compared with that of traditional fermented milk. When fermentation was carried out repeatedly at 30 or 37°C, kefir grains changed their kefir-like appearance, exhibited reduced growth rates, had a lower diversity of yeasts and water content, and a higher protein-to-polysaccharide ratio compared with the original kefir grains. In contrast, at 20°C kefir grains could remain in whey for prolonged periods without altering their acidification capacity, growth rate, macroscopic appearance or chemical and microbiologic composition-with the only difference being a reduction in certain yeast populations after 20 subcultures in whey. At this incubation temperature, the presence of Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lb. kefir, Lb. parakefir, Lactococcus lactis, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Saccharomyces unisporus, and Sac. cerevisiae was detected in kefir grains and in fermented whey by denaturing-gradient-gel electrophoresis (DGGE). In whey fermented at 20°C the number of lactic-acid bacteria (LAB) was significantly lower (Pkefir grains as whey-fermentation starters.

  17. Usage of the milk whey originated from Serro cheese to manufacture Dulce de Leche: economic viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Regina Lima

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The State of Minas Gerais is known for being the most traditional cheese producer in Brazil and part of those products are artisanal. About 90% of the milk used to produce cheese results in whey. Whey processing is of great importance due to its nutritional quality, volume and pollutant capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the economic viability of dulce de leche production with the addition of whey  from Serro cheese production. Formulations of dulce de leche were elaborated added with whey concentrations of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50%. The total investment for the production of the dulce de leche was R$359,26 (US$110.72. The fixed cost was R$18,00 (US$5.55. The variable costs stayed between R$81,07 (US$24.98 and R$96,91 (US$29.87. The sales price varied between R$5,36 (US$1.65 and R$5,47 (US$1.69. The performance indicators showed that the formulation with the highest percentage of whey added was more profitable. The profitability was approximately 27% for the formulation with the lowest percentage of whey added. The return time for the investment was 4 months for all the formulations. The equilibrium point for dulce de leche production is at the sales of 8 units. It can be concluded that it is economically viable to utilize whey for the production of the dulce de leche.

  18. Whey as a raw material for the production of functional beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulatović Maja Lj.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the least utilized by-products of food industry, despite the great potential that is described, is the whey, which is obtained as a by-product of the technological process production of cheese and casein. The excess whey, which occurs in this process in very high yields, with failure to processing is becoming a very big polluter, what is completely at odds with the potential that such materials possess. On the other hand, the modern tempo and way of life, and increasingly polluted environmental also, impose the need to produce food products that would help the human body in the fight against harmful agents which are exposed to daily. One of the more effective solution is the production of fermented functional beverages based on whey, which achieved this intention in the most natural and most comfortable way. Considering the rather untapped potential of whey as a raw material and growing food shortages in the world market, the aim of this study was to analyze the possibilities of production of functional beverages based on whey, with satisfactory sensory characteristics, in order to demonstrate the attractiveness of whey as raw material in the food industry. This paper presents an overview of the wide possibilities for the use of whey with a special emphasis on its attractiveness and the necessity of its utilizing.

  19. Characteristic of Fermented Whey Beverage with Addition of Tomato Juice (Lycopersicum esculentum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursiwi, A.; Nurhartadi, E.; Utami, R.; Sari, A. M.; Laksono, P. W.; Aprilia, E. N.

    2017-04-01

    Whey is the liquid resulting from the coagulation of milk from cheese manufacture. The availability of lactose in whey and presence of other essential nutrients for the growth of microorganisms makes it one of the potential substrate for the production of different bio-products through fermentation process. Lactic acid production through fermentation from lactic acid bacteria could be an alternative processing route for whey lactose utilization. However, a problem with such approaches is the low total solids content. Sucrose and tomato juice added to increases the total solids content. The aim of this work was to study the characteristic of fermented whey beverage with different tomato juice concentration (5, 10, 15%) using probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Lactic acid content, pH, antioxidant activity, and sensory properties of fermented whey beverage samples were examined after 18hours fermentation. Fermented whey beverage with 5% tomato juice obtained the highest scores for color, aroma, flavor, texture and overall attributes. The lactic acid content and pH of fermented whey beverage ranged from 0.326 to 0.437% and from 4.13 to 4.64, respectively. The highest antioxidant activity (9.073%) was found in sample with 15% tomato juice concentration. The best formulation is the sample with 5% of tomato juice concentration.

  20. Whey protein: The “whey” forward for treatment of type 2 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignone, Linda E; Wu, Tongzhi; Horowitz, Michael; Rayner, Christopher K

    2015-01-01

    A cost-effective nutritional approach to improve postprandial glycaemia is attractive considering the rising burden of diabetes throughout the world. Whey protein, a by-product of the cheese-making process, can be used to manipulate gut function in order to slow gastric emptying and stimulate incretin hormone secretion, thereby attenuating postprandial glycaemic excursions. The function of the gastrointestinal tract plays a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis, particularly during the postprandial period, and this review will discuss the mechanisms by which whey protein slows gastric emptying and stimulates release of gut peptides, including the incretins. Whey protein is also a rich source of amino acids, and these can directly stimulate beta cells to secrete insulin, which contributes to the reduction in postprandial glycaemia. Appetite is suppressed with consumption of whey, due to its effects on the gut-brain axis and the hypothalamus. These properties of whey protein suggest its potential in the management of type 2 diabetes. However, the optimal dose and timing of whey protein ingestion are yet to be defined, and studies are required to examine the long-term benefits of whey consumption for overall glycaemic control. PMID:26516411

  1. Effect of Incubation Time and Sucrose Addition on the Characteristics of Cheese Whey Yoghurt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhartadi, E.; Utami, R.; Nursiwi, A.; Sari, A. M.; Widowati, E.; Sanjaya, A. P.; Esnadewi, E. A.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of incubation time and concentration of sucrose addition on the characteristics of cheese whey yogurt (lactic acid content, pH, total lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity, viscosity) and sensory characteristics (color, odor, flavor, consistency, and overalls) were investigated. The cheese whey yogurt fermentation process was carried out for 24h and 36h with the addition of sucrose 8, 10, and 12% (w/w) of total solid, respectively. The results showed that the lactic acid content, total lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity, and viscosity of cheese whey yogurt were affected by the incubation time and sucrose addition. The level of pH of yogurt which was incubated at 24h and 36h were relatively in the same levels, which were 4.51 up to 4.63. Due the sensory characteristic of cheese whey yogurt the panellists gave the high score for the cheese whey yogurt which was incubated at 24h and sucrose addition 12% (w/w) of total solid. The cheese whey yogurt has 0.41% lactic acid content; pH 4.51; 7.09 log total lactic acid bacteria cells / ml; 5.78% antioxidant activity; and 5.97 cP viscosity. The best sensory and physico-chemical characteristic of cheese whey yogurt was achieved by 24h incubation time and 12% concentration of sucrose addition.

  2. Isolation and recovery of glycomacropeptide from milk whey by means of thermal treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelin Rojas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During enzymatic process of cheese manufacturing, rennin cleaves κ-casein releasing two fractions: para-κ-casein and glycomacropeptide (GMP, which remains soluble in milk whey. GMP is a peptide with structural particularities such as chain carbohydrates linked to specific threonine residues, to which a great variety of biological activities is attributed. Worldwide cheese production has increased generating high volumes of milk whey that could be efficiently used as an alternative source of high quality peptide or protein in foodstuff formulations. In order to evaluate isolation and recovery on whey GMP by means of thermal treatment (90 °C, 18 samples (2 L each of sweet whey, resuspended commercial whey (positive control and acid whey (negative control were processed. Indirect presence of GMP was verified using chemical tests and PAGE-SDS 15%. At 90 °C treated sweet whey, 14, 20 and 41 kDa bands were observed. These bands may correspond to olygomers of GMP. Peptide recovery showed an average of 1.5 g/L (34.08%. The results indicate that industrial scale GMP production is feasible; however, further research must be carried out for the biological and nutritional evaluation of GMP's incorporation to foodstuff as a supplement.

  3. Anaerobic biotransformation and methane generation potential of cheese whey in batch and UASB reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergüder, T H; Tezel, U; Güven, E; Demirer, G N

    2001-01-01

    Anaerobic treatability and methane generation potential of cheese whey were determined in batch reactors. Furthermore, the effect of nutrient and trace metal supplementation on the batch anaerobic treatment, and the high-rate anaerobic treatability of cheese whey in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors were investigated. To this purpose biochemical methane potential experiments were conducted and single- and two-stage UASB reactors with granular cultures were operated. In UASB experiments significance of process staging, operational parameters such as hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration and loading rate were also investigated. The results revealed that nutrient and trace metal supplementation is vital for the anaerobic treatment of cheese whey; the anaerobic methane generation for the cheese whey studied was found to be 424 ml CH4/g COD (23.4 1 CH4/l cheese whey); undiluted cheese whey could be treated anaerobically at relatively short HRT values (2.06-4.95 days) without any significant stability problems; HRT values as low as 2-3 days can be used for the anaerobic treatment of cheese whey, with a COD removal efficiency of 95-97% at influent COD concentration of 42 700 +/- 141-55 100 +/- 283 mg/l.

  4. The efects of whey protein and resistant starch on body weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemah Malekian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity is widely recognized as one of the most critical health threats to families and children across the country. Obesity is a very serious health problem for people in Louisiana and especially in African Americans Children with 40.5% in the State classified as either overweight or obese as compared to 41.2% nationally. African American women have the highest rates of being overweight or obese (79.8% compared to non-Hispanic whites (57.9%. In 2007, African Americans were 1.4 times as likely to be obese as whites. Therefore this study was designed to test the impact of dietary whey protein (WP and resistant starch (RS shakes/smoothies on reduction of body fat via increased satiety and increased energy expenditure in African Americans. Methods: Twenty eight African American males and females, age 21-43 years old were randomly divided into two groups. For a period of 24-weeks, the treatment group consumed WP and RS shakes/smoothies for breakfast and received nutrition education. For the same period, the control group consumed the same shake/smoothies but with starch powder and received nutrition education. The data was analyzed using SAS version 9.3. Results: At the end of the 24 week study, the treatment group lost a mean body weight of approximately 7 kg (P ≤ 0.008 that was significantly different from the control group (P ≤ 0.209. In addition, the treatment group exhibited a significant decrease of ~6 cm in waist circumference (P ≤ 0.023. There was no significant effect on mean blood pressure in treatment and control group. Conclusion: The findings from this study suggest that a combination of WP and RS in the form of shake/smoothie consumed for breakfast along with a nutrition education component may be an effective method in decreasing body weight, improving waist circumferences and cumulative food intake in African American males and females.

  5. Rheology and microstructure of binary mixed gel of rice bran protein-whey: effect of heating rate and whey addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafe, Ali; Vahedi, Elnaz; Hasan-Sarei, Azadeh Ghorbani

    2016-08-01

    Rice bran protein (RBP) is a valuable plant protein which has unique nutritional and hypoallergenic properties. Whey proteins have wide applications in the food industry, such as in dairy, meat and bakery products. Whey protein concentrate (WPC), RBP and their mixtures at different ratios (1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10 w/w) were heated from 20 to 90 °C at different heating rates (0.5, 1, 5 and 10 °C min(-1) ). The storage modulus (G') and gelling point (Tgel ) of WPC were higher than those of RBP, indicating the good ability of WPC to develop stiffer networks. By increasing the proportion of WPC in mixed systems, G' was increased and Tgel was reduced. Nevertheless, the elasticity of all binary mixtures was lower than that of WPC alone. Tgel and the final G' of RBP-WPC blends were increased by raising the heating rate. The RBP-WPC mixtures developed more elastic gels than RBP alone at different heating rates. RBP had a fibrillar and lentil-like structure whose fibril assembly had smaller structures than those of WPC. The gelling structure of the mixed gel of WPC-RBP was improved by adding WPC. Indeed, by adding WPC, gels tended to show syneresis and had lower water-holding capacity. Furthermore, the gel structure was produced by adding WPC to the non-gelling RBP, which is compatible with whey and can be applied as a functional food for infants and/or adults. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Application of infrared portable sensor technology for predicting perceived astringency of acidic whey protein beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Tan, Siow-Ying; Mutilangi, William; Plans, Marcal; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Formulating whey protein beverages at acidic pH provides better clarity but the beverages typically develop an unpleasant and astringent flavor. Our aim was to evaluate the application of infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics in predicting astringency of acidic whey protein beverages. Whey protein isolate (WPI), whey protein concentrate (WPC), and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) from different manufacturers were used to formulate beverages at pH ranging from 2.2 to 3.9. Trained panelists using the spectrum method of descriptive analysis tested the beverages providing astringency scores. A portable Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy attenuated total reflectance spectrometer was used for spectra collection that was analyzed by multivariate regression analysis (partial least squares regression) to build calibration models with the sensory astringency scores. Beverage astringency scores fluctuated from 1.9 to 5.2 units and were explained by pH, protein type (WPC, WPI, or WPH), source (manufacturer), and their interactions, revealing the complexity of astringency development in acidic whey protein beverages. The WPC and WPH beverages showed an increase in astringency as the pH of the solution was lowered, but no relationship was found for WPI beverages. The partial least squares regression analysis showed strong relationship between the reference astringency scores and the infrared predicted values (correlation coefficient >0.94), giving standard error of cross-validation ranging from 0.08 to 0.12 units, depending on whey protein type. Major absorption bands explaining astringency scores were associated with carboxylic groups and amide regions of proteins. The portable infrared technique allowed rapid prediction of astringency of acidic whey protein beverages, providing the industry a novel tool for monitoring sensory characteristics of whey-containing beverages. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Young's Modulus, Fracture Stress, and Fracture Strain of Gellan Hydrogels Filled with Whey Protein Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Cherry Wing Yu; Ikeda, Shinya

    2017-05-01

    Texture modifying abilities of whey protein microparticles are expected to be dependent on pH during heat-induced aggregation of whey protein in the microparticulation process. Therefore, whey protein microparticles were prepared at either pH 5.5 or 6.8 and their effects on small and large deformation properties of gellan gels containing whey protein microparticles as fillers were investigated. The majority of whey protein microparticles had diameters around 2 μm. Atomic force microscopy images showed that whey protein microparticles prepared at pH 6.8 partially collapsed and flatted by air-drying, while those prepared at pH 5.5 did not. The Young's modulus of filled gels adjusted to pH 5.5 decreased by the addition of whey protein microparticles, while those of filled gels adjusted to pH 6.8 increased with increasing volume fraction of filler particles. These results suggest that filler particles were weakly bonded to gel matrices at pH 5.5 but strongly at pH 6.8. Whey protein microparticles prepared at pH 5.5 showed more enhanced increases in the Young's modulus than those prepared at pH 6.8 at volume fractions between 0.2 and 0.4, indicating that microparticles prepared at pH 5.5 were mechanically stronger. The fracture stress of filled gels showed trends somewhat similar to those of the Young's modulus, while their fracture strains decreased by the addition of whey protein microparticles in all examined conditions, indicating that the primary effect of these filler particles was to enhance the brittleness of filled gels. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  8. Powder Production and Particle Engineering for Dry Powder Inhaler Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Wei; Wong, Jennifer; Qu, Li; Chan, Hak-Kim; Zhou, Qi Tony

    2015-01-01

    Dry powder inhalers have become increasingly attractive for pulmonary delivery of locally and systemically effective medications. In comparison to the liquid counterparts, such as nebulisation and pressurised metered dose inhalers, the powder form generally offers better chemical stability, improved portability and potentially superior patient adherence. Currently, the aerosol performance between dry powder inhalers varies to a large extent due to differences in the design of inhaler device and formulation. The particulate properties have a significant influence on the inter-particle interactions, which impacts on the aerosolisation of the inhaled powder. In this review, critical particulate properties that affect aerosol performance are discussed. Recent advances in powder production and particle engineering techniques are also assessed, aiming to develop new inhaled powder formulations or improve the aerosolisation efficiency of existing products.

  9. Fermentation and distillation of cheese whey: Carbon dioxide-equivalent emissions and water use in the production of whey spirits and white whiskey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Derrick; Shayevitz, Avi; Haapala, Karl; Meunier-Goddik, Lisbeth; Hughes, Paul

    2018-02-02

    Whey disposal can be both an environmental and economic challenge for artisanal creameries. Lactose in whey can be fermented to produce ethanol and subsequently distilled. The objective of this study was to use a process-based life cycle analysis to compare carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO 2 e) emissions and water usage associated with the artisanal or craft production of clear, unaged spirits using whey or malted barley as fermentation substrate. Differences in production were assessed based on key process differences: energy used, water used, distillation by-product disposal, and mass of CO 2 produced during fermentation. For this study, whey was assumed removed from the artisanal creamery waste stream. Quantifiable differences were evaluated per 750-mL (45% alcohol by volume) functional unit and expressed as mass-equivalent CO 2 emissions (kg of CO 2 e) and mass of water (kg) used. The CO 2 e emissions and water usage were quantified using published data, thermodynamic calculations, and mass-balance calculations for a hypothetical distillation system. The process-based life cycle analysis estimated that distillation of fermented whey reduced overall CO 2 e emissions by 8.4 kg per functional unit and required 0.44 kg less water added into the production process compared with production of a similar clear, unaged spirit using malted barley as substrate. Our preliminary analysis suggests that conversion to distilled whey spirit is a more environmentally responsible approach compared with landfill disposal of whey. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of carbon sources and micronutrients in whey and fermented whey on the kinetics of phenanthrene biodegradation in diesel contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Anders P., E-mail: anders.jonsson@miun.se [Department of Engineering, and Sustainable Development, Mid Sweden University, SE-83125 Ostersund (Sweden); Ostberg, Tomas L. [Jegrelius Institute for Applied Green Chemistry, Studiegangen 3, SE-831 40 Ostersund (Sweden)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {center_dot} Whey and fermented whey significantly enhances phenanthrene biodegradation. {center_dot} Mode of administration and amount of amendment is decisive. {center_dot} Observed effects were increased linear growth, bioavailability and degradation. {center_dot} The effects were attributed to lactate and vitamins. {center_dot} Growth factors play a significant role in phenanthrene biodegradation. - Abstract: This paper demonstrates significant effects on phenanthrene degradation in diesel contaminated soil by the addition of organic amendments such as whey and fermented whey. Both amount of amendment added and mode of administration was shown to be decisive. There was a strong positive effect on the {sup 14}C-mineralization of phenanthrene by multiple (bi-weekly) additions of fermented whey 210 mg dw kg{sup -1} soil dw (FW multi) and also by single dose addition of 2100 mg dw sweet whey kg{sup -1} soil dw (SW high). The most prominent effects on phenanthrene degradation kinetics were a five to fifteen fold increase in the linear growth term (k{sub 2}) and a 23-27% increase in bioavailability factor S{sub 0} for SW high and FW multi respectively. Also, total mineralization at the end of the experiment increased from 46% in the control to 66 and 71% respectively and the lag time was reduced from 21 to 15 days by multiple addition of fermented whey. The most significant stimulating effects on phenanthrene degradation kinetics could be attributed to lactate and vitamins. This study demonstrates a more complex dependence of carbon sources and growth factors for an aromatic compound such as phenanthrene in comparison to hexadecane.

  11. Usage of the milk whey originated from Serro cheese to manufacture Dulce de Leche: economic viability

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiana Regina Lima; Larissa de Oliveira Ferreira Rocha

    2017-01-01

    The State of Minas Gerais is known for being the most traditional cheese producer in Brazil and part of those products are artisanal. About 90% of the milk used to produce cheese results in whey. Whey processing is of great importance due to its nutritional quality, volume and pollutant capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the economic viability of dulce de leche production with the addition of whey  from Serro cheese production. Formulations of dulce de leche were elaborated added...

  12. Physicochemical and functional properties, microstructure, and storage stability of whey protein/polyvinylpyrrolidone based glue sticks

    OpenAIRE

    Guorong Wang; Jianjun Cheng; Liebing Zhang; Mingruo Guo

    2012-01-01

    A glue stick is comprised of solidified adhesive mounted in a lipstick-like push-up tube. Whey is a byproduct of cheese making. Direct disposal of whey can cause environmental pollution. The objective of this study was to use whey protein isolate (WPI) as a natural polymer along with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to develop safe glue sticks. Pre-dissolved WPI solution, PVP, sucrose, 1,2-propanediol (PG), sodium stearate, defoamer, and preservative were mixed and dissolved in water at 90 oC and t...

  13. The impact of iron on the bleaching efficacy of hydrogen peroxide in liquid whey systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, Suzanne M; Drake, MaryAnne

    2013-02-01

    Whey is a value-added product that is utilized in many food and beverage applications for its nutritional and functional properties. Whey and whey products are generally utilized in dried ingredient applications. One of the primary sources of whey is from colored Cheddar cheese manufacture that contains the pigment annatto resulting in a characteristic yellow colored Cheddar cheese. The colorant is also present in the liquid cheese whey and must be bleached so that it can be used in ingredient applications without imparting a color. Hydrogen peroxide and benzoyl peroxide are 2 commercially approved chemical bleaching agents for liquid whey. Concerns regarding bleaching efficacy, off-flavor development, and functionality changes have been previously reported for whey bleached with hydrogen peroxide and benzoyl peroxide. It is very important for the dairy industry to understand how bleaching can impact flavor and functionality of dried ingredients. Currently, the precise mechanisms of off-flavor development and functionality changes are not entirely understood. Iron reactions in a bleached liquid whey system may play a key role. Reactions between iron and hydrogen peroxide have been widely studied since the reaction between these 2 relatively stable species can cause great destruction in biological and chemical systems. The actual mechanism of the reaction of iron with hydrogen peroxide has been a controversy in the chemistry and biological community. The precise mechanism for a given reaction can vary greatly based upon the concentration of reactants, temperature, pH, and addition of biological material. In this review, some hypotheses for the mechanisms of iron reactions that may occur in fluid whey that may impact bleaching efficacy, off-flavor development, and changes in functionality are presented. Cheese whey is bleached to remove residual carotenoid cheese colorant. Concerns regarding bleaching efficacy, off-flavor development, and functionality changes have

  14. Whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Prestes Lessa Fernandes Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to prepare whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil at different concentrations, and evaluate their properties and antimicrobial activity. Films were more flexible with increasing the concentration of oregano oil and water vapor permeability was higher in the films with oregano oil. Increasing the concentration of essential oil decreased the water solubility. The solubility of control film and film with 1.5% oregano oil was 20.2 and 14.0%, respectively. The addition of 1% of oregano oil improved the resistance of the films. The tensile strength for the control film was 66.0 MPa, while for the film with 1% of oregano oil was 108.7 MPa. Films containing 1.5% oregano oil showed higher antimicrobial activity. The zone of inhibition ranged from 0 to 1.7 cm. The results showed that the whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil has potential application as active packaging.

  15. Amino acid composition of cottage cheese and whey with bifidobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Rodionova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breaking condition intestinal flora, the simplest way to create sensitive parts of the body microbiocenosis caused by various factors. Reasons for people microecology imbalances – antibiotics, preservatives, stress. The result is an imbalance – the number of gastrointestinal disorders, immune deficiency disorders metabolic processes in the body. Therapeutic effect of probiotic microorganisms is the result of exogenous and endometabolitov synthesis the character of the protein. Acid activity information probiotic microorganisms and the distribution of amino acids between the products and intermediates in biopotential evaluation process foods produced with probiotic microflora by fermentation. Test results from the amino acid composition of whey and quark are obtained by fermenting raw milk probiotics bifidobacterias. It was found that during the fermentation of the quark consortium, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum Y enriched curd 4 of leucine and glutamine. Rate of transfer amino acids in serum to 2–6% of essential amino acids is irrelevant 3–7%. The highest value observed transient threonine, isoleucyl, lysine, valine, alanine, glycine, proline, serine. The mean value of the prototype amino acid protein curd and whey protein biological value was 71.89 and 74.58. Preservation of active forms of probiotic microorganisms after heating the bunch to 53–55 °C, lg concentration of not less than 7 (in 1 g in cottage cheese and serum. The received data are actual for formation of an information data bank, necessary for the development of prescription-component solutions of eubiotic products.

  16. Antioxidative features of whey and its application in liver protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radić Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress represents a condition in which there is an imbalance between the production of free radicals and their removal. Many risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants, radiation, infective agents can induce oxidative stress in the liver leading to the functional disturbance of the liver cells. In order to reduce oxidative stress, modern medicine goes back to the natural substances, which are becoming increasingly popular both in prevention and in treatment of many diseases. Numerous hepatoprotective substances such as silymarin, spirulina, pumpkin oil and whey are used in traditional diets by many people. Some experimental studies on animals and the monitoring of the effects on humans showed that whey can be estimated as an important antioxidant in the treatment of liver diseases. New information obtained on the basis of controlled experimental and clinical studies of its effects in terms of protection or treatment of already existing changes in the liver tissue, certainly contribute to defining the concrete possibilities of potential use in therapeutic methods, either as a supplement or extrication of specific medicinal ingredients.

  17. The efficacy of whey associated with dodder seed extract on moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis in adults: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrbani, Mehrzad; Choopani, Rasool; Fekri, Alireza; Mehrabani, Mitra; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Mehrabani, Mehrnaz

    2015-08-22

    Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin condition that is on the rise and adversely affects quality of life of the affected individual. Dry skin and pruritus, major characteristics of this disease, are associated with the dysfunction of the skin barrier. Though mild cases of the disease can be controlled with antihistamines and topical corticosteroids, moderate-to-severe cases often require treatment with immunomodulatory drugs, which have many side effects. It is now more common to use complementary and alternative medicines in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. In traditional Iranian medicine, the use of whey with the aqueous extract of field dodder (Cuscuta campestris Yunck.) seeds in severe and refractory cases of atopic dermatitis is common and has no side effects. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of whey associated with dodder seed extract in the treatment of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis in adults. The study was a randomized, double-blind placebo control trial that was conducted on 52 patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis for 30 days. In this study patients received freeze dried whey powder with spray dried water extract of field dodder or the placebo for 15 days. At baseline (week zero), after the end of the 15 day treatment period (week three) and 15 days after stopping the drug or placebo (follow-up/week five), patients were evaluated in terms of skin moisture, elasticity, pigmentation, surface pH and sebum content on the forearm with Multi Skin Test Center® MC1000 (Courage & Khazaka, Germany) and the degree of pruritus and sleep disturbance in patients were also recorded. 42 patients completed 30 days of treatment with the medicine and the follow-up period. At the end of the follow-up period a significant increase in skin moisture and elasticity in the group receiving whey with dodder was observed compared with the placebo group (pextract over time (pextract can serve as a promising

  18. The foaming properties of camel and bovine whey: The impact of pH and heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajnaf, Roua; Picart-Palmade, Laetitia; Cases, Eliane; Attia, Hamadi; Marchesseau, Sylvie; Ayadi, M A

    2018-02-01

    The effect of heat treatment (70°C or 90°C for 30min) on the foaming and interfacial properties of acid and sweet whey obtained from bovine and camel fresh milk was examined. The maximum foamability and foam stability were observed for acid whey when compared to sweet whey for both milks, with higher values for the camel whey. This behavior for acid whey was explained by the proximity of the pI of whey protein (4.9-5.2), where proteins were found to carry the lowest negative charge as confirmed by the zeta potential measurements. Interfacial properties of acid camel whey and acid bovine whey were preserved at air water interface even after a heat treatment at 90°C. These results confirmed the pronounced foaming and interfacial properties of acid camel whey, even if acid and sweet bovine whey exhibited the highest viscoelastic modulus after heating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Short communication: Annatto in Cheddar cheese-derived whey protein concentrate is primarily associated with milk fat globule membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, D; Damodaran, S

    2012-02-01

    The yellow color of Cheddar cheese whey arises from a residual amount of annatto that partitions into the whey during Cheddar cheese manufacture. Bleaching of the color using hydrogen peroxide or benzoyl peroxide is often a prerequisite to produce an acceptable neutral-colored whey protein concentrate and isolate. However, the use of these strong oxidizing agents often generates off-flavors as a result of lipid oxidation and results in loss of nutritive value due to protein oxidation. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of partitioning of annatto between protein, milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), and aqueous (serum) phases of cheese whey so that a simple method can be developed to remove annatto from cheese whey. The MFGM was separated from Cheddar cheese whey using a recently developed novel method. Quantitative analysis of the distribution of annatto in the fat-free whey protein isolate (WPI), the MFGM fractions, and the serum phase revealed that annatto was not bound to the protein fraction but was mostly distributed between the serum phase and the MFGM fraction. The results showed that a colorless WPI or whey protein concentrate could be produced from Cheddar cheese whey by separation of MFGM from the whey, followed by diafiltration. This approach will negate the need for using bleaching agents. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recovery of Whey Proteins and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Lactose Derived from Casein Whey Using a Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bipasha; Bhattacharjee, Sangita; Bhattacharjee, Chiranjib

    2013-09-01

    In this study, ultrafiltration (UF) of pretreated casein whey was carried out in a cross-flow module fitted with 5 kDa molecular weight cut-off polyethersulfone membrane to recover whey proteins in the retentate and lactose in the permeate. Effects of processing conditions, like transmembrane pressure and pH on permeate flux and rejection were investigated and reported. The polarised layer resistance was found to increase with time during UF even in this high shear device. The lactose concentration in the permeate was measured using dinitro salicylic acid method. Enzymatic kinetic study for lactose hydrolysis was carried out at three different temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 °C using β-galactosidase enzyme. The glucose formed during lactose hydrolysis was analyzed using glucose oxidase-peroxidase method. Kinetics of enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose solution was found to follow Michaelis-Menten model and the model parameters were estimated by Lineweaver-Burk plot. The hydrolysis rate was found to be maximum (with Vmax = 5.5091 mmol/L/min) at 30 °C.

  1. Voltammetric detection of mercury(II) using lead powder-modified thiol-functionalized polysiloxane film electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Tyszczuk-Rotko, Katarzyna; Bęczkowska, Ilona; Barczak, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant-templated silica films functionalized with thiol groups and modified with lead powder have been deposited during one-step process onto glassy carbon electrodes. This strategy was based on co-condensation of tetraethoxysilane and 3- mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and modification of sol by the appropriate amount of lead powder. After template extraction, the novel lead powder modified thiol-functionalized polysiloxane film electr...

  2. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) assisted performance evaluation of the Twincer (TM) disposable high-dose dry powder inhaler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Anne H.; Hagedoorn, Paul; Woolhouse, Robert; Wynn, Ed

    Objectives To use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for evaluating and understanding the performance of the high-dose disposable Twincer (TM) dry powder inhaler, as well as to learn the effect of design modifications on dose entrainment, powder dispersion and retention behaviour. Methods Comparison

  3. Comparative study of particle structure evolution during water sorption: skim and whole milk powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrieta-Pazos, I; Gaiani, C; Galet, L; Cuq, B; Desobry, S; Scher, J

    2011-10-01

    Surface composition of dairy powders influences significantly a quantity of functional properties such as rehydration, caking, agglomeration. Nevertheless, the kinetic of water uptake by the powders was never directly related to the structure and the composition of the surface. In this work, the effect of relative humidity on the structural reorganization of two types of dairy powder was studied. The water-powder interaction for industrial whole milk powder, and skim milk powder was studied using dynamic vapor sorption. The water sorption isotherms were fitted with a Brunner-Emmet-Teller model and each stage of the sorption curve was analyzed with a Fickian diffusion. The water content in the monolayer predicted for each powder and the moisture diffusivity calculated were discussed and compared. Concurrently, powders microstructure and powders surface under variable relative humidity were assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray and atomic force microscopy. A correlation between the data obtained from the sorption isotherms and the modifications of structure allowed us to conclude that powder microstructure and chemical state of the components could play an important role in determining the water diffusivity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Studies on formulation of whey protein enriched concentrated tomato juice beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajoria, Avneet; Chauhan, Anil K; Kumar, Jitendra

    2015-02-01

    Whey protein components derived from cheese whey and heat and acid coagulated Indian products (paneer, chhana, chakka) possess valuable functional and nutritional properties. Tomato products rich in lycopene are reported to be anticarcinogenic and antioxidative. The main objective of this study was to formulate a whey protein enriched tomato juice concentrate for use as beverage by employing Response Surface Methodology (RSM) engaging the Central Composite Rotatable Design (CCRD). The ingredients range used for this formulation comprised of Whey Protein Concentrate (WPC) 4-8 g, Cane sugar 10-20 g and Guar gum (stabilizer) 0.75-1.25 g in 100 g of concentrated tomato juice. The most preferred reconstituted beverage was obtained from the formulation developed with WPC 4.98 g, sugar 15.71 g and Guar gum 0.93 g added to 100 g tomato juice concentrate.

  5. Using state diagrams for predicting colloidal stability of whey protein beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Ty B; Ward, Loren; Foegeding, E Allen

    2015-05-06

    A method for evaluating aspects of colloidal stability of whey protein beverages after thermal treatment was established. Three state diagrams for beverages (pH 3-7) were developed representing protein solubility, turbidity, and macroscopic state after two ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) treatments. Key transitions of stability in the state diagrams were explored using electrophoresis and chromatography to determine aggregation propensities of β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin, and glycomacropeptide. The state diagrams present an overlapping view of high colloidal stability at pH 3 accompanied by high solubility of individual whey proteins. At pH 5, beverages were characterized by poor solubility, high turbidity, and aggregation/gelation of whey proteins with the exception of glycomacropeptide. Stability increased at pH 6, due to increased solubility of α-lactalbumin. The results indicate that combinations of state diagrams can be used to identify key regions of stability for whey protein containing beverages.

  6. Development of a Synbiotic Beverage Enriched with Bifidobacteria Strains and Fortified with Whey Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruzzi, Federico; de Candia, Silvia; Quintieri, Laura; Caputo, Leonardo; De Leo, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a new synbiotic beverage evaluating the ability of some bifidobacteria strains to grow in this beverage which was fortified with whey proteins up to 20 g L-1, and enriched with 10 g L-1 of prebiotic inulin or resistant starch. The ability of Bifidobacterium strains to survive for 30 days at 4°C was evaluated in two synbiotic whey protein fortified beverages formulated with 2% of whey proteins and 1% of inulin or resistant starch. Microbial growth was significantly affected by the whey protein amount as well as by the kind of prebiotic fiber. Resistant starch promoted the growth of the Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum strain and its viability under cold storage, also conferring higher sensory scores. The development of this new functional beverage will allow to carry out in vivo trials in order to validate its pre- and probiotic effects. PMID:28469606

  7. Comparison of Three Methods to Determine the Whey Protein to Total Protein Ratio in Milk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miralles, B; Bartolome, B; Amigo, L; Ramos, M

    2000-01-01

    ....)] were applied to raw (n = 21), pasteurized (n = 5) and UHT (n = 18) milk samples. All methods effectively measured the whey protein to total protein ratio independently of the heat treatment applied to the milk...

  8. Whey protein potentiates the intestinotrophic action of glucagon-like peptide-2 in parenterally fed rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Murali, Sangita G; Holst, Jens J

    2009-01-01

    protein component, casein, soy, or whey protein, potentiates the intestinal growth response to GLP-2 in rats with PN-induced mucosal hypoplasia. Rats received PN and continuous intravenous infusion of GLP-2 (100 microg/kg/day) for 7 days. Six EN groups received PN+GLP-2 for days 1-3 and partial PN+GLP-2...... plus EN for days 4-7. EN was provided by ad libitum intake of a semielemental liquid diet with different protein sources: casein, hydrolyzed soy, whey protein concentrate (WPC), and hydrolyzed WPC+casein. Controls received PN+GLP-2 alone. EN induced significantly greater jejunal sucrase activity...... whey protein, and not casein or soy, potentiated the ability of GLP-2 to reverse PN-induced mucosal hypoplasia and further increase ileal villus height, crypt depth, and mucosa cellularity compared with PN+GLP-2 alone, P whey protein to induce greater mucosal surface area...

  9. Modulation of immune function by a modified bovine whey protein concentrate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cross, M L; Gill, H S

    1999-01-01

    .... In the present report, a modified whey protein concentrate (mWPC), derived as a by-product from the commercial manufacture of cheese, was tested for its ability to modulate murine immune function in vitro...

  10. Properties of sweetened Indian yogurt (mishti dohi) as affected by added tryptic whey protein hydrolysate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chatterjee, Alok; Kanawjia, S K; Khetra, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of Indian sweetened yogurt (colloquially termed as Mishti Dohi), as vehicle for ACE inhibition and antioxidant activity, by added tryptic whey protein hydrolysate (TWPH) (@ 1, 2, 3 % v/milk), was attempted. Yogurt with 3...

  11. Acne located on the trunk, whey protein supplementation: Is there any association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Pelin Cengiz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein is a source of protein that was isolated from milk. Whey proteins are composed of higher levels of essential amino acids. The role of diet in acne etiology has been investigated for several years. It was established that milk and milk products can trigger acneiform lesions, and recent evidence supports the role of whey protein supplements in acne. Herein, we report 6 healthy male adolescent patients developing acne located only to the trunk after the consumption of whey protein supplements for faster bodybuilding. This is the first observation which specified the location of acneiform lesions among bodybuilders. In our opinion, a trendy and common health problem is beginning among adolescents in the gyms.

  12. Effects of thermal denaturation on binding between bixin and whey protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhong, Qixin

    2012-08-01

    Heating is commonly used in the manufacture of dairy products, but impacts of thermal denaturation on binding between whey protein and molecules such as pigments are poorly understood. The objective of this work was to study the impacts of thermal denaturation on binding between bixin, a pigment relevant to colored cheeses, and whey proteins using several complementary techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy data showed that heat treatment caused tryptophan in β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin to be exposed to a more polar environment, but the opposite was observed for bovine serum albumin. The fluorescence quenching study indicated that the quenching of whey protein fluorescence by bixin was static quenching, and the affinity of binding with bixin was enhanced after thermal denaturation, caused by a higher extent of unordered structures, as revealed by results from circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectra. β-Lactoglobulin was responsible for overall impacts of thermal denaturation on binding between bixin and whey protein isolate.

  13. Safety of a new, ultrafiltrated whey hydrolysate formula in children with cow milk allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A; Hansen, L G

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a new ultrafiltrated whey hydrolysate infant formula, Profylac, could be administered safely to children with cow milk protein allergy/intolerance. Profylac has a stated molecular weight of

  14. Hydrolysis of whey lactose by immobilized β-Galactosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Panaro Mariotti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of whey lactose to glucose and galactose by immobilized galactosidase comes as an alternative to enlarge the possibilities of commercial use of this feedstock. To be applied at industrial scale, the process should be performed continuously .This work aimed to study the hydrolysis of whey lactose by an immobilized enzyme reactor. b-Galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae was immobilized on silica and activity and stability were evaluated. The best immobilization results were attained by using glutaraldehyde as support's activator and enzyme stabilizer. The optimized enzyme proportion for immobilization was 15-20 mg g-1 of support. Treatments of whey were performed (microfiltration, thermal treatment and ultrafiltration, seeking the elimination of sludge, and the effects on operating the fixed bed reactor were evaluated. Ultrafiltration was the best treatment towards a proper substrate solution for feeding the reactor.A hidrólise de lactose de soro de leite, resultando em glicose e galactose, apresenta-se como uma alternativa para ampliar as possibilidades de uso comercial deste insumo. Para ser aplicado em escala industrial, o processo deve ser operado de modo contínuo. Reporta-se o estudo de um sistema objetivando hidrólise de lactose de soro de leite através de um reator com enzima imobilizada. b-Galactosidase de Aspergillus oryzae foi imobilizada em sílica, sendo avaliadas a estabilidade e atividade. Os melhores resultados de imobilização foram obtidos usando glutaraldeído como ativante do suporte e estabilizador da enzima. A proporção otimizada entre enzima e suporte foi 15-20 mg.g-1. Foram estudadas formas de tratamento do soro (microfiltração, tratamento térmico e ultrafiltração, objetivando eliminação de material suspenso, e avaliando os efeitos na operação de reator de leito fixo. A ultrafiltração foi o melhor tratamento, na busca de uma solução de substrato apropriada para o reator contínuo.

  15. Functional fermented whey-based beverage using lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescuma, Micaela; Hébert, Elvira María; Mozzi, Fernanda; de Valdez, Graciela Font

    2010-06-30

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is employed as functional food ingredient because of its nutritional value and emulsifying properties. However, the major whey protein beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) is the main cause of milk allergy. The aim of this study was to formulate a fermented whey beverage using selected lactic acid bacteria and WPC35 (WPC containing 35% of proteins) to obtain a fermented product with low lactose and BLG contents and high essential amino acid concentration. Cell viability, lactose consumption, lactic acid production, proteolytic activity, amino acid release and BLG degradation by the selected strains Lactobacillus acidophilus CRL 636, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 656 and Streptococcus thermophilus CRL 804, as single or mixed (SLaB) cultures were evaluated in WPC35 (10%, w/v) incubated at 37 degrees C for 24h. Then, the fermented WPC35 was mixed with peach juice and calcium lactate (2%, w/v) and stored at 10 degrees C for 28 days. During fermentation, single cultures grew 1.7-3.1 log CFU/ml and produced 25.1-95.0 mmol/l of lactic acid as consequence of lactose consumption (14.0-41.8 mmol/l) after 12h fermentation. L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 656 was the most proteolytic strain (626 microg/ml Leu) and released the branched-chain essential amino acids Leu (16 microg/ml), Ile (27 microg/ml) and Val (43 microg/ml). All strains were able to degrade BLG in a range of 41-85% after 12h incubation. The starter culture SLaB grew 3.0 log CFU/ml, showed marked pH reduction, produced 122.0 mmol/l of lactic acid, displayed high proteolytic activity (484 microg/ml Leu) releasing Leu (13 microg/ml), Ile (18 microg/ml) and Val (35 microg/ml), and hydrolyzed 92% of BLG. The addition of calcium lactate to WPC35 maintained the drink pH stable during shelf life; no contamination was detected during this period. After 28 days, a decrease in cell viability of all strains was observed being more pronounced for L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus

  16. UV Radiation Induced Cross-Linking of Whey Protein Isolate-Based Films

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Markus; Prinz, Tobias Konrad; Müller, Kerstin; Haas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Casted whey protein films exposed to ultraviolet irradiation were analyzed for their cross-linking properties and mechanical and barrier performance. Expected mechanical and barrier improvements are discussed with regard to quantification of the cross-linking in the UV-treated whey protein films. Swelling tests were used to determine the degree of swelling, degree of cross-linking, and cross-linking density. When the UV radiation dosage was raised, a significant increase of the tensile streng...

  17. Emerging trends in nutraceutical applications of whey protein and its derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Seema

    2015-01-01

    The looming food insecurity demands the utilization of nutrient-rich residues from food industries as value-added products. Whey, a dairy industry waste has been characterized to be excellent nourishment with an array of bioactive components. Whey protein comprises 20 % of total milk protein and it is rich in branched and essential amino acids, functional peptides, antioxidants and immunoglobulins. It confers benefits against a wide range of metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular complicat...

  18. The Influence of 8-Weeks of Whey Protein and Leucine Supplementation on Physical and Cognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    extension resistance training than did a carbohydrate placebo (22%). Protein and branched chain amino acids ( BCAA ) supplementation may also improve... BCAAs scored better on both mood levels and 2 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited, Public Affairs Case File No. 09-189, 27 April 2009...supplemented subjects with whey and casein (WC), whey and BCAAs (WBC), or placebo (P) over 10 weeks of resistance training (RT). They observed a significant

  19. High-Level Production of Heterologous Protein by Engineered Yeasts Grown in Cottage Cheese Whey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maullu, Carlo; Lampis, Giorgio; Desogus, Alessandra; Ingianni, Angela; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Pompei, Raffaello

    1999-01-01

    Cottage cheese whey is a cheese industry by-product still rich in proteins and lactose. Its recycling is seldom cost-effective. In this work we show that the lactose-utilizing yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, engineered for production of recombinant human lysozyme, can be grown in cottage cheese whey, resulting in high-level production of the heterologous protein (125 μg/ml). PMID:10347071

  20. High-Level Production of Heterologous Protein by Engineered Yeasts Grown in Cottage Cheese Whey

    OpenAIRE

    Maullu, Carlo; Lampis, Giorgio; Desogus, Alessandra; Ingianni, Angela; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Pompei, Raffaello

    1999-01-01

    Cottage cheese whey is a cheese industry by-product still rich in proteins and lactose. Its recycling is seldom cost-effective. In this work we show that the lactose-utilizing yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, engineered for production of recombinant human lysozyme, can be grown in cottage cheese whey, resulting in high-level production of the heterologous protein (125 μg/ml).

  1. Manufacture of a beverage from cheese whey using a "tea fungus" fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloso-Morales, Genette; Hernández-Sánchez, Humberto

    2003-01-01

    Kombucha is a sour beverage reported to have potential health effects prepared from the fermentation of black tea and sugar with a "tea fungus", a symbiotic culture of acetic acid bacteria and yeasts. Although black tea is the preferred substrate for Kombucha fermentation, other beverages have also been tested as substrates with fair results. Cheese whey is a by-product with a good amount of fermentable lactose that has been used before in the production of beverages, so the objective of this study was to test three types of whey (fresh sweet, fresh acid and reconstituted sweet) in the elaboration of a fermented beverage using a kombucha culture as inoculum. The isolation and identification of bacteria and yeasts from the fermented tea and wheys was done along with the study of the rates of change in sugar consumption, acid production and pH decrease. Several species of acetic acid bacteria (Acetobacter aceti subsp. aceti, Gluconobacter oxydans subsp. industrius, subsp. oxydans and Gluconoacetobacter xylinus) were isolated from the different kombuchas along with the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Brettanomyces bruxelensis. The main metabolic products in the fermented wheys included ethanol, lactic and acetic acids. A good growth was obtained in both sweet wheys in which a pH of 3.3 and a total acid content (mainly lactic and acetic acids) of 0.07 mol/l was reached after 96 h. The sweet whey fermented beverages contained a relatively low lactose concentration (fermented wheys. The whey products were strongly sour and salty non sparkling beverages.

  2. Batch and Fed-Batch Fermentation System on Ethanol Production from Whey using Kluyveromyces marxianus

    OpenAIRE

    H Hadiyanto; Ariyanti, D; Aini, A.P; D.S. Pinundi

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays reserve of fossil fuel has gradually depleted. This condition forces many researchers to  find energy alternatives which is renewable and sustainable in the future. Ethanol derived from cheese industrial waste (whey) using fermentation process can be a new perspective in order to secure both energy and environment. The aim of this study was  to compare the operation modes (batch and fed-batch) of fermentation system on ethanol production from whey using Kluyveromyces marxianus. The r...

  3. Effects of different fractions of whey protein on postprandial lipid and hormone responses in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, L.S.; Holmer-Jensen, Jens; Hartvigsen, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objectives:Exacerbated postprandial lipid responses are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Dietary proteins influence postprandial lipemia differently, and whey protein has a preferential lipid-lowering effect. We compared the effects of different whey protein fractions...... in the incremental area under the curve over the 480-min period.Conclusions:A supplement of four different whey protein fractions to a fat-rich meal had similar effects on postprandial triglyceride responses in type 2 diabetic subjects. Whey isolate and whey hydrolysate caused a higher insulin response...... on postprandial lipid and hormone responses added to a high-fat meal in type 2 diabetic subjects.Subjects/Methods:A total of 12 type 2 diabetic subjects ingested four isocaloric test meals in randomized order. The test meals contained 100¿g of butter and 45¿g of carbohydrate in combination with 45¿g of whey...

  4. Indigenous tooth powders = Covert lead poisoning?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hegde, Sapna; Shubha, A; Rao, B

    2013-01-01

    .../almond shell, coconut shell and its sheath, wood, coal and other powders (sand, common salt-powder and crystalline, brick and tile powder, tobacco, areca nut). [4] In addition, a variety of indigenous tooth powders are marketed which are very popular with the local people. Many of these age-old formulations of tooth powders may contain ha...

  5. Succinic acid production from cheese whey using Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Xiu, Shuangning

    2008-03-01

    Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z was used to produce succinic acid from cheese whey in this study. At the presence of external CO(2) supply, the effects of initial cheese whey concentration, pH, and inoculum size on the succinic acid production were studied. The by-product formation during the fermentation process was also analyzed. The highest succinic acid yield of 0.57 was obtained at initial cheese whey concentration of 50 g/L, while the highest succinic acid productivity of 0.58 g h(-1) L(-1) was obtained at initial cheese whey concentration of 100 g/L. Increase in pH and inoculum size caused higher succinic acid yield and productivity. At the preferred fermentation condition of pH 6.8, inoculum size of 5% and initial cheese whey concentration of 50 g/L, succinic acid yield of 0.57, and productivity of 0.44 g h(-1) L(-1) were obtained. Acetic acid and formic acid were the main by-products throughout the fermentation run of 48 h. It is feasible to produce succinic acid using lactose from cheese whey as carbon resource by A. succinogenes 130 Z.

  6. Investigation of whey protein concentration by ultrafiltration elements designed for water treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukučka Miroslav Đ.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Suitability of polysulfone ultrafiltration membranes (UFM commercial designed for water treatment have been investigated for separation of protein (PR from sweet whey. Ultrafiltration (UF of whey originated from dairy has been realized by self-made pilot plant which has been in service about one year. Influence of two whey temperatures (9 oC and 30 oC on efficiency of protein concentration has been examined. Application of investigated UF elements has given whey protein concentrate (WPC with 5 to 6 times excess amount of protein content in regard to starting one. In the same time the prevalent content of lactose has been removed to permeate. Better results have been occurred during the cold whey filtration. Besides the fact that molecular weight cut-off (MWCO of investigated membranes were 50-100 kDa, results showed very successful concentrating of whey proteins of dominantly lower molar weights than 50-100 kDa. Investigated membranes are beneficial for design and construction of UF plants for exploitation in small dairies.

  7. Sensory evaluation of "dulce de leche" with coffee and whey using different affective data analysis methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Oliveira Ferreira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to evaluate the acceptance of "dulce de leche" with coffee and whey. The results were analyzed through response surface, ANOVA, test of averages, histograms, and preference map correlating the global impression data with results of physical, physiochemical and sensory analysis. The response surface methodology, by itself, was not enough to find the best formulation. For ANOVA, test of averages, and preference map it was observed that the consumers' favorite "dulce de leche" were those of formulation 1 (10% whey and 1% coffee and 2 (30% whey and 1% coffee, followed by formulation 9 (20% whey and 1.25% coffee. The acceptance of samples 1 and 2 was influenced by the higher acceptability in relation to the flavor and for presenting higher pH, L*, and b* values. It was observed that samples 1 and 2 presented higher purchase approval score and higher percentages of responses for the 'ideal' category in terms of sweetness and coffee flavor. It was found that consumers preferred the samples with low concentrations of coffee independent of the concentration of whey thus enabling the use of whey and coffee in the manufacture of dulce de leche, obtaining a new product.

  8. Does Whey Protein Supplementation Improve the Nutritional Status in Hypoalbuminemic Peritoneal Dialysis Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Kamal

    2017-10-01

    Limited data are available regarding the effects of whey protein on the nutritional status of the peritoneal dialysis population. This study evaluated the effects of whey protein supplementation for 12 weeks on the nutritional status in hypoalbuminemic peritoneal dialysis patients. Thirty-six stable adult patients on maintenance peritoneal dialysis with serum albumin levels supplement at a dose of 25% of the instructed daily protein diet (whey protein group), and 17 patients were instructed to receive 1.2 g/kg per day protein diet without additional whey protein supplementation (control group). Nutritional status was assessed using two measures: nPNA and lean tissue mass index (LTI) obtained by whole-body bioimpedance spectroscopy technique. In the whey protein group serum albumin and nPNA significantly increased from baseline to week 6 (P supplementation with whey protein improves nutritional status and is well tolerated in hypoalbuminemic PD patients. © 2017 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  9. Valorization of Cheese and Tofu Whey through Enzymatic Synthesis of Lactosucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzo-Martinez, Marta; Luscher, Alice; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario; Moreno, F Javier

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the development of a new bioprocess for the efficient synthesis of lactosucrose, a potential prebiotic oligosaccharide with a high value-added, from two important and inexpensive agro-industrial by-products such as tofu whey and cheese whey permeate. The bioconversion is driven by the ability of the enzyme levansucrase SacB from Bacillus subtilis CECT 39 to transfructosylate lactose contained in the cheese whey permeate by using not only sucrose but also raffinose and stachyose, which are present in considerable amounts in the tofu whey, as suitable donors of fructosyl moieties. The maximum lactosucrose concentration obtained from both by-products was 80.1 g L-1 after a short reaction time 120 min at 37°C, leading to productivity and specific productivity values of 40.1 g lactosucrose L-1 h-1 and 80.1 mg lactosucrose U enzyme-1 h-1, respectively. Findings contained in this work could provide a new strategy to valorize agro-industrial by-products as cheese whey permeate and, specially, tofu whey by means of their use as renewable resources in the enzymatic synthesis of bioactive oligosaccharides.

  10. Fortification of Ogi with Whey Increases Essential Amino Acids Content of Fortified Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Omole

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The inability of humans to synthesize essential amino acids (EAA necessitates the need to increase the levels of these nutrient molecules in certain foods in which they are deficient. Maize ogi is a typical food product for both infants and adults in Africa, but with poor EAA content. This study therefore sought to assess the possibility of increasing the EAA content in maize ogi by processing it with cheese whey instead of water. Maize ogi and whey-fortified ogi were prepared by the usual procedure of grain soaking, milling, and drying. Samples from both treatments were subjected to proximate composition and amino acid profile analyses using Waters 616/626 LC (HPLC instrument. L-lysine, L-trytophan, and L-methionine contents in maize ogi remarkably increased from 0.52, 0.15, and 0.90 mg/100 gm sample, respectively, to 0.90, 240, and 1.320 mg/100 gm sample in whey-fortified ogi. There were also significant increases in other EAA contents of whey-fortified ogi relative to its counterpart (normal maize ogi. The sum increase in EAA contents (9,405 mg correlates with the increase in protein (1 gm per gram sample. This study demonstrates that cheese whey increases EAA content in maize ogi and suggests that whey-fortified maize ogi may be a preferred alternative to water processed maize ogi.

  11. Succinic Acid Production from Cheese Whey using Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Xiu, Shuangning

    Actinobacillus succinogenes 130 Z was used to produce succinic acid from cheese whey in this study. At the presence of external CO2 supply, the effects of initial cheese whey concentration, pH, and inoculum size on the succinic acid production were studied. The by-product formation during the fermentation process was also analyzed. The highest succinic acid yield of 0.57 was obtained at initial cheese whey concentration of 50 g/L, while the highest succinic acid productivity of 0.58 g h-1 L-1 was obtained at initial cheese whey concentration of 100 g/L. Increase in pH and inoculum size caused higher succinic acid yield and productivity. At the preferred fermentation condition of pH 6.8, inoculum size of 5% and initial cheese whey concentration of 50 g/L, succinic acid yield of 0.57, and productivity of 0.44 g h-1 L-1 were obtained. Acetic acid and formic acid were the main by-products throughout the fermentation run of 48 h. It is feasible to produce succinic acid using lactose from cheese whey as carbon resource by A. succinogenes 130 Z.

  12. Valorization of Cheese and Tofu Whey through Enzymatic Synthesis of Lactosucrose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Corzo-Martinez

    Full Text Available This work deals with the development of a new bioprocess for the efficient synthesis of lactosucrose, a potential prebiotic oligosaccharide with a high value-added, from two important and inexpensive agro-industrial by-products such as tofu whey and cheese whey permeate. The bioconversion is driven by the ability of the enzyme levansucrase SacB from Bacillus subtilis CECT 39 to transfructosylate lactose contained in the cheese whey permeate by using not only sucrose but also raffinose and stachyose, which are present in considerable amounts in the tofu whey, as suitable donors of fructosyl moieties. The maximum lactosucrose concentration obtained from both by-products was 80.1 g L-1 after a short reaction time 120 min at 37°C, leading to productivity and specific productivity values of 40.1 g lactosucrose L-1 h-1 and 80.1 mg lactosucrose U enzyme-1 h-1, respectively. Findings contained in this work could provide a new strategy to valorize agro-industrial by-products as cheese whey permeate and, specially, tofu whey by means of their use as renewable resources in the enzymatic synthesis of bioactive oligosaccharides.

  13. Short communication: Conversion of lactose and whey into lactic acid by engineered yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Timothy L; Kim, Eunbee; Hwang, ChangHoon; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Liu, Jing-Jing; Jin, Yong-Su

    2017-01-01

    Lactose is often considered an unwanted and wasted byproduct, particularly lactose trapped in acid whey from yogurt production. But using specialized microbial fermentation, the surplus wasted acid whey could be converted into value-added chemicals. The baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is commonly used for industrial fermentation, cannot natively ferment lactose. The present study describes how an engineered S. cerevisiae yeast was constructed to produce lactic acid from purified lactose, whey, or dairy milk. Lactic acid is an excellent proof-of-concept chemical to produce from lactose, because lactic acid has many food, pharmaceutical, and industrial uses, and over 250,000 t are produced for industrial use annually. To ferment the milk sugar lactose, a cellodextrin transporter (CDT-1, which also transports lactose) and a β-glucosidase (GH1-1, which also acts as a β-galactosidase) from Neurospora crassa were expressed in a S. cerevisiae strain. A heterologous lactate dehydrogenase (encoded by ldhA) from the fungus Rhizopus oryzae was integrated into the CDT-1/GH1-1-expressing strain of S. cerevisiae. As a result, the engineered strain was able to produce lactic acid from purified lactose, whey, and store-bought milk. A lactic acid yield of 0.358g/g of lactose was achieved from whey fermentation, providing an initial proof of concept for the production of value-added chemicals from excess industrial whey using engineered yeast. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of polyols on the stability of whey proteins in intermediate-moisture food model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Peng; Tran, Amy; Labuza, Ted P

    2009-03-25

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of polyols on the stability of whey proteins in an intermediate-moisture food model system and to elucidate the effect of polyols on the hardening of whey protein-based bars during storage. Four major polyols, glycerol, propylene glycol, maltitol, and sorbitol, were evaluated in model systems, which contained whey protein isolate, polyols, and water. The results showed that glycerol was the most effective polyol in lowering water activity and provided the soft texture of intermediate-moisture foods, followed by sorbitol and maltitol. These three polyols stabilized the native structure of whey proteins, provided a desired texture, and slowed the hardening of the model systems. Propylene glycol should not be used in whey protein-based high-protein intermediate-moisture foods because it caused changes in protein conformation and stability as observed by differential scanning calorimeter and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and resulted in aggregation of whey proteins and hardening of the bar texture during storage, causing loss in product quality.

  15. Method of manufacturing powder particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borra, J.P.D.

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of manufacturing a dry powder particle, preferably using electro-hydrodynamic spraying, wherein two oppositely charged aerosol streams are contacted. The invention allows for the manufacture of powders having various, controllable compositions and shapes. In

  16. Influence of short chain organic acids and bases on the wetting properties and surface energy of submicrometer ceramic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neirinck, Bram; Soccol, Dimitri; Fransaer, Jan; Van der Biest, Omer; Vleugels, Jef

    2010-08-15

    The effect of short chained organic acids and bases on the surface energy and wetting properties of submicrometer alumina powder was assessed. The surface chemistry of treated powders was determined by means of Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform spectroscopy and compared to untreated powder. The wetting of powders was measured using a modified Washburn method, based on the use of precompacted powder samples. The geometric factor needed to calculate the contact angle was derived from measurements of the porous properties of the powder compacts. Contact angle measurements with several probe liquids before and after modification allowed a theoretical estimation of the surface energy based on the surface tension component theory. Trends in the surface energy components were linked to observations in infrared spectra. The results showed that the hydrophobic character of the precompacted powder depends on both the chain length and polar group of the modifying agent. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lactulose production from cheese whey using recyclable catalyst ammonium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Han, Jong-In

    2016-04-15

    Ammonium carbonate ((NH4)2CO3) was used as an alkaline catalyst of lactulose production from cheese whey. Maximum yield of 29.6% was obtained at reaction time of 28.44 min, (NH4)2CO3 of 0.76% at 97°C. During reaction, (NH4)2CO3 was fully decomposed to NH3 and CO2, and these gases were recovered. To boost up NH3 recovery, various methods such as heating, aeration, and pH adjustment were applied. The optimal condition for the purpose of NH3 retrieval was temperature of up to 60°C alongside aeration. Easy separation and recovery make (NH4)2CO3 a catalyst alternative to common alkaline chemicals especially for the weak alkaline reaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Production of Kluyveromices fragilis biomass in deproteinized milk whey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinappi, I; Sánchez Crispín, J A

    2000-01-01

    The milk whey from a mature cheese factory deproteinised by acid thermic coagulation (pH 4.5 and 90 degrees C), provides a good culture media for the production of Kluyveromices fragilis biomass. The optimal experimental conditions for the maximal production of biomass were established by using fermenters with different capacity and design. For lactose concentration of 15 g/l, pH 4.5, 30 degrees C and aireation between 0.25 and 1 VVM, the duplication time was below two hours and 98% of the lactose was consumed. The obtained yield in dried weight was between 36 and 49% (g biomass/g lactose). The biomass (without broken cell) contain 46% protein on dry base and showed an "in vitro" digestibility of 65%. The organic mass decreased 80% after 12 hour of fermentation. This process eliminates a polluting agent and simultaneously, produces a biomass that could have industrial use as a protein complement in feeds.

  19. Expanded functionality of modified whey protein dispersions after transglutaminase catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Debra A; Daubert, Christopher R

    2011-05-01

    The functionality of whey dispersions, prepared with a modified whey protein concentrate (mWPC) ingredient, was significantly altered after cross-linking with microbial transglutaminase (TGase) upon pH adjustment to 8. Test TGase-mWPC solutions, pH 8, gelled faster than control mWPC dispersions, as measured in real time; whereas, the gelling temperature of pretreated TGase-mWPC samples (37 °C, 2.5 h) increased from 67.8 to 74.8 °C with a minimal change in gel strength. Prolonged prior incubation with the enzyme (37 °C, 20 h) raised the gel strength in both control mWPC and TGase-mWPC dispersions, though these values were approximately 2.7 times lower in TGase-mWPC samples. Furthermore, the gelling temperature was raised by 9 °C after extensive polymerization. The water holding capacity was not impacted by enzymatic processing while emulsions prepared with TGase-mWPC dispersions proved very stable with no evidence of phase separation during storage at room temperature for 1 mo. Moreover, the apparent viscosity of TGase-mWPC emulsions exhibited a 10-fold increase compared to nonenzyme-treated mWPC samples. The particle size was nearly 11 μm in covalently linked TGase-mWPC test fractions compared with 8 μm in nonpolymerized mWPC dispersions. Ultimately, the functional characteristics of TGase-mWPC ingredients may be designed to deliver superior performance, especially with regard to improving heat and emulsion stability. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Effect of whey protein isolate on rehydration after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Lewis J; Mattin, Lewis; Aldiss, Peter; Adebishi, Rukayat; Hobson, Ruth M

    2014-05-01

    Studies have examined adding protein to carbohydrate-electrolyte rehydration drinks, but the effects of protein in isolation remain unknown. Ten subjects completed two trials in which they were dehydrated (~2 % of pre-exercise body mass) by intermittent cycling in the heat. Subjects then rehydrated (150 % total mass loss) over 1 h with mineral water (W) or mineral water plus 20 g L(-1) whey protein isolate (WP) and remained in the laboratory for a further 4 h. Blood and urine samples were provided pre-exercise, post-exercise, post-rehydration and every hour thereafter. From blood samples, serum osmolality, change in plasma volume and plasma albumin content was determined, whilst the volume and osmolality of urine samples were determined. There was no difference between trials for total urine volume [W: 1,234 (358) mL; WP: 1,306 (268) mL; P = 0.409], drink retention [W: 40 (14) %; WP: 37 (14) %; P = 0.322] or net fluid balance [W: -605 (318) mL; WP: -660 (274) mL; P = 0.792] 4-h post-rehydration. Plasma volume was greater 3 and 4 h post-drinking during WP, and plasma albumin content relative to pre-exercise was increased 1-4 h post-drinking in WP only. These results suggest that addition of 20 g L(-1) whey protein isolate neither enhances nor inhibits post-exercise rehydration, when a volume equivalent to 150 % of sweat losses is ingested in 1 h. As post-exercise nutritional requirements are multifactorial (rehydration, glycogen resynthesis, myofibrillar/mitochondrial protein synthesis), these data demonstrate that when post-exercise protein intake might benefit recovery or adaptation, this can be achieved without compromising rehydration.

  1. Secretory immunoglobulin purification from whey by chromatographic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlschweiger, Alexander; Engelmaier, Hannah; Himmler, Gottfried; Hahn, Rainer

    2017-08-15

    Secretory immunoglobulins (SIg) are a major fraction of the mucosal immune system and represent potential drug candidates. So far, platform technologies for their purification do not exist. SIg from animal whey was used as a model to develop a simple, efficient and potentially generic chromatographic purification process. Several chromatographic stationary phases were tested. A combination of two anion-exchange steps resulted in the highest purity. The key step was the use of a small-porous anion exchanger operated in flow-through mode. Diffusion of SIg into the resin particles was significantly hindered, while the main impurities, IgG and serum albumin, were bound. In this step, initial purity was increased from 66% to 89% with a step yield of 88%. In a second anion-exchange step using giga-porous material, SIg was captured and purified by step or linear gradient elution to obtain fractions with purities >95%. For the step gradient elution step yield of highly pure SIg was 54%. Elution of SIgA and SIgM with a linear gradient resulted in a step yield of 56% and 35%, respectively. Overall yields for both anion exchange steps were 43% for the combination of flow-through and step elution mode. Combination of flow-through and linear gradient elution mode resulted in a yield of 44% for SIgA and 39% for SIgM. The proposed process allows the purification of biologically active SIg from animal whey in preparative scale. For future applications, the process can easily be adopted for purification of recombinant secretory immunoglobulin species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of immunoglobulin G in bovine colostrum and milk powders, and in dietary supplements of bovine origin by protein G affinity liquid chromatography: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Grant; Otter, Don; Arnold, K; Austad, J; Christiansen, S; Ferreira, I; Irvine, F; Marsh, C; Massom, L R; Otter, D; Pearce, K; Stevens, J; Szpylka, J; Vyas, P; Woollard, D; Wu, C

    2010-01-01

    An AOAC collaborative study was conducted to evaluate an affinity LC procedure for measuring immunoglobulin G (IgG) in selected dairy powders. The powders were extracted with 0.15 M sodium chloride solution and the pH was adjusted to 4.6 to precipitate caseins, which would otherwise lead to an overestimation of IgG. The analyte was then bound to a commercially available Protein G affinity cartridge and selectively eluted with a glycine buffer at pH 2.5. Detection was at 280 nm and quantification was made against a calibration curve prepared from bovine serum IgG. The samples analyzed included the likely matrixes for which this assay will find commercial use, namely, high- and low-protein-content colostrum powders, tablets containing colostrum powder, and some IgG-containing dairy powders; milk protein isolate, whey protein concentrate, and skim milk powder. Eleven laboratories provided data for the study and assayed blind duplicates of six materials. The repeatability RSD values ranged from 2.1 to 4.2% and the reproducibility RSD values ranged from 6.4 to 18.5%. The Protein G method with casein removal has adequate reproducibility for measuring IgG in colostrum-derived powders that are traded on the basis of IgG content as a colostral marker.

  3. Evaluation of industrial dairy waste (milk dust powder) for acetone-butanol-ethanol production by solventogenic Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujor, Victor; Bharathidasan, Ashok Kumar; Cornish, Katrina; Ezeji, Thaddeus Chukwuemeka

    2014-01-01

    Readily available inexpensive substrate with high product yield is the key to restoring acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation to economic competitiveness. Lactose-replete cheese whey tends to favor the production of butanol over acetone. In the current study, we investigated the fermentability of milk dust powder with high lactose content, for ABE production by Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii. Both microorganisms produced 7.3 and 5.8 g/L of butanol respectively, with total ABE concentrations of 10.3 and 8.2 g/L, respectively. Compared to fermentation with glucose, fermentation of milk dust powder increased butanol to acetone ratio by 16% and 36% for C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii, respectively. While these results demonstrate the fermentability of milk dust powder, the physico-chemical properties of milk dust powder appeared to limit sugar utilization, growth and ABE production. Further work aimed at improving the texture of milk dust powder-based medium would likely improve lactose utilization and ABE production.

  4. Whey protein stimulates postprandial muscle protein accretion more effectively than do casein and casein hydrolysate in older men

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pennings, B; Boirie, Y; Senden, J.M.G; Gijsen, A.P; Kuipers, H; van Loon, L.J.C

    2011-01-01

    .... The objective was to compare protein digestion and absorption kinetics and subsequent postprandial muscle protein accretion after ingestion of whey, casein, and casein hydrolysate in healthy older adults...

  5. In-Depth Characterization of Sheep (Ovis aries) Milk Whey Proteome and Comparison with Cow (Bos taurus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Minh; Sabherwal, Manya; Duncan, Elizabeth; Stevens, Stewart; Stockwell, Peter; McConnell, Michelle; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Carne, Alan

    2015-01-01

    An in-depth proteomic study of sheep milk whey is reported and compared to the data available in the literature for the cow whey proteome. A combinatorial peptide ligand library kit (ProteoMiner) was used to normalize protein abundance in the sheep whey proteome followed by an in-gel digest of a 1D-PAGE display and an in-solution digestion followed by OFFGEL isoelectric focusing fractionation. The peptide fractions obtained were then analyzed by LC-MS/MS. This enabled identification of 669 proteins in sheep whey that, to our knowledge, is the largest inventory of sheep whey proteins identified to date. A comprehensive list of cow whey proteins currently available in the literature (783 proteins from unique genes) was assembled and compared to the sheep whey proteome data obtained in this study (606 proteins from unique genes). This comparison revealed that while the 233 proteins shared by the two species were significantly enriched for immune and inflammatory responses in gene ontology analysis, proteins only found in sheep whey in this study were identified that take part in both cellular development and immune responses, whereas proteins only found in cow whey in this study were identified to be associated with metabolism and cellular growth. PMID:26447763

  6. In-Depth Characterization of Sheep (Ovis aries Milk Whey Proteome and Comparison with Cow (Bos taurus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh Ha

    Full Text Available An in-depth proteomic study of sheep milk whey is reported and compared to the data available in the literature for the cow whey proteome. A combinatorial peptide ligand library kit (ProteoMiner was used to normalize protein abundance in the sheep whey proteome followed by an in-gel digest of a 1D-PAGE display and an in-solution digestion followed by OFFGEL isoelectric focusing fractionation. The peptide fractions obtained were then analyzed by LC-MS/MS. This enabled identification of 669 proteins in sheep whey that, to our knowledge, is the largest inventory of sheep whey proteins identified to date. A comprehensive list of cow whey proteins currently available in the literature (783 proteins from unique genes was assembled and compared to the sheep whey proteome data obtained in this study (606 proteins from unique genes. This comparison revealed that while the 233 proteins shared by the two species were significantly enriched for immune and inflammatory responses in gene ontology analysis, proteins only found in sheep whey in this study were identified that take part in both cellular development and immune responses, whereas proteins only found in cow whey in this study were identified to be associated with metabolism and cellular growth.

  7. In-Depth Characterization of Sheep (Ovis aries) Milk Whey Proteome and Comparison with Cow (Bos taurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Minh; Sabherwal, Manya; Duncan, Elizabeth; Stevens, Stewart; Stockwell, Peter; McConnell, Michelle; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Carne, Alan

    2015-01-01

    An in-depth proteomic study of sheep milk whey is reported and compared to the data available in the literature for the cow whey proteome. A combinatorial peptide ligand library kit (ProteoMiner) was used to normalize protein abundance in the sheep whey proteome followed by an in-gel digest of a 1D-PAGE display and an in-solution digestion followed by OFFGEL isoelectric focusing fractionation. The peptide fractions obtained were then analyzed by LC-MS/MS. This enabled identification of 669 proteins in sheep whey that, to our knowledge, is the largest inventory of sheep whey proteins identified to date. A comprehensive list of cow whey proteins currently available in the literature (783 proteins from unique genes) was assembled and compared to the sheep whey proteome data obtained in this study (606 proteins from unique genes). This comparison revealed that while the 233 proteins shared by the two species were significantly enriched for immune and inflammatory responses in gene ontology analysis, proteins only found in sheep whey in this study were identified that take part in both cellular development and immune responses, whereas proteins only found in cow whey in this study were identified to be associated with metabolism and cellular growth.

  8. Powder-Bed Stabilization for Powder-Based Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Zocca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The most successful additive manufacturing (AM technologies are based on thelayer-by-layer depositionof a flowable powder. Although considered as the third industrial revolution, one factor still limiting these processes to become completely autonomous is the often necessary build-up of support structures. Besides the prevention of lateral shifts of the part during the deposition of layers, the support assures quality and stability to the built process. The loose powder itself surrounding the built object, or so-called powder-bed, does not provide this sustenance in most existent technology available. Here we present a simple but effective and economical method for stabilizing the powder-bed, preventing distortions in the geometry with no need for support structures. This effect, achieved by applying an air flow through the powder-bed, is enabling an entirely autonomous generation of parts and is a major contribution to all powder-based additive manufacturing technologies. Moreover, it makes powder-based AM independent of gravitational forces, which will facilitate crafting items in space from a variety of powdery materials.

  9. Large Bore Powder Gun Qualification (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabern, Donald A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdiviez, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-02

    A Large Bore Powder Gun (LBPG) is being designed to enable experimentalists to characterize material behavior outside the capabilities of the NNSS JASPER and LANL TA-55 PF-4 guns. The combination of these three guns will create a capability to conduct impact experiments over a wide range of pressures and shock profiles. The Large Bore Powder Gun will be fielded at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) U1a Complex. The Complex is nearly 1000 ft below ground with dedicated drifts for testing, instrumentation, and post-shot entombment. To ensure the reliability, safety, and performance of the LBPG, a qualification plan has been established and documented here. Requirements for the LBPG have been established and documented in WE-14-TR-0065 U A, Large Bore Powder Gun Customer Requirements. The document includes the requirements for the physics experiments, the gun and confinement systems, and operations at NNSS. A detailed description of the requirements is established in that document and is referred to and quoted throughout this document. Two Gun and Confinement Systems will be fielded. The Prototype Gun will be used primarily to characterize the gun and confinement performance and be the primary platform for qualification actions. This gun will also be used to investigate and qualify target and diagnostic modifications through the life of the program (U1a.104 Drift). An identical gun, the Physics Gun, will be fielded for confirmatory and Pu experiments (U1a.102D Drift). Both guns will be qualified for operation. The Gun and Confinement System design will be qualified through analysis, inspection, and testing using the Prototype Gun for the majority of process. The Physics Gun will be qualified through inspection and a limited number of qualification tests to ensure performance and behavior equivalent to the Prototype gun. Figure 1.1 shows the partial configuration of U1a and the locations of the Prototype and Physics Gun/Confinement Systems.

  10. Aplicação de filmes proteicos à base de soro de leite Application of whey protein films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Maria Pedroso Yoshida

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A eficiência da aplicação de filmes à base de proteínas de soro de leite foi avaliada em um sistema de embalagem que consistia em um pote plástico utilizando-se filmes de proteínas de soro de leite como fechamento superior. Pedaços de maçã foram embalados e armazenados à temperatura ambiente (25 °C e sob refrigeração (10 °C. Os filmes proteicos à base de soro de leite foram obtidos por três procedimentos distintos: por desnaturação térmica; com a incorporação de ácido esteárico (0,5%, em massa; e por modificação enzimática utilizando-se a transglutaminase microbiana (10U/g proteína, ACTIVA TG-B , a partir de uma formulação básica de 6,50% de proteína, 3,0% de plastificante (glicerol e pH 7,0. A integridade dos filmes após embalagem e durante armazenamento foi observada, medindo-se as propriedades mecânicas dos filmes. A permeabilidade ao vapor d'água foi avaliada pela perda de massa, teor de umidade, e variação de textura dos pedaços de maçã. Os resultados indicaram que os filmes apresentam uma barreira moderada à umidade, apresentando diferença entre potes com e sem coberturas de filmes. A permeabilidade ao oxigênio foi conferida pelo escurecimento enzimático das maçãs pela ação da enzima polifenoxidase, apresentando diferença em relação ao das amostras acondicionadas em atmosfera modificada com gás N2.The efficiency of whey protein films packaging was evaluated. The packaging system consisted of whey protein films closing the top extremity of synthetic plastic container. Slices of apple were packed and stored at room temperature (25 °C and at 10 °C. Modified atmosphere packaging (N2 gas flushing was studied to verify the oxygen permeability of the films. Whey protein films (6.5% of protein, 3.0% of glycerol, and pH 7.0 were obtained by thermal denaturation, emulsification (0.5% (w/w with stearic acid, and enzymatic modification (10U/g protein of transglutaminase, ACTIVA-TG. Mechanical

  11. The effect of microfiltration on color, flavor, and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Y; Smith, T J; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A

    2015-09-01

    The residual annatto colorant in fluid Cheddar cheese whey is bleached to provide a neutral-colored final product. Currently, hydrogen peroxide (HP) and benzoyl peroxide are used for bleaching liquid whey. However, previous studies have shown that chemical bleaching causes off-flavor formation, mainly due to lipid oxidation and protein degradation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of microfiltration (MF) on norbixin removal and to compare flavor and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80) from MF whey to WPC80 from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase (LP). Cheddar cheese whey was manufactured from colored, pasteurized milk. The fluid whey was pasteurized and fat separated. Liquid whey was subjected to 4 different treatments: control (no bleaching; 50°C, 1 h), HP (250 mg of HP/kg; 50°C, 1 h), and LP (20 mg of HP/kg; 50°C, 1 h), or MF (microfiltration; 50°C, 1 h). The treated whey was then ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried to 80% concentrate. The entire experiment was replicated 3 times. Proximate analyses, color, functionality, descriptive sensory and instrumental volatile analysis were conducted on WPC80. The MF and HP- and LP-bleached WPC80 displayed a 39.5, 40.9, and 92.8% norbixin decrease, respectively. The HP and LP WPC80 had higher cardboard flavors and distinct cabbage flavor compared with the unbleached and MF WPC80. Volatile compound results were consistent with sensory results. The HP and LP WPC80 were higher in lipid oxidation compounds (especially heptanal, hexanal, pentanal, 1-hexen-3-one, 2-pentylfuran, and octanal) compared with unbleached and MF WPC80. All WPC80 had >85% solubility across the pH range of 3 to 7. The microstructure of MF gels determined by confocal laser scanning showed an increased protein particle size in the gel network. MF WPC80 also had larger storage modulus values, indicating higher gel firmness. Based on bleaching efficacy comparable to chemical bleaching with HP

  12. Comparison of energy supplements during prolonged exercise for maintenance of cardiac function: carbohydrate only versus carbohydrate plus whey or casein hydrolysate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oosthuyse, Tanja; Millen, Aletta M.E

    2016-01-01

    ...-only), carbohydrate-casein hydrolysate (CHO-casein), or carbohydrate-whey hydrolysate (CHO-whey). No treatment-by-time interactions occurred, but pre-to-postexercise time effects occurred selectively...

  13. The effects of native whey and [alpha]-lactalbumin on the social and individual behaviour of C57BL/6J mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O Yu Vekovischeva; K Peuhkuri; P Bäckström; N Sihvola; T Pilvi; R Korpela

    2013-01-01

    .... However, the effects of milk proteins after prolonged use remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of two whey proteins ([alpha]-lactalbumin ([alpha]-lac) and native whey...

  14. The effects of native whey and α-lactalbumin on the social and individual behaviour of C57BL/6J mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vekovischeva, O Yu; Peuhkuri, K; Bäckström, P; Sihvola, N; Pilvi, T; Korpela, R

    2013-01-01

    .... However, the effects of milk proteins after prolonged use remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of two whey proteins (alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-lac) and native whey...

  15. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals, such as nitrate salts of thallium, barium, calcium, and copper, which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of thallium in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  16. Effect of mechanical denaturation on surface free energy of protein powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin; Grimsey, Ian M; Forbes, Robert T; Blagbrough, Ian S; Conway, Barbara R

    2016-10-01

    Globular proteins are important both as therapeutic agents and excipients. However, their fragile native conformations can be denatured during pharmaceutical processing, which leads to modification of the surface energy of their powders and hence their performance. Lyophilized powders of hen egg-white lysozyme and β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae were used as models to study the effects of mechanical denaturation on the surface energies of basic and acidic protein powders, respectively. Their mechanical denaturation upon milling was confirmed by the absence of their thermal unfolding transition phases and by the changes in their secondary and tertiary structures. Inverse gas chromatography detected differences between both unprocessed protein powders and the changes induced by their mechanical denaturation. The surfaces of the acidic and basic protein powders were relatively basic, however the surface acidity of β-galactosidase was higher than that of lysozyme. Also, the surface of β-galactosidase powder had a higher dispersive energy compared to lysozyme. The mechanical denaturation decreased the dispersive energy and the basicity of the surfaces of both protein powders. The amino acid composition and molecular conformation of the proteins explained the surface energy data measured by inverse gas chromatography. The biological activity of mechanically denatured protein powders can either be reversible (lysozyme) or irreversible (β-galactosidase) upon hydration. Our surface data can be exploited to understand and predict the performance of protein powders within pharmaceutical dosage forms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. LS-SVM: uma nova ferramenta quimiométrica para regressão multivariada. Comparação de modelos de regressão LS-SVM e PLS na quantificação de adulterantes em leite em pó empregando NIR LS-SVM: a new chemometric tool for multivariate regression. Comparison of LS-SVM and pls regression for determination of common adulterants in powdered milk by nir spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco F. Ferrão

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVM were used as an alternative multivariate calibration method for the simultaneous quantification of some common adulterants found in powdered milk samples, using near-infrared spectroscopy. Excellent models were built using LS-SVM for determining R², RMSECV and RMSEP values. LS-SVMs show superior performance for quantifying starch, whey and sucrose in powdered milk samples in relation to PLSR. This study shows that it is possible to determine precisely the amount of one and two common adulterants simultaneously in powdered milk samples using LS-SVM and NIR spectra.

  18. (TECTONA GRANDIS LEAF POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yash Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the adsorption potential of Teak (Tectona grandis leaf powder (TLP toremove Methylene blue (MB and Malachite Green (MG dye molecules from aqueoussolution was investigated. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the influenceof operational parameters such as, pH (2−9, adsorbent dosage (1−7 g/L, contact time(15−150 minutes and initial dye concentration (20−120 mg/L at stirring speed of 150rpm for the adsorption of MB and MG on TLP. Maximum removal efficiency of 98.4%and 95.1% was achieved for MB and MG dye, respectively. The experimentalequilibrium data were analysed using Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isothermmodels and it was found that, it fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm model. Thesurface structure and morphology of the adsorbent was characterized using scanningelectron microscopy (SEM and the presence of functional groups and its interactionwith the dye molecules were analysed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR. Based on the investigation, it has been demonstrated that the teak leaf powderhas good potential for effective adsorption of methylene blue and malachite green dye.

  19. Effect of whey protein and glycomacropeptide on measures of satiety in normal-weight adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chungchunlam, Sylvia M S; Henare, Sharon J; Ganesh, Siva; Moughan, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Protein is the most satiating macronutrient and dairy whey protein is thought to be more satiating than other protein sources. The purported satiating effect of whey protein may be attributable to the presence of glycomacropeptide (GMP). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of GMP in the satiating effect of whey protein. Isoenergetic (~1600 kJ) preload drinks contained GMP isolate (86% GMP, "GMP"), whey protein isolate (WPI) with 21% naturally occurring GMP, WPI with 2% naturally present GMP, or maltodextrin carbohydrate ("carbohydrate"). Satiety was assessed in 22 normal-weight adult women by determining the consumption of a test meal provided ad libitum 120 min following ingestion of a preload drink, and also by using visual analogue scales (VAS) for rating feelings of hunger, desire to eat, prospective consumption and fullness (appetite). The ad libitum test meal intake was significantly different between the preload drinks (p = 0.0003), with food intake following ingestion of both WPI preload drinks (regardless of the amount of GMP) being ~18% lower compared with the beverages enriched with carbohydrate or GMP alone. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the VAS-rated feelings of appetite among the four preload drinks. GMP alone did not reduce subsequent food intake compared with a drink enriched with carbohydrate, but whey protein had a greater satiating effect than carbohydrate. The presence of GMP in whey does not appear to be the cause of the observed effect of whey protein on satiety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. PRODUCTION AND RECOVERY OF POLY-Β-HYDROXYBUTYRATE FROM WHEY DEGRADATION BY AZOTOBACTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khanafari , A. Akhavan Sepahei, M. Mogharab

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Three strains of Azotobacter chroococcum were studied to produce poly-β hydroxybutyrate as a inclusion body by whey degradation. Optimum degradation whey results were obtained when using whey broth as a fermentation medium without extra salt, temperature at 35 °C and pH 7 (P<0.05. Lambda max for whey broth medium was determined probably about 400 nm. The effect of different nitrogenous rich compounds (NH4NO3, Bactopeptone, Casein, Yeast extract, Meat extract, Protease peptone and Tryptone on whey degradation showed that incorporation of nitrogenous compounds into the medium did not increase whey degradation by Azotobacter chroococcum 1723 (P<0.05. But poly-β hydroxyl-butyrate production was increased in presence Meat extract up to 75% of the cell dry weight after 48h. The addition of nitrogenous sourced (except ammonium nitrate had a positive effect on poly-β hydroxyl-butyrate production as it peaked in the presence of Meat extract and 4.43 g/L was accumulated in comparison to 0.5g at diazotrophically growing cells. Increasing the O2 values resulted by shaking at 122 rpm in decreased poly-β hydroxyl-butyrate yield form 4.43 to 0.04 g/L. The results show that this medium supports the growth of strain 1735 and also that this waste could be utilized as a carbon and nitrogen source. Production of poly-β hydroxyl-butyrate by using whey as a medium looks promising, since the use of inexpensive feed-stocks for poly-β hydroxyl-butyrate is essential if bioplastics are to become competitive products.

  1. Short communication: The effect of liquid storage on the flavor of whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Curtis W; Parker, Megan; Drake, MaryAnne

    2016-06-01

    Unit operations in dried dairy ingredient manufacture significantly influence sensory properties and, consequently, their use and consumer acceptance in a variety of ingredient applications. In whey protein concentrate (WPC) manufacture, liquid can be stored as whey or WPC before spray drying. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of storage, composition, and bleaching on the flavor of spray-dried WPC80. Liquid whey was manufactured and subjected to the following treatments: bleached or unbleached and liquid whey or liquid WPC storage. The experiment was replicated 3 times and included a no-storage control. All liquid storage was performed at 4°C for 24h. Flavor of the final spray-dried WPC80 was evaluated by a trained panel and volatile compound analyses. Storage of liquids increased cardboard flavor, decreased sweet aromatic flavor, and resulted in increased volatile lipid oxidation products. Bleaching altered the effect of liquid storage. Storage of unbleached liquid whey decreased sweet aromatic flavor and increased cardboard flavor and volatile lipid oxidation products compared with liquid WPC80 and no storage. In contrast, storage of bleached liquid WPC decreased sweet aromatic flavor and increased cardboard flavor and associated volatile lipid oxidation products compared with bleached liquid whey or no storage. These results confirm that liquid storage increases off-flavors in spray-dried protein but to a variable degree, depending on whether bleaching has been applied. If liquid storage is necessary, bleached WPC80 should be stored as liquid whey and unbleached WPC80 should be stored as liquid WPC to mitigate off-flavors. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of ultrasound treatment on lipid oxidation of Cheddar cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkamani, Amir Ehsan; Juliano, Pablo; Ajlouni, Said; Singh, Tanoj Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Ultrasound (US) has been suggested for many whey processing applications. This study examined the effects of ultrasound treatment on the oxidation of lipids in Cheddar cheese whey. Freshly pasteurized whey (0.86 L) was ultrasonicated in a contained environment at the same range of frequencies and energies for 10 and 30 min at 37°C. The US reactor used was characterized by measuring the generation of free radicals in deionized water at different frequencies (20-2000 kHz) and specific energies (8.0-390 kJ/kg). Polar lipid (PL), free and bound fatty acids and lipid oxidation derived compounds were identified and quantified before and after US processing using high performance liquid chromatography equipped with an evaporative light scattering detector (HPLC-ELSD), methylation followed by gas chromatography flame ionized detector (GC-FID) and solid phase micro-extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GCMS), respectively. The highest concentration of hydroxyl radical formation in the sonicated whey was found between 400 and 1000 kHz. There were no changes in phospholipid composition after US processing at 20, 400, 1000 and 2000 kHz compared to non-sonicated samples. Lipid oxidation volatile compounds were detected in both non-sonicated and sonicated whey. Lipid oxidation was not promoted at any tested frequency or specific energy. Free fatty acid concentration was not affected by US treatment per se. Results revealed that US can be utilized in whey processing applications with no negative impact on whey lipid chemistry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibition of bacterial growth in sweet cheese whey by carbon dioxide as determined by culture-independent community profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Raquel; Xue, Tian; Weeks, Mike; Turner, Mark S; Bansal, Nidhi

    2016-01-18

    Whey is a valuable co-product from cheese making that serves as a raw material for a wide range of products. Its rich nutritional content lends itself to rapid spoilage, thus it typically needs to be pasteurised and refrigerated promptly. Despite the extensive literature on milk spoilage bacteria, little is known about the spoilage bacteria of whey. The utility of carbon dioxide (CO2) to extend the shelf-life of raw milk and cottage cheese has been well established, but its application in whey preservation has not yet been explored. This study aims to characterise the microbial populations of fresh and spoiled sweet whey by culture-independent community profiling using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and to determine whether carbonation is effective in inhibiting bacterial growth in sweet whey. The microbiota of raw Cheddar and Mozzarella whey was dominated by cheese starter bacteria. After pasteurisation, two out of the three samples studied became dominated by diverse environmental bacteria from various phyla, with Proteobacteria being the most dominant. Diverse microbial profiles were maintained until spoilage occurred, when the entire population was dominated by just one or two genera. Whey spoilage bacteria were found to be similar to those of milk. Pasteurised Cheddar and Mozzarella whey was spoiled by Bacillus sp. or Pseudomonas sp., and raw Mozzarella whey was spoiled by Pseudomonas sp., Serratia sp., and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. CO2 was effective in inhibiting bacterial growth of pasteurised Cheddar and Mozzarella whey stored at 15°C and raw Mozzarella whey stored at 4°C. The spoilage bacteria of the carbonated samples were similar to those of the non-carbonated controls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Achocolatados: análise química Chocolate drink powders: chemical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mércia de Freitas Eduardo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho avaliaram-se propriedades químicas de achocolatados do mercado brasileiro, sendo estas os teores de lipídios, proteínas, cinzas, umidade, pH, teobromina e alcalóides totais. Estas propriedades são influenciadas principalmente pelo conteúdo de cacau em pó e pelo conteúdo dos ingredientes lácteos, como o leite em pó e o soro de leite em pó. Foi feito um comparativo entre as marcas de achocolatados, dando ênfase às grandes diferenças, quando existentes, entre os achocolatados dietéticos (para dietas de restrição de sacarose, frutose e glicose (dextrose e "light" (com redução de açúcares e os tradicionais.Some chemical properties of chocolate drink powders from Brazilian market, such as lipid, protein, ashes, moisture, pH, theobromine and total alkaloids content of the samples were evaluated. These properties are mainly influenced by cocoa powder content and by dairy products, such as milk powder and whey. A comparison among the brands, emphasizing their strong differences, when existing, among diet (without sugars and light (low sugar and the standard brands was made.

  5. Short communication: low-fat ice cream flavor not modified by high hydrostatic pressure treatment of whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, J M; Lim, S-Y; Powers, J R; Ross, C F; Clark, S

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine flavor binding of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP)-treated whey protein concentrate (WPC) in a real food system. Fresh Washington State University (WSU, Pullman) WPC, produced by ultrafiltration of separated Cheddar cheese whey, was treated at 300 MPa for 15 min. Commercial WPC 35 powder was reconstituted to equivalent total solids as WSU WPC (8.23%). Six batches of low-fat ice cream were produced: A) HHP-treated WSU WPC without diacetyl; B) and E) WSU WPC with 2 mg/L of diacetyl added before HHP; C) WSU WPC with 2 mg/L of diacetyl added after HHP; D) untreated WSU WPC with 2 mg/L of diacetyl; and F) untreated commercial WPC 35 with 2 mg/L of diacetyl. The solution of WSU WPC or commercial WPC 35 contributed 10% to the mix formulation. Ice creams were produced by using standard ice cream ingredients and processes. Low-fat ice creams containing HHP-treated WSU WPC and untreated WSU WPC were analyzed using headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography. Sensory evaluation by balanced reference duo-trio test was carried out using 50 untrained panelists in 2 sessions on 2 different days. The headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography analysis revealed that ice cream containing HHP-treated WSU WPC had almost 3 times the concentration of diacetyl compared with ice cream containing untreated WSU WPC at d 1 of storage. However, diacetyl was not detected in ice creams after 14 d of storage. Eighty percent of panelists were able to distinguish between low-fat ice creams containing untreated WSU WPC with and without diacetyl, confirming panelists' ability to detect diacetyl. However, panelists were not able to distinguish between low-fat ice creams containing untreated and HHP-treated WSU WPC with diacetyl. These results show that WPC diacetyl-binding properties were not enhanced by 300-MPa HHP treatment for 15 min, indicating that HHP may not be suitable for such applications. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dairy

  6. Chemical modification/grafting of mesoporous alumina with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinheiro de Melo, A.F.; Nijmeijer, Arian; Sripathi, V.G.P.; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.

    2015-01-01

    A method for polydimethylsiloxane grafting of alumina powders is described which involves chemical modification of the surface of mesoporous (5 nm) γ-alumina flakes with a linker (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane: APTES), either by a solution phase (SPD) or a vapour phase (VPD) reaction, followed by

  7. Functionality of whey proteins covalently modified by allyl isothiocyanate. Part 1 physicochemical and antibacterial properties of native and modified whey proteins at pH 2 to 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keppler, Julia Katharina; Martin, Dierk; Garamus, Vasil M.; Berton-Carabin, Claire; Nipoti, Elia; Coenye, Tom; Schwarz, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Whey protein isolate (WPI) (∼75% β-lactoglobulin (β-LG)) is frequently used in foods as a natural emulsifying agent. However, at an acidic pH value, its emulsification capacity is greatly reduced. The covalent attachment of natural electrophilic hydrophobic molecules to WPI proteins is a

  8. Utilizing whey protein isolate and polysaccharide complexes to stabilize aerated dairy gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Chiu, Emily; Vardhanabhuti, Bongkosh

    2017-05-01

    Heated soluble complexes of whey protein isolate (WPI) with polysaccharides may be used to modify the properties of aerated dairy gels, which could be formulated into novel-textured high-protein desserts. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of polysaccharide charge density and concentration within a WPI-polysaccharide complex on the physical properties of aerated gels. Three polysaccharides having different degrees of charge density were chosen: low-methoxyl pectin, high-methoxyl type D pectin, and guar gum. Heated complexes were prepared by heating the mixed dispersions (8% protein, 0 to 1% polysaccharide) at pH 7. To form aerated gels, 2% glucono-δ-lactone was added to the dispersions of skim milk powder and heated complex and foam was generated by whipping with a handheld frother. The foam set into a gel as the glucono-δ-lactone acidified to a final pH of 4.5. The aerated gels were evaluated for overrun, drainage, gel strength, and viscoelastic properties. Without heated complexes, stable aerated gels could not be formed. Overrun of aerated gel decreased (up to 73%) as polysaccharide concentration increased from 0.105 to 0.315% due to increased viscosity, which limited air incorporation. A negative relationship was found between percent drainage and dispersion viscosity. However, plotting of drainage against dispersion viscosity separated by polysaccharide type revealed that drainage decreased most in samples with high-charge-density, low-methoxyl pectin followed by those with low-charge-density, high-methoxyl type D pectin. Aerated gels with guar gum (no charge) did not show improvement to stability. Rheological results showed no significant difference in gelation time among samples; therefore, stronger interactions between WPI and high-charge-density polysaccharide were likely responsible for increased stability. Stable dairy aerated gels can be created from WPI-polysaccharide complexes. High-charge-density polysaccharides, at

  9. Effect of whey protein isolate and β-cyclodextrin wall systems on stability of microencapsulated vanillin by spray-freeze drying method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundre, Swetank Y; Karthik, P; Anandharamakrishnan, C

    2015-05-01

    Vanillin flavour is highly volatile in nature and due to that application in food incorporation is limited; hence microencapsulation of vanillin is an ideal technique to increase its stability and functionality. In this study, vanillin was microencapsulated for the first time by non-thermal spray-freeze-drying (SFD) technique and its stability was compared with other conventional techniques such as spray drying (SD) and freeze-drying (FD). Different wall materials like β-cyclodextrin (β-cyd), whey protein isolate (WPI) and combinations of these wall materials (β-cyd + WPI) were used to encapsulate vanillin. SFD microencapsulated vanillin with WPI showed spherical shape with numerous fine pores on the surface, which in turn exhibited good rehydration ability. On the other hand, SD powder depicted spherical shape without pores and FD encapsulated powder yielded larger particle sizes with flaky structure. FTIR analysis confirmed that there was no interaction between vanillin and wall materials. Moreover, spray-freeze-dried vanillin + WPI sample exhibited better thermal stability than spray dried and freeze-dried microencapsulated samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Skim milk, whey, and casein increase body weight and whey and casein increase the plasma C-peptide concentration in overweight adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnberg, Karina; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim Fleischer; Jensen, Signe Marie; Trolle, Ellen; Larnkjær, Anni

    2012-12-01

    In adults, dietary protein seems to induce weight loss and dairy proteins may be insulinotropic. However, the effect of milk proteins in adolescents is unclear. The objective was to test whether milk and milk proteins reduce body weight, waist circumference, homeostatic model assessment, plasma insulin, and insulin secretion estimated as the plasma C-peptide concentration in overweight adolescents. Overweight adolescents (n = 203) aged 12-15 y with a BMI of 25.4 ± 2.3 kg/m(2) (mean ± SD) were randomized to 1 L/d of skim milk, whey, casein, or water for 12 wk. All milk drinks contained 35 g protein/L. Before randomization, a subgroup of adolescents (n = 32) was studied for 12 wk before the intervention began as a pretest control group. The effects of the milk-based test drinks were compared with baseline (wk 0), the water group, and the pretest control group. Diet and physical activity were registered. Outcomes were BMI-for-age Z-scores (BAZs), waist circumference, plasma insulin, homeostatic model assessment, and plasma C-peptide. We found no change in BAZ in the pretest control and water groups, whereas it was greater at 12 wk in the skim milk, whey, and casein groups compared with baseline and with the water and pretest control groups. The plasma C-peptide concentration increased from baseline to wk 12 in the whey and casein groups and increments were greater than in the pretest control (P milk or water group. These data suggest that high intakes of skim milk, whey, and casein increase BAZs in overweight adolescents and that whey and casein increase insulin secretion. Whether the effect on body weight is primary or secondary to the increased insulin secretion remains to be elucidated.

  11. High-Pressure-High-Temperature Processing Reduces Maillard Reaction and Viscosity in Whey Protein-Sugar Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avila Ruiz, Geraldine; Xi, Bingyan; Minor, Marcel; Sala, Guido; Boekel, van Tiny; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Stieger, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of pressure in high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) processing on Maillard reactions and protein aggregation of whey protein-sugar solutions. Solutions of whey protein isolate containing either glucose or trehalose at pH 6, 7, and 9 were

  12. The prospects of using milk whey enriched with Mg and Mn in the technology of bakery products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Kochubei-Lytvynenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article the technological properties of milk whey, enriched with magnesium and manganese particles by electrical discharge dispersion of metal granules in the medium, and the effect of whey on the technological process and quality of bakery products have been examined. The results of theoretical and experimental studies of the quality of milk whey enriched with Mg and Mn has been presented. The toxicological studies has determined that the enrichment of milk whey with magnesium and manganese particles has not caused potentially harmful factors that could significantly affect the viability of cells of the HEK-293, L-929, PTP lines and their morphological features. The cells of the HEK-293 line were the most vulnerable to the effect of the whey, both untreated and treated by electrical discharge method, due to the low pH of the studied whey samples. The positive influence of enriched whey if applied in the amount of 15% to the mass of flour, on the physical, chemical and sensory qualities of bakery products, particularly the increase specific volume and shelf-life, has been proven. Much attention has been paid to the staling processes, associated with the retrograding and aging of the main biopolymers of bakery products. The relevance of the presented research is in expanding the possibilities of using enriched milk whey for bakery products for the elderly.

  13. Impact of protein pre-treatment conditions on the iron encapsulation efficiency of whey protein cold-set gel particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.H.; Jong, G.A.H. de

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the possibility for iron fortification of food using protein gel particles in which iron is entrapped using cold-set gelation. The aim is to optimize the iron encapsulation efficiency of whey protein by giving the whey protein different heat treatment prior to gelation with

  14. Microbial fuel cell coupled to biohydrogen reactor: a feasible technology to increase energy yield from cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, J; Fuentes, L; Cabezas, A; Etchebehere, C

    2017-06-01

    An important pollutant produced during the cheese making process is cheese whey which is a liquid by-product with high content of organic matter, composed mainly by lactose and proteins. Hydrogen can be produced from cheese whey by dark fermentation but, organic matter is not completely removed producing an effluent rich in volatile fatty acids. Here we demonstrate that this effluent can be further used to produce energy in microbial fuel cells. Moreover, current production was not feasible when using raw cheese whey directly to feed the microbial fuel cell. A maximal power density of 439 mW/m 2 was obtained from the reactor effluent which was 1000 times more than when using raw cheese whey as substrate. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing showed that potential electroactive populations (Geobacter, Pseudomonas and Thauera) were enriched on anodes of MFCs fed with reactor effluent while fermentative populations (Clostridium and Lactobacillus) were predominant on the MFC anode fed directly with raw cheese whey. This result was further demonstrated using culture techniques. A total of 45 strains were isolated belonging to 10 different genera including known electrogenic populations like Geobacter (in MFC with reactor effluent) and known fermentative populations like Lactobacillus (in MFC with cheese whey). Our results show that microbial fuel cells are an attractive technology to gain extra energy from cheese whey as a second stage process during raw cheese whey treatment by dark fermentation process.

  15. Biotechnological Utilization with a Focus on Anaerobic Treatment of Cheese Whey: Current Status and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aspasia A. Chatzipaschali

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cheese whey utilization is of major concern nowadays. Its high organic matter content, in combination with the high volumes produced and limited treatment options make cheese whey a serious environmental problem. However, the potential production of biogas (methane, hydrogen or other marketable products with a simultaneous high COD reduction through appropriate treatment proves that cheese whey must be considered as an energy resource rather than a pollutant. The presence of biodegradable components in the cheese whey coupled with the advantages of anaerobic digestion processes over other treatment methods makes anaerobic digestion an attractive and suitable treatment option. This paper intends to review the most representative applications of anaerobic treatment of cheese whey currently being exploited and under research. Moreover, an effort has been made to categorize the common characteristics of the various research efforts and find a comparative basis, as far as their results are concerned. In addition, a number of dairy industries already using such anaerobic digestion systems are presented.

  16. [Distribution of aflatoxin M1 in whey and curd during cheese processing (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiermeier, F; Buchner, M

    1977-06-30

    In model experiments on the distribution of aflatoxin M1 in whey and curd, the influence of the different processing steps was investigated. Taking the same weight ratio between whey and curd, the following results were obtained: a) The aflatoxin M1-distribution in whey and curd was not changed with increasing amounts of rennet, thus decreasing the renneting time at constant renneting temperatures. b) With increasing renneting temperatures, however, the toxin's percentage in the curd decreased at constant amounts of rennet, whereas the whey's content remained stable. For the commonly used temperature variations between 28 and 35 degrees C, the toxin content of the cheese varied in the range of about 12%. c) Processing of curd by acidification with different organic acids at constant temperatures did not show any change in the aflatoxin M1 distribution as compared to rennet coagulation. d) Curd processing by means of starter cultures led to a decrease in the aflatoxin M1 in curd only at higher temperatures; the toxin's percentage in whey remained practically the same. e) Washing of the curd with the 2 1/2 volumes of water decreased the aflatoxin M1 content of cheese by 22%.

  17. Whey utilization in furrow irrigation: effects on aggregate stability and erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrsch, Gary A; Robbins, Charles W; Brown, Melvin J

    2008-11-01

    Improving soil structure often reduces furrow erosion and maintains adequate infiltration. Cottage cheese whey, the liquid byproduct from cottage cheese manufacture, was utilized to stabilize soil aggregates and reduce sediment losses from furrow irrigation. We applied either 2.4 or 1.9L of whey per meter of furrow (3.15 or 2.49Lm(-2), respectively) by gravity flow without incorporation to two fields of Portneuf silt loam (Durinodic Xeric Haplocalcid) near Kimberly, ID. Furrows were irrigated with water beginning four days later. We measured sediment losses with furrow flumes during each irrigation and measured aggregate stability by wet sieving about 10 days after the last irrigation. Overall, whey significantly increased aggregate stability 25% at the 0-15mm depth and 14% at 15-30mm, compared to controls. On average, whey reduced sediment losses by 75% from furrows sloped at 2.4%. Whey increased the aggregate stability of structurally degraded calcareous soil in irrigation furrows.

  18. Lactose Hydrolysis in Milk and Dairy Whey Using Microbial β-Galactosidases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Dutra Rosolen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed at evaluating the influence of enzyme concentration, temperature, and reaction time in the lactose hydrolysis process in milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate, using two commercial β-galactosidases of microbial origins. We used Aspergillus oryzae (at temperatures of 10 and 55°C and Kluyveromyces lactis (at temperatures of 10 and 37°C β-galactosidases, both in 3, 6, and 9 U/mL concentrations. In the temperature of 10°C, the K. lactis β-galactosidase enzyme is more efficient in the milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate lactose hydrolysis when compared to A. oryzae. However, in the enzyme reaction time and concentration conditions evaluated, 100% lactose hydrolysis was not reached using the K. lactis β-galactosidase. The total lactose hydrolysis in whey and permeate was obtained with the A. oryzae enzyme, when using its optimum temperature (55°C, at the end of a 12 h reaction, regardless of the enzyme concentration used. For the lactose present in milk, this result occurred in the concentrations of 6 and 9 U/mL, with the same time and temperature conditions. The studied parameters in the lactose enzymatic hydrolysis are critical for enabling the application of β-galactosidases in the food industry.

  19. Obtention and characterization of dried gels prepared with whey proteins, honey and hydrocolloids mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ana C; Torrez Irigoyen, Martín R; Navarro, Alba S; Yamul, Diego K

    2017-11-01

    Large amounts of honey and liquid whey derived from the dairy industry are produced in Argentina. Honey is exported in bulk and whey is transformed into whey protein concentrates and isolates. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of pH, composition and storage time on the properties of dried gels with honey, whey proteins and hydrocolloids. Color properties varied according to pH and composition. The fracture stress of dried gels prepared with corn starch was higher than that of gels prepared with guar gum in all conditions assayed. Young's modulus was higher at pH 7 for both compositions and increased with storage time. Rubbery characteristics were found in dried gels with guar gum, while both corn starch and guar gum made the microstructure rougher. Multivariate analysis showed that samples could be grouped by pH. Panelists preferred pH 7 products over acidic ones, and no significant differences in sensory properties were found using either corn starch or guar gum in the formulation. The results demonstrated that it is possible to generate a new product, which may open new applications for honey and whey in food formulations. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Biotransformation of soy whey into soy alcoholic beverage by four commercial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Jian-Yong; Lu, Yuyun; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2017-12-04

    Soy whey is a liquid waste stream generated from tofu and soy protein manufacturing, and is commonly disposed of into the drainage system in food industry. Instead of disposing of soy whey as a waste, it could be used to produce alcoholic beverages. This study investigated the feasibility of converting soy whey into soy alcoholic beverage using four commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains as a zero-waste approach to tackle the soy whey disposal issue. The four Saccharomyces yeasts grew by approximately 2logCFU/mL and produced approximately 7-8% (v/v) of ethanol. Isoflavone glucosides were hydrolyzed and transformed into isoflavone aglycones, increasing the antioxidant capacity. New aroma-active volatiles, especially esters and higher alcohols, were produced and imparted fruity and floral notes to the soy alcoholic beverage. Therefore, alcoholic fermentation would serve as a solution toward zero-waste manufacturing by biotransforming soy whey into a world's first novel functional alcoholic beverage naturally enriched with free isoflavones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure and shear in a cohesive powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Handling of powders and granular materials is of great importance to industry. However, the knowledge of many powder related processes in industry is poor. In this work, the flow behaviour of powder has been investigated with an advanced tester: the Flexible Wall Biaxial Tester. Flow of powder

  2. Effect of maize, rumen-protected fat and whey permeate on energy utilisation and milk fat composition in lactating goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Battelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of utilisation of diets with different proportions of energy sources (starch, fat, lactose was studied with three pairs of lactating Saanen goats; the animals were fed, in a Latin square design, 3 silage-based diets containing (on DM basis the following energy sources: 32% maize meal (diet M; 4.7% rumen-protected fat (Megalac® and 23.5% maize meal (diet F; 9.8% milk whey permeate powder and 22.3% maize meal (diet W. During each of the three experimental periods, 8 days of total collection balance trials were conducted during which goats were allocated for 72 h (three 24 h cycles in open circuit respiration chambers to determine methane and heat production and, hence, the energy balance. Diet F, in comparison with diets M and W, significantly increased the milk fat content (4.13 vs 3.11 and 3.14%, P<0.001 and the 4%-FCM yield (3367 vs 2927 and 3055 g/d, P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively, while no relevant changes were observed for milk protein content and yield. Energy digestibility was equal in diets F and W. Megalac® did not decrease fibre digestibility. The partition of the gross energy intake (EI differed significantly between diets: diet M had lower DE (72.4 vs 74.3 and 74.3%; P<0.01 and ME (62.1 vs 64.7 and 63.5%; P<0.05 in comparison with diets F and W, respectively. Energy lost as methane was not significantly decreased by the inclusion of rumen- protected fat in the diet, although a trend for a reduction of methanogenesis was observed. Heat production deter- mined by treatment F was lower in comparison with the other treatments. This difference was almost significant (P=0.056 when expressed as a percentage of the ME. Milk energy output increased significantly (+12%, P<0.001 by including fat in the diet, as compared with treatments M and W: 21.4 vs 19.1 and 19.0% of the EI. The net ener- gy content of the protected fat was 27.94 MJ NEl/kg DM (+340% vs maize meal; its kl value resulted 0.77. The corresponding values for whey

  3. Mass spectrometry detection of fraudulent use of cow whey in water buffalo, sheep, or goat Italian ricotta cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerini, Serena; Montepeloso, Emanuela; Casella, Marialuisa; Crescenzi, Marco; Marianella, Rosa Maria; Fuselli, Fabio

    2016-04-15

    Ricotta cheese is a typical Italian product, made with whey from various species, including cow, buffalo, sheep, and goat. Ricotta cheese nominally manufactured from the last three species may be fraudulently produced using the comparatively cheaper cow whey. Exposing such food frauds requires a reliable analytical method. Despite the extensive similarities shared by whey proteins of the four species, a mass spectrometry-based analytical method was developed that exploits three species-specific peptides derived from β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin. This method can detect as little as 0.5% bovine whey in ricotta cheese from the other three species. Furthermore, a tight correlation was found (R(2)>0.99) between cow whey percentages and mass spectrometry measurements throughout the 1-50% range. Thus, this method can be used for forensic detection of ricotta cheese adulteration and, if properly validated, to provide quantitative evaluations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Binding between bixin and whey protein at pH 7.4 studied by spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhong, Qixin

    2012-02-22

    Bixin is the major coloring component of annatto used in manufacturing colored cheeses, but its presence in liquid whey causes undesirable quality of the recovered whey protein ingredients. The objective of this work was to study molecular binding between bixin and three major whey proteins (β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, and bovine serum albumin) at pH 7.4 using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and circular dichroism. These complementary techniques illustrated that the binding is a spontaneous complexation process mainly driven by hydrophobic interactions. The complexation is favored at a lower temperature and a higher ionic strength. At a lower temperature, the binding is entropy-driven, while it changes to an enthalpy-driven process at higher temperatures. The binding also increases the percentage of unordered secondary structures of proteins. Findings from this work can be used to develop whey protein recovery processes for minimizing residual annatto content in whey protein ingredients.

  5. Penetrometry and estimation of the flow rate of powder excipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatloukal, Z; Sklubalová, Z

    2007-03-01

    In this work, penetrometry with a sphere was employed to study the flow properties of non-consolidated pharmaceutical powder excipients: sodium chloride, sodium citrate, boric acid, and sorbitol. In order to estimate flow rate, the pressure of penetration in Pascals was used. Penetrometry measurement with a sphere requires modification of the measurement container, in particular by decreasing the diameter of the container, to prevent undesirable movement of material in a direction opposite to that in which the sphere penetrates. Thus penetrometry by a sphere seems to be similar to indentation by the Brinell hardness tester. The pressure of penetration was determined from the depth of penetration by analogy with the Brinell hardness number and an equation for the inter conversion of the two variables is presented. The penetration pressure allowed direct estimation of the flow rate only for those powder excipients with a size fraction in the range of 0.250-0.630 mm. Using the ratio of penetration pressure to bulk density, a polynomial quadratic equation was generated from which the flow rates for the group of all tested powders could be estimated. Finally, if the inverse ratio of bulk density and penetration pressure was used as an independent variable, the flow rate could be estimated by linear regression with the coefficient of determination r2 = 0.9941. In conclusion, using sphere penetrometry, the flow properties of non-consolidated powder samples could be investigated by indentation. As a result, a linear regression in which the flow rate was directly proportional to the powder bulk density and inversely proportional to the penetration pressure could be best recommended for the estimation of the flow rate of powder excipients.

  6. On the Methods to Measure Powder Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Geoffrey; Morton, David A V; Larson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The flow of powders can often play a critical role in the manufacturing of pharmaceutical products. Many of these processes require good, consistent and predictable flow of powders to ensure continuous production of pharmaceutical dosages and to ensure their quality. Therefore, the flow of powders is of paramount importance to the pharmaceutical industry and thus the measuring and evaluating of powder flow is of utmost importance. At present, there are numerous methods in which the flow of powders can be measured. However, due to the complex and environment-dependent nature of powders, no one method exists that is capable of providing a complete picture of the behaviour of powders under dynamic conditions. Some of the most commonly applied methods to measure the flow of powders include: density indices, such as the Carr index and Hausner ratio, powder avalanching, the angle of repose (AOR), flow through an orifice, powder rheometry and shear cell testing.

  7. DIAFILTRATION OF ULTRAFILTRATION RETENTATE OF WHEY FROM WHITE BRINED CHEESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria DUSHKOVA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Whey diafiltration was carried out with a UF25-PAN polyacrylnitrilic membrane with 25 kDa molecular weight cut-off at volume reduction factors (VRF VRF=2, VRF=4, VRF=6, VRF=8, VRF=10. The values of the principal components dry matter, protein, lactose and mineral substances in the retentates and permeate obtained were established. The relative shares of protein, lactose and mineral substances in the dry matter, the concentration factor (CF values for dry matter, protein, lactose and mineral substances, and the protein retention factor (RF were determined. Linear models were created for the CF of each investigated component according to the VRF, and a logarithmic model was developed for the protein RF according to the VRF. The results obtained demonstrated the efficiency of diafiltration for deep treatment aimed at a further elimination of lactose and mineral substances and subsequent utilization of the diafiltration concentrates low in lactose and mineral substances as a liquid supplement in the manufacture of extruded cereal products.

  8. Antioxidant Effects of Sheep Whey Protein on Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthalia Kerasioti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS may cause endothelial dysfunction and consequently vascular disease. In the present study, the possible protective effects of sheep whey protein (SWP from tert-butyl hydroperoxide- (tBHP- induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells (EA.hy926 were assessed using oxidative stress biomarkers. These oxidative stress biomarkers were glutathione (GSH and ROS levels determined by flow cytometry. Moreover, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS, protein carbonyls (CARB, and oxidized glutathione (GSSG were determined spectrophotometrically. The results showed that SWP at 0.78, 1.56, 3.12, and 6.24 mg of protein mL−1 increased GSH up to 141%, while it decreased GSSG to 46.7%, ROS to 58.5%, TBARS to 52.5%, and CARB to 49.0%. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that SWP protected endothelial cells from oxidative stress. Thus, SWP may be used for developing food supplements or biofunctional foods to attenuate vascular disturbances associated with oxidative stress.

  9. In Vitro Digestibility of Rapeseed and Bovine Whey Protein Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joehnke, Marcel Skejovic; Rehder, Alina; Sørensen, Susanne; Bjergegaard, Charlotte; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Markedal, Keld Ejdrup

    2018-01-24

    Partial replacement of animal protein sources with plant proteins is highly relevant for the food industry, but potential effects on protein digestibility need to be established. In this study, the in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD) of four protein sources and their mixtures (50:50 w/w ratio) was investigated using a transient pepsin hydrolysis (1 h) followed by pancreatin (1 h). The protein sources consisted of napin-rich rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) protein concentrates (RPCs; RP1, RP2) prepared in pilot scale and major bovine whey proteins (WPs; α-LA, alpha-lactalbumin; β-LG, beta-lactoglobulin). IVPD of individual protein sources was higher for WPs compared to RPCs. The RP2/β-LG mixture resulted in an unexpected high IVPD equivalent to β-LG protein alone. Protein mixtures containing RP1 showed a new IVPD response type due to the negative influence of a high trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA) level. Improved IVPD of RP1 alone and in protein mixtures was obtained by lowering the TIA level using dithiothreitol (DTT). These results showed that napin-rich protein products prepared by appropriate processing can be combined with specific WPs in mixtures to improve the IVPD.

  10. Stable isotope characterization of milk components and whey ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masud, Z; Vallet, C; Martin, G J

    1999-11-01

    A multi-isotopic study of several components of milk has been carried out on commercial samples and on milk produced in feeding experiments involving different kinds of diets originating from C(3) or C(4) photosynthetic metabolisms and exhibiting a relatively wide range of isotope ratios. The dispersion of the carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotope parameters of dried matter and of the lactose, protein, and lipid components has been estimated. In addition, the carbohydrates were represented by the site specific isotope ratios (SNIF-NMR) of ethanol resulting from standardized fermentation of lactose. The rates of response of the isotopic parameters to changes in the feeding materials is slower for the minor components, proteins, and lipids than for lactose and ethanol. For similar diets, the nonexchangeable sites of lactose and the methyl site of ethanol, in particular, are relatively enriched in deuterium in the case of polygastric animals, cow, goat, and ewe, as compared to the monogastric species, sow and mare, and woman. From an analytical point of view, the carbon and hydrogen parameters of ethanol provide efficient criteria for identifying a whey origin with respect to other agricultural and fossil sources.

  11. Development of a Reproducible Powder Characterization Method using a Powder Rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Søren Vinter; Allesø, Morten; Garnæs, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a powder rheometer was used to measure flow characteristics of two pharmaceutical model powders. Precise measurements were obtained for one of the model powders whereas the results were less precise for the second powder. In conclusion, further work is needed to increase...... the mechanistic understanding of powder rheological measurements....

  12. Behavior Modification in Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Annette Rutt; Stillman, Stephen M.

    1979-01-01

    An example of behavior modification used in athletic coaching is presented. The case study involves a member of a women's basketball team and details the use of behavior modification for both weight reduction and skill improvement. (JMF)

  13. Effects of hydrolysed casein, intact casein and intact whey protein on energy expenditure and appetite regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist; Lorenzen, Janne Kunchel; Gomes, Sisse

    2014-01-01

    Casein and whey differ in amino acid composition and in the rate of absorption; however, the absorption rate of casein can be increased to mimic that of whey by exogenous hydrolysis. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of hydrolysed casein (HC), intact casein (IC......) and intact whey (IW) on energy expenditure (EE) and appetite regulation, and thereby to investigate the influence of amino acid composition and the rate of absorption. In the present randomised cross-over study, twenty-four overweight and moderately obese young men and women consumed three isoenergetic...... dietary treatments that varied in protein source. The study was conducted in a respiration chamber, where EE, substrate oxidation and subjective appetite were measured over 24 h at three independent visits. Moreover, blood and urine samples were collected from the participants. The results showed...

  14. Fractionation of whey proteins with high-capacity superparamagnetic ion-exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heebøll-Nielsen, Anders; Justesen, S.F.L.; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we describe the design, preparation and testing of superparamagnetic anion-exchangers, and their use together with cation-exchangers in the fractionation of bovine whey proteins as a model study for high-gradient magnetic fishing. Adsorbents prepared by attachment of trimethyl amine...... to 337 mg g(-1) with a dissociation constant of 0.042 muM. The latter anion-exchanger was selected for studies of whey protein fractionation. In these, crude bovine whey was treated with a superparamagnetic cation-exchanger to adsorb basic protein species, and the supernatant arising from this treatment......) was achieved with some simultaneous binding of immunoglobulins (1g). The immunoglobulins were separated from the other two proteins by desorbing with a low concentration of NaCl (less than or equal to0.4 M), whereas lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase were co-eluted in significantly purer form, e...

  15. Fractionation of whey proteins with high-capacity superparamagnetic ion-exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heebøll-Nielsen, Anders; Justesen, Sune; Thomas, Owen R. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we describe the design, preparation and testing of superparamagnetic anion-exchangers, and their use together with cation-exchangers in the fractionation of bovine whey proteins as a model study for high-gradient magnetic fishing. Adsorbents prepared by attachment of trimethyl amine...... to 337 mg g-1 with a dissociation constant of 0.042 µM. The latter anion-exchanger was selected for studies of whey protein fractionation. In these, crude bovine whey was treated with a superparamagnetic cation-exchanger to adsorb basic protein species, and the supernatant arising from this treatment......) was achieved with some simultaneous binding of immunoglobulins (Ig). The immunoglobulins were separated from the other two proteins by desorbing with a low concentration of NaCl (=0.4 M), whereas lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase were co-eluted in significantly purer form, e.g. lactoperoxidase was purified 28...

  16. Characteristics of activated carbon and carbon nanotubes as adsorbents to remove annatto (norbixin) in cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Pan, Kang; Zhong, Qixin

    2013-09-25

    Removing annatto from cheese whey without bleaching has potential to improve whey protein quality. In this work, the potential of two activated carbon products and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT) was studied for extracting annatto (norbixin) in aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption experiments were studied for the effects of solution pH, adsorbent mass, contact duration, and ionic strength. The equilibrium adsorption data were observed to fit both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The thermodynamic parameters estimated from adsorption isotherms demonstrated that the adsorption of norbixin on three adsorbents is exothermic, and the entropic contribution differs with adsorbent structure. The adsorption kinetics, with CNT showing a higher rate than activated carbon, followed the pseudo first order and second order rate expressions and demonstrated the significance of intraparticle diffusion. Electrostatic interactions were observed to be significant in the adsorption. The established adsorption parameters may be used in the dairy industry to decolorize cheese whey without applying bleaching agents.

  17. Comparison of two lipid extraction methods produced by yeast in cheese whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fernandes Castanha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate nine strains of yeast, previously identified as good producers of lipids in honey medium, for selecting the most suitable strain for the production of lipids in cheese whey medium and compared two well known extraction methods of lipids from the culture medium. The highest yield of total lipids was 1.27 g.L-1 produced by Cryptococcus laurentii 11. A comparison was made between the two culture media: cheese whey and liquid YEPG, and two lipid extraction methods: Bligh and Dyer and Folch et al. for C. laurentii. The experiments were performed with 2² full factorial design using two factors and two levels. Lipid content was higher in cheese whey and there was no difference in the extraction methods statistically. The method of Bligh and Dyer was used in preference to Folch et al. as it resulted in larger mean of total lipids.

  18. Individual whey protein components influence lipid oxidation dependent on pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    In emulsions, lipid oxidation is expected to be initiated at the oil-water interface. The properties of the emulsifier used and the composition at the interface is therefore expected to be of great importance for the resulting oxidation. Previous studies have shown that individual whey protein...... by affecting the preferential adsorption of whey protein components at the interface. The aim of the study was to compare lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared with 1% whey protein having either a high concentration of α-lactalbumin, a high concentration of β-lactoglobulin or equal...... components (α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin) adsorb differently to the interface depending on pH. In addition, differences has been shown to exists between the oxidative stability provided by α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin. The hypothesis is that pH influences the oxidative stability of emulsions...

  19. Use of acid whey and mustard seed to replace nitrites during cooked sausage production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójciak, Karolina M; Karwowska, Małgorzata; Dolatowski, Zbigniew J

    2014-02-01

    The aim was to determine the effects of sea salt, acid whey, native and autoclaved mustard seed on the physico-chemical properties, especially colour formation, microbial stability and sensory evaluation of non-nitrite cooked sausage during chilling storage. The cooked pork sausages were divided into 4 groups (group I--control sausages with curing salt (2.8%) and water (5%) added; group II--sausages with sea salt (2.8%) and acid whey (5%) added; group III--sausages with sea salt (2.8%), acid whey (5%) and mustard seed (1%) added; group IV--sausages with sea salt (2.8%), acid whey (5%) and autoclaved mustard seed (1%) added). Instrumental colour (L*, a*, b*), oxygenation index (ΔR), 650/570 nm ratio, heme iron, pH value and water activity (aw) were determined 1 day after production and after 10, 20 and 30 days of refrigerated storage (4 °C). Sensory analysis was conducted immediately after production (day 1). Microbial analysis (lactic acid bacteria, total viable count, Clostridium spp.) was determinated at the end of storage (30 days). The autoclaved mustard with acid whey can be used at 1.0% (w/w) of model cooked sausages with beneficial effect on physico-chemical and sensory qualities of no-nitrite sausage. This product can be stored at refrigeration temperature for up to 30 days, in vacuum, with good acceptability. The colour, visual appearance and overall quality of samples with autoclaved mustard seed and acid whey were similar to the control with curing agent. © 2013.

  20. Fat and whey supplementation influence milk composition, backfat loss, and reproductive performance in lactating sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummaruk, Padet; Sumransap, Peerapong; Jiebna, Nithitad

    2014-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of microencapsulated fat (FAT) and whey protein (WHEY) supplementation on the milk composition, backfat loss, and reproductive performance in lactating sows. A total of 144 sows were divided according to their backfat thickness at farrowing into three groups, i.e., low (12.0-16.5 mm, n = 33), moderate (17.0-21.5 mm, n = 78), and high (22.0-24.5 mm, n = 33). The lactation diet was divided into three types, i.e., a control diet (CONTROL, n = 50), a diet supplemented with FAT (n = 48), and a diet supplemented with WHEY (n = 50). Pooled milk samples were collected at the second and third week of lactation. On average, the sows lost backfat 23.5 % during lactation. The backfat loss during lactation was 24.5, 22.7, and 22.8 % in sows fed with CONTROL, FAT, and WHEY diets, respectively (P > 0.05). Supplementation of FAT increased the percentage of fat in the sow's milk compared to the CONTROL (9.1 and 8.4 %, P = 0.022). For sows with low backfat, FAT and WHEY supplementation increased the average daily gain of piglets compared to the CONTROL (244, 236, and 205 g/days, respectively, P FAT or WHEY (28.1, 14.1, and 13.0 %, respectively, P FAT in the diet of sow during lactation significantly enhanced the fat content in the sow's milk, improved the piglet's daily weight gain, and reduced piglet mortality.

  1. ISOLATION OF PROTEIN MINERAL CONCENTRATES AT ELECTROPHYSICAL PROCESSING OF WHEY IN STATIONARY REGIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRCEA BOLOGA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the study of isolation of protein mineral concentrates at the electrophysical processing of whey, which is practically important for food industry, as one. In the focus of attention were variations of the: electric current strength, energy consumption, pH values, and the degree of the isolations of proteins at different current densities. As a result, the optimal degree of the isolation of proteins at the stationary regime was determined, which heavily depends on the primary processing of milk as well as on the solid matter content and protein of the initial whey.

  2. Dataset of milk whey proteins of two indigenous greek goat breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Katsafadou, Angeliki I; Pierros, Vasileios; Kontopodis, Evangelos; Fthenakis, George C; Arsenos, George; Karkabounas, Spyridon Ch; Tzora, Athina; Skoufos, Ioannis; Tsangaris, George Th

    2016-09-01

    Due to its rarity and unique biological traits, as well as its growing financial value, milk of dairy Greek small ruminants is continuously attracting interest from both the scientific community and industry. For the construction of the present dataset, cutting-edge proteomics methodologies were employed, in order to investigate and characterize, for the first time, the milk whey proteome from the two indigenous Greek goat breeds, Capra prisca and Skopelos. In total 822 protein groups were identified in milk whey of the two breeds, The present data are further discussed in the research article "Milk of Greek sheep and goat breeds; characterization by means of proteomics" [1].

  3. Biochemical and clinical effects of Whey protein supplementation in Parkinson's disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosukhowong, Piyaratana; Boonla, Chanchai; Dissayabutra, Thasinas; Kaewwilai, Lalita; Muensri, Sasipa; Chotipanich, Chanisa; Joutsa, Juho; Rinne, Juha; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj

    2016-08-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an oxidative stress-mediated degenerative disorder. Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) is frequently found in the levodopa-treated PD patients, is associated with disease progression and is a marker of oxidative stress. Whey protein is a rich source of cysteine, and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). It has been shown that supplementation with Whey protein increases glutathione synthesis and muscle strength. In this study, we conducted a placebo-controlled, double-blind study (NCT01662414) to investigate the effects of undenatured Whey protein isolate supplementation for 6months on plasma glutathione, plasma amino acids, and plasma Hcy in PD patients. Clinical outcome assessments included the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) and striatal L-3,4-dihydroxy-6-(18)F-fluorophenylalanine (FDOPA) uptake were determined before and after supplementation. 15 patients received Whey protein, and 17 received Soy protein, served as a control group. Significant increases in plasma concentration of reduced glutathione and the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione were found in the Whey-supplemented patients but not in a control group. This was associated with a significant decrease of plasma levels of Hcy. The plasma levels of total glutathione were not significantly changed in either group. Plasma BCAA and essential amino acids (EAA) were significantly increased in the Whey-supplemented group only. The UPDRS and striatal FDOPA uptake in PD patients were not significantly ameliorated in either group. However, significant negative correlation was observed between the UPDRS and plasma BCAA and EAA in the pre-supplemented PD patients. This study is the first to report that Whey protein supplementation significantly increases plasma reduced glutathione, the reduced to oxidized glutathione ratio, BCAAs and EAAs in patients with PD, together with a concomitant significant reduction of plasma Hcy. However, there were no significant changes in

  4. Dataset of milk whey proteins of two indigenous greek goat breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios K. Anagnostopoulos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to its rarity and unique biological traits, as well as its growing financial value, milk of dairy Greek small ruminants is continuously attracting interest from both the scientific community and industry. For the construction of the present dataset, cutting-edge proteomics methodologies were employed, in order to investigate and characterize, for the first time, the milk whey proteome from the two indigenous Greek goat breeds, Capra prisca and Skopelos. In total 822 protein groups were identified in milk whey of the two breeds, The present data are further discussed in the research article “Milk of Greek sheep and goat breeds; characterization by means of proteomics” [1].

  5. Short communication: norbixin and bixin partitioning in Cheddar cheese and whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T J; Li, X E; Drake, M A

    2014-01-01

    The Cheddar cheese colorant annatto is present in whey and must be removed by bleaching. Chemical bleaching negatively affects the flavor of dried whey ingredients, which has established a need for a better understanding of the primary colorant in annatto, norbixin, along with cheese color alternatives. The objective of this study was to determine norbixin partitioning in cheese and whey from full-fat and fat-free Cheddar cheese and to determine the viability of bixin, the nonpolar form of norbixin, as an alternative Cheddar cheese colorant. Full-fat and fat-free Cheddar cheeses and wheys were manufactured from colored pasteurized milk. Three norbixin (4% wt/vol) levels (7.5, 15, and 30 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk) were used for full-fat Cheddar cheese manufacture, and 1 norbixin level was evaluated in fat-free Cheddar cheese (15 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk). For bixin incorporation, pasteurized whole milk was cooled to 55 °C, and then 60 mL of bixin/454 kg of milk (3.8% wt/vol bixin) was added and the milk homogenized (single stage, 8 MPa). Milk with no colorant and milk with norbixin at 15 mL/454 kg of milk were processed analogously as controls. No difference was found between the norbixin partition levels of full-fat and fat-free cheese and whey (cheese mean: 79%, whey: 11.2%). In contrast to norbixin recovery (9.3% in whey, 80% in cheese), 1.3% of added bixin to cheese milk was recovered in the homogenized, unseparated cheese whey, concurrent with higher recoveries of bixin in cheese (94.5%). These results indicate that fat content has no effect on norbixin binding or entrapment in Cheddar cheese and that bixin may be a viable alternative colorant to norbixin in the dairy industry. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. At same leucine intake, a whey/plant protein blend is not as effective as whey to initiate a transient post prandial muscle anabolic response during a catabolic state in mini pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélia Revel

    Full Text Available Muscle atrophy has been explained by an anabolic resistance following food intake and an increase of dietary protein intake is recommended. To be optimal, a dietary protein has to be effective not only to initiate but also to prolong a muscle anabolic response in a catabolic state. To our knowledge, whether or not a dairy or a dairy/plant protein blend fulfills these criterions is unknown in a muscle wasting situation.Our aim was, in a control and a catabolic state, to measure continuously muscle anabolism in term of intensity and duration in response to a meal containing casein (CAS, whey (WHEY or a whey/ plant protein blend (BLEND and to evaluate the best protein source to elicit the best post prandial anabolism according to the physio-pathological state.Adult male Yucatan mini pigs were infused with U-13C-Phenylalanine and fed either CAS, WHEY or BLEND. A catabolic state was induced by a glucocorticoid treatment for 8 days (DEX. Muscle protein synthesis, proteolysis and balance were measured with the hind limb arterio-venous differences technique. Repeated time variance analysis were used to assess significant differences.In a catabolic situation, whey proteins were able to initiate muscle anabolism which remained transient in contrast to the stimulated muscle protein accretion with WHEY, CAS or BLEND in healthy conditions. Despite the same leucine intake compared to WHEY, BLEND did not restore a positive protein balance in DEX animals.Even with WHEY, the duration of the anabolic response was not optimal and has to be improved in a catabolic state. The use of BLEND remained of lower efficiency even at same leucine intake than whey.

  7. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in powdered infant formula using IS900 quantitative PCR and liquid culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Kamal R; Dhand, Navneet K; Whittington, Richard J; Plain, Karren M

    2017-09-18

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) has been implicated in Crohn's disease in humans resulting in public concern over the presence of MAP in powdered infant formula, which could contribute towards early human exposure to MAP or MAP components. Testing of representative powdered infant formula samples using effective tests is required to provide information on contamination of infant formula with MAP, so that consumers can make informed decisions. This study aimed to test representative powdered infant formula samples for the presence of MAP using a quantitative PCR and liquid culture method. For this purpose, an efficient DNA extraction method was developed and an optimum decontamination protocol for culture method was identified. A total of 122 powdered infant formula samples were tested, comprising 72 brands produced by 12 manufacturers from 9 countries. Powdered infant formula samples were reconstituted and centrifuged to separate the casein pellet, cream layer and whey fraction. A sensitive qPCR test was performed on DNA extracted from the casein pellet. In addition, the cream layer and casein pellet were cultured in liquid media, following decontamination with the optimum protocol. Of the 122 samples tested, 6 were positive for MAP DNA but none were positive for growth in culture at 12 and 20 weeks. The limit of detection of the quantitative PCR was less than 5 MAP organisms per 1.5g milk powder. The methods developed in the study could be used for quality assurance testing for infant formula and calf milk replacers. The low contamination level of MAP and absence of viable forms in our study suggests a relatively low risk of exposure of infants to MAP components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A whey protein supplement decreases post-prandial glycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Alexandra L

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incidence of diabetes, obesity and insulin resistance are associated with high glycemic load diets. Identifying food components that decrease post-prandial glycemia may be beneficial for developing low glycemic foods and supplements. This study explores the glycemic impact of adding escalating doses of a glycemic index lowering peptide fraction (GILP from whey to a glucose drink. Methods Ten healthy subjects (3M, 7F, 44.4 ± 9.3 years, BMI 33.6 ± 4.8 kg/m2 participated in an acute randomised controlled study. Zero, 5, 10 and 20 g of protein from GILP were added to a 50 g glucose drink. The control (0 g of GILP meal was repeated 2 times. Capillary blood samples were taken fasting (0 min and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after the start of the meal and analyzed for blood glucose concentration. Results Increasing doses of GILP decreased the incremental areas under the curve in a dose dependant manner (Pearson's r = 0.48, p = 0.002. The incremental areas (iAUC under the glucose curve for the 0, 5, 10, and 20 g of protein from GILP were 231 ± 23, 212 ± 23, 196 ± 23, and 138 ± 13 mmol.min/L respectively. The iAUC of the 20 g GILP was significantly different from control, 5 g GILP and 10 g GILP (p Conclusion Addition of GILP to a oral glucose bolus reduces blood glucose iAUC in a dose dependent manner and averages 4.6 ± 1.4 mmol.min/L per gram of GILP. These data are consistent with previous research on the effect of protein on the glycemic response of a meal.

  9. Nutritional management of PKU with glycomacropeptide from cheese whey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, S. T.; van Calcar, S. C.; MacLeod, E. L.; Nelson, K. L.; Etzel, M. R.; Rice, G. M.; Wolff, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Individuals with phenylketonuria (PKU) must follow a lifelong low-phenylalanine (Phe) diet to prevent neurological impairment. Compliance with the low-Phe diet is often poor owing to restriction in natural foods and the requirement for consumption of a Phe-free amino acid formula or medical food. Glycomacropeptide (GMP), a natural protein produced during cheese-making, is uniquely suited to a low-Phe diet because when isolated from cheese whey it contains minimal Phe (2.5–5 mg Phe/g protein). This paper reviews progress in evaluating the safety, acceptability and efficacy of GMP in the nutritional management of PKU. A variety of foods and beverages can be made with GMP to improve the taste, variety and convenience of the PKU diet. Sensory studies in individuals with PKU demonstrate that GMP foods are acceptable alternatives to amino acid medical foods. Studies in the PKU mouse model demonstrate that GMP supplemented with limiting indispensable amino acids provides a nutritionally adequate source of protein and improves the metabolic phenotype by reducing concentrations of Phe in plasma and brain. A case report in an adult with classical PKU who followed the GMP diet for 10 weeks at home indicates safety, acceptability of GMP food products, a 13–14% reduction in blood Phe levels (p<0.05) and improved distribution of dietary protein throughout the day compared with the amino acid diet. In summary, food products made with GMP that is supplemented with limiting indispensable amino acids provide a palatable alternative source of protein that may improve dietary compliance and metabolic control of PKU. PMID:18956251

  10. Metabolic effects of amino acid mixtures and whey protein in healthy subjects: studies using glucose-equivalent drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Mikael; Holst, Jens J; Björck, Inger Me

    2007-04-01

    Milk protein, in particular the whey fraction, has been shown to display insulinotrophic properties in healthy persons and persons with type 2 diabetes. In parallel to the hyperinsulinemia, a pronounced postprandial rise of certain amino acids and of glucose-dependent insulinotrophic polypeptide (GIP) was observed in plasma. The objective of the study was to determine to what extent the insulinotrophic properties of whey could be simulated by specific amino acid mixtures. Twelve healthy volunteers were served drinks consisting of pure glucose (reference drink) or glucose supplemented with free amino acids or whey proteins (test drinks). A test drink with the branched-chain amino acids isoleucine, leucine, and valine resulted in significantly higher insulin responses than did the glucose reference. A drink containing glucose and leucine, isoleucine, valine, lysine, and threonine mimicked the glycemic and insulinemic responses seen after whey ingestion. With consumption of this drink, the glucose area under the curve (AUC) was 44% smaller (P drink. With consumption of the whey drink, the AUCs were 56% smaller (glucose; P drink. The whey drink was accompanied by an 80% greater GIP response (P drinks containing free amino acids did not significantly affect GIP secretion. A mixture of leucine, isoleucine, valine, lysine, and threonine resulted in glycemic and insulinemic responses closely mimicking those seen after whey ingestion in the absence of an additional effect of GIP and glucagon-like peptide 1.

  11. Protein characterization of pasteurized milk, cheese whey and their mixtures by using the CEM SprintTM analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Moura Paiva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the protein analyzer SprintTM was assessed regarding its capacity of predicting addition of whey in milk. This type of practice is relatively common in dairy plants, since whey, as it is a protein component, may be added with little loss of milk protein content. Besides,its incorrect elimination contributes to environmental pollution. Mixtures of milk and whey were prepared in different levels of addition and two methods of milk partition were tested. The results indicated that the concentration of trichloroacetic acid (TCA from the selected method was not suitable for the present purpose while the chosen method using glacial acetic acid (GAA has presented a satisfactory separation of the soluble and insoluble milk components. Even though the concentration of whey protein and casein are the essential parameters for determining whey addition in milk, the use of measurements from total protein was important in order to improve the linearity of the method due to the fact that the rates whey protein/total protein and casein/total protein presented the best results concerning fraud prediction capacity. Therefore, as the equipment is a rapid, safe and efficient platform, it can be used as an alternative to be implemented in laboratories of food quality control which perform or plan to perform assays to verify the whey addition in fluid milk.

  12. A Multi-Omics Approach to Evaluate the Quality of Milk Whey Used in Ricotta Cheese Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattin, Eleonora; Andreani, Nadia A.; Carraro, Lisa; Lucchini, Rosaria; Fasolato, Luca; Telatin, Andrea; Balzan, Stefania; Novelli, Enrico; Simionati, Barbara; Cardazzo, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In the past, milk whey was only a by-product of cheese production, but currently, it has a high commercial value for use in the food industries. However, the regulation of whey management (i.e., storage and hygienic properties) has not been updated, and as a consequence, its microbiological quality is very challenging for food safety. The Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technique was applied to several whey samples used for Ricotta production to evaluate the microbial community composition in depth using both RNA and DNA as templates for NGS library construction. Whey samples demonstrating a high microbial and aerobic spore load contained mostly Firmicutes; although variable, some samples contained a relevant amount of Gammaproteobacteria. Several lots of whey acquired as raw material for Ricotta production presented defective organoleptic properties. To define the volatile compounds in normal and defective whey samples, a headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis was conducted. The statistical analysis demonstrated that different microbial communities resulted from DNA or cDNA library sequencing, and distinguishable microbiota composed the communities contained in the organoleptic-defective whey samples. PMID:27582735

  13. Utilization of Cheese Whey Using Synergistic Immobilization of β-Galactosidase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells in Dual Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkiligadda, Anusha; Beniwal, Arun; Saini, Priyanka; Vij, Shilpa

    2016-08-01

    Whey is a byproduct of the dairy industry, which has prospects of using as a source for production of various valuable compounds. The lactose present in whey is considered as an environmental pollutant and its utilization for enzyme and fuel production, may be effective for whey bioremediation. The dairy yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus have the ability to utilize lactose sharply as the major carbon source for the production of the enzyme. Five strains were tested for the production of the β-galactosidase using whey. The maximum β-galactosidase activity of 1.74 IU/mg dry weight was achieved in whey using K. marxianus MTCC 1389. The biocatalyst was further immobilized on chitosan macroparticles and exhibited excellent functional activity at 35 °C. Almost 89 % lactose hydrolysis was attained for concentrated whey (100 g/L) and retained 89 % catalytic activity after 15 cycles of reuse. Finally, β-galactosidase was immobilized on chitosan and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on calcium alginate, and both were used together for the production of ethanol from concentrated whey. Maximal ethanol titer of 28.9 g/L was achieved during fermentation at 35 °C. The conclusions generated by employing two different matrices will be beneficial for the future modeling using engineered S. cerevisiae in scale-up studies.

  14. Electrodeposition of Fe powder from acid electrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VESNA M. MAKSIMOVIC

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Polarization characteristics of the electrodeposition processes of Fe powders from sulfate and chloride electrolytes and the morphology of the obtained powders were investigated. The morphology depended on the anion presence in the electrolyte but not on the current density in the investigated range. A characteristic feature of the dendritic powder with cauliflower endings obtained from sulfate electrolyte is the presence of cone-like cavities and the crystallite morphology of the powders surface. On the other hand, Fe powders electrodeposited from chloride electrolyte appear in the form of agglomerates. A soap solution treatment applied as a method of washing and drying provides good protection from oxidation of the powders.

  15. Bio-oil production and removal of organic load by microalga Scenedesmus sp. using culture medium contaminated with different sugars, cheese whey and whey permeate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Wesley da Silva; Araújo, Breno Severiano Alves; Moura, Lucas Gomes; Coutinho Filho, Ubirajara; de Resende, Miriam Maria; Cardoso, Vicelma Luiz

    2016-05-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the bio-oil production and the organic load removal using the microalga Scenedesmus sp. The cultivation was carried out in reactors with a total volume of 3 L and 0.7 vvm aeration, with illumination in photoperiods of 12 h light/12 h dark for 12 days. The following sugar concentrations were tested: 2.5, 5.0 and 10 g/L of glucose, lactose, fructose and galactose with 10% inoculum volume. After experiments were performed with cheese whey in natura and cheese whey permeate with different lactose concentrations (1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 5.0 g/L). In these experiments the inoculum concentrations were 10, 15, 20 and 30% (v/v). The results showed that this microalga was effective for the production of lipids when it was cultivated in medium with cheese whey in natura with 2.5 g/L of lactose and 20% inoculum (v/v). Using cheese whey in natura at the concentration of 3.5 g/L of lactose and 30% (v/v) of inoculum obtained 77.9% of TOC removal and 38.447 mg of TOC removed/mg oil produced. It was also observed that when there is increased production of bio-oil, there is less removal of organic matter. The addition of glucose, fructose or galactose in the medium did not enhance the production of bio-oil by Scenedesmus sp. when compared to lactose, but increased the organic matter removal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of whey on blood glucose and insulin responses to composite breakfast and lunch meals in type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Anders H; Nilsson, Mikael; Holst, Jens Juul; Björck, Inger M E

    2005-07-01

    Whey proteins have insulinotropic effects and reduce the postprandial glycemia in healthy subjects. The mechanism is not known, but insulinogenic amino acids and the incretin hormones seem to be involved. The aim was to evaluate whether supplementation of meals with a high glycemic index (GI) with whey proteins may increase insulin secretion and improve blood glucose control in type 2 diabetic subjects. Fourteen diet-treated subjects with type 2 diabetes were served a high-GI breakfast (white bread) and subsequent high-GI lunch (mashed potatoes with meatballs). The breakfast and lunch meals were supplemented with whey on one day; whey was exchanged for lean ham and lactose on another day. Venous blood samples were drawn before and during 4 h after breakfast and 3 h after lunch for the measurement of blood glucose, serum insulin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). The insulin responses were higher after both breakfast (31%) and lunch (57%) when whey was included in the meal than when whey was not included. After lunch, the blood glucose response was significantly reduced [-21%; 120 min area under the curve (AUC)] after whey ingestion. Postprandial GIP responses were higher after whey ingestion, whereas no differences were found in GLP-1 between the reference and test meals. It can be concluded that the addition of whey to meals with rapidly digested and absorbed carbohydrates stimulates insulin release and reduces postprandial blood glucose excursion after a lunch meal consisting of mashed potatoes and meatballs in type 2 diabetic subjects.

  17. Using 3D Printing for Rapid Prototyping of Characterization Tools for Investigating Powder Blend Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirschberg, Cosima; Boetker, Johan P; Rantanen, Jukka

    2018-01-01

    be monitored with an in-line near-infrared (NIR) spectrometer. Calculating the root mean square (RMS) of the scores of the two first principal components of the NIR spectra visualized spectral variation as a function of process time. In a same setup, mechanical properties (basic flow energy) of the powder......There is an increasing need to provide more detailed insight into the behavior of particulate systems. The current powder characterization tools are developed empirically and in many cases, modification of existing equipment is difficult. More flexible tools are needed to provide understanding...... of complex powder behavior, such as mixing process and segregation phenomenon. An approach based on the fast prototyping of new powder handling geometries and interfacing solutions for process analytical tools is reported. This study utilized 3D printing for rapid prototyping of customized geometries...

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Al-20 at. % Cu Powders Produced by Mechanical Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molka Ben Makhlouf

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical alloying is a powder processing technique used to process materials farther from equilibrium state. This technique is mainly used to process difficult-to-alloy materials in which the solid solubility is limited and to process materials where nonequilibrium phases cannot be produced at room temperature through conventional processing techniques. This work deals with the microstructural properties of the Al-20 at. % Cu alloy prepared by high-energy ball milling of elemental aluminum and copper powders. The ball milling of powders was carried out in a planetary mill in order to obtain a nanostructured Al-20 at. % Cu alloy. The obtained powders were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The structural modifications at different stages of the ball milling are investigated with X-ray diffraction. Several microstructure parameters such as the crystallite sizes, microstrains and lattice parameters are determined.

  19. Mask materials for powder blasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensink, H.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    Powder blasting, or abrasive jet machining (AJM), is a technique in which a particle jet is directed towards a target for mechanical material removal. It is a fast, cheap and accurate directional etch technique for brittle materials such as glass, silicon and ceramics. The particle jet (which

  20. High resolution powder blast micromachining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensink, H.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2000-01-01

    Powder blasting, or Abrasive Jet Machining (AJM), is a technique in which a particle jet is directed towards a target for mechanical material removal. It is a fast, cheap and accurate directional etch technique for brittle materials like glass, silicon and ceramics. By introducing electroplated

  1. Phonons from neutron powder diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrov, D.A.; Louca, D.; Roeder, H. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States))

    1999-09-01

    The spherically averaged structure function S([vert bar][bold q][vert bar]) obtained from pulsed neutron powder diffraction contains both elastic and inelastic scattering via an integral over energy. The Fourier transformation of S([vert bar][bold q][vert bar]) to real space, as is done in the pair density function (PDF) analysis, regularizes the data, i.e., it accentuates the diffuse scattering. We present a technique which enables the extraction of off-center ([vert bar][bold q][vert bar][ne]0) phonon information from powder diffraction experiments by comparing the experimental PDF with theoretical calculations based on standard interatomic potentials and the crystal symmetry. This procedure [dynamics from powder diffraction] has been [ital successfully] implemented as demonstrated here for two systems, a simple metal fcc Ni and an ionic crystal CaF[sub 2]. Although computationally intensive, this data analysis allows for a phonon based modeling of the PDF, and additionally provides off-center phonon information from neutron powder diffraction. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  2. Uranium Carbide Powder Ignition Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthinier, C.; Coullomb, S.; Rado, C.; Le Guyadec, F. [CEA, DEN, DTEC, SDTC, LEME, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Chatillon, C.; Blanquet, E.; Boichot, R. [SIMAP, Sciences et Ingenierie des Materiaux et Procedes, INPG-CNRS-UJF ENSEEG, BP 75, 38402 St Martin-d' Heres (France)

    2009-06-15

    Mixed (U, Pu) carbide, constituted by means of 80% of uranium monocarbide (UC), is considered as a possible fuel material for future gas fast reactors or sodium fast reactor. However, UC undergoes a strong exothermic reaction with air and fine powders of UC are pyrophoric. Thus, it is necessary to understand this high reactivity in order to determine safe handling conditions for the production and reprocessing of carbide fuels. UC powder was obtained by arc melting and milling. The reactivity of uranium carbide was studied in oxidizing atmosphere and different experimental devices were used to determine ignition temperatures. The phases formed at the various observed stages of the oxidation process were determined by post-mortem X ray diffraction analysis. Studies were first performed using small quantities of UC powder (around 50 mg) in Differential Thermal Analysis / Thermogravimetric Analysis (DTA/TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Experiments were realized using different parameters, such as heating rate and gas flow rate and composition, to determine their influence on pyro-phoricity. Results obtained with small quantities (tens of milligrams) revealed that UC powder is highly reactive in air in the range 200- 250 deg. C. Studies were also performed in the 'Pyro' test facility multi-function furnace allowing CCD camera recording, during heating and ignition, through view-ports. Lower ignition temperatures, around 100 deg. C, were obtained using around 1 g UC powder samples. Results are discussed and analysed with theory of burning curve ignition and numerical simulations. Simulations aim to understand the influence of the different parameters on pyro-phoricity. Small scale simulations (on a spherical grain) confirm the influence of UC grains size, heat rate and gas composition on powder ignition temperature with small quantities. The issue is now to understand the influence of grain pile form factor and volume on the pyro-phoricity of

  3. Anti-obesity Effect of Fermented Whey Beverage using Lactic Acid Bacteria in Diet-induced Obese Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Sung-Moon; Chung, Eui-Chun; Kim, Cheol-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    High-protein fermented whey beverage (FWB) was manufactured using whey protein concentrate (WPC) and Lactobacillus plantarum DK211 isolated from kimchi. This study was designed to evaluate the anti-obesity activity of FWB in male rats fed a high-fat diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups (n=8 per group). The three groups differed in their diet; one group received a normal diet (ND), another, a high-fat diet (HD), and the third, a HD plus fermented whey beverage ...

  4. Proliferative effect of whey from cow's milk obtained at two different stages of pregnancy measured in MCF-7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina S; Andersen, Charlotte; Sejrsen, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    (whey) in a proliferation assay with estrogen-sensitive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Milk samples were obtained from 22 cows representing different stages of pregnancy (first and second half) and whey was produced from the milk. 0·1, 0·25 or 0·5% whey was included in the cell culture medium......Dietary estrogens may play a role in the etiology of hormone-dependent cancers like breast cancer. Cow's milk contains various endogenous estrogens and feed derived phytoestrogens that potentially contribute to an estrogenic effect of milk in consumers, and therefore we evaluated the effect of milk...

  5. Production of extruded barley, cassava, corn and quinoa enriched with whey proteins and cashew pulp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Well-formulated snacks can play a positive role in enhancing health by providing essential nutrients, such as increased protein and fiber, that mitigate metabolic syndrome associated with obesity. Adding whey protein concentrate (WPC80) and cashew pulp (CP) to corn meal, a major ingredient in extru...

  6. Effect of microparticulated whey protein on sensory properties of liquid and semi-solid model foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, K.; Stieger, M.A.; Linden, van der E.; Velde, van de Fred

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the sensory properties of microparticulated whey protein (MWP) particles in relation to their rheological and tribological properties. The aim of this work is to obtain a better understanding of the sensory perception of MWP particles compared to oil droplets in liquid and

  7. A qualified presumption of safety approach for the safety assessment of Grana Padano whey starters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Lia; Carminati, Domenico; Zago, Miriam; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2009-03-15

    A Qualified Presumption of Safety (QPS) approach was applied to dominant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) associated with Grana Padano cheese whey starters. Thirty-two strains belonging to Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Lactobacillus fermentum, and representing the overall genotypic LAB diversity associated with 24 previously collected whey starters [Rossetti, L., Fornasari, M.E., Gatti, M., Lazzi, C., Neviani, E., Giraffa, G., 2008. Grana Padano cheese whey starters: microbial composition and strain distribution. International Journal of Food Microbiology 127, 168-171], were analyzed. All L. helveticus, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis, and S. thermophilus isolates were susceptible to four (i.e. vancomycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, and erythromycin) of the clinically most relevant antibiotics. One L. fermentum strain displayed phenotypic resistance to tetracycline (Tet(R)), with MIC of 32 microg/ml, and gentamycin (Gm(R)), with MIC of 32 microg/ml. PCR was applied to this strain to test the presence of genes tet(L), tet(M), tet(S), and aac(6')-aph(2')-Ia, which are involved in horizontal transfer of Tet(R) and Gm(R), respectively but no detectable amplification products were observed. According to QPS criteria, we conclude that Grana cheese whey starters do not present particular safety concerns.

  8. Phase behaviour and in vitro hydrolysis of wheat starch in mixture with whey protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Natasha; Liu, Yingting; Ashton, John; Gorczyca, Elisabeth; Kasapis, Stefan

    2013-04-15

    Network formation of whey protein isolate (WPI) with increasing concentrations of native wheat starch (WS) has been examined. Small deformation dynamic oscillation in shear and modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry enabled analysis of binary mixtures at the macro- and micromolecular level. Following heat induced gelation, textural hardness was measured by undertaking compression tests. Environmental scanning electron microscopy provided tangible information on network morphology of polymeric constituents. Experiments involving in vitro starch digestion also allowed for indirect assessment of phase topology in the binary mixture. The biochemical component of this work constitutes an attempt to utilise whey protein as a retardant to the enzymatic hydrolysis of starch in a model system with α-amylase enzyme. During heating, rheological profiles of binary mixtures exhibited dramatic increases in G' at temperatures more closely related to those observed for single whey protein rather than pure starch. Results from this multidisciplinary approach of analysis, utilising rheology, calorimetry and microscopy, argue for the occurrence of phase separation phenomena in the gelled systems. There is also evidence of whey protein forming the continuous phase with wheat starch being the discontinuous filler, an outcome that is explored in the in vitro study of the enzymatic hydrolysis of starch. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Pickering emulsions stabilized by whey protein nanoparticles prepared by thermal cross-linking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Jiande; Shi, Mengxuan; Li, Wei; Zhao, Luhai; Wang, Ze; Yan, Xinzhong; Norde, Willem; Li, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    A Pickering (o/w) emulsion was formed and stabilized by whey protein isolate nanoparticles (WPI NPs). Those WPI NPs were prepared by thermal cross-linking of denatured WPI proteins within w/o emulsion droplets at 80. °C for 15. min. During heating of w/o emulsions containing 10% (w/v) WPI

  10. Evaluation of the parameters effects on the bio-ethanol production process from Ricotta Cheese Whey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sansonetti, Sascha; Curcio, Stefano; Calabrò, Vincenza

    2010-01-01

    The work consists of an experimental analysis to evaluate the effects of the variables temperature (T), pH, agitation rate (K) and initial lactose concentration (L) on the batch fermentation process of Ricotta Cheese Whey (RCW) into bio-ethanol by using the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus. A central...

  11. FTIR spectra of whey and casein hydrolysates in relation to their functional properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, van der C.; Muresan, S.; Gruppen, H.; Bont, D.B.A.; Merck, K.B.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectra of whey and casein hydrolysates were recorded using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis techniques were used to investigate the capacity of FTIR spectra to classify hydrolysates and to study the ability of the spectra to predict bitterness,

  12. Growth of infants born to HIV-positive mothers fed a whey-adapted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth of infants born to HIV-positive mothers fed a whey-adapted acidified starter formula with prebiotics and nucleotides. PA Cooper, KD Bolton, M Mokhachane, SC Velaphi, RM Mphahlele, HN Bomela, L Monaheng, P Roux, E Haschke-Becher ...

  13. Bioethanol production by solid state fermentation from cheese whey mixed with brewer’s spent grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gigi COMAN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Food by-products, whey mixed with spent grains are renewable resources which can be used as fermentation susbtrates for bioethanol production using selected Kluyveromyces spp. yeast strains. These food by-products have extensive results as wastes in food industry, are cheap and readily available sources and their use has also important benefit for the environmental protection. The ability of some Kluyveromyces spp. yeast strains (commercial starter culture and wild culture to ferment the carbohydrates mixture from a complex fermentation substrate based on hydrolyzed brewer’s spent grains and cheese whey was analyzed. Three brewer’s spent grains (hydrolyzed and cheese whey (heat treated ratios (1:1, 1:2 and 2:1 were considered in the study. Studies have shown that using an optimum combination of fermentation substrate, respectively hydrolyzed brewer’s spent grains and heat treated cheese whey in ratio of 1:2 have influence on yeast fermentation behavior and yield ethanol production.

  14. The potential of whey in driving microbial fuel cells: A dual prospect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renewable and green energy resources are paramount to environmental sustainability. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are potential candidates for these alternatives but there is need to search for cheaper fuels to drive the MFCs for realistic large scale applications. A high strength effluent such as whey, which poses a serious ...

  15. Kinetics of anaerobic digestion of labaneh whey in a batch reactor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-04-16

    Apr 16, 2014 ... In this work, anaerobic digestion of labanah whey was carried out in a 100 L batch reactor (RE-BIOMAS) at temperature of 30-40°C and pH 6 - 7. During the experiments, the biogas production and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration were recorded with time. During fermentation of labaneh ...

  16. Preparation of gluten-free bread using a meso-structured whey protein particle system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsdijk, van L.E.; Goot, van der A.J.; Hamer, R.J.; Boom, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a novel method for making gluten-free bread using mesoscopically structured whey protein. The use of the meso-structured protein is based on the hypothesis that the gluten structure present in a developed wheat dough features a particle structure on a mesoscopic length scale

  17. An addition of sourdough and whey proteins affects the nutritional quality of wholemeal wheat bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeć, Aneta; Borczak, Barbara; Pysz, Mirosław; Sikora, Elżbieta; Sikora, Marek; Curic, Duska; Novotni, Dubravka

    2014-01-01

    Bread can be a good source of nutrients as well as non-nutrient compounds. This study was designed to assess the effect of adding of sourdough and whey proteins to wholemeal (WM) bread produced by bake-off technology on chemical composition and bioavailability of proteins, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and iron content in Wistar rats. Wholemeal breads were baked with using conventional or bake off technology. In breads chemical composition, selected minerals content, amino acid composition were measured. Five week-old Wistar rats (n = 30, male), were randomly divided into fi ve groups and fed with modified AIN-93G diets containing experimental breads. In animal study the nutritional value of breads' proteins and concentration of selected minerals in serum, liver and femoral bone, were measured. The body weight gain, biological value (BV) and net protein utilization (NPU) were significantly higher in rats fed with partially baked frozen wholemeal (PBF WM) bread with sourdough and whey proteins. The level of magnesium was significantly lower in serum of animals fed with the diet containing PBF WM bread with sourdough and whey proteins in comparison to rodents fed with conventional WM bread with sourdough. The content of iron was significantly higher in liver of rats fed with PBF WM with sourdough bread in comparison to the groups fed with conventional WM and conventional WM with sourdough breads. Sourdough addition can be recommended in a production of whole wheat partially baked frozen bread but its use is further more beneficial if it is fermented with whey proteins.

  18. Physical and chemical changes in whey protein concentrate stored at elevated temperature and humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemistry of whey protein concentrate (WPC) under adverse storage conditions was monitored to provide information on shelf life in hot, humid areas. WPC34 (34.9 g protein/100 g) and WPC80 (76.8 g protein/100 g) were stored for up to 18 mo under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and...

  19. Hydrolysis of lactose in whey permeate for subsequent fermentation to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coté, A; Brown, W A; Cameron, D; van Walsum, G P

    2004-06-01

    Fermentation of lactose in whey permeate directly into ethanol has had only limited commercial success, as the yields and alcohol tolerances of the organisms capable of directly fermenting lactose are low. This study proposes an alternative strategy: treat the permeate with acid to liberate monomeric sugars that are readily fermented into ethanol. We identified optimum hydrolysis conditions that yield mostly monomeric sugars and limit formation of fermentation inhibitors such as hydroxymethyl furfural by caramelization reactions. Both lactose solutions and commercial whey permeates were hydrolyzed using inorganic acids and carbonic acid. In all cases, more glucose was consumed by secondary reactions than galactose. Galactose was recovered in approximately stoichiometric proportions. Whey permeate has substantial buffering capacity-even at high partial pressures (>5500 kPa[g]), carbon dioxide had little effect on the pH in whey permeate solutions. The elevated temperatures required for hydrolysis with CO2-generated inhibitory compounds through caramelization reactions. For these reasons, carbon dioxide was not a feasible acidulant. With mineral acids reversion reactions dominated, resulting in a stable amount of glucose released. However, the Maillard browning reactions also appeared to be involved. By applying Hammet's acidity function, kinetic data from all experiments were described by a single line. With concentrated inorganic acids, low reaction temperatures allowed lactose hydrolysis with minimal by-product formation and generated a hexose-rich solution amenable to fermentation.

  20. Fractionation of sheep cheese whey by a scalable method to sequentially isolate bioactive proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilbrow, Jodi; Bekhit, Alaa El-din A; Carne, Alan

    2016-07-15

    This study reports a procedure for the simultaneous purification of glyco(caseino)macropeptide, immunoglobulin, lactoperoxidase, lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin from sheep cheese sweet whey, an under-utilized by-product of cheese manufacture generated by an emerging sheep dairy industry in New Zealand. These proteins have recognized value in the nutrition, biomedical and health-promoting supplements industries. A sequential fractionation procedure using economical anion and cation exchange chromatography on HiTrap resins was evaluated. The whey protein fractionation is performed under mild conditions, requires only the adjustment of pH between ion exchange chromatography steps, does not require buffer exchange and uses minimal amounts of chemicals. The purity of the whey protein fractions generated were analyzed by reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography and the identity of the proteins was confirmed by mass spectrometry. This scalable procedure demonstrates that several proteins of recognized value can be fractionated in reasonable yield and purity from sheep cheese whey in one streamlined process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct capture of lactoferrin from cheese whey on supermacroporous column of polyacrylamide cryogel with copper ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, B M A; Carvalho, L M; Silva, W F; Minim, L A; Soares, A M; Carvalho, G G P; da Silva, S L

    2014-07-01

    Lactoferrin is a protein that is present in cheese whey (a waste product from the dairy industry) and has several biological activities. However, its production from whey must have a high yield and low cost for industrial applications. As such, this study reports the use of polyacrylamide cryogel, loaded with Cu(2+) (through the bond with iminodiacetic acid (IDA)), as an adsorbent for the chromatographic process to capture lactoferrin whey. Ultrafiltered cheese whey was passed through the cryogel-IDA-Cu(2+) system. The eluates were subjected to analysis of total protein, SDS-PAGE and size exclusion chromatography. The results showed an axial dispersion coefficients, at different superficial velocities of liquid, in a range of 10(-6)-10(-5)m(2)/s. The cryogel demonstrated good hydraulic permeability (4.7086×10(-13)m(2)) and a porosity of approximately 78.2%. The IDA-Cu(2+) cryogel system was also able to capture lactoferrin in high purity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Conversion of cheese whey into poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) by Haloferax mediterranei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Joana; Serafim, Luísa S; Freitas, Filomena; Reis, Maria A M

    2016-01-25

    Haloferax mediterranei was cultivated in highly saline medium using cheese whey as the substrate for the production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate), P(3HB-co-3HV). Acid hydrolysis provided a simple inexpensive method to obtain a cheese whey hydrolysate that was used for cultivation of H. mediterranei. Batch bioreactor cultivation of H. mediterranei resulted in the production of an active biomass concentration of 7.54 g L(-1) with a polymer content of 53%, and a volumetric productivity of 4.04 g L(-1) day(-1). Supplementation of the cultivation medium with micronutrients favored galactose consumption that was used for polymer synthesis after exhaustion of the available glucose. P(3HB-co-3HV) with a 3-hydroxyvalerate content of 1.5 mol% was extracted from the biomass by hypo-osmotic shock. The polymer presented a molecular mass of 4.4×10(5), with a polydispersity index of 1.5. This work demonstrated the feasibility of using cheese whey for the production of a value-added biopolymer with high volumetric productivity, by using a glucose- and galactose-rich substrate obtained by acid hydrolysis of cheese whey. The use of H. mediterranei as the producing strain avoids the need for strict sterility due to the culture's high salinity requirements and, also, allows for polymer extraction by simply contacting the biomass with water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Maximizing hydrogen production and substrate consumption by Escherichia coli WDHL in cheese whey fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Colunga, Luis Manuel; Alvarado-Cuevas, Zazil Donaxí; Razo-Flores, Elías; Rodríguez, Antonio De León

    2013-10-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production is strongly affected by pH. In order to maximize hydrogen production and substrate consumption in Escherichia coli ΔhycA, ΔlacI (WDHL) cheese whey fermentation, the influence of pH control at values of 5.5, 6, and 6.5 was studied in batch stirred-tank bioreactors. From the conditions evaluated, pH 6.5 was the best condition, at which the highest cumulative hydrogen production and yield (1.78 mol H2/mol lactose) were obtained. Moreover, at this pH, all carbohydrates from the cheese whey were consumed, and a mix of ethanol and organic acids, mainly lactate, were produced from glucose, whereas galactose yielded acetate, ethanol, and succinate. Operating the reactor at pH 5.5 resulted in the highest maximum specific production rate, but smaller hydrogen yield because only glucose was metabolized and galactose was accumulated. At pH 6, not all cheese whey carbohydrates were consumed, and it was not favorable for hydrogen production. Lactose consumption and growth kinetics were not affected by the pH. The results show the importance of controlling pH to maximize hydrogen production and substrate consumption using cheese whey as substrate.

  4. Energy storage controls crumbly perception in whey proteins/polysaccharide mixed gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den L.; Carolas, A.L.; Vliet, van T.; Linden, van der E.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Velde, van de F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the relation between crumbliness of whey proteins/polysaccharide mixed gels and their physical properties. Crumbly sensation relates strongly to the breakdown behaviour of the gels, which is primarily determined by their viscoelastic properties. These properties result from the

  5. Morphology development during sessile single droplet drying of mixed maltodextrin and whey protein solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, E.M.; Karlina, A.M.; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2018-01-01

    A sessile single droplet drying method is employed to gain understanding on spray drying behaviour of mixed maltodextrin and whey protein solutions. Skin formation and subsequent locking of the skin and morphology development were the main aspects studied. Droplets of initial solids content of

  6. Calcium, vitamin D, casein and whey protein intakes and periodontitis among Danish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegboye, Amanda Ra; Boucher, Barbara J; Kongstad, Johanne; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Christensen, Lisa B; Heitmann, Berit L

    2016-02-01

    To investigate whether intakes of Ca, vitamin D, casein and whey are associated with periodontitis and to investigate the possibility of interactions between them. Cross-sectional study. An Internet-based, 267-item FFQ was used to assess dietary intake. Intakes of casein (32.0 g/d), whey proteins (9.6 g/d) and vitamin D (5.8 μg/d) were classified as within v. above the 50th percentile. Ca intake was classified as within v. below age-specific recommendations. Severe periodontitis was defined as having ≥2 inter-proximal sites with clinical attachment loss ≥6 mm (not on the same tooth) and ≥1 inter-proximal site with pocket depth ≥5 mm. Since vitamin D influences Ca absorption, models were stratified by lower and higher (periodontitis after adjustment for age, gender, education, smoking, sucrose intake, alcohol consumption, number of teeth, daily brushing, regular visits to the dentist and chronic illness, irrespective of vitamin D intake levels. Intake of vitamin D alone was not associated severe with periodontitis. Intakes of Ca, casein and whey protein were inversely associated with periodontitis. Consumption of foods rich in Ca, casein and whey (e.g. dairy foods) should be promoted, as they may contribute to the prevention of periodontitis. Further longitudinal studies are required to confirm these associations.

  7. Supplemental protein in support of muscle mass and health: advantage whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Michaela C; Phillips, Stuart M

    2015-03-01

    Skeletal muscle is an integral body tissue playing key roles in strength, performance, physical function, and metabolic regulation. It is essential for athletes to ensure that they have optimal amounts of muscle mass to ensure peak performance in their given sport. However, the role of maintaining muscle mass during weight loss and as we age is an emerging concept, having implications in chronic disease prevention, functional capacity, and quality of life. Higher-protein diets have been shown to: (1) promote gains in muscle mass, especially when paired with resistance training; (2) spare muscle mass loss during caloric restriction; and (3) attenuate the natural loss of muscle mass that accompanies aging. Protein quality is important to the gain and maintenance of muscle mass. Protein quality is a function of protein digestibility, amino acid content, and the resulting amino acid availability to support metabolic function. Whey protein is one of the highest-quality proteins given its amino acid content (high essential, branched-chain, and leucine amino acid content) and rapid digestibility. Consumption of whey protein has a robust ability to stimulate muscle protein synthesis. In fact, whey protein has been found to stimulate muscle protein synthesis to a greater degree than other proteins such as casein and soy. This review examines the existing data supporting the role for protein consumption, with an emphasis on whey protein, in the regulation of muscle mass and body composition in response to resistance training, caloric restriction, and aging. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Design of whey protein nanostructures for incorporation and release of nutraceutical compounds in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Oscar L; Pereira, Ricardo N; Martins, Artur; Rodrigues, Rui; Fuciños, Clara; Teixeira, José A; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Malcata, F Xavier; Vicente, António A

    2017-05-03

    Whey proteins are widely used as nutritional and functional ingredients in formulated foods because they are relatively inexpensive, generally recognized as safe (GRAS) ingredient, and possess important biological, physical, and chemical functionalities. Denaturation and aggregation behavior of these proteins is of particular relevance toward manufacture of novel nanostructures with a number of potential uses. When these processes are properly engineered and controlled, whey proteins may be formed into nanohydrogels, nanofibrils, or nanotubes and be used as carrier of bioactive compounds. This review intends to discuss the latest understandings of nanoscale phenomena of whey protein denaturation and aggregation that may contribute for the design of protein nanostructures. Whey protein aggregation and gelation pathways under different processing and environmental conditions such as microwave heating, high voltage, and moderate electrical fields, high pressure, temperature, pH, and ionic strength were critically assessed. Moreover, several potential applications of nanohydrogels, nanofibrils, and nanotubes for controlled release of nutraceutical compounds (e.g. probiotics, vitamins, antioxidants, and peptides) were also included. Controlling the size of protein networks at nanoscale through application of different processing and environmental conditions can open perspectives for development of nanostructures with new or improved functionalities for incorporation and release of nutraceuticals in food matrices.

  9. Reducing the stiffness of concentrated whey protein isolate (WPI) gels by using WPI microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purwanti, N.; Moerkens, A.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Concentrated protein gels were prepared using native whey protein isolate (WPI) and WPI based microparticles. WPI microparticles were produced by making gel pieces from a concentrated WPI suspension (40% w/w), which were dried and milled. The protein within the microparticles was denatured and the

  10. Effects of whey and molasses as silage additives on potato hash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potato hash silage (treated with no additive, or whey, or molasses) and MS were produced in 210 L drums for 90 days and the fermentation quality of the silages was determined thereafter. Diets were formulated and fed ad libitum to 32 South African Dorper lambs (23.5 ± 0.873 kg live weight) for 63 days. A digestibility study ...

  11. Effect of crosslink density on the water-binding capacity of whey protein microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.P.C.M.; Luyten, H.; Alting, A.C.; Boom, R.M.; Goot, van der A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of whey protein microparticles (MPs) to bind water and consequently to swell is, amongst others, determined by the crosslink density of the MPs. The Flory-Rehner model states that a decrease in crosslink density should lead to an increased swelling of the MPs. Decreasing the crosslink

  12. Endocrine responses and acute mTOR pathway phosphorylation to resistance exercise with leucine and whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MT Lane

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Leucine ingestion reportedly activates the mTOR pathway in skeletal muscle, contributing to a hypertrophy response. The purpose of the study was to compare the post-resistance exercise effects of leucine and whey protein supplementation on endocrine responses and muscle mTOR pathway phosphorylation. On visit 1, subjects (X±SD; n=20; age=27.8±2.8yrs provided baseline blood samples for analysis of cortisol, glucose and insulin; a muscle biopsy of the vastus lateralis muscle to assess mTOR signaling pathway phosphorylation; and were tested for maximum strength on the leg press and leg extension exercises. For visits 2 and 3, subjects were randomized in a double-blind crossover design to ingest either leucine and whey protein (10g+10g; supplement or a non-caloric placebo. During these visits, 5 sets of 10 repetitions were performed on both exercises, immediately followed by ingestion of the supplement or placebo. Blood was sampled 30 min post-, and a muscle biopsy 45 min post-exercise. Western blots quantified total and phosphorylated proteins. Insulin increased (α<.05 with supplementation with no change in glucose compared to placebo. Relative phosphorylation of AKT and rpS6 were greater with leucine and whey supplementation compared to placebo. Supplementation of leucine and whey protein immediately after heavy resistance exercise increases anabolic signaling in human skeletal muscle.

  13. Predictive response surface model for heat-induced rheological changes and aggregation of whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Pedro A; Emond, Charles; Gomaa, Ahmed; Remondetto, Gabriel E; Subirade, Muriel

    2015-02-01

    Whey proteins are now far more than a by-product of cheese processing. In the last 2 decades, food manufacturers have developed them as ingredients, with the dairy industry remaining as a major user. For many applications, whey proteins are modified (denatured) to alter their structure and functional properties. The objective of this research was to study the influence of 85 to 100 °C, with protein concentration of 8% to 12%, and treatment times of 5 to 30 min, while measuring rheological properties (storage modulus, loss modulus, and complex viscosity) and aggregation (intermolecular beta-sheet formation) in dispersions of whey protein concentrate (WPC). A Box-Behnken Response Surface Methodology modeled the heat denaturation of liquid sweet WPC at 3 variables and 3 levels. The model revealed a very significant fit for viscoelastic properties, and a lesser fit for protein aggregation, at temperatures not previously studied. An exponential increase of rheological parameters was governed by protein concentration and temperature, while a modest linear relationship of aggregation was governed by temperature. Models such as these can serve as valuable guides to the ingredient and dairy industries to develop target products, as whey is a major ingredient in many functional foods. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Effect of different media on production of lactic acid from whey by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-05

    Jan 5, 2009 ... Effect of different media on production of lactic acid from whey by Lactobacillus bulgaricus. Mostafa Ghasemi1*, Ghasem Najafpour1, Mostafa Rahimnejad 1, Pouyan Aeineh Beigi1,. Mehdi Sedighi2 and Babak Hashemiyeh3. 1School of Chemical Engineering, Noushirvani University of Technology, Babol, ...

  15. FERMENTATION ACTIVITY OF LACTOSE-FERMENTATION YEAST IN WHEY-MALT WORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Greek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The main parameters of fermentation of whey-malt wort with the use of different strains of lactose-fermentation yeast was investigated experimentally. According to the findings of investigation of fermentive activity for different types of lactose-fermentation microorganisms in whey-malt wort it was found that the most active spirituous fermentation for all parameters was in wort fermented by microorganisms Zygosaccharomyces lactis 868-K and Saccharomyces lactis 95. High capacity for utilization of malt carbohydrates represented by easily metabolized carbohydrates of malt extract was determined. Also organoleptic analysis of fermented whey drinks derived from the renewed mixtures of dry whey and fermented malt and yeast Zygosaccharomyces lactis 868-K and Saccharomyces lactis 95 was carried out. It was found that the drink fermented with yeast Zygosaccharomyces lactis 868-K had intense refreshing flavor of rye bread with fruit tones. Intensity growth of aromatization for complex of sample with microorganisms Saccharomyces lactis 95, indicating high organoleptic indexes of the drink was observed.

  16. Effects of whey and molasses as silage additives on potato hash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p2492989

    Alternatively, food waste materials such as whey (Nkosi, 2003; Zobell et al., 2004; Bautista-Trujillo et al., 2009) and sugarcane molasses (Bolsen et al., 1996; Yunus et al., 2000; Van Niekerk et al., 2007; Nkosi et al., 2009) can be used as silage additives to ensile high moisture potato hash. The present study compared the.

  17. Utilization of concentrated cheese whey for the production of protein concentrate fuel alcohol and alcoholic beverages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurti, R.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to recover the major components of whey and to develop food applications for their incorporation/conversion into acceptable products of commercial value. Reconstituted dried sweet whey with 36% solids was ultrafiltered to yield a protein concentrate (WPC) and a permeate containing 24% lactose and 3.7% ash. Orange juice fortified up to 2.07% and chocolate milks fortified up to 5.88% total protein levels with WPC containing 45% total protein were acceptable to about 90% of a panel of 24 individuals. Fermentation of demineralized permeate at 30/sup 0/C with Kluyveromyces fragilis NRRL Y 2415 adapted to 24% lactose levels, led to 13.7% (v/v) ethanol in the medium at the end of 34 hours. Batch productivity was 3.2 gms. ethanol per liter per hour and conversion efficiency was 84.26% of the theoretical maximum. Alcoholic fermentation of permeate and subsequent distillation produced compounds with desirable aroma characters in such products. This study suggests that there is potential for the production of protein fortified non-alcoholic products and alcoholic beverages of commercial value from whey, thus providing a cost effective solution to the whey utilization problem.

  18. Polymer quenched prealloyed metal powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Fleischhauer, Grier; German, Randall M.

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3 % Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  19. Physics of semiconductors and dielectrics optical properties and radiation stability of coatings based on BaTiO3 powders modified by ZrO2 micron size powders of different concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, M. M.; Utebekov, T. A.; Yur'ev, S. A.

    2013-10-01

    Diffuse reflection spectra in the wavelength range 350-2100 nm and radiation stability of coatings based on BaTiO3 powders modified by ZrO2 micron size powders of different concentrations are investigated. The presence of two wavelength ranges characterized by significant influence of modification on defects of the anion sublattice and its weak influence on defects of the cation sublattice of barium titanate is experimentally established.

  20. The effects of progressive resistance training combined with a whey-protein drink and vitamin D supplementation on glycaemic control, body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors in older adults with type 2 diabetes: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Robin M; Miller, Eliza G; Dunstan, David W; Kerr, Deborah A; Solah, Vicky; Menzies, David; Nowson, Caryl A

    2014-11-06

    While physical activity, energy restriction and weight loss are the cornerstone of type 2 diabetes management, less emphasis is placed on optimizing skeletal muscle mass. As muscle is the largest mass of insulin-sensitive tissue and the predominant reservoir for glucose disposal, there is a need to develop safe and effective evidence-based, lifestyle management strategies that optimize muscle mass as well as improve glycaemic control and cardiometabolic risk factors in people with this disease, particularly older adults who experience accelerated muscle loss. Using a two-arm randomized controlled trial, this 6-month study builds upon the community-based progressive resistance training (PRT) programme Lift for Life® to evaluate whether ingestion of a whey-protein drink combined with vitamin D supplementation can enhance the effects of PRT on glycaemic control, body composition and cardiometabolic health in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Approximately 200 adults aged 50 to 75 years with type 2 diabetes, treated with either diet alone or oral hypoglycaemic agents (not insulin), will be recruited. All participants will be asked to participate in a structured, supervised PRT programme based on the Lift for Life® programme structure, and randomly allocated to receive a whey-protein drink (20 g daily of whey-protein plus 20 g after each PRT session) plus vitamin D supplements (2000 IU/day), or no additional powder and supplements. The primary outcome measures to be collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months will be glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin sensitivity (homeostatic model assessment). Secondary outcomes will include changes in: muscle mass, size and intramuscular fat; fat mass; muscle strength and function; blood pressure; levels of lipids, adipokines and inflammatory markers, serum insulin-like growth factor-1 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D; renal function; diabetes medication; health-related quality of life, and cognitive function. The findings from this study

  1. Effect of dairy powders fortification on yogurt textural and sensorial properties: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Marie Celeste; Gaiani, Claire; Hosri, Chadi; Burgain, Jennifer; Scher, Joël

    2013-11-01

    Yogurts are important dairy products that have known a rapid market growth over the past few decades. Industrial yogurt manufacture involves different processing steps. Among them, protein fortification of the milk base is elemental. It greatly enhances yogurt nutritional and functional properties and prevents syneresis, an undesirable yogurt textural defect. Protein enrichment can be achieved by either concentration process (evaporation under vacuum and membrane processing: reverse osmosis and/or ultrafiltration) or by addition of dairy ingredients. Traditionally, skim milk powder (SMP) is used to enrich the milk base before fermentation. However, increased quality and availability of other dairy ingredients such as milk protein isolates (MPI), milk protein concentrates (MPC) whey protein isolates (WPI) and concentrates (WPC), micellar casein (MC) and caseinates have promoted their use as alternatives to SMP. Substituting different dry ingredients for skim milk powder in yogurt making affects the yogurt mix protein composition and subsequent textural and sensorial properties. This review focuses on various type of milk protein used for fortification purposes and their influence on these properties.

  2. Tyrosine Modifications in Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney, Maria B.; Schöneich, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Significance: The understanding of physiological and pathological processes involving protein oxidation, particularly under conditions of aging and oxidative stress, can be aided by proteomic identification of proteins that accumulate oxidative post-translational modifications only if these detected modifications are connected to functional consequences. The modification of tyrosine (Tyr) residues can elicit significant changes in protein structure and function, which, in some cases, may cont...

  3. Inulin-type fructans and whey protein both modulate appetite but only fructans alter gut microbiota in adults with overweight/obesity: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Raylene A; Willis, Holly J; Tunnicliffe, Jasmine M; Park, Heekuk; Madsen, Karen L; Soto-Vaca, Adriana

    2017-11-01

    Independently, prebiotics and dietary protein have been shown to improve weight loss and/or alter appetite. Our objective was to determine the effect of combined prebiotic and whey protein on appetite, body composition and gut microbiota in adults with overweight/obesity. In a 12 week, placebo-controlled, double-blind study, 125 adults with overweight/obesity were randomly assigned to receive isocaloric snack bars of: (1) Control; (2) Inulin-type fructans (ITF); (3) Whey protein; (4) ITF + Whey protein. Appetite, body composition and gut microbiota composition/genetic potential were assessed. Compared to Control, body fat was significantly reduced in the Whey protein group at 12 wks. Hunger, desire to eat and prospective food consumption were all lower with ITF, Whey protein and ITF + Whey protein compared to Control at 12 wks. Microbial community structure differed from 0 to 12 wks in the ITF and ITF +Whey Protein groups (i.e. increased Bifidobacterium) but not Whey Protein or Control. Changes in microbial genetic potential were seen between Control and ITF-containing treatments. Adding ITF, whey protein or both to snack bars improved several aspects of appetite control. Changes in gut microbiota may explain in part the effects of ITF but likely not whey protein. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Does whey protein supplementation affect blood pressure in hypoalbuminemic peritoneal dialysis patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan K

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Kamal Hassan,1,2 Fadi Hassan3 1Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar-Ilan University, Safed, 2Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Peritoneal Dialysis Unit, 3Department of Internal Medicine E, Galilee Medical Center, Nahariya, Israel Objective: Hypertension and hypoalbuminemia are common risk factors for cardiovascular complications in peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. Data are limited regarding the effects of whey protein consumption on blood pressure in this population. The aim of the present study was to examine if whey protein supplementation for 12 weeks to hypoalbuminemic PD patients affects their blood pressure.Patients and methods: This prospective randomized study included 36 stable PD patients with serum albumin levels <3.8 g/dL. During 12 weeks, 18 patients were instructed to consume 1.2 g/kg/day of protein and an additional whey protein supplement at a dose of 25% of the instructed daily protein (whey protein group. Eighteen patients were instructed to consume protein in the amount of 1.2 g/kg/day and an additional 25%, without whey protein supplementation (control group. Results: Compared to the control group, in the whey protein group, serum albumin levels, oncotic pressure, and dialysate ultrafiltration significantly increased (3.55±0.14 to 4.08±0.15 g/dL, P<0.001; 21.81±2.03 to 24.06±1.54 mmHg, P<0.001; 927.8±120.3 to 1,125.0±125.1 mL/day, P<0.001; respectively and were significantly higher after 12 weeks (4.08±0.15 vs 3.41±0.49 g/dL, P<0.001; 24.06±1.54 vs 22.71±1.77 mmHg, P=0.010; 1,125.0±125.1 vs 930.6±352.8 mL/day, P=0.017; respectively in the whey protein group compared to the control group. Fluid overload, the extracellular to intracellular ratio and mean arterial pressure (MAP significantly decreased (2.46±1.08 to 1.52±0.33, P<0.001; 1.080±0.142 to 0.954±0.124, P<0.001; 102.6±3.80 to 99.83±3.85, P=0.018; respectively and were significantly lower in the whey protein group after 12 weeks (1.52±0

  5. Different digestion of caprine whey proteins by human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Ellen K; Holm, Halvor; Jensen, Einar; Aaboe, Ragnhild; Devold, Tove G; Jacobsen, Morten; Vegarud, Gerd E

    2010-08-01

    The objective of the present study was twofold: first to compare the degradation patterns of caprine whey proteins digested with either human digestive juices (gastric or duodenal) or commercial porcine enzymes (pepsin or pancreatic enzymes) and second to observe the effect of gastric pH on digestion. An in vitro two-step assay was performed at 37 degrees C to simulate digestion in the stomach (pH 2, 4 or 6) and the duodenum (pH 8). The whey proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine pepsin than by human gastric juice at all pH values. Irrespective of the enzyme source, gastric digestion at pH 2 followed by duodenal digestion resulted in the most efficient degradation. Lactoferrin, serum albumin and the Ig heavy chains were highly degraded with less than 6 % remaining after digestion. About 15, 56 and 50 % Ig light chains, beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) and alpha-lactalbumin remained intact, respectively, when digested with porcine enzymes compared with 25, 74 and 81 % with human digestive juices. For comparison, purified bovine beta-LG was digested and the peptide profiles obtained were compared with those of the caprine beta-LG in the digested whey. The bovine beta-LG seemed to be more extensively cleaved than the caprine beta-LG in the whey. Commercial enzymes appear to digest whey proteins more efficiently compared with human digestive juices when used at similar enzyme activities. This could lead to conflicting results when comparing human in vivo protein digestion with digestion using purified enzymes of non-human species. Consequently the use of human digestive juices might be preferred.

  6. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of...

  7. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum. It...

  8. Metallurgical Characterization of Aluminum Powder Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    theoretical density could be obtained by cold compacting Al powder. The apparent lack of inter- particle bonding in Figure 13 is due to heavy etching of the...34 ring seal Crimp hold Figure 39. Powder pack as assembled. 47 • .U % . * .,Z . % Ignition PVC tube (21.6 cm O.D., 20 cm l.D.) ON 30cm Powder pack ANFO

  9. 21 CFR 520.1696a - Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1696a Buffered penicillin powder, penicillin powder with buffered aqueous diluent. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter contains penicillin G procaine equivalent...

  10. [Impact of directly compressed auxiliary materials on powder property of fermented cordyceps powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Hua; Yue, Guo-Chao; Guan, Yong-Mei; Yang, Ming; Zhu, Wei-Feng

    2014-01-01

    To investigate such physical indexes as hygroscopicity, angle of repose, bulk density, fillibility of compression of mixed powder of directly compressed auxiliary materials and fermented cordyceps powder by using micromeritic study methods. The results showed that spray-dried lactose Flowlac100 and microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH102 had better effect in liquidity and compressibility on fermented cordyceps powder than pregelatinized starch. The study on the impact of directly compressed auxiliary materials on the powder property of fermented cordyceps powder had guiding significant to the research of fermented cordyceps powder tablets, and could provide basis for the development of fermented cordyceps powder tablets.

  11. Production of fermented cheese whey-based beverage using kefir grains as starter culture: evaluation of morphological and microbial variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Karina Teixeira; Pereira, Maria Alcina; Nicolau, Ana; Dragone, Giuliano; Domingues, Lucília; Teixeira, José António; de Almeida Silva, João Batista; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2010-11-01

    Whey valorization concerns have led to recent interest on the production of whey beverage simulating kefir. In this study, the structure and microbiota of Brazilian kefir grains and beverages obtained from milk and whole/deproteinised whey was characterized using microscopy and molecular techniques. The aim was to evaluate its stability and possible shift of probiotic bacteria to the beverages. Fluorescence staining in combination with Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy showed distribution of yeasts in macro-clusters among the grain's matrix essentially composed of polysaccharides (kefiran) and bacteria. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis displayed communities included yeast affiliated to Kluyveromyces marxianus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kazachatania unispora, bacteria affiliated to Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens subsp. Kefirgranum, Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens subsp. Kefiranofaciens and an uncultured bacterium also related to the genus Lactobacillus. A steady structure and dominant microbiota, including probiotic bacteria, was detected in the analyzed kefir beverages and grains. This robustness is determinant for future implementation of whey-based kefir beverages.

  12. Breakdown properties and sensory perception of whey proteins/polysaccharide mixed gels as a function of microstructure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den L.; Vliet, van T.; Linden, van der E.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Velde, van de F.

    2007-01-01

    Whey protein isolate (WPI)/polysaccharide mixed gels used in the current study formed homogeneous and phase separated microstructures as visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The latter can be further classified into protein continuous, bicontinuous and coarse stranded

  13. Vitamin B/sub 12/ production from whey and simulation of optimal cultural conditions. [Propionibacterium shermanii 566

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marwaha, S.S.; Kennedy, J.F.; Sethi, R.P.

    1983-12-01

    The paper reports Propionibacterium shermanii 566 to be an efficient culture, among the three propionibacteria tested, for vitamin B/sub 12/ fermentation from whey. On the basis of the results observed and expected values calculated from simulated equations, 24 hours old inoculum, 5 mg/iron and 4% whey lactose concentration were selected as the optimal values for the fermentation. Carbon mixture of whey lactose and D-glucose (3.6% + 0.4%) and supplementation of whey with 0.5% (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/ further enhanced the yield of the metabolite. Under optimum cultural conditions, the organism metabolized 5.12 ..mu..g vitamin B/sub 12//ml culture, subsequently reducing the BOD by 90%, thereby reducing the pollution problems.

  14. Preventive Effect of Whey Hydrolysate Formulas for Mothers and Infants against Allergy Development in Infants for the First 2 Years

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    FUKUSHIMA, Yoichi; IWAMOTO, Kyosuke; TAKEUCHI-NAKASHIMA, Ayako; AKAMATSU, Noriko; FUJINO-NUMATA, Natsuko; YOSHIKOSHI, Masaki; ONDA, Takekazu; KITAGAWA, Michihiro

    1997-01-01

    ...), the mothers were given a hypoallergenic formula for mothers (MOM HA), which contained hydrolyzed whey protein as the only protein source, as a substitution for cow's milk during late pregnancy and lactation. In the CD group (n=127...

  15. COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF BIOCONVERSION NEUFCHATEL WHEY INTO RECTIFIED ETHANOL AND ORGANIC LIQUID FERTILIZER IN SEMI PILOT SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemilang Lara UTAMA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims of the study was to determine the cost-benefit analysis in neufchatel whey bioconversion into rectified ethanol and organic liquid fertilizer. Bioconversion whey into rectified ethanol and organic liquid fertilizer has shown great potential as a way to reduce the pollution resulting from cheese-making process. Semi pilot scale experiment was done to ferment 5 L neufchatel whey using 5% K. lactis at 33°C for 24 h in semi anaerobic plastic container without agitation and then distilled into 96.2% purity. Data collected and analyzed descriptively related to benefit cost ratio/BCR, net present value/NPV and internal rate returns/IRR. The result showed that semi pilot scale bioconversion of neufchatel whey resulting in 106.42 ml rectified ethanol and 4404.22 ml distillery residue. Economic benefit could achieved by the support of distillery residue sales as organic liquid fertilizer.

  16. Structural dynamic modification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... system, after some modifications are introduced into the sestem, is analysed using two different databases: the modal database and the frequency response function database. The limitaions of the modal database are discussed. Structural modifications that can be accounted for are lumped masses, springs, dampers and ...

  17. Permit application modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  18. Improvement of microwave-assisted digestion of milk powder with diluted nitric acid using oxygen as auxiliary reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizzi, Cezar A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Bioanalitica, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Barin, Juliano S. [Departamento de Tecnologia e Ciencia dos Alimentos, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Garcia, Edivaldo E. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, 87100-900, Maringa, PR (Brazil); Nobrega, Joaquim A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, 13565-905, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Dressler, Valderi L. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Bioanalitica, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Flores, Erico M.M., E-mail: ericommf@gmail.com [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Bioanalitica, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-05-15

    The feasibility of using diluted HNO{sub 3} solutions under oxygen pressure for decomposition of whole and non-fat milk powders and whey powder samples has been evaluated. Digestion efficiency was evaluated by determining the carbon content in solution (digests) and the determination of Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Pb and Zn was performed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and Hg by chemical vapor generation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Samples (up to 500 mg) were digested using HNO{sub 3} solutions (1 to 14 mol L{sup -1}) and the effect of oxygen pressure was evaluated between 2.5 and 20 bar. It was possible to perform the digestion of 500 mg of milk powder using 2 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} with oxygen pressure ranging from 7.5 to 20 bar with resultant carbon content in digests lower than 1700 mg L{sup -1}. Using optimized conditions, less than 0.86 mL of concentrated nitric acid (14 mol L{sup -1}) was enough to digest 500 mg of sample. The accuracy was evaluated by determination of metal concentrations in certified reference materials, which presented an agreement better than 95% (Student's t test, P < 0.05) for all the analytes.

  19. Effective modification of particle surface properties using ultrasonic water mist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genina, Natalja; Räikkönen, Heikki; Heinämäki, Jyrki

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to design a new technique to modify particle surface properties and, through that, to improve flowability of poorly flowing drug thiamine hydrochloride and pharmaceutical sugar lactose monohydrate of two different grades. The powdered particles were supplied...... by a vibratory feeder and exposed to an instantaneous effect of water mist generated from an ultrasound nebulizer. The processed and original powders were evaluated with respect to morphology (scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and spatial filtering technique), flow, and solid state...... increment in particle size. The changes in thiamine powder flow were mainly due to narrowing in particle size distribution where the tendency for better flow of finer lactose was related to surface and size modifications. The aqueous mist application did not cause any alteration of the crystal structures...

  20. Changes in selected oxysterols in powdered foodstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Chudy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research consisted of producing 3 types of powdered concentrates: the dairy, the egg and the dairy-egg (produced from a blend of raw liquid milk and liquid eggs. The dairy-egg powder was produced in order to facilitate formulation of dry food mixes. Powders were vacuumpackaged and packaged in air atmosphere and stored for 24 months. Changes in contents of selected oxysterols (determined by gas chromatography were recorded. Regardless of the packaging type, the predominant oxysterol in the dairy-egg powder was α-epoxy-C (7.679 and 5.600 μg/g powder, respectively.