WorldWideScience

Sample records for wet season branchiopod

  1. 2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, W

    2011-03-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS

  2. Technical Efficiency of Wet Season Melon Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananti Yekti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melon is one of high-value horticulture commodity which is cultivated widely in Kulon Progo regency. The nature of agricultural products is heavily dependent on the season, so it causes the prices of agricultural products always fluctuated every time. In wet season the price of agricultural products tends to be more expensive. Melon cultivation in wet season provide an opportunity to earn higher profits than in the dry season. The price of agricultural products tends to be more expensive in wet season, thus melon cultivation in wet season prospectively generate high profits. In order to achieve high profitability, melon farming has to be done efficiently. Objective of this study was to 1 determined the factors that influence melon production in wet season 2 measured technical efficiency of melon farming and 3 identified the factors that influanced technical efficiency. Data collected during April – June 2014. Location determined by multistage cluster sampling. 45 samples of farmers who cultivated melon during wet season obtained based on quota sampling technique. Technical efficiency was measured using Cobb-Douglas Stochastic Frontier. The result reveals that 1 land use, quantity of seed, K fertilizer contributed significantly increasing melon production, while N fertilizer decreased melon production significantly 2 technical efficiency indeces ranged from 0.40 to 0.99, with a mean of  0.77; 3 farmer’s experience gave significant influence to technical efficiency of melon farming in wet season.

  3. Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000): wet season campaigns

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Otter, LB

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) involved two wet season and one dry season field campaigns. This paper reports on the wet season campaigns. The first was conducted at five sites along the Kalahari Transect in Zambia...

  4. SAFARI 2000 PAR Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Botswana, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Ceptometer data from a Decagon AccuPAR (Model PAR-80) were collected at four sites in Botswana during the SAFARI 2000 Kalahari Transect Wet Season Campaign...

  5. SAFARI 2000 PAR Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Botswana, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ceptometer data from a Decagon AccuPAR (Model PAR-80) were collected at four sites in Botswana during the SAFARI 2000 Kalahari Transect Wet Season Campaign (March,...

  6. SAFARI 2000 Leaf Spectral Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Boston University team collected several data sets along the Kalahari Transect during the SAFARI 2000 wet season field campaign between March 3 and...

  7. SAFARI 2000 Leaf Spectral Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Boston University team collected several data sets along the Kalahari Transect during the SAFARI 2000 wet season field campaign between March 3 and March 18,...

  8. Wet season spatial occurrence of phytoplankton and zooplankton in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation into the spatial occurrence of wet season phytoplankton and zooplankton in Lagos lagoon, Nigeria was carried out in October, 2008 in 12 stations. A total of 36 species of phytoplankton from 21 genera, 20 zooplankton species from 17 genera and 10 juvenile forms were recorded for the study. The results ...

  9. wet season spatial occurrence of phytoplankton and zooplankton in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Onyema (2007) on a tidal creek (Abule-elude creek) and Onyema. &Ojo (2008) on the lower Ogun river (Agboyi creek). The aim of this work is to investigate the spatial occurrence of phytoplankton and zooplankton in the wet season in relation to environmental characteristics. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The Study Area: ...

  10. The dynamical and microphysical properties of wet season convection in Darwin as a function of wet season regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert; Collis, Scott; Protat, Alain; Majewski, Leon; Louf, Valentin; Potvin, Corey; Lang, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    A known deficiency of general circulation models (GCMs) is in their representation of convection (Arakawa 2004), typically parameterized using given assumptions about entrainment rates and mass fluxes that depend on the dynamical and microphysical characteristics of convection and lack any sort of representation of the organization of convection. Furthermore, mechanisms that couple large scale forcing and convective organization are poorly represented (Del Genio 2012). The Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME) version 1 aims to run at resolutions of 25 km, too coarse for convective parameterizations used in large eddy simulations but too fine for typical convective parameterizations used in GCMs. This prompts the need for observational datasets to validate simulations and guide model development in ACME in several regions of the globe. The focus of this study will be at the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site in Darwin, Australia and the surrounding maritime continent. In Darwin, well defined forcing regimes occur during the wet season of September to April with the onset and the break of the Northern Australian Monsoon (Drosdowsky 1996; Pope et al. 2009). In this study, the vertical velocities retrieved from over ten years of continuous plan position indicator scans from the C-band POLarimetric and Berrima radars stationed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement TWP site in Darwin are derived. This long term dataset in such a region provides an opportunity to explore the statistics of vertical velocities in convection as a function of large scale forcing and modes of convective organization. Initial attempts to classify the convective organizational state and derive vertical velocities using three-dimensional variational data retrieval (Potvin et al. 2012) are shown. The results will be used to validate ACME Regionally Refined Mesh simulations over Darwin as well as guide convective parameterization development.

  11. SAFARI 2000 LAI Measurements at Kalahari Transect Sites, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Boston University team collected several data sets along the Kalahari Transect during the SAFARI 2000 wet season field campaign from March 3rd to March...

  12. SAFARI 2000 LAI Measurements at Kalahari Transect Sites, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Boston University team collected several data sets along the Kalahari Transect during the SAFARI 2000 wet season field campaign from March 3rd to March 18th,...

  13. Population dynamic of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUWARNO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Suwarno (2010 Population dynamic of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons. Biodiversitas 11: 19-23. The population dynamic of Papilio polytes L. (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons was investigated in the citrus orchard in Tasek Gelugor, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Population of immature stages of P. polytes was observed alternate day from January to March 2006 (dry season, DS, from April to July 2006 (secondary wet season, SWS, and from October to December 2006 (primary wet season, PWS. The population dynamics of the immature stages of P. polytes varied between seasons. The immature stages of P. polytes are more abundance and significantly different in the PWS than those of the DS and the SWS. The larval densities in all seasons decreased with progressive development of the instar stages. Predators and parasitoids are the main factor in regulating the population abundance of immature stages of P. polytes. There were positive correlations between the abundance of immature stages of P. polytes and their natural enemies abundance in each season. Ooencyrtus papilioni Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae is the most egg parasitoid. Oxyopes quadrifasciatus L. Koch. and O. elegans L. Koch. (Araneae: Oxyopidae are the main predators in the young larvae, meanwhile Sycanus dichotomus Stal. (Heteroptera: Reduviidae, Calotes versicolor Fitzinger (Squamata: Agamidae, birds and praying mantis attacked the older larvae.

  14. Variability in boundary layer structure during HAPEX-Sahel wet-dry season transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wai, M.M.K.; Smith, E.A.; Bessemoulin, P.; Culf, A.D.; Dolman, A.J.; Lebel, T.

    1997-01-01

    The variability of the Sahelian boundary layer has been studied with streamline analyses, rainfall measurements, and upper air soundings during its transition from wet to dry season. The 1992 rainy season ended prematurely because of the early arrival of westerly troughs over West Africa. The change

  15. Socio-Economic Analysis of Wet And Dry Season Production of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was a negative returns-to-scale for labour on land preparation, water and insecticide applications in the dry season. All economic indices considered indicated that the profitability of varieties TI-563 and TI-570 was higher in the wet and dry seasons respectively. The consideration of economic factors in classifying ...

  16. The atmospheric sulfur cycle over the Amazon Basin. II - Wet season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, M. O.; Bingemer, H.; Berresheim, H.; Jacob, D. J.; Lewis, B. L.

    1990-01-01

    The fluxes and concentrations of atmospheric sulfur species were determined at ground level and from aircraft over the Amazon Basin during the 1987 wet season, providing a comprehensive description of the sulfur cycle over a remote tropical region. The vertical profile of dimethylsulfide (DMS) during the wet season was found to be very similar to that measured during the dry season, suggesting little seasonal variation in DMS fluxes. The concentrations of H2S were almost an order of magnitude higher than those of DMS, which makes H2S the most important biogenic source species in the atmosheric sulfur cycle over the Amazon Basin. Using the gradient-flux approach, the flux of DMS at the top of the tree canopy was estimated. The canopy was a source of DMS during the day, and a weak sink during the night. Measurements of sulfur gas emissions from soils, using the chamber method, showed very small fluxes, consistent with the hypothesis that the forest canopy is the major source of sulfur gases. The observed soil and canopy emission fluxes are similar to those measured in temperate regions. The concentrations of SO2 and sulfate aerosol in the wet season atmosphere were similar to dry season values.

  17. Biogenic cloud nuclei in the central Amazon during the transition from wet to dry season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Whitehead

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Amazon basin is a vast continental area in which atmospheric composition is relatively unaffected by anthropogenic aerosol particles. Understanding the properties of the natural biogenic aerosol particles over the Amazon rainforest is key to understanding their influence on regional and global climate. While there have been a number of studies during the wet season, and of biomass burning particles in the dry season, there has been relatively little work on the transition period – the start of the dry season in the absence of biomass burning. As part of the Brazil–UK Network for Investigation of Amazonian Atmospheric Composition and Impacts on Climate (BUNIAACIC project, aerosol measurements, focussing on unpolluted biogenic air masses, were conducted at a remote rainforest site in the central Amazon during the transition from wet to dry season in July 2013. This period marks the start of the dry season but before significant biomass burning occurs in the region. Median particle number concentrations were 266 cm−3, with size distributions dominated by an accumulation mode of 130–150 nm. During periods of low particle counts, a smaller Aitken mode could also be seen around 80 nm. While the concentrations were similar in magnitude to those seen during the wet season, the size distributions suggest an enhancement in the accumulation mode compared to the wet season, but not yet to the extent seen later in the dry season, when significant biomass burning takes place. Submicron nonrefractory aerosol composition, as measured by an aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM, was dominated by organic material (around 81 %. Aerosol hygroscopicity was probed using measurements from a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA, and a quasi-monodisperse cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNc. The hygroscopicity parameter, κ, was found to be low, ranging from 0.12 for Aitken-mode particles to 0.18 for accumulation

  18. The decreasing range between dry- and wet- season precipitation over land and its effect on vegetation primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    One consequence of climate change is the alteration of global water fluxes, both in amount and seasonality. As a result, the seasonal difference between dry- (p 100 mm/month) precipitation (p) has increased over land during recent decades (1980–2005). However, our analysis expanding to a 60-year period (1950–2009) showed the opposite trend. This is, dry-season precipitation increased steadily, while wet-season precipitation remained constant, leading to reduced seasonality at a global scale. The decrease in seasonality was not due to a change in dry-season length, but in precipitation rate; thus, the dry season is on average becoming wetter without changes in length. Regionally, wet- and dry-season precipitations are of opposite sign, causing a decrease in the seasonal variation of the precipitation over 62% of the terrestrial ecosystems. Furthermore, we found a high correlation (r = 0.62) between the change in dry-season precipitation and the trend in modelled net primary productivity (NPP), which is explained based on different ecological mechanisms. This trend is not found with wet-season precipitation (r = 0.04), These results build on the argument that seasonal water availability has changed over the course of the last six decades and that the dry-season precipitation is a key driver of vegetation productivity at the global scale. PMID:29284050

  19. The Dependency between the Arabian Peninsula Wet Events and Sea Level Pressure Patterns during Spring Season

    KAUST Repository

    El Kenawy, Ahmed M.

    2014-05-01

    This work investigates the relationships between regional extreme wet events in the Arabian Peninsula during the spring season (MAM) and sea level pressure (SLP) patterns. Based on NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data, S-mode principal components were computed from the de-seasonalized daily SLP for spring months between 1960 and 2013. The analysis covered a window for the region (15-70°E and 2.5-50°N). This window coupled different oceanic-land influences (e.g. the Indian, Mediterranean and the Sahara configurations) that may impart an effect on rainfall variations in the study domain. A set of eight significant circulation spatial patterns were retained, which explained 84.8% of the total explained variance. The derived patterns explained a wide variety of flows over the peninsula, with a clear distinction between zonal and meridional advections. The extreme wet events (R95 and R99) were defined from a relatively dense network of 209 observatories covering the peninsula, using the 95th and 99th percentile of rainfall distribution respectively. The links between the dominant SLP patterns and significant wet events were established and the physical interpretations of these associations were examined. The results, as revealed by the location and intensity of high pressure centers, highlight the strength of eastern and southeastern advections corresponding to these extreme events. Other patterns have a local character, suggesting an orographic origin of some wet events in the region. The relationships described in this research can advance the understanding of the large-scale processes that contribute to the wet weather events in the Arabian Peninsula. These findings can therefore contribute to better management of water resources and agricultural practices in the region.

  20. Modeling investigation of light-absorbing aerosols in the Amazon Basin during the wet season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We use a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem to interpret observed light-absorbing aerosols in Amazonia during the wet season. Observed aerosol properties, including black carbon (BC concentration and light absorption, at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO site in the central Amazon have relatively low background levels but frequently show high peaks during the study period of January–April 2014. With daily temporal resolution for open fire emissions and modified aerosol optical properties, our model successfully captures the observed variation in fine/coarse aerosol and BC concentrations as well as aerosol light absorption and its wavelength dependence over the Amazon Basin. The source attribution in the model indicates the important influence of open fire on the observed variances of aerosol concentrations and absorption, mainly from regional sources (northern South America and from northern Africa. The contribution of open fires from these two regions is comparable, with the latter becoming more important in the late wet season. The analysis of correlation and enhancement ratios of BC versus CO suggests transport times of < 3 days for regional fires and  ∼  11 days for African plumes arriving at ATTO during the wet season. The model performance of long-range transport of African plumes is also evaluated with observations from AERONET, MODIS, and CALIOP. Simulated absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD averaged over the wet season is lower than 0.0015 over the central Amazon, including the ATTO site. We find that more than 50 % of total absorption at 550 nm is from BC, except for the northeastern Amazon and the Guianas, where the influence of dust becomes significant (up to 35 %. The brown carbon contribution is generally between 20 and 30 %. The distribution of absorption Ångström exponents (AAE suggests more influence from fossil fuel combustion in the southern part of the basin (AAE  ∼  1 but more

  1. Seasonal prediction of the South Pacific Convergence Zone in the austral wet season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, A. N.; Brown, J. R.; Cottrill, A.; Shelton, K. L.; Nakaegawa, T.; Kuleshov, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The position and orientation of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), modulated by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), determine many of the potentially predictable interannual variations in rainfall in the South Pacific region. In this study, the predictability of the SPCZ in austral summer is assessed using two coupled (ocean-atmosphere) global circulation model (CGCM)-based seasonal prediction systems: the Japan Meteorological Agency's Meteorological Research Institute Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Model (JMA/MRI-CGCM) and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's Predictive Ocean-Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA-M24). Forecasts of austral summer rainfall, initialized in November are assessed over the period 1980-2010. The climatology of CGCM precipitation in the SPCZ region compares favorably to rainfall analyses over subsets of years characterizing different phases of ENSO. While the CGCMs display biases in the mean SPCZ latitudes, they reproduce interannual variability in austral summer SPCZ position indices for forecasts out to 4 months, with temporal correlations greater than 0.6. The summer latitude of the western branch of the SPCZ is predictable with correlations of the order of 0.6 for forecasts initialized as early as September, while the correlation for the eastern branch only exceeds 0.6 for forecasts initialized in November. Encouragingly, the models are able to simulate the large displacement of the SPCZ during zonal SPCZ years 1982-1983, 1991-1992, and 1997-1998.

  2. Age-specific life table of swallowtail butterfly Papilio demoleus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUWARNO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Suwarno. 2012. Age-specific life table of swallowtail butterfly Papilio demoleus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons. Biodiversitas 13: 28-33. Age-specific life table of Papilio demoleus L. in dry and wet seasons was investigated in the Tasek Gelugor, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Development of P. demoleus was observed from January to March 2006 (dry season, DS, April to July 2006 (secondary wet season, SWS, and October to December 2006 (primary wet season, PWS. Survivorship of P. demoleus in the DS was lower than in the SWS and in the PWS. The mortality (qx of the fifth instar larvae P. demoleus in all seasons was higher than in other stages. Predators, parasitoids, and rainfall were the most important factors of mortality in immature stages of P. demoleus. Predators caused the highest mortality in all stages of P. demoleus, except the pupal stage. Predation in the DS (94.39% was higher than in the SWS (90.88% and PWS (84.04% but no significantly different among the seasons. Meanwhile there was significantly different of mortality caused by parasitoids and the rain among the seasons. Spiders were the important mortality agent in the eggs and young larvae, meanwhile in the older larvae were S. dichotomus and Podisus sp. Ooencyrtus papilioni and Pteromalus puparum were the important parasitoids for the eggs and pupae of P. demoleus, respectively. In summary, the season influenced the survivorship of P. demoleus in citrus plantation. P. demoleus had the highest survival in the wet primary season (PWS, while the lowest survival was observed in the dry season (DS.

  3. Diagnosing the Role of Transpiration in the Transition from Dry to Wet Season Over the Amazon Using Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J. S.; Fu, R.; Yin, L.; Chae, J.

    2013-12-01

    Reanalysis data indicates that land surface evapotranspiration plays a key role in determining the timing of wet season onset over the Amazon. Here, we use satellite observations of water vapor and its stable isotopes, carbon dioxide, leaf area index, and precipitation together with reanalysis data to explore the importance of transpiration in initiating the transition from dry season to wet season over the Amazon. The growth of vegetation in this region is primarily limited by the availability of sunlight rather than the availability of soil moisture, so that the increase of solar radiation during the dry season coincides with dramatic increases in leaf area index within forested ecosystems. This period of plant growth is accompanied by uptake of carbon dioxide and enrichment of heavy isotopes in water vapor, particularly near the land surface. Reanalysis data indicate that this pre-wet season enrichment of HDO is accompanied by sharp increases in the surface latent heat flux, which eventually triggers sporadic moist convection. The transport of transpiration-enriched near-surface air by this convection causes a dramatic increase in free-tropospheric HDO in late August and September. September also marks transition points in the annual cycles of leaf area index (maximum) and carbon dioxide (minimum). The increase in convective activity during this period creates convergence, enhancing moisture transport into the region and initiating the wet season.

  4. First-order catchment mass balance during the wet season in the Panama Canal Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzialek, Justin M.; Ogden, Fred L.

    2012-09-01

    SummaryTropical hydrology is poorly understood for a number of reasons. Intense biological activity in the tropics introduces complexities to the hydrologic process. Bioturbation, rapid rates of decay, and intensive insect activity all tend to promote rapid flow paths in the upper soil. Aggressive weathering leads to clays depleted of light cations and deep soil profiles. Processes in the seasonal tropics are further complicated by seasonal transitions, and very large changes in catchment storage between seasons. Beginning in 2005, we installed a suite of hydrologic sensors in a 16.7 ha first-order catchment in the Panama Canal Watershed to observe hydrologic variables and identify the dominant streamflow generation processes. The site is located near the village of Gamboa, which is located on the east bank of the Panama Canal at the confluence of Lake Gatun and the Chagres River. The study catchment is located on the north side of a ridge off the eastern flank of a 230 m tall hill known as Cerro Pelado, and is covered by 70-120 year old re-growth triple-canopy forest. Measurements included: rainfall above the canopy, throughfall, stemflow, evapotranspiration, shallow groundwater levels and streamflow. Deep groundwater storage was not measured. This paper describes measurements made, data collected, and the worth of those data in estimating the mass balance closure of a first-order catchment during the wet season. We compare measurements of the different components of the water cycle with observations from other published studies from the tropics. Data analysis results indicate water balance closure errors of approximately 8%.

  5. Land use/ cover mapping of the dry and wet season of Kikuletwa catchment using GIS and remote sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msigwa, Anna; vangriensven, Ann; Komakech, Hans; Verbeiren, Boud

    2017-04-01

    Management of water resources has become complicated due to lack of reliable information on the water uses of different sectors. The quantification of water consumption has been concentrated to modified and cultivated areas, but often lacks a correct representation of agricultural water management practices (crop rotations, drip irrigation) while leaving out the water consumption from natural ecosystems (forest, barren land, grazed grassland and shrubland or thickets). A detailed land use map can help water resources scientists and managers to better quantify the water uses by these ecosystems. However, most of the time the hydrological seasons are not considered in developing the land use maps. The objective of this study was to develop a land use maps for the two main seasons (dry and wet season) of the semi-arid Kikuletwa catchment, Tanzania. Three Landsat 8 images of March, August and November 2016 were obtained and cloud masked. Ground truthing points and questionnaire surveys regarding cropping system were collected during the month of August 2016. Unsupervised and supervised techniques in ArcMap and ground truthing point with the aid of cropping calendar was used to classify the three images. About 20 land use/land cover classes were obtained. The dry season images seem to have higher accuracy than the wet season images having Maximum NDVI of 0.6. The results showed a clear difference of how the land is being used in the dry and wet seasons. The image obtained on March representing the wet season showed 74% of the total cultivated land is rainfed with supplemental irrigation while 60% of the cultivated land is irrigated in the dry seasons. Additionally, the results show differences in land size of the natural ecosystems like grazed grassland. The total grazed grassland for the dry month of August was 5.3% of the total catchment area while that of November was 5.1%. The change seen during the dry seasons between the month of August and November is due to

  6. Comparison of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei between wet and dry seasons in Guangzhou, southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Junyan; Tao, Jun; Wu, Yunfei; Cheng, Tiantao; Zhang, Renjian; Wang, Yanyu; Zhu, Hailin; Xie, Xin; Liu, Yuehui; Li, Xiang; Kong, Lingdong; Li, Mei; He, Qianshan

    2017-12-31

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosol chemical composition were measured simultaneously at an urban site of Guangzhou from July to August 2015 and in January 2016, and the seasonal variations of aerosol activated fractions (N CCN /N CN ) as well as their relevant influence factors were further studied accordingly. N CN is generally higher in winter (dry season), whereas N CCN and N CCN /N CN are mostly higher in summer (wet season) instead. In particular, N CCN and N CCN /N CN are much lower at smaller supersaturation levels (SS<0.2) in winter. In spite of similar diurnal variations for N CCN and N CN , N CCN /N CN indicates an opposite tendency, relatively lower at midday, dusk and before midnight. Other than the size of particles as well as their chemical composition, some other factors, such as mass, gas precursors, pollutant transportation, meteorological conditions, etc., also contribute to the variations of N CCN and N CCN /N CN. Particles from the local source or local-oceanic combination source cast influence on CN and CCN significantly, while the pollutants originating from and crossing over distant polluted areas contribute largely to CCN/CN. N CN and N CCN are relatively higher under pollution-free conditions in summertime and polluted conditions in wintertime, but N CCN /N CN is just the opposite. On various polluted conditions, aerosol CCN activities are greatly discrepant between summer and winter, especially during mist or heavy haze periods. The results imply that anthropogenic pollutants exert critical impacts on aerosol CCN activation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sub-Seasonal Prediction of the Maritime Continent Rainfall of Wet-Dry Transitional Seasons in the NCEP Climate Forecast Version 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuantuan Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the characteristics and prediction of the Maritime Continent (MC rainfall for the transitional periods between wet and dry seasons. Several observational data sets and the output from the 45-day hindcast by the U.S. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2 are used. Results show that the MC experiences a sudden transition from wet season to dry season (WTD around the 27th pentad, and a gradual transition from dry season to wet season (DTW around the 59th pentad. Correspondingly, the westerlies over the equatorial Indian Ocean, the easterlies over the equatorial Pacific Ocean, and the Australia High become weaker, contributing to weakening of the convergence over the MC. The subtropical western Pacific high intensifies and extends northeastward during the WTD. The Mascarene High becomes weaker, an anomalous anticyclonic circulation forms over the northeast of the Philippines, and an anomalous low-level convergence occurs over the western MC during the DTW. The NCEP CFSv2 captures the major features of rainfall and related atmospheric circulation when forecast lead time is less than three weeks for WTD and two weeks for DTW. The model predicts a weaker amplitude of the changes in rainfall and related atmospheric circulation for both WTD and DTW as lead time increases.

  8. Soil CO2 Efflux Dynamics in the Northern Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil during the Wet-Dry Season Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Jr, O. B.; Vourlitis, G. L.; Hentz, C. S.; Arruda, P. H. Z. D.; Santanna, F. B.; Dias, M. D. F.; de Musis, C. R.; Nogueira, J. D. S.

    2014-12-01

    The roles of tropical wetlands in the global carbon (C) cycle are still poorly understood, especially in seasonally flooded forests that are expected to be important sinks for atmospheric CO2. We measured soil CO2 efflux during the wet-dry transition period in a seasonally flooded palm-dominated forest (locally known as Acorizal) to determine the effect of litter input and seasonal hydrology. Measurements were performed monthly as part of a field litter manipulation experiment consisting of three treatments (litter removal, litter addition, and control; n = 6 plots per treatment), and our research objectives were to determine how soil CO2 efflux varied as a function of (1) litter input, (2) root density, and (3) seasonal variation in soil water content. We found that litter addition significantly increased soil CO2 efflux, but there was no relationship between root density and soil CO2 efflux. Efflux was highest during the wet season and declined as soil water content declined. Our data demonstrate that variations in litter inputs and soil water content are important controls on soil CO2 efflux in seasonally flooded tropical forests.

  9. Wet and Dry Atmospheric Depositions of Inorganic Nitrogen during Plant Growing Season in the Coastal Zone of Yellow River Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbao Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ecological problems caused by dry and wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen have been widespread concern in the world. In this study, wet and dry atmospheric depositions were monitored in plant growing season in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta (YRD using automatic sampling equipment. The results showed that SO42- and Na+ were the predominant anion and cation, respectively, in both wet and dry atmospheric depositions. The total atmospheric nitrogen deposition was ~2264.24 mg m−2, in which dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition was about 32.02%. The highest values of dry and wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition appeared in May and August, respectively. In the studied area, NO3-–N was the main nitrogen form in dry deposition, while the predominant nitrogen in wet atmospheric deposition was NH4+–N with ~56.51% of total wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition. The average monthly attribution rate of atmospheric deposition of NO3-–N and NH4+–N was ~31.38% and ~20.50% for the contents of NO3-–N and NH4+–N in 0–10 cm soil layer, respectively, suggested that the atmospheric nitrogen was one of main sources for soil nitrogen in coastal zone of the YRD.

  10. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Rizzo, L. V.; Pauliquevis, T.; Kuwata, M.; Karl, T. G.; Guenther, A.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.; Jimenez, J. L.; Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    Real-time mass spectra of the non-refractory species in submicron aerosol particles were recorded in a tropical rainforest in the central Amazon Basin during the wet season from February to March 2008, as a part of the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08). Organic material accounted on average for more than 80% of the non-refractory submicron particle mass concentrations during the period of measurements. There was insufficient ammonium to neutralize sulfate. In this acidic, isoprene-rich, HO2-dominant environment, positive-matrix factorization of the time series of particle mass spectra identified four statistical factors to account for the 99% of the variance in the signal intensities of the organic constituents. The first factor was identified as associated with regional and local pollution and labeled "HOA" for its hydrocarbon-like characteristics. A second factor was associated with long-range transport and labeled "OOA-1" for its oxygenated characteristics. A third factor, labeled "OOA-2," was implicated as associated with the reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products, especially of epoxydiols to acidic haze, fog, or cloud droplets. A fourth factor, labeled "OOA-3," was consistent with an association with the fresh production of secondary organic material (SOM) by the mechanism of gas-phase oxidation of biogenic volatile organic precursors followed by gas-to-particle conversion of the oxidation products. The suffixes 1, 2, and 3 on the OOA labels signify ordinal ranking with respect to the extent of oxidation represented by the factor. The process of aqueous-phase oxidation of water-soluble products of gas-phase photochemistry might also have been associated to some extent with the OOA-2 factor. The campaign-average factor loadings had a ratio of 1.4:1 for OOA-2 : OOA-3, suggesting the comparable importance of particle-phase compared to gas-phase pathways for the production of SOM during the study period.

  11. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Rizzo, L. V.; Pauliqueivis, T.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Karl, Thomas G.; Guenther, Alex B.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Poeschl, U.; Jiminez, J. L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Martin, Scot T.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time mass spectra of non-refractory component of submicron aerosol particles were recorded in a tropical rainforest in the central Amazon basin during the wet season of 2008, as a part of the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08). Organic components accounted on average for more than 80% of the non-refractory submicron particle mass concentrations during the period of measurements. Ammonium was present in sufficient quantities to halfway neutralize sulfate. In this acidic, isoprene-dominated, low-NOx environment the high-resolution mass spectra as well as mass closures with ion chromatography measurements did not provide evidence for significant contributions of organosulfate species, at least at concentrations above uncertainty levels. Positive-matrix factorization of the time series of particle mass spectra identified four statistical factors to account for the variance of the signal intensities of the organic constituents: a factor HOA having a hydrocarbon-like signature and identified as regional emissions of primary organic material, a factor OOA-1 associated with fresh production of secondary organic material by a mechanism of BVOC oxidation followed by gas-to-particle conversion, a factor OOA-2 consistent with reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products, especially epoxydiols by acidic particles, and a factor OOA-3 associated with long range transport and atmospheric aging. The OOA-1, -2, and -3 factors had progressively more oxidized signatures. Diameter-resolved mass spectral markers also suggested enhanced reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products to the accumulation mode for the OOA-2 factor, and such size partitioning can be indicative of in-cloud process. The campaign-average factor loadings were in a ratio of 1.1:1.0 for the OOA-1 compared to the OOA-2 pathway, suggesting the comparable importance of gas-phase compared to particle-phase (including cloud waters) production pathways of secondary organic material during

  12. Effect of elevated [CO2] and nutrient management on wet and dry season rice production in subtropical India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushree Sagarika Satapathy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of elevated [CO2] with varying nutrient management on rice–rice production system. The experiment was conducted in the open field and inside open-top chambers (OTCs of ambient [CO2] (≈ 390 μmol L− 1 and elevated [CO2] environment (25% above ambient during wet and dry seasons in 2011–2013 at Kharagpur, India. The nutrient management included recommended doses of N, P, and K as chemical fertilizer (CF, integration of chemical and organic sources, and application of increased (25% higher doses of CF. The higher [CO2] level in the OTC increased aboveground biomass but marginally decreased filled grains per panicle and grain yield of rice, compared to the ambient environment. However, crop root biomass was increased significantly under elevated [CO2]. With respect to nutrient management, increasing the dose of CF increased grain yield significantly in both seasons. At the recommended dose of nutrients, integrated nutrient management was comparable to CF in the wet season, but significantly inferior in the dry season, in its effect on growth and yield of rice. The [CO2] elevation in OTC led to a marginal increase in organic C and available P content of soil, but a decrease in available N content. It was concluded that increased doses of nutrients via integration of chemical and organic sources in the wet season and chemical sources alone in the dry season will minimize the adverse effect of future climate on rice production in subtropical India.

  13. [Monitoring of soil salinization in Northern Tarim Basin, Xinjiang of China in dry and wet seasons based on remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Ding, Jian-Li; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Hong-Nan

    2013-11-01

    Soil salinization is one of the most important eco-environment problems in arid area, which can not only induce land degradation, inhibit vegetation growth, but also impede regional agricultural production. To accurately and quickly obtain the information of regional saline soils by using remote sensing data is critical to monitor soil salinization and prevent its further development. Taking the Weigan-Kuqa River Delta Oasis in the northern Tarim River Basin of Xinjiang as test object, and based on the remote sensing data from Landsat-TM images of April 15, 2011 and September 22, 2011, in combining with the measured data from field survey, this paper extracted the characteristic variables modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and the third principal component from K-L transformation (K-L-3). The decision tree method was adopted to establish the extraction models of soil salinization in the two key seasons (dry and wet seasons) of the study area, and the classification maps of soil salinization in the two seasons were drawn. The results showed that the decision tree method had a higher discrimination precision, being 87.2% in dry season and 85.3% in wet season, which was able to be used for effectively monitoring the dynamics of soil salinization and its spatial distribution, and to provide scientific basis for the comprehensive management of saline soils in arid area and the rational utilization of oasis land resources.

  14. Quality of urban runoff in wet and dry seasons: a case study in a semi-arid zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Hernández, Joyce; Lucho-Constantino, Carlos; Lizárraga-Mendiola, Liliana; Beltrán-Hernández, Rosa Icela; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    Urban runoff (UR) is a promising new resource that may alleviate growing tensions in numerous arid and semi-arid regions of the world. However, it is precisely in these zones that the available UR quality characteristics are scarcer. This work aims to evaluate a wide set of parameters to establish a detailed approach to both the quality of UR in a midsized city in Central Mexico and the feasibility of using UR to recharge aquifers. UR from an institutional land use site was sampled during wet and dry seasons and assessed for suspended solids, organic matter, nutrients, microorganisms, metals, and persistent organic chemicals (i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH). The results were analyzed using multivariate statistical methods to identify relationships among the variables, the sampling sites and the seasons. The soil erosion and the leaching of materials due to the water flow through vegetated areas were identified as the most influencing factor on the quality of the site runoff in both dry and wet seasons. Additionally, data were more heterogeneous during the dry season, and higher pollutant concentrations were found both during the dry season and in more pervious zones. We consider UR a promising water source for recharging aquifers in arid and semi-arid zones if a program is implemented that can integrate an adequate runoff treatment system, soil protection, and other non-structural measures.

  15. Interannual, Monthly, and Regional Variability in the Wet Season Diurnal Cycle of Precipitation in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Karen I.

    2004-06-01

    Convective systems in sub-Saharan Africa were defined from measurements by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite Microwave Imager at 85 GHz for four wet seasons, May September 1998 2001. By applying a convective stratiform discrimination algorithm to each convective system, the pixels within were designated as convective or stratiform cloud, life cycle ages assigned, and rainfall rates calculated. The years 1998 and 1999 were wetter than the long-term (1898 2000) mean, while 2000 and 2001 were drier. The wetter years had about 10% more convective systems than the drier years, but the size and intensity distributions for the wetter and drier years were virtually identical.The wet season diurnal cycle of precipitation in the study area varied regionally, intraseasonally, and interannually. Analysis of precipitation versus time revealed different diurnal cycles for each of the three 10° zones south of the Sahara Desert. The diurnal cycle was bimodal north of 10°N and unimodal south of 10°N. The bimodal diurnal cycle was more pronounced north of 15°N. Diurnal cycles in each zone exhibited regional and seasonal variability of about 10% per four-hour time block. In wetter years the regional mean diurnal cycle was unimodal, but in drier years it was bimodal. The variability of the diurnal cycle appeared to be primarily influenced by variability in the frequency and life cycle of organized convective systems and thus the physical and dynamical factors responsible for their development.

  16. Wet-season spatial variability of N2O emissions from a tea field in subtropical central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Liu, X.; Li, Y.; Shen, J.; Wang, Y.; Zou, G.; Li, H.; Song, L.; Wu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Tea fields emit large amounts of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. Obtaining accurate estimations of N2O emissions from tea-planted soils is challenging due to strong spatial variability. We examined the spatial variability of N2O emissions from a red-soil tea field in Hunan province, China, on 22 April 2012 (in a wet season) using 147 static mini chambers approximately regular gridded in a 4.0 ha tea field. The N2O fluxes for a 30 min snapshot (10-10.30 a.m.) ranged from -1.73 to 1659.11 g N ha-1 d-1 and were positively skewed with an average flux of 102.24 g N ha-1 d-1. The N2O flux data were transformed to a normal distribution by using a logit function. The geostatistical analyses of our data indicated that the logit-transformed N2O fluxes (FLUX30t) exhibited strong spatial autocorrelation, which was characterized by an exponential semivariogram model with an effective range of 25.2 m. As observed in the wet season, the logit-transformed soil ammonium-N (NH4Nt), soil nitrate-N (NO3Nt), soil organic carbon (SOCt), total soil nitrogen (TSNt) were all found to be significantly correlated with FLUX30t (r=0.57-0.71, pobtained during the wet season. Our findings suggested that to accurately estimate the total N2O emissions over a region, the environmental variables (e.g., soil properties) and the current land use pattern (e.g., tea row transects in the present study) must be included in spatial interpolation. Additionally, compared with other kriging approaches, the cokriging prediction approach showed great advantages in being easily deployed, and more importantly providing accurate regional estimation of N2O emissions from tea-planted soils.

  17. Wet-season spatial variability in N2O emissions from a tea field in subtropical central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Liu, X.; Li, Y.; Shen, J.; Wang, Y.; Zou, G.; Li, H.; Song, L.; Wu, J.

    2015-06-01

    Tea fields emit large amounts of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. Obtaining accurate estimations of N2O emissions from tea-planted soils is challenging due to strong spatial variability. We examined the spatial variability in N2O emissions from a red-soil tea field in Hunan Province, China, on 22 April 2012 (in a wet season) using 147 static mini chambers approximately regular gridded in a 4.0 ha tea field. The N2O fluxes for a 30 min snapshot (10:00-10:30 a.m.) ranged from -1.73 to 1659.11 g N ha-1 d-1 and were positively skewed with an average flux of 102.24 g N ha-1 d-1. The N2O flux data were transformed to a normal distribution by using a logit function. The geostatistical analyses of our data indicated that the logit-transformed N2O fluxes (FLUX30t) exhibited strong spatial autocorrelation, which was characterized by an exponential semivariogram model with an effective range of 25.2 m. As observed in the wet season, the logit-transformed soil ammonium-N (NH4Nt), soil nitrate-N (NO3Nt), soil organic carbon (SOCt) and total soil nitrogen (TSNt) were all found to be significantly correlated with FLUX30t (r = 0.57-0.71, p obtained during the wet season. Our findings suggested that to accurately estimate the total N2O emissions over a region, the environmental variables (e.g., soil properties) and the current land use pattern (e.g., tea row transects in the present study) must be included in spatial interpolation. Additionally, compared with other kriging approaches, the cokriging prediction approach showed great advantages in being easily deployed and, more importantly, providing accurate regional estimation of N2O emissions from tea-planted soils.

  18. Assessment of long-term monthly and seasonal trends of warm (cold), wet (dry) spells in Kansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokoohaki, H.; Anandhi, A.

    2013-12-01

    A few recent studies have focused on trends in rainfall, temperature, and frost indicators at different temporal scales using centennial weather station data in Kansas; our study supplements this work by assessing the changes in spell indicators in Kansas. These indicators provide the duration between temperature-based (warm and cold) and precipitation-based (wet and dry) spells. For wet (dry) spell calculations, a wet day is defined as a day with precipitation ≥1 mm, and a dry day is defined as one with precipitation ≤1 mm. For warm (cold) spell calculations, a warm day is defined as a day with maximum temperature >90th percentile of daily maximum temperature, and a cold day is defined as a day with minimum temperature periods (through 1919, 1920-1949, 1950-1979, and 1980-2009). The definitions and software provided by Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) were adapted for application to Kansas. The long- and short-term trends in these indices were analyzed at monthly and seasonal timescales. Monthly results indicate that ADSL is decreasing and AWSL is increasing throughout the state. AWSD and ACSD both showed an overall decreasing trend, but AWSD trends were variable during the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. Results of seasonal analysis revealed that the fall season recorded the greatest increasing trend for ACSD and the greatest decreasing trend for AWSD across the whole state and during all time periods. Similarly, the greatest increasing and decreasing trends occurred in winter for AWSL and ADSL, respectively. These variations can be important indicators of climatic change that may not be represented in mean conditions. Detailed geographical and temporal variations of the spell indices also can be beneficial for updating management decisions and providing adaptation recommendations for local and regional agricultural production.

  19. Comparative Characterisation of Maritime Clouds between Dry and Wet Season Over the Tropical North Atlantic by Airborne Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Marek; Ament, Felix; Crewell, Susanne; Ehrlich, André; Wolf, Kevin; Mech, Mario; Orlandi, Emiliano; Schnitt, Sabrina

    2017-04-01

    Trade wind clouds are a major uncertainty in climate models. The observation of these clouds by satellites is limited by the satellite resolution and detailed ground-based observations are lacking. Therefore, the series of Next-Generation Aircraft Remote-Sensing for Validation campaigns (NARVAL) using the High Altitude LOng range research aircraft (HALO) was initiated to assess North Atlantic trade clouds on an appropriate scale. In this presentation, we take the advantage of the synergy of the HALO active and passive Microwave Package (HAMP) in combination with the solar radiation measured by the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement system (SMART) to characterize shallow clouds in the Caribbean. The two NARVAL campaigns in December 2013 and August 2016 offer the opportunity to study clouds during dry and wet season, respectively. Based on a cloud mask derived from SMART spectral solar measurements, about 12000 cloudy profiles describing 4100 individual clouds could be detected during the dry season (NARVAL-I) with about 70% of the clouds having a length of less than 2 km. Corresponding retrieval of the liquid water path (LWP) using passive microwave measurements reveals that these small clouds contain little water with a third of the clouds having a LWP of less than 50 g m-2. Such small clouds are difficult to measure by the spaceborne Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) due to its coarse resolution while precipitable water vapor agrees rather well between airborne and satellite measurements. Using a simple reflectivity threshold, 7% of the clouds were identified as precipitating. Precipitation did not show a strong dependence on LWP and there were also precipitating clouds showing a LWP lower than 100 g m-2. While the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is able to identify smaller clouds (˜ 1 km), it shows deficits in terms of LWP for drizzling clouds. This presentation addresses differences in cloud characteristics between the

  20. WET AND DRY SEASON ECOSYSTEM LEVEL FLUXES OF ISOPRENE AND MONOTERPENES FROM A SOUTHEAST ASIAN SECONDARY FOREST AND RUBBER TREE PLANTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canopy scale fluxes of isoprene and monoterpenes were investigated in both wet and dry seasons above a rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis)/secondary tropical forest in the Yunnan province of southwestern China. Drought conditions were unusually high during the dry season experiment....

  1. Unusual past dry and wet rainy seasons over Southern Africa and South America from a climate perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Bellprat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Southern Africa and Southern South America have experienced recent extremes in dry and wet rainy seasons which have caused severe socio-economic damages. Selected past extreme events are here studied, to estimate how human activity has changed the risk of the occurrence of such events, by applying an event attribution approach (Stott et al., 2004comprising global climate models of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5. Our assessment shows that models' representation of mean precipitation variability over Southern South America is not adequate to make a robust attribution statement about seasonal rainfall extremes in this region. Over Southern Africa, we show that unusually dry austral summers as occurred during 2002/2003 have become more likely, whereas unusually wet austral summers like that of 1999/2000 have become less likely due to anthropogenic climate change. There is some tentative evidence that the risk of extreme high 5-day precipitation totals (as observed in 1999/2000 have increased in the region. These results are consistent with CMIP5 models projecting a general drying trend over SAF during December–January–February (DJF but also an increase in atmospheric moisture availability to feed heavy rainfall events when they do occur. Bootstrapping the confidence intervals of the fraction of attributable risk has demonstrated estimates of attributable risk are very uncertain, if the events are very rare. The study highlights some of the challenges in making an event attribution study for precipitation using seasonal precipitation and extreme 5-day precipitation totals and considering natural drivers such as ENSO in coupled ocean–atmosphere models.

  2. Ant Diversity and Distribution along Elevation Gradients in the Australian Wet Tropics: The Importance of Seasonal Moisture Stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Nowrouzi

    Full Text Available The threat of anthropogenic climate change has seen a renewed focus on understanding contemporary patterns of species distribution. This is especially the case for the biota of tropical mountains, because tropical species often have particularly narrow elevational ranges and there are high levels of short-range endemism. Here we describe geographic patterns of ant diversity and distribution in the World Heritage-listed rainforests of the Australian Wet Tropics (AWT, revealing seasonal moisture stability to be an important environmental correlate of elevational patterns of species composition. We sampled ants in leaf litter, on the litter surface and on tree trunks at 26 sites from six subregions spanning five degrees of latitude and elevation ranges from 100-1,300 m. A total of 296 species from 63 genera were recorded. Species richness showed a slight peak at mid elevations, and did not vary significantly with latitude. Species composition varied substantially between subregions, and many species have highly localised distributions. There was very marked species turnover with elevation, with a particularly striking compositional disjunction between 600 m and 800 m at each subregion. This disjunction coincides with a strong environmental threshold of seasonal stability in moisture associated with cloud 'stripping'. Our study therefore provides further support for climatic stability as a potential mechanism underlying patterns of diversity. The average height of orographic cloud layers is predicted to rise under global warming, and associated shifts in seasonal moisture stability may exacerbate biotic change caused by rising temperature alone.

  3. Does interspecific competition alter effects of early season ozone exposure on plants from wet grasslands? Results of a three-year experiment in open-top chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonneijck, A.E.G.; Franzaring, J.; Brouwer, G.; Metselaar, K.; Dueck, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    Chronic effects of ozone on wet grassland species early in the growing season might be altered by interspecific competition. Individual plants of Holcus lanatus, Lychnis flos-cuculi, Molinia caerulea and Plantago lanceolata were grown in monocultures and in mixed cultures with Agrostis capillaris.

  4. Influence of prevailing disturbances on soil biology and biochemistry of montane habitats at Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, India during wet and dry seasons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, S.K.; Singh, Anoop; Rai, J.P.N.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of prevailing disturbances in montane habitats of Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve (NDBR) was studied on soil microbial population, biomass, soil respiration and enzyme activities during wet and dry seasons. The physico-chemical characteristics of soils exhibited conspicuous variation in t...

  5. Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the microphysical properties of Amazonian warm-phase clouds in the wet season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Micael A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Wang, Jian; Fan, Jiwen; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Schmid, Beat; Albrecht, Rachel; Martin, Scot T.; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    The remote atmosphere over the Amazon can be similar to oceanic regions in terms of aerosol conditions and cloud type formations. This is especially true during the wet season. The main aerosol-related disturbances over the Amazon have both natural sources, such as dust transport from Africa, and anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning or urban pollution. The present work considers the impacts of the latter on the microphysical properties of warm-phase clouds by analysing observations of the interactions between the Manaus pollution plume and its surroundings, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The analysed period corresponds to the wet season (specifically from February to March 2014 and corresponding to the first Intensive Operating Period (IOP1) of GoAmazon2014/5). The droplet size distributions reported are in the range 1 µm ≤ D ≤ 50 µm in order to capture the processes leading up to the precipitation formation. The wet season largely presents a clean background atmosphere characterized by frequent rain showers. As such, the contrast between background clouds and those affected by the Manaus pollution can be observed and detailed. The focus is on the characteristics of the initial microphysical properties in cumulus clouds predominantly at their early stages. The pollution-affected clouds are found to have smaller effective diameters and higher droplet number concentrations. The differences range from 10 to 40 % for the effective diameter and are as high as 1000 % for droplet concentration for the same vertical levels. The growth rates of droplets with altitude are slower for pollution-affected clouds (2.90 compared to 5.59 µm km-1), as explained by the absence of bigger droplets at the onset of cloud development. Clouds under background conditions have higher concentrations of larger droplets (> 20 µm) near the cloud base, which would contribute significantly to the growth rates through the collision-coalescence process. The overall shape

  6. Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the microphysical properties of Amazonian warm-phase clouds in the wet season

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchini, Micael A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Wang, Jian; Fan, Jiwen; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Schmid, Beat; Albrecht, Rachel; Martin, Scot T.; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The remote atmosphere over the Amazon can be similar to oceanic regions in terms of aerosol conditions and cloud type formations. This is especially true during the wet season. The main aerosol-related disturbances over the Amazon have both natural sources, such as dust transport from Africa, and anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning or urban pollution. The present work considers the impacts of the latter on the microphysical properties of warm-phase clouds by analysing observations of the interactions between the Manaus pollution plume and its surroundings, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The analysed period corresponds to the wet season (specifically from February to March 2014 and corresponding to the first Intensive Operating Period (IOP1) of GoAmazon2014/5). The droplet size distributions reported are in the range 1 µm ≤ D≤50 µm in order to capture the processes leading up to the precipitation formation. The wet season largely presents a clean background atmosphere characterized by frequent rain showers. As such, the contrast between background clouds and those affected by the Manaus pollution can be observed and detailed. The focus is on the characteristics of the initial microphysical properties in cumulus clouds predominantly at their early stages. The pollution-affected clouds are found to have smaller effective diameters and higher droplet number concentrations. The differences range from 10 to 40% for the effective diameter and are as high as 1000% for droplet concentration for the same vertical levels. The growth rates of droplets with altitude are slower for pollution-affected clouds (2.90 compared to 5.59 µm km₋1), as explained by the absence of bigger droplets at the onset of cloud development. Clouds under background conditions have higher concentrations of larger droplets (>20 µm) near the cloud base, which would contribute significantly to the growth rates through the collision

  7. Impacts of the Manaus pollution plume on the microphysical properties of Amazonian warm-phase clouds in the wet season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Cecchini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The remote atmosphere over the Amazon can be similar to oceanic regions in terms of aerosol conditions and cloud type formations. This is especially true during the wet season. The main aerosol-related disturbances over the Amazon have both natural sources, such as dust transport from Africa, and anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning or urban pollution. The present work considers the impacts of the latter on the microphysical properties of warm-phase clouds by analysing observations of the interactions between the Manaus pollution plume and its surroundings, as part of the GoAmazon2014/5 Experiment. The analysed period corresponds to the wet season (specifically from February to March 2014 and corresponding to the first Intensive Operating Period (IOP1 of GoAmazon2014/5. The droplet size distributions reported are in the range 1 µm ≤ D ≤ 50 µm in order to capture the processes leading up to the precipitation formation. The wet season largely presents a clean background atmosphere characterized by frequent rain showers. As such, the contrast between background clouds and those affected by the Manaus pollution can be observed and detailed. The focus is on the characteristics of the initial microphysical properties in cumulus clouds predominantly at their early stages. The pollution-affected clouds are found to have smaller effective diameters and higher droplet number concentrations. The differences range from 10 to 40 % for the effective diameter and are as high as 1000 % for droplet concentration for the same vertical levels. The growth rates of droplets with altitude are slower for pollution-affected clouds (2.90 compared to 5.59 µm km−1, as explained by the absence of bigger droplets at the onset of cloud development. Clouds under background conditions have higher concentrations of larger droplets (> 20 µm near the cloud base, which would contribute significantly to the growth rates through the

  8. Tropospheric ozone production related to West African city emissions during the 2006 wet season AMMA campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ancellet

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available During African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA airborne measurements of ozone, CO and nitrogen oxides (NOx were collected by French and German Falcon aircraft near three cities in West Africa (Cotonou, Niamey and Ouagadougou. They have been analysed to identify the good conditions to observe ozone plumes related to city emissions during the monsoon season. Results show that an O3 increase of 40–50 ppbv above the summer average concentration took place during two specific events: one near Cotonou on the coast of the Gulf of Guinea, and the other near Niamey in the Sahel region. In both cases a high level of NOx (3–5 ppbv is related to the ozone production. Air mass transport simulations with FLEXPART and a tracer simulation with the BOLAM mesoscale model shows that Southern Hemisphere biomass burning emissions are always at higher altitude (>3 km compared to the city emissions. In Niamey and Ouagadougou, the daily variability of ozone and CO correlates with the FLEXPART analysis showing the role of air mass stagnation near the city for 1–2 days and advection of emissions from the vegetated areas. Absence of ozone enhancements for high CO values can be explained by the occurrence of deep convection near the city. In the Sahel region, convection must be accounted for to understand the small number of observed ozone plumes but also to explain the high level of NOx in the 3–5 ppbv range, due to increasing soil emissions after rainfall. To verify that daily ozone production can reach 20 ppbv day−1 for the NOx and CO conditions encountered near West African cities, a simulation of the CiTTyCAT Lagrangian model was conducted using the observed average chemical composition reported by other aircraft during AMMA. Such ozone production is possible for NOx levels up to 5 ppb showing that West African cities are potentially significant sources of tropospheric

  9. Carbon monoxide and related trace gases and aerosols over the Amazon Basin during the wet and dry seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of airborne measurements of carbon monoxide (CO and aerosol particle number concentration (CN made during the Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia (BARCA program. The primary goal of BARCA is to address the question of basin-scale sources and sinks of CO2 and other atmospheric carbon species, a central issue of the Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (LBA program. The experiment consisted of two aircraft campaigns during November–December 2008 (BARCA-A and May–June 2009 (BARCA-B, which covered the altitude range from the surface up to about 4500 m, and spanned most of the Amazon Basin.

    Based on meteorological analysis and measurements of the tracer, SF6, we found that airmasses over the Amazon Basin during the late dry season (BARCA-A, November 2008 originated predominantly from the Southern Hemisphere, while during the late wet season (BARCA-B, May 2009 low-level airmasses were dominated by northern-hemispheric inflow and mid-tropospheric airmasses were of mixed origin. In BARCA-A we found strong influence of biomass burning emissions on the composition of the atmosphere over much of the Amazon Basin, with CO enhancements up to 300 ppb and CN concentrations approaching 10 000 cm−3; the highest values were in the southern part of the Basin at altitudes of 1–3 km. The ΔCN/ΔCO ratios were diagnostic for biomass burning emissions, and were lower in aged than in fresh smoke. Fresh emissions indicated CO/CO2 and CN/CO emission ratios in good agreement with previous work, but our results also highlight the need to consider the residual smoldering combustion that takes place after the active flaming phase of deforestation fires.

    During the late wet season, in contrast, there was little evidence for a significant presence of biomass smoke. Low CN concentrations (300–500 cm−3 prevailed basinwide, and CO mixing ratios were enhanced

  10. Occurrence of Blastocystis sp. in water catchments at Malay villages and Aboriginal settlement during wet and dry seasons in Peninsular Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samseh Abdullah Noradilah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the tropics, there are too few studies on isolation of Blastocystis sp. subtypes from water sources; in addition, there is also an absence of reported studies on the occurrence of Blastocystis sp. subtypes in water during different seasons. Therefore, this study was aimed to determine the occurrence of Blastocystis sp. subtypes in river water and other water sources that drained aboriginal vicinity of highly endemic intestinal parasitic infections during wet and dry seasons. Water samples were collected from six sampling points of Sungai Krau (K1–K6 and a point at Sungai Lompat (K7 and other water sources around the aboriginal villages. The water samples were collected during both seasons, wet and dry seasons. Filtration of the water samples were carried out using a flatbed membrane filtration system. The extracted DNA from concentrated water sediment was subjected to single round polymerase chain reaction and positive PCR products were subjected to sequencing. All samples were also subjected to filtration and cultured on membrane lactose glucuronide agar for the detection of faecal coliforms. During wet season, Blastocystis sp. ST1, ST2 and ST3 were detected in river water samples. Blastocystis sp. ST3 occurrence was sustained in the river water samples during dry season. However Blastocystis sp. ST1 and ST2 were absent during dry season. Water samples collected from various water sources showed contaminations of Blastocystis sp. ST1, ST2, ST3 and ST4, during wet season and Blastocystis sp. ST1, ST3, ST8 and ST10 during dry season. Water collected from all river sampling points during both seasons showed growth of Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes, indicating faecal contamination. In this study, Blastocystis sp. ST3 is suggested as the most robust and resistant subtype able to survive in any adverse environmental condition. Restriction and control of human and animal faecal contaminations to the river and other water sources

  11. Occurrence of Blastocystis sp. in water catchments at Malay villages and Aboriginal settlement during wet and dry seasons in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noradilah, Samseh Abdullah; Lee, Ii Li; Anuar, Tengku Shahrul; Salleh, Fatmah Md; Abdul Manap, Siti Nor Azreen; Mohd Mohtar, Noor Shazleen Husnie; Azrul, Syed Muhamad; Abdullah, Wan Omar

    2016-01-01

    In the tropics, there are too few studies on isolation of Blastocystis sp. subtypes from water sources; in addition, there is also an absence of reported studies on the occurrence of Blastocystis sp. subtypes in water during different seasons. Therefore, this study was aimed to determine the occurrence of Blastocystis sp. subtypes in river water and other water sources that drained aboriginal vicinity of highly endemic intestinal parasitic infections during wet and dry seasons. Water samples were collected from six sampling points of Sungai Krau (K1–K6) and a point at Sungai Lompat (K7) and other water sources around the aboriginal villages. The water samples were collected during both seasons, wet and dry seasons. Filtration of the water samples were carried out using a flatbed membrane filtration system. The extracted DNA from concentrated water sediment was subjected to single round polymerase chain reaction and positive PCR products were subjected to sequencing. All samples were also subjected to filtration and cultured on membrane lactose glucuronide agar for the detection of faecal coliforms. During wet season, Blastocystis sp. ST1, ST2 and ST3 were detected in river water samples. Blastocystis sp. ST3 occurrence was sustained in the river water samples during dry season. However Blastocystis sp. ST1 and ST2 were absent during dry season. Water samples collected from various water sources showed contaminations of Blastocystis sp. ST1, ST2, ST3 and ST4, during wet season and Blastocystis sp. ST1, ST3, ST8 and ST10 during dry season. Water collected from all river sampling points during both seasons showed growth of Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes, indicating faecal contamination. In this study, Blastocystis sp. ST3 is suggested as the most robust and resistant subtype able to survive in any adverse environmental condition. Restriction and control of human and animal faecal contaminations to the river and other water sources shall prevent the

  12. Large branchiopods (Branchiopoda: Anostraca, Notostraca and Spinicaudata from the salt lakes of Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudjéma SAMRAOUI

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a survey of large branchiopods (Crustacea, Branchiopoda of the major salt lakes of Algeria, particularly those of the eastern Hauts Plateaux. The aim of the survey was to complement a previous survey that focused on the freshwater habitats of Numidia, northeast Algeria. The study revealed 8 species, with one taxon new to Algeria and North Africa (Chirocephalus salinus. Data on the status, phenology and habitats of collected and previously known species are presented for 19 taxa. The distribution of many species has been greatly extended and the co-occurrence of Artemia tunisiana and Branchinella spinosa has been recorded. The studied salt lakes, owing to a large production of fairy shrimps, support a great number of wintering and breeding waterbirds, but are subject to increasing human pressure.

  13. Impact of alternating wet and dry periods on long-term seasonal phosphorus and nitrogen budgets of two shallow Mediterranean lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppens, Jan; Özen, Arda; Tavşanoğlu, Ü Nihan; Erdoğan, Şeyda; Levi, Eti E; Yozgatlıgil, Ceylan; Jeppesen, Erik; Beklioğlu, Meryem

    2016-09-01

    The water balance, with large seasonal and annual water level fluctuations, has a critical influence on the nitrogen and phosphorus dynamics of shallow lakes in the semi-arid climate zone. We constructed seasonal water and nutrient budgets for two connected shallow lakes, Lakes Mogan and Eymir, located in Central Anatolia, Turkey. The study period covered 20years with alternations between dry and wet years as well as restoration efforts including sewage effluent diversion and biomanipulations in Lake Eymir. Both lakes experienced a 1-2m water level drop during a drought period and a subsequent increase during the wet period, with seasonal water level fluctuations of 0.60 to 0.70m. During wet years with high water levels, small seasonal differences were observed with a nutrient peak in spring caused by external loading and nutrient loss via retention during summer. During years with low water levels, nutrient concentrations increased due to internal and external loading, exacerbated by evaporative water loss. In Lake Eymir, a shift to eutrophic conditions with turbid water occurred under low water level conditions and consequent internal loading of P from the sediment, causing high nutrient concentrations in summer. Our results indicate a threat of lakes drying out in the semi-arid climate zone if evaporation increases and precipitation decreases as anticipated from the global climate change predictions. In addition, our results show the influence of the water balance on the eutrophication of shallow lakes in the Mediterranean climate zone and highlight the ultimate consequences for lake management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Growth, Survival, and Death of Bacteria and Fungi Following Wet-up of Seasonally Dried Soil Revealed by Heavy Water Stable Isotope Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazewicz, S.; Nuccio, E. E.; Lim, H.; Schwartz, E.; Brodie, E.; Firestone, M.

    2013-12-01

    The rapid increase in microbial activity that occurs when a dry soil is rewetted has been well documented and is of great interest due to implications of changing precipitation patterns on soil C dynamics. Several studies have shown minor net changes in microbial population diversity or abundance following wet-up, but the gross population dynamics of bacteria and fungi resulting from soil wet-up are virtually unknown due to the technical difficulties associated with such measurements. Here we applied DNA stable isotope probing with H218O coupled with quantitative PCR and high throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to characterize taxonomic composition of bacteria and to describe new growth, survival, and mortality of bacteria and fungi following the rewetting of a seasonally dried California annual grassland soil. Total microbial abundance revealed little change throughout the 7-day post-wet incubation, but there was substantial turnover of both bacterial and fungal populations (49 and 52% respectively). New growth was linear between 24 and 168 hours for both bacteria and fungi with average growth rates of 2.3 x 108 bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies gdw-1 h-1 and 4.3 x 107 fungal ITS copies gdw-1 h-1. While bacteria and fungi differed in their mortality and survival characteristics during the 7-day incubation, mortality that occurred within the first 3 hours was similar with 25 and 27% of bacterial and fungal gene copies disappearing from the pre-wet community, respectively. The rapid disappearance of gene copies indicates that cell death, occurring either during the extreme dry down period (preceding 5 months) or during the rapid change in water-potential due to wet-up, generates a significant pool of available C that likely contributes to the large pulse in CO2 associated with wet-up. Sequential bacterial growth patterns observed at the phylum and order levels suggest that an ecologically coherent response was observable at coarse taxonomic levels with

  15. The influence of a season of extreme wet weather events on exposure of the World Heritage Area Great Barrier Reef to pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Karen; Devlin, Michelle; Bentley, Christie; Lee-Chue, Kristie; Paxman, Chris; Carter, Steve; Lewis, Stephen E; Brodie, Jon; Guy, Ellia; Vardy, Suzanne; Martin, Katherine C; Jones, Alison; Packett, Robert; Mueller, Jochen F

    2012-07-01

    The 2010-2011 wet season was one of extreme weather for the State of Queensland, Australia. Major rivers adjacent to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) were discharging at rates 1.5 to >3 times higher than their long term median. Exposure to photosystem II herbicides has been routinely monitored over a period of up to 5 years at 12 inshore GBR sites. The influence of this wet season on exposure to photosystem II herbicides was examined in the context of this long-term monitoring record and during flood plume events in specific regions. Median exposures expressed as diuron equivalent concentration were an average factor of 2.3 times higher but mostly not significantly different (p<0.05) to the median for the long-term monitoring record. The herbicides metolachlor and tebuthiuron were frequently detected in flood plume waters at concentrations that reached or exceeded relevant water quality guidelines (by up to 4.5 times). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. First faunal inventory of large branchiopods (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) of Western Maharashtra, India with taxonomical and distributional comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhye, Sameer; Rabet, Nicolas; Ghate, Hemant

    2015-01-06

    An updated inventory of large branchiopods of the Western Maharashtra state, India is presented for the first time. Employing current identification keys, we have detailed the egg morphology of Eulimnadia indocylindrova, which shares some similarities with E. geayi from South America and E. alluaudi from Madagascar, based on these egg characters. A thorough re-description of few morphological traits of the same species is also presented. We also have described the female of a Cyzicus species seen rarely from the studied region. Distributional comments on few species are also reported.

  17. Inter-annual variability of year-round NEE over 18 years, and environmental controls on seasonal patterns at an arctic wet sedge tundra, CMDL Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhori, A. A. M.; Oechel, W. C.; Goodrich, J. P.; Gioli, B.; Burba, G. G.; Shen, S. S. P.; Murphy, P.; Zona, D.

    2016-12-01

    To refine understanding of the total annual carbon balance in the Arctic, it is critical to extend long-term site-level CO2 flux data collection. These data are critical to addressing the environmental controls and processes responsible for temporal variability and seasonal patterns of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE). This dataset represents the longest running eddy covariance tower in the Arctic, which is located in an Alaskan wet sedge tundra ecosystem and is adjacent to the NOAA Climate Monitoring & Diagnostic Laboratory (CMDL). In addition to analyzing the year-to-year controls on NEE and its long-term trends, this work will complement a parallel study of the 40 year record of CO2 concentration measurements from the NOAA Barrow synoptic sampling station. For long-term, retrospective measurements, missing values are unavoidable, resulting from system failure, sensors icing-up during winter, losing network connections due to the harsh conditions, necessary instrument repairs, etc. Therefore, to analyze the annual sums, diurnal patterns, and seasonal vs. annual fluxes, the choice of gap-filling approach is critical and can dominate the magnitude of uncertainties, especially for periods with long gaps (> 1 month). We have applied different gap-filling methods such as artificial neural networks (ANN), and multiple linear regression (MLR) driven by micrometeorological parameters in an effort to minimize the associated uncertainties. Following gap-filling, a stepwise multiple regression against meteorological drivers including average summer PAR, average air and soil temperature, growing season length, duration of the zero curtain, growing degree days (GDD), date of snow melt, date of freeze up, and length of the summer was applied to determine the parameters that best explain the magnitude and sign of NEE in different seasons. These statistical analyses show that growing degree days were strongly correlated with summer NEE, which increased with higher GDD

  18. Enhanced precipitation promotes decomposition and soil C stabilization in semiarid ecosystems, but seasonal timing of wetting matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Xochi; Germino, Matthew; de Graaff, Marie-Anne

    2017-01-01

    AimsChanging precipitation regimes in semiarid ecosystems will affect the balance of soil carbon (C) input and release, but the net effect on soil C storage is unclear. We asked how changes in the amount and timing of precipitation affect litter decomposition, and soil C stabilization in semiarid ecosystems.MethodsThe study took place at a long-term (18 years) ecohydrology experiment located in Idaho. Precipitation treatments consisted of a doubling of annual precipitation (+200 mm) added either in the cold-dormant season or in the growing season. Experimental plots were planted with big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), or with crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum). We quantified decomposition of sagebrush leaf litter, and we assessed organic soil C (SOC) in aggregates, and silt and clay fractions.ResultsWe found that: (1) increased precipitation applied in the growing season consistently enhanced decomposition rates relative to the ambient treatment, and (2) precipitation applied in the dormant season enhanced soil C stabilization.ConclusionsThese data indicate that prolonged increases in precipitation can promote soil C storage in semiarid ecosystems, but only if these increases happen at times of the year when conditions allow for precipitation to promote plant C inputs rates to soil.

  19. Soil dehydrogenase in a land degradation-rehabilitation gradient: observations from a savanna site with a wet/dry seasonal cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Ryoichi; Ranamukhaarachchi, Senaratne Leelananda

    2009-01-01

    Soil dehydrogenase activity is a good indicator of overall microbial activity in soil, and it can serve as a good indicator of soil condition. However, seasonal changes in soil moisture content may have an effect on soil dehydrogenase activity, making an accurate assessment of soil condition difficult. In this study, we attempted to determine the significance of soil dehydrogenase activity for assessing soil condition, and we attempted to find a way to account for the influence of soil moisture content on soil dehydrogenase activity.' Soils were sampled in dry evergreen forest (original vegetation), bare ground (severely degraded) and Acacia plantation plots established on bare ground in 1986 and 1987 in Sakaerat, Thailand. Soil physico-chemical characteristics and dehydrogenase activity in the Acacia plantation soil had few differences from those in the evergreen forest soil. Soil dehydrogenase activity varied significantly between the bare ground and the forests regardless of the season (wet or dry), while the season did not produce a significant variation in soil dehydrogenase activity, as determined by repeated measures analysis of variance (p=0.077). The physico-chemical data provided the first principal component as a good measure of soil fertility. Values of soil dehydrogenase activity significantly correlated to scores of the soil samples of the first principal component (R=0.787, prehabilitative effects of reforestation in this part of Thailand.

  20. Changes in Hydraulic Gradient, Hyporheic Exchange, and Patterns of Nutrient Concentration between Dry and Wet Season Flows for a Tropical Mountain Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, M.; Endreny, T.; Lautz, L.; Siegel, D.

    2009-05-01

    Mountain streams are a common source in Central America for community water supplies (CWS). These streams become dewatered by the CWS during dry season low flows, with potential impacts on hydraulic gradients, hyporheic exchange flow, terrestrial-aquatic linkages, and nutrient dynamics, which may ultimately affect aquatic and riparian micro-ecosystems. We are presenting preliminary results of a study conducted in Buena Vista, a village in Yoro, Honduras where the mountain stream was instrumented and manipulated to measure impacts of a CWS. Piezometric head and stream water levels were taken at 7 cross-sections along 30 m of step-pool stream, and water quality samples were retrieved from 48 pairs of riparian and stream piezometers and monitoring wells. We computed vertical hydraulic gradients, zones of hyporheic upwelling and downwelling, and nutrient patterns, and their change with streamflow. Streamflow ranged from 30 L/s in the wet-season high flow to about 2 L/s in the dry-season low flow, and were dewatered to about 1 L/s. A HEC- RAS water-surface profile model was calibrated to observed stages to establish gradients along the entire reach, and river head was then input as a boundary condition into a MODFLOW groundwater model to examine patterns of hyporheic exchange. Changes in hydraulic gradients and fluxes are compared with baseline conditions during the dry season low flow without dewatering. Noticeable changes in hydraulic gradient occurred between high and low flows, but changes in low flow to dewatered flow were negligible. Lengths and location of hyporheic upwelling and downwelling zones shifted slightly with changes in flow, but again the dewatering had a minor impact. Concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, chloride, fluoride and dissolved oxygen were detected in the hyporheic zone, the stream water, and adjacent ground water. We are exploring mixing models to assess the extent to which hyporheic exchange migrated to and from the creek to adjacent

  1. Soil dehydrogenase in a land degradation-rehabilitation gradient: observations from a savanna site with a wet/dry seasonal cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoichi Doi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil dehydrogenase activity is a good indicator of overall microbial activity in soil, and it can serve as a good indicator of soil condition. However, seasonal changes in soil moisture content may have an effect on soil dehydrogenase activity, making an accurate assessment of soil condition difficult. In this study, we attempted to determine the significance of soil dehydrogenase activity for assessing soil condition, and we attempted to find a way to account for the influence of soil moisture content on soil dehydrogenase activity. Soils were sampled in dry evergreen forest (original vegetation, bare ground (severely degraded and Acacia plantation plots established on bare ground in 1986 and 1987 in Sakaerat, Thailand. Soil physico-chemical characteristics and dehydrogenase activity in the Acacia plantation soil had few differences from those in the evergreen forest soil. Soil dehydrogenase activity varied significantly between the bare ground and the forests regardless of the season (wet or dry, while the season did not produce a significant variation in soil dehydrogenase activity, as determined by repeated measures analysis of variance (p=0.077. The physico-chemical data provided the first principal component as a good measure of soil fertility. Values of soil dehydrogenase activity significantly correlated to scores of the soil samples of the first principal component (R=0.787, p<0.001. We found that soil dehydrogenase activity is a useful indicator of the extent of soil degradation and the rehabilitative effects of reforestation in this part of Thailand. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (1-2: 223-234. Epub 2009 June 30.

  2. Phenology of seed and leaves rain in response to periodic climatic variability in a seasonal wet tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteo, D.; Wright, S. J.; Davies, S. J.; Muller-Landau, H. C.; Wolfe, B.; Detto, M.

    2016-12-01

    Phenology, by controlling the rhythms of plants, plays a fundamental role in regulating access to resources, ecosystem processes, competition among species, interactions with consumers and feedbacks to the climate. In high biodiverse tropical forests, where phenology of flowering and leafing are complex, an adequate representation of phenology must take into account a given set of climatic, edaphic and biotic factors. Climatic factors are particularly important because plants may use them as cues for timing different phenological phases and be influenced by their intensity. Climatic variability can be periodic, if events occur with regular frequency, or aperiodic. One prominent periodic large-scale pattern that causes unusual weather is ENSO event. In general, Central America tends to be dry and warm during a mature phase of an ENSO event, which usually peaks between October and January with a frequency of 2-3 events per decade. Because in many tropical areas the effect of ENSO is highly prominent, it is plausible that plants have adapted their growth and reproduction mechanisms to synchronize ENSO phases, in a similar way that plants do during the seasonal cycle. We used a long dataset (30+ years) of fruits and leaves rains of tropical trees and lianas to determine ecosystem response and species specific response of these phenological events to local climate variability corresponding to the modes of ENSO. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that phenological responses to ENSO are similar to response to seasonal cycles, i.e., higher litterfall before a warm-dry phase and higher fruiting after such phase, with strong correlation between seeds and leaves. At sub-community level, we evaluated whether evergreen and deciduous, biotic and abiotic dispersers and free and climbing life forms, have the same response to ENSO in terms of leaves and seeds rain. At species level we tested the hypothesis that species with low photosynthetic capacity leaves are more responsive

  3. Dry spell, onset and cessation of the wet season rainfall in the Upper Baro-Akobo Basin, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Asfaw; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Edossa, Desalegn C.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, maximum dry spell length and number of dry spell periods of rainy seasons in the upper Baro-Akobo River basin which is a part of the Nile basin, Western Ethiopia, were investigated to analyse the drought trend. Daily rainfall records of the period 1972-2000 from eight rain gauge stations were used in the analysis, and Mann-Kendall test was used to test trends for significance. Furthermore, the beginning and end of the trend development in the dry spell were also tested using the sequential version of Mann-Kendall test. Results have shown that there is neither clear monotonic trend found in dry spell for the basin nor significant fluctuation in the onset, cession and duration of rainfall in the Baro-Akobo river basin. This sufficiently explains why rain-fed agriculture has suffered little in the western part of Ethiopia. The predictable nature of dry spell pattern may have allowed farmers to adjust to rainfall variability in the basin. Unlike many parts of Ethiopia, the Baro-Akobo basin climate variability is not a limiting factor for rain-fed agriculture productivity which may contribute significantly to national food security.

  4. Variability and trends of wet season temperature in the Sudano-Sahelian zone and relationships with precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oueslati, Boutheina; Camberlin, Pierre; Zoungrana, Joël; Roucou, Pascal; Diallo, Saliou

    2017-04-01

    The relationships between precipitation and temperature in the central Sudano-Sahelian belt are investigated by analyzing 50 years (1959-2008) of observed temperature (Tx and Tn) and rainfall variations. At daily time-scale, both Tx and Tn show a marked decrease as a response to rainfall occurrence, with a strongest departure from normal 1 day after the rainfall event (-0.5 to -2.5 °C depending on the month). The cooling is slightly larger when heavy rainfall events (>5 mm) are considered. The temperature anomalies weaken after the rainfall event, but are still significant several days later. The physical mechanisms accounting for the temperature response to precipitation are analysed. The Tx drop is accounted for by reduced incoming solar radiation associated with increased cloud cover and increased surface evaporation following surface moistening. The effect of evaporation becomes dominant a few days after the rainfall event. The reduced daytime heat storage and the subsequent sensible heat flux result in a later negative Tn anomaly. The effect of rainfall variations on temperature is significant for long-term warming trends. The rainfall decrease experienced between 1959 and 2008 accounts for a rainy season Tx increase of 0.15 to 0.3 °C, out of a total Tx increase of 1.3 to 1.5 °C. These results have strong implications on the assessment of future temperature changes. The dampening or amplifying effects of precipitation are determined by the sign of future precipitation trends. Confidence on temperature changes under global warming partly depend on the robustness of precipitation projections.

  5. Landsat-Based Long-Term Monitoring of Total Suspended Matter Concentration Pattern Change in the Wet Season for Dongting Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhubin Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the impacts of environmental change and anthropogenic activities on the historical and current total suspended matter (TSM pattern in Dongting Lake, China, is a large challenge. We addressed this challenge by using more than three decades of Landsat data. Based on in situ measurements, we developed an algorithm based on the near-infrared (NIR band to estimate TSM in Dongting Lake. The algorithm was applied to Landsat images to derive TSM distribution maps from 1978 to 2013 in the wet season, revealing significant inter-annual and spatial variability. The relationship of TSM to water level, precipitation, and wind speed was analyzed, and we found that: (1 sand mining areas usually coincide with regions that have high TSM levels in Dongting Lake; (2 water level and seven-day precipitation were both important to TSM variation, but no significant relationship was found between TSM and wind speed or other meteorological data; (3 the increased level of sand mining in response to rapid economic growth has deeply influenced the TSM pattern since 2000 due to the resuspension of sediment; and (4 TSM variation might be associated with policy changes regarding the management of sand mining; it might also be affected by lower water levels caused by the impoundment of the Three Gorges Dam since 2000.

  6. Estuarine Turbidity Maxima and Variations of Aggregate Parameters in the Cam-Nam Trieu Estuary, North Vietnam, in Early Wet Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Duy Vinh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at exploring the characteristic parameters of the Estuarine Turbidity Maxima (ETM and at investigating their tidal variations within the Cam-Nam Trieu estuary (North Vietnam during the early wet season. Six longitudinal river transects were performed at spring tide. Two types of ETM were observed: an upper well mixed ETM with high Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM concentrations up to the surface at low salinity (0.11 to <1 psu, and a lower ETM confined in a bottom layer over stratified waters at salinities between ~1 psu and 15 psu. Their length depended on the longitudinal salinity gradient and was highest at low tide than at high tide. D50 of the flocs varied between 35 and 90 μm, their excess of density between 60 and 300 kg m−3 and their settling velocity ranged from 0.07 to 0.55 mm s−1 with values between 0.12 and 0.40 mm s−1 in the core of ETMs. The average fractal dimension of flocs was estimated to vary between 1.93 (at high tide to 2.04 (at low tide.

  7. The Characterization of Extreme Episodes of Wet and Dry Deposition of Pollutants on an Above Cloud-Base Forest during its Growing Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelice, T. P.; Saxena, V. K.

    1991-11-01

    An analysis of a 3-yr database (1986-88) acquired new Mount Mitchell (35°4405N, 82°1715W, 2038 m MSL) where the forest consists primarily of Fraser fir and some red spruce stands is presented. The site was immersed in clouds for 28%-41% of the time during each of the three growing seasons (15 May-15 September). This study only investigated extreme episodes of wet (cloud-water pH% .3:1)and dry (eg., an ozone concentration 70 ppb) acidic deposition. Extreme wet events occasionally relieved periods of high ozone ( 70 ppb) exposures during the final field intensive. Extreme wet and dry events could activate the decline mechanism in any above cloud-base forest, especially if the trees are exposed to such events during very early or very late stages of their Lives. The exposure of the forest to natural climatic stress, such as drought condition wintertime temperatures during the growing season, snow storm during early spring, etc., would also subject the forest to a stressful period during which the exposure to the aforementioned episodes of pollutant deposition might trigger a decline.On the average, one of three cloud events that traverse this site is extreme. These extreme events usually last about 4 h. form during periods of high atmospheric pressure, have a liquid water content of 0.10 g m3, and contain cloud droplets of mean diameter around 8.0 m. During the dissipating stages, such cloud events result in maximum acidic deposition. When such events are preceded by very high ozone ( 100 ppb), they may prove oven more detrimental to forest health. A precipitating cloud event (pH = 4.4 on the average) preceded by periods of very high ozone concentrations will become an extreme episode. Extreme acidic events can occur in association with 1) an 850-mb closed low, situated just north of Montreal, Canada, that advances southward into New York State, and 2) an 850-mb high extending over the Gulf of Mexico (between Florida and Louisiana) to over eastern Kansas. In

  8. Diverse Diurnal and Seasonal Sapflux Responses in Three Co-occurring Species from East Himalayan Wet Temperate Forests in Sikkim Himalaya, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Joseph, G.; Krishnaswamy, J.

    2016-12-01

    In a first attempt from Eastern Himalaya, we investigate diurnal and seasonal variability in transpiration by three dominant co-occurring species, Symplocos sps (SYP), Eurya sps (EU) & Castanopsis sps (CNP) from a regenerating East-Himalyan wet temperate forest stand located at 2150 amsl in the Fambonglho Wildlife Sanctuary in Sikkim, India. We installed 13 trees (5 SYP, 5 EU & 3 CNP) with Granier's thermal dissipation method (TDM)-based sapflow sensors (different depths of sapwood in one tree of each species for radial sapflow profile and at 2ndcm depth for remaining trees) for the dry season from November 2013 - May 2014. Environmental variables like temperature, relative humidity, soil water potential, rainfall and streamflow were measured using dataloggers-based sensors. Radially, SYP and EU showed higher sapflux density (SFD) in the outer xylem, whereas CNP had highest SFD near the inner xylem. Diurnally, both SYP and EU exhibited bi-modal peaks (early-morning and late-afternoon) during the moist months, and unimodal peaks (noon) in the relatively drier months; indicating probable controls of soil moisture on transpiration. CNP showed only unimodal peak (noon). Higher SFD was observed at the sensor placed on the north-facing side, across all species, indicating circumferential variability. As the dry season progressed, SYP and EU exhibited decreasing transpiration, whereas Castnopsis showed consistently high rates (probably due to deeper rooting depths). Discrete weighted-mean method was used calculating whole-tree sapflow in the trees with depth sensors. Results suggest that SYP and EU exhibit similar transpiration characteristics possibly due their similar eco-physiological traits (secondary species); in contrast to CNP (canopy species). CNP showed relatively higher sapflow than reported from Central Himalaya, indicative of evolution under a relatively wetter climate. Vapour pressure deficit and solar radiation act as drivers of transpiration, which seems to

  9. Physical properties of the sub-micrometer aerosol over the Amazon rain forest during the wet-to-dry season transition - comparison of modeled and measured CCN concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rissler

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sub-micrometer atmospheric aerosol particles were studied in the Amazon region, 125 km northeast of Manaus, Brazil (-1°55.2'S, 59°28.1'W. The measurements were performed during the wet-to-dry transition period, 4-28 July 2001 as part of the LBA (Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia CLAIRE-2001 (Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment experiment. The number size distribution was measured with two parallel differential mobility analyzers, the hygroscopic growth at 90% RH with a Hygroscopic Tandem Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA and the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN with a cloud condensation nuclei counter. A model was developed that uses the H-TDMA data to predict the number of soluble molecules or ions in the individual particles and the corresponding minimum particle diameter for activation into a cloud droplet at a certain supersaturation. Integrating the number size distribution above this diameter, CCN concentrations were predicted with a time resolution of 10 min and compared to the measured concentrations. During the study period, three different air masses were identified and compared: clean background, air influenced by aged biomass burning, and moderately polluted air from recent local biomass burning. For the clean period 2001, similar number size distributions and hygroscopic behavior were observed as during the wet season at the same site in 1998, with mostly internally mixed particles of low diameter growth factor (~1.3 taken from dry to 90% RH. During the periods influenced by biomass burning the hygroscopic growth changed slightly, but the largest difference was seen in the number size distribution. The CCN model was found to be successful in predicting the measured CCN concentrations, typically within 25%. A sensitivity study showed relatively small dependence on the assumption of which model salt that was used to predict CCN concentrations from H-TDMA data. One strength of using H-TDMA data

  10. Sap flow based transpiration estimates in species-rich secondary forests of different ages in central Panama during a wet-season drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretfeld, M.; Ewers, B. E.; Hall, J. S.; Ogden, F. L.

    2015-12-01

    Many landscapes that were previously covered by mature tropical forests in central Panama today comprise of a mosaic of mature forest fragments, pastures and agricultural land, and regrowing secondary forests. An increasing demand for water due to urbanization and the expansion of the Panama Canal, along with a predicted transition into a dryer climatic period necessitate a better understanding regarding the effects of land use and land use history on hydrological processes. Such knowledge, including water storage, residence times, and fluxes is essential to develop effective land management strategies and propose incentives to alter land use practices to enhance hydrological services. To quantify transpiration rates at different stages of secondary forest succession, we measured sap flow in forests growing for 8, ~25, and 80+ years since last known land use in the 15 km2 "Agua Salud" study area, located in central Panama. In each forest, we selected a subset of at least 15 individuals, representing the local tree size distribution, and recorded data from heat-ratio sap flow sensors every 30 minutes starting in February 2015. All instrumented trees were identified to species and compared to local species distributions. Basal area in the three forest types was 9.1, 10.8, and 50.2 m2 ha-1 for 8, ~25, and 80+ year old forests, respectively. Average daily transpiration was highly correlated to forest age, with highest rates in the oldest forest (3.0 to 18.2 mm ha-1 day-1), followed by intermediate (1.2 to 6.7 mm ha-1 day-1) and youngest forests (0.2 to 2.7 mm ha-1 day-1), suggesting roughly a doubling in transpiration from 8 to ~25 year old forests, despite similar basal area, and again from ~25 to 80+ year old forests. Flow rates in individual trees generally reflected the dry-to-wet season transition but behaved differently in response to the unprecedentedly dry conditions during the first half of 2015 in central Panama.

  11. Isoprene and monoterpene emissions of Amazônian tree species during the wet season: Direct and indirect investigations on controlling environmental functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, U.; Rottenberger, S.; Biesenthal, T.; Wolf, A.; Schebeske, G.; Ciccioli, P.; Brancaleoni, E.; Frattoni, M.; Tavares, T. M.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2002-10-01

    As part of the project LBA-EUSTACH (European Studies on Trace gases and Atmosphere Chemistry as a contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere experiment in Amazonia), we examined the diel pattern of isoprenoid exchange in the wet season of 1999 at a remote field site in Rondônia, Brazil. The emission pattern of two tree species in a secondary forest was investigated by means of a dynamic branch enclosure system and was compared on the basis of climatological variables like temperature and light and physiological parameters such as assimilation, transpiration, and stomatal conductance. While the species Hymenaea courbaril was found to be a strong isoprene emitter, Apeiba tibourbou was found to exclusively emit monoterpenes and no isoprene. Species-related standard emission factors calculated on a carbon basis were 45.4 μg g-1 h-1 (24.9 nmol m-2 s-1) for isoprene and 3.6 μg g-1 h-1 (0.75 nmol m-2 s-1) for monoterpene emission, representing a nontrivial carbon loss by the plants of 1.8% and 0.1% C relative to the net carbon assimilation on a daily basis. About 90% of the total monoterpene emission from A. tibourbou was comprised of sabinene, α-pinene, β-pinene, myrcene, and limonene, in decreasing quantity. Despite the difference in isoprenoid emission composition, the diel emission pattern of both tree species reacted similarly toward the environmental conditions, fluctuating light and temperature, indicating that closely related metabolic controls were involved in the actual emission. Both isoprene emission and monoterpene emission exhibited a light saturation curve similar to CO2 assimilation. No isoprenoid emission was found during nighttime. The strong light dependence of the monoterpene emission by A. tibourbou suggests that this tree species does not store monoterpenes but emits them immediately upon production. The diel pattern of both the isoprene and the monoterpene emission could be adequately simulated by current isoprene algorithms. The

  12. [Study on Speciation Analysis and Ecological Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Surface Sediments in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia Sections of the Yellow River in Wet Season with HR-ICP-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-ling; Liu, Jing-jun; Zuo, Hang; Huang, Fang; Liu, Ying

    2015-04-01

    In order to continuously study the contents, pollution condition and potential ecological risk of heavy metals in surface sediments in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia sections of the Yellow River in wet seasons in different years, the speciation analysis of 9 kinds of heavy metals including Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, V, Co, Zn and Mn, pollution condition and potential ecological risk of heavy metals in surface sediments from 10 sampling sites like Baotoufuqiao (S2), Shizuishantaolezhen (S6) and Wujinxia (S9) in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia sections of the Yellow River in 2012 wet season were studied with BCR sequential extraction and high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) based on our previous works. The results implied that the order of heavy metals average contents in the 10 sediment samples were the same: Mn>V> Zn>Cr>Cu>Ni>Pb>Co>Cd. In the sediments, heavy metals mainly existed in the form of residual fraction, which indicated that the bioavailability or environmental impact was low. Results of geo-accumulation indices (Igeo) showed that Igeo(CD), was the largest among the heavy metals with the strongest pollution, while IGEO(Mn)was the smallest. Enrichment factor (EF) indicated that only Cd and Cu were enriched at some sampling sites. In S5, because EFcd reached 4. 69, Cd was affected by human activities obviously and the result was consistent with I. Potential ecological risk index (RI) implied that the RI values in S1, S2 and S5 were between 150 and 300, which belonged to moderate polluting degree, while others were less than 150, belonging to light pollution degree. The results of this paper could not only provide reliable experimental data and theoretical basis for the relevant departments, but also supply the technical support for constructing mathematics model of sediments-pollutants transport, systematically researching the migration and transformation rule of persistent toxic substances and environmental assessment in

  13. Modelling of growing season methane fluxes in a high-Arctic wet tundra ecosystem 1997–2010 using in situ and high-resolution satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbern Tagesson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 fluxes 1997–2010 were studied by combining remotely sensed normalised difference water index (NDWI with in situ CH4 fluxes from Rylekærene, a high-Arctic wet tundra ecosystem in the Zackenberg valley, north-eastern Greenland. In situ CH4 fluxes were measured using the closed-chamber technique. Regression models between in situ CH4 fluxes and environmental variables [soil temperature (Tsoil, water table depth (WtD and active layer (AL thickness] were established for different temporal and spatial scales. The relationship between in situ WtD and remotely sensed NDWI was also studied. The regression models were combined and evaluated against in situ CH4 fluxes. The models including NDWI as the input data performed on average slightly better [root mean square error (RMSE =1.56] than the models without NDWI (RMSE=1.67, and they were better in reproducing CH4 flux variability. The CH4 flux model that performed the best included exponential relationships against temporal variation in Tsoil and AL, an exponential relationship against spatial variation in WtD and a linear relationship between WtD and remotely sensed NDWI (RMSE=1.50. There were no trends in modelled CH4 flux budgets between 1997 and 2010. Hence, during this period there were no trends in the soil temperature at 10 cm depth and NDWI.

  14. Vaginitis test - wet mount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wet prep - vaginitis; Vaginosis - wet mount; Trichomoniasis - wet mount; Vaginal candida - wet mount ... a rash, painful intercourse, or odor after intercourse. Trichomoniasis , a sexually transmitted disease. Vaginal yeast infection .

  15. Functional morphology of amplexus (clasping) in spinicaudatan clam shrimps (Crustacea, Branchiopoda) and its evolution in bivalved branchiopods: A video-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigvardt, Zandra M S; Rogers, D Christopher; Olesen, Jørgen

    2017-04-01

    Male clam shrimps (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Laevicaudata, Spinicaudata, and Cyclestherida) have their first one or two trunk limb pairs modified as "claspers," which are used to hold the female during mating and mate guarding. Clasper morphology has traditionally been important for clam shrimp taxonomy and classification, but little is known about how the males actually use the claspers during amplexus (clasping). Homologies of the various clasper parts ("movable finger," "large palp," "palm," "gripping area," and "small palp") have long been discussed between the three clam shrimp taxa, and studies have shown that only some structures are homologous while others are convergent ("partial homology"). We studied the clasper functionality in four spinicaudatan species using video recordings and scanning electron microscopy, and compared our results with other clam shrimp groups. General mating behavior and carapace morphology was also studied. Generally, spinicaudatan and laevicaudatan claspers function similarly despite some parts being nonhomologous. We mapped clasper morphology and functionality aspects on a branchiopod phylogeny. We suggest that the claspers of the three groups were adapted from an original, simpler clasper, each for a "stronger" grip on the female's carapace margin: 1) Spinicaudata have two clasper pairs bearing an elongated apical club/gripping area with one setal type; 2); Cyclestherida have one clasper pair with clusters of molariform setae on the gripping area and at the movable finger apex; and 3) Laevicaudata have one clasper pair, but have incorporated an additional limb portion into the clasper palm and bear a diverse set of setae. J. Morphol. 278:523-546, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  17. Effect of Hydrochloric Acid, Mechanical Scarification, Wet Heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    HCL), Wet heat. ABSTRACT; The effect of different ... treatments observed showed 100% for wet heat, 90% for scarification (sand paper) and 70% for HCL of 50% ... the principle constant being a dry season of 5-7 month/year. It may grow in ...

  18. Water Productivity of Irrigated Rice under Transplanting, Wet Seeding and Dry Seeding Methods of Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali, NS.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Water productivity (WP of irrigated lowland rice was determined during the 1994 dry (January to May and wet (August to December seasons on a heavy clay acid sulphate soil. Treatments consisted of three cultivation methods : transplanted rice, pregerminated seeds broadcasted on puddled soil (wet seeding and dry seeds broadcasted on unpuddled soil (dry seeding. In wet and dry seeded plots, continuous standing water condition was initiated 17 days after sowing. Total water requirement for rice production was highest in transplanted plots (755 mm in wet season and 1154 mm in dry season and was lowest in dry seeded plots (505 mm in wet season and 1040 mm in dry season. Dry seeding required no water for land preparation but transplanting and wet seeding methods required 18 - 20 % of total water requirement in dry season and 27 - 29 % in wet season. Total percolation was maximum (99 mm in wet season and 215 mm in dry season in dry seeding method and was minimum (62 mm in wet season and 94 mm in dry season in transplanting method. In dry and wet seeding methods, daily percolation gradually decreased with the age of the crop. Total seepage loss did not show any significant difference between the cultivation methods in the two seasons. Grain yield was not affected by the three cultivation methods in both seasons. Water productivity (the ratio between grain yield and total amount of water used in production was 3.5 - 4.1 kg ha-1 mm-1, 3.8 - 4.4 kg ha-1 mm-1 and 4.1 - 5.5 kg ha-1 mm-1 in transplanted, wet seeded and dry seeded rice, respectively. Labour requirement for land preparation and sowing was maximum in transplanted (219 - 226 man-hours ha-1 followed by wet (104 -112 man-hours ha-1 and dry seeded (94 - 99 man-hours ha-1 methods. However, in wet season extra labour (77 man-hours ha-1 was required for weeding after crop establishment in dry and wet seeding methods. Crop maturity was 20 days earlier in wet and dry seeding methods compared to

  19. Wetting, Prewetting and Superfluidity

    OpenAIRE

    Taborek, P.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments on adsorption and wetting of quantum fluids (4He and 3He) on weakly binding alkali metal substrates are reviewed. Helium on weak substrates can undergo a variety of phase transitions including wetting, prewetting, layering, and liquid-vapor transitions. Another characteristic feature of weak substrates is the absence of an immobile quasi solid layer which is present on all conventional strong substrates. Both the absence of the immobile layer and the interaction with surface phase...

  20. Structure of macroinvertebrate communities in riffles of a Neotropical karst stream in the wet and dry seasons Estrutura das comunidades de macroinvertebrados em corredeiras de um riacho cárstico Neotropical nas estações seca e chuvosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Ocampo Righi-Cavallaro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Our study evaluated the effects of physical and chemical variables and seasonality on diversity and structure of the macroinvertebrate fauna in riffles of a Neotropical chalk stream; METHODS: Sampling was performed during the dry (September 2003 and rainy (March 2004 seasons, in five sites. Five samples were taken at each point with a Surber sampler. Physical and chemical variables were also evaluated; RESULTS: Temperature, pH, orthophosphate and total nitrogen were very similar for both seasons, while riffle length, conductivity, alkalinity, ammonia, phosphorus and leaf litter had different values. The total number of organisms collected was 25114 belonging to at least 50 families. Insects dominated in the samples. The highest abundance was found for the dry period. Temporary stretches were sampled in rainy season in order to complement the faunal inventory; CONCLUSIONS: The environmental seasonality was an important factor for structuring the macroinvertebrate fauna, with a significant difference between the invertebrate compositions in the sampling periods. The results of this study demonstrate the influences of seasonality on the temporal variation of communities.OBJETIVOS: Este estudo avaliou os efeitos das variáveis químicas e físicas e da sazonalidade na diversidade e estrutura da fauna de macroinvertebrados em corredeiras de um riacho cárstico Neotropical; MÉTODOS: As coletas foram realizadas durante as estações seca (Setembro 2003 e chuvosa (Março 2004, em cinco pontos de amostragem. Em cada ponto foram coletadas cinco unidades amostrais utilizando um amostrador Surber. Variáveis químicas e físicas também foram avaliadas; RESULTADOS: Temperatura, pH, ortofosfato e nitrogênio total foram muito similares entre as estações, enquanto os valores de comprimento da corredeira, condutividade, alcalinidade, amônia, fósforo total e a quantidade de folhiço variaram. O número total de organismos coletado foi 25114

  1. Wet gas sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welker, T.F.

    1997-07-01

    The quality of gas has changed drastically in the past few years. Most gas is wet with hydrocarbons, water, and heavier contaminants that tend to condense if not handled properly. If a gas stream is contaminated with condensables, the sampling of that stream must be done in a manner that will ensure all of the components in the stream are introduced into the sample container as the composite. The sampling and handling of wet gas is extremely difficult under ideal conditions. There are no ideal conditions in the real world. The problems related to offshore operations and other wet gas systems, as well as the transportation of the sample, are additional problems that must be overcome if the analysis is to mean anything to the producer and gatherer. The sampling of wet gas systems is decidedly more difficult than sampling conventional dry gas systems. Wet gas systems were generally going to result in the measurement of one heating value at the inlet of the pipe and a drastic reduction in the heating value of the gas at the outlet end of the system. This is caused by the fallout or accumulation of the heavier products that, at the inlet, may be in the vapor state in the pipeline; hence, the high gravity and high BTU. But, in fact, because of pressure and temperature variances, these liquids condense and form a liquid that is actually running down the pipe as a stream or is accumulated in drips to be blown from the system. (author)

  2. Seasonal variation in water quality of Orle River Basin, S. W. Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the other hand total hardness show increase in the dry season and decrease in the wet season. The rivers are considered to be more polluted in the wet season than in the dry season. Surface water quality has many effects on human use of water resources, water being a basic natural resource required by all human ...

  3. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... if low oxygen pressure or long reaction times were used. The reaction products derived from the experiment in which quinoline was mostly decomposed were studied with respect to biological degradation. The results showed that these products were highly digestible under activated sludge treatment....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  4. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Mishra, Himanshu; Bonn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measurin...

  5. Wetting of real surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward Yu

    2013-01-01

    The problem of wetting and drop dynamics on various surfaces is very interesting from both the scientificas well as thepractical viewpoint, and subject of intense research.The results are scattered across papers in journals, sothis workwill meet the need for a unifying, comprehensive work.

  6. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1999-03-30

    The elastic modulus E of wet granular material was found to be of the order of 0.25 MPa, this value does not compare well with the value predicted for a cubic array of spheres under Hertzian contact were the predicted values were in the order of 250 MPa . The strain-stress behavior of a wet granular media was measured using a split Parfitt tensile tester. In all cases the stress increases linearly with distance until the maximum uniaxial tensile stress is reached. The stress then decreases exponentially with distance after this maximum is reached. The linear region indicates that wet solids behave elastically for stresses below the tensile stresses and can store significant elastic energy. The elastic deformation cannot be explained by analyzing the behavior of individual capillary bridges and requires accounting for the deformation of the solids particles. The elastic modulus of the wet granular material remains unexplained. New information was found to support the experimental finding and a first theory to explain the very small elastic modulus is presented. A new model based on the used of the finite element method is being developed.

  7. The Wet Chaparral

    OpenAIRE

    Hope, Audrey Marie

    2017-01-01

    The Wet Chaparral: Poetry at Home (Out There) is an MFA thesis exhibition of new sculptures by Audrey Hope. The thesis paper describes the exhibition, discusses the artist’s personal and artistic motivations, and analyzes writings relevant to the work.

  8. Eficácia de herbicidas aplicados nas épocas seca e úmida para o controle de Merremia aegyptia na cultura da cana-de-açúcar Efficacy of herbicides applied during the dry and wet seasons for the control of Merremia aegyptia in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Correia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se estudar o efeito de herbicidas aplicados em pré e pós-emergência, isolados e em combinações nas épocas seca e úmida, para o controle de corda-de-viola (Merremia aegyptia na cultura de cana-de-açúcar colhida mecanicamente sem queima. O experimento foi desenvolvido no período de julho de 2008 a maio de 2009, em área de produção comercial de cana-de-açúcar localizada no município de Pradópolis, SP. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições, em esquema de parcela subdividida. Foram avaliados na época seca os herbicidas amicarbazone (1.400 g ha ¹, clomazone + hexazinone (800 + 200 g ha-1 e imazapic (147 g ha-1, aplicados em 16/7/2008 após a colheita da cana, e o tratamento sem manejo prévio das plantas daninhas nessa época. Os herbicidas estudados na época úmida foram: mesotrione isolado (192 g ha-1 e em mistura (120 g ha-1 com atrazine (1.500 g ha-1, metribuzin (960 g ha-1 ou diuron + hexazinone (702 + 198 g ha-1, aplicados em 6/11/2008, além de testemunha capinada e outra sem manejo das plantas daninhas. Dos herbicidas utilizados na época seca, o amicarbazone promoveu o melhor controle de M. aegyptia. No entanto, para todos eles, a complementação de manejo com a aplicação de herbicidas na época úmida mostrou-se obrigatória. Nesta época, a associação de mesotrione aos herbicidas atrazine, metribuzin e diuron + hexazinone foi mais eficaz no controle de M. aegyptia do que quando aplicado sozinho. Nenhum dos tratamentos com herbicidas interferiu no número de colmos por metro linear, diâmetro e altura de colmos de cana-de-açúcar (variedade SP 81-3250.To evaluate the efficacy of herbicides applied in pre and post-emergence, alone and in combination, during the dry and wet seasons, for the control of hairy woodrose (Merremia aegyptia on sugarcane, an experiment was arranged in a randomized block design, in split-plots, with four replications, in a commercial

  9. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-03-25

    The yield locus, tensile strength and fracture mechanisms of wet granular materials were studied. The yield locus of a wet material was shifted to the left of that of the dry specimen by a constant value equal to the compressive isostatic stress due to pendular bridges. for materials with straight yield loci, the shift was computed from the uniaxial tensile strength, either measured in a tensile strength tester or calculated from the correlation, and the angle of internal friction of the material. The predicted shift in the yield loci due to different moisture contents compare well with the measured shift in the yield loci of glass beads, crushed limestone, super D catalyst and Leslie coal. Measurement of the void fraction during the shear testing was critical to obtain the correct tensile strength theoretically or experimentally.

  10. Wetting in Color

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Ian Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Colorimetric litmus tests such as pH paper have enjoyed wide commercial success due to their inexpensive production and exceptional ease of use. However, expansion of colorimetry to new sensing paradigms is challenging because macroscopic color changes are seldom coupled to arbitrary differences in the physical/chemical properties of a system. In this thesis I present in detail the development of Wetting in Color Technology, focusing primarily on its application as an inexpensive and highly...

  11. Wetting in Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ian Bruce

    Colorimetric litmus tests such as pH paper have enjoyed wide commercial success due to their inexpensive production and exceptional ease of use. However, expansion of colorimetry to new sensing paradigms is challenging because macroscopic color changes are seldom coupled to arbitrary differences in the physical/chemical properties of a system. In this thesis I present in detail the development of Wetting in Color Technology, focusing primarily on its application as an inexpensive and highly selective colorimetric indicator for organic liquids. The technology exploits chemically-encoded inverse-opal photonic crystals to control the infiltration of fluids to liquid-specific spatial patterns, projecting minute differences in liquids' wettability to macroscopically distinct, easy-to-visualize structural color patterns. It is shown experimentally and corroborated with theoretical modeling using percolation theory that the high selectivity of wetting, upon-which the sensitivity of the indicator relies, is caused by the highly symmetric structure of our large-area, defect-free SiO2 inverse-opals. The regular structure also produces a bright iridescent color, which disappears when infiltrated with liquid - naturally coupling the optical and fluidic responses. Surface modification protocols are developed, requiring only silanization and selective oxidation, to facilitate the deterministic design of an indicator that differentiates a broad range of liquids. The resulting tunable, built-in horizontal and vertical chemistry gradients allow the wettability threshold to be tailored to specific liquids across a continuous range, and make the readout rely only on countable color differences. As wetting is a generic fluidic phenomenon, Wetting in Color technology could be suitable for applications in authentication or identification of unknown liquids across a broad range of industries. However, the generic nature of the response also ensures chemical non-specificity. It is shown

  12. Seasonal Variations in Physicochemical Properties of Water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of some physicochemical parameters in the dam water were determined in wet and dry seasons while the concentrations of Na, K and heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn) were determined in sediment, Tilapia fish (Cichlid sp) and Cat fish (Synod onus sp) during the dry season when fishing activities were high.

  13. Seasonal variation in fish abundance and physicochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a positive correlation between fish abundance and biomass for wet and dry seasons (r = 0.60 and 0.76 respectively). There was no significant difference between fish abundance in the two seasons. Variations occurred between physico-chemical parameters of water samples. Analysis of the lagoon waters showed ...

  14. Mercury mass budget estimates and cycling seasonality in the Florida Everglades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Kalla, Peter; Scheidt, Daniel; Richards, Jennifer; Scinto, Leonard J; Gaiser, Evelyn; Appleby, Charlie

    2008-03-15

    We estimated the mass budget for mercury (Hg) seasonally deposited into the Florida Everglades and investigated seasonality of Hg cycling by analyzing data obtained for water, soil, flocculent detrital material (floc), periphyton, and mosquitofish collected throughout the Everglades freshwater marshes in the 2005 dry and wet seasons. Higher wet season total Hg (THg) in soil, floc, and periphyton agreed with greater Hg amounts entering these compartments during the wet season, probably owing to substantially greater Hg deposition in the wet season than in the dry season. Seasonal differences were absent for THg in surface water. Methylmercury (MeHg) showed mixed seasonal patterns, with higher water and soil MeHg and lower periphyton MeHg in the dry season but no seasonality for floc MeHg. Seasonal variations in Hg deposition, MeHg production and transport, and mass of ecosystem compartments could be responsible for the seasonality of MeHg cycling. Higher mosquitofish THg, higher bioaccumulation factors, and higher biomagnification factors from periphyton to mosquitofish were observed in the wet season than in the dry season, indicating that the wet season is more favorable for Hg bioaccumulation. The mass budget estimation agreed with this result.

  15. Seasonal occurrence, distribution and diversity of phytoplankton in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyclotella bodanica, C. ocellata, C. comta, Navicula sp., Gomphonema sp., Nitzschia sp. and Denticula sp. were present in all samples. Nitrate ranged from 107.5 to 129.9 mg l–1 in the wet season and from 31 to 44 mg l–1 in the dry season. Phosphate ranged from 0.04 to 0.38 mg l–1 in the wet season and from 0.03 to 0.04 ...

  16. PREFACE: Wetting: introductory note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herminghaus, S.

    2005-03-01

    The discovery of wetting as a topic of physical science dates back two hundred years, to one of the many achievements of the eminent British scholar Thomas Young. He suggested a simple equation relating the contact angle between a liquid surface and a solid substrate to the interfacial tensions involved [1], γlg cos θ = γsg - γsl (1) In modern terms, γ denotes the excess free energy per unit area of the interface indicated by its indices, with l, g and s corresponding to the liquid, gas and solid, respectively [2]. After that, wetting seems to have been largely ignored by physicists for a long time. The discovery by Gabriel Lippmann that θ may be tuned over a wide range by electrochemical means [3], and some important papers about modifications of equation~(1) due to substrate inhomogeneities [4,5] are among the rare exceptions. This changed completely during the seventies, when condensed matter physics had become enthusiastic about critical phenomena, and was vividly inspired by the development of the renormalization group by Kenneth Wilson [6]. This had solved the long standing problem of how to treat fluctuations, and to understand the universal values of bulk critical exponents. By inspection of the critical exponents of the quantities involved in equation~(1), John W Cahn discovered what he called critical point wetting: for any liquid, there should be a well-defined transition to complete wetting (i.e., θ = 0) as the critical point of the liquid is approached along the coexistence curve [7]. His paper inspired an enormous amount of further work, and may be legitimately viewed as the entrance of wetting into the realm of modern physics. Most of the publications directly following Cahn's work were theoretical papers which elaborated on wetting in relation to critical phenomena. A vast amount of interesting, and in part quite unexpected, ramifications were discovered, such as the breakdown of universality in thin film systems [8]. Simultaneously, a number

  17. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolovratník Michal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  18. SAFARI 2000 Canopy Structural Measurements, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains leaf area index (LAI), leaf inclination angle, and canopy dimension data from study sites along the Kalahari Transect in southwest Botswana....

  19. SAFARI 2000 Vegetation Cover Characteristics, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vegetation cover and composition, including species types and richness assessments, were measured at four locations along the Kalahari Transect in Botswana...

  20. SAFARI 2000 Vegetation Cover Characteristics, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Vegetation cover and composition, including species types and richness assessments, were measured at four locations along the Kalahari Transect in Botswana...

  1. Effect of supplementation on reproduction of wet season kidding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Continuous Supplementation (CS), Before Rain Supplementation (BRS) and After Rain Supplementation (ARS). Fertility rate, kidding rate, kid survival rate and doe weight at weaning were similar between the three treatments and the control. Kid birth weights did not differ between treatment groups. Doe parturition weight ...

  2. Assessment of the Growing Season over the Unimodal Rainfall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most part of Tanzania experiences unimodal rainfall. The characteristics of rainfall such as its onset and cessation dates, dry and wet spell lengths, frequency and number of rainy days can be, used to determine the nature of growing season length of growing season end of season and its geographical variation both ...

  3. Fontes suplementares de proteína para novilhos mestiços em recria em pastagens de capim-braquiária no período das águas: desempenho produtivo e econômico Protein sources in multiple supplements for finishing crossbred steers on Brachiaria pasture, in the wet season: productive and economical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlos Oliveira Porto

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o desempenho de novilhos mestiços Holandês-Zebu em fase de recria recebendo suplementação com fontes de proteína em uma área de pastagem de Brachiaria brizantha, cv. Marandu, durante o período das águas. A área foi dividida em piquetes de 1,5 ha, com disponibilidade média de matéria seca e matéria seca potencialmente digestível de 7,46 e 4,50 t/ha, respectivamente. Utilizaram-se 25 novilhos mestiços com peso e idade iniciais médios de 229 kg e 12 meses, distribuídos em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com cinco fontes de proteína e cinco repetições. As fontes de proteína testadas foram mistura mineral - grupo controle (60 g/animal; farelo de soja + farelo de algodão + mistura mineral (510 g/animal; farelo de soja + mistura mineral (460 g/animal; grão de soja triturado e mistura mineral (560 g/animal; grão de soja inteiro e mistura mineral (560 g/animal. Embora sem significância estatística, os animais que receberam suplemento múltiplo apresentaram ganho médio diário de 211 g/animal (23,78% a mais que aqueles que receberam somente mistura mineral. O uso do suplemento múltiplo à base de farelo de soja e farelo de algodão proporcionou aumento numérico de 247 g/animal em relação à mistura mineral. A suplementação com as fontes de proteína pode proporcionar ganhos adicionais durante o período das águas. A suplementação múltipla proporcionou retorno econômico, indiferentemente da fonte de proteína utilizada.The performance was evaluated of beef crossbred Holstein-Zebu steers, supplemented with different protein sources on pasture of Brachiaria brizantha, cv. Marandu, during the wet season. The area was divided into paddocks of 1.5 ha, with an availability of dry matter and potentially digestible dry matter of 7.46 and 4.50 t/ha, respectively. Twenty-five animals with 229 kg initial weight and 12 months of age were distributed in a complete randomized design, with five treatments and five

  4. Evaluation of the Acidic Wet Deposition Predictions of CMAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, R. L.

    2002-05-01

    Acidic deposition is coming back into importance as part of more encompassing multi-pollutant thinking. Acidic and nutrient deposition is an important component of new multi-pollutant legislation being considered by the Administration. The Community Multiscale Air Quality model, CMAQ, was designed to handle multiple pollutants in a one-atmosphere context. Much of the initial evaluation of CMAQ was directed at the criteria pollutants. CMAQ's predictions of acidic deposition also need to be evaluated, not only because of the importance of deposition but also because deposition sets the lifetime of fine particles in the atmosphere. The controlling deposition is wet deposition, hence, we consider it first. We compare wet deposition for selected months throughout 1990, showing that CMAQ captures the main features of seasonality. We note that the previous problem of overprediction of winter wet deposition associated with the RADM cloud parameterization has been addressed through explicit recognition of icy cloud water. We are still plagued by the difficulty of meteorological models to predict precipitation as input to chemical transport models which produces additional scatter. Interestingly, there is a consistent differential between sulfate and nitrate wet deposition, with nitrate wet deposition being slightly lower. We explore several hypotheses for this behavior, including the hypothesis that this is more an issue of mixing than an issue of cloud chemistry. In general, CMAQ appears to be producing reasonable predictions that demonstrate an improvement in our ability to predict wet deposition, although there is room for improvement.

  5. Forced wetting and hydrodynamic assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Terence D.; Fernandez-Toledano, Juan-Carlos; Doyen, Guillaume; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Wetting is a prerequisite for coating a uniform layer of liquid onto a solid. Wetting failure and air entrainment set the ultimate limit to coating speed. It is well known in the coating art that this limit can be postponed by manipulating the coating flow to generate what has been termed "hydrodynamic assist," but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Experiments have shown that the conditions that postpone air entrainment also reduce the apparent dynamic contact angle, suggesting a direct link, but how the flow might affect the contact angle remains to be established. Here, we use molecular dynamics to compare the outcome of steady forced wetting with previous results for the spontaneous spreading of liquid drops and apply the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting to rationalize our findings and place them on a quantitative footing. The forced wetting simulations reveal significant slip at the solid-liquid interface and details of the flow immediately adjacent to the moving contact line. Our results confirm that the local, microscopic contact angle is dependent not simply only on the velocity of wetting but also on the nature of the flow that drives it. In particular, they support an earlier suggestion that during forced wetting, an intense shear stress in the vicinity of the contact line can assist surface tension forces in promoting dynamic wetting, thus reducing the velocity-dependence of the contact angle. Hydrodynamic assist then appears as a natural consequence of wetting that emerges when the contact line is driven by a strong and highly confined flow. Our theoretical approach also provides a self-consistent model of molecular slip at the solid-liquid interface that enables its magnitude to be estimated from dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the model predicts how hydrodynamic assist and slip may be influenced by liquid viscosity and solid-liquid interactions.

  6. Source identification of total mercury (TM) wet deposition using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yong-Seok; Han, Young-Ji; Holsen, Thomas M.; Choi, Eunhwa; Zoh, Kyung-Duk; Yi, Seung-Muk

    2015-03-01

    Event-based precipitation samples for total mercury (TM) were collected with a modified MIC-B sampler concurrent with atmospheric gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and particulate bound mercury (PBM) concentrations in Seoul, Korea from January 2006 to December 2009 to: 1) determine the seasonal variations in TM wet deposition, 2) investigate contributions of GOM and PBM scavenging to mercury wet deposition, and 3) identify source areas contributing to the high TM wet deposition using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM). The volume-weighted mean (VWM) TM concentration was highest in winter, while the wet deposition flux was highest in summer. Multiple linear regression showed that the scavenging coefficient (SC) for GOM was much higher than the SC for PBM indicating that GOM was more effectively scavenged by wet deposition than PBM. Joint-probability LPDM (JP-LPDM) indicated that the main sources of TM wet deposition were the industrial and coastal areas in China and Japan.

  7. Contrasting patterns of litterfall seasonality and seasonal changes in litter decomposability in a tropical rainforest region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, S. A.; Valdez-Ramirez, V.; Congdon, R. A.; Williams, S. E.

    2014-09-01

    The seasonality of litter inputs in forests has important implications for understanding ecosystem processes and biogeochemical cycles. We quantified the drivers of seasonality in litterfall and leaf decomposability using plots throughout the Australian wet tropical region. Litter fell mostly in the summer (wet, warm) months in the region, but other peaks occurred throughout the year. Litterfall seasonality was modelled well with the level of deciduousness of the site (plots with more deciduous species had lower seasonality than evergreen plots), temperature (higher seasonality in the uplands), disturbance (lower seasonality with more early secondary species) and soil fertility (higher seasonality with higher N : P/P limitation) (SL total litterfall model 1 = deciduousness + soil N : P + early secondary sp.: r2 = 0.63, n = 30; model 2 = temperature + early secondary sp. + soil N : P: r2 = 0.54, n = 30; SL leaf = temperature + early secondary sp. + rainfall seasonality: r2 = 0.39, n = 30). Leaf litter decomposability was lower in the dry season than in the wet season, driven by higher phenolic concentrations in the dry, with the difference exacerbated particularly by lower dry season moisture. Our results are contrary to the global trend for tropical rainforests; in that seasonality of litterfall input was generally higher in wetter, cooler, evergreen forests, compared to generally drier, warmer, semi-deciduous sites that had more uniform monthly inputs. We consider this due to more diverse litter shedding patterns in semi-deciduous and raingreen rainforest sites, and an important consideration for ecosystem modellers. Seasonal changes in litter quality are likely to have impacts on decomposition and biogeochemical cycles in these forests due to the litter that falls in the dry season being more recalcitrant to decay.

  8. Stochastic Approach in Wet Snow Detection Using Multitemporal SAR Data

    OpenAIRE

    Besic, Nikola; Vasile, Gabriel; Dedieu, Jean-Pierre; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Stankovic, Srdjan

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper introduces an alternative strategy for wet snow detection using multitemporal SAR data. The proposed change detection method is primarily based on the comparison between two X band SAR images acquired during the accumulation (winter) and the melting (spring) seasons, in the French Alps. The new decision criterion relies on the local intensity statistics of the SAR images by considering the backscattering ratio as a stochastic process: the probability that "t...

  9. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra

    2016-11-28

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid \\'marbles\\' with molecularly thin graphene.

  10. Surface structure determines dynamic wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Junichiro; Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Cannon, James; Yue, Feng; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting, the spontaneous spreading process after droplet contacts a solid surface, is important in various engineering processes, such as in printing, coating, and lubrication. In the recent years, experiments and numerical simulations have greatly progressed the understanding in the dynamic wetting particularly on ``flat'' substrates. To gain further insight into the governing physics of the dynamic wetting, we perform droplet-wetting experiments on microstructured surfaces, just a few micrometers in size, with complementary numerical simulations, and investigate the dependence of the spreading rate on the microstructure geometries and fluid properties. We reveal that the influence of microstructures can be quantified in terms of a line friction coefficient for the energy dissipation rate at the contact line, and that this can be described in a simple formula in terms of the geometrical parameters of the roughness and the line-friction coefficient of the planar surface. The systematic study is also of practical importance since structures and roughness are omnipresent and their influence on spreading rate would give us additional degrees of freedom to control the dynamic wetting. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (J.W., J.C., and J.S) and Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (M.D.-Q. and G.A.).

  11. Seasonal evaluation of groundwater quality around Igando ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: Correlation and Multiple linear regression analysis was used to establish the degree of relationship and variability of groundwater quality parameters around Solous 1 and 2 Dumpsites, in Igando, Lagos, for the wet and the dry seasons. The correlation between TDS and other hydrochemical parameters which.

  12. Seasonal evaluation of groundwater quality around Igando ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correlation and Multiple linear regression analysis was used to establish the degree of relationship and variability of groundwater quality parameters around Solous 1 and 2 Dumpsites, in Igando, Lagos, for the wet and the dry seasons. The correlation between TDS and other hydrochemical parameters which constituted ...

  13. Seasonal differences in leaf-level physiology give lianas a competitive advantage over trees in a tropical seasonal forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhi-Quan; Schnitzer, Stefan A; Bongers, Frans

    2009-08-01

    Lianas are an important component of most tropical forests, where they vary in abundance from high in seasonal forests to low in seasonal forests. We tested the hypothesis that the physiological ability of lianas to fix carbon (and thus grow) during seasonal drought may confer a distinct advantage in seasonal tropical forests, which may explain pan-tropical liana distributions. We compared a range of leaf-level physiological attributes of 18 co-occurring liana and 16 tree species during the wet and dry seasons in a tropical seasonal forest in Xishuangbanna, China. We found that, during the wet season, lianas had significantly higher CO(2) assimilation per unit mass (A(mass)), nitrogen concentration (N(mass)), and delta(13)C values, and lower leaf mass per unit area (LMA) than trees, indicating that lianas have higher assimilation rates per unit leaf mass and higher integrated water-use efficiency (WUE), but lower leaf structural investments. Seasonal variation in CO(2) assimilation per unit area (A(area)), phosphorus concentration per unit mass (P(mass)), and photosynthetic N-use efficiency (PNUE), however, was significantly lower in lianas than in trees. For instance, mean tree A(area) decreased by 30.1% from wet to dry season, compared with only 12.8% for lianas. In contrast, from the wet to dry season mean liana delta(13)C increased four times more than tree delta(13)C, with no reduction in PNUE, whereas trees had a significant reduction in PNUE. Lianas had higher A(mass) than trees throughout the year, regardless of season. Collectively, our findings indicate that lianas fix more carbon and use water and nitrogen more efficiently than trees, particularly during seasonal drought, which may confer a competitive advantage to lianas during the dry season, and thus may explain their high relative abundance in seasonal tropical forests.

  14. Seasonal impact on phyto-accumulation potentials of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    osuocha uzoma

    Seasonal impact on soil trace metals and phytoaccumulation potentials of Cucurbita pepo, Cucumis ... mining activities are sources of environmental pollution .... Table 1. level of trace metals in quarry mining effluent discharge soils in wet season(mg/kg). Location. Site. Lead. Cadmium. Chromium. Nickel. Manganese. Zinc.

  15. Seasonal Population Dynamics of Rodents of Mount Chilalo, Arsi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study on seasonal population dynamics of rodents was carried out on Mount Chilalo from August, 2007 to April, 2008. Six habitats, namely grassland, bush land, montane forest, Erica forest, Afroalpine forest and moor land were identified to carry out live and snap trapping during wet and dry seasons in randomly selected ...

  16. Seasonal variation in physico-chemical properties of groundwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parameters analysed are temperature, turbidity, TDS, TSS, pH, DO, BOD, total hardness, conductivity, iron content, nitrate, sulphate, E.coli and faecal streptococci. Result of the analyses showed that all the parameters have higher concentration during the wet season than in the dry season in all the Groups, except for BOD, ...

  17. Geographical distribution and seasonal variation of the vectors of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The range of each species was influenced by seasonal climatic changes in wind movement, and river water level. S. damnosum and S. squamosum were recorded from all the bioclimatic zones although they were more frequently observed in the dry season samples than in the wet. S. yahense was found breeding in the ...

  18. Assessment of the Growing Season Regime Region of Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cessation dates, dry and wet spell lengths, frequency and number of rainy days can be, used to determine the nature of growing season; length of ... Key words: Agrometeorology, dry spells: growing season, Tanzania, unimodal rainfall. Introduction ..... most statistical' text books and in Okoola and. Salano (2002). Positive ...

  19. Nigerian Journal of Chemical Research Vol. 20, 2015 39 Seasonal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr M Waziri

    The levels of some physicochemical parameters in the dam water were determined in wet and dry seasons while the concentrations of Na, K and heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Pb,. Zn) were determined in sediment, Tilapia fish (Cichlid sp) and Cat fish (Synod onus sp) during the dry season when fishing activities were high.

  20. Fontes de energia em suplementos múltiplos de auto-regulação de consumo na recria de novilhos mestiços em pastagens de Brachiaria decumbens durante o período das águas Energy sources in multiple supplements of self-feed of growing crossbred steers at pastures of Brachiaria Decumbens in wet season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Fonseca Paulino

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o efeito de diferentes fontes energéticas em suplementos múltiplos de auto-regulação de consumo sobre o ganho médio diário (GMD, ganho de peso total (GPT, pH e a concentração de amônia ruminal em novilhos recriados em pastejo no período das águas. Foram avaliados suplementos contendo grão de milho moído (GMM, milho desintegrado com palha e sabugo (MDPS, sorgo moído (SM e tratamento controle (mistura mineral - MM. Utilizaram-se 16 novilhos mestiços Holandês-Zebu, não-castrados, com 12 meses de idade e peso médio inicial de 265 kg para avaliar o desempenho. Os parâmetros ruminais foram obtidos utilizando-se quatro novilhos mestiços Holandês-Zebu fistulados no rúmen. O pH do líquido ruminal variou de 6,43 a 6,62 (média de 6,55, não sendo influenciado pelas quantidades de sal e de suplemento consumidas. As concentrações de amônia foram de 9,61; 25,71; 24,45 e 26,04 mg/dL, respectivamente para os tratamentos MM, GMM, MDPS, SM. Não se verificou diferença entre os tratamentos, contudo o suplemento MDPS proporcionou ganhos adicionais em torno de 220 g/animal/dia. Maiores concentrações de amônia ruminal foram observadas nos animais suplementados.The effect of different energy sources in multiple supplements of self-feed on the average daily gain (ADG, total weight gain (TWG, pH and ruminal ammonia concentration of steers grazed at pasture in the wet season was evaluated. Treatments were supplements containing ground corn grain (GCG, corn, ears and cob (CEC, ground sorghum (GS and control treatment (mineral mix - MM. Sixteen crossbreed steers with initial age and weight of 12 months old and 265 kg were used. Ruminal parameters were obtained from four crossbreed steers fistulated in the rumen. The pH values ranged from 6.43 to 6.62, with an average of 6.55 not having effect for the amounts of salt and supplement consumed. Concentrations were 9.61, 25.71, 24.45 and 26.04 mg/dL, respectively, for MM, GCG

  1. Seasonal Variation of Water Quality and Phytoplankton Response Patterns in Daya Bay, China

    OpenAIRE

    Yan-Ying Zhang; Fu-Lin Sun; Yu-Tu Wang; Jun-De Dong; Cui-Ci Sun; You-Shao Wang; Mei-Lin Wu

    2011-01-01

    Data collected from 12 stations in Daya Bay in different seasons in 2002 revealed the relation between water quality and phytoplankton response patterns. The results showed that Daya Bay could be divided into wet and dry seasons by multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis indicated that temperature, chlorophyll a and nutrients were important components during the wet season (summer and autumn). The salinity and dissolved oxygen were the main environmental factors in the...

  2. Hydrologic behavior of two engineered barriers following extreme wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, I

    2001-01-01

    Many engineered barriers are expected to function for hundreds of years or longer. Over the course of time, it is likely that some barriers will experience infiltration to the point of breakthrough. This study compares the recovery from breakthrough of two storage-evapotranspiration type engineered barriers. Replicates of test plots comprising thick soil and capillary-biobarrier covers were wetted to breakthrough in 1997. Test plots were kept cleared of vegetation to maximize hydrologic stress during recovery. Following cessation of drainage resulting from the wetting irrigations, water storage levels in all plots were at elevated levels compared with pre-irrigation levels. As a result, infiltration of melting snow during the subsequent spring overloaded the storage capacity and produced drainage in all plots. Relatively rapid melting of accumulated snowfall produced the most significant infiltration events each year during the study. Capillary barriers yielded less total drainage than thick soil barriers. By limiting drainage, capillary barriers increased water storage in the upper portions of the test plots, which led to increased evaporation from the capillary barrier plots compared with thick soil plots. Increased evaporation in the capillary barrier plots allowed more water to infiltrate in the second season following the wetting tests without triggering drainage. All thick soil plots again yielded drainage in the second season. Within two years of intentionally induced breakthrough, evaporation alone (without transpiration) restored the capability of the capillary barrier covers to function as intended, although water storage in these covers remained at elevated levels.

  3. Simulations of tropical rainforest albedo: is canopy wetness important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Silvia N M; Costa, Marcos H

    2011-12-01

    Accurate information on surface albedo is essential for climate modelling, especially for regions such as Amazonia, where the response of the regional atmospheric circulation to the changes on surface albedo is strong. Previous studies have indicated that models are still unable to correctly reproduce details of the seasonal variation of surface albedo. Therefore, it was investigated the role of canopy wetness on the simulated albedo of a tropical rainforest by modifying the IBIS canopy radiation transfer code to incorporate the effects of canopy wetness on the vegetation reflectance. In this study, simulations were run using three versions of the land surface/ecosystem model IBIS: the standard version, the same version recalibrated to fit the data of albedo on tropical rainforests and a modified version that incorporates the effects of canopy wetness on surface albedo, for three sites in the Amazon forest at hourly and monthly scales. The results demonstrated that, at the hourly time scale, the incorporation of canopy wetness on the calculations of radiative transfer substantially improves the simulations results, whereas at the monthly scale these changes do not substantially modify the simulated albedo.

  4. Simulations of tropical rainforest albedo: is canopy wetness important?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia N.M. Yanagi

    Full Text Available Accurate information on surface albedo is essential for climate modelling, especially for regions such as Amazonia, where the response of the regional atmospheric circulation to the changes on surface albedo is strong. Previous studies have indicated that models are still unable to correctly reproduce details of the seasonal variation of surface albedo. Therefore, it was investigated the role of canopy wetness on the simulated albedo of a tropical rainforest by modifying the IBIS canopy radiation transfer code to incorporate the effects of canopy wetness on the vegetation reflectance. In this study, simulations were run using three versions of the land surface/ecosystem model IBIS: the standard version, the same version recalibrated to fit the data of albedo on tropical rainforests and a modified version that incorporates the effects of canopy wetness on surface albedo, for three sites in the Amazon forest at hourly and monthly scales. The results demonstrated that, at the hourly time scale, the incorporation of canopy wetness on the calculations of radiative transfer substantially improves the simulations results, whereas at the monthly scale these changes do not substantially modify the simulated albedo.

  5. Five-year records of mercury wet deposition flux at GMOS sites in the Northern and Southern hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprovieri, Francesca; Pirrone, Nicola; Bencardino, Mariantonia; D'Amore, Francesco; Angot, Helene; Barbante, Carlo; Brunke, Ernst-Günther; Arcega-Cabrera, Flor; Cairns, Warren; Comero, Sara; Diéguez, María del Carmen; Dommergue, Aurélien; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Feng, Xin Bin; Fu, Xuewu; Garcia, Patricia Elizabeth; Gawlik, Bernd Manfred; Hageström, Ulla; Hansson, Katarina; Horvat, Milena; Kotnik, Jože; Labuschagne, Casper; Magand, Olivier; Martin, Lynwill; Mashyanov, Nikolay; Mkololo, Thumeka; Munthe, John; Obolkin, Vladimir; Ramirez Islas, Martha; Sena, Fabrizio; Somerset, Vernon; Spandow, Pia; Vardè, Massimiliano; Walters, Chavon; Wängberg, Ingvar; Weigelt, Andreas; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Hui

    2017-02-01

    The atmospheric deposition of mercury (Hg) occurs via several mechanisms, including dry and wet scavenging by precipitation events. In an effort to understand the atmospheric cycling and seasonal depositional characteristics of Hg, wet deposition samples were collected for approximately 5 years at 17 selected GMOS monitoring sites located in the Northern and Southern hemispheres in the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project. Total mercury (THg) exhibited annual and seasonal patterns in Hg wet deposition samples. Interannual differences in total wet deposition are mostly linked with precipitation volume, with the greatest deposition flux occurring in the wettest years. This data set provides a new insight into baseline concentrations of THg concentrations in precipitation worldwide, particularly in regions such as the Southern Hemisphere and tropical areas where wet deposition as well as atmospheric Hg species were not investigated before, opening the way for future and additional simultaneous measurements across the GMOS network as well as new findings in future modeling studies.

  6. Vegetation response to rainfall seasonality and interannual variability in tropical dry forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Silva Souza, R. M.; Souza, E.; Antonino, A.; Montenegro, S.; Porporato, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed the response of tropical dry forests to seasonal and interannual rainfall variability, focusing on the caatinga biome in semi-arid in Northeast Brazil. We selected four sites across a gradient of rainfall amount and seasonality and analyzed daily rainfall and biweekly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in the period 2000-2014. The seasonal and interannual rainfall statistics were characterized using recently developed metrics describing duration, location, and intensity of wet season and compared them with those of NDVI time series and modelled soil moisture. A model of NDVI was also developed and forced by different rainfall scenarios (combination amount of rainfall and duration of wet season). The results show that the caatinga tends to have a more stable response characterized by longer and less variable growing seasons (of duration 3.1±0.1 months) compared to the rainfall wet seasons (2.0±0.5 months). Even for more extreme rainfall conditions, the ecosystem shows very little sensitivity to duration of wet season in relation to the amount of rainfall, however the duration of wet season is most evident for wetter sites. This ability of the ecosystem in buffering the interannual variability of rainfall is corroborated by the stability of the centroid location of the growing season compared to the wet season for all sites. The maximal biomass production was observed at intermediate levels of seasonality, suggesting a possible interesting trade-off in the effects of intensity (i.e., amount) and duration of the wet season on vegetation growth.

  7. Wet water glass production plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant of a capacity of 75,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE, Italy, in 1997. and 1998, increasing detergent zeolite production, from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate dissolution plant. The main goal was increasing the detergent zeolite production. The technological cycle of NaOH was closed, and no effluents emitted, and there is no pollution (except for the filter cake. The wet water glass production process is fully automatized, and the product has uniform quality. The production process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start - up, and repairs. By installing additional process equipment (centrifugal pumps and heat exchangers technological bottlenecks were overcome, and by adjusting the operation of autoclaves, and water glass filters and also by optimizing the capacities of process equipment.

  8. Different regimes of dynamic wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustav, Amberg; Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Shiomi, Junichiro; Physiochemical fluid mechanics Team; Maruyama-Chiashi Laboratory Team

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting, as observed when a droplet contacts a dry solid surface, is important in various engineering processes, such as printing, coating, and lubrication. Our overall aim is to investigate if and how the detailed properties of the solid surface influence the dynamics of wetting. Here we discuss how surface roughness influences the initial dynamic spreading of a partially wetting droplet by studying the spreading on a solid substrate patterned with microstructures just a few micrometers in size. This is complemented by matching numerical simulations. We present a parameter map, based on the properties of the liquid and the solid surface, which identifies qualitatively different spreading regimes, where the spreading speed is limited by either the liquid viscosity, the surface properties, or the liquid inertia. The peculiarities of the different spreading regimes are studied by detailed numerical simulations, in conjuction with experiments. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (J.W. and J.S) and Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (M.D.-Q. and G.A).

  9. Evapotranspiration seasonality across the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiji Maeda, Eduardo; Ma, Xuanlong; Wagner, Fabien Hubert; Kim, Hyungjun; Oki, Taikan; Eamus, Derek; Huete, Alfredo

    2017-06-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) of Amazon forests is a main driver of regional climate patterns and an important indicator of ecosystem functioning. Despite its importance, the seasonal variability of ET over Amazon forests, and its relationship with environmental drivers, is still poorly understood. In this study, we carry out a water balance approach to analyse seasonal patterns in ET and their relationships with water and energy drivers over five sub-basins across the Amazon Basin. We used in situ measurements of river discharge, and remotely sensed estimates of terrestrial water storage, rainfall, and solar radiation. We show that the characteristics of ET seasonality in all sub-basins differ in timing and magnitude. The highest mean annual ET was found in the northern Rio Negro basin (˜ 1497 mm year-1) and the lowest values in the Solimões River basin (˜ 986 mm year-1). For the first time in a basin-scale study, using observational data, we show that factors limiting ET vary across climatic gradients in the Amazon, confirming local-scale eddy covariance studies. Both annual mean and seasonality in ET are driven by a combination of energy and water availability, as neither rainfall nor radiation alone could explain patterns in ET. In southern basins, despite seasonal rainfall deficits, deep root water uptake allows increasing rates of ET during the dry season, when radiation is usually higher than in the wet season. We demonstrate contrasting ET seasonality with satellite greenness across Amazon forests, with strong asynchronous relationships in ever-wet watersheds, and positive correlations observed in seasonally dry watersheds. Finally, we compared our results with estimates obtained by two ET models, and we conclude that neither of the two tested models could provide a consistent representation of ET seasonal patterns across the Amazon.

  10. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  11. Coastal Freshwater Wetland Plant Community Response to Seasonal Drought and Flooding in Northwestern Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    In tropical wet-dry climates, seasonal hydrologic cycles drive wetland plant community change and produce distinct seasonal plant assemblages. In this study, we examined the plant community response to seasonal flooding and drought in a large coastal freshwater wetland in northwe...

  12. Mold management of wetted carpet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kee-Hean; Dixit, Anupma; Lewis, Roger D; MacDonald Perkins, Maureen; Backer, Denis; Condoor, Sridhar; Emo, Brett; Yang, Mingan

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the growth and removal of fungi on wetted carpet using newly designed technologies that rely on physical principles of steam, heat, and fluid flow. Sixty samples of carpet were embedded with heat-treated house dust, followed by embedding, wearing with a hexapod, and wetting. Samples were inoculated using a liquid suspension of Cladosporium sphaerospermum prior to placement over a water-saturated foam pad. Incubation times were 24 hr, 7 days, and 30 days. Cleaning was performed using three methods; high-flow hot water extraction, hot water and detergent, and steam. Fungal loading increased from approximately 1500 colony forming units per area (CFU/cm(2)) in 24 hr to a maximum of approximately 10,200 CFU/cm(2) after 7 days with a slight decline to 9700 CFU/cm(2) after 30 days incubation. Statistically significant differences were found among all three methods for removal of fungi for all three time periods (p mold spore decline from wetted carpet after 24 hr and 30 days, and over 92% efficiency after 7 days. The alternative methods exhibited lower efficiencies with a decline over time, from a maximum of 82% and 81% at 24 hr down to 60% and 43% at 30 days for detergent-hot water and high-flow, hot water extraction, respectively. The net effect of the mold management study demonstrates that while steam has a consistent fungal removal rate, the detergent and high-flow, hot water methods decline in efficiency with increasing incubation time.

  13. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  14. Wet/Dry Vacuum Cleaner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Harold; Andampour, Jay; Kunitser, Craig; Thomas, Ike

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum cleaner collects and retains dust, wet debris, and liquids. Designed for housekeeping on Space Station Freedom, it functions equally well in normal Earth Gravity or in microgravity. Generates acoustic noise at comfortably low levels and includes circuitry that reduces electromagnetic interference to other electronic equipment. Draws materials into bag made of hydrophobic sheet with layers of hydrophilic super-absorbing pads at downstream end material. Hydrophilic material can gel many times its own weight of liquid. Blower also provides secondary airflow to cool its electronic components.

  15. The Limnological Status of an Old Intermitent Pond during the Wet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The limnological status of an intermitent borrow pit pond in Ekpoma, Edo State of Nigeria was studied between June and September 2005 (wet season). In situ measurements of temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, transparency and total dissolved solids (TDS) were recorded together with the dissolved oxygen (DO), ...

  16. Managing Your Seasonal Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Seasonal Allergies Managing Your Seasonal Allergies Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table ... decongestants, or immunotherapy. Read More "Seasonal Allergies" Articles Managing Your Seasonal Allergies / Diagnosis, Treatment & Research Spring 2015 ...

  17. Elucidating the mysteries of wetting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Sackinger, Philip A.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Emerson, John Allen; Ash, Benjamin Jesse; Heine, David R.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Gorby, Allen D.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly every manufacturing and many technologies central to Sandia's business involve physical processes controlled by interfacial wetting. Interfacial forces, e.g. conjoining/disjoining pressure, electrostatics, and capillary condensation, are ubiquitous and can surpass and even dominate bulk inertial or viscous effects on a continuum level. Moreover, the statics and dynamics of three-phase contact lines exhibit a wide range of complex behavior, such as contact angle hysteresis due to surface roughness, surface reaction, or compositional heterogeneities. These thermodynamically and kinetically driven interactions are essential to the development of new materials and processes. A detailed understanding was developed for the factors controlling wettability in multicomponent systems from computational modeling tools, and experimental diagnostics for systems, and processes dominated by interfacial effects. Wettability probed by dynamic advancing and receding contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and direct determination of the capillary and disjoining forces. Molecular scale experiments determined the relationships between the fundamental interactions between molecular species and with the substrate. Atomistic simulations studied the equilibrium concentration profiles near the solid and vapor interfaces and tested the basic assumptions used in the continuum approaches. These simulations provide guidance in developing constitutive equations, which more accurately take into account the effects of surface induced phase separation and concentration gradients near the three-phase contact line. The development of these accurate models for dynamic multicomponent wetting allows improvement in science based engineering of manufacturing processes previously developed through costly trial and error by varying material formulation and geometry modification.

  18. Skid resistance determination for pavement management and wet-weather road safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.F. Fwa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Road accidents during wet weather have been a topic of major concern of road engineers in regions of wet-tropical climate and in other parts of the world during the wet season of the year. Road safety studies indicate that approximately 20% of all road accidents occurred during wet weather, and that the skid resistance of wet pavements have a major influence on the occurrences of wet-weather accidents. Monitoring of wet pavement skid resistance has been an integral part of a typical pavement management system. However, because of the lack of prediction capability of pavement skid resistance under various rainfall intensities, the minimum skid resistance threshold for safe wet-weather driving has been specified by highway agencies based on either engineering judgement or past experience. It is shown in this paper that the single-point minimum skid resistance threshold is inadequate to offer a complete description of the skid resistance performance of the pavement sections in question for effective management of a road network. It is unable to assess the risk involved in an actual wet-weather condition where the pavement surface water-film thickness and vehicle speed are different from standard test conditions. This limitation of the current system of specifying a minimum skid resistance threshold can be overcome by adopting a theoretically sound approach to represent pavement skid resistance under different conditions of water-film thickness and vehicle speed. This paper describes the theoretical basis of the approach and the development of a mechanistically derived three-dimensional finite-element skid resistance simulation model to predict skid resistance. The application of the proposed approach and the skid resistance prediction procedure in pavement management system and wet-weather driving safety assessment is presented.

  19. Stochastic soil water balance under seasonal climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Porporato, Amilcare; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2015-02-08

    The analysis of soil water partitioning in seasonally dry climates necessarily requires careful consideration of the periodic climatic forcing at the intra-annual timescale in addition to daily scale variabilities. Here, we introduce three new extensions to a stochastic soil moisture model which yields seasonal evolution of soil moisture and relevant hydrological fluxes. These approximations allow seasonal climatic forcings (e.g. rainfall and potential evapotranspiration) to be fully resolved, extending the analysis of soil water partitioning to account explicitly for the seasonal amplitude and the phase difference between the climatic forcings. The results provide accurate descriptions of probabilistic soil moisture dynamics under seasonal climates without requiring extensive numerical simulations. We also find that the transfer of soil moisture between the wet to the dry season is responsible for hysteresis in the hydrological response, showing asymmetrical trajectories in the mean soil moisture and in the transient Budyko's curves during the 'dry-down' versus the 'rewetting' phases of the year. Furthermore, in some dry climates where rainfall and potential evapotranspiration are in-phase, annual evapotranspiration can be shown to increase because of inter-seasonal soil moisture transfer, highlighting the importance of soil water storage in the seasonal context.

  20. Erosional nitrogen losses in a geomorphologically dynamic wet tropical watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, S. R.; Stallard, R. F.; Taylor, P.; Asner, G. P.; Townsend, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In erosion-prone watersheds, the loss of nutrients associated with eroding topsoil can be substantial. Previous studies in a geomorphologically dynamic wet-tropical study site demonstrated elevated nitrogen availability, characterized by larger nitrate pools, higher 15-N enrichment, and higher rates of net and potential nitrification, on stable ridge-tops compared to N-poor steep hillslopes. In the current study, we sought to test whether these pronounced differences in N availability were correlated with spatial patterns of erosional N-export. In order to characterize N transport patterns within a small (12-hectare) forested watershed, we buried Gerlach troughs at approximately 15-meter intervals along a 100-meter long study hillslope, beginning at the ridge-slope break and continuing downslope toward the stream. We recovered and analyzed all soil, water, and detritus collected by these troughs over the course of one year and concurrently monitored rainfall and stream discharge. We also measured soil mineralogy, texture, and permeability (Ksat) at the topographic locations where troughs were installed. We observed distinct patterns in the nature and timing of downslope N transport, with shifts in the contribution of dissolved versus particulate losses both across the hillslope and with intensification of wet-season precipitation. Unlike the flat ridge-top, steeper downslope segments exported a substantial amount of N during the late wet season, approximately 85% of which was in particulate form. These slope fluxes help account for much of the watershed- scale losses of > 10 kg particulate N per hectare per year, quantified in a nearby stream. Soil mineralogic and hydraulic characteristics varied in concert with general N export patterns, implying different degrees of soil stability and the dominance of different soil water flowpaths in steeper versus flatter areas. In this forested landscape, geomorphic position determines overland N fluxes and likely couples N

  1. Differential wetting characterization of hair fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaynberg, Abe; Stuart, Mark; Wu, Xiang-Fa

    2012-01-01

    Surface wetting is one of the key properties of human hair used to indicate the extent of chemical/mechanical damage and the outcome of conditioning treatment. Characterization of hair wetting property is a challenging task due to the non-homogeneous nature of hair fibers and the requirement for sensitive equipment. Motivated by these considerations, we developed a new methodology, termed a differential wetting characterization (DWC), which would allow rapid and reliable characterization of the wetting property of hair fibers. This method is based on observation of a number of droplets suspended on a pair of parallel fibers stretched in a horizontal plane. The wetting behavior of the fibers can be deduced from the shape assumed by the droplets. When the wetting properties of the two hair fibers are identical, the droplets suspended between the fibers assume a symmetric configuration. In contrast, on the fibers with dissimilar wetting characteristics, the droplets will assume a skewed configuration towards a more hydrophilic fiber. This makes it possible to differentiate the hydrophobicities of the tested fibers. In this paper it is demonstrated that the proposed DWC method is capable of differentiating the changes in wetting property of hair surfaces in response to either chemical or physical treatment. Results of the paper indicate that the DWC method is applicable for broad wetting differentiation of various fibers.

  2. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  3. Seasonality of Fire Weather Strongly Influences Fire Regimes in South Florida Savanna-Grassland Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, William J.; Orzell, Steve L.; Slocum, Matthew G.

    2015-01-01

    Fire seasonality, an important characteristic of fire regimes, commonly is delineated using seasons based on single weather variables (rainfall or temperature). We used nonparametric cluster analyses of a 17-year (1993–2009) data set of weather variables that influence likelihoods and spread of fires (relative humidity, air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, soil moisture) to explore seasonality of fire in pine savanna-grassland landscapes at the Avon Park Air Force Range in southern Florida. A four-variable, three-season model explained more variation within fire weather variables than models with more seasons. The three-season model also delineated intra-annual timing of fire more accurately than a conventional rainfall-based two-season model. Two seasons coincided roughly with dry and wet seasons based on rainfall. The third season, which we labeled the fire season, occurred between dry and wet seasons and was characterized by fire-promoting conditions present annually: drought, intense solar radiation, low humidity, and warm air temperatures. Fine fuels consisting of variable combinations of pyrogenic pine needles, abundant C4 grasses, and flammable shrubs, coupled with low soil moisture, and lightning ignitions early in the fire season facilitate natural landscape-scale wildfires that burn uplands and across wetlands. We related our three season model to fires with different ignition sources (lightning, military missions, and prescribed fires) over a 13-year period with fire records (1997–2009). Largest wildfires originate from lightning and military ignitions that occur within the early fire season substantially prior to the peak of lightning strikes in the wet season. Prescribed ignitions, in contrast, largely occur outside the fire season. Our delineation of a pronounced fire season provides insight into the extent to which different human-derived fire regimes mimic lightning fire regimes. Delineation of a fire season associated with timing of

  4. Seasonality of fire weather strongly influences fire regimes in South Florida savanna-grassland landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Platt

    Full Text Available Fire seasonality, an important characteristic of fire regimes, commonly is delineated using seasons based on single weather variables (rainfall or temperature. We used nonparametric cluster analyses of a 17-year (1993-2009 data set of weather variables that influence likelihoods and spread of fires (relative humidity, air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, soil moisture to explore seasonality of fire in pine savanna-grassland landscapes at the Avon Park Air Force Range in southern Florida. A four-variable, three-season model explained more variation within fire weather variables than models with more seasons. The three-season model also delineated intra-annual timing of fire more accurately than a conventional rainfall-based two-season model. Two seasons coincided roughly with dry and wet seasons based on rainfall. The third season, which we labeled the fire season, occurred between dry and wet seasons and was characterized by fire-promoting conditions present annually: drought, intense solar radiation, low humidity, and warm air temperatures. Fine fuels consisting of variable combinations of pyrogenic pine needles, abundant C4 grasses, and flammable shrubs, coupled with low soil moisture, and lightning ignitions early in the fire season facilitate natural landscape-scale wildfires that burn uplands and across wetlands. We related our three season model to fires with different ignition sources (lightning, military missions, and prescribed fires over a 13-year period with fire records (1997-2009. Largest wildfires originate from lightning and military ignitions that occur within the early fire season substantially prior to the peak of lightning strikes in the wet season. Prescribed ignitions, in contrast, largely occur outside the fire season. Our delineation of a pronounced fire season provides insight into the extent to which different human-derived fire regimes mimic lightning fire regimes. Delineation of a fire season associated with

  5. Seasonality of fire weather strongly influences fire regimes in South Florida savanna-grassland landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, William J; Orzell, Steve L; Slocum, Matthew G

    2015-01-01

    Fire seasonality, an important characteristic of fire regimes, commonly is delineated using seasons based on single weather variables (rainfall or temperature). We used nonparametric cluster analyses of a 17-year (1993-2009) data set of weather variables that influence likelihoods and spread of fires (relative humidity, air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, soil moisture) to explore seasonality of fire in pine savanna-grassland landscapes at the Avon Park Air Force Range in southern Florida. A four-variable, three-season model explained more variation within fire weather variables than models with more seasons. The three-season model also delineated intra-annual timing of fire more accurately than a conventional rainfall-based two-season model. Two seasons coincided roughly with dry and wet seasons based on rainfall. The third season, which we labeled the fire season, occurred between dry and wet seasons and was characterized by fire-promoting conditions present annually: drought, intense solar radiation, low humidity, and warm air temperatures. Fine fuels consisting of variable combinations of pyrogenic pine needles, abundant C4 grasses, and flammable shrubs, coupled with low soil moisture, and lightning ignitions early in the fire season facilitate natural landscape-scale wildfires that burn uplands and across wetlands. We related our three season model to fires with different ignition sources (lightning, military missions, and prescribed fires) over a 13-year period with fire records (1997-2009). Largest wildfires originate from lightning and military ignitions that occur within the early fire season substantially prior to the peak of lightning strikes in the wet season. Prescribed ignitions, in contrast, largely occur outside the fire season. Our delineation of a pronounced fire season provides insight into the extent to which different human-derived fire regimes mimic lightning fire regimes. Delineation of a fire season associated with timing of

  6. The physical origins of rapid soil CO2 release following wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus; Grahm, Lina; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    A rainfall event after an extended dry period is known to produce large spikes in CO2 release from soil, a phenomenon referred to as the "Birch effect". The Birch effect is commonly attributed to biological factors, such as the rapid activation of dormant microbial populations and stimulation of soil organic carbon turnover. Evidence suggests that CO2 emissions set in at time scales too short for microbial activation and growth (seconds to minutes after onset of wetting). We conducted controlled wetting experiments on sterilized soil in the lab showing CO2 efflux dynamics that are consistent in magnitude with those reported in field studies (up to 4 mmol m-2 s-1 per mm of precipitation). The explanation proposed is purely physical, involving desorption of CO2 from soil surfaces as it is replaced by the more polar water during wetting. We present experimental results and a CO2 adsorption and desorption model that lend credence to the notion that a large fraction of the early soil CO2 emission during wetting (minutes to an hour) is associated with physical processes independent of microbial activity. This suggests that a significant amount of atmospheric CO2 becomes bound to soil surfaces during dry seasons and is rapidly released at the onset of wet seasons world-wide, irrespective of the soil organic carbon cycle.

  7. Defined wetting properties of optical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felde, Nadja; Coriand, Luisa; Schröder, Sven; Duparré, Angela; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Optical surfaces equipped with specific functional properties have attracted increasing importance over the last decades. In the light of cost reduction, hydrophobic self-cleaning behavior is aspired. On the other side, hydrophilic properties are interesting due to their anti-fog effect. It has become well known that such wetting states are significantly affected by the surface morphology. For optical surfaces, however, this fact poses a problem, as surface roughness can induce light scattering. The generation of optical surfaces with specific wetting properties, hence, requires a profound understanding of the relation between the wetting and the structural surface properties. Thus, our work concentrates on a reliable acquisition of roughness data over a wide spatial frequency range as well as on the comprehensive description of the wetting states, which is needed for the establishment of such correlations. We will present our advanced wetting analysis for nanorough optical surfaces, extended by a vibration-based procedure, which is mainly for understanding and tailoring the wetting behavior of various solid-liquid systems in research and industry. Utilizing the relationships between surface roughness and wetting, it will be demonstrated how different wetting states for hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity can be realized on optical surfaces with minimized scatter losses.

  8. 7 CFR 29.1083 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.1083 Section 29.1083 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1083 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing excessive moisture to the extent that it is in...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2570 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.2570 Section 29.2570 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2570 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3077 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.3077 Section 29.3077 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing excessive moisture to the extent that it is in an unsafe or...

  11. 7 CFR 29.2316 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.2316 Section 29.2316 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2316 Wet (W...

  12. 7 CFR 29.3567 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.3567 Section 29.3567 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3567 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing excessive moisture to the extent that it is in...

  13. Characteristics of wet work in nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungbauer, FHW; Steenstra, FB; Groothoff, JW; Coenraads, PJ

    Background objectives: Nursing is known for its high prevalence of hand dermatitis, mainly caused by the intense exposure to wet work in nursing activities. We aimed to study the characteristics of wet work exposure in nursing. Method: Trained observers monitored the duration and frequency of

  14. SAR-sensing of vegetation wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JJM; Klaassen, W

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this study is to measure rain induced forest canopy wetness. The approach used is ERS tandem mission C-band SAR backscatter change detection between successive dry and rainy days. The observed backscatter change is positively related with modelled canopy wetness change. It is therefore

  15. Wet work in relation to occupational dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungbauer, Franciscus Henricus Wilhelmus

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the nature and the quantity of work-related skin exposure in occupations where ‘wet work’ is performed. Activities that cause one or both hands to become wet, in contact with detergents or other skin irritating substances or activities that need to be done with occlusive gloves

  16. Dynamic wetting at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amberg, Gustav; Nakamura, Yoshinori; Carlson, Andreas; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2013-11-01

    Although the capillary spreading of a drop on a dry substrate is well studied, the physical mechanisms that govern the dynamics remain challenging. Here we study the dynamics of spreading of partially wetting nano-droplets, by combining molecular dynamics and continuum simulations. The latter accounts for all the relevant hydrodynamics, i.e. capillarity, inertia and viscous stresses. By coordinated continuum and molecular dynamics simulations, the macroscopic model parameters are extracted. For a Lennard-Jones fluid spreading on a planar surface, the liquid slip on the substrate is found to be crucial for the motion of the contact line. Evaluation of the different contributions to the energy transfer shows that the liquid slip generates dissipation of the same order as the bulk viscous dissipation or the energy transfer to kinetic energy. We also study the dynamics of spreading on a substrate with a periodic nanostructure. Here it is found that a nanostructure with a length scale commensurate with molecular size completely inhibits the liquid slip. This reduces the spreading speed by about 30%. This work is partially supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, the Swedish Research Council, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and the Sasakawa foundation.

  17. Seasonal variability of essential oils of Eugenia uniflora leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Deomar P.; Santos, Suzana C.; Seraphin, José C.; Ferri, Pedro H.

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal influence on the chemical composition of essential oils of Eugenia uniflora leaves with red-orange fruit colour biotype has indicated the presence of two oil clusters in the two seasons of the Brazilian Cerrado. Cluster I included samples collected during dry months (April-September) which were characterized by the highest percentages of spathulenol (10%) and caryophyllene oxide (4.1%). In cluster II, whose samples were collected during wet months (October-March), the major constitue...

  18. Seasonality, mobility, and livability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    Signature project 4a, Seasonality, Mobility, and Livability investigated the effects of weather, season, built environment, community amenities, attitudes, and demographics on mobility and quality of life (QOL). A four season panel survey exami...

  19. Seasonal variations and shared latrine cleaning practices in the slums of Kampala city, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiringira, Japheth; Atekyereza, Peter; Niwagaba, Charles; Kabumbuli, Robert; Rwabukwali, Charles; Kulabako, Robinah; Günther, Isabel

    2016-04-27

    The effect of seasons on health outcomes is a reflection on the status of public health and the state of development in a given society. Evidence shows that in Sub-Saharan Africa, most infectious diseases flourish during the wet months of the year; while human activities in a context of constrained choices in life exacerbate the effects of seasons on human health. The paper argues that, the wet season and when human activities are at their peak, sanitation is most dire poor slum populations. A shared latrine cleaning observation was undertaken over a period of 6 months in the slums of Kampala city. Data was collected through facility observations, user group meetings, Focus group discussions and, key informant interviews. The photos of the observed sanitation facilities were taken and assessed for facility cleanliness or dirt. Shared latrine pictures, observations, Focus Group Discussion, community meetings and key informant interviews were analysed and subjected to an analysis over the wet, dry and human activity cycles before a facility was categorised as either 'dirty' or 'clean'. Human activity cycles also referred to as socio-economic seasons were, school days, holidays, weekends and market days. These have been called 'impure' seasons, while the 'pure' seasons were the wet and dry months: improved and unimproved facilities were negatively affected by the wet seasons and the peak seasons of human activity. Wet seasons were associated with, mud and stagnant water, flooding pits and a repugnant smell from the latrine cubicle which made cleaning difficult. During the dry season, latrines became relatively cleaner than during the wet season. The presence of many child(ren) users during school days as well as the influx of market goers for the roadside weekly markets compromised the cleaning outcomes for these shared sanitation facilities. Shared latrine cleaning in slums is impacted by seasonal variations related to weather conditions and human activity. The wet

  20. Methane fluxes from a wet puna ecosystem in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam; Diem, Torsten; Priscila Huaraca Quispe, Lidia; Quispe Ccahuana, Adan Julian; Meir, Patrick; Arn Teh, Yit

    2014-05-01

    Discrepancies exist between top-down and bottom-up estimates of the tropical South American atmospheric methane budget. This suggests that current source-sink inventories fail to adequately characterise the landscapes of the region. This may be particularly true of Andean environments where very few field observations have been made. The high tropical Andes, between tree and permanent snow-lines, is home to diverse grass, shrub and giant rosette dominated ecosystems known variously from Venezuela to northern Chile and Argentina as paramo, jalca and puna. In humid regions these are characterised by wet, organic-rich mineral soils, peat-forming wetlands and shallow lakes. Such conditions are likely to promote methane production and potentially represent a regionally significant source to the atmosphere that should be considered. We report on methane fluxes from a bunch-grass dominated puna habitat at 3500 m above sea level in south-eastern Peru. Mean annual temperature and precipitation are 11 °C and 2500 mm, respectively. Temperature is aseasonal but experiences considerable diurnal variations with overnight frosting common-place. In contrast, rainfall is intensely episodic and has a pronounced wet season between September and March. Sampling encompassed a range of topographic features, such as grassland on freely draining, gently inclined or steep slopes and depressions containing bogs, over a 3 ha ridge to basin transition. Monthly sampling was carried out between January 2011 and June 2013 to investigate seasonal variability in methane fluxes. Intensive sampling campaigns were conducted to investigate spatial and short-term variations on a daily basis in two nine-day campaigns during wet and dry season. The site was a net source of methane to the atmosphere during the period of study. Methane fluxes were dominated by emissions from bogs, whereas, freely draining grassland exhibited weak source or marginal sink activity. Temporal variations were most notable at

  1. Seasonal water parameters of active and resting nursery ponds on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water quality parameters from active and resting nursery ponds were taken in both dry and wet seasons at the model fish farms, University of Ibadan. Temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen (D.O.), free carbon dioxide, pH, total alkalinity, total hardness and nitrite were examined to determine the suitable conditions of the ...

  2. 45 Seasonal Variations in the Composition and Distribution of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    community structure was determined using the. Margalef's species ... Species richness index (d) for the adult zooplankton was highest in stations J (Moba) and D (Ibese) in wet and dry season respectively (Table 2). Stations B. (Ikorodu Port) and ..... variations in the zooplankton spectrum and observed that recruitment of ...

  3. Forest disturbance type differentially affects seasonal moose forage

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.A. Lautenschlager; Hewlette S. Crawford; Martin R. Stokes; Timothy L. Stone

    1997-01-01

    We examined the effects of forest disturbance on forage availability, moose (Alces alces) seasonal forage selection, and predicted in vivo digestibility in eastern Maine. Wet-mass estimates and dry-mass conversions of species consumed by 3 tamed moose were made throughout the year (late winter, early spring, late spring, summer, fall, early winter)...

  4. Joint pattern of seasonal hydrological droughts and floods ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In our study, the sudden alternation of droughts and flood events (ADFEs) between adjacent seasons is studied using the multivariate L-moments theory and the bivariate copula functions in the Huai River Basin (HRB) of China with monthly streamflow data at 32 hydrological stations from 1956 to 2012. The dry and wet ...

  5. Joint pattern of seasonal hydrological droughts and floods ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ShaoFei Wu

    2017-06-07

    Jun 7, 2017 ... adjacent seasons is studied using the multivariate L-moments theory and the bivariate copula functions in the Huai River Basin (HRB) of China with monthly streamflow data at 32 hydrological stations from 1956 to 2012. The dry and wet conditions are characterized by the standardized streamflow index.

  6. seasonal water parameters of active and resting nursery ponds on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    carbon dioxide. total alkalinity (as CaCOg, mg/l), Total Hardness (as CaCO; mg/l), and nitrite concentration were determined as described in APHA (1995). The ponds were sampled around 8.00 am daily for two weeks in February and July for the dry and wet seaSons respectively. The mean value for each parameter under.

  7. Effect of seasonal drawdown variations on groundwater quality in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-07-24

    Jul 24, 2013 ... Water samples from twenty (20) shallow wells in Akure were analyzed during the wet and dry seasons in 2009 to ... study. The revealed water quality was independent on drawdown but dependent on other parameters such as ..... pesticides used for subsistence farming could also be responsible for the ...

  8. The influence of reproduction and lambing season of the Dohne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of reproduction and lambing season of the Dohne. Merino on different wool production traits. Ortrud Steinhagen. Animal and Dair-v Science Research Institute, Private Bag X2, Irene,. 1675 Republic of South Africa. P.J. de Wet. Department of Sheep and Wool Science, University of Stellenbosch,. Stellenbosch ...

  9. Seasonal impact of quarry mining effluent discharge impacted soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to assess the impact quarry mining effluent discharge impacted soil on growth parameters and phytochemical constituents of edible vegetables. Three quarry mining sites were used for the study that covered wet and dry seasons. Plant growth such as plant height, leaf area, internodes and plant ...

  10. Seasonality Affects the Diversity and Composition of Bacterioplankton Communities in Dongjiang River, a Drinking Water Source of Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Water quality ranks the most vital criterion for rivers serving as drinking water sources, which periodically changes over seasons. Such fluctuation is believed associated with the state shifts of bacterial community within. To date, seasonality effects on bacterioplankton community patterns in large rivers serving as drinking water sources however, are still poorly understood. Here we investigated the intra-annual bacterial community structure in the Dongjiang River, a drinking water source of Hong Kong, using high-throughput pyrosequencing in concert with geochemical property measurements during dry, and wet seasons. Our results showed that Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla of bacterioplankton communities, which varied in composition, and distribution from dry to wet seasons, and exhibited profound seasonal changes. Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Cyanobacteria seemed to be more associated with seasonality that the relative abundances of Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were significantly higher in the dry season than those in the wet season (p < 0.01, while the relative abundance of Cyanobacteria was about 10-fold higher in the wet season than in the dry season. Temperature and NO3--N concentration represented key contributing factors to the observed seasonal variations. These findings help understand the roles of various bacterioplankton and their interactions with the biogeochemical processes in the river ecosystem.

  11. Wet granular matter a truly complex fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Herminghaus, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    This is a monograph written for the young and advanced researcher who is entering the field of wet granular matter and keen to understand the basic physical principles governing this state of soft matter. It treats wet granulates as an instance of a ternary system, consisting of the grains, a primary, and a secondary fluid. After addressing wetting phenomena in general and outlining the basic facts on dry granular systems, a chapter on basic mechanisms and their effects is dedicated to every region of the ternary phase diagram. Effects of grain shape and roughness are considered as well. Rather than addressing engineering aspects such as existing books on this topic do, the book aims to provide a generalized framework suitable for those who want to understand these systems on a more fundamental basis. Readership: For the young and advanced researcher entering the field of wet granular matter.

  12. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  13. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  14. ROE Wet Sulfate Deposition 2009-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet sulfate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2009 to 2011. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  15. Should seasonal rainfall forecasts be used for flood preparedness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Coughlan de Perez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In light of strong encouragement for disaster managers to use climate services for flood preparation, we question whether seasonal rainfall forecasts should indeed be used as indicators of the likelihood of flooding. Here, we investigate the primary indicators of flooding at the seasonal timescale across sub-Saharan Africa. Given the sparsity of hydrological observations, we input bias-corrected reanalysis rainfall into the Global Flood Awareness System to identify seasonal indicators of floodiness. Results demonstrate that in some regions of western, central, and eastern Africa with typically wet climates, even a perfect tercile forecast of seasonal total rainfall would provide little to no indication of the seasonal likelihood of flooding. The number of extreme events within a season shows the highest correlations with floodiness consistently across regions. Otherwise, results vary across climate regimes: floodiness in arid regions in southern and eastern Africa shows the strongest correlations with seasonal average soil moisture and seasonal total rainfall. Floodiness in wetter climates of western and central Africa and Madagascar shows the strongest relationship with measures of the intensity of seasonal rainfall. Measures of rainfall patterns, such as the length of dry spells, are least related to seasonal floodiness across the continent. Ultimately, identifying the drivers of seasonal flooding can be used to improve forecast information for flood preparedness and to avoid misleading decision-makers.

  16. Should seasonal rainfall forecasts be used for flood preparedness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan de Perez, Erin; Stephens, Elisabeth; Bischiniotis, Konstantinos; van Aalst, Maarten; van den Hurk, Bart; Mason, Simon; Nissan, Hannah; Pappenberger, Florian

    2017-09-01

    In light of strong encouragement for disaster managers to use climate services for flood preparation, we question whether seasonal rainfall forecasts should indeed be used as indicators of the likelihood of flooding. Here, we investigate the primary indicators of flooding at the seasonal timescale across sub-Saharan Africa. Given the sparsity of hydrological observations, we input bias-corrected reanalysis rainfall into the Global Flood Awareness System to identify seasonal indicators of floodiness. Results demonstrate that in some regions of western, central, and eastern Africa with typically wet climates, even a perfect tercile forecast of seasonal total rainfall would provide little to no indication of the seasonal likelihood of flooding. The number of extreme events within a season shows the highest correlations with floodiness consistently across regions. Otherwise, results vary across climate regimes: floodiness in arid regions in southern and eastern Africa shows the strongest correlations with seasonal average soil moisture and seasonal total rainfall. Floodiness in wetter climates of western and central Africa and Madagascar shows the strongest relationship with measures of the intensity of seasonal rainfall. Measures of rainfall patterns, such as the length of dry spells, are least related to seasonal floodiness across the continent. Ultimately, identifying the drivers of seasonal flooding can be used to improve forecast information for flood preparedness and to avoid misleading decision-makers.

  17. Biodegradation of wet-white leather

    OpenAIRE

    Ollé Otero, Lluís; Jorba Rafart, Montse; Font Vallès, Joaquim; Shendrik, Alexander; Bacardit Dalmases, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the physical, chemical and biological processes associated with the deterioration of wet-white leather. The samples of leather were exposed for eight months to outdoor weathering and then their properties were subsequently evaluated. The results indicate that resistance and dimensional stability of wet-white (THPS-syntan) leather is higher than that of chrometanned leather. The comparative work with chrome leather was described earlier.

  18. Thermal neutron diffusion cooling in wet quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdowicz, K. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: krzysztof.drozdowicz@ifj.edu.pl; Krynicka, E. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Crakcw (Poland); Dabrowska, J. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland)

    2007-07-15

    The thermal neutron diffusion parameters of a rock material depend on the rock matrix itself and on the water content. The effect has been studied in quartz by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the variable buckling experiment for nine series of samples. A hyperbolic dependence of the density-removed diffusion cooling coefficient on the water content shows a variability of this parameter by two orders of magnitude. The function obtained for wet quartz is compared with the analogous dependence for wet dolomite.

  19. The effect of seasonal variation on the consistency of resistivity data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is a known fact that apparent resistivity values above the water level are affected by seasons [5]. It is therefore the aim of this paper is to confirm this effect in Rapele and to show that the lithology derived from the resistivity values for both wet and dry seasons are the same. Vertical electrical soundings (VES) using the ...

  20. Seasonal Variation in Water Quality of Orle River Basin, South West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study reveal that the chemical indices of pollution such as Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5), and Dissolved Oxygen (DO) vary significantly between the seasons. Likewise, Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5), Dussolved Oxygen (DO) and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) show increase in the wet season and ...

  1. A structural equation model analysis of relationships among ENSO, seasonal descriptors and wildfires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G Slocum

    Full Text Available Seasonality drives ecological processes through networks of forcings, and the resultant complexity requires creative approaches for modeling to be successful. Recently ecologists and climatologists have developed sophisticated methods for fully describing seasons. However, to date the relationships among the variables produced by these methods have not been analyzed as networks, but rather with simple univariate statistics. In this manuscript we used structural equation modeling (SEM to analyze a proposed causal network describing seasonality of rainfall for a site in south-central Florida. We also described how this network was influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO, and how the network in turn affected the site's wildfire regime. Our models indicated that wet and dry seasons starting later in the year (or ending earlier were shorter and had less rainfall. El Niño conditions increased dry season rainfall, and via this effect decreased the consistency of that season's drying trend. El Niño conditions also negatively influenced how consistent the moistening trend was during the wet season, but in this case the effect was direct and did not route through rainfall. In modeling wildfires, our models showed that area burned was indirectly influenced by ENSO via its effect on dry season rainfall. Area burned was also indirectly reduced when the wet season had consistent rainfall, as such wet seasons allowed fewer wildfires in subsequent fire seasons. Overall area burned at the study site was estimated with high accuracy (R (2 score = 0.63. In summary, we found that by using SEMs, we were able to clearly describe causal patterns involving seasonal climate, ENSO and wildfire. We propose that similar approaches could be effectively applied to other sites where seasonality exerts strong and complex forcings on ecological processes.

  2. Evaluation of wet indices using standard precipitation index: A case study of Terengganu states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, M. F.; Rauf, U. F. Abdul; Din, W. R. Wan; Hussin, A. G.

    2017-09-01

    In line with the current climate conditions, the study of prolonged precipitation is imperative as it may predict the flood events in the future. In 2014, Terengganu is amongst the state in Peninsular Malaysia was affected by floods and it experienced three waves of floods during the monsoon seasons. In this research study, Standard Precipitation Index (SPI) is used to analyse the monthly precipitation data for two selected rain gauge stations in Terengganu over the period of forty-five years from 1970 to 2014. The objective of this study is to monitor the extreme wet conditions that eventually could cause the occurrence of floods. Comparisons were made using 3-month, 6-month, 24-month and 48-month time scales. SPI time series is calculated from precipitation index data for two rain-gauge stations in Terengganu. The shortest of time scales of SPI indicate the condition of moisture in short and medium terms, which is then used to estimate the seasonal precipitation. The longest time scales reveal patterns of long-term precipitation before the flood events. The result clearly shows that the annual trends of the wet events for longest periods are regularly experienced in wet conditions compare to drought conditions and predicted to have a higher probability of flood disaster. SK Kuala Telemong station has recorded the highest SPI values for the wet event in the entire periods, which the shortest time scales is 3.43 and longest term of time scales closer to three (2.90) in this analysis.

  3. Seasonal habitat selection by African buffalo Syncerus caffer in the Savuti–Mababe–Linyanti ecosystem of northern Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keoikantse Sianga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to establish seasonal movement and habitat selection patterns of African buffalo Syncerus caffer in relation to a detailed habitat map and according to seasonal changes in forage quality and quantity in the Savuti–Mababe–Linyanti ecosystem (Botswana. Two buffalo were collared in November 2011 and another in October 2012. All three buffalo had greater activities in the mopane–sandveld woodland mosaic during the wet season, which provided high-quality leafy grasses and ephemeral water for drinking, but moved to permanent water and reliable forage of various wetlands (swamps and floodplains and riverine woodlands during the dry season. Wetlands had higher grass greenness, height and biomass than woodlands during the dry season. Buffalo had similar wet season concentration areas in the 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 wet seasons and similar dry season concentration areas over the 2012 and 2013 dry seasons. However, their dry season location of collaring in 2011 differed dramatically from their 2012 and 2013 dry season concentration areas, possibly because of the exceptionally high flood levels in 2011, which reduced accessibility to their usual dry season concentration areas. The study demonstrates that extremely large and heterogeneous landscapes are needed to conserve buffalo in sandy, dystrophic ecosystems with variable rainfall.Conservation implications: This study emphasises the importance of large spatial scale available for movement, which enables adaptation to changing conditions between years and seasons.

  4. Seasonal variations and shared latrine cleaning practices in the slums of Kampala city, Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Japheth Kwiringira; Peter Atekyereza; Charles Niwagaba; Robert Kabumbuli; Charles Rwabukwali; Robinah Kulabako; Isabel Günther

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The effect of seasons on health outcomes is a reflection on the status of public health and the state of development in a given society. Evidence shows that in Sub-Saharan Africa, most infectious diseases flourish during the wet months of the year; while human activities in a context of constrained choices in life exacerbate the effects of seasons on human health. The paper argues that, the wet season and when human activities are at their peak, sanitation is most dire poo...

  5. The influence of birth season on height: Evidence from Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Kitae

    2015-08-01

    Literature on the effect of birth month on height has generally considered regions in temperate climates. However, because many climatic conditions there change with seasons, it is difficult to isolate potential causes. This study estimated the effect of birth month and season on terminal height by analyzing the population of a country with only a few factors driving its climate. The sample was derived from nationally representative data of the Indonesian population. We considered 9,262 men and 10,314 women 20-50 years of age. We applied cosinor analysis to a time series of height by birth month. We then applied a more flexible approach by regressing height on a series of dummy variables for birth month (and, subsequently, season) and birth year fixed effects by sex. There was no statistically significant difference in height by birth month. However, although weakly significant, men born in the dry season (June-September) were 2.3 mm shorter than those born in the wet season (the remaining months). The corresponding figure for women was 2.6 mm, a statistically significant difference. We eliminated some potential factors previously suggested in the literature, including insolation, the position of our planet with respect to the sun, food availability, and maternal workload. We speculate that babies born in the dry season were affected in the third trimester by the high disease burden that characterizes the wet season. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Removal of atmospheric ethanol by wet deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, J. David; Willey, Joan D.; Thomas, Rachel K.; Mullaugh, Katherine M.; Avery, G. Brooks; Kieber, Robert J.; Mead, Ralph N.; Helms, John; Giubbina, Fernanda F.; Campos, M. Lucia A. M.; Cala, John

    2017-02-01

    The global wet deposition flux of ethanol is estimated to be 2.4 ± 1.6 Tg/yr with a conservative range of 0.2-4.6 Tg/yr based upon analyses of 219 wet deposition samples collected at 12 locations globally. This estimate calculated by using observed wet deposition ethanol concentrations is in agreement with previous models (1.4-5 Tg/yr) predicting the wet deposition sink using Henry's law coefficients and atmospheric ethanol concentrations. Wet deposition is estimated to remove between 6 and 17% of the total ethanol emitted to the atmosphere on an annual basis. The concentration of ethanol in marine rain (25 ± 6 nM) is an order of magnitude less than in the majority of terrestrial rains (345 ± 280 nM). Terrestrial rain samples collected in locations impacted by high local sources of biofuel usage and locations downwind from ethanol distilleries were an order of magnitude higher in ethanol concentration (3090 ± 448 nM) compared to rain collected in terrestrial locations not impacted by these sources. These results indicate that wet deposition of ethanol is heavily influenced by local sources. Results of this study are important because they suggest that as biofuel production and usage increase, the concentration of ethanol in the atmosphere will increase as well the wet deposition flux. Additional research constraining the sources, sinks, and atmospheric impacts of ethanol is necessary to better assist in the debate as whether or not to increase consumption of the alcohol as a biofuel.

  7. Dry and wet spell variability during monsoon in gauge-based gridded daily precipitation datasets over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Shushobhit; Dhanya, C. T.; Vinnarasi, R.

    2017-03-01

    Accurate estimates of monsoonal rainfall at daily time scales are essential inputs for various water-related sectors such as drought and flood forecasting, crop and water management for agriculture. To serve this purpose, a variety of rainfall products, especially the gauge based products which serve as the ground-truth for other derived rainfall products, are available over India. In this study, three different daily gauge based gridded rainfall datasets, namely Indian Meteorological Department (IMD), Asian Precipitation Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards Evaluation of water resources (APHRODITE) and Climate Prediction Center (CPC) unified rain gauge data are compared over India for the monsoon season of 1979-2007. The comparison among the datasets is based on the duration, frequency and intensity of three different spell characteristics, namely dry, wet and extreme wet spells, and their associated trends. Wet (dry) spells are defined as the consecutive period of wet (dry) days, where a wet (dry) day is defined using rainfall threshold of 1 mm. Extreme wet spells are defined using the 90th percentile of rainfall above the depth of wet day. All datasets capture the spatial distribution of precipitation characteristics, albeit with pronounced differences at heavy rainfall regions. CPC and IMD show a close match in spell characteristics while APHRODITE significantly deviates. APHRODITE shows increased intensity of rainfall during dry periods, leading to over-estimation of wet days and under-estimation of dry days. Northern extreme of India (Jammu and Kashmir) show major differences in replicating the spell characteristics. Trend patterns are also not consistent between the three datasets. The present study will provide information on the spatio-temporal pattern of dry, wet and extreme wet spell characteristics over India and aid in selecting appropriate datasets for studying the Indian monsoon rainfall depending on their scope and application of

  8. Carbon in Amazon forests: unexpected seasonal fluxes and disturbance-induced losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. R. Saleska; S. D. Miller; D. M. Matross; M. L. Goulden; S. C. Wofsy; H. R. da Rocha; P. B. de Camargo; P. Crill; B. C. Daube; H. C. de Freitas; L. Hutyra; M. Keller; V. Kirchhoff; M. Menton; J. W. Munger; H. E. Pyle; A. H. Rice; H. Silva

    2003-01-01

    The net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide was measured by eddy covariance methods for 3 years in two old-growth forest sites near Santarém, Brazil. Carbon was lost in the wet season and gained in the dry season, which was opposite to the seasonal cycles of both tree growth and model predictions. The 3-year average carbon loss was 1.3 (confidence...

  9. Wetting and adsorption modification in the system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Bogdanova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Regularities of wetting and adsorption modification of surfaces of continual membranes made from highly permeable glassy polymers poly[1-(trimethylsilyl-1-propyne] (PTMSP and poly(4-methyl-2-pentyn (PMP with aqueous ethanol solutions and alcohol solutions containing organic dyes (Solvent Blue 35 and Remazol Brilliant Blue were investigated. Isotherms of stress wetting of polymer membrane surface by etanol solutions were found out to have maximums in the range of concentrations corresponding to the beginning of liquid sorption into the membrane and polymer swelling. Thus, the principal possibility of optimization of nanofiltration experiments by liquid wetting angle measurements on continuous polymer membrane surfaces was shown. The presence of the dye was shown not to affect PMP wetting. But in the case of PTMSP, it leads to shear of the maximum of stress wetting isotherms to the range of higher concentrations. It was found out the effectiveness of the adsorption surface modification of continuous polymer membrane surfaces by ethanol solutions containing dyes does not dependent on chemical nature of the dye. At the same time, there are different trends in the energy characteristics of the membrane surface.

  10. Membrane-based wet electrostatic precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, David J; Shi, Liming; Kremer, Gregory; Stuart, Ben J; Reynolds, James; Caine, John

    2005-06-01

    Emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in both primary and secondary form, are difficult to capture in typical dry electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Wet (or water-based) ESPs are well suited for collection of acid aerosols and fine particulates because of greater corona power and virtually no re-entrainment. However, field disruptions because of spraying (misting) of water, formation of dry spots (channeling), and collector surface corrosion limit the applicability of current wet ESPs in the control of secondary PM2.5. Researchers at Ohio University have patented novel membrane collection surfaces to address these problems. Water-based cleaning in membrane collectors made of corrosion-resistant fibers is facilitated by capillary action between the fibers, maintaining an even distribution of water. This paper presents collection efficiency results of lab-scale and pilot-scale testing at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant for the membrane-based wet ESP. The data indicate that a membrane wet ESP was more effective at collecting fine particulates, acid aerosols, and oxidized mercury than the metal-plate wet ESP, even with approximately 15% less collecting area.

  11. Dynamic wetting on anisotropic patterned surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do-Quang, Minh; Wang, Jiayu; Nita, Satoshi; Shiomi, Junichiro; Amberg, Gustav; Physiochemical fluid mechanics Team; Maruyama-Chiashi Laboratory Team

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting, as occurs when a droplet of a wetting liquid is brought in contact with a dry solid, is important in various engineering processes, such as printing, coating, and lubrication. Our overall aim is to investigate if and how the detailed properties of the solid surface influence the dynamics of wetting. We have recently quantified the hindering effect of fairly isotropic micron-sized patterns on the substrate. Here we will study highly anisotropic surfaces, such as parallel grooves, either perpendicular or parallel to an advancing contact line. This is done by detailed phase field simulations and experiments on structured silicon surfaces. The dynamic wetting behavior of drops on the grooved surfaces is governed by the combined interplay of the wetting line friction and the internal viscous dissipation. Influence of roughness is quantified in terms of the energy dissipation rate at the contact line using the experiment-simulation combined analysis. The energy dissipation of the contact line at the different part of the groove will be discussed. The performance of the model is assessed by comparing its predictions with the experimental data. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (J.W., S.N., and J.S) and Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (M.D.-Q. and G.A).

  12. Energy and heat balance in wet DCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Viren; Moser, Alexander; Schaefer, Michael; Ritschel, Michael [BorgWarner Drivetrain Engineering GmbH, Ketsch (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Wet clutch systems are well known for their thermal robustness and versatility in a wide range of automotive applications. Conventional automatics have used them for a long time as torque converter lock-up clutches, shift elements and launch clutches. With the development of DCTs, wet clutch technology has evolved in terms of launch and shift performance, controllability, robustness and efficiency. This paper discusses improvements in the wet clutch and their impact on today's vehicle applications in terms of heat and energy management. Thermal robustness is a crucial aspect for an automatic transmission. In addition to the clutch thermal performance, the influence of transmission oil cooler and oil sump warm-up behavior are discussed. Based on our latest development activities, test results and simulations, we shall discuss the latest friction material enhancement and its impact on DCTs in terms of efficiency and performance. Drag loss is a much-discussed topic during the development of wet clutch systems. This paper discusses in detail the cause and break-up of various energy losses in a wet DCT. Efficient energy management strategies for actuation systems, cooling, and lubrication, clutch apply, and pre-selection in modern power trains with engine start / stop are evaluated based on the latest test and simulation results. Finally, the paper summarizes the performance and efficiency optimized moist clutch system. (orig.)

  13. Adaptation to seasonality and the winter freeze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christine Preston

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Flowering plants initially diversified during the Mesozoic era at least 140 million years ago in regions of the world where temperate seasonal environments were not encountered. Since then several cooling events resulted in the contraction of warm and wet environments and the establishment of novel temperate zones in both hemispheres. In response, less than half of modern angiosperm families have members that evolved specific adaptations to cold seasonal climates, including cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, endodormancy, and vernalization responsiveness. Despite compelling evidence for multiple independent origins, the level of genetic constraint on the evolution of adaptations to seasonal cold is not well understood. However, the recent increase in molecular genetic studies examining the response of model and crop species to seasonal cold offers new insight into the evolutionary lability of these traits. This insight has major implications for our understanding of complex trait evolution, and the potential role of local adaptation in response to past and future climate change. In this review, we discuss the biochemical, morphological, and developmental basis of adaptations to seasonal cold, and synthesize recent literature on the genetic basis of these traits in a phylogenomic context. We find evidence for multiple genetic links between distinct physiological responses to cold, possibly reinforcing the coordinated expression of these traits. Furthermore, repeated recruitment of the same or similar ancestral pathways suggests that land plants might be somewhat pre-adapted to dealing with temperature stress, perhaps making inducible cold traits relatively easy to evolve.

  14. Estimating seasonal evapotranspiration from temporal satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Liu, Shu-Guang; Tieszen, Larry L.; Suyker, Andrew E.; Verma, Shashi B.

    2012-01-01

    Estimating seasonal evapotranspiration (ET) has many applications in water resources planning and management, including hydrological and ecological modeling. Availability of satellite remote sensing images is limited due to repeat cycle of satellite or cloud cover. This study was conducted to determine the suitability of different methods namely cubic spline, fixed, and linear for estimating seasonal ET from temporal remotely sensed images. Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model in conjunction with the wet METRIC (wMETRIC), a modified version of the METRIC model, was used to estimate ET on the days of satellite overpass using eight Landsat images during the 2001 crop growing season in Midwest USA. The model-estimated daily ET was in good agreement (R2 = 0.91) with the eddy covariance tower-measured daily ET. The standard error of daily ET was 0.6 mm (20%) at three validation sites in Nebraska, USA. There was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) among the cubic spline, fixed, and linear methods for computing seasonal (July–December) ET from temporal ET estimates. Overall, the cubic spline resulted in the lowest standard error of 6 mm (1.67%) for seasonal ET. However, further testing of this method for multiple years is necessary to determine its suitability.

  15. Adaptation to seasonality and the winter freeze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jill C; Sandve, Simen R

    2013-01-01

    Flowering plants initially diversified during the Mesozoic era at least 140 million years ago in regions of the world where temperate seasonal environments were not encountered. Since then several cooling events resulted in the contraction of warm and wet environments and the establishment of novel temperate zones in both hemispheres. In response, less than half of modern angiosperm families have members that evolved specific adaptations to cold seasonal climates, including cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, endodormancy, and vernalization responsiveness. Despite compelling evidence for multiple independent origins, the level of genetic constraint on the evolution of adaptations to seasonal cold is not well understood. However, the recent increase in molecular genetic studies examining the response of model and crop species to seasonal cold offers new insight into the evolutionary lability of these traits. This insight has major implications for our understanding of complex trait evolution, and the potential role of local adaptation in response to past and future climate change. In this review, we discuss the biochemical, morphological, and developmental basis of adaptations to seasonal cold, and synthesize recent literature on the genetic basis of these traits in a phylogenomic context. We find evidence for multiple genetic links between distinct physiological responses to cold, possibly reinforcing the coordinated expression of these traits. Furthermore, repeated recruitment of the same or similar ancestral pathways suggests that land plants might be somewhat pre-adapted to dealing with temperature stress, perhaps making inducible cold traits relatively easy to evolve.

  16. Controlling Factors of Long-Term Trends in Mercury Wet Deposition and Precipitation Concentrations at Huntington Wildlife Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Z.; Mao, H.; Driscoll, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) at Huntington Wildlife Forest (HWF) suggested that a significant decline (r2 = 0.34, p = 0.03) from 2000 to 2013 in volume weighted mean (VWM) Hg concentrations in precipitation was linked to Hg emission decreases in the United States, especially in the Northeast and Midwest, and yet Hg wet deposition has remained fairly constant over the past two decades. The present study aimed to investigate the climatic, terrestrial, and anthropogenic factors that influenced the decadal pattern in Hg wet deposition in upstate NY. In spring and summer, when Hg wet deposition was the strongest, significant positive correlation (r2 = 0.89, p < 0.0001 in spring; r2 = 0.58, p = 0.002 in summer) of Hg wet deposition with precipitation was found. Increases in precipitation during these seasons could offset the decreasing of Hg concentration in precipitation. Besides, springtime positive correlation (r2 = 0.35, p = 0.02) between precipitation and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index together with geopotential height and wind speed analysis indicated that large-scale dynamical forcing was likely an important factor influencing the long term trend in springtime Hg wet deposition at HWF. To further quantify the roles of meteorological and anthropogenic factors in Hg wet deposition, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was employed using an algorithm depicting state-of-the-art Hg chemistry mechanism and up-to-date Hg emission inventories evaluated with MDN and Atmospheric Mercury Network (AMNet) measurement data. CMAQ simulations with a constant vs. realistic meteorological conditions for multiple warm seasons (including spring and summer) were used to characterize and quantify the impacts of inter-annual variability of precipitation and atmospheric circulation on Hg wet deposition. In addition, contributions to Hg wet deposition from decreases in anthropogenic emissions in NYS and nation-wide were quantified from

  17. Seasonal dynamics of atmospheric and river inputs of black carbon, and impacts on biogeochemical cycles in Halong Bay, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Mari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Emissions of black carbon (BC, a product of incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, biofuels and biomass, are high in the Asia-Pacific region, yet input pathways and rates to the ocean are not well constrained. Atmospheric and riverine inputs of BC in Halong Bay (Vietnam, a hotspot of atmospheric BC, were studied at monthly intervals during one year. Climate in Halong Bay is governed by the monsoon regime, characterized by a northeast winter monsoon (dry season and southeast summer monsoon (wet season. During the dry season, atmospheric BC concentrations averaged twice those observed during the wet season. In the sea surface microlayer (SML and underlying water (ULW, concentrations of particulate BC (PBC averaged 539 and 11 μmol C L–1, respectively. Dissolved BC (DBC concentrations averaged 2.6 μmol C L–1 in both the SML and ULW. Seasonal variations indicated that PBC concentration in the SML was controlled by atmospheric deposition during the dry season, while riverine inputs controlled both PBC and DBC concentrations in ULW during the wet season. Spatiotemporal variations of PBC and DBC during the wet season suggest that river runoff was efficient in transporting PBC that had accumulated on land during the dry season, and in mobilizing and transporting DBC to the ocean. The annual river flux of PBC was about 3.8 times higher than that of DBC. The monsoon regime controls BC input to Halong Bay by favoring dry deposition of BC originating from the north during the dry season, and wet deposition and river runoff during the wet season. High PBC concentrations seem to enhance the transfer of organic carbon from dissolved to particulate phase by adsorbing dissolved organic carbon and stimulating aggregation. Such processes may impact the availability and biogeochemical cycling of other dissolved substances, including nutrients, for the coastal marine ecosystem.

  18. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1993-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Evaporation from rain-wetted forest in relation to canopy wetness, canopy cover, and net radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    2001-01-01

    Evaporation from wet canopies is commonly calculated using E-PM, the Penman-Monteith equation with zero surface resistance. However, several observations show a lower evaporation from rain-wetted forest. Possible causes for the difference between E-PM and experiments are evaluated to provide rules

  20. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  1. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, Louis G.

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  2. Novel design for Konin wet FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawacki, T.; Bengtsson, S. [ZEPAK, Konin (Poland)

    1996-09-01

    The Konin Power Station, Poland, with a total production capacity of 538 MW{sub e} and 462 MW{sub th} and belonging to the ZEPAK group, is extensively rebuilding units Nos 7 and 8 and retrofitting with wet flue gas desulphurisation. ZEPAK evaluated wet FGD technologies in 1992 and 1993 and decided for a novel concrete absorber-in-stack concept for a limestone forced oxidation system, that will produce commercial grade gypsum. The FGD plant is now under construction and commissioning is scheduled to commence in first quarter of 1997. The paper will provide the background for the choice of wet FGD and present details on both execution and technology for this novel absorber-in-stack concept for power plant FGD.

  3. Influenza Seasonal Summary, 2014-2015 Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-14

    upcoming season. Influenza vaccines are available as a high-dose vaccine , inu·adennal vaccine , regulru· flu shot, or nasal spray flu vaccine , which is...seasonlflu-season.htm. Updated October 22, 2014. Accessed June 19, 2015. 6. Key facts about seasonal flu vaccine . Centers for Disease Conu·ol and...Accessed June 19, 2015. 8. Use of antivirals. Centers for Disease Conu·ol and Prevention Web site. http:/ /cdc. gov/ flu / professionals /antivirals/antiviral

  4. Seasonal Variation in Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Seasonality analyses are important in medical research. If the incidence of a disease shows a seasonal pattern, then an environmental factor must be considered in its etiology. We discuss a method for the simultaneous analysis of seasonal variation in multiple groups. The nuts and bolts are explained using simple trigonometry, an elementary…

  5. Sphere impact and penetration into wet sand

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2012-08-07

    We present experimental results for the penetration of a solid sphere when released onto wet sand. We show, by measuring the final penetration depth, that the cohesion induced by the water can result in either a deeper or shallower penetration for a given release height compared to dry granular material. Thus the presence of water can either lubricate or stiffen the granular material. By assuming the shear rate is proportional to the impact velocity and using the depth-averaged stopping force in calculating the shear stress, we derive effective viscosities for the wet granular materials.

  6. Soil nitrogen transformation responses to seasonal precipitation changes are regulated by changes in functional microbial abundance in a subtropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Xiao, Guoliang; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Jenerette, G. Darrel; Ma, Ying; Liu, Wei; Wang, Zhengfeng; Shen, Weijun

    2017-05-01

    The frequency of dry-season droughts and wet-season storms has been predicted to increase in subtropical areas in the coming decades. Since subtropical forest soils are significant sources of N2O and NO3-, it is important to understand the features and determinants of N transformation responses to the predicted precipitation changes. A precipitation manipulation field experiment was conducted in a subtropical forest to reduce dry-season precipitation and increase wet-season precipitation, with annual precipitation unchanged. Net N mineralization, net nitrification, N2O emission, nitrifying (bacterial and archaeal amoA) and denitrifying (nirK, nirS and nosZ) gene abundance, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), extractable organic carbon (EOC), NO3-, NH4+ and soil water content (SWC) were monitored to characterize and explain soil N transformation responses. Dry-season precipitation reduction decreased net nitrification and N mineralization rates by 13-20 %, while wet-season precipitation addition increased both rates by 50 %. More than 20 % of the total variation of net nitrification and N mineralization could be explained by microbial abundance and SWC. Notably, archaeal amoA abundance showed the strongest correlation with net N transformation rates (r ≥ 0.35), suggesting the critical role of archaeal amoA abundance in determining N transformations. Increased net nitrification in the wet season, together with large precipitation events, caused substantial NO3- losses via leaching. However, N2O emission decreased moderately in both dry and wet seasons due to changes in nosZ gene abundance, MBC, net nitrification and SWC (decreased by 10-21 %). We conclude that reducing dry-season precipitation and increasing wet-season precipitation affect soil N transformations through altering functional microbial abundance and MBC, which are further affected by changes in EOC and NH4+ availabilities.

  7. Wetting properties and performance test of modified rigid collector in wet electrostatic precipitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunyan; Chang, Jingcai; Meng, Zhen; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Jing; Cui, Lin; Ma, Chunyuan

    2016-10-01

    The fine particles are considered a significant pollution problem. The wet electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) have advantages of efficient collection of the fine particles with lower pressure drop and eliminating reentrainment. The wetting properties of the collector surfaces have significantly important effect on wet ESPs' stable and secure operation. The modified rigid collector (MRC) was modified by coating specific vinyl ester resin composites and loose glass fiber cloth over the conventional carbon steel in a certain way. The rigid collector surfaces before and after modification had been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and interface tensiometer. The effect of operating temperatures on the wetting properties of the rigid collector surfaces before and after modification was investigated. The temperature range was 40~90 °C, and the wetting properties contained liquid holdup, surface flow rate, film rate, average film thickness, and critical saturation time. The modified rigid collector surface exhibited excellent wetting properties at the operating temperatures. The fine particles collection performance compared among the MRC, the conventional rigid collector (CRC), and the flexible collector (FC) in the wet ESPs was investigated. The effects of the applied voltage, the water film, corona power, and the specific collecting area on the fine particles collection were evaluated. The modified rigid collector provided high fine particles collection effect with lower energy and water consumption. To improve the submicron particles collection efficiency and decrease energy and water consumption, the formation of uniform water film over the collector surfaces has been widely studied. The modified rigid collector was modified by coating specific vinyl ester resin composites and loose glass fiber cloth (ERGF) over the conventional carbon steel (CCS) in a certain way. The modified rigid collector surface exhibited excellent wetting properties. The wet

  8. Catalytic gasification of dry and wet biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, G.; Potic, B.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic gasification of dry biomass and of wet biomass streams in hot compressed water are reviewed and discussed as potential technologies for the production of synthesis gas, hydrogen- and methane-rich gas. Next to literature data also new experimental results from our laboratory on catalytic

  9. Wet oxidation of salicylic acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Garrido, Laura; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2010-11-15

    Salicylic acid is a frequent pollutant in several industrial wastewaters. Uncatalyzed wet air oxidation, which is a promising technique for the treatment of phenolic effluents, has not been analyzed yet for the removal of salicylic acid. The effect of different conditions of pH (1.3-12.3), pressure (1.0-4.1 MPa), temperature (413-443 K), and initial concentrations (1.45-14.50 mM) on the wet oxidation of salicylate/salicylic acid solutions have here been investigated. The pH value of the reaction media was found to be a key parameter for the rate of the oxidation process with an optimum at pH 3.1, when the concentrations of salicylic acid and salicylate were similar. The oxidation reaction followed pseudofirst-order kinetics with respect to salicylic acid and 0.82 order with respect to dissolved oxygen. Additionally, the evolution of the color during the wet oxidation was analyzed and discussed in relation with the formation of intermediate compounds. Then, a reaction pathway for the noncatalytic wet oxidation of the salicylic acid was proposed.

  10. Curvature controlled wetting in two dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Tamir; Mikheev, Lev V.

    1995-01-01

    layer lW, leading to a power law lW∝r01/3. At a critical wetting transition of a planar substrate, curvature adds a relevant field; the corresponding multiscaling forms are readily available. The method allows for the systematic evaluation of corrections to the leading behavior; the next to the leading...

  11. Theory of the forced wetting transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, Tak Shing; Snoeijer, Jacobus Hendrikus; Eggers, J.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a solid plate being withdrawn from a bath of liquid which it does not wet. At low speeds, the meniscus rises below a moving contact line, leaving the rest of the plate dry. At a critical speed of withdrawal, this solution bifurcates into another branch via a saddle-node bifurcation: two

  12. Directional wetting on chemically patterned substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst S.; Jansen, H.P.; Bliznyuk, O.; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The directional wetting behavior of chemically defined stripe-patterned anisotropic surfaces is presented. The equilibrium shapes of asymmetric droplets, arising from patterns of alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes with dimensions in the low-micrometer range, are investigated in relation

  13. Accretion Dynamics on Wet Granular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saingier, Guillaume; Sauret, Alban; Jop, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    Wet granular aggregates are common precursors of construction materials, food, and health care products. The physical mechanisms involved in the mixing of dry grains with a wet substrate are not well understood and difficult to control. Here, we study experimentally the accretion of dry grains on a wet granular substrate by measuring the growth dynamics of the wet aggregate. We show that this aggregate is fully saturated and its cohesion is ensured by the capillary depression at the air-liquid interface. The growth dynamics is controlled by the liquid fraction at the surface of the aggregate and exhibits two regimes. In the viscous regime, the growth dynamics is limited by the capillary-driven flow of liquid through the granular packing to the surface of the aggregate. In the capture regime, the capture probability depends on the availability of the liquid at the saturated interface, which is controlled by the hydrostatic depression in the material. We propose a model that rationalizes our observations and captures both dynamics based on the evolution of the capture probability with the hydrostatic depression.

  14. Cohesion and agglomeration of wet powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raux, Pascal S.; Biance, Anne-Laure

    2018-01-01

    Wet high-shear granulation consists in vigorously mixing grains and a liquid binder to create agglomerates of various sizes. The process results from a balance between cohesion of the wet granular agglomerates and fragmentation due to the high mixing. By performing a simple test with glass beads and various liquids, we first focus on the static cohesion of wet granular media. Contrary to previous works, we extend the study to larger values of the liquid fraction w . After the well-documented plateau, the cohesive strength increases again with w , a behavior we capture by a simple model. We then focus on the dynamical cohesion of the media and we design an agglomeration process that consists in vibrating a bead/liquid mixture at a large amplitude. The vibrations induce not only the fluidization of the wet granular material but also the formation of aggregates. As expected, their size is affected by the liquid content, the frequency, and the amplitude of the vibrations, similarly to high-shear granulation data. However, the number of beads in an agglomerate does not depend on the bead size, showing a self-similar mechanism of agglomeration. The role of the static cohesion strength in this dynamical process remains therefore ambiguous.

  15. Microwave moisture sensing of wet bales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensing of moisture in very wet lint bales is unique due to the fact that moisture distribution is typically non-uniform and can in some instances be highly localized. This issue is even further complicated by the use of a sensor that reads only a portion of the bale and/or with a sensor that provid...

  16. Ovine wet carcass syndrome of unknown aetiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    plicating cachexia, inflammatory processes, lymphoedema, cardiac failure, glycogen storage or myxoedema in the pathogenesis of the syndrome. In conclusion, despite intensive investigation the aeti- ology of the wet carcase syndrome remains unknown. At present the possibility of a histamine reaction due to insect bites is ...

  17. Uncertainty associated with convective wet removal of entrained aerosols in a global climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Croft

    2012-11-01

    scheme since nearly all entrained accumulation and coarse mode aerosols are assumed to be cloud-droplet borne or ice-crystal borne, and evaporation due to the Bergeron-Findeisen process is neglected.

    The simulated convective wet scavenging of entrained accumulation and coarse mode aerosols has feedbacks on new particle formation and the number of Aitken mode aerosols, which control stratiform and convective cloud droplet number concentrations and yield precipitation changes in the ECHAM5-HAM model. However, the geographic distribution of aerosol annual mean convective wet deposition change in the model is driven by changes to the assumptions regarding the scavenging of aerosols entrained above cloud bases rather than by precipitation changes, except for sea salt deposition in the tropics. Uncertainty in the seasonal, regional cycles of AOD due to assumptions about entrained aerosol wet scavenging is similar in magnitude to the estimated error in the AOD retrievals.

    The uncertainty in aerosol concentrations, burdens, and AOD attributed to different assumptions for the wet scavenging of aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases in a global model motivates the ongoing need to better understand and model the activation and impaction processes that aerosols undergo after entrainment into convective updrafts.

  18. Seasonality of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auda Fares

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was designed to review previous studies and analyse the current knowledge and controversies related to seasonal variability of tuberculosis (TB to examine whether TB has an annual seasonal pattern. Study Design and Methods: Systematic review of peer reviewed studies identified through literature searches using online databases belonging to PubMed and the Cochrane library with key words "Tuberculosis, Seasonal influence" and " Tuberculosis, Seasonal variation". The search was restricted to articles published in English. The references of the identified papers for further relevant publications were also reviewed. Results: Twelve studies conducted between the period 1971 and 2006 from 11 countries/regions around the world (South Western Cameroon, South Africa, India, Hong Kong, Japan, Kuwait, Spain, UK, Ireland, Russia, and Mongolia were reviewed. A seasonal pattern of tuberculosis with a mostly predominant peak is seen during the spring and summer seasons in all of the countries (except South Western Cameroon and Russia. Conclusions: The observation of seasonality leads to assume that the risk of transmission of M. tuberculosis does appear to be the greatest during winter months. Vitamin D level variability, indoor activities, seasonal change in immune function, and delays in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis are potential stimuli of seasonal tuberculosis disease. Additionally, seasonal variation in food availability and food intake, age, and sex are important factors which can play a role in the tuberculosis notification variability. Prospective studies regarding this topic and other related subjects are highly recommended.

  19. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Shirtcliffe

    Full Text Available Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted, texture (smooth, rough or granular or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  20. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  1. Disappearing seasonality in birthweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Kitae

    2016-11-01

    We estimated seasonality in birthweight over time and assessed how seasonality changed. We analyzed all full-term singletons (N = 8,268,693) born in South Korea in 1997-2014. We first pooled all years and regressed birthweight on birth season while flexibly controlling for a large set of covariates. We then repeated the analysis by birth year and charted the trends in seasonality in birthweight. When we pooled all years, babies born in winter were the heaviest, while those born in summer the lightest; the difference in birthweight was about 11 g. When we analyzed the data by birth year, however, seasonality almost disappeared by the end of the period. Whatever causes the seasonality has lost its influence in Korea. Replication studies can determine whether other countries exhibit the same patterns. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:767-773, 2016. © 2016Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Assessing the Sources of Atmospheric Mercury Wet Deposited in Florida, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvonch J. T.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available From October 2008 through August 2010, event-based precipitation samples for mercury (Hg, trace elements, and major ions analysis were collected at six monitoring sites in Florida, USA. The objectives of these measurements were to quantify the levels of Hg wet deposition across the state, and to assess the contributions to Hg in precipitation from major local and regional emission sources in support of a Hg Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL project. The measurement sites were located in Pensacola, Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa, Davie, and Everglades National Park. For the period April 2009 through August 2010, Hg wet deposition rates ranged from 26.8 to 38.7 μg/m2 across the six sites. We observed a strong seasonal pattern, with increases in measured Hg concentrations and Hg wet deposition occurring during the summer months, which was further pronounced at the southern sites. We also observed a clear overall spatial gradient in Hg wet deposition, increasing across sites from north to south.

  3. High mercury wet deposition at a “clean Air” site in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, James B.; Engle, Mark A.; Scholl, Martha A.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Brunette, Robert; Olson, Mark L.; Conroy, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric mercury deposition measurements are rare in tropical latitudes. Here we report on seven years (April 2005 to April 2012, with gaps) of wet Hg deposition measurements at a tropical wet forest in the Luquillo Mountains, northeastern Puerto Rico, U.S. Despite receiving unpolluted air off the Atlantic Ocean from northeasterly trade winds, during two complete years the site averaged 27.9 μg m–2 yr–1 wet Hg deposition, or about 30% more than Florida and the Gulf Coast, the highest deposition areas within the U.S. These high Hg deposition rates are driven in part by high rainfall, which averaged 2855 mm yr–1. The volume-weighted mean Hg concentration was 9.8 ng L–1, and was highest during summer and lowest during the winter dry season. Rainout of Hg (decreasing concentration with increasing rainfall depth) was minimal. The high Hg deposition was not supported by gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) at ground level, which remained near global background concentrations (<10 pg m–3). Rather, a strong positive correlation between Hg concentrations and the maximum height of rain detected within clouds (echo tops) suggests that droplets in high convective cloud tops scavenge GOM from above the mixing layer. The high wet Hg deposition at this “clean air” site suggests that other tropical areas may be hotspots for Hg deposition as well.

  4. Fast eutrophication assessment for stormwater wet detention ponds via fuzzy probit regression analysis under uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahsin, Subrina; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2016-02-01

    Stormwater wet detention ponds have been a commonly employed best management practice for stormwater management throughout the world for many years. In the past, the trophic state index values have been used to evaluate seasonal changes in water quality and rank lakes within a region or between several regions; yet, to date, there is no similar index for stormwater wet detention ponds. This study aimed to develop a new multivariate trophic state index (MTSI) suitable for conducting a rapid eutrophication assessment of stormwater wet detention ponds under uncertainty with respect to three typical physical and chemical properties. Six stormwater wet detention ponds in Florida were selected for demonstration of the new MTSI with respect to total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), and Secchi disk depth (SDD) as cognitive assessment metrics to sense eutrophication potential collectively and inform the environmental impact holistically. Due to the involvement of multiple endogenous variables (i.e., TN, TP, and SDD) for the eutrophication assessment simultaneously under uncertainty, fuzzy synthetic evaluation was applied to first standardize and synchronize the sources of uncertainty in the decision analysis. The ordered probit regression model was then formulated for assessment based on the concept of MTSI with the inputs from the fuzzy synthetic evaluation. It is indicative that the severe eutrophication condition is present during fall, which might be due to frequent heavy summer storm events contributing to high-nutrient inputs in these six ponds.

  5. Modeling seasonal surface temperature variations in secondary tropical dry forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Sen; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo

    2017-10-01

    Secondary tropical dry forests (TDFs) provide important ecosystem services such as carbon sequestration, biodiversity conservation, and nutrient cycle regulation. However, their biogeophysical processes at the canopy-atmosphere interface remain unknown, limiting our understanding of how this endangered ecosystem influences, and responds to the ongoing global warming. To facilitate future development of conservation policies, this study characterized the seasonal land surface temperature (LST) behavior of three successional stages (early, intermediate, and late) of a TDF, at the Santa Rosa National Park (SRNP), Costa Rica. A total of 38 Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) data and the Surface Reflectance (SR) product were utilized to model LST time series from July 2013 to July 2016 using a radiative transfer equation (RTE) algorithm. We further related the LST time series to seven vegetation indices which reflect different properties of TDFs, and soil moisture data obtained from a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). Results showed that the LST in the dry season was 15-20 K higher than in the wet season at SRNP. We found that the early successional stages were about 6-8 K warmer than the intermediate successional stages and were 9-10 K warmer than the late successional stages in the middle of the dry season; meanwhile, a minimum LST difference (0-1 K) was observed at the end of the wet season. Leaf phenology and canopy architecture explained most LST variations in both dry and wet seasons. However, our analysis revealed that it is precipitation that ultimately determines the LST variations through both biogeochemical (leaf phenology) and biogeophysical processes (evapotranspiration) of the plants. Results of this study could help physiological modeling studies in secondary TDFs.

  6. Interannual variability of seasonal rainfall over the Cape south coast of South Africa and synoptic type association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Christien J.; Landman, Willem A.

    2016-07-01

    The link between interannual variability of seasonal rainfall over the Cape south coast of South Africa and different synoptic types as well as selected teleconnections is explored. Synoptic circulation over the region is classified into different synoptic types by employing a clustering technique, the self-organizing map (SOM), on daily circulation data for the 33-year period from 1979 to 2011. Daily rainfall data are used to investigate interannual variability of seasonal rainfall within the context of the identified synoptic types. The anomalous frequency of occurrence of the different synoptic types for wet and for dry seasons differs significantly within the SOM space, except for austral spring. The main rainfall-producing synoptic types are to a large extent consistent for wet and dry seasons. The main rainfall-producing synoptic types have a notable larger contribution to seasonal rainfall totals during wet seasons than during dry seasons, consistent with a higher frequency of occurrence of the main rainfall-producing synoptic types during wet seasons compared to dry seasons. Dry seasons are characterized by a smaller contribution to seasonal rainfall totals by all the different synoptic types, but with the largest negative anomalies associated with low frequencies of the main rainfall-producing synoptic types. The frequencies of occurrence of specific configurations of ridging high pressure systems, cut-off lows and tropical-temperate troughs associated with rainfall are positively linked to interannual variability of seasonal rainfall. It is also shown that the distribution of synoptic types within the SOM space is linked to the Southern Annular Mode and El Niño Southern Oscillation, implying some predictability of intraseasonal variability at the seasonal time scale.

  7. Timing of Seasonal Sales.

    OpenAIRE

    Courty, Pascal; Hao, Li

    1999-01-01

    We present a model of timing of seasonal sales where stores choose several designs at the beginning of the season without knowing wich one, if any, will be fashionable. Fashionable designs have a chance to fetch high prices in fashion markets while non-fashionable ones must be sold in a discount market. In the beginning of the season, stores charge high prices in the hope of capturing their fashion market. As the end of the season approaches with goods still on the shelves, stores adjust down...

  8. Critical Casimir forces and anomalous wetting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l´Ecole Normale Supérieure, associé au CNRS et aux Universités Paris 6 et 7, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France. E-mail: balibar@lps.ens.fr. Abstract. We present a review of critical Casimir forces in connection with successive experiments on wetting near the critical ...

  9. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  10. Wetting and phase separation at surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    comparable to the RHS of figure 1. The averaging yields ψav(z, t) ≃ ψ0 = 0 in the bulk, where the phase-separation profiles are randomly oriented. However, a systematic behavior is seen at the surface. The wetting profiles are characterized by the zero-crossings of ψav(z, t) − ψ0. We denote the first and second zeros as.

  11. Wet flue gas desulphurization and new fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiil, S.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Michelsen, M.L.

    1998-04-01

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FDG plants is presented. The mechanism underlying the rate of dissolution of finely grained limestone particles was examined in a laboratory batch apparatus using acid titration. Three Danish limestones of different origin were tested. A transient, mass transport controlled, mathematical model was developed to describe the dissolution process. Model predictions were found to be qualitatively in good agreement with experimental data. Empirical correlations for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients in a pilot plant (falling-film column) were determined. The presence of inert particles in the liquid phase was found to decrease the rate of gas phase mass transport with up to 15%, though the effect could not be correlated. A detailed model for a wet FGD pilot plant, based on the falling film principle, was developed. All important rate determining steps, absorption of SO{sub 2}, oxidation of HSO{sub 3}{sup -}, dissolution of limestone, and crystallisation of gypsum were included. Model predictions were compared to experimental data such as gas phase concentration profiles of SO{sub 2}, slurry pH-profiles, solids contents of slurry, liquid phase concentrations, and residual limestone in the gypsum. The possibility of co-firing straw and coal was investigated in a full-scale power plant. No effects on the overall performance of the wet FGD plant were observed, though laboratory experiments with fine dust and fly ash from the full-scale experiments showed a decrease in limestone reactivity. (EG) EFP-95. 45 refs.; Also ph.d. thesis of Soeren Kiil

  12. Study of polycaprolactone wet electrospinning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kostakova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wet electrospinning is a useful method for 3-dimensional structure control of nanofibrous materials. This innovative technology uses a liquid collector instead of the metal one commonly used for standard electrospinning. The article compares the internal structural features of polycaprolactone (PCL nanofibrous materials prepared by both technologies. We analyze the influence of different water/ethanol compositions used as a liquid collector on the morphology of the resultant polycaprolactone nanofibrous materials. Scanning electron micro-photographs have revealed a bimodal structure in the wet electrospun materials composed of micro and nanofibers uniformly distributed across the sample bulk. We have shown that the full-faced, twofold fiber distribution is due to the solvent composition and is induced and enhanced by increasing the ethanol weight ratio. Moreover, the comparison of fibrous layers morphology obtained by wet and dry spinning have revealed that beads that frequently appeared in dry spun materials are created by Plateau-Rayleigh instability of the fraction of thicker fibers. Theoretical conditions for spontaneous and complete immersion of cylindrical fibers into a liquid collector are also derived here.

  13. Bioinspired Dynamic Wetting on Multiple Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengwei; Bian, Ruixin; Meng, Qing'an; Liu, Huan; Jiang, Lei

    2017-10-12

    Natural fibers have versatile strategies for interacting with water media and better adapting to the local environment, and these strategies offer inspiration for the development of artificial functional fibers with diverse applications. Wetting on fibers is a dynamic liquid-moving process on/in fibrous systems with various patterns, and the process is normally driven by the structural gradient, chemical gradient, elasticity of a single fiber, or the synergistic effect of these factors in multiple fibers in an integrated system in which the spatial geometry of the fibers is involved. Compared with the directional liquid movement on a single fiber, wetting on multiple fibers in both the micro- and macroscales is particularly fascinating, with various performances, including directional liquid transport, controllable liquid transfer, efficient liquid encapsulation, and capillary-induced fibrous coalescence. Based on these properties, fibrous materials offer an alternative open system for liquid manipulation that is applicable to various functional liquid materials. Here, recent achievements in bioinspired dynamic wetting on multiple fibers are highlighted, and perspectives on future directions are presented. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Cost estimation for advanced wet MOX plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Masahito; Kojima, Hisao [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1997-12-01

    PNC proposes a design concept of an advanced wet MOX plant based on low-level decontamination reprocessing plant and a simple fuel fabrication method. It significantly changes the boundary condition for design of reprocessing, fuel fabrication and reactor to alter the wet MOX cycle into a convenient form as simple as that of metal fuel cycle. According to the concept, the reprocessing process is substantially simplified by holding the decontamination level low, so that both reprocessing and fabrication processes can be installed in a single facility utilizing common utilities including a liquid waste processing facility. This report summarizes the results of the conceptual design of the plant and cost evaluation. Construction costs were estimated for the current plant constructed by means of the current technology, for the standard plant based on the improved technology of high-level decontamination cycle, and for the advanced plant based on the wet MOX cycle concept. It was concluded then that the construction costs in unit of the cost of the current plant were evaluated to be 0.60 for the standard plant (handling capacity 50 t/y) and 0.66 or 0.50 for the advanced plant (handling capacity 100 t/y or 50 t/y). (H. Baba)

  15. Florida's wet weather demonstration project : final report, January 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) established a wet-weather pavement marking demonstration project with goals to gather performance data, evaluate various wet-weather marking systems, and develop a measurement protocol for measuring ret...

  16. Atmospheric wet deposition of sulfur and nitrogen in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, Sichuan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Xiao, Weiyang; Jaffe, Daniel; Kota, Sri Harsha; Ying, Qi; Tang, Ya

    2015-04-01

    In the last two decades, remarkable ecological changes have been observed in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve (JNNR). Some of these changes might be related to excessive deposition of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N), but the relationship has not been quantified due to lack of monitoring data, particularly S and N deposition data. In this study, we investigated the concentrations, fluxes, and sources of S and N wet deposition in JNNR from April 2010 to May 2011. The results show that SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ concentrations in the wet deposition were 39.4-170.5, 6.2-34.8, and 0.2-61.2 μeq L(-1), with annual Volume-Weighted Mean (VWM) concentrations of 70.5, 12.7, and 13.4 μeq L(-1), respectively. Annual wet deposition fluxes of SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ were 8.06, 1.29, and 1.39 kg S(N)ha(-1), respectively, accounting for about 90% of annual atmospheric inputs of these species at the monitoring site. The results of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis show that fossil fuel combustion, agriculture, and aged sea salt contributed to 99% and 83% of annual wet deposition fluxes of SO4(2-) and NO3-, respectively. Agriculture alone contributed to 89% of annual wet deposition flux of NH4+. Although wet deposition in JNNR was polluted by anthropogenic acids, the acidity was largely neutralized by the Ca2+ from crust and 81% of wet deposition samples had a pH higher than 6.00. However, acid rain mainly caused by SO4(2-) continued to occur in the wet season, when ambient alkaline dust concentration was lower. Since anthropogenic emissions have elevated S and N deposition and caused acid rain in JNNR, further studies are needed to better quantify the regional sources and ecological effects of S and N deposition for JNNR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Unstable malaria in Sudan: the influence of the dry season. Malaria in areas of unstable and seasonal transmission. Lessons from Daraweesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, T G

    1999-01-01

    Most studies of the natural history of Plasmodium falciparum infection have been performed in areas of stable malaria transmission and the acquisition of immunity to malaria in individuals who live in such areas is well documented. For the past 10 years, we have monitored host-parasite relationsh......Most studies of the natural history of Plasmodium falciparum infection have been performed in areas of stable malaria transmission and the acquisition of immunity to malaria in individuals who live in such areas is well documented. For the past 10 years, we have monitored host......-parasite relationships in an area characterized by unstable and seasonal malaria of low transmission intensity. The work was performed in the village Daraweesh located in north-eastern Sudan 16 km from Gedaref town. The climate of the region is characterized by well-defined wet and dry periods with a short rainy season...... followed by a long dry season. In some years the rains fail and there is little precipitation even during the wet season. Malaria cases are rare in the dry season and during droughts. In years with rains, falciparum malaria sweeps through Daraweesh during the wet season and 20-40% of the entire population...

  18. Interplay of wetting and phase separation at surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sanjay

    2007-10-01

    We review our understanding of surface-directed spinodal decomposition (SDSD), i.e., the interplay of wetting and phase separation in an unstable AB mixture placed in contact with a wetting surface. In this context, we present results for two problems, viz., SDSD in a semi-infinite geometry with a completely wet surface; and SDSD in a thin-film geometry with partially wet surfaces.

  19. Assessing the production and economic benefits from preventing cows grazing on wet soils in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenson, Seth; Houlbrooke, David J; Beukes, Pierre C

    2016-10-01

    Intensive grazing by cattle on wet pasture can have a negative effect on soil physical quality and future pasture production. On a North Otago dairy farm in New Zealand, experimental plots were monitored for four years to assess whether preventing cow grazing of wet pastures during the milking season would improve soil structure and pasture production compared with unrestricted access to pastures. The DairyNZ Whole Farm Model was used to scale up results to a farm system level and ascertain the cost benefit of deferred grazing management. Soils under deferred grazing management had significantly higher total porosity, yet no significant improvement in macroporosity (values ranging between 0.112 and 0.146 m(3)  m(-3) ). Annual pasture production did not differ between the control and deferred grazing treatments, averaging 17.0 ± 3.8 and 17.9 ± 4.1 t DM ha(-1) year(-1) respectively (P > 0.05). Furthermore, whole farm modelling indicated that farm operating profit was reduced by NZ$1683 ha(-1) year(-1) (four-year average) under deferred grazing management. Deferring dairy cow grazing from wet Pallic soils in North Otago was effective in improving soil structure (measured as total soil porosity), yet did not lead to a significant increase in pasture production. Whole farm modelling indicated no economic benefit of removing cows from wet soils during the milking season. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Assessing pesticide wet deposition risk within a small agricultural watershed in the Southeastern Coastal Plain (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Thomas L; Coffin, Alisa W

    2017-02-15

    Pesticide volatilization and deposition with precipitation is widely documented and has been connected to adverse ecological impact. Here we describe a 3-yr study of current use and legacy pesticides in event-based rain samples within a 123-ha agricultural watershed. Crops in farm fields were documented quarterly with data used to estimate target compound use. The median number of pesticide detections in samples was 6. The fungicide, chlorothalonil which was used most intensively was detected in nearly all samples. It had the highest mean and peak concentrations with total deposition ≈0.1% of the estimated amount applied. The insecticide endosulfan also had relatively high use with behavior mirroring chlorothalonil. There was strong seasonal variation in concentration and depositional dynamics with the highest values measured during growing seasons. Similar behavior was observed with other compounds detected in rain samples with a general decrease in deposition and mean concentrations as use decreased. Comparison of measured concentrations to values associated with toxic impact on aquatic organisms indicated that chlorothalonil, endosulfan, chlorpyrifos, malathion and atrazine may contribute to adverse impact. The number of samples exceeding risk endpoints ranged from 1 to 77%. The highest value was for endosulfan; however its on-going phase-out is expected to reduce risks. Another finding was that the wet deposition of the herbicide, metolachlor exceeded measured runoff rates in the watershed by 5-fold. The study has demonstrated that localized pesticide wet deposition may present ecological risks and that volatilization and wet deposition is an important pesticide transport pathway at the local scale. Findings point to the need to include wet deposition in assessments of pesticide ecological risk and environmental fate. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. A new remote optical wetness sensor and its applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, B.G.; Berkowicz, S.M.; Jacobs, A.F.G.; Hillen, W.C.A.M.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    An optical wetness sensor (OWS) was developed for continuous surface wetness measurements. The sensor is an all-weather instrument that does not interfere with the surface wetting and drying process and is unaffected by solar radiation. It is equipped with its own light source with which it can scan

  2. Characteristics of wet work in the cleaning industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungbauer, F H W; Van Der Harst, J J; Schuttelaar, M L; Groothoff, J W; Coenraads, P J

    Wet work is the main cause of occupational contact dermatitis in the cleaning industry. Dermatologists and occupational physicians need to base their primary and secondary prevention for workers in the cleaning industry on the characteristics of wet work exposures. We quantified the burden of wet

  3. SAFARI 2000 Kalahari Transect CO2, Water Vapor, and Heat Flux, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Short-term measurements of carbon dioxide, water, and energy fluxes were collected at four locations along a mean annual precipitation gradient in southern Africa...

  4. SAFARI 2000 Kalahari Transect CO2, Water Vapor, and Heat Flux, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Short-term measurements of carbon dioxide, water, and energy fluxes were collected at four locations along a mean annual precipitation gradient in southern...

  5. SAFARI 2000 ETA Atmospheric Model Data, Wet and Dry Seasons 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — With modern computer power now capable of making mesoscale model output available in real time in the operational environment, increased attention has been given to...

  6. SAFARI 2000 Leaf Measurements of Dominant Trees, Kalahari Sites, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Data presented in this data set were collected during an intensive field campaign in Botswana between February 28 and March 18, 2000 along the Kalahari...

  7. SAFARI 2000 Leaf Measurements of Dominant Trees, Kalahari Sites, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Data presented in this data set were collected during an intensive field campaign in Botswana between February 28 and March 18, 2000 along the Kalahari Transect as...

  8. SAFARI 2000 AOT and Column Water Vapor, Kalahari Transect, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The data presented here include the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and column water vapor measurements taken at sites along the Kalahari Transect using a...

  9. Spatial autocorrelation of West Nile virus vector mosquito abundance in a seasonally wet suburban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trawinski, P. R.; Mackay, D. S.

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify and model spatial dependence in mosquito vector populations and develop predictions for unsampled locations using geostatistics. Mosquito control program trap sites are often located too far apart to detect spatial dependence but the results show that integration of spatial data over time for Cx. pipiens-restuans and according to meteorological conditions for Ae. vexans enables spatial analysis of sparse sample data. This study shows that mosquito abundance is spatially correlated and that spatial dependence differs between Cx. pipiens-restuans and Ae. vexans mosquitoes.

  10. Observations of Runoff Generation During the Dry/Wet Seasonal Transition in Panama

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ogden, Fred L

    2005-01-01

    .... Instrumentation installed include an eddy-correlation flux system on a 36 m tall tower near Cerro Pelado, and throughfall troughs, soil moisture sensors, rain gages, interflow collector, piezometers...

  11. SAFARI 2000 Leaf-Level VOC Emissions, Maun, Botswana, Wet Season 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) comprise a significant proportion of trace gases in the atmospheric environment and play an important role in the...

  12. SAFARI 2000 Leaf-Level VOC Emissions, Maun, Botswana, Wet Season 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) comprise a significant proportion of trace gases in the atmospheric environment and play an important role in...

  13. SAFARI 2000 BVOC Measurements at Skukuza and Maun Flux Towers, Wet Season 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions were measured in a Colophospermum mopane woodland near Maun, Botswana, and in a Combretum-Acacia savanna in...

  14. SAFARI 2000 BVOC Measurements at Skukuza and Maun Flux Towers, Wet Season 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions were measured in a Colophospermum mopane woodland near Maun, Botswana, and in a Combretum-Acacia...

  15. Survival of Trichomonas vaginalis in wet preparation and on wet mount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Kevin A; Rabe, Lorna K; Meyn, Leslie A; Hillier, Sharon L

    2013-09-01

    Microscopy is an insensitive method for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis, but is widely used because it is both rapid and inexpensive. Diagnosis of trichomoniasis by microscopy requires that motile forms be identified in vaginal fluid samples. However, microscopy cannot always be performed immediately after sample collection. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of sample storage at room temperature on trichomonad motility. Vaginal swab samples from 77 women positive for T vaginalis infection were collected to determine the impact of storage on wet preparations (swabs in plastic tubes with saline) and wet mounts (samples placed onto a glass slide with a coverslip). Samples were read at 400× every 30 min for the first hour and then once per hour thereafter until there were no motile trichomonads observed. For wet preparations, motility was 100% at 30 min, 99% at 60 min and decreased by 3%-15% each subsequent hour, with samples having a lower density of trichomonads losing motility more quickly. Trichomonad motility diminished more rapidly in wet mounts compared with wet preparations, with a 20% decrement in motility in 60 min. These data suggest that vaginal fluid samples for diagnosis of trichomoniasis should be stored in saline rather than on microscope slides until they are examined under the microscope and samples should be evaluated by microscopy within an hour of collection. These findings also suggest that clinical sites which cannot perform microscopy within 1 h of sample collection should consider the use of other diagnostic tests.

  16. Simulations of tropical rainforest albedo: is canopy wetness important?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia N.M. Yanagi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate information on surface albedo is essential for climate modelling, especially for regions such as Amazonia, where the response of the regional atmospheric circulation to the changes on surface albedo is strong. Previous studies have indicated that models are still unable to correctly reproduce details of the seasonal variation of surface albedo. Therefore, it was investigated the role of canopy wetness on the simulated albedo of a tropical rainforest by modifying the IBIS canopy radiation transfer code to incorporate the effects of canopy wetness on the vegetation reflectance. In this study, simulations were run using three versions of the land surface/ecosystem model IBIS: the standard version, the same version recalibrated to fit the data of albedo on tropical rainforests and a modified version that incorporates the effects of canopy wetness on surface albedo, for three sites in the Amazon forest at hourly and monthly scales. The results demonstrated that, at the hourly time scale, the incorporation of canopy wetness on the calculations of radiative transfer substantially improves the simulations results, whereas at the monthly scale these changes do not substantially modify the simulated albedo.A informação precisa do albedo superficial é essencial para a modelagem climática, especialmente para regiões, tais como a Amazônia, onde a resposta da circulação atmosférica regional às mudanças do albedo superficial é forte. Estudos preliminares têm indicado que os modelos ainda não são capazes de reproduzir corretamente os detalhes da variação sazonal do albedo superficial. Portanto, investigou-se o papel do molhamento foliar sobre o albedo simulado de uma floresta tropical por meio da modificação do código de transferência radiativa no dossel do IBIS para incorporar os efeitos do molhamento do dossel sobre a refletância da vegetação. Neste estudo, procederamse simulações usando três versões do modelo superf

  17. Seasonal Biophysical Dynamics of the Amazon from Space Using MODIS Vegetation Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete, A. R.; Didan, K.; Ratana, P.; Ferreira, L.

    2002-12-01

    We utilized the Terra- Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Vegetation Index (VI) products to analyze the seasonal and spatial patterns of photosynthetic vegetation activity over the Amazon Basin and surrounding regions of Brazil. The seasonal patterns of vegetation activity were studied along two, eco-climatic transects extending from (1) the cerrado region (Brasilia National Park) to the seasonal tropical forest (Tapajos National Forest) and (2) the caatinga biome to the seasonal and per-humid tropical forests. In addition to the climatic transects, we also investigated the seasonal dynamics of altered, land conversion areas associated with pastures and clearcutting land use activities. Both the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) at 250-m, 500-m, and 1-km were used to extract seasonal profile curves. The quality assurance (QA) information of the output products was used in noise removal and data filtering prior to the generation of the seasonal profiles. Histogram analyses were also performed at coarse (biome) scale and fine, site intensive (flux towers) scale. The seasonal patterns of the cerrado and caatinga were very pronounced with distinct dry and wet seasonal trends. We observed decreasing dry-wet seasonal patterns in the transitional areas near Araguaia National Park. In contrast, the seasonal behavior of the tropical forests were much harder to assess, but indicated slight seasonal trends that ran counter to rainfall activity. This may be attributed to new leaf growth in the dry season. We further found MODIS VI seasonal patterns to vary significantly in land converted and land degraded areas.

  18. The sensitivity of wood production to seasonal and interannual variations in climate in a lowland Amazonian rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Lucy; Malhi, Y; Silva-Espejo, J E; Farfán-Amézquita, F; Halladay, K; Doughty, C E; Meir, P; Phillips, O L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding climatic controls on tropical forest productivity is key to developing more reliable models for predicting how tropical biomes may respond to climate change. Currently there is no consensus on which factors control seasonal changes in tropical forest tree growth. This study reports the first comprehensive plot-level description of the seasonality of growth in a Peruvian tropical forest. We test whether seasonal and interannual variations in climate are correlated with changes in biomass increment, and whether such relationships differ among trees with different functional traits. We found that biomass increments, measured every 3 months on the two plots, were reduced by between 40 and 55% in the peak dry season (July-September) relative to peak wet season (January-March). The seasonal patterns of biomass accumulation are significantly (p < 0.01) associated with seasonal patterns of rainfall and soil water content; however, this may reflect a synchrony of seasonal cycles rather than direct physiological controls on tree growth rates. The strength of the growth seasonality response among trees is significantly correlated to functional traits: consistent with a hypothesised trade-off between maximum potential growth rate and hydraulic safety, tall and fast-growing trees with broad stems had the most strongly seasonal biomass accumulation, suggesting that they are more productive in the wet season, but more vulnerable to water limitation in the dry season.

  19. [Seasonality and contribution to acid rain of the carbon abundance in rainwater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Song, Zhi-guang; Liu, Jun-feng; Wang, Cui-ping

    2008-02-01

    This paper reports the results from a study of the carbon abundance in rainwater of Guangzhou city, China. The determination of TOC, DOC, POC and PEC helps to study the seasonality of carbon abundance and its contribution to the acid rain. The results display the fact that the average contents of TOC, DOC, POC and PEC are 7.10 mg/L, 3.58 mg/L, 3.60 mg/L and 0.72 mg/L, respectively. These results confirm the deep effect of the organic pollutant to the rain. The seasonality exists in the carbon abundance of rainwater. The contents of TOC and DOC are up to the maximum in spring and the minimum in summer; the contribution of POC to TOC in summer is obviously higher than that in other seasons; and the relative content of POC is clearly higher in dry season than that in wet season. The seasonality reflects the more emission of the total pollutant in spring and the solid particle pollutant in summer than those in other seasons. Moreover, the emission of the organic pollutant from the mobile vehicles is more obvious in dry season than that in wet season. The contents of TOC and DOC have the negative correlation to the pH values, which confirms the contribution effect of the organic pollutant, such as vehicle emission, to the acid rain.

  20. Groundwater dependent pools in seasonal and permanent streams in the Clare Valley of South Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Bestland

    2017-02-01

    In this Mediterranean climate with cool wet winters and dry hot summers strong salinity changes (up to 2.5 times due to seasonal cycles of wetting and drying were observed in surface water. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope values from pool sites showed strong evaporative enrichment during the dry season with up to 50% net evaporation calculated. Water isotopes from groundwater, however, cluster at the depleted end of the local meteoric water line and most do not show change despite significant seasonal salinity changes. Strontium isotope values and concentrations from the pools over the one year period do not define a mixing relationship. Instead, most pool sites have unchanging strontium isotope values despite the large seasonal change in salinity indicating strong evaporation of groundwater fed pools during this drought year.

  1. Seasonal diet shift in a Tetragonopterinae (Osteichthyes, Characidae) from the Ubatiba River, RJ, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, R; Rezende, C F

    2003-02-01

    In the present study, we describe feeding habits of Deuterodon sp. from the Ubatiba River and explore if diet changes according to a temporal cycle of dry and wet seasons. We observed that Deuterodon sp. fed on an extremely high diversity of items ranging from organic matter, sediment (sand plus quartz parts), algae, seeds and leaves to animal organisms, such as, crustaceans, oligochaets and several life stages of terrestrial and aquatic insects, indicating an omnivorous diet. An important shift in the use of feeding resources was also registered; animal and vegetal items had alternated importance between both seasons. Allochthonous vs. autochthonous items analysis showed predominance of allochthonous items during dry season while no significant differences were registered during wet season.

  2. Seasonal diet shift in a Tetragonopterinae (Oateichthyes, Characidae from the Ubatiba river, RJ, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzoni R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we describe feeding habits of Deuterodon sp. from the Ubatiba River and explore if diet changes according to a temporal cycle of dry and wet seasons. We observed that Deuterodon sp. fed on an extremely high diversity of items ranging from organic matter, sediment (sand plus quartz parts, algae, seeds and leaves to animal organisms, such as, crustaceans, oligochaets and several life stages of terrestrial and aquatic insects, indicating an omnivorous diet. An important shift in the use of feeding resources was also registered; animal and vegetal items had alternated importance between both seasons. Allochthonous vs. autochthonous items analysis showed predominance of allochthonous items during dry season while no significant differences were registered during wet season.

  3. Wet oxidation processes for water pollution remediation

    OpenAIRE

    García Molina, Verónica

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to test the efficiency of wet oxidation processes when treating several types of aqueous wastes. On one side its performance for the abatement of chloro-organic aromatic toxic pollutants, such as 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol has been studied. On the other hand, wastewater from pulp and paper mills, which has been reported to be an indirect source of entry of chlorophenols in the aquatic environment, has been investigated. More in detail, it has bee...

  4. Collapse of granular media subjected to wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Korchi Fatima Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the collapse of granular materials subjected to wetting action. For soils, the collapse potential depends on several parameters such as liquid limit, matric suction, compactness, initial water content and the amount of fine particles. The effect of grain size, which plays a key role in the rearrangement of grains, remains little studied and poorly understood. To investigate the capillary origin of the collapse phenomenon, we present an experimental study on macroscopic and local scales. Our results show the effect of grain size and water content on collapse.

  5. Seasonal Prediction of Taiwan's Streamflow Using Teleconnection Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Jeng; Lee, Tsung-Yu

    2017-04-01

    Seasonal streamflow as an integrated response to complex hydro-climatic processes can be subject to activity of prevailing weather systems potentially modulated by large-scale climate oscillations (e.g., El Niño-Southern Oscillation, ENSO). To develop a seamless seasonal forecasting system in Taiwan, this study assesses how significant Taiwan's precipitation and streamflow in different seasons correlate with selected teleconnection patterns. Long-term precipitation and streamflow data in three major precipitation seasons, namely the spring rains (February to April), Mei-Yu (May and June), and typhoon (July to September) seasons, are derived at 28 upstream and 13 downstream catchments in Taiwan. The three seasons depict a complete wet period of Taiwan as well as many regions bearing similar climatic conditions in East Asia. Lagged correlation analysis is then performed to investigate how the precipitation and streamflow data correlate with predominant teleconnection indices at varied lead times. Teleconnection indices are selected only if they show certain linkage with weather systems and activity in the three seasons based on previous literature. For instance, the ENSO and Quasi-Biennial Oscillation, proven to influence East Asian climate across seasons and summer typhoon activity, respectively, are included in the list of climate indices for correlation analysis. Significant correlations found between Taiwan's precipitation and streamflow and teleconnection indices are further examined by a climate regime shift (CRS) test to identify any abrupt changes in the correlations. The understanding of existing CRS is useful for informing the forecasting system of the changes in the predictor-predictand relationship. To evaluate prediction skill in the three seasons and skill differences between precipitation and streamflow, hindcasting experiments of precipitation and streamflow are conducted using stepwise linear regression models. Discussion and suggestions for coping

  6. Standard test method for determining atmospheric chloride deposition rate by wet candle method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a wet candle device and its use in measuring atmospheric chloride deposition (amount of chloride salts deposited from the atmosphere on a given area per unit time). 1.2 Data on atmospheric chloride deposition can be useful in classifying the corrosivity of a specific area, such as an atmospheric test site. Caution must be exercised, however, to take into consideration the season because airborne chlorides vary widely between seasons. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Seasonality of Suicidal Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor T. Postolache

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A seasonal suicide peak in spring is highly replicated, but its specific cause is unknown. We reviewed the literature on suicide risk factors which can be associated with seasonal variation of suicide rates, assessing published articles from 1979 to 2011. Such risk factors include environmental determinants, including physical, chemical, and biological factors. We also summarized the influence of potential demographic and clinical characteristics such as age, gender, month of birth, socioeconomic status, methods of prior suicide attempt, and comorbid psychiatric and medical diseases. Comprehensive evaluation of risk factors which could be linked to the seasonal variation in suicide is important, not only to identify the major driving force for the seasonality of suicide, but also could lead to better suicide prevention in general.

  8. 2012 Swimming Season Factsheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  9. A wetting and drying scheme for ROMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, John C.; Defne, Zafer; Haas, Kevin; Arango, Hernan G.

    2013-01-01

    The processes of wetting and drying have many important physical and biological impacts on shallow water systems. Inundation and dewatering effects on coastal mud flats and beaches occur on various time scales ranging from storm surge, periodic rise and fall of the tide, to infragravity wave motions. To correctly simulate these physical processes with a numerical model requires the capability of the computational cells to become inundated and dewatered. In this paper, we describe a method for wetting and drying based on an approach consistent with a cell-face blocking algorithm. The method allows water to always flow into any cell, but prevents outflow from a cell when the total depth in that cell is less than a user defined critical value. We describe the method, the implementation into the three-dimensional Regional Oceanographic Modeling System (ROMS), and exhibit the new capability under three scenarios: an analytical expression for shallow water flows, a dam break test case, and a realistic application to part of a wetland area along the Georgia Coast, USA.

  10. Wet paper codes with improved embedding efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridrich, Jessica; Goljan, Miroslav; Soukal, David

    2006-02-01

    Construction of steganographic schemes in which the sender and the receiver do not share the knowledge about the location of embedding changes requires wet paper codes. Steganography with non-shared selection channels empowers the sender as now he is able to embed secret data by utilizing arbitrary side information, including a high-resolution version of the cover object (perturbed quantization steganography), local properties of the cover (adaptive steganography), and even pure randomness, e.g., coin flipping, for public key steganography. In this paper, we propose a new approach to wet paper codes using random linear codes of small codimension that at the same time improves the embedding efficiency-the number of message bits embedded per embedding change. We describe a practical algorithm, test its performance experimentally, and compare the results to theoretically achievable bounds. We point out an interesting ripple phenomenon that should be taken into account by practitioners. The proposed coding method can be modularly combined with most steganographic schemes to allow them to use non-shared selection channels and, at the same time, improve their security by decreasing the number of embedding changes.

  11. Further progress in watermark evaluation testbed (WET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung C.; Lin, Eugene T.; Guitart, Oriol; Delp, Edward J., III

    2005-03-01

    While Digital Watermarking has received much attention in recent years, it is still a relatively young technology. There are few accepted tools/metrics that can be used to evaluate the suitability of a watermarking technique for a specific application. This lack of a universally adopted set of metrics/methods has motivated us to develop a web-based digital watermark evaluation system called the Watermark Evaluation Testbed or WET. There have been more improvements over the first version of WET. We implemented batch mode with a queue that allows for user submitted jobs. In addition to StirMark 3.1 as an attack module, we added attack modules based on StirMark 4.0. For a new image fidelity measure, we evaluate conditional entropy as an image fidelity measure for different watermarking algorithms and different attacks. Also, we show the results of curve fitting the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis data using the Parzen window density estimation. The curve fits the data closely while having only two parameters to estimate.

  12. Seasonal groundwater turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Nordell, Bo; Engström, Maria

    2006-01-01

      Seasonal air temperature variations and corresponding changes in groundwater temperature cause convective movements in groundwater similar to the seasonal turnover in lakes. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the natural conditions for thermally driven groundwater convection to take place. Thermally driven convection could be triggered by a horizontal groundwater flow, Convection then starts at a considerably lower Rayleigh number (Ra) than the general critical Rayleigh ...

  13. Wet atmospheric deposition of organic carbon: An underreported source of carbon to watersheds in the northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavorivska, Lidiia; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Grimm, Jeffrey W.

    2017-03-01

    We measured wet atmospheric deposition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) over 6 years at a network of 12 monitoring sites across Pennsylvania, quantified rates of wet DOC deposition, and developed the first statewide estimates of inputs of DOC to watersheds via wet deposition. Average annual volume-weighted concentration of DOC was 0.71 mg C L-1. Annual wet deposition fluxes of DOC varied between sites and years, ranging from 3 to 13 kg C ha-1 yr-1, with an average value of 8 kg C ha-1 yr-1 across all sites and years and are of the same order of magnitude as literature values for riverine organic carbon fluxes in the northeastern United States. The rates of wet DOC deposition showed a pronounced seasonality and spatial distribution, with highest deposition rates observed in the summer, especially at the sites located in western Pennsylvania. Significant links between DOC and inorganic constituents in precipitation, such as sulfate and inorganic nitrogen forms, point to the similarity of sources and atmospheric processing and suggest that DOC may potentially affect their atmospheric transport and ecological fate. Observational data resulting from this study underscore the potential significance of atmospheric deposition as an external input of reactive carbon species to watersheds and may be useful for constraining atmospheric carbon models and evaluating atmospheric influences on ecosystems.

  14. Seasonal Variation of Water Quality and Phytoplankton Response Patterns in Daya Bay, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Ying Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Data collected from 12 stations in Daya Bay in different seasons in 2002 revealed the relation between water quality and phytoplankton response patterns. The results showed that Daya Bay could be divided into wet and dry seasons by multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis indicated that temperature, chlorophyll a and nutrients were important components during the wet season (summer and autumn. The salinity and dissolved oxygen were the main environmental factors in the dry season (winter and spring. According to non-metric multidimensional scaling, there was a shift from the large diatoms in the dry season to the smaller line-chain taxa in the wet season with the condition of a high dissolved inorganic nitrogen and nitrogen to phosphorous concentration ratio. Nutrient changes can thus alter the phytoplankton community composition and biomass, especially near the aquaculture farm areas. There was no evidence of an effect of thermal water from the nearby nuclear power plants on the observed changes in phytoplankton community and biomass in 2002.

  15. Seasonal variation of water quality and phytoplankton response patterns in Daya Bay, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cui-Ci; Wang, You-Shao; Wu, Mei-Lin; Dong, Jun-De; Wang, Yu-Tu; Sun, Fu-Lin; Zhang, Yan-Ying

    2011-07-01

    Data collected from 12 stations in Daya Bay in different seasons in 2002 revealed the relation between water quality and phytoplankton response patterns. The results showed that Daya Bay could be divided into wet and dry seasons by multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis indicated that temperature, chlorophyll a and nutrients were important components during the wet season (summer and autumn). The salinity and dissolved oxygen were the main environmental factors in the dry season (winter and spring). According to non-metric multidimensional scaling, there was a shift from the large diatoms in the dry season to the smaller line-chain taxa in the wet season with the condition of a high dissolved inorganic nitrogen and nitrogen to phosphorous concentration ratio. Nutrient changes can thus alter the phytoplankton community composition and biomass, especially near the aquaculture farm areas. There was no evidence of an effect of thermal water from the nearby nuclear power plants on the observed changes in phytoplankton community and biomass in 2002.

  16. Response of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) to seasonal changes in rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garstang, Michael; Davis, Robert E; Leggett, Keith; Frauenfeld, Oliver W; Greco, Steven; Zipser, Edward; Peterson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The factors that trigger sudden, seasonal movements of elephants are uncertain. We hypothesized that savannah elephant movements at the end of the dry season may be a response to their detection of distant thunderstorms. Nine elephants carrying Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers were tracked over seven years in the extremely dry and rugged region of northwestern Namibia. The transition date from dry to wet season conditions was determined annually from surface- and satellite-derived rainfall. The distance, location, and timing of rain events relative to the elephants were determined using the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite precipitation observations. Behavioral Change Point Analysis (BCPA) was applied to four of these seven years demonstrating a response in movement of these elephants to intra- and inter-seasonal occurrences of rainfall. Statistically significant changes in movement were found prior to or near the time of onset of the wet season and before the occurrence of wet episodes within the dry season, although the characteristics of the movement changes are not consistent between elephants and years. Elephants in overlapping ranges, but following separate tracks, exhibited statistically valid non-random near-simultaneous changes in movements when rainfall was occurring more than 100 km from their location. While the environmental trigger that causes these excursions remains uncertain, rain-system generated infrasound, which can travel such distances and be detected by elephants, is a possible trigger for such changes in movement.

  17. WetLab-2: Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler Providing PCR Capability on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Macarena; Schonfeld, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The WetLab-2 system will provide sample preparation and qRT-PCR analysis on-board the ISS, a capability to enable using the ISS as a real laboratory. The system will be validated on SpX-7, and is planned for its first PI use on SpX-9.

  18. Doubly Reentrant Cavities Prevent Catastrophic Wetting Transitions on Intrinsically Wetting Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Domingues, Eddy

    2017-06-05

    Omniphobic surfaces, i.e. which repel all known liquids, have proven of value in applications ranging from membrane distillation to underwater drag reduction. A limitation of currently employed omniphobic surfaces is that they rely on perfluorinated coatings, increasing cost and environmental impact, and preventing applications in harsh environments. There is, thus, a keen interest in rendering conventional materials, such as plastics, omniphobic by micro/nano-texturing rather than via chemical make-up, with notable success having been achieved for silica surfaces with doubly reentrant micropillars. However, we found a critical limitation of microtextures comprising of pillars that they undergo catastrophic wetting transitions (apparent contact angles, θr → 0° from θr > 90°) in the presence of localized physical damages/defects or on immersion in wetting liquids. In response, a doubly reentrant cavity microtexture is introduced, which can prevent catastrophic wetting transitions in the presence of localized structural damage/defects or on immersion in wetting liquids. Remarkably, our silica surfaces with doubly reentrant cavities could exhibited apparent contact angles, θr ≈ 135° for mineral oil, where the intrinsic contact angle, θo ≈ 20°. Further, when immersed in mineral oil or water, doubly reentrant microtextures in silica (θo ≈ 40° for water) were not penetrated even after several days of investigation. Thus, microtextures comprising of doubly reentrant cavities might enable applications of conventional materials without chemical modifications, especially in scenarios that are prone to localized damages or immersion in wetting liquids, e.g. hydrodynamic drag reduction and membrane distillation.

  19. [Seasonal differences in the leaf hydraulic conductance of mature Acacia mangium in response to its leaf water use and photosynthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping; Sun, Gu-Chou; Ni, Guang-Yan; Zeng, Xiao-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In this study, measurements were made on the leaf water potential (psi1), stomatal conductance (g(s)), transpiration rate, leaf area index, and sapwood area of mature Acacia mangium, aimed to understand the relationships of the leaf hydraulic conductance (K1) with the leaf water use and photosynthetic characteristics of the A. mangium in wet season (May) and dry season (November). The ratio of sapwood area to leaf area (A(sp)/A(cl)) of the larger trees with an average height of 20 m and a diameter at breast height (DBH) of 0.26 m was 8.5% higher than that of the smaller trees with an average height of 14.5 m and a DBH of 0.19 m, suggesting that the larger trees had a higher water flux in their leaf xylem, which facilitated the water use of canopy leaf. The analysis on the vulnerability curve of the xylem showed that when the K1 decreased by 50%, the psi1 in wet season and dry season was -1.41 and -1.55 MPa, respectively, and the vulnerability of the xylem cavitation was higher in dry season than in wet season. The K1 peak value in wet season and dry season was 5.5 and 4.5 mmol x m(-2) x s(-1) x MPa(-1), and the maximum transpiration rate (T(r max)) was 3.6 and 1.8 mmol x m(-2) x s(-1), respectively. Both the K1 and T(r max), were obviously higher in wet season than in dry season. Within a day, the K1 and T(r), fluctuated many times, reflecting the reciprocated cycle of the xylem cavitation and refilling. The leaf stomatal closure occurred when the K1 declined over 50% or the psi1 reached -1.6 MPa. The g(s) would be maintained at a high level till the K1 declined over 50%. The correlation between the hydraulic conductance and photosynthetic rate was more significant in dry season than in wet season. The loss of leaf hydraulic conductance induced by seasonal change could be the causes of the decrease of T(r) and CO2 gas exchange.

  20. Shakedown modeling of unsaturated expansive soils subjected to wetting and drying cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowamooz Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to model the behavior of unsaturated expansive soils subjected to wetting and drying cycles because they alter significantly their hydro-mechanical behavior and therefore cause a huge differential settlement on shallow foundations of the structure. A simplified model based on the shakedown theory (Zarka method has been developed in this study for unsaturated expansive soils subjected to wetting and drying cycles. This method determines directly the stabilized limit state and consequently saves the calculation time. The parameters of the proposed shakedown-based model are calibrated by the suction-controlled oedometer tests obtained for an expansive soil compacted at loose and dense initial states, and then validated for the same soil compacted at intermediate initial state by comparing the model predictions with the experimental results. Finally, the finite element equations for the proposed shakedown model are developed and these equations are implemented in the finite element code CAST3M to carry out the full-scale calculations. A 2D geometry made up of the expansive soil compacted at the intermediate state is subjected to successive extremely dry and wet seasons for the different applied vertical loads. The results show the swelling plastic deformations for the lower vertical stresses and the shrinkage deformations for the higher vertical stresses.

  1. Wet snow hazard for power lines: a forecast and alert system applied in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bonelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Wet snow icing accretion on power lines is a real problem in Italy, causing failures on high and medium voltage power supplies during the cold season. The phenomenon is a process in which many large and local scale variables contribute in a complex way and not completely understood. A numerical weather forecast can be used to select areas where wet snow accretion has an high probability of occurring, but a specific accretion model must also be used to estimate the load of an ice sleeve and its hazard. All the information must be carefully selected and shown to the electric grid operator in order to warn him promptly.

    The authors describe a prototype of forecast and alert system, WOLF (Wet snow Overload aLert and Forecast, developed and applied in Italy. The prototype elaborates the output of a numerical weather prediction model, as temperature, precipitation, wind intensity and direction, to determine the areas of potential risk for the power lines. Then an accretion model computes the ice sleeves' load for different conductor diameters. The highest values are selected and displayed on a WEB-GIS application principally devoted to the electric operator, but also to more expert users. Some experimental field campaigns have been conducted to better parameterize the accretion model. Comparisons between real accidents and forecasted icing conditions are presented and discussed.

  2. Seasonal patterns in energy partitioning of two freshwater marsh ecosystems in the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkle L. Malone; Christina L. Staudhammer; Henry W. Loescher; Paulo Olivas; Steven F. Oberbauer; Michael G. Ryan; Jessica Schedlbauer; Gregory Starr

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed energy partitioning in short- and long-hydroperiod freshwater marsh ecosystems in the Florida Everglades by examining energy balance components (eddy covariance derived latent energy (LE) and sensible heat (H) flux). The study period included several wet and dry seasons and variable water levels, allowing us to gain better mechanistic information about the...

  3. Identifying Seasonal Groundwater Recharge Using Environmental Stable Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Fu Yeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the stable isotope values of oxygen and hydrogen were used to identify the seasonal contribution ratios of precipitation to groundwater recharge in the Hualien River basin of eastern Taiwan. The differences and correlations of isotopes in various water bodies were examined to evaluate the groundwater recharge sources for the Hualian River basin and the interrelations between groundwater and surface water. Proportions of recharge sources were calculated based on the results of the mass balance analysis of the isotope composition of hydrogen and oxygen in the basin. Mountain river water accounted for 83% and plain rainfall accounted for 17% of the groundwater recharge in the Huanlian River basin. Using the mean d-values, a comparison of d-values of precipitation and groundwater indicates the groundwater consists of 75.5% wet seasonal sources and 24.5% dry seasonal sources, representing a distinct seasonal variation of groundwater recharge in the study area. Comparisons between hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in rainwater showed that differences in the amount of rainfall resulted in depleted oxygen and hydrogen isotopes for precipitation in wet seasons as compared to dry seasons. The river water contained more depleted hydrogen and oxygen isotopes than was the case for precipitation, implying that the river water mainly came from the upstream catchment. In addition, the hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in the groundwater slightly deviated from the hydrogen and oxygen isotopic meteoric water line in Huanlian. Therefore, the groundwater in this basin might be a mixture of river water and precipitation, resulting in the effect of the river water recharge being greater than that of rainfall infiltration.

  4. Freshwater security in agricultural watersheds of the wet-dry tropics, Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hund, S. V.; Johnson, M. S.; Morillas, L.; Allen, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    In agricultural watersheds of the wet-dry tropics in Central America, communities often experience water scarcity. During the long dry season, water conflicts between household water use and agricultural water use emerge. Despite the frequent water shortages, scientific knowledge on the response of the coupled surface water-groundwater system to the high inter-annual rainfall variability and to societal water use is limited. Using a socio-hydrological system approach, we studied the surface water - groundwater system for the Potrero and Caimital rivers and aquifer in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. High frequency monitoring of 5 river stations, 3 groundwater wells and a meteorological station including eddy covariance measurements of evapotranspiration began in June 2014. Urban and rural household water extraction data was obtained from water agencies. Agricultural water use was estimated using evapotranspiration measurements and extraction estimates from local farms. The dataset is further supplemented with MODIS evapotranspiration estimates and vegetation indices. Here we present responses between water use and the hydrological system as conditioned by rainfall variability throughout the wet and dry seasons. This approach will allow exploring feedback processes between rainfall variability, water use and water availability, such enabling the development of water management strategies and improve the freshwater security of communities.

  5. Proteomic effects of wet cupping (Al-hijamah).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaiman, Amer A

    2018-01-01

    Wet cupping (Al-hijamah) is a therapeutic technique practiced worldwide as a part of the Unani system of medicine. It involves bloodletting from acupoints on a patient's skin to produce a therapeutic outcome. A thorough review of research articles on wet cupping with relevance to proteomics field that are indexed by Google Scholar, PubMed, and/or Science Direct databases was performed. Eight original research articles were summarized in this paper. Overall, wet cupping did not have a significant effect on C-reactive protein, Hsp-27, sister chromatid exchanges, and cell replication index. In contrast, wet cupping was found to produce higher oxygen saturation, eliminate lactate from subcutaneous tissues, remove blood containing higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide, and produce higher activity of myeloperoxidase. The proteomic effects of wet cupping therapy have not been adequately investigated. Thus, future studies on wet cupping that use systemic and sound protocols to avoid bias should be conducted.

  6. Wet-cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagil, Suleyman Murat; Celik, Huseyin Tugrul; Ciftci, Sefa; Kazanci, Fatmanur Hacievliyagil; Arslan, Muzeyyen; Erdamar, Nazan; Kesik, Yunus; Erdamar, Husamettin; Dane, Senol

    2014-12-01

    Wet-cupping therapy is one of the oldest known medical techniques. Although it is widely used in various conditions such as acute\\chronic inflammation, infectious diseases, and immune system disorders, its mechanism of action is not fully known. In this study, we investigated the oxidative status as the first step to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of wet cupping. Wet cupping therapy is implemented to 31 healthy volunteers. Venous blood samples and Wet cupping blood samples were taken concurrently. Serum nitricoxide, malondialdehyde levels and activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase were measured spectrophotometrically. Wet cupping blood had higher activity of myeloperoxidase, lower activity of superoxide dismutase, higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitricoxide compared to the venous blood. Wet cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tympanoplasty: does dry or wet temporalis fascia graft matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G B; Kumar, D; Aggarwal, K; Garg, S; Arora, R; Kumar, S

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the success rate of dry and wet temporalis fascia grafts in type I underlay tympanoplasty. A prospective, randomised study was conducted. One hundred adult patients (males and females) with chronic suppurative otitis media (mucosal type) were divided into 2 groups of 50 each: one group underwent dry graft tympanoplasty and the other underwent wet graft tympanoplasty. Fibroblast count was calculated in dry and wet grafts. The dry graft and wet graft groups had overall surgical success rates of 82 and 90 per cent, respectively; this finding was not statistically significant. A statistically significant high fibroblast count was observed in wet grafts, but it did not correlate with surgical success. A dry or wet temporalis fascia graft does not influence the outcome of tympanoplasty type I.

  8. Wick wetting for water condensation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Susanne Vera; Spielman, Steven Russel; Lewis, Gregory Stephen; Kreisberg, Nathan Michael

    2017-04-04

    A system and method for particle enlargement with continuously wetted wicks includes a container into which a flow of particle-laden air is introduced in a laminar manner through an inlet and to an outlet. The container has a first section, a second section and a third section though which the particle-laden air flows between the inlet and the outlet. The temperature of the second section is warmer than that of the first section at the inlet and the third section at the outlet. In one embodiment, a continuous wick spanning an interior wall of the first second, second section and third section, said wick being capable of internally transporting liquid water along its length is provided.

  9. THERMAL TRANSFERS IN WET HYPERBARIC ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara STANCIU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The heat losses of human body are greater in underwater environment than in dry, normal atmosphere, due to the great heat capacity of water. Body temperature of divers in immersion was studied taking into account the pressure the divers are subjected to. The theoretic equation that describes the total heat transfer- at both levels: skin and respiratory system- was established, considering conduction, convection and respiratory gas heating and humidification. The body temperature of the divers was measured in a series of dives at different depths of immersion, conducted in the wet simulator of the Diving Center, in Constanta. The experimental results were in good accordance with the temperature predicted by the mathematical model.

  10. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  11. Improved bitumen extraction using wet combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wylie, I.; Hagen, D.; McGuire, A. [VAST Power Systems Inc., Elkhart, IN (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This presentation outlined the main concerns regarding the current combustion paradigm for steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) bitumen extraction and provided a solution that is more energy efficient with less environmental impact. SAGD operations currently use dry steam injection to deliver heat and reduce the viscosity bitumen, but this results in heat loss, restricted fuel choices, high water use and high emissions. Vast Power Systems Inc. has developed a wet flue gas known as VASTgas{sup TM} for efficient extraction. The downhole fluid has a much higher heat output and much lower emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. Other key advantages include net clean water from combustion and electricity as a by-product. This presentation also described the advantages of the VASThermogenerator{sup TM} for SAGD which solves some of the concerns regarding the combustion paradigm of mined bitumen and tailings pond purification. figs.

  12. Wet-Bulb-Globe Temperature Data Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    ARL‐SR‐0317 ● MAR 2015          US Army Research Laboratory      Wet‐ Bulb –Globe Temperature Data Report    by David P Sauter...originator.         ARL‐SR‐0317 ● MAR 2015      US Army Research Laboratory      Wet‐ Bulb –Globe Temperature Data Report    by David P Sauter...March 2015 2. REPORT TYPE  Special Report 3. DATES COVERED (From ‐ To)  11 Aug 2014–23 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE  Wet- Bulb –Globe Temperature

  13. Extreme Seasonality During Early Eocene Hyperthermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plink-Bjorklund, P.; Birgenheier, L.

    2012-12-01

    intensification is seen as short intense rain seasons alternating with prolonged droughts. Such seasonality intensification had a profound effect on landscape morphology as well as on vegetation. River systems changed from braided streams to highly seasonal fluvial megafans with tens of meters deep channels. River channels staid dry through most of the prolonged droughts, as witnessed by intra-channel insect burrows and paleosols. The intense wet seasons caused extremely high water discharge in channels, resulting in high rates of erosion, sediment transport and deposition. As a result, the channels were filled locally by up to 10s of meters of sediment, causing rapid river course changes and terrestrial flooding. Particulate organic matter content is extremely low in these sediments. This is in contrast to river sediments that were deposited during less intense seasonality. The dataset was compared to other datasets from intermontane basins in the Western Interior and also Europe (Spain), where similar seasonality changes are indicated to have occurred during the PETM. This is in great contrast to intermontane Early Eocene river systems documented in Norwegian Arctic (e.g. Spitsbergen) and in tropics (e.g. Venezuela), where no seasonality intensification has been documented. Thus the seasonality intensification seems to have been confined to (northern) mid-latitudes and subtropics.

  14. Meteorological effects on Hg wet deposition in a forested site in the Adirondack region of New York during 2000-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Huiting; Ye, Zhuyun; Driscoll, Charles

    2017-11-01

    An analysis of weekly measurement data of mercury (Hg) wet deposition was conducted for Huntington Wildlife Forest (HWF), a forest ecosystem in Upstate New York and a biological Hg hotspot, during 2000-2015. Annual accumulated Hg wet deposition flux was found to decrease at a rate of -0.13 μg m-2 yr-1 (2% yr-1) (p = 0.09), and volume weighted mean (VWM) Hg precipitation concentrations at -0.14 ng L-1 yr-1 (2.5% yr-1) (p = 0.00). In examining data by season, no trends were identified for the two variables. It was found that the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) affected Hg wet deposition predominantly in spring, as did the position of the U.S. East Coast trough in summer, which suggests different dominant mechanisms driving Hg wet deposition in different seasons. The impacts of such large scale circulation processes were facilitated via variations in precipitation amounts. This was manifested in spring 2011 with the strongest positive phase of NAO, resulting in the wettest spring with the largest Hg wet deposition flux, and in summer 2007 with the U.S. East Coast trough positioned the farthest out over the Atlantic Ocean, causing the driest summer with the lowest Hg wet deposition flux of the study period. Extreme precipitation amounts in spring could singularly drive the overall long-term trend in Hg wet deposition whereas in summer other factors could just be as important. Similar mechanisms were thought to control the long term variations of Hg wet deposition and precipitation concentrations in all seasons but summer as indicated in their significant correlation in all but summer. Atmospheric concentrations of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and particulate borne mercury (PBM) at HWF over 2009-2015 hardly exhibited correlations with Hg wet deposition or precipitation concentrations. Chemical transport model simulations strongly supported efficient scavenging of oxidized Hg by precipitation resulting in the lowest concentration of GOM in the warm season despite the

  15. Seasonality, diaspore traits and the structure of plant-frugivore networks in Neotropical savanna forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darosci, Adriano Antonio Brito; Bruna, Emilio M.; Motta-Junior, José Carlos; Ferreira, Cristiane da Silva; Blake, John Gilman; Munhoz, Cássia Beatriz Rodrigues

    2017-10-01

    Complex frugivory networks are common in heterogeneous environments, but how the structure of those networks varies due to seasonality and other environmental factors remains unclear. For example, seasonal variation in rainfall can influence fruit production and diaspore characteristics, which could alter the quantity and quality of resources available to different animals in the network and, hence, network structure. We investigated how a frugivory network varied seasonally in Brazilian savanna (Cerrado), where there are well-defined dry and wet seasons and fructification mainly during the rainy season for most tree species. We recorded fruit consumption by animals during the dry and wet seasons in two different gallery forests and used these data to test the hypotheses that connectance, links per species and nestedness would be higher in the dry season than rainy season due to low available food in the former that would be consumed by various species of frugivores. Concomitantly, we also measured seed width and lipid content from diaspores of the fruiting trees to determine if these characteristics influenced interaction properties between fruiting trees and frugivores. Among the measured network parameters, connectance, links per species and specialization varied between seasons in one site but not in the other, indicating that seasonal variation in networks is not necessarily consistent over time or space. The number of tree species with small diaspores with high lipid content differed between seasons, and those characteristics were key factors increasing the interaction parameter of fruiting trees. We suggest that network stability between seasons may be related to local frugivore diversity, resource availability, and fruit quality.

  16. Modeling the early stages of reactive wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel; Warren, James A; Boettinger, William J

    2010-11-01

    Recent experimental studies of molten metal droplets wetting high-temperature reactive substrates have established that the majority of triple-line motion occurs when inertial effects are dominant. In light of these studies, this paper investigates wetting and spreading on reactive substrates when inertial effects are dominant using a thermodynamically derived diffuse interface model of a binary three-phase material. The liquid-vapor transition is modeled using a van der Waals diffuse interface approach, while the solid-fluid transition is modeled using a phase field approach. The results from the simulations demonstrate an O(t(-1/2)) spreading rate during the inertial regime and oscillations in the triple-line position when the metal droplet transitions from inertial to diffusive spreading. It is found that the spreading extent is reduced by enhancing dissolution by manipulating the initial liquid composition. The results from the model exhibit good qualitative and quantitative agreement with a number of recent experimental studies of high-temperature droplet spreading, particularly experiments of copper droplets spreading on silicon substrates. Analysis of the numerical data from the model suggests that the extent and rate of spreading are regulated by the spreading coefficient calculated from a force balance based on a plausible definition of the instantaneous interface energies. A number of contemporary publications have discussed the likely dissipation mechanism in spreading droplets. Thus, we examine the dissipation mechanism using the entropy-production field and determine that dissipation primarily occurs in the locality of the triple-line region during the inertial stage but extends along the solid-liquid interface region during the diffusive stage.

  17. Bed wetting in school children of Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithani, Shoaib; Zaidi, Zafar

    2005-01-01

    To estimate the frequency of primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) in Pakistani children and to examine the factors associated with it. A randomly selected cross-sectional study was conducted in five elementary schools, one in each of five districts of Karachi. The parents of 5000 children age between 3-13 years were asked to complete a questionnaire which included items about the frequency of daytime wetting and nocturnal enuresis, family history, urinary tract infection, parents and child's own concern about this problem and acquisition of treatments. Over all corrected response rate to the questionnaire was 69% (3395). Enuresis was present in 9.1% (308). There were 166 (53.9%) boys and 142 (46%) girls with a median age of 7 years. Only 54% (166) children sought help for their problem of which 26% consulted doctors, 16% visited homeopaths while 11% used hakeems and home remedies. Of the bed wetters, 30% were wet every night, 30% for more than three nights a week and 40% for less than three nights every week. Parents of 68.5% (211) children reported concern for the problem while 69.8% (215) children were also anxious about their enuresis. Among the concerned children group, 22% parents were not concerned about their child's problem. Family history of enuresis was present in 25.6% (79) children. The frequency of enuresis among the school going children in Karachi is 9.1% and is similar to that reported in European countries and other Asian countries including Korea and Taiwan. Enuresis causes concern to both parents and children, but only a small percentage of parents seek medical help for this problem.

  18. Season and location effects on serum and liver mineral concentrations of Senepol cattle on St Croix, Virgin Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildeus, S; McDowell, L R; Fugle, J R

    1992-11-01

    Serum and liver concentrations of selected macro- and trace minerals were determined in Senepol cattle at 8 sites (4 each in a high and low rainfall region) during the dry and wet season on St Croix. At each site an average of 15 mature, lactating cows, grazing native grass/legume pastures without supplementation were blood sampled each season. Liver samples were collected (n = 51) at slaughter from mature animals originating from the same sites. A preliminary analysis indicated no differences in serum mineral concentrations between mature lactating cows and growing heifers. There were differences between sites for serum magnesium (Mg) (P < 0.001), copper (Cu) (P < 0.05) selenium (Se) (P < 0.001) and zinc (Zn) (P < 0.01) in the dry season, and for Cu (P < 0.01), iron (Fe) (P < 0.001) and Zn (P < 0.01) in the wet season. Higher (P < 0.001) serum concentrations of Mg, Cu, Fe and Zn were observed in the dry season, while Se was higher (P < 0.01) in the wet season. Liver concentrations of Cu and Fe were lower (P < 0.01) and liver molybdenum (Mo) (P < 0.001) and Se (P < 0.05) higher during the dry season. The seasonal differences in serum Cu, Se and Zn concentrations have not been observed in other studies in the Central American region. More than 50% of serum samples were deficient in phosphorus (P) regardless of season, and in Cu and Zn during the wet season. Mineral supplementation should be considered.

  19. Pavement Marking Visibility Requirements During Wet Night Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Ronald B. (Ronald Bruce)

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of pavement markings in wet night conditions. Typically, performance will decrease in wet conditions. The degradation is a result of flooding of the marking optics and a change in the optical media, thereby reducing retroreflectivity and the visibility distance. Several technologies are available to improve the visibility of markings under wet conditions. This study used four technologies and evaluated them in a dynamic situation. In the experiment, veh...

  20. Energy management in crowned sifakas (Propithecus coronatus) and the timing of reproduction in a seasonal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, Claire; Simmen, Bruno

    2015-07-14

    Little is known about the absolute pool of energy primates use in the wild and how this pool varies seasonally. It is also not fully understood why some species facing unpredictable changes in food supply and risks of energy imbalance show high breeding seasonality. We examined these issues in a folivorous gregarious lemur (Propithecus coronatus) in a dry forest of Madagascar. We assessed energy input and activity budget in males and females from three groups during dry and wet months. Diet composition and daily food intake were determined using focal animal sampling and continuous recording of mouthfuls. Locomotion types and daily distances traveled were recorded. Time budget was determined using scan sampling, supplemented with a preliminary analysis of the energy budget using the factorial method. The macronutrient composition of the diet did not change markedly between seasons but a large increase in energy input arose during the early wet season. Activity was highest at this period but entailed only moderate increase in energy expenditure. Females did not ingest more energy than males despite female dominance. Both sexes exhibited a thrifty energy strategy and, possibly, fat storage. Seasonal increase of daily energy input was likely related to male-male mating competition and females' need to reach physical condition prior to the dry season sufficient for reproducing. Sifakas may time their reproductive cycle according to the seasonal variation in day-length because recurrent patterns of low (dry season) versus high (wet season) food production occur despite years of food shortage. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Seasonal Variations in Mercury Deposition over the Yellow Sea, July 2007 through April 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ghim, young sung; Oh, Hyun Sun; Kim, Jin Young; Woo, Jung-Hun; Chang, Young-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Spatial and temporal variations of mercury, including dry and wet deposition fluxes, were assessed over Northeast Asia, targeting the Yellow Sea, using meteorology and chemistry models. Four modeling periods, each representative of one of the four seasons, were selected. Modeling results captured general patterns and behaviors, and fell within similar ranges with respect to observations. However, temporal variations of mercury were not closely matched, possibly owing to the effects of localized emissions. Modeling results indicated that dry deposition is correlated with wind speed, while wet deposition is correlated with precipitation amount. Overall, the wet deposition flux of 66 ng/m2-day was about twice as large as the dry deposition flux of 32 ng/m2-day, when averaged over the four modeling periods. Dry deposition occurred predominantly in the form of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM). In contrast, RGM accounted for only about two-thirds of wet deposition, while particulate mercury accounted for the remainder.

  2. Plague cycles in two rodent species from China: Dry years might provide context for epizootics in wet years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, David A.; Biggins, Dean E.; Xu, Lei; Liu, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    Plague, a rodent-associated, flea-borne zoonosis, is one of the most notorious diseases in history. Rates of plague transmission can increase when fleas are abundant. Fleas commonly desiccate and die when reared under dry conditions in laboratories, suggesting fleas will be suppressed during droughts in the wild, thus reducing the rate at which plague spreads among hosts. In contrast, fleas might increase in abundance when precipitation is plentiful, producing epizootic outbreaks during wet years. We tested these hypotheses using a 27-yr data set from two rodents in Inner Mongolia, China: Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) and Daurian ground squirrels (Spermophilus dauricus). For both species of rodents, fleas were most abundant during years preceded by dry growing seasons. For gerbils, the prevalence of plague increased during wet years preceded by dry growing seasons. If precipitation is scarce during the primary growing season, succulent plants decline in abundance and, consequently, herbivorous rodents can suffer declines in body condition. Fleas produce more offspring and better survive when parasitizing food-limited hosts, because starving animals tend to exhibit inefficient behavioral and immunological defenses against fleas. Further, rodent burrows might buffer fleas from xeric conditions aboveground during dry years. After a dry year, fleas might be abundant due to the preceding drought, and if precipitation and succulent plants become more plentiful, rodents could increase in density, thereby creating connectivity that facilitates the spread of plague. Moreover, in wet years, mild temperatures might increase the efficiency at which fleas transmit the plague bacterium, while also helping fleas to survive as they quest among hosts. In this way, dry years could provide context for epizootics of plague in wet years.

  3. Spatiotemporal variability of wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitall, D.R.; Paerl, H.W. [University of North Carolina, Morehad City, NC (USA). Inst. of Marine Sciences

    2001-10-01

    Excessive nitrogen (N) loading to N-sensitive waters such as the Neuse River estuary (North Carolina) has been shown to promote changes in microbial and algal community composition and function (harmful algal blooms), hypoxia and anoxia, and fish kills. Previous studies have estimated that wet atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (WAD-N), as deposition of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN: NO{sub 3}{sup -} NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and dissolved organic nitrogen, may contribute at least 15% of the total externally supplied or 'new' N flux to the coastal waters of North Carolina. In a 3-yr study from June 1996 to June 1999, the weekly wet deposition of inorganic and organic N was counted at eleven sites on a northwest-southeast transect in the watershed. The annual mean total (wet DIN + wet organics) WAD-N flux for (15,026 Mg N/yr). Seasonally the spring (March-May) and summer (June - August) months contain the highest total weekly N depositions; this pattern appears to be driven by N concentration in precipitation. There is also spatial variability in WAD-N deposition; in general, the upper portion of the watershed receives the lowest annual deposition and the middle portion of the watershed receives the highest deposition. Based on a range of watershed N retention and in-stream riverine processing values, it was estimated that this flux contributes approximately 24% of the total 'new' N flux to the estuary. 61 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Letting Wet Spots be Wet: Restoring Natural Bioreactors in the Dissected Glacial Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Keith E.; McLellan, Eileen; Bettis, E. Arthur

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we argue that there is tremendous potential for nitrate-N reductions to occur throughout the Corn Belt region of the USA if we simply let naturally occurring wet spots on the landscape be wet. Geologic and hydrologic data gathered in the Walnut Creek watershed located in south-central Iowa provides compelling evidence that substantial nutrient-processing capacity exists in this dissected glacial landscape. Self-similarity of stratigraphy, sedimentology and hydrology observed at all spatial scales in the watershed suggests that Holocene alluvial fill deposits provide a natural bioreactor for denitrification of upland groundwater nitrate-N; the occurrence of such deposits can be mapped to identify potential nitrogen sinks across the landscape. This approach to identifying potential nitrogen sinks is geology focused and extends potential locations for nutrient processing upstream into the headwater catchments of individual fields.

  5. Atmospheric wet and dry deposition of trace elements at 10 sites in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y. P.; Wang, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is considered to be a major process that removes pollutants from the atmosphere and an important source of nutrients and contaminants for ecosystems. Trace elements (TEs), especially toxic metals deposited on plants and into soil or water, can cause substantial damage to the environment and human health due to their transfer and accumulation in food chains. Despite public concerns, quantitative knowledge of metal deposition from the atmosphere to ecosystems remains scarce. To advance our understanding of the spatiotemporal variations in the magnitudes, pathways, compositions and impacts of atmospherically deposited TEs, precipitation (rain and snow) and dry-deposited particles were collected simultaneously at 10 sites in Northern China from December 2007 to November 2010. The measurements showed that the wet and dry depositions of TEs in the target areas were orders of magnitude higher than previous observations within and outside China, generating great concern over the potential risks. The spatial distribution of the total (wet plus dry) deposition flux was consistent with that of the dry deposition, with a significant decrease from industrial and urban areas to suburban, agricultural and rural sites, while the wet deposition exhibited less spatial variation. In addition, the seasonal variation of wet deposition was also different from that of dry deposition, although they were both governed by the precipitation and emission patterns. For the majority of TEs that exist as coarse particles, dry deposition dominated the total flux at each site. This was not the case for potassium, nickel, arsenic, lead, zinc, cadmium, selenium, silver and thallium, for which the relative importance between wet and dry deposition fluxes varied by site. Whether wet deposition is the major atmospheric cleansing mechanism for the TEs depends on the size distribution of the particles. We found that atmospheric inputs of copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, arsenic and

  6. Atmospheric wet and dry deposition of trace elements at ten sites in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y. P.; Wang, Y. S.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric deposition is considered to be a major process that removes pollutants from the atmosphere and an important source of nutrients and contaminants for ecosystems. Trace elements (TEs), especially toxic metals deposited on plants and into soil and water, can cause substantial damage to the environment and human health due to their transfer and accumulation in food chains. Despite public concerns, quantitative knowledge of metal deposition from the atmosphere to ecosystems remains scarce. To advance our understanding of the spatio-temporal variations in the magnitudes, pathways, compositions and impacts of atmospherically deposited TEs, precipitation (rain and snow) and dry-deposited particles were collected simultaneously at ten sites in Northern China from December 2007 to November 2010. The measurements showed that the wet and dry depositions of TEs in the target areas were orders of magnitude higher than previous observations within and outside China, generating great concern over the potential risks. The spatial distribution of the total (wet plus dry) deposition flux was consistent with that of the dry deposition, with a significant decrease from industrial and urban areas to suburban, agricultural and rural sites. In contrast, the wet deposition exhibited less spatial variation. The seasonal variation of wet deposition was also different from that of dry deposition, although they were both governed by the precipitation and emission patterns. For the majority of TEs that exist as coarse particles, dry deposition dominated the total flux at each site. This was not the case for K, Ni, As, Pb, Zn, Cd, Se, Ag and Tl, for which the relative importance between wet and dry deposition fluxes varied by site. Whether wet deposition is the major atmospheric cleansing mechanism for the TEs depends on the size distribution and solubility of the particles. We found that atmospheric inputs of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, As and Se were of the same magnitude as their increases in

  7. Biodiesel production from wet microalgae feedstock using sequential wet extraction/transesterification and direct transesterification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Lung; Huang, Chien-Chang; Ho, Kao-Chia; Hsiao, Ping-Xuan; Wu, Meng-Shan; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-10-01

    Although producing biodiesel from microalgae seems promising, there is still a lack of technology for the quick and cost-effective conversion of biodiesel from wet microalgae. This study was aimed to develop a novel microalgal biodiesel producing method, consisting of an open system of microwave disruption, partial dewatering (via combination of methanol treatment and low-speed centrifugation), oil extraction, and transesterification without the pre-removal of the co-solvent, using Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 with 68.7 wt% water content as the feedstock. Direct transesterification with the disrupted wet microalgae was also conducted. The biomass content of the wet microalgae increased to 56.6 and 60.5 wt%, respectively, after microwave disruption and partial dewatering. About 96.2% oil recovery was achieved under the conditions of: extraction temperature, 45°C; hexane/methanol ratio, 3:1; extraction time, 80 min. Transesterification of the extracted oil reached 97.2% conversion within 15 min at 45°C and 6:1 solvent/methanol ratio with simultaneous Chlorophyll removal during the process. Nearly 100% biodiesel conversion was also obtained while conducting direct transesterification of the disrupted oil-bearing microalgal biomass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Implications of climatic seasonality on activity patterns and resource use by sympatric peccaries in northern Pantanal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Gabriel Selbach; Coelho, Igor Pfeifer; Bastazini, Vinicius Augusto Galvão; Cordeiro, José Luís Passos; de Oliveira, Luiz Flamarion Barbosa

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the effects of climate seasonality from a thermal and water availability perspective on the activity patterns and resource use of Pecari tajacu and Tayassu pecari during wet and dry seasons in the northeastern Brazilian Pantanal. We used camera traps and temperature sensors to record species activity patterns in relation to temperature, established five habitat categories based on flooding intensity and local vegetation characteristics, assessed the activity patterns of each species in dry and wet periods and in artificial water bodies using circular statistical metrics, and calculated niche amplitude and overlap on three axes (temperature, time, and habitat) in both periods. Peccaries shared a strong resemblance in resource use and in their responses to seasonal variations in the tested gradients. The activity patterns of both species exhibited a significant correlation with air temperature on all the evaluated measures, and both species strongly reduced their activity when the air temperature exceeded 35 °C. High temperatures associated with low water availability were most likely responsible for the changes in species activity patterns, which resulted in an increased temporal overlap in habitat use throughout the dry season. However, the peccaries avoided intensively flooded habitats; therefore, the habitat gradient overlap was greater during the wet period. Our results show that an increase in niche overlap on the environmental gradient as a result of climatic seasonality may be partially compensated by a reduction in other niche dimensions. In this case, temporal partitioning appears to be an important, viable mechanism to reduce competition by potentially competing species.

  9. Testing for seasonality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThis paper proposes a general-to-simple test procedure for the presence of seasonal patterns in time series, which is based on tests for parameter restrictions in a general periodic model. The method is illustrated for the U.K. stock price index and the U.S. CLI index.

  10. Warning Signs: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee describes the main symptoms of seasonal flu and when it is serious enough to seek medical help.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  11. The Hungry Season

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    start to go some way towards addressing this fundamental question. A delightful animation of The Hungry Season, commissioned by Leonie Joubert and funded by the University of Cape Town's Criminology. Department and the Embassy of Finland, is available online at http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=iX77NZttLKo.

  12. Take Three: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee describes how to keep from getting seasonal flu and spreading it to others by taking these three steps.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  13. Seasonal Influenza: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Christina; Freedman, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. It also has major social and economic consequences in the form of high rates of absenteeism from school and work as well as significant treatment and hospitalization costs. In fact, annual influenza epidemics and the resulting deaths and lost days of productivity…

  14. Teaching Science: Eclipse Seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    Demonstrates the need for a three-dimensional model as an aid for teaching students why eclipses do not occur every two weeks, as falsely indicated by two-dimensional models such as books, chalkboards, and computer screens. Describes procedure to construct the model. Indicates question related to seasons likely to arise from such a model and…

  15. Overcoming Seasonal Affective Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Laura G

    2017-11-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) significantly impacts the lives of individuals around the world. The mood fluctuations that occur are not only exhibited during the winter months but also during the spring and summer. The key to identifying SAD is the distinct seasonal onset and spontaneous remission of symptoms over the course of a season. Nurses are in a unique position to identify the symptoms of SAD and offer treatment recommendations to reduce the negative impact of these seasonal mood fluctuations. As holistic health care practitioners, nurses provide patient education regarding healthy lifestyle interventions, which can aid in minimizing the disruptive symptoms of SAD. Advanced practice nurses can offer pharmacotherapy interventions to address symptoms contributing to the individual's inability to function across domains-individual, family, and social. Finally, after reading the article, nurses of all disciplines will have a better understanding of the evidence-based bright light therapy (also known as light box therapy) and how to incorporate this treatment when caring for patients with SAD. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(11), 10-14.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Antiviral Drugs: Seasonal Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Joe Bresee explains the nature of antiviral drugs and how they are used for seasonal flu.  Created: 9/29/2010 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 9/29/2010.

  17. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and making you feel moody. Less often, SAD causes depression in the spring or early summer. Treatment for ... play a role in SAD. Reduced sunlight can cause a drop in serotonin that may trigger depression. Melatonin levels. The change in season can disrupt ...

  18. Elemental mercury removal using a wet scrubber.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, E.; Livengood, C. D.; Martin, K.; Mendelsohn, M. H.; Zhou, C. Q.

    1999-05-19

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that is emitted into the environment by both natural and human activities. Acute and chronic exposure to mercury and methyl mercury in humans results in central nervous system damage, kidney damage, and even death. Although some Hg emission sources have been regulated, coal-fired utilities have not been. In anticipation of federal regulations on mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has designed a flue gas simulation system to study the removal of elemental mercury. The simulated flue gas enters the system and combines with the inlet mercury vapor (from a calibrated permeation tube), carried by nitrogen gas. This combined gas continues past the flow meter and the pressure gage to the reactor inlet. Inside the reactor chamber, the flue gas is sprayed with NOXSORB{reg_sign}, a chloric acid solution, which reacts with elemental mercury. The amount of reaction (oxidation) of elemental mercury is important since mercury in an oxidized form is highly soluble, In this form, the Hg can be picked up downstream by a wet scrubber from fossil-fuel burning utilities. Experiments on mercury removal from flue gases have been conducted at ANL, with the participation of a senior design team from Purdue University Calumet. Temperature variations ranging from room temperature to 350 F have been studied. Other parameters, such as the concentration of NOXSORB{reg_sign}, were also tested. Furthermore, pump speed and sprayer droplet sizes of the NOXSORB{reg_sign} solution were studied. A literature survey on the current and proposed mercury control legislation, along with the existing control technologies, has been performed as part of the senior design project. With guidance from ANL, an understanding of the simulation system has been developed. This information has been used to determine the mass transfer. Another literature survey was performed on the reaction kinetics of mercury. The information obtained was

  19. Dinámica estacional de la estructura trófica de un ensamblaje de Coleoptera en la Amazonia Colombiana/Seasonal dynamics of the trophic structure of an assemblage of Coleoptera in the Colombian Amazon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jorge Ari A Noriega; Juan Pablo Botero; Marcelo Viola; Giovanny Fagua

    2007-01-01

    To understand the different patterns of seasonal variation in the trophic structure of coleopteran assemblages, a study was conducted in the Colombian Amazon, over three consecutive years in wet and...

  20. Analysis of the snow-atmosphere energy balance during wet-snow instabilities and implications for avalanche prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mitterer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Wet-snow avalanches are notoriously difficult to predict; their formation mechanism is poorly understood since in situ measurements representing the thermal and mechanical evolution are difficult to perform. Instead, air temperature is commonly used as a predictor variable for days with high wet-snow avalanche danger – often with limited success. As melt water is a major driver of wet-snow instability and snow melt depends on the energy input into the snow cover, we computed the energy balance for predicting periods with high wet-snow avalanche activity. The energy balance was partly measured and partly modelled for virtual slopes at different elevations for the aspects south and north using the 1-D snow cover model SNOWPACK. We used measured meteorological variables and computed energy balance and its components to compare wet-snow avalanche days to non-avalanche days for four consecutive winter seasons in the surroundings of Davos, Switzerland. Air temperature, the net shortwave radiation and the energy input integrated over 3 or 5 days showed best results in discriminating event from non-event days. Multivariate statistics, however, revealed that for better predicting avalanche days, information on the cold content of the snowpack is necessary. Wet-snow avalanche activity was closely related to periods when large parts of the snowpack reached an isothermal state (0 °C and energy input exceeded a maximum value of 200 kJ m−2 in one day, or the 3-day sum of positive energy input was larger than 1.2 MJ m−2. Prediction accuracy with measured meteorological variables was as good as with computed energy balance parameters, but simulated energy balance variables accounted better for different aspects, slopes and elevations than meteorological data.

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in the occurrences of wet periods ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study highlights the hydro-climatic features of the five wet periods contributing in different percentages to the annual rainfall total over major river basins in India. Spatial and temporal variations in the parameters such as starting date, duration and rainfall intensity of these wet periods throughout India have been ...

  2. Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, E.K.

    1987-08-21

    A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

  3. Spatial and temporal variations in the occurrences of wet periods ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study highlights the hydro-climatic features of the five wet periods contributing in different percentages to the annual rainfall total over major river basins in India.Spatial and temporal variations in the parameters such as starting date,duration and rainfall intensity of these wet periods throughout India have been ...

  4. Electrophoretic deposition of titania nanoparticles: Wet density of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of titania nanoparticles was performed at different voltages and times. The wet density of deposits was calculated according to the Archimedes' principle. The wet density as well as the electric field over the deposits increased with time and attained the plateau at longer times. The.

  5. Hydrodynamics of a Multistage Wet Scrubber Incineration Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, M. M.; Manyele, S. V.; Raphael, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the hydrodynamics of the two stage counter-current cascade wet scrubbers used during incineration of medical waste. The dependence of the hydrodynamics on two main variables was studied: Inlet air flow rate and inlet liquid flow rate. This study introduces a new wet scrubber operating features, which are…

  6. The Influence of Wetting Rate and Electrolyte Concentration on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Substantial macroscopic swelling of rapidly wetted soil was attributed to air compressed into the largest available voids. Consequent soil matrix failure resulted in macroscopic swelling and increased sorption of water. Hydraulic conductivity appeared to be a non-linear function of wetting rate over the range w = 0-30 mm ...

  7. Phase change materials and the perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are increasingly incorporated in textiles in order to serve as a thermal buffer when humans change from a hot to a cold environment and the reverse. Due to the absence of wetness sensors in the skin, cooling of the skin may be perceived as a sensation of wetness instead

  8. Phase Change Materials and the perception of wetness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are increasingly incorporated in textiles in order to serve as a thermal buffer when humans change from a hot to a cold environment and the reverse. Due to the absence of wetness sensors in the skin, cooling of the skin may be perceived as a sensation of wetness instead

  9. Evaluation of wetting ability of five new saliva substitutes on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate & compare the wetting ability of five saliva substitutes & distilled water on heat-polymerized acrylic resin. Contact angle of the saliva substitute on denture base can be taken as an indicator of wettability. Good wetting of heat-polymerized acrylic resin is critical for optimum ...

  10. Comparative Batch and Column Evaluation of Thermal and Wet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: The efficiency of regenerated spent commercial activated carbon for synthetic dye removal was studied using thermal and wet ... Keywords: Activated Carbon, Methyl Red, Chromatography Capacity, Wet and Thermal Regeneration. INTRODUCTION ... processes in wastewater treatment. A number of techniques ...

  11. Fluorinated Silsesquioxanes: Structure, Solubility, and Wetting (Briefing charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) July 2015-July 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FLUORINATED SILSESQUIOXANES: STRUCTURE, SOLUBILITY , AND WETTING...FLUORINATED SILSESQUIOXANES: STRUCTURE, SOLUBILITY , AND WETTING Joseph Mabry, Andrew Guenthner, Scott Iacono, Raymond Campos, Sean Ramirez, Brian Moore...Crystalline solids • Soluble in fluorinated solvents 5DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. • Spin-cast surface of FD

  12. Electrophoretic deposition of titania nanoparticles: Wet density of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of titania nanoparticles was performed at different voltages and times. The wet density of deposits was calculated according to the Archimedes' principle. The wet density as well as the electric field over the deposits increased with time and attained the plateau at longer times. The velocity at ...

  13. Tactile cues significantly modulate the perception of sweat-induced skin wetness independently of the level of physical skin wetness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filingeri, Davide; Fournet, Damien; Hodder, Simon; Havenith, George

    2015-06-01

    Humans sense the wetness of a wet surface through the somatosensory integration of thermal and tactile inputs generated by the interaction between skin and moisture. However, little is known on how wetness is sensed when moisture is produced via sweating. We tested the hypothesis that, in the absence of skin cooling, intermittent tactile cues, as coded by low-threshold skin mechanoreceptors, modulate the perception of sweat-induced skin wetness, independently of the level of physical wetness. Ten males (22 yr old) performed an incremental exercise protocol during two trials designed to induce the same physical skin wetness but to induce lower (TIGHT-FIT) and higher (LOOSE-FIT) wetness perception. In the TIGHT-FIT, a tight-fitting clothing ensemble limited intermittent skin-sweat-clothing tactile interactions. In the LOOSE-FIT, a loose-fitting ensemble allowed free skin-sweat-clothing interactions. Heart rate, core and skin temperature, galvanic skin conductance (GSC), and physical (w(body)) and perceived skin wetness were recorded. Exercise-induced sweat production and physical wetness increased significantly [GSC: 3.1 μS, SD 0.3 to 18.8 μS, SD 1.3, P FIT and LOOSE-FIT (P > 0.05). However, the limited intermittent tactile inputs generated by the TIGHT-FIT ensemble reduced significantly whole-body and regional wetness perception (P < 0.01). This reduction was more pronounced when between 40 and 80% of the body was covered in sweat. We conclude that the central integration of intermittent mechanical interactions between skin, sweat, and clothing, as coded by low-threshold skin mechanoreceptors, significantly contributes to the ability to sense sweat-induced skin wetness. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Reversible wetting of titanium dioxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, A. G. G.; Nolan, M. G.; Cai, R.; Butler, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO II) films were rendered hydrophilic through ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation (254nm) and returned to their previous hydrophobic condition when exposed to a sealed pressurized nitrogen atmosphere. UV light irradiation on TiO II films resulted in super-hydrophilic surfaces with water contact angles of 40°. The switching of TiO II surface wettability could be repeated on the same surface with little hysteresis in water contact angle values. The mechanism behind the hydrophilic and hydrophobic reversal in TiO II surfaces is proposed to be due to UV light mediated photocatalysis and physio- adsorption of N II molecules respectively. The non-intrusive control of TiO II surface wettability could be an attractive alternative to other wettability-based microfluidic valving strategies like electrowetting and photochromic wetting variation. The above results are discussed in terms of the potential use of the films in wettability based valving and repeated wettability patterning of TiO II surfaces for open and sealed microfluidic systems.

  15. Wet process technology in the semiconductor manufacturing process. 1. Physics and chemistry of wet cleaning process; Handotai process ni okeru wet process. Wet senjo no butsuri kagaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuta, J. [Mitsubishi Materials Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-03-05

    The wet cleaning consists of a cleaning process in chemicals and a rinse process using ultra-pure water. Among a series of cleaning process, this paper focuses on the SC1 (standard cleaning 1) process using NH4OH, H2O2, and H2O. During the SC1 process, two reactions progress simultaneously, i.e., natural oxidation and etching reactions on the wafer surface. As a consequence of measurement of the oxide film thickness, it was found that the reaction rate during the initial oxidation is extremely high. As a result of measurement of the etching rate, it was also found that the etching reaction is affected by the oxidation reaction. It is illustrated that pits, which are caused by defects in the crystal, are formed during the repeated SC1 process. It is also illustrated that the adsorption and desorption of Fe occur simultaneously on the wafer surface during the SC1 process. It was found that a clean wafer surface can be obtained by removing the particles and metal impurities in the cleaning liquid. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Photochemical organonitrate formation in wet aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. B. Lim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Water is the most abundant component of atmospheric fine aerosol. However, despite rapid progress, multiphase chemistry involving wet aerosols is still poorly understood. In this work, we report results from smog chamber photooxidation of glyoxal- and OH-containing ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid particles in the presence of NOx and O3 at high and low relative humidity. Particles were analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. During the 3 h irradiation, OH oxidation products of glyoxal that are also produced in dilute aqueous solutions (e.g., oxalic acids and tartaric acids were formed in both ammonium sulfate (AS aerosols and sulfuric acid (SA aerosols. However, the major products were organonitrogens (CHNO, organosulfates (CHOS, and organonitrogen sulfates (CHNOS. These were also the dominant products formed in the dark chamber, indicating non-radical formation. In the humid chamber (> 70 % relative humidity, RH, two main products for both AS and SA aerosols were organonitrates, which appeared at m ∕ z− 147 and 226. They were formed in the aqueous phase via non-radical reactions of glyoxal and nitric acid, and their formation was enhanced by photochemistry because of the photochemical formation of nitric acid via reactions of peroxy radicals, NOx and OH during the irradiation.

  17. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in wet beriberi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giri Shivraman

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The clinical presentation of beriberi can be quite varied. In the extreme form, profound cardiovascular involvement leads to circulatory collapse and death. This case report is of a 72 year-old male who was admitted to the Neurology inpatient ward with progressive bilateral lower extremity weakness and parasthesia. He subsequently developed pulmonary edema and high output cardiac failure requiring intubation and blood pressure support. With the constellation of peripheral neuropathy, encephalopathy, ophthalmoplegia, unexplained heart failure, and lactic acidosis, thiamine deficiency was suspected. He was empirically initiated on thiamine replacement therapy and his thiamine level pre-therapy was found to be 23 nmol/L (Normal: 80-150 nmol/L, consistent with the diagnosis of beriberi. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR showed severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction, markedly increased myocardial T2, and minimal late gadolinium enhancement (LGE. After 5 days of daily 100 mg IV thiamine and supportive care, the hypotension resolved and the patient was extubated and was released from the hospital 3 weeks later. Our case shows via CMR profound myocardial edema associated with wet beriberi.

  18. Metal--nanotube interactions -- wetting properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ruzeng; Cui, Shuwen

    2011-03-01

    The wetting properties of metal nanoparticles in large-diameter single Carbon nanotubes (LDSWNT) is studied by considering the size effect on surface tension of the metal cluster. For the case of macro-nonwetting, we get finite critical atom number N such that the metal cluster with any atom number smaller than it has contact angle π , and so it shrinks into a ball. For an experiential formula of the surface tension of cluster expressed by the number of atoms, we determine the parameters in it for Pd and Pt respectively by density functional theory (DFT). Taking a graphene sheet as a representative of LDSWNT and using the known data of the surface tensions of solid and liquid, we obtain solid-liquid interface tension through Berthelot rule. Based on these results, we obtain N=5 for Pd and N=6 for Pt. For cluster containing 13 Pd atoms and that containing 13 Pt atoms, we use the above mentioned experiential formula to obtain their contact angles in LDSWNT consistent with those shown by the pictures given by DFT (A Maiti and A Ricca, Chem Phys Letters 395 (2004) 7--11), and thus the validity of our method is proved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.11072242).

  19. Long-distance seed dispersal by straw-coloured fruit bats varies by season and landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Abedi-Lartey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available On-going fragmentation of tropical forest ecosystems and associated depletion of seed dispersers threatens the long-term survival of animal-dispersed plants. These threats do not only affect biodiversity and species abundance, but ultimately ecosystem functions and services. Thus, seed dispersers such as the straw-coloured fruit bat, E. helvum, which traverse long distances across fragmented landscapes, are particularly important for maintaining genetic connectivity and colonizing new sites for plant species. Using high-resolution GPS-tracking of movements, field observations and gut retention experiments, we quantify dispersal distances for small- and large-seeded fruits foraged by E. helvum during periods of colony population low (wet season and high (dry season in an urban and a rural landscape in the forest zone of Ghana. Gut passage time averaged 116 min (range 4–1143 min, comparable to other fruit bats. Movements were generally longer in the urban than in the rural landscape and also longer in the dry than in the wet season. As the majority of seeds are dispersed only to feeding roosts, median dispersal distances were similar for both large (42–67 m and small (42–65 m seeds. However, small seeds were potentially dispersed up to 75.4 km, four times further than the previous maximum distance estimated for a similar-sized frugivore. Maximum seed dispersal distances for small seeds were almost twice as long in the rural (49.7 km compare to the urban (31.2 km landscape. Within the urban landscape, estimated maximum dispersal distances for small seeds were three times longer during the dry season (75.4 km compared to the wet season (22.8 km; in contrast, distances in the rural landscape were three times longer in the wet season (67 km compared to the dry season (24.4. Dispersal distances for large seeds during the dry season (551 m in the rural landscape were almost twice that in the wet season (319 m. We found no influence of food

  20. Wetting of silicone oil onto a cell-seeded substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongjie; Chan, Yau Kei; Chao, Youchuang; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2017-11-01

    Wetting behavior of solid substrates in three-phase systems containing two immiscible liquids are widely studied. There exist many three-phase systems in biological environments, such as droplet-based microfluidics or tamponade of silicone oil for eye surgery. However, few studies focus on wetting behavior of biological surfaces with cells. Here we investigate wetting of silicone oil onto cell-seeded PMMA sheet immersed in water. Using a simple parallel-plate cell, we show the effect of cell density, viscosity of silicone oil, morphology of silicone oil drops and interfacial tension on the wetting phenomenon. The dynamics of wetting is also observed by squeezing silicone oil drop using two parallel plates. Experimental results are explained based on disjoining pressure which is dependent on the interaction of biological surfaces and liquid used. These findings are useful for explaining emulsification of silicone oil in ophthalmological applications.

  1. Using wet microalgae for direct biodiesel production via microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Yu, Tao; Li, Tao; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2013-03-01

    To address the large energy consumption of microalgae dewatering and to simplify the conventional two-step method (cellular lipid extraction and lipid transesterification) for biodiesel production, a novel process for the direct conversion of wet microalgae biomass into biodiesel by microwave irradiation is proposed. The influences of conventional thermal heating and microwave irradiation on biodiesel production from wet microalgae biomass were investigated. The effects of using the one-step (simultaneous lipid extraction and transesterification) and two-step methods were also studied. Approximately 77.5% of the wet microalgal cell walls were disrupted under microwave irradiation. The biodiesel production rate and yield from wet microalgae biomass obtained through the one-step process using microwave irradiation were 6-fold and 1.3-fold higher than those from wet microalgae obtained through the two-step process using conventional heating. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurisa-tion (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FGD plants is presented. The experimental work covers laboratory studies as well as pilot- and full-scale...... was found to decrease the rate of gas phase mass transport with up to 15 %, though the effect could not be correlated.A detailed model for a wet FGD pilot plant, based on the falling film principle, was devel-oped. All important rate determining steps, absorption of SO2, oxidation of HSO3-, dissolution...... - 333 K, pertinent for full-scale wet FGD packed towers. The possibility of co-firing straw and coal was investigated in a full-scale power plant. No ef-fects on the overall performance of the wet FGD plant were observed, though laboratory ex-periments with fine dust and fly ash from the full-scale...

  3. Repeated bouncing of drops on wetting and non-wetting surfaces mediated by a persisting thin air film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, J.; Lagraauw, R.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Submitted for the DFD14 Meeting of The American Physical Society Repeated bouncing of drops on wetting and non-wetting sur- faces mediated by a persisting thin air lm JOLET DE RUITER, RUDY LAGRAAUW, DIRK VAN DEN ENDE, FRIEDER MUGELE, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente

  4. Quantification of wet-work exposure in nurses using a newly developed wet-work exposure monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Maaike J.; Behroozy, Ali; Verberk, Maarten M.; Semple, Sean; Kezic, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) is an important work-related disease. A major cause of OCD is 'wet work': frequent contact of the skin with water, soap, detergents, or occlusive gloves. The German guidance TRGS 401 recommends that the duration of wet work (including use of occlusive gloves)

  5. Imaging of oil layers, curvature and contact angle in a mixed‐wet and a water‐wet carbonate rock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Kamaljit; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    ...‐wet), whereas the untreated rock (without doped oil) was weakly water‐wet (θ=47 ± 9°). Using X‐ray micro‐tomography, we show that the brine displaces oil in larger pores during brine injection in the mixed...

  6. Fluvial Tufa Evidence of Late Pleistocene Wet Intervals from Santa Barbara, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Y.; Corsetti, F. A.; Feakins, S. J.; Rhodes, E. J.; Kirby, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Past pluvials in the western United States provide valuable context for understanding regional hydroclimate variability. Here we report evidence of conditions substantially wetter than today from fluvial tufa deposits located near Zaca Lake, Santa Barbara County, California that have been dated by radiocarbon (14C) and Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence (IRSL). Two successions of tufa deposition occur within a small catchment that drains Miocene Monterey Formation bedrock: 1) a fluvial deposit (0-0.5 m thick, 200 m in extent) that formed along a narrow valley below a modern spring, and 2) a perched deposit about 10 m higher (2 m thick, 15 m in extent). IRSL and radiocarbon dating of the perched carbonates suggests at least two episodes of carbonate growth: one at 19.4 ± 2.4 (1σ) through 17.8 ± 2.8 (1σ) ka and another at 11.9 ± 1.5 (1σ) ka verified with a charcoal 14C age of 10.95 ± 0.12 (2σ) cal ka BP. The relationship between the perched and fluvial spring deposits is inferred to represent a drop in the water table of more than 10 m associated with a transition from a wet climate in the late glacial to a dry Holocene today. The wet period indicated by tufa growth between 19.4 and 17.8 ka is relatively consistent with other California climate records both north and south of Zaca Lake. However, tufa growth ca. 12 to 11 ka demonstrates wet conditions occurred as far south as Zaca Lake during the Younger Dryas event, in contrast to climate records farther south in Lake Elsinore indicating persistently dry conditions through this interval. A small shift north in the average position of the winter season storm track could explain wet winters at Zaca while at the same time generating dry winters at Lake Elsinore, 275 km southwest of Zaca. If true, these data indicate that rather small latitudinal shifts in the average winter season storm track can produce large changes in regional hydroclimate.

  7. Wet nitrogen and phosphorus deposition in the eutrophication of the Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladosu, Najeem O; Abayomi, Akeem A; Olayinka, Kehinde O; Alo, Babajide I

    2017-03-01

    Air pollution is influenced by wind-aided particulate suspension, open-air waste burning, and fossil fuel combustion. The pollutants from these sources eventually deposit on ambient surfaces. Atmospheric wet deposition into Lagos Lagoon may be significant additions to the nutrient levels of the eutrophic lagoon. Precipitation was monitored at three stations in the Lagos Lagoon basin from May to November, 2012, in order to estimate the contribution of wet deposition to the nutrient cycles of the lagoon. Water samples were digested with potassium persulfate, and the species of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) were analyzed by colorimetric methods. The mean [NO 3 - +NO 2 - ]-N level was 0.39 ± 0.51 kg ha -1  month -1 . The average total N was 3.16 ± 6.39 kg ha -1  month -1 . The mean soluble reactive P was lower than the [NO 3 - +NO 2 - ]-N averaging 0.06 ± 0.09 (at control site S2) to 0.24 ± 0.10 kg ha -1  month -1 (at site S1). Average total P was 1.25 ± 0.82 kg ha -1  month -1 . The annual total N (May-September) was 4.55 (at S2) to 32.4 kg ha -1  year -1 (at S3). The annual total P (May-November) over Lagos Lagoon basin was 5.06 kg ha -1  year -1 (at S2). This study demonstrated that wet deposition of anthropogenically derived nutrients to the Lagos Lagoon is ongoing and may represent a considerable proportion of the total nutrient loading to it. The increased P availability in the wet deposition is likely responsible for the water hyacinths, which usually blossom on Lagos Lagoon during the late rainy season, and the reported harmattan-season bottom water hypoxia.

  8. Water Quality Assessment of the Los Angeles River Watershed, California, USA in Wet and Dry Weather Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie Boroon, M. H.; Von L Coo, C.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify sources of potential pollutants and characterize urban water quality along the Los Angeles River from its head to the mouth during dry and wet weather periods. Los Angeles (LA) River flows through heavily populated urbanized area in the Los Angeles downtown. The LA River is an effluent-dominated water body during the dry season. The three waste water treatment plants (WWTP) including the Tillman, Burbank, and Glendale discharge the majority of the volume flowing in the LA River during the dry and wet period. The concentration values (ppm) for anions in the dry season ranging 5.5-16,027 (Cl), 0-1.0 (F), 0-21(NO3), 0-1.6 (PO4), and 13.3-2,312 (SO4); whereas the values (ppm) for anions in the wet season ranging 3.4-5,860 (Cl), 0-0.66 (F), 0-17 (NO3), 0-0.67 (PO4), 7.9- 745 (SO4). Dry season concentrations values for trace metals were obtained with values (ppb) ranging 0.9-10 (Ni), 0.8-62 (Zn), 1-4 (As), 0-1 (Pb) and 0-3 (Se). As for wet season trace metals (ppb) ranging 0.001-0.008 (Ni), 0.000001-0.038 (Zn), 0.0016-0.016 (As), 0.00099-0.0058 (Pb), 0.000001-0.0093 (Se). Higher concentrations values during the dry period in the LA River watershed may be attributed to the three WWTPs discharge (75% of the volume of water flowing in the LA River). In water-limited areas such as the Los Angeles basin, urban runoff is a water resource that could enhance restricted water supplies and to enhance localized renewable groundwater resources, thus an assessment of this precious water resource is important for local city and regulatory organizations. In water-limited areas such as the LA basin, urban runoff is a water resource that could enhance restricted water supplies and groundwater resources, thus an assessment of this precious water resource is important for local regulatory organizations.

  9. Vaccination against seasonal flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The Medical Service once again recommends you to get your annual flu vaccination for the year.   Vaccination is the most effective way of avoiding the illness and any serious consequences and protecting those around you. The flu can have especially serious consequences for people with chronic conditions (diabetes, cardio-vascular disease, etc.), pregnant women, infants, and people over 65 years of age. Remember, anyone working on the CERN site who wishes to be vaccinated against seasonal flu should go to the Infirmary (Building 57, ground floor) with their vaccine. The Medical Service will issue a prescription on the day of the vaccination for the purposes of reimbursement by UNIQA. NB: The Medical Service cannot provide this vaccination service for family members or retired members of the personnel. For more information: • The "Seasonal flu" flyer by the Medical Service • Recommendations of the Swiss Federal Office of Public...

  10. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    As every year, the Medical Service is taking part in the campaign to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal influenza is especially recommended for people suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney conditions or diabetes, for those recovering from a serious illness or surgical operation and for everyone over the age of 65. The influenza virus is transmitted by air and contact with contaminated surfaces, hence the importance of washing hands regularly with soap and / or disinfection using a hydro-alcoholic solution. From the onset of symptoms (fever> 38°, chills, cough, muscle aches and / or joint pain, fatigue) you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. In the present context of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, it is important to dissociate these two illnesses and emphasise that the two viruses and the vaccines used to combat them are quite different and that protection against one will not pr...

  11. Seasonal variation of shallow-to-deep convection transition and its link to the environmental conditions over the Central Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yizhou; Fu, Rong; Marengo, José A.; Wang, Hongqing

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to characterize the seasonal variation of the shallow-to-deep convection transition and understand how environmental conditions impact the behavior of this transition using data collected from the Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAmazon) field campaign in the Central Amazon (Manaus). The diurnal cycle of the rain/cloud fraction shows that the wet season has more extensive shallow convection before the transition to deep convection with larger fractional coverage and rainfall; deep convection in the transition season is more intense and has higher vertical extension and a stronger updraft. Surface meteorology, atmospheric moisture, instability, and wind shear are contrasted for the shallow/congestus convection (SC) cases and the locally formed shallow-to-deep convection transition (LD) cases. The comparisons suggest that occurrence of the LD is generally promoted under the conditions of high atmospheric moisture and instability but has a weaker dependence on wind shear. The relative importance of these environmental controls also varies in different seasons: The dry and transition seasons require a deeper moist layer from the boundary layer to midtroposphere than the wet season; convective available potential energy (CAPE) is higher during the transition season, but it is a less important factor for shallow-to-deep convection transition than in other seasons; LD only has significantly larger wind shears than SC during the dry season.

  12. Summer season | Cafeteria closures

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Please note the following cafeteria closures over the summer season: Bldg. 54 closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 13: closed from 13/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Restaurant No. 2, table service (brasserie and restaurant): closed from 01/08/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 864: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 865: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013.

  13. Heartbeat of the Season

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandra Tunajek

    2009-01-01

    ... sounds of the season. It can be tiring and even annoying-and yet, it is the heartbeat of holidays. Along with the candy canes and mistletoe, there we are surrounded, day and night, by Christmas carols, intended to put us in a festive mood. In the six weeks running up to Christmas, individuals who work in environments that play background music will hear "Ji...

  14. Wet melting along the Tonga Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, L. B.; Plank, T.; Arculus, R. J.; Hauri, E. H.; Hall, P.

    2010-12-01

    Melting in the mantle at convergent margins is driven by water from the subducting slab. Previous work has found a strong role for water-fluxed melting from correlations between the concentration of water in the mantle source, (H2O)o, and the extent of melting beneath backarcs, Fba. Here we explore how wet melting beneath the Lau Backarc Basin relates to that beneath the Tonga Arc, Farc, by providing the first systematic study of water contents in Tonga arc magmas. We have measured volatiles and major and trace elements in melt inclusions, glasses, and whole rocks obtained from recently sampled submarine and subaerial Tonga arc volcanoes. The compositions are varied and range mostly between andesite and basalt/boninite, and least-degassed water contents range from 2 to 5 wt%. We estimate (H2O)o and Farc independently by combining pressure (P) and temperature (T) estimates from an olivine-orthopyroxene-melt thermobarometer with a wet melting productivity model. When P, T, and (H2O)o are known, Farc is uniquely constrained. Results for the volcanoes in the Tonga Arc are bimodal with respect to T: volcanoes located near active backarc spreading centers reflect cooler melting (~1275°C) than those located far from active spreading centers (~1365°C). The cooler primary T’s may result from removal of the heat of fusion during prior melting beneath the Lau backarc, Fba. In the northern portion of the arc, the warmest primary T’s may be due to proximity to the Samoan mantle plume. Farc varies non-systematically along-strike, indicating that Fba is the primary driver of along-arc variability in primary melt compositions. Farc can also be used to calculate the TiO2 concentration of the arc mantle source, (TiO2)o (a proxy for source depletion), which varies monotonically along the Tonga Arc. Arc volcanoes adjacent to the Southern Lau Rifts and Valu Fa Ridge melt mantle with a fertile N-MORB TiO2, while those adjacent to the northern extent of the Eastern Lau Spreading

  15. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    This year, as usual, the Medical Service is helping to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal flu is especially recommended for anyone who suffers from chronic pulmonary, cardio-vascular or kidney disease or diabetes, is recovering from a serious illness or major surgery, or is over 65 years of age. The flu virus is transmitted through the air and through contact with contaminated surfaces, so frequent hand-washing with soap and/or an antiseptic hand wash is of great importance. As soon as the first symptoms appear (fever above 38°, shivering, coughing, muscle and/or joint pains, generalised weakness), you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. Anyone working on the CERN site who wishes to be vaccinated against seasonal flu should go to the Infirmary (Building 57, ground floor), with their dose of vaccine. The Medical Service will issue a prescription on the day of the vaccination for the purposes of reimbursement through UNIQA...

  16. ENSO modulation of seasonal rainfall and extremes in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supari; Tangang, Fredolin; Salimun, Ester; Aldrian, Edvin; Sopaheluwakan, Ardhasena; Juneng, Liew

    2017-12-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of how ENSO events affect seasonal and extreme precipitation over Indonesia. Daily precipitation data from 97 stations across Indonesia covering the period from 1981 to 2012 were used to investigate the effects of El Niño and La Niña on extreme precipitation characteristics including intensity, frequency and duration, as defined based on a subset of the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI). Although anomalous signals in these three indices were consistent with those of total rainfall, anomalies in the duration of extremes [i.e., consecutive dry days (CDD) and consecutive wet days (CWD)] were much more robust. El Niño impacts were particularly prominent during June-July-August (JJA) and September-October-November (SON), when anomalously dry conditions were experienced throughout the country. However, from SON, a wet anomaly appeared over northern Sumatra, later expanding eastward during December-January-February (DJF) and March-April-May (MAM), creating contrasting conditions of wet in the west and dry in the east. We attribute this apparent eastward expansion of a wet anomaly during El Niño progression to the equatorial convergence of two anti-cyclonic circulations, one residing north of the equator and the other south of the equator. These anti-cyclonic circulations strengthen and weaken according to seasonal changes and their coupling with regional seas, hence shaping moisture transport and convergence. During La Niña events, the eastward expansion of an opposite (i.e., dry) anomaly was also present but less prominent than that of El Niño. We attribute this to differences in regional ocean—atmosphere coupling, which result in the contrasting seasonal evolution of the two corresponding anomalous cyclonic circulations and in turn suggests the strong nonlinearity of El Niño and La Niña responses over the Maritime Continent. Based on the seasonal behaviour of anomalous CDD and CWD, we

  17. The effect of alternate wetting and drying on methane fluxes on different varieties of European rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Viktoria; Cochrane, Nicole; Monaco, Stefano; Volante, Andrea; Orasen, Gabriele; Price, Adam; Arn Teh, Yit

    2017-04-01

    In Europe, rice is grown (467 000 ha) under permanently flooded conditions (PF) using irrigation waters of major rivers. Climate change, which has led to a greater fluctuation in river flows, is a major challenge to rice production systems, which depend on large and consistent water supplies. This challenge will become more acute in the future, with more frequent extreme weather (e.g. drought) predicted under climate change and increased demands for rice. Alternate wetting and drying (AWD) is a system in where irrigation is applied to obtain 2-5 cm of field water depth, after which the soil is allowed to drain naturally to typically 15 cm below the surface before re-wetting once more. Preliminary studies suggest that AWD can reduce water use by up 30 %, with no net loss in yield but significantly reducing CH4 emissions. The work presented here evaluated the impacts of AWD on the productivity and yield of twelve varieties of European rice, whilst simultaneously measuring CH4 fluxes and plant biomass allocation patterns under different treatment regimes. Field experiments were conducted in the Piedmont region (northern Italy Po river plain) in a loamy soil during the growing season of 2015 in a 2-factor paired plot design, with water treatment (AWD, PF) and variety (12 European varieties) as factors (n=4 per variety per treatment). The varieties chosen were commercially important cultivars from across the rice growing regions of Europe (6 Italian, 3 French, 3 Spanish). Greenhouse gas fluxes were taken using the static chamber approach 11 times during the growing season between May and October 2015. Environmental variables (soil moisture, temperature, water table depth, water potential) were collected concomitantly. Above and belowground biomass were determined by destructively harvesting at the end of the growing season. Belowground biomass was estimated by manually extracting roots from 30 cm deep soil cores and aboveground biomass estimated by collecting and

  18. Flame Stabilization on Microscopic Scale of Wet Biogas with Microflame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Tamio; Fuchihata, Manabu; Mizuno, Satoru

    Harvesting, transportation, energy conversion and the high-efficient utilization, cascade method and market formation besides become with the indispensable element in order to utilize the biomass resource. There are two type biogases; it is gasified gas from dried biomass by partially combustion and wet biogas from wet biomass by methane fermentation, especially from the livestock excrement resources. This paper discusses an experimental study for flame stabilization on microscopic scale with wet biogas (mainly 0.6CH4+0.4CO2). In this study, the microflame with the wet biogas fuels are formed by the diffusion flame on the coppered straight pipes of inner diameter 0.02mm ˜ 1.5mm. This study is obtained stability mapping on microscopic scale of formed microflame by wet biogas fuels. The flame stability limit conditions on microscopic scale of wet biogas is drawn with blow off and extinction flame double limit lines. It is suggested that minimum mixing spatial scale change by the each mixing ratio of the wet biogas.

  19. Seasonal abundance and habitat use of bird species in and around Wondo Genet Forest, south-central Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Zerihun; Mamo, Yosef; Mengesha, Girma; Verma, Ashok; Asfaw, Tsyon

    2017-05-01

    The habitat use and seasonal migratory pattern of birds in Ethiopia is less explored as compared to diversity studies. To this end, this study aimed at investigating the patterns of distribution related to seasonality and the effect of habitat characteristics (elevation, slope, and average vegetation height) on habitat use of birds of Wondo Genet Forest Patch. A stratified random sampling design was used to assess the avian fauna across the four dominant habitat types found in the study area: natural forest, wooded grassland, grassland, and agroforestry land. A point transect count was employed to investigate avian species richness and abundance per habitat type per season. Ancillary data, such as elevation above sea level, latitude and longitude, average vegetation height, and percent slope inclination, were recorded with a GPS and clinometers per plot. A total of 33 migratory bird species were recorded from the area, of which 20 species were northern (Palearctic) migrants while 13 were inter-African migrants. There was a significant difference in the mean abundance of migratory bird species between dry and wet seasons ( t  = 2.13, p  = .038, df  = 44). The variation in mean abundance per plot between the dry and wet seasons in the grassland habitat was significant ( t  = 2.35, p  = .051, df  = 7). In most habitat types during both dry and wet seasons, omnivore birds were the most abundant. While slope was a good predictor for bird species abundance in the dry season, altitude and average vegetation height accounted more in the wet season. The patch of forest and its surrounding is an important bird area for migratory, endemic, and global threatened species. Hence, it is conservation priority area, and the study suggests that conservation coupled with ecotourism development is needed for its sustainability.

  20. NEW SEASON NEW HOPES: OFF-SEASON OPTIMISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguz Ersan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available While literature on the relation between on-field sports performance and stock returns is ample, there is very limited evidence on off-season stage. Constituting around 3 months, off-seasons do not only occupy a significant part of the year but also represent totally different characteristics than on-seasons. They lack the periodic, unambiguous news events in on-seasons (match results, instead they are associated with highly uncertain transfer news and rumors. We show that this distinction has several impacts on the stock market performances of soccer clubs. Most notably, off-seasons generate substantially higher (excess returns. After controlling for other variables, the estimated effect of off-season periods is as high as 38.75%, annually. In line with several seminal studies, we link this fact to increased optimism and betting behavior through uncertain periods; and periods prior to the start of a new calendar (in our case, new season. For all of the examined 7 clubs (3 from Italy and 4 from Turkey, mean excess returns over the market are positive (negative in off-seasons (on-seasons. On-seasons are associated with increased trading activity due to more frequent news. Stocks of Italian clubs are evidently more volatile through off-seasons while volatility results for the stocks of Turkish clubs are not consistent.

  1. Partial wetting gas-liquid segmented flow microreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi Oskooei, S Ali; Sinton, David

    2010-07-07

    A microfluidic reactor strategy for reducing plug-to-plug transport in gas-liquid segmented flow microfluidic reactors is presented. The segmented flow is generated in a wetting portion of the chip that transitions downstream to a partially wetting reaction channel that serves to disconnect the liquid plugs. The resulting residence time distributions show little dependence on channel length, and over 60% narrowing in residence time distribution as compared to an otherwise similar reactor. This partial wetting strategy mitigates a central limitation (plug-to-plug dispersion) while preserving the many attractive features of gas-liquid segmented flow reactors.

  2. Wet combing for the eradication of head lice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Manual removal (using conditioner and comb or a wet comb) can be used in the treatment of head lice. Head lice infestation (Pediculosis humanus capitis) is a common problem. It is diagnosed by visualising the lice. As half of people infested with head lice will not scratch, all people in contact with a person affected with head lice should be manually checked for infestations. Wet combing is easily and safely performed at home, but persistence is needed. This article describes the process of head lice removal using a wet comb. It has NHMRC Level 2 evidence of efficacy and no serious adverse effects have been reported.

  3. Modelling of wetting tests for a natural pyroclastic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moscariello Mariagiovanna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The so-called wetting-induced collapse is one of the most common problems associated with unsaturated soils. This paper applies the Modified Pastor-Zienkiewicz model (MPZ to analyse the wetting behaviour of undisturbed specimens of an unsaturated air-fall volcanic (pyroclastic soil originated from the explosive activity of the Somma-Vesuvius volcano (Southern Italy. Both standard oedometric tests, suction-controlled oedometeric tests and suction-controlled isotropic tests are considered. The results of the constitutive modelling show a satisfactory capability of the MPZ to simulate the variations of soil void ratio upon wetting, with negligible differences among the measured and the computed values.

  4. Wet gas compression. Experimental investigation of the aerodynamics within a centrifugal compressor exposed to wet gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruener, Trond Gammelsaeter

    2012-07-01

    The demand for more efficient oil and gas production requires improved technology to increase production rates and enhance profitable operation. The centrifugal compressor is the key elements in the compression system. Preliminary studies of wet gas compressor concepts have demonstrated the benefits of wet gas boosting. An open-loop test facility was designed for single-stage wet gas compressor testing. Experimental investigators have been performed to reveal the impact of liquid on the aerodynamics of centrifugal compressor. The investigation consisted of two test campaigns with different impeller/diffuser configurations. Atmospheric air and water were used as experimental fluids. The two configurations showed a different pressure ratio characteristics when liquid as present. The results from test campaign A demonstrated a pronounced pressure ratio decrease at high flow and a minor pressure ration increase pressure ratio with reducing gas mass fraction (GMF). The deviation in pressure ratio characteristic for the two test campaigns was attributed to the volute operating characteristic. Both impeller/diffuser configurations demonstrated a reduction in maximum volume flow with decreasing GMF. The impeller pressure ratio was related to the diffuser and/or the volute performance). Air and water are preferable experimental fluids for safety reasons and because a less extensive facility design is required. An evaluation of the air/water tests versus hydrocarbon tests was performed in order to reveal whether the results were representative. Air/water tests at atmospheric conditions reproduced the general performance trend of hydrocarbon wet gas compressor tests with an analogous impeller at high pressures. Aerodynamic instability limits the operating range because of feasible severe damage of the compressor and adverse influence on the performance. It is essential to establish the surge margin at different operating conditions. A delayed instability inception was

  5. Ammonium and phosphate enrichment across the dry-wet transition and their ecological relevance in a subtropical reservoir, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Qiongli; Chen, Nengwang; Zhou, Xingpeng; Chen, Jixin; Duan, Shuiwang

    2016-07-13

    Small river reservoirs are widespread and can be ecologically sensitive across the dry-wet transition under monsoon climate with respect to nutrient loading and phenology. Monthly sampling and high-frequency in situ measurements were conducted for a river reservoir (southeast China) in 2013-2014 to examine the seasonal pattern of nutrients and phytoplankton. We found that nutrient concentrations were runoff-mediated and determined by watershed inputs and, in some cases, by internal cycling depending on hydrology and temperature. Ammonium and phosphate were relatively enriched in February-March (a transitional period from dry/cold to wet/hot climate), which can be ascribed to initial flushing runoff from human/animal waste and spring fertilizer use. A phytoplankton bloom (mainly Chlorophyta) occurred during April after a surge of water temperature, probably due to the higher availability of inorganic nutrients and sunlight and suitable hydraulic residence time (medium flow) in the transitional period. The concentration of phytoplankton was low during May-June (wet-hot climate) when the concentrations of total suspended matter (TSM) were highest, likely owing to the "shading" effect of TSM and turbulence of high flow conditions. Nutrient-algae shifts across the dry-wet season and vertical profiles suggested that algal blooms seem to be fueled primarily by phosphate and ammonium rather than nitrate. Current findings of a strong temporal pattern and the relationship between physical parameters, nutrient and biota would improve our understanding of drivers of change in water quality and ecosystem functions with dam construction.

  6. Characterization of Wet and Dry Deposition in the Downwind of Industrial Sources in a Dry Tropical Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K. Singh

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An atmospheric deposition study was conducted in the downwind of Shaktinagar Thermal Power Plant (STPP, Renusagar Thermal Power Plant (RTPP, and Anpara Thermal Power Plant (ATPP, at Singrauli region, Uttar Pradesh (UP, India to characterize dry and wet deposition in relation to different pollution loading. During the study period, dry and wet depositions and levels of gaseous pollutants (SO2 and NO2 were estimated across the sites. Dry deposition was collected on a monthly basis and wet deposition on an event basis. Depositions were analyzed for pH, nitrate (NO3�, ammonium (NH4+, and sulphate (SO42� contents. Dry deposition rate both collected as clearfall and throughfall varied between 0.15 to 2.28 and 0.33 to 3.48 g m�2 day�1, respectively, at control and maximally polluted sites. The pH of dry deposition varied from 5.81 to 6.89 during winter and 6.09 to 7.02 during summer across the sites. During the rainy season, the mean pH of clear wet deposition varied from 6.56 to 7.04 and throughfall varied from 6.81 to 7.22. The concentrations of NO2 and SO2 pollutants were highest during the winter season. Mean SO2 concentrations varied from 18 to 75 �g m�3 at control and differently polluted sites during the winter season. The variation in NO2 concentrations did not show a pattern similar to that of SO2. The highest NO2 concentration during the winter season was 50 �g m�3, observed near RTPP. NO2 concentration did not show much variation among different sites, suggesting that the sources of NO2 emission are evenly distributed along the sites. The concentrations of NH4+, NO3�, and SO42� ions in dry deposition were found to be higher in summer as compared to the winter season. In dry deposition (clearfall the concentrations of NH4+, NO3�, and SO42� varied from 0.13 to 1.0, 0.81 to 1.95, and 0.82 to 3.27 mg l�1, respectively, during winter. In wet deposition (clearfall, the above varied from 0.14 to 0.74, 0.81 to 1.82, and 0

  7. Influence of growth stage and season on the antioxidant constituents of Cosmos caudatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediani, Ahmed; Abas, Faridah; Ping, Tan Chin; Khatib, Alfi; Lajis, Nordin H

    2012-12-01

    The impact of tropical seasons (dry and wet) and growth stages (8, 10 and 12 weeks) of Cosmos caudatus on the antioxidant activity (AA), total phenolic content (TPC) as well as the level of bioactive compounds were evaluated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The plant morphology (plant height) also showed variation between the two seasons. Samples planted from June to August (during the dry season) exhibited a remarkably higher bioactivity and height than those planted from October to December (during the wet season). The samples that were harvested at eight weeks of age during the dry season showed the highest bioactivity with values of 26.04 g GAE/100 g and 22.1 μg/ml for TPC and IC₅₀, respectively. Identification of phytochemical constituents in the C. caudatus extract was carried out by liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection and electrospray tandem mass (LC-DAD-ESIMS/MS) technique and the confirmation of constituents was achieved by comparison with literature data and/or co-chromatography with authentic standards. Six compounds were indentified including quercetin 3-O-rhamnoside, quercetin 3-O-glucoside, rutin, quercetin 3-O-arabinofuranoside, quercetin 3-O-galactoside and chlorogenic acid. Their concentrations showed significant variance among the 8, 10 and 12-week-old herbs during both seasons.

  8. Seasonal water storage, stress modulation, and California seismicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher W; Fu, Yuning; Bürgmann, Roland

    2017-06-16

    Establishing what controls the timing of earthquakes is fundamental to understanding the nature of the earthquake cycle and critical to determining time-dependent earthquake hazard. Seasonal loading provides a natural laboratory to explore the crustal response to a quantifiable transient force. In California, water storage deforms the crust as snow and water accumulates during the wet winter months. We used 9 years of global positioning system (GPS) vertical deformation time series to constrain models of monthly hydrospheric loading and the resulting stress changes on fault planes of small earthquakes. The seasonal loading analysis reveals earthquakes occurring more frequently during stress conditions that favor earthquake rupture. We infer that California seismicity rates are modestly modulated by natural hydrological loading cycles. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Solvent content and dentin bond strengths using water-wet, ethanol-wet and deproteinization bonding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Araújo, José Everton; Rocha, Gilliane Pereira; de Oliveira, Aline da Silva; de Moraes, Rafael Ratto

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of solvent content in two-step, etch-and-rinse adhesives on the dentin bond strengths obtained via water-wet, ethanol-wet or deproteinization techniques. A model photocurable Bis-GMA/HEMA blend was diluted in ethanol (7.5, 15 or 30 mass%) or acetone (15, 30 or 60 mass%) (low, medium or high solvent content, respectively). Viscosity of the solutions was measured with an oscillatory viscometer and data analyzed using ANOVA on Ranks (5%). Dentin bond strengths were evaluated using microshear bond test. After acid-etching and rinsing, the dentin was kept wet (water-wet), treated with ascending ethanol concentrations (ethanol-wet) or with 10% NaOCl solution (deproteinization). Composite cylinders built-up on the surfaces for the microshear test. Data from each bonding technique were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Fisher's LSD method (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification and data analyzed using chi-square tests (5%). Viscosity of ethanol-based agents was remarkably higher than acetone solutions. For the water-wet technique, lower bond strength was observed for the low compared with medium and high ethanol contents. For the ethanol-wet technique, the bond strength for both solvents types was low dentin bond strengths for the conventional and ethanol bonding techniques.

  10. Seasonal differences to the effect of nematode parasitism on weight gain of sheep and goats in Cigudeg, West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beriajaya I

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the seasonal effect of gastrointestinal nematode parasitism on weight gain of recently weaned sheep and goats in an area of West Java. Most animals were allowed to graze during the day and kept in pens with a raised slatted floor during the night Three trials were conducted in tandem,each for a period of4 months . The effect of parasitism was assesed by comparing weight gain of untreated animals with that of otherwisesimilar group treated each 2 weeks with oxfendazole or albendazole to suppress nematode parasitism . There was no difference between weight gain of treated and untreated sheep and goats during the dry season . Moreover, during the dry season both treated and untreated sheep and goats grew at about twice the rate of untreated animals and 25 percent greater than treated animalsduring the wet season . As faecal egg counts (and, thus, presumably the level of parasitism were the same throughout the year it was concluded that the low level of nutrition during the wet season was the main determinant affecting pathogenicity of gastrointestinal nematode parasitism in this study. Furthermore, improved nutrition during the wet season in areas similar to that of this study, especially in sheep and goats for the first 10 weeks after weaning, may obviate the need for anthelmintic therapy, being a means to both increase weight gain and negate the effect of nematode parasitism

  11. Species diversity and seasonal variation in the composition of a bat community in the semi-arid brazilian caatinga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrício Adriano da Rocha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The caatinga scrublands are relatively poorly-studied, and few data are available on the biome’s chiropteran fauna. The present study focuses on the bat community of the arboreal caatinga of Serra da Guia. Bats were trapped in mist-nets on three new moon nights per month between October, 2008, and September, 2009. Atotal of 157 individuals were captured, representing 12 species. Species richness estimated by Jackknife1 was 14.8. Glossophaga soricina and Carollia perspicillata were by far the most common species, accounting for 56.7% of the specimens captured. Species diversity was 1.80, while equitability was 0.72. There was no significant seasonal difference in species diversity or evenness. However, the present study recorded a clear seasonal shift in community structure. The principal difference in species composition was related to the temporal distribution of the rarest forms – all of the seven rarest species were recorded exclusively in only one season (dry or wet. The nectarivorous bats predominated numerically both in the dry season as in rainy, while frugivores became prominent, in terms of both the number of species and individuals, during the wet season. The predominance of stenodermatine bats during the wet season almost certainly reflects the increased availability of resources for this group during this part of the year.

  12. The Geologic Evidence for a Warm and Wet Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, R. A.; Irwin, R. P.; Howard, A. D.; Morgan, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    The geologic evidence supporting a warm and wet climate on early Mars is presented. The case against an "icy highlands" scenario is also made. Climate models are converging to a solution, but any theoretical data must explain the empirical data.

  13. Advanced Wet Tantalum Capacitors: Design, Specifications and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Insertion of new types of commercial, high volumetric efficiency wet tantalum capacitors in space systems requires reassessment of the existing quality assurance approaches that have been developed for capacitors manufactured to MIL-PRF-39006 requirements. The specifics of wet electrolytic capacitors is that leakage currents flowing through electrolyte can cause gas generation resulting in building up of internal gas pressure and rupture of the case. The risk associated with excessive leakage currents and increased pressure is greater for high value advanced wet tantalum capacitors, but it has not been properly evaluated yet. This presentation gives a review of specifics of the design, performance, and potential reliability risks associated with advanced wet tantalum capacitors. Problems related to setting adequate requirements for DPA, leakage currents, hermeticity, stability at low and high temperatures, ripple currents for parts operating in vacuum, and random vibration testing are discussed. Recommendations for screening and qualification to reduce risks of failures have been suggested.

  14. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in two wet retention ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Laila C.; Vollertsen, Jes; Blecken, Godecke-Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Metal accumulation in stormwater ponds may contaminate the inhabiting fauna, thus jeopardizing their ecosystem servicing function. We evaluated bioaccumulation of metals in natural fauna and caged mussel indicator organisms in two wet retention ponds. Mussel cages were distributed throughout...

  15. ROE Wet Sulfate Deposition Raster 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet sulfate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  16. In silico and wet lab approaches to study transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hestand, Matthew Scott

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is a complicated process with multiple types of regulation, including binding of proteins termed transcription factors. This thesis looks at transcription factors and transcription factor binding site discovery through computational predictions and wet lab work to better elucidate

  17. Wet-aerosol leakage through simulated containment leak paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutradhar, S.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Some types of postulated accidents in a nuclear reactor can result in the formation of radioactive wet aerosols in containment and their subsequent release into the environment. Wet-aerosol leakage was investigated using simulated leak paths for isolation damper valves and airlock door seals. Leakage was calculated from measured uranine concentrations deposited on high-quality filters positioned downstream of the simulated leak paths. Test results indicated that a small fraction of wet aerosols leaked through the simulated isolation damper valves, whereas a large fraction leaked through the simulated airlock door seals. Data on wet-aerosol leakage through containment leak paths are needed to develop and validate models in safety analysis codes. (author)

  18. Combined wet oxidation and alkaline hydrolysis of polyvinylchloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    In view of the widespread aversion to burning polyvinylchloride (PVC) together with municipal waste, we have attempted an alternative approach to its decomposition. This paper describes a combined wet oxidation/alkaline hydrolysis yielding water soluble, biodegradable products. Experiments were...

  19. Simulations of tropical rainforest albedo: is canopy wetness important?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silvia N.M. Yanagi; Marcos H. Costa

    2011-01-01

    .... Therefore, it was investigated the role of canopy wetness on the simulated albedo of a tropical rainforest by modifying the IBIS canopy radiation transfer code to incorporate the effects of canopy...

  20. The Forensic and Legal Implications of Water, Wet, or Fry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Susan M. Chlebowski; Cecilia Leonard

    2012-01-01

    ...), has several names, such as water, wet, illy, and fry. Individuals who commit crimes under the influence of this substance are often violent and may appear psychotic, with symptoms resembling schizophrenia or delirium...

  1. Characterization of silver nanoparticles prepared by wet chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of silver nanoparticles prepared by wet chemical method and their antibacterial and cytotoxicity activities. Manal A Awad, Awatif A Hendi, Khalid MO Ortashi, Reem A Alotaibi, Maha Sh Sharafeldin ...

  2. Regulated wet nursing: managed care or organized crime?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Obladen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    .... When artificial feeding lost its threat thanks to sewage disposal, improved plumbing, the introduction of rubber teats, cooling facilities and commercial formula, wet nursing declined towards the end of the 19th century.

  3. Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeper, Stephen A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1981-07-01

    A survey of wet cooling tower literature was performed to develop a simplified method of cooling tower design and simulation for use in power plant cycle optimization. The theory of heat exchange in wet cooling towers is briefly summarized. The Merkel equation (the fundamental equation of heat transfer in wet cooling towers) is presented and discussed. The cooling tower fill constant (Ka) is defined and values derived. A rule-of-thumb method for the optimized design of cooling towers is presented. The rule-of-thumb design method provides information useful in power plant cycle optimization, including tower dimensions, water consumption rate, exit air temperature, power requirements and construction cost. In addition, a method for simulation of cooling tower performance at various operating conditions is presented. This information is also useful in power plant cycle evaluation. Using the information presented, it will be possible to incorporate wet cooling tower design and simulation into a procedure to evaluate and optimize power plant cycles.

  4. Advance of Wetting Front in Silt Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahmood

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Under drip irrigation , the plant's root is concentrated inside the wetted bulb (region. Thus, the development of these roots and the plant production are greatly affected by the wetting pattern. Therefore, the wetting pattern of soil under drip irrigation must be taken into consideration in the design of drip irrigation system for both single dripping source or multi-overlapping wetting patterns of dripping water sources.2The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of initial water content of the soil and spacing between two adjacent dripping sources with different flow rate on the movement of the wetting front.This study included 16 tests for monitoring the advancement of the wetting front with time during and after the water application phase. The water advance and water distribution measurement are carried out for two cases of the soil profile: for the first case with initial volumetric water content of 4.08% and for the second case with initial volumetric water content of 12.24%. Two spacing between the emitter were tested 25cm and 50 cm using application flow rates of 0.606, 1.212, 1.818, and 2.424 cm3 /min/cm to show the combined effect of spacing and flow rate on the performance of two adjacent emitter.The study proposed a method for determining the spacing between the two emitting sources , the water application rate and watering time. The proposed method depends on a wetted zone whose depth is equal to the root zone depth with a values equals to the maximum vertical advance of the wetting front underneath the drip line at time when this depth is equal to the depth of wetting at mid­point between the drip line. the study revealed that both the vertical water advance in soil underneath the emitter and the horizontal advance of the wetting front is larger than those in the case of single emitter.Furthermore, the vertical water advance increases with the decrease spacing between the two drip lines. Also, the horizontal advance of the

  5. Forecasting of wet snow avalanche activity: Proof of concept and operational implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobiet, Andreas; Jöbstl, Lisa; Rieder, Hannes; Bellaire, Sascha; Mitterer, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    State-of-the-art tools for the operational assessment of avalanche danger include field observations, recordings from automatic weather stations, meteorological analyses and forecasts, and recently also indices derived from snowpack models. In particular, an index for identifying the onset of wet-snow avalanche cycles (LWCindex), has been demonstrated to be useful. However, its value for operational avalanche forecasting is currently limited, since detailed, physically based snowpack models are usually driven by meteorological data from automatic weather stations only and have therefore no prognostic ability. Since avalanche risk management heavily relies on timely information and early warnings, many avalanche services in Europe nowadays start issuing forecasts for the following days, instead of the traditional assessment of the current avalanche danger. In this context, the prognostic operation of detailed snowpack models has recently been objective of extensive research. In this study a new, observationally constrained setup for forecasting the onset of wet-snow avalanche cycles with the detailed snow cover model SNOWPACK is presented and evaluated. Based on data from weather stations and different numerical weather prediction models, we demonstrate that forecasts of the LWCindex as indicator for wet-snow avalanche cycles can be useful for operational warning services, but is so far not reliable enough to be used as single warning tool without considering other factors. Therefore, further development currently focuses on the improvement of the forecasts by applying ensemble techniques and suitable post processing approaches to the output of numerical weather prediction models. In parallel, the prognostic meteo-snow model chain is operationally used by two regional avalanche warning services in Austria since winter 2016/2017 for the first time. Experiences from the first operational season and first results from current model developments will be reported.

  6. Landfill Mining - Wet mechanical treatment of fine MSW with a wet jigger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanka, Sebastian; Münnich, Kai; Fricke, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The motives for landfill mining are various. In the last couple of years Enhanced Landfill Mining (ELFM) has become increasingly important in academic discourse and practical implementation. The main goal of ELFM is to recover as much material as possible from deposited municipal solid waste (MSW). In most of the projects carried out so far, the main focus has been set on coarse materials such as plastics, woods, papers and metals. These fractions can be separated easily by sieving in combination with magnetic separation. In these projects most of the fine materials, which might represent as much as 60-70% of the total mass of the landfill body, had to be deposited again. A further treatment aiming at reducing the masses of these fine materials, which are still a conglomerate of soil, calorific fractions, metals, minerals and residues, usually did not take place. One topic in the framework of the landfill mining project TÖNSLM, in addition to the separation of the calorific fraction and metals has been the treatment of fine materials with the goal to re-use these e.g. for construction purposes. This paper shows the results obtained after the wet mechanical treatment of fine MSW 10-60mm with a wet jigger. The physical principle of this process is the separation of the mass flux due to the different densities of the waste constituents. As a result, three main waste fluxes are obtained: Dense inert and dense fine fraction with a high content of minerals and a lightweight fraction with a high calorific value between 16 and 20MJ/kg. An additional positive effect of wet mechanical treatment is the removal of the finest particles from the surface of the waste material, thus increasing the quality of the generated waste fluxes. The mass fluxes of the different fractions and their qualities as well as possible recovery paths are described below. An economical and ecological consideration of the treatment of the fine materials does not take place within the framework of

  7. Surface Tension Triggered Wetting and Point of Care Sensor Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falde, Eric J; Yohe, Stefan T; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-08-05

    Rapid, simple, and inexpensive point-of-care (POC) medical tests are of significant need around the world. The transition between nonwetting and wetted states is used to create instrument-free surface tension sensors for POC diagnosis, using a layered electrospun mesh with incorporated dye to change color upon wetting. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Evaluation of the effectiveness of coal and mine dust wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Cybulski

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method to evaluate the effectiveness of coal or mine dust's moistening conducted with the use of water solutions of wetting agents in order to deprive the dust of its volatility, is based on the method of measurement of time of complete moistening of that dust's one-gram samples with the use of “pure” water or water solutions of the particular wetting agent.

  9. Modeling Reactive Wetting when Inertial Effects are Dominant

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Daniel; Warren, James A.; Boettinger, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent experimental studies of molten metal droplets wetting high temperature reactive substrates have established that the majority of triple-line motion occurs when inertial effects are dominant. In light of these studies, this paper investigates wetting and spreading on reactive substrates when inertial effects are dominant using a thermodynamically derived, diffuse interface model of a binary, three-phase material. The liquid-vapor transition is modeled using a van der Waals diffuse inter...

  10. [Hemicorporectomy with double barreled wet colostomy: an extremely rare procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Marco Antonio; Duarte, Enio Lucio Coelho; Souza, Renato Costa Amaral; Albuquerque-Peres, Carlos Michel; Guimaraes, Gustavo Cardoso; Lopes, Ademar

    2009-12-01

    The Hemicorporectomy associated to Double-barreled wet colostomy is a high complex and heroic procedure and is to be used only exceptionally, when it is the last resource for treating locally advanced pelvic diseases in the absence of evidences of distant metastasis. We retrospectively analyzed the surgical technical details and the results from a hemicorporectomy with double-barreled wet colostomy in a single surgical time in a case of epidermoide carcinoma from a coetaneous pressure ulcer.

  11. Wet Deposition Concentrations and Fluxes of Mercury in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, G.; Lin, N.

    2010-12-01

    Taiwan is located downwind to the largest anthropogenic Hg emission source region, the East Asian continent, and thus model simulations often predicted that Taiwan could receive high Hg input via wet deposition. Therefore, a mercury (Hg) wet deposition monitoring network was established in Taiwan to collect rainwater for total Hg analysis since September 2008. The objective of this network is to establish a national database of wet deposition concentrations and fluxes of Hg. This database will later be used to develop information on spatial and temporal trends in Hg wet deposition and to evaluate the contribution of regional/long-range transport. A total of 12 sampling sites, covering urban, rural, mountain, coastal and remote island areas, were set up. Weekly samples were collected using automated wet-only precipitation collection systems. Acid-cleaned glass funnels were used for rainwater collections and samples were collected into acid-cleaned 1L Teflon bottles. Samples were retrieved and sampling trains were changed every Tuesday morning. Total Hg was quantified by dual amalgamation CVAFS after BrCl oxidation, NH2OH●HCl neutralization, and SnCl2 reduction. In 2009, total Hg concentrations of all the rainwater samples ranged from 2.1 to 82.2 ng/L. Volume-weighted mean (VWM) total Hg concentrations of all the sampling sites ranged between 7.6 and 17.2 ng/L. In general, rainwater Hg concentrations were lower in northern Taiwan sites, likely due to the dilution effect caused by higher rainfall amount. Annual wet depositional Hg fluxes ranged between 12.3 and 37.0 μg/m2 in 2009, with higher values usually observed in northern Taiwan sites. The geographical distribution of wet depositional Hg flux mimicked the distribution of accumulative rainfall amount, suggesting precipitation depth is the primary factor in determining the magnitude of wet depositional Hg flux.

  12. Development of Wet Noodles Based on Cassava Flour

    OpenAIRE

    Abidin, Akhmad Z; Devi, Cinantya; Adeline, A

    2013-01-01

    Cassava is one of Indonesia’s original commodities and contains good nutrition and has high productivity and a relatively low price. Cassava flour has a high potential as a substitute for imported wheat flour that is widely used in noodle production. The main purpose of this research was to develop wet noodles from cassava flour that can compete with wet noodles from wheat flour. The research consisted of experiments with several variations of composition and production method for producing c...

  13. Microbial community composition of transiently wetted Antarctic Dry Valley soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas D. Neiderberger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the summer months, wet (hyporheic soils associated with ephemeral streams and lake edges in the Antarctic Dry Valleys (DV become hotspots of biological activity and are hypothesized to be an important source of carbon and nitrogen for arid DV soils. Recent research in the DV has focused on the geochemistry and microbial ecology of lakes and arid soils, with substantially less information being available on hyporheic soils. Here we determined the unique properties of hyporheic microbial communities, resolved their relationship to environmental parameters and to compared them to archetypal arid DV soils. Generally, pH increased and chlorophyll a concentrations decreased along transects from wet to arid soils (9.0 to ~7.0 for pH and ~0.8 to ~ 5 µg/cm3 for chlorophyll a, respectively. Soil water content decreased to below ~3% in the arid soils. Community fingerprinting-based principle component analyses revealed that bacterial communities formed distinct clusters specific to arid and wet soils; however, eukaryotic communities that clustered together did not have similar soil moisture content nor did they group together based on sampling location. Collectively, rRNA pyrosequencing indicated a considerably higher abundance of Cyanobacteria in wet soils and a higher abundance of Acidobacterial, Actinobacterial, Deinococcus/Thermus, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospira and Planctomycetes in arid soils. The two most significant differences at the genus level were Gillisia signatures present in arid soils and chloroplast signatures related to Streptophyta that were common in wet soils. Fungal dominance was observed in arid soils and Viridplantae were more common in wet soils. This research represents an in-depth characterization of microbial communities inhabiting wet DV soils. Results indicate that the repeated wetting of hyporheic zones has a profound impact on the bacterial and eukaryotic communities inhabiting in these areas.

  14. Hijama (Wet Cupping or Dry Cupping) for Diabetes Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Vakilinia, Seyed Reza; Bayat, Davood; Asghari, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is known as one of the most common diseases in the world and its treatment is one of the most important healthcare issues. Consequently, different treatment methods of complementary medicine and recent medicine have been used by scientific communities to control and predict the disease. This article considered the effects of dry cupping and wet cupping, based on traditional medicine and recent studies. Methods: At first, the benefits of dry cupping and wet cupping were ta...

  15. Human skin wetness perception: psychophysical and neurophysiological bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filingeri, Davide; Havenith, George

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perceive thermal changes in the surrounding environment is critical for survival. However, sensing temperature is not the only factor among the cutaneous sensations to contribute to thermoregulatory responses in humans. Sensing skin wetness (i.e. hygrosensation) is also critical both for behavioral and autonomic adaptations. Although much has been done to define the biophysical role of skin wetness in contributing to thermal homeostasis, little is known on the neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning the ability to sense skin wetness. Humans are not provided with skin humidity receptors (i.e., hygroreceptors) and psychophysical studies have identified potential sensory cues (i.e. thermal and mechanosensory) which could contribute to sensing wetness. Recently, a neurophysiological model of human wetness sensitivity has been developed. In helping clarifying the peripheral and central neural mechanisms involved in sensing skin wetness, this model has provided evidence for the existence of a specific human hygrosensation strategy, which is underpinned by perceptual learning via sensory experience. Remarkably, this strategy seems to be shared by other hygroreceptor-lacking animals. However, questions remain on whether these sensory mechanisms are underpinned by specific neuromolecular pathways in humans. Although the first study on human wetness perception dates back to more than 100 years, it is surprising that the neurophysiological bases of such an important sensory feature have only recently started to be unveiled. Hence, to provide an overview of the current knowledge on human hygrosensation, along with potential directions for future research, this review will examine the psychophysical and neurophysiological bases of human skin wetness perception. PMID:27227008

  16. Alternate wetting and drying decreases methylmercury in flooded rice (Oryza sativa) systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, K. Christy; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Fleck, Jacob; Linquist, Bruce A.

    2018-01-01

    In flooded soils, including those found in rice (Oryza sativa L.) fields, microbes convert inorganic Hg to more toxic methylmercury (MeHg). Methylmercury is accumulated in rice grain, potentially affecting health. Methylmercury in rice field surface water can bioaccumulate in wildlife. We evaluated how introducing aerobic periods into an otherwise continuously flooded rice growing season affects MeHg dynamics. Conventional continuously flooded (CF) rice field water management was compared with alternate wetting and drying, where irrigation was stopped twice during the growing season, allowing soil to dry to 35% volumetric moisture content, at which point plots were reflooded (AWD-35). Methylmercury studies began at harvest in Year 3 and throughout Year 4 of a 4-yr replicated field experiment. Bulk soil, water, and plant samples were analyzed for MeHg and total Hg (THg), and iron (Fe) speciation was measured in soil samples. Rice grain yield over 4 yr did not differ between treatments. Soil chemistry responded quickly to AWD-35 dry-downs, showing significant oxidation of Fe(II) accompanied by a significant reduction of MeHg concentration (76% reduction at harvest) compared with CF. Surface water MeHg decreased by 68 and 39% in the growing and fallow seasons, respectively, suggesting that the effects of AWD-35 management can last through to the fallow season. The AWD-35 treatment reduced rice grain MeHg and THg by 60 and 32%, respectively. These results suggest that the more aerobic conditions caused by AWD-35 limited the activity of Hg(II)-methylating microbes and may be an effective way to reduce MeHg concentrations in rice ecosystems.

  17. Hijama (Wet Cupping or Dry Cupping) for Diabetes Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakilinia, Seyed Reza; Bayat, Davood; Asghari, Majid

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes is known as one of the most common diseases in the world and its treatment is one of the most important healthcare issues. Consequently, different treatment methods of complementary medicine and recent medicine have been used by scientific communities to control and predict the disease. This article considered the effects of dry cupping and wet cupping, based on traditional medicine and recent studies. At first, the benefits of dry cupping and wet cupping were taken from some original books of Iranian traditional medicine, such as Canon of Medicine, Kholasat-al-hekma, Tib-e-Akbari and Exir-e-Azam. Then, the information about scientific articles was obtained by studying some of the Iranian traditional medicine journals and searching through PubMed, SID and Google Scholar. In traditional medicine, Hijama is divided into two kinds, namely wet cupping (with sharat, with incision, and blood giving) and dry cupping (without sharat, without incision). Dry cupping causes organ blood absorption, organ warming, and loss of organ humidity. The texts of Iranian traditional medicine refer to the Ziabites disease that its symptoms are like diabetes. This disease is divided into two types including warm and cold ziabetes. The treatments that are recommended for both types are dry cupping for cold ziabetes and wet cupping for warm ziabetes. In addition, according to scientific studies, dry cupping and wet cupping have been recommended for diabetes treatment. Dry cupping and wet cupping can be introduced as the complementary treatment methods beside other treatment methods.

  18. Development of Wet Noodles Based on Cassava Flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmad Z. Abidin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cassava is one of Indonesia’s original commodities and contains good nutrition and has high productivity and a relatively low price. Cassava flour has a high potential as a substitute for imported wheat flour that is widely used in noodle production. The main purpose of this research was to develop wet noodles from cassava flour that can compete with wet noodles from wheat flour. The research consisted of experiments with several variations of composition and production method for producing cassava flour-based wet noodles. The best result was then examined for its nutritional value, economical value, and market response, and also a comparison was made between the prepared wet noodles and the standard noodles made from wheat flour. The analysis was based on five characteristics: taste, texture, chewiness, aroma, and appearance. Relations between these characteristics with composition, materials used, and methods applied are discussed. The developed cassava flour-based wet noodle meets physical, nutritional, and economical standards. Raw materials of the noodle were cassava flour and a wheat flour composite with a 5:1 ratio, egg, gluten, soda-ash, water, and vegetable oil, while the process was completed in multiple stages. Market response showed that the cassava flour-based wet noodles were 80% similar to wheat-flour noodles.

  19. Flu season and trehalose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of us who are practicing medicine know that we are in a very active flu season. This was brought home to me when last week trying to admit a patient to the hospital from the office. She was a bone marrow transplant patient who had severe diarrhea and dehydration probably secondary to C. difficile. Hospital admissions said the patient had to be sent to the Emergency Room because the hospital was full due to the flu epidemic. Nationwide there has been a dramatic increase in the number of hospitalizations due to influenza over the past week from 13.7 to 22.7 per 100,000 (1. Influenza A(H3N2 has been the most common form of influenza reported this season. These viruses are often linked to more severe illness, especially in children and people age 65 years and older. Fortunately, the CDC also says that the flu cases may be peaking. However, at ...

  20. Music season coming soon

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin in collaboration with Julio Rosenfeld

    2012-01-01

    On 16 June, CERN’s music season will open with Music on the Lawn. The event is the CERN Music Club’s contribution to the Fete de la Musique and will take place on the terrace of Restaurant 1 from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. The Hardronic Festival, CERN’s long-running rock festival, will be held on the evenings of 20 and 21 July in Prévessin, on the terrace behind Restaurant 3. If you would like to help with the organisation, please contact the Music Club by e-mail: music.club@cern.ch.   The Canettes Blues Band during the 2011 Hardronic Festival. (© Christoph Balle, 2010). Summer is coming, and along with it comes the music season. CERN will be hosting its two annual rock music concerts: Music on the Lawn and the Hardronic Festival. The two events are organised by the CERN Music Club, which has been sharing the enjoyment of good music with its numerous fans for many years. “Music on the Lawn was originally created so that the members of the Mus...

  1. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2009-01-01

    As every year, the Medical Service is taking part in the campaign to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal influenza is especially recommended for people suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney conditions or diabetes, for those recovering from a serious illness or surgical operation and for everyone over the age of 65. The influenza virus is transmitted by air and contact with contaminated surfaces, hence the importance of washing hands regularly with soap and / or disinfection using a hydro-alcoholic solution. From the onset of symptoms (fever> 38°, chills, cough, muscle aches and / or joint pain, fatigue) you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. In the present context of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, it is important to dissociate these two illnesses and emphasise that the two viruses and the vaccines used to combat them are quite different and that protection against one will not provide protection against the...

  2. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea are more resistant than denitrifiers to seasonal precipitation changes in an acidic subtropical forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie

    2017-04-01

    More frequent droughts and storms will occur globally in the prediction of global climate change model, which will influence soil microorganisms and nutrient cycles. Understanding the resistance of soil functional microorganisms and the associated biogeochemical cycles to such climate changes is important in evaluating responses of ecosystem functioning. In order to clarify the responses of soil functional microorganisms involved in nitrogen (N) cycle to the predicted precipitation scenarios, two contrasting precipitation manipulation experiments were conducted in an acidic subtropical forest soil. One experiment manipulated drier dry-season and wetter wet-season (DD) by reducing dry-season rainfall and adding the equivalently reduced rainfall to wet-season. Another experiment manipulated extending dry-season and wetter wet-season (ED) by reducing spring-season rainfall and adding the equivalent rainfall in the late wet-season. The resistance index of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) amoA and denitrifying (nirK, nirS and nosZ) genes abundance, soil net N mineralization and nitrification rates were calculated during experiments to examine their responses to precipitation changes. As the results, the resistance index of functional microbial abundance (-0.03 ± 0.08) was much lower than that of net N transformation rates (0.55 ± 0.02), indicating more sensitive of functional microorganisms in response to precipitation changes than the related N processes. Extending dry-season showed greater effects on both AOA amoA and denitrifying genes abundance than drier dry-season, with significant increases of these microbial abundance after extending dry-season. This was mainly due to the interaction effects of soil water content (SWC), dissolve organic carbon (DOC) and NH4+ concentration during rainfall reduction in spring-season. Interestingly, the resistance index of AOA amoA abundance was significantly higher than that of denitrifying gene abundance, indicating more

  3. Seasonal variations in nutrients and secondary metabolites in semi-arid savannas depend on year and species

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scogings, PF

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available years, including one ‘wet’ year (above-average rainfall) and two ‘dry’ years (below-average rainfall). Neither N nor P consistently decreased during wet seasons, while CBSMs did not consistently increase. Neither N nor P in the evergreen species...

  4. Biomimetic wet-stable fibres via wet spinning and diacid-based crosslinking of collagen triple helices

    CERN Document Server

    Arafat, M Tarik; Yin, Jie; Wood, David J; Russell, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    One of the limitations of electrospun collagen as bone-like fibrous structure is the potential collagen triple helix denaturation in the fibre state and the corresponding inadequate wet stability even after crosslinking. Here, we have demonstrated the feasibility of accomplishing wet-stable fibres by wet spinning and diacid-based crosslinking of collagen triple helices, whereby fibre ability to act as bone-mimicking mineralisation system has also been explored. Circular dichroism (CD) demonstrated nearly complete triple helix retention in resulting wet-spun fibres, and the corresponding chemically crosslinked fibres successfully preserved their fibrous morphology following 1-week incubation in phosphate buffer solution (PBS). The presented novel diacid-based crosslinking route imparted superior tensile modulus and strength to the resulting fibres indicating that covalent functionalization of distant collagen molecules is unlikely to be accomplished by current state-of-the-art carbodiimide-based crosslinking. ...

  5. Seasonal changes of water carbon relations in savanna ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsch, W. L.; Merbold, L.; Archibald, S.

    2011-12-01

    During evolution plant species have developed different strategies to optimize the water carbon relations. These stratgies summarize to ecosystem properties. As an example we show how tropical and subtropical savannas and woodlands can respond flexibly to changes in temperature and water availability and thus optimize carbon and water fluxes between land surface and atmosphere. Several phenomena are presented and discussed in this overview from African flux sites in Zambia, Burkina Faso and South Africa: Pre-rain leaf development: Many trees developed new leaves before the first rain appeared. As a consequence of this early timing of leaf flush, the phenological increase of photosynthetic capacity (Amax) was steeper than in temperate forests. Mid-term response of conductance and photosynthesis to soil water relations: The regulation of canopy conductance was temporally changing in two ways: changes due to phenology during the course of the growing season and short-term (hours to days) acclimation to soil water conditions. The most constant parameter was water use efficiency. It was influenced by water vapour pressure deficit (VPD) during the day, but the VPD response curve of water usage only changed slightly during the course of the growing season, and decreased by about 30% during the transition from wet to dry season. The regulation of canopy conductance and photosynthetic capacity were closely related. This observation meets recent leaf-level findings that stomatal closure triggers down-regulation of Rubisco during drought. Our results may show the effects of these processes on the ecosystem scale. Furthermore, we observed that the close relationship between stomatal conductance and photosynthesis resulted in different temperature optima of GPP that were close to the average daytime temperature. Adaptation of respiration to rain pulses: Finally, the response of respiration to rain pulses showed changes throughout the growing season. The first rain events early

  6. with short selling season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moutaz Khouja

    2005-01-01

    deciding on the production levels for a product that has a very short selling season. The firm has a full period to produce and meet a lumpy demand which occurs at the end of the period. The product is no longer demanded after the end of the period. A constant production rate which minimizes average unit cost may increase holding costs. Varying the production rate at discrete points in time may increase production costs but may also decrease holding costs. In addition, allowing changes in the production rate enables the incorporation of forecast revisions into the production plan. Therefore, the best production plan depends on the flexibility of the production system and on the holding cost. In this paper, we formulate and solve a model of this production planning problem. Two models are developed to deal with two types of the average unit cost function. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the results of the model.

  7. Seasonal variation in metabolic rate, flight activity and body size of Anopheles gambiae in the Sahel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, Diana L; Yaro, Alpha S; Traoré, Adama I; Dieter, Kathryne L; Nwagbara, Juliette I; Bowie, Aleah C; Adamou, Abdoulaye; Kassogué, Yaya; Diallo, Moussa; Timbiné, Seydou; Dao, Adama; Lehmann, Tovi

    2012-06-15

    Malaria in Africa is vectored primarily by the Anopheles gambiae complex. Although the mechanisms of population persistence during the dry season are not yet known, targeting dry season mosquitoes could provide opportunities for vector control. In the Sahel, it appears likely that M-form A. gambiae survive by aestivation (entering a dormant state). To assess the role of eco-physiological changes associated with dry season survival, we measured body size, flight activity and metabolic rate of wild-caught mosquitoes throughout 1 year in a Sahelian locality, far from permanent water sources, and at a riparian location adjacent to the Niger River. We found significant seasonal variation in body size at both the Sahelian and riparian sites, although the magnitude of the variation was greater in the Sahel. For flight activity, significant seasonality was only observed in the Sahel, with increased flight activity in the wet season when compared with that just prior to and throughout the dry season. Whole-organism metabolic rate was affected by numerous biotic and abiotic factors, and a significant seasonal component was found at both locations. However, assay temperature accounted completely for seasonality at the riparian location, while significant seasonal variation remained after accounting for all measured variables in the Sahel. Interestingly, we did not find that mean metabolic rate was lowest during the dry season at either location, contrary to our expectation that mosquitoes would conserve energy and increase longevity by reducing metabolism during this time. These results indicate that mosquitoes may use mechanisms besides reduced metabolic rate to enable survival during the Sahelian dry season.

  8. Water quality assessment for sustainable agriculture in the Wet Tropics--a community-assisted approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faithful, John; Finlayson, Wendy

    2005-01-01

    A number of studies in north Queensland over the past two decades have concluded that large amounts of nutrients and sediments are exported from agricultural watersheds, particularly during wet season rainfall events. With the co-operation of a number of growers, runoff from Queensland Wet Tropics banana and cane farm paddocks in two distinct tropical river catchments was examined to provide an estimate of nutrient and sediment concentrations and export, with comparison to water quality of flow through a small urban lakes system. Median total nitrogen concentrations in cane drainage runoff (3110 microg N/L) were higher than for banana paddock drainage (2580 microg N/L), although the maximum concentration was recorded from a banana paddock (20,900 microg N/L). Nitrogen losses during post-event drainage flow were supplemented by high proportions of NO(X) (nitrate + nitrite) sourced from groundwater inputs. Banana paddocks had the highest maximum and median total phosphorus and TSS concentrations (5120 and 286 microg P/L, and 7250 and 75 mg/L respectively) compared to the cane farms (1430 and 50 microg P/L, and 1840 and 14 mg/L respectively). The higher phosphorus and TSS concentrations in the banana runoff were attributed to higher paddock slopes and a greater proportion of exposed ground surface during the wet season. Highest nutrient and TSS concentrations corresponded with samples collected near the peak discharge periods; however, the rising stage of the drainage flows, where the highest nutrient and TSS concentrations are often reported, were difficult to target because of the manual sampling strategy used. This study shows that high concentrations of nutrients and TSS occur in the runoff from cane and banana paddocks. Median total nitrogen, total phosphorus and TSS concentrations in flow through the urban lakes were 369 microg N/L, 16 microg P/L and 11 mg/L, respectively. Flux estimates of 9.2 kg N, 0.8 kg P and 126 kg TSS/ha were determined for drainage runoff

  9. Visual wetness perception based on image color statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawayama, Masataka; Adelson, Edward H; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2017-05-01

    Color vision provides humans and animals with the abilities to discriminate colors based on the wavelength composition of light and to determine the location and identity of objects of interest in cluttered scenes (e.g., ripe fruit among foliage). However, we argue that color vision can inform us about much more than color alone. Since a trichromatic image carries more information about the optical properties of a scene than a monochromatic image does, color can help us recognize complex material qualities. Here we show that human vision uses color statistics of an image for the perception of an ecologically important surface condition (i.e., wetness). Psychophysical experiments showed that overall enhancement of chromatic saturation, combined with a luminance tone change that increases the darkness and glossiness of the image, tended to make dry scenes look wetter. Theoretical analysis along with image analysis of real objects indicated that our image transformation, which we call the wetness enhancing transformation, is consistent with actual optical changes produced by surface wetting. Furthermore, we found that the wetness enhancing transformation operator was more effective for the images with many colors (large hue entropy) than for those with few colors (small hue entropy). The hue entropy may be used to separate surface wetness from other surface states having similar optical properties. While surface wetness and surface color might seem to be independent, there are higher order color statistics that can influence wetness judgments, in accord with the ecological statistics. The present findings indicate that the visual system uses color image statistics in an elegant way to help estimate the complex physical status of a scene.

  10. Identification of Potential Strain Heterogeneities During Wetting-Induced Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihalache Constance

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compaction upon wetting has been reported to occur in various types of unsaturated soils with damaging consequences for infrastructure in field applications. This deformation process is often referred to as “wetting-collapse”, implying that it may be unstable in nature. Recent evidences also indicate that compaction localization represents a possible mode of deformation during wetting, even in the presence of oedometric loading paths. Despite this, little work has been done from a mechanistic perspective to assess the susceptibility of these processes to localization instability. Here we assess the potential for strain localization during wetting through controllability analyses defined in light of a second-order work expression for unsaturated soils. A hydro-mechanical constitutive model with suction-dependent hardening is used to simulate classic experimental data, and the controllability criteria are specialized to capture the potential for shear band formation for a range of band inclinations under water content-controlled and suction-controlled wetting paths. The effect of changes in material characteristics was evaluated, showing that the potential for strain localization upon water-injection increases with increasing values of suction-induced hardening, and that non-associativity may have an effect on both the potential for localization under rapid wetting, as well as on the range of band angles over which it may occur. Specifically, it is possible to distinguish two well-defined stress regions, one within which strain localization is first possible with horizontal band inclinations and another in which inclined localization zones tend to be more critical. Such results provide insight on the factors that may contribute to strain localization during wetting and find general applicability in the interpretation of the response of geo-structures subjected to intense hydrologic forcing.

  11. The effect of surface water and wetting on gecko adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Sullivan, Timothy W; Niewiarowski, Peter H

    2012-09-01

    Despite profound interest in the mechanics and performance of the gecko adhesive system, relatively few studies have focused on performance under conditions that are ecologically relevant to the natural habitats of geckos. Because geckos are likely to encounter surfaces that are wet, we used shear force adhesion measurements to examine the effect of surface water and toe pad wetting on the whole-animal performance of a tropical-dwelling gecko (Gekko gecko). To test the effect of surface wetting, we measured the shear adhesive force of geckos on three substrate conditions: dry glass, glass misted with water droplets and glass fully submerged in water. We also investigated the effect of wetting on the adhesive toe pad by soaking the toe pads prior to testing. Finally, we tested for repeatability of the adhesive system in each wetting condition by measuring shear adhesion after each step a gecko made under treatment conditions. Wetted toe pads had significantly lower shear adhesive force in all treatments (0.86 ± 0.09 N) than the control (17.96 ± 3.42 N), as did full immersion in water (0.44 ± 0.03 N). Treatments with droplets of water distributed across the surface were more variable and did not differ from treatments where the surface was dry (4.72 ± 1.59 N misted glass; 9.76 ± 2.81 N dry glass), except after the gecko took multiple steps. These findings suggest that surface water and the wetting of a gecko's adhesive toe pads may have significant consequences for the ecology and behavior of geckos living in tropical environments.

  12. Seasonal dynamics of butterfly population in DAE Campus, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.J. Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal population trends of butterflies inhabiting the campus of Department of Atomic Energy (DAE at Kalpakkam were recorded by setting a permanent line transect of 300m and recording all species of butterflies observed within a 5m distance. The survey yielded 2177 individuals of 56 butterfly species, belonging to the families Nymphalidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae, Papilionidae and Hesperiidae. Nymphalidae were found to be the dominant family during all seasons. Species richness and abundance were highest during the northeast monsoon and winter periods, indicating that in the southern plains of India butterflies prefer cool seasons for breeding and emergence. The taxonomic structure of the butterflies sampled resembles that of the Western Ghats and other regions of India in two ways: (a dominance of nymphalids and (b peak abundance during wet seasons. A detailed study of ecologically important local butterfly fauna and their host plants is in progress, to construct a butterfly garden in Kalpakkam to attract and support butterflies.

  13. Seasonal variation of fecal contamination in drinking water sources in developing countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyla, Caroline; Bain, Rob; Cronk, Ryan; Bartram, Jamie

    2015-05-01

    Accounting for fecal contamination of drinking water sources is an important step in improving monitoring of global access to safe drinking water. Fecal contamination varies with time while its monitoring is often infrequent. We sought to understand seasonal trends in fecal contamination to guide best practices to capture seasonal variation and ascertain the extent to which the results of a single sample may overestimate compliance with health guidelines. The findings from 22 studies from developing countries written in English and identified through a systematic review were analyzed. Fecal contamination in improved drinking water sources was shown to follow a statistically significant seasonal trend of greater contamination during the wet season (pwater quality monitoring by the World Health Organization and national water quality agencies could lead to improved assessments of access to safe drinking water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effect of Drying-Wetting Cycle’s Repetition to the Characteristic of Natural and Stabilization Residual Soils Jawa Timur - Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntaha, M.

    2017-11-01

    Indonesia, which located in tropical region, continuously undergoes wetting and drying cycles due to the changeable seasons. An important role in activating the clay minerals on tropical residual soils is the main factor that affects the static and dynamic properties, such as: volume change, soil suction and dynamic modulus. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effect of drying-wetting cycles repetition on volume change, soil suction and mechanical characteristics of natural and stabilization of residual soils from Jawa Timur - Indonesia. The natural undisturbed and stabilized residual soil sample was naturally and gradually dried up with air to 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100 % of the initial water content. The wetting processes were carried out with the gradual increment water content of 25 %(wsat ‑ wi), 50 %(wsat ‑ wi), 75 %(wsat ‑ wi), up to 100 %(wsat ‑ wi). The Direct Shear test is used to measure the mechanic properties, and Whatman filter paper No. 42 is used to measure the soil suction. The drying-wetting processes were carried out for 1, 2, 4, and 6 cycles. The laboratory test results showed that, the void ratio decreased, the unit weight, cohesion and the internal friction angle were increasing due to stabilization. Drying-wetting cycle repetition reduces void ratio, negative pore-water pressure, cohesion and internal friction angle of natural and stabilized soils. Briefly, the decreased of mechanical soil properties was proven from the physical properties change observation.

  15. Contribution of water-limited regions to their own supply of rainfall during wet and dry years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Diego; Nieto, Raquel; McDowell, Nathan; Dorigo, Wouter; Verhoest, Niko; Liu, Yi; Teuling, Adriaan; Dolman, Han; Good, Stephen; Gimeno, Luis

    2017-04-01

    The occurrence of wet and dry spells in water-limited regions remains poorly understood. When these precipitation anomalies happen during the growing season, they can impact carbon and water budgets and hinder the regional management of natural resources. The difficulties to understand and predict these anomalies are partly owed to the complex role that water-limited ecoregions play in the genesis of their own rainfall: the increases in biomass and transpiration during the growing season are expected to influence the local input of rainfall. In this presentation, we unravel the origin and immediate drivers of growing-season rainfall in the ten major water-limited ecoregions on Earth. We use novel satellite data of vegetation water content and transpiration, combined with Langrangian atmospheric trajectory modelling. The extent to which these ecoregions themselves contribute to their own supply of rainfall is analyzed for dry and wet years separately. Results show that persistent anomalies in growing-season precipitation—and subsequent biomass impacts—are caused by a complex interplay of anomalies in land and ocean evaporation, air circulation and local atmospheric stability. Nonetheless, the specific drivers vary depending on the region of interest. For instance, in Kalahari and Australia, local atmospheric instability and evaporation in the surrounding regions play a central role. In these regions, the volumes of moisture recycling decline in dry years, providing an overall positive feedback that intensifies dry conditions. Despite these declines in the volumes of recycled rainfall, recycling ratios increase over 40% during dry times. This implies that transpiration in periods of water stress partly offsets the decreases in incoming precipitation that are mainly triggered by external conditions. Findings highlight the need to adequately represent vegetation-atmosphere feedbacks in models to predict biomass changes and simulate the fate of water-limited regions

  16. Insect emergence in relation to floods in wet meadows and swamps in the River Dalälven floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnersten, T Z Persson; Östman, Ö; Schäfer, M L; Lundström, J O

    2014-08-01

    Annual variation in flood frequency and hydroperiod during the vegetation season has ecological impacts on the floodplain biota. Although many insect groups may have a lower emergence during a flood event, it is poorly known how annual emergence of insects in temporary wetlands is related to the variation in hydrology. Between May and September, we studied the weekly emergence of 18 insect taxa over six consecutive years, 2002-2007, in six temporary flooded wetlands (four wet meadows and two forest swamps) in the River Dalälven floodplains, Central Sweden. We used emergence traps to collect emerging insects from terrestrial and aquatic parts of wet meadows and swamp forests. In all wetlands, the insect fauna was numerically dominated by the orders Diptera, Hymenoptera, Coleoptera and Homoptera. On a weekly basis, 9 out of the 18 insect taxa had lower emergence in weeks with flood than in weeks with no flood, whereas no taxon had a higher emergence in weeks with flood. Over the seasons, we related insect emergence to seasonal flood frequency and length of hydroperiod. The emergence of most studied taxa decreased with increasing hydroperiod, which suggests that emergence after floods do not compensate for the reduced emergence during floods. Only Culicidae and the aquatic Chironomidae sub-families Tanypodinae and Chironominae showed an increase in emergence with increasing hydroperiod, whereas Staphylinidae peaked at intermediate hydroperiod. We conclude that a hydroperiod covering up to 40% of the vegetation season has a significant negative effect on the emergence of most taxa and that only a few taxa occurring in the temporary wetlands are actually favoured by a flood regime with recurrent and unpredictable floods.

  17. Spatiotemporal distribution and source apportionment of low molecular weight organic acids in wet precipitation at a coastal city, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenjiao; Hong, Zhenyu; Chen, Yanting; Deng, Junjun; Chen, Jinsheng; Xu, Lingling; Hong, Youwei; Xiao, Hang

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the characteristics and sources of low molecular weight (LMW) organic acids in wet precipitation at a coastal city, Xiamen, a total of 313 rainwater samples were collected at seven different functional areas from September 2012 to August 2013. Spatiotemporal characteristics of LMW organic acids as well as pH and electrical conductivity were analyzed. Meanwhile, air mass clusters in different seasons and the positive matrix factorization (PMF) source apportion model were comprehensively used to identify the sources of organic acids. In conclusion, the volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentration of formic (3.20 μmol/L), acetic (1.84 μmol/L), lactic (0.44 μmol/L), and oxalic acid (0.53 μmol/L) were obtained, which jointly contributed to 4.33% of the total free acidity (TFA). At the same time, the highest wet deposition flux of LMW organic acids and contribution of that to TFA were achieved at the forest protection area during growing season in Xiamen. In addition, biogenic emissions (77.12%), sea salts (13.77%), regional agriculture activities (3.92%), soil emissions (2.56%), biomass burning (1.47%), and secondary aerosols (1.15%) were determined as the source of LMW organic acids. Besides, the dominancy of biomass burning via long-range transport in non-growing season (NGS) and the contribution of biogenic emission in growing season (GS) were recognized. Finally, the considerable influence of sea salts on the LMW organic acids (13.77%) in Xiamen was quantified, especially for oxalic acid.

  18. Seasonal variations of outdoor air pollution and factors driving them in the school environment in rural Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangchuk, Tenzin; He, Congrong; Dudzinska, Marzenna R.; Morawska, Lidia

    2015-07-01

    A quantitative understanding of outdoor air quality in school environments is crucial given that air pollution levels inside classrooms are significantly influenced by outdoor pollution sources. To date, only a handful of studies have been conducted on this important topic in developing countries. The aim of this study was to quantify pollutant levels in the outdoor environment of a school in Bhutan and assess the factors driving them. Measurements were conducted for 16 weeks, spanning the wet and dry seasons, in a rural school in Bhutan. PM10, PM2.5, particle number (PN) and CO were measured daily using real-time instruments, while weekly samples for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), carbonyls and NO2 were collected using a passive sampling method. Overall mean PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations (μg/m3) were 27 and 13 for the wet, and 36 and 29 for the dry season, respectively. Only wet season data were available for PN concentrations, with a mean of 2.56 × 103 particles/cm3. Mean CO concentrations were below the detection limit of the instrumentation for the entire measurement period. Only low levels of eight VOCs were detected in both the wet and dry seasons, which presented different seasonal patterns in terms of the concentration of different compounds. The notable carbonyls were formaldehyde and hexaldehyde, with mean concentrations (μg/m3) of 2.37 and 2.41 for the wet, and 6.22 and 0.34 for the dry season, respectively. Mean NO2 concentration for the dry season was 1.7 μg/m3, while it was below the detection limit of the instrumentation for the wet season. The pollutant concentrations were associated with a number of factors, such as cleaning and combustion activities in and around the school. A comparison with other school studies showed comparable results with a few of the studies, but in general, we found lower pollutant concentrations in the present study.

  19. Inter-annual variability of NDVI in response to long-term warming and fertilization in wet sedge and tussock tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelman, Natalie T; Stieglitz, Marc; Griffin, Kevin L; Shaver, Gaius R

    2005-05-01

    This study explores the relationship between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and aboveground plant biomass for tussock tundra vegetation and compares it to a previously established NDVI-biomass relationship for wet sedge tundra vegetation. In addition, we explore inter-annual variation in NDVI in both these contrasting vegetation communities. All measurements were taken across long-term experimental treatments in wet sedge and tussock tundra communities at the Toolik Lake Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site, in northern Alaska. Over 15 years (for wet sedge tundra) and 14 years (for tussock tundra), N and P were applied in factorial experiments (N, P and N+P), air temperature was increased using greenhouses with and without N+P fertilizer, and light intensity was reduced by 50% using shade cloth. during the peak growing seasons of 2001, 2002, and 2003, NDVI measurements were made in both the wet sedge and tussock tundra experimental treatment plots, creating a 3-year time series of inter-annual variation in NDVI. We found that: (1) across all tussock experimental tundra treatments, NDVI is correlated with aboveground plant biomass (r2 = 0.59); (2) NDVI-biomass relationships for tussock and wet sedge tundra communities are community specific, and; (3) NDVI values for tussock tundra communities are typically, but not always, greater than for wet sedge tundra communities across all experimental treatments. We suggest that differences between the response of wet sedge and tussock tundra communities in the same experimental treatments result from the contrasting degree of heterogeneity in species and functional types that characterize each of these Arctic tundra vegetation communities.

  20. Improved hydrogen sorption kinetics in wet ball milled Mg hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Li

    2011-05-04

    In this work, wet ball milling method is used in order to improve hydrogen sorption behaviour due to its improved microstructure of solid hydrogen materials. Compared to traditional ball milling method, wet ball milling has benefits on improvement of MgH{sub 2} microstructure and further influences on its hydrogen sorption behavior. With the help of solvent tetrahydrofuran (THF), wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder has much smaller particle size and its specific surface area is 7 times as large as that of dry ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder. Although after ball milling the grain size is decreased a lot compared to as-received MgH{sub 2} powder, the grain size of wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder is larger than that of dry ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder due to the lubricant effect of solvent THF during wet ball milling. The improved particle size and specific surface area of wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder is found to be determining its hydrogen sorption kinetics especially at relatively low temperatures. And it also shows good cycling sorption behavior, which decides on its industrial applicability. With three different catalysts MgH{sub 2} powder shows improved hydrogen sorption behavior as well as the cyclic sorption behavior. Among them, the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst is found to be the most effective one in this work. Compared to the wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder, the particle size and specific surface area of the MgH{sub 2} powder with catalysts are similar to the previous ones, while the grain size of the MgH{sub 2} with catalysts is much finer. In this case, two reasons for hydrogen sorption improvement are suggested: one is the reduction of the grain size. The other may be as pointed out in some literatures that formation of new oxidation could enhance the hydrogen sorption kinetics, which is also the reason why its hydrogen capacity is decreased compared to without catalysts. After further ball milling, the specific surface area of wet ball milled Mg

  1. Climate-Determined Suitability of the Water Saving Technology "Alternate Wetting and Drying" in Rice Systems: A Scalable Methodology demonstrated for a Province in the Philippines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Nelson

    Full Text Available 70% of the world's freshwater is used for irrigated agriculture and demand is expected to increase to meet future food security requirements. In Asia, rice accounts for the largest proportion of irrigated water use and reducing or conserving water in rice systems has been a long standing goal in agricultural research. The Alternate Wetting and Drying (AWD technique has been developed to reduce water use by up to 30% compared to the continuously flooded conditions typically found in rice systems, while not impacting yield. AWD also reduces methane emissions produced by anaerobic archae and hence has applications for reducing water use and greenhouse gas emissions. Although AWD is being promoted across Asia, there have been no attempts to estimate the suitable area for this promising technology on a large scale. We present and demonstrate a spatial and temporal climate suitability assessment method for AWD that can be widely applied across rice systems in Asia. We use a simple water balance model and easily available spatial and temporal information on rice area, rice seasonality, rainfall, potential evapotranspiration and soil percolation rates to assess the suitable area per season. We apply the model to Cagayan province in the Philippines and conduct a sensitivity analysis to account for uncertainties in soil percolation and suitability classification. As expected, the entire dry season is climatically suitable for AWD for all scenarios. A further 60% of the wet season area is found suitable contradicting general perceptions that AWD would not be feasible in the wet season and showing that spatial and temporal assessments are necessary to explore the full potential of AWD.

  2. Aroma recovery from roasted coffee by wet grinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggenstoss, J; Thomann, D; Perren, R; Escher, F

    2010-01-01

    Aroma recovery as determined by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) was compared in coffees resulting from conventional grinding processes, and from wet grinding with cold and hot water. Freshly roasted coffee as well as old, completely degassed coffee was ground in order to estimate the relationship of internal carbon dioxide pressure in freshly roasted coffee with the aroma loss during grinding. The release of volatile aroma substances during grinding was found to be related to the internal carbon dioxide pressure, and wet grinding with cold water was shown to minimize losses of aroma compounds by trapping them in water. Due to the high solubility of roasted coffee in water, the use of wet-grinding equipment is limited to processes where grinding is followed by an extraction step. Combining grinding and extraction by the use of hot water for wet grinding resulted in considerable losses of aroma compounds because of the prolonged heat impact. Therefore, a more promising two-step process involving cold wet grinding and subsequent hot extraction in a closed system was introduced. The yield of aroma compounds in the resulting coffee was substantially higher compared to conventionally ground coffee. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. Physicochemical properties and combustion behavior of duckweed during wet torrefaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuping; Chen, Tao; Li, Wan; Dong, Qing; Xiong, Yuanquan

    2016-10-01

    Wet torrefaction of duckweed was carried out in the temperature range of 130-250°C to evaluate the effects on physicochemical properties and combustion behavior. The physicochemical properties of duckweed samples were investigated by ultimate analysis, proximate analysis, FTIR, XRD and SEM techniques. It was found that wet torrefaction improved the fuel characteristics of duckweed samples resulting from the increase in fixed carbon content, HHVs and the decrease in nitrogen and sulfur content and atomic ratios of O/C and H/C. It can be seen from the results of FTIR, XRD and SEM analyses that the dehydration, decarboxylation, solid-solid conversion, and condensation polymerization reactions were underwent during wet torrefaction. In addition, the results of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in air indicated that wet torrefaction resulted in significant changes on combustion behavior and combustion kinetics parameters. Duckweed samples after wet torrefaction behaved more char-like and gave better combustion characteristics than raw sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurisa-tion (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FGD plants is presented. The experimental work covers laboratory studies as well as pilot- and full-scale exper......This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurisa-tion (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FGD plants is presented. The experimental work covers laboratory studies as well as pilot- and full...... degree of desulphuri-sation and absorber pH profile for the two limestone types using a holding tank pH of 5.5, but the residual limestone in the gypsum was significantly lower for the chalk. Furthermore, simulations showed that between 10 and 30 % of the limestone dissolves in the absorber de......-pending on the process conditions. A typical holding tank pH of 5-5.5 (also used in full-scale wet FGD packed towers) was found to be a reasonable compromise between residual lime-stone in the gypsum and the degree of desulphurisation. Simulations were only slightly sensi-tive to the temperature in the interval 313...

  5. Seasonal changes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in response to hydrology and anthropogenic activities in the Pearl River estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Niu, Lixia; Chen, Hui; Li, Ping; Tian, Feng; Yang, Qingshu

    2017-04-15

    The behaviours of PAHs (containing 2-6 aromatic rings) in the Pearl River estuary were examined each month in 2011. This study was designed to investigate the abundance of 16 priority PAHs and their response to the seasonal dynamics of anthropogenic activities and hydrological cycles. Monthly mean concentrations of ∑ 16 PAHs in water and suspended particulate matter (SPM) were 88.31ng/L and 252.31ng/L respectively, with higher concentrations in the wet season (April to September). Heavy precipitation in the wet season resulted in relatively increased PAH input via riverine discharges and atmospheric deposition. Seasonal variations in suspended sediment concentration (SSC), temperature and salinity have considerably affected the PAH phase association. Higher SSC in the wet season contributed to higher concentration of the PAHs in SPM, and higher temperature and lower salinity facilitated desorption from SPM. The PAH sources were largely attributed to vehicular emissions, coal combustion and coke ovens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of farming activities on seasonal variation of water quality of Bonsma Dam, KwaZulu-Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayanda N. Shabalala

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture has both direct and indirect effects on the quality of surface water and groundwater and is among the leading causes of water quality degradation, mainly as a result of the excessive use of agrochemicals. Water samples were collected in a selected catchment area (Bonsma Dam in KwaZulu-Natal and analysed for physicochemical variables. The concentrations of most of the elements and total dissolved solids, as well as the pH and electrical conductivity values, met the water quality requirements for domestic, agricultural, livestock and aquatic ecosystem uses. However, the inlet streams feeding the dam were found to be eutrophic during the wet season. Analysis of nitrate in the water body of the study area indicated that agricultural applications of manure and fertilisers may be a potential source of nitrate contamination. Most elements were more concentrated in the dam during the wet season. The overall ionic conductivity values were also higher in the wet season, while the pH was lower. The outcome of this work links the concentrations of physicochemical variables to land use, agricultural practice and local geomorphology. Seasonal patterns in the concentration of physicochemical variables occur, as land use, rainfall and farming activities change seasonally, and these concentrations should therefore be determined periodically.

  7. Spatial and Seasonal Variations of Heavy Metal Loads in Uyo Urban Drainage Stream under PS and NPS Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Essien

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of heavy metals (HM in the 4km urban drainage stream in Uyo was studied using grab and composite sampling of water from six stations on the stream, and analyzed by a multipurpose atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The data were statistically analyzed using SPSS version 17 software arid correlated between stations and among samples. HM contamination was evaluated with the coefficient and rate of dispersion between stations and the Normalized Scatter Coefficient (NSC. The seasonal distribution of metal pollution varied individually amongst metals at stations. The Fe and Pb concentrations exceeded the safe drinking water standard, rendering the water quality not acceptable for drinking; however, the quality was within the safe limit for crop production along the river bank. The relative.dominance of heavy metals followed a different sequence in upstream leachate effluent from all downstream stations. The NSC in dry-wet season was higher than in wet season, and was in the order: Fe>Cu>Zn>Pb, showing that large but variable concentration of Fe from PS and NPS contaminated the stream at faster rate in the wet season while Pb contaminated at nearly constant rate. However, in the dry season, Fe and Pb depleted at downstream at rates far higher than Zn as Cu was increasing. Fe and Pb could be good pollution monitor for total maximum daily load (TMDL pollution monitoring programme.

  8. Global Seasonality of Rotavirus Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish M.; Pitzer, Virginia; Alonso, Wladimir J.; Vera, David; Lopman, Ben; Tate, Jacqueline; Viboud, Cecile; Parashar, Umesh D.

    2012-01-01

    Background A substantial number of surveillance studies have documented rotavirus prevalence among children admitted for dehydrating diarrhea. We sought to establish global seasonal patterns of rotavirus disease before widespread vaccine introduction. Methods We reviewed studies of rotavirus detection in children with diarrhea published since 1995. We assessed potential relationships between seasonal prevalence and locality by plotting the average monthly proportion of diarrhea cases positive for rotavirus according to geography, country development, and latitude. We used linear regression to identify variables that were potentially associated with the seasonal intensity of rotavirus. Results Among a total of 99 studies representing all six geographical regions of the world, patterns of year-round disease were more evident in low- and low-middle income countries compared with upper-middle and high income countries where disease was more likely to be seasonal. The level of country development was a stronger predictor of strength of seasonality (P=0.001) than geographical location or climate. However, the observation of distinctly different seasonal patterns of rotavirus disease in some countries with similar geographical location, climate and level of development indicate that a single unifying explanation for variation in seasonality of rotavirus disease is unlikely. Conclusion While no unifying explanation emerged for varying rotavirus seasonality globally, the country income level was somewhat more predictive of the likelihood of having seasonal disease than other factors. Future evaluation of the effect of rotavirus vaccination on seasonal patterns of disease in different settings may help understand factors that drive the global seasonality of rotavirus disease. PMID:23190782

  9. Can I Stop Myself From Having a Wet Dream? (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Stop Myself From Having a Wet Dream? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can I Stop Myself From Having a Wet Dream? Print A A A Can I stop myself from having a wet dream? – Tom* You really can't stop wet dreams, ...

  10. Wet deposition and soil content of Beryllium - 7 in a micro-watershed of Minas Gerais (Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel L, Alexander D; Moreira, Rubens M; Monteiro, Roberto Pellacani G; Dos Santos, Anômora A Rochido; Juri Ayub, Jimena; Valladares, Diego L

    2017-04-01

    Beryllium-7 ( 7 Be) is a natural radionuclide of cosmogenic origin, normally used as a tracer for several environmental processes; such as soil redistribution, sediment source discrimination, atmospheric mass transport, and trace metal scavenging from the atmosphere. In this research the content of 7 Be in soil, its seasonal variation throughout the year and its relationship with the rainfall regime in the Mato Frio creek micro-watershed was investigated, to assess its potential use in estimating soil erosion. The 7 Be content in soil shows a marked variation throughout the year. Minimum 7 Be values were observed in the dry season (from April to September) and were between 7 and 14 times higher in the rainy season (from October to March). The seasonal oscillations in 7 Be soil content could be explained by the asymmetric rainfall regime. A highly linear relationship between rainfall amount and 7 Be deposition was observed in rain water. A good agreement between 7 Be soil content and 7 Be atmospheric deposition was noticed, mainly in wet months. 7 Be penetration in soil reaches a 5 cm depth, this could be explained by the soil type in the region. The soils are Acrisol type, characterized by low pH values and clay illuviation in deeper layers of the soil. In some regions of Brazil special attention should be paid if this radionuclide will be used as soil erosion tracer, taking into account the soil origin and its particular properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Occurrence, Ecological and Human Health Risks, and Seasonal Variations of Phenolic Compounds in Surface Water and Sediment of a Potential Polluted River Basin in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mo; Zhang, Jiquan; Sun, Caiyun

    2017-09-27

    Five phenolic compounds in water and sediment of Yinma River Basin were investigated. The average concentration of phenol was the highest in water samples as well as in sediment samples during the wet season, 101.68 ng/L and 127.76 ng/g, respectively. 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) was not detected in some sampling sites. Shitou Koumen Reservoir and the neighboring area were the severest areas of phenolic pollution. The lower reach was more polluted in three water seasons than the middle reach and upper reach. Phenol had ecological risks in sediment during three water seasons. 2-Nitrophenol (2-NP) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) had ecological risks in sediment in both the normal and wet season. The concentrations of five phenolic compounds from high to low were in the wet season, normal season, and dry season in water and sediment, respectively. There were middle risks in water of total concentrations for five phenolic compounds in several sampling sites. Total concentrations for five phenolic compounds in sediment had high ecological risks in all sampling sites. However, there was no human health risk in the Yinma River Basin.

  12. Variation in the helminth community structure of Thrichomys pachyurus (Rodentia: Echimyidae) in two sub-regions of the Brazilian Pantanal: the effects of land use and seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, R; Gentile, R; Rademaker, V; D'Andrea, P; Herrera, H; Freitas, T; Lanfredi, R; Maldonado, A

    2010-09-01

    The Pantanal is a large ecosystem located in South America. This preserved area is seasonally flooded due to abundant rainfall during the summer and the subsequent overflow of the Paraguai River. In this paper, we examine the helminth community structure in the wild rodent Thrichomys pachyurus during the wet and dry seasons in two locations of the preserved and cattle ranching areas in the Southern Pantanal. We identified 12 species of helminth, and, although we did not find any differences in species richness between locations within the Pantanal, we found that richness was higher during the wet season. Helminth species were largely aggregated in both farm locations and during seasons. The most common helminth species were more abundant during the dry season than during the wet season, which may have been due to the increased habitat availability and rodent population increase. The intensity of the infection also followed the same pattern for most helminths. The trichostrongylids (Heligmostrongylus crucifer, H. almeidai and Pudica cercomysi) were dominant at both farm locations. The land use of each area was not correlated with helminth diversity. However, species composition of the helminth community of T. pachyurus differed between locations and may be correlated with environmental differences between the habitats. The seasonality of the Pantanal was highly correlated with helminth parasitism in T. pachyurus.

  13. Modeling of GPS tropospheric delay wet Neill mapping function (NMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakidin, Hamzah; Ahmad, Asmala; Bugis, Ismadi

    2014-10-01

    The modeling of the GPS tropospheric delay mapping function should be revised by modifying or simplify its mathematical model. Some current mapping functions models are separated into hydrostatic and the wet part. The current tropospheric delay models use mapping functions in the form of continued fractions. This model is quite complex and need to be simplified. By using regression method, the wet mapping function models has been selected to be simplified. There are eleven operations for wet mapping function component of Neill Mapping Function (NMF), to be carried out before getting the mapping function scale factor. So, there is a need to simplify the mapping function models to allow faster calculation and also better understanding of the models.

  14. Drying and wetting of building materials and components

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book, Drying and Wetting of Building Materials and Components, provides a collection of recent contributions in the field of drying and wetting in porous building materials. The main benefit of the book is that it discusses some of the most important topics related to the drying and wetting processes, namely, innovations and trends in drying science and technology, drying mechanism and theory, equipment, advanced modelling, complex simulation and experimentation. At the same time, these topics will be going to the encounter of a variety of scientific and engineering disciplines. The book is divided in several chapters that intend to be a resume of the current state of knowledge for benefit of professional colleagues.

  15. Development of the Internet Watershed Educational Tool (InterWET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Parson

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Watershed educational and informational efforts have largely neglected to inform one important group of decision-makers: local government officials. The Internet Watershed Educational Tool (InterWET was developed to help inform local officials about water resources, using as a case study the Spring Creek Watershed in central Pennsylvania. Utilizing the "microworlds" concept, InterWET consists of a set of web pages that present water resource issues and components from different perspectives. Specifically, the components of surface runoff, groundwater flow, detached and delivered sediment, in-stream nutrients, and fish populations are presented from the perspectives of a researcher, a conservationist, and a local official. In addition to informing local officials, InterWET can also be used as a stand-alone informational resource or as part of larger watershed educational efforts.

  16. In situ transesterification of highly wet microalgae using hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bora; Im, Hanjin; Lee, Jae W

    2015-06-01

    This study addresses in situ transesterification of highly wet microalgae with hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a catalyst. In situ transesterification was performed by heating the mixture of wet algal cells, HCl, methanol, and solvent in one pot, resulting in the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield over 90% at 95°C. The effects of reaction variables of temperature, amounts of catalyst, reactant, and solvent, and type of solvents on the yield were investigated. Compared with the catalytic effect of H2SO4, in situ transesterification using HCl has benefits of being less affected by moisture levels that are as high as or above 80%, and requiring less amounts of catalyst and solvent. For an equimolar amount of catalyst, HCl showed 15wt.% higher FAME yield than H2SO4. This in situ transesterification using HCl as a catalyst would help to realize a feasible way to produce biodiesel from wet microalgae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Wetting and Spreading of Molten Volcanic Ash in Jet Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-04-20

    A major hazard to jet engines posed by volcanic ash is linked to the wetting and spreading of molten ash droplets on engine component surfaces. Here, using the sessile drop method, we study the evolution of the wettability and spreading of volcanic ash. We employ rapid temperature changes up to 1040-1450 °C, to replicate the heating conditions experienced by volcanic ash entering an operating jet engine. In this scenario, samples densify as particles coalesce under surface tension until they form a large system-sized droplet (containing remnant gas bubbles and crystals), which subsequently spreads on the surface. The data exhibit a transition from a heterogeneous to a homogeneous wetting regime above 1315 °C as crystals in the drops are dissolved in the melt. We infer that both viscosity and microstructural evolution are key controls on the attainment of equilibrium in the wetting of molten volcanic ash droplets.

  18. Some specificities of wetting by cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delabre, U; Richard, C; Cazabat, A M, E-mail: cazabat@lps.ens.f [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2009-11-18

    The present paper provides an up to date restatement of the wetting behaviour of the series of cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals (LCs) on usual substrates, i.e. oxidized silicon wafers, water and glycerol, at both the macroscopic and microscopic scale, in the nematic range of temperature. We show that on water the systems are close to a wetting transition, especially 5CB and 7CB. In that case, the wetting behaviour is controlled by the presence of impurities. On a mesoscopic scale, we observe for all our (thin LC film-substrate) systems an identical, complex, but well defined general scenario, not accounted for by the available models. In the last part, we present a study on line tension which results from the specific organization of LCs at the edge of the nematic film. We report preliminary results on two-dimensional film coalescence where this line tension plays a major role.

  19. Wetting dynamics beneath fluid drops impacting on hot surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harth, Kirsten; van Limbeek, Michiel A. J.; Shirota, Minori; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    Fluid droplets encountering a phase transition when they impact a target surface are involved in many applications, e.g., spray cooling or painting / coating, ink-jet and 3D printing, soldering, firefighting using sprinklers. Drop impact on hot plates is an emerging topic, involving a complex interplay of hydrodynamics, heat flux and the occurring phase transition, involving large spatial and temporal gradients. Whether and to what extent droplets touch the surface is of immense importance for the overall heat transfer. High-speed total internal reflection imaging allows us to discriminate wetted and vapor-covered regions of the substrate. We study the transient wetting behaviour of the plate by varying the latent heat of the droplet. The characteristic cooling time of the plate is not solely determined by the plate properties. In addition to current literature, we show that in those cases the wetting pattern is both spatially and temporally inhomogeneous.

  20. Liquid Metal Phagocytosis: Intermetallic Wetting Induced Particle Internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianbo; Zhao, Xi; Li, Jing; Zhou, Yuan; Liu, Jing

    2017-05-01

    A biomimetic cellular-eating phenomenon in gallium-based liquid metal to realize particle internalization in full-pH-range solutions is reported. The effect, which is called liquid metal phagocytosis, represents a wet-processing strategy to prepare various metallic liquid metal-particle mixtures through introducing excitations such as an electrical polarization, a dissolving medium, or a sacrificial metal. A nonwetting-to-wetting transition resulting from surface transition and the reactive nature of the intermetallic wetting between the two metallic phases are found to be primarily responsible for such particle-eating behavior. Theoretical study brings forward a physical picture to the problem, together with a generalized interpretation. The model developed here, which uses the macroscopic contact angle between the two metallic phases as a criterion to predict the particle internalization behavior, shows good consistency with experimental results.

  1. Helminths in rodents from Wet Markets in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribas A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Only a few surveys have ever been carried out of the helminths of the commensal rodents found in the traditional wet markets that play such an important part of daily life in South-east Asia. The potential of rodents as reservoirs of zoonoses including helminths is of great interest since in these markets humans and rodents come into closer contact than in other environments and food may be indirectly contaminated via rodent faeces. Helminths in a total of 98 rats belonging to two species (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus exulans were surveyed in eight traditional wet markets in Udon Thani, Thailand. Thirteen species of helminths were recovered, seven of which are potentially zoo-notic, with an overall prevalence of 89.8 %. Our results show that rodents in wet markets could pose a threat to human health as potential reservoirs of zoonotic helminthiases.

  2. Tailoring the microstructure of particle-stabilized wet foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzenbach, Urs T; Studart, André R; Tervoort, Elena; Gauckler, Ludwig J

    2007-01-30

    Inorganic colloidal particles which are in situ hydrophobized upon adsorption of short-chain amphiphilic molecules can be used as foam stabilizers. In this study, we tailor the microstructure of particle-stabilized wet foams, namely, the foam air content, average bubble size, and bubble size distribution, by changing the composition of the initial colloidal suspension. Wet foams featuring average bubble sizes between 10 and 200 microm and air contents between 45% and 90% were obtained by adjusting the amphiphile and particle concentration, pH, ionic strength, and particle size in the initial suspension. The influence of these parameters on the bubble size was satisfactorily described in terms of a balance between the shear stress applied during mixing and the counteracting Laplace pressure of the air bubbles. This model, originally developed for oil droplets in emulsions, can therefore be used to deliberately tailor the microstructure of particle-stabilized wet foams.

  3. Seasonality and Photoperiodism in Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    2001-01-01

    This review gives a retrospective of what is known about photoperiodism in fungi, which is largely based on reports about seasonal spore concentrations. Relatively few species have been investigated under laboratory conditions, so that our knowledge whether seasonal reproduction in fungi is mainly a

  4. Regional-seasonal weather forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abarbanel, H.; Foley, H.; MacDonald, G.; Rothaus, O.; Rudermann, M.; Vesecky, J.

    1980-08-01

    In the interest of allocating heating fuels optimally, the state-of-the-art for seasonal weather forecasting is reviewed. A model using an enormous data base of past weather data is contemplated to improve seasonal forecasts, but present skills do not make that practicable. 90 references. (PSB)

  5. Psychiatric disturbance, urgency, and bacteriuria in children with day and night wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, I; Fielding, D; Meadow, R

    1977-01-01

    Forty children with day and night wetting were compared with 46 with night wetting only to see if day wetting was then associated with particular clinical features. Interviews with mothers, questionnaries completed by teachers, physical investigations, and measurement of functional bladder capacities were used. Day wetting combined with bed wetting occurred equally in boys and girls and was associated with daytime urgency and greater frequency of psychiatric disturbance. In boys, soiling was also associated. In girls, bacteriuria, which appeared to be caused by the day wetting, occurred in about 50%. Neither daytime frequency nor small functional bladder capacity were specifically related to day wetting. PMID:921313

  6. RIPENING OF ARTISANAL MINAS CHEESE FROM THE "CAMPO DAS VERTENTES" REGION AND THE EFFECTS OF DRY AND WET PERIODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Gonçalves Costa Júnior

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is an expressive artisanal cheeses production in Brazil, manufactured from raw milk, and within this context, the state of Minas Gerais has a highlight in this activity with its five micro regions officially recognized. Within these, “Campo das Vertentes” was the last to have recognition. Evaluating the effect of dry and wet periods during the ripening of artisanal Minas cheese of the micro region above mentioned was the main objective of this study, which also related aspects of physicochemical composition of 10 to 30 days of ripening. Four registered dairies were selected and who attended legal requirements and good manufacturing practice to compose the experiment. The analysis of moisture content, moisture to the non fat substance (MNFS and pH showed that these values varied greatly among cheeses and were highest in the dry season. Indexes of proteolysis behaved with variation between samples and advanced in the period of ripening, however, they were higher in the wet season. Even aware that the moisture content of the cheeses exerts strong influence on proteolysis, as well as other factors such as dosage of coagulant and “drop”, the room temperature observed in two periods of ripening was also very important for the advancement of proteolysis.

  7. Observations on arbuscular mycorrhiza associated with important edible tuberous plants grown in wet evergreen forest in Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAJA RISHI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kumar R, Tapwal A, Pandey S, Rishi R, Borah D. 2013. Observations on arbuscular mycorrhiza associated with important edible tuberous plants grown in wet evergreen forest in Assam, India. Biodiversitas 14: 67-72. Non-timber forest products constitute an important source of livelihood for rural households from forest fringe communities across the world. Utilization of wild edible tuber plants is an integral component of their culture. Mycorrhizal associations influence the establishment and production of tuber plants under field conditions.The aim of present study is to explore the diversity and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AMF colonization of wild edible tuber plants grown in wet evergreen forest of Assam, India. A survey was conducted in 2009-10 in Sunaikuchi, Khulahat, and Bura Mayong reserved forest of Morigaon district of Assam to determine the AMF spore population in rhizosphere soils and root colonization of 14 tuberous edible plants belonging to five families. The results revealed AMF colonization of all selected species in all seasons. The percent colonization and spore count was less in summer, moderate in winter and highest in rainy season. Seventeen species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were recorded in four genera viz. Acaulospora (7 species, Glomus (5 species, Sclerocystis (3 species and Gigaspora (2 species.

  8. Wetting behavior on hybrid surfaces with hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Chun-Wei [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Alvarado, Jorge L., E-mail: Alvarado@entc.tamu.edu [Dept. of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Marsh, Charles P. [ERDC – Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, 2902 Newmark Dr., Champaign, IL 61826 (United States); Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Jones, Barclay G. [Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Collins, Michael K. [ERDC – Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, 2902 Newmark Dr., Champaign, IL 61826 (United States); Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-01-30

    Hybrid surfaces consisting of a micropillar array of hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites were designed and fabricated to understand the effects of their unique surface morphology and chemistry on droplet condensation. Droplet impingement experiments have revealed that hybrid surfaces exhibit high contact angles, which is characteristic of purely hydrophobic surfaces. However, little is known about the wetting behavior of droplets that nucleate and grow on hybrid surfaces during condensation. In fact, condensed droplets display a distinct wetting behavior during the droplet growth phase which cannot be reproduced by simply impinging droplets on hybrid surfaces. In this study, hybrid surfaces with three different spacing ratios were subjected to condensation tests using an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and a condensation cell under ambient conditions. For hybrid surfaces with spacing ratio below 2, droplets were observed to form on top and sides of the micropillars, where they grew, coalesced with adjacent droplets, and shed after reaching a given size. After shedding, the top surface remained partially dry, which allowed for immediate droplet growth. For hybrid surfaces with spacing ratio equal to 2, a different wetting behavior was observed, where droplets basically coalesced and formed a thin liquid film which was ultimately driven into the valleys of the microstructure. The liquid shedding process led to the renucleation of droplets primarily on top of the dry hydrophilic sites. To better understand the nature of droplet wetting on hybrid surfaces, a surface energy-based model was developed to predict the transition between the two observed wetting behaviors at different spacing ratios. The experimental and analytical results indicate that micropillar spacing ratio is the key factor for promoting different wetting behavior of condensed droplets on hybrid surfaces.

  9. Drought, multi-seasonal climate, and wildfire in northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Ellis; Woodhouse, Connie A.; Swetnam, Thomas W.

    2017-01-01

    Wildfire is increasingly a concern in the USA, where 10 million acres burned in 2015. Climate is a primary driver of wildfire, and understanding fire-climate relationships is crucial for informing fire management and modeling the effects of climate change on fire. In the southwestern USA, fire-climate relationships have been informed by tree-ring data that extend centuries prior to the onset of fire exclusion in the late 1800s. Variability in cool-season precipitation has been linked to fire occurrence, but the effects of the summer North American monsoon on fire are less understood, as are the effects of climate on fire seasonality. We use a new set of reconstructions for cool-season (October–April) and monsoon-season (July–August) moisture conditions along with a large new fire scar dataset to examine relationships between multi-seasonal climate variability, fire extent, and fire seasonality in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico (1599–1899 CE). Results suggest that large fires burning in all seasons are strongly influenced by the current year cool-season moisture, but fires burning mid-summer to fall are also influenced by monsoon moisture. Wet conditions several years prior to the fire year during the cool season, and to a lesser extent during the monsoon season, are also important for spring through late-summer fires. Persistent cool-season drought longer than 3 years may inhibit fires due to the lack of moisture to replenish surface fuels. This suggests that fuels may become increasingly limiting for fire occurrence in semi-arid regions that are projected to become drier with climate change.

  10. Effect of wet grinding on structural properties of ball clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, A., E-mail: anuradha.purohit34@gmail.com; Chander, S.; Dhaka, M. S. [Department of Physics, Mohanlal Sukhadia University, Udaipur-313001 (India); Hameed, A.; Singh, P. [Department of Ceramic Engineering, Govt. College of Engineering and Technology, Bikaner-334004 (India); Nehra, S. P. [Centre of Excellence for Energy and Environmental Studies, Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology, Murthal, Sonepat-131039 (India)

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, the effect of wet grinding on structural properties of ball clay is undertaken. The wet grinding treatment was performed employing ball and vibro mills for different time spells of 2, 4, 8 and 16 hours. The structural properties were carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structure of ground samples is found to be simple cubic. The crystallographic parameters are calculated and slight change in lattice constant, inter planner spacing and particle size is observed with grinding treatment. The results are in agreement with the available literature.

  11. Wet-air oxidation cleans up black wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Sterling Organics produces the analgesic paracetamol (acetaminophen) at its Dudley, England, plant. The wastewater from the batch process contains intermediates such as para-aminophenol (PAP) and byproducts such as thiosulfates, sulfites and sulfides. To stay ahead of increasingly strict environmental legislation, Sterling Organics installed a wet-air oxidation system at the Dudley facility in August 1992. The system is made by Zimpro Environmental Inc. (Rothschild, Wis.). Zimpro's wet-air oxidation system finds a way around the limitations of purely chemical or physical processes. In the process, compressed air at elevated temperature and pressure oxidizes the process intermediates and byproducts and removes the color from the wastewater.

  12. Wetting of doped carbon nanotubes by water droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Demosthenous, E.; Walther, Jens Honore

    2005-01-01

    We study the wetting of doped single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes by water droplets using molecular dynamics simulations. Chemisorbed hydrogen is considered as a model of surface impurities. We study systems with varying densities of surface impurities and we observe increased wetting......, as compared to the pristine nanotube case, attributed to the surface dipole moment that changes the orientation of the interfacial water. We demonstrate that the nature of the impurity is important as here hydrogen induces the formation of an extended hydrogen bond network between the water molecules...

  13. Final Report: Wetted Cathodes for Low-Temperature Aluminum Smelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Craig W

    2002-09-30

    A low-temperature aluminum smelting process being developed differs from the Hall-Heroult process in several significant ways. The low-temperature process employs a more acidic electrolyte than cryolite, an alumina slurry, oxygen-generating metal anodes, and vertically suspended electrodes. Wetted and drained vertical cathodes are crucial to the new process. Such cathodes represent a significant portion of the capital costs projected for the new technology. Although studies exist of wetted cathode technology with Hall-Heoult cells, the differences make such a study desirable with the new process.

  14. Topographical Anisotropy and Wetting of Ground Stainless Steel Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Bellmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic and physico-chemical methods were used for a comprehensive surface characterization of different mechanically modified stainless steel surfaces. The surfaces were analyzed using high-resolution confocal microscopy, resulting in detailed information about the topographic properties. In addition, static water contact angle measurements were carried out to characterize the surface heterogeneity of the samples. The effect of morphological anisotropy on water contact angle anisotropy was investigated. The correlation between topography and wetting was studied by means of a model of wetting proposed in the present work, that allows quantifying the air volume of the interface water drop-stainless steel surface.

  15. Evaluation of wet oxidation pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of softwood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palonen, H.; Thomsen, A.B.; Tenkanen, M.

    2004-01-01

    The wet oxidation pretreatment (water, oxygen, elevated temperature, and pressure) of softwood (Picea abies) was investigated for enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment was preliminarily optimized. Six different combinations of reaction time, temperature, and pH were applied......, and the compositions of solid and liquid fractions were analyzed. The solid fraction after wet oxidation contained 58-64% cellulose, 2-16% hemicellulose, and 24-30% lignin. The pretreatment series gave information about the roles of lignin and hemicellulose in the enzymatic hydrolysis. The temperature...

  16. Energy and exergy analysis of counter flow wet cooling towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Mani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooling tower is an open system direct contact heat exchanger, where it cools water by both convection and evaporation. In this paper, a mathematical model based on heat and mass transfer principle is developed to find the outlet condition of water and air. The model is solved using iterative method. Energy and exergy analysis infers that inlet air wet bulb temperature is found to be the most important parameter than inlet water temperature and also variation in dead state properties does not affect the performance of wet cooling tower. .

  17. Effect of Atmospheric Press on Wet Bulb Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Stasiak, Michael A.; Lawson, Jamie; Wehkamp, Cara Ann P.; Dixon, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Our measurements of wet bulb depression at different pressures matched the modeled adiabatic saturation temps reasonably well. At a dry bulb temp of 25 C, the normal wet bulb temp for 30% RH and 100 kPa is approx.15 C, but this dropped to approx.8 C at 10 kPa. The results suggest that psychrometers need direct calibration at the target pressures or that pressure corrected charts are required. For a given vapour pressure deficit, any moist surfaces, including transpiring plant leaves, will be cooler at lower pressures due to the increased evaporation rates.

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    limestones of dif-ferent origin were tested. A transient, mass transport controlled, mathematical model was de-veloped to describe the dissolution process. Model predictions were found to be qualitatively in good agreement with experimental data. Deviations between measurements and simulations were...... - 333 K, pertinent for full-scale wet FGD packed towers. The possibility of co-firing straw and coal was investigated in a full-scale power plant. No ef-fects on the overall performance of the wet FGD plant were observed, though laboratory ex-periments with fine dust and fly ash from the full...

  19. Wetting ability modifications in biocompatible polymers induced by pulsed lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolaro, C.; Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Velardi, L.

    2014-04-01

    Wetting ability was measured in the surface of different biocompatible polymers, such as mylar, polyethylene, poly-methyl-methacrylate and teflon. Nanosecond pulse lasers at intensities of the order of 108 W/cm2 were employed at different doses to irradiate the polymeric surfaces and to induce wetting ability modifications due to the chemical and physical surface changes vs. irradiation time and laser wavelength. In particular, the contact angle as a function of the surface roughness was investigated, as will be presented and discussed.

  20. Thyroid hormone fluctuations indicate a thermoregulatory function in both a tropical (Alouatta palliata) and seasonally cold-habitat (Macaca fuscata) primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cynthia L; Powell, Brianna L; Williams, Susan H; Hanya, Goro; Glander, Kenneth E; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2017-11-01

    Thyroid hormones boost animals' basal metabolic rate and represent an important thermoregulatory pathway for mammals that face cold temperatures. Whereas the cold thermal pressures experienced by primates in seasonal habitats at high latitudes and elevations are often apparent, tropical habitats also display distinct wet and dry seasons with modest changes in thermal environment. We assessed seasonal and temperature-related changes in thyroid hormone levels for two primate species in disparate thermal environments, tropical mantled howlers (Alouatta palliata), and seasonally cold-habitat Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata). We collected urine and feces from animals and used ELISA to quantify levels of the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (fT 3 ). For both species, fT 3 levels were significantly higher during the cooler season (wet/winter), consistent with a thermoregulatory role. Likewise, both species displayed greater temperature deficits (i.e., the degree to which animals warm their body temperature relative to ambient) during the cooler season, indicating greater thermoregulatory pressures during this time. Independently of season, Japanese macaques displayed increasing fT 3 levels with decreasing recently experienced maximum temperatures, but no relationship between fT 3 and recently experienced minimum temperatures. Howlers increased fT 3 levels as recently experienced minimum temperatures decreased, although demonstrated the opposite relationship with maximum temperatures. This may reflect natural thermal variation in howlers' habitat: wet seasons had cooler minimum and mean temperatures than the dry season, but similar maximum temperatures. Overall, our findings support the hypothesis that both tropical howlers and seasonally cold-habitat Japanese macaques utilize thyroid hormones as a mechanism to boost metabolism in response to thermoregulatory pressures. This implies that cool thermal pressures faced by tropical primates are sufficient to invoke an

  1. Understanding and predicting the strong Southern Annular Mode and its impact on the record wet east Australian spring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eun-Pa; Hendon, Harry H.

    2015-05-01

    In 2010 eastern Australia experienced its wettest spring on record, which has been largely attributed to a strong La Niña event in conjunction with an extraordinary positive excursion of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM). La Niña impacts would be expected to have been predictable months in advance, but predictability of the occurrence of the strong SAM is less known. We explore the predictability of the strong SAM in austral spring 2010 and its contribution to the extreme wet conditions in eastern Australia, using the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's dynamical seasonal forecast system (POAMA2). Seasonal forecasts from POAMA2 were skilful in predicting the wet conditions over eastern Australia at up to 2 month lead time as a result of a good prediction of the impacts of the ongoing La Niña and the development of a strong positive excursion of the SAM. Forecast sensitivity experiments on initial conditions demonstrate that (1) the strong La Niña was a necessary condition for promoting the positive phase of SAM (high SAM) and the anomalous wet conditions over eastern Australia during October to November 2010; but (2) internal atmospheric processes were important for producing the moderate strength of the high SAM in September 2010 and for amplifying the strength of the high SAM forced by La Niña in October to November 2010; and (3) the strong high SAM was an important factor for the extremity of the Australian rainfall in late spring 2010. Therefore, high quality atmosphere and ocean initial conditions were both essential for the successful prediction of the extreme climate during austral spring 2010.

  2. Predictability of Seasonal Rainfall over the Greater Horn of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaina, J. N.

    2016-12-01

    The El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a primary mode of climate variability in the Greater of Africa (GHA). The expected impacts of climate variability and change on water, agriculture, and food resources in GHA underscore the importance of reliable and accurate seasonal climate predictions. The study evaluated different model selection criteria which included the Coefficient of determination (R2), Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC), and the Fisher information approximation (FIA). A forecast scheme based on the optimal model was developed to predict the October-November-December (OND) and March-April-May (MAM) rainfall. The predictability of GHA rainfall based on ENSO was quantified based on composite analysis, correlations and contingency tables. A test for field-significance considering the properties of finiteness and interdependence of the spatial grid was applied to avoid correlations by chance. The study identified FIA as the optimal model selection criterion. However, complex model selection criteria (FIA followed by BIC) performed better compared to simple approach (R2 and AIC). Notably, operational seasonal rainfall predictions over the GHA makes of simple model selection procedures e.g. R2. Rainfall is modestly predictable based on ENSO during OND and MAM seasons. El Nino typically leads to wetter conditions during OND and drier conditions during MAM. The correlations of ENSO indices with rainfall are statistically significant for OND and MAM seasons. Analysis based on contingency tables shows higher predictability of OND rainfall with the use of ENSO indices derived from the Pacific and Indian Oceans sea surfaces showing significant improvement during OND season. The predictability based on ENSO for OND rainfall is robust on a decadal scale compared to MAM. An ENSO-based scheme based on an optimal model selection criterion can thus provide skillful rainfall predictions over GHA. This study concludes that the

  3. Responses of High-Elevation Cold Desert Shrubs to a Wet Winter After California's Historic Drought of 2012 - 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loik, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    California experienced an historic drought between 2011 and late 2015, which caused lasting impacts on plant survival and productivity, community patterns, and ecosystem processes. The winter of 2015-2016 was relatively wet by comparison, with over twice the annual snowfall and total precipitation (479 mm) as during the drought years. This study compared soil water content, water potential, photosynthetic processes, and Net Primary Productivity (NPP) for the widespread, co-dominant shrubs Artemisia tridentata (Asteraceae) and Purshia tridentata (Rosaceae) at the ecotone with Sierra Nevada conifer forest in eastern California (2315 m). Measurements were made in June and July 2014, 2015, and 2016, during the seasonal peak of new leaf, stem, and flower production. Soil water content was twice as high in early summer 2016 compared to 2014 and 2015. Mid-morning stem water potential averaged -1.80 MPa in 2014 and increased to -1.20 MPa in 2016 for A. tridentata; water potential for P. tridentata increased from -2.20 MPa to -1.30 MPa over the same period. Stomatal conductance to water vapor (gs) averaged 0.285 mol m-2 s-1 during the drought and increased almost 3-fold by 2016 for A. tridentata. By contrast, gs for P. tridentata increased by 1.6-fold from dry to wet years. Mean photosynthetic CO2 assimilation (A) was 32 μmol m-2 s-1 in the wet year 2016 for A. tridentata, which was almost twice that during the drought. The change in A was much smaller from wet to dry years for P. tridentata. The A vs. gs response wasmore sensitive to drought for A. tridentata than for P. tridentata. For both species, stomata closed around 11:30 h local time during the drought, but stayed open for the entire daytime during June and July of 2016. NPP was about two-fold greater in 2016 than in 2015 for A. tridentata, but only about 15% greater for P. tridentata over the same time. Results indicate that A. tridentata is capable of appreciable upregulation of photosynthesis and productivity in

  4. Seasonal organic matter dynamics in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon: Contribution of carbohydrates and proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lønborg, Christian; Doyle, Jason; Furnas, Miles; Menendez, Patricia; Benthuysen, Jessica A.; Carreira, Cátia

    2017-04-01

    Organic matter (OM) plays a fundamental role in sustaining the high productivity of coral reef ecosystems. Carbohydrates and proteins constitute two of the major chemical classes identified in the OM pool and are used as indicators of bioavailability due to their fast turn-over. We conducted three cruises across the southern shelf of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) during the early dry, late dry and wet seasons in 2009-2010 to 1) assess the relative bioavailability of particulate (POM) and dissolved (DOM) organic matter, 2) track the temporal and spatial variability in the carbohydrate and protein contribution to the OM pool, and 3) assess factors influencing protein and carbohydrate fractions of the OM pool. Generally, higher concentrations of particulate carbohydrates were found during the wet season, while similar concentrations of particulate protein were found during the three seasons. Both the dissolved carbohydrates and proteins had highest levels during the early dry season and lowest during the wet season, suggesting seasonal variations in the chemical composition of the DOM pool. Spatially, carbohydrates showed higher concentrations at the inshore stations, while no clear spatial pattern was found for the protein concentrations. On average carbohydrates and proteins accounted for a similar fraction (13±5 and 12±6% respectively) of POM, while carbohydrates accounted for a smaller fraction of the DOM than the proteins (6±3 and 13±10%). This suggests that the POM bioavailability was similar between seasons, while the DOM bioavailability varied seasonally with highest levels during the early dry season. This demonstrates that carbohydrates and proteins in the GBR have temporal and spatial variations. Our statistical analysis showed that 1) both carbohydrates and proteins were related with the POM and DOM C:N:P stoichiometry, demonstrating that both bulk estimates (stoichiometry) and specific compounds (CHO and Prot) provide useful measures of OM

  5. Prediction uncertainty in seasonal partial duration series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Funder; Rosbjerg, Dan

    1991-01-01

    -seasonal probability density function of the T year event estimator has been deduced and used in the assessment of the precision of approximate moments. The nonseasonal approach covered both a total omission of seasonality by pooling data from different flood seasons and a discarding of nonsignificant season(s) before...

  6. Seasonal Variations in Color Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Karen B; Nelson, Rolf; Parker, Laura; Heck, Isobel A; Palmer, Stephen E

    2017-08-01

    We investigated how color preferences vary according to season and whether those changes could be explained by the ecological valence theory (EVT). To do so, we assessed the same participants' preferences for the same colors during fall, winter, spring, and summer in the northeastern United States, where there are large seasonal changes in environmental colors. Seasonal differences were most pronounced between fall and the other three seasons. Participants liked fall-associated dark-warm colors-for example, dark-red, dark-orange (brown), dark-yellow (olive), and dark-chartreuse-more during fall than other seasons. The EVT could explain these changes with a modified version of Palmer and Schloss' (2010) weighted affective valence estimate (WAVE) procedure that added an activation term to the WAVE equation. The results indicate that color preferences change according to season, as color-associated objects become more/less activated in the observer. These seasonal changes in color preferences could not be characterized by overall shifts in weights along cone-contrast axes. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  7. A dynamical statistical framework for seasonal streamflow forecasting in an agricultural watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Louise J.; Villarini, Gabriele; Bradley, A. Allen; Vecchi, Gabriel A.

    2017-07-01

    The state of Iowa in the US Midwest is regularly affected by major floods and has seen a notable increase in agricultural land cover over the twentieth century. We present a novel statistical-dynamical approach for probabilistic seasonal streamflow forecasting using land cover and General Circulation Model (GCM) precipitation forecasts. Low to high flows are modelled and forecast for the Raccoon River at Van Meter, a 8900 km2 catchment located in central-western Iowa. Statistical model fits for each streamflow quantile (from seasonal minimum to maximum; predictands) are based on observed basin-averaged total seasonal precipitation, annual row crop (corn and soybean) production acreage, and observed precipitation from the month preceding each season (to characterize antecedent wetness conditions) (predictors). Model fits improve when including agricultural land cover and antecedent precipitation as predictors, as opposed to just precipitation. Using the dynamically-updated relationship between predictand and predictors every year, forecasts are computed from 1 to 10 months ahead of every season based on annual row crop acreage from the previous year (persistence forecast) and the monthly precipitation forecasts from eight GCMs of the North American Multi-Model Ensemble (NMME). The skill of our forecast streamflow is assessed in deterministic and probabilistic terms for all initialization months, flow quantiles, and seasons. Overall, the system produces relatively skillful streamflow forecasts from low to high flows, but the skill does not decrease uniformly with initialization time, suggesting that improvements can be gained by using different predictors for specific seasons and flow quantiles.

  8. Seasonal patterns of mixed species groups in large East African mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kiffner

    Full Text Available Mixed mammal species groups are common in East African savannah ecosystems. Yet, it is largely unknown if co-occurrences of large mammals result from random processes or social preferences and if interspecific associations are consistent across ecosystems and seasons. Because species may exchange important information and services, understanding patterns and drivers of heterospecific interactions is crucial for advancing animal and community ecology. We recorded 5403 single and multi-species clusters in the Serengeti-Ngorongoro and Tarangire-Manyara ecosystems during dry and wet seasons and used social network analyses to detect patterns of species associations. We found statistically significant associations between multiple species and association patterns differed spatially and seasonally. Consistently, wildebeest and zebras preferred being associated with other species, whereas carnivores, African elephants, Maasai giraffes and Kirk's dik-diks avoided being in mixed groups. During the dry season, we found that the betweenness (a measure of importance in the flow of information or disease of species did not differ from a random expectation based on species abundance. In contrast, in the wet season, we found that these patterns were not simply explained by variations in abundances, suggesting that heterospecific associations were actively formed. These seasonal differences in observed patterns suggest that interspecific associations may be driven by resource overlap when resources are limited and by resource partitioning or anti-predator advantages when resources are abundant. We discuss potential mechanisms that could drive seasonal variation in the cost-benefit tradeoffs that underpin the formation of mixed-species groups.

  9. Modelling seasonal habitat suitability for wide-ranging species: Invasive wild pigs in northern Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens G Froese

    Full Text Available Invasive wildlife often causes serious damage to the economy and agriculture as well as environmental, human and animal health. Habitat models can fill knowledge gaps about species distributions and assist planning to mitigate impacts. Yet, model accuracy and utility may be compromised by small study areas and limited integration of species ecology or temporal variability. Here we modelled seasonal habitat suitability for wild pigs, a widespread and harmful invader, in northern Australia. We developed a resource-based, spatially-explicit and regional-scale approach using Bayesian networks and spatial pattern suitability analysis. We integrated important ecological factors such as variability in environmental conditions, breeding requirements and home range movements. The habitat model was parameterized during a structured, iterative expert elicitation process and applied to a wet season and a dry season scenario. Model performance and uncertainty was evaluated against independent distributional data sets. Validation results showed that an expert-averaged model accurately predicted empirical wild pig presences in northern Australia for both seasonal scenarios. Model uncertainty was largely associated with different expert assumptions about wild pigs' resource-seeking home range movements. Habitat suitability varied considerably between seasons, retracting to resource-abundant rainforest, wetland and agricultural refuge areas during the dry season and expanding widely into surrounding grassland floodplains, savanna woodlands and coastal shrubs during the wet season. Overall, our model suggested that suitable wild pig habitat is less widely available in northern Australia than previously thought. Mapped results may be used to quantify impacts, assess risks, justify management investments and target control activities. Our methods are applicable to other wide-ranging species, especially in data-poor situations.

  10. Seasonal Patterns of Mixed Species Groups in Large East African Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiffner, Christian; Kioko, John; Leweri, Cecilia; Krause, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Mixed mammal species groups are common in East African savannah ecosystems. Yet, it is largely unknown if co-occurrences of large mammals result from random processes or social preferences and if interspecific associations are consistent across ecosystems and seasons. Because species may exchange important information and services, understanding patterns and drivers of heterospecific interactions is crucial for advancing animal and community ecology. We recorded 5403 single and multi-species clusters in the Serengeti-Ngorongoro and Tarangire-Manyara ecosystems during dry and wet seasons and used social network analyses to detect patterns of species associations. We found statistically significant associations between multiple species and association patterns differed spatially and seasonally. Consistently, wildebeest and zebras preferred being associated with other species, whereas carnivores, African elephants, Maasai giraffes and Kirk's dik-diks avoided being in mixed groups. During the dry season, we found that the betweenness (a measure of importance in the flow of information or disease) of species did not differ from a random expectation based on species abundance. In contrast, in the wet season, we found that these patterns were not simply explained by variations in abundances, suggesting that heterospecific associations were actively formed. These seasonal differences in observed patterns suggest that interspecific associations may be driven by resource overlap when resources are limited and by resource partitioning or anti-predator advantages when resources are abundant. We discuss potential mechanisms that could drive seasonal variation in the cost-benefit tradeoffs that underpin the formation of mixed-species groups. PMID:25470495

  11. Modelling seasonal habitat suitability for wide-ranging species: Invasive wild pigs in northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Jens G; Smith, Carl S; Durr, Peter A; McAlpine, Clive A; van Klinken, Rieks D

    2017-01-01

    Invasive wildlife often causes serious damage to the economy and agriculture as well as environmental, human and animal health. Habitat models can fill knowledge gaps about species distributions and assist planning to mitigate impacts. Yet, model accuracy and utility may be compromised by small study areas and limited integration of species ecology or temporal variability. Here we modelled seasonal habitat suitability for wild pigs, a widespread and harmful invader, in northern Australia. We developed a resource-based, spatially-explicit and regional-scale approach using Bayesian networks and spatial pattern suitability analysis. We integrated important ecological factors such as variability in environmental conditions, breeding requirements and home range movements. The habitat model was parameterized during a structured, iterative expert elicitation process and applied to a wet season and a dry season scenario. Model performance and uncertainty was evaluated against independent distributional data sets. Validation results showed that an expert-averaged model accurately predicted empirical wild pig presences in northern Australia for both seasonal scenarios. Model uncertainty was largely associated with different expert assumptions about wild pigs' resource-seeking home range movements. Habitat suitability varied considerably between seasons, retracting to resource-abundant rainforest, wetland and agricultural refuge areas during the dry season and expanding widely into surrounding grassland floodplains, savanna woodlands and coastal shrubs during the wet season. Overall, our model suggested that suitable wild pig habitat is less widely available in northern Australia than previously thought. Mapped results may be used to quantify impacts, assess risks, justify management investments and target control activities. Our methods are applicable to other wide-ranging species, especially in data-poor situations.

  12. Improving statistical forecasts of seasonal streamflows using hydrological model output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Robertson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Statistical methods traditionally applied for seasonal streamflow forecasting use predictors that represent the initial catchment condition and future climate influences on future streamflows. Observations of antecedent streamflows or rainfall commonly used to represent the initial catchment conditions are surrogates for the true source of predictability and can potentially have limitations. This study investigates a hybrid seasonal forecasting system that uses the simulations from a dynamic hydrological model as a predictor to represent the initial catchment condition in a statistical seasonal forecasting method. We compare the skill and reliability of forecasts made using the hybrid forecasting approach to those made using the existing operational practice of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for 21 catchments in eastern Australia. We investigate the reasons for differences. In general, the hybrid forecasting system produces forecasts that are more skilful than the existing operational practice and as reliable. The greatest increases in forecast skill tend to be (1 when the catchment is wetting up but antecedent streamflows have not responded to antecedent rainfall, (2 when the catchment is drying and the dominant source of antecedent streamflow is in transition between surface runoff and base flow, and (3 when the initial catchment condition is near saturation intermittently throughout the historical record.

  13. Improving statistical forecasts of seasonal streamflows using hydrological model output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, D. E.; Pokhrel, P.; Wang, Q. J.

    2013-02-01

    Statistical methods traditionally applied for seasonal streamflow forecasting use predictors that represent the initial catchment condition and future climate influences on future streamflows. Observations of antecedent streamflows or rainfall commonly used to represent the initial catchment conditions are surrogates for the true source of predictability and can potentially have limitations. This study investigates a hybrid seasonal forecasting system that uses the simulations from a dynamic hydrological model as a predictor to represent the initial catchment condition in a statistical seasonal forecasting method. We compare the skill and reliability of forecasts made using the hybrid forecasting approach to those made using the existing operational practice of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology for 21 catchments in eastern Australia. We investigate the reasons for differences. In general, the hybrid forecasting system produces forecasts that are more skilful than the existing operational practice and as reliable. The greatest increases in forecast skill tend to be (1) when the catchment is wetting up but antecedent streamflows have not responded to antecedent rainfall, (2) when the catchment is drying and the dominant source of antecedent streamflow is in transition between surface runoff and base flow, and (3) when the initial catchment condition is near saturation intermittently throughout the historical record.

  14. Methane Fluxes from the Pantanal Floodplain in Brazil. Seasonal Variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvala, P.C.; Kirchhoff, V.W.J.H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, S. Paulo (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    A total of 15 campaigns were performed during 1997 and 1998 in a lake inside the Pantanal region, near the Miranda River using the static chamber technique to determine methane fluxes. Air samples were collected in stainless steel canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography, with a FID detector. A distinct seasonal variation has been found, with much higher emissions during the wet season, and comparatively lower emissions during the dry season, but with large variability. Individual fluxes had variations from less than 1 to 1,389 mgCH4m{sup -2}d{sup -1}. The average for the period of high fluxes, from October to April was 238 {+-}238 mgCH4m{sup -2}d{sup -1}, and for the period of lower fluxes, from May to September, the average was 7 {+-}14mgCH4m{sup -2}d{sup -1}. Methane fluxes were correlated with the precipitation in the region, but with a poor statistics. 8 refs.

  15. Dynamics of wetting on smooth and rough surfaces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cazabat, A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The rate of spreading of non-volatile liquids on smooth and on rough surfaces was investigated. The radius of the wetted spot was found to agree with recently proposed scaling laws (t 1/10 for capillarity driven andt 1/8 for gravity driven spreading) when the surface was smooth. However, the

  16. Nanoparticulate platinum films on gold using dendrimer-based wet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630 006, India. E-mail: kanalaphani@yahoo.com. Abstract. There is a growing interest in devising wet chemical alternatives for ... itating polyamine isolated from diatoms [8,9]. Dendrimers are also excellent hosts for a diverse array of nanoparticles [10–15]. In contrast to ...

  17. Electrostatic cloaking of surface structure for dynamic wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Junichiro; Nita, Satoshi; Do-Quang, Minh; Wang, Jiayu; Chen, Yu-Chung; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic wetting problems are fundamental to the understanding of the interaction between liquids and solids. Even in a superficially simple experimental situation, such as a droplet spreading over a dry surface, the result may depend not only on the liquid properties but also strongly on the substrate-surface properties; even for macroscopically smooth surfaces, the microscopic geometrical roughness can be important. In addition, as surfaces may often be naturally charged, or electric fields are used to manipulate fluids, electric effects are crucial components that influence wetting phenomena. Here we investigate the interplay between electric forces and surface structures in dynamic wetting. While surface microstructures can significantly hinder the spreading, we find that the electrostatics can ``cloak'' the microstructures, i.e. deactivate the hindering. We identify the physics in terms of reduction in contact-line friction, which makes the dynamic wetting inertial force dominant and insensitive to the substrate properties. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems, and the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  18. Converting SDAP into gypsum in a wet limestone scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogh, F. [Faelleskemikerne, Elsamprojekt A/S, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The ELSAM power pool has an installed electrical capacity of approx. 5 GW{sub e}, mainly firing import coal. The major base load units are equipped with desulphurization units and three different desulphurization technologies are used: the wet limestone gypsum process, the spray dry absorption process and a sulphuric acid process. Gypsum and sulphuric acid are commercialized, whereas it has been difficult to utilize the spray dry absorption product (SDAP). The main constituents of SDAP are calcium sulphide, calcium chloride, hydrated lime and impurities mainly originating from fly ash. Sulphide can be oxidized into sulphate in acidic solution - the reaction is utilized in the wet limestone gypsum process - and the possibility of using any spare capacity in the wet limestone gypsum units to oxidize the sulphide content of SDAP into sulphate and produce usable gypsum has been investigated in the laboratory and in a 400 MW{sub e} equivalent wet limestone unit. The limestone inhibition effect of the addition of SDAP is currently being studied in the laboratory in order to determine the effect of different SDAP types (plant/coal sources) on limestone reactivity before further long-term full-scale tests are performed and permanent use of the process planned. (EG)

  19. Thermo-hydrodynamic transport phenomena in partially wetting ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vyas Srinivasan

    channels has increased due to emerging applications in diverse branches ranging from .... plug, observed when the solid is not pre-wetted by liquid and there is no thin-film around the gas slug, leading to the formation of three- phase contact line [75]. 608 ... given by Young's law as follows: rlv cos heq ¼ rsv ю rsl. П4ч.

  20. Rheology of dry, partially saturated and wet granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pakpour, M.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the rheology of dry, wet and partially saturated granular materials. Granular media, suspensions, emulsions, polymers and gels are ubiquitous in the chemical and materials processing industry, and despite their very different appearance, the rheology and

  1. Ambient analysis of liquid materials with Wet-SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Toshio, E-mail: seki@sakura.nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Uji, 611-0011 Kyoto (Japan); SENTAN, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, 102-0075 Tokyo (Japan); Kusakari, Masakazu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Uji, 611-0011 Kyoto (Japan); Fujii, Makiko [Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Uji, 611-0011 Kyoto (Japan); Aoki, Takaaki [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, 615-8510 Kyoto (Japan); SENTAN, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, 102-0075 Tokyo (Japan); Matsuo, Jiro [Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Uji, 611-0011 Kyoto (Japan); SENTAN, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, 102-0075 Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a method with high surface sensitivity that allows both elemental and molecular analysis. However, volatile liquid (wet) samples are difficult to measure using conventional SIMS, because samples must be dried and introduced into a high vacuum chamber. The mean free path of ions with energy in the keV range is very short in low vacuum and these ions cannot penetrate the surface. In contrast, ions in the MeV-energy range have high transmission capability in low vacuum and wet samples can be measured using heavy ions without dry sample preparation. Ion beams in the MeV-energy range also excite electrons near the surface and enhance the ionization of high-mass molecules and thus fragment-suppressed SIMS spectra of ionized molecules can be obtained. We have developed an ambient analysis system with secondary ion mass spectrometry for wet samples (Wet-SIMS) that operates from low vacuum to 30 kPa using MeV-energy heavy ion beams. The system is equipped with fine apertures that avoid vacuum degradation at both the primary beam incidence and the secondary ion measurement sides, even when the target chamber is filled with He gas at 30 kPa. Water evaporation was suppressed in a He atmosphere of 16.5 kPa and a solution of benzoic acid could be measured using MeV-energy heavy ions.

  2. Wet faeces produced by sheep fed dried spineless cactus pear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cactus pear cladodes in ruminant diets are characterized by the production of wet faeces and assumed to be diarrhoea. Incremental levels of sun-dried and coarsely ground spineless cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica var. Algerian) cladodes were used to substitute part of the lucerne hay in balanced sheep diets. Feed and ...

  3. Manganese zinc ferrite nanoparticles as efficient catalysts for wet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spinel ferrites; catalytic activity; wet peroxide oxidation; 4-chlorophenol; water treatment. 1. Introduction. Sustainable waste water management and reuse of industrial waste water are critical issues for the develop- ment of human activities and environment conservation. The treatment and safe disposal of hazardous organic.

  4. Microclimate conditions in ventilated wet-walled greenhouses in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatial variations of microclimatic conditions in enclosed north–south (N–S) oriented single-arched greenhouse polycarbonate structures, with a wet-wall providing evaporative cooling at the S end, were investigated and displayed online in near real-time. Temperature-controlled fans at the N end extracted air.

  5. Physical chemistry of wet chemical anisotropic etching of silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we explain a view to understand the anisotropy of the etching of silicon in certain wet chemical agents (such as KOH). The starting point is the assumption that the [Left angle bracket]111[Right Angle Bracket] face of silicon is a flat face, the etch rate of which is then governed by a

  6. The surface state of hematite and its wetting characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimali, Kaustubh; Jin, Jiaqi; Hassas, Behzad Vaziri; Wang, Xuming; Miller, Jan D

    2016-09-01

    Apart from being a resource for iron/steel production, the iron oxide minerals, goethite and hematite, are used in the paint, cosmetics, and other industries as pigments. Surface characteristics of these minerals have been studied extensively both in resource recovery by flotation and in the preparation of colloidal dispersions. In this current research, the wetting characteristics of goethite (FeOOH) and hematite (Fe2O3) have been analyzed by means of contact angle, bubble attachment time, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements as well as by Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS). Goethite is naturally hydroxylated and wetted by water at all pH values. In contrast, the anhydrous hematite surface (001) was found to be slightly hydrophobic at natural pH values with a contact angle of about 50°. At alkaline pH hydroxylation of the hematite surface occurs rapidly and the hematite becomes hydrophilic. The wetting characteristics of the hematite surface then vary between the hydrophobic anhydrous hematite and the completely hydrophilic hydroxylated hematite, similar to goethite. The hydrophobicity can be restored by heating of the hydroxylated hematite surface at 60°C. The hydrophobic character of the anhydrous hematite (001) surface is confirmed by MDS which also reveals that after hydrolysis the hematite (001) surface can be wetted by water, similar to the goethite (001) surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Implementing the NPDES program: An update on the WET ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA has utilized the Clean Water Act - National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permitting program to protect waters of the U.S for over 40 years. NPDES permit effluent limitations serve as the primary mechanism for controlling discharges of pollutants to receiving waters. When developing effluent limitations for an NPDES permit, a permit writer must consider limits based on both the technology available to control the pollutants (i.e., technology-based effluent limits) and limits that are protective of the water quality standards of the receiving water (i.e., water quality-based effluent limits). WET testing is one of the water quality-based effluent limitation mechanisms available to permit writers that is useful in determining how the additive, synergistic and compounding effects of toxic effluents effect streams. This presentation will provide an overview of the current EPA NPDES permit program direction for increasing the efficacy of NPDES permits program administered by the U.S. EPA and States. The training implementation plan is expected to provide permit writers with a clearer understanding of WET requirements as established via the U.S. EPA WET test manuals, NPDES permitting regulatory authorities, and the WET science which has been long established. not applicable

  8. Wetting characteristics of 3-dimensional nanostructured fractal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Ethan, E-mail: ethan.davis4@huskers.unl.edu [Nano & Microsystems Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588-0526 (United States); Liu, Ying; Jiang, Lijia; Lu, Yongfeng [Laser Assisted Nano Engineering Lab, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 209N Scott Engineering Center, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 (United States); Ndao, Sidy, E-mail: sndao2@unl.edu [Nano & Microsystems Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, W342 Nebraska Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588-0526 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Hierarchically structured surfaces were fabricated on the micro/nano-scale. • These structures reduced the contact angle of the inherently hydrophilic material. • Similar surfaces have applications in two-phase heat transfer and microfluidics. - Abstract: This article reports the fabrication and wetting characteristics of 3-dimensional nanostructured fractal surfaces (3DNFS). Three distinct 3DNFS surfaces, namely cubic, Romanesco broccoli, and sphereflake were fabricated using two-photon direct laser writing. Contact angle measurements were performed on the multiscale fractal surfaces to characterize their wetting properties. Average contact angles ranged from 66.8° for the smooth control surface to 0° for one of the fractal surfaces. The change in wetting behavior was attributed to modification of the interfacial surface properties due to the inclusion of 3-dimensional hierarchical fractal nanostructures. However, this behavior does not exactly obey existing surface wetting models in the literature. Potential applications for these types of surfaces in physical and biological sciences are also discussed.

  9. Subcritical water extraction of lipids from wet algal biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shuguang; Reddy, Harvind K.; Schaub, Tanner; Holguin, Francisco Omar

    2016-05-03

    Methods of lipid extraction from biomass, in particular wet algae, through conventionally heated subcritical water, and microwave-assisted subcritical water. In one embodiment, fatty acid methyl esters from solids in a polar phase are further extracted to increase biofuel production.

  10. Preparation of tools for lithographically controlled wetting and soft lithography

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Massmiliano Cavallini, Denis Gentili, Pierpaolo Greco, Francesco Valle & Fabio Biscarini ### Abstract This protocol provides the instructions for designing and fabricating stamping tools with features ranging from nanometer to micrometer scale, including the fabrication using commercial tools such as compact disks or digital video disks. In particular the reported procedures are oriented towards the tools fabrication for lithographically controlled wetting and soft lithograph...

  11. Teach Battery Technology with Class-Built Wet Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    With some simple metal samples and common household liquids, teachers can build wet cell batteries and use them to teach students about batteries and how they work. In this article, the author offers information that is derived from some simple experiments he conducted in his basement workshop and can easily be applied in the classroom or lab. He…

  12. Die Wet op Nasionale Erfenishulpbronne | Van Vollenhoven | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Die Wet op Nasionale Erfenishulpbronne. Anton C Van Vollenhoven. Abstract. The National Heritage Resources Act In this article the National Heritage Resources Act is discussed. It is also shortly compared to the former National Monuments Act. Attention is given to the way in which the new act addresses the problems ...

  13. Optimization of wet oxidation pretreatment of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, A.S.; Thomsen, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    The wet oxidation process (water; oxygen and elevated temperature) was investigated under alkaline conditions for fractionation of hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin from wheat straw. At higher temperature and longer reaction time, a purified cellulose fraction (69% w/w) was produced with high ...

  14. Effects of sulphuric acid, mechanical scarification and wet heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of different treatment methods on the germination of seeds of Parkia biglobosa (mimosaceae) were carried out. Prior treatment of seeds with sulphuric acid, wet heat and mechanical scarification were found to induce germination of the dormant seeds. These methods could be applied to raise seedlings of the plant for ...

  15. Spatial Variability of Wet Troposphere Delays Over Inland Water Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehran, Ali; Clark, Elizabeth A.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2017-11-01

    Satellite radar altimetry has enabled the study of water levels in large lakes and reservoirs at a global scale. The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission (scheduled launch 2020) will simultaneously measure water surface extent and elevation at an unprecedented accuracy and resolution. However, SWOT retrieval accuracy will be affected by a number of factors, including wet tropospheric delay—the delay in the signal's passage through the atmosphere due to atmospheric water content. In past applications, the wet tropospheric delay over large inland water bodies has been corrected using atmospheric moisture profiles based on atmospheric reanalysis data at relatively coarse (tens to hundreds of kilometers) spatial resolution. These products cannot resolve subgrid variations in wet tropospheric delays at the spatial resolutions (of 1 km and finer) that SWOT is intended to resolve. We calculate zenith wet tropospheric delays (ZWDs) and their spatial variability from Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction model simulations at 2.33 km spatial resolution over the southwestern U.S., with attention in particular to Sam Rayburn, Ray Hubbard, and Elephant Butte Reservoirs which have width and length dimensions that are of order or larger than the WRF spatial resolution. We find that spatiotemporal variability of ZWD over the inland reservoirs depends on climatic conditions at the reservoir location, as well as distance from ocean, elevation, and surface area of the reservoir, but that the magnitude of subgrid variability (relative to analysis and reanalysis products) is generally less than 10 mm.

  16. Wet spinning of asymmetric hollow fibre membranes for gas separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Jacob Adriaan

    1988-01-01

    This thesis describes the spinning and characterizatin of hollow fibre membranes for gas separation. The type of fibres studied here are made by a wet spinning process. A homogeneous solution is prepared, consisting of a polymer in a suitable organic solvent, and extruded as a hollow fibre. Both the

  17. Werking Wet verbetering poortwachter onder werknemers : hoofdonderzoek en herhaalonderzoek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ybema, J.F.; Evers, M.; Lagerveld, S.

    2006-01-01

    Als onderdeel van de evaluatie van de Wet verbetering poortwachter (Wvp) heeft TNO voor het ministerie van SZW een serie onderzoeken uitgevoerd waarin de reïntegratie- inspanningen bij langdurige uitval wegens ziekte centraal staan. Dit betreft twee onderzoeken onder werknemers en drie onderzoeken

  18. Ranibizumab vs. aflibercept for wet age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Shelagh M; Hedegaard, Morten; Chan, Keith

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although a reduced aflibercept (2.0 mg) injection frequency relative to the approved dosing posology is included in national treatment guidelines for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), there is limited evidence of its comparative efficacy. The objective was to compare...

  19. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of formic acid in wastewater with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-03

    Jul 3, 2016 ... ABSTRACT. The catalytic wet oxidation of formic acid, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent over naturally-occurring iron ore, was explored. Firstly, the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to its hydroxyl radicals (HO• and HOO•) over naturally-occurring iron ore was investigated. The reaction was ...

  20. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of formic acid in wastewater with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The catalytic wet oxidation of formic acid, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent over naturally-occurring iron ore, was explored. Firstly, the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to its hydroxyl radicals (HO• and HOO•) over naturally-occurring iron ore was investigated. The reaction was monitored by ATR FTIR by ...