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Sample records for wheat ige-mediated food

  1. Ige-mediated food allergy - current problems and future perspectives (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomidze, N; Gotua, T; Gotua, M

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of FA have changed over time, and many studies have indeed suggested a true rise in prevalence over the past 10-20 years. Recent studies showed that prevalence of self-reported food allergy is 17, 3%, versus challenged confirmed - 0.9%. The majority of allergic reactions to foods, particularly in children, are suggested to be caused primarily by eight foods, namely cow's milk, egg, wheat, soy, peanut, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish. Clinical symptoms of FA include skin, gastrointestinal and systemic reaction anaphylaxis that might be life-threatening and cause fatal reaction. Diagnosis of food allergy is based on SPT, sIgE measurements, component resolved diagnostics (CRD) and double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) tests. The primary therapy for food allergy is strict avoidance of the causal foods. Patients should be provided an emergency action plan, including how to administer an epinephrine autoinjector. It is recommended that all infants be exclusively breast-fed, without maternal diet restriction of allergens, until 4 to 6 months of age. Recent studies have shown that oral immunotherapy (OIT) can induce desensitization and modulate allergen-specific immune responses. Further work to evaluate the long-term effectiveness and safety of this therapy is ongoing and needed before they are used in the main-stream care of children or adults with food allergy.

  2. Wheat allergy: diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cianferoni A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Cianferoni Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy and Immunology, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Triticum aestivum (bread wheat is the most widely grown crop worldwide. In genetically predisposed individuals, wheat can cause specific immune responses. A food allergy to wheat is characterized by T helper type 2 activation which can result in immunoglobulin E (IgE and non-IgE mediated reactions. IgE mediated reactions are immediate, are characterized by the presence of wheat-specific IgE antibodies, and can be life-threatening. Non-IgE mediated reactions are characterized by chronic eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. IgE mediated responses to wheat can be related to wheat ingestion (food allergy or wheat inhalation (respiratory allergy. A food allergy to wheat is more common in children and can be associated with a severe reaction such as anaphylaxis and wheat-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis. An inhalation induced IgE mediated wheat allergy can cause baker’s asthma or rhinitis, which are common occupational diseases in workers who have significant repetitive exposure to wheat flour, such as bakers. Non-IgE mediated food allergy reactions to wheat are mainly eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE or eosinophilic gastritis (EG, which are both characterized by chronic eosinophilic inflammation. EG is a systemic disease, and is associated with severe inflammation that requires oral steroids to resolve. EoE is a less severe disease, which can lead to complications in feeding intolerance and fibrosis. In both EoE and EG, wheat allergy diagnosis is based on both an elimination diet preceded by a tissue biopsy obtained by esophagogastroduodenoscopy in order to show the effectiveness of the diet. Diagnosis of IgE mediated wheat allergy is based on the medical history, the detection of specific IgE to wheat, and oral food challenges. Currently, the main treatment of a

  3. Wheat allergy: diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianferoni, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Triticum aestivum (bread wheat) is the most widely grown crop worldwide. In genetically predisposed individuals, wheat can cause specific immune responses. A food allergy to wheat is characterized by T helper type 2 activation which can result in immunoglobulin E (IgE) and non-IgE mediated reactions. IgE mediated reactions are immediate, are characterized by the presence of wheat-specific IgE antibodies, and can be life-threatening. Non-IgE mediated reactions are characterized by chronic eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. IgE mediated responses to wheat can be related to wheat ingestion (food allergy) or wheat inhalation (respiratory allergy). A food allergy to wheat is more common in children and can be associated with a severe reaction such as anaphylaxis and wheat-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis. An inhalation induced IgE mediated wheat allergy can cause baker’s asthma or rhinitis, which are common occupational diseases in workers who have significant repetitive exposure to wheat flour, such as bakers. Non-IgE mediated food allergy reactions to wheat are mainly eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) or eosinophilic gastritis (EG), which are both characterized by chronic eosinophilic inflammation. EG is a systemic disease, and is associated with severe inflammation that requires oral steroids to resolve. EoE is a less severe disease, which can lead to complications in feeding intolerance and fibrosis. In both EoE and EG, wheat allergy diagnosis is based on both an elimination diet preceded by a tissue biopsy obtained by esophagogastroduodenoscopy in order to show the effectiveness of the diet. Diagnosis of IgE mediated wheat allergy is based on the medical history, the detection of specific IgE to wheat, and oral food challenges. Currently, the main treatment of a wheat allergy is based on avoidance of wheat altogether. However, in the near future immunotherapy may represent a valid way to treat IgE mediated reactions to

  4. Wheat allergy: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianferoni, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Triticum aestivum (bread wheat) is the most widely grown crop worldwide. In genetically predisposed individuals, wheat can cause specific immune responses. A food allergy to wheat is characterized by T helper type 2 activation which can result in immunoglobulin E (IgE) and non-IgE mediated reactions. IgE mediated reactions are immediate, are characterized by the presence of wheat-specific IgE antibodies, and can be life-threatening. Non-IgE mediated reactions are characterized by chronic eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. IgE mediated responses to wheat can be related to wheat ingestion (food allergy) or wheat inhalation (respiratory allergy). A food allergy to wheat is more common in children and can be associated with a severe reaction such as anaphylaxis and wheat-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis. An inhalation induced IgE mediated wheat allergy can cause baker's asthma or rhinitis, which are common occupational diseases in workers who have significant repetitive exposure to wheat flour, such as bakers. Non-IgE mediated food allergy reactions to wheat are mainly eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) or eosinophilic gastritis (EG), which are both characterized by chronic eosinophilic inflammation. EG is a systemic disease, and is associated with severe inflammation that requires oral steroids to resolve. EoE is a less severe disease, which can lead to complications in feeding intolerance and fibrosis. In both EoE and EG, wheat allergy diagnosis is based on both an elimination diet preceded by a tissue biopsy obtained by esophagogastroduodenoscopy in order to show the effectiveness of the diet. Diagnosis of IgE mediated wheat allergy is based on the medical history, the detection of specific IgE to wheat, and oral food challenges. Currently, the main treatment of a wheat allergy is based on avoidance of wheat altogether. However, in the near future immunotherapy may represent a valid way to treat IgE mediated reactions to

  5. Strategies to reduce or prevent wheat coeliacimmunogenicity and wheat sensitivity through food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Meer, van der I.M.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Cereals are among the oldest foods of humans. Wheat is one of these. In present times,several syndromes are, whether true or false, increasingly attributed to the consumption of wheat, with increasing costs for medical care and decreasing turnover for the food industry, especially the bakery sector.

  6. Deoxynivalenol. Derivation of concentration limits in wheat and wheat containing food products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters MN; Fiolet DCM; Baars AJ; CSR

    1999-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) produced by fungi of the Fusarium genus may occur in various cereal crops. A provisional TDI of 1.1 ug per kg body weight was derived to calculate concentration limits for the mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON), in wheat and wheat food products. Children (1-4 years

  7. Occupational asthma due to IgE mediated allergy to the flower Molucella laevis (Bells of Ireland)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miesen, WMAJ; van der Heide, S; Kerstjens, HAM; Dubois, AEJ; de Monchy, JGR

    Background: About 25% of greenhouse flower and/or ornamental plant growers sensitised to workplace flowers or moulds have occupational asthma, a disease that is suffered by 8% of the growers who cultivate these crops. Aim: To document a case of occupational asthma due to IgE mediated allergy to the

  8. Food security: the challenge of increasing wheat yield and the importance of not compromising food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, T; Halford, N G

    2014-01-01

    Current wheat yield and consumption is considered in the context of the historical development of wheat, from early domestication through to modern plant breeding, the Green Revolution and wheat's place as one of the world's most productive and important crops in the 21st Century. The need for further improvement in the yield potential of wheat in order to meet current and impending challenges is discussed, including rising consumption and the demand for grain for fuel as well as food. Research on the complex genetics underlying wheat yield is described, including the identification of quantitative trait loci and individual genes, and the prospects of biotechnology playing a role in wheat improvement in the future are discussed. The challenge of preparing wheat to meet the problems of drought, high temperature and increasing carbon dioxide concentration that are anticipated to come about as a result of climate change is also reviewed. Wheat yield must be increased while not compromising food safety, and the emerging problem of processing contaminants is reviewed, focussing in particular on acrylamide, a contaminant that forms from free asparagine and reducing sugars during high temperature cooking and processing. Wheat breeders are strongly encouraged to consider the contaminant issue when breeding for yield.

  9. Role played by Th2 type cytokines in IgE mediated allergy and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deo Sudha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Recent evidence suggest that allergen type 2 helper T cells (Th2 play a triggering role in the activation/recruitment of IgE antibody producing B cells, mast cells and eosinophils. Reduced microbial exposure in early life is responsible for a shift of Th1/Th2 balance in the immune system towards the pre-allergic Th2 response. The Th1 predominantly produce IFNg and delayed type hypersensitivity while Th2 secrete IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13 and regulate B cell and eosinophil mediated responses. To assess regulatory changes in the immune system, in patients with allergy and asthma, we studied the cytokine profile in serum in comparison with normal healthy controls. Patients and Methods: A total of 170 patients with various allergies and asthmatic conditions were studied, for cytokines in the serum by ELISA using kits from Immunotech, and analyzed to identify the triggering factors or main contributors towards allergy and asthma. Results: Our study showed increase in the levels of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 in all groups which were non- significant. But the levels of IL-10, IL-13 and TNF α were highly significant. Besides, we found correlation of GM-CSF with IL-10. Significant correlation with different cytokines was observed. Most of these patients showed increase in IgE levels. Conclusions: This study gives a better understanding of how cytokines are the mediators of balance of Th1 and Th2 immune responses and IgE synthesis is controlled by cytokines. Further studies will eventually lead to improved treatment strategies in the clinical management of IgE mediated allergy.

  10. Wheat Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Soy sauce Starch (gelatinized starch, modified starch, modified food starch, vegetable starch) Surimi Some Unexpected Sources of Wheat Ale Asian dishes can feature wheat flour flavored and shaped ...

  11. Radioimmunoassay for wheat gliadin to assess the suitability of gluten free foods for patients with coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciclitira, P.J.; Ellis, H.J. (United Medical School of Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospital, London (UK)); Evans, D.J. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); Lennox, E.S. (Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK))

    1985-03-01

    Coeliac disease is a clinical condition characterised by malabsorption secondary to abnormalities of the small intestine. The condition is known to be exacerbated by wheat gliadin, rye, barley and possibly oats. The only assays that are available for testing for the presence of wheat gluten in foods are double diffusion against rabbit anti-gliadin antiserum and measurement of Kjeldahl nitrogen in products derived from wheat flour. We have developed a radioimmunoassay for wheat gliadin with a detection limit of 1 ng. Nominally gluten free foods based on wheat starch have been shown to contain up to 1.9 x 10/sup -2/% wheat gliadin. Bread made from Nutregen wheat starch which has now been withdrawn contains 6.4 mg gliadin per standard 30 g slice. A radioimmunoassay for wheat gliadin could be used to define standards for the suitability of gluten free products based on wheat starch for patients with coeliac disease.

  12. Food label guide for whole wheat bread (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole grains, like the kind found in whole wheat bread, contain fiber and antioxidants such as Vitamin E and selenium, iron, magnesium, zinc and B vitamins. Fiber is a very beneficial nutrient that ...

  13. Food security, wheat production and policy in South Africa: Reflections on food sustainability and challenges for a market economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois de Wet

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional concept of security has broadened over the past decades. Food security in South Africa is an imperative for human and non-human survival. In the contemporary political economy, there is a real nexus between globalisation, exploitation, the state, scarcity of resources, the market, peoples’ need to feel secure, notions of state responsibility and food production. Political economy and human security in theoretical debates and face-to-face politics are intrinsically linked. The notion of a ‘secure community’ changed. Food security and the right to quality living became a social imperative. Understanding current agricultural economics requires the ability to link security and access to food for all. In this case study, wheat production in South Africa is addressed against the interface of the global and the local including South Africa’s transition to a democratic and constitutional state with a Bill of Rights. The current security approach represents a more comprehensive understanding of what security is meant to be and include, amongst others, housing security, medical security, service delivery and food security, as set out in the Millennium Development Goals and the subsequent Sustainable Development Goals. The issue of food security is addressed here with particular reference to wheat production, related current government policies and the market economy. The authors chose to limit their socio-economic focus to a specific sector of the agricultural market, namely wheat, rather than discuss food security in South Africa in general. Wheat was chosen as a unit of analysis because as a crop, wheat used in bread is one of the staples for the majority of South Africans and given the current negative economic developments, wheat as a staple is likely to remain integral, if not increasing its status of dependability

  14. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis due to wheat in a young woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanchian, Hamid; Farid, Reza; Ansari, Elham; Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Purreza, Reza; Noorizadeh, Shadi

    2013-03-01

    Food Dependent Exercise-Induced Allergy is a rare condition. However, the occurrence of anaphylaxis is increasing especially in young people. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is based on clinical criteria and can be supported by laboratory tests such as serum tryptase and positive skin test results for specific IgE to potential triggering allergens. Anaphylaxis prevention needs strict avoidance of confirmed relevant allergen. Food-exercise challenge test may be an acceptable method for diagnosis of Food Dependent Exercise-Induced Allergy and dietary elimination of food is recommended to manage it. In this study, a 32 year-old woman visited the allergy clinic with a history of several episodes of hives since 11 years ago and 3 life-threatening attacks of anaphylaxis during the previous 6 months. The onsets of majority of these attacks were due to physical activity after breakfast. On Blood RAST test, the panel of common food Allergens was used and she had positive test only to wheat flour. On skin prick tests for common food allergens she showed a 6 millimeter wheal with 14 mm flare to Wheat Extract. The rest of allergens were negative.The patient was diagnosed as wheat-dependent exercise-induced, and all foods containing wheat were omitted from her diet. In this report we emphasized on the importance of careful history taking in anaphylaxis diagnosis.

  15. Soy in wheat--contamination levels and food allergy risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Benjamin C; Taylor, Steve L; Marx, David B; Petersen, Barbara J; Baumert, Joseph L

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, packaged food ingredients derived from allergenic sources must be clearly labeled. However, no requirement exists to declare the presence of residues of raw agricultural commodities due to agricultural commodity comingling. Clinical reports of allergic reactions to undeclared soy in wheat-based products do not exist suggesting that a rather low degree of risk is posed by wheat-based products that are comingled with soy. Detectable soybean residues (>2.5 ppm soy flour) were found in 62.8% of commercially available wheat flours at concentrations of 3-443 ppm soy flour (1.6-236 ppm soy protein). Conservative probabilistic risk assessments predict a risk of allergic reaction among the most sensitive soy-allergic individuals of 2.8±2.0 per 1000 soy-allergic user eating occasions of foods containing wheat flour. However, the predicted reactions occur at exposure levels below the lowest eliciting dose observed to provoke objective reactions in clinical oral soy challenges. Given this low level of predicted risk and the lack of evidence for allergic reactions among soy-allergic consumers to wheat-based products, the avoidance of wheat-based products by soy-allergic consumers does not appear to be necessary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Stability of the Trichothecene, Deoxynivalenol in Processed Foods and Wheat Flake Cereal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species, principally F. graminearum and F. culmorum. These fungi are natural contaminants of wheat, barley and corn and, consequently, DON is found in cereal-based foods. The effect of thermal processing on DON is variable: som...

  17. A kaizen approach to food safety quality management in the value chain from wheat to bread

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a Management Science approach to quality management in food production. Aspects of food quality, product conformance and reliability/food safety are examined, starting with wheat and ending with its value chain transformation into bread. Protein qualities that influence glycemic index levels in bread are used to compare the value chains of France and the US. With Kaizen models the book shows how changes in these characteristics are the result of management decisions made by the wheat growers in response to government policy and industry strategy. Lastly, it provides step-by-step instructions on how to apply kaizen methodology and Deming's work on quality improvement to make the HACCPs (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) in food safety systems more robust.

  18. Wheat Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... References Wheat allergy. American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. http://www.acaai.org/allergist/allergies/Types/food- ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/wheat-allergy/basics/definition/CON-20031834 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions ...

  19. Color of whole-wheat foods prepared from a bright-white hard winter wheat and the phenolic acids in its coarse bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongxin; Martin, Joe; Okot-Kotber, Moses; Seib, Paul A

    2011-08-01

    The color of wheat kernels often impacts the color and thereby the value of wheat-based foods. A line of hard white winter wheat (B-W HW) with bright appearing kernels has been developed at the Kansas State Agricultural Research Center. The objective of this study was to compare the color of several foods made from the B-W HW wheat with those of 2 hard white wheat cultivars, Trego and Lakin. The B-W HW kernels showed higher lightness (L*, 57.6) than Trego (55.5) and Lakin (56.8), and the increased lightness was carried over to its bran and whole-wheat flour. Alkaline noodle and bread crumb made from the B-W HW whole-wheat flour showed slightly higher lightness (L*) than those made from Trego and Lakin. The sum of soluble and bound phenolics extracted from the 3 wheat brans, which had not been preextracted to remove lipids, was found to be 17.22 to 18.98 mg/g. The soluble phenolic acids in the brans were principally vanillic, ferulic, and syringic. The bound phenolic acids in the brans were dominated by ferulic, which accounted for 50.1% to 82.2% of total identified bound phenolic acids. Other bound phenolic acids were protocatechuic, caffeic, syringic, trans-cinnamic, p-hydroxybenzoic, p-coumaric, and vanillic. The lightness (L*) values of coarse wheat brans correlated positively with their levels of bound protocatechuic (r = 0.72, P < 0.01) and p-hydroxybenzoic acids (r = 0.75, P < 0.01). © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Impact of casein and egg white proteins on the structure of wheat gluten-based protein-rich food

    OpenAIRE

    Wouters, Arno; Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Delcour, Jan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing interest in texturally and nutritionally satisfying vegetable alternatives for meat. Wheat gluten proteins have unique functional properties but a poor nutritional value in comparison to animal proteins. This study investigated the potential of egg white and bovine milk casein with well-balanced amino acid composition to increase the quality of wheat gluten-based protein-rich foods. RESULTS: Heating a wheat gluten (51.4 g) - water (100.0 ml) blend for 120 min...

  1. Eat Wheat!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho Wheat Commission, Boise.

    This pamphlet contains puzzles, games, and a recipe designed to teach elementary school pupils about wheat. It includes word games based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Guide Pyramid and on foods made from wheat. The Food Guide Pyramid can be cut out of the pamphlet and assembled as a three-dimensional information source and food guide.…

  2. Glycemic response of rice, wheat and finger millet based diabetic food formulations in normoglycemic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobana, Shanmugam; Kumari, Singh R Usha; Malleshi, Nagappa G; Ali, Syed Z

    2007-08-01

    Food formulations suitable as dietary supplements to diabetic subjects based on wheat, decorticated finger millet, popped (aralu) and expanded (puri) rice each blended separately with legumes, non-fat dry milk, vegetable oils, spices and a few hypoglycemic ingredients were formulated. The formulations contained 13.0-18.3% protein, 11.3-11.8% fat, 59.9-67.5% starch and 13.2-18.0% dietary fiber. A 50-g equivalent carbohydrate portion of the foods in the form of thick porridge was provided to eight healthy adult subjects and the postprandial blood glucose response was determined. The Glycemic Index (GI) values were 55.4+/-9, 93.4+/-7, 105+/-6 and 109+/-8 for wheat-based, millet-based, aralu-based and puri-based formulations. The variations in the GI could be attributed to the nature of available as well as non-available (non-starchy polysaccharides) carbohydrates in the foods besides the processing undergone by the cereal ingredients. The higher GI of rice formulations could be due to the easily digestible nature of starches and also their lower dietary fiber contents. The study revealed the suitability of wheat-based formulation as a food supplement or as meal replacer in diabetic subjects but the unsuitability of rice-based formulations.

  3. Breeding for wheat quality to assure food security of a staple crop: the case study of Tajikistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Husenov, Bahromiddin; Makhkamov, Marufkul; Gustavsson, Larisa; Muminjanov, Hafiz; Johansson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated options and obstacles to strengthening food security through breeding a staple crop in a developing country, using the case of quality of bread wheat in Tajikistan as an example. Methods...

  4. Epidemiology of IgE-mediated food allergy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiology of IgE- mediated food allergy. The prevalence of food allergy varies significantly based on geographical region, allergens tested, diagnostic criteria, population age and concurrent atopic conditions.[5]. Variations in food allergy definitions and inconsistencies in study design make studies on food allergy.

  5. Gastrointestinal food allergy in Ghanaian children: a case series ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Food allergy is an adverse health effect arising from a specific immune response that occurs reproducibly on exposure to a given food. Food allergies are classified into three types: Ig(immunoglobulin)E mediated, mixed IgE and cell mediated and cell-mediated non IgE mediated. Gastrointestinal (GIT) food ...

  6. Appetite and food intake after consumption of sausages with 10% fat and added wheat or rye bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuholm, Stine; Arildsen Jakobsen, Louise Margrethe; Vejrum Sørensen, Karina; Kehlet, Ursula; Raben, Anne; Kristensen, Mette

    2014-02-01

    The use of dietary fibers as fat-replacers in sausages gives less energy-dense and thereby healthier foods. Also, dietary fibers have been shown to induce satiety. The objectives of this study were to investigate if appetite sensations and energy intake was affected by (1) addition of dietary fibers to sausages, (2) type of dietary fibers and (3) the food matrix of the dietary fibers. In this randomized cross-over study 25 young men were served four test meals; wheat bran sausages, rye bran sausages, rye bran bread and wheat flour sausages. The test meals were served as breakfast after an overnight fast. Appetite sensations were evaluated by visual analogue scales (VAS) assessed every 30 min for 240 min followed by an ad libitum lunch meal where energy intake was calculated. Both rye bran and wheat bran sausages increased satiety (P importance of food matrix and food processing.

  7. Toxicology of isoproturon to the food crop wheat as affected by salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lu; Lu, Yan Li; Yang, Hong

    2012-07-01

    Isoproturon, a herbicide belonging to the phenylurea family, is widely used to kill weeds in soils. Recent study indicated that isoproturon has become a contaminant in ecosystems due to its intensive use, thus bringing environmental risks to crop production safety. Salicylic acid (SA) is one of the components in plant defense signaling pathways and regulates diverse physiological responses to biotic and environmental stresses. The purpose of the study is to help to understand how SA mediates the biological process in wheat under isoproturon stress. Wheat seeds (Triticum aestivum, cv. Yangmai 13) were surface-sterilized and placed on moist filter paper for germination. After 24 h, the germinating seeds were placed on a plastic pot (1 L) containing 1,120 g soil mixed with isoproturon at 4 mg kg(-1) soil. After 4 days, wheat leaves were sprayed with 5 mg L(-1) SA. The SA treatment was undertaken once a day and lasted for 6 days, when the third true leaf was well developed. For control seedlings, only water was sprayed. Seedlings were grown under a light intensity of 300 µmol m(-2) s(-1) with a light/dark cycle of 12/12 h at 25°C, and watered to keep 70% relative water content in soils. We investigated the role of SA in alleviating isoproturon-induced toxicity in the food crop wheat (T. aestivum). Plants exposed to 4 mg kg(-1) isoproturon showed growth stunt and oxidative damage, but concomitant treatment with 5 mg L(-1) SA was able to attenuate the toxic effect. Isoproturon in soils was readily accumulated by wheat, but such accumulation can be blocked significantly by SA application. Treatment with SA decreased the abundance of O(2) (.-) and H(2)O(2), as well as activities of antioxidant enzymes, and increased activities of catalase in isoproturon-exposed plants. The enzyme activities were confirmed by the native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Further, an RT-PCR-based assay was performed to show that several transcripts coding antioxidant enzymes were

  8. [Consumption of foods prepared with corn, wheat and rice and its relationship to gastric cancer incidence in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascón Pacheco, R A; López Carrillo, L

    1998-09-01

    To assess the consumption of food prepared with corn, wheat or rice, in relation to the risk of developing gastric cancer (GC). We analyzed information about cereal consumption using data from a study of diet and GC for which 220 histologically confirmed incident GC cases and 752 population-based controls, were recruited. All subjects were interviewed using a food frequency questionnaire in which the consumption of 11 foods prepared with corn, wheat or rice, 54 additional food items and 4 alcoholic beverages was assessed. Adjusting by age, gender and total caloric intake, the results did not show an increased risk for gastric cancer incidence in regard to the consumption of foods prepared with corn (O.R. q4 vs. q1 = 0.97 C.I. 95% 0.58-1.63), wheat (O.R. q4 vs. q1 = 1.07 C.I. 95% 0.62-1.84) or rice (O.R. q4 vs. q1 = 1.36 C.I. 95% 0.96-1.90). These results remained similar after stratifying by histological type of GC (i.e. intestinal vs. diffuse). Our results do not lend support to the hypothesis that the consumption of foods prepared with corn, wheat or rice increase the risk of being diagnosed with gastric cancer.

  9. Clinical spectrum of food allergies: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Marco H-K; Wong, Wilfred H-S; Chang, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Food allergy is defined as an adverse immune response towards food proteins or as a form of a food intolerance associated with a hypersensitive immune response. It should also be reproducible by a double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge. Many reported that food reactions are not allergic but are intolerances. Food allergy often presents to clinicians as a symptom complex. This review focuses on the clinical spectrum and manifestations of various forms of food allergies. According to clinical presentations and allergy testing, there are three types of food allergy: IgE mediated, mixed (IgE/Non-IgE), and non-IgE mediated (cellular, delayed type hypersensitivity). Recent advances in food allergy in early childhood have highlighted increasing recognition of a spectrum of delayed-onset non-IgE-mediated manifestation of food allergy. Common presentations of food allergy in infancy including atopic eczema, infantile colic, and gastroesophageal reflux. These clinical observations are frequently associated with food hypersensitivity and respond to dietary elimination. Non-IgE-mediated food allergy includes a wide range of diseases, from atopic dermatitis to food protein-induced enterocolitis and from eosinophilic esophagitis to celiac disease. The most common food allergies in children include milk, egg, soy, wheat, peanut, treenut, fish, and shellfish. Milk and egg allergies are usually outgrown, but peanut and treenut allergy tends to persist. The prevalence of food allergy in infancy is increasing and may affect up to 15-20 % of infants. The alarming rate of increase calls for a public health approach in the prevention and treatment of food allergy in children.

  10. Appetite and food intake after consumption of sausages with 10% fat and added wheat or rye bran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuholm, Stine; Arildsen Jakobsen, Louise Margrethe; Sørensen, Karina Vejrum

    2014-01-01

    fibers to sausages, (2) type of dietary fibers and (3) the food matrix of the dietary fibers. In this randomized cross-over study 25 young men were served four test meals; wheat bran sausages, rye bran sausages, rye bran bread and wheat flour sausages. The test meals were served as breakfast after...... and rye bran added to sausages decreased appetite sensations and thereby has a potential added health benefit beyond the role as fat-replacer. The satisfying effect of dietary fibers appears to be more pronounced when added to sausages than when added to bread, stressing the importance of food matrix...

  11. Immunomodulatory effects of food | El-Gamal | Egyptian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In persons with allergies, a normally harmless material can be mistaken as an antigen. Some individuals develop an exaggerated immune response to food through developing food allergy which may be IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated, or mixed. This review will highlight the interaction between the immune system and ...

  12. Approaches to assess IgE mediated allergy risks (sensitization and cross-reactivity) from new or modified dietary proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remington, B.; Broekman, H. C. H.; Blom, W. M.

    2018-01-01

    The development and introduction of new dietary protein sources has the potential to improve food supply sustainability. Understanding the potential allergenicity of these new or modified proteins is crucial to ensure protection of public health. Exposure to new proteins may result in de novo sen...

  13. Production of a high-nutritional-value functional food, the Update1 bread, with the supplementation of the wheat flour with high-protein-content raw food materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csapó J.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During our research, we added extracted soya bean meal, egg-white powder, gluten, wheat sourdough, and bamboo fibre to wheat flour in order to increase the quantity of the essential amino acid and the biological value of the wheat protein, producing such a functional, health-protecting, health-preservative food product which is suitable to satisfy the essential amino acid requirements of humans, assuming normal nutrition. Furthermore, we could produce such a food, which, on the one hand, was suitable to confine or prevent the essential amino acid’s malnutrition symptoms, while, on the other hand, when applied alone, to meet the consumers’ needs. During our work, we determined the protein content and amino acid composition of the wheat flour, of the additives used in bread baking, and in the bread both baked with supplementation (Update1 bread and without supplementation (normal bread, as well as the quantity of the Maillard reaction products (hydroxymethylfurfural. We calculated the biological value of the protein of different breads and evaluated the sensory characteristics of the produced functional food and the fortified bread, supplemented with high essential-amino-acid-containing additives.

  14. Study on the Immunoreactivity of Triticum monococcum (Einkorn) Wheat in Patients with Wheat-Dependent Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis for the Production of Hypoallergenic Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Carla; Bolla, Michela; Chignola, Roberto; Senna, Gianenrico; Rossin, Giacomo; Caruso, Beatrice; Tomelleri, Carlo; Cecconi, Daniela; Brandolini, Andrea; Zoccatelli, Gianni

    2015-09-23

    Wheat [Triticum aestivum (T.a.)] ingestion can cause a specific allergic reaction, which is called wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). The major allergen involved is ω-5 gliadin, a gluten protein coded by genes located on the B genome. Our aim was to study the immunoreactivity of proteins in Triticum monococcum (einkorn, T.m.), a diploid ancestral wheat lacking B chromosomes, for possible use in the production of hypoallergenic foods. A total of 14 patients with a clear history of WDEIA and specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) to ω-5 gliadin were enrolled. Skin prick test (SPT) with a commercial wheat extract and an in-house T.a. gluten diagnostic solution tested positive for 43 and 100% of the cases, respectively. No reactivity in patients tested with solutions prepared from four T.m. accessions was observed. The immunoblotting of T.m. gluten proteins performed with the sera of patients showed different IgE-binding profiles with respect to T.a., confirming the absence of ω-5 gliadin. A general lower immunoreactivity of T.m. gluten proteins with scarce cross-reactivity to ω-5 gliadin epitopes was assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Given the absence of reactivity by SPT and the limited cross-reactivity with ω-5 gliadin, T.m. might represent a potential candidate in the production of hypoallergenic bakery products for patients sensitized to ω-5 gliadin. Further analyses need to be carried out regarding its safety.

  15. Proteomics of wheat flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat is a major food crop grown on more than 215 million hectares of land throughout the world. Wheat flour provides an important source of protein for human nutrition and is used as a principal ingredient in a wide range of food products, largely because wheat flour, when mixed with water, has un...

  16. A history into genetic and epigenetic evolution of food tolerance: how humanity rapidly evolved by drinking milk and eating wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Carine

    2017-12-01

    Human exposure to wheat and milk is almost global worldwide. Yet the introduction of milk and wheat is very recent (5000-10 000 years) when compared to the human evolution. The last 4 decades have seen a rise in food allergy and food intolerance to milk and wheat. Often described as plurifactorial, the cause of allergic diseases is the result from an interplay between genetic predisposition and epigenetic in the context of environmental changes. Genetic and epigenetic understanding and their contribution to allergy or other antigen-driven diseases have considerably advanced in the last few years. Yet, environmental factors are also quite difficult to identify and associate with disease risk. Can we rethink our old findings and learn from human history and recent genetic studies? More than one million years separate Homo habilis to today's mankind, more than 1 million years to develop abilities to obtain food by foraging in diverse environments. One million year to adjust and fine-tune our genetic code and adapt; and only 1% of this time, 10 000 years, to face the three biggest revolutions of the human kind: the agricultural revolution, the industrial revolution and the postindustrial revolution. With big and rapid environmental changes come adaptation but with no time for fine-tuning. Today tolerance and adverse reactions to food may be a testimony of adaptation successes and mistakes.

  17. Nutritional Status of Water-soluble Vitamins Did not Differ According to Intake Levels of Wheat and Wheat Alternatives and Rice and Rice Alternatives as a Staple Food in Pregnant Japanese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Katsumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether the intake level of a staple food influences the nutritional status of water-soluble vitamins in pregnant Japanese women. Urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins was used as a biomarker for nutritional assessment. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were collected and vitamin intake was surveyed using a validated self-administered comprehensive diet history questionnaire. Subjects were categorized into bottom, middle, and upper tertiles according to the percentage of total energy intake from wheat and wheat alternatives or rice and rice alternatives. The present study showed that the nutritional status of water-soluble vitamins did not differ with intake level of wheat and wheat alternatives or rice and rice alternatives as a staple food in pregnant Japanese women.

  18. Nutritional Status of Water-soluble Vitamins Did not Differ According to Intake Levels of Wheat and Wheat Alternatives and Rice and Rice Alternatives as a Staple Food in Pregnant Japanese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumi Shibata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate whether the intake level of a staple food influences the nutritional status of water-soluble vitamins in pregnant Japanese women. Urinary excretion of water-soluble vitamins was used as a biomarker for nutritional assessment. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were collected and vitamin intake was surveyed using a validated self-administered comprehensive diet history questionnaire. Subjects were categorized into bottom, middle, and upper tertiles according to the percentage of total energy intake from wheat and wheat alternatives or rice and rice alternatives. The present study showed that the nutritional status of water-soluble vitamins did not differ with intake level of wheat and wheat alternatives or rice and rice alternatives as a staple food in pregnant Japanese women.

  19. Wheat for Kids! [and] Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho Wheat Commission, Boise.

    "Wheat for Kids" contains information at the elementary school level about: the structure of the wheat kernel; varieties of wheat and their uses; growing wheat; making wheat dough; the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Guide Pyramid and nutrition; Idaho's part of the international wheat market; recipes; and word games based on the…

  20. 21 CFR 184.1322 - Wheat gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Wheat gluten. 184.1322 Section 184.1322 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1322 Wheat gluten. (a) Wheat gluten (CAS Reg. No. 8002-80-0) is the principal protein component of wheat and consists mainly of gliadin and glutenin. Wheat gluten is obtained...

  1. Development of a Method for Evaluating Floor Dry-Cleanability from Wheat Flour in the Food Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreca, F; Cardinali, G D; Borgese, E; Russo, M

    2017-04-01

    Many productive processes are characterized by inadequate protocols of sanitation that increase the possibility of proliferation of microbial contaminants, especially on surfaces. The use of this method for evaluating the degree of floor cleanability in agri-food companies is important not only to reduce the risk of contamination of products, but also to provide companies with a tool to identify critical issues. The method is based on the usage of bicinchoninic acid assay (BCA) in a solution at a 1:50 ratio of Cu(2+) /BCA, which is ideal for detecting the amount of proteins contained in wheat flour residues on industrial flooring. Spectrophotometric analysis allowed identifying maximum absorbance values at 562 nm for different protein concentrations, although the construction of a regression function led to the definition of the intervals of evaluation corresponding to different degrees of cleanliness from residues of wheat flour. The results of the absorbance curves, obtained by applying the proposed evaluation method to 6 tiles commonly used in agri-food buildings, showed the clear persistence of food material on 2 tiles with surface relief. In particular, such tiles showed a higher presence of proteins, with a level of contamination 440% higher. Furthermore, a robotic system was designed to standardize the cleaning method commonly employed in agri-food companies to remove solid particles from flooring. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. Healthy food from organic wheat: choice of genotypes for production and breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Abrar; Larsson, Hans; Kuktaite, Ramune; Johansson, Eva

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, 40 wheat genotypes were grown in the same soil in organic farming system trials in Alnarp, Sweden. The purpose was to evaluate opportunities for production and breeding of organic wheat of high nutritious value. The results showed a large variation in content of minerals, total tocochromanols and heavy metals in the grain of 40 organically produced wheat genotypes. Principal component and cluster analysis were used as tools for selection of the most suitable genotypes for production and breeding of organic wheat of high nutritious value. No single genotype group was found particularly superior from the studied material to produce this specific type of wheat. However, certain genotypes from different groups were found with promising nutritional characters. The most promising genotypes as related to nutritionally relevant compounds were 6356 spelt, Triticum monococcum, Ölands 17 borst spelt, Lv Dal 16 brun borst and Fylgia. By choosing these genotypes for organic production and future wheat breeding, nutritionally improved organic wheat products might be developed. However, for future breeding, nutritional components such as protein, fibre, glycaemic index and B-group vitamins should also be considered. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Impact of casein and egg white proteins on the structure of wheat gluten-based protein-rich food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Arno G B; Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Delcour, Jan A

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing interest in texturally and nutritionally satisfying vegetable alternatives to meat. Wheat gluten proteins have unique functional properties but a poor nutritional value in comparison to animal proteins. This study investigated the potential of egg white and bovine milk casein with well-balanced amino acid composition to increase the quality of wheat gluten-based protein-rich foods. Heating a wheat gluten (51.4 g)-water (100.0 mL) blend for 120 min at 100 °C increased its firmness less than heating a wheat gluten (33.0 g)-freeze-dried egg white (16.8 g)-water (100.0 mL) blend. In contrast, the addition of casein to the gluten-water blend negatively impacted firmness after heating. Firmness was correlated with loss of protein extractability in sodium dodecyl sulfate containing medium during heating, which was higher with egg white than with casein. Even more, heat-induced polymerization of the gluten-water blend with egg white but not with casein was greater than expected from the losses in extractability of gluten and egg white on their own. Structure formation was favored by mixing gluten with egg white but not with casein. These observations were linked to the intrinsic polymerization behavior of egg white and casein, but also to their interaction with gluten. Thus not all nutritionally suitable proteins can be used for enrichment of gluten-based protein-rich foods. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Low-calorie bread baked with charred cellulose granules and wheat flour to eliminate toxic xanthene food dye in the alimentary canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabara, Aya; Yamane, Chihiro; Seguchi, Masaharu

    2012-01-01

    We baked low-calorie bread by mixing charred cellulose granules with wheat flour, using the charred cellulose granules to eliminate toxic xanthene food dyes contained in processed foods from the alimentary canal. The size of the charred cellulose granules played an important role in determining good breadmaking properties in respect of the bread height (mm) and specific volume (SV, cm3/g). Charred cellulose granules with a diameter above 270 μm were blended with wheat flour at 10% to obtain bread with a lower caloric content (1020 kcal/gram of bread) than the control bread (1126 kcal) made solely from wheat flour. The charred cellulose granules taken out from the bread adsorbed toxic xanthene food dyes at around pH 6.5, such that toxic food dyes taken into the alimentary canal were excreted in the feces with the non-digestible cellulose granules.

  5. Compatibility of Clinical Manifestation with Skin Prick Test Result and Food Provocation Test in Food Cross Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Azwin; Barlianto, Wisnu; Endaryanto, Anang; Harsono, Ariyanto

    2017-01-01

    Background: Subjective diagnostic test of food allergy is hugely biased, resulting in irrational diet avoidance. Additional objective tools by skin prick test following food provocation test resulting more accurate cause and prevalence on population. Purpose: To evaluate the compatibility of clinical symptoms with skin prick test and provocation test for imunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated food allergy in Dr. Soetomo Hospital Surabaya. Methods: Cross sectional observational analytic study. Patient...

  6. INCIDENCE OF APNEA ATTACK AS ALLERGIC REACTION AFTER ORAL FOOD CHALLENGE IN PATIENT WITH IgE-MEDIATED WHEAT ALLERGY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that is rapid in onset and might cause death. Although wheezes, dyspnea or loss of consciousness are known to occur with severe allergic reactions with IgE-mediated food allergy, reports of apnea attack associated with IgE-mediated food allergy are rare. In this case, 9-year-old boy with IgE-mediated wheat allergy experienced apnea attack with strong desaturation after an immediate allergic reaction including erythema, abdominal pain, vomiting, and anaphylactic shock. The patient had asphyxia and cyanosis confirmed by medical staff when his oxygen saturation decreased to the 60% level, and he had occasional asphyxia over 10 seconds with no thoracic motion after a desaturation episode. Central apnea attack might be occurred in patient with IgE-mediated food allergy. However, the exact mechanism responsible remains unknown and further research is needed.

  7. A comparison of the nutritional value and food safety of organically and conventionally produced wheat flours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrček, Ivana Vinković; Čepo, Dubravka Vitali; Rašić, Dubravka; Peraica, Maja; Žuntar, Irena; Bojić, Mirza; Mendaš, Gordana; Medić-Šarić, Marica

    2014-01-15

    Growing interest in organic agriculture has prompted this study aiming to evaluate nutritional content of wheat flours originating from organic and conventional production systems. Obtained results showed that organic samples had significantly lower protein content and lower levels of Ca, Mn and Fe compared to conventional samples. Protein digestibility and levels of K, Zn and Mo were significantly higher in organic than in conventional wheat flours. Regarding undesirable metals, significantly higher levels of As and Cd were found in conventional compared to organic wheat flours. Although the mean concentrations of zearalenone and ochratoxin A were higher in conventional than in organic flours, this difference was not significant. This study revealed that organic agriculture has the potential to yield products with some relevant improvements in terms of high quality proteins and microelements contents, while the reduction in contamination with toxic elements and mycotoxins may be accomplished. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Accelerated solvent extraction of alkylresorcinols in food products containing uncooked and cooked wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research focuses on the overall extraction process of alkylresorcinols (ARs) from uncooked grains and baked products that have been processed with wheat, corn, rice, and white flour. Previously established extraction methods developed by Ross and colleagues, as well as a semiautomated method in...

  9. 21 CFR 136.180 - Whole wheat bread, rolls, and buns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whole wheat bread, rolls, and buns. 136.180... § 136.180 Whole wheat bread, rolls, and buns. (a) Each of the foods whole wheat bread, graham bread, entire wheat bread, whole wheat rolls, graham rolls, entire wheat rolls, whole wheat buns, graham buns...

  10. Application of calibrations to hyperspectral images of food grains: example for wheat falling number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Caporaso

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a few kernels with sprouting problems in a batch of wheat can result in enzymatic activity sufficient to compromise flour functionality and bread quality. This is commonly assessed using the Hagberg Falling Number (HFN method, which is a batch analysis. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI can provide analysis at the single grain level with potential for improved performance. The present paper deals with the development and application of calibrations obtained using an HSI system working in the near infrared (NIR region (~900–2500 nm and reference measurements of HFN. A partial least squares regression calibration has been built using 425 wheat samples with a HFN range of 62–318 s, including field and laboratory pre-germinated samples placed under wet conditions. Two different approaches were tested to apply calibrations: i application of the calibration to each pixel, followed by calculation of the average of the resulting values for each object (kernel; ii calculation of the average spectrum for each object, followed by application of the calibration to the mean spectrum. The calibration performance achieved for HFN (R2 = 0.6; RMSEC ~ 50 s; RMSEP ~ 63 s compares favourably with other studies using NIR spectroscopy. Linear spectral pre-treatments lead to similar results when applying the two methods, while non-linear treatments such as standard normal variate showed obvious differences between these approaches. A classification model based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA was also applied to segregate wheat kernels into low (250 s HFN groups. LDA correctly classified 86.4% of the samples, with a classification accuracy of 97.9% when using an HFN threshold of 150 s. These results are promising in terms of wheat quality assessment using a rapid and non-destructive technique which is able to analyse wheat properties on a single-kernel basis, and to classify samples as acceptable or unacceptable for flour production.

  11. Gastrointestinal manifestations of food allergies in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Careaga, Manuel; Kerner, John A

    2005-10-01

    Foods that account for 90% of allergic reactions in children are cow's milk protein, eggs, peanut, soy, tree nuts, fish, and wheat. Food allergy can manifest as urticaria/angioedema, anaphylaxis, atopic dermatitis, respiratory symptoms, or a gastrointestinal (GI) disorder. GI allergic manifestations can be classified as immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated (immediate GI hypersensitivity and oral allergy syndrome); "mixed" GI allergy syndromes (involving some IgE components and some non-IgE or T-cell-mediated components) include eosinophilic esophagitis and eosinophilic gastroenteritis. Non-IgE-mediated or T-cell-mediated allergic GI disorders include dietary protein enteropathy, protein-induced enterocolitis, and proctitis. All these conditions share a common denominator: the response of the immune system to a specific protein leading to pathologic inflammatory changes in the GI tract. This immunological response can elicit symptoms such as diarrhea, vomiting, dysphagia, constipation, or GI blood loss, symptoms consistent with a GI disorder. The detection of food allergies can be accomplished by the use of radioallergosorbent (RAST) testing and skin prick tests in helping to assess the IgE-mediated disorders. Patch tests may help evaluate delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Treatment of GI allergic disorders ranges from strict dietary elimination of offending food(s), use of protein hydrolysates, and use of L-amino acid-based formula when protein hydrolysates fail. Treatment with topical (for eosinophilic esophagitis) or systemic steroids is used if all dietary measures are unsuccessful. Maternal breast feeding or the use from birth of hydrolysate formulas (extensive or partial hydrolysates) may be efficacious in the prevention of atopic disease in "high-risk" families (with at least 1 parent or sibling with a history of atopic disease).

  12. Climate change impacts on natural toxins in food production systems, exemplified by deoxynivalenol in wheat and diarrhetic shellfish toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Olesen, J E; Naustvoll, L-J; Friocourt, Y; Mengelers, M J B; Christensen, J H

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is expected to affect food and feed safety, including the occurrence of natural toxins in primary crop and seafood production; however, to date, quantitative estimates are scarce. This study aimed to estimate the impact of climate change effects on mycotoxin contamination of cereal grains cultivated in the terrestrial area of north west Europe, and on the frequency of harmful algal blooms and contamination of shellfish with marine biotoxins in the North Sea coastal zone. The study focused on contamination of wheat with deoxynivalenol, and on abundance of Dinophysis spp. and the possible relationship with diarrhetic shellfish toxins. The study used currently available data and models. Global and regional climate models were combined with models of crop phenology, mycotoxin prediction models, hydrodynamic models and ecological models, with the output of one model being used as input for the other. In addition, statistical data analyses using existing national datasets from the study area were performed to obtain information on the relationships between Dinophysis spp. cell counts and contamination of shellfish with diarrhetic shellfish toxins as well as on frequency of cereal cropping. In this paper, a summary of the study is presented, and overall conclusions and recommendations are given. Climate change projections for the years 2031-2050 were used as the starting point of the analyses relative to a preceding 20-year baseline period from which the climate change signal was calculated. Results showed that, in general, climate change effects lead to advanced flowering and harvest of wheat, and increased risk of contamination of wheat with deoxynivalenol. Blooms of dinoflagellates were estimated to occur more often. If the group of Dinophysis spp. behaves similarly to other flagellates in the future then frequency of harmful algal blooms of Dinophysis spp. may also increase, but consequences for contamination of shellfish with diarrhetic shellfish

  13. Wheat Bread with Pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima L.) Pulp
as a Functional Food Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula; Dziki, Dariusz; Jakubczyk, Anna; Karaś, Monika; Różyło, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this study, a new application of pumpkin pulp in bread production is shown. The aim of this work is to determine the influence of the addition of fresh pumpkin pulp directly into wheat flour on physical, sensorial and biological properties of bread. The bioaccessibility of active compounds was also studied. An increase in the addition of pumpkin pulp from 5 to 20% (converted to dry matter) caused a decrease of bread volume and increase of crumb hardness and cohesiveness. The sensory characteristics of the bread showed that a partial replacement of wheat flour with up to 10% of pumpkin pulp gave satisfactory results. The taste, aroma and overall acceptability of control bread and bread containing 5 or 10% of pulp had the highest degree of liking. The addition of higher levels of pumpkin pulp caused an unpleasant aroma and taste. Pumpkin pulp is a good material to complement the bread with potentially bioaccessible phenolics (including flavonoids) and, especially, with peptides. The highest antioxidant activity was observed, in most cases, of the samples with added 10 and 15% of pumpkin pulp. The addition of the pulp significantly enriched the bread with potentially bioaccessible angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. The highest activity was determined in the bread with 15 and 20% pumpkin pulp. ACE inhibitors from the tested bread were highly bioaccessible in vitro. Pumpkin pulp seems to be a valuable source of active compounds to complement the wheat bread. Adding the pulp directly to the wheat flour gives satisfactory baking results and reduces the cost of production. Additionally, pumpkin pulp is sometimes treated as waste material after the acquisition of seeds, thus using it as bread supplement also has environmental and economic benefits. Key words: pumpkin, bread, texture, antioxidants, bioaccessibility in vitro, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition PMID:27904316

  14. Wheat Bread with Pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima L. Pulp as a Functional Food Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Różyło

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new application of pumpkin pulp in bread production is shown. The aim of this work is to determine the influence of the addition of fresh pumpkin pulp directly into wheat flour on physical, sensorial and biological properties of bread. The bioaccessibility of active compounds was also studied. An increase in the addition of pumpkin pulp from 5 to 20 % (converted to dry matter caused a decrease of bread volume and increase of crumb hardness and cohesiveness. The sensory characteristics of the bread showed that a partial replacement of wheat fl our with up to 10 % of pumpkin pulp gave satisfactory results. The taste, aroma and overall acceptability of control bread and bread containing 5 or 10 % of pulp had the highest degree of liking. The addition of higher levels of pumpkin pulp caused an unpleasant aroma and taste. Pumpkin pulp is a good material to complement the bread with potentially bioaccessible phenolics (including flavonoids and, especially, with peptides. The highest antioxidant activity was observed, in most cases, of the samples with added 10 and 15 % of pumpkin pulp. The addition of the pulp significantly enriched the bread with potentially bioaccessible angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors. The highest activity was determined in the bread with 15 and 20 % pumpkin pulp. ACE inhibitors from the tested bread were highly bioaccessible in vitro. Pumpkin pulp seems to be a valuable source of active compounds to complement the wheat bread. Adding the pulp directly to the wheat flour gives satisfactory baking results and reduces the cost of production. Additionally, pumpkin pulp is sometimes treated as waste material after the acquisition of seeds, thus using it as bread supplement also has environmental and economic benefi ts.

  15. Development of micronutrients rich homemade extruded food products with the incorporation of processed foxtail millet, wheat and chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Gautam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food based approaches are recognized as an essential part of an urgently needed more comprehensive strategy for improving nutrition by increasing the availability and consumption to combat iron and other micronutrient deficiencies. Aims & Objective: The specific objective of the study was utilization of Foxtail millet (Setariaitalica along with other flour for production of micronutrients rich ready-to-eat snack products using homemade extrusion cooking. Material and methods: Methods Composite flour were prepared using processed Foxtail millet flour (FMF and other processed flours namely; wheat flour (WF, and chick pea flour (CPF. Nutritional properties of the blends were analyzed by using standard procedure. Two homemade extruded products namely; namkeensev, seviyan were prepared with four treatments T0, T1, T2, & T3. The commonly consumed recipes were developed by incorporating 50%, 75% and 100% of best result malted composite flour (FMF+CPF+WF. Results: The organoleptic qualities of these extruded samples were analyzed by panelists on a 9 point hedonic scale. The result indicate that the processed composite flour (FMF+CPF+WF based products were significantly accepted at the level of p<0.05 50% incorporation followed by 75% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: The present study conclude that, processed composite flour (Foxtail millet; wheat; chickpea in the ratios of (50:50 could be used to produce nutritive quality of homemade extrudates with acceptable sensory properties as they deliver vehicles for malnourished children.

  16. Characterization of key aroma compounds in distiller's grains from wheat as a basis for utilization in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M; Meiringer, M; Kollmannsberger, H; Zarnkow, M; Jekle, M; Becker, T

    2014-11-12

    The limited use of distiller's grains (DG) in the food industry depends occasionally on the characteristic odor of DG. For a better understanding of this typical odor, a sensory evaluation was performed first. The impressions seasoninglike, roasty/breadlike, and malty/caramellike were revealed as the most intensive odors. Furthermore, analysis of volatile flavor compounds was applied on dried DG from wheat. Isolation was performed by means of headspace solid-phase microextraction, solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE), and simultaneous distillation/extraction and identification with gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry. As a result, 42 odor-active compounds could be identified in total. Among 24 of the 42 odor-active compounds obtained by SAFE, 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethyl-2(5H)-furanone (seasoninglike) showed the highest flavor dilution (FD) factor, and 7 compounds (3-methylbutanioc acid, dimethyl trisulfide, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-phenylethanol, 2,6-nonadienal, and 5-ethyl-3-hydroxy-4-methyl-2(5H)-furanone) with a FD factor ≥ 32 were identified as key aroma compounds in DG from wheat.

  17. Incidence and risk factors for food hypersensitivity in UK infants: results from a birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, Kate E C; Bryant, Trevor; Oliver, Erin M; Martin, Jane; Maskell, Joe; Kemp, Terri; Clare Mills, E N; Foote, Keith D; Margetts, Barrie M; Beyer, Kirsten; Roberts, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of food hypersensitivity in the UK is still largely open to debate. Additionally its pathogenesis is also unclear although it is known that there are differing phenotypes. Determining its prevalence, along with identifying those factors associated with its development will help to assess its clinical importance within the national setting and also add to the debate on appropriate prevention strategies. A population based birth cohort study conducted in Hampshire, UK as part of the EuroPrevall birth cohort study. 1140 infants were recruited with 823 being followed up until 2 years of age. Infants with suspected food reactions were assessed including specific IgE measurement and skin prick testing. Diagnosis of food hypersensitivity was by positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) where symptoms up to 48 h after the end of the food challenge were considered indicative of a food hypersensitivity. Factors associated with food hypersensitivity and its two phenotypes of IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated disease were modelled in a multivariable logistic regression analysis. Cumulative incidence of food hypersensitivity by 2 years of age was 5.0 %. The cumulative incidence for individual food allergens were hens' egg 2.7 % (1.6-3.8); cows' milk 2.4 % (1.4-3.5); peanut 0.7 % (0.1-1.3); soy 0.4 % (0.0-0.8); wheat 0.2 % (0.0-0.5) and 0.1 % (0.0-0.32) for fish. The cumulative incidence of IgE-mediated food allergy was 2.6 % with 2.1 % reacting to hens' egg. For non-IgE-mediated food allergy the cumulative incidence was 2.4 % (cows' milk 1.7 %). Predictors for any food hypersensitivity were wheeze, maternal atopy, increasing gestational age, age at first solid food introduction and mean healthy dietary pattern score. Predictors for IgE mediated allergy were eczema, rhinitis and healthy dietary pattern score whereas for non-IgE-mediated food allergy the predictors were dog in the home, healthy dietary pattern score, maternal

  18. Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Food Allergies KidsHealth / For Kids / Food Allergies What's in ... cow's milk eggs soy wheat What Is a Food Allergy? Food allergies happen when the immune system ...

  19. Growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum adapted to lowland Lombok Island as an alternative food crop for dryland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zubaidi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wheat is not currently grown as a commercial crop in Indonesia, however since the consumption of wheat in Indonesia is steadily increasing and alternative of dry season crops are required for farming system diversification, wheat becomes an important crop to be adapted in dry land areas of Indonesia, one of them is dry land area of Lombok Island. The aims of this experiment is to adapt and screen wheat varieties including national and introduced Australian varieties in lowland Lombok Island. In future, wheat is expected to be an alternative crop for degraded lands. The experimental method used to evaluate growth and yield of 10 wheat varieties to look at the adaptability on the lowland of 200 m asl (Pringgarata and on higher land of 400 m asl (Aik Bukak. The results showed that at a lower altitude (Pringgarata, wheat growth is slower than in Aik Bukak, which can be caused by the temperature at 200 m asl has exceeded the tolerance limit for grain growth (supra optimal temperature. Wheat can give good yields on 400 m asl, but the yield is decreased at 200 m asl (average 1.68 t/ha vs 0.82 t/ha. This low yield is mainly due to sterility indicated by the low number of grain/spikelet ( 2 t/ha , higher than other varieties

  20. Diversity of Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy is defined as an immune system-mediated adverse reaction to food components. Food allergic reactions are mostly IgE mediated and also known as immediate type hypersensitivity (type I reaction). There are several characteristic clinical types of food allergy, such as Anaphylaxis, Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA), and Oral allergy syndrome (OAS). In addition, food allergy is also classified into two types (class 1 and class 2) based on the pathophysiological mechanism. In the class 2 food allergy, pollen allergy causes plant food allergy; therefore this type of allergy is sometimes called Pollen-food allergy syndrome (PFAS). The risk of food allergy (allergenicity) may vary with the treatment of the food allergens. The formation or status of the causative food affects its allergenicity. Class 1 food allergens are generally heat-, enzyme-, and low pH-resistant glycoproteins ranging in size from 10 to 70 kD. Class 1 food allergens induce allergic sensitization via the gastrointestinal tract and are responsible for systemic reactions. Class 2 food allergens are generally heat-labile, susceptible to digestion, and highly homologous with pollen allergens. Taken together, it may be important to consider the diversity of food allergy in order to fight against food allergy.

  1. Energy use for cooking and other stages in the life cycle of food. A study of wheat, spaghetti, pasta, barley, rice, potatoes, couscous and mashed potatoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson-Kanyama, A. [Environmental Strategies Research Group, Stockholm (Sweden); Bostroem-Carlsson, K. [Swedish Consumer Agency, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-01-01

    In this study, electricity use for cooking wheat, spaghetti, pasta, barley, rice, potatoes, couscous and mashed potatoes from potatoes mashed powder was measured. The measurements were made with cooking appliances and number of portions relevant for households. Hotplates, electric kettles and microwave ovens were used for measuring electricity use for cooking. We also estimated the energy use in the life cycle stages before cooking. Energy use for cooking can be a large or dominating part in the energy use for some food products' life cycle. Such food products are of vegetable origin with low to medium degree of processing. Electricity use per portion for cooking varied between 0.11 MJ and 5.1 MJ and was greatly influenced by the choice of cooking appliance and the number of portions cooked. Cooking in a microwave oven with a sensor regulated simmering function was 36 % to 92 % more energy demanding compared to cooking on a hotplate. An electric kettle was 35 % to 60% more energy efficient than a hotplate for boiling the water needed for cooking couscous and mashed potatoes from mashed potato powder. The electricity use for boiling water in an electric kettle was similar to the specific heat for water. A microwave oven was up to ten times more energy efficient than a conventional oven for baking potatoes. It was always more energy efficient to cook several portions at the same time. The differences were in the order of a factor two to three for wheat, barley, rice, potatoes, couscous and mashed potatoes. For spaghetti and fresh pasta the differences were smaller. Electricity use for households' cooking matches energy use for industrial food processing. There seem to be great possibilities for improving the energy efficiency of diets with respect to choice of ingredient and cooking method. Our study indicates that one portion of food commonly served as part of hot meals can be produced with life cycle energy inputs ranging from 0.33 MJ to 6.0 MJ per

  2. Cadmium minimization in wheat: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Abbas, Tahir; Zia-Ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Hannan, Fakhir; Keller, Catherine; Al-Wabel, Mohammad I; Ok, Yong Sik

    2016-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) accumulation in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and its subsequent transfer to food chain is a major environmental issue worldwide. Understanding wheat response to Cd stress and its management for aiming to reduce Cd uptake and accumulation in wheat may help to improve wheat growth and grain quality. This paper reviewed the toxic effects, tolerance mechanisms, and management of Cd stress in wheat. It was concluded that Cd decreased germination, growth, mineral nutrients, photosynthesis and grain yield of wheat and plant response to Cd toxicity varies with cultivars, growth conditions and duration of stress applied. Cadmium caused oxidative stress and genotoxicity in wheat plants. Stimulation of antioxidant defense system, osmoregulation, ion homeostasis and over production of signalling molecules are important adaptive strategies of wheat under Cd stress. Exogenous application of plant growth regulators, inorganic amendments, proper fertilization, silicon, and organic, manures and biochar, amendments are commonly used for the reduction of Cd uptake in wheat. Selection of low Cd-accumulating wheat cultivars, crop rotation, soil type, and exogenous application of microbes are among the other agronomic practices successfully employed in reducing Cd uptake by wheat. These management practices could enhance wheat tolerance to Cd stress and reduce the transfer of Cd to the food chain. However, their long-term sustainability in reducing Cd uptake by wheat needs further assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Feeding of wheat bran and sugar beet pulp as sole supplements in high-forage diets emphasizes the potential of dairy cattle for human food supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, P; Zebeli, Q; Zollitsch, W; Knaus, W

    2016-02-01

    Besides the widely discussed negative environmental effects of dairy production, such as greenhouse gas emissions, the feeding of large amounts of potentially human-edible feedstuffs to dairy cows is another important sustainability concern. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the effects of a complete substitution of common cereal grains and pulses with a mixture of wheat bran and sugar beet pulp in a high-forage diet on cow performance, production efficiency, feed intake, and ruminating behavior, as well as on net food production potential. Thirteen multiparous and 7 primiparous mid-lactation Holstein dairy cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments in a change-over design with 7-wk periods. Cows were fed a high-forage diet (grass silage and hay accounted for 75% of the dry matter intake), supplemented with either a cereal grain-based concentrate mixture (CON), or a mixture of wheat bran and dried sugar beet pulp (WBBP). Human-edible inputs were calculated for 2 different scenarios based on minimum and maximum potential recovery rates of human-edible energy and protein from the respective feedstuffs. Dietary starch and neutral detergent fiber contents were 3.0 and 44.1% for WBBP, compared with 10.8 and 38.2% in CON, respectively. Dietary treatment did not affect milk production, milk composition, feed intake, or total chewing activity. However, chewing index expressed in minutes per kilogram of neutral detergent fiber ingested was 12% lower in WBBP compared with CON. In comparison to CON, the human-edible feed conversion efficiencies for energy and protein, defined as human-edible output per human-edible input, were 6.8 and 5.3 times higher, respectively, in WBBP under the maximum scenario. For the maximum scenario, the daily net food production (human-edible output minus human-edible input) increased from 5.4 MJ and 250 g of crude protein per cow in CON to 61.5 MJ and 630 g of crude protein in the WBBP diet. In conclusion, our data suggest

  4. Weed Dynamics and Management in Wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabran, Khawar; Mahmood, Khalid; Melander, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Wheat is among the most important cereal and food crops of world and is grown in almost all parts of the world. It is a staple for a large part of the world population. Any decline in wheat yield by biotic or abiotic factors may affect global food security adversely. Weeds are the most damaging...

  5. Supplemental irrigation as an initiative to support water and food security: A global evaluation of the potential to support and increase precipitation-fed wheat production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilovic, M.; Gleeson, T. P.; Adamowski, J. F.; Langhorn, C.; Kienzle, S. W.

    2016-12-01

    Supplemental irrigation is the practice of supporting precipitation-fed agriculture with limited irrigation. Precipitation-fed agriculture dominates the agricultural landscape, but is vulnerable to intraseasonal and interannual variability in precipitation and climate. The interplay between food security, water resources, ecosystem health, energy, and livelihoods necessitates evaluating and integrating initiatives that increase agricultural production while reducing demands on water resources. Supplemental irrigation is the practice of minimally irrigating in an effort to stabilize and increase agricultural production, as well as increase water productivity - the amount of crop produced per unit of water. The potential of supplemental irrigation to support both water and food security has yet to be evaluated at regional and global scales. We evaluate whether supplemental irrigation could stabilize and increase agricultural production of wheat by determining locally-calibrated water use-crop yield relationships, known as crop-water production functions. Crop-water production functions are functions of seasonal water use and crop yield, and previous efforts have largely ignored the effects of the temporal distribution of water use throughout the growing season. We significantly improve upon these efforts and provide an opportunity to evaluate supplemental irrigation that appropriately acknowledges the effects of irrigation scheduling. Integrating agroclimatic and crop data with the crop-water model Aquacrop, we determine the increases in wheat production achieved by maximizing water productivity, sharing limited water between different years, and other irrigation scenarios. The methodology presented and evaluation of supplemental irrigation provides water mangers, policy makers, governments, and non-governmental organizations the tools to appropriately understand and determine the potential of this initiative to support precipitation-fed agriculture.

  6. Using a gluten oral food challenge protocol to improve diagnosis of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockow, Knut; Kneissl, Daniel; Valentini, Luzia; Zelger, Otto; Grosber, Martine; Kugler, Claudia; Werich, Martina; Darsow, Ulf; Matsuo, Hiroaki; Morita, Eishin; Ring, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Oral wheat plus cofactors challenge tests in patients with wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) produce unreliable results. We sought to confirm WDEIA diagnosis by using oral gluten flour plus cofactors challenge, to determine the amount of gluten required to elicit symptoms, and to correlate these results with plasma gliadin levels, gastrointestinal permeability, and allergologic parameters. Sixteen of 34 patients with a history of WDEIA and ω5-gliadin IgE underwent prospective oral challenge tests with gluten with or without cofactors until objective symptoms developed. Gluten reaction threshold levels, plasma gliadin concentrations, gastrointestinal permeability, sensitivities and specificities for skin prick tests, and specific IgE levels were ascertained in patients and 38 control subjects. In 16 of 16 patients (8 female and 8 male patients; age, 23-76 years), WDEIA was confirmed by challenges with gluten alone (n = 4) or gluten plus cofactors (n = 12), including 4 patients with previous negative wheat challenge results. Higher gluten doses or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) plus alcohol instead of physical exercise were cofactors in 2 retested patients. The cofactors ASA plus alcohol and exercise increased plasma gliadin levels (P gluten skin prick tests was 100% and 96%, respectively. Oral challenge with gluten alone or along with ASA and alcohol is a sensitive and specific test for the diagnosis of WDEIA. Exercise is not an essential trigger for the onset of symptoms in patients with WDEIA. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Manaca, sweet potato and yam: possible substitutes of wheat in foods for two ethnic population in Venezuelan Amazon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangronis, Elba; Teixeira, Patricia; Otero, Mariana; Guerra, Marisa; Hidalgo, Glida

    2006-03-01

    In this study, flours from manaca or acai (Euterpe oleracea Mart), sweet potato (Ipomea batatas), and yam (Dioscorea spp.), species grown in the Venezuelan Amazon, were obtained. The proximal composition, water activity (a(w)), Fe, Ca, Zn, Mg, Cu, Na and K content were determined for the flours of manaca, sweet potato and yam. These flours were used as ingredients of products for the inhabitants of the indigenous populations of the Venezuelan Amazon (Piaroa and Hiwi). Two types of products that traditionally contain wheat flour in their formulation (ingredient they know by transculturation) were formulated; an attempt to substitute it totally or partially by the manaca, sweet potato and/or yam flours was made. For the selection of the products to be formulated, the preferences and eating habits of the indigenous communities and ease and simplicity of the preparations to be developed, were considered. The two products formulated were cookies and "small cakes". To decide on the formulation(s) of the final product(s), sensorial evaluations were made in the laboratory and in the indigenous communities Piaroa and Hiwi. High fat content (16%), dietetic fiber (59.7%) and iron (25 mg / 100 g) in manaca or acai flour were remarkable. Two types of cookies and two of "small cakes" were equally accepted by the indigenous communities. Cookies supply a high iron amount (about 24%). The feasibility of substituting the wheat flour by manaca, sweet potato and yam flour in products accepted by two ethnic populations of the Venezuelan Amazon was demonstrated.

  8. Diagnosis of Allergic and Nonallergic Food Intolerance in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Cheburkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Because the incorrect food avoidance affects quality of life and nutrition, especially in children, there is possible harm in over-diagnosing food allergy. The approach to the proper diagnosis of food allergy and nonallergic intolerance requires consideration of the medical history, tests for food-specific IgE antibodies, skin puncture tests. Pediatrist must appreciate that a positive test for food-specific IgE or skin puncture test primarily denotes sensitization and may not confirm clinical allergy. Food elimination diet or oral food challenge is required for diagnosis confirmation. Additional procedures may be needed, depending on the differential diagnosis of IgE mediated or non-IgE mediated food intolerance.

  9. Consumption of wheat aleurone-rich foods increases fasting plasma betaine and modestly decreases fasting homocysteine and LDL-cholesterol in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Ruth K; Keaveney, Edel M; Hamill, Lesley L; Wallace, Julie M W; Ward, Mary; Ueland, Per M; McNulty, Helene; Strain, J J; Parker, Michael J; Welch, Robert W

    2010-12-01

    There is strong evidence that whole-grain foods protect against heart disease. Although underlying mechanisms and components are unclear, betaine, found at high levels in wheat aleurone, may play a role. We evaluated the effects of a diet high in wheat aleurone on plasma betaine and related measures. In a parallel, single-blinded intervention study, 79 healthy participants (aged 45-65 y, BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) incorporated either aleurone-rich cereal products (27 g/d aleurone) or control products balanced for fiber and macronutrients into their habitual diets for 4 wk. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and postintervention (4 wk) from participants. Compared with the control, the aleurone products provided an additional 279 mg/d betaine and resulted in higher plasma betaine (P < 0.001; intervention effect size: 5.2 μmol/L) and lower plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) (P = 0.010; -0.7 μmol/L). Plasma dimethylglycine and methionine, which are products of betaine-mediated homocysteine remethylation, were also higher (P < 0.001; P = 0.027) relative to control. There were no significant effects on plasma choline or B vitamins (folate, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6). However, LDL cholesterol was lower than in the control group (P = 0.037). We conclude that incorporating aleurone-rich products into the habitual diet for 4 wk significantly increases plasma betaine concentrations and lowers tHcy, which is attributable to enhanced betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase-mediated remethylation of homocysteine. Although this supports a role for betaine in the protective effects of whole grains, concomitant decreases in LDL suggest more than one component or mechanism may be responsible.

  10. Determination of zearalenone in barley, maize and wheat flour, polenta, and maize-based baby food by immunoaffinity column cleanup with liquid chromatography: interlaboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Susan J; Anderson, Sharron; Brereton, Paul; Wood, Roger; Damant, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was performed on behalf of the UK Food Standards Agency to evaluate the effectiveness of an affinity column cleanup liquid chromatography (LC) method for the determination of zearalenone (ZON) in a variety of cereals and cereal products at proposed European regulatory limits. The test portion is extracted with acetonitrile:water. The sample extract is filtered, diluted, and applied to an affinity column. The column is washed, and ZON is eluted with acetonitrile. ZON is quantified by reversed-phase LC with fluorescence detection. Barley, wheat and maize flours, polenta, and a maize-based baby food naturally contaminated, spiked, and blank (very low level) were sent to 28 collaborators in 9 European countries and 1 collaborator in New Zealand. Participants were asked to spike test portions of all samples at a ZON concentration equivalent to 100 microg/kg. Average recoveries ranged from 91-111%. Based on results for 4 artificially contaminated samples (blind duplicates) and 1 naturally contaminated sample (blind duplicate), the relative standard deviation for repeatability (RSDr) ranged from 6.9-35.8%, and the relative standard deviation for reproducibility (RSDR) ranged from 16.4-38.2%. The method showed acceptable within- and between-laboratory precision for all 5 matrixes, as evidenced by HorRat values <1.7.

  11. Is perceived intolerance to milk and wheat associated with the corresponding IgG and IgA food antibodies? A cross sectional study in subjects with morbid obesity and gastrointestinal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvehaugen, Anne Stine; Tveiten, Dag; Farup, Per G

    2018-01-30

    Serum IgG and IgA food antibodies have been used for dietary advice to subjects with gastrointestinal symptoms and perceived food intolerance, but the role of these antibodies in mediating intolerance is controversial. The present study investigated associations between perceived gastrointestinal intolerance to milk-or wheat and the corresponding s-IgG and s-IgA food antibodies in subjects with morbid obesity. Subjects with morbid obesity (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m 2 or ≥35 kg/m 2 with obesity-related complications) were included. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) was diagnosed based on the Rome III criteria. Severity of specific gastrointestinal symptoms were measured with the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS)-IBS. S-IgG against cow's milk, cheese, wheat and gluten, and s-IgA against casein and gliadin were measured. Ninety-seven subjects (80 females) with mean age 45 (SD 8.4) years were included, 70 had gastrointestinal complaints, 25 had IBS, and 22 and 20 reported milk- and wheat- intolerance respectively. There were no significant differences in serum concentrations or proportions of subjects above defined cut-off values for the antibodies between subjects with and without gastrointestinal complaints. In the group with gastrointestinal complaints, no significant differences were found between subjects with and without perceived food intolerance. Except for a significant correlation between IgG against cheese and GSRS-diarrhea (Rho: -0.25, P = 0.04), no significant correlations were found between the antibodies and type or degree of gastrointestinal symptoms, including IBS. The study showed no associations between perceived milk or wheat intolerance and the corresponding s-IgG and s-IgA food antibodies in subjects with morbid obesity.

  12. WheatGenome.info: an integrated database and portal for wheat genome information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kaitao; Berkman, Paul J; Lorenc, Michal Tadeusz; Duran, Chris; Smits, Lars; Manoli, Sahana; Stiller, Jiri; Edwards, David

    2012-02-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) is one of the most important crop plants, globally providing staple food for a large proportion of the human population. However, improvement of this crop has been limited due to its large and complex genome. Advances in genomics are supporting wheat crop improvement. We provide a variety of web-based systems hosting wheat genome and genomic data to support wheat research and crop improvement. WheatGenome.info is an integrated database resource which includes multiple web-based applications. These include a GBrowse2-based wheat genome viewer with BLAST search portal, TAGdb for searching wheat second-generation genome sequence data, wheat autoSNPdb, links to wheat genetic maps using CMap and CMap3D, and a wheat genome Wiki to allow interaction between diverse wheat genome sequencing activities. This system includes links to a variety of wheat genome resources hosted at other research organizations. This integrated database aims to accelerate wheat genome research and is freely accessible via the web interface at http://www.wheatgenome.info/.

  13. Food-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok K; Upparahalli Venkateshaiah, Sathisha; Goyal, Hemant; Mishra, Anil

    2017-12-01

    Food allergy, a commonly increasing problem worldwide, defined as an adverse immune response to food. A variety of immune-related effector cells such as mast cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, and T cells are involved in food-related allergic responses categorized as IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated, and mixed (IgE and non-IgE) depending upon underlying immunological mechanisms. The dietary antigens mainly target the gastrointestinal tract including pancreas that gets inflamed due to food allergy and leads acute pancreatitis. Reports indicate several food proteins induce pancreatitis; however, detailed underlying mechanism of food-induced pancreatitis is unexplored. The aim of the review is to understand and update the current scenario of food-induced pancreatitis. A comprehensive literature search of relevant research articles has been performed through PubMed, and articles were chosen based on their relevance to food allergen-mediated pancreatitis. Several cases in the literature indicate that acute pancreatitis has been provoked after the consumption of mustard, milk, egg, banana, fish, and kiwi fruits. Food-induced pancreatitis is an ignored and unexplored area of research. The review highlights the significance of food in the development of pancreatitis and draws the attention of physicians and scientists to consider food allergies as a possible cause for initiation of pancreatitis pathogenesis.

  14. Spatial variability analysis of within-field winter wheat nitrogen and grain quality using canopy fluorescence sensor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat grain protein content (GPC) is a key component when evaluating wheat nutrition. It is also important to determine wheat GPC before harvest for agricultural and food process enterprises in order to optimize the wheat grading process. Wheat GPC across a field is spatially variable due to the inh...

  15. Wheat Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Watery eyes Wheat allergy Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  16. "Determination the best cereal substitute for wheat in wheat allergic children "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiasy Esfahany Z "

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food allergy is one of the most important among other allergic diseases. Although it is less prevalent in adult but in infants it’s prevalence was reported as much as 8 percent. In part, wheat is one of the six main food allergens in infant and in other part there is extensive cross reactivity between the cereals. Therefore the aim of this study is selection of the best food substitute for wheat among other cereals. Materials and Methods: 24 patients with definitive diagnosis of type one hypersensitivity reaction to wheat were entered in this study. Skin prick test and serum specific IgE (Eliza with 6 members of cereals family (wheat, barley, oat, Rye-Rice & Corn were performed for them and open food challenge test was also done with three more available of the cereals (corn, Rice, barley in our food culture and so comparison between allergenicity of wheat flour and wheat bran with skin prick test were done. Results: The Skin prick tests (SPTs were positive in 66.7 percent for Barley, 100 percent for wheat bran and 80-100 percent for other cereals. The results of specific IgE for wheat, Barley were positive in 94.5 percent, 68 percent, 39 percent of patients respectively and the results for other cereals were positive in less than 11 percent of cases. The results of food challenge test, for barley were positive in 60 percent of cases and for Rice and Corn were negative in all cases. Conclusion: In the base of food challenge test as the gold standard test, the best food substitute for wheat sensitive patient between other cereals, were Corn and Rice respectively. It is important to emphasis that will be needed to perform oral food challenge in hospital with complete emergency equipment before introducing any other cereals as food substitute for wheat, specially Barley.

  17. Climate change impacts on natural toxins in food production systems, exemplified by deoxynivalenol in wheat and diarrhetic shellfish toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Olesen, Jørgen E; Naustvoll, L-J

    2012-01-01

    on food safety hazards, rather than median or average values only. Furthermore, it is recommended to closely monitor levels of mycotoxins and marine biotoxins in the future, in particular related to risky situations associated with favourable climatic conditions for toxin producing organisms...

  18. Climate change impacts on natural toxins in food production systems, exemplified by deoxynivalenol in wheat and diarrhetic shellfish toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.; Olesen, J.E.; Naustvoll, L.J.; Friocourt, Y.; Mengelers, M.J.B.; Christensen, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is expected to affect food and feed safety, including the occurrence of natural toxins in primary crop and seafood production; however, to date, quantitative estimates are scarce. This study aimed to estimate the impact of climate change effects on mycotoxin contamination of cereal

  19. An overview of wheat genome sequencing and its implications for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) serves as the staple food for. 30% of the global population and is a rich source of proteins, minerals and other essential nutrients. But global warming is posing a serious threat to wheat productivity worldwide, and of note, wheat is extremely sensitive to heat, where. ±2◦. C temperature variation ...

  20. Wheat: The Whole Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This publication presents information on wheat. Wheat was originally a wild grass and not native to the United States. Wheat was not planted there until 1777 (and then only as a hobby crop). Wheat is grown on more acres than any other grain in this country. Soft wheats are grown east of the Mississippi River, and hard wheats are grown west of the…

  1. Understanding the yield gap in wheat production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat production around the globe is a staple of human nutrition needs and will continue to provide a major component of global food security. The increases in world population demand that we continue to increase wheat production in a sustainable manner. To achieve this goal requires that we underst...

  2. Segregation ratios of colored grains in F1 hybrid wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zifeng Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutritious and functional foods from wheat have received great attention in recent years. Colored-grain wheat contains a large number of nutrients such as anthocyanins and hence the breeding is interesting. In this work, colored-grained wheat lines of mixed pollination of einkorn wheat (Triticum boeoticum, AA and French rye (French Secale cereale, RR were used as male parents and wheat line Y1642 (derived from common wheat and Agropyron elongatum, AABBDD was used as the female parent. These colored wheat were used for diallel cross to study the segregation ratios of F1 colored grains. Results show that the color inheritance of purple-grained wheat follows a maternal inheritance pattern and that the blue-grained wheat expresses xenia in most cases. In some circumstances, the grains with different color shades appear in the same spike.

  3. Pushing Wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Paul Richard

    This paper documents the evolution of variables central to understanding the creation of an Atlantic Economy in wheat between the US and the UK in the nineteenth century. The cointegrated VAR model is then applied to the period 1838-1913 in order to find long-run relationships between these varia......This paper documents the evolution of variables central to understanding the creation of an Atlantic Economy in wheat between the US and the UK in the nineteenth century. The cointegrated VAR model is then applied to the period 1838-1913 in order to find long-run relationships between...

  4. Heat tolerance in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Dew Kumari

    genetic determination (GD). An initial mass screening of 1,274 wheat cultivars (diverse origin) showed a GD of 8.5%. A stronger heat treatment was given in the second screening with 138 selected cultivars resulting in larger differentiation of cultivars (GD 15.4%). The GD further increased to 27....../Fm and dry matter accumulation during heat stress is a step forward to document that phenotypic differences measured by phenomic approaches can be translated into overall plant performance under heat stress. The fourth study focussed on associating phenotypic variations identified by Fv/Fm to genetic......As a consequence of global climate change, heat stress together with other abiotic stresses will remain an important determinant of future food security. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is the third most important crop of the world feeding one third of the world population. Being a crop of temperate...

  5. Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... food, most food allergies are caused by tree nuts, peanuts, milk, eggs, soy, wheat, fish, and shellfish. These 8 ... blood tests.Many children usually outgrow allergies to milk, eggs, soybean ... tree nuts, fish, and shellfish. Can food allergies be prevented ...

  6. Cereal-Based Gluten-Free Food: How to Reconcile Nutritional and Technological Properties of Wheat Proteins with Safety for Celiac Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Lamacchia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The gluten-free diet is, to date, the only efficacious treatment for patients with Celiac Disease. In recent years, the impressive rise of Celiac Disease incidence, dramatically prompted changes in the dietary habit of an increasingly large population, with a rise in demand of gluten-free products. The formulation of gluten-free bakery products presents a formidable challenge to cereal technologists. As wheat gluten contributes to the formation of a strong protein network, that confers visco-elasticity to the dough and allows the wheat flour to be processed into a wide range of products, the preparation of cereal-based gluten-free products is a process somehow difficult process. This review focuses on nutritional and technological quality of products made with gluten-free cereals available on the market. The possibility of using flour from naturally low toxic ancient wheat species or detoxified wheat for the diet of celiacs is also discussed.

  7. Food, novel foods, and allergenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loveren H van; LPI

    2002-01-01

    Certain foods lead may to allergic responses in certain individuals. Main allergenic foods are Crustacea (shrimp, lobster, crab), egg, fish, milk, peanuts, soybeans, tree nuts, and wheat, and allergens are always proteins. A wide array of symptoms can result from food allergy (gastrointestinal,

  8. wheat flour (dubbie) in rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2 Central Food Technological Research Institute. Mysore 570013, Mysore, India. ABSTRACT: Anaemic rats were fed on diets containing sour dough bread. (Di/'0 dabbo) or porridge prepared from soy-fortified wheat flour (Dubbie) as the source of nonheme iron. The criteria used to determine the relative biological.

  9. Morphological features and physicochemical properties of waxy wheat starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huanxin; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Chunzhong; Zhou, Xing

    2013-11-01

    Morphological features, granule composition, and physicochemical properties of waxy wheat starch were compared with those of normal wheat starch. The morphologies and granule populations were found to be similar for the two starches. However, waxy wheat starch contained a smaller proportion of B-type granules, had a larger average granule diameter, and a higher degree of crystallinity than normal wheat starch, as measured by particle size analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. These differences resulted in a higher gelatinization temperature, transition enthalpy, peak viscosity, breakdown, swelling power, lower peak viscosity temperature and final viscosity in waxy wheat starch. These points suggest that waxy wheat starch should have greater resistance to retrogradation during cooling and higher water-holding capacity under dry conditions. Highlighting the differences in physicochemical properties of waxy and normal wheat starches should help point toward effective applications of waxy wheat starch in the food industry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adverse Effects of Wheat Gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Frits

    2015-01-01

    Man began to consume cereals approximately 10,000 years ago when hunter-gatherers settled in the fertile golden crescent in the Middle East. Gluten has been an integral part of the Western type of diet ever since, and wheat consumption is also common in the Middle East, parts of India and China as well as Australia and Africa. In fact, the food supply in the world heavily depends on the availability of cereal-based food products, with wheat being one of the largest crops in the world. Part of this is due to the unique properties of wheat gluten, which has a high nutritional value and is crucial for the preparation of high-quality dough. In the last 10 years, however, wheat and gluten have received much negative attention. Many believe that it is inherently bad for our health and try to avoid consumption of gluten-containing cereals; a gluten-low lifestyle so to speak. This is fueled by a series of popular publications like Wheat Belly; Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health. However, in reality, there is only one condition where gluten is definitively the culprit: celiac disease (CD), affecting approximately 1% of the population in the Western world. Here, I describe the complexity of the cereals from which gluten is derived, the special properties of gluten which make it so widely used in the food industry, the basis for its toxicity in CD patients and the potential for the development of safe gluten and alternatives to the gluten-free diet. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Comparison of the levels of bioactive benzoxazinoids in different wheat and rye fractions and the transformation of these compounds in homemade foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanwir, Fariha; Fredholm, Maria; Gregersen, Per L.

    2013-01-01

    Benzoxazinoids are important phytochemicals found in wheat and rye that are associated with plant resistance against pathogens, and recent studies have emphasized the potential health-promoting role of these compounds i.e. anti-cancer, anti-allergy and anti-inflammation. Accordingly, an understan......Benzoxazinoids are important phytochemicals found in wheat and rye that are associated with plant resistance against pathogens, and recent studies have emphasized the potential health-promoting role of these compounds i.e. anti-cancer, anti-allergy and anti-inflammation. Accordingly....... The analysis of seed fractions obtained from the milling of wheat and rye showed significantly higher concentrations of these bioactive compounds in the germ than in the other fractions, i.e. the bran and endosperm. Di-hexoses of 2,4-dihydroxy-1, 4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIBOA-glc-hexose) and 2-hydroxy-1, 4...

  12. Kids with Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living With Food Allergies Allergens Peanut Allergy Tree Nut Allergy Milk Allergy Egg Allergy Soy Allergy Wheat Allergy Sesame ... Lost Nutrients How To Recipe Substitutions Substitutions for ... for Peanuts and Tree Nuts Substitutions for Corn Menu Planning for the Food ...

  13. Expression of globulin-2, a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins with similarity to known food allergens, is increased under high temperature regimen during wheat grain development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-three expressed sequence tags (ESTs)from the US spring wheat Butte 86 were identified that encode proteins similar to a globulin-2 protein from maize embryos. The ESTs assembled into three contigs, two of which include the entire coding region for the mature protein. The encoded proteins co...

  14. Patterns of suspected wheat-related allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker Christensen, Morten; Eller, Esben; Mortz, Charlotte G

    2014-01-01

    ). All children had atopic dermatitis, and most (13/15) outgrew their wheat allergy. Most children (13/15) had other food allergies. Challenge positive patients showed significantly higher levels of sIgE to wheat and significantly more were SPT positive than challenge negative. Group 2: Eleven out of 13...... of sIgE to ω-5-gliadin. The natural course is presently unknown. CONCLUSION: Wheat allergy can manifest in different disease entities, rendering a detailed case history and challenge mandatory. Patient age, occupation, concomitant allergies (food or inhalant) and atopic dermatitis are important factors...... were examined with detailed case history, specific IgE (sIgE), Skin Prick Test (SPT) and wheat challenge (nasal or oral ± exercise). Details of the case history were extracted from the patients´ case records. RESULTS: Group 1: Twenty one of 95 patients were challenge positive (15 children, 6 adults...

  15. Molecular characterization of wheat allergens specifically recognized by patients suffering from wheat-induced respiratory allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahr, S; Constantin, C; Mari, A; Scheiblhofer, S; Thalhamer, J; Ebner, C; Vrtala, S; Mittermann, I; Valenta, R

    2012-04-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is an important allergen source responsible for various clinical manifestations of allergy (i.e. food allergy, pollen allergy, respiratory allergy to flour-Baker's asthma). The objective of this study was the molecular and immunological characterization of new recombinant wheat allergens and to evaluate their usefulness for the diagnosis of allergy to wheat. A T. aestivum cDNA library was constructed and screened with serum IgE from patients suffering from wheat allergy to identify cDNAs coding for new wheat allergens. The allergen-encoding cDNAs were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. IgE reactivity of recombinant proteins was analysed in RAST-based, non-denaturing dot blot experiments and by ELISA with sera from wheat allergic patients and their allergenic activity was assessed in basophil degranulation experiments. We report the molecular characterization, recombinant expression and purification of five wheat allergens, a thioredoxin h isoform, glutathione transferase, 1-Cys-peroxiredoxin, profilin and dehydrin. Homologous proteins were identified by sequence comparisons in various plants. 1-Cys-peroxiredoxin appeared to be the most relevant of the newly identified wheat allergens according to prevalence of IgE recognition and results from basophil degranulation experiments. It showed IgE cross-reactivity with seed proteins from barley, rye, rice, maize, soy, oat and spelt. 1-Cys-peroxiredoxin, glutathione transferase and dehydrin were mainly recognized by patients with baker's asthma but not wheat-induced food allergy. The characterized recombinant wheat allergens may be useful for the development of serological tests which allow the discrimination of different clinical manifestations of wheat allergy. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Aflatoxin B1and sterigmatocystin in wheat and wheat products from supermarkets in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yarong; Wang, Qiongshan; Huang, Jianxiang; Ma, Liyan; Chen, Zhihui; Wang, Fuhua

    2018-03-01

    Wheat is an important cereal but it is often contaminated with mycotoxins. The natural occurrence of aflatoxin B 1 (AFB 1 ) and sterigmatocystin (STC) was determined in 178 food samples (32 wheat samples and 146 wheat products) purchased from Chinese supermarkets. The methodology was validated, the wheat and wheat products samples were treated with a modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) and quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). From these samples 18.8% of wheat and 8.2% of cracker samples were contaminated with AFB 1 . Mean levels were 0.06 µg/kg and 0.05µg/kg, respectively. There was no AFB 1 contamination in white bread or whole meal bread. Meanwhile 53.1% of wheat, 59.2% of crackers, 20.8% of white bread and 16% of whole meal bread samples were contaminated with STC. The mean levels were 0.07, 0.79, 0.12 and 0.12 µg/kg respectively. Although the levels were low, this demonstrates the need for more comprehensive surveys for these two mycotoxins in wheat and wheat products from China.

  17. [Contact urticaria induced by hydrolyzed wheat proteins in cosmetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaiwan, A; Pecquet, C; Mathelier-Fusade, P; Francès, C

    2010-04-01

    Hydrolyzed wheat protein, produced by hydrolysis of gluten, is used in certain cosmetics and foods as emulsifiers and stabilizers. It can induce contact urticaria to cosmetics and/or anaphylaxis to food via an immunologic mechanism. A 28-year-old female beautician presented recurrent contact urticaria, initially on the hands and then more diffused, immediately after applying cosmetics of the same brand containing hydrolyzed wheat protein. Skin tests were positive with the cosmetics and with the hydrolyzed wheat protein contained therein. A 34-year-old woman presented four episodes of generalized urticaria after eating industrially prepared foods. She had also experienced contact urticaria with cosmetics. Skin tests with hydrolyzed wheat protein were positive. For both patients, withdrawal of cosmetics and foods containing hydrolyzed wheat protein led to the regression of symptoms. They were both tolerant to traditional wheat products, such as bread and pastries. Although contact urticaria to hydrolyzed wheat protein is rarely described, it must be understood since treatment by eradication of this product is simple and because contact urticaria may precede food allergy. Patients are tolerant to products containing unmodified wheat protein. 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of wheat sensitization using an in-house wheat extract in Coca-10% alcohol solution in children with wheat anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacharn, Punchama; Kumjim, Sasaros; Tattiyapong, Puntanat; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Piboonpocanun, Surapon

    2016-06-01

    Identification of wheat sensitization by a skin prick test (SPT) is essential for children with wheat-induced anaphylaxis, since oral food challenge can cause serious adverse effects. Wheat allergens are both water/salt and alcohol soluble. The preparation of wheat extract for SPT containing both water/salt and alcohol soluble allergen is needed. To determine if a wheat extract using Coca's solution containing 10% alcohol (Coca-10% EtOH), prepared in-house, contians both water/salt and alcohol soluble allergens. Serum of children with a history of anaphylaxis after wheat ingestion was used. Wheat flour was extracted in Coca-10% alcohol solution. An SPT with both commercial and in-house wheat extracts was performed as well as specific IgE (sIgE) for wheat and omega-5 gliadin. Direct and IgE inhibition immunoblots were performed to determine serum sIgE levels against water/salt as well as alcohol soluble (gliadins and glutenins) allergens in the extracts. Six children with history of wheat anaphylaxis had positive SPT to both commercial and in-house extracts. They also had different levels of sIgE against wheat and omega-5 gliadin allergens. The results of direct immunoblotting showed all tested sera had sIgE bound to ~35 kDa wheat protein. Further IgE inhibition immunoblotting identified the ~35 kDa wheat protein as gliadin but not gluten allergen. The in-house prepared Coca-10% EtOH solution could extract both water/salt and alcohol soluble allergens. The ~35 kDa gliadin appears to be a major wheat allergen among tested individuals.

  19. Agribusiness Perspectives on Transgenic Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Declining yields of the major human food crops, looming growth in global population and rise of populism, and ill-founded bans on agricultural and horticultural crops and foodstuffs which are genetically modified have potentially serious implications. It makes the chance less than otherwise would be the case that agribusiness value chains in the future will meet the growing demand around the world for more and different foods from more and wealthier people. In the agribusiness value chain, transgenic wheat, meeting a consumer "trigger need" also must meet the "experience" and "credence," risk-related criteria of well-informed consumers. Public policy that rejects science-based evidence about the reductions in costs of production and price of genetically modified agricultural products and the science about the safety of genetically modified foods, including transgenic wheat, has imposed significant costs on producers and consumers. If the science-based evidence is accepted, transgenic wheat has potential to improve significantly the well-being of grain growers and consumers all over the world.

  20. Effect of partial replacement of wheat with peanut flour on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Consumption of bread is continually growing despite the high cost of wheat importation. There is a dire need to reduce the dependence on wheat through partial replacement of wheat with indigenous crops as well as improving the nutritional value of carbohydrate based foods. Objectives: The objectives of this ...

  1. Volatile organic compounds of whole grain soft winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aroma from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is an indicator of grain soundness and also an important quality attribute of grain foods. To identify the inherent VOCs of wheat grain unaffected by fungal infestation and other extrinsic factors, grains of nine soft wheat varieties were collected at...

  2. Genetic analysis of amino acid content in wheat grain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-22

    Aug 22, 2014 ... Therefore, it is important to enhance the level of nutrition in food by increasing the protein content of wheat, especially improving the amino acid composition of protein. Contents of wheat grain amino acids are quantitative traits, controlled by many genes, and their genetic basis was. ∗For correspondence.

  3. Study on genetic diversity in Pakistani wheat varieties using simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) is a grass species, cultivated world wide. Globally, it is the most important human food grain and ranks second in total production as a cereal crop behind maize. Genetic diversity evaluation of germplasm is the basis of improvement in wheat. In the present study genetic diversity of 10 ...

  4. Wheat related allergy – A retrospective single-centre study of 156 patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker Christensen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergy to wheat can manifest in different forms: sensitization to ingested wheat via the gastrointestinal tract can cause traditional food allergy or in combination with exercise, Wheat-Dependent Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis (WDEIA). Sensitization to inhaled wheat flour may lead...... to occupational rhinitis and/or asthma. Methods We retrospectively investigated 156 patients (age 0.7 – 73 years) with a case history of wheat allergy. The population was divided into three groups, I: wheat allergy elicited by ingestion of wheat, II: by inhalation and III: WDEIA. All were examined with detailed...... case history, specific IgE (s-IgE), (Thermofischer AB, Sweden), Skin Prick Test (SPT) and wheat challenge (nasal or oral ± exercise). Results Group I: Twenty one of 95 patients were challenge positive (15 children, 6 adults). All positive children had atopic dermatitis and 90 % also other food...

  5. Glycemic index of grain amaranth, wheat and rice in NIDDM subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, A; Sarojini, G; Nirmala, G; Nirmalamma, N; Satyanarayana, D

    1997-01-01

    Glycemic index of grain amaranth, wheat and rice preparations was studied in non-insulin dependent diabetic subjects. Diets containing 50 g carbohydrate equivalent were given and post-prandial blood glucose estimated at different intervals. Glycemic index calculated for different experimental diets showed that GI of amaranth-wheat composite flour diet (25:75) was the least (65.6%) followed by wheat diet (65.7%), rice diet (69.2%), amaranth-wheat flour 50:50 (75.5%), and popped amaranth in milk (97.3%). Therefore 25:75 combination of amaranth and wheat, wheat and rice can be considered low GI food, 50:50 grain amaranth and wheat medium GI food and popped amaranth and milk combination high GI food.

  6. Wheat and gluten intolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busink-van den Broeck, Hetty; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Brouns, F.

    2016-01-01

    With this White Paper, the current state of scientific knowledge on human disorders related to gluten and wheat is presented, with reference to other grains such as spelt, barley, rye, and oats. Backgrounds are described of coeliac disease (gluten intolerance), wheat allergies and any kind of wheat

  7. trategies for durum wheat fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Plescuta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Durum wheat (Tr. durum Desf. ranks second in the world cereal production after common wheat. It differs from the other species with its high grain protein content, especially with gluten quality, which makes it suitable for producing spaghetti, macaroni, semolina flour and other products for the food industry. The purpose of this review was to summarize the results obtained in Bulgaria and in the world on the impact of mineral fertilization on yield and quality of durum wheat. All authors confirm that a significant increase of the grain yield in the last decades was achieved by both using new varieties and through optimal fertilization. Nitrogen as a nutrient is of great importance for wheat productivity. Nitrogen fertilization leads to stronger increase of leaf area, dry matter accumulation, content of protein and gluten. Accumulated nitrogen and phosphorus depend mainly on the formed dry matter. At low nitrogen rates yield increased at higher phosphorus level. Suppressant effect of high nitrogen and phosphorus rates on growth and development is emphasized in richer soil. A number of authors have found genotypic specificity regarding grain yield in dependence on the level of fertilization. Problems of genetically determined and improved grain quality under different durum wheat varieties are the subject of extensive research. The opinions of all authors are one-way for the positive influence of fertilization and in particular nitrogen on the technological quality parameters – protein content, wet and dry gluten, vitreoussness, carotenoids pigment, although the values vary significantly. The influence of fertilization is insignificant on the test weight.

  8. Natural history of food allergy in infants and children in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronov, Darit; Tasher, Diana; Levine, Arie; Somekh, Eli; Serour, Francis; Dalal, Ilan

    2008-12-01

    Knowledge about the natural history of food allergy, especially sesame, is scarce. To follow the natural history of food allergies in Israel, particularly of sesame allergy. The survey was conducted based on clinical records and a detailed questionnaire of children diagnosed as having food allergy. We found 234 children with suspected food allergy. Testing detected 283 allergies in 180 patients (77%) with confirmed diagnosis. The most common allergies were to cow's milk (n = 125), eggs (n = 71), sesame (n = 30), and soy (n = 23). Of those with milk allergy, 69% were IgE mediated (group 1) and 31% were non-IgE mediated (group 2). Group 1 was more likely to have an atopic background than was group 2 (P = .003), whereas group 2 was more likely to have resolution of the allergy (35 of 39 [90%] in group 2 compared with only 32 of 86 [37%] in group 1, P Allergy to soy was found in 23 children, of whom 87% manifested with gastrointestinal symptoms and 21 (91%) were also allergic to cow's milk. In 19 children (83%), the allergy resolved. Thirty children had allergy to sesame, and 73% of them had an atopic background. The allergy resolved in only 9 of these patients (30%) at a mean age of 2.8 years. The distribution of food allergens in Israel differs from that in other countries. Non-IgE-mediated food allergy and particularly milk and soy allergy were likely to resolve completely with time. Sesame allergy was 1 of the most frequent in this cohort, was usually IgE mediated, and tended to resolve in only a few patients.

  9. HULLED WHEAT FARMING IN DEVELI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sancar Bulut

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Emmer (Triticum dicoccum and einkorn (T. monococcum cultivation has a long history in Anatolia. The crops, cultivated in Anatolia over thousands years, can still be found in some parts of the country, especially Develi in the Kayseri province. The total cultivation area of these crops was around 36 000 ha in 2015. The species is mainly cultivated in sloping and marginal lands by poor farmers, where no other crops can be economically grown. Cultivation area is rapidly declining, and if such trend continues, hulled wheats will be shortly completely wiped out from Turkey. Present-day distribution of emmer and spelt within Turkey is concentrated in countryside areas of Develi where traditional farming systems still survive. This group of wheats is called in Turkish the general name of ‘kaplìca’ which means ‘covered’ or ‘hulled’. More specifically, the tetraploid species (emmer is called ‘gacer’ in the Develi. Being a low-yielding type of wheat, emmer was replaced by other improved varieties of Triticum. This decrease was mainly due to the widespread use of improved cultivars of wheat and the adoption of new agricultural techniques, but also to social and economic factors. In fact, wheat yielded 2840 t/ha, whereas hulled wheats yielded 1200 t/ha. The cultivation of these two crops shows disadvantages that relate to the harvesting techniques used and the need to dehisce the spikelets to obtain the grain for human consumption. The increasing interest in low-input systems due to the actual ecological and economical situation has led to a growing interest in specific genetic variability. Organic agriculture and health food products have been gaining increasing popularity that has led to a renewed interest in hulled wheat species such as emmer and spelt. The objective of this study was to estimate agronomical and grain quality characteristics of some Turkey (Develi emmer landraces. This effort was motivated by the fact that autochthonous

  10. [Wheat anaphylaxis or wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis caused by use of a soap product which contains hydrolyzed wheat proteins. -a report of 12 cases-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Akiko; Kishikawa, Reiko; Nishie, Haruko; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Shimoda, Terufumi; Iwanaga, Tomoaki; Nishima, Sankei; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-11-01

    Recently, it has become a social problem that hydrolyzed wheat protein in facial soap can induce wheat allergy including wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). We described the clinical characteristics of the patients related. We collected 12 cases who had had a medical examination from January to October in 2010. All the patients were female and mean age was 36.0± 9.9 years. All of them had had no prior symptoms history of wheat allergy, they gradually developed wheat anaphylaxis or WDEIA in an average of 2 years after they started to use a soap product in question which contains hydrolyzed wheat proteins. Most patients suffered immediate contact allergic reactions after or at the time of washing their face with the soap product. 10 of 12 patients showed a low level of IgE to CAP-recombinant ω-5-gliadin. Episodes of anaphylaxis were prevented by avoiding both intake of wheat-containing foods and usage of the soap product. We concluded that their wheat anaphylaxis is likely to be caused by epicutaneous sensitization of the hydrolyzed wheat proteins in the soap product. It was important that physicians should know the possibility of sensitization from non-dietary antigen.

  11. Exploring the Relationship between Structural and Air-Water Interfacial Properties of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Gluten Hydrolysates in a Food System Relevant pH Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Arno G B; Fierens, Ellen; Rombouts, Ine; Brijs, Kristof; Joye, Iris J; Delcour, Jan A

    2017-02-15

    The relationship between structural and foaming properties of two tryptic and two peptic wheat gluten hydrolysates was studied at different pH conditions. The impact of pH on foam stability (FS) of the samples heavily depended on the peptidase used and the degree of hydrolysis reached. Surface dilatational moduli were in most, but not all, instances related to FS, implying that, although the formation of a viscoelastic protein hydrolysate film is certainly important, this is not the only phenomenon that determines FS. In contrast to what might be expected, surface charge was not a major factor contributing to FS, except when close to the point-of-zero-charge. Surface hydrophobicity and intrinsic fluorescence measurements suggested that changes in protein conformation take place when the pH is varied, which can in turn influence foaming. Finally, hydrolyzed gluten proteins formed relatively large particles, suggesting that protein hydrolysate aggregation probably influences its foaming properties.

  12. Bioactive compounds in whole grain wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateo Anson, N.

    2010-01-01

    Bread can be healthier! Consuming whole-grain foods can prevent cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This is due to bioactive compounds in whole grain, such as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds. We found that the different fractions of a wheat grain vary much

  13. Starch facilitates enzymatic wheat gluten hydrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardt, N.A.; Boom, R.M.; Goot, van der A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Wheat gluten can be hydrolyzed by either using (vital) wheat gluten or directly from wheat flour. This study investigates the influence of the presence of starch, the main component of wheat, on enzymatic wheat gluten hydrolysis. Wheat gluten present in wheat flour (WFG) and vital wheat gluten (VWG)

  14. Two cases of wheat-dependent anaphylaxis induced by aspirin administration but not by exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, S; Aihara, M; Sugawara, M; Kunimi, Y; Matsuki, M; Inoue, Y; Kambara, T; Ikezawa, Z

    2010-04-01

    Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to enhance the symptoms of wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). In contrast to many reports on WDEIA, there have been only a few reports of wheat-dependent aspirin-induced anaphylaxis not induced by the combination of wheat and exercise. Two patients with wheat-dependent anaphylaxis underwent provocation tests to clarify the cause of their symptoms. Skin-prick testing (SPT) was also performed with and without administration of aspirin. Specific IgE antibody to wheat, gluten, and omega-5 gliadin were examined. In the provocation tests, anaphylactic reactions were not induced by wheat or aspirin alone or by the combination of wheat and exercise, but were induced by the combination of wheat and aspirin. An increase in the blood histamine level was detected after provocation in both patients. Pretreatment with aspirin enhanced the SPT reactions to wheat and gluten in both patients. Specific IgE antibodies to wheat and gluten were expressed in the serum of both patients, and specific omega-5 gliadin IgE antibody was detected in the serum of one patient. We present two cases of specific wheat-dependent anaphylaxis induced by aspirin but not by exercise. We suggest that pretreatment with aspirin under controlled conditions is useful to confirm the diagnosis of food allergy when a challenge test with food alone or with food and exercise fails to induce positive reactions.

  15. Coverage of Large-Scale Food Fortification of Edible Oil, Wheat Flour, and Maize Flour Varies Greatly by Vehicle and Country but Is Consistently Lower among the Most Vulnerable: Results from Coverage Surveys in 8 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Grant J; Friesen, Valerie M; Jungjohann, Svenja; Garrett, Greg S; Neufeld, Lynnette M; Myatt, Mark

    2017-05-01

    Background: Large-scale food fortification (LSFF) of commonly consumed food vehicles is widely implemented in low- and middle-income countries. Many programs have monitoring information gaps and most countries fail to assess program coverage. Objective: The aim of this work was to present LSFF coverage survey findings (overall and in vulnerable populations) from 18 programs (7 wheat flour, 4 maize flour, and 7 edible oil programs) conducted in 8 countries between 2013 and 2015. Methods: A Fortification Assessment Coverage Toolkit (FACT) was developed to standardize the assessments. Three indicators were used to assess the relations between coverage and vulnerability: 1 ) poverty, 2 ) poor dietary diversity, and 3 ) rural residence. Three measures of coverage were assessed: 1 ) consumption of the vehicle, 2 ) consumption of a fortifiable vehicle, and 3 ) consumption of a fortified vehicle. Individual program performance was assessed based on the following: 1 ) achieving overall coverage ≥50%, 2) achieving coverage of ≥75% in ≥1 vulnerable group, and 3 ) achieving equity in coverage for ≥1 vulnerable group. Results: Coverage varied widely by food vehicle and country. Only 2 of the 18 LSFF programs assessed met all 3 program performance criteria. The 2 main program bottlenecks were a poor choice of vehicle and failure to fortify a fortifiable vehicle (i.e., absence of fortification). Conclusions: The results highlight the importance of sound program design and routine monitoring and evaluation. There is strong evidence of the impact and cost-effectiveness of LSFF; however, impact can only be achieved when the necessary activities and processes during program design and implementation are followed. The FACT approach fills an important gap in the availability of standardized tools. The LSFF programs assessed here need to be re-evaluated to determine whether to further invest in the programs, whether other vehicles are appropriate, and whether other approaches

  16. Drought Tolerance in Modern and Wild Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budak, Hikmet; Kantar, Melda; Yucebilgili Kurtoglu, Kuaybe

    2013-01-01

    The genus Triticum includes bread (Triticum aestivum) and durum wheat (Triticum durum) and constitutes a major source for human food consumption. Drought is currently the leading threat on world's food supply, limiting crop yield, and is complicated since drought tolerance is a quantitative trait with a complex phenotype affected by the plant's developmental stage. Drought tolerance is crucial to stabilize and increase food production since domestication has limited the genetic diversity of crops including wild wheat, leading to cultivated species, adapted to artificial environments, and lost tolerance to drought stress. Improvement for drought tolerance can be achieved by the introduction of drought-grelated genes and QTLs to modern wheat cultivars. Therefore, identification of candidate molecules or loci involved in drought tolerance is necessary, which is undertaken by “omics” studies and QTL mapping. In this sense, wild counterparts of modern varieties, specifically wild emmer wheat (T. dicoccoides), which are highly tolerant to drought, hold a great potential. Prior to their introgression to modern wheat cultivars, drought related candidate genes are first characterized at the molecular level, and their function is confirmed via transgenic studies. After integration of the tolerance loci, specific environment targeted field trials are performed coupled with extensive analysis of morphological and physiological characteristics of developed cultivars, to assess their performance under drought conditions and their possible contributions to yield in certain regions. This paper focuses on recent advances on drought related gene/QTL identification, studies on drought related molecular pathways, and current efforts on improvement of wheat cultivars for drought tolerance. PMID:23766697

  17. Drought Tolerance in Modern and Wild Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmet Budak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Triticum includes bread (Triticum aestivum and durum wheat (Triticum durum and constitutes a major source for human food consumption. Drought is currently the leading threat on world's food supply, limiting crop yield, and is complicated since drought tolerance is a quantitative trait with a complex phenotype affected by the plant's developmental stage. Drought tolerance is crucial to stabilize and increase food production since domestication has limited the genetic diversity of crops including wild wheat, leading to cultivated species, adapted to artificial environments, and lost tolerance to drought stress. Improvement for drought tolerance can be achieved by the introduction of drought-grelated genes and QTLs to modern wheat cultivars. Therefore, identification of candidate molecules or loci involved in drought tolerance is necessary, which is undertaken by “omics” studies and QTL mapping. In this sense, wild counterparts of modern varieties, specifically wild emmer wheat (T. dicoccoides, which are highly tolerant to drought, hold a great potential. Prior to their introgression to modern wheat cultivars, drought related candidate genes are first characterized at the molecular level, and their function is confirmed via transgenic studies. After integration of the tolerance loci, specific environment targeted field trials are performed coupled with extensive analysis of morphological and physiological characteristics of developed cultivars, to assess their performance under drought conditions and their possible contributions to yield in certain regions. This paper focuses on recent advances on drought related gene/QTL identification, studies on drought related molecular pathways, and current efforts on improvement of wheat cultivars for drought tolerance.

  18. Evaluation of some properties of wheat-brewers' spent cassava flour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    brewers' spent cassava flour blends and that it has a lot of potential in the food industry especially its use as thickener and binding agent in the food systems. Keywords: Brewers' spent cassava flour, wheat flour, proximate, functional properties.

  19. WheatGenome.info: A Resource for Wheat Genomics Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kaitao

    2016-01-01

    An integrated database with a variety of Web-based systems named WheatGenome.info hosting wheat genome and genomic data has been developed to support wheat research and crop improvement. The resource includes multiple Web-based applications, which are implemented as a variety of Web-based systems. These include a GBrowse2-based wheat genome viewer with BLAST search portal, TAGdb for searching wheat second generation genome sequence data, wheat autoSNPdb, links to wheat genetic maps using CMap and CMap3D, and a wheat genome Wiki to allow interaction between diverse wheat genome sequencing activities. This portal provides links to a variety of wheat genome resources hosted at other research organizations. This integrated database aims to accelerate wheat genome research and is freely accessible via the web interface at http://www.wheatgenome.info/ .

  20. Eighteen cases of wheat allergy and wheat-dependent exercise-induced urticaria/anaphylaxis sensitized by hydrolyzed wheat protein in soap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tomoko; Ito, Tomonobu; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Fuzishiro, Kanzan; Hirano, Hirofumi; Okubo, Yukari; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2015-08-01

    Glupearl 19S, an acid-hydrolyzed wheat protein (HWP), is used widely in Japan as a moisturizing ingredient in facial soaps. Since 2010, there has been an increasing number of reports of contact urticaria and wheat allergy resulting from the use of products containing this substance. Sixty-one patients who had used HWP-containing facial soap visited our hospital. Thirty-five of these experienced urticaria or anaphylaxis after consuming wheat-containing food. Eighteen of the 35 patients tested positive to 0.01% Glupearl 19S solution. Wheat-specific IgE and serum gluten-specific IgE were higher in the patients with HWP allergy than in non-HWP allergy patients. Among the patients who tested positive to Glupearl 19S on the skin prick test, nine experienced HWP-wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, and four experienced food-dependent anaphylaxis. Moreover, four of these patients not only experienced food-dependent anaphylaxis but also a worsening of the symptoms during exercise. The clinical symptomology was so variable that the patients were classified into six groups. We found that patients with HWP allergy tended to manifest symptoms of both HWP-wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis and contact urticaria. The etiology of hydrolyzed wheat protein allergy is unknown. Patients with a history of these symptoms need to be informed about the risk of consuming wheat-containing foods and the importance of excluding such items from their diet. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  1. Effect of Fungal Colonization of Wheat Grains with Fusarium spp. on Food Choice, Weight Gain and Mortality of Meal Beetle Larvae (Tenebrio molitor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiqing; Döll, Katharina; Dastjerdi, Raana; Karlovsky, Petr; Dehne, Heinz-Wilhelm; Altincicek, Boran

    2014-01-01

    Species of Fusarium have significant agro-economical and human health-related impact by infecting diverse crop plants and synthesizing diverse mycotoxins. Here, we investigated interactions of grain-feeding Tenebrio molitor larvae with four grain-colonizing Fusarium species on wheat kernels. Since numerous metabolites produced by Fusarium spp. are toxic to insects, we tested the hypothesis that the insect senses and avoids Fusarium-colonized grains. We found that only kernels colonized with F. avenaceum or Beauveria bassiana (an insect-pathogenic fungal control) were avoided by the larvae as expected. Kernels colonized with F. proliferatum, F. poae or F. culmorum attracted T. molitor larvae significantly more than control kernels. The avoidance/preference correlated with larval feeding behaviors and weight gain. Interestingly, larvae that had consumed F. proliferatum- or F. poae-colonized kernels had similar survival rates as control. Larvae fed on F. culmorum-, F. avenaceum- or B. bassiana-colonized kernels had elevated mortality rates. HPLC analyses confirmed the following mycotoxins produced by the fungal strains on the kernels: fumonisins, enniatins and beauvericin by F. proliferatum, enniatins and beauvericin by F. poae, enniatins by F. avenaceum, and deoxynivalenol and zearalenone by F. culmorum. Our results indicate that T. molitor larvae have the ability to sense potential survival threats of kernels colonized with F. avenaceum or B. bassiana, but not with F. culmorum. Volatiles potentially along with gustatory cues produced by these fungi may represent survival threat signals for the larvae resulting in their avoidance. Although F. proliferatum or F. poae produced fumonisins, enniatins and beauvericin during kernel colonization, the larvae were able to use those kernels as diet without exhibiting increased mortality. Consumption of F. avenaceum-colonized kernels, however, increased larval mortality; these kernels had higher enniatin levels than F

  2. Effect of fungal colonization of wheat grains with Fusarium spp. on food choice, weight gain and mortality of meal beetle larvae (Tenebrio molitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqing Guo

    Full Text Available Species of Fusarium have significant agro-economical and human health-related impact by infecting diverse crop plants and synthesizing diverse mycotoxins. Here, we investigated interactions of grain-feeding Tenebrio molitor larvae with four grain-colonizing Fusarium species on wheat kernels. Since numerous metabolites produced by Fusarium spp. are toxic to insects, we tested the hypothesis that the insect senses and avoids Fusarium-colonized grains. We found that only kernels colonized with F. avenaceum or Beauveria bassiana (an insect-pathogenic fungal control were avoided by the larvae as expected. Kernels colonized with F. proliferatum, F. poae or F. culmorum attracted T. molitor larvae significantly more than control kernels. The avoidance/preference correlated with larval feeding behaviors and weight gain. Interestingly, larvae that had consumed F. proliferatum- or F. poae-colonized kernels had similar survival rates as control. Larvae fed on F. culmorum-, F. avenaceum- or B. bassiana-colonized kernels had elevated mortality rates. HPLC analyses confirmed the following mycotoxins produced by the fungal strains on the kernels: fumonisins, enniatins and beauvericin by F. proliferatum, enniatins and beauvericin by F. poae, enniatins by F. avenaceum, and deoxynivalenol and zearalenone by F. culmorum. Our results indicate that T. molitor larvae have the ability to sense potential survival threats of kernels colonized with F. avenaceum or B. bassiana, but not with F. culmorum. Volatiles potentially along with gustatory cues produced by these fungi may represent survival threat signals for the larvae resulting in their avoidance. Although F. proliferatum or F. poae produced fumonisins, enniatins and beauvericin during kernel colonization, the larvae were able to use those kernels as diet without exhibiting increased mortality. Consumption of F. avenaceum-colonized kernels, however, increased larval mortality; these kernels had higher enniatin

  3. NUTRITIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF EMMER WHEAT VARIETIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdaléna Lacko - Bartošová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the nutritional compounds (fat, sugars, crude protein, soluble fiber, ash and starch of four emmer wheat varieties grown under the conditions of organic farming system. The experiment was established on Scientific Research base Dolná Malanta, near Nitra in Slovakia during 2010 – 2011 and 2011 – 2012 growing seasons. Nutritional parameters, except crude protein content, were not influenced by the variety and weather conditions. Agnone variety had the highest content of fat, crude protein and starch but the lowest content of soluble dietary fiber. The lowest values of fat, crude protein had Molise sel Colli variety; Farvento variety had the lowest sugars and starch content. Emmer wheat as ancient wheat has a unique composition in secondary components, such as starch, which may play a role as functional food ingredients.

  4. Antioxidant responses of wheat plants under stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Caverzan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, food security depends on the increased production of cereals such as wheat (Triticum aestivum L., which is an important source of calories and protein for humans. However, cells of the crop have suffered from the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which can cause severe oxidative damage to the plants, due to environmental stresses. ROS are toxic molecules found in various subcellular compartments. The equilibrium between the production and detoxification of ROS is sustained by enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants. In the present review, we offer a brief summary of antioxidant defense and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 signaling in wheat plants. Wheat plants increase antioxidant defense mechanisms under abiotic stresses, such as drought, cold, heat, salinity and UV-B radiation, to alleviate oxidative damage. Moreover, H2O2 signaling is an important factor contributing to stress tolerance in cereals.

  5. Wheat-Dependent Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis Sensitized with Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein in Soap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Chinuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA is a specific form of wheat allergy typically induced by exercise after ingestion of wheat products. Wheat ω-5 gliadin is a major allergen associated with conventional WDEIA, and detection of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE specific to recombinant ω-5 gliadin is a reliable method for its diagnosis. Recently, an increased incidence of a new subtype of WDEIA, which is likely to be sensitized via a percutaneous and/or rhinoconjunctival route to hydrolyzed wheat protein (HWP, has been observed. All of the patients with this new subtype had used the same brand of soap, which contained HWP. Approximately half of these patients developed contact allergy several months later and subsequently developed WDEIA. In each of these patients, contact allergy with soap exposure preceded food ingestion-induced reactions. Other patients directly developed generalized symptoms upon ingestion of wheat products. The predominant observed symptom of the new WDEIA subtype was angioedema of the eyelids; a number of patients developed anaphylaxis. This new subtype of WDEIA has little serum ω-5 gliadin-specific serum IgE.

  6. Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolyzed wheat protein in soap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinuki, Yuko; Morita, Eishin

    2012-12-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is a specific form of wheat allergy typically induced by exercise after ingestion of wheat products. Wheat ω-5 gliadin is a major allergen associated with conventional WDEIA, and detection of serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) specific to recombinant ω-5 gliadin is a reliable method for its diagnosis. Recently, an increased incidence of a new subtype of WDEIA, which is likely to be sensitized via a percutaneous and/or rhinoconjunctival route to hydrolyzed wheat protein (HWP), has been observed. All of the patients with this new subtype had used the same brand of soap, which contained HWP. Approximately half of these patients developed contact allergy several months later and subsequently developed WDEIA. In each of these patients, contact allergy with soap exposure preceded food ingestion-induced reactions. Other patients directly developed generalized symptoms upon ingestion of wheat products. The predominant observed symptom of the new WDEIA subtype was angioedema of the eyelids; a number of patients developed anaphylaxis. This new subtype of WDEIA has little serum ω-5 gliadin-specific serum IgE.

  7. Discrimination of volatiles of refined and whole wheat bread containing red and white wheat bran using an electronic nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapirstein, Harry D; Siddhu, Silvi; Aliani, Michel

    2012-11-01

    with brans of preferred type in order to foster increased consumption of whole wheat products which confer many favorable health benefits. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Drug transporters of the fungal wheat pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roohparvar, R.

    2007-01-01

    Wheat is the most important cereal crop in the world. It occupies 17% of the cultivated land and is the main source of food for 35% of the world population. InIran, wheat is the most important agricultural crop and

  9. Changes of nematode community under monoculture wheat and wheat/jujube intercropping system in Xinjiang, Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Y. B.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nematode communities in the soils of wheat (Triticum aestivum Linn. rhizosphere grown alone and grown in jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. orchard were investigated for three years in Hetian arid area, Xingjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, northwest of China. The results showed that eu-dominant families were Rhabditidae, Cephalobidae and Aphelenchidae among 15 families and 19 genera. Nematode abundance in wheat rhizosphere soil was smaller in wheat/jujube intercropping system, mainly because of lower numbers of bacterial feeders and fungal feeders. Besides, the nematode numbers of cp-1 and cp-2 (cp, colonizer-persister guilds were significantly lower in wheat/jujube intercropping system than that in monoculture wheat system, due to the markedly lower numbers of Rhabditidae and Cephalobidae, although those of cp-3 and cp-4 guilds had no significant differences between monoculture and intercropping systems. Shannon-Weaver index (H’, genus dominance index (Ig and structural index (SI, represented soil food web diversity and structure, had no differences between monoculture and intercropping systems. Significantly lower values of Wasilewska index (WI and PPI/MI in monoculture wheat than in intercropping system. It was concluded that the soil status in monoculture wheat system exhibited better soil ecosystem in compared with wheat/ jujube intercropping system.

  10. Improving farming practices reduces the carbon footprint of spring wheat production

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Yantai; Liang, Chang; Chai, Qiang; Lemke, Reynald L.; Campbell, Con A.; Robert P. Zentner

    2014-01-01

    Wheat is one of the world’s most favoured food sources, reaching millions of people on a daily basis. However, its production has climatic consequences. Fuel, inorganic fertilizers and pesticides used in wheat production emit greenhouse gases that can contribute negatively to climate change. It is unknown whether adopting alternative farming practices will increase crop yield while reducing carbon emissions. Here we quantify the carbon footprint of alternative wheat production systems suited ...

  11. Epidemiological link between wheat allergy and exposure to hydrolyzed wheat protein in facial soap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutomi, Y; Taniguchi, M; Nakamura, H; Akiyama, K

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the importance of extra-intestinal routes of sensitization to food-related allergens as the cause of epidemics of food allergy. Instances of Japanese women developing food allergy to wheat after exposure to hydrolyzed wheat protein (HWP) present in facial soap have been reported. However, the epidemiologic impact of these ingredients as a cause of food allergy has not been well studied. To clarify the epidemiological relationship between food allergy to wheat and contact exposure to HWP, a case-control study of Japanese women aged 20-54 years with self-reported wheat allergy (WA) (cases, n = 157) and age-matched control subjects without WA (controls, n = 449) was performed using a large-scale Web-based research panel. Subjects answered a Web-based questionnaire regarding the use of skin and hair care products, as well as other possible risk factors. Current use of an HWP-containing facial soap (Cha no Shizuku; Yuka) was significantly associated with an increased risk of WA (adjusted odds ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-5.7; frequencies of current use in cases and controls; 11% and 6%, respectively). Use of Cha no Shizuku was more common in subjects with more recent-onset WA, implying that this soap may have contributed to the recent epidemic of WA. An epidemiological relationship between WA and contact exposure to HWP has been documented. This study implicates a possible role of contact exposure to food-derived protein hydrolysates as a risk factor for the development of food allergy manifesting itself as anaphylaxis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The structure of wheat bread influences the postprandial metabolic response in healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eelderink, Coby; Noort, Martijn W J; Sozer, Nesli

    2015-01-01

    Postprandial high glucose and insulin responses after starchy food consumption, associated with an increased risk of developing several metabolic diseases, could possibly be improved by altering food structure. We investigated the influence of a compact food structure; different wheat products...... or insulin-independent glucose disposal. These results demonstrate that the structure of wheat bread can influence the postprandial metabolic response, with a more compact structure being more beneficial for health. Bread-making technology should be further explored to create healthier products....

  13. Catering Gluten-Free When Simultaneously Using Wheat Flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kathryn; McGough, Norma; Urwin, Heidi

    2016-02-01

    A European law on gluten-free (GF) labeling came into force in 2012, covering foods sold prepacked and in food service establishments, and a similar U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation covers GF labeling from August 2014. Gluten is found in the grains wheat, rye, and barley. A common source of gluten in the kitchen is wheat flour. This research aimed to determine variables that have a significant effect on gluten contamination in commercial kitchens when wheat flour is in use and to establish controls necessary to assure GF production. A pilot study was used to test the following hypotheses: (i) increasing duration of exposure to wheat flour would increase gluten contamination, (ii) increasing distance between the site of preparation and the site of wheat flour would reduce gluten contamination, (iii) the use of a ventilation hood would decrease gluten contamination, and (iv) the use of a barrier segregating the site of preparation of a GF meal and the use of wheat flour would decrease gluten contamination. Petri dishes containing GF rice pudding were placed in three directions at increasing distances (0.5 to 2 m) from a site of wheat flour use. A barrier was in place between a third of samples and the site of wheat flour. After wheat flour was handled for 0.5 and 4.0 h, petri dishes were sealed and the contents were analyzed for gluten. The experiment was duplicated with the ventilation hood on and off. The pilot study revealed that a distance of 2 m from the use of wheat flour was required to control gluten contamination at ≤20 ppm if wheat flour had been in use for 4.0 h. The identified control of distance was tested in five different study sites. In each of the study sites, a test meal was prepared a minimum of 2 m away from the site of wheat flour use. Although kitchens vary and must be considered individually, the established control of a minimum 2 m distance, along with good hygiene practices, was found to be effective in preparing GF meals

  14. [Food allergy in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szépfalusi, Z

    2012-12-01

    Food allergies can result in life-threatening reactions and diminish quality of life. The prevalence of food allergies has increased in several regions throughout the world. A few food allergens cover the majority of food-related reactions (milk, egg, wheat, soy, fish, crustacean, nuts and peanut). Immunological mechanisms range between IgE-mediated (most common) and non-IgE-mediated, the latter of which remaining often a clue in the diagnosis. Treatment of food allergy involves strict avoidance of the trigger food. Medications help to manage symptoms of disease, but currently, there is no cure for food allergy.

  15. Detection of antigens reactive to IgE and IgA during wheat seed maturation and in different wheat cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Claudia; Touraev, Alisher; Heberle-Bors, Erwin; Quirce, Santiago; Huber, Wolf Dietrich; Valenta, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    Dietary intake of wheat causes hypersensitivity reactions in patients suffering from IgE-mediated food allergy and coeliac disease. To study the expression of IgE- and IgA-reactive antigens during wheat seed maturation and in different wheat cultivars. Summer wheat was grown in a glasshouse and seeds were harvested at defined maturation stages. Mature seeds were obtained from 13 different defined cultivars. Protein extracts were prepared from different maturation stages and cultivars with a standardized procedure based on seed weight and analysed by IgE and IgA immunoblotting using sera from clinically defined patients suffering from wheat allergy or coeliac disease. With a few exceptions the expression of IgE- and IgA-reactive wheat antigens increased during wheat seed maturation. Wheat cultivars could be identified in which the expression of certain IgE- and IgA-reactive components was strongly reduced or not detectable. The expression of IgE- and IgA-reactive antigens depends on wheat seed maturation and varies in different wheat cultivars.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A FUNCTIONAL PURPOSE WHIPPED BREAD WHOLE GRAIN WHEAT, RYE AND WHEAT BRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. Magomedov

    2015-01-01

    main nutrients of food, but also vitamins, minerals and biologically active. In the work of the established mathematical relationship and causality between technological parameters of dough and whipped bread and their quality. Defined rational dosing rye and wheat bran in technology enriched whipped bread flour wholegrain wheat.

  17. Aluminium toxicity in winter wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabó A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium is the most frequent metal of the earth crust; it occurs mainly as biologically inactive, insoluble deposit. Environmental problems, industrial contaminations and acid rains increase the soil acidity, leading to the mobilization of Al. Half of the world’s potential arable lands are acidic; therefore, Al-toxicity decreases crop productivity. Wheat is a staple food for 35% of the world population. The effects of Al-stress (0.1 mM were studied on winter wheat; seedlings were grown hydroponically, at acidic pH. After two weeks, the root weight was decreased; a significant difference was found in the P- and Ca-content. The shoot weight and element content changed slightly; Al-content in the root was one magnitude higher than in the shoot, while Al-translocation was limited. The root plasma membrane H+-ATPase has central role in the uptake processes; Al-stress increased the Mg2+-ATPase activity of the microsomal fraction.

  18. Deoxynivalenol in wheat, maize, wheat flour and pasta: surveys in Hungary in 2008-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tima, Helga; Berkics, Adrienn; Hannig, Zoltán; Ittzés, András; Kecskésné Nagy, Eleonóra; Mohácsi-Farkas, Csilla; Kiskó, Gabriella

    2017-11-23

    Among Fusarium mycotoxins, deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most common contaminant in case of cereals and cereal-based foods in Hungary. In this study, Hungarian wheat (n = 305), maize (n = 108), wheat flour (n = 179) and pasta (n = 226) samples were analysed (N = 818). The samples were collected during 2008-2015 in Hungary. Applied methods of analysis were enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and liquid-chromatography coupled with a mass spectrometer. Results were compared and evaluated with Hungarian weather data. Among cereal samples, in 2011, wheat was contaminated with DON (overall average ± standard deviation was 2159 ± 2818 µg kg-1), which was above the maximum limit (ML). In case of wheat flour and pasta, no average values above ML were found during 2008-2015, but higher DON contamination could be observed in 2011 as well (wheat flour: 537 ± 573 µg kg-1; pasta: 511 ± 175 µg kg-1).

  19. Dissipation of organophosphorus pesticides in wheat during pasta processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygun, Umran; Senoz, Berrin; Koksel, Hamit

    2008-07-15

    For investigating the carryover of some organophosphorus pesticide residues in the cereal food chain from grain to consumer, a study was set up on durum wheat, semolina and pasta. Pesticide-free durum wheat was placed into a small-scale model of a commercial storage vessel and treated with pesticides (malathion, fenitrothion, chlorpyrifos methyl, and pirimiphos methyl) according to the raw material legislation of Turkey. The residue levels of insecticides were determined in wheat, semolina, and spaghetti produced from stored wheat at various time intervals during five months of storage. A multiresidue analysis was performed using GC equipped with an NPD. The confirmation was performed by GC-MS. The residue levels of insecticides in wheat exceeded the maximum residue limits (MRLs) for wheat. The storage period was generally not effective enough to reduce the residues in wheat to levels below the MRLs. Although a considerable amount of the insecticides remained in the semolina, spaghetti processing significantly reduced residue concentrations in general. Pirimiphos methyl was the most persistent of the insecticides and comparatively less substantial loss occurred during milling and spaghetti processing due to its physicochemical properties. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolomics analysis of the effect of elevated co2 on wheat resistance to Fusarium head blight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change is expected to intensify Fusarium head blight (FHB) contamination of wheat and increase the associated risk of mycotoxin contamination in food and feed. Rising CO2 levels are part of climate change with still unknown effects on natural wheat resistance mechanisms against Fusarium gram...

  1. The Potential Link between Gut Microbiota and IgE-Mediated Food Allergy in Early Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, John; Allen, Katrina; Collier, Fiona; Tang, Mimi L. K.; Ward, Alister C.; Vuillermin, Peter

    2013-01-01

    There has been a dramatic rise in the prevalence of IgE-mediated food allergy over recent decades, particularly among infants and young children. The cause of this increase is unknown but one putative factor is a change in the composition, richness and balance of the microbiota that colonize the human gut during early infancy. The coevolution of the human gastrointestinal tract and commensal microbiota has resulted in a symbiotic relationship in which gut microbiota play a vital role in early life immune development and function, as well as maintenance of gut wall epithelial integrity. Since IgE mediated food allergy is associated with immune dysregulation and impaired gut epithelial integrity there is substantial interest in the potential link between gut microbiota and food allergy. Although the exact link between gut microbiota and food allergy is yet to be established in humans, recent experimental evidence suggests that specific patterns of gut microbiota colonization may influence the risk and manifestations of food allergy. An understanding of the relationship between gut microbiota and food allergy has the potential to inform both the prevention and treatment of food allergy. In this paper we review the theory and evidence linking gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life. We then consider the implications and challenges for future research, including the techniques of measuring and analyzing gut microbiota, and the types of studies required to advance knowledge in the field. PMID:24351744

  2. The potential link between gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, John; Allen, Katrina; Collier, Fiona; Tang, Mimi L K; Ward, Alister C; Vuillermin, Peter

    2013-12-16

    There has been a dramatic rise in the prevalence of IgE-mediated food allergy over recent decades, particularly among infants and young children. The cause of this increase is unknown but one putative factor is a change in the composition, richness and balance of the microbiota that colonize the human gut during early infancy. The coevolution of the human gastrointestinal tract and commensal microbiota has resulted in a symbiotic relationship in which gut microbiota play a vital role in early life immune development and function, as well as maintenance of gut wall epithelial integrity. Since IgE mediated food allergy is associated with immune dysregulation and impaired gut epithelial integrity there is substantial interest in the potential link between gut microbiota and food allergy. Although the exact link between gut microbiota and food allergy is yet to be established in humans, recent experimental evidence suggests that specific patterns of gut microbiota colonization may influence the risk and manifestations of food allergy. An understanding of the relationship between gut microbiota and food allergy has the potential to inform both the prevention and treatment of food allergy. In this paper we review the theory and evidence linking gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life. We then consider the implications and challenges for future research, including the techniques of measuring and analyzing gut microbiota, and the types of studies required to advance knowledge in the field.

  3. The wheat chloroplastic proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Cho, Kun; Choi, Jong-Soon; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Komatsu, Setsuko; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Woo, Sun Hee

    2013-11-20

    With the availability of plant genome sequencing, analysis of plant proteins with mass spectrometry has become promising and admired. Determining the proteome of a cell is still a challenging assignment, which is convoluted by proteome dynamics and convolution. Chloroplast is fastidious curiosity for plant biologists due to their intricate biochemical pathways for indispensable metabolite functions. In this review, an overview on proteomic studies conducted in wheat with a special focus on subcellular proteomics of chloroplast, salt and water stress. In recent years, we and other groups have attempted to understand the photosynthesis in wheat and abiotic stress under salt imposed and water deficit during vegetative stage. Those studies provide interesting results leading to better understanding of the photosynthesis and identifying the stress-responsive proteins. Indeed, recent studies aimed at resolving the photosynthesis pathway in wheat. Proteomic analysis combining two complementary approaches such as 2-DE and shotgun methods couple to high through put mass spectrometry (LTQ-FTICR and MALDI-TOF/TOF) in order to better understand the responsible proteins in photosynthesis and abiotic stress (salt and water) in wheat chloroplast will be focused. In this review we discussed the identification of the most abundant protein in wheat chloroplast and stress-responsive under salt and water stress in chloroplast of wheat seedlings, thus providing the proteomic view of the events during the development of this seedling under stress conditions. Chloroplast is fastidious curiosity for plant biologists due to their intricate biochemical pathways for indispensable metabolite functions. An overview on proteomic studies conducted in wheat with a special focus on subcellular proteomics of chloroplast, salt and water stress. We have attempted to understand the photosynthesis in wheat and abiotic stress under salt imposed and water deficit during seedling stage. Those studies

  4. ATTEMPT TO APPLY STABILIZED WHEAT GERM FOR BREAD SUPPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Gambuś

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The increased interest in rational nutrition causes, that from many years is observed a growing consumption of bread, and novel food supplemented with health promoting components. For the bread production in Poland mainly wheat and rye cake flours are used, depleted of a many valuable nutrients such as protein, dietary fibre, minerals and vitamins. Because of their unique chemical composition wheat germs are a particularly valuable resource, both for direct consumption and to enhance the nutritional value of food products. The aim of the study was to prepare wheat bread with a 10% addition of commercial stabilized wheat germs. Based on the obtained results, it was found that wheat germs, due to their unique chemical composition, were a particularly valuable resource to supplement the nutritional value of bread. However, germs had detrimental effect on mechanical properties of dough, and on bread quality. Texture of bread crumb and its chemical composition were analysed. It was shown, that germs subjected to fermentation process could be used in wheat bread production as dietary fibre and mineral compound supplement.

  5. TEXTURE OF COOKED SPELT WHEAT NOODLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdaléna Lacko - Bartošová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available At present, there are limited and incomplete data on the ability of spelt to produce alimentary pasta of suitable quality. Noodles are traditional cereal-based food that is becoming increasingly popular worldwide because of its convenience, nutritional qualities, and palatability. It is generally accepted that texture is the main criterion for assessing overall quality of cooked noodles. We present selected indicators of noodle texture of three spelt cultivars – Oberkulmer Rotkorn, Rubiota and Franckenkorn grown in an ecological system at the locality of Dolna Malanta near Nitra. A texture analyzer TA.XT PLUS was used to determine cooked spelt wheat noodle firmness (N (AACC 66-50. The texture of cooked spelt wheat noodles was expressed also as elasticity (N and extensibility (mm. Statistical analysis showed significant influence of the variety and year of growing on the firmness, elasticity and extensibility of cooked noodles. The wholemeal spelt wheat noodles were characterized with lower cutting firmness than the flour noodles. Flour noodles were more tensile than wholemeal noodles. The best elasticity and extensibility of flour noodles was found in noodles prepared from Rubiota however from wholemeal noodles it was Oberkulmer Rotkorn. Spelt wheat is suitable for noodle production, however also here it is necessary to differentiate between varieties. According to achieved results, wholemeal noodles prepared from Oberkulmer Rotkorn can be recommended for noodle industry due to their consistent structure and better texture quality after cooking.

  6. Nutraceutical and functional scenario of wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Imran; Saeed, Farhan; Waqas, Khalid; Anjum, Faqir Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad Umair

    2013-01-01

    In the era of nutrition, much focus has been remunerated to functional and nutraceutical foodstuffs. The health endorsing potential of such provisions is attributed to affluent phytochemistry. These dynamic constituents have functional possessions that are imperative for cereal industry. The functional and nutraceutical significance of variety of foods is often accredited to their bioactive molecules. Numerous components have been considered but wheat straw and its diverse components are of prime consideration. In this comprehensive dissertation, efforts are directed to elaborate the functional and nutraceutical importance of wheat straw. Wheat straw is lignocellulosic materials including cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. It hold various bioactive compounds such as policosanols, phytosterols, phenolics, and triterpenoids, having enormous nutraceutical properties like anti-allergenic, anti-artherogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, antioxidant, anti-thrombotic, cardioprotective and vasodilatory effects, antiviral, and anticancer. These compounds are protecting against various ailments like hypercholesterolemia, intermittent claudication, benign prostatic hyperplasia and cardiovascular diseases. Additionally, wheat straw has demonstrated successfully, low cost, renewable, versatile, widely distributed, easily available source for the production of biogas, bioethanol, and biohydrogen in biorefineries to enhance the overall effectiveness of biomass consumption in protected and eco-friendly environment. Furthermore, its role in enhancing the quality and extending the shelf life of bakery products through reducing the progression of staling and retrogradation is limelight of the article.

  7. BREAD QUALITY SUBSTITUTED BY POTATO STARCH INSTEAD OF WHEAT FLOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nemar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wheat bread constitutes the most regularly consumed food in the World, the international market for wheat undergoes strong pressure and prices are unceasingly increasing. The aim of this study is to substitute wheat flour by potato starch in bread preparation. Mixtures flours were characterized for composition, damaged starch, and Alveograph properties. According to the results of alveograph parameters, they decrease with the rate of incorporation of potato starch. This decrease can be corrected by adding vital gluten. The results of physicochemical analysis showed a decrease in protein levels, an increase in moisture content (about 2% and carbohydrates levels due to the composition of potato starch. However, sensory analysis (p ≤ 0.05 showed that the addition 80% of potato starch leads to bread with better characteristics: taste, colour and odour, based on that, it is highly advisable as an ingredient in the standard preparation of wheat bread.

  8. Behavioural responses of wheat stem sawflies to wheat volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Piesik; D. K. Weaver; J. B. Runyon; M. Buteler; G. E. Peck; W. L. Morrill

    2008-01-01

    1) Adult wheat stem sawflies Cephus cinctus, pests of cultivated cereals that also infests wild grasses, migrate into wheat fields where they oviposit in elongating, succulent stems. 2) Volatiles released by wheat plants at susceptible stages were analyzed to determine potential semiochemical compounds. Seven major compounds were identified and...

  9. Concentrations of radiocaesium in Italian durum wheat and its products after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotfi, M.; Notaro, M.; Azimi-Garakani, D.; Tommasino, L. (ENEA, Rome (Italy)); Cubadda, R.; Santaroni, G.P. (National Inst. of Nutrition, Rome (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    The radiocaesium concentrations of over 400 samples of durum wheat (triticum durum) collected throughout Italy after the Chernobyl accident have been measured to study the implications of contamination of this specific type of wheat used primarily in making alimentary pasta. The transfer of radiocaesium from the wheat sample of highest activity into the human food chain was studied systematically by measuring radiocaesium levels in the outer layers of the grain and in semolina, pasta and bread produced this wheat. The effect of cooking on the nuclide content of pasta was also studied, the results showing that most of the radiocaesium is removed into the water in which the pasta is boiled. (author).

  10. Improving farming practices reduces the carbon footprint of spring wheat production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yantai; Liang, Chang; Chai, Qiang; Lemke, Reynald L; Campbell, Con A; Zentner, Robert P

    2014-11-18

    Wheat is one of the world's most favoured food sources, reaching millions of people on a daily basis. However, its production has climatic consequences. Fuel, inorganic fertilizers and pesticides used in wheat production emit greenhouse gases that can contribute negatively to climate change. It is unknown whether adopting alternative farming practices will increase crop yield while reducing carbon emissions. Here we quantify the carbon footprint of alternative wheat production systems suited to semiarid environments. We find that integrating improved farming practices (that is, fertilizing crops based on soil tests, reducing summerfallow frequencies and rotating cereals with grain legumes) lowers wheat carbon footprint effectively, averaging -256 kg CO2 eq ha(-1) per year. For each kg of wheat grain produced, a net 0.027-0.377 kg CO2 eq is sequestered into the soil. With the suite of improved farming practices, wheat takes up more CO2 from the atmosphere than is actually emitted during its production.

  11. Nutritional properties of einkorn wheat (Triticum monococcum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Alyssa; Brandolini, Andrea

    2014-03-15

    The hulled wheat einkorn (Triticum monococcum L. ssp. monococcum), a staple food of early farmers for many thousand years, today is cropped only in small areas of the Mediterranean region and continental Europe. Increasing attention to the nutritional quality of foods has fostered renewed interest in this low-impact crop. The reappraisal of einkorn quality evidenced that this ancient wheat has some dietary advantages over polyploid wheats. Einkorn wholemeal is poor in dietary fibre but rich in proteins, lipids (mostly unsaturated fatty acids), fructans and trace elements (including zinc and iron). The good concentration of several antioxidant compounds (carotenoids, tocols, conjugated polyphenols, alkylresorcinols and phytosterols) and low β-amylase and lipoxygenase activities (which limit antioxidant degradation during food processing) contribute to the excellent nutritional properties of its flour, superior to those of other wheats. Conversely, einkorn has relatively low bound polyphenol content and high polyphenol oxidase activity. In spite of eliciting weaker toxic reactions than other Triticum species, einkorn is not suitable for coeliacs. Current trends towards the consumption of functional foods suggest that this cereal may still play a significant role in human consumption, especially in the development of new or special foods with superior nutritional quality. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Biolistics Transformation of Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Caroline A.; Jones, Huw D.

    We present a complete, step-by-step guide to the production of transformed wheat plants using a particle bombardment device to deliver plasmid DNA into immature embryos and the regeneration of transgenic plants via somatic embryogenesis. Currently, this is the most commonly used method for transforming wheat and it offers some advantages. However, it will be interesting to see whether this position is challenged as facile methods are developed for delivering DNA by Agrobacterium tumefaciens or by the production of transformants via a germ-line process (see other chapters in this book).

  13. Neutron activation analysis of wheat samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galinha, C. [CERENA-IST, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Tecnoclogico e Nuclear, URSN, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Anawar, H.M. [Instituto Tecnoclogico e Nuclear, URSN, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Freitas, M.C., E-mail: cfreitas@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnoclogico e Nuclear, URSN, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Pacheco, A.M.G. [CERENA-IST, Technical University of Lisbon, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Almeida-Silva, M. [Instituto Tecnoclogico e Nuclear, URSN, E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Coutinho, J.; Macas, B.; Almeida, A.S. [INRB/INIA-Elvas, National Institute of Biological Resources, Est. Gil Vaz, 7350-228 Elvas (Portugal)

    2011-11-15

    The deficiency of essential micronutrients and excess of toxic metals in cereals, an important food items for human nutrition, can cause public health risk. Therefore, before their consumption and adoption of soil supplementation, concentrations of essential micronutrients and metals in cereals should be monitored. This study collected soil and two varieties of wheat samples-Triticum aestivum L. (Jordao/bread wheat), and Triticum durum L. (Marialva/durum wheat) from Elvas area, Portugal and analyzed concentrations of As, Cr, Co, Fe, K, Na, Rb and Zn using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) to focus on the risk of adverse public health issues. The low variability and moderate concentrations of metals in soils indicated a lower significant effect of environmental input on metal concentrations in agricultural soils. The Cr and Fe concentrations in soils that ranged from 93-117 and 26,400-31,300 mg/kg, respectively, were relatively high, but Zn concentration was very low (below detection limit <22 mg/kg) indicating that soils should be supplemented with Zn during cultivation. The concentrations of metals in roots and straw of both varieties of wheat decreased in the order of K>Fe>Na>Zn>Cr>Rb>As>Co. Concentrations of As, Co and Cr in root, straw and spike of both varieties were higher than the permissible limits with exception of a few samples. The concentrations of Zn in root, straw and spike were relatively low (4-30 mg/kg) indicating the deficiency of an essential micronutrient Zn in wheat cultivated in Portugal. The elemental transfer from soil to plant decreases with increasing growth of the plant. The concentrations of various metals in different parts of wheat followed the order: Root>Straw>Spike. A few root, straw and spike samples showed enrichment of metals, but the majority of the samples showed no enrichment. Potassium is enriched in all samples of root, straw and spike for both varieties of wheat. Relatively to the seed used for cultivation

  14. Antioxidant activity of wheat and buckwheat flours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedej Ivana J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidative activities of wheat flours (type 500 and wholegrain and buckwheat flours (light and wholegrain were tested using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·-scavenging activity, reducing power and chelating activity on Fe2+. Also, the content of the total phenolics of ethanolic extracts was estimated. Polyphenolics content (expressed as gallic acid equivalent, GAE in wheat flours varied between 37.1 and 137.2 μg GAE/g extract, while its content in buckwheat flour were at least four time higher and ranged between 476.3 and 618.9μg GAE/g extract. Ethanolic extracts of buckwheat flours exhibited higher antioxidant activities in all the assays, except for chelating activity. Regarding all the obtained results, it can be concluded that bakery products produced with buckwheat flour could be regarded as potential functional foods.

  15. A diploid wheat TILLING resource for wheat functional genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawat Nidhi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triticum monococcum L., an A genome diploid einkorn wheat, was the first domesticated crop. As a diploid, it is attractive genetic model for the study of gene structure and function of wheat-specific traits. Diploid wheat is currently not amenable to reverse genetics approaches such as insertion mutagenesis and post-transcriptional gene silencing strategies. However, TILLING offers a powerful functional genetics approach for wheat gene analysis. Results We developed a TILLING population of 1,532 M2 families using EMS as a mutagen. A total of 67 mutants were obtained for the four genes studied. Waxy gene mutation frequencies are known to be 1/17.6 - 34.4 kb DNA in polyploid wheat TILLING populations. The T. monococcum diploid wheat TILLING population had a mutation frequency of 1/90 kb for the same gene. Lignin biosynthesis pathway genes- COMT1, HCT2, and 4CL1 had mutation frequencies of 1/86 kb, 1/92 kb and 1/100 kb, respectively. The overall mutation frequency of the diploid wheat TILLING population was 1/92 kb. Conclusion The mutation frequency of a diploid wheat TILLING population was found to be higher than that reported for other diploid grasses. The rate, however, is lower than tetraploid and hexaploid wheat TILLING populations because of the higher tolerance of polyploids to mutations. Unlike polyploid wheat, most mutants in diploid wheat have a phenotype amenable to forward and reverse genetic analysis and establish diploid wheat as an attractive model to study gene function in wheat. We estimate that a TILLING population of 5, 520 will be needed to get a non-sense mutation for every wheat gene of interest with 95% probability.

  16. Value addition of traditional wheat flour vermicelli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogra, Renu; Midha, Seema

    2013-08-01

    Vermicelli is a product prepared by using whole or refined wheat flour. Hard dough is prepared, extruded and dried in the sun. Since wheat flour is deficient in lysine, one of the essential amino acids, the protein quality remains poor. Refining of wheat further reduces nutritional quality. Therefore value addition of vermicelli is of prime importance to improve nutrient content and to save its delicacy. Secondly, use of value added convenient/processed foods can be a solution to the problem of supplementary feeding and under nutrition Gernah et al. (Am J Food Technol 6:404-412, 2011). Three variations of vermicelli were prepared using whole wheat flour (WWF); malted wheat flour (MWF); malted wheat flour, green gram, spinach and sago (MGSS). A spice mix containing powders of tomato, coriander, chillies, turmeric, salt, raw mango powder, black pepper, cloves and asafetida was also prepared. Results revealed that the overall acceptability scores for WWF, MWF and MGSS were 7.3 ± 6.13, 6.5 ± 0.06 and 8.1 ± 0.01 on 9 point hedonic scale. MGSS vermicelli was most acceptable by the panel members than the other counterparts. WWF, MWF and MGSS contained moisture 6.9 to 7.7%, protein 9.3 to 13.5%, fat 1.2-2.7%, ash 2.9 to 5.8%, crude fibre 2.2 to 2.4%, carbohydrates 69.8 to 75.2% and energy 344 to 362 kcal/100 g respectively. MGSS vermicelli was highest in protein content (13.5%) while energy content was high in WWF. MWF vermicelli had highest amount of total (8.91%), reducing (2.41%) and non-reducing sugars (6.57%). Quality of protein was improved by mutual supplementation of amino acid. Regarding minerals, higher contents of sodium (100 mg), calcium (30 mg), iron (5.9 mg), zinc (1.4 mg) were found in MGSS. Vermicelli could be safely stored for 2 months period at room temperature (25-30 °C).

  17. Global wheat production potentials and management flexibility under the representative concentration pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkovič, Juraj; van der Velde, Marijn; Skalský, Rastislav; Xiong, Wei; Folberth, Christian; Khabarov, Nikolay; Smirnov, Alexey; Mueller, Nathaniel D.; Obersteiner, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Wheat is the third largest crop globally and an essential source of calories in human diets. Maintaining and increasing global wheat production is therefore strongly linked to food security. A large geographic variation in wheat yields across similar climates points to sizeable yield gaps in many nations, and indicates a regionally variable flexibility to increase wheat production. Wheat is particularly sensitive to a changing climate thus limiting management opportunities to enable (sustainable) intensification with potentially significant implications for future wheat production. We present a comprehensive global evaluation of future wheat yields and production under distinct Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) using the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) agro-ecosystem model. We project, in a geographically explicit manner, future wheat production pathways for rainfed and irrigated wheat systems. We explore agricultural management flexibility by quantifying the development of wheat yield potentials under current, rainfed, exploitable (given current irrigation infrastructure), and irrigated intensification levels. Globally, because of climate change, wheat production under conventional management (around the year 2000) would decrease across all RCPs by 37 to 52 and 54 to 103 Mt in the 2050s and 2090s, respectively. However, the exploitable and potential production gap will stay above 350 and 580 Mt, respectively, for all RCPs and time horizons, indicating that negative impacts of climate change can globally be offset by adequate intensification using currently existing irrigation infrastructure and nutrient additions. Future world wheat production on cropland already under cultivation can be increased by ~ 35% through intensified fertilization and ~ 50% through increased fertilization and extended irrigation, if sufficient water would be available. Significant potential can still be exploited, especially in rainfed wheat systems in Russia

  18. Wheat-based traditional flat breads of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parimala, K R; Sudha, M L

    2015-01-01

    Wheat forms the basic ingredient for various bakery and traditional products. Wheat-based flat breads are one of the traditional products prepared in different parts of the world. Different regions of the world have inherited different preparation methods since time immemorial, which has led to the existence of traditional flat breads'. Being traditional, only a few have been extensively studied scientifically. India, being the second largest producer of wheat, has a great saga of traditional flat breads with different tastes and texture. This review is a compiled information related to the research studies carried out on some of the wheat-based traditional flat breads of India namely chapati, puri, tandoori roti, parantha (whole-wheat flour based) and parotta, naan, bhatura, kulcha (refined wheat flour based) which indicates the magnitude of attention they have drawn among the food scientists. The review delves upon the developments and improvements brought about in the storage stability and realization of large-scale production of few of these flat breads which has helped considerably to cater to the growing demand in the domestic as well as international markets. The review also indicates the possibility and the tremendous scope available for technological developments for traditional flat breads.

  19. COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTICS BETWEEN CULTURES: COMMON WHEAT, EINKORN AND SPELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryana Yonkova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years in Bulgaria there is an increasing interest in organic production of healthy cereals einkorn and spelt. Typical for them is that they are unpretentious to the soil, resistant to major diseases and pests occurring in cereals. Einkorn and spelt are considered the most ancient types of wheat today and now they are perceived as healthy food. They are distinguished from ordinary wheat in the following parameters: higher percentage of protein; greater amount of fiber, minerals and vitamins /twice higher contents of Vitamin A; vitamins B; calcium, phosphorus, iron, zinc and others/; they do not contain cholesterol. They outmach the common wheat in the content of selenium and antioxidants, the amount of gluten is minimized. It does not cause allergic reactions in people suffering from celiac disease /in which the specific protein is not digested, in this case - gluten/. The reason for this property is the content of only 14 chromosomes as opposed to 28 in the common wheat and 42 in the modern types of wheat, which makes it easy to assimilate. Because of the hard shell flakes the grain of einkorn does not absorb harmful substances from soil /eg heavy metals/ which is a problem in modern wheat varieties. This article examines the energy and nutritional qualities of those cereals and the possibility einkorn and spelled to be an alternative in agricultural production - both in crop and animal husbandry.

  20. Wheat 2003 outdoor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, J.B.; Vos, J.; Fournier, C.; Andrieu, B.; Struik, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    This dataset containts the underlying data for the study: Evers JB, Vos J, Fournier C, Andrieu B, Chelle M, Struik PC. 2005. Towards a generic architectural model of tillering in Gramineae, as exemplified by spring wheat (Triticum aestivum). New Phytologist, 166: 801-812,

  1. Durum wheat modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toscano, P.; Ranieri, R.; Matese, A.

    2012-01-01

    growth and yield of durum wheat in the major Italian supply basins (Basilicata, Capitanata, Marche, Tuscany). The model was validated and evaluated for three years (1995–1997) at 11 experimental fields and then used in operational mode for eleven years (1999–2009), showing an excellent/good accuracy...

  2. Wheat 2012 outdoor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brufau Segues, Eduard; Vos, J.; Evers, J.B.; Anten, Niels

    2013-01-01

    This dataset contains the underlying data for the MSc thesis: Effects of population density on tillering in wheat and barley. Tillering is the formation of lateral shoots from the base of the stem which is produced specially in grasses and cereals. It is an important property in crops (cereals and

  3. BRS 277: Wheat cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Caierão

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The wheat cultivar ‘BRS 277’ was developed by Embrapa (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária,resulting from a cross between OR1 and Coker 97-33. The plant height of ‘BRS 277’ is short, frost resistance in the vegetativestage is good and resistance to leaf rust moderate.

  4. Registration of 'Tiger' wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Tiger’ hard white winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed at Research Center-Hays, Kansas State University and released by Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station in 2010. Tiger was selected from a three-way cross KS98H245/’Trego’//KS98HW518 made in 1999 at Hays, KS. The objective of this ...

  5. Effect of Sucrose Esters on the Physicochemical Properties of Wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Jinhelai Food Additive Co Ltd. Sodium hydroxide, ethanol, acetic acid, iodine, potassium iodide were of analytical grade. Isolation of starch. The wheat starch was isolated following the method reported by Kasemsuwan et al [15]. The isolated starch was washed with water and ethanol, and recovered by filtration using filter.

  6. Fungal flora and deoxynivalenol (DON) level in wheat from Jeddah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungal flora and deoxynivalenol (DON) level in wheat from Jeddah market, Saudi Arabia. ... The 200 μg/kg DON level (the safe limit for baby foods and young children) was exceeded by 50% of some of the imported samples. The presence of some toxigenic fungi in these samples should set the alarm of possible ...

  7. Hot spots of wheat yield decline with rising temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asseng, Senthold; Cammarano, Davide; Basso, Bruno; Chung, Uran; Alderman, Phillip D; Sonder, Kai; Reynolds, Matthew; Lobell, David B

    2017-06-01

    Many of the irrigated spring wheat regions in the world are also regions with high poverty. The impacts of temperature increase on wheat yield in regions of high poverty are uncertain. A grain yield-temperature response function combined with a quantification of model uncertainty was constructed using a multimodel ensemble from two key irrigated spring wheat areas (India and Sudan) and applied to all irrigated spring wheat regions in the world. Southern Indian and southern Pakistani wheat-growing regions with large yield reductions from increasing temperatures coincided with high poverty headcounts, indicating these areas as future food security 'hot spots'. The multimodel simulations produced a linear absolute decline of yields with increasing temperature, with uncertainty varying with reference temperature at a location. As a consequence of the linear absolute yield decline, the relative yield reductions are larger in low-yielding environments (e.g., high reference temperature areas in southern India, southern Pakistan and all Sudan wheat-growing regions) and farmers in these regions will be hit hardest by increasing temperatures. However, as absolute yield declines are about the same in low- and high-yielding regions, the contributed deficit to national production caused by increasing temperatures is higher in high-yielding environments (e.g., northern India) because these environments contribute more to national wheat production. Although Sudan could potentially grow more wheat if irrigation is available, grain yields would be low due to high reference temperatures, with future increases in temperature further limiting production. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Tritium in the food chain. Comparison of predicted and observed behaviour. A: Re-emission from soil and vegetation. B: Formation of organically bound tritium in grain of spring wheat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, P. [AECL, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Strack, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Barry, P. [PJS Barry, (Canada)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    {sup -1} in the dark. The loss rate factor was estimated to be 0.8 - 1.15 h{sup -1} in light and 0.12 - 0.17 h{sup -1} in darkness. The rate factor for transformation to OBT was estimated to be 6 - 10 10{sup -4} h{sup -1} in the light and 2 - 3 10{sup -4} h{sup -1} in the dark. These values can be compared to those used by the modelers. The range of the uncertainty expressed in these results is due to some minor departures of the experimental conditions from ideal. Although small (about 50%), it would be useful to reduce them further by applying more stringent controls in future experiments. Although wheat is a major contributor to doses estimated according to regulations current in some jurisdictions, other crops or produce dominate doses estimated elsewhere. It is important to repeat these experiments with other food items. Another source of uncertainty in model predictions revealed by the first scenario report is the amount of OBT formed and present in milk and meat(abstract truncated)

  9. Nutritional and Nutraceutical Properties of Triticum dicoccum Wheat and Its Health Benefits: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanavath, Srinu; Prasada Rao, U J S

    2017-10-01

    Triticum dicoccum wheat is one of the ancient wheat species and is gaining popularity due to its suggested health benefits as well as its suitability for organic farming. In some parts of the world, certain traditional foods prepared with dicoccum wheat are preferred due to their better taste, texture, and flavor. It is rich in bioactive compounds and its starch has been reported to have slow digestibility. However, content and composition of bioactive compounds is reported to vary depending on the geographical location, seasonal variations, varieties used, and the analytical methods followed. Therefore, in the present study, we report the food uses, digestibility of starch, nutritional and nutraceutical compositions of dicoccum wheat grown in different parts of the world, and also its health benefits in ameliorating diabetes and celiac disease. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  10. THE MODERN THEORY AND TECHNOLOGY OF PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND USE OF THE PRODUCTS OF COMPLEX PROCESSING OF WHEAT GERM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Rodionova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The data and methods for the preparation of deep processing of wheat germ and their impact on the physical and chemical properties of the final products. It was found that for use in food technology is preferable to use a method is-cold-pressed wheat germ, under which the processed products do not present a residual amount of solvents and other non-food components. Given food and biological characteristics of wheat germ and products deep processing, it was found that they contain vitamin E, A, D, vitamin group В, more than 20 macro- and microelements. Methods of extracting oil from different types raw materials. Analyzed the functional role of ω-6 and ω -3 fatty acids for the human body and ways to maintain balance. A review of plant oils, the prospects of its use to create food systems balanced composition of fatty acids. It was found that the ratio of ω-6 and ω -3 fatty acids in wheat germ oil does not meet the recommended therefore to establish the necessary balance it is preferable to mix amaranth oil and pumpkin. Classified the factors affecting the quality parameters of wheat germ stored, evaluated the role of the enzyme complex during storage of wheat germ and their products deep processing. It was found that a significant effect on the damage of wheat germ has a dual action of lipase, lipoxygenase and catalase. Given the storage and stabilization of wheat germ, shows the potential use of stabilizers to increase the shelf life of wheat germ. As stabilizers, preference is given to compositions of organic acids: ascorbic, succinic and fumaric. It is proved that the composition of organic acids suppress the activity of lipase and lipoxygenase catalase by wheatgerm type noncompetitive inhibition. A review of the technologies used wheat germ and products of their complex processing in medical, cosmetic, feed and food industry. Evaluated the potential application of wheat germ and products deep processing industry of functional

  11. Food allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waserman Susan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Food allergy is defined as an adverse immunologic response to a dietary protein. Food-related reactions are associated with a broad array of signs and symptoms that may involve many bodily systems including the skin, gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, and cardiovascular system. Food allergy is a leading cause of anaphylaxis and, therefore, referral to an allergist for appropriate and timely diagnosis and treatment is imperative. Diagnosis involves a careful history and diagnostic tests, such as skin prick testing, serum-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE testing and, if indicated, oral food challenges. Once the diagnosis of food allergy is confirmed, strict elimination of the offending food allergen from the diet is generally necessary. For patients with significant systemic symptoms, the treatment of choice is epinephrine administered by intramuscular injection into the lateral thigh. Although most children “outgrow” allergies to milk, egg, soy and wheat, allergies to peanut, tree nuts, fish and shellfish are often lifelong. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management and prognosis of patients with food allergy.

  12. TECHNOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF WHEAT LINEAGES CULTIVATED IN THE CERRADO MINEIRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Antônio Viana Madeira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Farmers need highly productive wheat cultivars in order to reach better profitability. However, this alone is not enough, because, in order to serve the mills, the food industry, and more specifically, the bakers, wheat cultivars must present minimum quality requirements that result in final products of superior quality. This study was conducted with the goals of performing the technological characterization of wheat flour five lineages developed for cultivation in the Cerrado Mineiro; compare the flours of these lineages with the wheat flour of two commercial wheat cultivars, and classify the wheat lineages according to current Brazilian legislation. A completely randomized design was conducted with seven treatments and three replicates. Moisture, protein and ashes content, and the rheological characteristics of the flours were determined. The EP066066 lineage as rated was basic wheat. The EP066055, EP064021, EP062043 and EP063065 were rated as bread wheat. Among the studied lineages, the wheat flour from the EP062043 stood from the others, presenting considerable gluten contents, good level of mixing tolerance, good stability and good gluten strength.

  13. Effect of Pleurotus eryngii Mushroom β-Glucan on Quality Characteristics of Common Wheat Pasta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SunHee; Lee, Jo-Won; Heo, Yena; Moon, BoKyung

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of β-glucan-rich fractions (BGRFs) from Pleurotus eryngii mushroom powder on the quality, textural properties, and sensory evaluation of common wheat pasta. Pasta was prepared from semolina flour and common wheat flour by replacing common wheat flour at 2%, 4%, and 6% with BGRFs. Semolina flour showed significantly higher viscosities than common wheat flour samples. However, all viscosities, except the breakdown viscosity, were reduced with increasing percentages of BGRFs. Replacement of the common wheat flour with BGRFs resulted in a reddish brown colored pasta with a lower L* value and a higher a* value. The common wheat pastas containing up to 4% BGRFs were not significantly different from semolina pasta with regard to cooking loss. Addition of up to 2% BGRFs had no significant impact on swelling index and water absorption. The addition of BGRFs in common wheat flour had a positive effect on the quality of common wheat pasta and resulted in hardness values similar to those of semolina pasta. In a sensory evaluation, cooked pasta with 2% BGRFs had the highest overall acceptability score. In summary, the results showed that common wheat flour containing 4% BGRFs could be used to produce pasta with an improved quality and texture properties similar to semolina pasta. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. STUDY OF WHEAT PROTEIN DEGRADATION DURING GERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Michalcová

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutens, the storage proteins of cereals, play significant role in technological and nutraceutical quality of cereal grains. Whereas the high content of glutens allows making better structure of dough, consummation of foods with high gluten content can cause digestive problems. In our work, we studied ability of wheat proteases to degrade proteins, especially glutens. Wheat grains were germinated for up to seven days at three different temperatures 15, 20, 30 °C and pH 3.0, 4.0, 5.5, 7.0, 8.0. Proteins were fractionated into salt-soluble albumins and globulins, alcohol-soluble gliadins and base-soluble glutenins. In these fractions, protein content and their composition were analyzed by Bradford method and SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results showed that remarkable degradation of glutens started after three days and the lowest concentration was measured at the seventh day of germination of wheat grain at temperature 20 °C, pH 5.5.

  15. Immunofluorescent determination of wheat protein in meat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Petrášová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In food industry nowadays, there are various plant-origin protein additives which are meant for production of meat products. Among the most frequent additives of this type there are different kinds of flour, starch, fiber, and plant-origin proteins. Their usage at present is limited by the existing legislation not to prevent consumer deception but also for reasons of possible influence on consumer health. Therefore, this problem is paid a lot of attention not only in the Czech Republic but also all over the world. The main risk is seen in the impossibility to choose a suitable foodstuff for an individual prone to allergic reactions. Potential allergens are also often plant-origin raw materials which are added into foodstuffs for their technological qualities and low price. Wheat is widely cultivated cereal as well as an important source of proteins. After ingestion or inhalation, wheat proteins may cause adverse reactions. These adverse effects include a wide range of disorders which are dependent on the method of contact with wheat protein. These adverse effects can then take the form of various clinical manifestations, such as celiac disease, T-cell mediated inflammatory bowel disease, dermatitis, skin rash, breathing difficulties, allergy to pollen or to wheat flour or food allergy to foodstuffs containing gluten. The only possible protection against adverse immune reactions for those with food allergies is strictly excluding the allergen from their diet. Although the number of studies dealing with the reduction or loss of allergenicity is increasing, yet these practices are not common. Most of the population suffering from food allergies is thus still dependent on strict exclusion of foodstuffs causing adverse allergic reactions from their diet. In order to avoid misleading consumers and also to protect allergic consumers, analytical methods applicable to all types of foodstuffs have been developed. Unfortunately, detection of allergens in

  16. Heat tolerance in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Dew Kumari

    climate, wheat is sensitive to heat stress. We need to understand how our crops will perform in these changing climatic conditions and how we can develop varieties, which are more tolerant. The PhD study focussed on understanding heat tolerance in wheat with a combined approach of plant physiology...... and quantitative genetics in particular, plant phenotyping based quantitative trait loci (QTL) discovery for a physiological trait under heat stress. Chlorophyll a fluorescence trait, Fv/Fm was used as a phenotyping tool, as it reflects the effect of heat stress on maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem...... among cultivars due to heat stress as the GD of most of them remained similar in control and stress. The second study investigated if it was possible to use detached leaves to screen for heat tolerance instead of intact plants. The previously selected 41 cultivars, known to differ in v/Fm, were used...

  17. Finished Genome of the Fungal Wheat Pathogen Mycosphaerella graminicola Reveals Dispensome Structure, Chromosome Plasticity, and Stealth Pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodwin, S.B.; M'Barek, Ben S.; Dhillon, B.; Wittenberg, A.H.J.; Crane, C.F.; Hane, J.K.; Foster, A.J.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Grimwood, J.; Aerts, A.; Antoniw, J.; Bailey, A.; Bluhm, B.; Bowler, J.; Bristow, J.; Burgt, van der A.; Canto-Canché, B.; Churchill, A.C.L.; Conde-Ferràez, L.; Cools, H.J.; Coutinho, P.M.; Csukai, M.; Dehal, P.; Wit, de P.J.G.M.; Donzelli, B.; Geest, van de H.C.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Hammond-Kosack, K.E.; Henrissat, B.; Kilian, A.; Kobayashi, A.K.; Koopmann, E.; Kourmpetis, Y.; Kuzniar, A.; Lindquist, E.; Lombard, V.; Maliepaard, C.A.; Martins, N.; Mehrabi, A.; Nap, J.P.H.; Ponomarenko, A.; Rudd, J.J.; Salamov, A.; Schmutz, J.; Schouten, H.J.; Shapiro, H.; Stergiopoulos, I.; Torriani, S.F.F.; Tu, H.; Vries, de R.P.; Waalwijk, C.; Ware, S.B.; Wiebenga, A.; Zwiers, L.H.; Oliver, R.P.; Grigoriev, I.V.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    The plant-pathogenic fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola (asexual stage: Septoria tritici) causes septoria tritici blotch, a disease that greatly reduces the yield and quality of wheat. This disease is economically important in most wheat-growing areas worldwide and threatens global food production.

  18. Wholegrain rye, but not wholegrain wheat, lowers body weight and fat mass compared with refined wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, J; Vuholm, Stine; Iversen, K N

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational studies suggest inverse associations between wholegrain intake and body weight gain. Only few controlled intervention studies have supported this association and few compare effects of different grain varieties. OBJECTIVE: To investigate how wholegrain wheat (WGW) and rye...... compared with refined wheat (RW) affect body weight and composition and appetite sensation. DESIGN: Seventy overweight/obese adults participated in this 6-week randomized parallel study, in which they replaced their habitual cereal foods with RW, WGW or wholegrain rye (WGR). Further, a 4 h postprandial...... test meal challenge was completed with meals corresponding to diet allocation in the beginning and after the intervention. Body weight and composition, fasted blood samples, compliance and 4-day dietary intake were obtained before and after the intervention period. Appetite and breath hydrogen...

  19. Will fortification of staple foods make a difference to the dietary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prior to 2003 there was no mandatory fortification of staple foods, with the exception of iodine added to salt. Mandatory fortification of maize and wheat flour was introduced in October 2003. Micronutrient values of fortified wheat and maize food sources were determined by chemical analyses of these foods. These values ...

  20. The impact of Septoria tritici Blotch disease on wheat: An EU perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fones, Helen; Gurr, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    Zymoseptoria tritici is the causal agent of one of the European Union's most devastating foliar diseases of wheat: Septoria tritici Blotch (STB). It is also a notable pathogen of wheat grown in temperate climates throughout the world. In this commentary, we highlight the importance of STB on wheat in the EU. To better understand STB, it is necessary to consider the host crop, the fungal pathogen and their shared environment. Here, we consider the fungus per se and its interaction with its host and then focus on a more agricultural overview of the impact STB on wheat. We consider the climatic and weather factors which influence its spread and severity, allude to the agricultural practices which may mitigate or enhance its impact on crop yields, and evaluate the economic importance of wheat as a food and animal feed crop in the UK and EU. Finally, we estimate the cost of STB disease to EU agriculture. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Evaluation of the quality attributes of wheat composite (wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    plantain and wheat-rice) flours in bread making. ... The bulk density of the samples ranged between 0.48 and 0.88 g/ml while pH values ranged from 6.57 to 6.70. The sensory analysis reflected that bread produced from 100% wheat flour was ...

  2. Wheat ferritins: Improving the iron content of the wheat grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Søren; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Tauris, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of the full complement of wheat ferritins show that the modern hexaploid wheat genome contains two ferritin genes, TaFer1 and TaFer2, each represented by three homeoalleles and placed on chromosome 5 and 4, respectively. The two genes are differentially regulated and expresse...

  3. Interactions and reactions between different types of proteins and their importance in wheat-based model and noodle systems:Interacties en reacties tussen verschillende typen proteïnen en hun belang voor tarwegebaseerde model- en noedelsystemen

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrecht, Marlies

    2016-01-01

    Proteins impact the structural quality of wheat-based food products. The main proteins of wheat are gluten proteins. These consist of monomeric gliadin and polymeric glutenin. They form a network when wheat flour is mixed with water and polymerize even further upon heating, mainly through disulfide bond formation. Gluten network formation is responsible for inter alia the visco-elastic properties of wheat-based dough, the crumb structure of bread and the cooking properties of pasta or noodles...

  4. The effect of feeding wheat with purple pericarp on the growth of carp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mareš

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed and compared the influence of feeding wheat with purple pericarp (variety Konini and standard coloured wheat (red variety Bohemia on the growth characteristics of fingerling carp (Cyprinus carpio L. of the "Amurský lysec" line. The total content of anthocyanins converted to cyanidin 3-glucoside in the control Bohemia wheat was 24.95 mg.kg-1 and in the Konini purple wheat 41.70 mg.kg-1. Two experimental variants for feed were evaluated: dipped wheat grain and crushed wheat grain. The feed dose for wheat was 1.5% of the fish stock weight and for natural food (frozen Chironomid larvae was 0.2% of fish stock weight to all variants. Growth parameters (body length, body weight, Fulton's condition factor and feed conversion ratio of the fish were evaluated after one month of administration. The feed consumption and physico-chemical parameters (temperature, oxygen saturation, pH, N-NH4 +, N-NO2-, N-NO3- and Cl- of the environment were observed. During the feeding test, no major differences in food consumption among variations feeding on either wheat and on Chironomid larvae were noted. Satisfying results for mas and length gain were achieved in V2 wheat with purple pericarp (Konini variety - dipped grain, where the average total body length was 156.56 mm and the average unit mass was 60.81 g. In this variant, higher values of the parameters were achieved compared to the control group (100.6%, resp. 104.2%. A positive impact of wheat with purple pericarp on the evaluated parameter of fish condition factor was demonstrated. This trend was confirmed in all variants. No effect was demonstrated for mechanical disruption of kernels on the level of utilization of nutrients. In further experiments on growth characteristics we would like to determine antioxidant parameters in the blood and liver of fry.

  5. Phenotyping for drought adaptation in wheat using physiological traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eMonneveux

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Wheat (Triticum spp is one of the first domesticated food crops. It represents the first source of calories (after rice and an important source of proteins in developing countries. As a result of the Green Revolution, wheat yield sharply increased due to the use of improved varieties, irrigation, pesticides and fertilizers. The rate of increase in world wheat production however slowed after 1980, except in China, India and Pakistan. Being adapted to a wide range of moisture conditions, wheat is grown on more land area worldwide than any other crop, including in drought prone areas. In these marginal rain-fed environments where at least 60m ha of wheat is grown, amount and distribution of rainfall are the predominant factors influencing yield variability. Intensive work has been carried out in the area of drought adaptation over the last decades. Breeding strategies for drought tolerance improvement include: definition of the target environment, choice and characterisation of the testing environment, water stress management and characterization, and use of phenotyping traits with high heritability. The use of integrative traits, facilitated by the development and application of new technologies (thermal imaging, spectral reflectance, stable isotopes is facilitating high throughput phenotyping and indirect selection, consequently favoring yield improvement in drought prone environments.

  6. A review of wheat diseases - a field perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Melania; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Solomon, Peter S

    2017-10-18

    Wheat is one of the primary staple foods throughout the planet. Significant yield gains in wheat production over the past 40 years have resulted in a steady balance of supply versus demand. However, predicted global population growth rates and dietary changes necessitate substantial yield gains over the next several decades to meet this escalating demand. A key component to meeting this challenge is better management of fungal incited diseases, which can be responsible for 15-20% yield losses per annum. Prominent diseases of wheat that currently contribute to these losses include the rusts, the blotches and head blight/scab. Other recently emerged or relatively unnoticed diseases like wheat blast and spot blotch, respectively, also threaten grain production. This review seeks to provide an overview of the impact, distribution and management strategies of these diseases. Also, the biology of the pathogens and the molecular basis of their interaction with wheat are discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Nutrient concentration in wheat and soil under allelopathy treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadkhani, Nayer; Servati, Moslem

    2017-10-29

    Allelopathy is related to soil nutrient availability and allelochemicals can change the soil and therefore the plant nutrient status. Wheat is one of the most important crops for the production of human food in the world. Alhagi maurorum and Cardaria draba are the most important weeds in wheat fields. We performed experiments to assess the allelopathic effect of A. maurorum and C. draba shoots on mineral nutrient concentrations in pot-grown wheat plants and soil. The presence of dry powder of A. maurorum and C. draba shoots reduced concentrations of macronutrients (NO3(-), K(+), Ca(2+) and P) and micronutrients (Fe(2+) and Cu(2+)) in roots and shoots of wheat plants, whereas it did not affect concentrations of Mg(2+), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+). Allelopathic effect of A. maurorum was significantly greater than that of C. draba. There was a significantly positive correlation between wheat growth and ion concentration. There was a significantly negative correlation between the soil nutrient concentration and plant nutrient concentration across the treatments. These results suggest that allelopathy increases the nutrient availability in the soil because of the decrease in absorption by plants.

  8. Functional Properties of Wheat Gluten

    OpenAIRE

    筒井, 知己; ツツイ, トモミ; TOMOMI, TSUTSUI

    1989-01-01

    Glutens were obtained from nine varieties of wheat. These glutens diffred in amino acid composition. Gluten of american durum and Canadian western No 1 wheat indicated higher emulsifying properties. On the contrary, gluten of hard winter indicated higher forming properties. But these functional properties were not correrated to the content of hydrophobic amino acid of gluten.

  9. Registration of 'LCS Wizard' wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to develop widely adapted hard winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties to meet the needs of mills, bakeries, and consumers in the eastern and Great Plains regions of the United States. ‘LCS Wizard’ (Reg. No. CV-1111, PI 669574), a hard red winter (HRW) wheat,...

  10. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bren d'Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008-2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  11. Canola-Wheat Rotation versus Continuous Wheat for the Southern Plains

    OpenAIRE

    Duke, Jason C.; Epplin, Francis M.; Vitale, Jeffrey D.; Peeper, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Crop rotations are not common in the wheat belt of the Southern Plains. After years of continuous wheat, weeds have become increasingly difficult and expensive to manage. Yield data were elicited from farmers and used to determine if canola-wheat-wheat rotations are economically competitive with continuous wheat in the region.

  12. THE IMPACT OF REFORMING WHEAT IMPORTING STATE-TRADING ENTERPRISES ON THE QUALITY OF WHEAT IMPORTED

    OpenAIRE

    Lavoie, Nathalie

    2003-01-01

    Recent surveys of wheat importers indicate that countries that import wheat via a state trader are less sensitive to quality issues in import decision making than countries that import wheat through private traders. This study examines conceptually and empirically the impact of the deregulation of wheat imports on the quality and source of wheat imports.

  13. Current and potential barley grain food products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley has been an important food source from the beginning of human civilization, and remains an important staple food crop in a few countries, although its consumption has decreased sharply with the ample availability of more palatable and versatile food crops such as rice and wheat. In many Weste...

  14. Towards an improved variety assortment for the Dutch organic sector : case studies on onion and spring wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osman, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Key words: organic farming; principles of organic agriculture; food production chain; plant breeding; genetic correlation; plant traits; farmers’ preferences; variety testing; Value for Cultivation and Use; EU seed legislation; onion; Allium cepa; spring wheat; Triticum aestivum; baking

  15. Draft genome of the wheat A-genome progenitor Triticum urartu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hong-Qing; Zhao, Shancen; Liu, Dongcheng; Wang, Junyi; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Chi; Fan, Huajie; Li, Dong; Dong, Lingli; Tao, Yong; Gao, Chuan; Wu, Huilan; Li, Yiwen; Cui, Yan; Guo, Xiaosen; Zheng, Shusong; Wang, Biao; Yu, Kang; Liang, Qinsi; Yang, Wenlong; Lou, Xueyuan; Chen, Jie; Feng, Mingji; Jian, Jianbo; Zhang, Xiaofei; Luo, Guangbin; Jiang, Ying; Liu, Junjie; Wang, Zhaobao; Sha, Yuhui; Zhang, Bairu; Wu, Huajun; Tang, Dingzhong; Shen, Qianhua; Xue, Pengya; Zou, Shenhao; Wang, Xiujie; Liu, Xin; Wang, Famin; Yang, Yanping; An, Xueli; Dong, Zhenying; Zhang, Kunpu; Zhang, Xiangqi; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Dvorak, Jan; Tong, Yiping; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Zhensheng; Wang, Daowen; Zhang, Aimin; Wang, Jun

    2013-04-04

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD) is one of the most widely cultivated and consumed food crops in the world. However, the complex polyploid nature of its genome makes genetic and functional analyses extremely challenging. The A genome, as a basic genome of bread wheat and other polyploid wheats, for example, T. turgidum (AABB), T. timopheevii (AAGG) and T. zhukovskyi (AAGGA(m)A(m)), is central to wheat evolution, domestication and genetic improvement. The progenitor species of the A genome is the diploid wild einkorn wheat T. urartu, which resembles cultivated wheat more extensively than do Aegilops speltoides (the ancestor of the B genome) and Ae. tauschii (the donor of the D genome), especially in the morphology and development of spike and seed. Here we present the generation, assembly and analysis of a whole-genome shotgun draft sequence of the T. urartu genome. We identified protein-coding gene models, performed genome structure analyses and assessed its utility for analysing agronomically important genes and for developing molecular markers. Our T. urartu genome assembly provides a diploid reference for analysis of polyploid wheat genomes and is a valuable resource for the genetic improvement of wheat.

  16. THE EFFECTS OF SWINGS IN GLOBAL WHEAT PRICES ON THE DOMESTIC MARKETS IN AFGHANISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najibullah Hassanzoy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent shocks in global prices of cereals and the spillover effects of trade restrictive policies adversely affected domestic markets, particularly in the net food importing countries such as Afghanistan. This paper investigates the effects of 2007–2008 spikes in global wheat prices on the dynamics of price transmission and long-run equilibrium relationship between global and domestic wheat markets. The findings indicate that domestic and global wheat markets may be cointegrated in Regime-I (pre-break, Regime-II (post-break and the overall sample period. Moreover, the elasticity of price transmission and speed of adjustment towards the long-run equilibrium are substantially different between the two regimes, i.e., they appear to be larger in Regime-I as compared to Regime-II. Similarly, the effect of a shock in global wheat prices on domestic wheat markets might be long-lasting in Regime-I but transitory in Regime-II. This research underlines the need for mitigating the adverse effect of spikes in global wheat prices on domestic wheat markets in the context of a landlocked net food importing country.

  17. Search for diagnostic proteins to prove authenticity of organic wheat grains (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zörb, Christian; Betsche, Thomas; Langenkämper, Georg

    2009-04-08

    Research comparing the biochemical composition of wheat grains from organic or conventional agriculture has used the targeted analytical approach. To obtain a more comprehensive record of the food's composition, we employed protein profiling techniques. Levels of 1049 proteins were recorded in wheat grains (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Titlis) of two growing seasons from a rigorously controlled field trial in Switzerland, containing organic and conventional plots. Levels of 25 proteins were different between organic and conventional wheat in both years. Storage proteins, enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, a peroxidase, and proteins of unknown function were affected by the agricultural regime. Total protein content was lower in organic wheat. We consider these differences negligible with regard to nutrition in an average diet and propose that food quality of conventional and organic wheat grown in the field trial was equal. Applying various filters and calculations, one of which takes seasonal influences into account, 16 of the 25 proteins with different levels in organic and conventional wheat were retained. These 16 "diagnostic" proteins have the potential to afford a signature to prove authenticity of organic wheat.

  18. Path Through the Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Middleton

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The hillside’s tidal waves of yellow-green Break downward into full-grown stalks of wheat In which a peasant, shouldering his hoe Passes along a snaking narrow path -- A teeming place through which his hard thighs press And where his head just barely stays above The swaying grain, drunken in abundance, Farm buildings almost floating on the swells Beyond which sea gulls gliding white in air Fly down on out of sight to salty fields, Taking the channel fish off Normandy, A surfeit fit for Eden i...

  19. A genetic strategy generating wheat with very high amylose content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regina, Ahmed; Berbezy, Pierre; Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Li, Suzhi; Cmiel, Mark; Larroque, Oscar; Bird, Anthony R; Swain, Steve M; Cavanagh, Colin; Jobling, Stephen A; Li, Zhongyi; Morell, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Resistant starch (RS), a type of dietary fibre, plays an important role in human health; however, the content of RS in most modern processed starchy foods is low. Cereal starch, when structurally manipulated through a modified starch biosynthetic pathway to greatly increase the amylose content, could be an important food source of RS. Transgenic studies have previously revealed the requirement of simultaneous down-regulation of two starch branching enzyme (SBE) II isoforms both located on the long arm of chromosome 2, namely SBEIIa and SBEIIb, to elevate the amylose content in wheat from ~25% to ~75%. The current study revealed close proximity of genes encoding SBEIIa and SBEIIb isoforms in wheat with a genetic distance of 0.5 cM on chromosome 2B. A series of deletion and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loss of function alleles in SBEIIa, SBEIIb or both was isolated from two different wheat populations. A breeding strategy to combine deletions and SNPs generated wheat genotypes with altered expression levels of SBEIIa and SBEIIb, elevating the amylose content to an unprecedented ~85%, with a marked concomitant increase in RS content. Biochemical assays were used to confirm the complete absence in the grain of expression of SBEIIa from all three genomes in combination with the absence of SBEIIb from one of the genomes. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Nutraceutical Value of Durum Wheat: Influence of Environment and Genotype in a Large Scale Experimental Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Di Loreto, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Grain quality is well known as one of the most interesting breeding objectives in Mediterranean countries. It still has great importance in wheat markets because of the increased interest of the consumers for high-quality staple food such as pasta, couscous and various types of bread. The performance of many quality characteristics depends greatly on environmental conditions and, in this context, organic agriculture could guarantee a durum wheat material with high nutraceutical value for heal...

  1. Food labeling: gluten-free labeling of foods. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is issuing a final rule to define the term "gluten-free'' for voluntary use in the labeling of foods. The final rule defines the term "gluten-free'' to mean that the food bearing the claim does not contain an ingredient that is a gluten-containing grain (e.g., spelt wheat); an ingredient that is derived from a gluten-containing grain and that has not been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat flour); or an ingredient that is derived from a gluten-containing grain and that has been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat starch), if the use of that ingredient results in the presence of 20 parts per million (ppm) or more gluten in the food (i.e., 20 milligrams (mg) or more gluten per kilogram (kg) of food); or inherently does not contain gluten; and that any unavoidable presence of gluten in the food is below 20 ppm gluten (i.e., below 20 mg gluten per kg of food). A food that bears the claim "no gluten,'' "free of gluten,'' or "without gluten'' in its labeling and fails to meet the requirements for a "gluten-free'' claim will be deemed to be misbranded. In addition, a food whose labeling includes the term "wheat'' in the ingredient list or in a separate "Contains wheat'' statement as required by a section of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) and also bears the claim "gluten-free'' will be deemed to be misbranded unless its labeling also bears additional language clarifying that the wheat has been processed to allow the food to meet FDA requirements for a "gluten-free'' claim. Establishing a definition of the term "gluten-free'' and uniform conditions for its use in food labeling will help ensure that individuals with celiac disease are not misled and are provided with truthful and accurate information with respect to foods so labeled. We are issuing the final rule under the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (FALCPA).

  2. Drought Tolerance in Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodhan, Zakaria Hossain; Faruq, Golam

    2013-01-01

    Drought is one of the most important phenomena which limit crops' production and yield. Crops demonstrate various morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular responses to tackle drought stress. Plants' vegetative and reproductive stages are intensively influenced by drought stress. Drought tolerance is a complicated trait which is controlled by polygenes and their expressions are influenced by various environmental elements. This means that breeding for this trait is so difficult and new molecular methods such as molecular markers, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping strategies, and expression patterns of genes should be applied to produce drought tolerant genotypes. In wheat, there are several genes which are responsible for drought stress tolerance and produce different types of enzymes and proteins for instance, late embryogenesis abundant (lea), responsive to abscisic acid (Rab), rubisco, helicase, proline, glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and carbohydrates during drought stress. This review paper has concentrated on the study of water limitation and its effects on morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular responses of wheat with the possible losses caused by drought stress. PMID:24319376

  3. Effect of Different Extrusion Parameters on Dietary Fiber in Wheat Bran and Rye Bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Annica A M; Andersson, R; Jonsäll, Anette; Andersson, Jörgen; Fredriksson, Helena

    2017-06-01

    Wheat bran and rye bran are mostly used as animal feed today, but their high content of dietary fiber and bioactive components are beneficial to human health. Increased use of bran as food raw material could therefore be desirable. However, bran mainly contains unextractable dietary fiber and deteriorates the sensory properties of products. Processing by extrusion could increase the extractability of dietary fiber and increase the sensory qualities of bran products. Wheat bran and rye bran were therefore extruded at different levels of moisture content, screw speed and temperature, in order to find the optimal setting for increased extractability of dietary fiber and positive sensory properties. A water content of 24% for wheat bran and 30% for rye bran, a screw speed of 400 rpm, and a temperature of 130 °C resulted in the highest extractability of total dietary fiber and arabinoxylan. Arabinoxylan extractability increased from 5.8% in wheat bran to 9.0% in extruded wheat bran at those settings, and from 14.6% to 19.2% for rye bran. Total contents of dietary fiber and arabinoxylan were not affected by extrusion. Content of β-glucan was also maintained during extrusion, while its molecular weight decreased slightly and extractability increased slightly. Extrusion at these settings is therefore a suitable process for increasing the use of wheat bran and rye bran as a food raw material. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. ANALYSIS OF WHEAT ALLERGEN DISPERSED IN AIR BY THE ACTION OF THREE TYPES OF FLOUR SIFTER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Yoshimitsu, Masato; Kiyota, Kyohei

    2017-01-01

    Since wheat flour, a cause of food allergy, tends to disperse rapidly in air, it can unintentionally mix other foods during the sieving process. Our aim was to analyze the dispersal of wheat flour dust in air in order to prevent unintentional mixing. We measured particle size distribution of wheat flour, photographed the scattered flour for 60 seconds every 10 seconds after sieving through three types of flour sifter, constructed a velocity vector diagram of flour dust dispersal by each type of sifter, and measured the distance of wheat allergen dispersal over 20 minutes using a petri dish and immunochromatographic test. The particles were mainly 14.2μm and 60.4μm in diameter and settled at terminal velocities of about 8mm/s and 150mm/s, respectively. Wheat flour particles of more than 60μm (released in air by sifting) dropped mainly in the perpendicular direction, while particles of less than 30μm remained suspended and traveled 5m after sifting by all flour sifters. Our results suggested that wheat flour dust dispersed by sifting (regardless of sifter) could unintentionally mix other foods. To prevent contamination, it is necessary to control the flow of air or sift flour in a separate room.

  5. Development and optimisation of a generic micro LC-ESI-MS method for the qualitative and quantitative determination of 30-mer toxic gliadin peptides in wheat flour for food analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Bilgin; Muñoz, Amalia; Klein, Christoph L; Reinert, Knut

    2017-02-01

    We sometimes see manufactured bakery products on the market which are labelled as being gluten free. Why is the content of such gluten proteins of importance for the fabrication of bakery industry and for the products? The gluten proteins represent up to 80 % of wheat proteins, and they are conventionally subdivided into gliadins and glutenins. Gliadins belong to the proline and glutamine-rich prolamin family. Its role in human gluten intolerance, as a consequence of its harmful effects, is well documented in the scientific literature. The only known therapy so far is a gluten-free diet, and hence, it is important to develop robust and reliable analytical methods to quantitatively assess the presence of the identified peptides causing the so-called coeliac disease. This work describes the development of a new, fast and robust micro ion pair-LC-MS analytical method for the qualitative and quantitative determination of 30-mer toxic gliadin peptides in wheat flour. The use of RapiGest™ SF as a denaturation reagent prior to the enzymatic digestion showed to shorten the measuring time. During the optimisation of the enzymatic digestion step, the best 30-mer toxic peptide was identified from the maximum recovery after 3 h of digestion time. The lower limit of quantification was determined to be 0.25 ng/μL. The method has shown to be linear for the selected concentration range of 0.25-3.0 ng/μL. The uncertainty related to reproducibility of measurement procedure, excluding the extraction step, has shown to be 5.0 % (N = 12). Finally, this method was successfully applied to the quantification of 30-mer toxic peptides from commercial wheat flour with an overall uncertainty under reproducibility conditions of 6.4 % including the extraction of the gliadin fraction. The results were always expressed as the average of the values from all standard concentrations. Subsequently, the final concentration of the 30-mer toxic peptide in the flour was calculated and

  6. Defatted Soy Flour Supplementation of Wheat Bread ameliorates Blood Chemistry and Oxidative Stress in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebuehi, O A T; Okafor, H K

    2015-01-01

    Bread is a convenience food made from wheat flour, which is derived from wheat and whose technology of which dates back to the ancient Egyptians. It is therefore of economic advantage if wheat importation to Nigeria can be reduced by substitution with other suitable materials. This led to the whole idea of composite flour, which is a mixture of wheat with other materials to form suitable flour for baking'purposes. The study is to ascertain the effect of supplementation of bread with defatted soy flour on blood chemistry and oxidative stress in Wistar rats. Wheat flour mixed with high quality defatted Soy flour at several ratios: 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, and 60:40. The 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, and 60:40 flour mixtures were used to prepare 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% Soya bread, respectively. The control bread (100%) was prepared with 100% wheat flour. Bread produced with these blends compared with regular 100% wheat bread and was tested for chemical and. organoleptic characteristics. Sixteen rats were randomly given codes and allocated to 2 different groups via tables with random numbers to feed on the 100% wheat blend and soy supplemented bread (90% wheat flour/10% soy flour) for 28 days. The weights and feedintake of the rats were computed on dailybasis. Blood was taken for biochemical assays and liver was used for antioxidant assay, that is activities of catalase, super oxider dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathine level. The activities of serum SOD and catalase were significantly increase (pbread as compared to the control, (wheat bread) and a significant decrease (pbread as compared to the control. There was a significant decrease (pbread.

  7. Global wheat production potentials and management flexibility under the representative concentration pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkovic, Juraj; van der Velde, Marijn; Skalsky, Rastislav; Xiong, Wei; Folberth, Christian; Khabarov, Nikolay; Smirnov, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    Global wheat production is strongly linked with food security as wheat is one of the main sources of human nutrition. Increasing or stabilizing wheat yields in response to climate change is therefore imperative. To do so will require agricultural management interventions that have different levels of flexibility at regional level. Climate change is expected to worsen wheat growing conditions in many places and thus negatively impact on future management opportunities for sustainable intensification. We quantified, in a spatially explicit manner, global wheat yield developments under the envelope of Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP 2.6, 4.5, 6.0 and 8.5) under current and alternative fertilization and irrigation management to estimate future flexibility to cope with climate change impacts. A large-scale implementation of the EPIC model was integrated with the most recent information on global wheat cultivation currently available, and it was used to simulate regional and global wheat yields and production under historical climate and the RCP-driven and bias-corrected HadGEM2-ES climate projections. Fertilization and irrigation management scenarios were designed to project actual and exploitable (under current irrigation infrastructure) yields as well as the climate- and water-limited yield potentials. With current nutrient and water management, and across all RCPs, the global wheat production at the end of the century decreased from 50 to 100 Mt - with RCP2.6 having the lowest and RCP8.5 the highest impact. Despite the decrease in global wheat production potential on current cropland, the exploitable and climatic production gap of respectively 350 and 580 Mt indicates a considerable flexibility to counteract negative climate change impacts across all RCPs. Agricultural management could increase global wheat production by approximately 30% through intensified fertilization and 50% through improved fertilization and extended irrigation if nutrients or water

  8. Development and Characterization of Wheat Bread with Lupin Flour

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Paula; Gonzaga, Marta; Batista, Luís; Beirão-Costa, Luísa; Guiné, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to develop an innovative food product with good textural and sensorial characteristics. The product, a new type of bread, was prepared with wheat (90%) and lupin (10%) flours, without the addition of any conservatives. Several experiences were also done to find the most appropriate proportion of lupin flour. The optimized product was characterized considering the rheological, physical-che...

  9. Biofortification: High zinc wheat programme – The potential agricultural options for alleviating malnutrition in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qadir Bux Baloch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The deficiency of micronutrients (zinc, iron, iodine and vitamin A is persistently afflicting millions of people living across Africa, Southern Americas, Asia and Pakistan. Among these, the zinc deficiency syndrome is occurring by 47.6, 41.3, and 39.2% in pregnant, non-pregnant and children under 5 years, respectively in Pakistan. The reason being that majority of the people subsists on cereal-based diets, i.e., wheat. The commercially grown wheat varieties contain zinc about 25 mg/g, whereas about 40 mg/g zinc is required in daily diet.The potential risk of zinc deficiency could be mitigated through certain interventions i.e., mineral drugs, food supplements, diversity in diets, production of fortified foods, and genetic biofortification of staple food crops. Among these, quantum increase in zinc content in wheat grains through genetic manipulation would be basics to alleviate zinc deficiency in the malnourished communities. The objective of the programme is to enhance the concentration of zinc nutrient from 25 to 40 mg/g in wheat grains through conventional plant breeding techniques.Pakistan Agricultural Research Council, Islamabad in collaboration with Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR and International Maize & Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT and HarvestPlus, Pakistan started R&D works to develop biofortified high zinc wheat varieties containing around 40 mg/g in the year 2009. The biofortified wheat crop is developed through conventional plant breeding techniques. The germplasm inherited with high zinc nutrient are crossed with high yielding and adopted to ecological conditions. The varieties are high yielding, and inheriting zinc around 40 mg/g in the grains under both irrigated and rainfed production environments. The Government of Punjab has also given high priority to develop and consume biofortified high zinc wheat in its multi-sectoral Nutrition Strategy Plan 2015, as potential agricultural option to

  10. Biofortification: High zinc wheat programme – The potential agricultural options for alleviating malnutrition in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qadir Bux Baloch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The deficiency of micronutrients (zinc, iron, iodine and vitamin A is persistently afflicting millions of people living across Africa, Southern Americas, Asia and Pakistan. Among these, the zinc deficiency syndrome is occurring by 47.6, 41.3, and 39.2% in pregnant, non-pregnant and children under 5 years, respectively in Pakistan. The reason being that majority of the people subsists on cereal-based diets, i.e., wheat. The commercially grown wheat varieties contain zinc about 25 mg/g, whereas about 40 mg/g zinc is required in daily diet.The potential risk of zinc deficiency could be mitigated through certain interventions i.e., mineral drugs, food supplements, diversity in diets, production of fortified foods, and genetic biofortification of staple food crops. Among these, quantum increase in zinc content in wheat grains through genetic manipulation would be basics to alleviate zinc deficiency in the malnourished communities. The objective of the programme is to enhance the concentration of zinc nutrient from 25 to 40 mg/g in wheat grains through conventional plant breeding techniques.Pakistan Agricultural Research Council, Islamabad in collaboration with Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR and International Maize & Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT and HarvestPlus, Pakistan started R&D works to develop biofortified high zinc wheat varieties containing around 40 mg/g in the year 2009. The biofortified wheat crop is developed through conventional plant breeding techniques. The germplasm inherited with high zinc nutrient are crossed with high yielding and adopted to ecological conditions. The varieties are high yielding, and inheriting zinc around 40 mg/g in the grains under both irrigated and rainfed production environments. The Government of Punjab has also given high priority to develop and consume biofortified high zinc wheat in its multi-sectoral Nutrition Strategy Plan 2015, as potential agricultural option to

  11. Formation of macromolecules in wheat gluten/starch mixtures during twin-screw extrusion: effect of different additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaiqiang; Li, Cheng; Wang, Bingzhi; Yang, Wen; Luo, Shuizhong; Zhao, Yanyan; Jiang, Shaotong; Mu, Dongdong; Zheng, Zhi

    2017-12-01

    Wheat gluten comprises a good quality and inexpensive vegetable protein with an ideal amino acid composition. To expand the potential application of wheat gluten in the food industry, the effect of different additives on the physicochemical and structural properties of wheat gluten/starch mixtures during twin-screw extrusion was investigated. Macromolecules were observed to form in wheat gluten/starch mixtures during twin-screw extrusion, which may be attributed to the formation of new disulfide bonds and non-covalent interactions, as well as Maillard reaction products. Additionally, the water retention capacity and in vitro protein digestibility of all extruded wheat gluten/starch products significantly increased, whereas the nitrogen solubility index and free sulfhydryl group (SH) content decreased, during twin-screw extrusion. Secondary structural analysis showed that α-helices disappeared with the concomitant increase of antiparallel β-sheets, demonstrating the occurrence of protein aggregation. Microstructures suggested that the irregular wheat gluten granular structure was disrupted, with additive addition favoring transformation into a more layered or fibrous structure during twin-screw extrusion. The findings of the present study demonstrate that extrusion might affect the texture and quality of extruded wheat gluten-based foods and suggest that this process might serve as a basis for the high-value application of wheat gluten products. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Stamena winter wheat variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišić Todor

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Stamena is a winter wheat variety developed at the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad, Yugoslavia. It was released by the Federal Commission for varietals Approval in 1999. Stamena was developed by crossing genetically divergent and highly productive parents Lasta and Rodna (Breeders: T. Mišić. N. Mladenov, Z. Jerković and R. Jevtić. Spike is white, smooth, awn less, medium compact with 18-21 spike lets. The grain is vitreous and dark red (Triticum aestivum L. ssp. vulgar e var. lutescens. Stamena is a medium early variety, 1 day earlier than Partizanka and 3 days earlier than Jugoslavija (Table 4. It has excellent resistance to winterkilling, as in very winter hardy Partizanka. The average stem height is 78 cm, with a good resistance to lodging. Stamena has field resistance to leaf rust (Pucce, recondita tritict, horizontal resistance, which is the type of resistance that modern wheat breeding is interested in. The resistance to stem rust (Pucce, graminis tritict is good and to powdery mildew (Erysiphegraminis tritici very good. The 1000 grain mass is about 32 g and volume grain mass 81.3 kg/hi. (Table 2. Stamena is classified in the subgroup A-l. It has excellent milling and baking quality and it belong to the 1st technological group (quality enhancer. The quantity of dry gluten is about 9%. The variety Stamena is a very productive, with the genetic potential for grain above 11 t/ha suitable for growing on fertile and less fertile soils. It has started to be grown commercially in 2000.

  13. Comparison of Statistical Models for Analyzing Wheat Yield Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Lucie; Makowski, David

    2013-01-01

    The world's population is predicted to exceed nine billion by 2050 and there is increasing concern about the capability of agriculture to feed such a large population. Foresight studies on food security are frequently based on crop yield trends estimated from yield time series provided by national and regional statistical agencies. Various types of statistical models have been proposed for the analysis of yield time series, but the predictive performances of these models have not yet been evaluated in detail. In this study, we present eight statistical models for analyzing yield time series and compare their ability to predict wheat yield at the national and regional scales, using data provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and by the French Ministry of Agriculture. The Holt-Winters and dynamic linear models performed equally well, giving the most accurate predictions of wheat yield. However, dynamic linear models have two advantages over Holt-Winters models: they can be used to reconstruct past yield trends retrospectively and to analyze uncertainty. The results obtained with dynamic linear models indicated a stagnation of wheat yields in many countries, but the estimated rate of increase of wheat yield remained above 0.06 t ha−1 year−1 in several countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and America, and the estimated values were highly uncertain for several major wheat producing countries. The rate of yield increase differed considerably between French regions, suggesting that efforts to identify the main causes of yield stagnation should focus on a subnational scale. PMID:24205280

  14. Comparison of statistical models for analyzing wheat yield time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Lucie; Makowski, David

    2013-01-01

    The world's population is predicted to exceed nine billion by 2050 and there is increasing concern about the capability of agriculture to feed such a large population. Foresight studies on food security are frequently based on crop yield trends estimated from yield time series provided by national and regional statistical agencies. Various types of statistical models have been proposed for the analysis of yield time series, but the predictive performances of these models have not yet been evaluated in detail. In this study, we present eight statistical models for analyzing yield time series and compare their ability to predict wheat yield at the national and regional scales, using data provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and by the French Ministry of Agriculture. The Holt-Winters and dynamic linear models performed equally well, giving the most accurate predictions of wheat yield. However, dynamic linear models have two advantages over Holt-Winters models: they can be used to reconstruct past yield trends retrospectively and to analyze uncertainty. The results obtained with dynamic linear models indicated a stagnation of wheat yields in many countries, but the estimated rate of increase of wheat yield remained above 0.06 t ha⁻¹ year⁻¹ in several countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and America, and the estimated values were highly uncertain for several major wheat producing countries. The rate of yield increase differed considerably between French regions, suggesting that efforts to identify the main causes of yield stagnation should focus on a subnational scale.

  15. Comparison of statistical models for analyzing wheat yield time series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Michel

    Full Text Available The world's population is predicted to exceed nine billion by 2050 and there is increasing concern about the capability of agriculture to feed such a large population. Foresight studies on food security are frequently based on crop yield trends estimated from yield time series provided by national and regional statistical agencies. Various types of statistical models have been proposed for the analysis of yield time series, but the predictive performances of these models have not yet been evaluated in detail. In this study, we present eight statistical models for analyzing yield time series and compare their ability to predict wheat yield at the national and regional scales, using data provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and by the French Ministry of Agriculture. The Holt-Winters and dynamic linear models performed equally well, giving the most accurate predictions of wheat yield. However, dynamic linear models have two advantages over Holt-Winters models: they can be used to reconstruct past yield trends retrospectively and to analyze uncertainty. The results obtained with dynamic linear models indicated a stagnation of wheat yields in many countries, but the estimated rate of increase of wheat yield remained above 0.06 t ha⁻¹ year⁻¹ in several countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and America, and the estimated values were highly uncertain for several major wheat producing countries. The rate of yield increase differed considerably between French regions, suggesting that efforts to identify the main causes of yield stagnation should focus on a subnational scale.

  16. Processing Quality of Organic Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Alföldi, Thomas; Dierauer, Hansueli; Stoecklin, Milo

    2015-01-01

    In the past, the quality of organic wheat has led to some controversy in the grain industry. The focus lies on the protein content, which is generally lower in organic wheat due to lower nitrogen supply. The Swiss organic sector has agreed on a new protein payment model, which was implemented in 2016. In the video, representatives of the value chain present their points of view.

  17. Effects of Milling and Cooking Processes on the Deoxynivalenol Content in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayo Kushiro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin is a natural-occuring mycotoxin mainly produced by Fusarium graminearum, a food-borne fungi widely distributed in crops and it is one of the most important mycotoxins in wheat and wheat-based foods and feeds. DON affects animal and human health causing diarrhea, vomiting, gastro-intestinal inflammation, and immunomodulation. Since the rate of the occurrence of DON in wheat is high, effective procedures to remove or eliminate DON from food products is essential to minimize exposures in those who consume large amounts of wheat. Cleaning prior to milling reduced to some extent the concentration of DON in final products. Since DON is distributed throughout the kernels, with higher content in the outer skin, milling is also effective in reducing the DON levels of wheat-based foods if bran and shorts are removed before thermal cooking. DON is water-soluble and cooking with larger amounts of water lowers DON content in products such as spaghetti and noodles. During baking or heating, DON is partially degraded to DON-related chemicals, whose toxicological effects are not studied well. This paper reviews the researches on the effects of milling and cooking on the DON level and discusses the perspectives of further studies.

  18. Effect of fermentation and malting on some cereal weaning foods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of fermentation and malting on some cereal weaning foods enriched with African locust beans were carried out. Cereals (wheat and millet) were malted for the period of 144 hours and further fermented for 48 hours by natural fermentation. The millet, wheat and locust bean flours were mixed together in the ratio ...

  19. Analysis of food allergen structures and development of foods for allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2008-03-01

    Food allergy is one of the important health problems, and countermeasures are socially required. We have been undertaking studies on wheat allergens and their epitopes, and have developed a method for producing hypoallergenic wheat flour by enzymatic modification. The hypoallergenic products are now provided to patients. More noteworthy, by taking hypoallergenic cupcakes over a long period, more than half of patients are hyposensitized and become able to eat normal wheat products. This suggests that the hypoallergenic wheat flour can act as anti-allergenic via allergen-specific immunotolerance. This series of studies was followed by expansive research on food allergy: analysis of epitopes of bovine serum albumin (the major beef allergen), isolation and identification of inhibitory peptides for allergen absorption at the intestine, evaluation of hesperetin as an inhibitor of degranulation of mast cells, and the development of PCR detection methods for verifying allergen labeling and for identifying hidden allergic ingredients in processed foods.

  20. Wheat waxy proteins: polymorphism, molecular characterization and effects on starch properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Carlos; Alvarez, Juan B

    2016-01-01

    The starch fraction, comprising about 70% of the total dry matter in the wheat grain, can greatly affect the end-use quality of products made from wheat kernels, especially Asian noodles. Starch is associated with the shelf life and nutritional value (glycaemic index) of different wheat products. Starch quality is closely associated with the ratio of amylose to amylopectin, the two main macromolecules forming starch. In this review, we briefly summarise the discovery of waxy proteins-shown to be the sole enzymes responsible for amylose synthesis in wheat. The review particularly focuses on the different variants of these proteins, together with their molecular characterisation and evaluation of their effects on starch composition. There have been 19 different waxy protein variants described using protein electrophoresis; and at a molecular level 19, 15 and seven alleles described for Wx-A1, Wx-B1 and Wx-D1, respectively. This large variability, found in modern wheat and genetic resources such as wheat ancestors and wild relatives, is in some cases not properly ordered. The proper ordering of all the data generated is the key to enhancing use in breeding programmes of the current variability described, and thus generating wheat with novel starch properties to satisfy the demand of industry and consumers for novel high-quality processed food.

  1. Mutations in Durum Wheat SBEII Genes affect Grain Yield Components, Quality, and Fermentation Responses in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Naemeh, Mahmoudreza; Hamilton, M Kristina; Rust, Bret; Raybould, Helen E; Newman, John W; Martin, Roy; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Increased amylose in wheat (Triticum ssp.) starch is associated with increased resistant starch, a fermentable dietary fiber. Fermentation of resistant starch in the large intestine produces short-chain fatty acids that are associated with human health benefits. Since wheat foods are an important component of the human diet, increases in amylose and resistant starch in wheat grains have the potential to deliver health benefits to a large number of people. In three replicated field trials we found that mutations in starch branching enzyme II genes (SBEIIa and SBEIIb) in both A and B genomes (SBEIIa/b-AB) of durum wheat [T. turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.] resulted in large increases of amylose and resistant starch content. The presence of these four mutations was also associated with an average 5% reduction in kernel weight (P = 0.0007) and 15% reduction in grain yield (P = 0.06) compared to the wild type. Complete milling and pasta quality analysis showed that the mutant lines have an acceptable quality with positive effects on pasta firmness and negative effects on semolina extraction and pasta color. Positive fermentation responses were detected in rats (Rattus spp.) fed with diets incorporating mutant wheat flour. This study quantifies benefits and limitations associated with the deployment of the SBEIIa/b-AB mutations in durum wheat and provides the information required to develop realistic strategies to deploy durum wheat varieties with increased levels of amylose and resistant starch.

  2. [Detection of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-yong; Li, Gang; Liu, Hai-xue; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Bao-ju; Wu, Xiao-rong

    2011-12-01

    Adding benzoyl peroxide (BPO) into wheat flour was prohibited by the relevant government departments since May 1, 2011. And it is of great importance to detect BPO additive amount in wheat flour quickly and accurately. Part of BPO which was added into wheat flour will be deoxidized into benzoic acid, and this make it complex to detect the original BPO additive amount. The objective of the present research is to investigate the potential of NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy as a way for measurement of BPO original adding amount in wheat flour. A total of 133 wheat flour samples were prepared by adding different content of BPO into pure wheat flour. Spectra data were obtained by NIR spectrometer and then denoised by wavelet transform. Ninety seven samples were taken as calibration set and other 36 samples as prediction set. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was applied to establish the calibration model between BPO original adding contents and the spectra data. The determination coefficient of model for the calibration set is 0.8901, and root mean squared error of calibration (RMSEC) is 40.85 mg x kg(-1). The determination coefficient for the prediction set is 0.8865, and root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) is 44.69 mg x kg(-1). The result indicates that it is feasible to detect the BPO adding contents in wheat flour by NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy technique and this technique has the potential to measure some other additives in food.

  3. Mutations in Durum Wheat SBEII Genes affect Grain Yield Components, Quality, and Fermentation Responses in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Naemeh, Mahmoudreza; Hamilton, M. Kristina; Rust, Bret; Raybould, Helen E.; Newman, John W.; Martin, Roy; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Increased amylose in wheat (Triticum ssp.) starch is associated with increased resistant starch, a fermentable dietary fiber. Fermentation of resistant starch in the large intestine produces short-chain fatty acids that are associated with human health benefits. Since wheat foods are an important component of the human diet, increases in amylose and resistant starch in wheat grains have the potential to deliver health benefits to a large number of people. In three replicated field trials we found that mutations in starch branching enzyme II genes (SBEIIa and SBEIIb) in both A and B genomes (SBEIIa/b-AB) of durum wheat [T. turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.] resulted in large increases of amylose and resistant starch content. The presence of these four mutations was also associated with an average 5% reduction in kernel weight (P = 0.0007) and 15% reduction in grain yield (P = 0.06) compared to the wild type. Complete milling and pasta quality analysis showed that the mutant lines have an acceptable quality with positive effects on pasta firmness and negative effects on semolina extraction and pasta color. Positive fermentation responses were detected in rats (Rattus spp.) fed with diets incorporating mutant wheat flour. This study quantifies benefits and limitations associated with the deployment of the SBEIIa/b-AB mutations in durum wheat and provides the information required to develop realistic strategies to deploy durum wheat varieties with increased levels of amylose and resistant starch. PMID:27134286

  4. Specific Immunoglobulin (Ig) G Reference Intervals for Common Food, Insect, and Mold Allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Thomas B; Bandhauer, Michael E; Wilcock, Diane M; Hill, Harry R; Slev, Patricia R

    2016-12-01

    The clinical utility of serum IgG measurement in the diagnosis of allergy and food-induced hypersensitivity has been largely discredited. Recent studies, however, have shown that specific IgG can inhibit IgE mediated allergies, and may play a role in allergen specific desensitization. Accurate reference intervals for IgG specific allergens have not been widely established and are needed for better interpretation of serum antibody concentrations. In this study we established 64 IgG reference intervals for 48 common food allergens, 5 venoms, and 11 molds. Specific IgG concentrations were determined employing an automated fluorescent enzyme immunoassay on serum samples from 130 normal adults (65 males and 65 females), age range 18-69 y, mean 37.3 y. The lower reference interval limit for all allergens tested (n=64) was <2 mcg/mL. The median upper reference interval value for all 64 allergens was 12.9 mcg/mL, with Tuna (f40) having the lowest upper interval limit at 3.8 mcg/mL, and the mold Setomelanomma rostrate (m8) demonstrating the highest upper interval limit at 131 mcg/L. The considerable variation observed among the upper reference interval limits emphasizes the need for the establishment of allergen specific ranges for IgG. These newly established ranges should be a useful aid for clinicians in the interpretation of laboratory serum IgG results. © 2016 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  5. Effect of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seed color and hardness genes on the consumption preference of the house mouse (Mus musculus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain is a staple food and provides necessary nutrients for human health and nutrition. Yet, flavor differences among wheat varieties are not well understood. Grain flavor and consumption preference can be examined using the house mouse (Mus musculus L.) as a...

  6. Climate change impacts on the ecology of Fusarium graminearum species complex and susceptibility of wheat to Fusarium head blight: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat caused mainly by members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) is a major threat to agricultural grain production, food safety, and animal health. The severity of disease epidemics and accumulation of associated trichothecene mycotoxins in wheat kerne...

  7. Mutations in durum wheat SBEII genes conferring increased amylose and resistant starch affect grain yield components, semolina and pasta quality and fermentation responses in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased amylose in wheat (Triticum spp.) starch is associated with increased resistant starch, a fermentable dietary fiber. Fermentation of resistant starch in the large intestine produces short-chain fatty acids that provide human health benefits. Since wheat foods are an important component of t...

  8. Irrigation offsets wheat yield reductions from warming temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Jesse; Barkley, Andrew; Hendricks, Nathan

    2017-11-01

    Temperature increases due to climate change are expected to cause substantial reductions in global wheat yields. However, uncertainty remains regarding the potential role for irrigation as an adaptation strategy to offset heat impacts. Here we utilize over 7000 observations spanning eleven Kansas field-trial locations, 180 varieties, and 29 years to show that irrigation significantly reduces the negative impact of warming temperatures on winter wheat yields. Dryland wheat yields are estimated to decrease about eight percent for every one-degree Celsius increase in temperature, yet irrigation completely offsets this negative impact in our sample. As in previous studies, we find that important interactions exist between heat stress and precipitation for dryland production. Here, uniquely, we observe both dryland and irrigated trials side-by-side at the same locations and find that precipitation does not provide the same reduction in heat stress as irrigation. This is likely to be because the timing, intensity, and volume of water applications influence wheat yields, so the ability to irrigate—rather than relying on rainfall alone—has a stronger influence on heat stress. We find evidence of extensive differences of water-deficit stress impacts across varieties. This provides some evidence of the potential for adapting to hotter and drier climate conditions using optimal variety selection. Overall, our results highlight the critical role of water management for future global food security. Water scarcity not only reduces crop yields through water-deficit stress, but also amplifies the negative effects of warming temperatures.

  9. Abundance and diversity of GI microbiota rather than IgG4 levels correlate with abdominal inconvenience and gut permeability in consumers claiming food intolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippe, Berit; Remely, Marlene; Bartosiewicz, Natalie; Riedel, Monika; Nichterl, Claudia; Schatz, Lulit; Pummer, Sandra; Haslberger, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Food intolerances are an increasing global health problem. Interactions between genetics and environmental changes such as microbial- and stress factors remain poorly understood. Whereas the analyses of IgE mediated allergic responses is based on solid concepts, the roles of microbiota, gut permeability, and IgG antibodies remain widely unclear and are under fierce discussion for scientific relevance. The present pilot study analyzes forty participants, under consultation of nutritional health professionals, for gastrointestinal discomfort and claimed food intolerances. Food frequency questionnaire addresses nutrition, lifestyle and present discomfort. Feces samples are analyzed for dominant microbiota using 16S rDNA based methods and the fecal marker Calprotectin. Blood samples are analyzed for IgG4 levels. The total microbial abundance significantly correlates with claimed discomfort (R=-0.37; p=0.02). The abundance and diversity of microbiota significantly correlates with low Calprotectin values (R=-0.35; p=0.01) and with higher abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (R=0.78; pdiversity is also correlating with reduced antibodies against IgG4 of egg white (R=0.68; pgut permeability and reduced inflammation with an established microbial equilibrium. Self-reported abdominal inconvenience of participants relates mainly to characteristics of microbiota and gut permeability. Anti-inflammatory effects of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii or Lactobacilli and gut barrier functions of Akkermansia may have a key role in food intolerances. The role of IgG4 linking food immune responses with intolerances remains unclear.

  10. Cultivar variations in cadmium and lead accumulation and distribution among 30 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weitao; Liang, Lichen; Zhang, Xue; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, heavy metal pollution in agricultural soil in China has received public concern. The concept of low-accumulation cultivars (LACs) was proposed to minimize the influx of pollutants to the human food chain. Variations in Cd and Pb accumulation, distribution, and tolerance among 30 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars were studied in a hydroponic experiment to preliminary identify LACs of Cd or Pb for further field experiments. Of the 30 wheat cultivars tested, 27 and 26 wheat cultivars showed no effect of the Cd/Pb treatments on the shoot and root biomass, respectively. The results showed that the tested wheat cultivars had considerable tolerance to Cd and Pb toxicity. Significant (p experiments.

  11. Ethanol production from mixtures of wheat straw and wheat meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbe Mats

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioethanol can be produced from sugar-rich, starch-rich (first generation; 1G or lignocellulosic (second generation; 2G raw materials. Integration of 2G ethanol with 1G could facilitate the introduction of the 2G technology. The capital cost per ton of fuel produced would be diminished and better utilization of the biomass can be achieved. It would, furthermore, decrease the energy demand of 2G ethanol production and also provide both 1G and 2G plants with heat and electricity. In the current study, steam-pretreated wheat straw (SPWS was mixed with presaccharified wheat meal (PWM and converted to ethanol in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF. Results Both the ethanol concentration and the ethanol yield increased with increasing amounts of PWM in mixtures with SPWS. The maximum ethanol yield (99% of the theoretical yield, based on the available C6 sugars was obtained with a mixture of SPWS containing 2.5% water-insoluble solids (WIS and PWM containing 2.5% WIS, resulting in an ethanol concentration of 56.5 g/L. This yield was higher than those obtained with SSF of either SPWS (68% or PWM alone (91%. Conclusions Mixing wheat straw with wheat meal would be beneficial for both 1G and 2G ethanol production. However, increasing the proportion of WIS as wheat straw and the possibility of consuming the xylose fraction with a pentose-fermenting yeast should be further investigated.

  12. Ethanol production from mixtures of wheat straw and wheat meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Borbála; Barta, Zsolt; Sipos, Bálint; Réczey, Kati; Galbe, Mats; Zacchi, Guido

    2010-07-02

    Bioethanol can be produced from sugar-rich, starch-rich (first generation; 1G) or lignocellulosic (second generation; 2G) raw materials. Integration of 2G ethanol with 1G could facilitate the introduction of the 2G technology. The capital cost per ton of fuel produced would be diminished and better utilization of the biomass can be achieved. It would, furthermore, decrease the energy demand of 2G ethanol production and also provide both 1G and 2G plants with heat and electricity. In the current study, steam-pretreated wheat straw (SPWS) was mixed with presaccharified wheat meal (PWM) and converted to ethanol in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Both the ethanol concentration and the ethanol yield increased with increasing amounts of PWM in mixtures with SPWS. The maximum ethanol yield (99% of the theoretical yield, based on the available C6 sugars) was obtained with a mixture of SPWS containing 2.5% water-insoluble solids (WIS) and PWM containing 2.5% WIS, resulting in an ethanol concentration of 56.5 g/L. This yield was higher than those obtained with SSF of either SPWS (68%) or PWM alone (91%). Mixing wheat straw with wheat meal would be beneficial for both 1G and 2G ethanol production. However, increasing the proportion of WIS as wheat straw and the possibility of consuming the xylose fraction with a pentose-fermenting yeast should be further investigated.

  13. Safety of irradiated foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwahara, Shigeo (Foods Medicines Safety Center (Japan)); Kobayashi, Kazuo

    1983-01-01

    The safety of 7 irradiated foods (potato, onion, rice, wheat, vienna sausage, fish paste and mandarine orange), in terms of 2-year long-term toxic effect, reproductive physiology and possible teratogenesis, was studied using 3 generations of rats, mice and monkeys. The genetic toxicity was studied by means of various mutagenicity tests. The details of the studies conducted by the authors to date and some overseas data were reported. The available data showed no toxic effect.

  14. Image texture analysis of crushed wheat kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayas, Inna Y.; Martin, C. R.; Steele, James L.; Dempster, Richard E.

    1992-03-01

    The development of new approaches for wheat hardness assessment may impact the grain industry in marketing, milling, and breeding. This study used image texture features for wheat hardness evaluation. Application of digital imaging to grain for grading purposes is principally based on morphometrical (shape and size) characteristics of the kernels. A composite sample of 320 kernels for 17 wheat varieties were collected after testing and crushing with a single kernel hardness characterization meter. Six wheat classes where represented: HRW, HRS, SRW, SWW, Durum, and Club. In this study, parameters which characterize texture or spatial distribution of gray levels of an image were determined and used to classify images of crushed wheat kernels. The texture parameters of crushed wheat kernel images were different depending on class, hardness and variety of the wheat. Image texture analysis of crushed wheat kernels showed promise for use in class, hardness, milling quality, and variety discrimination.

  15. Gliadin Detection in Food by Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gordon; Sporns, Peter; Hsieh, Y.-H. Peggy

    Immunoassays are very sensitive and efficient tests that are commonly used to identify a specific protein. Examples of applications in the food industry include identification of proteins expressed in genetically modified foods, allergens, or proteins associated with a disease, including celiac disease. This genetic disease is associated with Europeans and affects about one in every 200 people in North America. These individuals react immunologically to wheat proteins, and consequently their own immune systems attack and damage their intestines. This disease can be managed if wheat proteins, specifically "gliadins," are avoided in foods.

  16. Fungal contamination of produced wheat flour in West Azerbaijan, northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Asadzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate fungal contamination of produced wheat flours in West Azarbaijan Province, located in the North West of Iran as wheat flour is one of the most important food and nutrient in the Iranians diet. Methods: This descriptive study was performed during March 2011 to April 2013 in flour mills of West Azerbaijan province. A total of 17 samples of produced wheat flour in Azerbaijan Province of Iran were tested for mold contamination based on Iran National Standard Method No. 2393. Results: Presence of molds in all collected 151 samples from flour factories of Azerbaijan Province were at the limit based on Iranian national standard. Conclusions: The obtained results showed that the process of flour production was hygienic quietly. Bread is staple ingredient of Iranian diet, and strict control on its processing of wheat flour, maintenance and distribution results nonpolluting or reduction of fungal contamination. Objective: To investigate fungal contamination of produced wheat flours in West Azarbaijan Province, located in the North West of Iran as wheat flour is one of the most important food and nutrient in the Iranians diet. Methods: This descriptive study was performed during March 2011 to April 2013 in flour mills of West Azerbaijan province. A total of 17 samples of produced wheat flour in Azerbaijan Province of Iran were tested for mold contamination based on Iran National Standard Method No. 2393. Results: Presence of molds in all collected 151 samples from flour factories of Azerbaijan Province were at the limit based on Iranian national standard. Conclusions: The obtained results showed that the process of flour production was hygienic quietly. Bread is staple ingredient of Iranian diet, and strict control on its processing of wheat flour, maintenance and distribution results nonpolluting or reduction of fungal contamination.

  17. Cereal Crops Are not Created Equal: Wheat Consumption Associated with Obesity Prevalence Globally and Regionally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenpeng You

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cereals have been extensively advocated as the beneficial food group in terms of body weight management, but each staple cereal crop may contribute in different ways. Studies of the association between wheat availability and risk of obesity are controversial. This study aimed to test the global and regional association between wheat availability as reported by FAO and obesity prevalence at a population level. FAO does not distinguish between whole grain wheat and refined wheat. Methods: Population-specific data from 170 countries on prevalence of obesity, availabilities of mixed cereals, wheat, rice, maize, meat, sugar, fat, soy and calories and GDP are obtained from the UN agencies. All variables were measured as per capita per day (or per year. Each country is treated as an individual subject. SPSS v. 22 is used to analyse these data for all the 170 countries and official country groupings (regions using non parametric and parametric correlations, including partial correlation analysis. Results: Pearson’s correlation coefficient analysis showed that obesity prevalence is positively associated with wheat availability (r = 0.500, p < 0.001, but is inversely associated with availabilities of total cereals (r = -0.132, p = 0.087, rice (r = -0.405, p < 0.001 and maize (r = -0.227, p = 0.004. These associations remain in partial correlation model when we keep availabilities of meat, fat, sugar, soy, caloric intake and GDP statistically constant. Overall, positive associations between wheat availability and obesity prevalence remain in different regions. Maize and mixed cereal availabilities do not show independent associations with the obesity prevalence. Conclusions: Our study suggests that wheat availability is an independent predictor of the obesity prevalence both worldwide and with special regard to the regions of Africa, Americas and Asia. Future studies should distinguish between possible influence of whole grain and ultra

  18. Food Microscopy and the Nutritional Quality of Cereal Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Yiu, Suk Hing

    1993-01-01

    The nutritional quality of cereal foods is directly related to the nature of nutrient storage in cereal grains. Most cereal nutrients, such as carbohydrates and minerals , are st ructurally bound. Processing alters the structural organization of the cereal grain. Results obtained from many nutritional studies indicate that the structure and physical form of a cereal food greatly influence the availability of its nutrients. Using oats and wheat as examples, this review demonstrates how micr...

  19. Getting the Facts on Food Allergy Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... them. Eight kinds of food cause most food allergies: •Cow’s milk •Eggs •Peanuts •Wheat • Soy • Fish • Shellfish • Tree nuts Your source for more information or to find an allergist/immunologist. 02/2011 AAAAI -0111 -532

  20. Moulds in food spoilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filtenborg, Ole; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Thrane, Ulf

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing knowledge and understanding of the role played by moulds in food spoilage. Especially the discovery of mycotoxin production in foods has highligh-ted the importance of moulds in food quality. It is, however, only within the last 5-10 years that major progresses have been made...... towards the prevention of spoilage caused by moulds. This is due to recent international agreements on taxonomy and analytical methods for foodborne moulds, which has led to the discovery, that a specific, very limited funga (=mycobiota) is responsible for the spoilage of each kind of food. This is called...... the associated or critical funga and has been shown to consist of less than 10 species. In this paper the associated funga is described for the following foods: Citrus and pomaceous fruits, potato and yam tubers, onions, rye, wheat, rye bread, cheese and fermented sausages and whenever possible the selective...

  1. Instant noodles made with fortified wheat flour to improve micronutrient intake in Asia: a review of simulation, nutrient retention and sensory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronder, Kayla L; Zimmerman, Sarah L; van den Wijngaart, Annoek; Codling, Karen; Johns, Kirsten Ag; Pachón, Helena

    2017-03-01

    Consumption of foods made with wheat flour, particularly instant noodles, is increasing in Asia. Given this trend, fortifying wheat flour with vitamins and minerals may improve micronutrient intake in the region. The objective of this review was to understand what is known about fortifying wheat flour used to make instant noodles. A literature review of seven databases was performed using the search terms "noodle" and ("Asian" or "instant"). Grey literature was requested through a food fortification listserv. Articles were title screened first for relevance and duplicity, with exclusion criteria applied during the second round of abstract-level screening. This review considered studies examining simulation, retention, sensory, bioavailability, efficacy, and effectiveness of instant noodles made with fortified wheat flour. Fourteen relevant documents were reviewed for simulation (n=1), retention (n=11), and sensory studies (n=3). The documents revealed that instant noodles produced from fortified wheat flour have potential to improve nutrient intakes, have high retention of most nutrients, and provoke no or minimal changes in sensory characteristics. The available literature indicates that using fortified wheat flour for instant noodle production results in retention of the added nutrients, except thiamin, with no significant sensory change to the final product. Given the rising consumption of instant noodles, production of this item with fortified wheat flour has potential to improve nutrient intakes in Asia. This review provides a resource for the design of a wheat flour fortification program in countries where a large proportion of wheat flour is consumed as instant noodles.

  2. Biotechnology Assisted Wheat Breeding for Organic Agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffan, Philipp Matthias

    Common bunt of wheat is a major seed borne disease of wheat worldwide. It is of particular importance to organic farming, where systemic fungicides cannot be applied. The knowledge about location and mechanisms of common bunt resistance in wheat is limited, and only three race specific genes have...

  3. SODIUM HYDROXIDE TREATED WHEAT STRAW FOR SHEEP

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Schwab & Satter (1976). Diets were fed twice daily at 08h30 and 15h30 at a level of ad lib + lO%. The untreated wheat straw wfuch ... A comparison of NaOH treated wheat straw iraed and not rinsed and untreated wheat strow fed to sheep.

  4. Growing Wheat. People on the Farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.

    This booklet, one in a series about life on modern farms, describes the daily life of the Don Riffel family, wheat farmers in Kansas. Beginning with early morning, the booklet traces the family's activities through a typical harvesting day in July, while explaining how a wheat farm is run. The booklet also briefly describes the wheat growing…

  5. Variation in Asparagine Concentration in Nebraska Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concentration of asparagine in wheat grain depends on both genetics and environmental factors, therefore study of different wheat cultivars, growing locations and crops years is needed for proper evaluation of potential risks of acrylamide formation in baked products made from Nebraska wheats. T...

  6. Soft durum wheat - a paradigm shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two traits define most aspects of wheat quality and utilization: kernel texture (hardness) and gluten. The former is far simpler genetically and is controlled by two genes, Puroindoline a and Puroindoline b. Durum wheat lacks puroindolines and has very hard kernels. As such, durum wheat when milled ...

  7. 21 CFR 137.195 - Crushed wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the method prescribed in “Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists,” 13th Ed. (1980), section 7.002 under “Preparation of Sample—Official Final Action,” and section... crushing cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested by the method...

  8. Wholegrain vs. refined wheat bread and pasta. Effect on postprandial glycemia, appetite, and subsequent ad libitum energy intake in young healthy adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, M.; Jensen, M.G.; Riboldi, G.

    2010-01-01

    ) and wholegrain wheat pasta (WWP) and were served after an overnight fast. Appetite ratings and blood glucose were assessed for 180 min after which an ad libitum lunch meal was served and El measured. The 180 min glucose responses were similar for wholemeal and refined products, but pasta meals gave significantly......Wholegrain foods have received much attention in recent years, and have been proposed to play a role in energy regulation through lowering of postprandial glycemia and appetite. This randomized crossover single meal study in 16 Young adults Was Conducted to test the effect of iso-caloric meals...... based oil wholemeal wheat breads and pasta in comparison to similar refined wheat products on postprandial glycemia, appetite and ad libitum energy intake (EI). Test meals (50 g carbohydrates; 2MJ) consisted of refined wheat bread (RWB), wholegrain wheat bread (WWB), refined wheat pasta (RWP...

  9. Does Your Child Really Have a Food Allergy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... food allergies, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology: Cow's milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, seafood, wheat and soy. The report, published July 24 in Pediatrics , highlighted ...

  10. Pulsed light inactivation of naturally occurring moulds on wheat grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron Maftei, Nicoleta; Ramos-Villarroel, Ana Y; Nicolau, Anca I; Martín-Belloso, Olga; Soliva-Fortuny, Robert

    2014-03-15

    Pulsed light (PL) is emerging as a non-thermal technology with excellent prospects for the decontamination of foods and food contact surfaces. Its application for mould inactivation on cereal grains would allow a reduction of storage losses as well as the prevention of mycotoxin contamination at a post-harvest level. The potential of PL for the decontamination of naturally occurring moulds on wheat grain was investigated in this study. Treatments of up to 40 flashes of a fluence of 0.4 J cm⁻² per pulse were applied to both sides of the grain, with an overall energy release ranging from 6.4 to 51.2 J g⁻¹. The most powerful treatment applied to wheat in this study (51.2 J g⁻¹) resulted in a mould reduction of approximately 4 log cycles on samples displaying an initial mould contamination level of 2.2 × 10⁵ CFU g⁻¹. At the same time, the seed germination percentage was only slightly affected. For PL treatments causing an inactivation of 3-4 log cycles, only 14-15% of the germination power of the wheat seeds was lost. The PL treatments attained greater microbial reductions for higher treatment times and lower initial mould loads. The absence of the UV portion of the radiation spectrum was found to significantly reduce the treatment effectiveness. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. [Demographic pressure and extension of new cultures: difficult adaptation. The case of the wheat-growing culture of highland Byumba].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutaganda, T

    1993-04-01

    Results of a 1990 survey are the basis for a discussion of the spread of wheat cultivation in the Byumba highlands of Rwanda. The highlands are among the most densely populated areas of Rwanda, with an estimated 370 persons per sq km compared to the national average of 272. The region offers ideal temperature and rainfall conditions for wheat cultivation. 76% of the cultivable lands of the region are considered suitable for wheat. Wheat is among crops that Rwanda would like to produce internally in greater quantity to reduce import requirements. Population pressure has led to division of plots, so that at present, 57.3% of households have less than 1 hectare of land. Dispersion of plots has also become a problem. A wide variety of crops in addition to wheat are cultivated in the Byumba highlands. The number of hectares devoted to wheat has increased from 140 in 1983 to 2902 in 1990. The increase is due to the growing number of cultivators growing a small amount of wheat rather than to increased size of production units. 68% of wheat cultivators harvested less than 200 kg in 1990. The subsistence nature of most agriculture in the Byumba highlands has limited the spread of wheat cultivation, as households seek to produce an adequate and varied food supply for their own consumption. The small size of holdings has limited the feasibility of technical advances in wheat cultivation for local growers. Many households devote space to crops such as sweet potatoes that do not produce well at their relatively high altitudes. Encouraging greater cultivation of wheat will require an improved marketing system and a sufficiently high price to allow growers to purchase the foodstuffs they forego planting. Steps should be taken to limit the division of land holdings and to improve cultivation techniques. It will be necessary as well to limit population growth through family planning in order to lessen demographic pressure on the limited cultivable lands.

  12. Food allergy is associated with recurrent respiratory tract infections during childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Woicka-Kolejwa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : To find out whether children with food allergy have an increased risk of recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections and of asthma. Aim: To describe the clinical profile of children diagnosed with food allergy referred to the Allergy Clinic. Material and methods : We conducted a retrospective study to assess the patients’ demographic, anthropometric and clinical data. The analysis included data of all children by the age of 10 years (registered with the Allergy Clinic between 2012 and 2013 in whom IgE mediated food allergy had been diagnosed during 18 months of observation. Results : We included 280 children into the analysis. Recurrent respiratory tract infections (rRTI, asthma and gastrointestinal (GI symptoms were observed in 153 (54.6%, 96 (34.3%, 39 (13.9%, respectively, with a significant increasing trend across age-subgroups. In children from 1 to 2 years old, sensitization to -lactoglobulin increased the risk of rRTI (OR = 3.91; 95% CI: 1.03–14.87. In older children sensitization to allergens other than milk or egg decreases the risk of rRTI (OR = 0.25; 95% CI: 0.10–0.62; sensitization to egg decreased the risk of asthma diagnosis (OR = 0.09; 95% CI: 0.01–0.75. We did not identify food allergens which change the risk of GI symptoms in children. This finding was consistent throughout all age-subgroups. Conclusions : Sensitization to -lactoglobulin increased the risk of rRTI in children under 2 years of age nearly four times. The presence of sensitization to food allergens above 3 years of age did not increase the risk of developing clinical presentation of food allergy other than atopic dermatitis.

  13. Monitoring wheat growth with radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, T. F.

    1976-01-01

    The scattering properties of wheat in the 8-18 GHz band were studied as a function of frequency, polarization, incidence angle, and crop maturity. Supporting ground truth was collected at the time of measurement. The data indicate the radar backscattering coefficient is sensitive to both radar system parameters and crop characteristics, particularly at incidence angles near nadir. Linear regression analysis of the backscattering coefficient (dB) on both time and plant moisture content result in rather good correlation, as high as 0.9, with the slope of these regression lines being 0.55 dB/day and -0.275 dB% plant moisture at 9.4 GHz at nadir. It is found that the coefficient undergoes rapid variations shortly before and after the wheat is harvested. Both of these analyses suggest methods for estimating wheat maturity and for monitoring the progress of harvest.

  14. The assessment of soil availability and wheat grain status of zinc and iron in Serbia: Implications for human nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Miroslav; Nikolic, Nina; Kostic, Ljiljana; Pavlovic, Jelena; Bosnic, Predrag; Stevic, Nenad; Savic, Jasna; Hristov, Nikola

    2016-05-15

    The deficiency of zinc (Zn) and iron (Fe) is a global issue causing not only considerable yield losses of food crops but also serious health problems. We have analysed Zn and Fe concentrations in the grains of two bread wheat cultivars along native gradient of micronutrient availability throughout Serbia. Although only 13% of the soil samples were Zn deficient and none was Fe deficient, the levels of these micronutrients in grain were rather low (median values of 21 mg kg(-1) for Zn and 36 mg kg(-1) for Fe), and even less adequate in white flour. Moreover, excessive P fertilization of calcareous soils in the major wheat growing areas strongly correlated with lower grain concentration of Zn. Our results imply that a latent Zn deficiency in wheat grain poses a high risk for grain quality relevant to human health in Serbia, where wheat bread is a staple food. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Germination and Extrusion on Physicochemical Properties and Nutritional Qualities of Extrudates and Tortilla from Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lijia; Adedeji, Akinbode A; Alavi, Sajid

    2017-08-01

    Wheat is the most common grain in the temperate region. Modifying its constituent through food processing improves its functionality and nutrient access. In this study, the combined effect of germination and extrusion on physicochemical properties and nutritional qualities of extrudates and tortilla from wheat was evaluated. Results showed that germination significantly increased (P wheat (GW) and extruded germinated whole wheat (EGW) as compared to the control of whole wheat (WW). Germination also significantly increased the protein content, reducing sugar and total soluble sugar content in GW, while extrusion had much increasing impact on reducing sugar content in extruded samples. Specific mechanical energy during extrusion was reduced as feed moisture content increased from 20 to 30%. Higher extruder screw speed (350 rpm) led to better expansion ratio at low moisture content (20%) as compared to low screw speed (200 rpm). Extrusion significantly increased the starch digestibility but decreased the protein digestibility in extrudates. Tortilla made from 100% WW had about the same physical characteristics, namely color and rollability, with tortilla made from 85% WW with 15% GW, 85% WW with 15% extruded whole wheat (EW), and 85% WW with 15% EGW. Tortilla made from 85% WW with 15% GW showed the largest diameter, thinnest thickness and least extensibility. A 15% extruded germinated wheat (350 rpm) addition in 85% WW showed significant increase of γ-aminobutyric acid content in tortilla compared to the control (100% WW). © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  16. The substantiation of development of mousses technology using wheat starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Мriachenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is dedicated to the substantiation of development of technology of fruit and vegetable mousses using wheat starch and surfactant – Tween 20. The innovative idea of product with foamy structure was expounded, the implementation of which will allow to provide obtaining of the final product with stable quality indicators, new consumer characteristics and will give an opportunity to carry out the production technological process with distinct industrial signs.The foaming capacity and foam stability of “wheat starch-Tween 20” model systems depending on the heat treatment temperature and starch concentration were investigated. The rational foaming zone was determined that will allow to obtain foamy structure of mousses. The model systems behavior was studied by the determining of their viscosity. It was confirmed that the controlled regulation of dynamic phase transitions of starch with surfactant provides food systems’ colloidal stability.

  17. Quality and sensory characteristics of hard red wheat after residential storage for up to 32 y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Devin J; Ogden, Lynn V; Dunn, Michael L; Jamison, Rachel G; Lloyd, Michelle A; Pike, Oscar A

    2011-01-01

    temperature retains quality and can be made into bread that is well accepted by consumers. Thus, whole wheat has good long-term storage stability and can be recommended for emergency food supplies.

  18. Development of a doubled haploid system for wheat through wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty wheat genotypes were crossed with six maize varieties. The haploid embryos were rescued and cultured for plant regeneration and subsequently treated with colchicines for chromosome doubling. Half-diallel crosses were made in a cage and greenhouse and the embryos were cultured in the laboratory under ...

  19. IgE mediated autoallergy against thyroid peroxidase--a novel pathomechanism of chronic spontaneous urticaria?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altrichter, Sabine; Peter, Hans-Jürgen; Pisarevskaja, Dina; Metz, Martin; Martus, Peter; Maurer, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria (csU), which is characterized by recurrent episodes of mast cell-driven wheal and flare-type skin reactions, is often associated with elevated total IgE levels and thyroid autoimmunity...

  20. Metabolite profiling on wheat grain to enable a distinction of samples from organic and conventional farming systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bonte, Anja; Neuweger, Heiko; Goesmann, Alexander; Thonar, Cécile; Mäder, Paul; Langenkämper, Georg; Niehaus, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Identification of biomarkers capable of distinguishing organic and conventional products would be highly welcome to improve the strength of food quality assurance. Metabolite profiling was used for biomarker search in organic and conventional wheat grain (Triticum aestivum L.) of 11 different old and new bread wheat cultivars grown in the DOK system comparison trial. Metabolites were extracted usingmethanol and analysed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of the Nutritional and Sensory Quality of Major Commercial Whole-wheat Breads in Nigerian Market

    OpenAIRE

    Joel Ndife; James Obiegbunna; Simeon Ajayi

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the nutritional, microbial and sensory profile of regularly consumed commercial whole wheat breads in Nigeria in order to offer an insight into the overall quality of these foods. Four major local brands of commercial whole wheat breads (samples A, B, C and D) were evaluated. The normal white bread (sample E) served as control. Results of the physical properties obtained, showed that the white bread (sample E) had higher values for bread volume (2850 cm3 ), specific volume ...

  2. DEM Model of Wheat Grains in Storage Considering the Effect of Moisture Content in Direct Shear Test

    OpenAIRE

    Hamed Johnny Sarnavi; A. Noor Mohammadi; A. Modares Motlagh; A. Rahmani Didar

    2013-01-01

    Discrete Element Method (DEM) modeling was conducted for predicting strength properties of stored wheat grains in different levels of moisture contents, to extend the knowledge of grain storage beyond current experimental studies in the future. The main features of agricultural and food materials that make them different from mineral materials are strong influence of Moisture Content (MC) on mechanical behavior. Published data on grain and bulk properties of wheat relevant to DEM modeling wer...

  3. Effects of crop rotation on weed density, biomass and yield of wheat (Titicum aestivum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    A. Zareafeizabadi; H.R. Rostamzadeh

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the weed populations in wheat, under different crop rotations an experiment was carried out at Agricultural Research Station of Jolgeh Rokh, Iran. During growing season this project was done in five years, based on Randomized Complete Bloch Design with three replications, on Crop rotations included: wheat monoculture for the whole period (WWWWW), wheat- wheat- wheat- canola- wheat (WWWCW), wheat- sugar beet- wheat-sugar beet- wheat (WSWSW), wheat- potato- wheat- potato- whea...

  4. Chapter 23: Food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Rachel G; Pongracic, Jacqueline A

    2012-01-01

    The onset of IgE-mediated food allergy is usually within minutes to 2 hours of food ingestion. Risk factors for fatal food-induced anaphylaxis include presence of asthma (which is a risk factor for anaphylaxis in general), failure to use epinephrine autoinjectors promptly, history of prior severe reactions, known food allergy, denial of symptoms, and adolescent/young adult age. The most commonly implicated foods are cow's milk, eggs, peanuts, soy, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, and wheat. Allergies to peanut, tree nuts, and seafood are the most common food allergens in adults. The major food allergens are glycoproteins that are generally water soluble and stable to the effects of heat, proteases, and acids. Food proteins that escape proteolysis are taken up by intestinal epithelial cells and presented to primed T cells. This process leads to the generation of T-helper type 2 (Th2) cells that produce IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13. Recent studies have found that tolerance can be acquired with >70% of children becoming tolerant to cow's milk and eggs by age 16 years. Allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, and seafood are frequently lifelong. Food-allergic patients or their care givers should be taught when and how to administer injectable epinephrine. In terms of prevention, the American Academy of Pediatrics concluded that there is no convincing evidence that delaying the introduction of solid foods, including common allergens, beyond 4-6 months of age has a protective effect on the development of atopic disease.

  5. Performance of ELISA and PCR methods for the determination of allergens in food: an evaluation of six years of proficiency testing for soy (Glycine max L.) and wheat gluten (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Alexandra; Kasel, Udo; Wichmann, Gerhard; Besler, Matthias

    2013-10-30

    For the routine detection of allergens in foods, PCR and/or ELISA methods are employed. To assess the suitability of these methods, proficiency tests (PTs) could be used as a valuable instrument. It is a common practice to evaluate the results with respect to the experimentally obtained robust mean without considering the actual allergen content. In the present study, an overview is given of the results of allergen PTs for the determination of soy and gluten conducted by Dienstleistung Lebensmittel Analytik GbR (DLA). A total of 16 PTs were evaluated with respect to the comparison of PCR and ELISA performances and a new focus on the actually spiked values. The analytes were added in the ranges of 7.8-6264 mg/kg (gluten) and 184-5500 mg/kg (soy protein) in differently composed matrices such as pastry, infant food, and sausage meat. The evaluation of the PTs showed a widely reliable qualitative detection of both allergens by PCR methods. ELISA performances differed for soy and gluten. Although a high number of false-negative results occurred for the detection of soy, the qualitative detection of gluten was appropriate. Quantitative results showed obvious test kit-specific differences for the ELISA methods, but the limits of quantification were suitable for gluten determination. Both ELISA and PCR methods demonstrated their valuable contribution in food allergen determination.

  6. ABOUT THE STATE OF THE WORLD WHEAT MARKET AT THE CURRENT STAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pogorelyy M.U.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The author considers the Phillips curve in the historical aspect. In the article there is a mention that there were examples when the Phillips curve was not confirmed. Then the author goes on to describe the post-crisis economic situation. The author refers to the food problem as a global problem, which has been designated in the papers of the Club of Rome. Then the author characterizes world wheat production for the period 2003-2013. The author gives an example that shows the volatility of the wheat market (CBOT. The author explains why he uses quotations of forward contracts, and not in the spot market. The author scrutinizes the quotations of CBOT wheat futures contracts in the paper. The author substantiates the need for an econometric model in the research process of futures CBOT wheat prices. The author justifies the chosen scientific approach that defines the methods of research and research model. The author uses econometric approach in the paper. The author uses linear regression as a method of the research. The author creates the equation of linear regression using the software. The author makes a conclusion that there is a certain linear relationship between the price of the futures contract CBOT wheat and the level of unemployment in the United States during the period. The author verifies the effect of Phillips curve. Results of this paper allow the analyst to make informed pricing decisions on the organized market of wheat trade in the medium term.

  7. Improving farming practices reduces the carbon footprint of spring wheat production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yantai; Liang, Chang; Chai, Qiang; Lemke, Reynald L.; Campbell, Con A.; Zentner, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Wheat is one of the world’s most favoured food sources, reaching millions of people on a daily basis. However, its production has climatic consequences. Fuel, inorganic fertilizers and pesticides used in wheat production emit greenhouse gases that can contribute negatively to climate change. It is unknown whether adopting alternative farming practices will increase crop yield while reducing carbon emissions. Here we quantify the carbon footprint of alternative wheat production systems suited to semiarid environments. We find that integrating improved farming practices (that is, fertilizing crops based on soil tests, reducing summerfallow frequencies and rotating cereals with grain legumes) lowers wheat carbon footprint effectively, averaging −256 kg CO2 eq ha−1 per year. For each kg of wheat grain produced, a net 0.027–0.377 kg CO2 eq is sequestered into the soil. With the suite of improved farming practices, wheat takes up more CO2 from the atmosphere than is actually emitted during its production. PMID:25405548

  8. Modeling deoxynivalenol contamination of wheat in northwestern Europe for climate change assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Goedhart, P W; Elen, O; Börjesson, T; Hietaniemi, V; Booij, C J H

    2012-06-01

    Climate change will affect mycotoxin contamination of feed and food. Mathematical models for predicting mycotoxin concentrations in cereal grains are useful for estimating the impact of climate change on these toxins. The objective of the current study was to construct a descriptive model to estimate climate change impacts on deoxynivalenol (DON) contamination of mature wheat grown in northwestern Europe. Observational data from 717 wheat fields in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and The Netherlands were analyzed, including the DON concentrations in mature wheat, agronomical practices, and local weather. Multiple regression analyses were conducted, and the best set of explanatory variables, mainly including weather factors, was selected. The final model included the following variables: flowering date, length of time between flowering and harvest, wheat resistance to Fusarium infection, and several climatic variables related to relative humidity, temperature, and rainfall during critical stages of wheat cultivation. The model accounted for 50 % of the variance, which was sufficient to make this model useful for estimating the trends of climate change on DON contamination of wheat in northwestern Europe. Application of the model in possible climate change scenarios is illustrated.

  9. Representing winter wheat in the Community Land Model (version 4.5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yaqiong; Williams, Ian N.; Bagley, Justin E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Kueppers, Lara M.

    2017-05-01

    Winter wheat is a staple crop for global food security, and is the dominant vegetation cover for a significant fraction of Earth's croplands. As such, it plays an important role in carbon cycling and land-atmosphere interactions in these key regions. Accurate simulation of winter wheat growth is not only crucial for future yield prediction under a changing climate, but also for accurately predicting the energy and water cycles for winter wheat dominated regions. We modified the winter wheat model in the Community Land Model (CLM) to better simulate winter wheat leaf area index, latent heat flux, net ecosystem exchange of CO2, and grain yield. These included schemes to represent vernalization as well as frost tolerance and damage. We calibrated three key parameters (minimum planting temperature, maximum crop growth days, and initial value of leaf carbon allocation coefficient) and modified the grain carbon allocation algorithm for simulations at the US Southern Great Plains ARM site (US-ARM), and validated the model performance at eight additional sites across North America. We found that the new winter wheat model improved the prediction of monthly variation in leaf area index, reduced latent heat flux, and net ecosystem exchange root mean square error (RMSE) by 41 and 35 % during the spring growing season. The model accurately simulated the interannual variation in yield at the US-ARM site, but underestimated yield at sites and in regions (northwestern and southeastern US) with historically greater yields by 35 %.

  10. Improving farming practices reduces the carbon footprint of spring wheat production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yantai; Liang, Chang; Chai, Qiang; Lemke, Reynald L.; Campbell, Con A.; Zentner, Robert P.

    2014-11-01

    Wheat is one of the world’s most favoured food sources, reaching millions of people on a daily basis. However, its production has climatic consequences. Fuel, inorganic fertilizers and pesticides used in wheat production emit greenhouse gases that can contribute negatively to climate change. It is unknown whether adopting alternative farming practices will increase crop yield while reducing carbon emissions. Here we quantify the carbon footprint of alternative wheat production systems suited to semiarid environments. We find that integrating improved farming practices (that is, fertilizing crops based on soil tests, reducing summerfallow frequencies and rotating cereals with grain legumes) lowers wheat carbon footprint effectively, averaging -256 kg CO2 eq ha-1 per year. For each kg of wheat grain produced, a net 0.027-0.377 kg CO2 eq is sequestered into the soil. With the suite of improved farming practices, wheat takes up more CO2 from the atmosphere than is actually emitted during its production.

  11. Cross-Species Extrapolation of Models for Predicting Lead Transfer from Soil to Wheat Grain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Liu

    Full Text Available The transfer of Pb from the soil to crops is a serious food hygiene security problem in China because of industrial, agricultural, and historical contamination. In this study, the characteristics of exogenous Pb transfer from 17 Chinese soils to a popular wheat variety (Xiaoyan 22 were investigated. In addition, bioaccumulation prediction models of Pb in grain were obtained based on soil properties. The results of the analysis showed that pH and OC were the most important factors contributing to Pb uptake by wheat grain. Using a cross-species extrapolation approach, the Pb uptake prediction models for cultivar Xiaoyan 22 in different soil Pb levels were satisfactorily applied to six additional non-modeled wheat varieties to develop a prediction model for each variety. Normalization of the bioaccumulation factor (BAF to specific soil physico-chemistry is essential, because doing so could significantly reduce the intra-species variation of different wheat cultivars in predicted Pb transfer and eliminate the influence of soil properties on ecotoxicity parameters for organisms of interest. Finally, the prediction models were successfully verified against published data (including other wheat varieties and crops and used to evaluate the ecological risk of Pb for wheat in contaminated agricultural soils.

  12. The case of the missing wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobell, David B.

    2012-06-01

    In Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass, Alice finds herself running as fast as she can but not moving anywhere. The Red Queen explains to her 'Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that.' Such is the situation in global agriculture. Global demand for agricultural products continues to rise as population grows and people get richer. As they get richer, people have fewer babies but eat more. And they use a lot more energy, which is increasingly derived from agricultural products. Crop technologies have to move incredibly fast just to keep up. Remarkably, over the past 50 years they have, with yields (production per hectare of land) for most crops more than doubling since 1960, and real prices of food falling for most of the period. In many ways we have come to take continued yield growth for granted. But, as Lin and Huybers show [1] elsewhere in this issue, there is increasing evidence that this growth has stalled in many regions. The question is not new—people have worried about the pace of yield growth since at least the days of Malthus [2, 3]. But Lin and Huybers [1] use updated data and bring a new rigor to identifying where stagnation is statistically significant, for example by taking care to account for year-to-year correlation in yields. They report that for slightly more than half of the regions that they inspected, it is likely (80% chance) that yield growth has already flattened out. For many of these countries, responsible for about one quarter of global wheat production, the stagnation has very likely occurred (95% chance). Why are yields of wheat stagnating in so many areas? At least four suspects seem plausible. One narrative is that for years the real price of wheat was declining, providing little incentive for innovation. The most obvious consequence was a major decline in investment in research and development in most

  13. Drought resistance in durum wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simane, B.

    1993-01-01

    Durum wheat is widely grown as a rainfed crop in the semi-arid tropics. Its production is low and variable from season to season due to frequent drought-stress. Characterization of target environment and employing both analytical and empirical breeding approaches would speed up progress in

  14. Registration of Vision 30 Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Vision 30’ (Reg. No. CV-1062, PI 661153) hard red winter (HRW) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed and tested as VA06HRW-49 and released by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station in March 2010. Vision 30 was derived from the cross 92PAN1#33/VA97W-414. Vision 30 is high yielding, awned,...

  15. IPR 118 - Bread wheat cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Riede

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat cultivar IPR 118 developed by IAPAR has a good yield potential and is widely adapted. It is earlymaturing and moderately tolerant to shattering and soil aluminum, moderately resistant to leaf rust and presents high glutenstrength for bread-making. The overall yield exceeded controls by 13%.

  16. Aphid resistance in wheat varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elek, Henriett; Werner, Peter; Smart, Lesley; Gordon-Weeks, Ruth; Nádasy, Miklós; Pickett, John

    2009-01-01

    As an environmentally compatible alternative to the use of conventional insecticides to control cereal aphids, we have investigated the possibility to exploit natural resistance to insect pests in wheat varieties. We have tested a wide range of hexaploid (Triticum aestivum), tetraploid (T. durum) and diploid (T. boeoticum and T. monococcum) wheat lines for resistance to the bird cherry oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi). Lines tested included Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia), greenbug (Schizaphis graminum), hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) and orange wheat blossom midge (Sitodiplosis mosellana) resistant varieties. Antixenosis and antibiosis were determined in the settling and fecundity tests respectively. Since hydroxamic acids (Hx), including the most generally active, 2,4-dihidroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA), are biosynthesised in many cereal plants and are implicated in resistance against insects, leaf tissue was analysed for Hx and the glucosides from which they are produced. The hexaploid varieties, which contained relatively low levels of the DIMBOA glucoside, did not deter aphid feeding or reduce nymph production significantly. Reduced settlement and nymph production were recorded on the diploid varieties, but they contained no detectable level of the glucoside or the toxic aglucone.

  17. Specific Oral Tolerance Induction Using IFN-Gamma in 2 Cases of Food-Dependent Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geunwoong Noh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaphylaxis induced by exercise after the intake of certain foods is referred to as food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA. Only the preventive medication such as oral sodium cromoglycate and oral combined cetirizine-montelukast was tried in FDEIA. Specific oral tolerance induction (SOTI using IFN-gamma was tried in 2 cases of FDEIA for wheat. Merely, exercise accompanied every treatment just after the intake of allergenic foods during treatment. Patients acquired tolerance for wheat in both cases successfully. After treatment, two patients take wheat in their food living freely. Conclusively, SOTI using IFN-gamma was effective as the causative treatment for allergenic foods in FDEIA.

  18. Potential of Flavobacterium as Biofertilizer to Increase Wheat Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Asadi Rahmani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Intoduction: Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are a diverse group of bacteria consisting different species like Pseudomonas, Azotobacter, Azospirillum, Flavobacterium, Bacillus and Serratia with ability of enhancing plant growth and yield by different mechanisms. Flavobacteria are aerobic, gram negative, rod shape bacteria with more than 100 species living in different habitats ranging from soil and water to the foods. There are reports indicating that Flavobacteria are of dominant rhizosphere bacteria with beneficial effects on agricultural crops. Studies in Iran showed that six species of Flavobacterium were isolated and identified from rhizosphere of wheat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of four strains of Flavobacterium on growth and yield of wheat under field conditions. Materials and Methods: In this study four strains of Flavobacterium F9, F11, F21 and F40 were used. Bacterial strains were propagated in liquid NB growth medium and were used in field experiments. Fields were prepared in Khorasan Razavi, Khuzestan, Fars, Mazandran and Kermanshah and wheat seeds were inoculated with strains and sowed in a randomized complete block design (RCBD with five treatments (four strains and a un-inoculated control with four replications. Wheat varieties were Pishtaz in Khorasan and Fars, Marvdasht in Kermanshah, Chamran in Khuzestan and Milan in Mazandaran. Chemical fertilizers were used based on soil analysis. The rate of inoculation was 10 ml of bacteria per kg of seed. Plants were harvested at the end of the experiment and seed yield, total shoot biomass, 1000-seed weight, plant height, number of panicles per m2, number of seeds per panicle and panicle length were measured. Data analysis was performed by SPSS software, and the means were compared at α꞊5% by Duncan test. Results and discussion: Results of the study showed that bacterial strains increased growth and yield of wheat in all provinces. In Mazandaran, all

  19. Applications of systems simulation for understanding and increasing yield potential of wheat and rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aggarwal, P.K.

    2000-01-01

    Understanding and increasing yield potential of cereals is essential to meet the growing food demand in Asia. A crop growth simulation model -WTGROWS- was developed to quantify the climatically determined potential grain yields and yield gaps in wheat in tropics and sub-tropics. The model

  20. Breeding and Characterization of Hexaploid Wheats with Nil Levels of Grain Polyphenol Oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is a ubiquitous enzyme in plants, responsible for many browning reactions and reduction of food product quality. In common (bread) wheat, PPO occurs in the external layers of grain, often is carried into flour via milling, and can be responsible for the discoloration of whe...

  1. Inheritance of grain polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in multiple wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genetic backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grain polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity can cause discoloration of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) food products. Five crosses (PI 117635/Antelope; Fielder/NW03681; Fielder/Antelope; NW07OR1070/Antelope; NW07OR1066/OR2050272H) were selected to study the genetic inheritance of PPO activity. STS marker...

  2. Microbial correlates of Fusarium biomass and deoxynivalenol content in individual wheat seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manipulating the microbiome of wheat seeds and heads may contribute to control of Fusarium head blight and mycotoxin accumulation in grain, which creates a food safety hazard. With the aim of identifying novel management targets, we looked for correlations between Fusarium biomass or deoxynivalenol ...

  3. Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat : using the in vitro androgenic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, M.B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) belongs to the three most important food crops in the world. In certain years, the crop can suffer considerable damage as a result of Fusarium Head Blight (FHB), especially as no chemical control is effective against

  4. Development of a European system for identification of emerging mycotoxins in wheat supply chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.; Kandhai, M.C.; Brynestad, S.; Dreyer, M.; Borjesson, T.; Martins, M.; Uiterwijk, M.; Morrison, E.; Booij, C.J.H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a research project aimed at the conceptual development of an identification system for emerging mycotoxins in European feed and food supply chains of wheat. Basic requirements for such a system were addressed, including the selection of indicators, locating

  5. Influence of instrument rigidity and specimen geometry on calculations of compressive strength properties of wheat endosperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endosperm texture is one of the most important quality features in wheat that defines milling energy requirements and the suitability of flour or semolina for the various food products such as pan breads, crackers, cakes, and pastas. Rooted in low molecular weight proteins known as puroindolines a a...

  6. 7 CFR 810.2201 - Definition of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definition of wheat. 810.2201 Section 810.2201... GRAIN United States Standards for Wheat Terms Defined § 810.2201 Definition of wheat. Grain that, before the removal of dockage, consists of 50 percent or more common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), club wheat...

  7. Acceptability of Noodles Produced from Blends of Wheat, Acha and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acha (Digitaria exilis) and soybean (Glycine max) were processed into flours and used to substitute wheat flour (Titicum aestivm) as a composite flour at different proportions of 100:0:0 (Wheat); 75:25:25 (Wheat: Acha: Soybean); 75:25 (Wheat: Acha); 75:25 (Wheat: Soybean) and 50:50 (Acha: soybean). The formulated ...

  8. Assessment of Allergy to Milk, Egg, Cod, and Wheat in Swedish Schoolchildren: A Population Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winberg, Anna; West, Christina E; Strinnholm, Åsa; Nordström, Lisbeth; Hedman, Linnea; Rönmark, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Knowledge about the prevalence of allergies to foods in childhood and adolescence is incomplete. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of allergies to milk, egg, cod, and wheat using reported data, clinical examinations, and double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges, and to describe the phenotypes of reported food hypersensitivity in a cohort of Swedish schoolchildren. Methods In a population-based cohort of 12-year-old children, the parents of 2612 (96% of invited) completed a questionnaire. Specific IgE antibodies to foods were analyzed in a random sample (n=695). Children reporting complete avoidance of milk, egg, cod, or wheat due to perceived hypersensitivity and without physician-diagnosed celiac disease were invited to undergo clinical examination that included specific IgE testing, a celiac screening test, and categorization into phenotypes of food hypersensitivity according to preset criteria. Children with possible food allergy were further evaluated with double-blind challenges. Results In this cohort, the prevalence of reported food allergy to milk, egg, cod, or wheat was 4.8%. Food allergy was diagnosed in 1.4% of the children after clinical evaluation and in 0.6% following double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge. After clinical examination, children who completely avoided one or more essential foods due to perceived food hypersensitivity were categorized with the following phenotypes: allergy (29%), outgrown allergy (19%), lactose intolerance (40%), and unclear (12%). Conclusions There was a high discrepancy in the prevalence of allergy to milk, egg, cod and wheat as assessed by reported data, clinical evaluation, and double-blind food challenges. Food hypersensitivity phenotyping according to preset criteria was helpful for identifying children with food allergy. PMID:26134827

  9. Assessment of Allergy to Milk, Egg, Cod, and Wheat in Swedish Schoolchildren: A Population Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Winberg

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the prevalence of allergies to foods in childhood and adolescence is incomplete. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of allergies to milk, egg, cod, and wheat using reported data, clinical examinations, and double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges, and to describe the phenotypes of reported food hypersensitivity in a cohort of Swedish schoolchildren.In a population-based cohort of 12-year-old children, the parents of 2612 (96% of invited completed a questionnaire. Specific IgE antibodies to foods were analyzed in a random sample (n=695. Children reporting complete avoidance of milk, egg, cod, or wheat due to perceived hypersensitivity and without physician-diagnosed celiac disease were invited to undergo clinical examination that included specific IgE testing, a celiac screening test, and categorization into phenotypes of food hypersensitivity according to preset criteria. Children with possible food allergy were further evaluated with double-blind challenges.In this cohort, the prevalence of reported food allergy to milk, egg, cod, or wheat was 4.8%. Food allergy was diagnosed in 1.4% of the children after clinical evaluation and in 0.6% following double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge. After clinical examination, children who completely avoided one or more essential foods due to perceived food hypersensitivity were categorized with the following phenotypes: allergy (29%, outgrown allergy (19%, lactose intolerance (40%, and unclear (12%.There was a high discrepancy in the prevalence of allergy to milk, egg, cod and wheat as assessed by reported data, clinical evaluation, and double-blind food challenges. Food hypersensitivity phenotyping according to preset criteria was helpful for identifying children with food allergy.

  10. Effect of textile wastewater on growth and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najam-us-Sahar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Textile wastewater can be a good source of nutrients in addition to meet the crop water requirements in areas facing water shortage problem. The use of untreated industrial wastewater can be hazardous for end users and soil environment due to high concentration of pollutants. The toxic effects of wastewater could be reduced by dilution of these pollutants. A pot trial was conducted to evaluate the suitability of untreated textile wastewater at different dilution levels (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100% for improving growth, physiology and yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. Tap water (0 % dilution level was applied as control treatment. Results showed that textile effluents negatively affected growth and yield of wheat. Maximum reduction in growth, yield, chemical and physiological parameters of wheat was recorded on application of textile wastewater (100% wastewater dilution level. However, on dilution, inhibitory effects of textile wastewater on all measured parameters of wheat were significantly reduced. In addition, effects of 10% and 20% diluted textile effluent on growth and yield of wheat was statistically at par with control. So, it can be concluded that although textile wastewater imparts negative effects on wheat but on dilution it can be used for irrigation of wheat in areas facing water scarcity. However, dyes or their intermediates even in the diluted textile wastewater after entering into food chain may cause harm to human. Such wastewater could be used for biomass production of bioenergy crops and further studies are required to test toxicity impacts of textile wastewater on human through food chain.

  11. Using Satellite Data to Unpack Causes of Yield Gaps in India's Wheat Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, M.; Singh, B.; Srivastava, A.; Malik, R. K.; McDonald, A.; Lobell, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    India will face significant food security challenges in the coming decades due to climate change, natural resource degradation, and population growth. Yields of wheat, one of India's staple crops, are already stagnating and will be significantly impacted by warming temperatures. Despite these challenges, wheat yields can be enhanced by implementing improved management in regions with existing yield gaps. To identify the magnitude and causes of current yield gaps, we produced 30 m resolution yield maps across India's main wheat belt, the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP), from 2000 to 2015. Yield maps were derived using a new method that translates satellite vegetation indices to yield estimates using crop model simulations, bypassing the need for ground calibration data that rarely exist in smallholder systems. We find that yields can be increased by 5% on average and up to 16% in the eastern IGP by improving management to current best practices within a given district. However, if policies and technologies are put in place to improve management to current best practices in Punjab, the highest yielding state, yields can be increased by 29% in the eastern IGP. Considering which factors most influence wheat yields, we find that later sow dates and warmer temperatures are most associated with low yields across the IGP. This suggests that strategies that reduce the negative effects of heat stress, like earlier sowing and planting heat-tolerant wheat varieties, are critical to India's current and future food security.

  12. Primary versus secondary immunoglobulin E sensitization to soy and wheat in the Multi-Centre Allergy Study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matricardi, P M; Bockelbrink, A; Beyer, K; Keil, T; Niggemann, B; Grüber, C; Wahn, U; Lau, S

    2008-03-01

    IgE sensitization to soy and wheat is classified as 'primary' when generated by food ingestion and 'secondary' when it as a consequence of primary sensitization to cross-reacting pollen antigens via inhalation. The age-specific relevance of these categories of sensitization throughout childhood is unknown. To monitor the natural course of IgE sensitization against common food allergens in childhood in relation to sensitization against cross-reactive airborne allergens. The German Multi-Centre Allergy Study with follow-up from birth to age 13 recruited initially 1314 children. IgE antibody levels against cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, wheat, mites, cat and dog dander, birch and grass pollens were tested. Longitudinal data were analysed from the 273 children with sera obtained at age 2, 5, 7 and 10 years of age. The point prevalence of sensitization (>1.0 kU/L) to milk and egg allergens progressively decreased from about 4% at 2 years to soy progressively increased with age, from 2% to 7% (soy) and from 2% to 9% (wheat). At 10 years of age, IgE to grass pollen was detected in 97% and 98% of the children reacting against soy and wheat, respectively; IgE to birch pollen was observed in 86% and 82% of the children reacting against soy and wheat, respectively. Early IgE sensitization to soy or wheat preceded that to grass or birch pollen in only 4% and 8% of participants sensitized to soy and wheat, respectively. IgE sensitization to soy and wheat is relatively uncommon and mostly primary in early infancy, more frequent and mostly secondary to pollen sensitization at school age. Clinical Implications Awareness should be raised to avoid unnecessary diet restrictions due to the high frequency of clinically irrelevant, secondary sensitization to soy and wheat in schoolchildren with pollinosis.

  13. Evaluation of the Effect of Crop Rotations on Yield and Yield Components of Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Darya)

    OpenAIRE

    H. A. Fallahi; U. Mahmadyarov; H. Sabouri; M. Ezat-Ahmadi4

    2013-01-01

    Grain yield in wheat is influenced directly and indirectly by other plant characteristics. One of the main goals in wheat breeding programs is increase of grain yield. Considering the role of crop rotation in increasing grain yield, and in order to study the difference between crop rotations for wheat yield and yield components (Darya cultivar), an experiment was conducted with six rotation treatments (wheat-chickpea-wheat, wheat-cotton-wheat, wheat-watermelon-wheat, wheat-wheat-wheat, wheat-...

  14. Food allergy: the 10 common offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, F

    1976-02-01

    The 10 chief offenders among food allergens are cow's milk, chocolate and cola (the kola nut family), corn, eggs, the pea family (chiefly peanut, which is not a nut), citrus fruits, tomato, wheat and other small grains, cinnamon and artificial food colors. Food allergy results in a remarkable variety of clinical syndromes. Diagnois rests on an elimination and challenge process. Treatment is avoidance. Desensitization does not work.

  15. De Novo Assembly and Transcriptome Analysis of Wheat with Male Sterility Induced by the Chemical Hybridizing Agent SQ-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qidi; Song, Yulong; Zhang, Gaisheng; Ju, Lan; Zhang, Jiao; Yu, Yongang; Niu, Na; Wang, Junwei; Ma, Shoucai

    2015-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), one of the world's most important food crops, is a strictly autogamous (self-pollinating) species with exclusively perfect flowers. Male sterility induced by chemical hybridizing agents has increasingly attracted attention as a tool for hybrid seed production in wheat; however, the molecular mechanisms of male sterility induced by the agent SQ-1 remain poorly understood due to limited whole transcriptome data. Therefore, a comparative analysis of wheat anther transcriptomes for male fertile wheat and SQ-1-induced male sterile wheat was carried out using next-generation sequencing technology. In all, 42,634,123 sequence reads were generated and were assembled into 82,356 high-quality unigenes with an average length of 724 bp. Of these, 1,088 unigenes were significantly differentially expressed in the fertile and sterile wheat anthers, including 643 up-regulated unigenes and 445 down-regulated unigenes. The differentially expressed unigenes with functional annotations were mapped onto 60 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. They were mainly involved in coding for the components of ribosomes, photosynthesis, respiration, purine and pyrimidine metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glutathione metabolism, RNA transport and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species metabolism, mRNA surveillance pathways, protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, protein export, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. This study is the first to provide a systematic overview comparing wheat anther transcriptomes of male fertile wheat with those of SQ-1-induced male sterile wheat and is a valuable source of data for future research in SQ-1-induced wheat male sterility.

  16. De Novo Assembly and Transcriptome Analysis of Wheat with Male Sterility Induced by the Chemical Hybridizing Agent SQ-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qidi Zhu

    Full Text Available Wheat (Triticum aestivum L., one of the world's most important food crops, is a strictly autogamous (self-pollinating species with exclusively perfect flowers. Male sterility induced by chemical hybridizing agents has increasingly attracted attention as a tool for hybrid seed production in wheat; however, the molecular mechanisms of male sterility induced by the agent SQ-1 remain poorly understood due to limited whole transcriptome data. Therefore, a comparative analysis of wheat anther transcriptomes for male fertile wheat and SQ-1-induced male sterile wheat was carried out using next-generation sequencing technology. In all, 42,634,123 sequence reads were generated and were assembled into 82,356 high-quality unigenes with an average length of 724 bp. Of these, 1,088 unigenes were significantly differentially expressed in the fertile and sterile wheat anthers, including 643 up-regulated unigenes and 445 down-regulated unigenes. The differentially expressed unigenes with functional annotations were mapped onto 60 pathways using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. They were mainly involved in coding for the components of ribosomes, photosynthesis, respiration, purine and pyrimidine metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glutathione metabolism, RNA transport and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species metabolism, mRNA surveillance pathways, protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, protein export, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. This study is the first to provide a systematic overview comparing wheat anther transcriptomes of male fertile wheat with those of SQ-1-induced male sterile wheat and is a valuable source of data for future research in SQ-1-induced wheat male sterility.

  17. Anaphylaxis to wheat flour-derived foodstuffs and the lipid transfer protein syndrome: a potential role of wheat lipid transfer protein Tri a 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacin, Arantxa; Bartra, Joan; Muñoz, Rosa; Diaz-Perales, Araceli; Valero, Antonio; Salcedo, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Food allergy to wheat-derived foodstuffs is on the rise. Tri a 14, a wheat flour lipid transfer protein (LTP) allergen, has been described as a major allergen associated with baker's asthma and wheat food allergy. Cross-reactivity among LTP allergens leads to the so-called 'LTP syndrome'. Eight adult patients showing anaphylaxis after ingestion of wheat-derived foodstuffs were selected. A homemade wheat extract, purified natural (n) and recombinant (r) Tri a 14, and peach fruit and Artemisia pollen LTP allergens Pru p 3 and Art v 3 were subjected to skin prick test, specific IgE determination (ELISA) and IgE immunodetection assays. All tests were positive in the 8 selected patients with the homemade extract. Positive skin prick test responses to nTri a 14, Pru p 3 and Art v 3 were found in 5/8, 6/8 and 4/4 patients, respectively. Specific IgE determined by ELISA assays was detected in 6 to nTri a 14 and rTri a 14, in 4 to Pru p 3 and in 3 to Art v 3 out of 8 individual sera tested, whereas all these sera showed IgE binding to nTri a 14 and Pru p 3 in immunodetection after SDS-PAGE separation. Tri a 14 seems to be a relevant allergen in patients with anaphylaxis after ingestion of wheat flour foodstuffs, according to in vitro and in vivo results. Clinical history of the analyzed patients, together with sensitization to peach Pru p 3 and Artemisia pollen Art v 3, suggests that 6 of them suffer from LTP syndrome. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Reinforcement Effect of Alkali-Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten and Shear-Degraded Wheat Starch in Carboxylated Styrene-Butadiene Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) are the protein and carbohydrate obtained from wheat flours. Wheat gluten is not water soluble or dispersible due to its hydrophobic nature. To prepare wheat gluten dispersions, an alkali hydrolysis reaction was carried out to produce a stable aqueous disper...

  19. Alkylresorcinols in selected Polish rye and wheat cereals and whole-grain cereal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulawinek, Mariola; Jaromin, Anna; Kozubek, Arkadiusz; Zarnowski, Robert

    2008-08-27

    The alkylresorcinol content and homologue composition in selected Polish rye and wheat cultivars and selected whole-grain cereal products were determined in this study. Cereal grains and whole-grain cereal products were extracted with acetone, whereas bread types were extracted with hot 1-propanol. The average alkylresorcinol content in tested rye (approximately 1100 mg/kg DM) and wheat (approximately 800 mg/kg DM) grains harvested in Poland was within the range previously reported in Swedish and Finnish samples. The total alkylresorcinol content in tested cereal products available on the Polish market varied from very low levels in barley grain-based foods up to 3000 mg/kg DM in wheat bran. The total alkylresorcinol content in 14 bread samples extracted with hot 1-propanol varied from approximately 100 mg/kg DM in whole bread made with honey up to approximately 650 mg/kg DM in whole-rye bread. Calculated ratios of C17:0 to C21:0 homologues, a useful parameter previously used to distinguish between rye and wheat cereals and their derived products, was about 1.2-1.4 in rye products, about 0.2 in wheat products, and varied between 0.2 and 0.6 in cereal-derived products containing a mixture of whole rye and/or wheat. The data set obtained were subsequently compared using cluster and principal component analysis, which allowed the tested cereal products to be classified into two major groups consisting of whole-rye or whole-wheat products, respectively. On the basis of that approach, mixed cereal products containing rye and wheat bran or whole rye and wheat flour were grouped between those two well-defined clusters. Our work not only provides a detailed examination of alkylresorcinols in selected Polish rye and wheat cultivars and selected whole-grain cereal products, but also demonstrates that this type of analysis accompanied by the use of proper statistical algorithms offers an objective way to evaluate the quality of whole-grain rye and/or wheat and their derived

  20. Performance of Vegetation Indices for Wheat Yield Forecasting for Punjab, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempewolf, J.; Becker-Reshef, I.; Adusei, B.; Barker, B.

    2013-12-01

    Forecasting wheat yield in major producer countries early in the growing season allows better planning for harvest deficits and surplus with implications for food security, world market transactions, sustaining adequate grain stocks, policy making and other matters. Remote sensing imagery is well suited for yield forecasting over large areas. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has been the most-used spectral index derived from remote sensing imagery for assessing crop condition of major crops and forecasting crop yield. Many authors have found that the highest correlation between NDVI and yield of wheat crops occurs at the height of the growing season when NDVI values and photosynthetic activity of the wheat plants are at their relative maximum. At the same time NDVI saturates in very dense and vigorous (healthy, green) canopies such as wheat fields during the seasonal peak and shows significantly reduced sensitivity to further increases in photosynthetic activity. In this study we compare the performance of different vegetation indices derived from space-borne red and near-infrared spectral reflectance measurements for wheat yield forecasting in the Punjab Province, Pakistan. Areas covered by wheat crop each year were determined using a time series of MODIS 8-day composites at 250 m resolution converted to temporal metrics and classified using a bagged decision tree approach, driven by classified multi-temporal Landsat scenes. Within the wheat areas we analyze and compare wheat yield forecasts derived from three different satellite-based vegetation indices at the peak of the growing season. We regressed in turn NDVI, Wide Dynamic Range Vegetation Index (WDRVI) and the Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) from the four years preceding the wheat growing season 2011/12 against reported yield values and applied the regression equations to forecast wheat yield for the 2011/12 season per district for each of 36 Punjab districts. Yield forecasts overall

  1. Study of wheat protein based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Peng

    Wheat gluten is a naturally occurring protein polymer. It is produced in abundance by the agricultural industry, is biodegradable and very inexpensive (less than $0.50/lb). It has unique viscoelastic properties, which makes it a promising alternative to synthetic plastics. The unplasticized wheat gluten is, however, brittle. Plasticizers such as glycerol are commonly used to give flexibility to the articles made of wheat gluten but with the penalty of greatly reduced stiffness. Former work showed that the brittleness of wheat gluten can also be improved by modifying it with a tri-thiol additive with no penalty of reduced stiffness. However, the cost of the customer designed tri-thiol additive was very high and it was unlikely to make a cost effective material from such an expensive additive. Here we designed a new, inexpensive thiol additive called SHPVA. It was synthesized from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) through a simple esterification reaction. The mechanical data of the molded wheat gluten/SHPVA material indicated that wheat gluten was toughened by SHPVA. As a control, the wheat gluten/PVA material showed no improvement compared with wheat gluten itself. Several techniques have been used to characterize this novel protein/polymer blend. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) study showed two phases in both wheat gluten/PVA and wheat gluten/SHPVA material. However, scanning electron microscope (SEM) pictures indicated that PVA was macroscopically separated from wheat gluten, while wheat gluten/SHPVA had a homogeneous look. The phase image from the atomic force microscope (AFM) gave interesting contrast based on the difference in the mechanical properties of these two phases. The biodegradation behavior of these protein/polymer blends was examined in soil. SHPVA was not degraded in the time period of the experiment. Wheat gluten/SHPVA degraded slower than wheat gluten. We also developed some other interesting material systems based on wheat gluten, including the

  2. Evaluating spectral indices for winter wheat health status monitoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vegetation index relationships for winter wheat in order to determine indices that are sensitive to changes in the wheat health status. The indices were derived from Landsat 8 scenes over the wheat growing area across Bloemfontein, South Africa.

  3. Meiotic behaviour of tetraploid wheats (Triticum turgidum L.) and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meiotic aberrations such as laggards, chromosome bridges, micronuclei, abnormal cytokines, chromatin pulling and meiotic restitution were observed and the studied genotypes were accordingly ranked as follows: triticale > synthetic hexaploid wheats > tetraploid wheats possessing meiotic restitution > tetraploid wheats ...

  4. Genetic variability in Brazilian wheat cultivars assessed by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Ivan; Vieira, Elisa Serra Negra; da Silva, Glacy Jaqueline; de Assis Franco, Francisco; Marchioro, Volmir Sérgio

    2009-07-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is one of the most important food staples in the south of Brazil. Understanding genetic variability among the assortment of Brazilian wheat is important for breeding. The aim of this work was to molecularly characterize the thirty-six wheat cultivars recommended for various regions of Brazil, and to assess mutual genetic distances, through the use of microsatellite markers. Twenty three polymorphic microsatellite markers (PMM) delineated all 36 of the samples, revealing a total of 74 simple sequence repeat (SSR) alleles, i.e. an average of 3.2 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content (PIC value) calculated to assess the informativeness of each marker ranged from 0.20 to 0.79, with a mean of 0.49. Genetic distances among the 36 cultivars ranged from 0.10 (between cultivars Ocepar 18 and BRS 207) to 0.88 (between cultivars CD 101 and Fudancep 46), the mean distance being 0.48. Twelve groups were obtained by using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means analysis (UPGMA), and thirteen through the Tocher method. Both methods produced similar clusters, with one to thirteen cultivars per group. The results indicate that these tools may be used to protect intellectual property and for breeding and selection programs.

  5. Hyperspectral imaging to identify salt-tolerant wheat lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Ali; Yang, Ce; Miller, Marisa E.; Kianian, Shahryar; Marchetto, Peter

    2017-05-01

    In order to address the worldwide growing demand for food, agriculture is facing certain challenges and limitations. One of the important threats limiting crop productivity is salinity. Identifying salt tolerate varieties is crucial to mitigate the negative effects of this abiotic stress in agricultural production systems. Traditional measurement methods of this stress, such as biomass retention, are labor intensive, environmentally influenced, and often poorly correlated to salinity stress alone. In this study, hyperspectral imaging, as a non-destructive and rapid method, was utilized to expedite the process of identifying relatively the most salt tolerant line among four wheat lines including Triticum aestivum var. Kharchia, T. aestivum var. Chinese Spring, (Ae. columnaris) T. aestivum var. Chinese Spring, and (Ae. speltoides) T. aestivum var. Chinese Spring. To examine the possibility of early detection of a salt tolerant line, image acquisition was started one day after stress induction and continued on three, seven, and 12 days after adding salt. Simplex volume maximization (SiVM) method was deployed to detect superior wheat lines in response to salt stress. The results of analyzing images taken as soon as one day after salt induction revealed that Kharchia and (columnaris)Chinese Spring are the most tolerant wheat lines, while (speltoides) Chinese Spring was a moderately susceptible, and Chinese Spring was a relatively susceptible line to salt stress. These results were confirmed with the measuring biomass performed several weeks later.

  6. Characterizing bias correction uncertainty in wheat yield predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Andrea Monica; Jones, Julie; Freckleton, Robert; Scaife, Adam

    2017-04-01

    Farming systems are under increased pressure due to current and future climate change, variability and extremes. Research on the impacts of climate change on crop production typically rely on the output of complex Global and Regional Climate Models, which are used as input to crop impact models. Yield predictions from these top-down approaches can have high uncertainty for several reasons, including diverse model construction and parameterization, future emissions scenarios, and inherent or response uncertainty. These uncertainties propagate down each step of the 'cascade of uncertainty' that flows from climate input to impact predictions, leading to yield predictions that may be too complex for their intended use in practical adaptation options. In addition to uncertainty from impact models, uncertainty can also stem from the intermediate steps that are used in impact studies to adjust climate model simulations to become more realistic when compared to observations, or to correct the spatial or temporal resolution of climate simulations, which are often not directly applicable as input into impact models. These important steps of bias correction or calibration also add uncertainty to final yield predictions, given the various approaches that exist to correct climate model simulations. In order to address how much uncertainty the choice of bias correction method can add to yield predictions, we use several evaluation runs from Regional Climate Models from the Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment over Europe (EURO-CORDEX) at different resolutions together with different bias correction methods (linear and variance scaling, power transformation, quantile-quantile mapping) as input to a statistical crop model for wheat, a staple European food crop. The objective of our work is to compare the resulting simulation-driven hindcasted wheat yields to climate observation-driven wheat yield hindcasts from the UK and Germany in order to determine ranges of yield

  7. Wheat yield dynamics: a structural econometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Afsin; Akdi, Yilmaz; Arslan, Fahrettin

    2007-10-15

    In this study we initially have tried to explore the wheat situation in Turkey, which has a small-open economy and in the member countries of European Union (EU). We have observed that increasing the wheat yield is fundamental to obtain comparative advantage among countries by depressing domestic prices. Also the changing structure of supporting schemes in Turkey makes it necessary to increase its wheat yield level. For this purpose, we have used available data to determine the dynamics of wheat yield by Ordinary Least Square Regression methods. In order to find out whether there is a linear relationship among these series we have checked each series whether they are integrated at the same order or not. Consequently, we have pointed out that fertilizer usage and precipitation level are substantial inputs for producing high wheat yield. Furthermore, in respect for our model, fertilizer usage affects wheat yield more than precipitation level.

  8. Elevatated CO2 alleviates heat stress tolerance in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Rosenqvist, Eva S. K.; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2014-01-01

    Wollenweber4 1Department of Bioenergy, Tamilnadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India. 2Department of Food Science, Aarhus University, Kirstinebjergvej 10, 5792 Årslev, Denmark 3Institute of Agricultural Sciences and Ecology, University of Copenhagen, Hojbakkegaard Allé 9, 2630 Taastrup, Denmark 4......Institute for Agroecology, Aarhus University, Forsøgsvej 1, 4200 Slagelse, Denmark *Presenting author This study analysed the alleviating effect of elevated CO2 on stress-induced decreases in photosynthesis and changes in carbohydrate metabolism in two wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.) of different...... crop performance under various climatic stresses....

  9. Birds select conventional over organic wheat when given free choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Ailsa J; Whittingham, Mark J

    2010-08-30

    Global demand for organic produce is increasing by euro4 billion annually. One key reason why consumers buy organic food is because they consider it to be better for human and animal health. Reviews comparing organic and conventional food have stated that organic food is preferred by birds and mammals in choice tests. This study shows the opposite result-that captive birds in the laboratory and wild garden birds both consumed more conventional than organic wheat when given free choice. There was a lag in preference formation during which time birds learnt to distinguish between the two food types, which is likely to explain why the present results differ from those of previous studies. A further experiment confirmed that, of 16 potential causal factors, detection by birds of consistently higher levels of protein in conventional seeds (a common difference between many organic and conventional foodstuffs) is the likely mechanism behind this pattern. The results of this study suggest that the current dogma that organic food is preferred to conventional food may not always be true, which is of considerable importance for consumer perceptions of organically grown food. Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Prehaustorial and posthaustorial resistance to wheat leaf rust in diploid wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anker, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    In modern wheat cultivars, resistance to wheat leaf rust, Puccinia triticina , is either based on hypersensitivity resistance or on partial resistance. Hypersensitivity resistance in wheat is monogenic, often complete and posthaustorial: it is induced after the

  11. Chromatin Structure of Wheat Breeding Lines Resistant to Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus (WSMV) is an important disease limiting wheat production, however no WSMV resistance effective above 18°C is present within the primary genetic pool of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In contrast, the wild relative Thinopyrum intermedium (2n=6x=42) shows good resistance to WS...

  12. Wheat genomics comes of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uauy, Cristobal

    2017-04-01

    Advances in wheat genomics have lagged behind other major cereals (e.g., rice and maize) due to its highly repetitive and large polyploid genome. Recent technological developments in sequencing and assembly methods, however, have largely overcome these barriers. The community now moves to an era centred on functional characterisation of the genome. This includes understanding sequence and structural variation as well as how information is integrated across multiple homoeologous genomes. This understanding promises to uncover variation previously hidden from natural and human selection due to the often observed functional redundancy between homoeologs. Key functional genomic resources will enable this, including sequenced mutant populations and gene editing technologies which are now available in wheat. Training the next-generation of genomics-enabled researchers will be essential to ensure these advances are quickly translated into farmers' fields. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of two transgenic low-gliadin wheat lines and non-transgenic wheat control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Molina, María Dolores; Muccilli, Vera; Saletti, Rosaria; Foti, Salvatore; Masci, Stefania; Barro, Francisco

    2017-08-08

    Gluten proteins are major determinants of the bread making quality of wheat, but also of important wheat-related disorders, including coeliac disease (CD), and allergies. We carried out a proteomic study using the total grain proteins from two low-gliadin wheat lines, obtained by RNAi, and the untransformed wild type as reference. The impact of silencing on both target and on non-target proteins was evaluated. Because of the great protein complexity, we performed separate analyses of four kernel protein fractions: gliadins and glutenin subunits, and metabolic and CM-like proteins, by using a classical 2D electrophoresis gel based approach followed by RP-HPLC/nESI-MS/MS. As a result of the strong down-regulation of gliadins, the HMW-GS, metabolic and chloroform/methanol soluble proteins were over-accumulated in the transgenic lines, especially in the line D793, which showed the highest silencing of gliadins. Basing on these data, and considering that metabolic proteins and chloroform/methanol soluble proteins (CM-like), such as the α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor family, β-amylase and serpins, were related to wheat allergens, further in vivo analysis will be needed, especially those related to clinical trials in controlled patients, to determine if these lines could be used for food preparation for celiac or other gluten intolerant groups. Several enteropathies and allergies are related to wheat proteins. Biotechnological techniques such as genetic transformation and RNA interference have allowed the silencing of gliadin genes, providing lines with very low gliadin content in the grains. We report a proteomic-based approach to characterize two low-gliadin transgenic wheat lines obtained by RNAi technology. These lines harbor the same silencing fragment, but driven by two different endosperm specific promoters (γ-gliadin and D-hordein). The comprehensive proteome analysis of these transgenic lines, by combining two-dimensional electrophoresis and RP

  14. Food allergy and its relevance to industrial food proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, E N C; Breiteneder, H

    2005-09-01

    Food allergies can be defined as IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and are quite distinct from food intolerances, such as Coeliac disease, with symptoms usually appearing within a matter of minutes of exposure. Around 1-2% of adults and up to 5-7% of children suffer from some type of food allergy with foods such as peanuts, tree nuts, wheat and soy, cow's milk, egg, fish and shellfish being responsible for the majority of reactions. The macromolecules recognised by IgE (generally proteinaceous in nature) are termed allergens. A brief description of the allergenic components present in the major allergenic foods is given followed by a short discussion regarding their importance in industrial proteins in the light of recent food labelling legislation for allergens.

  15. Multimodel ensembles of wheat growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martre, Pierre; Wallach, Daniel; Asseng, Senthold

    2015-01-01

    , but such studies are difficult to organize and have only recently begun. We report on the largest ensemble study to date, of 27 wheat models tested in four contrasting locations for their accuracy in simulating multiple crop growth and yield variables. The relative error averaged over models was 24...... are applicable to other crop species, and hypothesize that they apply more generally to ecological system models....

  16. Interference of allelopathic wheat with different weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song-Zhu; Li, Yong-Hua; Kong, Chui-Hua; Xu, Xiao-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Interference of allelopathic wheat with weeds involves a broad spectrum of species either independently or synergistically with competitive factors. This study examined the interference of allelopathic wheat with 38 weeds in relation to the production of allelochemical 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (DIMBOA) in wheat with and without root-root interactions. There were substantial differences in weed biomass and DIMBOA concentration in wheat-weed coexisting systems. Among 38 weeds, nine weeds were inhibited significantly by allelopathic wheat but the other 29 weeds were not. DIMBOA levels in wheat varied greatly with weed species. There was no significant relationship between DIMBOA levels and weed suppression effects. Root segregation led to great changes in weed inhibition and DIMBOA level. Compared with root contact, the inhibition of eight weeds was lowered significantly, while significantly increased inhibition occurred in 11 weeds with an increased DIMBOA concentration under root segregation. Furthermore, the production of DIMBOA in wheat was induced by the root exudates from weeds. Interference of allelopathic wheat with weeds not only is determined by the specificity of the weeds but also depends on root-root interactions. In particular, allelopathic wheat may detect certain weeds through the root exudates and respond by increasing the allelochemical, resulting in weed identity recognition. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Photosynthesis of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum) in rainfed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . ... observed environments. These physiological results of wheat genotypes can be used to find adaptive and potential genotypes for changing environment. Keywords: Wheat, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, environment.

  18. Food allergies and migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, E C

    1979-05-05

    60 migraine patients completed elimination diets after a 5-day period of withdrawal from their normal diet. 52 (87%) of these patients had been using oral contraceptive steroids, tobacco, and/or ergotamine for an average of 3 years, 22 years, and 7.4 years respectively. The commonest foods causing reactions were wheat (78%), orange (65%), eggs (45%), tea and coffee (40% each), chocolate and milk (37%) each), beef (35%), and corn, cane sugar, and yeast (33% each). When an average of ten common foods were avoided there was a dramatic fall in the number of headaches per month, 85% of patients becoming headache-free. The 25% of patients with hypertension became normotensive. Chemicals in the home environment can make this testing difficult for outpatients. Both immunological and non-immunological mechanisms may play a part in the pathogenesis of migraine caused by food intolerance.

  19. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF PROCESSED PRODUCTS OF WHEAT GERM ON GRAIN BREAD QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Ponomareva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Development and introduction of new types of bakery products with increased nutritional value is one of the basic and urgent problems in the bakery industry. The solution of it is the use of whole grains, as well as secondary products of their processing. The use of by-products of wheat germ (oil, oilcake, oilcake flour, which are rich in proteins and enhances the nutritional value of products is considered to be a promising area in the bakery industry. At the same time the program objectives products, developed in the framework of the "Strategy of development of the food processing industry of the Russian Federation for the period up to 2020"products, are expanding the production of cereal-based foods , and involving of secondary resources in the economy. These technologies are re-source efficient. They allow efficient use of by-products raw materials of the milling industry. The process for the preparation of grain bread on the basis of a thick sourdough from bioactivated wheat grain is known. However, despite all the advantages of grain breads with high amounts of dietary fiber, minerals and vitamins, they exhibit low levels of protein and lysine deficiency. At present larger preference is given to the raw materials of natural origin (millet, buckwheat and oatmeal flours, fruit puree, whole grains, oil, flour and wheat germ flakes, and etc. for foods enrichment in modern food science. Products of processing of wheat germ: oil, flakes, oilcake and oil-cake flour are widely used in bakery technology. To improve the nutritional value flour from wheat germ oilcake was used in the work. In the course of the research its positive effect on the quality of semi-finished and finished products was found. They differed from the control sample in a high content of antioxidants and better digestibility of proteins bread crumb.

  1. Sit down at the ball game: How trade barriers make the world less food secure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.M.; Shutes, L.J.; Meijerink, G.W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the impacts of trade policy responses to rising world food prices by carrying out a series of stylised experiments in the wheat market using a world trade model, GTAP. The sequence of events that is modelled comprises a negative wheat supply shock and subsequent implementation of

  2. Water footprint assessment along the wheat-bread value chain towards the sustainable use of freshwater in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohlotsane, Pascalina; Owusu-Sekyere, Enoch; Jordaan, Henry

    2017-04-01

    A significant amount of water is used in food production. The current increase in demand for food and impact of climate change place much pressure on the available water resources. South Africa is soon approaching complete utilisation of its available surface water, with irrigated agriculture accountable for about 63% of the country's available water use. This poses a threat to food security. Wheat is the largest winter cereal crop produced in South Africa, approximately 80% of this wheat is used to produce Bread. Bread consumption in South Africa is estimated at 2.8 billion loaves per annum. About 62 loaves of bread are consumed per person per annum with noticeable differences in preferences. Therefore, it is important to account for the amount of water used along the wheat-bread production chain. In this paper, we examined water footprint along the wheat-bread value chain. The water footprint concept provides an appropriate framework for analysis to find the link between the consumption of agricultural goods and the use of water resources. The paper employed the Global Water Footprint Standard approach to calculating the volumetric green, blue and grey water footprint along the wheat-bread value chain. Our findings reveal that wheat production at the farm level accounts for 99.95 percent of the total water footprint of the bread, while processing and wholesale levels only account for 0.56 per cent. Our findings highlight the importance of effective and efficient water use at the farm level for wheat production. Specifically, the total water footprint of wheat bread is 937.42m3.ton-1. The green water component was found to be 190.59m3.ton-1 and that of blue water was 745.28 m3.ton-1. Grey water footprint accounted for only 1.55 m3.ton-1. The results indicate that the amount of water used at farm level is the largest contributor to the total water footprint of bread. Given the blue water scarcity situation in South Africa, it is very critical for wheat producers to

  3. Quantitative immunohistochemical method for detection of wheat protein in model sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Řezáčová Lukášková

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since gluten can induce coeliac symptoms in hypersensitive consumers with coeliac disease, it is necessary to label foodstuffs containing it. In order to label foodstuffs, it is essential to find reliable methods to accurately determine the amount of wheat protein in food. The objective of this study was to compare the quantitative detection of wheat protein in model sausages by ELISA and immunohistochemical methods. Immunohistochemistry was combined with stereology to achieve quantitative results. High correlation between addition of wheat protein and compared methods was confirmed. For ELISA method the determined values were r = 0.98, P P < 0.01. Although ELISA is an accredited method, it was not reliable, unlike immunohistochemical methods (stereology SD = 3.1.

  4. Impact of Enzymatic and Microbial Bioprocessing on Protein Modification and Nutritional Properties of Wheat Bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arte, Elisa; Rizzello, Carlo G; Verni, Michela; Nordlund, Emilia; Katina, Kati; Coda, Rossana

    2015-10-07

    Besides providing dietary fiber, wheat bran is a recognized source of protein and is considered a very valuable substitute for other protein-rich sources in the food and feed industry. Nonetheless, several factors affect protein bioavailability, including bran's layered structure. This study showed the influence on the release and protein modification of wheat bran of different bioprocessing methods involving the activation of endogenous enzymes of bran, the addition of an enzyme mixture having carbohydrase activity, and microbial fermentation. Bioprocessing in acidic conditions significantly enhanced the solubilization of protein from wheat bran, reaching the highest value in the treatment where the sole endogenous protease activity was activated. Bioprocessing through controlled fermentation allowed a more intense proteolysis and strongly impacted the in vitro digestibility of proteins. The combined use of starter cultures and cell-wall-degrading enzymes was characterized by the highest increase of phytase activity and total phenols.

  5. Effect of phytase on digestibility of corn, sorghum and wheat bran by silver catfish (Rhamdia voulezi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altevir Signor

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the digestibility of plant energetic ingredients, corn, sorghum and wheat bran, with and without phytase supplementation, in silver catfish (Rhamdia voulezi. The experimental design was completely randomized, represented by eight treatments, which consisted of the development of a reference diet and a test diet for each ingredient evaluated (corn, sorghum and wheat bran, with and without supplemental phytase. Diets were formulated so as to contain 70% reference feed and 30% test ingredient. The digestibility coefficients of dry matter and crude protein were significantly influenced only in relation to the evaluated ingredients. Phytase influenced the digestibility coefficients of energy and phosphorus, with interaction between food and the enzyme addition. The interaction between these two factors shows that the phytase efficiency is dependent on the type of vegetable ingredient used in the diet. The results suggest the supplementation of phytase for a higher nutrient digestibility of corn, sorghum and wheat bran by silver catifish (R. voulezi.

  6. Effect of incorporating finger millet in wheat flour on mixolab behavior, chapatti quality and starch digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bharati; Gujral, Hardeep Singh; Solah, Vicky

    2017-09-15

    Wheat and finger millet flour (two cultivars) were blended in the ratio (3:1) to form a composite flour and its dough properties were studied on the mixolab. The chapatti making and digestibility behavior of the composite flour was also investigated. The wheat finger millet (WFM) flour blend displayed up to 30.7% higher total phenolic content (TPC), 38.2% higher total flavonoid content (TFC) and 75.4% higher antioxidant activity (AOA) than the wheat flour. Chapattis prepared from the composite blends exhibited lower retrogradation as evident by the mixolab retrogradation index, higher values of soluble starch and soluble amylose in stored chapatti. The slowly digestible starch (SDS) correlated positively (R=0.816, pstarch content. The chapattis made from the composite flour had higher SDS and resistant starch (RS) values demonstrating potential as a food with functional characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dry heat treatment affects wheat bran surface properties and hydration kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Pieter J; Hemdane, Sami; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-07-15

    Heat stabilization of wheat bran aims at inactivation of enzymes which may cause rancidity and processability issues. Such treatments may however cause additional unanticipated phenomena which may affect wheat bran technological properties. In this work, the impact of toasting on wheat bran hydration capacity and hydration kinetics was studied. Hydration properties were assessed using the Enslin-Neff and drainage centrifugation water retention capacity methods, thermogravimetric analysis and contact angle goniometry, next to more traditional methods. While equilibrium hydration properties of bran were not affected by the heat treatment, the rate at which the heat treated bran hydrated was, however, very significantly reduced compared to the untreated bran. This phenomenon was found to originate from the formation of a lipid coating during the treatment rendering the bran surface hydrophobic. These insights help to understand and partially account for the modified processability of heat treated bran in food applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation Acreage, Production and Yield of Wheat (T. aestivum L. by Krigging Method in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Olgun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to reveal similarities and dissimilarities of provinces and to determine the potential of provinces on wheat in terms of for acreage, production and yield by using krigging method in Turkey. Wheat is the most important and strategic crop for Turkey and plays important a role in crop production, food industry and animal husbandry whether it is given greater importance in production marketing and valorization. Results revealed that, significant relationships appear between acreage, production and crop yield. Besides, climatic, topographic and soil conditions are very significant factors in determining acreage, yield and production of wheat. The use of cultivars having higher yield, more tolerance to drought cold, and have a shorter growing period allowing rapid development will increase crop, yield therefore acreage and production.

  9. Mass-spectrometry data for Rhizoctonia solani proteins produced during infection of wheat and vegetative growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P. Anderson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani is an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato, legumes and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about how R. solani causes disease. The data described in this article is derived from applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Comparisons of the data for sample types in this set will be useful to identify metabolic pathway changes as the fungus switches from saprophytic to a pathogenic lifestyle or pathogenicity related proteins contributing to the ability to cause disease on wheat. The data set is deposited in the PRIDE archive under identifier PRIDE: PXD002806.

  10. Morphological and physiological responses of different wheat genotypes to chilling stress: a cue to explain yield loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pu-Fang; Ma, Bao-Luo; Xiong, You-Cai; Zhang, Wen-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    The eco-physiological mechanism of wheat yield loss resulting from chilling stress is a fundamental scientific issue. However, previous studies have focused on hexaploid wheats, and few studies on the morphological and physiological plasticity of wheat plants. Six different wheat genotypes were tested under chilling stress to investigate the physio-morphological parameters as well as the loss of grain yield in growth chambers. Chilling stress resulted in significant loss in grain yield in all genotypes. Under chilling stress, diploid wheats generated zero harvest, and tetraploid genotypes also suffered from a pronounced loss in grain yield, compared with the control group. In contrast, hexaploid genotypes acquired relatively high maintenance rate of grain yield among three species. Diploid and tetraploid wheat genotypes maintained relatively large leaf area and high photosynthetic rates, but they were subjected to significant declines in vascular bundle number and productive tillers as a consequence of the inhibition by sink growth under chilling stress. The hexaploid wheats were found to have relatively low leaf area and photosynthetic rates. These genotypes also stored more soluble carbohydrates and exhibited stronger sink enhancement, ensuring the translocation and redistribution of assimilates. Our findings provided a new theoretical understanding of yield stabilization in the domestication process of wheat genotypes under chilling stress. © 2017 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Development of a LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous screening of seven water-soluble vitamins in processing semi-coarse wheat flour products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurit, Eric; Lyan, Bernard; Piquet, Agnès; Branlard, Gérard; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle

    2015-05-01

    Wheat is the second largest crop cultivated around the world and constitutes a major part of the daily diet in Europe. It is therefore important to determine the content of micronutrient in wheat and wheat-based food products to define the contribution of wheat-based foods to the nutrition of the consumers. The aim of the present work was to develop a simple and rapid method based on liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the simultaneous determination of seven water-soluble vitamins in various wheat-based food materials. The vitamins present in the test material were separated in less than 15 min by using a reverse-phase C18 column, and analyzed by positive ion electrospray selected reaction monitoring MS/MS. The MS response for all the vitamins was linear over the working range (0.05 to 9 μg/mL) with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.991 and 1. Limits of quantification in the different food materials ranged from 0.09 to 3.5 μg/g. Intra-day and inter-day precision were found satisfactory. The developed method was applied for the simultaneous analysis of the water-soluble vitamin natural content of different semi-coarse wheat flours and in their corresponding baking products.

  12. Mapping Winter Wheat with Multi-Temporal SAR and Optical Images in an Urban Agricultural Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Pan, Jianjun; Zhang, Peiyu; Wei, Shanbao; Han, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Winter wheat is the second largest food crop in China. It is important to obtain reliable winter wheat acreage to guarantee the food security for the most populous country in the world. This paper focuses on assessing the feasibility of in-season winter wheat mapping and investigating potential classification improvement by using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) images, optical images, and the integration of both types of data in urban agricultural regions with complex planting structures in Southern China. Both SAR (Sentinel-1A) and optical (Landsat-8) data were acquired, and classification using different combinations of Sentinel-1A-derived information and optical images was performed using a support vector machine (SVM) and a random forest (RF) method. The interference coherence and texture images were obtained and used to assess the effect of adding them to the backscatter intensity images on the classification accuracy. The results showed that the use of four Sentinel-1A images acquired before the jointing period of winter wheat can provide satisfactory winter wheat classification accuracy, with an F1 measure of 87.89%. The combination of SAR and optical images for winter wheat mapping achieved the best F1 measure–up to 98.06%. The SVM was superior to RF in terms of the overall accuracy and the kappa coefficient, and was faster than RF, while the RF classifier was slightly better than SVM in terms of the F1 measure. In addition, the classification accuracy can be effectively improved by adding the texture and coherence images to the backscatter intensity data. PMID:28587066

  13. Mapping Winter Wheat with Multi-Temporal SAR and Optical Images in an Urban Agricultural Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Winter wheat is the second largest food crop in China. It is important to obtain reliable winter wheat acreage to guarantee the food security for the most populous country in the world. This paper focuses on assessing the feasibility of in-season winter wheat mapping and investigating potential classification improvement by using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar images, optical images, and the integration of both types of data in urban agricultural regions with complex planting structures in Southern China. Both SAR (Sentinel-1A and optical (Landsat-8 data were acquired, and classification using different combinations of Sentinel-1A-derived information and optical images was performed using a support vector machine (SVM and a random forest (RF method. The interference coherence and texture images were obtained and used to assess the effect of adding them to the backscatter intensity images on the classification accuracy. The results showed that the use of four Sentinel-1A images acquired before the jointing period of winter wheat can provide satisfactory winter wheat classification accuracy, with an F1 measure of 87.89%. The combination of SAR and optical images for winter wheat mapping achieved the best F1 measure–up to 98.06%. The SVM was superior to RF in terms of the overall accuracy and the kappa coefficient, and was faster than RF, while the RF classifier was slightly better than SVM in terms of the F1 measure. In addition, the classification accuracy can be effectively improved by adding the texture and coherence images to the backscatter intensity data.

  14. Health risk assessment of heavy metals in wheat using different water qualities: implication for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zafar Iqbal; Ahmad, Kafeel; Rehman, Sidrah; Siddique, Samra; Bashir, Humayun; Zafar, Asma; Sohail, Muhammad; Ali, Salem Alhajj; Cazzato, Eugenio; De Mastro, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    In the recent years, the use of sewage water for irrigation has attracted the attention of arid and semi-arid countries where the availability of fresh water is poor. Despite the potential use of sewage water in crop irrigation as effective and sustainable strategy, the environmental and human risks behind this use need to be deeply investigated. In this regard, an experiment was carried out under field conditions in Nursery, University College of Agriculture Sargodha, to evaluate the possible health risks of undesirable metals in wheat grains. Wheat variety Sarang was cultivated and irrigated with different combinations of ground (GW) and sewage water (SW). The concentrations of heavy metals (Cr, Cd, Ni, and Pb) and trace elements (Cu, Zn, and Fe) in wheat grains as well as in soil were determined. Moreover, the pollution load index (PLI), accumulation factor (AF), daily intake of metals (DIM), and health risk index (HRI) were calculated. Results showed that the concentration trend of heavy metals was Pbwater quality, whereas Pb concentration in grain was within the acceptable levels as suggested by World Health Organization, when 100 % of SW was used for irrigation. Similar observation was reported for Cd concentration in the soil when wheat was irrigated with 100 % SW. In comparison to soil, the edible part of wheat presented lower concentration of all studied metals, except for Zn which was much higher compared to the tested soil samples. The higher concentration of Zn was responsible for increasing the DIM of Zn where, in average, the highest value was reported, particularly in 75 % SW treatment. This was reflected also in HRI where the maximum value was reported for Zinc under the same treatment. Higher value of HRI for wheat cultivated on polluted soils suggested that appropriate management of cultivated area is necessary for food safety and thus for public health. The results are expected to create awareness among the public on the safety of consuming

  15. Sensitivity to wheat, gluten and FODMAPs in IBS: facts or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giorgio, Roberto; Volta, Umberto; Gibson, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    IBS is one of the most common types of functional bowel disorder. Increasing attention has been paid to the causative role of food in IBS. Food ingestion precipitates or exacerbates symptoms, such as abdominal pain and bloating in patients with IBS through different hypothesised mechanisms including immune and mast cell activation, mechanoreceptor stimulation and chemosensory activation. Wheat is regarded as one of the most relevant IBS triggers, although which component(s) of this cereal is/are involved remain(s) unknown. Gluten, other wheat proteins, for example, amylase-trypsin inhibitors, and fructans (the latter belonging to fermentable oligo-di-mono-saccharides and polyols (FODMAPs)), have been identified as possible factors for symptom generation/exacerbation. This uncertainty on the true culprit(s) opened a scenario of semantic definitions favoured by the discordant results of double-blind placebo-controlled trials, which have generated various terms ranging from non-coeliac gluten sensitivity to the broader one of non-coeliac wheat or wheat protein sensitivity or, even, FODMAP sensitivity. The role of FODMAPs in eliciting the clinical picture of IBS goes further since these short-chain carbohydrates are found in many other dietary components, including vegetables and fruits. In this review, we assessed current literature in order to unravel whether gluten/wheat/FODMAP sensitivity represent 'facts' and not 'fiction' in IBS symptoms. This knowledge is expected to promote standardisation in dietary strategies (gluten/wheat-free and low FODMAP) as effective measures for the management of IBS symptoms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Mapping Winter Wheat with Multi-Temporal SAR and Optical Images in an Urban Agricultural Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Pan, Jianjun; Zhang, Peiyu; Wei, Shanbao; Han, Tao

    2017-05-25

    Winter wheat is the second largest food crop in China. It is important to obtain reliable winter wheat acreage to guarantee the food security for the most populous country in the world. This paper focuses on assessing the feasibility of in-season winter wheat mapping and investigating potential classification improvement by using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) images, optical images, and the integration of both types of data in urban agricultural regions with complex planting structures in Southern China. Both SAR (Sentinel-1A) and optical (Landsat-8) data were acquired, and classification using different combinations of Sentinel-1A-derived information and optical images was performed using a support vector machine (SVM) and a random forest (RF) method. The interference coherence and texture images were obtained and used to assess the effect of adding them to the backscatter intensity images on the classification accuracy. The results showed that the use of four Sentinel-1A images acquired before the jointing period of winter wheat can provide satisfactory winter wheat classification accuracy, with an F1 measure of 87.89%. The combination of SAR and optical images for winter wheat mapping achieved the best F1 measure-up to 98.06%. The SVM was superior to RF in terms of the overall accuracy and the kappa coefficient, and was faster than RF, while the RF classifier was slightly better than SVM in terms of the F1 measure. In addition, the classification accuracy can be effectively improved by adding the texture and coherence images to the backscatter intensity data.

  17. Detection of l-Cysteine in wheat flour by Raman microspectroscopy combined chemometrics of HCA and PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebi, Nur; Dogan, Canan Ekinci; Develioglu, Ayşen; Yayla, Mediha Esra Altuntop; Sagdic, Osman

    2017-08-01

    l-Cysteine is deliberately added to various flour types since l-Cysteine has enabled favorable baking conditions such as low viscosity, increased elasticity and rise during baking. In Turkey, usage of l-Cysteine as a food additive isn't allowed in wheat flour according to the Turkish Food Codex Regulation on food additives. There is an urgent need for effective methods to detect l-Cysteine in wheat flour. In this study, for the first time, a new, rapid, effective, non-destructive and cost-effective method was developed for detection of l-Cysteine in wheat flour using Raman microscopy. Detection of l-Cysteine in wheat flour was accomplished successfully using Raman microscopy combined chemometrics of PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and HCA (Hierarchical Cluster Analysis). In this work, 500-2000cm(-1) spectral range (fingerprint region) was determined to perform PCA and HCA analysis. l-Cysteine and l-Cystine were determined with detection limit of 0.125% (w/w) in different wheat flour samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Utilization of barley or wheat bran to bioconvert glutamate to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wen-Jie; Kim, Min-Ju; Kim, Keun-Sung

    2013-09-01

    This study deals with the utilization of agro-industrial wastes created by barley and wheat bran in the production of a value-added product, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The simple and eco-friendly reaction requires no pretreatment or microbial fermentation steps but uses barley or wheat bran as an enzyme source, glutamate as a substrate, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. The optimal reaction conditions were determined on the basis of the temperatures and times used for the decarboxylation reactions and the initial concentrations of barley or wheat bran, glutamate, and PLP. The optimal reactions produced 9.2 mM of GABA from 10 mM glutamate, yielding a 92% GABA conversion rate, when barley bran was used and 6.0 mM of GABA from 10 mM glutamate, yielding a 60% GABA conversion rate, when wheat bran was used. The results imply that barley bran is more efficient than wheat bran in the production of GABA. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Non-coeliac gluten or wheat sensitivity: emerging disease or misdiagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Michael DE; Walker, Marjorie M; Talley, Nicholas J

    2017-08-04

    Non-coeliac gluten or wheat sensitivity (NCG/WS) is a condition characterised by adverse gastrointestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms associated with the ingestion of gluten- or wheat-containing foods, in the absence of coeliac disease or wheat allergy. Up to one in 100 people in Australia may have coeliac disease but many more report adverse gastrointestinal and/or extra-intestinal symptoms after eating wheat products. In the absence of validated biomarkers, a diagnosis of NCG/WS can only be made by a double-blind, placebo-controlled, dietary crossover challenge with gluten, which is difficult to apply in clinical practice. Of people self-reporting gluten or wheat sensitivity, only a small proportion (16%) will have reproducible symptoms after a blinded gluten challenge of gluten versus placebo in a crossover dietary trial and fulfil the current consensus criteria for a diagnosis of NCG/WS. A wide range of symptoms are associated with NCG/WS, including gastrointestinal, neurological, psychiatric, rheumatological and dermatological complaints. The pathogenesis of NCG/WS is not well understood, but the innate immune system has been implicated, and there is overlap with coeliac disease and the functional gastrointestinal disorders (irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia). Identification of NCG/WS is important as gluten-free diets carry risks, are socially restricting and are costlier than regular diets.

  20. Drought and salt tolerances in wild relatives for wheat and barley improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, Eviatar; Chen, Guoxiong

    2010-04-01

    Drought and salinity are the major abiotic stresses that dramatically threaten the food supply in the world. Tribe Triticeae, including wheat and barley, possesses tremendous potential for drought and salt tolerance that has been extensively and practically identified, tested, and transferred to wheat cultivars with proven expression of tolerance in experimental trials. Triticum dicoccoides and Hordeum spontaneum, the progenitors of cultivated wheat and barley, have adapted to a broad range of environments and developed rich genetic diversities for drought and salt tolerances. Drought- and salt-tolerant genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been identified in T. dicoccoides and H. spontaneum and have great potential in wheat and barley improvement. Advanced backcross QTL analysis, the introgression libraries based on wild wheat and wild barley as donors, and positional cloning of natural QTLs will play prevailing roles in elucidating the molecular control of drought and salt tolerance. Combining tolerant genes and QTLs in crop breeding programs aimed at improving tolerance to drought and salinity will be achieved within a multidisciplinary context. Wild genetic resistances to drought and salinity will be shifted in the future from field experiments to the farmer.

  1. Crop Sequence Influences on Sustainable Spring Wheat Production in the Northern Great Plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Krupinsky

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cropping systems in American agriculture are highly successful since World War II, but have become highly specialized, standardized, and simplified to meet the demands of an industrialized food system. Minimal attention has been given to the efficient exploitation of crop diversity and the synergistic and/or antagonistic relationships of crops in crop sequences. Objectives of our research were to determine if previous crop sequences have long-term benefits and/or drawbacks on spring wheat seed yield, seed N concentration, and seed precipitation-use efficiency in the semiarid northern Great Plains, USA. Research was conducted 6 km southwest of Mandan, ND using a 10 × 10 crop matrix technique as a research tool to evaluate multiple crop sequence effects on spring wheat (triticum aestivum L. production in 2004 and 2005. Spring wheat production risks can be mitigated when second year crop residue was dry pea (Pisium sativum L. averaged over all first year crop residues. When compared to spring wheat as second year crop residue in the dry year of 2004, dry pea as the second year residue crop resulted in a 30% spring wheat seed yield increase. Sustainable cropping systems need to use precipitation efficiently for crop production, especially during below average precipitation years like 2004. Precipitation use efficiency average over all treatments, during the below average precipitation year was 23% greater than the above average precipitation year of 2005. Diversifying crops in cropping systems improves production efficiencies and resilience of agricultural systems.

  2. Registration of 'Sunshine' Hard White Winter Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ’Sunshine’ (Reg. No. CV-XXXX, PI 674741) hard white winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed by the Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station and released in August 2014 through a marketing agreement with the Colorado Wheat Research Foundation. In addition to researchers at Colorado State Un...

  3. Gamma radiation effects on commercial Mexican bread making wheat flour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agundez-Arvizu, Z. [Departamento de Ciencias Quimico Biologicas, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000 (Mexico); Fernandez-Ramirez, M.V. [Departamento de Ciencias Quimico Biologicas, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000 (Mexico); Arce-Corrales, M.E. [Departamento de Ciencias Quimico Biologicas, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000 (Mexico); Cruz-Zaragoza, E. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares-UNAM, A.P. 70-543, Mexico 04510 DF (Mexico); Melendrez, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora 83190 (Mexico); Chernov, V. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora 83190 (Mexico); Barboza-Flores, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, Hermosillo, Sonora 83190 (Mexico)]. E-mail: mbarboza@cajeme.cifus.uson.mx

    2006-04-15

    Gamma irradiation is considered to be an alternative method for food preservation to prevent food spoilage, insect infestation and capable of reducing the microbial load. In the present investigation, commercial Mexican bread making wheat flour was irradiated at 1.0 kGy using a {sup 6}C Gammabeam 651 PT irradiator facility. No changes were detected in moisture, protein and ashes in gamma irradiated samples as compared to those of non-irradiated samples. Slight radiation effects were observed in the alveogram values and farinograph properties; the falling number decreased 11%, the absorption as well as the mixing tolerance were practically unchanged by irradiation. An increase of 15% in the stability value and a 29% in the dough development time were observed. Also the deformation energy decreased 7% with no change at all in the tenacity/extensibility factor. Total aerobic, yeast and mold counts were reduced 96%, 25% and 75%; respectively by the irradiation process. The obtained results confirm that gamma irradiation is effective in reducing the microbial load in bread making wheat flour without a significant change in the physicochemical and baking properties.

  4. Use of Avocado (Persea americana M. Paste in Wheat Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Man

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bread is the staple food for most people around the world, it being consumed since ancient times. Because of it’s major importance in the diet, over the last years, the trend of enrich the nutritional quality was developed, by replacing the chemical fortification of foods with an intake of bioactive compounds from fruits, vegetables and cereals. The avocado is useful in human nutrition as a source of various nutrients and especially as source of energy and monounsaturated fatty acids. This paper belongs to a more complex study, which aiming the evaluation of enriched bread for breakfast prepared with an addition of avocado paste (12% as a source of biologically active components in nutrition. Bread produced from 100% wheat flour served as the control. The seasoned bread for breakfast and the control samples were subjected to physico-chemical and organoleptic analyses. Addition of avocado paste (AP in bread has improved physicochemical and sensory attributes.

  5. Organically vs conventionally grown winter wheat: effects on grain yield, technological quality, and on phenolic composition and antioxidant properties of bran and refined flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoncini, Marco; Antichi, Daniele; Silvestri, Nicola; Ciantelli, Giulia; Sgherri, Cristina

    2015-05-15

    Since organic food is widely assumed to have a better nutritional quality than conventional food, our aim was to study the effects of organic vs conventional cropping systems on yield and the phenolic composition of winter wheat cv. 'Bologna'. Although organic wheat yielded less than conventional wheat, mainly due to the nitrogen shortage, and its bread-making quality was lower, the cultivation system did not affect the total amounts of phenolics and phenolic acids. Of the eight phenolic acids identified, only ferulic acid was influenced by the cultivation system. Phenolic composition and quantity were significantly affected by the milling fraction (bran or white flour): phenolics were more concentrated in the bran, which showed the highest antioxidant power. Under the conditions adopted in this study, an organic cropping system can maintain or even increase the health properties of the wheat milled products, provided a reduction in grain yield is accepted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic variability in anthocyanin composition and nutritional properties of blue, purple, and red bread (Triticum aestivum L.) and durum (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. turgidum convar. durum) wheats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficco, Donatella B M; De Simone, Vanessa; Colecchia, Salvatore A; Pecorella, Ivano; Platani, Cristiano; Nigro, Franca; Finocchiaro, Franca; Papa, Roberto; De Vita, Pasquale

    2014-08-27

    Renewed interest in breeding for high anthocyanins in wheat (Triticum ssp.) is due to their antioxidant potential. A collection of different pigmented wheats was used to investigate the stability of anthocyanins over three crop years. The data show higher anthocyanins in blue-aleurone bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), followed by purple- and red-pericarp durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. turgidum convar. durum), using cyanidin 3-O-glucoside as standard. HPLC of the anthocyanin components shows five to eight major anthocyanins for blue wheat extracts, compared to three anthocyanins for purple and red wheats. Delphinidin 3-O-rutinoside, delphinidin 3-O-glucoside, and malvidin 3-O-glucoside are predominant in blue wheat, with cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, peonidin 3-O-galactoside, and malvidin 3-O-glucoside in purple wheat. Of the total anthocyanins, 40-70% remain to be structurally identified. The findings confirm the high heritability for anthocyanins, with small genotype × year effects, which will be useful for breeding purposes, to improve the antioxidant potential of cereal-based foods.

  7. Impact of improved wheat technology adoption on productivity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most important cereal crops cultivated in wide range of agro-ecologies in Eastern Africa. However, wheat productivity has remained low. This study was carried out in Ethiopia Aris Zone to determine the level and impact of adoption of improved wheat varieties on wheat productivity ...

  8. Breeding value of primary synthetic wheat genotypes for grain yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    To introduce new genetic diversity into the bread wheat gene pool from its progenitor, Aegilops tauschii (Coss.) Schmalh, 33 primary synthetic hexaploid wheat genotypes (SYN) were crossed to 20 spring bread wheat (BW) cultivars at the International Wheat and Maize Improvement Center. Modified single...

  9. Identification of novel QTL for sawfly resistance in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. D. Sherman; D. K. Weaver; M. L. Hofland; S. E. Sing; M. Buteler; S. P. Lanning; Y. Naruoka; F. Crutcher; N. K. Blake; J. M. Martin; P. F. Lamb; G. R. Carlson; L. E. Talbert

    2010-01-01

    The wheat stem sawfly (WSS) (Cephus cinctus Nort.) is an important pest of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em. Thell.) in the Northern Great Plains. This paper reports the genetic analysis of antixenosis for egg-laying WSS females in recombinant inbred lines (RIL) of hard red spring wheat. Female WSS preferentially choose certain wheat genotypes for egg-laying, with the...

  10. Registration of “Pritchett” soft white winter club wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soft white club winter wheat (Triticium aestivum L. ssp. compactum) is a unique component of the wheat production in the PNW, comprising 6-10% of the wheat crop. It is valued for milling and baking functionality and marketed for export in a 20-30% blend with soft white wheat as Western White. Our g...

  11. Evaluation on the resistance to aphids of wheat germplasm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A collection of more than 200 wheat lines from the main wheat-producing areas of China was evaluated for resistance to wheat aphids, using fuzzy recognition technique in five field experiments over 2 years. The results show that susceptibility to wheat aphids was exhibited in most of the lines tested, and no immune and ...

  12. 77 FR 21685 - United States Standards for Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... change the definition of Contrasting classes (CCL) in Hard White wheat and change the grade limits for... marketing of wheat. DATES: Comments must be received on or before June 11, 2012. ADDRESSES: You may submit... standards facilitate the marketing of wheat and define U.S. wheat quality and commonly used industry terms...

  13. Nutritional survey, staple foods composition and the uses of savoury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-02

    May 2, 2008 ... were greater in the group of women. The most frequently used staple foods are shown in. Table 2, alongside with the content of total proteins, lipids, crude fibres and carbohydrates. All staples foods were based on cereal proteins, predominantly cassava, yam, wheat rice and banana, and thus were charac-.

  14. Resistance to Wheat Curl Mite in Arthropod-Resistant Rye-Wheat Translocation Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Maria Aguirre-Rojas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The wheat curl mite, Aceria toschiella (Keifer, and a complex of viruses vectored by A. toschiella substantially reduce wheat yields in every wheat-producing continent in the world. The development of A. toschiella-resistant wheat cultivars is a proven economically and ecologically viable method of controlling this pest. This study assessed A. toschiella resistance in wheat genotypes containing the H13, H21, H25, H26, H18 and Hdic genes for resistance to the Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say and in 94M370 wheat, which contains the Dn7 gene for resistance to the Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov. A. toschiella populations produced on plants containing Dn7 and H21 were significantly lower than those on plants of the susceptible control and no different than those on the resistant control. Dn7 resistance to D. noxia and H21 resistance to M. destructor resulted from translocations of chromatin from rye into wheat (H21—2BS/2RL, Dn7—1BL/1RS. These results provide new wheat pest management information, indicating that Dn7 and H21 constitute resources that can be used to reduce yield losses caused by A. toschiella, M. destructor, D. noxia, and wheat streak mosaic virus infection by transferring multi-pest resistance to single sources of germplasm.

  15. [RATIONALE FOR ELIMINATING CERTAIN FOODS IN CHILDREN WITH FOOD ALLERGY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Takahiro; Futamura, Masaki; Kitazawa, Hiroshi; Ohya, Yukihiro

    2015-05-01

    Some caregivers of children with food allergy may eliminate specific foods from the diet of these children without first consulting doctors. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of such practice and the sensitization of the offending foods. All participants were patients aged one year or over who visited our outpatients unit with complaints of food allergy. Caregivers of the patients were asked to fill out a questionnaire to state the eliminated food items and the grounds for avoidance ("doctor's instructions", "family's judgment", and "not consumed in daily diet") of nine food items including chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, soy bean, rice, buckwheat, peanut, sesame and shrimp. Data on food-specific IgE titers were extracted from the patients' electronic medical charts. A total of 463 subjects were included in the analyses. Prevalence of patients with specific food avoidance of each of the food item was higher in the lower age group than the higher age group. More than 83% of the patients who avoided chicken egg, cow's milk or wheat were advised by their doctors to do so, while less than 49% of patients who avoided buckwheat did so for the same reason. The percentage of the patients who showed positive sensitization to buckwheat, peanut or shrimp, and avoided it without doctor's instructions, was 46%, 48%, and 34%, respectively. While the majority of caregivers of the children who visited our outpatient unit eliminated specific foods according to doctor's instructions, a considerable proportion of them do so inappropriately without first consulting a doctor.

  16. Evidence of decreasing mineral density in wheat grain over the last 160 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ming-Sheng; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Poulton, Paul R; Dunham, Sarah J; McGrath, Steve P

    2008-01-01

    Wheat is an important source of minerals such as iron, zinc, copper and magnesium in the UK diet. The dietary intake of these nutrients has fallen in recent years because of a combination of reduced energy requirements associated with sedentary lifestyles and changes in dietary patterns associated with lower micronutrient density in the diet. Recent publications using data from food composition tables indicate a downward trend in the mineral content of foods and it has been suggested that intensive farming practices may result in soil depletion of minerals. The aim of our study was to evaluate changes in the mineral concentration of wheat using a robust approach to establish whether trends are due to plant factors (e.g. cultivar, yield) or changes in soil nutrient concentration. The mineral concentration of archived wheat grain and soil samples from the Broadbalk Wheat Experiment (established in 1843 at Rothamsted, UK) was determined and trends over time examined in relation to cultivar, yield, and harvest index. The concentrations of zinc, iron, copper and magnesium remained stable between 1845 and the mid 1960s, but since then have decreased significantly, which coincided with the introduction of semi-dwarf, high-yielding cultivars. In comparison, the concentrations in soil have either increased or remained stable. Similarly decreasing trends were observed in different treatments receiving no fertilizers, inorganic fertilizers or organic manure. Multiple regression analysis showed that both increasing yield and harvest index were highly significant factors that explained the downward trend in grain mineral concentration.

  17. Phosphorus flows and use efficiencies in production and consumption of wheat, rice, and maize in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenqi; Ma, Lin; Li, Jianhui; Wang, Fanghao; Sisák, István; Zhang, Fusuo

    2011-08-01

    Increasing fertilizer phosphorus (P) application in agriculture has greatly contributed to the increase of crop yields during the last decades in China but it has also increased P flows in food production and consumption. The relationship between P use efficiency and P flow is not well quantified at national level. In present paper we report on P flows and P use efficiencies in rice, wheat, and maize production in China using the NUFER model. Conservation strategies for P utilization and the impact of these strategies on P use efficiency have been evaluated. Total amounts of P input to wheat, rice, and maize fields were 1095, 1240, and 1128 Gg, respectively, in China, approximately 80% of which was in chemical fertilizers. The accumulation of P annually in the fields of wheat, rice, and maize was 29.4, 13.6, and 21.3 kg ha(-1), respectively. Phosphorus recovered in the food products of wheat, rice, and maize accounted for only 12.5%, 13.5%, and 3.8% of the total P input, or 3.2%, 2.6%, and 0.9% of the applied fertilizer P, respectively. The present study shows that optimizing phosphorus flows and decreasing phosphorus losses in crop production and utilization through improved nutrient management must be considered as an important issue in the development of agriculture in China. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Usefulness of antigen-specific IgE probability curves derived from the 3gAllergy assay in diagnosing egg, cow's milk, and wheat allergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakura Sato

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Measurements of sIgE against egg, milk, and wheat as determined by 3gAllergy may be used as a tool to facilitate the diagnosis of food allergy in subjects with suspected food allergies. However, these probability curves should not be applied interchangeably between different assays.

  19. Chemical Composition and Nutritional Value of Emmer Wheat (Triticum dicoccon Schrank: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika ČURNÁ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cereals represent the most important group of crops in the structure of plant production from the economic and agronomic point of view. Cereals are widely consumed and are a valuable sources of delivering components with biological activity to humans. They are one of the most abundant sources of protein and energy and are consumed as bread – a major staple food – in most countries throughout the world. The cultivated hulled wheats emmer, einkorn, and spelt, are among the most ancient Triticeae cultivated in the world and have long represented a staple food. However, the move in recent years toward more natural foods and sustainable agriculture and the rediscovery of ancient foods and flavours have brought renewed interest in these neglected species. Emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccon Schrank is rich in resistant starch, minerals, fibre, carotenoids, antioxidant compounds, and poor in fats; it has been recognized as a very healthy cereal and is recommended in the diet for people suffering from allergies, colitis, diabetes and high blood cholesterol. For these reasons, research activities and selection programs are being conducted to assess the genetic, agronomic, nutritional and technological properties of emmer wheat. The main results of studies and the knowledge acquired about the chemical and nutritional composition (protein content, digestible carbohydrates, dietary fibre, lipids, vitamins, and minerals are reviewed in this paper.

  20. Heavy Metal Contents of Soils, Durum and Bread Wheats in Harran Plain, Southeast Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükkılıç Yanardaǧ, Asuman

    2013-04-01

    Soils are vital for regulating the biological effects and mobility of metals in nature. Iron and zinc are some of the essential nutrients for plants and animals, while other metals are potentially toxic such as lead and cadmium. Toxic heavy metals (HMs) can be taken up easily by organisms. HMs inputs to soil via the application of metal-contained fertilizers often exceed outputs in crops and drainage waters, thus toxic HMs content in many agricultural soils tends to be gradually increasing. Thus adverse human health effects due to soil-plant and plant-human transfer of HMs have been enhanced. HMs may cause harmful effects on human health due to the ingestion of food grain grown in soils. The objectives of this study were (1) to understand the chemistry of metals in soils for managing their agricultural and ecological impacts, (2) to identify metal uptakes of different genotypes of wheat. Concentrations of HMs (Cd, Zn, Ni, Mn, Cu, Mo, Pb) in wheat were investigated in different agricultural areas in Southeast, Turkey. The results showed that concentrations of HMs were in following order: Mn>Ni>Zn>Cu>Pb>Mo>Cd in surface and next to surface soil and Mn>Zn>Cu>Pb> Ni>Mo>Cd in wheat, respectively. HMs concentrations of several soil samples exceeded the permissible limits of Europe standard except for Ni and Mn. In addition, concentration of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Pb were higher in bread wheat than in durum wheat; however, concentration of Mn, Ni and Mo were higher in durum wheat than in bread wheat. Unusual amount of heavy metals found in some fertilizers used in the Southeast region of Turkey, it becomes an important subject to determine the amount of metals added to the soil every year. Heavy metals uptake by plants still remains to be an interest for researchers. As the heavy metals contents of plants were below the threshold levels, we conclude that the quality of wheat is high and it should receive attention in national and international markets. Keywords: Heavy Metals

  1. Wheat products as acceptable substitutes for rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, B H; Kies, C

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the acceptability to semi-trained US American and Asian palatability panelist, of four wheat products processed to be possible replacers of rice in human diets. Products evaluated using rice as the control standard of excellence were steamed whole wheat, couscous (steamed, extracted wheat flour semolina), rosamarina (rice shaped, extracted wheat flour pasta), and bulgar (steamed, pre-cooked partly debranned, cracked wheat). Using a ten point hedonic rating scale, both groups of panelists gave rosamarina closely followed by couscous, most favorable ratings although these ratings were somewhat lower than that of the positive control, steamed polished rice. Bulgar wheat was given the lowest evaluation and was, in general, found to be an unacceptable replacement for rice by both American and Asian judges because of its dark, 'greasy' color and distinctive flavor. In their personal dietaries, judges included rice from 0.25 to 18 times per week with the Asian judges consuming rice significantly more times per week than did the American judges (10.8 +/- 4.71 vs 1.75 +/- 1.65, p < 0.01). However, rice consumption patterns, nationality, race, or sex of the judges was not demonstrated to affect scoring of the wheat products as rice replacers.

  2. Allergenic Proteins in Foods and Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Cosme

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Food allergies can be defined as immunologically mediated hypersensitivity reactions; therefore, a food allergy is also known as food hypersensitivity. The reactions are caused by the immune system response to some food proteins. The eight most common food allergens are proteins from milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, soya, wheat, fish and shellfish. However, many other foods have been identified as allergens for some people, such as certain fruits or vegetables and seeds. It is now recognized that food allergens are an important food safety issue. A food allergy occurs when the body’s immune system reacts to otherwise harmless substances in certain foods. For these reasons, one of the requirements from the European Union is that allergenic food ingredients should be labelled in order to protect allergic consumers. According to the European Federation of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients’ Associations, about 8 % of children and 4 % of adults suffer from some type of food allergy. Food allergies often develop during infant or early childhood ages, affecting mainly the gastrointestinal tract (stomach and intestines. In some cases, the allergy may persist in adult age, for example, coeliac disease, which is an abnormal immune response to certain proteins present in gluten, a type of protein composite found in wheat and barley. Almost all allergens are proteins, and highly sensitive analytical methods have been developed to detect traces of these compounds in food, such as electrophoretic and immunological methods, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purpose of this review is to describe the allergenic components of the most common causes of food allergies, followed by a brief discussion regarding their importance in the food industry and for consumer safety. The most important methods used to detect allergenicity in food will also be discussed.

  3. How the foraging decisions of a small ruminant are influenced by past feeding experiences with low-quality food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanese, F; Distel, R A; Fernández, P; Villalba, J J

    2016-05-01

    Feeding experiences with low-quality foods can be improved when these foods are ingested in close temporal association with foods of higher nutritional quality. However, preference for low-quality foods in nature seems to be rather insensitive to past positive experiences and more related to their intrinsic nutritional value. An explanation for this observation is still lacking, mainly because little is known about how herbivores use information about low-quality foods during foraging. Our objective was to provide original information about this issue using a small ruminant (sheep; Ovis aries) as animal model. We manipulated the sheep's experience with a low-quality food (wheat straw) using a conditioning procedure ("oral-delay conditioning procedure"), and then we evaluated the use of this information in a simulated foraging scenario provided with wheat straw and a variable amount of a high-quality food in spatially separated feeding stations. Inclusion of wheat straw into the diet was strongly dependent on the availability of the high-quality food. We observed a threshold level in the availability of the high-quality food, which defined a zone of drastic change in the likelihood of inclusion of the wheat straw into the diet (i.e., acceptance or rejection of wheat straw). This threshold level did not change for sheep with (CS+) or without (CS-) a previous positive experience with wheat straw. However, once foraging conditions stimulated all sheep to start including the wheat straw into the diet (i.e., below the threshold level), the intake of this food was greater by CS+ sheep. This increased intake was not explained by a higher motivation to eat the wheat straw but to a greater amount of time spent foraging this food and less time spent searching for the preferred higher-quality alternative. We discuss these results based on optimal foraging models and learning models of diet selection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of wheat varieties with reduced contents of celiac-immunogenic epitopes through conventional and GM strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, M.J.M.; Jouanin, A.A.; Schaart, J.G.; Visser, R.G.F.; Cockram, J.; Leigh, F.; Wallington, E.; Boyd, L.A.; Broeck, van den H.C.; Meer, van der I.M.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Cereals, especially wheat, may cause several food-related diseases, of which gluten intolerance (coeliac disease, CD) is the best defined: specific immunogenic epitopes, nine amino acid-long peptide sequences, have been identified from various gluten proteins. These may activate T cells, causing

  5. Heavy metals in the environment; uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of spatial predictions of heavy metals in wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.; Jansen, M.J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy metals seriously threaten the health of human beings when they enter the food chain. Therefore, policymakers require precise predictions of heavy metal concentrations in agricultural crops. In this paper we quantify the uncertainty of regression predictions of Cd and Pb in wheat (Triticum

  6. Different site-specific N-glycan types in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) PAP phytase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dionisio, Giuseppe; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Welinder, Karen Gjesing

    2011-01-01

    Phytase activity in grain is essential to make phosphate available to cell metabolism, and in food and feed. Cereals contain the purple acid phosphatase type of phytases (PAPhy). Mature wheat grain is dominated by TaPAPhy_a which, in the present work, has been characterized by extensive peptide a...

  7. Mixed cropping of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) landraces in the central highlands of Eritrea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldeamlak, A.

    2001-01-01

    A common cropping system in the central highlands of Eritrea is mixed cropping of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum); it is called hanfetz (Tigrigna word). Mixtures may give higher yield, better yield stability, better food quality and more animal feed. Factors affecting

  8. Evalua (wheat tion of t-cassa f the q ava, w uality heat-p in bre attribu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2007-09-07

    @ remain perma. 2014 e uality heat-p in bre. G. O.*, Ab ity of Technol ..... Effect of emulsifiers on wheat-potato composite flour for the production of leavened flat bread (naan). Nutr. Food Sci. 38(5):482-449. AOAC (1990).

  9. The carbon to nitrogen ratio in isoenergetic wheat based diets controls the growth rate of the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarhoven, B.; Elissen, H.J.H.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Temmink, H.

    2016-01-01

    The aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus (Lv) contains high levels of proteins and can provide an excellent fish food. Large-scale production of Lv on low value organic substrates, such as by-products produced during wheat processing, therefore can be a promising and sustainable concept for the

  10. Assessing the evolving fragility of the global food system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Michael J.; Bose, Satyajit; Chon, So Young; Cook, Benjamin I.

    2015-02-01

    The world food crisis in 2008 highlighted the susceptibility of the global food system to price shocks. Here we use annual staple food production and trade data from 1992-2009 to analyse the changing properties of the global food system. Over the 18 year study period, we show that the global food system is relatively homogeneous (85% of countries have low or marginal food self-sufficiency) and increases in complexity, with the number of global wheat and rice trade connections doubling and trade flows increasing by 42 and 90%, respectively. The increased connectivity and flows within these global trade networks suggest that the global food system is vulnerable to systemic disruptions, especially considering the tendency for exporting countries to switch to non-exporting states during times of food scarcity in the global markets. To test this hypothesis, we superimpose continental-scale disruptions on the wheat and rice trade networks. We find greater absolute reductions in global wheat and rice exports along with larger losses in network connectivity as the networks evolve due to disruptions in European wheat and Asian rice production. Importantly, our findings indicate that least developed countries suffer greater import losses in more connected networks through their increased dependence on imports for staple foods (due to these large-scale disturbances): mean (median) wheat losses as percentages of staple food supply are 8.9% (3.8%) for 1992-1996, increasing to 11% (5.7%) for 2005-2009. Over the same intervals, rice losses increase from 8.2% (2.2%) to 14% (5.2%). Our work indicates that policy efforts should focus on balancing the efficiency of international trade (and its associated specialization) with increased resilience of domestic production and global demand diversity.

  11. Assessing the Evolving Fragility of the Global Food System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Michael Joseph; Bose, Satyajit; Chon, So Young; Cook, Benjamin I.

    2015-01-01

    The world food crisis in 2008 highlighted the susceptibility of the global food system to price shocks. Here we use annual staple food production and trade data from 1992-2009 to analyse the changing properties of the global food system. Over the 18-year study period, we show that the global food system is relatively homogeneous (85 of countries have low or marginal food self-sufficiency) and increases in complexity, with the number of global wheat and rice trade connections doubling and trade flows increasing by 42 and 90, respectively. The increased connectivity and flows within these global trade networks suggest that the global food system is vulnerable to systemic disruptions, especially considering the tendency for exporting countries to switch to non-exporting states during times of food scarcity in the global markets. To test this hypothesis, we superimpose continental-scale disruptions on the wheat and rice trade networks. We find greater absolute reductions in global wheat and rice exports along with larger losses in network connectivity as the networks evolve due to disruptions in European wheat and Asian rice production. Importantly, our findings indicate that least developed countries suffer greater import losses in more connected networks through their increased dependence on imports for staple foods (due to these large-scale disturbances): mean (median) wheat losses as percentages of staple food supply are 8.9 (3.8) for 1992-1996, increasing to 11 (5.7) for 20052009. Over the same intervals, rice losses increase from 8.2 (2.2) to 14 (5.2). Our work indicates that policy efforts should focus on balancing the efficiency of international trade (and its associated specialization) with increased resilience of domestic production and global demand diversity.

  12. Infrared warming reduced winter wheat yields and some physiological parameters, which were mitigated by irrigation and worsened by delayed sowing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibo Fang

    Full Text Available Winter wheat has a central role in ensuring the food security and welfare of 1.3 billion people in China. Extensive previous studies have concluded that winter wheat yields would decrease with higher temperatures, owing to warming-induced soil drying or shortening of phenophase. Temperature in China is predicted to increase by 1-5°C by 2100, which may greatly impact plant production and cause other negative effects. We performed a manipulative field experiment, creating diverse growth regimes for wheat by infrared radiation (IR warming day and night, including IR warming only (DW, IR warming + delayed sowing dates (DS, IR warming + increased irrigation (IW, and a control (CK. The results show that IR warming increased daily average wheat canopy and soil temperatures by 2.0°C and 2.3°C, respectively. DW was associated with an advanced maturity of 10 days and yield reduction of 8.2%. IR-warming effects on the photosynthetic apparatus of wheat varied with season as well as significant differences were found in the booting stage. DS represented a worsened situation, lowering yield per plant by 16.4%, with a significant decline in aboveground biomass and functional leaf area. Wheat under DS showed double-peak patterns of diurnal gas exchange during booting stages and, consequently, lower photosynthetic capacity with high transpiration for cooling. Significantly lower actual water use efficiency and intrinsic water use efficiency from jointing to anthesis stages were also found under DS. However, IW had no significant difference from CK, irrespective of yield and photosynthesis. Therefore, we concluded that delayed sowing date may not be a good choice for winter wheat, whereas a thoroughly-watered wheat agroecosystem should be promoted in the context of global warming.

  13. Is Yield Increase Sufficient to Achieve Food Security in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xing; Zhang, Zhao; Shi, Peijun; Wang, Pin; Chen, Yi; Song, Xiao; Tao, Fulu

    2015-01-01

    Increasing demand for food, driven by unprecedented population growth and increasing consumption, will keep challenging food security in China. Although cereal yields have substantially improved during the last three decades, whether it will keep thriving to meet the increasing demand is not known yet. Thus, an integrated analysis on the trends of crop yield and cultivated area is essential to better understand current state of food security in China, especially on county scale. So far, yield stagnation has extensively dominated the main cereal-growing areas across China. Rice yield is facing the most severe stagnation that 53.9% counties tracked in the study have stagnated significantly, followed by maize (42.4%) and wheat (41.9%). As another important element for production sustainability, but often neglected is the planted area patterns. It has been further demonstrated that the loss in productive arable land for rice and wheat have dramatically increased the pressure on achieving food security. Not only a great deal of the planted areas have stagnated since 1980, but also collapsed. 48.4% and 54.4% of rice- and wheat-growing counties have lost their cropland areas to varying degrees. Besides, 27.6% and 35.8% of them have retrograded below the level of the 1980s. The combined influence (both loss in yield and area) has determined the crop sustainable production in China to be pessimistic for rice and wheat, and consequently no surprise to find that more than half of counties rank a lower level of production sustainability. Therefore, given the potential yield increase in wheat and maize, as well as substantial area loss of rice and wheat, the possible targeted adaptation measures for both yield and cropping area is required at county scale. Moreover, policies on food trade, alongside advocation of low calorie diets, reducing food loss and waste can help to enhance food security. PMID:25680193

  14. Is yield increase sufficient to achieve food security in China?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wei

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for food, driven by unprecedented population growth and increasing consumption, will keep challenging food security in China. Although cereal yields have substantially improved during the last three decades, whether it will keep thriving to meet the increasing demand is not known yet. Thus, an integrated analysis on the trends of crop yield and cultivated area is essential to better understand current state of food security in China, especially on county scale. So far, yield stagnation has extensively dominated the main cereal-growing areas across China. Rice yield is facing the most severe stagnation that 53.9% counties tracked in the study have stagnated significantly, followed by maize (42.4% and wheat (41.9%. As another important element for production sustainability, but often neglected is the planted area patterns. It has been further demonstrated that the loss in productive arable land for rice and wheat have dramatically increased the pressure on achieving food security. Not only a great deal of the planted areas have stagnated since 1980, but also collapsed. 48.4% and 54.4% of rice- and wheat-growing counties have lost their cropland areas to varying degrees. Besides, 27.6% and 35.8% of them have retrograded below the level of the 1980s. The combined influence (both loss in yield and area has determined the crop sustainable production in China to be pessimistic for rice and wheat, and consequently no surprise to find that more than half of counties rank a lower level of production sustainability. Therefore, given the potential yield increase in wheat and maize, as well as substantial area loss of rice and wheat, the possible targeted adaptation measures for both yield and cropping area is required at county scale. Moreover, policies on food trade, alongside advocation of low calorie diets, reducing food loss and waste can help to enhance food security.

  15. Is yield increase sufficient to achieve food security in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xing; Zhang, Zhao; Shi, Peijun; Wang, Pin; Chen, Yi; Song, Xiao; Tao, Fulu

    2015-01-01

    Increasing demand for food, driven by unprecedented population growth and increasing consumption, will keep challenging food security in China. Although cereal yields have substantially improved during the last three decades, whether it will keep thriving to meet the increasing demand is not known yet. Thus, an integrated analysis on the trends of crop yield and cultivated area is essential to better understand current state of food security in China, especially on county scale. So far, yield stagnation has extensively dominated the main cereal-growing areas across China. Rice yield is facing the most severe stagnation that 53.9% counties tracked in the study have stagnated significantly, followed by maize (42.4%) and wheat (41.9%). As another important element for production sustainability, but often neglected is the planted area patterns. It has been further demonstrated that the loss in productive arable land for rice and wheat have dramatically increased the pressure on achieving food security. Not only a great deal of the planted areas have stagnated since 1980, but also collapsed. 48.4% and 54.4% of rice- and wheat-growing counties have lost their cropland areas to varying degrees. Besides, 27.6% and 35.8% of them have retrograded below the level of the 1980s. The combined influence (both loss in yield and area) has determined the crop sustainable production in China to be pessimistic for rice and wheat, and consequently no surprise to find that more than half of counties rank a lower level of production sustainability. Therefore, given the potential yield increase in wheat and maize, as well as substantial area loss of rice and wheat, the possible targeted adaptation measures for both yield and cropping area is required at county scale. Moreover, policies on food trade, alongside advocation of low calorie diets, reducing food loss and waste can help to enhance food security.

  16. Accumulation, transfer, and potential sources of mercury in the soil-wheat system under field conditions over the Loess Plateau, northwest China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shengli [Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Prediction and Control, Gansu Province, College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Western China' s Environmental Systems (Ministry of Education), College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Nan, Zhongren, E-mail: nanzhongren@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Prediction and Control, Gansu Province, College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Western China' s Environmental Systems (Ministry of Education), College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Prete, Daniel [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Ryerson University, Toronto M5B 2K3 (Canada); Ma, Jianmin; Liao, Qin; Zhang, Qian [Key Laboratory for Environmental Pollution Prediction and Control, Gansu Province, College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-10-15

    There is limited information on accumulation, transfer, and source of mercury in wheats under field conditions over the Loess Plateau, northwest China. The present study collected 26 pairs of topsoil and whole wheat samples (roots, stems, leaves, shells, and grains) from Dongdagou stream watershed and upper Xidagou stream watershed, Baiyin City, northwest China. Hg concentrations from these samples were used to identify their relationships with soil properties, interactions with other metals, localization of Hg in the different wheat tissues, bio-concentration and transfer of Hg, and major sources of Hg in wheat. Results show that Hg levels in 11 out of 26 sampled soils (42.3% of soil samples) exceeded Hg limit of grade II soil environmental quality standards in China (1.0 mg·kg{sup −} {sup 1}). Likewise, it was also found that Hg in over 50% of wheat grain samples reached or exceeded the maximum permissible food safety levels (0.02 mg·kg{sup −} {sup 1}) according to the General Standard of Contaminants in Food in China (GB 2762-2012). The spatial distribution pattern of Hg in wheats grains was different from that in the sampled soils. Hg concentrations in different wheat tissues were highest in roots, followed by leaves, stalks, shells, and grains, respectively. Bio-concentration factors (BCF) of Hg in almost all grains samples were one or two orders of magnitude lower than that in roots, except for two wheat samples. The translocation factors (TF) of Hg in wheat tissues on average were leaves > stems > shells > grains. The spatial distribution of Hg and its correlation with other heavy metal detected simultaneously in the soil samples suggested that the Hg soil contamination was probably caused by past sewage irrigation practices and atmospheric deposition. Correlation analysis revealed that the principle source of Hg in wheat roots was very likely from Hg contaminated soils. - Highlights: • Hg concentrations in wheats and corresponding soils from loess

  17. Durum wheat and allelopathy: toward wheat breeding for natural weed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragasso, Mariagiovanna; Iannucci, Anna; Papa, Roberto

    2013-09-24

    Wheat-derived foodstuffs represent about one-fifth of the calories consumed by humans worldwide. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most important crops throughout the world, and it has been extensively studied for its allelopathic potential. In contrast, for allelopathy in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum), our knowledge is partial and fragmentary. Through highlighting recent advances in using allelopathy as a crop-breeding tool, we provide an overview of allelopathy in Triticum spp., to stimulate further coordinated breeding-oriented studies, to favor allelopathy exploitation for the sustainable cultivation of wheat, and in particular, to achieve improved biological weed control.

  18. External nitrogen input affects pre- and post-harvest cell wall composition but not the enzymatic saccharification of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldwin, Laetitia Andrée; Glazowska, Sylwia Emilia; Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Wheat is one of the most important crops for food and feed and its straw is a potential feedstock for biorefinery purposes. Nitrogen (N) is an essential input factor in wheat agriculture but no information is available on how it affects straw composition during maturation and at harvest. To inves......Wheat is one of the most important crops for food and feed and its straw is a potential feedstock for biorefinery purposes. Nitrogen (N) is an essential input factor in wheat agriculture but no information is available on how it affects straw composition during maturation and at harvest....... To investigate this, we conducted a large scale field experiment in which wheat plants were cultivated at three levels of externally applied N. The plants were harvested at different stages of maturation, spanning green straw at heading (ear emergence) to fully yellow straw at final maturity. Defined parts...... of the straw were analyzed for cell wall characteristics relevant for further biomass processing. The straw N concentration corroborated with the level of N input, but the yield of straw biomass was not largely affected. High N treatment modified cell wall composition, namely increased abundance...

  19. Physicochemical, microbiological and sensory quality of noodles produced with partial replacement of wheat semolina by amaranth flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Samir Vedia-Quispe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pasta is a worldwide high consumption and acceptability food due to its low cost, easy preparation and storage. Pasta is usually made of edible wheat semolina and water. The replacement of wheat semolina by amaranth flour stimulates the development of new products and improves nutritional profile of pasta. The aim of this study was to assess physicochemical, microbiological and sensory properties of noodles made with partially replaced wheat semolina by whole grain and raw amaranth flours. Material and Methods: We evaluated the effect of the partial substitution (20% and 30% of wheat semolina using raw amaranth and whole grain amaranth flours in physicochemical, microbiological, quality characteristics and sensory analysis of acceptance. Results: The best treatment was the combination of 70% wheat semolina and 30% raw amaranth, where flavor was the factor in the overall acceptance, and some quality parameters correlated with the sensory responses. All pastas show sanitary quality and food safety. Conclusions: The partial substitution of amaranth flour, either raw or whole grain, improved significantly physicochemical characteristics of fiber with an increase of 60% and 140% in minerals (calcium and iron in the noodles.

  20. Elemental mapping of biofortified wheat grains using micro X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, I.; Pataco, I. M.; Mourinho, M. P.; Lidon, F.; Reboredo, F.; Pessoa, M. F.; Carvalho, M. L.; Santos, J. P.; Guerra, M.

    2016-06-01

    Micro X-ray fluorescence has been used to obtain elemental maps of biofortified wheat grains. Two varieties of wheat were used in the study, Triticum aestivum L. and Triticum durum desf. Two treatments, with different nutrient concentration, were applied to the plants during the whole plant growth cycle. From the obtained elemental maps it was possible to extract information regarding the plant's physiological processes under the biofortification procedures. Both macro and micronutrients were mapped, providing useful insight into the posterior food processing mechanisms of this biofortified staple food. We have also shown that these kind of studies can now be performed with laboratory benchtop apparatus, rather than using synchrotron radiation, increasing the overall attractiveness of micro X-ray fluorescence in the study of highly heterogeneous biological samples.

  1. Food and functional dyspepsia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncanson, K R; Talley, N J; Walker, M M; Burrows, T L

    2017-09-15

    Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a debilitating functional gastrointestinal disorder characterised by early satiety, post-prandial fullness or epigastric pain related to meals, which affects up to 20% of western populations. A high dietary fat intake has been linked to FD and duodenal eosinophilia has been noted in FD. We hypothesised that an allergen such as wheat is a risk factor for FD and that withdrawal will improve symptoms of FD. We aimed to investigate the relationship between food and functional dyspepsia. Sixteen out of 6451 studies identified in a database search of six databases met the inclusion criteria of studies examining the effect of nutrients, foods and food components in adults with FD or FD symptoms. Wheat-containing foods were implicated in FD symptom induction in six studies, four of which were not specifically investigating gluten and two that were gluten-specific, with the implementation of a gluten-free diet demonstrating a reduction in symptoms. Dietary fat was associated with FD in all three studies that specifically measured this association. Specific foods reported as inducing symptoms were high in either natural food chemicals, high in fermentable carbohydrates or high in wheat/gluten. Caffeine was associated with FD in four studies, although any association with alcohol was uncertain. Wheat and dietary fats may play key roles in the generation of FD symptoms and reduction or withdrawal eased symptoms. Randomised trials investigating the roles of gluten, FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide and polyols) and high fat ingestion and naturally occurring food chemicals in the generation of functional dyspepsia symptoms are warranted and further investigation of the mechanisms is now required. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  2. Regulatory monitoring systems of fortified salt and wheat flour in selected ASEAN countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wijngaart, Annoek; Bégin, France; Codling, Karen; Randall, Philip; Johnson, Quentin W

    2013-06-01

    Considerable efforts have been made over the past decade to address vitamin and mineral deficiencies. An increasing number of countries in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) are adopting mandatory food fortification as one of the primary strategies to overcome these deficiencies. Experience shows that fortified foods can reach large parts of the population, including the poor, if the fortification is done on a mandatory rather than a voluntary basis and if the food vehicle is widely consumed. To review the importance of regulatory monitoring as an essential component of food fortification efforts in selected ASEAN countries, with special focus on the available information on regulatory monitoring systems for iodized salt and fortified wheat flour. The role of regulatory monitoring in strengthening food fortification programs was discussed during a joint regional meeting of the World Health Organization, UNICEF, the Flour Fortification Initiative, the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition, the Micronutrient Initiative, and the World Bank on regulatory monitoring of salt and wheat flour fortification programs in Asia, which took place in Manila, Philippines, on 27-29 September 2011. This paper reviews the regulatory monitoring systems of selected ASEAN countries that participated in this meeting. Problems and challenges in regulatory monitoring systems for iodized salt and fortified wheat flour in selected ASEAN countries are identified, and a description of the role of regulatory monitoring in strengthening food fortification initiatives, particularly of salt and flour, and highlights of areas for improvement are presented. Regulatory monitoring consists of monitoring activities conducted at the production level, at customs warehouses, and at retail stores by concerned regulatory authorities, and at the production level by producers themselves, as part of quality control and assurance efforts. Unless there are appropriate enforcement and quality

  3. Peanut, milk, and wheat intake during pregnancy is associated with reduced allergy and asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyavanich, Supinda; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Platts-Mills, Thomas A; Workman, Lisa; Sordillo, Joanne E; Camargo, Carlos A; Gillman, Matthew W; Gold, Diane R; Litonjua, Augusto A

    2014-05-01

    Maternal diet during pregnancy may affect childhood allergy and asthma. We sought to examine the associations between maternal intake of common childhood food allergens during early pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma. We studied 1277 mother-child pairs from a US prebirth cohort unselected for any disease. Using food frequency questionnaires administered during the first and second trimesters, we assessed maternal intake of common childhood food allergens during pregnancy. In mid-childhood (mean age, 7.9 years), we assessed food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis by questionnaire and serum-specific IgE levels. We examined the associations between maternal diet during pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma. We also examined the cross-sectional associations between specific food allergies, asthma, and atopic conditions in mid-childhood. Food allergy was common (5.6%) in mid-childhood, as was sensitization to at least 1 food allergen (28.0%). Higher maternal peanut intake (each additional z score) during the first trimester was associated with 47% reduced odds of peanut allergic reaction (odds ratio [OR], 0.53; 95% CI, 0.30-0.94). Higher milk intake during the first trimester was associated with reduced asthma (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.69-0.99) and allergic rhinitis (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74-0.97). Higher maternal wheat intake during the second trimester was associated with reduced atopic dermatitis (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.46-0.90). Peanut, wheat, and soy allergy were each cross-sectionally associated with increased childhood asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis (ORs, 3.6 to 8.1). Higher maternal intake of peanut, milk, and wheat during early pregnancy was associated with reduced odds of mid-childhood allergy and asthma. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Economic Evaluation of Improved Irrigated Bread Wheat Varieties with National and International Origins and Its Impacts on Transfer of Supply Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hormoz asadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Agricultural research is important and one of the determinant factors of development of technologies in agricultural sector. Among agricultural research disciplines, breeding programs, especially, wheat breeding programs are one of the applied approaches in improving of production and food security. Based on a study by Byerlee & Traxler (1995, economic benefits and Internal Rate of Return (IRR for Impact of International Wheat Improvement (for all breeding programs were estimated US$3.0 billion per year with internal rate of 53%, and economic benefits for Impact of International Wheat Improvement (Attributed to IWIN was estimated US$1.5 billion per year during 1966-90. Materials and methods The main objectives of this research were to determine shift of supply function of variety and impacts of breeding wheat varieties on reduction costs, and determination of economic return of released irrigated bread wheat in breeding program for the period of 1991-2000. Wheat varieties included; 23 varieties of released irrigated bread wheat by wheat breeding program of Seed and Plant Improvement Institute (SPII and Provincial Agricultural Research Centers. Ex-ante and Ex-post methods were used in this study. Measuring criteria for these methods were; quantity of shift in supply function, cost-benefit analysis and internal rate of return of varieties. For estimation of reduction costs and shift of supply function of varieties in breeding program were calculated following Brennan et al. (2002: Where: Cvb: Cost reduction due to breeding program, TCh: Cost production per ha, Yv (without: yield of check variety in breeding plots, Yv (with: yield of new variety in breeding plots, PSS: % supply shift in breeding program and Pw: price of wheat grain per kg For assessing economic criteria, Net Present Value (NPV, Cost-Benefit Analysis and Internal Rate of Return (IRR were used: Following Brennan et al (2002, gross benefit of irrigated bread wheat

  5. Paint removal using wheat starch blast media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Terry; Oestreich, John

    1993-03-01

    A review of the Wheat Starch Blasting technology is presented. Laboratory evaluations covering Almen Arc testing on bare 2024-T3 aluminum and magnesium, as well as crack detection on 7075-T6 bare aluminum, are discussed. Comparisons with Type V plastic media show lower residual stresses are achieved on aluminum and magnesium with wheat starch media. Dry blasting effects on the detection of cracks confirms better crack visibility with wheat starch media versus Type V or Type II plastic media. Testing of wheat starch media in several composite test programs, including fiberglass, Kevlar, and graphite-epoxy composites, showed no fiber damage. Process developments and production experience at the first U.S. aircraft stripping facility are also reviewed. Corporate and regional aircraft are being stripped in this three nozzle dry blast hanger.

  6. QUALITY PARAMETRES OF EMMER WHEAT LANDRACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr KONVALINA

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Emmer wheat, Triticum dicoccum SCHUEBL, is an old variety of cereals which has been traditionally grown in aride areas. Nowdays, it is mainly grown in Italy, Spain, Turkey, Austria and in the Czech republic. This article deals with a study of quality parametres and selected economic parametres of 6 varieties coming from the genetic resources of emmer wheat. High crude protein content in grain was proved during the trials. Nevertheless, such a characteristic is not suitable for the classical bakery processing (production of leavened products. Low figure of the harvest index is supposed to be the most problematic economic character. However, emmer wheat is a suitable variety for organic farming system. Growing of emmer wheat contributes to an extension of the agrobiodiversity in the countryside and to the suistainable development of a region.

  7. Production of ethanol from wheat straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smuga-Kogut Małgorzata

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a method for the production of ethanol from wheat straw lignocellulose where the raw material is chemically processed before hydrolysis and fermentation. The usefulness of wheat straw delignification was evaluated with the use of a 4:1 mixture of 95% ethanol and 65% HNO3 (V. Chemically processed lignocellulose was subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis to produce reducing sugars, which were converted to ethanol in the process of alcoholic fermentation. Chemical processing damages the molecular structure of wheat straw, thus improving ethanol yield. The removal of lignin from straw improves fermentation by eliminating lignin’s negative influence on the growth and viability of yeast cells. Straw pretreatment facilitates enzymatic hydrolysis by increasing the content of reducing sugars and ethanol per g in comparison with untreated wheat straw.

  8. Prevalence of Wheat Allergy in Japanese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eishin Morita

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of wheat allergy in Japanese adults was found to be 0.21% by using a combination of questionnaire-based examination, skin prick test and serum omega-5 gliadin-specific IgE test.

  9. Food Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Food Poisoning KidsHealth / For Kids / Food Poisoning What's in ... find out how to avoid it. What Is Food Poisoning? Food poisoning comes from eating foods that ...

  10. Organic Wheat Farming Improves Grain Zinc Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Helfenstein, Julian; Müller, Isabel; Grüter, Roman; Bhullar, Gurbir S.; Mandloi, Lokendra; Papritz, Andreas; Siegrist, Michael; Schulin, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) nutrition is of key relevance in India, as a large fraction of the population suffers from Zn malnutrition and many soils contain little plant available Zn. In this study we compared organic and conventional wheat cropping systems with respect to DTPA (diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid)-extractable Zn as a proxy for plant available Zn, yield, and grain Zn concentration. We analyzed soil and wheat grain samples from 30 organic and 30 conventional farms in Madhya Pradesh (central I...

  11. Responses of Wheat Yield, Macro- and Micro-Nutrients, and Heavy Metals in Soil and Wheat following the Application of Manure Compost on the North China Plain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wang

    Full Text Available The recycling of livestock manure in cropping systems is considered to enhance soil fertility and crop productivity. However, there have been no systematic long-term studies of the effects of manure application on soil and crop macro- and micro-nutrients, heavy metals, and crop yields in China, despite their great importance for sustainable crop production and food safety. Thus, we conducted field experiments in a typical cereal crop production area of the North China Plain to investigate the effects of compost manure application rates on wheat yield, as well as on the macro-/micro-nutrients and heavy metals contents of soil and wheat. We found that compost application increased the soil total N and the available K, Fe, Zn, and Mn concentrations, whereas the available P in soil was not affected, and the available Cu decreased. In general, compost application had no significant effects on the grain yield, biomass, and harvest index of winter wheat. However, during 2012 and 2013, the N concentration decreased by 9% and 18% in straw, and by 16% and 12% in grain, respectively. With compost application, the straw P concentration only increased in 2012 but the grain P generally increased, while the straw K concentration tended to decrease and the grain K concentration increased in 2013. Compost application generally increased the Fe and Zn concentrations in straw and grain, whereas the Cu and Mn concentrations decreased significantly compared with the control. The heavy metal concentrations increased at some compost application rates, but they were still within the safe range. The balances of the macro-and micro-nutrients indicated that the removal of nutrients by wheat was compensated for by the addition of compost, whereas the level of N decreased without the application of compost. The daily intake levels of micronutrients via the consumption of wheat grain were still lower than the recommended levels when sheep manure compost was applied, except

  12. Responses of Wheat Yield, Macro- and Micro-Nutrients, and Heavy Metals in Soil and Wheat following the Application of Manure Compost on the North China Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Wang, Zhaohui; Kou, Changlin; Ma, Zhenghua; Zhao, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The recycling of livestock manure in cropping systems is considered to enhance soil fertility and crop productivity. However, there have been no systematic long-term studies of the effects of manure application on soil and crop macro- and micro-nutrients, heavy metals, and crop yields in China, despite their great importance for sustainable crop production and food safety. Thus, we conducted field experiments in a typical cereal crop production area of the North China Plain to investigate the effects of compost manure application rates on wheat yield, as well as on the macro-/micro-nutrients and heavy metals contents of soil and wheat. We found that compost application increased the soil total N and the available K, Fe, Zn, and Mn concentrations, whereas the available P in soil was not affected, and the available Cu decreased. In general, compost application had no significant effects on the grain yield, biomass, and harvest index of winter wheat. However, during 2012 and 2013, the N concentration decreased by 9% and 18% in straw, and by 16% and 12% in grain, respectively. With compost application, the straw P concentration only increased in 2012 but the grain P generally increased, while the straw K concentration tended to decrease and the grain K concentration increased in 2013. Compost application generally increased the Fe and Zn concentrations in straw and grain, whereas the Cu and Mn concentrations decreased significantly compared with the control. The heavy metal concentrations increased at some compost application rates, but they were still within the safe range. The balances of the macro-and micro-nutrients indicated that the removal of nutrients by wheat was compensated for by the addition of compost, whereas the level of N decreased without the application of compost. The daily intake levels of micronutrients via the consumption of wheat grain were still lower than the recommended levels when sheep manure compost was applied, except for that of Mn.

  13. Clinical and laboratory features, and quality of life assessment in wheat dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis patients from central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Huang, Nan; Li, Wen-Jing; Dong, Xiang; Qi, Shan-Shan; Wang, You-Na; Liu, Guang-Hui; Zhu, Rong-Fei

    2016-06-01

    Wheat dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is a rare but potentially severe food allergy caused by the combination of wheat ingestion and physical exercise. The impact of WDEIA on quality of life (QOL) is unclear. This study characterized the clinical and laboratory features and investigated the QOL in WDEIA patients from Central China. Twenty-eight WDEIA patients were analyzed, and QOL was measured by validated Chinese version Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire-Adult Form (FAQLQ-AF) and Food Allergy Independent Measure (FAIM) after obtaining the diagnosis. The results showed that half of the patients were females. The median onset age was 37 years old. The symptoms occurred within 1 h after wheat ingestion (26/28). Symptoms of anaphylaxis included cutaneous (26/28), respiratory (11/28), gastro-intestinal (5/28) and cardiovascular manifestations (27/28). Skin prick tests were positive to salt soluble (89.3%) and salt insoluble wheat allergen extracts (100%). Positive rate to wheat, gluten and omega-5 gliadin specific IgE was 64.3%, 92.9% and 92.9% respectively. Specific IgE to omega-5 gliadin with a cut-off value 0.83 KU/L offered highly efficient diagnostic criterion for WDEIA (sensitivity: 89.3%; and specificity: 88.9%). The mean scores of FAQLQ-AF and FAIM were 4.70 and 4.98 respectively and level of anti-omega-5 gliadin IgE had positive correlations with FAQLQ scores. Thereby, WDEIA is commonly found in mid-age adults. In most cases, multi-organs especially skin and cardiovascular systems are involved. Salt insoluble wheat allergen skin test and serum specific IgE to gluten and omega-5 gliadin help to diagnose WDEIA. QOL in WDEIA patients is severely impaired.

  14. Cytotoxic testing for food allergy: evaluation of reproducibility and correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, T E; Arkins, J A

    1976-10-01

    Cytotoxic food tests still present conflicting opinions concerning their validity. Nine atopic patients with or without a history of food allergy were studied along with 5 nonatopic patients. All tests were conducted in a double-blind fashion with 6 determinations for each of 10 food antigens. Reproducibility of the test (5/6 positive or negative) was demonstrated with wheat, milk, yeast, chocolate, and orange. In the nonatopic group, reproducible results were obtained for wheat, egg, yeast, chocolate, and chicken. Clinical correlation with 11 foods in 7 patients was demonstrated. However, there were 46 positive tests without correlation and 2 negative tests with positive histories. Therefore, there appears to be reproducibility of the tests to only 3 foods but no apparent correlation with clinical symptoms. At the present time, cytotoxic tests offer no reliable help in establishing the diagnosis of food allergy.

  15. Drought Response in Wheat: Key Genes and Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Root System Architecture and Transpiration Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kulkarni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as, drought, heat, salinity, and flooding threaten global food security. Crop genetic improvement with increased resilience to abiotic stresses is a critical component of crop breeding strategies. Wheat is an important cereal crop and a staple food source globally. Enhanced drought tolerance in wheat is critical for sustainable food production and global food security. Recent advances in drought tolerance research have uncovered many key genes and transcription regulators governing morpho-physiological traits. Genes controlling root architecture and stomatal development play an important role in soil moisture extraction and its retention, and therefore have been targets of molecular breeding strategies for improving drought tolerance. In this systematic review, we have summarized evidence of beneficial contributions of root and stomatal traits to plant adaptation to drought stress. Specifically, we discuss a few key genes such as, DRO1 in rice and ERECTA in Arabidopsis and rice that were identified to be the enhancers of drought tolerance via regulation of root traits and transpiration efficiency. Additionally, we highlight several transcription factor families, such as, ERF (ethylene response factors, DREB (dehydration responsive element binding, ZFP (zinc finger proteins, WRKY, and MYB that were identified to be both positive and negative regulators of drought responses in wheat, rice, maize, and/or Arabidopsis. The overall aim of this review is to provide an overview of candidate genes that have been identified as regulators of drought response in plants. The lack of a reference genome sequence for wheat and non-transgenic approaches for manipulation of gene functions in wheat in the past had impeded high-resolution interrogation of functional elements, including genes and QTLs, and their application in cultivar improvement. The recent developments in wheat genomics and reverse genetics, including the availability of a

  16. Food availability according to food security- insecurity among Mexican households.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna Guadalupe Valencia-Valero

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To know the differences in food availability according to food insecurity level among the Mexican households. Materials and methods. We analyzed the database of the National Survey of Household’s Incomes and Expenditures (n=27 445 households. Households were classified according to the Latin American and Caribbean Inventory of Food Security. The availability of each food group was estimated as grams per day per equivalent adult. Results. 50.0% of Mexican households experienced some degree of food insecurity. Among households with food insecurity there was high availability of corn, wheat, egg, and sugars; but there was low availability of fresh fruits and vegetables, lean meat, poultry, seafood, milk, cheeses, and sweetened beverages. Conclusion. Although in households with food insecurity there is lower availability of most food groups (both with high nutrient density and with high energy density; they have higher availability of cheap foods, which in some cases are only source of energy but do not provide nutrients.

  17. Basic Thermal Parameters of Selected Foods and Food Raw Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Božiková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, processing and manipulation with foods and food raw materials have significant influence on their physical properties. The article is focused on thermophysical parameters measurement of selected foods and food raw materials. There were examined thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of selected materials. For detection of thermal parameters was used instrument Isomet 2104, which principle of measurement is based on transient methods. In text are presented summary results of thermal parameters measurement for various foods and food raw materials as: granular materials – corn flour and wheat flour; fruits, vegetables and fruit products – grated apple, dried apple and apple juice; liquid materials – milk, beer etc. Measurements were performed in two temperature ranges according to the character of examined material. From graphical relations of thermophysical parameter is evident, that thermal conductivity and diffusivity increases with temperature and moisture content linearly, only for granular materials were obtained non‑linear dependencies. Results shows, that foods and food raw materials have different thermal properties, which are influenced by their type, structure, chemical and physical properties. From presented results is evident, that basic thermal parameters are important for material quality detection in food industry.

  18. OFFICIAL CONTROL OF WHEAT MYCOTOXINS CONTAMINATION IN THE SLOVAK REPUBLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Remža

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It is important for the protection of public health that maximum levels are set on unprocessed cereals in order to avoid, that highly contaminated cereals can enter the food chain and to encourage and ensure that all measures are taken during the field, harvest and storage stage of the production chain. The contamination of winter wheat grain by toxins with focus on the genus Fusarium was monitored within the years 2009 – 2011 under the official control according to EC Regulation 401/2006 and 178/2010 on the territory of the Slovak Republic. The concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON and nivalenol was determined by HPLC/DAD detector and concentration of zearalenone (ZEA by HPLC/FLD detector. Deoxynivalenol was the most common (dominant Fusarium toxins in 2009-2011 with a concentration ranging from 20 µg.kg-1 - 2 651.79 µg.kg-1. 4 samples contained the content of deoxynivalenol which was over the EC Regulation no. 1881/2006 about setting the maximum levels for certain contaminants in foodstuff. Trichothecenes nivalenol occurred regularly together with deoxynivalenol. 12 % of wheat samples were contaminated with two toxins deoxynivalenol and zearalenone, 7 % of samples were analyzed for concurrent occurrence of zearalenone + deoxynivalenol + nivalenol.

  19. Identification of bitter compounds in whole wheat bread crumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Qing; Peterson, Devin G

    2016-07-15

    Consumer acceptability of whole wheat foods is challenged by negative bitter flavour attributes. In this study, bitter compounds in whole wheat bread crumb were investigated. Utilising sensory-guided multi-dimensional fractionation techniques, the compounds with the highest bitterness intensity in the crumb were purified and identified by LC-MS-ToF and NMR techniques. The main bitter compounds were reported to be L-tryptophan, Wessely-Moser isomers apigenin-6-C-galactoside-8-C-arabinoside & apigenin-6-C-arabinoside-8-C-galactoside, and 9,12,13-trihydroxy-trans-10-octadecenoic acid (pinellic acid). Sensory recombination experiments of the bitter compounds formulated at the concentrations determined in expectorated saliva after bread mastication indicated pinellic acid had the greatest contribution to the bitterness perception of the crumb. Quantitative analysis of pinellic acid in the raw flour was reported to be inherently low compared to bread; the concentration increased more than 30-fold after flour hydration and baking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of color sorting machine in reducing food safety risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Kecskes-Nagy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available It is the very difficult problem how we can decrease food safety risks in the product, which was polluted in process of cropping. According to professional literature almost the prevention is considered as an exclusive method to keep below safe level the content of DON toxin. The source of food safety in food chain is that the primary products suit the food safety requirements. It is a very difficult or sometimes it is not possible to correct food safety risk factors - which got into the products during cultivation - in the course of processing. Such factor is fusariotoxin in fodder and bread wheat. DON toxin is the most frequent toxin in cereals. The objective of the searching was to investigate, if it is possible to decrease DON toxin content of durum wheat and to minimize the food safety risk by application milling technology with good production practice and technological conditions. The samples were taken in the first phase of milling technology just before and after color sorting. According to measuring results Sortex Z+ optical sorting decreased DON toxin content of wheat. This mean that the food safety risks can be reduced by Sortex Z+ optical sorting machine. Our experiments proved if there is color sorting in the cleaning process preceding the milling of wheat then a part of the grain of wheat infected by Fusarium sp. can be selected. This improves the food safety parameters of given lot of wheat and decrease the toxin content. The flour made from contaminated grains of wheat can be a serious food safety risk. We would like to support scientifically the technical development of milling technology with our experimental data. Normal 0 21 false false false HU X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

  1. Whole-genome profiling and shotgun sequencing delivers an anchored, gene-decorated, physical map assembly of bread wheat chromosome 6A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poursarebani, Naser; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Simková, Hana; Safář, Jan; Witsenboer, Hanneke; van Oeveren, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav; Mayer, Klaus F X; Stein, Nils; Schnurbusch, Thorsten

    2014-07-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is the most important staple food crop for 35% of the world's population. International efforts are underway to facilitate an increase in wheat production, of which the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) plays an important role. As part of this effort, we have developed a sequence-based physical map of wheat chromosome 6A using whole-genome profiling (WGP™). The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig assembly tools fingerprinted contig (fpc) and linear topological contig (ltc) were used and their contig assemblies were compared. A detailed investigation of the contigs structure revealed that ltc created a highly robust assembly compared with those formed by fpc. The ltc assemblies contained 1217 contigs for the short arm and 1113 contigs for the long arm, with an L50 of 1 Mb. To facilitate in silico anchoring, WGP™ tags underlying BAC contigs were extended by wheat and wheat progenitor genome sequence information. Sequence data were used for in silico anchoring against genetic markers with known sequences, of which almost 79% of the physical map could be anchored. Moreover, the assigned sequence information led to the 'decoration' of the respective physical map with 3359 anchored genes. Thus, this robust and genetically anchored physical map will serve as a framework for the sequencing of wheat chromosome 6A, and is of immediate use for map-based isolation of agronomically important genes/quantitative trait loci located on this chromosome. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Changes in the rheological properties of wheat dough during short-term storage of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadnađev, Miroslav; Dapčević Hadnađev, Tamara; Pojić, Milica; Torbica, Aleksandra; Tomić, Jelena; Rakita, Slađana; Janić Hajnal, Elizabet

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of the small- and large-deformation fundamental rheological tests to monitor the changes during short-term post-harvest storage of wheat. At the end of wheat storage period, wet gluten quantity decreased, while gluten index increased in comparison to those of freshly harvested samples. The rheological properties of dough changed over the pre-defined period of storage in terms of becoming more elastic and less extensible in comparison to that of freshly harvested wheat. Visco-elastic properties of weaker flour samples changed more markedly during storage than those of stronger flours, indicating that the intensity of dough rheological changes during wheat storage might be dependent on gluten quality and were the characteristic of wheat variety. It was shown that small deformation dynamic oscillation and large deformation creep-recovery tests can be successfully employed to monitor the changes in flour quality during wheat storage and that required storage period after wheat harvesting has to be defined according to wheat variety initial rheological properties and its gluten quality. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. ESTIMATION OF WHEAT STRAW AND RAPESEED USEFULNESS FOR WHEAT FERTILISATION IN ARABLE FARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Stankowski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was the estimation of wheat and rapeseed straw usefulness for fertilising plants in arable farming. The subject matter of the study was the analysis of the influence of soil fertilisation with wheat and rapeseed straw on the yield and changes in the content of phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium in winter wheat grain cultivars: Finezja and Ludwig. The static field experiment was conducted at Agricultural Experiment Station, Grabów, Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation – State Research Institute (51°21′ N, 21°40′ E in the years 2008–2010 on Haplic Luvisol. The effect of fertilisation with wheat and rapeseed straw did not have a significant effect on grain yield of winter wheat cultivars ‘Finezja’ and ‘Ludwig’. The introduction of complementary nitrogen fertilisation caused an increase in grain yield of wheat cultivar Ludwig. Organic fertilisation with wheat and rapeseed straw as well as complementary nitrogen fertilisation did not significantly differentiate the content of phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium in winter wheat grain cultivars ‘Finezja’ and ‘Ludwig’.

  4. The conversion of spring wheat into winter wheat and vice versa ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 2. The conversion of spring wheat into winter wheat and vice versa: false claim or Lamarckian inheritance? Xiuju Li Yongsheng Liu. Mini-review Volume 35 Issue 2 June 2010 pp 321-325 ...

  5. Quality of shear fractionated wheat gluten – comparison to commercial vital wheat gluten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zalm, van der E.E.J.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The functional properties of gluten obtained with a shear-induced separation process, recently proposed by Peighambardoust et al. (2008), are compared with a commercially available vital wheat gluten. Two tests were performed. First, a relatively strong wheat flour, Soissons, was enriched with

  6. The surface-associated proteins of wheat starch granules: suitability of wheat starch for celiac patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat starch is used to make baked products for celiac patients in several European countries, but is avoided in the US because of uncertainty about the amounts of associated grain storage (gluten) proteins. People with celiac disease (CD) must avoid wheat, rye and barley proteins and products that...

  7. Effect of temperature on wheat streak mosaic disease development in winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperature is one of the key factors that influence viral disease development in plants. In this study, temperature effect on Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) replication and in planta movement was determined using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged virus in two winter wheat cultivars. Virus-...

  8. Evaluation of a new protocol for wheat desensitization in patients with wheat-induced anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekabi, Mahsa; Arshi, Saba; Bemanian, Mohammad Hassan; Rekabi, Vahab; Rajabi, Abolfazl; Fallahpour, Morteza; Molatefi, Rasool; Shokri, Sima; Eslami, Narges; Ahmadian, Javad; Khoshmirsafa, Majid; Seif, Farhad; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Akbarpour, Nadieh; Nabavi, Mohammad

    2017-06-01

    New approaches such as oral immunotherapy (OIT) may be useful in IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to wheat. 12 patients underwent OIT protocol that comprised of two phases: the first with semolina flour and the second with spaghetti. Total and specific wheat IgE were assayed by ELISA before and after OIT and 18 months later. Skin prick tests were also performed. Patients successfully tolerated 50 g of wheat. The median baseline total IgE was decreased after up-dosing phase and decreased after follow-up (p < 0.01). The median baseline wheat-specific IgE was increased after up-dosing and decreased after follow-up (p < 0.001). The efficiency and safety of our OIT protocol were shown on wheat allergic patients but further investigation is needed.

  9. Detection of soft wheat in semolina and durum wheat bread by analysis of DNA microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualone, Antonella; Montemurro, Cinzia; Grinn-Gofron, Agnieszka; Sonnante, Gabriella; Blanco, Antonio

    2007-05-02

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the analysis of DNA microsatellites for the detection of soft wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in semolina and durum wheat bread (prepared from Triticum turgidum L. var. durum). The results enabled selection of an efficient D-genome-specific repetitive DNA sequence to detect common wheat in semolina and breads by qualitative PCR with a threshold of 3 and 5%, respectively, lowered to 2.5% by real-time PCR. This is of major importance for checking during production of some typical products recently awarded the European Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) mark such as Altamura bread, which should not contain soft wheat flour. The feasibility of quantification of common wheat adulteration in semolina using real-time PCR was also demonstrated.

  10. Effect of homogenization and ultrasonication on the physical properties of insoluble wheat bran fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ran; Zhang, Min; Adhikari, Benu; Liu, Yaping

    2015-10-01

    Wheat bran is rich in dietary fibre and its annual output is abundant, but underutilized. Insoluble dietary fibre often influences food quality negatively; therefore, how to improve the physical and chemical properties of insoluble dietary fibre of wheat bran for post processing is a challenge. Insoluble dietary fibre was obtained from wheat bran and micronized using high-pressure homogenization, high-intensity sonication, and a combination of these two methods. The high-pressure homogenization and high-pressure homogenization+high-intensity sonication treatments significantly (pproperties by high-intensity sonication alone was marginal. In most cases, the high-pressure homogenization process was as good as the high-pressure homogenization+high-intensity sonication process in improving the above-mentioned properties; hence, the contribution of high-`intensity sonication in the high-pressure homogenization+high-intensity sonication process was minimal. The best results show that the minimum particle size of wheat bran can reach 9 μm, and the solubility, swelling, water-holding, oil-holding, cation exchange capacities change significantly.

  11. Analysis of Deoxynivalenol and Deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside in Hard Red Spring Wheat Inoculated with Fusarium Graminearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribel Ovando-Martínez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a mycotoxin affecting wheat quality. The formation of the “masked” mycotoxin deoxinyvalenol-3-glucoside (D3G results from a defense mechanism the plant uses for detoxification. Both mycotoxins are important from a food safety point of view. The aim of this work was to analyze DON and D3G content in inoculated near-isogenic wheat lines grown at two locations in Minnesota, USA during three different years. Regression analysis showed positive correlation between DON content measured with LC and GC among wheat lines, locality and year. The relationship between DON and D3G showed a linear increase until a certain point, after which the DON content and the D3G increased. Wheat lines having higher susceptibility to Fusarium showed the opposite trend. ANOVA demonstrated that the line and location have a greater effect on variation of DON and D3G than do their interaction among years. The most important factor affecting DON and D3G was the growing location. In conclusion, the year, environmental conditions and location have an effect on the D3G/DON ratio in response to Fusarium infection.

  12. Yield and Production Gaps in Rainfed Wheat, Barley, and Canola in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapagain, Tejendra; Good, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Improving crop yields are essential to meet the increasing pressure of global food demands. The loss of high quality land, the slowing in annual yield increases of major cereals, increasing fertilizer use, and the effect of this on the environment all indicate that we need to develop new strategies to increase grain yields with less impact on the environment. One strategy that could help address this concern is by narrowing the yield gaps of major crops using improved genetics and management. The objective of this study was to determine wheat (Triticum spp. L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and canola (Brassica napus L.) yields and production gaps in Alberta. We used 10 years of data (2005–2014) to understand yield variability and input efficiency at a farmers’ specified level of management, and the yield potential under optimal management to suggest appropriate pathways for closing yield gaps. Significant management gaps were observed between attainable and actual yields of rainfed wheat (24%), barley (25%), and canola (30%). In addition, genetic gaps (i.e., gaps due to genetic selection) in wheat, barley, and canola were 18, 12, and 5%, respectively. Genetic selection with optimal crop management could increase yields of wheat, barley, and canola significantly, with estimated yield gains of 3.42, 1.92, and 1.65 million tons, respectively, each year under rainfed conditions in Alberta. This paper identifies yield gaps and offers suggestions to improve efficiency in crop production. PMID:26635824

  13. Comparing sorghum and wheat whole grain breakfast cereals: Sensorial acceptance and bioactive compound content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anunciação, Pamella Cristine; Cardoso, Leandro de Morais; Gomes, Jaqueline Vieira Piovesana; Della Lucia, Ceres Mattos; Carvalho, Carlos Wanderlei Piler; Galdeano, Melicia Cintia; Queiroz, Valéria Aparecida Vieira; Alfenas, Rita de Cássia Gonçalves; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte; Pinheiro-Sant'Ana, Helena Maria

    2017-04-15

    The sensory acceptance and the content of bioactive compounds of whole-sorghum and whole-wheat breakfast cereals were compared. Sensory acceptance was assessed using the Food Action RatingScale. 3-Deoxyanthocyanidins, flavones and flavanones were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection, and vitamin E by HPLC with fluorescence detection. Total phenolics and antioxidant activity were determined by spectrophotometry. The sorghum breakfast cereal had better sensory acceptance (70.6%) than wheat breakfast cereal (41.18%). Sorghum had higher 3-deoxyanthocyanidin content (100% higher), total phenolic compounds (98.2% higher) and antioxidant activity (87.9% higher) than wheat breakfast cereal. Flavones and flavanones were not detected in both breakfast cereals. Total vitamin E content was 78.6% higher in wheat than in sorghum breakfast cereal. Thus, consumption of whole sorghum breakfast cereal should be encouraged, since it had good sensory acceptance and is a source of bioactive compounds that can promote benefits to human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sensory characteristics and consumer acceptance of bread and cracker products made from red or white wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challacombe, Carolyn A; Seetharaman, Koushik; Duizer, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    Whole grain consumption is being promoted due to a number of associated health benefits. However, whole grain consumption is below recommendations possibly due to the presence of characteristic flavors that consumers find unacceptable. The objective of this study was to investigate the sensory characteristics and consumer acceptance of products made from commercial whole grain flours produced from red or white wheats, and with fine or coarse bran particle sizes. Descriptive analysis and consumer acceptance panels were used to characterize both low (cracker) and intermediate (bread) moisture products made with the flours. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was used to correlate the descriptive and consumer data. Sensory differences in whole grain products made from red or white wheat with small or large bran particles sizes and product moisture contents were observed. Bran particle size had a greater effect on the sensory properties of the whole grain products, particularly within the cracker; conversely bran particle size had little influence on consumer acceptance. Red wheat products were found to be more acceptable than the white wheat products. However, a number of color × bran particle interactions were observed in both the descriptive and consumer data. PLS regression demonstrated that consumers could be divided into groupings based upon certain attributes and characteristics. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. Dissipation kinetics of organophosphorus pesticides in milled toasted maize and wheat flour (gofio) during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Curbelo, Miguel Ángel; Socas-Rodríguez, Bárbara; Herrero, Miguel; Herrera-Herrera, Antonio V; Hernández-Borges, Javier

    2017-08-15

    The dissipation/degradation of the pesticides dimethoate, terbufos, disulfoton, and pirimiphos-methyl were evaluated in milled toasted maize and wheat flour (gofio) during three months of storage. Their dissipation kinetics and residual levels were determined, as well as their possible decomposition into some of their main transformation products (disulfoton sulfoxide, terbufos sulfone and disulfoton sulfone). For this purpose, pesticide-free milled toasted maize and wheat samples were spiked with the pesticides, and they were then stored in the darkness at ambient temperature in a closed container to simulate current storage conditions of such packed food. A multiresidue analysis based on the QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) method was performed for the simultaneous determination of these pesticides and their metabolites. After three months of storage, the dissipation of residues ranged between 34% (pirimiphos-methyl) and 86% (disulfoton) for maize gofio and between 69% (terbufos) and 92% (disulfoton and pirimiphos-methyl) for wheat gofio. The results demonstrated that the degradation was slower in gofio than in wheat gofio and that none of the selected metabolites were detected in any of the samples. Dissipation curves of all studied pesticides fitted to a first-order decay curve in both types of cereals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. PEMANFAATAN TEPUNG KOMPOSIT UBI JALAR PUTIH (Ipomea batatas L. KECAMBAH KEDELAI (Glycine max Merr DAN KECAMBAH KACANG HIJAU (Virginia radiata L SEBAGAI SUBSTITUEN PARSIAL TERIGU DALAM PRODUK PANGAN ALTERNATIF BISKUIT KAYA ENERGI PROTEIN [Utilization of Composite Flour from White Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoea batatas L, Germinated Soybeans (Glycine max Merr., and Germinated Mung Beans (Virginia radiata L as Wheat Flour Partial Substituent of Alternative Food, High Energy-Protein Biscuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferry H Sunandar2

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available An emergency food based biscuit product was formulated by utilizing composite flour from white sweet potatoes, germinated soybeans, and germinated mung beans. This product was designed to meet high protein and energy wich contain protein as minimum as 12% and 50% carbohydrate. Sweet potatoes, germinated soybeans, and germinated mung beans flour were obtained by using drum dryer. The flour characteristics determination showed that there were positive corelation between bulk density and wettability, and had negative corelation with stack angle. The bulk density number of sweet potatoes, germinated soybeans, and germinated mung beans flour were 0.56, 0.38, 0.45 g/m; compact density 0.63, 0.54, and 0.56 g/ml; whiteness degree 49.77, 29.82 and 34.41%; stack angle 30.56, 41.77 and 31.16 degree; wettability 1.104, 345, 20 second; and dispersibility 1.98, 1.06 and 0.70%. Wheat flour could be substituted by sweet potatoes flour as much as 80%. The range utilization of germinated soybeans and germinated mung beans flour were 12-28 % which combined with 25-44% sweet potatoes flour. The nutritional composition of high energy and protein biscuit were within average range of protein 12.34%, fat 24.56%, carbohydrate 60.65 %, and also total dietary fiber 15.01%. The result of organoleptic test showed that high energy and protein biscuit was accepted by consument, so that its very potential to ben as alternative food.

  17. Food and Beverage Availability in Small Food Stores Located in Healthy Food Financing Initiative Eligible Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Chelsea R; Li, Yu; Duran, Ana Clara; Zenk, Shannon N; Odoms-Young, Angela; Powell, Lisa M

    2017-10-18

    Food deserts are a major public health concern. This study aimed to assess food and beverage availability in four underserved communities eligible to receive funding from the Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI). Data analyzed are part of a quasi-experimental study evaluating the impact of the HFFI on the retail food environment in selected Illinois communities. In 2015, 127 small grocery and limited service stores located in the four selected communities were audited. All communities had a large percentage of low-income and African-American residents. Differences in food and beverage item availability (e.g., produce, milk, bread, snack foods) were examined by store type and community location. Food stores had, on average, 1.8 fresh fruit and 2.9 fresh vegetable options. About 12% of stores sold low-fat milk while 86% sold whole milk. Only 12% of stores offered 100% whole wheat bread compared to 84% of stores offering white bread. Almost all (97%) stores offered soda and/or fruit juice. In summary, we found limited availability of healthier food and beverage items in the communities identified for HFFI support. Follow up findings will address how the introduction of new HFFI-supported supermarkets will affect food and beverage availability in these communities over time.

  18. Food and Beverage Availability in Small Food Stores Located in Healthy Food Financing Initiative Eligible Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea R. Singleton

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Food deserts are a major public health concern. This study aimed to assess food and beverage availability in four underserved communities eligible to receive funding from the Healthy Food Financing Initiative (HFFI. Data analyzed are part of a quasi-experimental study evaluating the impact of the HFFI on the retail food environment in selected Illinois communities. In 2015, 127 small grocery and limited service stores located in the four selected communities were audited. All communities had a large percentage of low-income and African-American residents. Differences in food and beverage item availability (e.g., produce, milk, bread, snack foods were examined by store type and community location. Food stores had, on average, 1.8 fresh fruit and 2.9 fresh vegetable options. About 12% of stores sold low-fat milk while 86% sold whole milk. Only 12% of stores offered 100% whole wheat bread compared to 84% of stores offering white bread. Almost all (97% stores offered soda and/or fruit juice. In summary, we found limited availability of healthier food and beverage items in the communities identified for HFFI support. Follow up findings will address how the introduction of new HFFI-supported supermarkets will affect food and beverage availability in these communities over time.

  19. Binary mixtures of waxy wheat and conventional wheat as measured by NIR reflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delwiche, Stephen R; Graybosch, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Waxy wheat contains very low concentration (generally wheat whose starch is typically 20% amylose, with the balance being the branched macromolecule, amylopectin. With the release of a commercial hard winter waxy wheat cultivar in the United States, the grain trade, milling, and processing industries seek to have a rapid technique to ensure the purity of identity preserved waxy wheat lots. Near infrared (NIR) reflectance spectroscopy, a technique widely used in the cereals industry for proximate analysis, is a logical candidate for measuring contamination level and thus is the subject of this study. Two sets of wheat samples, harvested, prepared and scanned one year apart, were used to evaluate the NIR concept. One year consisted of nine pairs of conventional:waxy preparations, with each preparation consisting of 29 binary mixtures ranging in conventional wheat fraction (by weight) of 0-100% (261 spectral samples). The second year was prepared in the same fashion, with 12 preparations, thus producing 348 spectral samples. One year's samples were controlled for protein content and moisture level between pair components in order to avoid the basis for the conventional wheat fraction models being caused by something other than spectral differences attributed to waxy and nonwaxy endosperm. Likewise the second year was controlled by selection of conventional wheat for mixture preparation based on either protein content or cluster analysis of principal components of candidate spectra. Partial least squares regression, one and two-term linear regression, and support vector machine regression models were examined. Validation statistics arising from sets within the same year or across years were remarkably similar, as were those among the three regression types. A single wavelength on second derivative transformed spectra, namely 2290 nm, was effective at estimating the mixture level by weight, with standard errors of performance in the 6-9% range. Thus, NIR spectroscopy

  20. Biomass production chamber air analysis of wheat study (BWT931)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, J. H.; Peterson, B. V.; Berdis, E.; Wheeler, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) biomass production chamber at John F. Kennedy Space Center provides a test bed for bioregenerative studies using plants to provide food, oxygen, carbon dioxide removal, and potable water to humans during long term space travel. Growing plants in enclosed environments has brought about concerns regarding the level of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) emitted from plants and the construction materials that make up the plant growth chambers. In such closed systems, the potential exists for some VOC's to reach toxic levels and lead to poor plant growth, plant death, or health problems for human inhabitants. This study characterized the air in an enclosed environment in which wheat cv. Yocora Rojo was grown. Ninty-four whole air samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry throughout the eighty-four day planting. VOC emissions from plants and materials were characterized and quantified.

  1. Dietary exposure to aluminium from wheat flour and puffed products of residents in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junfei; Peng, Shaojie; Tian, Mingsheng; Wang, Liwei; Chen, Bo; Wu, Min; He, Gengsheng

    2015-01-01

    A dietary survey of 3431 residents was conducted by a 24-h dietary recall method in Shanghai, China, quarterly from September 2013 to September 2014. A total of 400 food samples were tested for aluminium concentration, including wheat flour and puffed products from 2011 to 2013. Probabilistic analysis was used to estimate the dietary exposure to aluminium from wheat and puffed products. The means of dietary aluminium exposure for children (2-6 years old), juveniles (7-17 years old), adults (18-65 years old) and seniors (over 65 years old) were 1.88, 0.94, 0.44 and 0.42 mg kg(-1) body weight (bw) week(-1) respectively, with a population average of 0.51 mg kg(-1) bw week(-1). The proportions of those who had aluminium exposure from wheat and puffed products lower than the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) were 77%, 90%, 97%, and 97% respectively from children to seniors. We estimated that the proportions of people at risk would decrease by 13%, 6%, 2% and 2% respectively under the new China National Standards - GB 2760-2014 National Food Safety for Standards for using food additives. The results indicated that aluminium from wheat flour and puffed products is unlikely to cause adverse health effects in the general population in Shanghai; however, children were at a higher risk of excess aluminium exposure. Significant improvements in reducing the dietary exposure to aluminium are expected in the population, especially for children after the implementation of GB 2760-2014.

  2. Food security of small holding farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peramaiyan, Panneer; Hermansen, John Erik; Halberg, Niels

    2010-01-01

    practicing different agro-ecological methods were higher under organic systems than conventional systems. These results suggest that organic farming has the potential to improve food security of small farmers by reducing indebtedness due to the lower cost of production without affecting total farm production...... states. Total food production was found to be comparable for the two systems in two of three states. While yield of rice and wheat generally was lower under the organic systems, yield from intercropping food crops was generally higher. The number of agro-ecological methods and percentage of farms...

  3. Relationship between lutein and mycotoxin content in durum wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Rosa M; Sulyok, Michael; Jirsa, Ondřej; Spitzer, Tomáš; Krska, Rudolf; Polišenská, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Levels of lutein and a number of mycotoxins were determined in seven varieties of durum wheat (Triticum durum) and two varieties of common wheat (Triticum aestivum) in order to explore possible relationships amongst these components. Durum wheat cultivars always showed both higher lutein and mycotoxin contents than common wheat cultivars. The mycotoxins detected in both common and durum wheat cultivars were produced by the genera Fusarium, Claviceps, Alternaria and Aspergillus. Fusarium was the major producer of mycotoxins (26 mycotoxins) followed by Claviceps (14 mycotoxins), which was present only in some cultivars such as Chevalier (common wheat), Lupidur and Selyemdur (both durum wheat), Alternaria (six mycotoxins) and Aspergillus (three mycotoxins). Positive correlations between the levels of lutein and mycotoxins in durum wheat cultivars were found for the following mycotoxins: deoxynivalenol (DON), its derivative DON-3-glucoside, moniliformin, culmorin and its derivatives (5-hydroxyculmorin and 15-hydroxyculmorin).

  4. Wheat Breeding Technologies for a Shifting Global Climate

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — This dataset will contain phenotypic observations of a large number of wheat genotypes evaluated in 2016-2017 and 2017-2018 at the International Maize and Wheat...

  5. 77 FR 23420 - United States Standards for Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... Wheat under the U.S. Grain Standards Act. The proposed rule would change the definition of Contrasting... that these proposed changes will help to facilitate the marketing of wheat. DATES: The comment period...

  6. Effect of high molecular weight glutenin subunit composition in common wheat on dough properties and steamed bread quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Jondiko, Tom O; Tilley, Michael; Awika, Joseph M

    2014-10-01

    Steamed bread is a popular staple food in Asia with different flour quality requirements from pan bread. Little is known about how glutenin characteristics affect steamed bread quality. This work investigated how deletions of high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) influence gluten properties and Chinese steamed bread quality using 16 wheat lines grown in Texas. Although similar in protein content (134-140 mg g⁻¹), gluten composition and dough properties differed widely among the lines. Compared with non-deletion lines, deletion lines had lower (P bread quality (score, 60.8-65.0) with good elasticity and crumb structure. Deletion at Glu-B1y and/or Glu-D1y loci in high-strength hard wheat produced good dough properties for steamed bread. This suggests that wheat functionality for steamed bread can be improved by manipulating HMW-GS composition. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Low level impurities in imported wheat are a likely source of feral transgenic oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Juerg; Brodmann, Peter; Oehen, Bernadette; Bagutti, Claudia

    2015-11-01

    In Switzerland, the cultivation of genetically modified (GM) oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) and the use of its seeds for food and feed are not permitted. Nevertheless, the GM oilseed rape events GT73, MS8×RF3, MS8 and RF3 have recently been found in the Rhine port of Basel, Switzerland. The sources of GM oilseed rape seeds have been unknown. The main agricultural good being imported at the Rhine port of Basel is wheat and from 2010 to 2013, 19% of all Swiss wheat imports originated from Canada. As over 90% of all oilseed rape grown in Canada is GM, we hypothesised that imports of Canadian wheat may contain low level impurities of GM oilseed rape. Therefore, waste fraction samples gathered during the mechanical cleaning of Canadian wheat from two Swiss grain mills were analysed by separating oilseed rape seeds from waste fraction samples and testing DNA of pooled seeds for the presence of transgenes by real-time PCR. Furthermore, oilseed rape seeds from each grain mill were sown in a germination experiment, and seedling DNA was tested for the presence of transgenes by real-time PCR. GT73, MS8×RF3, MS8 and RF3 oilseed rape was detected among seed samples and seedlings of both grain mills. Based on this data, we projected a mean proportion of 0.005% of oilseed rape in wheat imported from Canada. Besides Canadian wheat, the Rhine port of Basel does not import any other significant amounts of agricultural products from GM oilseed rape producing countries. We therefore conclude that Canadian wheat is the major source of unintended introduction of GM oilseed rape seeds into Switzerland.

  8. Registration of Durum Wheat Germplasm Lines with Combined Mutations in SBEIIa and SBEIIb Genes Conferring Increased Amylose and Resistant Starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Naemeh, Mahmoudreza; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2014-08-25

    Durum wheat [Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.], used in pasta, couscous, and flatbread production, is an important source of starch food products worldwide. The amylose portion of the starch forms resistant starch complexes that resist digestion and contribute to dietary fiber. Increasing the amount of amylose and resistant starch in wheat by mutating the STARCH BRANCHING ENZYME II (SBEII) genes has potential to provide human health benefits. Ethyl methane sulfonate mutations in the linked SBEIIa and SBEIIb paralogs were combined on chromosomes 2A (SBEIIa/b-A; Reg. No. GP-968, PI 670159), 2B (SBEIIa/b-B; Reg. No. GP-970, PI 670161), and on both chromosomes (SBEIIa/b-AB; Reg. No. GP-969, PI 670160) in the tetraploid wheat cultivar Kronos, a semidwarf durum wheat cultivar that has high yield potential and excellent pasta quality. These three double and quadruple SBEII-mutant lines were compared with a control sib line with no SBEII mutations in two field locations in California. The SBEIIa/b-AB line with four mutations showed dramatic increases in amylose (average 66%) and resistant starch (average 753%) relative to the control. However, the SBEIIa/b-AB line also showed an average 7% decrease in total starch and an 8% decrease in kernel weight. The release by the University of California-Davis of the durum wheat germplasm combining four SBEIIa and SBEIIb mutations will accelerate the deployment of these mutations in durum wheat breeding programs and the development of durum wheat varieties with increased resistant starch.

  9. Planting Date and Variety Selection for Management of Viruses Transmitted by the Wheat Curl Mite (Acari: Eriophyidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMechan, Anthony J; Hein, Gary L

    2016-02-01

    Wheat is an important food grain worldwide, and it is the primary dryland crop in the western Great Plains. A complex of three viruses (Wheat streak mosaic, Wheat mosaic, and Triticum mosaic viruses) is a common cause of loss in winter wheat production in the Great Plains. All these viruses are transmitted by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). Once these viruses are established, there are no curative actions; therefore, prevention is the key to successful management. A study was designed to evaluate preventative management tactics (planting date, resistant varieties) for reducing the impact from this virus complex. The main plot treatments were three planting dates, and split-plot treatments were three wheat varieties. Varieties were planted at three different times during the fall to simulate early, recommended, and late planting dates. The varieties evaluated in this study were Mace (virus resistant), Millennium (mild tolerance), and Tomahawk (susceptible). Measurements of virus symptomology and yield were used to determine virus impact. Results consistently showed that the resistant Mace yielded more than Millennium or Tomahawk under virus pressure. In some years, delayed planting improved the yields for all varieties, regardless of their background; however, under the most severe virus pressure the combination of both management strategies was not sufficient to provide practical control of this complex. These results illustrate the importance of using a combination of management tactics for this complex, but also reinforce the importance for producers to use additional management strategies (e.g., control preharvest volunteer wheat) to manage this complex. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Development, validation and application of a multi-mycotoxin method for the analysis of whole wheat plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenzel, Judith; Forrer, Hans-Rudolf; Vogelgsang, Susanne; Bucheli, Thomas D

    2012-05-01

    Mycotoxins are known to affect the health of humans and husbandry animals. In contrast to wheat grains used for food and feed, whole wheat plants are rarely analysed for mycotoxins, although contaminated straw could additionally expose animals to these toxic compounds. Since the entire wheat plant may also act as source of mycotoxins emitted into the environment, an analytical method was developed, optimised and validated for the analysis of 28 different mycotoxins in above-ground material from whole wheat plants. The method comprises solid-liquid extraction and a clean-up step using a Varian Bond Elut Mycotoxin(®) cartridge, followed by liquid chromatography with electrospray ionisation and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Total method recoveries for 26 out of 28 compounds were between 69 and 122% and showed limits of detection from 1 to 26 ng/gdry weight (dw). The overall repeatability for all validated compounds was on average 7%, and their mean ion suppression 65%. Those rather high matrix effects made it necessary to use matrix-matched calibrations to quantify mycotoxins within whole wheat plants. The applicability of this method is illustrated with data from a winter wheat test field to examine the risks of environmental contamination by toxins following artificial inoculation separately with four different Fusarium species. The selected data originate from samples of a part of the field which was inoculated with Fusarium crookwellense. In the wheat samples, various trichothecenes (3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol, deoxynivalenol, diacetoxyscirpenol, fusarenone-X, nivalenol, HT-2 toxin, and T-2 toxin) as well as beauvericin and zearalenone were identified with concentrations ranging from 32 ng/gdw to 12 × 10(3) ng/gdw.

  11. GABA Shunt in Durum Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronia Carillo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant responses to salinity are complex, especially when combined with other stresses, and involve many changes in gene expression and metabolic fluxes. Until now, plant stress studies have been mainly dealt only with a single stress approach. However, plants exposed to multiple stresses at the same time, a combinatorial approach reflecting real-world scenarios, show tailored responses completely different from the response to the individual stresses, due to the stress-related plasticity of plant genome and to specific metabolic modifications. In this view, recently it has been found that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA but not glycine betaine (GB is accumulated in durum wheat plants under salinity only when it is combined with high nitrate and high light. In these conditions, plants show lower reactive oxygen species levels and higher photosynthetic efficiency than plants under salinity at low light. This is certainly relevant because the most of drought or salinity studies performed on cereal seedlings have been done in growth chambers under controlled culture conditions and artificial lighting set at low light. However, it is very difficult to interpret these data. To unravel the reason of GABA accumulation and its possible mode of action, in this review, all possible roles for GABA shunt under stress are considered, and an additional mechanism of action triggered by salinity and high light suggested.

  12. Aroma of Wheat Bread Crumb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Anja Niehues

    and VII. The longest fermentation times were generally found for doughs fermented with all baker’s yeasts at 5°C and the lowest yeast concentration (2.88•1014 CFU/kg flour). In Paper II, III and V wheat breads were produced for volatile analysis. The dough samples were fermented to equal height and baked...... containing the highest concentration of the majority of the compounds formed from yeast activity (e.g. 2,3-butanedione and phenylacetaldehyde), compared to doughs fermented at lower yeast concentrations (20 and 40 g/kg flour). A fermentation temIII perature at 5°C resulted in breads with the highest...... fermented at 5°C. In Paper III the effect of the type of commercial baker’s yeast (baker’s yeast I to VII, 2.88•1014 yeast CFU/kg flour) on bread aroma was investigated. Breads fermented by commercial baker’s yeast I to IV had the significantly highest concentration of 2,3-butanedione and 1-propanol...

  13. Variety specificity of soft wheat varieties at organic production

    OpenAIRE

    Ilievski, Mite; Spasova, Dragica; Kukutanov, Risto; Atanasova, Biljana; Jovanov, Dalibor

    2013-01-01

    Surveys were conducted from 2004/05 to 2007/08 on ten (10) genotypes soft winter wheat. The main objective was to determine the variety specificity on wheat in organic production and to recommend varieties that will suit for organic production. Varieties podobrena orovchanka, lizinka, mila, bistra, orovchanka and olga are best and most stable genotypes for high yield of good quality in organic wheat production. Key words: wheat, organic, varieties, specification, grain

  14. Relay cropping of spring barley and winter wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Roslon, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis was to investigate various management practices in order to design a relay cropping system of spring barley and winter wheat with high yielding capacity and good weed suppressive capability under Swedish conditions. The work consisted of two greenhouse experiments, one small-scale field experiment and two field experiments. The factors investigated were seed rate of barley and wheat, undersowing time of wheat and timing of nitrogen fertilisation. Wheat see...

  15. Food Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food allergy is an abnormal response to a food triggered by your body's immune system. In adults, the foods ... a severe reaction called anaphylaxis. Symptoms of food allergy include Itching or swelling in your mouth Vomiting, ...

  16. Nudging children towards whole wheat bread: a field experiment on the influence of fun bread roll shape on breakfast consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Ellen; Vrijhof, Milou; Polet, Ilse A; Vingerhoeds, Monique H; de Wijk, René A

    2014-09-02

    Many children do not eat enough whole grains, which may have negative health consequences. Intervention research is increasingly focusing on nudging as a way to influence food choices by affecting unconscious behavioural processes. The aim of this field study was to examine whether the shape of bread rolls is able to shift children's bread choices from white to whole wheat during breakfast to increase whole grain intake. In a between-subjects experiment conducted at twelve primary schools in the Netherlands, with school as the unit of condition assignment, children were exposed to an assortment of white and whole wheat bread rolls, both varying in shape (regular versus fun). Children were free to choose the type and number of bread rolls and toppings to eat during breakfast. Consumption of bread rolls was measured at class level via the number of bread rolls before and after breakfast. In addition, children (N = 1113) responded to a survey including questions about the breakfast. Results of the field experiment showed that about 76% of bread consumption consisted of white bread rolls. Consumption of white bread rolls did not differ according to shape (all P-values > 0.18). However, presenting fun-shaped whole wheat bread rolls almost doubled consumption of whole wheat bread (P = 0.001), particularly when the simultaneously presented white bread rolls had a regular shape (interaction P = 0.02). Survey results suggest that slight increases in perceived pleasure and taste are associated with these effects. Overall, presenting whole wheat bread in fun shapes may be helpful in increasing consumption of whole wheat bread in children. Future research could examine how improving the visual appeal of healthy foods may lead to sustained behaviour changes.

  17. Enrichment of Bread with Nutraceutical-Rich Mushrooms: Impact of Auricularia auricula (Mushroom) Flour Upon Quality Attributes of Wheat Dough and Bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Biao; Zhao, Liyan; Yang, Wenjian; McClements, David Julian; Hu, Qiuhui

    2017-09-01

    Edible mushrooms contain a variety of bioactive molecules that may enhance human health and wellbeing. Consequently, there is increasing interest in fortifying functional foods with these nutraceutical-rich substances. However, incorporation of mushroom-based ingredients into foods should not adversely affect the quality attributes of the final product. In this study, the impact of incorporating powdered Auricularia auricula, a widely consumed edible mushroom, into bread products was examined. The rheological and structural properties of wheat dough and bread supplemented with 0% to 10% (w/w) A. auricula flour were measured. Supplementation of wheat doughs with A. auricula flour increased the peak viscosity and enhanced their water holding capacity. Rapid viscosity analysis showed that peak and final viscosities of the blended flour (wheat flour with A. auricula flour) were higher than wheat flour alone. However, dough stability and elastic modulus were reduced by blending wheat flour with A. auricula flour. SEM observation showed that doughs with up to 5% (w/w) A. auricula flour had acceptable gluten network microstructure. Characterization of the quality attributes of bread indicated that incorporation of A. auricula flour at levels >5% negatively impacted bread volume, height, texture, and appearance. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  18. Ancestral QTL alleles from wild emmer wheat improve drought resistance and productivity in modern wheat cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianne eMerchuk-Ovnat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides is considered a promising source for improving stress resistances in domesticated wheat. Here we explored the potential of selected quantitative trait loci (QTLs from wild emmer wheat, introgressed via marker-assisted selection, to enhance drought resistance in elite durum (T. turgidum ssp. durum and bread (T. aestivum wheat cultivars. The resultant near-isogenic lines (BC3F3 and BC3F4 were genotyped using SNP array to confirm the introgressed genomic regions and evaluated in two consecutive years under well-watered (690–710 mm and water-limited (290–320 mm conditions. Three of the introgressed QTLs were successfully validated, two in the background of durum wheat cv. Uzan (on chromosomes 1BL and 2BS, and one in the background of bread wheat cvs. Bar Nir and Zahir (chromosome 7AS. In most cases, the QTL x environment interaction was validated in terms of improved grain yield and biomass - specifically under drought (7AS QTL in cv. Bar Nir background, under both treatments (2BS QTL, and a greater stability across treatments (1BL QTL. The results provide a first demonstration that introgression of wild emmer QTL alleles can enhance productivity and yield stability across environments in domesticated wheat, thereby enriching the modern gene pool with essential diversity for the improvement of drought resistance.

  19. Ancestral QTL Alleles from Wild Emmer Wheat Improve Drought Resistance and Productivity in Modern Wheat Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchuk-Ovnat, Lianne; Barak, Vered; Fahima, Tzion; Ordon, Frank; Lidzbarsky, Gabriel A.; Krugman, Tamar; Saranga, Yehoshua

    2016-01-01

    Wild emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides) is considered a promising source for improving stress resistances in domesticated wheat. Here we explored the potential of selected quantitative trait loci (QTLs) from wild emmer wheat, introgressed via marker-assisted selection, to enhance drought resistance in elite durum (T. turgidum ssp. durum) and bread (T. aestivum) wheat cultivars. The resultant near-isogenic lines (BC3F3 and BC3F4) were genotyped using SNP array to confirm the introgressed genomic regions and evaluated in two consecutive years under well-watered (690–710 mm) and water-limited (290–320 mm) conditions. Three of the introgressed QTLs were successfully validated, two in the background of durum wheat cv. Uzan (on chromosomes 1BL and 2BS), and one in the background of bread wheat cvs. Bar Nir and Zahir (chromosome 7AS). In most cases, the QTL x environment interaction was validated in terms of improved grain yield and biomass—specifically under drought (7AS QTL in cv. Bar Nir background), under both treatments (2BS QTL), and a greater stability across treatments (1BL QTL). The results provide a first demonstration that introgression of wild emmer QTL alleles can enhance productivity and yield stability across environments in domesticated wheat, thereby enriching the modern gene pool with essential diversity for the improvement of drought resistance. PMID:27148287

  20. Management of parthenium weed by extracts and residue of wheat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehsan Zaidi

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... bioassay, dried and chopped wheat straw of the four test wheat varieties was thoroughly mixed in pot soil at 0.5 .... Copped materials were mixed in sandy loam soil in plastic pots of 8 ... Effect of different concentrations of methanol straw extracts of four wheat varieties on germination and seedling growth of.

  1. Patterns of trait associations in various wheat populations under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-15

    Mar 15, 2012 ... Five wheat populations were investigated for two years to explore the pattern of trait associations and their contribution to grain ... Key words: Pakistani, CIMMYT, genotypes, wheat, ICARDA, populations. INTRODUCTION ...... grain yield improvement in spring wheat (Triticum aestivum). Int. J. Agric. Biol.

  2. Effect of Sucrose Esters on the Physicochemical Properties of Wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of sucrose esters on the physicochemical properties of wheat starch. Methods: Sucrose ester was mixed with wheat starch extracted from normal soft wheat cultivars and heated. Change in starch properties arising from the interaction between were assessed for starch blue value, viscosity, ...

  3. Genetic studies in wheat for leaf rust resistance ( Puccinia recondita ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic studies in wheat for leaf rust resistance (Puccinia recondita). F Hussain, M Ashraf, MA Hameed, N Hussain, RA Sial. Abstract. Leaf rust is a major disease of wheat crop in the world as a whole. This study was undertaken to find the genetic effects of adult plant leaf resistance in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

  4. Postharvest tillage reduces Downy Brome infestations in winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the Pacific Northwest, downy brome continues to infest winter wheat producing regions especially in low-rainfall areas where the winter wheat-summer fallow rotation is the dominate production system. In Washington, a study was conducted for 2 years at each of two locations in the winter wheat -su...

  5. Determination of genetic diversity among Turkish durum wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wheat landraces represent an important source of genetic variation that can be used for future wheat breeding program. The rich wheat landraces from Turkey have not been sufficiently analyzed genetically. For this reason, genetic diversity and relationship of the landraces must be determined. In this study, genetic diversity ...

  6. 7 CFR 407.17 - Group risk plan for wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Group risk plan for wheat. 407.17 Section 407.17..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GROUP RISK PLAN OF INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 407.17 Group risk plan for wheat. The provisions of the Group Risk Plan for Wheat for the 2000 and succeeding crop years are as follows: 1...

  7. Saliva fractions from South African Russian wheat aphid biotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. The Russian wheat aphid (RWA), Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjomov, 1913), is a notorious pest that reduces yield in wheat. Nevertheless, the source of eliciting activity during RWA–wheat interaction has not been established. This paper reports on the isolation of eliciting activity in aphid saliva that is capable of inducing ...

  8. Effects on respiratory system due to exposure to wheat flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Mohammed Said

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Exposure to wheat flour increases the risk of developing respiratory symptoms; it also causes reduction in the pulmonary function parameters, as regards spirometry and DLCOSB. Exposure to wheat flour causes interstitial lung disease as detected by HRCT chest. Smoking augments the wheat flour induced lung disease.

  9. Effect of Some Oligosaccharides on Functional Properties of Wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of oligosaccharides on the functional properties of wheat starch. Methods: The blue value, retrogradation and pasting properties of wheat starch were determined. In addition, water activity (Aw), melting enthalpy and melting temperature of wheat starch paste were analyzed. Results: ...

  10. Sources of stem rust resistance in Ethiopian tetraploid wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stem or black rust of wheat caused by the fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Ericks and Henn (Pgt) is an important disease on wheat worldwide. Pgt is an obligate biotroph, heteroceous in its life cycle and heterothallic in mating type. Seedlings of 41 emmer (Triticum dicoccum), 56 durum (T. durum) wheat accessions were ...

  11. Development of RAPD based markers for wheat rust resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rust diseases are the major cause of low yield of wheat in Pakistan. Wheat breeders all over the world as well as in Pakistan are deriving rust resistance genes from alien species like Triticum ventricosum and introducing them in common wheat (Triticum aestivum). One such example is the introgression of rust resistance ...

  12. Grain yield and agronomic characteristics of Romanian bread wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... In this study, fourteen bread wheat varieties, twelve of which were introduced into Turkey from. Romania, were evaluated for grain ... Romanian wheat varieties, to study the associations between yield and yield components, and to determine the most ...... Huerta-Espino J (1994). Rust diseases of wheat. In:.

  13. Molecular cytogenetic identification of a novel dwarf wheat line with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-08

    Jan 8, 2012 ... It is known to possess a number of valuable genes for wheat improvement, such as tolerance to abiotic stresses, salinity and drought, and good resistance to leaf rust, yellow rust, stem rust, wheat curl mite, wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), barley yellow dwarf virus. (BYDV) resistance and tan spot (Jiang ...

  14. Sustainable use of winter Durum wheat landraces under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research expected to determine new durum wheat germplasm resistant to biotic and abiotic stress factors. Eighty durum wheat lines selected from eighteen diverse landraces were tested together with eight durum wheat cultivars under reliable yellow rust epidemic during two successive years. Average infection ...

  15. Genetic Diversity in Durum Wheat in Palestine: A Comparative Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NNU

    2012-08-16

    Aug 16, 2012 ... method to evaluate genetic variation and relatedness among ten wheat landraces and cultivars. Key words: Random amplified ... production of wheat in Palestine is 32000 ton (Palestinian. Central Bureau of Statistics, 2009), ..... marker linked with yellow rust resistance in wheat. Biol. Plantarum. 54:691-696.

  16. leaf and stripe rust resistance among ethiopian grown wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    ABSTRACT: Ethiopian grown wheat varieties and lines were studied to identify germplasm sources possessing resistance to leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina and stripe rust (P. striiformis). Sixty-four lines were included of which 38 were bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, 2n=6x=42, AABBDD) and 26 durum wheat (T.

  17. Characterization of a new synthetic wheat – Aegilops biuncialis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the experiments was to identify the synthetic wheat – Aegilops biuncialis germplasm Line 15-3-2 with 42 chromosomes. Morphologically, the spike of line 15-3-2 is intermediate to those of its wheat and Aegilops parents. Line 15-3-2 displays stable fertility and immunity to wheat powdery mildew and stripe rust.

  18. 78 FR 27857 - United States Standards for Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... definition of Contrasting classes (CCL) in the class Hard White wheat. This change will help facilitate the marketing of wheat. DATES: Effective Date: May 1, 2014. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patrick McCluskey... Standards for Wheat under the United States Grain Standards Act (USGSA) to change the definition of...

  19. Metabolite profiling on wheat grain to enable a distinction of samples from organic and conventional farming systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonte, Anja; Neuweger, Heiko; Goesmann, Alexander; Thonar, Cécile; Mäder, Paul; Langenkämper, Georg; Niehaus, Karsten

    2014-10-01

    Identification of biomarkers capable of distinguishing organic and conventional products would be highly welcome to improve the strength of food quality assurance. Metabolite profiling was used for biomarker search in organic and conventional wheat grain (Triticum aestivum L.) of 11 different old and new bread wheat cultivars grown in the DOK system comparison trial. Metabolites were extracted using methanol and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Altogether 48 metabolites and 245 non-identified metabolites (TAGs) were detected in the cultivar Runal. Principal component analysis showed a sample clustering according to farming systems and significant differences in peak areas between the farming systems for 10 Runal metabolites. Results obtained from all 11 cultivars indicated a greater influence of the cultivar than the farming system on metabolite concentrations. Nevertheless, a t-test on data of all cultivars still detected 5 metabolites and 11 TAGs with significant differences between the farming systems. Based on individual cultivars, metabolite profiling showed promising results for the categorization of organic and conventional wheat. Further investigations are necessary with wheat from more growing seasons and locations before definite conclusions can be drawn concerning the feasibility to evolve a combined set of biomarkers for organically grown wheat using metabolite profiles. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Mining centuries old in-situ conserved Turkish wheat landraces for grain yield and stripe rust resistance genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepmala Sehgal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wheat landraces in Turkey are an important genetic resource for wheat improvement. An exhaustive five-year (2009-2014 effort made by the International Winter Wheat Improvement Programme (IWWIP a cooperative program between the Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Livestock of Turkey, the International Center for Maize and Wheat Improvement (CIMMYT and the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA, led to the collection and documentation of around 2,000 landrace populations from 55 provinces throughout Turkey. This study reports the genetic characterization of a subset of bread wheat landraces collected in 2010 from 11 diverse provinces using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS technology. The potential of this collection to identify loci determining grain yield and stripe rust resistance via genome-wide association (GWA analysis was explored. A high genetic diversity (diversity index = 0.260 and a moderate population structure based on highly inherited spike traits was revealed in the panel. The linkage disequilibrium decayed at 10 cM across the whole genome and was slower as compared to other landrace collections. In addition to previously reported QTL, GWA analysis also identified new candidate genomic regions for stripe rust resistance, grain yield and spike productivity components. New candidate genomic regions reflect the potential of this landrace collection to further increase genetic diversity in elite germplasm.

  1. Mechanistic Insight of Water Stress Induced Aggregation in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Quality: The Protein Paradigm Shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijaz Rasool NOORKA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertical and horizontal expansion of agriculture to provide food, feed, fibre and fuel to escalating populations has affected the availability of wheat in terms of quantity and quality. Irrigation is the most important factor influencing yield and grain quality. To achieve sustainable and quality wheat production, strategic measures should be adopted. Seven water stress-tolerant wheat varieties/strains were crossed with drought-susceptible lines using a line tester design to evaluate the effect of water stress on genetic variability and heritability of wheat grains. As might be expected, plant traits like moisture, ash, fat, protein and gluten content showed different responses under normal, irrigated and water-stress environments. In particular, the quality of wheat grains was found to be highly significant, indicating the presence of high variability in plant attributes like moisture percentage, ash content, crude fat, crude protein percentage and gluten content under both normal irrigation and water stress conditions. Water stress played a key role in reducing the moisture and fat content, whereas correspondingly, it increased protein, ash and gluten contents. The paradigm shifts in the deleterious effects of water stress have been elucidated. The broad-sense heritability estimate was significant for each of these characters under both conditions, with water stress in some measurements altering the heritabilities of all quality characters.

  2. Mechanistic Insight of Water Stress Induced Aggregation in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Quality: The Protein Paradigm Shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijaz Rasool NOORKA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertical and horizontal expansion of agriculture to provide food, feed, fibre and fuel to escalating populations has affected the availability of wheat in terms of quantity and quality. Irrigation is the most important factor influencing yield and grain quality. To achieve sustainable and quality wheat production, strategic measures should be adopted. Seven water stress-tolerant wheat varieties/strains were crossed with drought-susceptible lines using a line � tester design to evaluate the effect of water stress on genetic variability and heritability of wheat grains. As might be expected, plant traits like moisture, ash, fat, protein and gluten content showed different responses under normal, irrigated and water-stress environments. In particular, the quality of wheat grains was found to be highly significant, indicating the presence of high variability in plant attributes like moisture percentage, ash content, crude fat, crude protein percentage and gluten content under both normal irrigation and water stress conditions. Water stress played a key role in reducing the moisture and fat content, whereas correspondingly, it increased protein, ash and gluten contents. The paradigm shifts in the deleterious effects of water stress have been elucidated. The broad-sense heritability estimate was significant for each of these characters under both conditions, with water stress in some measurements altering the heritabilities of all quality characters.

  3. Variation in Susceptibility to Wheat dwarf virus among Wild and Domesticated Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, Jim; Shad, Nadeem; Kvarnheden, Anders; Westerbergh, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the variation in plant response in host-pathogen interactions between wild (Aegilops spp., Triticum spp.) and domesticated wheat (Triticum spp.) and Wheat dwarf virus (WDV). The distribution of WDV and its wild host species overlaps in Western Asia in the Fertile Crescent, suggesting a coevolutionary relationship. Bread wheat originates from a natural hybridization between wild emmer wheat (carrying the A and B genomes) and the wild D genome donor Aegilops tauschii, followed by polyploidization and domestication. We studied whether the strong selection during these evolutionary processes, leading to genetic bottlenecks, may have resulted in a loss of resistance in domesticated wheat. In addition, we investigated whether putative fluctuations in intensity of selection imposed on the host-pathogen interactions have resulted in a variation in susceptibility to WDV. To test our hypotheses we evaluated eighteen wild and domesticated wheat taxa, directly or indirectly involved in wheat evolution, for traits associated with WDV disease such as leaf chlorosis, different growth traits and WDV content. The plants were exposed to viruliferous leafhoppers (Psammotettix alienus) in a greenhouse trial and evaluated at two time points. We found three different plant response patterns: i) continuous reduction in growth over time, ii) weak response at an early stage of plant development but a much stronger response at a later stage, and iii) remission of symptoms over time. Variation in susceptibility may be explained by differences in the intensity of natural selection, shaping the coevolutionary interaction between WDV and the wild relatives. However, genetic bottlenecks during wheat evolution have not had a strong impact on WDV resistance. Further, this study indicates that the variation in susceptibility may be associated with the genome type and that the ancestor Ae. tauschii may be useful as genetic resource for the improvement of WDV resistance in wheat. PMID

  4. TGF-Beta Gene Polymorphisms in Food Allergic versus Non-Food Allergic Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Food IgE+ group 20-45% have positive IgE to milk , wheat, egg, and/or soy (Table 3) with food specific serum IgE elevated in the range of 2-4 kU/L...control Table 4: Levels of serum IgE to Foods Serum IgE, mean ku/L Egg (n=66) Milk (n=74) Wheat (n=68) Soy (n=62) 4.1 2.7 3.3 3.1...TGFb1 promoter SNP C-509T was analyzed in 200 subjects with EoE. Subject phenotype for IgE sensitization to the disease relevant antigens milk , egg, soy

  5. Fate of starch in food processing: from raw materials to final food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcour, Jan A; Bruneel, Charlotte; Derde, Liesbeth J; Gomand, Sara V; Pareyt, Bram; Putseys, Joke A; Wilderjans, Edith; Lamberts, Lieve

    2010-01-01

    Starch, an essential component of an equilibrated diet, is present in cereals such as common and durum wheat, maize, rice, and rye, in roots and tubers such as potato and cassava, and in legumes such as peas. During food processing, starch mainly undergoes nonchemical transformations. Here, we focus on the occurrence of starch in food raw materials, its composition and properties, and its transformations from raw material to final products. We therefore describe a number of predominant food processes and identify research needs. Nonchemical transformations that are dealt with include physical damage to starch, gelatinization, amylose-lipid complex formation, amylose crystallization, and amylopectin retrogradation. A main focus is on wheat-based processes. (Bio)chemical modifications of starch by amylolytic enzymes are dealt with only in the context of understanding the starch component in bread making.

  6. Soil amendment affects Cd uptake by wheat — are we underestimating the risks from chloride inputs?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, A. Sigrun, E-mail: Sigrun.Dahlin@slu.se [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Eriksson, Jan, E-mail: Jan.O.Eriksson@slu.se [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Campbell, Colin D., E-mail: Colin.Campbell@hutton.ac.uk [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); The James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Öborn, Ingrid, E-mail: Ingrid.Oborn@slu.se [Department of Crop Production Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7043, SE-750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), UN Avenue, P.O. Box 30677-00100, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2016-06-01

    Many parts of the world are investigating the efficacy of recycling nutrient resources to agriculture from different industry and domestic sectors as part of a more circular economy. The complex nature of recycled products as soil amendments coupled to the large diversity of soil types and their inherent properties make it difficult to optimize the benefits and minimize the risks from potentially toxic elements often present in recycled materials. Here we investigated how wheat grain cadmium (Cd) concentration was affected by soil amendments, namely human urine and biogas digestate compared to traditional farm manures and mineral fertilizers. We show that Cl{sup −} inadvertently added to soils with e.g. urine or biogas digestate strongly increased crop Cd concentrations, largely by mobilizing inherent soil Cd. This resulted in wheat grain Cd levels that could result in exceeding recommended WHO limits for dietary intake. This was evident even in soils with low inherent Cd content and when Cd inputs were low. The future of a circular economy that helps to underpin global food security needs to ensure that the effects of applying complex materials to different types of agricultural land are fully understood and do not jeopardize food safety. Modified from Wivstad et al. (2009) - Highlights: • High-Cl by-products used as soil amendments mobilize soil Cd. • Wheat grain Cd levels were found that could result in exceeding dietary intake limits. • Quality and risk assessment of by-products should include Cl effects.

  7. PROTEIN COMPLEX OF WHEAT, BUCKWHEAT AND MAIZE IN RELATION TO CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Chňapek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cereals are the most wide spread and very important plants utilized as a food source for mankind and for animals where they play role in energetical metabolism and proteosynthesis. Cereals contain proteins with unique properties. These properties allow us to produce leavened bread. Technological characteristic of cereal grain is determined by quantity and quality of storage proteins which represent alcohol soluble prolamins and glutenins soluble in acids and basis solutions. Celiac disease is one of the most frequent food intolerance caused by cereal storage proteins. Therapy consists of strict diet without consumptions of cereals or gluten. Pseudocereals are very perspective groups of plants in gluten free diet, due to absence of celiac active proteins, but on the other hand, flour from pseudocereals is not very suitable for baking. There are a lot of analytical methods applicable for detection of celiac active proteins in cereal and pseudocereal grain. Electrophoretical and immunochemical methods are the most utilized. Genotypes of wheat and maize were homogeneous and singlelined in contrast with genotypes of buckwheat. Average content of HMW-GS was highest in genotypes of bread wheat and lowest in buckwheat varieties. A celiac active fraction of storage proteins (LMW-GS and gliadins was detected at the highest content level in wheat genotypes. Genotypes of buckwheat and maize showed similar low content of this protein fraction. Presence of residual albumins and globulins in buckwheat varieties showed the highest value.

  8. Dynamics of the Global Wheat Trade Network and Resilience to Shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Kathyrn R; Bauch, Chris T; Anand, Madhur

    2017-08-03

    Agri-food trade networks are increasingly vital to human well-being in a globalising world. Models can help us gain insights into trade network dynamics and predict how they might respond to future disturbances such as extreme weather events. Here we develop a preferential attachment (PA) network model of the global wheat trade network. We find that the PA model can replicate the time evolution of crucial wheat trade network metrics from 1986 to 2011. We use the calibrated PA model to predict the response of wheat trade network metrics to shocks of differing length and severity, including both attacks (outward edge removal on high degree nodes) and errors (outward edge removal on randomly selected nodes). We predict that the network will become less vulnerable to attacks but will continue to exhibit low resilience until 2050. Even short-term shocks strongly increase link diversity and cause long-term structural changes that influence the network's response to subsequent shocks. Attacks have a greater impact than errors. However, with repeated attacks, each attack has a lesser impact than the previous attack. We conclude that dynamic models of multi-annual, commodity-specific networks should be further developed to gain insight into possible futures of global agri-food trade networks.

  9. Use of the polymerase chain reaction for detection of Fusarium graminearum in bulgur wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bertechini Faria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The detection of mycotoxigenic fungi in foodstuff is important because their presence may indicate the possible associated mycotoxin contamination. Fusarium graminearum is a wheat pathogen and a producer of micotoxins. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR has been employed for the specific identification of F. graminearum. However, this methodology has not been commonly used for detection of F. graminearum in food. Thus, the objective of the present study was to develop a molecular methodology to detect F. graminearum in commercial samples of bulgur wheat. Two methods were tested. In the first method, a sample of this cereal was contaminated with F. graminearum mycelia. The genomic DNA was extracted from this mixture and used in a F. graminearum specific PCR reaction. The F. graminearum species was detected only in samples that were heavily contaminated. In the second method, samples of bulgur wheat were inoculated on a solid medium, and isolates having F. graminearum culture characteristics were obtained. The DNA extracted from these isolates was tested in F. graminearum specific PCR reactions. An isolate obtained had its trichothecene genotype identified by PCR. The established methodology could be used in surveys of food contamination with F. graminearum.

  10. Effect of Organic and Mineral Fertilizers on Yield Parameters and Quality of Wheat Grain

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    Buráňová Š.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate winter wheat grain qualitative and yield parameters after the application of different organic and mineral fertilizers at two sites in the Czech Republic (S1 – Lukavec, S2 – Prague-Suchdol. For the purpose of this paper grain yield (GY, t ha−1, thousand kernel weight (TKW, g, bulk density (BD, g l−1, grain crude protein content (CP, %, and falling number (FN, s were determined with regard to the CSN 461100-2 (2001 standard for food wheat. Significantly highest values of GY and BD at both sites and of CP at S2 were observed after the use of nitrogen in mineral form. At S1, significantly highest values of FN were obtained after the use of mineral fertilizers in combination with straw. The required limit of BD for food wheat was met for all fertilization treatments, while that of CP only at S2 by treatments with mineral nitrogen fertilizers. At S2, a strong correlation between all evaluated traits was registered. Low correlation was found at S1 between TKW and other evaluated traits.

  11. Aroma of wheat porridge and bread-crumb is influenced by the wheat variety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starr, Gerrard; Hansen, Åse Solvej; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin

    2015-01-01

    evaluation, from these eight were selected for bread evaluation. Porridge and bread results were compared. Variations were found in both evaluations. Five odour- and nine flavour descriptors were found to be common to both wheat porridge and bread. The results for two descriptors: "cocoa" and "oat porridge......" were correlated between the wheat porridge and bread samples. Analysis of whole-meal and low-extraction samples revealed that the descriptors "malt", "oat-porridge", "øllebrød", "cocoa" and "grain" mostly characterized wheat bran, while descriptors for "maize", "bean-shoots", "chamomile", "umami...

  12. Impact of organic amendments on soil carbon sequestration, water use efficiency and yield of irrigated wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehzadi, S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. Soil organic carbon (SOC plays critical role in terrestrial carbon (C cycling and is central to preserving soil quality, food security and environmental protection in agroecosystem. The prevailing soil and climatic conditions of cultivated and irrigated soils in warm semi-arid areas favor the rapid decomposition, mineralization and loss of SOC to the atmosphere which contribute to global warming. One potential strategy to address this C loss is the addition of organic amendments. Objectives. To investigate the effect of four contrasting organic wastes with and without NPK mineral fertilizer on SOC retention, water use efficiency (WUE and wheat yield in irrigated wheat-maize cropping system. Method. A 2-year field experiment was conducted using four organic wastes included municipal solid waste (MSW, farm yard manure (FYM, sugar industry waste (filter cake and maize cropping residues. All wastes were applied at 3 t C·ha-1 alone and with a full or half dose of NPK mineral fertilizer. Results. On average, among organic wastes as sole treatment, highest SOC content in the 0-15 cm layer was recorded in filter cake (6.5 t·ha-1 and MSW (5.9 t·ha-1. Addition of NPK fertilizer along with organic wastes, improved the SOC contents with the highest SOC (7.7 t·ha-1 by filter cake + full NPK treatment followed by the MSW + NPK (6.9 t·ha-1. On average, maximum wheat grain WUE (18 kg·ha-1·mm-1 and grain yield (4.8 t·ha-1 were obtained by MSW + full NPK treatment followed by filter cake + NPK. Conclusions. These results indicate that the targeted addition of organic wastes (filter cake or MSW have the best potential for improving SOC retention, WUE and wheat yield in irrigated maize-wheat cropping system.

  13. Increasing the amylose content of durum wheat through silencing of the SBEIIa genes

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    Masci Stefania

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High amylose starch has attracted particular interest because of its correlation with the amount of Resistant Starch (RS in food. RS plays a role similar to fibre with beneficial effects for human health, providing protection from several diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases. Amylose content can be modified by a targeted manipulation of the starch biosynthetic pathway. In particular, the inactivation of the enzymes involved in amylopectin synthesis can lead to the increase of amylose content. In this work, genes encoding starch branching enzymes of class II (SBEIIa were silenced using the RNA interference (RNAi technique in two cultivars of durum wheat, using two different methods of transformation (biolistic and Agrobacterium. Expression of RNAi transcripts was targeted to the seed endosperm using a tissue-specific promoter. Results Amylose content was markedly increased in the durum wheat transgenic lines exhibiting SBEIIa gene silencing. Moreover the starch granules in these lines were deformed, possessing an irregular and deflated shape and being smaller than those present in the untransformed controls. Two novel granule bound proteins, identified by SDS-PAGE in SBEIIa RNAi lines, were investigated by mass spectrometry and shown to have strong homologies to the waxy proteins. RVA analysis showed new pasting properties associated with high amylose lines in comparison with untransformed controls. Finally, pleiotropic effects on other starch genes were found by semi-quantitative and Real-Time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Conclusion We have found that the silencing of SBEIIa genes in durum wheat causes obvious alterations in granule morphology and starch composition, leading to high amylose wheat. Results obtained with two different methods of transformation and in two durum wheat cultivars were comparable.

  14. Changes in selenium speciation associated with increasing tissue concentrations of selenium in wheat grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubadda, Francesco; Aureli, Federica; Ciardullo, Silvia; D'Amato, Marilena; Raggi, Andrea; Acharya, Raghunath; Reddy, Ramana A V; Prakash, Nagaraja Tejo

    2010-02-24

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) collected in the Nawanshahr-Hoshiarpur Region (Punjab, India) showed the highest selenium concentrations ever recorded in cereal grains (29-185 microg g(-1)). There was a strong positive relationship between the selenium content in shoots and that in kernels, showing that grain selenium concentration can be predicted from that in the vegetative tissues of the plant. The identity and content of the selenocompounds in the grain samples and in wheat-based reference materials were investigated by HPLC-ICP-dynamic reaction cell-MS. Reversed-phase, cation exchange, and anion exchange HPLC were used to separate the selenium species after ultrasound-assisted enzymatic extraction with an ultrasonic probe. Selenomethionine and selenate accounted for 72-85% and 2-6% of the sum of the selenium species, respectively. The proportion of organic Se species varied with increasing Se content; namely, SeMet showed a relative reduction whereas the other organoselenium compounds increased up to 18-22% of the total chromatographed selenium. Se-methyl-selenocysteine was detected as a minor compound (0.2-0.5%) in high-Se wheat by both reversed-phase and cation exchange HPLC using retention time matching with the standard substance spiked to the sample extracts. Regular consumption of locally produced wheat-based food items may lead the population of the study area to an excessive intake of selenium. On the other hand, the large predominance of selenomethionine shows that local wheat can be a promising raw material for naturally enriched products to be used to supplement human and animal diets in low selenium areas.

  15. Inter- and intraspecific variation in leaf economic traits in wheat and maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam R; Hale, Christine E; Cerabolini, Bruno E L; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Craine, Joseph; Gough, William A; Kattge, Jens; Tirona, Cairan K F

    2018-02-01

    Leaf Economics Spectrum (LES) trait variation underpins multiple agroecological processes and many prominent crop yield models. While there are numerous independent studies assessing trait variation in crops, to date there have been no comprehensive assessments of intraspecific trait variation (ITV) in LES traits for wheat and maize: the world's most widespread crops. Using trait databases and peer-reviewed literature, we compiled over 700 records of specific leaf area (SLA), maximum photosynthetic rates ( A max ) and leaf nitrogen (N) concentrations, for wheat and maize. We evaluated intraspecific LES trait variation, and intraspecific trait-environment relationships. While wheat and maize occupy the upper 90th percentile of LES trait values observed across a global species pool, ITV ranged widely across the LES in wheat and maize. Fertilization treatments had strong impacts on leaf N, while plant developmental stage (here standardized as the number of days since planting) had strong impacts on A max ; days since planting, N fertilization and irrigation all influenced SLA. When controlling for these factors, intraspecific responses to temperature and precipitation explained 39.4 and 43.7 % of the variation in A max and SLA, respectively, but only 5.4 % of the variation in leaf N. Despite a long history of domestication in these species, ITV in wheat and maize among and within cultivars remains large. Intraspecific trait variation is a critical consideration to refine regional to global models of agroecosystem structure, function and food security. Considerable opportunities and benefits exist for consolidating a crop trait database for a wider range of domesticated plant species.

  16. 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K in wheat flour samples of Iraq markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abid Abojassim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Wheat flour is a nutritious type of food that is widely consumed by various age groups in Iraq. This study investigates the presence of long-lived gamma emitters in different type of wheat flour in Iraqi market. Materials and methods. Uranium (238 U, Thorium (232 Th and Potassium (40 K specific activity in (Bq/kg were measured in (12 different types of wheat flours that are available in Iraqi markets. The gamma spectrometry method with a NaI(Tl detector has been used for radiometric measurements. Also in this study we have calculated the internal hazard index, radium equivalent and absorbed dose rate in all samples. Results and discussion. It is found that the specific activity in wheat flour samples were varied from (1.086±0.0866 Bq/kg to (12.532±2.026 Bq/kg with an average (6.6025 Bq/kg for 238 U, For 232 Th From (0.126±0.066 Bq/kg to (4.298±0.388 Bq/kg with an average (1.9465Bq/kg and for 40 K from (41.842±5.875 Bq/kg to (264.729±3.843 Bq/kg with an average (133.097 Bq/kg. Also, it is found that the radium equivalent and the internal hazard index in wheat flour samples ranged from (3.4031 Bq/kg to (35.1523 Bq/kg with an average (19.6346 Bq/kg and from (0.0091 to (0.1219 with an average (0.0708 respectively. Conclusion. This study prove that the natural radioactivity and radiation hazard indices were lower than the safe.

  17. Pelletizing properties of torrefied wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Nielsen, Niels Peter; Hansen, Hans Ove

    2013-01-01

    of wheat straw have been analyzed. Laboratory equipment has been used to investigate the pelletizing properties of wheat straw torrefied at temperatures between 150 and 300 °C. IR spectroscopy and chemical analyses have shown that high torrefaction temperatures change the chemical properties of the wheat......Combined torrefaction and pelletization are used to increase the fuel value of biomass by increasing its energy density and improving its handling and combustion properties. However, pelletization of torrefied biomass can be challenging and in this study the torrefaction and pelletizing properties...... straw significantly, and the pelletizing analyses have shown that these changes correlate to changes in the pelletizing properties. Torrefaction increase the friction in the press channel and pellet strength and density decrease with an increase in torrefaction temperature....

  18. Genotypic Variation in Wheat Flour Lysophospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lysophospholipids (LPLs are the most abundant polar lipids in wheat endosperm and naturally complex with amylose, affecting starch physicochemical properties. We analyzed LPLs in wheat flour from 58 cultivars which differ by grain hardness using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS. There were significant differences in LPL content between cultivars, demonstrating that genotype rather than environment contributes most to the total variance in wheat endosperm LPLs. Polar lipids such as LPLs may play a role in grain hardness through their interaction with puroindoline proteins, however, no strong correlation between kernel hardness and LPLs was detected. This may reflect the location of LPLs within the starch granule as opposed to the puroindoline proteins outside starch granules. LPLs may have an indirect relationship with kernel hardness as they could share the same origin as polar lipids that interact with puroindoline on the starch granule surface.

  19. Evaluation of broiler performance when fed roundup ready wheat event mon 71800, control, and commercial wheat varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, C.A.; Hartnell, G.F.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the nutritional value of broiler diets containing approximately 40% wheat grain from Roundup Ready wheat (MON 71800), its similar nontransgenic control (MON 71900), or reference commercial wheat varieties. The feeding trial lasted 40 d, and each treatment consisted of 10 replicates of

  20. Evaluation of the technological characteristics and bread-making quality of alternative wheat cereals in comparison with common and durum wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualone, A; Piergiovanni, A R; Caponio, F; Paradiso, V M; Summo, C; Simeone, R

    2011-04-01

    The growing sensibility toward those foods that are characterized by natural and healthy features has raised the interest toward alternative wheat cereals. This research was carried out to compare the technological characteristics and the bread-making quality of Khorasan wheat, type Kamut and spelt (cv. Forenza), to those of common (cv. Rio) and durum wheat (cv. Norba). The results obtained show that both Forenza and Kamut gave an acceptable bread-making performance. A certain variability affected flour characteristics (protein content, carotenoid pigments and alveograph indices) over the 2 years of experimentation, due to environmental effects. This reflected on the corresponding breads but the statistical analysis indicated that, on the whole, Kamut bread was characterized by a high content of carotenoid pigments. Regarding sensory properties (profiled by means of 11 descriptors of visual appearance, texture, odor and flavor) and loaf volumes, breads from Forenza and Kamut appeared different from each other but similar to those obtained from Rio and Norba grown in the same environment, respectively.

  1. Plasma-Assisted Pretreatment of Wheat Straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Jensen, Nadja; Leipold, Frank; Bindslev, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    and milled particle size (the extent to which the wheat straw was milled) were investigated and optimized. The developed methodology offered the advantage of a simple and relatively fast (0.5–2 h) pretreatment allowing a dry matter concentration of 45–60%. FTIR measurements did not suggest any structural...... straw with desired lignin content because of the online analysis. The O3 consumption of wheat straw and its polymeric components, i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, as well as a mixture of these, dry as well as with 50% water, were studied. Furthermore, the process parameters dry matter content...

  2. Mycobiota of Serbian wheat grain in 2010

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    Stanojev Zagorka N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focused on the assessment of the infection level of sampled wheat grains with phytopathogenic fungi. The samples were taken from the localities Rimski Šančevi and Sombor. The research investigated the impact of localities to intensity of fungal infection by fungi from genus Fusarium and Alternaria. Isolates from genus Fusarium and Alternaria were determined to species level. Pathogenicity of Fusarium and Alternaria isolates from different localities to wheat seedlings was also established. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46005: Genetic divergence, technological quality and storage of cereals and pseudocereals from organic production

  3. How fast was wild wheat domesticated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Ken-Ichi; Willcox, George

    2006-03-31

    Prehistoric cultivation of wild wheat in the Fertile Crescent led to the selection of mutants with indehiscent (nonshattering) ears, which evolved into modern domestic wheat. Previous estimates suggested that this transformation was rapid, but our analyses of archaeological plant remains demonstrate that indehiscent domesticates were slow to appear, emerging approximately 9500 years before the present, and that dehiscent (shattering) forms were still common in cultivated fields approximately 7500 years before the present. Slow domestication implies that after cultivation began, wild cereals may have remained unchanged for a long period, supporting claims that agriculture originated in the Near East approximately 10,500 years before the present.

  4. Drought priming effects on alleviating later damages of heat and drought stress in different wheat cultivars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendanha, Thayna; Hyldgaard, Benita; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    The ongoing change is climate; in particular the increase of drought and heat waves episodes are a major challenge in the prospect of food safety. Under many field conditions, plants are usually exposed to mild intermittent stress episodes rather than a terminal stress event. Previous, but limited...... studies suggest that plants subjected to early stress (primed) can be more resistant to future stress exposure than those not stressed during seedling stage. In our experiment we aimed to test if repeated mild drought stresses could improve heat and drought tolerance during anthesis heat and drought...... stresses in wheat cultivars. Two wheat cultivars, Gladius and Paragon, were grown in a fully controlled gravimetric platform and subjected to either no stress (control) or two (P) drought cycles during seedling stage, at three and five complete developed leaves. Each cycle consisted of withholding water...

  5. The choice of preparation method for the determination of Alternaria toxins from wheat samples by LC-MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajnal-Janić Elizabet P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cereals are the primary source of human diet, wheat being the third most produced grain worldwide, and in Serbia second most produced grain, just behind corn. As a result of climate change and global warming, frequent occurrences of mycobiota on steep grains can produce a negative impact on the safety of food products and their quality, which inevitably leads to large economic losses. Although Fusarium spp. remains a main source of mycotoxins contamination of wheat, in recent years, due to the evident climatic changes affecting agricultural production, other mycotoxigenic fungi have been pointed out as important wheat contaminants. Among them are the fungi of the genus Alternaria, especially A. alternata, which under favourable conditions, produces mycotoxins such as alternariol, alternariol monomethyl ether, tenuazonic acid, and other Alternaria toxins. Taking into account the toxicity of metabolites produced by certain species of fungi of the genus Alternaria in the system from farm to table, it is necessary to develop specific and sensitive analytical methods in order to implement systematic controls of occurrence of Alternaria toxins. Liquid chromatography coupled to (tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS has become the technique of choice for the detection and quantification of Alternaria toxins in food and feed. There are several limiting factors such as the efficiency of sample cleanup and the lack of reference materials for food and feed. The aim of this study was to choose the most suitable preparation method for the determination of Alternaria toxins from wheat samples by LC-MS/MS technique based on published sample preparation methods, with possible modifications, which are used in analysis of mycotoxins. Modified method of wheat samples preparation by extraction with ethyl acetate was selected as acceptable based on extraction efficiency of analytes of interest.

  6. High-fiber foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that have higher amounts of fiber, such as whole-wheat bread versus white bread. ... cereals, such as oatmeal and farina (Cream of Wheat) Whole-grain breads Brown rice Popcorn High-fiber cereals, such as ...

  7. Assessing Wheat Frost Risk with the Support of GIS: An Approach Coupling a Growing Season Meteorological Index and a Hybrid Fuzzy Neural Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaojie Yue

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Crop frost, one kind of agro-meteorological disaster, often causes significant loss to agriculture. Thus, evaluating the risk of wheat frost aids scientific response to such disasters, which will ultimately promote food security. Therefore, this paper aims to propose an integrated risk assessment model of wheat frost, based on meteorological data and a hybrid fuzzy neural network model, taking China as an example. With the support of a geographic information system (GIS, a comprehensive method was put forward. Firstly, threshold temperatures of wheat frost at three growth stages were proposed, referring to phenology in different wheat growing areas and the meteorological standard of Degree of Crop Frost Damage (QX/T 88-2008. Secondly, a vulnerability curve illustrating the relationship between frost hazard intensity and wheat yield loss was worked out using hybrid fuzzy neural network model. Finally, the wheat frost risk was assessed in China. Results show that our proposed threshold temperatures are more suitable than using 0 °C in revealing the spatial pattern of frost occurrence, and hybrid fuzzy neural network model can further improve the accuracy of the vulnerability curve of wheat subject to frost with limited historical hazard records. Both these advantages ensure the precision of wheat frost risk assessment. In China, frost widely distributes in 85.00% of the total winter wheat planting area, but mainly to the north of 35°N; the southern boundary of wheat frost has moved northward, potentially because of the warming climate. There is a significant trend that suggests high risk areas will enlarge and gradually expand to the south, with the risk levels increasing from a return period of 2 years to 20 years. Among all wheat frost risk levels, the regions with loss rate ranges from 35.00% to 45.00% account for the largest area proportion, ranging from 58.60% to 63.27%. We argue that for wheat and other frost-affected crops, it is

  8. Improving wheat simulation capabilities in Australia from a cropping systems perspective. III. The integrated wheat model (I-WHEAT).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinke, H.; Hammer, G.L.; Keulen, van H.; Rabbinge, R.

    1998-01-01

    Previous work has identified several short-comings in the ability of four spring wheat and one barley model to simulate crop processes and resource utilization. This can have important implications when such models are used within systems models where final soil water and nitrogen conditions of one

  9. Starch characteristics of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) overexpressing the Dx5 high molecular weight glutenin subunit are substantially equivalent to those in nonmodified wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckles, Diane M; Tananuwong, Kanitha; Shoemaker, Charles F

    2012-04-01

    The effects of engineering higher levels of the High Molecular Weight Glutenin Dx5 subunit on starch characteristics in transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain were evaluated. This is important because of the interrelationship between starch and protein accumulation in grain, the strong biotechnological interest in modulating Dx5 levels and the increasing likelihood that transgenic wheat will be commercialized in the U.S. Unintended effects of Dx5 overexpression on starch could affect wheat marketability and therefore should be examined. Two controls with native levels of Dx5 were used: (i) the nontransformed Bobwhite cultivar, and (ii) a transgenic line (Bar-D) expressing a herbicide resistant (bar) gene, and they were compared with 2 transgenic lines (Dx5G and Dx5J) containing bar and additional copies of Dx5. There were few changes between Bar-D and Dx5G compared to Bobwhite. However, Dx5J, the line with the highest Dx5 protein (×3.5) accumulated 140% more hexose, 25% less starch and the starch had a higher frequency of longer amylopectin chains. These differences were not of sufficient magnitude to influence starch functionality, because granule morphology, crystallinity, amylose-to-amylopectin ratio, and the enthalpy of starch gelatinization and the amylose-lipid complex melting were similar to the control (P > 0.05). This overall similarity was borne out by Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Function Analysis, which could not distinguish among genotypes. Collectively our data imply that higher Dx5 can affect starch accumulation and some aspects of starch molecular structure but that the starches of the Dx5 transgenic wheat lines are substantially equivalent to the controls. Transgenic manipulation of biochemical pathways is an effective way to enhance food sensory quality, but it can also lead to unintended effects. These spurious changes are a concern to Government Regulatory Agencies and to those Industries that market the product. In this study we

  10. Ancient wheat and health: a legend or the reality? A review on KAMUT khorasan wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoni, Alessandra; Danesi, Francesca; Di Nunzio, Mattia; Taccari, Annalisa; Valli, Veronica

    2017-05-01

    After WWII, the industrialized agriculture selected modern varieties of Triticum turgidum spp. durum and spp. aestivum (durum wheat and common wheat) based on higher yields and technological characteristics. Nowadays, the use of whole ancient grains and pseudo cereals is considered nutritionally important. How ancient grains have positive effects is not entirely known, the fragmentation of the scientific knowledge being also related to the fact that ancient grains are not a homogeneous category. The KAMUT® trademark indicates a specific and ancient variety of grain (Triticum turgidum ssp. turanicum, commonly khorasan wheat), and guarantees certain attributes making studies sufficiently comparable. In this work, studies on KAMUT® khorasan wheat have been systematically reviewed, evidencing different aspects supporting its benefits. Although it is not possible to establish whether all ancient grains share these positive characteristics, in total or in part, this review provides further evidences supporting the consumption of ancient grains.

  11. Oxylipins discriminate between whole grain wheat and wheat aleurone intake: a metabolomics study on pig plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Natalja; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2013-01-01

    from refined wheat flour made iso-DF by adding Vitacel. The pigs were fitted with catheters in the mesenteric artery and the portal vein, which allow studying the enrichment of nutrient in plasma after passing the gastrointestinal tract. LC–MS measurements showed the presence of oxygenated fatty acids...... (oxylipins) in the plasma of pigs and with discrimination between whole grain wheat versus wheat aleurone and refined flour. The oxylipin-marker of this difference was identified as a mixture of 13-hydroxy-9,11-octadecadienoic and 9-hydroxy-10,12-octadecadienoic acid (13-HODE and 9-HODE). Similar oxylipins...... were also found in the flour and the bread consumed by pigs. Since the germ is part of the whole grain flour, the germ is most likely responsible for the elevated level of oxylipins in plasma after whole grain wheat consumption. This finding may also point towards bioactive compounds, which can be used...

  12. High-yielding Wheat Varieties Harbour Superior Plant Growth Promoting-Bacterial Endophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehwish Yousaf

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the endophytic microbial flora of different wheat varieties to check whether a better yielding variety also harbours superior plant growth promoting bacteria. Such bacteria are helpful in food biotechnology as their application can enhance the yield of the crop.Material and Methods: Three wheat varieties (Seher, Faisalabad and Lasani were selected, Seher being the most superior variety. endophytic bacteria were isolated from the histosphere of the leaves and roots at different growth phases of the plants. The isolates were analyzed for plant growth promoting activities. Isolates giving best results were identified through 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Statistical analysis was done using Microsoft Excel 2013. All the experiments were conducted in triplicates.Results and Conclusion: The endophytes of Seher variety showed maximum plant growth promoting abilities. Among the shoot endophytes, the highest auxin production was shown by Seher isolate SHHP1-3 up to 51.9μg ml-1, whereas in the case of root endophytes, the highest auxin was produced by SHHR1-5 up to 36 μg ml-1. The bacteria showing significant plant growth promoting abilities were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Bacillus, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria species were the dominant bacteria showing all the traits of plant growth promotion. It can be concluded that Seher variety harbours superior plant growth promoting endophytes that must be one of the reasons for its better growth and yield as compared to the other two varieties. The investigated results support possible utilization of the selected isolates in wheat growth promotion with respect to increase in agro-productivity. The application of such bacteria could be useful to enhance wheat yield and can help in food biotechnology.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  13. Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis following laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding procedure associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staikuniene, Jurate; Staneviciute, Jurate; Adamonis, Kestutis; Serapinas, Danielius

    2014-06-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is a special form of adult food allergy when allergic symptoms are elicited when triggering factor such as exercise is added after ingestion of wheat. Besides the molecular characteristics of wheat proteins, the gastric function is decisive for the allergenic potential. Alterations in the gastric milieu are frequently experienced during a lifetime either physiologically or as a result of gastrointestinal pathologies. Helicobacter pylori infection can lead to hypoacidity and enhance the sensitization risk for food allergens in adults. Gastric transit of food proteins and alterations in the gastric secretion can be disturbed after bariatric surgery such as the laparoscopic adjustable gastric binding (LAGB) procedure used commonly as therapy for morbid obesity. We report a case of WDEIA in a 42-year-old man with H. pylori positive gastritis, 2 years after bariatric surgery and no history of allergy previously. Our presented case strongly suggests that H. pylori-associated gastritis and gastric anatomy and functional changes after adjustable gastric banding lead to the alterations in gastric milieu and may contribute to a development of food allergy in previously non-sensitized patients.

  14. Consumer liking of refined and whole wheat breads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, A; Vickers, Z

    2007-09-01

    Preference for refined bread is often cited as a reason for the relatively low consumption of whole wheat bread; only a few studies, however, have examined consumer preferences between refined and whole wheat breads, and the results of these studies are inconclusive. Our objective was to determine if refined wheat bread is preferred to whole wheat bread. We hypothesized that people would prefer refined wheat bread. We conducted a taste test with 89 people. They rated their liking of 9 different breads chosen to represent several comparisons between equivalent refined and whole wheat breads. The participants also rated the intensity of 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and completed a questionnaire about their bread preferences and purchasing habits. We classified the participants by their bread preference and their PROP taster status, and then examined the liking patterns of these subgroups. People preferred refined bread to whole wheat bread when both were made using equivalent ingredients and procedures. They liked the commercial samples of refined and whole wheat breads equally well. When people were classified by their bread preference, those who preferred refined bread liked the refined bread better in all comparisons. PROP nontasters liked all refined and whole wheat breads equally. Sensory preferences are a barrier to whole wheat bread consumption, but ingredient or processing modifications can improve liking of whole wheat bread to the level of refined bread.

  15. Electrochemical Affinity Biosensors Based on Disposable Screen-Printed Electrodes for Detection of Food Allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Alina Vasilescu; Gilvanda Nunes; Akhtar Hayat; Usman Latif; Jean-Louis Marty

    2016-01-01

    Food allergens are proteins from nuts and tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, soy, eggs or milk which trigger severe adverse reactions in the human body, involving IgE-type antibodies. Sensitive detection of allergens in a large variety of food matrices has become increasingly important considering the emergence of functional foods and new food manufacturing technologies. For example, proteins such as casein from milk or lysozyme and ovalbumin from eggs are sometimes used as fining agents in t...

  16. Natural variation in grain composition of wheat and related cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewry, Peter R; Hawkesford, Malcolm J; Piironen, Vieno; Lampi, Ann-Maija; Gebruers, Kurt; Boros, Danuta; Andersson, Annica A M; Åman, Per; Rakszegi, Mariann; Bedo, Zoltan; Ward, Jane L

    2013-09-04

    The wheat grain comprises three groups of major components, starch, protein, and cell wall polysaccharides (dietary fiber), and a range of minor components that may confer benefits to human health. Detailed analyses of dietary fiber and other bioactive components were carried out under the EU FP6 HEALTHGRAIN program on 150 bread wheat lines grown on a single site, 50 lines of other wheat species and other cereals grown on the same site, and 23-26 bread wheat lines grown in six environments. Principal component analysis allowed the 150 bread wheat lines to be classified on the basis of differences in their contents of bioactive components and wheat species (bread, durum, spelt, emmer, and einkorn wheats) to be clearly separated from related cereals (barley, rye, and oats). Such multivariate analyses could be used to define substantial equivalence when novel (including transgenic) cereals are considered.

  17. Perfection of technology of production of bakery products on the basis of crushed sprouted wheat grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. K. Huzin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The promising direction of innovative technologies in bakery is the production of bread with the use of wheat germ (Triticumaestivum L., in which all the nutrients incorporated into the grain by nature are rationally used. Germination of grain is accompanied by a significant increase in its antioxidant capacity, which makes it advisable to use sprouted grain in food formulas, not only to increase nutritional value and enrichment with dietary fiber, but also to slow down the rancidity of food lipids. The practical significance of the research is the creation of innovative technology to produce a new bakery product using germinated wheat grains (Triticumaestivum L.. The analysis of the existing market of sprouted grain and prospects of its development, the analysis of consumers' information regarding sprouted grain was carried out. The rational regimes of germination of wheat (Triticumaestivum L., allowing to obtain an additive in the formulation of bakery products with maximum biological activity, are determined. It is shown that the length of sprouts of germinated seeds used in this recipe should not exceed 2 mm. It was found that under the selected germination conditions, the shoots reach the required length within 48 hours of germination. Thus, in spite of a slight difference in price, the products will be in demand and be competitive in the market of bread and bakery products. In the food industry, there is an opportunity to bring to the market a new category of functional foods that have not only high nutritional value, but also the ability to improve health and reduce the risk of diseases.

  18. Effect of consumption of micronutrient enriched wheat steamed bread on postprandial plasma glucose in healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su-Que, Lan; Ya-Ning, Meng; Xing-Pu, Li; Ye-Lun, Zhang; Guang-Yao, Song; Hui-Juan, Ma

    2013-05-17

    Steamed wheat bread have previously been shown to induce comparatively high postprandial plasma glucose responses, on the contrary, buckwheat products induced lower postprandial plasma glucose. The present study was to assess the effects of micronutrient enriched bread wheat variety Jizi439 and buckwheat on postprandial plasma glucose in healthy and diabetic subjects comparing with buckwheat and other bread wheat varieties. Two experiments were conducted to study the effects of bread wheat variety Jizi439 on the postprandial plasma glucose levels of the randomly selected subjects. The first experiment involved three types of steamed bread with equivalent of 50 g available carbohydrate fed to 10 normal weight young healthy subjects. Two types of steamed bread were made from two purple-grain bread wheat varieties, Jizi439 and Chu20, respectively, and the third type was made from the mixture of different white grain wheat varieties. Plasma glucose levels of each subject were measured at 15, 30, 45, 60, 120 min after eating. Glucose was used as a reference, the total area under curve (AUC) and glycemic index (GI) was calculated for test meal. The second experiment was performed among ten type 2 diabetics who were served equivalent of 50 g available carbohydrate of steamed bread made from Jizi 439, the mixture of white grain bread wheat and buckwheat, respectively. The plasma glucose increment was determined two hours thereafter. In the first experiment, consumption of the steamed bread made from Jizi439 resulted in the least increase in plasma glucose and the GI was significantly lower than that of Chu20 and the mixture. In the second experiment, the average of postprandial 2 h plasma glucose increment of Jizi439 was 2.46 mmol/L which was significantly lower than that of the mixture of white wheat but was not significantly different from buckwheat. The results indicated that consumption of Jizi439 steamed bread resulted in significantly lower plasma glucose in

  19. Food allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngshin Han

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy is an important public health problem affecting 5% of infants and children in Korea. Food allergy is defined as an immune response triggered by food proteins. Food allergy is highly associated with atopic dermatitis and is one of the most common triggers of potentially fatal anaphylaxis in the community. Sensitization to food allergens can occur in the gastrointestinal tract (class 1 food allergy or as a consequence of cross reactivity to structurally homologous inhalant allergens (class 2 food allergy. Allergenicity of food is largely determined by structural aspects, including cross-reactivity and reduced or enhanced allergenicity with cooking that convey allergenic characteristics to food. Management of food allergy currently focuses on dietary avoidance of the offending foods, prompt recognition and treatment of allergic reactions, and nutritional support. This review includes definitions and examines the prevalence and management of food allergies and the characteristics of food allergens.

  20. Local food:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundbo, Donna Isabella Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been more focus on food in general and local food in particular. But what is local food? And what are the perceptions of this concept according to theory and to providers and consumers of local food? This article first summarises and compares three different theoretical perspec...... the providers and consumers studied on what local food is. However, this may change in time.......Recently there has been more focus on food in general and local food in particular. But what is local food? And what are the perceptions of this concept according to theory and to providers and consumers of local food? This article first summarises and compares three different theoretical...... perspectives on local food, namely experience economy, local food systems and what is termed pro-industrialism. These have differing and sometimes opposite conceptualisations and aims for the concept of local food. Using the perspective of experience economy as theoretical background, the concept of local food...