WorldWideScience

Sample records for wet lab studies

  1. In silico and wet lab approaches to study transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hestand, Matthew Scott

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is a complicated process with multiple types of regulation, including binding of proteins termed transcription factors. This thesis looks at transcription factors and transcription factor binding site discovery through computational predictions and wet lab work to better elucidate

  2. WetLab-2: Providing Quantitative PCR Capabilities on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Macarena; Jung, Jimmy Kar Chuen; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis David; Schonfeld, Julie; Tran, Luan Hoang

    2015-01-01

    The objective of NASA Ames Research Centers WetLab-2 Project is to place on the ISS a system capable of conducting gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of biological specimens sampled or cultured on orbit. The WetLab-2 system is capable of processing sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. The project has developed a RNA preparation module that can lyse cells and extract RNA of sufficient quality and quantity for use as templates in qRT-PCR reactions. Our protocol has the advantage that it uses non-toxic chemicals, alcohols or other organics. The resulting RNA is transferred into a pipette and then dispensed into reaction tubes that contain all lyophilized reagents needed to perform qRT-PCR reactions. These reaction tubes are mounted on rotors to centrifuge the liquid to the reaction window of the tube using a cordless drill. System operations require simple and limited crew actions including syringe pushes, valve turns and pipette dispenses. The resulting process takes less than 30 min to have tubes ready for loading into the qRT-PCR unit.The project has selected a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) qRT-PCR unit, the Cepheid SmartCycler, that will fly in its COTS configuration. The SmartCycler has a number of advantages including modular design (16 independent PCR modules), low power consumption, rapid thermal ramp times and four-color detection. The ability to detect up to four fluorescent channels will enable multiplex assays that can be used to normalize for RNA concentration and integrity, and to study multiple genes of interest in each module. The WetLab-2 system will have the capability to downlink data from the ISS to the ground after a completed run and to uplink new programs. The ability to conduct qRT-PCR on-orbit eliminates the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms or the concern of RNA degradation of fixed samples. The

  3. In Silico and Wet Lab Studies Reveal the Cholesterol Lowering Efficacy of Lauric Acid, a Medium Chain Fat of Coconut Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekshmi Sheela, Devi; Nazeem, Puthiyaveetil Abdulla; Narayanankutty, Arunaksharan; Manalil, Jeksy Jos; Raghavamenon, Achuthan C

    2016-12-01

    The coconut oil (CO) contains 91 % of saturated fatty acids in which 72 % are medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) like lauric, capric and caprylic acids. In contrast to animal fat, coconut oil has no cholesterol. Despite this fact, CO is sidelined among other vegetable oils due to the health hazards attributed to the saturated fatty acids. Though various medicinal effects of CO have been reported including the hypolipidemic activity, people are still confused in the consumption of this natural oil. In silico analyses and wet lab experiments have been carried out to identify the hypolipidemic properties of MCFAs and phenolic acids in CO by using different protein targets involved in cholesterol synthesis. The molecular docking studies were carried out using CDOCKER protocol in Accelery's Discovery Studio, by taking different proteins like HMG- CoA reductase and cholesterol esterase as targets and the different phytocompounds in coconut as ligands. Molecular docking highlighted the potential of lauric acid in inhibiting the protein targets involved in hyperlipidemics. Further, validation of in silico results was carried out through in vivo studies. The activity of key enzymes HMG- CoA reductase and lipoprotein lipase were found reduced in animals fed with lauric acid and CO.

  4. The role of wet lab in thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedetti, Benedetta; Schnorr, Philipp; Schmidt, Joachim; Scarci, Marco

    2017-01-01

    During the last three decades, minimally invasive surgery has become common practice in all kinds of surgical disciplines and, in Thoracic Surgery, the minimally invasive approach is recommended as the treatment of choice for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Nevertheless, all over the world a large number of lobectomies is still performed by conventional open thoracotomy and not as video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which shows the need of a proper training for this technique. Development and improvement of surgical skills are not only challenging and time-consuming components of the training curriculum for resident or fellow surgeons, but also for more experienced consultants learning new techniques. The rapid evolution of medical technologies like VATS or robotic surgery requires an evolution of the existing educational models to improve cognitive and procedural skills before reaching the operating room in order to increase patient safety. Nowadays, in the Thoracic Surgery field, there is a wide range of simulation-based training methods for surgeons starting or wanting to improve their learning curve in VATS. Aim is to overcome the learning curve required to successfully master this new technique in a brief time. In general, the basic difference between the various learning techniques is the distinction between "dry" and "wet" lab modules, which mainly reflects the use of synthetic or animal-model-based materials. Wet lab trainings can be further sub-divided into in vivo modules, where living anaesthetized animals are used, and ex vivo modules, where only animal tissues serve as basis of the simulation-based training method. In the literature, the role of wet lab in Thoracic Surgery is still debated.

  5. Porcine wet lab improves surgical skills in third year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosdeck, Joseph; Carraro, Ellen; Arnold, Mark; Perry, Kyle; Harzman, Alan; Nagel, Rollin; Sinclair, Lynnsay; Muscarella, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Medical students desire to become proficient in surgical techniques and believe their acquisition is important. However, the operating room is a challenging learning environment. Small group procedural workshops can improve confidence, participation, and performance. The use of fresh animal tissues has been rated highly among students and improves their surgical technique. Greater exposure to surgical procedures and staff could positively influence students' interest in surgical careers. We hypothesized that a porcine "wet lab" course for third year medical students would improve their surgical skills. Two skills labs were conducted for third year medical students during surgery clerkships in the fall of 2011. The students' surgical skills were first evaluated in the operating room across nine dimensions. Next, the students performed the following procedures during the skills lab: (1) laparotomy; (2) small bowel resection; (3) splenectomy; (4) partial hepatectomy; (5) cholecystectomy; (6) interrupted abdominal wall closure; (7) running abdominal wall closure; and (8) skin closure. After the skills lab, the students were re-evaluated in the operating room across the same nine dimensions. Student feedback was also recorded. Fifty-one participants provided pre- and post-lab data for use in the final analysis. The mean scores for all nine surgical skills improved significantly after participation in the skills lab (P ≤ 0.002). Cumulative post-test scores also showed significant improvement (P = 0.002). Finally, the student feedback was largely positive. The surgical skills of third year medical students improved significantly after participation in a porcine wet lab, and the students rated the experience as highly educational. Integration into the surgery clerkship curriculum would promote surgical skill proficiency and could elicit interest in surgical careers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Implementing a Hybrid Wet Lab and Online Module Lab Curriculum into a General Chemistry Course: Impacts on Student Performance and Engagement with the Chemistry Triplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Stefan M.; Borda, Emily J.; Haupt, Justin

    2018-01-01

    Here, we describe the implementation a hybrid general chemistry teaching laboratory curriculum that replaces a portion of a course's traditional "wet lab" experiences with online virtual lab modules. These modules intentionally utilize representations on all three levels of the chemistry triplet-macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic.…

  7. Pharmacological repositioning of Achyranthes aspera as an antidepressant using pharmacoinformatic tools PASS and PharmaExpert: a case study with wet lab validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, R K; Gawande, D Y; Lagunin, A A; Poroikov, V V

    2018-01-01

    Traditional knowledge guides the use of plants for restricted therapeutic indications, but their pharmacological actions may be found beyond their ethnic therapeutic indications employing emerging computational tools. In this context, the present study was envisaged to explore the novel pharmacological effect of Achyranthes aspera (A. aspera) using PASS and PharmaExpert software tools. Based on the predicted mechanisms of the antidepressant effect for all analysed phytoconstituents of A. aspera, one may suggest its significant antidepressant action. The possible mechanism of this novel pharmacological effect is the enhancement of serotonin release, in particular caused by hexatriacontane. Therefore, pharmacological validation of the methanolic extract, hexatriacontane rich (HRF) and hexatriacontane lacking fraction (HLF) of A. aspera was carried out using the Forced Swimming Test and Tail suspension test in mice. The cortical and hippocampal monoamine and their metabolite levels were measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A. aspera methanolic extract, HRF treatments showed a significant antidepressant effect comparable to imipramine. Further, the corresponding surge in cortical and hippocampal monoamine and their metabolite levels was also observed with these treatments. In conclusion, A. aspera has shown a significant antidepressant effect, possibly due to hexatriacontane, by raising monoamine levels.

  8. Promoting Undergraduate Surgical Education: Current Evidence and Students' Views on ESMSC International Wet Lab Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideris, Michail; Papalois, Apostolos; Theodoraki, Korina; Dimitropoulos, Ioannis; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Georgopoulou, Efstratia-Maria; Staikoglou, Nikolaos; Paparoidamis, Georgios; Pantelidis, Panteleimon; Tsagkaraki, Ismini; Karamaroudis, Stefanos; Potoupnis, Michael E; Tsiridis, Eleftherios; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Papagrigoriadis, Savvas; Papalois, Vassilios; Zografos, Georgios; Triantafyllou, Aggeliki; Tsoulfas, Georgios

    2017-04-01

    Undergraduate Surgical Education is becoming an essential element in the training of the future generation of safe and efficient surgeons. Essential Skills in the Management of Surgical Cases (ESMSC), is an international, joint applied surgical science and simulation-based learning wet lab course. We performed a review of the existing literature on the topic of undergraduate surgical education. Following that, we analyzed the feedback questionnaire received 480 from 2 recent series of ESMSC courses (May 2015, n = 49 and November 2015, n = 40), in order to evaluate European Union students' (UK, Germany, Greece) views on the ESMSC course, as well as on the undergraduate surgical education. Results Using a 10 point graded scale, the overall ESMSC concept was positively evaluated, with a mean score of 9.41 ± 0.72 (range: 8-10) and 8.94 ± 1.1 (range: 7-10). The majority of delegates from both series [9.86 ± 0.43 (range: 8-10) and 9.58 ± 0.91 (range: 6-10), respectively] believed that ESMSC should be incorporated in the undergraduate surgical curriculum. Comparison of responses from the UK to the Greek Medical Student, as well as the findings from the third and fourth year versus the fifth and sixth year Medical Students, revealed no statistically significant differences pertaining to any of the questions (p > 0.05). Current evidence in the literature supports the enhancement of surgical education through the systematic use of various modalities that provide Simulation-Based Training (SBT) hands-on experience, starting from the early undergraduate level. The findings of the present study are in agreement with these previous reports.

  9. Animal ethics and welfare education in wet-lab training can foster residents' ethical values toward life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iki, Yuko; Ito, Takuya; Kudo, Katsuyoshi; Noda, Masafumi; Kanehira, Masahiko; Sueta, Teruko; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Kagaya, Yutaka; Okada, Yoshinori; Unno, Michiaki

    2017-10-30

    Live animals are used in surgical skills training in wet lab, which has undeniable effectiveness for the development of future surgeons. However, where such training is provided, animal welfare is a major consideration. Increasingly, institutions that offer wet-lab training are incorporating animal ethics and welfare-related content into their training courses, but the effectiveness of such animal ethics education has yet to be evaluated quantitatively. We investigated whether the animal ethics content of a training course affected trainees by measuring increase in ethical awareness using visual analog scale questionnaires before and after training. Our results demonstrated a significant and positive increase in awareness of animal ethics (significance level of 5%; 0.0380≤P≤0.0016).

  10. Development Status of the WetLab-2 Project: New Tools for On-orbit Real-time Quantitative Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jimmy; Parra, Macarena P.; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis; Chinn, Tori; Ricco, Antonio; Souza, Kenneth; Hyde, Liz; Rukhsana, Yousuf; Richey, C. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of NASA Ames Research Centers WetLab-2 Project is to place on the ISS a research platform to facilitate gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of biological specimens grown or cultured on orbit. The WetLab-2 equipment will be capable of processing multiple sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. In addition to the logistical benefits of in-situ sample processing and analysis, conducting qRT-PCR on-orbit eliminates the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms. The system can also validate terrestrial analyses of samples returned from ISS by providing quantitative on-orbit gene expression benchmarking prior to sample return. The ability to get on orbit data will provide investigators with the opportunity to adjust experimental parameters for subsequent trials based on the real-time data analysis without need for sample return and re-flight. Finally, WetLab-2 can be used for analysis of air, surface, water, and clinical samples to monitor environmental contaminants and crew health. The verification flight of the instrument is scheduled to launch on SpaceX-5 in Aug. 2014.Progress to date: The WetLab-2 project completed a thorough study of commercially available qRT-PCR systems and performed a downselect based on both scientific and engineering requirements. The selected instrument, the Cepheid SmartCycler, has advantages including modular design (16 independent PCR modules), low power consumption, and rapid ramp times. The SmartCycler has multiplex capabilities, assaying up to four genes of interest in each of the 16 modules. The WetLab-2 team is currently working with Cepheid to modify the unit for housing within an EXPRESS rack locker on the ISS. This will enable the downlink of data to the ground and provide uplink capabilities for programming, commanding, monitoring, and instrument maintenance. The project is

  11. WetLab-2: Tools for Conducting On-Orbit Quantitative Real-Time Gene Expression Analysis on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Macarena; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis; Jung, Jimmy; Schonfeld, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The objective of NASA Ames Research Centers WetLab-2 Project is to place on the ISS a research platform capable of conducting gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of biological specimens sampled or cultured on orbit. The project has selected a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) qRT-PCR system, the Cepheid SmartCycler and will fly it in its COTS configuration. The SmartCycler has a number of advantages including modular design (16 independent PCR modules), low power consumption, rapid ramp times and the ability to detect up to four separate fluorescent channels at one time enabling multiplex assays that can be used for normalization and to study multiple genes of interest in each module. The team is currently working with Cepheid to enable the downlink of data from the ISS to the ground and provide uplink capabilities for programming, commanding, monitoring, and instrument maintenance. The project has adapted commercial technology to design a module that can lyse cells and extract RNA of sufficient quality and quantity for use in qRT-PCR reactions while using a housekeeping gene to normalize RNA concentration and integrity. The WetLab-2 system is capable of processing multiple sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. The ability to conduct qRT-PCR on-orbit eliminates the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms or the concern of RNA degradation of fixed samples. The system can be used to validate terrestrial analyses of samples returned from ISS by providing on-orbit gene expression benchmarking prior to sample return. The ability to get on orbit data will provide investigators with the opportunity to adjust experiment parameters for subsequent trials based on the real-time data analysis without need for sample return and re-flight. Researchers will also be able to sample multigenerational changes in organisms. Finally, the system can be

  12. Study Labs Kortlægningsrapport UCSJ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørnø, Rasmus Leth Vergmann; Hestbech, Astrid Margrethe; Gynther, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Rapporten er en delleverance i det regionale forprojekt S​tudy Labs,​der udføres som et samarbejde mellem Holbæk, Odsherred og Kalundborg kommune og University College Sjælland (UCSJ). Samarbejdet er delvist medfinansieret af Region Sjælland. Rapporten behandler projektets etableringsfase...... for at nå de kommunale målsætninger. De potentielle målgrupper er blevet kortlagt. Samtidig er undersøgelser i brugergrupperne blevet gjort håndgribelige i form af Personaer. Kommunerne har, faciliteret af Educationlab, gennemført designworkshops og er fremkommet med designs for Study Labs, der som...

  13. Studying Robots Outside the Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blond, Lasse

    and ethnographic studies will enhance understandings of the dynamics of HRI. Furthermore, the paper emphasizes how users and the context of use matters to integration of robots, as it is shown how roboticists are unable to control how their designs are implemented in practice and that the sociality of social...... robots is inscribed by its users in social practice. This paper can be seen as a contribution to studies of long-term HRI. It presents the challenges of robot adaptation in practice and discusses the limitations of the present conceptual understanding of human-robotic relations. The ethnographic data......As more and more robots enter our social world there is a strong need for further field studies of human-robotic interaction. Based on a two-year ethnographic study of the implementation of the South Korean socially assistive robot in Danish elderly care this paper argues that empirical...

  14. A comparative study on real lab and simulation lab in communication engineering from students' perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, B.; Woods, P. C.

    2013-05-01

    Over the years, rapid development in computer technology has engendered simulation-based laboratory (lab) in addition to the traditional hands-on (physical) lab. Many higher education institutions adopt simulation lab, replacing some existing physical lab experiments. The creation of new systems for conducting engineering lab activities has raised concerns among educators on the merits and shortcomings of both physical and simulation labs; at the same time, many arguments have been raised on the differences of both labs. Investigating the effectiveness of both labs is complicated, as there are multiple factors that should be considered. In view of this challenge, a study on students' perspectives on their experience related to key aspects on engineering laboratory exercise was conducted. In this study, the Visual Auditory Read and Kinetic model was utilised to measure the students' cognitive styles. The investigation was done through a survey among participants from Multimedia University, Malaysia. The findings revealed that there are significant differences for most of the aspects in physical and simulation labs.

  15. Labs not in a lab: A case study of instructor and student perceptions of an online biology lab class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Jessica Boyce

    Distance learning is not a new phenomenon but with the advancement in technology, the different ways of delivering an education have increased. Today, many universities and colleges offer their students the option of taking courses online instead of sitting in a classroom on campus. In general students like online classes because they allow for flexibility, the comfort of sitting at home, and the potential to save money. Even though there are advantages to taking online classes, many students and instructors still debate the effectiveness and quality of education in a distant learning environment. Many universities and colleges are receiving pressure from students to offer more and more classes online. Research argues for both the advantages and disadvantages of online classes and stresses the importance of colleges and universities weighing both sides before deciding to adopt an online class. Certain classes may not be suitable for online instruction and not all instructors are suitable to teach online classes. The literature also reveals that there is a need for more research on online biology lab classes. With the lack of information on online biology labs needed by science educators who face the increasing demand for online biology labs, this case study hopes to provide insight into the use of online biology lab classes and the how students and an instructor at a community college in Virginia perceive their online biology lab experience as well as the effectiveness of the online labs.

  16. Respecifying lab ethnography an ethnomethodological study of experimental physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sormani, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Respecifying Lab Ethnography delivers the first ethnomethodological study of current experimental physics in action, describing the disciplinary orientation of lab work and exploring the discipline in its social order, formal stringency and skilful performance - in situ and in vivo. In bringing together two major strands of ethnomethodological inquiry, reflexive ethnography and video analysis, which have hitherto existed in parallel, Respecifying Lab Ethnography introduces a practice-based video analysis. In doing so, the book recasts conventional distinctions to shed fresh light on methodolog

  17. Study of polycaprolactone wet electrospinning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kostakova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wet electrospinning is a useful method for 3-dimensional structure control of nanofibrous materials. This innovative technology uses a liquid collector instead of the metal one commonly used for standard electrospinning. The article compares the internal structural features of polycaprolactone (PCL nanofibrous materials prepared by both technologies. We analyze the influence of different water/ethanol compositions used as a liquid collector on the morphology of the resultant polycaprolactone nanofibrous materials. Scanning electron micro-photographs have revealed a bimodal structure in the wet electrospun materials composed of micro and nanofibers uniformly distributed across the sample bulk. We have shown that the full-faced, twofold fiber distribution is due to the solvent composition and is induced and enhanced by increasing the ethanol weight ratio. Moreover, the comparison of fibrous layers morphology obtained by wet and dry spinning have revealed that beads that frequently appeared in dry spun materials are created by Plateau-Rayleigh instability of the fraction of thicker fibers. Theoretical conditions for spontaneous and complete immersion of cylindrical fibers into a liquid collector are also derived here.

  18. Spring-action Apparatus for Fixation of Eyeball (SAFE): a novel, cost-effective yet simple device for ophthalmic wet-lab training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Seema; Baskaran, Prabu; Fazal, Romana; Sulaiman, Syed Mohammad; Krishnan, Tiruvengada; Venkatesh, Rengaraj

    2016-10-01

    Achieving a formed and firm eyeball which is stably fixed in a holding device is a major challenge of surgical wet-lab training. Our innovation, the 'Spring-action Apparatus for Fixation of Eyeball (SAFE)' is a robust, simple and economical device to solve this problem. It consists of a hollow iron cylinder to which a spring-action syringe is attached. The spring-action syringe generates vacuum and enables reliable fixation of a human or animal cadaveric eye on the iron cylinder. The rise in intraocular pressure due to vacuum fixation can be varied as per need or nature of surgery being practised. A mask-fixed version of this device is also designed to train surgeons for appropriate hand positioning. An experienced surgeon performed various surgeries including manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS), phacoemulsification, laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), femtosecond LASIK docking, Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty, deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty, penetrating keratoplasty and trabeculectomy on this device, while a trainee surgeon practised MSICS and wound suturing. Skill-appropriate comfort level was much higher with SAFE than with conventional globe holders for both surgeons. Due to its stability, pressure adjustability, portability, cost-efficiency and simplicity, we recommend SAFE as the basic equipment for every wet lab. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. A Case Study of a High School Fab Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jennifer E.

    This dissertation examines making and design-based STEM education in a formal makerspace. It focuses on how the design and implementation of a Fab Lab learning environment and curriculum affect how instructors and students see themselves engaging in science, and how the Fab Lab relates to the social sorting practices that already take place at North High School. While there is research examining design-based STEM education in informal and formal learning environments, we know little about how K-12 teachers define STEM in making activities when no university or museum partnership exists. This study sought to help fill this gap in the research literature. This case study of a formal makerspace followed instructors and students in one introductory Fab Lab course for one semester. Additional observations of an introductory woodworking course helped build the case and set it into the school context, and provided supplementary material to better understand the similarities and differences between the Fab Lab course and a more traditional design-based learning course. Using evidence from observational field notes, participant interviews, course materials, and student work, I found that the North Fab Lab relies on artifacts and rhetoric symbolic of science and STEM to set itself apart from other design-based courses at North High School. Secondly, the North Fab Lab instructors and students were unable to explain how what they were doing in the Fab Lab was science, and instead relied on vague and unsupported claims related to interdisciplinary STEM practices and dated descriptions of science. Lastly, the design and implementation of the Fab Lab learning environment and curriculum and its separation from North High School's low tech, design-based courses effectively reinforced social sorting practices and cultural assumptions about student work and intelligence.

  20. Nuclear turbine efficiency improvement by wet steam study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Morson, A.; Markytan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Most of the turbine used at the nuclear power plant are operated at environment of wet steam, which composes of a big factor of its inner loss in comparison with those of the thermal power plant. If an analytical method predictable on behavior of the wet steam is established, it could be upgraded efficiency of the turbine and also reliability against corrosion formed by moisture. This study, therefore, aims at understanding of physical property of the wet steam flow scarcely known at present, development of an optimum turbine cascade design tool reflected by the property, development of a turbine cascade design reducible of steam loss due to wet steam by using the tool, and development on a method of removing moisture in the turbine to its outer portion. For the tool, a new three dimensional flow numerical analysis is necessary to be developed, to aim at accurately and numerically understanding of the behavior of wet steam. As this study is in advancing now, by using a turbine cascade optimized on the wet steam flow and a developed moisture removing apparatus, about 0.6 % of upgrading in turbine efficiency can be predicted in comparison with that of the advanced aero-cascade of the GE Corporation. (G.K.)

  1. Wetting study of patterned surfaces for superhydrophobicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhushan, Bharat [Nanotribology Laboratory for Information Storage and MEMS/NEMS (NLIM), 201 W. 19th Avenue, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43202-1107 (United States)], E-mail: Bhushan.2@osu.edu; Jung, Yong Chae [Nanotribology Laboratory for Information Storage and MEMS/NEMS (NLIM), 201 W. 19th Avenue, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43202-1107 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have considerable technological potential for various applications due to their extreme water-repellent properties. A number of studies have been carried out to produce artificial biomimetic roughness-induced hydrophobic surfaces. In general, both homogeneous and composite interfaces are possible on the produced surface. Silicon surfaces patterned with pillars of two different diameters and heights with varying pitch values were fabricated. We show how static contact angles vary with different pitch values on the patterned silicon surfaces. Based on the experimental data and a numerical model, the trends are explained. We show that superhydrophobic surfaces have low hysteresis and tilt angle. Tribological properties play an important role in many applications requiring water-repellent properties. Therefore, it is important to study the adhesion and friction properties of these surfaces that mimic nature. An atomic/friction force microscope (AFM/FFM) is used for surface characterization and adhesion and friction measurements.

  2. Environmental management system case study: textile wet processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasreldin, A A [Engineering Researches and Industrial Technologies Council, Sudan Academy of Sciences, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2008-10-15

    Textile industry is one of the oldest industries, it started very early in the ancient ages, its grows and improves gradually at the first and then rapidly to satisfy other different need of the mankind, even for luxury purposes, this development caused damage to environment, then its need the treatment. Textile wet processes used significant quantities of water and various kind of chemicals marketed under the name textile auxiliaries, to enhance the appearance of the fabric, serviceability, and durability. The chemical contamination of textile wet processes can be a health risk for the mill workers, consumers and for the environment as well. A number of schemes have been proposed in different countries to control the textile wet processes to create better environment and protect the ecosystem from further degradation, the developing countries need to apply their designed policies from the beginning. A theoretical study for probability of application of environmental management system in textile industry, to prevent or eliminate textile industry pollution that considered as one of the largest polluters in Sudanese environment, especially after the government (industrial ministry) support and facilitate to textile industry development. Applying environmental management system can appreciably reduce the textile industry pollution as founded from the study.(Author)

  3. Environmental management system case study: textile wet processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasreldin, A.A.

    2008-10-01

    Textile industry is one of the oldest industries, it started very early in the ancient ages, its grows and improves gradually at the first and then rapidly to satisfy other different need of the mankind, even for luxury purposes, this development caused damage to environment, then its need the treatment. Textile wet processes used significant quantities of water and various kind of chemicals marketed under the name textile auxiliaries, to enhance the appearance of the fabric, serviceability, and durability. The chemical contamination of textile wet processes can be a health risk for the mill workers, consumers and for the environment as well. A number of schemes have been proposed in different countries to control the textile wet processes to create better environment and protect the ecosystem from further degradation, the developing countries need to apply their designed policies from the beginning. A theoretical study for probability of application of environmental management system in textile industry, to prevent or eliminate textile industry pollution that considered as one of the largest polluters in Sudanese environment, especially after the government (industrial ministry) support and facilitate to textile industry development. Applying environmental management system can appreciably reduce the textile industry pollution as founded from the study.(Author)

  4. Parametric study of closed wet cooling tower thermal performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasim, S. M.; Hayder, M. J.

    2017-08-01

    The present study involves experimental and theoretical analysis to evaluate the thermal performance of modified Closed Wet Cooling Tower (CWCT). The experimental study includes: design, manufacture and testing prototype of a modified counter flow forced draft CWCT. The modification based on addition packing to the conventional CWCT. A series of experiments was carried out at different operational parameters. In view of energy analysis, the thermal performance parameters of the tower are: cooling range, tower approach, cooling capacity, thermal efficiency, heat and mass transfer coefficients. The theoretical study included develops Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models to predicting various thermal performance parameters of the tower. Utilizing experimental data for training and testing, the models simulated by multi-layer back propagation algorithm for varying all operational parameters stated in experimental test.

  5. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-01-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an…

  6. Human Engineering Modeling and Performance Lab Study Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    The HEMAP (Human Engineering Modeling and Performance) Lab is a joint effort between the Industrial and Human Engineering group and the KAVE (Kennedy Advanced Visualiations Environment) group. The lab consists of sixteen camera system that is used to capture human motions and operational tasks, through te use of a Velcro suit equipped with sensors, and then simulate these tasks in an ergonomic software package know as Jac, The Jack software is able to identify the potential risk hazards.

  7. A safety study on the wet storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Whang, Joo Ho; Lee, Hoo Kun; Choi, Jong Won; Lee, Jong Geun

    1989-02-01

    This study is to provide data related with a basic design of the spent fuel storage facility in the field of radiation and to establish the safety assessment methodology of away from reactor spent fuel storage facility. This is in progress and continue upto the year of 1991. The mathematical model which predict the quantity of environmental release of fission and corrosion products from spent fuel received and stored in wet storage facility operated in normal conditions was prepared. The decay characteristic of domestic spent fuels are analysed and then the coefficients for the prediction of the decay heat by simple formular was determined. This correlations could predict decay heat of spent fuel with ±10% difference from ORIGEN2 results. The release factor of cobalt out of PWR spent fuel in PIE pool is 7.97 x 10-12∼8.49 x 10-11 Ci/ sec-rod, which appears to be linear without being connected with the types of fuel defects, but that of cesium varies with the defect type and the exposure time in water. In water condition, release factor of uranium out of CANDU fuel pellets appears to be about 5 x 10-8/day, whose tendency is similar to that of cesium of the latter half of the exposure time of water. (Author)

  8. Study of wet blasting of components in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.

    1999-12-01

    This report looks at the method of wet blasting radioactive components in nuclear power stations. The wet blaster uses pearl shaped glass beads with the dimensions of 150-250 μm mixed with water as blasting media. The improved design, providing outer operator's positions with proper radiation protection and more efficient blasting equipment has resulted in a lesser dose taken by the operators. The main reason to decontaminate components in nuclear power plants is to enable service on these components. On components like valves, pump shafts, pipes etc. oxides form and bind radiation. These components are normally situated at some distance from the reactor core and will mainly suffer from radiation from so called activation products. When a component is to be decontaminated it can be decontaminated to a radioactive level where it will be declassified. This report has found levels ranging from 150-1000 Bq/kg allowing declassification of radioactive materials. This difference is found between different countries and different organisations. The report also looks at the levels of waste generated using wet blasting. This is done by tracking the contamination to determine where it collects. It is either collected in the water treatment plant or collected in the blasting media. At Barsebaeck the waste levels, from de-contaminating nearly 800 components in one year, results in a waste volume of about 0,250 m 3 . This waste consists of low and medium level waste and will cost about 3 600 EURO to store. The conclusions of the report are that wet blasting is an indispensable way to treat contaminated components in modern nuclear power plants. The wet blasting equipment can be improved by using a robot enabling the operators to remotely treat components from the outer operator's positions. There they will benefit from better radiation protection thus further reduce their taken dose. The wet blasting equipment could also be used to better control the levels of radioactivity on

  9. A study on the effect of varying sequence of lab performance skills on lab performance of high school physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bournia-Petrou, Ethel A.

    The main goal of this investigation was to study how student rank in class, student gender and skill sequence affect high school students' performance on the lab skills involved in a laboratory-based inquiry task in physics. The focus of the investigation was the effect of skill sequence as determined by the particular task. The skills considered were: Hypothesis, Procedure, Planning, Data, Graph, Calculations and Conclusion. Three physics lab tasks based on the simple pendulum concept were administered to 282 Regents physics high school students. The reliability of the designed tasks was high. Student performance was evaluated on individual student written responses and a scoring rubric. The tasks had high discrimination power and were of moderate difficulty (65%). It was found that, student performance was weak on Conclusion (42%), Hypothesis (48%), and Procedure (51%), where the numbers in parentheses represent the mean as a percentage of the maximum possible score. Student performance was strong on Calculations (91%), Data (82%), Graph (74%) and Plan (68%). Out of all seven skills, Procedure had the strongest correlation (.73) with the overall task performance. Correlation analysis revealed some strong relationships among the seven skills which were grouped in two distinct clusters: Hypothesis, Procedure and Plan belong to one, and Data, Graph, Calculations, and Conclusion belong to the other. This distinction may indicate different mental processes at play within each skill cluster. The effect of student rank was not statistically significant according to the MANOVA results due to the large variation of rank levels among the participating schools. The effect of gender was significant on the entire test because of performance differences on Calculations and Graph, where male students performed better than female students. Skill sequence had a significant effect on the skills of Procedure, Plan, Data and Conclusion. Students are rather weak in proposing a

  10. Study of wet blasting of components in nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, J

    1999-12-01

    This report looks at the method of wet blasting radioactive components in nuclear power stations. The wet blaster uses pearl shaped glass beads with the dimensions of 150-250 {mu}m mixed with water as blasting media. The improved design, providing outer operator's positions with proper radiation protection and more efficient blasting equipment has resulted in a lesser dose taken by the operators. The main reason to decontaminate components in nuclear power plants is to enable service on these components. On components like valves, pump shafts, pipes etc. oxides form and bind radiation. These components are normally situated at some distance from the reactor core and will mainly suffer from radiation from so called activation products. When a component is to be decontaminated it can be decontaminated to a radioactive level where it will be declassified. This report has found levels ranging from 150-1000 Bq/kg allowing declassification of radioactive materials.This difference is found between different countries and different organisations. The report also looks at the levels of waste generated using wet blasting. This is done by tracking the contamination to determine where it collects. It is either collected in the water treatment plant or collected in the blasting media. At Barsebaeck the waste levels, from de-contaminating nearly 800 components in one year, results in a waste volume of about 0,250 m{sup 3}. This waste consists of low and medium level waste and will cost about 3 600 EURO to store. The conclusions of the report are that wet blasting is an indispensable way to treat contaminated components in modern nuclear power plants. The wet blasting equipment can be improved by using a robot enabling the operators to remotely treat components from the outer operator's positions. There they will benefit from better radiation protection thus further reduce their taken dose. The wet blasting equipment could also be used to better control the levels of

  11. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of multi-component wastes. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials

  12. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M. [Delphi Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of multi-component wastes. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials.

  13. Transmission studies involving a wet fowl pox isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleazer, T H; Harrell, J S; Blalock, H G

    1983-01-01

    An isolate of fowl pox (FP) virus from a case of "wet" pox in commercial white leghorn (WL) pullets was used to expose WL cockerels via the comb-scratch (CS), eye-drop (ED), or laryngeal-swab (LS) route. Seven days postinoculation (PI), the groups challenged via CS had scabby proliferative pox lesions at the challenge site, the groups challenged via LS had slight dyspnea and rales, and 20% of the cockerels challenged via ED had mild conjunctivitis and lacrimation. By termination of the trial on day 21 PI, the CS-challenged groups had developed pronounced pox lesions. The LS-challenged groups showed severe dyspnea and rales with pronounced raised plaque-like lesions at the opening to the trachea and extending into the upper quarter of the trachea with heavy yellowish caseous exudate partly occluding the glottis. The ED-challenged groups had severe lacrimation and conjunctivitis and small pox lesions on the face, comb, and wattles; 12 of 18 had proliferative lesions on the oral mucosa in the area of the larynx. Forty-five percent of the LS-challenged groups died of suffocation. Pox virus was re-isolated from tissues in all treatment groups. Wet pox transmission appears to be possible via the LS and ED routes.

  14. Studies of the neutron spin structure at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsch, W.

    2003-01-01

    The polarized 3 He program of Hall A at Jefferson Lab will be described. Results on the generalized Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn integral for the neutron in a Q 2 range between 0.02 GeV 2 /c 2 2 2 /c 2 will be presented. Preliminary results of the virtual photon asymmetry A 1 n (x,Q 2 ) and the spin structure function g 2 n (x,Q 2 ) at large values of Bjorken x and low Q 2 , respectively, will be discussed. (orig.)

  15. Flexible HVAC System for Lab or Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedan, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses an effort to design a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system flexible enough to accommodate an easy conversion of classrooms to laboratories and dry labs to wet labs. The design's energy efficiency and operations and maintenance are examined. (GR)

  16. Study of 0+ States at iThemba Labs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.; Papka, P.; Sharpey-Shafer, J. F.; Vymers, P.; Bvumbi, S. P.; Bucher, T. D.; Dinoko, T. S.; Easton, J. L.; Herbert, M. S.; Kheswa, B. V.; Khumalo, N.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Majola, S. N. T.; Ndayishimye, J.; Negi, D.; Noncolela, S. P.; Orce, J. N.; Shirinda, O.; Sithole, P.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Wiedeking, M.

    2013-01-01

    An initial series of experiments utilising the ( 3 He,n) reactions have been carried out at iThemba Labs. These are complimentary to transfer reactions such as (t,p) stripping or (p,t) pick-up reactions measurements using magnetic spectrometers. However, in the past, ( 3 He,n) measurements have suffered from ambiguities due to the low energy resolution in-built into the time-of-flight techniques used. By combining neutron detection techniques with the AFRODITE γ-ray array, it has been shown that very good energy resolutions can be achieved. This enables the relative strengths of two proton stripping to excited states, separated by only a few keV, to be accurately measured. This technique has been applied to first excited 0 2 + states and, in particular to those uniquely seen in double β-decay. (authors)

  17. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering Studies at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatie, F.

    2010-11-01

    This document describes the early experimental effort at Jefferson Lab to unravel the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD), using the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process. The GPDs contain the usual form factors and parton distribution functions, but in addition, they include correlations between states of different longitudinal and transverse momenta. They therefore give access to a three-dimensional picture of the nucleon. DVCS is the cleanest process allowing to extract GPDs, and as early as 2000, a number of experiments were proposed for this purpose. The results of the first exploratory experiments are presented as well as the first measurements of linear combinations of GPDs. In addition, a thorough discussion on the insights gained from these early experiments is proposed, linked with the theoretical tools used to extract GPDs from DVCS data. Finally, improvements on what was done for this first experimental phase are proposed and discussed, and new proposals and measurements are described. (author)

  18. Designer-Wet Micromodels for Studying Potential Changes in Wettability during Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R. T.; Wildenschild, D.

    2010-12-01

    Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) is a process where microorganisms are used for tertiary recovery of oil. Some bacteria can facilitate the mobilization of oil through the production of amphiphilic compounds called biosurfactants that reduce the interfacial tension (IFT) between immiscible phases. Additionally, most bacteria have an inclination to colonize surfaces and form biofilm, which can change a reservoir's wetting properties or clog preferential flow paths. Herein, we aim to understand changes in wettability during MEOR under mixed wettability conditions within silicon etched micromodels and to identify the type of oil field (i.e. based on wettability) in which MEOR is likely to be most profitable. To quantify porous media wettability, macro-scale indexes (obtained with techniques such as the Carter or Amott methods) are used regularly. However, these measurements lack the capability for characterization of changes in wettability during MEOR treatment, and only provide macro-scale information. In an effort to understand micro-scale temporal and spatial changes in wettability we measure interfacial curvature from stereo microscope images using level set methods. Curvature, from the perspective of the oil phase, is positive for a concave interface (i.e. water-wet surface) and negative for a convex interface (i.e. oil-wet surface). Thus, shifts in the radius of curvature distribution (i.e. from positive to negative or conversely) are indicative of wettability changes. Both curvature distributions using level-set methods and the Carter method are used to characterize wettability before and after microbial treatment. In preliminary studies aimed at understanding wettability changes due to microbial surface interactions by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2, oil droplets were placed on glass slides suspended in growth media and the resulting contact angle was measured over time. Results showed that a water-wet surface will become more water wet as JF-2 accumulated in

  19. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    DETOX SM is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit

  20. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests

  1. A Mechanistic Study of Wetting Superhydrophobic Porous 3D Meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohe, Stefan T.; Freedman, Jonathan D.; Falde, Eric J.; Colson, Yolonda L.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Superhydrophobic, porous, 3D materials composed of poly( ε -caprolactone) (PCL) and the hydrophobic polymer dopant poly(glycerol monostearate-co- ε -caprolactone) (PGC-C18) are fabricated using the electrospinning technique. These 3D materials are distinct from 2D superhydrophobic surfaces, with maintenance of air at the surface as well as within the bulk of the material. These superhydrophobic materials float in water, and when held underwater and pressed, an air bubble is released and will rise to the surface. By changing the PGC-C18 doping concentration in the meshes and/or the fiber size from the micro- to nanoscale, the long-term stability of the entrapped air layer is controlled. The rate of water infiltration into the meshes, and the resulting displacement of the entrapped air, is quantitatively measured using X-ray computed tomography. The properties of the meshes are further probed using surfactants and solvents of different surface tensions. Finally, the application of hydraulic pressure is used to quantify the breakthrough pressure to wet the meshes. The tools for fabrication and analysis of these superhydrophobic materials as well as the ability to control the robustness of the entrapped air layer are highly desirable for a number of existing and emerging applications. PMID:25309305

  2. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: a sensor array for chemical analysis of the Martian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounaves, Samuel P.; Lukow, Stefan R.; Comeau, Brian P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Grannan-Feldman, Sabrina M.; Manatt, Ken; West, Steven J.; Wen, Xiaowen; Frant, Martin; Gillette, Tim

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified for the now canceled MSP (Mars Surveyor Program) '01 Lander. The MECA package consisted of a microscope, electrometer, material patch plates, and a wet chemistry laboratory (WCL). The primary goal of MECA was to analyze the Martian soil (regolith) for possible hazards to future astronauts and to provide a better understanding of Martian regolith geochemistry. The purpose of the WCL was to analyze for a range of soluble ionic chemical species and electrochemical parameters. The heart of the WCL was a sensor array of electrochemically based ion-selective electrodes (ISE). After 20 months storage at -23 degrees C and subsequent extended freeze/thawing cycles, WCL sensors were evaluated to determine both their physical durability and analytical responses. A fractional factorial calibration of the sensors was used to obtain slope, intercept, and all necessary selectivity coefficients simultaneously for selected ISEs. This calibration was used to model five cation and three anion sensors. These data were subsequently used to determine concentrations of several ions in two soil leachate simulants (based on terrestrial seawater and hypothesized Mars brine) and four actual soil samples. The WCL results were compared to simulant and soil samples using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that flight qualification and prolonged low-temperature storage conditions had minimal effects on the sensors. In addition, the analytical optimization method provided quantitative and qualitative data that could be used to accurately identify the chemical composition of the simulants and soils. The WCL has the ability to provide data that can be used to "read" the chemical, geological, and climatic history of Mars, as well as the potential habitability of its regolith.

  3. NASA GeneLab Project: Bridging Space Radiation Omics with Ground Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Afshin; Miller, Jack; Kidane, Yared; Berrios, Daniel; Gebre, Samrawit G; Costes, Sylvain V

    2018-04-13

    Accurate assessment of risks of long-term space missions is critical for human space exploration. It is essential to have a detailed understanding of the biological effects on humans living and working in deep space. Ionizing radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a major health risk factor for astronauts on extended missions outside the protective effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently, there are gaps in our knowledge of the health risks associated with chronic low-dose, low-dose-rate ionizing radiation, specifically ions associated with high (H) atomic number (Z) and energy (E). The NASA GeneLab project ( https://genelab.nasa.gov/ ) aims to provide a detailed library of omics datasets associated with biological samples exposed to HZE. The GeneLab Data System (GLDS) includes datasets from both spaceflight and ground-based studies, a majority of which involve exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition to detailed information on radiation exposure for ground-based studies, GeneLab is adding detailed, curated dosimetry information for spaceflight experiments. GeneLab is the first comprehensive omics database for space-related research from which an investigator can generate hypotheses to direct future experiments, utilizing both ground and space biological radiation data. The GLDS is continually expanding as omics-related data are generated by the space life sciences community. Here we provide a brief summary of the space radiation-related data available at GeneLab.

  4. Exploratory study of the acceptance of two individual practical classes with remote labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado-Morueta, Ramón; Sánchez-Herrera, Reyes; Márquez-Sánchez, Marco A.; Mejías-Borrero, Andrés; Andujar-Márquez, José Manuel

    2018-03-01

    Remote lab experiences are proliferating in higher education, although there are still few studies that manage to build a theoretical framework for educational assessment and design of this technology. In order to explore to what extent the use of facilitators of proximity to the laboratory and the autonomy of the experiment makes remote laboratories a technology accepted by students, two remote labs different yet similar educational conditions in laboratories are used. A sample of 98 undergraduate students from a degree course in Energy Engineering was used for this study; 57 of these students ran experiments in a laboratory of electrical machines and 41 in a photovoltaic systems laboratory. The data suggest using conditions that facilitate the proximity of the laboratory and the autonomy in the realisation of the experiment; in both laboratories the experience was positively valued by the students. Also, data suggest that the types of laboratory and experiment have influences on usability - autonomy and lab proximity - perceived by students.

  5. Vision Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Vision Lab personnel perform research, development, testing and evaluation of eye protection and vision performance. The lab maintains and continues to develop...

  6. Comparative study of heat transfer and wetting behaviour of conventional and bioquenchants for industrial heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Peter; Prabhu, K. Narayan [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, P.O. Srinivasnagar 575 025 Mangalore, Karnataka State (India)

    2008-02-15

    An investigation was conducted to study the suitability of vegetable oils as bioquenchants for industrial heat treatment. The study involved the assessment of the severity of quenching and wetting behaviour of conventional and vegetable oil quench media. Quench severities of sunflower, coconut and palm oils were found to be greater than mineral oil. The quench severity of aqueous media is greater than oil media although their wettability is poor as indicated by their higher contact angles. A dimensionless contact angle parameter defined in this work is found to be a better parameter to compare the wetting behaviour with heat transfer. (author)

  7. Recirculating Beam Breakup Study for the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ilkyoung; Satogata, Todd; Ahmed, Shahid; Bogacz, Slawomir; Stirbet, Mircea; Wang, Haipeng; Wang, Yan; Yunn, Byung; Bodenstein, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Two new high gradient C100 cryomodules with a total of 16 new cavities were installed at the end of the CEBAF south linac during the 2011 summer shutdown as part of the 12-GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab. We surveyed the higher order modes (HOMs) of these cavities in the Jefferson Lab cryomodule test facility and CEBAF tunnel. We then studied recirculating beam breakup (BBU) in November 2011 to evaluate CEBAF low energy performance, measure transport optics, and evaluate BBU thresholds due to these HOMs. This paper discusses the experiment setup, cavity measurements, machine setup, optics measurements, and lower bounds on BBU thresholds by new cryomodules.

  8. Recirculating Beam Breakup Study for the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkyoung Shin, Todd Satogata, Shahid Ahmed, Slawomir Bogacz, Mircea Stirbet, Haipeng Wang, Yan Wang, Byung Yunn, Ryan Bodenstein

    2012-07-01

    Two new high gradient C100 cryomodules with a total of 16 new cavities were installed at the end of the CEBAF south linac during the 2011 summer shutdown as part of the 12-GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab. We surveyed the higher order modes (HOMs) of these cavities in the Jefferson Lab cryomodule test facility and CEBAF tunnel. We then studied recirculating beam breakup (BBU) in November 2011 to evaluate CEBAF low energy performance, measure transport optics, and evaluate BBU thresholds due to these HOMs. This paper discusses the experiment setup, cavity measurements, machine setup, optics measurements, and lower bounds on BBU thresholds by new cryomodules.

  9. Study progress of CCR3 in wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Wei Wu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the study, chemokine receptor 3(CCR3in the eye is mainly distributed in retinal pigment epithelial cells, and also expressed in the choroidal vascular endothelial cells(CECs. The specificity of CCR3's high expression in wet age-related macular degeneration(AMDwas found, and it is proved that in wet-AMD patients, it plays an important role in the formation of choroidal neovascularization(CNV. In this paper, the structure, function, the problem of current research and the future direction of CCR3 were summarized. It is believed that with the further research on CCR3, it will not only help us to find a new method of wet-AMD diagnosis and treatment, but also may provide an important reference for other CNV disease research and new anti-CNV drugs.

  10. Study of Transitions between Wetting States on Microcavity Arrays by Optical Transmission Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Emil; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard; Smistrup, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a simple and fast optical method based on transmission microscopy to study the stochastic wetting transitions on micro- and nanostructured polymer surfaces immersed in water. We analyze the influence of immersion time and the liquid pressure on the degree of water......-Laplace equation for the water menisci in the cavities and the diffusion of dissolved gas molecules in the water. In addition, the wetting transitions had a stochastic nature, which resulted from the short diffusion distance for dissolved gas molecules in the water between neighboring cavities. Furthermore, we...... compared the contact angle properties of two polymeric materials (COC and PP) with moderate hydrophobicity. We attributed the difference in the water repellency of the two materials to a difference in the wetting of their nanostructures. Our experimental observations thus indicate that both the diffusion...

  11. Study of wet incineration of organic matters under ultrasounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey-Gaurez, F.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potentiality of power ultrasound for minimizing the volumes of solid waste and effluents generated by the spent nuclear fuel refining industry. In the first part, the advantages of power ultrasound for the decontamination of ion exchange resins (IER) is demonstrated: 1) sonication allows to remove 100 % of the 137 Cs and more than 20 % of the 60 Co initially present in the contaminated resins, 2) the decontamination is fast, 3) very simple experimental conditions are necessary (water, air or argon as saturating gas and weak electric intensity). The study of different chemical and sono-chemical parameters shows that decontamination seems to be related to the effects induced by cavitation: micro-streaming and solid erosion or disruption. In the second part, the selectivity of power ultrasound for the elimination of nitrogen (nitrate, nitro) aliphatic derivatives diluted in the PUREX process solvent is established. The nitrogen derivatives of butane or dodecane are removed under sonication while the solvent is scarcely damaged. The nitrogen derivatives of butane are quickly eliminated according to a thermal way in the cavitation bubble. A great number of kinetic data have been obtained and the influence of different parameters has been studied. The mechanisms are complex and initiated mainly by the homolytic cleavage of the O-N bond of butyl nitrate or nitrite and the C-N bond of nitrobutane. The elimination of nitrogen derivatives of dodecane is slower than the four-carbon component one. This preliminary kinetic study was difficult as the kinetic order was undetermined and a steady state concentration was reached after a short time of sonication. Unlike the four-carbon derivatives, the decomposition rate was not controlled by the boiling point of the long-chain derivatives. Nevertheless, good carbon balance (dodecane is the major product) has been obtained and led to potential mechanisms. (author) [fr

  12. Value added or misattributed? A multi-institution study on the educational benefit of labs for reinforcing physics content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, N. G.; Olsen, Jack; Thomas, James L.; Wieman, Carl E.

    2017-06-01

    Instructional labs are widely seen as a unique, albeit expensive, way to teach scientific content. We measured the effectiveness of introductory lab courses at achieving this educational goal across nine different lab courses at three very different institutions. These institutions and courses encompassed a broad range of student populations and instructional styles. The nine courses studied had two key things in common: the labs aimed to reinforce the content presented in lectures, and the labs were optional. By comparing the performance of students who did and did not take the labs (with careful normalization for selection effects), we found universally and precisely no added value to learning course content from taking the labs as measured by course exam performance. This work should motivate institutions and departments to reexamine the goals and conduct of their lab courses, given their resource-intensive nature. We show why these results make sense when looking at the comparative mental processes of students involved in research and instructional labs, and offer alternative goals and instructional approaches that would make lab courses more educationally valuable.

  13. Studying the Binomial Distribution Using LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Danielle J.; Hammer, Nathan I.

    2015-01-01

    This undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory exercise introduces students to the study of probability distributions both experimentally and using computer simulations. Students perform the classic coin toss experiment individually and then pool all of their data together to study the effect of experimental sample size on the binomial…

  14. Discrete element simulation studies of angles of repose and shear flow of wet, flexible fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y; Wassgren, C; Ketterhagen, W; Hancock, B; Curtis, J

    2018-04-18

    A discrete element method (DEM) model is developed to simulate the dynamics of wet, flexible fibers. The angles of repose of dry and wet fibers are simulated, and the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental results, validating the wet, flexible fiber model. To study wet fiber flow behavior, the model is used to simulate shear flows of wet fibers in a periodic domain under Lees-Edwards boundary conditions. Significant agglomeration is observed in dilute shear flows of wet fibers. The size of the largest agglomerate in the flow is found to depend on a Bond number, which is proportional to liquid surface tension and inversely proportional to the square of the shear strain rate. This Bond number reflects the relative importance of the liquid-bridge force to the particle's inertial force, with a larger Bond number leading to a larger agglomerate. As the fiber aspect ratio (AR) increases, the size of the largest agglomerate increases, while the coordination number in the largest agglomerate initially decreases and then increases when the AR is greater than four. A larger agglomerate with a larger coordination number is more likely to form for more flexible fibers with a smaller bond elastic modulus due to better connectivity between the more flexible fibers. Liquid viscous force resists pulling of liquid bridges and separation of contacting fibers, and therefore it facilitates larger agglomerate formation. The effect of liquid viscous force is more significant at larger shear strain rates. The solid-phase shear stress is increased due to the presence of liquid bridges in moderately dense flows. As the solid volume fraction increases, the effect of fiber-fiber friction coefficient increases sharply. When the solid volume fraction approaches the maximum packing density, the fiber-fiber friction coefficient can be a more dominant factor than the liquid bridge force in determining the solid-phase shear stress.

  15. Exploratory Study of the Acceptance of Two Individual Practical Classes with Remote Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado-Morueta, Ramón; Sánchez-Herrera, Reyes; Márquez-Sánchez, Marco A.; Mejías-Borrero, Andrés; Andujar-Márquez, José Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Remote lab experiences are proliferating in higher education, although there are still few studies that manage to build a theoretical framework for educational assessment and design of this technology. In order to explore to what extent the use of facilitators of proximity to the laboratory and the autonomy of the experiment makes remote…

  16. Experimental and numerical study of MILD combustion in a lab-scale furnace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, X.; Tummers, M.J.; Roekaerts, D.J.E.M.; Scherer, Viktor; Fricker, Neil; Reis, Albino

    2017-01-01

    Mild combustion in a lab-scale furnace has been experimentally and numerically studied. The furnace was operated with Dutch natural gas (DNG) at 10 kW and at an equivalence ratio of 0.8. OH∗chemiluminescence images were taken to characterize the reaction zone. The chemiluminescence intensity is

  17. Visibility of road markings on wet road surfaces : a literature study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The English version of B 14153 is presented. Road markings, notably lane markers, are often only poorly visible when the road is wet. This is particularly a problem at night on unlit roads. A study is made of whether a solution for this problem can be found on the basis of the known, published

  18. NASA GeneLab Project: Bridging Space Radiation Omics with Ground Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Afshin; Miller, Jack; Kidane, Yared H.; Berrios, Daniel; Gebre, Samrawit G.; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2018-01-01

    Accurate assessment of risk factors for long-term space missions is critical for human space exploration: therefore it is essential to have a detailed understanding of the biological effects on humans living and working in deep space. Ionizing radiation from Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) is one of the major risk factors factor that will impact health of astronauts on extended missions outside the protective effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently there are gaps in our knowledge of the health risks associated with chronic low dose, low dose rate ionizing radiation, specifically ions associated with high (H) atomic number (Z) and energy (E). The GeneLab project (genelab.nasa.gov) aims to provide a detailed library of Omics datasets associated with biological samples exposed to HZE. The GeneLab Data System (GLDS) currently includes datasets from both spaceflight and ground-based studies, a majority of which involve exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition to detailed information for ground-based studies, we are in the process of adding detailed, curated dosimetry information for spaceflight missions. GeneLab is the first comprehensive Omics database for space related research from which an investigator can generate hypotheses to direct future experiments utilizing both ground and space biological radiation data. In addition to previously acquired data, the GLDS is continually expanding as Omics related data are generated by the space life sciences community. Here we provide a brief summary of space radiation related data available at GeneLab.

  19. Comparative study of the antioxidant and immunomodulant activities between yeast and lab fermented papaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Caliceti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dietary supplements of Carica papaya Linn fermented with yeast using a biotechnological process have well recognized positive effects on immunological, hematological, inflammatory, and oxidative stress parameters, utilized as biomarkers of chronic and degenerative diseases. Although many natural products fermented with lactic acid bacteria (LAB have shown beneficial effects on the immune system and on antioxidant defenses, formulations of papaya fermented with LAB have not yet been studied. Aims: The aims of this study were to investigate the immunomodulatory activity linked to the type of papaya fermentation (yeast vs LAB in macrophages and to evaluate whether the type of fermentation differently modulates oxidative stress both in cell free system and in a model of embryonic brain cells. Methods: Cytotoxicity was evaluated through cell proliferation kinetic and lactate dehydrogenase release assays; immunomodulatory activity through the transcriptional activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα by qRT-PCR in RAW 264.7 macrophages; antioxidant capacity was assessed, in cell free system and in pheochromocytoma cells embryonic brain cells, by measuring the intracellular ROS levels through a fluorescent dye. Results: Our data showed that all the formulations studied are safe at low concentrations (3-6 mg/ml; the LAB- fermented formulations promoted the expression of iNOS and TNFα more efficiently than yeast-fermented papaya preparation (p <0.001. In a cell free system, the LAB-fermented formulation acted as mild scavengers of ROS while, in cells, both formulations didn’t show any significant effect. Conclusions: This study corroborates previous reports showing the efficacy of yeast fermented papaya as a potent immunostimulant and highlights the beneficial contribution of lactic bacteria fermentation.

  20. Study on road sign recognition in LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoiu, M.; Rat, C. L.; Panoiu, C.

    2016-02-01

    Road and traffic sign identification is a field of study that can be used to aid the development of in-car advisory systems. It uses computer vision and artificial intelligence to extract the road signs from outdoor images acquired by a camera in uncontrolled lighting conditions where they may be occluded by other objects, or may suffer from problems such as color fading, disorientation, variations in shape and size, etc. An automatic means of identifying traffic signs, in these conditions, can make a significant contribution to develop an Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) that continuously monitors the driver, the vehicle, and the road. Road and traffic signs are characterized by a number of features which make them recognizable from the environment. Road signs are located in standard positions and have standard shapes, standard colors, and known pictograms. These characteristics make them suitable for image identification. Traffic sign identification covers two problems: traffic sign detection and traffic sign recognition. Traffic sign detection is meant for the accurate localization of traffic signs in the image space, while traffic sign recognition handles the labeling of such detections into specific traffic sign types or subcategories [1].

  1. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2011-01-01

    The sensation of wetness is well-known but barely investigated. There are no specific wetness receptors in the skin, but the sensation is mediated by temperature and pressure perception. In our study, we have measured discrimination thresholds for the haptic perception of wetness of three di erent

  2. Implementation of a Research-Based Lab Module in a High School Chemistry Curriculum: A Study of Classroom Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarz, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    For this study, a research-based lab module was implemented in two high school chemistry classes for the purpose of examining classroom dynamics throughout the process of students completing the module. A research-based lab module developed for use in undergraduate laboratories by the Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE) was…

  3. Wood Decomposition of Cyrilla racemiflora (Cyrillaceae) in Puerto Rican Dry and Wet Forests: A 13-year Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan A. Torres; Grizelle Gonzalez

    2005-01-01

    We studied the decomposition of Cyrilla racemiflora logs over a 13-yr period in tropical dry and wet forests in Puerto Rico. The mean mass loss, ratio of soft to hard wood, nutrient concentrations, and the diversity of wood-inhabiting organisms were greater in logs decomposing in the dry forest than in the wet forest. Termites were also more abundant in the logs...

  4. MarkoLAB: A simulator to study ionic channel's stochastic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Robson Rodrigues; Goroso, Daniel Gustavo; Bers, Donald M; Puglisi, José Luis

    2017-08-01

    Mathematical models of the cardiac cell have started to include markovian representations of the ionic channels instead of the traditional Hodgkin & Huxley formulations. There are many reasons for this: Markov models are not restricted to the idea of independent gates defining the channel, they allow more complex description with specific transitions between open, closed or inactivated states, and more importantly those states can be closely related to the underlying channel structure and conformational changes. We used the LabVIEW ® and MATLAB ® programs to implement the simulator MarkoLAB that allow a dynamical 3D representation of the markovian model of the channel. The Monte Carlo simulation was used to implement the stochastic transitions among states. The user can specify the voltage protocol by setting the holding potential, the step-to voltage and the duration of the stimuli. The most studied feature of a channel is the current flowing through it. This happens when the channel stays in the open state, but most of the time, as revealed by the low open probability values, the channel remains on the inactive or closed states. By focusing only when the channel enters or leaves the open state we are missing most of its activity. MarkoLAB proved to be quite useful to visualize the whole behavior of the channel and not only when the channel produces a current. Such dynamic representation provides more complete information about channel kinetics and will be a powerful tool to demonstrate the effect of gene mutations or drugs on the channel function. MarkoLAB provides an original way of visualizing the stochastic behavior of a channel. It clarifies concepts, such as recovery from inactivation, calcium- versus voltage-dependent inactivation, and tail currents. It is not restricted to ionic channels only but it can be extended to other transporters, such as exchangers and pumps. This program is intended as a didactical tool to illustrate the dynamical behavior of a

  5. Monitoring soil wetness variations by means of satellite passive microwave observations: the HYDROPTIMET study cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lacava

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture is an important component of the hydrological cycle. In the framework of modern flood warning systems, the knowledge of soil moisture is crucial, due to the influence on the soil response in terms of infiltration-runoff. Precipitation-runoff processes, in fact, are related to catchment's hydrological conditions before the precipitation. Thus, an estimation of these conditions is of significant importance to improve the reliability of flood warning systems. Combining such information with other weather-related satellite products (i.e. rain rate estimation might represent a useful exercise in order to improve our capability to handle (and possibly mitigate or prevent hydro-geological hazards. Remote sensing, in the last few years, has supported several techniques for soil moisture/wetness monitoring. Most of the satellite-based techniques use microwave data, thanks to the all-weather and all-time capability of these data, as well as to their high sensitivity to water content in the soil. On the other hand, microwave data are unfortunately highly affected by the presence of surface roughness or vegetation coverage within the instantaneous satellite field of view (IFOV. Those problems, consequently, strongly limit the efficiency and the reliability of traditional satellite techniques. Recently, using data coming from AMSU (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit, flying aboard NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites, a new methodology for soil wetness estimation has been proposed. The proposed index, called Soil Wetness Variation Index (SWVI, developed by a multi-temporal analysis of AMSU records, seems able to reduce the problems related to vegetation and/or roughness effects. Such an approach has been tested, with promising results, on the analysis of some flooding events which occurred in Europe in the past. In this study, results achieved for the HYDROPTIMET test cases will be analysed and discussed in detail

  6. The effect of traditional wet cupping on shoulder pain and neck pain: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Müzeyyen; Gökgöz, Nurcan; Dane, Şenol

    2016-05-01

    Wet cupping therapy (WCT) is a traditional complementary method recommended to decrease the symptoms of a lot of diseases and used in the treatment of pain syndromes. In this pilot study, the possible effects of wet cupping therapy on nonspecific neck and upper shoulder pain were investigated. Sixty one eligible volunteer participants with nonspecific neck and upper shoulder pain for at least 3 months were allocated. The Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) was used to assess pain scores. Pain scores were recorded before and after wet cupping therapy. The mean scores of neck pain in study group were 7.02 (SD = 1.8) before and 3.70 (SD = 2.2) after cupping therapy. The decrease of pain scores between pre- and post-test was statistically significant (p < 0.05). It can be stated that WCT has potential therapeutic effect in nonspecific neck and upper shoulder pain. Future full-scale randomized controlled trials will be needed to provide firm evidence of the effectiveness of this intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A new approach to standardize multicenter studies: mobile lab technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Lermen

    Full Text Available Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120-150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab in the project "Labor der Zukunft" (future's lab technology. This laboratory includes a 14.7 m(2 reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m(2 examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m(2 biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m(2 personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for

  8. A new approach to standardize multicenter studies: mobile lab technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lermen, Dominik; Schmitt, Daniel; Bartel-Steinbach, Martina; Schröter-Kermani, Christa; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; von Briesen, Hagen; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120-150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab) in the project "Labor der Zukunft" (future's lab technology). This laboratory includes a 14.7 m(2) reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m(2) examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m(2) biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m(2) personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL) 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for retrospective

  9. Estimation of Geographically Weighted Regression Case Study on Wet Land Paddy Productivities in Tulungagung Regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danang Ariyanto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Regression is a method connected independent variable and dependent variable with estimation parameter as an output. Principal problem in this method is its application in spatial data. Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR method used to solve the problem. GWR  is a regression technique that extends the traditional regression framework by allowing the estimation of local rather than global parameters. In other words, GWR runs a regression for each location, instead of a sole regression for the entire study area. The purpose of this research is to analyze the factors influencing wet land paddy productivities in Tulungagung Regency. The methods used in this research is  GWR using cross validation  bandwidth and weighted by adaptive Gaussian kernel fungtion.This research using  4 variables which are presumed affecting the wet land paddy productivities such as:  the rate of rainfall(X1, the average cost of fertilizer per hectare(X2, the average cost of pestisides per hectare(X3 and Allocation of subsidized NPK fertilizer of food crops sub-sector(X4. Based on the result, X1, X2, X3 and X4  has a different effect on each Distric. So, to improve the productivity of wet land paddy in Tulungagung Regency required a special policy based on the GWR model in each distric.

  10. Structural Modification of Cobalt Catalysts: Effect of Wetting Studied by X-Ray and Infrared Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodakov A.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of wetting on the structure and localisation of cobalt species on various supports (Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, HZSM-5 zeolite was studied using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with CO as a molecular probe, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. Aqueous impregnation to incipient wetness of reduced and passivated cobalt catalysts results, even in the absence of any promoter, in a considerable decrease in the concentration of Co crystalline phases and modifies the surface sites. The decrease in the concentration of Co3O4 crystallites was especially pronounced on silica supported catalysts prepared via impregnation of cobalt and on a mixture of Co3O4 and HZSM-5 zeolite. Saturation with water of the passivated Co/SiO2 sample results in an amorphous solid with a local structure close to that of Co2SiO4. For Co/Al2O3 and Co/TiO2 catalysts, the effect of wetting on the concentration of Co3O4 crystalline phase was considerably smaller.

  11. Studies on the wetting properties of plate surfaces used in pulsed extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai Derong; Yang Xin; Wang Xinchang

    1991-01-01

    Many factors influence the hydrodynamic characteristics of pulsed column. Of all the factors the surface effect at liquid-liquid interfaces and liquid-solid boundaries may be the most influential factor to the state of droplets. In order to get some understanding of the behaviour of droplets in a pulsed column, the time history of wetting properties of plates under different conditions in 30% TBP (Kerosene) -HNO 3 -UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 -H 2 O systems was studied. The results show that the hydrophilic wetting behaviour of the plates changes into the hydrophobic and neutral conditions, respectively after they have been exposed to air and put in the 'open system' within about 50 days after contacting with process solutions. For the case where the access of air is prohibited at the upper organic phase boundary by a well fitting cover, or supersonic pulse cleaning is used to the cartridge, the behaviour of the metal surface stays in the original good hydrophilic wetting condition constant with time. The uranium charged liquid systems can conserve hydrophilic behaviour better than the non-charged systems under identical conditions. It is also found that the interfacial tension is unvaried with time for saturated process systems, hence it has no effects on the variation of wettability

  12. Study on wetting properties of periodical nanopatterns by a combinative technique of photolithography and laser interference lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yung-Lang; Hsu, Chin-Chi; Chang, Tien-Li; Kuo, Long-Sheng; Chen, Ping-Hei

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the wetting properties, including hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and anisotropic behavior, of water droplets on the silicon wafer surface with periodical nanopatterns and hierarchical structures. This study fabricates one

  13. Spectroscopic Study of L Hypernuclei with Electron Beams at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Satoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Gogami, Toshiyuki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Tang, Liguang [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The missing mass spectroscopy of L hypernuclei with the (e, e'K^+) reaction was started from 2000 at Jefferson Lab. In this fifteen years, various hypernuclei (A = 7 - 52) including hyperon (L, S^0) productions have been studied with newly developed experimental techniques. The (e, e'K^+) reaction spectroscopy of L hypernuclei features its capability of absolute missing mass calibration and production of new species of hypernuclei which are the isospin partners of well studied hypernuclei by (K^-, pi-) and (pi^+, K^+) reactions. In this paper, we will review how we established the (e, e'K^+) spectroscopic study of hypernuclei.

  14. Outreach Science Education: Evidence-Based Studies in a Gene Technology Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, outreach labs are important informal learning environments in science education. After summarizing research to goals outreach labs focus on, we describe our evidence-based gene technology lab as a model of a research-driven outreach program. Evaluation-based optimizations of hands-on teaching based on cognitive load theory (additional…

  15. Wetting of Liquid Iron in Carbon Nanotubes and on Graphene Sheets: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yu-Feng; Yang Yang; Sun De-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the wetting of liquid iron in a carbon nanotube and on a graphene sheet. It is found that the contact angle of a droplet in a carbon nanotube increases linearly with the increase of wall curvature but is independent of the length of the filled liquid. The contact angle for a droplet on a graphene sheet decreases with the increasing droplet size. The line tension of a droplet on a graphene sheet is also obtained. Detailed studies show that liquid iron near the carbon walls exhibits the ordering tendencies in both the normal and tangential directions. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  16. Altitude Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Altitude Lab evaluates the performance of complete oxygen systems operated in individually controlled hypobaric chambers, which duplicate pressures that would be...

  17. A Data Mining Approach to Study the Impact of the Methodology Followed in Chemistry Lab Classes on the Weight Attributed by the Students to the Lab Work on Learning and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, M.; Esteves, L.; Neves, J.; Vicente, H.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the use of data mining tools in order to examine the influence of the methodology used in chemistry lab classes, on the weight attributed by the students to the lab work on learning and own motivation. The answer frequency analysis was unable to discriminate the opinions expressed by the respondents according to the type of the…

  18. Wetting kinetics of water nano-droplet containing non-surfactant nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Gui; Hu, Han; Sun, Ying; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter, dynamic wetting of water nano-droplets containing non-surfactant gold nanoparticles on a gold substrate is examined via molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the addition of non-surfactant nanoparticles hinders the nano-second droplet wetting process, attributed to the increases in both surface tension of the nanofluid and friction between nanofluid and substrate. The droplet wetting kinetics decreases with increasing nanoparticle loading and water-particle interaction energy. The observed wetting suppression and the absence of nanoparticle ordering near the contact line of nano-sized droplets differ from the wetting behaviors reported from nanofluid droplets of micron size or larger

  19. Moessbauer study of Mn-Zn and Mn ferrites prepared by wet method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalk, C.

    1985-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was employed to study Mn-Zn ferrites before and after low-temperature annealing. The unannealed Mn-Zn ferrite prepared by a wet method and also the sintered material after annealing at 400 deg C in air show the presence of paramagnetic clusters. These findings are explained as being due to nonrandom ordering of Fe 3+ and Zn 2+ ions caused by local charge compensation in the neighbourhood of cation vacancies. A change of cation distribution after annealing at relatively low temperatures was observed. 10 refs., 3 figs. (author)

  20. Leaf surface wetness and evaporation studies with a β-ray gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthakur, N.N.

    1984-01-01

    Surface wetness duration was measured by a β-ray gauge as a function of wind velocity in the laboratory. The instrument was field-tested as a dewmeter over a wax bean canopy. Diurnal variations of the net count rate through a turgid tobacco leaf measured by a β-ray gauge system corresponded with the stomatal movement. The approximate exponential relationship of the transmission of β-particles with absorber thickness was found acceptable to study rates of evaporation from free water and through pores. The cumulative rate of evaporation of free water varied linearly with time. Three distinct stages of evaporation rates were observed through a porous medium. (author)

  1. Semitechnical studies of uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid by liquid-liquid-extraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poczynajlo, A.; Wlodarski, R.; Giers, M.

    1987-01-01

    A semitechnical installation for uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid has been built. The installation is based on technological process comprising 2 extraction cycles, the first with a mixture of mono- and dinonylphenylphosphoric acids (NPPA) and the second with a synergic mixture of di-/2-ethylhexyl/-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). The installation was set going and the studies on the concentration distributions of uranium and other components of phosphoric acid have been performed for all technological circuits. 23 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  2. Wet Gas Airfoil Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Tarjei Thorrud

    2011-01-01

    Subsea wet gas compression renders new possibilities for cost savings and enhanced gas recovery on existing gas wells. Technology like this opens to make traditional offshore processing plants redundant. With new technology, follows new challenges. Multiphase flows is regarded as a complex field of study, and increased knowledge on the fundamental mechanisms regarding wet gas flow is of paramount importance to the efficiency and stability of the wet gas compressor. The scope of this work was ...

  3. Beyond the Usability Lab Conducting Large-scale Online User Experience Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, William; Tullis, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Usability testing and user experience research typically take place in a controlled lab with small groups. While this type of testing is essential to user experience design, more companies are also looking to test large sample sizes to be able compare data according to specific user populations and see how their experiences differ across user groups. But few usability professionals have experience in setting up these studies, analyzing the data, and presenting it in effective ways.  Online usability testing offers the solution by allowing testers to elicit feedback simultaneously from 1,0

  4. PD Lab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilow, Marcel; Entrop, Alexis Gerardus; Lichtenberg, Jos; Stoutjesdijk, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    PD Lab explores the applications of building sector related product development. PD lab investigates and tests digital production technologies like CNC milled wood connections. It will also act as a platform in its wider meaning to investigate the effects and influences of file to factory

  5. Pilot-scale field study for ammonia removal from lagoon biogas using an acid wet scrubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongjian; Wu, Xiao; Miller, Curtis; Zhu, Jun; Hadlocon, Lara Jane; Manuzon, Roderick; Zhao, Lingying

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic activities in swine slurry storage and treatment generate biogas containing gaseous ammonia component which is a chemical agent that can cause adverse environmental impacts when released to the atmosphere. The aim of this pilot plant study was to remove ammonia from biogas generated in a covered lagoon, using a sulfuric acid wet scrubber. The data showed that, on average, the biogas contained 43.7 ppm of ammonia and its concentration was found to be exponentially related to the air temperature inside the lagoon. When the air temperature rose to 35°C and the biogas ammonia concentration reached 90 ppm, the mass transfer of ammonia/ammonium from the deeper liquid body to the interface between the air and liquid became a limiting factor. The biogas velocity was critical in affecting ammonia removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. A biogas flow velocity of 8 to 12 mm s(-1) was recommended to achieve a removal efficiency of greater than 60%. Stepwise regression revealed that the biogas velocity and air temperature, not the inlet ammonia concentration in biogas, affected the ammonia removal efficiency. Overall, when 73 g L(-1) (or 0.75 M) sulfuric acid solution was used as the scrubber solution, removal efficiencies varied from 0% to 100% with an average of 55% over a 40-d measurement period. Mass balance calculation based on ammonium-nitrogen concentration in final scrubber liquid showed that about 21.3 g of ammonia was collected from a total volume of 1169 m(3) of biogas, while the scrubber solution should still maintain its ammonia absorbing ability until its concentration reaches up to 1 M. These results showed promising use of sulfuric acid wet scrubber for ammonia removal in the digester biogas.

  6. A comparative study on performance of CBN inserts when turning steel under dry and wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah Bagaber, Salem; Razlan Yusoff, Ahmad

    2017-10-01

    Cutting fluids is the most unsustainable components of machining processes, it is negatively impacting on the environmental and additional energy required. Due to its high strength and corrosion resistance, the machinability of stainless steel has attracted considerable interest. This study aims to evaluate performance of cubic boron nitride (CBN) inserts for the machining parameters includes the power consumption and surface roughness. Due to the high single cutting-edge cost of CBN, the performance of significant is importance for hard finish turning. The present work also deals with a comparative study on power consumption and surface roughness under dry and flood conditions. Turning process of the stainless steel 316 was performed. A response surface methodology based box-behnken design (BBD) was utilized for statistical analysis. The optimum process parameters are determined as the overall performance index. The comparison study has been done between dry and wet stainless-steel cut in terms of minimum value of energy and surface roughness. The result shows the stainless still can be machined under dry condition with 18.57% improvement of power consumption and acceptable quality compare to the wet cutting. The CBN tools under dry cutting stainless steel can be used to reduce the environment impacts in terms of no cutting fluid use and less energy required which is effected in machining productivity and profit.

  7. Study of the design variables for a wet-chamber gas meter prototype (MGCH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patino, Carlos Hernando; Romero, Luis Said; Quiroga, Jabid

    2004-01-01

    This paper established the most important variables and their correlation that affect design and operation of wet-chamber gas meter (MGCH), focused on the gas pressure difference along the meter and the sealing-liquid level. In order to study variable behavior a simulation was carried out based on computational systems The mathematical model developed was built taking into account common features in present wet test gas meter as their internal configuration. Therefore, this work can be understood as a general analysis and its conclusions can be extended to whichever meter of this type. Software was developed to facilitate the analysis of the variables involved in this physical process; besides the drum sizing was modeling using CAD software. As a result of this investigation, theoretical basis were established for the analyzing and designing of a MGCH meter, as a previous phase to the construction and evaluation of the prototype. Uncertainty analysis of each variable implicates in this model was beyond the scope of this study

  8. Exergy transfer and parametric study of counter flow wet cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Li Nianping

    2011-01-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of the counter flow wet cooling tower (CWCT) is performed in this paper. Both energy and exergy formulations are developed and validated for the system. Four types of exergy transfer processes occurring inside the CWCT are investigated schematically. A parametric study is conducted under various operating conditions in order to investigate the effects of thermal efficiency and water-to-air ratio on the exergy performance of the CWCT. Unlike past studies, the transiting exergy contained in the inlet and outlet water is not considered. It is found that the exergy efficiency is always less than 25%. The exergy parameters including evaporation water loss, exergy efficiency, exergy input, internal and external exergy losses are very sensitive to the thermal efficiency when it is very close to 1.0 at lower water-to-air ratios. - Research highlights: → We model counter flow wet cooling towers and make a detailed exergy analysis. → Four types of exergy transfer processes are investigated schematically. → Only a small part of exergy input, less than 25%, is effectively utilized.

  9. Advanced LabVIEW Labs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Eric D.

    1999-01-01

    In the world of computer-based data acquisition and control, the graphical interface program LabVIEW from National Instruments is so ubiquitous that in many ways it has almost become the laboratory standard. To date, there have been approximately fifteen books concerning LabVIEW, but Professor Essick's treatise takes on a completely different tack than all of the previous discussions. In the more standard treatments of the ways and wherefores of LabVIEW such as LabVIEW Graphical Programming: Practical Applications in Instrumentation and Control by Gary W. Johnson (McGraw Hill, NY 1997), the emphasis has been instructing the reader how to program LabVIEW to create a Virtual Instrument (VI) on the computer for interfacing to a particular instruments. LabVIEW is written in ''G'' a graphical programming language developed by National Instruments. In the past the emphasis has been on training the experimenter to learn ''G''. Without going into details here, ''G'' incorporates the usual loops, arithmetic expressions, etc., found in many programming languages, but in an icon (graphical) environment. The net result being that LabVIEW contains all of the standard methods needed for interfacing to instruments, data acquisition, data analysis, graphics, and also methodology to incorporate programs written in other languages into LabVIEW. Historically, according to Professor Essick, he developed a series of experiments for an upper division laboratory course for computer-based instrumentation. His observation was that while many students had the necessary background in computer programming languages, there were students who had virtually no concept about writing a computer program let alone a computer- based interfacing program. Thus the beginnings of a concept for not only teaching computer- based instrumentation techniques, but aiso a method for the beginner to experience writing a com- puter program. Professor Essick saw LabVIEW as the ''perfect environment in which to

  10. Wetting and layering transitions in a nano-dendrimer PAMAM structure: Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouini, S.; Ziti, S.; Labrim, H.; Bahmad, L.

    2016-10-01

    This study is based on a nano-model of the dendrimer polyamidoamine (PAMAM). The idea is to examine the magnetic properties of such models in the context of wetting and the layering transitions. The studied system consists of spins σ ={1/2} Ising ferromagnetic in real nanostructure found in different scientific domains. To study this system, we perform Monte Carlo simulations leading to interesting results recapitulated in two classes. The former is the ground state phase diagrams study. The latter is the magnetic properties at non null temperatures. Also, we analyzed the effect of the terms present in the Hamiltonian governing our system such as the external magnetic field and the exchange couplings interactions.

  11. Numerical study on over reading coefficient in wet steam flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Xuesong; Yuan Dewen; Yan Xiao; Peng Xingjian

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigated the flow process of wet steam in Venturi under interested conditions with CFD simulation software. The effect of pressure, mass flow rate, throat radius on over reading factor was analyzed. This paper aims to improve the wet steam over reading model and the prediction accuracy in wet steam. The results prove that the mass flow has a small effect on over reading coefficient, while the effect that throat radius has on over reading coefficient increases as the pressure rises. (authors)

  12. A study of the tyre/road interface under wet conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Mosley, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    This work addresses the problem of tyre tread pattern design for optimum wet grip performance. A mathematical model of tyre behaviour on wet roads has been developed. This utilizes the finite element method in the representation of tread pattern geometry. The performance of a particular tread pattern is found in terms of the fluid pressures and film thicknesses existing within the contact patch, under wet conditions. Many modern tread patterns are based on 'blocks', an...

  13. A Positive Psychology Intervention in a Hindu Community: The Pilot Study of the Hero Lab Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Siddhi; Qureshi, Adil; Galiatsatos, Panagis

    2016-12-01

    India has high rates of mental health issues among its youth and low-income communities experience a disproportionate amount of depression and suicide. Positive psychology, the act of promoting well-being, could be used as a tool to promote wellness and help improve the mental health of youth living in slum areas of India. A pilot positively psychology program, "The Hero Lab", was conducted in a migratory slum in Worli, Mumbai, with trained Hindu community leaders implementing the interventions toward at-risk Hindu youth. The curriculum's impact showed statistical improvement (p < 0.001) in happiness (General Happiness Scale from 11.24 ± 1.56 to 19.08 ± 3.32), grit (Grit Survey from 2.23 ± 0.34 to 3.24 ± 0.67), empathy (Toronto Empathy Questionnaire from 24.92 ± 3.27 to 41.96 ± 8.41), and gratitude (Gratitude Survey from 16.88 ± 3.47 to 27.98 ± 6.59). While a pilot study, the Hero Lab curriculum demonstrates that positive psychology interventions may be an important tool in improving mental health in at-risk children.

  14. [Wet work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Chomiczewska, Dorota; Krecisz, Beata

    2010-01-01

    Wet work is one of the most important risk factors of occupational skin diseases. Exposure of hands to the wet environment for more than 2 hours daily, wearing moisture-proof protective gloves for a corresponding period of time or necessity to wash hands frequently lead to the disruption of epidermal stratum corneum, damage to skin barrier function and induction of irritant contact dermatitis. It may also promote penetration of allergens into the skin and increase the risk of sensitization to occupational allergens. Exposure to wet work plays a significant role in occupations, such as hairdressers and barbers, nurses and other health care workers, cleaning staff, food handlers and metalworkers. It is more common among women because many occupations involving wet work are female-dominated. The incidence of wet-work-induced occupational skin diseases can be reduced by taking appropriate preventive measures. These include identification of high-risk groups, education of workers, organization of work enabling to minimize the exposure to wet work, use of personal protective equipment and skin care after work.

  15. PD Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Bilow

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available PD Lab explores the applications of building sector related product development.  PD lab investigates and tests digital production technologies like CNC milled wood connections. It will also act as a platform in its wider meaning to investigate the effects and influences of file to factory production, to explore the potential in the field of sustainability, material use, logistics and the interaction of stakeholders within the chain of the building process.

  16. A Study of Cognitive Load for Enhancing Student’s Quantitative Literacy in Inquiry Lab Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuraeni, E.; Rahman, T.; Alifiani, D. P.; Khoerunnisa, R. S.

    2017-09-01

    Students often find it difficult to appreciate the relevance of the role of quantitative analysis and concept attainment in the science class. This study measured student cognitive load during the inquiry lab of the respiratory system to improve quantitative literacy. Participants in this study were 40 11th graders from senior high school in Indonesia. After students learned, their feelings about the degree of mental effort that it took to complete the learning tasks were measured by 28 self-report on a 4-point Likert scale. The Task Complexity Worksheet were used to asses processing quantitative information and paper based test were applied to assess participants’ concept achievements. The results showed that inquiry instructional induced a relatively low mental effort, high processing information and high concept achievments.

  17. Real-time studies of chemical reactions in lab-on-a-chip devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brivio, M.

    2005-01-01

    The realization of a lab-on-a-chip system in which chemical reactions are carried out in a continuous flow mode and monitored on-line by a suitable analytical technique is the main topic of this thesis. Two types of a lab-on-a-chip were realized, both using mass spectrometry (MS) as the on-line

  18. Three 3-axis accelerometers fixed inside the tyre for studying contact patch deformations in wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Arto J.; Tuononen, Ari J.

    2014-05-01

    The tyre-road contact area was studied visually by means of a high-speed camera and three accelerometers fixed to the inner liner of the tyre carcass. Both methods show a distorted contact area in wet conditions, but interesting differences appeared. First, the contact area in full aquaplaning seems strongly distorted on a glass plate when subjected to visual inspection, while the accelerometers indicate a more even hydrodynamic aquaplaning contact length (CL) across the tyre width. Secondly, the acceleration sensors predict the clear shortening of the CL of the tyre before the critical aquaplaning speed. It can be concluded that the visual contact area and shape are heavily dependent on the transparency of the liquid and smoothness of the glass. Meanwhile, the tyre sensors can provide a CL estimate on any road surface imaginable.

  19. Diagnosing the Nature of Land-Atmosphere Coupling: A Case Study of Dry/Wet Extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Kennedy, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of land surface and planetary boundary layer (PBL) temperature and moisture states and fluxes. In turn, these interactions regulate the strength of the connection between surface moisture and precipitation in a coupled system. To address deficiencies in numerical weather prediction and climate models due to improper treatment of L-A interactions, recent studies have focused on development of diagnostics to quantify the strength and accuracy of the land-PBL coupling at the process-level. In this study, a diagnosis of the nature and impacts oflocalland-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) during dry and wet extreme conditions is presented using a combination of models and observations during the summers of2006-7 in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. Specifically, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been coupled to NASA's Land Information System (LIS), which provides a flexible and high-resolution representation and initialization of land surface physics and states. A range of diagnostics exploring the links and feedbacks between soil moisture and precipitation are examined for the dry/wet regimes of this region, along with the behavior and accuracy of different land-PBL scheme couplings under these conditions. In addition, we examine the impact of improved specification ofland surface states, anomalies, and fluxes that are obtained through the use of a hew optimization and uncertainty module in LIS, on the L-A coupling in WRF forecasts. Results demonstrate how LoCo diagnostics can be applied to coupled model components in the context of their integrated impacts on the process-chain connecting the land surface to the PBL and support of hydrological anomalies.

  20. A ten-week biochemistry lab project studying wild-type and mutant bacterial alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherow, D Scott

    2016-11-12

    This work describes a 10-week laboratory project studying wild-type and mutant bacterial alkaline phosphatase, in which students purify, quantitate, and perform kinetic assays on wild-type and selected mutants of the enzyme. Students also perform plasmid DNA purification, digestion, and gel analysis. In addition to simply learning important techniques, students acquire novel biochemical data in their kinetic analysis of mutant enzymes. The experiments are designed to build on students' work from week to week in a way that requires them to apply quantitative analysis and reasoning skills, reinforcing traditional textbook biochemical concepts. Students are assessed through lab reports focused on journal style writing, quantitative and conceptual question sheets, and traditional exams. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(6):555-564, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Preliminary study of light yield dependence on LAB liquid scintillator composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Xingchen; Yu Boxiang; Zhou Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillator (LS) will be adopted as the detector material in JUNO (Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory). The energy resolution requirement of JUNO is 3%, which has never previously been reached. To achieve this energy resolution, the light yield of liquid scintillator is an important factor. PPO (the fluor) and bis-MSB (the wavelength shifter) are the two main materials dissolved in LAB. To study the influence of these two materials on the transmission of scintillation photons in LS, 25 and 12 cm-long quartz vessels were used in a light yield experiment. LS samples with different concentration of PPO and bis-MSB were tested. At these lengths, the light yield growth is not obvious when the concentration of PPO is higher than 4 g/L. The influence from bis-MSB becomes insignificant when its concentration is higher than 8 mg/L. This result could provide some useful suggestions for the JUNO LS. (authors)

  2. PREFACE: Dynamics of wetting Dynamics of wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grest, Gary S.; Oshanin, Gleb; Webb, Edmund B., III

    2009-11-01

    dynamics and the broader field of fluid dynamics [7-9]. Such an active field requires an occasional collective examination of current research to highlight both recent successes and remaining challenges. Herein, we have collected a range of articles to illustrate the broad nature of research associated with understanding dynamics of moving condensed matter three phase contact lines. Despite the breadth of topics examined, certain unifying themes emerge. The role of the substrate surface is critical in determining kinetics of wetting; this is evidenced by the attention given to this in articles herein. McHale et al investigate the role of surface topography on wetting kinetics and how its effect can be incorporated in existing theories describing contact line dynamics. Moosavi et al examine surface topography effects via a mesoscopic hydrodynamics approach. The capillary driven motion of fluid through structures on a surface bears tremendous importance for microfluidics studies and the emerging field of nanofluidics. Blow et al examine this phenomena for liquid imbibition into a geometric array of structures on a solid surface, while Shen et al analyze the effects of surface temperature during boiling and non-boiling conditionson droplet impingement dynamics. Finally, Pesika et al discover a wonderful world of smart surfaces, like gecko adhesion pads. A number of papers utilize computational modeling to explore phenomena underlying wetting dynamics and to consider relevant mechanisms in terms of existing theory for contact line dynamics. Winter et al utilize Monte Carlo simulation techniques and thermodynamic integration methods to test classical theory describing heterogeneous nucleation at a wall near a wetting transition. Qian et al briefly review the Onsager principle of minimum energy dissipation underlying many descriptions of dissipative systems; they then provide a variational approach description of hydrodynamics of moving contact lines and demonstrate the validity

  3. Lab-on-a-brane: A novel physiologically relevant planar arterial model to study transendothelial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhwani, Karim Ismail

    The tremendous quality of life impact notwithstanding, cardiovascular diseases and Cancer add up to over US$ 700bn each year in financial costs alone. Aging and population growth are expected to further expand the problem space while drug research and development remain expensive. However, preclinical costs can be substantially mitigated by substituting animal models with in vitro devices that accurately model human cardiovascular transport. Here we present a novel physiologically relevant lab-on-a-brane that simulates in vivo pressure, flow, strain, and shear waveforms associated with normal and pathological conditions in large and small blood vessels for studying molecular transport across the endothelial monolayer. The device builds upon previously demonstrated integrated microfluidic loop design by: (a) introducing nanoscale pores in the substrate membrane to enable transmembrane molecular transport, (b) transforming the substrate membrane into a nanofibrous matrix for 3D smooth muscle cell (SMC) tissue culture, (c) integrating electrospinning fabrication methods, (d) engineering an invertible sandwich cell culture device architecture, and (e) devising a healthy co-culture mechanism for human arterial endothelial cell (HAEC) monolayer and multiple layers of human smooth muscle cells (HSMC) to accurately mimic arterial anatomy. Structural and mechanical characterization was conducted using confocal microscopy, SEM, stress/strain analysis, and infrared spectroscopy. Transport was characterized using FITC-Dextran hydraulic permeability protocol. Structure and transport characterization successfully demonstrate device viability as a physiologically relevant arterial mimic for testing transendothelial transport. Thus, our lab-on-a-brane provides a highly effective and efficient, yet considerably inexpensive, physiologically relevant alternative for pharmacokinetic evaluation; possibly reducing animals used in pre-clinical testing, clinical trials cost from false

  4. Wet Grasslands as a Green Infrastructure for Ecological Sustainability: Wader Conservation in Southern Sweden as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Manton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biosphere Reserves aim at being role models for biodiversity conservation. This study focuses on the unsuccessful conservation of waders (Charadrii on wet grasslands in the Kristianstad Vattenrike Biosphere Reserve (KVBR in southern Sweden. Predation on nests and young has been proposed as one reason contributing to the decline of waders. We explored this hypothesis by comparing two landscapes, one with declining (KVBR and one with stable (Östergötland wader populations on managed wet grasslands in southern Sweden. Specifically, we tested three predictions linked to predation on wader nests and young, namely that (1 the relative abundance of avian predators and waders; (2 the avian predator abundance; and (3 the predation rate on artificial wader nests, should all be higher in declining versus stable populations. All predictions were clearly supported. Nevertheless, predation may not be the ultimate factor causing wader population declines. We discuss the cumulative effects of landscape change linked to increased food resources for predators, reduced wet grassland patch size and quality. Holistic analyses of multiple wet grassland landscapes as social-ecological systems as case studies, including processes such as predation and other factors affecting waders, is a promising avenue towards collaborative learning for wet grasslands as a functional green infrastructure. However, if governance and management approaches can be improved is questionable without considerable investment in both ecological and social systems.

  5. TELECOM LAB

    CERN Multimedia

    IT-CS-TEL Section

    2001-01-01

    The Telecom Lab is moving from Building 104 to Building 31 S-026, with its entrance via the ramp on the side facing Restaurant n°2. The help desk will thus be closed to users on Tuesday 8 May. On May 9, the Lab will only be able to deal with problems of a technical nature at the new address and it will not be able to process any new subscription requests throughout the week from 7 to 11 May. We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause and thank you for your understanding.

  6. Sensitivity study of the wet deposition schemes in the modelling of the Fukushima accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quérel, Arnaud; Quélo, Denis; Roustan, Yelva; Mathieu, Anne; Kajino, Mizuo; Sekiyama, Thomas; Adachi, Kouji; Didier, Damien; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2016-04-01

    The Fukushima-Daiichi release of radioactivity is a relevant event to study the atmospheric dispersion modelling of radionuclides. Actually, the atmospheric deposition onto the ground may be studied through the map of measured Cs-137 established consecutively to the accident. The limits of detection were low enough to make the measurements possible as far as 250km from the nuclear power plant. This large scale deposition has been modelled with the Eulerian model ldX. However, several weeks of emissions in multiple weather conditions make it a real challenge. Besides, these measurements are accumulated deposition of Cs-137 over the whole period and do not inform of deposition mechanisms involved: in-cloud, below-cloud, dry deposition. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis is performed in order to understand wet deposition mechanisms. It has been shown in a previous study (Quérel et al, 2016) that the choice of the wet deposition scheme has a strong impact on the assessment of the deposition patterns. Nevertheless, a "best" scheme could not be highlighted as it depends on the selected criteria: the ranking differs according to the statistical indicators considered (correlation, figure of merit in space and factor 2). A possibility to explain the difficulty to discriminate between several schemes was the uncertainties in the modelling, resulting from the meteorological data for instance. Since the move of the plume is not properly modelled, the deposition processes are applied with an inaccurate activity in the air. In the framework of the SAKURA project, an MRI-IRSN collaboration, new meteorological fields at higher resolution (Sekiyama et al., 2013) were provided and allows to reconsider the previous study. An updated study including these new meteorology data is presented. In addition, a focus on several releases causing deposition in located areas during known period was done. This helps to better understand the mechanisms of deposition involved following the

  7. Study for process and equipment design of wet gelation stages in vibropacking process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Ryoji; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Amino, Masaki; Yanai, Minoru

    2004-02-01

    Process and layout design of external wet gelation stages in vibropacking process was examined for the feasibility study of commercialized FBR cycle system. In this study, following process stages for the oxide core fuel production line were covered, that is, solidification, washing, drying, calcination, reduction, sintering stages including interim storage of sintering particles and reagent recovery stage. The main results obtained by this study are as follows: (1) Based on the process examination results conducted previously, process-flow, mass-balance and number of production line/equipment were clarified. The process is covered from the receive tank of feed solution to the interim storage equipment. Reagent recovery process-flow, mass-balance were also clarified. And preliminary design of the main equipment was reexamined. (2) Normal operation procedure and the procedure after process failure were summarized along with a remote automated operation procedure. Operation sequence of each production line was mapped out by using a time-chart. (3) Design outline of reagent recovery equipments, installed to recover waste liquid from the wet gelation stages in the view of environmental impact were examined. Effective techniques such as collection of solvent, residue waste treatment method were examined its applicability and selected. Schematic block diagram was presented. (4) Analytical items and analyzing apparatus were extracted taking into account of quality control and process management. Analytical sample taking position and frequency of sampling were also examined. (5) A schematic layout drawing of main manufacturing process and reagent recovery process was presented taking into account of material handling. (6) A feature of the operating rate at each process stage was examined by analyzing failure rate reliability of each component. applying the reliability-centred method. (RCM), the operating rate was evaluated and annual maintenance period was estimated using

  8. Study on the communication technology of instrument based on LabVIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Wei; Lai Qinggui; Zhang Xiaobo

    2012-01-01

    The hardware and software structure of communication of universal instrument is discussed based on LabVIEW, the several realization of remote communication is compared too. In the control and measure system of LIA, using LabVIEW, the communication is realized among the plenty of instruments which have the various interfaces, in this paper the frame of hardware and software about instrument communication is showed. (authors)

  9. Preliminary Study of Single-Phase Natural Circulation for Lab-scaled Molten Salt Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yukyung; Kang, Sarah; Kim, In Guk; Seo, Seok Bin; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong Dae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Advanced reactors such as MSR (FHR), VHTR and AHTR utilized molten salt as a coolant for efficiency and safety which has advantages in higher heat capacity, lower pumping power and scale compared to liquid metal. It becomes more necessary to study on the characteristics of molten salt. However, due to several characteristics such as high operating temperature, large-scale facility and preventing solidification, satisfying that condition for study has difficulties. Thus simulant fluid was used with scaling method for lab-scale experiment. Scaled experiment enables simulant fluid to simulate fluid mechanics and heat transfer behavior of molten salt on lower operating temperature and reduced scale. In this paper, as a proof test of the scaled experiment, simplified single-phase natural circulation loop was designed in a lab-scale and applied to the passive safety system in advanced reactor in which molten salt is considered as a major coolant of the system. For the application of the improved safety system, prototype was based on the primary loop of the test-scale DRACS, the main passive safety system in FHR, developed at the OSU. For preliminary experiment, single-phase natural circulation under low power was performed. DOWTHERM A and DOWTHERM RP were selected as simulant candidates. Then, study of feasibility with simulant was conducted based on the scaling law for heat transfer characteristics and geometric parameters. Additionally, simulation with MARS code and ANSYS-CFX with the same condition of natural circulation was carried out as verification. For the accurate code simulation, thermo-physical properties of DOWTHERM A and RP were developed and implemented into MARS code. In this study, single-phase natural circulation experiment was performed with simulant oil, DOWTHERM RP, based on the passive safety system of FHR. Feasibility of similarity experiment for molten salt with oil simulant was confirmed by scaling method. In addition, simulation with two

  10. A combined wet chemistry and EXAFS study of U(VI) uptake by cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, E.; Harfouche, M.; Tits, J.; Kunz, D.; Daehn, R.; Fujita, T.; Tsukamoto, M.

    2006-01-01

    The sorption behaviour and speciation of U(VI) in cementitious systems was investigated by a combination of wet chemistry experiments and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. Radiotracer studies using 233 U were carried out on hardened cement paste (HCP) and calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), which are the major constituents of HCP, to determine the uptake kinetics and sorption isotherms. C-S-H phases were synthesized using different methods for solid phase preparation, which enabled us to study the U(VI) uptake by different types of C-S-H phases and a wide range of Ca/Si compositions, and to distinguish U(VI) sorption on the surface of C-S-H from U(VI) incorporation into the structure. XAS measurements were performed using U(VI) loaded HCP and C-S-H materials (sorption and co-precipitation samples) to gain structural information on the U(VI) speciation in these systems, i.e., the type and number of neighbouring atoms, and bond distances. Examples of studies that have utilized XAS to characterize U(VI) speciation in cementitious systems are still rare, and to the best of our knowledge, detailed XAS investigations of the U(VI)/C-S-H system are lacking. The results obtained from the combined use of wet chemical and spectroscopic techniques allow mechanistic models of the immobilization process to be proposed for cementitious waste forms containing low and high U(VI) inventories. In the latter case U(VI) immobilization is controlled by a solubility-limiting process with the U(VI) mineral predominantly formed under the conditions prevailing in cementitious systems. At low U(VI) concentrations, however, U(VI) appears to be predominantly bound onto C-S-H phases. The coordination environment of U(VI) taken up by C-S-H was found to resemble that of U(VI) in uranophane. A mechanistic understanding of the U(VI) binding by cementitious materials will allow more detailed and scientifically well founded predictions of the retention of

  11. Behavior of wet precast beam column connections under progressive collapse scenario: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimse, Rohit B.; Joshi, Digesh D.; Patel, Paresh V.

    2014-12-01

    Progressive collapse denotes a failure of a major portion of a structure that has been initiated by failure of a relatively small part of the structure such as failure of any vertical load carrying element (typically columns). Failure of large part of any structure will results into substantial loss of human lives and natural resources. Therefore, it is important to prevent progressive collapse which is also known as disproportionate collapse. Nowadays, there is an increasing trend toward construction of buildings using precast concrete. In precast concrete construction, all the components of structures are produced in controlled environment and they are being transported to the site. At site such individual components are connected appropriately. Connections are the most critical elements of any precast structure, because in past major collapse of precast structure took place because of connection failure. In this study, behavior of three different 1/3rd scaled wet precast beam column connections under progressive collapse scenario are studied and its performance is compared with monolithic connection. Precast connections are constructed by adopting different connection detailing at the junction by considering reinforced concrete corbel for two specimens and steel billet for one specimen. Performance of specimen is evaluated on the basis of ultimate load carrying capacity, maximum deflection and deflection measured along the span of the beam. From the results, it is observed that load carrying capacity and ductility of precast connections considered in this study are more than that of monolithic connections.

  12. Studies on Mathematical Models of Wet Adhesion and Lifetime Prediction of Organic Coating/Steel by Grey System Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fandi; Liu, Ying; Liu, Li; Li, Ying; Wang, Fuhui

    2017-06-28

    A rapid degradation of wet adhesion is the key factor controlling coating lifetime, for the organic coatings under marine hydrostatic pressure. The mathematical models of wet adhesion have been studied by Grey System Theory (GST). Grey models (GM) (1, 1) of epoxy varnish (EV) coating/steel and epoxy glass flake (EGF) coating/steel have been established, and a lifetime prediction formula has been proposed on the basis of these models. The precision assessments indicate that the established models are accurate, and the prediction formula is capable of making precise lifetime forecasting of the coatings.

  13. Studying the Aspects of Knowledge Creation in the LAB Studio Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari-Pekka Heikkinen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The organisations of higher education are constantly changing. Universities, colleges, private schools and online universities refine their pedagogical methods and learning models in a competitive market. This article is a study on whether one such model helps students to gain new knowledge. A study of the LAB studio model (LSM, which is a pedagogical model developing connections between working-life based problems and the recognition and development of business-related prototypes and start-up companies, is presented. The LSM, theoretically grounded in a constructivist view of learning with a project-based education at its core, has the key goal of educating entrepreneurial competences in higher education. Based on the case study, comprisinga literature review of knowledge creation and a survey, the qualitative results analysis suggests that LSM offers a promising support for knowledge creation. The results lead to the conclusion that LSM provides support especially for the various modes of the SECI model, such as socialisation and internalisation, and seems to support organisational knowledge creation aspects as well.

  14. Study on Modified Sand Filtration Towards Water Quality of Wet Market Waste Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad F.N.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on the potential of sand filter as a pre-treatment of waste water was done in Kangar wet market, Perlis. Besides, the best composition of filter in order to treat wastewater based on BOD, COD, SS, AN, turbidity and pH levels are further examined. In this study, there are four types of sand filter composition which the medias consist of fine sand and coarse sand while the modified sand filter are consist of sand, course sand and activated carbon prepared from rice husk and coconut shells. After 10 weeks of treatment, the results show that the concentration of BOD, COD, SS, AN, turbidity and pH were reduced up to 86%, 84%, 63%, 88%, 73%, respectively while pH nearly to neutral with 6.83. Moreover, the result also revealed that the sand filter added with rice husk almost complied with Standard B of Malaysia Environmental Quality (Sewage Regulations 2009 as well as gives the highest number of WQI with 36.81. Overall, WQI obtained in this study are ranged from 12.77 to 36.81.

  15. Dry and wet "deposition" studies of the degradation of cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Ramírez, S.

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of portland cement mortars with SO2 gaseous pollutant and artificial 'acid rain' solution has been examined using laboratory exposure chambers, with realistic presentation rates of pollutants. The mortar were previously carbonated to produce superficial carbonation. Two mortars with different w/c ratio and hence specific surface were prepared and exposed into the chambers. For dry deposition of SO2 pollutant gas, the important roles of water and water plus oxidant in increasing chemical reaction are readily revealed. Further, accessible porosity also increases reaction through increased times of reaction of pollutant with the mortars. Interestingly, in the absence of deliberate surface wetting, the presence of oxidant, ozone, leads to a reduction in the already limited extent of reaction. Wet deposition studies using artificial 'acid rain' solution result in gypsum formation, which is more extensive for mortars of increased w/c ratios.

    Se han realizado ensayos de laboratorio de simulación de los procesos ambientales de "deposición" seca y húmeda sobre morteros de cemento portland, estudiándose las reacciones que se producen con el contaminante SO2 ("deposición" seca y la disolución de 'lluvia acida' ("deposición" húmeda. Los morteros de cemento se carbonataron para favorecer la carbonatación superficial de los mismos. Se prepararon morteros con dos relaciones a/c con el fin de estudiar la influencia que la variable superficie específica tenía en el proceso de deterioro de dichos materiales. En los estudios de deposición seca con SO2 como gas agresivo se ha visto la importancia que el agua y el agua junto a un oxidante tienen en la reacción del contaminante con los componentes del mortero. La superficie específica Juega un papel importante, ya que al aumentar, aumenta la reacción con el contaminante. La reacción en presencia de oxidante, (SO2+O3

  16. Thermodynamic study of the effects of ambient air conditions on the thermal performance characteristics of a closed wet cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaefthimiou, V.D.; Rogdakis, E.D.; Koronaki, I.P.; Zannis, T.C.

    2012-01-01

    A thermodynamic model was developed and used to assess the sensitivity of thermal performance characteristics of a closed wet cooling tower to inlet air conditions. In the present study, three cases of different ambient conditions are considered: In the first case, the average mid-winter and mid-summer conditions as well as the extreme case of high temperature and relative humidity, in Athens (Greece) during summer are considered according to the Greek Regulation for Buildings Energy Performance. In the second case, the varied inlet air relative humidity while the inlet air dry bulb temperature remains constant were taken into account. In the last case, the effects on cooling tower thermal behaviour when the inlet air wet bulb temperature remains constant were examined. The proposed model is capable of predicting the variation of air thermodynamic properties, sprayed water and serpentine water temperature inside the closed wet cooling tower along its height. The reliability of simulations was tested against experimental data, which were obtained from literature. Thus, the proposed model could be used for the design of industrial and domestic applications of conventional air-conditioning systems as well as for sorption cooling systems with solid and liquid desiccants where closed wet cooling towers are used for precooling the liquid solutions. The most important result of this theoretical investigation is that the highest fall of serpentine water temperature and losses of sprayed water are observed for the lowest value of inlet wet bulb temperature. Hence, the thermal effectiveness, which is associated with the temperature reduction of serpentine water as well as the operational cost, which is related to the sprayed water loss due to evaporation, of a closed wet cooling tower depend predominantly on the degree of saturation of inlet air.

  17. Randomly auditing research labs could be an affordable way to improve research quality: A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Adrian G; Zardo, Pauline; Graves, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    The "publish or perish" incentive drives many researchers to increase the quantity of their papers at the cost of quality. Lowering quality increases the number of false positive errors which is a key cause of the reproducibility crisis. We adapted a previously published simulation of the research world where labs that produce many papers are more likely to have "child" labs that inherit their characteristics. This selection creates a competitive spiral that favours quantity over quality. To try to halt the competitive spiral we added random audits that could detect and remove labs with a high proportion of false positives, and also improved the behaviour of "child" and "parent" labs who increased their effort and so lowered their probability of making a false positive error. Without auditing, only 0.2% of simulations did not experience the competitive spiral, defined by a convergence to the highest possible false positive probability. Auditing 1.35% of papers avoided the competitive spiral in 71% of simulations, and auditing 1.94% of papers in 95% of simulations. Audits worked best when they were only applied to established labs with 50 or more papers compared with labs with 25 or more papers. Adding a ±20% random error to the number of false positives to simulate peer reviewer error did not reduce the audits' efficacy. The main benefit of the audits was via the increase in effort in "child" and "parent" labs. Audits improved the literature by reducing the number of false positives from 30.2 per 100 papers to 12.3 per 100 papers. Auditing 1.94% of papers would cost an estimated $15.9 million per year if applied to papers produced by National Institutes of Health funding. Our simulation greatly simplifies the research world and there are many unanswered questions about if and how audits would work that can only be addressed by a trial of an audit.

  18. Experimental and numerical studies on the treatment of wet astronaut trash by forced-convection drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arquiza, J. M. R. Apollo; Morrow, Robert; Remiker, Ross; Hunter, Jean B.

    2017-09-01

    During long-term space missions, astronauts generate wet trash, including food containers with uneaten portions, moist hygiene wipes and wet paper towels. This waste produces two problems: the loss of water and the generation of odors and health hazards by microbial growth. These problems are solved by a closed-loop, forced-convection, heat-pump drying system which stops microbial activity by both pasteurization and desiccation, and recovers water in a gravity-independent porous media condensing heat exchanger. A transient, pseudo-homogeneous continuum model for the drying of wet ersatz trash was formulated for this system. The model is based on the conservation equations for energy and moisture applied to the air and solid phases and includes the unique trash characteristic of having both dry and wet solids. Experimentally determined heat and mass transfer coefficients, together with the moisture sorption equilibrium relationship for the wet material are used in the model. The resulting system of differential equations is solved by the finite-volume method as implemented by the commercial software COMSOL. Model simulations agreed well with experimental data under certain conditions. The validated model will be used in the optimization of the entire closed-loop system consisting of fan, air heater, dryer vessel, heat-pump condenser, and heat-recovery modules.

  19. Studying the Effect of Roughness of Wet Road on Critical speed of Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali K. Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroplaning is one the most dangerous phenomena which effect on the safety of driving cars on wet roads, then, the critical speed of slipping cars is an important parameter in the hydroplaning ,and depends on the properties of  the following three  parameters: tires, water layer and  road surface. The road texture is the main property of road specifications which affect directly on the critical speed of the vehicle. In the present work, the properties of road roughness and influence of surface texture on critical speed of vehicle are studied with variation of the following parameters: thickness and dynamic viscosity of water on the road surface and the vehicle load. The results showed that increasing the road surface roughness and the vehicle load both has a appositive influence on the critical speed (increaseof the vehicle, while increasing the dynamic viscosity and thickness of the water layer on the road surface has a negative influence on the critical speed (decrease of the vehicle. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.25130/tjes.24.2017.24

  20. Adolescent bariatric surgery program characteristics: the Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) study experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsky, Marc P; Inge, Thomas H; Teich, Steven; Eneli, Ihuoma; Miller, Rosemary; Brandt, Mary L; Helmrath, Michael; Harmon, Carroll M; Zeller, Meg H; Jenkins, Todd M; Courcoulas, Anita; Buncher, Ralph C

    2014-02-01

    The number of adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery (WLS) has increased in response to the increasing prevalence of severe childhood obesity. Adolescents undergoing WLS require unique support, which may differ from adult programs. The aim of this study was to describe institutional and programmatic characteristics of centers participating in Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS), a prospective study investigating safety and efficacy of adolescent WLS. Data were obtained from the Teen-LABS database, and site survey completed by Teen-LABS investigators. The survey queried (1) institutional characteristics, (2) multidisciplinary team composition, (3) clinical program characteristics, and (4) clinical research infrastructure. All centers had extensive multidisciplinary involvement in the assessment, pre-operative education, and post-operative management of adolescents undergoing WLS. Eligibility criteria and pre-operative clinical and diagnostic evaluations were similar between programs. All programs have well-developed clinical research infrastructure, use adolescent-specific educational resources, and maintain specialty equipment, including high weight capacity diagnostic imaging equipment. The composition of clinical team and institutional resources is consistent with current clinical practice guidelines. These characteristics, coupled with dedicated research staff, have facilitated enrollment of 242 participants into Teen-LABS. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Changing learning with new interactive and media-rich instruction environments: virtual labs case study report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Camillan

    2003-01-01

    Technology has created a new dimension for visual teaching and learning with web-delivered interactive media. The Virtual Labs Project has embraced this technology with instructional design and evaluation methodologies behind the simPHYSIO suite of simulation-based, online interactive teaching modules in physiology for the Stanford students. In addition, simPHYSIO provides the convenience of anytime web-access and a modular structure that allows for personalization and customization of the learning material. This innovative tool provides a solid delivery and pedagogical backbone that can be applied to developing an interactive simulation-based training tool for the use and management of the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) image information system. The disparity in the knowledge between health and IT professionals can be bridged by providing convenient modular teaching tools to fill the gaps in knowledge. An innovative teaching method in the whole PACS is deemed necessary for its successful implementation and operation since it has become widely distributed with many interfaces, components, and customizations. This paper will discuss the techniques for developing an interactive-based teaching tool, a case study of its implementation, and a perspective for applying this approach to an online PACS training tool. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. Unveiling the nucleon tensor charge at Jefferson Lab: A study of the SoLID case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Zhihong; Sato, Nobuo; Allada, Kalyan; Liu, Tianbo; Chen, Jian-Ping; Gao, Haiyan; Kang, Zhong-Bo; Prokudin, Alexei; Sun, Peng; Yuan, Feng

    2017-04-01

    © 2017 The Authors Future experiments at the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade, in particular, the Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID), aim at a very precise data set in the region where the partonic structure of the nucleon is dominated by the valence quarks. One of the main goals is to constrain the quark transversity distributions. We apply recent theoretical advances of the global QCD extraction of the transversity distributions to study the impact of future experimental data from the SoLID experiments. Especially, we develop a simple strategy based on the Hessian matrix analysis that allows one to estimate the uncertainties of the transversity quark distributions and their tensor charges extracted from SoLID data simulation. We find that the SoLID measurements with the proton and the effective neutron targets can improve the precision of the u- and d-quark transversity distributions up to one order of magnitude in the range 0.05 < x < 0.6.

  3. Statistical gamma-ray decay studies at iThemba LABS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiedeking M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A program to study the γ-ray decay from the region of high-level density has been established at iThemba LABS, where a high-resolution gamma-ray detector array is used in conjunction with silicon particle-telescopes. Results from two recent projects are presented: 1 The 74Ge(α,α′γ reaction was used to investigate the Pygmy Dipole Resonance. The results were compared to (γ,γ′ data and indicate that the dipole states split into mixed isospin and relatively pure isovector excitations. 2 Data from the 95Mo(d,p reaction were used to develop a novel method for the determination of spins for low-lying discrete levels utilizing statistical γ-ray decay in the vicinity of the neutron separation energy. These results provide insight into the competition of (γ,n and (γ,γ′ reactions and highlights the need to correct for angular momentum barrier effects.

  4. Lab architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-04-01

    There are few more dramatic illustrations of the vicissitudes of laboratory architecturethan the contrast between Building 20 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its replacement, the Ray and Maria Stata Center. Building 20 was built hurriedly in 1943 as temporary housing for MIT's famous Rad Lab, the site of wartime radar research, and it remained a productive laboratory space for over half a century. A decade ago it was demolished to make way for the Stata Center, an architecturally striking building designed by Frank Gehry to house MIT's computer science and artificial intelligence labs (above). But in 2004 - just two years after the Stata Center officially opened - the building was criticized for being unsuitable for research and became the subject of still ongoing lawsuits alleging design and construction failures.

  5. Modeling study on axial wetting length of meniscus in vertical rectangular microgrooves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, Xuelei; Hu, Xuegong; Tang, Dawei

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the traditional model for predicting axial wetting length of meniscus in vertical microgrooves is introduced firstly. The traditional model may cause inaccurate results in predicting wetting length in vertical microgrooves because of the assumption of round meniscus in cross sections of microgrooves and the way of calculating curvature. In order to develop this model and make it more accurate, a revised micro-PIV system is built to test the meniscus shapes in cross sections of vertical and horizontal microgrooves, and the experimental results prove that the real shapes of meniscus are parabolic other than round. The fitting formulas of meniscus shapes are obtained with software Origin 7.5. Based on experimental results and fitting formulas, the traditional model is revised by changing the way to calculate curvature. In the modified model, the curvature for calculating axial wetting length of meniscus equals average curvature of meniscus in cross section of vertical microgrooves minus the average curvature of meniscus in cross section of horizontal microgrooves. It is proved that the modified model can predict the wetting length in vertical microgrooves better than the original model. The average difference between experiment and modified model is 2.5% while that between experiment and traditional model is 174.2%. The disadvantage of the modified model is that using the new model to predict wetting length needs to know the real shapes of meniscus in vertical and horizontal microgrooves. -- Highlights: ► An experimental system is designed to test the shapes of meniscus in microgrooves. ► The real shapes of meniscus in microgrooves are obtained for first time. ► The shapes of meniscus in microgrooves is compared and analyzed. ► The model for predicting wetting length of meniscus in microgrooves is developed

  6. Hydrate formation during wet granulation studied by spectroscopic methods and multivariate analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna; Rantanen, Jukka; Karjalainen, Milja

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim was to follow hydrate formation of two structurally related drugs, theophylline and caffeine, during wet granulation using fast and nondestructive spectroscopic methods. METHODS: Anhydrous theophylline and caffeine were granulated with purified water. Charge-coupled device (CCD......) Raman spectroscopy was compared with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) in following hydrate formation of drugs during wet granulation (off-line). To perform an at-line process analysis, the effect of water addition was monitored by NIR spectroscopy and principal components analysis (PCA). The changes...

  7. Using FlowLab, an educational computational fluid dynamics tool, to perform a comparative study of turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parihar, A.; Kulkarni, A.; Stern, F.; Xing, T.; Moeykens, S.

    2005-01-01

    Flow over an Ahmed body is a key benchmark case for validating the complex turbulent flow field around vehicles. In spite of the simple geometry, the flow field around an Ahmed body retains critical features of real, external vehicular flow. The present study is an attempt to implement such a real life example into the course curriculum for undergraduate engineers. FlowLab, which is a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool developed by Fluent Inc. for use in engineering education, allows students to conduct interactive application studies. This paper presents a synopsis of FlowLab, a description of one FlowLab exercise, and an overview of the educational experience gained by students through using FlowLab, which is understood through student surveys and examinations. FlowLab-based CFD exercises were implemented into 57:020 Mechanics of Fluids and Transport Processes and 58:160 Intermediate Mechanics of Fluids courses at the University of Iowa in the fall of 2004, although this report focuses only on experiences with the Ahmed body exercise, which was used only in the intermediate-level fluids class, 58:160. This exercise was developed under National Science Foundation funding by the authors of this paper. The focus of this study does not include validating the various turbulence models used for the Ahmed body simulation, because a two-dimensional simplification was applied. With the two-dimensional simplification, students may setup, run, and post process this model in a 50 minute class period using a single-CPU PC, as required for the 58:160 class at the University of Iowa. It is educational for students to understand the implication of a two- dimensional approximation for essentially a three-dimensional flow field, along with the consequent variation in both qualitative and quantitative results. Additionally, through this exercise, students may realize that the choice of the respective turbulence model will affect simulation prediction. (author)

  8. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angermann, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Determination of electronic interface properties by contact-less surface photovoltage (SPV) technique. • Systematic correlations of substrate morphology and surface electronic properties. • Optimization of surface pre-treatment for flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si solar cell substrates. • Ultra-thin passivating Si oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states by wet-chemical oxidation and subsequent annealing. • Environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing hot water, diluted HCl, or ozone low cost alternative to current approaches with concentrated chemicals. • The effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent layer deposition. - Abstract: The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution D it (E), and density D it,min of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly based on

  9. Forest structure in low diversity tropical forests: a study of Hawaiian wet and dry forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Ostertag; F. Inman-Narahari; S. Cordell; C.P. Giardina; L. Sack

    2014-01-01

    The potential influence of diversity on ecosystem structure and function remains a topic of significant debate, especially for tropical forests where diversity can range widely. We used Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) methodology to establish forest dynamics plots in montane wet forest and lowland dry forest on Hawai‘i Island. We compared the species...

  10. Enabling rapid behavioral ecotoxicity studies using an integrated lab-on-a-chip systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yushi; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-12-01

    Behavioral ecotoxicity tests are gaining an increasing recognition in environmental toxicology. Behavior of sensitive bioindicator species can change rapidly in response to an acute exposure to contaminants and thus has a much higher sensitivity as compared to conventional LC50 mortality tests. Furthermore, behavioral endpoints seems to be very good candidates to develop early-warning biomonitoring systems needed for rapid chemical risk assessment. Behavioral tests are non-invasive, fast, do not harm indicator organisms (behavioural changes are very rapid) and are thus fully compatible with 3R (Replacement - Reduction - Refinement) principle encouraging alternatives to conventional animal testing. These characteristics are essential when designing improved ecotoxicity tests for chemical risk assessment. In this work, we present a pilot development of miniaturized Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) devices for studying toxin avoidance behaviors of small aquatic crustaceans. As an investigative tool, LOCs represent a new direction that may miniaturize and revolutionize behavioral ecotoxicology. Specifically our innovative microfluidic prototype: (i) enables convening "caging" of specimens for real-time videomicroscopy; (ii) eliminates the evaporative water loss thus providing an opportunity for long-term behavioral studies; (iii) exploits laminar fluid flow under low Reynolds numbers to generate discrete domains and gradients enabling for the first time toxin avoidance studies on small aquatic crustaceans; (iv) integrates off-the-chip mechatronic interfaces and video analysis algorithms for single animal movement analysis. We provide evidence that by merging innovative bioelectronic and biomicrofluidic technologies we can deploy inexpensive and reliable systems for culture, electronic tracking and complex computational analysis of behavior of bioindicator organisms.

  11. Wet cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hole, B. [IMC Technical Services (United Kingdom)

    1999-08-01

    Continuous miners create dust and methane problems in underground coal mining. Control has usually been achieved using ventilation techniques as experiments with water based suppression have led to flooding and electrical problems. Recent experience in the US has led to renewed interest in wet head systems. This paper describes tests of the Hydraphase system by IMC Technologies. Ventilation around the cutting zone, quenching of hot ignition sources, dust suppression, the surface trial gallery tests, the performance of the cutting bed, and flow of air and methane around the cutting head are reviewed. 1 ref., 2 figs., 2 photos.

  12. Changing Efficacy of Wet Cupping Therapy in Migraine with Lunar Phase: A Self-Controlled Interventional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Benli, Ali Ramazan; Sunay, Didem

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of blood-letting with wet cupping therapy (WCT) in migraine treatment and to determine whether there was any difference according to the phase of the moon when the treatment was applied. Material/Methods This self-controlled study was conducted in Karabuk between 2014 and 2016. Patients who were diagnosed with migraine were enrolled in the study. Migraine disability assessment questionnaire (MIDAS), demographic characteristics, migra...

  13. Earth analog image digitization of field, aerial, and lab experiment studies for Planetary Data System archiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. A.; Nelson, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    A portion of the earth analog image archive at the Ronald Greeley Center for Planetary Studies (RGCPS)-the NASA Regional Planetary Information Facility at Arizona State University-is being digitized and will be added to the Planetary Data System (PDS) for public use. This will be a first addition of terrestrial data to the PDS specifically for comparative planetology studies. Digitization is separated into four tasks. First is the scanning of aerial photographs of volcanic and aeolian structures and flows. The second task is to scan field site images taken from ground and low-altitude aircraft of volcanic structures, lava flows, lava tubes, dunes, and wind streaks. The third image set to be scanned includes photographs of lab experiments from the NASA Planetary Aeolian Laboratory wind tunnels, vortex generator, and of wax models. Finally, rare NASA documents are being scanned and formatted as PDF files. Thousands of images are to be scanned for this project. Archiving of the data will follow the PDS4 standard, where the entire project is classified as a single bundle, with individual subjects (i.e., the Amboy Crater volcanic structure in the Mojave Desert of California) as collections. Within the collections, each image is considered a product, with a unique ID and associated XML document. Documents describing the image data, including the subject and context, will be included with each collection. Once complete, the data will be hosted by a PDS data node and available for public search and download. As one of the first earth analog datasets to be archived by the PDS, this project could prompt the digitizing and making available of historic datasets from other facilities for the scientific community.

  14. A Study of the Literature on Lab-Based Instruction in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttick, Gillian; Drayton, Brian; Cohen, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the practitioner literature on lab-based instruction in biology in "The American Biology Teacher" between 2007 and 2012. We investigated what laboratory learning looks like in biology classrooms, what topics are addressed, what instructional methods and activities are described, and what is being learned about student…

  15. The Study on Virtual Medical Instrument based on LabVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengwei, Li; Limei, Zhang; Xiaoming, Hu

    2005-01-01

    With the increasing performance of computer, the virtual instrument technology has greatly advanced over the years, and then virtual medical instrument technology becomes available. This paper presents the virtual medical instrument, and then as an example, an application of a signal acquisition, processing and analysis system using LabVIEW is also given.

  16. Model study on acidifying wet deposition in East Asia during wintertime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiwei; Ueda, Hiromasa; Sakurai, Tatsuya

    A regional air quality model (RAQM) has been developed and applied together with an aerosol model to investigate the states and characteristics of wet deposition in East Asia in December 2001. Model simulation is performed with monthly based emission inventory [Streets, D.G., Bond, T.C., Carmichael, G.R., Fernandes, S.D., Fu, Q., He, D., Klimont, Z., Nelson, S. M., Tsai, N.Y., Wang, M.Q., Woo, J.-H., Yarber, K.F., 2003. An inventory of gaseous and primary emissions in Asia in the year 2000. Journal of Geophysical Research 108(D21), 8809] and meteorological fields derived from MM5. Model results are compared with extensive monitoring data including relevant gaseous species and ions in precipitation. The validation demonstrates that this model system is able to represent most of the major physical and chemical processes involved in acid deposition and reproduces concentrations reasonably well, within a factor of 2 of observations in general. The study shows that the regions with pH less than 4.5 are mainly located in southwestern China, parts of the Yangtze Delta, the Yellow Sea and the Korean peninsula, indicating wide regions of acid precipitation in East Asia in wintertime. Japan islands mainly exhibit pH values of 4.5-5.0, whereas over wide areas of northern China, pH values are relatively high (⩾5.0) due to neutralization by alkaline materials such as calcium-laden particles and ammonia, which are more abundant in northern China than that in southern China. While acid rain over most of China is still characterized by sulfur-induced type, considerable areas of eastern China and the western Pacific Rim are found to be more affected by nitric acid than sulfuric acid in acidification of precipitation, which is supposed to result from a combined effect of variations in photochemistry and emission, suggesting the increasing importance of NO x emission in these regions.

  17. A study of energy-size relationship and wear rate in a lab-scale high pressure grinding rolls unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi Dashtbayaz, Samira

    This study is focused on two independent topics of energy-size relationship and wear-rate measurements on a lab-scale high pressure grinding rolls (HPGR). The first part of this study has been aimed to investigate the influence of the operating parameters and the feed characteristics on the particle-bed breakage using four different ore samples in a 200 mm x 100 mm lab-scale HPGR. Additionally, multistage grinding, scale-up from a lab-scale HPGR, and prediction of the particle size distributions have been studied in detail. The results obtained from energy-size relationship studies help with better understanding of the factors contributing to more energy-efficient grinding. It will be shown that the energy efficiency of the two configurations of locked-cycle and open multipass is completely dependent on the ore properties. A test procedure to produce the scale-up data is presented. The comparison of the scale-up factors between the data obtained on the University of Utah lab-scale HPGR and the industrial machine at the Newmont Boddington plant confirmed the applicability of lab-scale machines for trade-off studies. The population balance model for the simulation of product size distributions has shown to work well with the breakage function estimated through tests performed on the HPGR at high rotational speed. Selection function has been estimated by back calculation of population balance model with the help of the experimental data. This is considered to be a major step towards advancing current research on the simulation of particle size distribution by using the HPGR machine for determining the breakage function. Developing a technique/setup to measure the wear rate of the HPGR rolls' surface is the objective of the second topic of this dissertation. A mockup was initially designed to assess the application of the linear displacement sensors for measuring the rolls' weight loss. Upon the analysis of that technique and considering the corresponding sources of

  18. Rock properties influencing impedance spectra (IS) studied by lab measurements on porous model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkmann, J.; Klitzsch, N.; Mohnke, O. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Applied Geophysics and Geothermal Energy; Schleifer, N. [Wintershall Holding GmbH, Barnstorf (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    The wetting condition of reservoir rocks is a crucial parameter for the estimation of reservoir characteristics like permeability and saturation with residual oil or water. Since standard methods are often costly, at least in terms of time, we aim at assessing wettability of reservoir rocks using impedance spectroscopy (IS), a frequency dependent measurement of complex electric resistivity. This approach is promising, because IS is sensitive to the electrochemical properties of the inner surface of rocks which, on the other hand, are decisively influencing wettability. Unfortunately, there is large number of rock parameters - besides wettability - influencing the impedance spectra often not exactly known for natural rock samples. Therefore, we study model systems to improve the understanding of the underlying mechanisms and to quantify the influencing parameters. The model systems consist of sintered porous silica beads of different sizes leading to samples with different pore sizes. The main advantage of these samples compared to natural rocks is their well-defined and uniform mineralogical composition and thus their uniform electrochemical surface property. In order to distinguish pore geometry and fluid electrochemistry effects on the IS properties we measured the IS response of the fully water saturated model systems in a wide frequency range - from 1 mHz to 35 MHz - to capture different often overlapping polarization processes. With these measurements we study the influence of pore or grain size, fluid conductivity, and wettability (contact angle) on the impedance spectra. The influence of wettability was studied by modifying the originally hydrophilic inner surface into a hydrophobic state. The wettability change was verified by contact angle measurements. As results, we find pore size dependent relaxation times and salinity dependent chargeabilities for the hydrophilic samples in the low frequency range (< 10 kHz), whereas for the hydrophobic samples

  19. Study on wetting properties of periodical nanopatterns by a combinative technique of photolithography and laser interference lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yung-Lang

    2010-03-01

    This study presents the wetting properties, including hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and anisotropic behavior, of water droplets on the silicon wafer surface with periodical nanopatterns and hierarchical structures. This study fabricates one- and two-dimensional periodical nanopatterns using laser interference lithography (LIL). The fabrication of hierarchical structures was effectively achieved by combining photolithography and LIL techniques. Unlike conventional fabrication methods, the LIL technique is mainly used to control the large-area design of periodical nanopatterns in this study. The minimum feature size for each nanopattern is 100 nm. This study shows that the wetting behavior of one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and hierarchical patterns can be obtained, benefiting the development of surface engineering for microfluidic systems. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Preparation and study of poly vinyl alcohol/hyperbranched polylysine fluorescence fibers via wet spinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongwei; Zou, Liming; Xu, Yongjing; Sun, Hong; Li, Yan Vivian

    2018-02-01

    A simple method of using wet spinning was found effective in the preparation of photoluminescent poly vinyl alcohol (PVA)/hyperbranched polylysine (HBPL) fibers. The photoluminescence of the PVA/HBPL fibers was significantly uniform and the unique uniformity was obtained by controlling the mass ratio of PVA to HBPL in aqueous solutions used in the wet spinning process. The high solubility of HBPL in water make it feasible to well control in the mass ratio of PVA to HBPL, which facilitated the formation of a unique PVA/HBPL mixture, resulting in the fabrication of homogeneous PVA composite fluorescence fibers. The composite fibers exhibit good mechanical, and thermal properties that make the PVA/HBPL fluorescent fibers a great material potentially used in fluorescence applications including optics, imaging and detection.

  1. A study on electric properties for pulse laser annealing of ITO film after wet etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.J.; Lin, H.K.; Li, C.H.; Chen, L.X.; Lee, C.C.; Wu, C.W.; Huang, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    The electric properties of ITO thin film after UV or IR laser annealing and wet etching was analyzed via grazing incidence in-plane X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra and residual stress measurement. The laser annealing process readily induced microcracks or quasi-microcracks on the ITO thin film due to the residual tension stress of crystalline phase transformation between irradiated and non-irradiated areas, and these defects then became the preferred sites for a higher etching rate, resulting in discontinuities in the ITO thin film after the wet etching process. The discontinuities in the residual ITO thin film obstruct carrier transmission and further result in electric failure. - Highlights: ► The laser annealing process induces microcracks in InSnO 2 thin films. ► The defects result in higher local etching rate during wet etching. ► These process defects originate from residual tension stress. ► Decreasing the thermal shock is suggested in order to reduce these process defects.

  2. Clinical study of Conbercept intravitreal injection for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Ting He

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinical curative effect of conbercept intravitreal injection for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration.METHODS: Sixty patients with wet age related macular degeneration were randomly divided into treatment group 30 cases and control group 30 cases according to the random number table. The treatment group was injected with Conbercept 0.05mL, the control group was injected with triamcinolone acetonide 0.1mL. The best corrected visual acuity(BCVAwas performed before and after 1d, 1 and 3mo after treatment, and the thickness of macular was detected by optical coherence tomography(OCT. The complications of patients were observed after 1d, 1 and 3mo,including inflammatory reaction, corneal edema, anterior chamber, high intraocular pressure, etc.RESULTS:In treatment group 1d, 1 and 3mo after treatment, eyesight was improved significantly better than the control group(PPCONCLUSION: Intravitreal injection of Conbercept in the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration can improve the curative effect.

  3. A kinetic model of municipal sludge degradation during non-catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince-Pike, Arrian; Wilson, David I; Baroutian, Saeid; Andrews, John; Gapes, Daniel J

    2015-12-15

    Wet oxidation is a successful process for the treatment of municipal sludge. In addition, the resulting effluent from wet oxidation is a useful carbon source for subsequent biological nutrient removal processes in wastewater treatment. Owing to limitations with current kinetic models, this study produced a kinetic model which predicts the concentrations of key intermediate components during wet oxidation. The model was regressed from lab-scale experiments and then subsequently validated using data from a wet oxidation pilot plant. The model was shown to be accurate in predicting the concentrations of each component, and produced good results when applied to a plant 500 times larger in size. A statistical study was undertaken to investigate the validity of the regressed model parameters. Finally the usefulness of the model was demonstrated by suggesting optimum operating conditions such that volatile fatty acids were maximised. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental studies of applicability of the wet air oxidation for purification liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergienko, V. I.; Dobrzansky, V. G.

    2005-01-01

    The scheme of handling with liquid radioactive waste (LRW) accepted to exploitation at atomic electric station (AWS) is often connected with evaporating technologies. In this case vat residues of evaporating systems with activity 10 5 -10 6 Bq/1 and containing to 200-300 g/1 of salts are delivered up to LRW storages for lasting keeping. This schema does not correlate to the modern safety standards of handling with LRW, therefore at present numerous works are being carried on including those using technology of accumulated vat residues processing. Some successful experiments on sorption purification of high-salt LRW from cesium radionuclides giving the principal contribution into the total activity of a certain LRW are known. Unfortunately, attempts of sorption purification of the vat residues from other long-lived radionuclides (mainly from 60 Co-radionuclide) were unsuccessful up to the present time. It is found with the fact that the vat residues contain a considerable amount of complexing agent producing stable complexes with transition metal radionuclides including those of 60 Co. Extreme oxidation of the vat residues for decomposition of radioactive organic complexes is one of the solutions of this problem. The works related to oxidation of LRW including the AES vat residues with ozone, hydrogen peroxide as well as photo catalytic and electrochemical oxidation are known, however, possibilities of wet air oxidation (WAO) for LRW processing are not studied till the present time. Condition for decomposition of cobalt complex compounds and necessary excess of oxidizing agent may be easily attained with WAO usage. The necessary experiments were carried out at the experimental plant with the great interface surface (oxygen-solutions) equal to 400m -1 and 3 mm probe bed thickness. The heating time of the reactor to the working temperature 250 .deg. C did not exceed 50 seconds. 20... 50-fold oxidizer excess was achieved by the initial oxygen pressure into the reactor

  5. Study on Factors of Favorable Wet Cotton Hand Towels “Oshibori”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeta, Yasuhiro; Kitamoto, Takuma; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Kasuga, Masao

    In the present study, we evaluated important factors of the feelings of comfort associated with wet cotton hand towels, or oshibori. First, the following adjectives were extracted as words used to evaluate the characteristics of the oshibori: “large,” “pretty,” “comfortable,” “high-grade,” “shapely,” “soft,” “favorite,” “thick,” “clean,” “moist,” “luxurious,” “heavy,” “strong,” “safe,” “good-touch,” and “rare.” We then conducted a subjective evaluation of 25 kinds of oshibori of various sizes and thicknesses. Forty males and twenty-four females, ranging in age from their twenties to fifties, participated in the experiment. Each subject evaluated the oshibori by grading them from one to five based on the extracted descriptive characteristics. Factor analysis was conducted on the experimental results and the following three factors were extracted; the first factor defined as “dignity factor,” the second factor defined as “preference factor,” and the third factor defined as “touch factor.” The score for dignity increased as the size of the oshibori increased. The score for preference was high when the size of the oshibori was between 25 cm × 25 cm and 30 cm × 30 cm. These results suggest that subjects felt high-class if the size of the oshibori was greater than 30 cm × 30 cm, but subjects most preferred oshibori that were between 25 cm × 25 cm and 30 cm × 30 cm. No notable trend was found between the thickness of oshibori and the three factors. We then analyzed the experimental data focusing on the following viewpoints; “gender” and “generation.” of the subjects, and discussed how these factors effected on the feelings of oshibori using the Mann-Whitney U test and the Kruskal-Wallis H test. The analyzed results show that the female subjects tended to evaluate more highly on the evaluation words of “thick,” “moist,” and “heavy,” that the evaluations of “large,”

  6. Studying and Improving Human Response to Natural Hazards: Lessons from the Virtual Hurricane Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, R.; Broad, K.; Orlove, B. S.

    2010-12-01

    threat. From a basic research perspective the data provide valuable potential insights into the dynamics of information gathering prior to hurricane impacts, as well as laboratory in which we can study how both information gathering and responses varies in responses to controlled variations in such factors as the complexity of forecast information. From an applied perspective the simulations provide an opportunity for residents in hazard-prone areas to learn about different kinds of information and receive feedback on their potential biases prior to an actual encounter with a hazard. The presentation concludes with a summary of some of the basic research findings that have emerged from the hurricane lab to date, as well as a discussion of the prospects for extending the technology to a broad range of environmental hazards.

  7. Characterizing the variability in chemical composition of flowback and produced waters - results from lab and field studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilke, Franziska D. H.; Schmid, Franziska E.; Zhu, Yaling; Lipińska, Olga; Konieczyńska, Monika

    2017-04-01

    The huge volumes and unknown composition of flowback and produced waters cause major public concerns about the environmental and social compatibility of hydraulic fracturing and the exploitation of gas from unconventional reservoirs. Flowback and produced waters contain not only residues of fracking additives but also chemical species that are dissolved from the target shales themselves. Shales are a heterogeneous mixture of minerals, organic matter, and formation water and little is actually understood about the fluid-rock interactions occurring during hydraulic fracturing of the shales and their effects on the chemical composition of flowback and produced water. To overcome this knowledge gap, interactions of different shales with different artificial stimulation fluids were studied in lab experiments under ambient and elevated temperature and pressure conditions. These lab experiments showed clearly that fluid-rock interactions change the chemical composition of the initial stimulation fluid and that geochemistry of the fractured shale is relevant for understanding flowback water composition. In addition, flowback water samples were taken after hydraulic fracturing of one horizontal well in Pomeranian region, Poland and investigated for their chemical composition. With this presentation, results from lab and field studies will be presented and compared to decipher possible controls on chemical compositions of flowback and produced water.

  8. Enamel Wetness Effects on Microshear Bond Strength of Different Bonding Agents (Adhesive Systems): An in vitro Comparative Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Mishra, Vinay K

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of enamel wetness on microshear bond strength using different adhesive systems. To evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on dry enamel; to evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on wet enamel; and to compare microshear bond strength of three different bonding agents on dry and wet enamel. Sixty extracted noncarious human premolars were selected for this study. Flat enamel surfaces of approximately 3 mm were obtained by grinding the buccal surfaces of premolars with water-cooled diamond disks. This study evaluated one etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Single Bond 2) and two self-etching adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Xeno-V). The specimens were divided into two groups (n = 30). Group I (dry) was air-dried for 30 seconds and in group II (wet) surfaces were blotted with absorbent paper to remove excess water. These groups were further divided into six subgroups (n = 10) according to the adhesives used. The resin composite, Filtek Z 250, was bonded to flat enamel surfaces that had been treated with one of the adhesives, following the manufacturer's instructions. After being stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours, bonded specimens were stressed in universal testing machine (Fig. 3) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were evaluated with one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), t-test, and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests (a = 0.05). The two-way ANOVA and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests showed significant differences among adhesive systems, but wetness did not influence microshear bond strength (p = 0.1762). The one-way ANOVA and t-test showed that the all-in-one adhesive (Xeno-V) was the only material influenced by the presence of water on the enamel surface. Xeno-V showed significantly higher microshear bond strength when the enamel was kept wet. Single Bond 2 adhesive showed significantly higher microshear bond strength as compared with Xeno-V adhesive but no

  9. Forest structure in low-diversity tropical forests: a study of Hawaiian wet and dry forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostertag, Rebecca; Inman-Narahari, Faith; Cordell, Susan; Giardina, Christian P; Sack, Lawren

    2014-01-01

    The potential influence of diversity on ecosystem structure and function remains a topic of significant debate, especially for tropical forests where diversity can range widely. We used Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) methodology to establish forest dynamics plots in montane wet forest and lowland dry forest on Hawai'i Island. We compared the species diversity, tree density, basal area, biomass, and size class distributions between the two forest types. We then examined these variables across tropical forests within the CTFS network. Consistent with other island forests, the Hawai'i forests were characterized by low species richness and very high relative dominance. The two Hawai'i forests were floristically distinct, yet similar in species richness (15 vs. 21 species) and stem density (3078 vs. 3486/ha). While these forests were selected for their low invasive species cover relative to surrounding forests, both forests averaged 5->50% invasive species cover; ongoing removal will be necessary to reduce or prevent competitive impacts, especially from woody species. The montane wet forest had much larger trees, resulting in eightfold higher basal area and above-ground biomass. Across the CTFS network, the Hawaiian montane wet forest was similar to other tropical forests with respect to diameter distributions, density, and aboveground biomass, while the Hawai'i lowland dry forest was similar in density to tropical forests with much higher diversity. These findings suggest that forest structural variables can be similar across tropical forests independently of species richness. The inclusion of low-diversity Pacific Island forests in the CTFS network provides an ∼80-fold range in species richness (15-1182 species), six-fold variation in mean annual rainfall (835-5272 mm yr(-1)) and 1.8-fold variation in mean annual temperature (16.0-28.4°C). Thus, the Hawaiian forest plots expand the global forest plot network to enable testing of ecological theory for

  10. Wetting kinetics of nanodroplets on lyophilic nanopillar-arrayed surfaces: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Diyuan; Yang, Zhen; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2017-10-01

    Wetting kinetics of water droplets on substrates with lyophilic nanopillars was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Early spreading of the droplet is hindered by the nanopillars because of the penetration of the liquid which induce an extra dissipation in the droplet. Droplet spreading is mainly controlled by liquid viscosity and surface tension and not dependent on solid wettability. Propagation of the fringe film is hindered by the enhanced solid wettability because of the energy barrier introduced by the interaction between water molecules and nanopillars which increase with solid wettability.

  11. Fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces based on ZnO-PDMS nanocomposite coatings and study of its wetting behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakradhar, R.P.S., E-mail: chakra@nal.res.in [Surface Engineering Division, National Aerospace Laboratories (CSIR), Bangalore 560017 (India); Kumar, V. Dinesh [Surface Engineering Division, National Aerospace Laboratories (CSIR), Bangalore 560017 (India); Rao, J.L. [Department of Physics, S.V. University, Tirupathi 517502 (India); Basu, Bharathibai J., E-mail: bharathi@nal.res.in [Surface Engineering Division, National Aerospace Laboratories (CSIR), Bangalore 560017 (India)

    2011-08-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces based on ZnO-PDMS nanocomposite coatings are demonstrated by a simple, facile, time-saving, wet chemical route. ZnO nanopowders with average particle size of 14 nm were synthesized by a low temperature solution combustion method. Powder X-ray diffraction results confirm that the nanopowders exhibit hexagonal wurtzite structure and belong to space group P63mc. Field emission scanning electron micrographs reveal that the nanoparticles are connected to each other to make large network systems consisting of hierarchical structure. The as formed ZnO coating exhibits wetting behaviour with Water Contact Angle (WCA) of {approx}108{sup o}, however on modification with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), it transforms to superhydrophobic surface with measured contact and sliding angles for water at 155{sup o} and less than 5{sup o} respectively. The surface properties such as surface free energy ({gamma}{sub p}), interfacial free energy ({gamma}{sub pw}), and the adhesive work (W{sub pw}) were evaluated. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies on superhydrophobic coatings revealed that the surface defects play a major role on the wetting behaviour. Advantages of the present method include the cheap and fluorine-free raw materials, environmentally benign solvents, and feasibility for applying on large area of different substrates.

  12. Fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces based on ZnO-PDMS nanocomposite coatings and study of its wetting behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Kumar, V. Dinesh; Rao, J. L.; Basu, Bharathibai J.

    2011-08-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces based on ZnO-PDMS nanocomposite coatings are demonstrated by a simple, facile, time-saving, wet chemical route. ZnO nanopowders with average particle size of 14 nm were synthesized by a low temperature solution combustion method. Powder X-ray diffraction results confirm that the nanopowders exhibit hexagonal wurtzite structure and belong to space group P63 mc. Field emission scanning electron micrographs reveal that the nanoparticles are connected to each other to make large network systems consisting of hierarchical structure. The as formed ZnO coating exhibits wetting behaviour with Water Contact Angle (WCA) of ˜108°, however on modification with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), it transforms to superhydrophobic surface with measured contact and sliding angles for water at 155° and less than 5° respectively. The surface properties such as surface free energy ( γp), interfacial free energy ( γpw), and the adhesive work ( Wpw) were evaluated. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies on superhydrophobic coatings revealed that the surface defects play a major role on the wetting behaviour. Advantages of the present method include the cheap and fluorine-free raw materials, environmentally benign solvents, and feasibility for applying on large area of different substrates.

  13. Fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces based on ZnO-PDMS nanocomposite coatings and study of its wetting behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakradhar, R.P.S.; Kumar, V. Dinesh; Rao, J.L.; Basu, Bharathibai J.

    2011-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces based on ZnO-PDMS nanocomposite coatings are demonstrated by a simple, facile, time-saving, wet chemical route. ZnO nanopowders with average particle size of 14 nm were synthesized by a low temperature solution combustion method. Powder X-ray diffraction results confirm that the nanopowders exhibit hexagonal wurtzite structure and belong to space group P63mc. Field emission scanning electron micrographs reveal that the nanoparticles are connected to each other to make large network systems consisting of hierarchical structure. The as formed ZnO coating exhibits wetting behaviour with Water Contact Angle (WCA) of ∼108 o , however on modification with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), it transforms to superhydrophobic surface with measured contact and sliding angles for water at 155 o and less than 5 o respectively. The surface properties such as surface free energy (γ p ), interfacial free energy (γ pw ), and the adhesive work (W pw ) were evaluated. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies on superhydrophobic coatings revealed that the surface defects play a major role on the wetting behaviour. Advantages of the present method include the cheap and fluorine-free raw materials, environmentally benign solvents, and feasibility for applying on large area of different substrates.

  14. Wet-plate culture studies of Penicillium sp. PT95 and Q1 for mass production of sclerotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen-Jing; An, Cui-Hong; Han, Jian-Rong

    2014-04-01

    Penicillium sp. PT95 and Q1 strains were able to form abundant orange, sand-shaped sclerotia in which carotenoids were accumulated. To determine the potential availability of the wet-plate method for mass production of sclerotia, nine kinds of liquid media were used culture the PT95 and Q1 strains. The results of the wet-plate culture showed that on 25% glycerol nitrate broth medium, the growth of both strains was relatively slow, and no sclerotia were found. Q1 strain cultured on Czapek's yeast extract broth medium could not form sclerotia. On other media, both strains could form sclerotia. For PT95 strain, the highest sclerotial biomass (380 mg plate(-1) ) and carotenoids yield (20.88 µg plate(-1) ) could be obtained on Czapek's yeast extract broth and Georgiou's liquid medium, respectively. For Q1 strain, malt extract broth medium gave the highest sclerotial biomass (340 mg plate(-1) ) and omitting iron Joham's liquid medium gave the highest carotenoids yield (18.29 µg plate(-1) ). The results from this study suggest the potential usage of wet-plate method in the mass production of sclerotia of the PT95 and Q1 strains. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Wet storage integrity update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables

  16. Study of surfactant-added TMAH for applications in DRIE and wet etching-based micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, B.; Shikida, M.; Sato, K.; Pal, P.; Amakawa, H.; Hida, H.; Fukuzawa, K.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, etching anisotropy is evaluated for a number of different crystallographic orientations of silicon in a 0.1 vol% Triton-X-100 added 25 wt% tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution using a silicon hemisphere. The research is primarily aimed at developing advanced applications of wet etching in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The etching process is carried out at different temperatures in the range of 61-81 °C. The etching results of silicon hemisphere and different shapes of three-dimensional structures in {1 0 0}- and {1 1 0}-Si surfaces are analyzed. Significantly important anisotropy, different from a traditional etchant (e.g. pure KOH and TMAH), is investigated to extend the applications of the wet etching process in silicon bulk micromachining. The similar etching behavior of exact and vicinal {1 1 0} and {1 1 1} planes in TMAH + Triton is utilized selectively to remove the scalloping from deep reactive-ion etching (DRIE) etched profiles. The direct application of the present research is demonstrated by fabricating a cylindrical lens with highly smooth etched surface finish. The smoothness of a micro-lens at different locations is measured qualitatively by a scanning electron microscope and quantitatively by an atomic force microscope. The present paper provides a simple and effective fabrication method of the silicon micro-lens for optical MEMS applications.

  17. A Big Bang Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  18. The LUSI LAB project: a multidisciplinary study of focussed fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, A.

    2012-12-01

    The 29th of May 2006 several gas and mud eruption sites suddenly appeared along a fault in the NE of Java, Indonesia. Within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. To date Lusi is still active. This disaster has forced 50.000 people to be evacuated and an area of more than 7 km2 is covered by mud. The social impact of the eruption and its spectacular dimensions still attract the attention of international media reporting on the "largest mud eruption site on Earth". Our investigations revealed that the Watukosek fault system reactivated after the 27-05-2006 Yogyakarta earthquake allowing the release of overpressured fluids along the fault planes. Sampling results indicate that the main source of clay and fluids was traced from the overpressured units located at ~1500 m depth. Further, analyses and modelling indicate that Lusi gas was generated at high temperatures (>220°C) with maturity and isotopic characteristics corresponding to the oil-prone Eocene, Ngimbang shales situated at 4,400 m. Hydrocarbon, CO2 and helium analyses are consistent with a scenario of deep sited (>4000 m) magmatic intrusions and hydrothermal fluids responsible for the enhanced heat that altered source rocks and/or gas reservoirs. The neighbouring magmatic Arjuno complex and its fluid-pressure system combined with high seismic activity could have played a key role in the Lusi genesis and evolution. Despite the work done, still many unanswered questions remain. What lies beneath Lusi? If Lusi is not a mud volcano, how large is the connected hydrothermal system? How do the frequent seismic activity and the neighbouring Arjuno Welirang volcanic complex effect pulsating Lusi behaviour? What are the mechanisms triggering the eruption? How long will the eruption last? Are more eruptions like this one likely to occur? LUSI LAB is an ambitious project that aims to answer these questions and to perform a multidisciplinary study using

  19. The effect of integrating lab experiments in electronic circuits into mathematic studies - a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabag, Nissim

    2017-10-01

    The importance of knowledge and skills in mathematics for electrical engineering students is well known. Engineers and engineering educators agree that any engineering curriculum must include plenty of mathematics studies to enrich the engineer's toolbox. Nevertheless, little attention has been given to the possible contribution of examples from engineering fields for the clarification of mathematical issues.

  20. Ntal/Lab/Lat2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaki, Shoko; Jensen, Bettina M; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2007-01-01

    T cells. As demonstrated in monocytes and B cells, phosphorylated NTAL/LAB/LAT2 recruits signaling molecules such as Grb2, Gab1 and c-Cbl into receptor-signaling complexes. Although gene knock out and knock down studies have indicated that NTAL/LAB/LAT2 may function as both a positive and negative...

  1. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reactio...

  2. Conditioning of Si-interfaces by wet-chemical oxidation: Electronic interface properties study by surface photovoltage measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angermann, Heike, E-mail: angermann@helmholtz-berlin.de

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • Determination of electronic interface properties by contact-less surface photovoltage (SPV) technique. • Systematic correlations of substrate morphology and surface electronic properties. • Optimization of surface pre-treatment for flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si solar cell substrates. • Ultra-thin passivating Si oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states by wet-chemical oxidation and subsequent annealing. • Environmentally acceptable processes, utilizing hot water, diluted HCl, or ozone low cost alternative to current approaches with concentrated chemicals. • The effect of optimized wet-chemical pre-treatments can be preserved during subsequent layer deposition. - Abstract: The field-modulated surface photovoltage (SPV) method, a very surface sensitive technique, was utilized to determine electronic interface properties on wet-chemically oxidized and etched silicon (Si) interfaces. The influence of preparation-induced surface micro-roughness and un-stoichiometric oxides on the resulting the surface charge, energetic distribution D{sub it}(E), and density D{sub it,min} of rechargeable states was studied by simultaneous, spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurements on polished Si(111) and Si(100) substrates. Based on previous findings and new research, a study of conventional and newly developed wet-chemical oxidation methods was established, correlating the interactions between involved oxidizing and etching solutions and the initial substrate morphology to the final surface conditioning. It is shown, which sequences of wet-chemical oxidation and oxide removal, have to be combined in order to achieve atomically smooth, hydrogen terminated surfaces, as well as ultra-thin oxide layers with low densities of rechargeable states on flat, saw damage etched, and textured Si substrates, as commonly applied in silicon device and solar cell manufacturing. These conventional strategies for wet-chemical pre-treatment are mainly

  3. Forest structure in low-diversity tropical forests: a study of Hawaiian wet and dry forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ostertag

    Full Text Available The potential influence of diversity on ecosystem structure and function remains a topic of significant debate, especially for tropical forests where diversity can range widely. We used Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS methodology to establish forest dynamics plots in montane wet forest and lowland dry forest on Hawai'i Island. We compared the species diversity, tree density, basal area, biomass, and size class distributions between the two forest types. We then examined these variables across tropical forests within the CTFS network. Consistent with other island forests, the Hawai'i forests were characterized by low species richness and very high relative dominance. The two Hawai'i forests were floristically distinct, yet similar in species richness (15 vs. 21 species and stem density (3078 vs. 3486/ha. While these forests were selected for their low invasive species cover relative to surrounding forests, both forests averaged 5->50% invasive species cover; ongoing removal will be necessary to reduce or prevent competitive impacts, especially from woody species. The montane wet forest had much larger trees, resulting in eightfold higher basal area and above-ground biomass. Across the CTFS network, the Hawaiian montane wet forest was similar to other tropical forests with respect to diameter distributions, density, and aboveground biomass, while the Hawai'i lowland dry forest was similar in density to tropical forests with much higher diversity. These findings suggest that forest structural variables can be similar across tropical forests independently of species richness. The inclusion of low-diversity Pacific Island forests in the CTFS network provides an ∼80-fold range in species richness (15-1182 species, six-fold variation in mean annual rainfall (835-5272 mm yr(-1 and 1.8-fold variation in mean annual temperature (16.0-28.4°C. Thus, the Hawaiian forest plots expand the global forest plot network to enable testing of ecological

  4. High energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy study of the dielectric properties of bulk and nanoparticle LaB6 in the near-infrared region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yohei; Terauchi, Masami; Mukai, Masaki; Kaneyama, Toshikatsu; Adachi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    The dielectric properties of LaB 6 crystals and the plasmonic behavior of LaB 6 nanoparticles, which have been applied to solar heat-shielding filters, were studied by high energy-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS). An EELS spectrum of a LaB 6 crystal showed a peak at 2.0 eV, which was attributed to volume plasmon excitation of carrier electrons. EELS spectra of single LaB 6 nanoparticles showed peaks at 1.1-1.4 eV depending on the dielectric effect from the substrates. The peaks were assigned to dipole oscillation excitations. These peak energies almost coincided with the peak energy of optical absorption of a heat-shielding filter with LaB 6 nanoparticles. On the other hand, those energies were a smaller than a dipole oscillation energy predicted using the dielectric function of bulk LaB 6 crystal. It is suggested that the lower energy than expected is due to an excitation at 1.2 eV, which was observed for oxidized LaB 6 area. -- Highlights: → The dielectric properties of LaB 6 nanoparticles applied to solar heat-shielding filters were studied by HR-EELS. → Plasmon peak energies of the LaB 6 nanoparticles were almost equal to optical absorption energy of a heat-shielding filter. → From this result, near-infrared optical absorption of the filter is due to the surface dipole mode of the nanoparticles.

  5. Numerical Study of Electrolyte Wetting Phenomena in the Electrode of Lithium Ion Battery Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Gun [Seoul Nat' l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Dong Hyup [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The electrolyte wetting phenomena in the electrode of lithium ion battery is studied numerically using a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). When a porous electrode is compressed during roll-pressing process, the porosity and thickness of the compressed electrode are changed, which can affect its wettability. In this study, the change in electrolyte distribution and degree of saturation as a result of varying the compression ratio are investigated with two-dimensional LBM approach. We found that changes in the electrolyte transport path are caused by a reduction in through-plane pore size and result in a decrease in the wettability of the compressed electrode.

  6. Wetting front instability in an initially wet unsaturated fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholl, M.J.; Glass, R.J.; Nguyen, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results exploring gravity-driven wetting from instability in a pre-wetted, rough-walled analog fractures such as those at Yucca Mountain are presented. Initial conditions considered include a uniform moisture field wetted to field capacity of the analog fracture and the structured moisture field created by unstable infiltration into an initially dry fracture. As in previous studies performed under dry initial conditions, instability was found to result both at the cessation of stable infiltration and at flux lower than the fracture capacity under gravitational driving force. Individual fingers were faster, narrower, longer, and more numerous than observed under dry initial conditions. Wetting fronts were found to follow existing wetted structure, providing a mechanism for rapid recharge and transport

  7. Wetting front instability in an initially wet unsaturated fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholl, M.J.; Glass, R.J.; Nguyen, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental results exploring gravity-driven wetting front instability in a pre-wetted, rough-walled analog fracture are presented. Initial conditions considered include a uniform moisture field wetted to field capacity of the analog fracture and the structured moisture field created by unstable infiltration into an initially dry fracture. As in previous studies performed under dry initial conditions, instability was found to result both at the cessation of stable infiltration and at flux lower than the fracture capacity under gravitational driving force. Individual fingers were faster, narrower, longer, and more numerous than observed under dry initial conditions. Wetting fronts were found to follow existing wetted structure, providing a mechanism for rapid recharge and transport

  8. Bipolar Radiofrequency Ablation Using Dual Internally Cooled Wet Electrodes: Experimental Study in Ex Vivo Bovine Liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Joon; Byun, Jae Young [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To determine the optimized protocol for bipolar radiofrequency ablation (RFA), using dual internally cooled wet (ICW) electrodes in the ex vivo bovine liver. RFA was applied to the explanted bovine liver, using two 3 cm active tip electrodes with 3.5 cm spacing. A total of 25 ablation zones were created by five groups; group A: 70 W-20 minute (min), group B: 70 W-25 min, group C: 90 W-15 min, group D: 90 W-20 min, and group E: 90 W-25 min. We measured the total energy and size of ablation zones with a color of grey or pink. Statistical analysis was done using Kruskal Wallis test and Mann Whitney U-test. The mean energy, mean volume of ablation zone with grey and pink color of groups A to E were 16.7, 23.9, 16.7, 21.8, 29.2 kcal, 25.7, 34.3, 29.5, 36.2, 45.2 cm{sup 3}, and 60.0, 88.0, 71.5, 87.4, 104.5 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Those were significantly different (p < 0.05). The volume of ablation zone of group E with grey color was larger than groups A, B and C (p < 0.05). Bipolar RFA, using dual ICW electrodes, can produce a large ablation zone with the protocol of 90 W-25 min.

  9. Bipolar Radiofrequency Ablation Using Dual Internally Cooled Wet Electrodes: Experimental Study in Ex Vivo Bovine Liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Joon; Byun, Jae Young

    2012-01-01

    To determine the optimized protocol for bipolar radiofrequency ablation (RFA), using dual internally cooled wet (ICW) electrodes in the ex vivo bovine liver. RFA was applied to the explanted bovine liver, using two 3 cm active tip electrodes with 3.5 cm spacing. A total of 25 ablation zones were created by five groups; group A: 70 W-20 minute (min), group B: 70 W-25 min, group C: 90 W-15 min, group D: 90 W-20 min, and group E: 90 W-25 min. We measured the total energy and size of ablation zones with a color of grey or pink. Statistical analysis was done using Kruskal Wallis test and Mann Whitney U-test. The mean energy, mean volume of ablation zone with grey and pink color of groups A to E were 16.7, 23.9, 16.7, 21.8, 29.2 kcal, 25.7, 34.3, 29.5, 36.2, 45.2 cm 3 , and 60.0, 88.0, 71.5, 87.4, 104.5 cm 3 , respectively. Those were significantly different (p < 0.05). The volume of ablation zone of group E with grey color was larger than groups A, B and C (p < 0.05). Bipolar RFA, using dual ICW electrodes, can produce a large ablation zone with the protocol of 90 W-25 min.

  10. Preliminary study of Conbercept injected intravitreally for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the preliminary efficacy of conbercept injected intravitreally for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration(wAMD.METHODS:Seventeen wAMD patients(18 eyeswere selected to receive conbercept injection. All patients were given a single conbercept injection every month, 3 times. Before and after 1, 2, 3mo of the injection, the best corrected visual acuity(BCVA, intraocular pressure(IOP, measured by Non-contact tonometer, fundus photography, fundus fluorescein angiography(FFA, indocyanine green angiography(ICG, optical coherence tomography(OCTexamination and the complications incidence were compared.RESULTS:Three months after conbercept injection, the BCVA improved in 15 eyes(83%, stable in 3 eyes(17%. Before treatment, the average central macular thickness was 421.72±54.43μm, at 1 and 2 and 3mo after treatment, the average central macular thickness was 337.89±25.88μm, 293.56±26.87μm, 266.89±19.10μm respectively. There were significant differences compared with before and after injection(PCONCLUSION:Intravitreal injection conbercept for wAMD can significantly improve the visual function, reduce the macular edema and the leakage with higher safety and less complications. However the prolonged efficacy needs further observation.

  11. A preliminary and qualitative study of resource ratio theory to nitrifying lab-scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Micol; Ofiţeru, Irina D; Beneduce, Luciano; Graham, David W; Head, Ian M; Curtis, Thomas P

    2015-05-01

    The incorporation of microbial diversity in design would ideally require predictive theory that would relate operational parameters to the numbers and distribution of taxa. Resource ratio-theory (RRT) might be one such theory. Based on Monod kinetics, it explains diversity in function of resource-ratio and richness. However, to be usable in biological engineered system, the growth parameters of all the bacteria under consideration and the resource supply and diffusion parameters for all the relevant nutrients should be determined. This is challenging, but plausible, at least for low diversity groups with simple resource requirements like the ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). One of the major successes of RRT was its ability to explain the 'paradox of enrichment' which states that diversity first increases and then decreases with resource richness. Here, we demonstrate that this pattern can be seen in lab-scale-activated sludge reactors and parallel simulations that incorporate the principles of RRT in a floc-based system. High and low ammonia and oxygen were supplied to continuous flow bioreactors with resource conditions correlating with the composition and diversity of resident AOB communities based on AOB 16S rDNA clone libraries. Neither the experimental work nor the simulations are definitive proof for the application of RRT in this context. However, it is sufficient evidence that such approach might work and justify a more rigorous investigation. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Parametric studies and evaluations of indoor thermal environment in wet season using a field survey and PMV-PPD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Shengxian [College of Physics and Electric Engineering, Qujing Normal University, Qujing 655011 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Technique and Preparation for Renewable Energy Materials, Ministry of Education, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China); Li, Ming [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technique and Preparation for Renewable Energy Materials, Ministry of Education, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China); Lin, Wenxian [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technique and Preparation for Renewable Energy Materials, Ministry of Education, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China); School of Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811 (Australia); Sun, Yanlin [College of Physics and Electric Engineering, Qujing Normal University, Qujing 655011 (China)

    2010-06-15

    Fanger's PMV-PPD is the most famous thermal sensation indices but it is too complex to be applied in practice. To obtain simple and applicable correlations, taking Qujing of Yunnan province, China, as example, a wet season (six-month) field measurement was conducted in a naturally ventilated residential room. Based on collected data, PMV indices were calculated by using Newton's iterative method. It is shown that the PMV values approximately vary from -1.0 to +1.0 and the indoor thermal environment is basically comfortable. Relationships of the parameters (indoor and outdoor air temperatures, mean radiant temperature, PMV and PPD) and indoor air temperature gradients (vertical and horizontal) were also studied by means of the linear regression and the quadratic polynomial fit techniques. Numerous correlations with high relativities have been developed. Moreover, the vertical and horizontal air temperature gradients range from 0.1 K/m to 0.85 K/m and from -0.208 K/m to 0.063 K/m in wet season. It is convenient to use these results to evaluate and assess the indoor thermal environment under similar climatic conditions. The results of this work enrich and develop the basic theory of the indoor thermal environment design and control. (author)

  13. Study on Surface Integrity of AISI 1045 Carbon Steel when machined by Carbide Cutting Tool under wet conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamin N. Fauzi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the evaluation of surface roughness and roughness profiles when machining carbon steel under wet conditions with low and high cutting speeds. The workpiece materials and cutting tools selected in this research were AISI 1045 carbon steel and canela carbide inserts graded PM25, respectively. The cutting tools undergo machining tests by CNC turning operations and their performances were evaluated by their surface roughness value and observation of the surface roughness profile. The machining tests were held at varied cutting speeds of 35 to 53 m/min, feed rate of 0.15 to 0.50 mm/rev and a constant depth of cut of 1 mm. From the analysis, it was found that surface roughness increased as the feed rate increased. Varian of surface roughness was suspected due to interaction between cutting speeds and feed rates as well as nose radius conditions; whether from tool wear or the formation of a built-up edge. This study helps us understand the effect of cutting speed and feed rate on surface integrity, when machining AISI 1045 carbon steel using carbide cutting tools, under wet cutting conditions.

  14. Influence of Air Pollution on Chemical Quality of Wet Atmospheric Deposition: a Case Study in Urmia, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaghoub Hajizadeh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Increased combustion of fossil fuel owing to the energy requirement is a main cause of air pollution throughout the world. Atmospheric precipitation is considered as a major water resource for indoor, municipal, industrial and agricultural uses. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of air pollution on chemical quality of rain and snow in Urmia, a city in northwest of Iran. Sampling was performed during the wet seasons from October to March at six sampling stations in different locations of the city. Acidity, alkalinity, NO3- , SO42-, Cl- and pH contents of the collected samples were analyzed. All samples showed a pH value of more than 6.8, and lower acidity than alkalinity, therefore, the precipitations were not acidic. Maximum concentrations of SO42- and NO3- in the samples were 5 and 8.8mg/L, respectively. Chloride was varied from 1 to 11.5 mg/L with the highest measures observing in autumn. According to the results, concentrations of the analyzed parameters in wet precipitations in Urmia were within the natural ranges except chloride ions, which was higher than its common level in the atmosphere. This phenomenon may be the result of desert dusts which transfers by wind from the west border to Iran. ‎

  15. Long-term operational studies of lab-scale pumice-woodchip packed stormwater biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing; Yuan, Qingke; Kim, Youngchul

    2017-06-13

    The performance of three pumice-woodchip packed stormwater biofilter (PWSWBF) systems with three packing volume ratios of pumice to woodchip (1:2, 1:1 and 2:1) were compared. The results show that the PWSWBF system packed with a lower percentage of woodchip attained a higher removal efficiency of TCOD, TN, NH 4 -N and TP, whereas all three systems completely removed nitrate. The highest removal efficiencies for TCOD, TN, NH 4 -N, NO 3 -N and TP were 95%, 70%, 86%, 100% and 100%, respectively. In the biofilter with a lower percentage of woodchip, the pollutants that get removed through aerobic biological processes were removed more significantly, which is attributed to less oxygen depletion via woodchip decomposition, which is common under wet conditions. Nitrate was significantly removed via denitrification in all three systems, indicating that the woodchip that occupied one-third of the main media was sufficient for denitrification, and also that the oxygen condition inside the column was proper for denitrification to proceed. A smaller amount of woodchip as the packing material also mitigated the adverse effect of the release of organics from the media during the initial period. In addition, the system showed very good buffering capacity, in that the outflow pH was constant within the optimal range for microorganism growth.

  16. Study of Double Spin Asymmetries in Inclusive ep Scattering at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hoyoung [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-01

    The spin structure of the proton has been investigated in the high Bjorken x and low momentum transfer Q2 region. We used Jefferson Lab's polarized electron beam, a polarized target, and a spectrometer to get both the parallel and perpendicular spin asymmetries Apar and Aperp. These asymmetries produced the physics asymmetries A_1 and A_2 and spin structure functions g_1 and g_2. We found Q2 dependences of the asymmetries at resonance region and higher-twist effects. Our result increases the available data on the proton spin structure, especially at resonance region with low Q2. Moreover, A_2 and g_2 data show clear Q2 evolution, comparing with RSS and SANE-BETA. Negative resonance in A_2 data needs to be examined by theory. It can be an indication of very negative transverse-longitudinal interference contribution at W ~ 1.3 GeV. Higher twist effect appears at the low Q2 of 1.9 GeV2, although it is less significant than lower Q2 data of RSS. Twist03 matrix element d_2 was calculated using our asymmetry fits evaluation at Q2 – 1.9 GeV2. D-bar_2 = -0.0087±0.0014 was obtained by integrating 0.47 ≤ x ≤ 0.87.

  17. Study of elemental mercury re-emission through a lab-scale simulated scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng-Li Wu; Yan Cao; Cheng-Chun He; Zhong-Bing Dong; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

    2010-08-15

    This paper describes a lab-scale simulated scrubber that was designed and built in the laboratory at Western Kentucky University's Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology. A series of tests on slurries of CaO, CaSO{sub 3}, CaSO{sub 4}/CaSO{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3} were carried out to simulate recirculating slurries in different oxidation modes. Elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) re-emission was replicated through the simulated scrubber. The relationship between the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of the slurries and the Hg0 re-emissions was evaluated. Elemental mercury re-emission occurred when Hg{sup 2+} that was absorbed in the simulated scrubber was converted to Hg{sup 0}; then, Hg{sup 0} was emitted from the slurry together with the carrier gas. The effects of both the reagents and the operational conditions (including the temperature, pH, and oxygen concentrations in the carrier gas) on the Hg{sup 0} re-emission rates in the simulated scrubber were investigated. The results indicated that as the operational temperature of the scrubber and the pH value of the slurry increased, the Hg{sup 0} concentrations that were emitted from the simulated scrubber increased. The Hg{sup 0} re-emission rates decreased as the O{sub 2} concentration in the carrier gas increased. In addition, the effects of additives to suppress Hg{sup 0} re-emission were evaluated in this paper. Sodium tetrasulfide, TMT 15, NaHS and HI were added to the slurry, while Hg{sup 2+}, which was absorbed in the slurry, was retained in the slurry as mercury precipitates. Therefore, there was a significant capacity for the additives to suppress Hg{sup 0} re-emission. 11 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Creating an inclusive mall environment with the PRECEDE-PROCEED model: a living lab case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sara; Swaine, Bonnie; Milot, Marc; Gaudet, Caroline; Poldma, Tiiu; Bartlett, Gillian; Mazer, Barbara; Le Dorze, Guylaine; Barbic, Skye; Rodriguez, Ana Maria; Lefebvre, Hélène; Archambault, Philippe; Kairy, Dahlia; Fung, Joyce; Labbé, Delphine; Lamontagne, Anouk; Kehayia, Eva

    2017-10-01

    Although public environments provide opportunities for participation and social inclusion, they are not always inclusive spaces and may not accommodate the wide diversity of people. The Rehabilitation Living Lab in the Mall is a unique, interdisciplinary, and multi-sectoral research project with an aim to transform a shopping complex in Montreal, Canada, into an inclusive environment optimizing the participation and social inclusion of all people. The PRECEDE-PROCEDE Model (PPM), a community-oriented and participatory planning model, was applied as a framework. The PPM is comprised of nine steps divided between planning, implementation, and evaluation. The PPM is well suited as a framework for the development of an inclusive mall. Its ecological approach considers the environment, as well as the social and individual factors relating to mall users' needs and expectations. Transforming a mall to be more inclusive is a complex process involving many stakeholders. The PPM allows the synthesis of several sources of information, as well as the identification and prioritization of key issues to address. The PPM also helps to frame and drive the implementation and evaluate the components of the project. This knowledge can help others interested in using the PPM to create similar enabling and inclusive environments world-wide. Implication for rehabilitation While public environments provide opportunities for participation and social inclusion, they are not always inclusive spaces and may not accommodate the wide diversity of people. The PRECEDE PROCEDE Model (PPM) is well suited as a framework for the development, implementation, and evaluation of an inclusive mall. Environmental barriers can negatively impact the rehabilitation process by impeding the restoration and augmentation of function. Removing barriers to social participation and independent living by improving inclusivity in the mall and other environments positively impacts the lives of people with disabilities.

  19. A comparative study on nutrient cycling in wet heathland ecosystems : II. Litter decomposition and nutrient mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendse, Frank; Bobbink, Roland; Rouwenhorst, Gerrit

    1989-03-01

    The concept of the relative nutrient requirement (L n ) that was introduced in the first paper of this series is used to analyse the effects of the dominant plant population on nutrient cycling and nutrient mineralization in wet heathland ecosystems. A distinction is made between the effect that the dominant plant species has on (1) the distribution of nutrients over the plant biomass and the soil compartment of the ecosystem and (2) the recirculation rate of nutrients. The first effect of the dominant plant species can be calculated on the basis of the δ/k ratio (which is the ratio of the relative mortality to the decomposition constant). The second effect can be analysed using the relative nutrient requirement (L n ). The mass loss and the changes in the amounts of N and P in decomposing above-ground and below-ground litter produced by Erica tetralix and Molinia caerulea were measured over three years. The rates of mass loss from both above-ground and below-ground litter of Molinia were higher than those from Erica litter. After an initial leaching phase, litter showed either a net release or a net immobilization of nitrogen or phosphorus that depended on the initial concentrations of these nutrients. At the same sites, mineralization of nitrogen and phosphorus were measured for two years both in communities dominated by Molinia and in communities dominated by Erica. There were no clear differences in the nitrogen mineralization, but in one of the two years, phosphate mineralization in the Molinia-community was significantly higher. On the basis of the theory that was developed, mineralization rates and ratios between amounts of nutrients in plant biomass and in the soil were calculated on the basis of parameters that were independently measured. There was a reasonable agreement between predicted and measured values in the Erica-communities. In the Molinia-communities there were large differences between calculated and measured values, which was explained by the

  20. The Study of Impacts of Water Transferring From Wet Regions To Dry Regions In Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motiee-Homayoun, Dr.; Ghomashchi, Dr.

    available. In this situation, water transformation from wet areas (with good water resources) to dried and desert regions of the country has been identified as a necessary and reasonable policy to tacklewater shortage. Mediterain climate and mountains in north, west and southwest regions of Iran grant a benefit of high level rate of rainfall, several deep and long rivers, and large capacity of groundwater resources in these areas. Existence of such rivers and water resources, especially a big river of Karoon in southwest, strengthens the goal of constructing hydraulic structures in order to transfer water fro m wet areas to central and eastern areas of the country. This goal has led to planning and implementing of several large and high cost projects. Experts of water affairs, believe that although drinking water supply is one of the most crucial missions of the government, it should also be noted that transformation huge amount of water from an area to another area, with a very long distant, undoubtedly, will cause significant environmental impacts in future. Therefore, decision making and implementing such strategic projects needs a very precise consideration and accurate cost-benefit analyzes. On the one hand, through a socio- economic approach, implementation of such big projects for water transferring requires a great amount of investment and a long period to complete, and benefit peoples. So in many cases multi-purpose and multi- dimensional projects should be considered carefully. On the other hand, water supply for some provinces is vital. In most identified areas, water scarcity is the main cause of urban decline, economic problems and finally loosing population because of emigration. Thus, fresh water should be supplied for these provinces at the earliest possible. This paper is an attempt to identify, define and explain the characteristics and specification of all projects for transferring in different parts of Iran. Generally, advantages and disadvantages of

  1. Digital Social Science Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Michael; Lauersen, Christian Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    At the Faculty Library of Social Sciences (part of Copenhagen University Library) we are currently working intensely towards the establishment of a Digital Social Science Lab (DSSL). The purpose of the lab is to connect research, education and learning processes with the use of digital tools...... at the Faculty of Social Sciences. DSSL will host and facilitate an 80 m2 large mobile and intelligent study- and learning environment with a focus on academic events, teaching and collaboration. Besides the physical settings DSSL has two primary functions: 1. To implement relevant social scientific software...... and hardware at the disposal for students and staff at The Faculty of Social Sciences along with instruction and teaching in the different types of software, e.g. Stata, Nvivo, Atlas.ti, R Studio, Zotero and GIS-software. 2. To facilitate academic events focusing on use of digital tools and analytic software...

  2. Spent-fuel shipping and cask-handling studies in wet and dry environments. Studies and research concerning BNFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreery, P.N.

    1982-09-01

    A demonstration cask system has been constructed specifically to be used in examining unconventional techniques in handling spent fuel and fuel-hauling casks. This report demonstrates, through a series of photographs, some of these techniques and discusses others. It includes wet and dry operations, loading and unloading horizontally and vertically, mobile on-site carriers that can eliminate the need for some cranes and, in general, many of the operational options that are open in the design of future fuel handling systems

  3. Comparative study of telmisartan tablets prepared via the wet granulation method and pritor™ prepared using the spray-drying method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junsung; Park, Hee Jun; Cho, Wonkyung; Cha, Kwang-Ho; Yeon, Wonki; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2011-03-01

    The wet granulation method was successfully used to manufacture amorphous telmisartan tablets (CNU) for comparison with the spray-drying method, used for Pritor™. Drug crystallinity in the tablet was characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction, and pharmaceutical properties of the tablets such as hardness, friability, water absorption, and in vitro dissolution in pH 1.2, 4.0, 6.8 and 7.5 were characterized. Especially with regard to the water absorption feature, the CNU tablets showed better performance by maintaining their original structures and by absorbing less water. Since both Pritor™ and CNU tablets had similar physical properties of crystallinity, hardness, friability, and > 50 f(2) value in an in vitro dissolution study, the bioequivalence of CNU tablets should be analyzed in a future in vivo study. Therefore, telmisartan tablets can be produced using a more economical and easier method than that used to produce Pritor™ tablets.

  4. GROWTH KINETIC STUDY OF CHLORELLA VULGARIS USING LAB-SCALE AND PILOT-SCALE PHOTOBIOREACTOR: EFFECT OF CO2 CONCENTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAN KEE LAM

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, growth kinetic of Chlorella vulgaris was performed when the microalgae was cultivated with different concentrations of CO2 . The experiments were carried out using lab-scale and pilot-scale photobioreactors, and the growth results were analyzed using POLYMATH 6.0 with different growth kinetic models. The growth of the microalgae was found fitted well to the Richards growth model with attainable high R2 values as demonstrated in all studied cases, in concert with low values of root mean squares deviation (RMSD and variance. In addition, the output from the plots of experimental values versus predicted values and residual plots further confirmed the good fit of Richards model. The predicted specific growth rate from Richards model was similar to the experimental specific growth rate with deviation lesser than 5%. The attained results paved a preliminary prediction of microalgae growth characteristic when the cultivation is scaled-up to commercial scale.

  5. A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Augmented Reality to Enhance the Use of Remote Labs in Electrical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, A. Mejias; Marquez, J. M. Andujar

    2012-01-01

    Lab practices are an essential part of teaching in Engineering. However, traditional laboratory lessons developed in classroom labs (CL) must be adapted to teaching and learning strategies that go far beyond the common concept of e-learning, in the sense that completely virtualized distance education disconnects teachers and students from the real…

  6. Simulation studies of the influence of HCl absorption on the performance of a wet flue gas desulphurisation pilot plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; Nygaard, Helle; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    2002-01-01

    The mathematical model of Kiil et al, (Ind. Eng, Chem. Res. 37 (1998) 2792) for a wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) pilot plant was extended to include the simultaneous absorption of HCl. In contrast to earlier models for wet FGD plants, the inclusion of population balance equations...

  7. A critical analysis of one standard and five methods to monitor surface wetness and time-of-wetness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camuffo, Dario; della Valle, Antonio; Becherini, Francesca

    2018-05-01

    Surface wetness is a synergistic factor to determine atmospheric corrosion, monument weathering, mould growth, sick buildings, etc. However, its detection and monitoring are neither easy nor homogeneous, for a number of factors that may affect readings. Various types of methods and sensors, either commercial or prototypes built in the lab, have been investigated and compared, i.e. the international standard ISO 9223 to evaluate corrosivity after wetness and time-of-wetness; indirect evaluation of wetness, based on the dew point calculated after the output of temperature and relative humidity sensors and direct measurements by means of capacitive wetness sensors, safety sensors, rain sensors (also known as leaf wetness sensors), infrared reflection sensors and fibre optic sensors. A comparison between the different methods is presented, specifying physical principles, forms of wetting to which they are respondent (i.e. condensation, ice melting, splashing drops, percolation and capillary rise), critical factors, use and cost.

  8. Accelerated Drying of Wet Boots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dyck, Walter

    2002-01-01

    .... One such material is sodium polyacrylate. Because recent field trials with Canadian Forces soldiers have reconfirmed that donning wet combat boots is very uncomfortable, a study was done to assess the efficacy of using sodium polyacrylate...

  9. Infrared and swelling study of the hydration-induced phase transition of wet-spun hyaluronate films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, A. D.; Marlowe, R. L.; Lee, S. A.; Powell, J. W.; Rupprecht, A.

    1997-03-01

    The hydration properties of wet-spun films of hyaluronate (HA) with four different counterions (Li^+, Cs^+, Mg^2+, and Ca^2+) have been studied using optical microscopy, optical birefringence and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Small pieces of these films were found to be optically birefringent up to hydration levels near 90 % relative humidity (RH). All four kinds of films then became optically isotropic and display dramatic changes in size. These changes are consistent with the occurrence of an order-disorder (o-d) transition. IR spectroscopy of the backbone region (from 800 to 1000 cm-1) suggests that the Li^+, Cs^+ and Ca^2+ films are very similar. Two IR bands in this region are observed at low RH and show no dependence on hydration until the o-d transition. The IR spectra of CaHA show five bands in this region. These five bands are observed to 95 % RH.

  10. Role of excipients in hydrate formation kinetics of theophylline in wet masses studied by near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna C; Airaksinen, Sari; Karjalainen, Milja

    2004-01-01

    . Anhydrous theophylline was chosen as the hydrate-forming model drug compound and two excipients, silicified microcrystalline cellulose (SMCC) and alpha-lactose monohydrate, with different water absorbing properties, were used in formulation. An early stage of wet massing was studied with anhydrous...... theophylline and its 1:1 (w/w) mixtures with alpha-lactose monohydrate and SMCC with 0.1g/g of purified water. The changes in the state of water were monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy, and the conversion of the crystal structure was verified using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). SMCC decreased...... the hydrate formation rate by absorbing water, but did not inhibit it. The results suggest that alpha-lactose monohydrate slightly increased the hydrate formation rate in comparison with a mass comprising only anhydrous theophylline....

  11. Applying wet sieving fecal particle size measurement to frugivores: A case study of the eastern chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weary, Taylor E; Wrangham, Richard W; Clauss, Marcus

    2017-07-01

    Fecal particle size (FPS) as quantified by wet sieving analysis is a measure of chewing efficiency relevant for the understanding of physiological adaptations and constraints in herbivores. FPS has not been investigated systematically in frugivores, and important methodological problems remain. In particular, food items that are not chewed may skew estimates of FPS. We address such methodological issues and also assess the influence of diet type and age on FPS in wild chimpanzees. About 130 fecal samples of 38 individual chimpanzees (aged from 1.3 to ∼55 years) from the Kanyawara community of Kibale National Park (Uganda) were collected during three fruit seasons and analyzed using standardized wet sieves (pores from 16 to 0.025 mm). The effects of using different sieve series and excluding large seeds were investigated. We also assessed the relationship between FPS and sex, age, and fruit season. The treatment of seeds during the sieving process had a large influence on the results. FPS was not influenced by chimpanzee sex or age, but was smaller during a fig season (0.88 ± 0.31 mm) than during two drupe-fruit seasons (1.68 ± 0.37 mm) (0.025-4 mm sieves, excluding seeds). The absence of an age effect on FPS suggests that dental senescence might be less critical in chimpanzees, or in frugivores in general, than in folivorous herbivores. To increase the value of FPS studies for understanding frugivore and hominoid dietary evolution we propose modifications to prior herbivore protocols. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The impact of intermediate wet states on two-phase flow in porous media, studied by network modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeiland, Linda Kaada

    2006-04-15

    Reservoir wettability is a measure of a rocks preference for the oil and/or the brine phase. Wettability has a dominant impact on fluid movements in porous media, hence oil displacement in reservoir rocks. Understanding the local wettability and the effect of wettability on the fluid movements are therefore of interest in relation to oil recovery processes. Contrary to the earlier believed homogenous wetted cases where the porous media was strongly oil-wet for carbonate reservoirs or strongly water-wet for clastic reservoirs, it is now believed that most reservoir rocks experience some kind of intermediate wet state. Since wettability affects oil recovery, different classes of intermediate wettability are expected to have different impacts on the fluid flow processes. The major subject treated in this thesis is how different intermediate wet states affect fluid flow parameters which are important for the oil recovery. This is done by use of a capillary dominated network model of two-phase flow, where the network is based on a model of reconstructed sandstone. The existence of different intermediate wet classes is argued in Paper I, while Paper II, III and IV analyse the effect different intermediate wet classes have on wettability indices, residual oil saturation, capillary pressure and relative permeability (author)

  13. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  14. Thermodynamic study contribution of U-Fe and U-Ga alloys by high temperature mass spectroscopy, and of the wetting of yttrium oxide by uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardie, P.

    1992-01-01

    High temperature thermodynamic properties study of U-Fe and U-Ga alloys, and wetting study of yttrium oxide by uranium are presented. High temperature mass spectrometry coupled to a Knudsen effusion multi-cell allows to measure iron activity in U-Fe alloys and of gallium in U-Ga alloys, the U activity is deduced from Gibbs-Duhem equation. Wetting of the system U/Y_2O_3_-_x is studied between 1413 K and 1973 K by the put drop method visualized by X-rays. This technique also furnishes density, surface tension of U and of U-Fe alloys put on Y_2O_3_-_x. A new model of the interfacial oxygen action on wetting is done for the system U/Y_2O_3_-_x. (A.B.)

  15. Virtual Reality Lab Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Hrishikesh; Palmer, Timothy A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality Lab Assistant (VRLA) demonstration model is aligned for engineering and material science experiments to be performed by undergraduate and graduate students in the course as a pre-lab simulation experience. This will help students to get a preview of how to use the lab equipment and run experiments without using the lab hardware/software equipment. The quality of the time available for laboratory experiments can be significantly improved through the use of virtual reality technology.

  16. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Donner Lab Administrator Baird G. Whaley, August 15, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Baird G. Whaley, Donner Lab Administrator, was interviewed by representatives of US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). The purpose of the interview was to capture the remembrances of Mr. Whaley concerning what he could relate on activities at the Donner Lab that pertain to the OHRE responsibilities. Following a brief biographical sketch, Mr. Whaley relates his experiences in administration at the LAB including funding activities, staffing concerns, intralaboraory politics, and remembrances of John Lawrence, John Gofman, Cornelius Tobias, Jim Born, Alex Margolis, B.V.A. Low- Beer, and Ed Alpen. Further patient care procedures for Donner Clinic Research Programs were discussed

  17. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Donner Lab Administrator Baird G. Whaley, August 15, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Baird G. Whaley, Donner Lab Administrator, was interviewed by representatives of US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). The purpose of the interview was to capture the remembrances of Mr. Whaley concerning what he could relate on activities at the Donner Lab that pertain to the OHRE responsibilities. Following a brief biographical sketch, Mr. Whaley relates his experiences in administration at the LAB including funding activities, staffing concerns, intralaboraory politics, and remembrances of John Lawrence, John Gofman, Cornelius Tobias, Jim Born, Alex Margolis, B.V.A. Low- Beer, and Ed Alpen. Further patient care procedures for Donner Clinic Research Programs were discussed.

  18. Introduction to wetting phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indekeu, J.O.

    1995-01-01

    In these lectures the field of wetting phenomena is introduced from the point of view of statistical physics. The phase transition from partial to complete wetting is discussed and examples of relevant experiments in binary liquid mixtures are given. Cahn's concept of critical-point wetting is examined in detail. Finally, a connection is drawn between wetting near bulk criticality and the universality classes of surface critical phenomena. (author)

  19. In silico Prediction and Wet Lab Validation of Arisaema tortuosum (Wall.) Schott Extracts as Antioxidant and Anti-breast Cancer Source: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Kamal; Lal, Uma Ranjan; Ghosh, Manik

    2018-01-01

    Globally, reactive oxygen species have served as an alarm predecessor toward pathogenesis of copious oxidative stress-related diseases. The researchers have turned their attention toward plant-derived herbal goods due to their promising therapeutic applications with minimal side effects. Arisaema tortuosum (Wall.) Schott (ATWS) is used in the traditional medicine since ancient years, but scientific assessments are relatively inadequate and need to be unlocked. Our aim was designed to validate the ATWS tuber and leaf extracts as an inhibitor of oxidative stress using computational approach. The reported chief chemical entities of ATWS were docked using Maestro 9.3 (Schrödinger, LLC, Cambridge, USA) tool and further ATWS extracts (tubers and leaves) were validated with 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), ferric-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), and sulforhodamine B assays experimentally. In silico results showed notable binding affinity of ATWS phytoconstituents with the receptor (PDB: 3ERT). Experimentally, butanolic tuber fraction confirmed promising antioxidant potential (ABTS: IC 50 : 271.67 μg/ml; DPPH: IC 50 : 723.41 μg/ml) with a noteworthy amount of FRAP (195.96 μg/mg), total phenolic content (0.087 μg/mg), and total flavonoid content (7.5 μg/mg) while chloroform fraction (leaves) showed considerable reduction in the cell viability of MCF-7 cell line. The current findings may act as a precious tool to further unlock novel potential therapeutic agents against oxidative stress. Quercetin showed top.ranked glide score with notable binding toward 3ERT receptorAmong extracts, butanolic tubers confirmed as promising antioxidant with remarkable amount of TPC and TFCIn addition, chloroform fraction (leaves) revealed considerable decline in the cell viability of MCF-7 cell line. Abbreviations used: ATWS: Arisaema tortuosum (Wall.) Schott, DPPH: 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, ABTS: 2,2'-Azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt, FRAP: Ferric-reducing ability of plasma, TPC: Total phenolic content, TFC: Total flavonoid content, SRB: Sulforhodamine B.

  20. Wet-lab tested microRNA assays for qPCR studies with SYBR®Green and DNA primers in pig tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Caroline M. Junker; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Córdoba, Sarai

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that are involved in several biological processes including those that mediate disease pathophysiology. Hence, quantifying microRNA expression levels can provide important and novel insights into disease biology. In recent years...

  1. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Dolfine Kosters, N.; Daanen, h.a.m.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2012-01-01

    In daily life, people interact with textiles of different degrees of wetness, but little is known about the me-chanics of wetness perception. This paper describes an experiment with six conditions regarding haptic dis-crimination of the wetness of fabrics. Three materials were used: cotton wool,

  2. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Kappers, Astrid M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    In daily life, people interact with textiles of different degrees of wetness, but little is known about the mechanics of wetness perception. This paper describes an experiment with six conditions regarding haptic discrimination of the wetness of fabrics. Three materials were used: cotton wool,

  3. CMAPS Study Wet Only Mercury in Precipitation Data Set from Chippiwa Lake and G.T. Graig Monitoring Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Total mercury in precipitation collected using ASPS automated wet-only instrument and analyzed by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. This dataset is...

  4. Stabilization study on a wet-granule tableting method for a compression-sensitive benzodiazepine receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Megumi; Himi, Satoshi; Iwata, Motokazu

    2010-03-01

    SX-3228, 6-benzyl-3-(5-methoxy-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-one, is a newly-synthesized benzodiazepine receptor agonist intended to be developed as a tablet preparation. This compound, however, becomes chemically unstable due to decreased crystallinity when it undergoes mechanical treatments such as grinding and compression. A wet-granule tableting method, where wet granules are compressed before being dried, was therefore investigated as it has the advantage of producing tablets of sufficient hardness at quite low compression pressures. The results of the stability testing showed that the drug substance was chemically considerably more stable in wet-granule compression tablets compared to conventional tablets. Furthermore, the drug substance was found to be relatively chemically stable in wet-granule compression tablets even when high compression pressure was used and the effect of this pressure was small. After investigating the reason for this excellent stability, it became evident that near-isotropic pressure was exerted on the crystals of the drug substance because almost all the empty spaces in the tablets were occupied with water during the wet-granule compression process. Decreases in crystallinity of the drug substance were thus small, making the drug substance chemically stable in the wet-granule compression tablets. We believe that this novel approach could be useful for many other compounds that are destabilized by mechanical treatments.

  5. Molecular Simulation Study of Montmorillonite in Contact with Variably Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim; Nair, Arun Kumar Narayanan; Sun, Shuyu

    2017-01-01

    We perform grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to study the detailed molecular mechanism of intercalation behavior of CO2 in Na-, Ca-, and Mg- montmorillonite exposed to variably hydrated supercritical CO2 at 323.15 K and 90 bar, The simulations

  6. Influence of Individual Values Dissimilarity in the Outcome of top Management Teams: a study in a management lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ramon D'Acosta Rivera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Several studies relate organizational outcomes to the performance of top management teams (TMT. Some of these studies suggest that the process of strategic choice is influenced by the cognitive background and values of the executives in those teams, and have focused on the composition of TMT, using demographic variables as proxies for deep-level characteristics. The aim of this descriptive and exploratory study was to verify directly the influence of deep-level characteristics – the dissimilarities of TMT members’ individual values – on the team outcomes. This research was carried out using a quantitative method within a public university management lab environment located in the city of São Paulo, applying two value surveys validated in Brazil on TMT composed of Business Management and Accounting undergraduates submitted to a business game situation, resulting in a non-probabilistic sample formed of 32 teams comprising 186 students with valid responses. Through multiple linear regression technique, two statistically significant regression models were found. It was found that the improved performance of TMT occurs when members differ in the importance assigned to values related to openness to change and have similar appreciation of values related to rules and to security in life (conservation values and the pursuit of power (prestige, giving evidence that this can occur not only in a laboratory environment, but also in the business environment, where time pressures and competition are even more severe and, therefore, more subject to deep-level subjective characteristics.

  7. Innovative High-Throughput SAXS Methodologies Based on Photonic Lab-on-a-Chip Sensors: Application to Macromolecular Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Isaac; Radajewski, Dimitri; Charton, Sophie; Phamvan, Nhat; Brennich, Martha; Pernot, Petra; Bonneté, Françoise; Teychené, Sébastien

    2017-06-02

    The relevance of coupling droplet-based Photonic Lab-on-a-Chip (PhLoC) platforms and Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) technique is here highlighted for the performance of high throughput investigations, related to the study of protein macromolecular interactions. With this configuration, minute amounts of sample are required to obtain reliable statistical data. The PhLoC platforms presented in this work are designed to allow and control an effective mixing of precise amounts of proteins, crystallization reagents and buffer in nanoliter volumes, and the subsequent generation of nanodroplets by means of a two-phase flow. Spectrophotometric sensing permits a fine control on droplet generation frequency and stability as well as on concentration conditions, and finally the droplet flow is synchronized to perform synchrotron radiation SAXS measurements in individual droplets (each one acting as an isolated microreactor) to probe protein interactions. With this configuration, droplet physic-chemical conditions can be reproducibly and finely tuned, and monitored without cross-contamination, allowing for the screening of a substantial number of saturation conditions with a small amount of biological material. The setup was tested and validated using lysozyme as a model of study. By means of SAXS experiments, the proteins gyration radius and structure envelope were calculated as a function of protein concentration. The obtained values were found to be in good agreement with previously reported data, but with a dramatic reduction of sample volume requirements compared to studies reported in the literature.

  8. Study Of The Wet Multipass Drawing Process Applied On High Strength Thin Steel Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimont, J.; Felder, E.; Bobadilla, C.; Buessler, P.; Persem, N.; Vaubourg, JP.

    2011-05-01

    Many kinds of high strength thin steel wires are involved in so many applications. Most of the time, these wires are made of a pearlitic steel grade. The current developments mainly concern the wire last drawing operation: after a patenting treatment several reduction passes are performed on a slip-type multipass drawing machine. This paper focuses on modeling this multipass drawing process: a constitutive law based on the wire microstructure evolutions is created, a mechanical study is performed, a set of experiments which enables determining the process friction coefficients is suggested and finally the related analytical model is introduced. This model provides several general results about the process and can be used in order to set the drawing machines.

  9. Rain pH estimation based on the particulate matter pollutants and wet deposition study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shweta; Elumalai, Suresh Pandian; Pal, Asim Kumar

    2016-09-01

    In forecasting of rain pH, the changes caused by particulate matter (PM) are generally neglected. In regions of high PM concentration like Dhanbad, the role of PM in deciding the rain pH becomes important. Present work takes into account theoretical prediction of rain pH by two methods. First method considers only acid causing gases (ACG) like CO2, SO2 and NOx in pH estimation, whereas, second method additionally accounts for effect of PM (ACG-PM). In order to predict the rain pH, site specific deposited dust that represents local PM was studied experimentally for its impact on pH of neutral water. After incorporation of PM correction factor, it was found that, rain pH values estimated were more representative of the observed ones. Fractional bias (FB) for the ACG-PM method reduced to values of the order of 10(-2) from those with order of 10(-1) for the ACG method. The study confirms neutralization of rain acidity by PM. On account of this, rain pH was found in the slightly acidic to near neutral range, despite of the high sulfate flux found in rain water. Although, the safer range of rain pH blurs the severity of acid rain from the picture, yet huge flux of acidic and other ions get transferred to water bodies, soil and ultimately to the ground water system. Simple use of rain pH for rain water quality fails to address the issues of its increased ionic composition due to the interfering pollutants and thus undermines severity of pollutants transferred from air to rain water and then to water bodies and soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nucleation of wetting films on cylindrical and spherical substrates: A numerical study by the string method

    KAUST Repository

    Qiu, Chunyin

    2009-09-25

    Using the mean-field diffuse-interface model for liquid-vapor system and employing the numerical string method, we study the critical nuclei involved in the prewetting transitions on curved substrates. We first introduce three distinct kinds of critical nuclei, namely, the disklike, bandlike, and layerlike ones, which respectively correspond to three possible growth modes of wettingfilms. We show the disklike growth mode to be the only mode for infinite planar substrates. We then turn to cylindrical and spherical substrates, the two simplest but most important geometries in the real world. We focus on the critical nuclei of finite size, through which the wettingfilms may be formed with finite thermodynamic probabilities. It is shown that the disklike growth mode is always the most probable for wettingfilmnucleation and growth as long as a disklike critical nucleus exists. It is also shown that on a cylindrical substrate, the disklike critical nucleus can no longer exist if the substrate radius is smaller than some critical value, comparable to the radius of the disklike critical nucleus on planar substrate. We find that on a cylindrical substrate whose radius is below the critical value, the nucleation and growth of a wettingfilm can only occur through the bandlike critical nucleus. It is worth emphasizing that the results concerning the bandlike and layerlike growth modes can only be obtained from the diffuse-interface model, beyond the macroscopic description based on the line and surface tensions.

  11. Molecular Simulation Study of Montmorillonite in Contact with Variably Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim

    2017-03-07

    We perform grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to study the detailed molecular mechanism of intercalation behavior of CO2 in Na-, Ca-, and Mg- montmorillonite exposed to variably hydrated supercritical CO2 at 323.15 K and 90 bar, The simulations indicate that the intercalation of CO2 strongly depends on the relative humidity (RH). The intercalation of CO2 in the dehydrated interlayer is inhibited, followed by the swelling of the interlayer region due to uptake of water and CO2 as the RH increases. In all of the hydrated clay samples, the amount of the intercalated CO2 generally decreases as a function of increasing RH, which is attributed mainly to the weakening of the interaction between CO2 and clay. At low RH values, Ca- and Mg- montmorillonite are relatively more efficient in capturing CO2. The amount of CO2 trapped in all clay samples shows similar values above RH of similar to 60%. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the diffusion coefficient of each species generally increases with increasing RH due to the associated expansion of the interlayer distance of the clay. For all the hydrated samples, the diffusion coefficients of CO2 and water in the interlayers are mostly comparable due to the fact that CO2 molecules are well solvated. The diffusion of CO2 in each hydration state is mostly independent of the type of cation in accordance with the fact that CO2 molecules hardly migrate into the first hydration shell of the interlayer cations.

  12. Nucleation of wetting films on cylindrical and spherical substrates: A numerical study by the string method

    KAUST Repository

    Qiu, Chunyin; Qian, Tiezheng

    2009-01-01

    Using the mean-field diffuse-interface model for liquid-vapor system and employing the numerical string method, we study the critical nuclei involved in the prewetting transitions on curved substrates. We first introduce three distinct kinds of critical nuclei, namely, the disklike, bandlike, and layerlike ones, which respectively correspond to three possible growth modes of wettingfilms. We show the disklike growth mode to be the only mode for infinite planar substrates. We then turn to cylindrical and spherical substrates, the two simplest but most important geometries in the real world. We focus on the critical nuclei of finite size, through which the wettingfilms may be formed with finite thermodynamic probabilities. It is shown that the disklike growth mode is always the most probable for wettingfilmnucleation and growth as long as a disklike critical nucleus exists. It is also shown that on a cylindrical substrate, the disklike critical nucleus can no longer exist if the substrate radius is smaller than some critical value, comparable to the radius of the disklike critical nucleus on planar substrate. We find that on a cylindrical substrate whose radius is below the critical value, the nucleation and growth of a wettingfilm can only occur through the bandlike critical nucleus. It is worth emphasizing that the results concerning the bandlike and layerlike growth modes can only be obtained from the diffuse-interface model, beyond the macroscopic description based on the line and surface tensions.

  13. WHERE DO WET, DRY, AND MIXED GALAXY MERGERS OCCUR? A STUDY OF THE ENVIRONMENTS OF CLOSE GALAXY PAIRS IN THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Lihwai; Cooper, Michael C.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Jian, Hung-Yu; Chiueh, Tzihong; Koo, David C.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Patton, David R.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Croton, Darren J.; Gerke, Brian F.; Lotz, Jennifer; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    We study the environments of wet, dry, and mixed galaxy mergers at 0.75 c ) is observed to increase with overdensity, using N-body simulations, we find that the fraction of pairs that will eventually merge decreases with the local density, predominantly because interlopers are more common in dense environments. After taking into account the merger probability of pairs as a function of local density, we find only marginal environment dependence of the galaxy merger rate for wet mergers. On the other hand, the dry and mixed merger rates increase rapidly with local density due to the increased population of red galaxies in dense environments, implying that the dry and mixed mergers are most effective in overdense regions. We also find that the environment distribution of K+A galaxies is similar to that of wet mergers alone and of wet+mixed mergers, suggesting a possible connection between K+A galaxies and wet and/or wet+mixed mergers. Based on our results, we therefore expect that the properties, including structures and masses, of red-sequence galaxies should be different between those in underdense regions and those in overdense regions since the dry mergers are significantly more important in dense environments. We conclude that, as early as z ∼ 1, high-density regions are the preferred environment in which dry mergers occur, and that present-day red-sequence galaxies in overdense environments have, on average, undergone 1.2 ± 0.3 dry mergers since this time, accounting for (38 ± 10)% of their mass accretion in the last 8 billion years. The main uncertainty in this finding is the conversion from the pair fraction to the galaxy merger rate, which is possibly as large as a factor of 2. Our findings suggest that dry mergers are crucial in the mass assembly of massive red galaxies in dense environments, such as brightest cluster galaxies in galaxy groups and clusters.

  14. Global transcriptomic analysis suggests carbon dioxide as an environmental stressor in spaceflight: A systems biology GeneLab case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Afshin; Cekanaviciute, Egle; Smith, David J; Costes, Sylvain V

    2018-03-08

    Spaceflight introduces a combination of environmental stressors, including microgravity, ionizing radiation, changes in diet and altered atmospheric gas composition. In order to understand the impact of each environmental component on astronauts it is important to investigate potential influences in isolation. Rodent spaceflight experiments involve both standard vivarium cages and animal enclosure modules (AEMs), which are cages used to house rodents in spaceflight. Ground control AEMs are engineered to match the spaceflight environment. There are limited studies examining the biological response invariably due to the configuration of AEM and vivarium housing. To investigate the innate global transcriptomic patterns of rodents housed in spaceflight-matched AEM compared to standard vivarium cages we utilized publicly available data from the NASA GeneLab repository. Using a systems biology approach, we observed that AEM housing was associated with significant transcriptomic differences, including reduced metabolism, altered immune responses, and activation of possible tumorigenic pathways. Although we did not perform any functional studies, our findings revealed a mild hypoxic phenotype in AEM, possibly due to atmospheric carbon dioxide that was increased to match conditions in spaceflight. Our investigation illustrates the process of generating new hypotheses and informing future experimental research by repurposing multiple space-flown datasets.

  15. A Ten-Week Biochemistry Lab Project Studying Wild-Type and Mutant Bacterial Alkaline Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherow, D. Scott

    2016-01-01

    This work describes a 10-week laboratory project studying wild-type and mutant bacterial alkaline phosphatase, in which students purify, quantitate, and perform kinetic assays on wild-type and selected mutants of the enzyme. Students also perform plasmid DNA purification, digestion, and gel analysis. In addition to simply learning important…

  16. Kinetic study on the effect of temperature on biogas production using a lab scale batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepanraj, B; Sivasubramanian, V; Jayaraj, S

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, biogas production from food waste through anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 2l laboratory-scale batch reactor operating at different temperatures with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The reactors were operated with a solid concentration of 7.5% of total solids and pH 7. The food wastes used in this experiment were subjected to characterization studies before and after digestion. Modified Gompertz model and Logistic model were used for kinetic study of biogas production. The kinetic parameters, biogas yield potential of the substrate (B), the maximum biogas production rate (Rb) and the duration of lag phase (λ), coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE) were estimated in each case. The effect of temperature on biogas production was evaluated experimentally and compared with the results of kinetic study. The results demonstrated that the reactor with operating temperature of 50°C achieved maximum cumulative biogas production of 7556ml with better biodegradation efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Individual and group antecedents of job satisfaction: a one-lab multilevel study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M. Martínez

    Full Text Available This study examines the simultaneous effect of individual (selfefficacy and group variables (cohesion and gender diversity on satisfaction. A laboratory study was conducted involving 373 college students randomly distributed across 79 small groups, who performed a laboratory task in about five hours. Two-level Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM method was used. Results show the main effect from individual selfefficacy to satisfaction (both level 1, the cross-level effect from group cohesion (level 2 to individual satisfaction (level 1, and the interaction effect between self-efficacy and gender diversity to satisfaction. These results suggest that in a work group, satisfaction has a background in individual and group variables. Group cohesion and gender diversity have important effects on satisfaction. The article concludes with practical strategies and with limitations and suggestions for future research.

  18. Comparative study of wet and dry torrefaction of corn stalk and the effect on biomass pyrolysis polygeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianhua; Wu, Jing; Chen, Yingquan; Pattiya, Adisak; Yang, Haiping; Chen, Hanping

    2018-06-01

    Wet torrefaction (WT) possesses some advantages over dry torrefaction (DT). In this study, a comparative analysis of torrefied corn stalk from WT and DT was conducted along with an investigation of their pyrolysis properties under optimal conditions for biomass pyrolysis polygeneration. Compared with DT, WT removed 98% of the ash and retained twice the amount of hydrogen. The impacts of DT and WT on the biomass macromolecular structure was also found to be different using two-dimensional perturbation correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-PCIS). WT preserved the active hydroxyl groups and rearranged the macromolecule structure to allow cellulose to be more ordered, while DT removed these active hydroxyl groups and formed inter-crosslinking structures in macromolecules. Correspondingly, the bio-char yield after WT was lower than DT but the bio-char quality was upgraded due to high ash removal. Furthermore, higher bio-oil yield, higher sugar content, and higher H 2 generation, were obtained after WT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Metallurgical Laboratory (MetLab) Treatability Study: An Analysis of Passive Soil Vapor Extraction Wells (PSVE) FY1999 Update; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riha, B.D.

    1999-01-01

    The results to date on the treatability study of the PSVE system at the MetLab of the Savannah River Site (SRS) indicate the technology is performing well. Well concentrations are decreasing and contour maps of the vadose zone soil gas plume show a decrease in the extent of the plume. In the 18 months of operation approximately 200 pounds of chlorinated organic contaminants have been removed by natural barometric pumping of wells fitted with BaroBall valves (low pressure check valves). The mass removal estimates are approximate since the flow rates are estimated, the concentration data is based on exponential fits of a limited data set, and the concentration data is normalized to the average CO2.The concentration values presented in this report should be taken as the general trend or order of magnitude of concentration until longer-term data is collected. These trends are of exponentially decreasing concentration showing the same characteristics as the concentration trends at the SRS Miscellaneous Chemical Basin after three years of PSVE (Riha et. al., 1999)

  20. Studies of nuclei using radioactive beams. [Space Astronomy Lab. , Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1989-07-01

    The 12 month period from May 1988 to July 1989 represents the first full year of our 18 month pilot program in nuclear structure research. In this period, research was initiated to develop a capability for radioactive secondary beams at Argonne National Laboratory using the Atlas and the new Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA), which is currently under construction. Two major new detector facilities are currently in the final stages of design and testing. The Large-Area, Scintillator Telescope (LAST) detector is fully operational and will be shipped to Argonne National Laboratory in August for fit-tests and in-beam calibrations. The first segments of a new sixteen-segment neutron multiplicity detector have been built and tested. The remaining segments are currently being constructed. Research was continued in the areas of (1) Coulomb excitation studies of rare earth and actinide nuclei; (2) In-beam, gamma-ray spectroscopy of nuclei in the mass 100 region, and (3) Advanced detector design. Several journal articles and abstracts were published or submitted for publication in the reporting period, and others are currently in preparation. Three graduate students participated in the program, one from the University of Florida and two from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.

  1. A lab-based study of subground passive cooling system for indoor temperature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chok, Mun-Hong; Chan, Chee-Ming

    2017-11-01

    Passive cooling is an alternative cooling technique which helps to reduce high energy consumption. Respectively, dredged marine soil (DMS) is either being dumped or disposed as waste materials. Dredging works had resulted high labor cost, therefore reuse DMS as to fill it along the coastal area. In this study, DMS chosen to examine the effectiveness of passive cooling system by model tests. Soil characterization were carried out according to BS1377: Part 2: 1990. Model were made into scale of 3 cm to 1 m. Heat exchange unit consists of three pipe designs namely, parallel, ramp and spiral. Preliminary tests including flow rate test and soil sample selection were done to select the best heat exchange unit to carry out the model test. Model test is classified into 2 conditions, day and night, each condition consists of 4 configurations which the temperature results are determined. The result shows that window left open and fan switched on (WO/FO) recorded the most effective cooling effects, from 29 °C to 27 °C with drop of 6.9 %.

  2. U.S. bioassay Intercomparison Studies Program at Oak Ridge National Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, G.F.; Bores, N.; Melton, K.K.; Rankin, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    The Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP) for in-vitro bioassay at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been in place since May 1991. The ISP was originally created to fill a need in the Radiobioassay area at ORNL, specifically in the areas of Quality Control, Quality Assurance, and Performance Testing. In the beginning, this consisted of two or three laboratories working in a pilot intercomparison program. Once it was determined that this could work effectively, the program began to seek additional members to broaden the scope of the effort. The program became formalized with a quarterly report in January 1992. The ISP currently provides cross-check blind/double-blind samples spiked with known amounts of radioactivity to various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, universities, and private industry organizations throughout the US. These samples can be packaged according to ORNL procedures (ORNL sample bottles, ORNL chain-of-custody forms, tamper seals etc.), for a single blind sample or according to the needs of a particular facility if the double-blind sample mode is to be maintained. In 1998, the customer base was broadened to include European facilities. In January 1993, the whole-body count program was added. This involves each participating facility receiving a block phantom from the ISP and determining a geometry factor using a known standard. At quarterly intervals, each participant receives an unknown sample for analysis. The sample is counted and the data is collected for publication in an annual report. In October 1994, the fecal program was added. This involves spiking an artificial matrix with known amounts of radioactivity. Laboratories receive unknown samples on a quarterly basis. The sample is counted and the data is collected and published in a quarterly report. The ISP maintains archive samples which can be analyzed in the QC laboratory at the request of any participants if a conflict or discrepancy in a sample analysis/result occurs

  3. Data analysis phase-study of the reproducibility of cementation in Lab and facility scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haucz, Maria Judite Afonso; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de, E-mail: hauczmj@cdtn.br, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) several activities are carried out in the nuclear research area, generating low-level radioactive waste, including aqueous one. The treatment used for these wastes in the CDTN is their volume reduction by the addition of chemicals, in order to concentrate the radionuclides in the waste to an insoluble form, generating sludge. This sludge is incorporated into cement in the Cementation Facility (ICIME) of CDTN, with a mixing system outside the drum and a batch capacity of 200 liters. As these wastes come from different research works, the chemical characteristics are also different, and therefore laboratory studies are necessary to define the process parameters of the cementation for each type of waste. This determination and the quality of the cemented waste product are performed in the Cementation Laboratory (LABCIM), where 2 liters of pastes containing wastes are prepared with a household mixer with circular motion. In LABCIM, tests are done to determinate the viscosity, the setting time and the density in the paste, as well as the compressive and the tensile strength, the density, the homogeneity and the presence of free water in the product. The tests are carried out to verify if the solidified waste product, generated in CDTN, meets the acceptance criteria for safe disposal in the repository established in the standard CNEN NN 6:09. In a previous analysis Haucz et al., comparing the test results of pastes and waste products, which were obtained at LABCIM and ICIME, it was observed that there were statistical differences among them. In order to evaluate these differences and to select the best LABCIM mixing system, it was proposed a design of experiments (DOE), using the applicable statistical tools. Then at LABCIM, pastes were prepared with the same procedure using three different mixers, different types of cement, different times of mixing and different water:cement ratio. Then one formulation was selected, and

  4. Data analysis phase-study of the reproducibility of cementation in Lab and facility scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haucz, Maria Judite Afonso; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2015-01-01

    In Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) several activities are carried out in the nuclear research area, generating low-level radioactive waste, including aqueous one. The treatment used for these wastes in the CDTN is their volume reduction by the addition of chemicals, in order to concentrate the radionuclides in the waste to an insoluble form, generating sludge. This sludge is incorporated into cement in the Cementation Facility (ICIME) of CDTN, with a mixing system outside the drum and a batch capacity of 200 liters. As these wastes come from different research works, the chemical characteristics are also different, and therefore laboratory studies are necessary to define the process parameters of the cementation for each type of waste. This determination and the quality of the cemented waste product are performed in the Cementation Laboratory (LABCIM), where 2 liters of pastes containing wastes are prepared with a household mixer with circular motion. In LABCIM, tests are done to determinate the viscosity, the setting time and the density in the paste, as well as the compressive and the tensile strength, the density, the homogeneity and the presence of free water in the product. The tests are carried out to verify if the solidified waste product, generated in CDTN, meets the acceptance criteria for safe disposal in the repository established in the standard CNEN NN 6:09. In a previous analysis Haucz et al., comparing the test results of pastes and waste products, which were obtained at LABCIM and ICIME, it was observed that there were statistical differences among them. In order to evaluate these differences and to select the best LABCIM mixing system, it was proposed a design of experiments (DOE), using the applicable statistical tools. Then at LABCIM, pastes were prepared with the same procedure using three different mixers, different types of cement, different times of mixing and different water:cement ratio. Then one formulation was selected, and

  5. Changing Efficacy of Wet Cupping Therapy in Migraine with Lunar Phase: A Self-Controlled Interventional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benli, Ali Ramazan; Sunay, Didem

    2017-12-29

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of blood-letting with wet cupping therapy (WCT) in migraine treatment and to determine whether there was any difference according to the phase of the moon when the treatment was applied. MATERIAL AND METHODS This self-controlled study was conducted in Karabuk between 2014 and 2016. Patients who were diagnosed with migraine were enrolled in the study. Migraine disability assessment questionnaire (MIDAS), demographic characteristics, migraine attack frequency and duration, and family history was used to assess the severity of headache. WCT was applied in 3 sessions and the questionnaire was administered before and 3 months after the final WCT session. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used in pre-and posttreatment measurements, and the Chi-square test was used to check independence in two-way categorical tables. RESULTS A total of 85 patients were included. The reduction in MIDAS scores and number of migraine attacks was significantly greater in the WCT applications made in the first half of the month compared to those in the second half of the month. Although the reduction in visual analog scale (VAS) scores was greater in the second half of the month, it was also significant in the applications made in the first half of the month. CONCLUSIONS WCT was found to be an effective treatment of migraine. The effect on MIDAS, VAS, and the number of attacks was significantly better when the application was made in the second half of the month compared to those made in the first half.

  6. Magnetic Media Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This lab specializes in tape certification and performance characterization of high density digital tape and isprepared to support the certification of standard size...

  7. Fabrication and Prototyping Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Fabrication and Prototyping Lab for composite structures provides a wide variety of fabrication capabilities critical to enabling hands-on research and...

  8. Crystallization Formulation Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Crystallization Formulation Lab fills a critical need in the process development and optimization of current and new explosives and energetic formulations. The...

  9. USNA DIGITAL FORENSICS LAB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To enable Digital Forensics and Computer Security research and educational opportunities across majors and departments. Lab MissionEstablish and maintain a Digital...

  10. First-principles study on the electronic structure, phonons and optical properties of LaB_6 under high-pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Luomeng; Bao, Lihong; Wei, Wei; O, Tegus; Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structure, phonons and optical properties of LaB_6 compound under different pressure have been studied by first-principles calculation. The electronic structure calculation shows that the d band along the M-Γ direction of the Brillouin zone moves up with increasing pressure and the band minimum is above the Fermi level at 45 GPa. The pressure-induced charge transfer from La to B atoms is reflected in the upshift of d band along the M-Γ direction with pressure. The calculated phonon dispersion curve at zero pressure is in good agreement with the experimental results. However, the phonon dispersion under high pressure does not show any information about the phase transition at 10 GPa, which was reported previously. The acoustic and optical phonon modes harden all the way with increasing pressure. In addition, the dielectric function is in accordance with the Drude model in the pressure range of 0 GPa–35 GPa and follows the Lorentz model at 45 GPa. The LaB_6 compound exhibits better visible light transmittance performance with the increasing pressure in the range of 0 GPa–35 GPa and visible light transmittance peak would be shifted towards ultraviolet region. - Highlights: • Physical properties of LaB_6 under high pressure have been theoretically studied. • Predict an electronic topological transition occurs at 45 GPa for LaB_6. • Predict a pressure-induced charge transfer from La to B atoms. • The phonon modes at Γ point show an increasing trend with increasing pressure. • The LaB_6 exhibits better heat-shielding performance with the increasing pressure.

  11. Treatment of Row Leachate Using Catalytic Wet Oxidation Processes in Combination Hydrogen Peroxide, A Case Study of Isfahan Composting Factory Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Karimi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of toxic organic compounds is one of the major applications of the Wet Air Oxidation (WAO processes. The process can be defined  as the oxidation of substances, either in the form of solutions or suspensions, with the use of an oxidant (oxygen or air at elevated pressure and temperature. The aim of this paper was to study of Catalytic Wet Oxidation (CWAO with hydrogen peroxide to improve removal efficiency of organic matter and ammonia mainly produced in Isfahan composting factory leachate. The experiment was carried out by adding 1.5 Lit pretreated leachate sample to 3 Lit autoclave reactor. Four parameters are considered: pressure (8–12 bar; temperature (100–300 °C; retention time (30–90 min; H2O2 (1–5 mL/L.The highest removal efficiencies of COD and BOD were achieved at 300°C; approximately 44% and 48% were destroyed, respectively. On the other hand, highest ammonium removal efficiency was achieved at 100 °C in which approximately 63.8% was removed. The efficiency of aqueous phase oxidation can be largely improved by the use of H2O2 as catalyst. Therefore, catalytic wet oxidation would provide an environmentally attractive option for control of organic and toxic wastes problems. Temperature was found to be the most important control variable of the wet oxidation process of leachate.

  12. Study on morphology of high-aspect-ratio grooves fabricated by using femtosecond laser irradiation and wet etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Tao; Pan, An; Li, Cunxia; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied morphologies of silicon grooves fabricated by laser irradiation and wet etching. • We found nano-ripple structures formed on the groove sidewall. • Formations of nano-ripples were due to the formation of standing wave and nanoplanes. • Remaining debris on the groove bottom was removed by KOH etching. - Abstract: Morphologies of high-aspect-ratio silicon grooves fabricated by using femtosecond laser irradiation and selective chemical etching of hydrofluoric acid (HF) were studied. Oxygen was deeply doped into silicon under femtosecond laser irradiation in air, and then the oxygen-doped regions were removed by HF etching to form high-aspect-ratio grooves. After HF etching, periodic nano-ripples which were induced in silicon by femtosecond laser were observed on the groove sidewalls. The ripple orientation was perpendicular or parallel to the laser propagation direction (z direction), which depended on the relative direction between the laser polarization direction and the scanning direction. The formation of nano-ripples with orientations perpendicular to z direction could be attributed to the standing wave generated by the interference of the incident light and the reflected light in z direction. The formation of nano-ripples with orientations parallel to z direction could be attributed to the formation of self-organized periodic nanoplanes (bulk nanogratings) induced by femtosecond laser inside silicon. Materials in the tail portion of laser-induced oxygen doping (LIOD) regions were difficult to be etched by HF solution due to low oxygen concentration. The specimen was etched further in KOH solution to remove remaining materials in LIOD regions and all-silicon grooves were fabricated

  13. DEM Study of Wet Cohesive Particles in the Presence of Liquid Bridges in a Gas Fluidized Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurong He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified discrete element method (DEM was constructed by compositing an additional liquid-bridge module into the traditional soft-sphere interaction model. Simulations of particles with and without liquid bridges are conducted in a bubbling fluidized bed. The geometry of the simulated bed is the same as the one in Müller’s experiment (Müller et al., 2008. A comparison between the dry and the wet particular systems is carried out on the bubble behavior, the bed fluctuation, and the mixing process. The bubble in the dry system possesses a regular round shape and falling of scattered particles exists while the bubble boundary of the wet particles becomes rough with branches of agglomerates stretching into it. The mixing of the dry system is quicker than that of the wet system. Several interparticle liquid contents are applied in this work to find their influence on the kinetic characteristic of the wet particle flow. With an increase of liquid content, the mixing process costs more time to be completed. Symmetrical profiles of the velocity and granular temperature are found for two low liquid contents (0.001% and 0.01%, while it is antisymmetrical for the highest liquid content (0.1%.

  14. Impact of Wet-Weather Peak Flow Blending on Disinfection and Treatment: A Case Study at Three Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research project was administered by the EPA Office of Research and Development and funded by Office of Water; Office of Policy, Economics and Innovation; and Office of Research and Development. Blending is the practice of diverting a part of peak wet-weather flows at wa...

  15. The sensitivity of Sphagnum to surface layer conditions in a re-wetted bog: a simulation study of water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouwenaars, J.M.; Gosen, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The behaviour of the water table in re-wetted bogs varies widely between different locations so that recolonising Sphagnum is vulnerable to water stress, especially when the water table is drawn down in summer. It is important to understand how physical site conditions influence the occurrence of

  16. A Comparative-Study on Nutrient Cycling in Wet Heathland Ecosystems.2.Litter Decomposition and Nutrient Mineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendse, F.; Bobbink, R.; Rouwenhorst, G.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of the relative nutrient requirement (L n) that was introduced in the first paper of this series is used to analyse the effects of the dominant plant population on nutrient cycling and nutrient mineralization in wet heathland ecosystems. A distinction is made between the effect that the

  17. Evaluation of Factors Influencing Lab-Scale Studies to Determine Heavy Metal Removal by Six Sorbents for Stormwater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Huber

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For the development of decentralized treatment systems for road runoff, the determination of pollutant removal capacities is essential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of boundary conditions on the simultaneous removal of copper, nickel, and zinc by six sorbents used for urban stormwater treatment (i.e., granular activated alumina, anthracite, granular reactivated carbon, granular ferric hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and granular activated lignite. For batch experiments, capacities were determined at initial concentrations within the range of 2.5–180 mg/L with a rotary shaker. Further influences were investigated: the use of a horizontal shaker for concentrations of up to 1080 mg/L, a variation of the initial pH value (5 and 7, and the presence of a buffer. Furthermore, the influences of the filtration process on the capacities were studied. Kinetic experiments were conducted for contact times between 5 min and 120 min. Lab-scale column experiments with inflow concentrations of 2.5 mg/L (copper and nickel and 5.0 mg/L (zinc at an initial pH of 5 and a contact time of 11 min were performed for comparison. Selected experiments were subsequently carried out with changes in initial concentrations and contact time. One result is that it is essential to conduct batch experiments with the metals of interest. The capacities determined by column experiments deviated from batch experiments. Batch experiments under well-defined conditions can be used to evaluate different production batches. Column experiments give a more faithful capacity by considering realistic boundary conditions and should be preferred to determine efficiencies and service lives.

  18. Structure Study of Cellulose Fibers Wet-Spun from Environmentally Friendly NaOH/Urea Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen,X.; Burger, C.; Wan, F.; Zhang, J.; Rong, L.; Hsiao, B.; Chu, B.; Cai, J.; Zhang, L.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, structure changes of regenerated cellulose fibers wet-spun from a cotton linter pulp (degree of polymerization {approx}620) solution in an NaOH/urea solvent under different conditions were investigated by simultaneous synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). WAXD results indicated that the increase in flow rate during spinning produced a better crystal orientation and a higher degree of crystallinity, whereas a 2-fold increase in draw ratio only affected the crystal orientation. When coagulated in a H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solution at 15 {sup o}C, the regenerated fibers exhibited the highest crystallinity and a crystal orientation comparable to that of commercial rayon fibers by the viscose method. SAXS patterns exhibited a pair of meridional maxima in all regenerated cellulose fibers, indicating the existence of a lamellar structure. A fibrillar superstructure was observed only at higher flow rates (>20 m/min). The conformation of cellulose molecules in NaOH/urea aqueous solution was also investigated by static and dynamic light scattering. It was found that cellulose chains formed aggregates with a radius of gyration, R{sub g}, of about 232 nm and an apparent hydrodynamic radius, R{sub h}, of about 172 nm. The NaOH/urea solvent system is low-cost and environmentally friendly, which may offer an alternative route to replace more hazardous existing methods for the production of regenerated cellulose fibers.

  19. Degradation of cellulose at the wet-dry interface. II. Study of oxidation reactions and effect of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Myung-Joon; Dupont, Anne-Laurence; de la Rie, E René

    2014-01-30

    To better understand the degradation of cellulose upon the formation of a tideline at the wet-dry interface when paper is suspended in water, the production of chemical species involved in oxidation reactions was studied. The quantitation of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals was carried out in reverse phase chromatography using triphenylphosphine and terephthalic acid, respectively, as chemical probes. Both reactive oxygen species were found in the tideline immediately after its formation, in the range of micromoles and nanomoles per gram of paper, respectively. The results indicate that hydroxyl radicals form for the most part in paper before the tideline experiment, whereas hydroperoxides appear to be produced primarily during tideline formation. Iron sulfate impregnation of the paper raised the production of hydroperoxides. After hygrothermal aging in sealed vials the hydroxyl radical content in paper increased significantly. When aged together in the same vial, tideline samples strongly influenced the degradation of samples from other areas of the paper (multi-sample aging). Different types of antioxidants were added to the paper before the tideline experiment to investigate their effect on the oxidation reactions taking place. In samples treated with iron sulfate or artificially aged, the addition of Irgafos 168 (tris(2,4-ditert-butylphenyl) phosphate) and Tinuvin 292 (bis(1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl) sebacate and methyl 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl sebacate) reduced the concentration of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Tinuvin 292 was also found to considerably lower the rate of cellulose chain scission reactions during hygrothermal aging of the paper. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. PREFACE: Wetting: introductory note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herminghaus, S.

    2005-03-01

    of very specific and quantitative predictions were put forward which were aimed at direct experimental tests of the developed concepts [9]. Experimentally, wetting phenomena proved to be a rather difficult field of research. While contact angles seem quite easy to measure, deeper insight can only be gained by assessing the physical properties of minute amounts of material, as provided by the molecularly thin wetting layers. At the same time, the variations in the chemical potential relevant for studying wetting transitions are very small, such that system stability sometimes poses hard to solve practical problems. As a consequence, layering transitions in cryogenic systems were among the first to be thoroughly studied [10] experimentally, since they require comparably moderate stability. First-order wetting transitions were not observed experimentally before the early nineties, either in (cryogenic) quantum systems [11,12] or in binary liquid mixtures [13,14]. The first observation of critical wetting, a continuous wetting transition, in 1996 [15] was a major breakthrough [16]. In the meantime, a detailed seminal paper by Pierre Gilles de Gennes published in 1985 [17] had spurred a large number of new research projects which were directed to wetting phenomena other than those related to phase transitions. More attention was paid to non-equilibrium physics, as it is at work when oil spreads over a surface, or a liquid coating beads off (`dewets') from its support and forms a pattern of many individual droplets. This turned out to be an extremely fruitful field of research, and was more readily complemented by experimental efforts than was the case with wetting transitions. It was encouraging to find effects analogous to layering (as mentioned above) in more common systems such as oil films spreading on a solid support [18,19]. Long standing riddles such as the divergence of dissipation at a moving contact line were now addressed both theoretically and experimentally

  1. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: a case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, H.; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, G. S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-20

    The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep, continental convective clouds in the mid-latitudes is studied for a severe storm case in Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. A new passive-tracer based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize the convective transport based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases. The passive gas concentration in the upper troposphere convective outflow results from a mixture of 47% from the lower level (0-3 km), 21% entrained from the upper troposphere, and 32% from mid-atmosphere based on observations. The transport analysis framework is applied to aerosols to estimate aerosol transport and wet-scavenging efficiency. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% and 68% for aerosol mass (Dp < 1μm) and aerosol number (0.03< Dp < 2.5μm), respectively. Little chemical selectivity to wet scavenging is seen among observed submicron sulfate (84%), organic (82%), and ammonium (80%) aerosols, while nitrate has a much lower scavenging efficiency of 57% likely due to the uptake of nitric acid. Observed larger size particles (0.15 - 2.5μm) are scavenged more efficiently (84%) than smaller particles (64%; 0.03 - 0.15μm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the WRF model. Compared to the observation based analysis, the standard model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency for both mass and number concentrations with low biases of 31% and 40%, respectively. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulation results, so that the bias in scavenging efficiency in mass and number concentrations is reduced to <10%. This supports the hypothesis that secondary activation is an important process for wet removal of aerosols in deep convective storms.

  2. Reforming Cookbook Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Erin

    2005-01-01

    Deconstructing cookbook labs to require the students to be more thoughtful could break down perceived teacher barriers to inquiry learning. Simple steps that remove or disrupt the direct transfer of step-by-step procedures in cookbook labs make students think more critically about their process. Through trials in the author's middle school…

  3. Payments to the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goals Recycling Green Purchasing Pollution Prevention Reusing Water Resources Environmental Management the Lab Make payments for event registrations, sponsorships, insurance, travel, other fees. Contact Treasury Team (505) 667-4090 Email If you need to make a payment to the Lab for an event registration

  4. Guidelines for Urban Labs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholl, Christian; Agger Eriksen, Mette; Baerten, Nik

    2017-01-01

    urban lab initiatives from five different European cities: Antwerp (B), Graz and Leoben (A), Maastricht (NL) and Malmö (S). We do not pretend that these guidelines touch upon all possible challenges an urban lab may be confronted with, but we have incorporated all those we encountered in our...

  5. Continuing global improvement in human papillomavirus DNA genotyping services: The 2013 and 2014 HPV LabNet international proficiency studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Carina; Forslund, Ola; Wallin, Keng-Ling; Dillner, Joakim

    2018-04-01

    Accurate and internationally comparable human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA detection and typing services are essential for HPV vaccine research and surveillance. This study assessed the proficiency of different HPV typing services offered routinely in laboratories worldwide. The HPV Laboratory Network (LabNet) has designed international proficiency panels that can be regularly issued. The HPV genotyping proficiency panels of 2013 and 2014 contained 43 and 41 coded samples, respectively, composed of purified plasmids of sixteen HPV types (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68a and 68b) and 3 extraction controls. Proficient typing was defined as detection in both single and multiple infections of 50 International Units of HPV 16 and HPV 18 and 500 genome equivalents for the other 14 HPV types, with at least 97% specificity. Ninety-six laboratories submitted 136 datasets in 2013 and 121 laboratories submitted 148 datasets in 2014. Thirty-four different HPV genotyping assays were used, notably Linear Array, HPV Direct Flow-chip, GenoFlow HPV array, Anyplex HPV 28, Inno-LiPa, and PGMY-CHUV assays. A trend towards increased sensitivity and specificity was observed. In 2013, 59 data sets (44%) were 100% proficient compared to 86 data sets (59%) in 2014. This is a definite improvement compared to the first proficiency panel, issued in 2008, when only 19 data sets (26%) were fully proficient. The regularly issued global proficiency program has documented an ongoing worldwide improvement in comparability and reliability of HPV genotyping services. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Teach Battery Technology with Class-Built Wet Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    With some simple metal samples and common household liquids, teachers can build wet cell batteries and use them to teach students about batteries and how they work. In this article, the author offers information that is derived from some simple experiments he conducted in his basement workshop and can easily be applied in the classroom or lab. He…

  7. Particle-assisted wetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hui; Yan Feng; Tierno, Pietro; Marczewski, Dawid; Goedel, Werner A

    2005-01-01

    Wetting of a solid surface by a liquid is dramatically impeded if either the solid or the liquid is decorated by particles. Here it is shown that in the case of contact between two liquids the opposite effect may occur; mixtures of a hydrophobic liquid and suitable particles form wetting layers on a water surface though the liquid alone is non-wetting. In these wetting layers, the particles adsorb to, and partially penetrate through, the liquid/air and/or the liquid/water interface. This formation of wetting layers can be explained by the reduction in total interfacial energy due to the replacement of part of the fluid/fluid interfaces by the particles. It is most prominent if the contact angles at the fluid/fluid/particle contact lines are close to 90 0

  8. Wetting and evaporation of binary mixture drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefiane, Khellil; David, Samuel; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2008-09-11

    Experimental results on the wetting behavior of water, methanol, and binary mixture sessile drops on a smooth, polymer-coated substrate are reported. The wetting behavior of evaporating water/methanol drops was also studied in a water-saturated environment. Drop parameters (contact angle, shape, and volume) were monitored in time. The effects of the initial relative concentrations on subsequent evaporation and wetting dynamics were investigated. Physical mechanisms responsible for the various types of wetting behavior during different stages are proposed and discussed. Competition between evaporation and hydrodynamic flow are evoked. Using an environment saturated with water vapor allowed further exploration of the controlling mechanisms and underlying processes. Wetting stages attributed to differential evaporation of methanol were identified. Methanol, the more volatile component, evaporates predominantly in the initial stage. The data, however, suggest that a small proportion of methanol remained in the drop after the first stage of evaporation. This residual methanol within the drop seems to influence subsequent wetting behavior strongly.

  9. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  10. Junction formation of CuInSe2 with CdS: A comparative study of 'dry' and 'wet' interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunger, R.; Lebedev, M.V.; Sakurai, K.; Schulmeyer, T.; Mayer, Th.; Klein, A.; Niki, S.; Jaegermann, W.

    2007-01-01

    The junction formation of polycrystalline CuInSe 2 absorbers (CIS) with thermally evaporated CdS was investigated by high-resolution synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemistry and electronics of the interfaces of Cd partial electrolyte treated CIS ('wet' processed) and clean, decapped CIS ('dry' processed) were compared. A valence band offset of 0.96(10) eV was determined in both cases. The Cd(Se,OH) surface layer induced by the wet Cd partial electrolyte process does not significantly modify the band alignment at the CIS/CdS heterointerface from the 'dry', vacuum-processed CIS/CdS interface. During the stepwise interface formation the energy converting capability of the CIS/CdS heterojunction was assessed by in situ surface photovoltage measurements at room temperature. The evolution of the surface photovoltage significantly differs for the 'wet' and the 'dry' interfaces and is discussed in relation to the function in solar cell devices

  11. Magnetic Viscous Drag for Friction Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Chris; Catching, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The typical friction lab performed in introductory mechanics courses is usually not the favorite of either the student or the instructor. The measurements are not all that easy to make, and reproducibility is usually a troublesome issue. This paper describes the augmentation of such a friction lab with a study of the viscous drag on a magnet…

  12. Study of a novel cell lysis method with titanium dioxide for Lab-on-a-Chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weijie; Yeow, John T W

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a novel method is proposed and demonstrated to be able to lyse gram-negative (E. coli) bacteria cells for Lab-on-a-Chip applications. The proposed method incorporates using titanium dioxide particles as photocatalysts and a miniaturized UV LED array as an excitation light source to perform cell lysis on microchips. The experimental result demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed prototype device. The working device suggests an inexpensive, easy to be fabricated and effective way for microchip cell lysis. The miniaturized UV LED array and the microchip with a reaction chamber can be easily integrated with other functional components to form a customized whole Lab-on-a-Chip system.

  13. Variability of extreme wet events over Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libanda Brigadier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse effects of extreme wet events are well documented by several studies around the world. These effects are exacerbated in developing countries like Malawi that have insufficient risk reduction strategies and capacity to cope with extreme wet weather. Ardent monitoring of the variability of extreme wet events over Malawi is therefore imperative. The use of the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI has been recommended by many studies as an effective way of quantifying extreme wet events. In this study, ETCCDI indices were used to examine the number of heavy, very heavy, and extremely heavy rainfall days; daily and five-day maximum rainfall; very wet and extremely wet days; annual wet days and simple daily intensity. The Standard Normal Homogeneity Test (SNHT was employed at 5% significance level before any statistical test was done. Trend analysis was done using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall statistical test. All stations were found to be homogeneous apart from Mimosa. Trend results show high temporal and spatial variability with the only significant results being: increase in daily maximum rainfall (Rx1day over Karonga and Bvumbwe, increase in five-day maximum rainfall (Rx5day over Bvumbwe. Mzimba and Chileka recorded a significant decrease in very wet days (R95p while a significant increase was observed over Thyolo. Chileka was the only station which observed a significant trend (decrease in extremely wet rainfall (R99p. Mzimba was the only station that reported a significant trend (decrease in annual wet-day rainfall total (PRCPTOT and Thyolo was the only station that reported a significant trend (increase in simple daily intensity (SDII. Furthermore, the findings of this study revealed that, during wet years, Malawi is characterised by an anomalous convergence of strong south-easterly and north-easterly winds. This convergence is the main rain bringing mechanism to Malawi.

  14. Kinematic Labs with Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Jason M.

    2015-07-01

    This book provides 13 labs spanning the common topics in the first semester of university-level physics. Each lab is designed to use only the student's smartphone, laptop and items easily found in big-box stores or a hobby shop. Each lab contains theory, set-up instructions and basic analysis techniques. All of these labs can be performed outside of the traditional university lab setting and initial costs averaging less than 8 per student, per lab.

  15. Low pressure-induced secondary structure transitions of regenerated silk fibroin in its wet film studied by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhipeng; Liu, Zhao; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Huang, He

    2018-06-01

    The secondary structure transitions of regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) under different external perturbations have been studied extensively, except for pressure. In this work, time-resolved infrared spectroscopy with the attenuated total reflectance (ATR) accessory was employed to follow the secondary structure transitions of RSF in its wet film under low pressure. It has been found that pressure alone is favorable only to the formation of β-sheet structure. Under constant pressure there is an optimum amount of D 2 O in the wet film (D 2 O : film = 2:1) so as to provide the optimal condition for the reorganization of the secondary structure and to have the largest formation of β-sheet structure. Under constant amount of D 2 O and constant pressure, the secondary structure transitions of RSF in its wet film can be divided into three stages along with time. In the first stage, random coil, α-helix, and β-turn were quickly transformed into β-sheet. In the second stage, random coil and β-turn were relatively slowly transformed into β-sheet and α-helix, and the content of α-helix was recovered to the value prior to the application of pressure. In the third and final stage, no measurable changes can be found for each secondary structure. This study may be helpful to understand the secondary structure changes of silk fibroin in silkworm's glands under hydrostatic pressure. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Laser Research Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laser Research lab is thecenter for the development of new laser sources, nonlinear optical materials, frequency conversion processes and laser-based sensors for...

  17. Clothing Systems Design Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Clothing Systems Design Lab houses facilities for the design and rapid prototyping of military protective apparel.Other focuses include: creation of patterns and...

  18. The Udall Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Udall lab is interested in genome evolution and cotton genomics.The cotton genus ( Gossypium) is an extraordinarily diverse group with approximately 50 species...

  19. OpenLabNotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Franz, Michael; Tan, Qihua

    2015-01-01

    be advantageous if an ELN was Integrated with a laboratory information management system to allow for a comprehensive documentation of experimental work including the location of samples that were used in a particular experiment. Here, we present OpenLabNotes, which adds state-of-the-art ELN capabilities to Open......LabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively Closes the gap between research documentation and sample management......, thus making Open-Lab Framework more attractive for laboratories that seek to increase productivity through electronic data management....

  20. LIDAR Research & Development Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The LIDAR Research and Development labs are used to investigate and improve LIDAR components such as laser sources, optical signal detectors and optical filters. The...

  1. CDC Lab Values

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    More than fifteen hundred scientists fill the lab benches at CDC, logging more than four million hours each year. CDC’s laboratories play a critical role in the agency’s ability to find, stop, and prevent disease outbreaks. This podcast provides a brief overview of what goes on inside CDC’s labs, and why this work makes a difference in American’s health.

  2. ABB wet flue gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niijhawan, P.

    1994-12-31

    The wet limestone process for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is outlined. The following topics are discussed: wet flue gas desulfurization, wet FGD characteristics, wet scrubbers, ABB wet FGD experience, wet FGD forced oxidation, advanced limestone FGD systems, key design elements, open spray tower design, spray tower vs. packed tower, important performance parameters, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, influence by L/G, limestone utilization, wet FGD commercial database, particulate removal efficiencies, materials of construction, nozzle layout, spray nozzles, recycle pumps, mist elimination, horizontal flow demister, mist eliminator washing, reagent preparation system, spray tower FGDS power consumption, flue gas reheat options, byproduct conditioning system, and wet limestone system.

  3. Study on Oil Pressure Characteristics and Trajectory Tracking Control in Shift Process of Wet-Clutch for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqiu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate control of oil pressure of wet-clutch is of great importance for improving shift quality. Based on dynamic models of two-gear planetary transmission and hydraulic control system, a trajectory tracking model of oil pressure was built by sliding mode control method. An experiment was designed to verify the validity of hydraulic control system, through which the relationship between duty cycle of on-off valve and oil pressure of clutch was determined. The tracking effect was analyzed by simulation. Results showed that oil pressure could follow well the optimal trajectory and the shift quality was effectively improved.

  4. Influence of local calibration on the quality of online wet weather discharge monitoring: feedback from five international case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caradot, Nicolas; Sonnenberg, Hauke; Rouault, Pascale; Gruber, Günter; Hofer, Thomas; Torres, Andres; Pesci, Maria; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports about experiences gathered from five online monitoring campaigns in the sewer systems of Berlin (Germany), Graz (Austria), Lyon (France) and Bogota (Colombia) using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectrometers and turbidimeters. Online probes are useful for the measurement of highly dynamic processes, e.g. combined sewer overflows (CSO), storm events, and river impacts. The influence of local calibration on the quality of online chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements of wet weather discharges has been assessed. Results underline the need to establish local calibration functions for both UV-VIS spectrometers and turbidimeters. It is suggested that practitioners calibrate locally their probes using at least 15-20 samples. However, these samples should be collected over several events and cover most of the natural variability of the measured concentration. For this reason, the use of automatic peristaltic samplers in parallel to online monitoring is recommended with short representative sampling campaigns during wet weather discharges. Using reliable calibration functions, COD loads of CSO and storm events can be estimated with a relative uncertainty of approximately 20%. If no local calibration is established, concentrations and loads are estimated with a high error rate, questioning the reliability and meaning of the online measurement. Similar results have been obtained for total suspended solids measurements.

  5. Quality of urban runoff in wet and dry seasons: a case study in a semi-arid zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Hernández, Joyce; Lucho-Constantino, Carlos; Lizárraga-Mendiola, Liliana; Beltrán-Hernández, Rosa Icela; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    Urban runoff (UR) is a promising new resource that may alleviate growing tensions in numerous arid and semi-arid regions of the world. However, it is precisely in these zones that the available UR quality characteristics are scarcer. This work aims to evaluate a wide set of parameters to establish a detailed approach to both the quality of UR in a midsized city in Central Mexico and the feasibility of using UR to recharge aquifers. UR from an institutional land use site was sampled during wet and dry seasons and assessed for suspended solids, organic matter, nutrients, microorganisms, metals, and persistent organic chemicals (i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH). The results were analyzed using multivariate statistical methods to identify relationships among the variables, the sampling sites and the seasons. The soil erosion and the leaching of materials due to the water flow through vegetated areas were identified as the most influencing factor on the quality of the site runoff in both dry and wet seasons. Additionally, data were more heterogeneous during the dry season, and higher pollutant concentrations were found both during the dry season and in more pervious zones. We consider UR a promising water source for recharging aquifers in arid and semi-arid zones if a program is implemented that can integrate an adequate runoff treatment system, soil protection, and other non-structural measures.

  6. Wet air oxidation of seedcorn wastes containing pesticides and insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, M.; Schlaefer, O.; Onyeche, T.I.; Schroeder, C.; Bormann, H.; Schaefer, S. [CUTEC-Inst. GmbH (Clausthal Environment Technology Inst.), Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Wet air oxidation as an alternative treatment process to pyrolysis and combustion of seedcorn wastes was investigated in lab-scale experiments. Due to solid condition of the seed corn waste, the process has been adapted by repeated spraying of water on the seed corn bulk to avoid the production of sludge and its subsequent dewatering. Original seed corns from industrial production plants were used for a degradation kinetic study under smooth wet air oxidation conditions. The temperatures were between 80 and 150 C, the pressure from 1 to 4.5 bar and the pH at different values from 3 to 13. Degradation rates for five different compounds of pesticides and insecticides, namely Imidacloprid, Thiram, Hymexazol, Carbofuran and Tefluthrin were conducted. These compounds represent the recently used in agricultural seedcorn applications. The degradation rate depends linearly on temperature between 80 and 150 C. At 120 C the lowest degradation rate was found for Tefluthrin by 25 mg/h per L reaction volume while the highest degradation rate to be conducted was for Imidacloprid at 363 mg/h L. (orig.)

  7. Wetting Resistance of Commercial Membrane Distillation Membranes in Waste Streams Containing Surfactants and Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Eykens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Water management is becoming increasingly challenging and several technologies, including membrane distillation (MD are emerging. This technology is less affected by salinity compared to reverse osmosis and is able to treat brines up to saturation. The focus of MD research recently shifted from seawater desalination to industrial applications out of the scope of reverse osmosis. In many of these applications, surfactants or oil traces are present in the feed stream, lowering the surface tension and increasing the risk for membrane wetting. In this study, the technological boundaries of MD in the presence of surfactants are investigated using surface tension, contact angle and liquid entry pressure measurements together with lab-scale MD experiments to predict the wetting resistance of different membranes. Synthetic NaCl solutions mixed with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS were used as feed solution. The limiting surfactant concentration was found to be dependent on the surface chemistry of the membrane, and increased with increasing hydrophobicity and oleophobicity. Additionally, a hexadecane/SDS emulsion was prepared with a composition simulating produced water, a waste stream in the oil and gas sector. When hexadecane is present in the emulsion, oleophobic membranes are able to resist wetting, whereas polytetrafluoretheen (PTFE is gradually wetted by the feed liquid.

  8. Dynamic Wetting Behavior of Vibrated Droplets on a Micropillared Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-hai Jia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical wetting behavior has been observed under vertical vibration of a water droplet placed on a micropillared surface. The wetting transition takes place under the different processes. In compression process, the droplet is transited from Cassie state to Wenzel state. The droplet undergoes a Wenzel-Cassie wetting transition in restoring process and the droplet bounces off from the surface in bouncing process. Meanwhile, the wetting and dewetting models during vibration are proposed. The wetting transition is confirmed by the model calculation. This study has potential to be used to control the wetting state.

  9. Wet gas sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welker, T.F.

    1997-07-01

    The quality of gas has changed drastically in the past few years. Most gas is wet with hydrocarbons, water, and heavier contaminants that tend to condense if not handled properly. If a gas stream is contaminated with condensables, the sampling of that stream must be done in a manner that will ensure all of the components in the stream are introduced into the sample container as the composite. The sampling and handling of wet gas is extremely difficult under ideal conditions. There are no ideal conditions in the real world. The problems related to offshore operations and other wet gas systems, as well as the transportation of the sample, are additional problems that must be overcome if the analysis is to mean anything to the producer and gatherer. The sampling of wet gas systems is decidedly more difficult than sampling conventional dry gas systems. Wet gas systems were generally going to result in the measurement of one heating value at the inlet of the pipe and a drastic reduction in the heating value of the gas at the outlet end of the system. This is caused by the fallout or accumulation of the heavier products that, at the inlet, may be in the vapor state in the pipeline; hence, the high gravity and high BTU. But, in fact, because of pressure and temperature variances, these liquids condense and form a liquid that is actually running down the pipe as a stream or is accumulated in drips to be blown from the system. (author)

  10. Electrochemical noise study on 2024-T3 Aluminum alloy corrosion in simulated acid rain under cyclic wet-dry condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yanyan; Zhang Zhao; Su Jingxin; Cao Fahe; Zhang Jianqing

    2006-01-01

    Potential noise records have been collected for 2024-T3 aluminum alloy, which was exposed to simulated acid rain with different pH value for 15 wet-dry cycles. Meanwhile, Potentiodynamic polarization and SEM techniques were also used as assistant measurements. Three mathematic methods including average, standard deviation and wavelet transformation have been employed to analyze the records. The results showed that each single wet-dry cycle can be divided into three regions with respect to the change of the cathodic reaction rate, and with the increase of pH value the main cathodic reaction changes from the reduction of protons to that of oxygen molecules. The analysis of the EDP versus time evolution clearly indicates that the whole corrosion process can be divided into three segments for the case of pH 3.5 and only one for the cases of pH 4.5 and 6.0, which have been theoretically interpreted according to the corrosion theory and experimentally proved by SEM. The results also showed that the corrosion in the case of pH 3.5 was much more rigorous than that in the cases of pH 4.5 and 6.0. It may due to synergistic effects of that, the characteristic of hydrogen ions which is much more active than that of oxygen molecules, the high diffusion/migration rate of hydrogen ions in solution or through surface films and the lower stability of surface passive film at low pH value system

  11. LabVIEW 2010 Computer Vision Platform Based Virtual Instrument and Its Application for Pitting Corrosion Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Rogelio; Zlatev, Roumen; Valdez, Benjamin; Stoytcheva, Margarita; Carrillo, Mónica; García, Juan-Francisco

    2013-01-01

    A virtual instrumentation (VI) system called VI localized corrosion image analyzer (LCIA) based on LabVIEW 2010 was developed allowing rapid automatic and subjective error-free determination of the pits number on large sized corroded specimens. The VI LCIA controls synchronously the digital microscope image taking and its analysis, finally resulting in a map file containing the coordinates of the detected probable pits containing zones on the investigated specimen. The pits area, traverse length, and density are also determined by the VI using binary large objects (blobs) analysis. The resulting map file can be used further by a scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) system for rapid (one pass) "true/false" SVET check of the probable zones only passing through the pit's centers avoiding thus the entire specimen scan. A complete SVET scan over the already proved "true" zones could determine the corrosion rate in any of the zones.

  12. CDC Lab Values

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-02-02

    More than fifteen hundred scientists fill the lab benches at CDC, logging more than four million hours each year. CDC’s laboratories play a critical role in the agency’s ability to find, stop, and prevent disease outbreaks. This podcast provides a brief overview of what goes on inside CDC’s labs, and why this work makes a difference in American’s health.  Created: 2/2/2015 by Office of the Associate Director for Communication (OADC).   Date Released: 2/2/2015.

  13. Comparative study of the effect of dry and wet ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) spice on the proximate and microbial safety of soybean beverage

    OpenAIRE

    Adegbola Oladele Dauda; Olufunmilola Adunni Abiodun

    2017-01-01

    Soybean beverage, most common nutritious local beverage in Nigeria and in the world, is a high protein beverage used as a dairy milk substitute with the limited utilization due to natural or ambient conditions that serve as growth medium for microorganisms. Hence, it has a short shelf life. This study examines the shelf life of soybean beverage preserved with the ginger spice (dried at 70 ˚C, 80 ˚C, 90 ˚C and 100 ˚C, and 2 g and 4 g of fresh/wet ginger respectively) over 7-week period. The sa...

  14. Hazardous gases and oxygen depletion in a wet paddy pile: an experimental study in a simulating underground rice mill pit, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenjai, Pornthip; Chaiear, Naesinee; Charerntanyarak, Lertchai; Boonmee, Mallika

    2012-01-01

    During the rice harvesting season in Thailand, large amounts of fresh paddy are sent to rice mills immediately after harvesting due to a lack of proper farm storage space. At certain levels of moisture content, rice grains may generate hazardous gases, which can replace oxygen (O(2)) in the confined spaces of underground rice mill pits. This phenomenon has been observed in a fatal accident in Thailand. Our study aimed to investigate the type of gases and their air concentrations emitted from the paddy piles at different levels of moisture content and duration of piling time. Four levels of moisture content in the paddy piles were investigated, including dry paddy group (Gases emitted were measured with an infrared spectrophotometer and a multi-gas detector every 12 h for 5 days throughout the experiment. The results revealed high levels of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) (range 5,864-8,419 ppm) in all wet paddy groups, which gradually increased over time. The concentration of carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH(4)), nitromethane (CH(3)NO(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) in all wet paddy groups increased with piling time and with moisture content, with ranges of 11-289; 2-8; 36-374; and 4-26 ppm, respectively. The highest levels of moisture content in the paddy piles were in the range 28-30%wb. Nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) concentrations were low in all paddy groups. The percentage of O(2) in the wet paddy groups decreased with piling time and moisture content (from 18.7% to 4.1%). This study suggested that hazardous gases could be emitted in moist paddy piles, and their concentrations could increase with increasing moisture content and piling time period.

  15. Fifteen years experience: Egyptian metabolic lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekram M. Fateen

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: This study illustrates the experience of the reference metabolic lab in Egypt over 15 years. The lab began metabolic disorder screening by using simple diagnostic techniques like thin layer chromatography and colored tests in urine which by time updated and upgraded the methods to diagnose a wide range of disorders. This study shows the most common diagnosed inherited inborn errors of metabolism among the Egyptian population.

  16. Wetting of real surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward Yu

    2013-01-01

    The problem of wetting and drop dynamics on various surfaces is very interesting from both the scientificas well as thepractical viewpoint, and subject of intense research.The results are scattered across papers in journals, sothis workwill meet the need for a unifying, comprehensive work.

  17. Medium-range mid-tropospheric transport of ozone and precursors over Africa: two numerical case studies in dry and wet seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sauvage

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A meso-scale model was used to understand and describe the dynamical processes driving high ozone concentrations observed during both dry and monsoon season in monthly climatologies profiles over Lagos (Nigeria, 6.6° N, 3.3° E, obtained with the MOZAIC airborne measurements (ozone and carbon monoxide. This study focuses on ozone enhancements observed in the upper-part of the lower troposphere, around 3000 m. Two individual cases have been selected in the MOZAIC dataset as being representative of the climatological ozone enhancements, to be simulated and analyzed with on-line Lagrangian backtracking of air masses.

    This study points out the role of baroclinic low-level circulations present in the Inter Tropical Front (ITF area. Two low-level thermal cells around a zonal axis and below 2000 m, in mirror symmetry to each other with respect to equator, form near 20° E and around 5° N and 5° S during the (northern hemisphere dry and wet seasons respectively. They are caused by surface gradients – the warm dry surface being located poleward of the ITF and the cooler wet surface equatorward of the ITF.

    A convergence line exists between the poleward low-level branch of each thermal cell and the equatorward low-level branch of the Hadley cell. Our main conclusion is to point out this line as a preferred location for fire products – among them ozone precursors – to be uplifted and injected into the lower free troposphere.

    The free tropospheric transport that occurs then depends on the hemisphere and season. In the NH dry season, the AEJ allows transport of ozone and precursors westward to Lagos. In the NH monsoon (wet season, fire products are transported from the southern hemisphere to Lagos by the southeasterly trade that surmounts the monsoon layer. Additionally ozone precursors uplifted by wet convection in the ITCZ can also mix to the ones uplifted by the baroclinic cell and be advected up to Lagos by the trade

  18. Comparative study of the luminescence of structures with Ge nanocrystals formed by dry and wet oxidation of SiGe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RodrIguez, A; Ortiz, M I; Sangrador, J; RodrIguez, T; Avella, M; Prieto, A C; Torres, A; Jimenez, J; Kling, A; Ballesteros, C

    2007-01-01

    The luminescence emission of structures containing Ge nanocrystals embedded in a dielectric matrix obtained by dry and wet oxidation of polycrystalline SiGe layers has been studied as a function of the oxidation time and initial SiGe layer thickness. A clear relationship between the intensity of the luminescence, the structure of the sample, the formation of Ge nanocrystals and the oxidation process parameters that allows us to select the appropriate process conditions to get the most efficient emission has been established. The evolution of the composition and thickness of the growing oxides and the remaining SiGe layer during the oxidation processes has been characterized using Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. For dry oxidation, the luminescence appears suddenly, regardless of the initial SiGe layer thickness, when all the Si of the SiGe has been oxidized and the remaining layer of the segregated Ge starts to be oxidized forming Ge nanocrystals. Luminescence is observed as long as Ge nanocrystals are present. For wet oxidation, the luminescence appears from the first stages of the oxidation, and is related to the formation of Ge-rich nanoclusters trapped in the mixed (Si and Ge) growing oxide. A sharp increase of the luminescence intensity for long oxidation times is also observed, due to the formation of Ge nanocrystals by the oxidation of the layer of segregated Ge. For both processes the luminescence is quenched when the oxidation time is long enough to cause the full oxidation of the Ge nanocrystals. The intensity of the luminescence in the dry oxidized samples is about ten times higher than in the wet oxidized ones for equal initial thickness of the SiGe layer

  19. Diagnosing the Nature of Land-Atmosphere Coupling: A Case Study of Dry/Wet Extremes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kennedy, Aaron; Kumar, Sujay V.

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of land surface and planetary boundary layer (PBL) temperature and moisture states and fluxes. In turn, these interactions regulate the strength of the connection between surface moisture and precipitation in a coupled system. To address model deficiencies, recent studies have focused on development of diagnostics to quantify the strength and accuracy of the land-PBL coupling at the process level. In this paper, a diagnosis of the nature and impacts of local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) during dry and wet extreme conditions is presented using a combination of models and observations during the summers of 2006 and 2007 in the U.S. southern Great Plains. A range of diagnostics exploring the links and feedbacks between soil moisture and precipitation is applied to the dry/wet regimes exhibited in this region, and in the process, a thorough evaluation of nine different land-PBL scheme couplings is conducted under the umbrella of a high-resolution regional modeling test bed. Results show that the sign and magnitude of errors in land surface energy balance components are sensitive to the choice of land surface model, regime type, and running mode. In addition, LoCo diagnostics show that the sensitivity of L-A coupling is stronger toward the land during dry conditions, while the PBL scheme coupling becomes more important during the wet regime. Results also demonstrate how LoCo diagnostics can be applied to any modeling system (e.g., reanalysis products) in the context of their integrated impacts on the process chain connecting the land surface to the PBL and in support of hydrological anomalies.

  20. Physics lab in spin

    CERN Multimedia

    Hawkes, N

    1999-01-01

    RAL is fostering commerical exploitation of its research and facilities in two main ways : spin-out companies exploit work done at the lab, spin-in companies work on site taking advantage of the facilities and the expertise available (1/2 page).

  1. Modifying Cookbook Labs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert, L.; Clough, Michael P.; Berg, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    Modifies an extended lab activity from a cookbook approach for determining the percent mass of water in copper sulfate pentahydrate crystals to one which incorporates students' prior knowledge, engenders active mental struggling with prior knowledge and new experiences, and encourages metacognition. (Contains 12 references.) (ASK)

  2. Technical Efficiency of Wet Season Melon Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananti Yekti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melon is one of high-value horticulture commodity which is cultivated widely in Kulon Progo regency. The nature of agricultural products is heavily dependent on the season, so it causes the prices of agricultural products always fluctuated every time. In wet season the price of agricultural products tends to be more expensive. Melon cultivation in wet season provide an opportunity to earn higher profits than in the dry season. The price of agricultural products tends to be more expensive in wet season, thus melon cultivation in wet season prospectively generate high profits. In order to achieve high profitability, melon farming has to be done efficiently. Objective of this study was to 1 determined the factors that influence melon production in wet season 2 measured technical efficiency of melon farming and 3 identified the factors that influanced technical efficiency. Data collected during April – June 2014. Location determined by multistage cluster sampling. 45 samples of farmers who cultivated melon during wet season obtained based on quota sampling technique. Technical efficiency was measured using Cobb-Douglas Stochastic Frontier. The result reveals that 1 land use, quantity of seed, K fertilizer contributed significantly increasing melon production, while N fertilizer decreased melon production significantly 2 technical efficiency indeces ranged from 0.40 to 0.99, with a mean of  0.77; 3 farmer’s experience gave significant influence to technical efficiency of melon farming in wet season.

  3. Erosion corrosion in wet steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavast, J.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of different remedies against erosion corrosion in wet steam has been studied in Barsebaeck 1. Accessible steam systems were inspected in 1984, 1985 and 1986. The effect of hydrogen peroxide injection of the transport of corrosion products in the condensate and feed water systems has also been followed through chemical analyses. The most important results of the project are: - Low alloy chromium steels with a chromium content of 1-2% have shown excellent resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. - A thermally sprayed coating has shown good resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. In a few areas with restricted accessibility minor attacks have been found. A thermally sprayed aluminium oxide coating has given poor results. - Large areas in the moisture separator/reheater and in steam extraction no. 3 have been passivated by injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide to the high pressure steam. In other inspected systems no significant effect was found. Measurements of the wall thickness in steam extraction no. 3 showed a reduced rate of attack. - The injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide has not resulted in any significant reduction of the iron level result is contrary to that of earlier tests. An increase to 40 ppb resulted in a slight decrease of the iron level. - None of the feared disadvantages with hydrogen peroxide injection has been observed. The chromium and cobalt levels did not increase during the injection. Neither did the lifetime of the precoat condensate filters decrease. (author)

  4. Evaluation of oral microbiology lab curriculum reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Min; Gao, Zhen Y; Wu, Xin Y; Jiang, Chen X; Du, Jia H

    2015-12-07

    According to the updated concept of oral microbiology, the School of Stomatology, Wuhan University, has carried out oral microbiology teaching reforms during the last 5 years. There was no lab curriculum before 2009 except for a theory course of oral microbiology. The school has implemented an innovative curriculum with oral medicine characteristics to strengthen understanding of knowledge, cultivate students' scientific interest and develop their potential, to cultivate the comprehensive ability of students. This study was designed to evaluate the oral microbiology lab curriculum by analyzing student performance and perceptions regarding the curriculum from 2009 to 2013. The lab curriculum adopted modalities for cooperative learning. Students collected dental plaque from each other and isolated the cariogenic bacteria with selective medium plates. Then they purified the enrichment culture medium and identified the cariogenic strains by Gram stain and biochemical tests. Both quantitative and qualitative data for 5 years were analysed in this study. Part One of the current study assessed student performance in the lab from 2009 to 2013. Part Two used qualitative means to assess students' perceptions by an open questionnaire. The 271 study students' grades on oral microbiology improved during the lab curriculum: "A" grades rose from 60.5 to 81.2 %, and "C" grades fell from 28.4 to 6.3 %. All students considered the lab curriculum to be interesting and helpful. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that the lab curriculum has strengthened students' grasp of important microbiology-related theory, cultivated their scientific interest, and developed their potential and comprehensive abilities. Our student performance and perception data support the continued use of the innovative teaching system. As an extension and complement of the theory course, the oral microbiology lab curriculum appears to improve the quality of oral medicine education and help to

  5. Study of the proton structure by measurements of polarization transfers in real Compton scattering at J Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanelli, C.; Salme, G.; Cisbani, E.; Hamilton, D.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2014-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of polarization-transfer data at large scattering angle (70 degrees), obtained in an experiment of real Compton scattering on proton, performed in Hall-C of Jefferson Lab, is presented. It is also discussed the relevance of this kind of experiments for shedding light on the non-perturbative structure of the proton, at low energy, and on the transition from the non-perturbative regime to the perturbative one, that occurs at high energy. Moreover, the possibility to extract Compton form factors and the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD), one of the most promising theoretical tool to determine the total angular momentum contribution of quarks and gluons to nucleon spin, is emphasized. The preliminary results appear consistent with GPD's based and Regge predictions. This is not sufficient yet to exclude pQCD COZ (Chernyak-Oglobin-Zhitnistsky) model, but it is another preliminary indication that the handbag approach seems to be the dominant mechanism at the energy of the experiment

  6. Advanced HVAC modeling with FemLab/Simulink/MatLab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijndel, van A.W.M.

    2003-01-01

    The combined MatLab toolboxes FemLab and Simulink are evaluated as solvers for HVAC problems based on partial differential equations (PDEs). The FemLab software is designed to simulate systems of coupled PDEs, 1-D, 2-D or 3-D, nonlinear and time dependent. In order to show how the program works, a

  7. Online labs and the MARVEL experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Mueller

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available MARVEL is a Leonardo da Vinci project that provides a framework to analyse the pedagogic effectiveness of online labs in various heterogeneous areas that include solar energy, robotics, electronics and electro-pneumatics. It is also used as a test bench to compare the implementation of purely remote labs, where all devices are real, versus mixed-reality environments, where real devices work together with simulation models. This paper describes the basic concepts underlying the implementation of such online labs and presents two case studies (which are openly available to the public. A final section discusses the main pedagogical implications of online labs and presents the research directions that are being considered as a follow-up from this project.

  8. Virtual labs in Leonardo da Vinci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Nagy

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the problem of virtual lab capabilities in the e-learning. Using combination of web conferencing and "virtual labs" capabilities, a new quality distance learning teaching is now in preparation and will be included in the course teaching to produce interactive, online simulations for the natural gas engineering studies. The activities are designed to enhance the existing curriculum and to include online assessments. A special care is devoted to the security problem between a server and a client computer. Several examples of the virtual labs related to the PVT thermodynamics, fluid flow, the natural gas well-testing, and thev gas network flow are prepared and tested. A major challenge for the 'CELGAS' system is in managing the delicate balance between the student collaboration and the isolation. Students may be encouraged to collaborate and work with each other, simulating their exploration of the lab material.

  9. Comparative study of the different industrial manufacturing routes for UO2 pellet specifications through the wet process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palheiros, Franklin; Gonzaga, Reinaldo; Soares, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    In the fuel cycle, converting UF 6 to UO 2 powder is an intermediate step for fabrication of pellets for fuel assemblies to be used in nuclear power plants. The basic proposal common to the different powder fabrication processes is to provide raw material capable of being processed into the form of pellets. The wet processes is the most often used industrially and are divided in two categories: the ADU (Ammonium Diuranate) and AUC (Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate) processes, whose names originate in the precipitate obtained in aqueous solution during the intermediate steps of UO 2 powder fabrication. It has known that the powder characteristics have a considerable influence in the UO 2 pellet manufacturing and quality characteristics. INB has used the AUC process to produce UO 2 pellets and supply fuel to Angra 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Plants. Despite of this process is characterized by the precipitation of a different intermediate precipitate compared to the ADU route (i.e., (NH 4 ) 4 UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 , in the AUC process, and (NH 4 ) 2 U 2 O 7 in ADU process) leading to some slight differences in the final pellet microstructure, it has been considered that the models that predict the pellet behavior during irradiation in a nuclear reactor are basically the same compared to those used to predict the pellets form the ADU process. In order to evaluate how different the pellets originated from these two industrial routes are, this paper aims to compare the INB production historical data (Angra 1, Cycles 14 and 15) with the key parameters of a common product specification from the ADU process. (author)

  10. Cost analysis of iliac stenting performed in the operating room and the catheterization lab: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooyeon; Kramer, Sage P; Dugan, Adam J; Minion, David J; Gurley, John C; Davenport, Daniel L; Ferraris, Victor A; Saha, Sibu P

    2016-12-01

    Iliac arterial stenting is performed both in the operating room (OR) and the catheterization lab (CL). To date, no analysis has compared resource utilization between these locations. Consecutive patients (n = 105) treated at a single center were retrospectively analyzed. Patients included adults with chronic, symptomatic iliac artery stenosis with a minimum Rutherford classification (RC) of 3, treated with stents. Exclusion criteria were prior stenting, acute ischemia, or major concomitant procedures. Immediate and two-year outcomes were observed. Patient demographics, perioperative details, physician billings, and hospital costs were recorded. Multivariable regression was used to adjust costs by patient and perioperative cost drivers. Fifty-one procedures (49%) were performed in the OR and 54 (51%) in the CL. Mean age was 57, and 44% were female. Severe cases were more often performed in the OR (RC ≥ 4; 42% vs. 11%, P costs (P costs (P costs but was associated with increased professional fees. Same-stay (5%) and post-discharge reintervention (33%) did not vary by location. The OR was associated with increased length of stay, more ICU admissions, and increased total costs. However, OR patients had more severe disease and therefore often required more aggressive intervention. After controlling for these differences, procedure venue per se was not associated with increased costs, but OR cases incurred increased professional fees due to dual-provider charges. Given the similar clinical results between venues, it seems reasonable to perform most stenting in the CL or utilize conscious sedation in the OR. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Healthy snacks at the checkout counter: A lab and field study on the impact of shelf arrangement and assortment structure on consumer choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Kleef Ellen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The essence of nudging is to adapt the environment in which consumers make decisions to help them make better choices, without forcing certain outcomes upon them. To determine how consumers can effectively be guided to select healthier snacks, we examine the effect of manipulating the assortment structure and shelf layout of an impulse display including both healthy and unhealthy snacks near the checkout counter of a canteen. Methods Both a lab and field study applied a two-factor experimental design manipulating snack offerings both in an on-screen choice environment and a natural environment (hospital staff restaurant. Shelf arrangement (i.e. accessibility was altered by putting healthy snacks at higher shelves versus lower shelves. Assortment structure (i.e. availability was altered by offering an assortment that either included 25% or 75% healthy snacks. Participants in the lab study (n = 158 made a choice from a shelf display. A brief survey following snack selection asked participants to evaluate the assortment and their choice. The field experiment took place in a hospital canteen. Daily sales data were collected for a period of four weeks. On completion of the field study, employees (n = 92 filled out a questionnaire about all four displays and rated their attractiveness, healthiness and perceived freedom of choice. Results The lab study showed a higher probability of healthy snack choice when 75% of the assortment consisted of healthy snacks compared to conditions with 25% healthy snack assortments, even though choices were not rated less satisfying or more restrictive. Regarding shelf display location of healthy snacks, no significant differences were observed. There was also no significant shelf arrangement by assortment structure interactive effect. The field study replicated these findings, in that this assortment structure led to higher sales of healthy snacks. Sales of unhealthy and total snacks were

  12. Healthy snacks at the checkout counter: a lab and field study on the impact of shelf arrangement and assortment structure on consumer choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Ellen; Otten, Kai; van Trijp, Hans C M

    2012-12-12

    The essence of nudging is to adapt the environment in which consumers make decisions to help them make better choices, without forcing certain outcomes upon them. To determine how consumers can effectively be guided to select healthier snacks, we examine the effect of manipulating the assortment structure and shelf layout of an impulse display including both healthy and unhealthy snacks near the checkout counter of a canteen. Both a lab and field study applied a two-factor experimental design manipulating snack offerings both in an on-screen choice environment and a natural environment (hospital staff restaurant). Shelf arrangement (i.e. accessibility) was altered by putting healthy snacks at higher shelves versus lower shelves. Assortment structure (i.e. availability) was altered by offering an assortment that either included 25% or 75% healthy snacks. Participants in the lab study (n = 158) made a choice from a shelf display. A brief survey following snack selection asked participants to evaluate the assortment and their choice. The field experiment took place in a hospital canteen. Daily sales data were collected for a period of four weeks. On completion of the field study, employees (n = 92) filled out a questionnaire about all four displays and rated their attractiveness, healthiness and perceived freedom of choice. The lab study showed a higher probability of healthy snack choice when 75% of the assortment consisted of healthy snacks compared to conditions with 25% healthy snack assortments, even though choices were not rated less satisfying or more restrictive. Regarding shelf display location of healthy snacks, no significant differences were observed. There was also no significant shelf arrangement by assortment structure interactive effect. The field study replicated these findings, in that this assortment structure led to higher sales of healthy snacks. Sales of unhealthy and total snacks were not impacted by manipulations (no main or interaction effects

  13. Healthy snacks at the checkout counter: A lab and field study on the impact of shelf arrangement and assortment structure on consumer choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The essence of nudging is to adapt the environment in which consumers make decisions to help them make better choices, without forcing certain outcomes upon them. To determine how consumers can effectively be guided to select healthier snacks, we examine the effect of manipulating the assortment structure and shelf layout of an impulse display including both healthy and unhealthy snacks near the checkout counter of a canteen. Methods Both a lab and field study applied a two-factor experimental design manipulating snack offerings both in an on-screen choice environment and a natural environment (hospital staff restaurant). Shelf arrangement (i.e. accessibility) was altered by putting healthy snacks at higher shelves versus lower shelves. Assortment structure (i.e. availability) was altered by offering an assortment that either included 25% or 75% healthy snacks. Participants in the lab study (n = 158) made a choice from a shelf display. A brief survey following snack selection asked participants to evaluate the assortment and their choice. The field experiment took place in a hospital canteen. Daily sales data were collected for a period of four weeks. On completion of the field study, employees (n = 92) filled out a questionnaire about all four displays and rated their attractiveness, healthiness and perceived freedom of choice. Results The lab study showed a higher probability of healthy snack choice when 75% of the assortment consisted of healthy snacks compared to conditions with 25% healthy snack assortments, even though choices were not rated less satisfying or more restrictive. Regarding shelf display location of healthy snacks, no significant differences were observed. There was also no significant shelf arrangement by assortment structure interactive effect. The field study replicated these findings, in that this assortment structure led to higher sales of healthy snacks. Sales of unhealthy and total snacks were not impacted by

  14. Guidelines for Urban Labs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholl, Christian; Agger Eriksen, Mette; Baerten, Nik

    2017-01-01

    These guidelines are intended for team members and managers of urban labs and, more generally, for civil servants and facilitators in cities working with experimental processes to tackle complex challenges. They aim to support the everyday practice of collaboratively experimenting and learning ho...... the result is inspiring and instructive for all those who want to wrap their minds around experimental co-creative approaches to urban governance and city development....

  15. Study of the heterogeneous reaction of O3 with CH3SCH3 using the wetted-wall flowtube technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barcellos da Rosa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the heterogeneous kinetics of the reaction of CH3SCH3 (dimethyl sulphide, DMS with O3 (ozone in aqueous solutions of different ionic strengths (0, 0.1 and 1.0M NaCl using the wetted-wall flowtube (WWFT technique. Henry's law coefficients of DMS on pure water and on different concentrations of NaCl (0.1M - 4.0M in the WWFT from UV spectrophotometric measurements of DMS in the gas phase, using a numerical transport model of phase exchange, were determined to be H ±s (M atm-1 = 2.16±0.5 at 274.4 K, 1.47±0.3 at 283.4 K, 0.72±0.2 at 291 K, 0.57±0.1 at 303.4 K and 0.33±0.1 at 313.4 K on water, on 1.0M NaCl to be H = 1.57±0.4 at 275.7 K, 0.8±0.2 at 291 K and on 4.0M NaCl to be H = 0.44±0.1 at 275.7 K and 0.16±0.04 at 291 K, showing a significant effect of ionic strength, m, on the solubility of DMS according to the equation ln (H/M atm-1 = 4061 T-1 - 0.052 m2 - 50.9 m T-1 - 14.0. At concentrations of DMS(liq above 50 mM, UV spectrophotometry of both O3(gas and DMS(gas enables us to observe simultaneously the reactive uptake of O3 on DMS solution and the gas-liquid equilibration of DMS along the WWFT. The uptake coefficient, g (gamma, of O3 on aqueous solutions of DMS, varying between 1 and 15·10-6, showed a square root-dependence on the aqueous DMS concentration (as expected for diffusive penetration into the surface film, where the reaction takes place in aqueous solution. The uptake coefficient was smaller on NaCl solution in accord with the lower solubility of O3. The heterogeneous reaction of O3(gas with DMS(liq was evaluated from the observations of the second order rate constant (kII for the homogeneous aqueous reaction O3(liq + DMS(liq using a numerical model of radial diffusion and reactive penetration, leading to kII ± D kII (in units of 108 M-1 s-1 = 4.1±1.2 at 291.0 K, 2.15±0.65 at 283.4 K and 1.8±0.5 at 274.4 K. Aside from the expected influence on solubility and aqueous-phase diffusion coefficient of both

  16. Double success for neutrino lab

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    "The Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy is celebrating two key developments in the field of neutrino physics. Number one is the first ever detection, by the OPERA experiement, of possible tau neutrino that has switched its identity from a muon neutrino as it travelled form its origins at CERN in Switzerland to the Italian lab. Number two is the successful start-up of the ICARUS detector, which, like OPERA, is designed to study neutrinos that "oscillate" between types" (0.5 pages)

  17. A green chemistry lab course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rank, J.; Lenoir, D.; Bahadir, M.; Koning, B.

    2006-01-01

    The traditional course content of chemistry classes must change to achieve better awareness of the important issues of sustainability in chemistry within the next generation of professional chemists. To provide the necessary material for the organic chemistry teaching lab course, which is part of almost all study programs in chemistry, material was developed and collected (http://www.oc-praktikum.de/en) that allows students and teachers to assess reactions beyond the experimental set up, reaction mechanism and chemical yield. Additional parameters like atom economy of chemical transformations, energy efficiency, and questions of waste, renewable feed stocks, toxicity and ecotoxicity, as well as the safety measures for the chemicals used are discussed. (author)

  18. Allergenic Ingredients in Personal Hygiene Wet Wipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbeck, Kelly A; Warshaw, Erin M

    Wet wipes are a significant allergen source for anogenital allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of the study was to calculate the frequency of potentially allergenic ingredients in personal hygiene wet wipes. Ingredient lists from brand name and generic personal hygiene wet wipes from 4 large retailers were compiled. In the 54 personal hygiene wet wipes evaluated, a total of 132 ingredients were identified (average of 11.9 ingredients per wipe). The most common ingredients were Aloe barbadensis (77.8%), citric acid (77.8%), fragrance (72.2%), sorbic acid derivatives (63.0%), tocopherol derivatives (63.0%), glycerin (59.3%), phenoxyethanol (55.6%), disodium cocoamphodiacetate (53.7%), disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (42.6%), propylene glycol (42.6%), iodopropynyl butylcarbamate (40.7%), chamomile extracts (38.9%), sodium benzoate (35.2%), bronopol (22.2%), sodium citrate (22.2%), lanolin derivatives (20.4%), parabens (20.4%), polyethylene glycol derivatives (18.5%), disodium phosphate (16.7%), dimethylol dimethyl hydantoin (DMDM) (14.8%), and cocamidopropyl propylene glycol (PG)-dimonium chloride phosphate (11.1%). Of note, methylisothiazolinone (5.6%) was uncommon; methylchloroisothiazolinone was not identified in the personal hygiene wet wipes examined. There are many potential allergens in personal hygiene wet wipes, especially fragrance and preservatives.

  19. Toward intrinsic graphene surfaces: a systematic study on thermal annealing and wet-chemical treatment of SiO2-supported graphene devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zengguang; Zhou, Qiaoyu; Wang, Chenxuan; Li, Qiang; Wang, Chen; Fang, Ying

    2011-02-09

    By combining atomic force microscopy and trans-port measurements, we systematically investigated effects of thermal annealing on surface morphologies and electrical properties of single-layer graphene devices fabricated by electron beam lithography on silicon oxide (SiO(2)) substrates. Thermal treatment above 300 °C in vacuum was required to effectively remove resist residues on graphene surfaces. However, annealing at high temperature was found to concomitantly bring graphene in close contact with SiO(2) substrates and induce increased coupling between them, which leads to heavy hole doping and severe degradation of mobilities in graphene devices. To address this problem, a wet-chemical approach employing chloroform was developed in our study, which was shown to enable both intrinsic surfaces and enhanced electrical properties of graphene devices. Upon the recovery of intrinsic surfaces of graphene, the adsorption and assisted fibrillation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ1-42) on graphene were electrically measured in real time.

  20. Pre-bent instruments used in single-port laparoscopic surgery versus conventional laparoscopic surgery: comparative study of performance in a dry lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miernik, Arkadiusz; Schoenthaler, Martin; Lilienthal, Kerstin; Frankenschmidt, Alexander; Karcz, Wojciech Konrad; Kuesters, Simon

    2012-07-01

    Different types of single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) have become increasingly popular. Although SILS is technically even more challenging than conventional laparoscopy, published data of first clinical series seem to demonstrate the feasibility of these approaches. Various attempts have been made to overcome restrictions due to loss of triangulation in SILS by specially designed SILS-specific instruments. This study involving novices in a dry lab compared task performances between conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS) and single-port laparoscopic surgery (SPLS) using newly designed pre-bent instruments. In this study, 90 medical students without previous experience in laparoscopic techniques were randomly assigned to undergo one of three procedures: CLS, SPLS using two pre-bent instruments (SPLS-pp), or SPLS using one pre-bent and one straight laparoscopic instrument (SPLS-ps). In the dry lab, the participants performed four typical laparoscopic tasks of increasing difficulty. Evaluation included performance times or number of completed tasks within a given time frame. All performances were videotaped and evaluated for unsuccessful attempts and unwanted interactions of instruments. Using subjective questionnaires, the participants rated difficulties with two-dimensional vision and coordination of instruments. Task performances were significantly better in the CLS group than in either SPLS group. The SPLS-ps group showed a tendency toward better performances than the SPLS-pp group, but the difference was not significant. Video sequences and participants` questionnaires showed instrument interaction as the major problem in the single-incision surgery groups. Although SILS is feasible, as shown in clinical series published by laparoscopically experienced experts, SILS techniques are demanding due to restrictions that come with the loss of triangulation. These can be compensated only partially by currently available SILS-designed instruments. The future of

  1. Innovative Educational Practice: Using Virtual Labs in the Secondary Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Satsky Kerr, PhD

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Two studies investigated the effectiveness of teaching science labs online to secondary students. Study 1 compared achievement among students instructed using hands-on Chemistry labs versus those instructed using virtual Chemistry labs (eLabs. Study 2 compared the same groups of students again while both teachers instructed using hands-on Chemistry labs to determine whether teacher or student characteristics may have affected Study 1’s findings. Participants were high school Chemistry students from a Central Texas Independent School District. Results indicated that: students learn science effectively online, schools may experience cost savings from delivering labs online, and students gain valuable technology skills needed later in college and in the workplace.

  2. Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks: A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson L. Ward; Glendon W. Gee; John S. Selker; Caly Cooper

    2002-04-24

    The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts a typical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could force flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contact angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface

  3. Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks; A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson l. Ward; Glendon W. Gee; John S. Selker; Clay Cooper

    2002-04-24

    The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts atypical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could for ce flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contract angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface

  4. Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks: A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Selker, John S.; Cooper, Caly

    2002-01-01

    The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts a typical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could force flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contact angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface tension

  5. Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks: A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Selker, John S.; Cooper, Clay

    2002-01-01

    The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts atypical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could for ce flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contract angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface tens ion

  6. Wet, Carbonaceous Asteroids: Altering Minerals, Changing Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2011-04-01

    Many carbonaceous chondrites contain alteration products from water-rock interactions at low temperature and organic compounds. A fascinating fact known for decades is the presence in some of them of an assortment of organic compounds, including amino acids, sometimes called the building blocks of life. Murchison and other CM carbonaceous chondrites contain hundreds of amino acids. Early measurements indicated that the amino acids in carbonaceous chondrites had equal proportions of L- and D-structures, a situation called racemic. This was in sharp contrast to life on Earth, which heavily favors L- forms. However, beginning in 1997, John Cronin and Sandra Pizzarello (Arizona State University) found L- excesses in isovaline and several other amino acids in the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. In 2009, Daniel Glavin and Jason Dworkin (Astrobiology Analytical Lab, Goddard Space Flight Center) reported the first independent confirmation of L-isovaline excesses in Murchison using a different analytical technique than employed by Cronin and Pizzarello. Inspired by this work, Daniel Glavin, Michael Callahan, Jason Dworkin, and Jamie Elsila (Astrobiology Analytical Lab, Goddard Space Flight Center), have done an extensive study of the abundance and symmetry of amino acids in carbonaceous chondrites that experienced a range of alteration by water in their parent asteroids. The results show that amino acids are more abundant in the less altered meteorites, implying that aqueous processing changes the mix of amino acids. They also confirmed the enrichment in L-structures of some amino acids, especially isovaline, confirming earlier work. The authors suggest that aqueously-altered planetesimals might have seeded the early Earth with nonracemic amino acids, perhaps explaining why life from microorganisms to people use only L- forms to make proteins. The initial imbalance caused by non-biologic processes in wet asteroids might have been amplified by life on Earth. Alternatively

  7. Assimilation of Soil Wetness Index and Leaf Area Index into the ISBA-A-gs land surface model: grassland case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Barbu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the joint assimilation in a land surface model of a Soil Wetness Index (SWI product provided by an exponential filter together with Leaf Area Index (LAI is investigated. The data assimilation is evaluated with different setups using the SURFEX modeling platform, for a period of seven years (2001–2007, at the SMOSREX grassland site in southwestern France. The results obtained with a Simplified Extended Kalman Filter demonstrate the effectiveness of a joint data assimilation scheme when both SWI and Leaf Area Index are merged into the ISBA-A-gs land surface model. The assimilation of a retrieved Soil Wetness Index product presents several challenges that are investigated in this study. A significant improvement of around 13 % of the root-zone soil water content is obtained by assimilating dimensionless root-zone SWI data. For comparison, the assimilation of in situ surface soil moisture is considered as well. A lower impact on the root zone is noticed. Under specific conditions, the transfer of the information from the surface to the root zone was found not accurate. Also, our results indicate that the assimilation of in situ LAI data may correct a number of deficiencies in the model, such as low LAI values in the senescence phase by using a seasonal-dependent error definition for background and observations. In order to verify the specification of the errors for SWI and LAI products, a posteriori diagnostics are employed. This approach highlights the importance of the assimilation design on the quality of the analysis. The impact of data assimilation scheme on CO2 fluxes is also quantified by using measurements of net CO2 fluxes gathered at the SMOSREX site from 2005 to 2007. An improvement of about 5 % in terms of rms error is obtained.

  8. The Influence of Tablet PCs on Students' Use of Multiple Representations in Lab Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelman, Clarisa Bercovich; De Leone, Charles; Price, Edward

    2009-11-01

    This study examined how different tools influenced students' use of representations in the Physics laboratory. In one section of a lab course, every student had a Tablet PC that served as a digital-ink based lab notebook. Students could seamlessly create hand-drawn graphics and equations, and write lab reports on the same computer used for data acquisition, simulation, and analysis. In another lab section, students used traditional printed lab guides, kept paper notebooks, and then wrote lab reports on regular laptops. Analysis of the lab reports showed differences between the sections' use of multiple representations, including an increased use of diagrams and equations by the Tablet users.

  9. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolovratník Michal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  10. Wetting, superhydrophobicity, and icephobicity in biomimetic composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Vahid

    Recent developments in nano- and bio-technology require new materials. Among these new classes of materials which have emerged in the recent years are biomimetic materials, which mimic structure and properties of materials found in living nature. There are a large number of biological objects including bacteria, animals and plants with properties of interest for engineers. Among these properties is the ability of the lotus leaf and other natural materials to repel water, which has inspired researchers to prepare similar surfaces. The Lotus effect involving roughness-induced superhydrophobicity is a way to design nonwetting, self-cleaning, omniphobic, icephobic, and antifouling surfaces. The range of actual and potential applications of superhydrophobic surfaces is diverse including optical, building and architecture, textiles, solar panels, lab-on-a-chip, microfluidic devices, and applications requiring antifouling from biological and organic contaminants. In this thesis, in chapter one, we introduce the general concepts and definitions regarding the wetting properties of the surfaces. In chapter two, we develop novel models and conduct experiments on wetting of composite materials. To design sustainable superhydrophobic metal matrix composite (MMC) surfaces, we suggest using hydrophobic reinforcement in the bulk of the material, rather than only at its surface. We experimentally study the wetting properties of graphite-reinforced Al- and Cu-based composites and conclude that the Cu-based MMCs have the potential to be used in the future for the applications where the wear-resistant superhydrophobicity is required. In chapter three, we introduce hydrophobic coating at the surface of concrete materials making them waterproof to prevent material failure, because concretes and ceramics cannot stop water from seeping through them and forming cracks. We create water-repellant concretes with CA close to 160o using superhydrophobic coating. In chapter four, experimental

  11. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of Schottky barrier formation and thermal stability of the LaB6/GaAs(001) c (4 x 4) interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokotsuka, T.; Narusawa, T.; Uchida, Y.; Nakashima, H.

    1987-01-01

    Schottky barrier formation and thermal stability of the LaB 6 /GaAs(001) c (4 x 4) interface were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results show an excellent thermal stability without any appreciable interface reactions such as interdiffusion. Band bending induced by LaB 6 deposition is found to depend on the evaporation condition. However, the Fermi level pinning position does not change due to heat treatments between 300 and 700 0 C. This indicates that LaB 6 is a promising gate material for GaAs integrated circuits

  12. Microgrid central controller development and hierarchical control implemetation in the intelligent microgrid lab of Aalborg University

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Lexuan; Savaghebi, Mehdi; Andrade, Fabio; Vasquez Quintero, Juan Carlos; Guerrero, Josep M.; Graells Sobré, Moisès

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a microgrid central controller in an inverter-based intelligent microgrid (iMG) lab in Aalborg University, Denmark. The iMG lab aims to provide a flexible experimental platform for comprehensive studies of microgrids. The complete control system applied in this lab is based on the hierarchical control scheme for microgrids and includes primary, secondary and tertiary control. The structure of the lab, including the lab facilities, configurations and comm...

  13. A study of wet deposition of atmospheric tritium releases at the Ontario Power Generation, Pickering Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, G.; DeWilde, J.; Yu, L.

    2001-01-01

    The Ontario Power Generation,Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) has been investigating deposition of atmospheric releases of tritium on their site. This study has included numerical dispersion modelling studies conducted over the past three years, as well as an ongoing field monitoring study. The following paper will present results of the field monitoring study and make comparisons to the numerical modelling. The results of this study could be of potential use to nuclear stations in quantifying tritium deposition in near field regions where building wake effects dominate pollutant dispersion

  14. Size effect of added LaB6 particles on optical properties of LaB6/Polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yifei; Zhang Lin; Hu Lijie; Wang Wei; Min Guanghui

    2011-01-01

    Modified LaB 6 particles with sizes ranging from 50 nm to 400 nm were added into polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix in order to investigate the effect of added LaB 6 particles on optical properties of LaB 6 /PMMA composites. Method of in-situ polymerization was applied to prepare PMMA from raw material—methyl methacrylate (MMA), a process during which LaB 6 particles were dispersed in MMA. Ultraviolet–visible–near infrared (UV–vis–NIR) absorption spectrum was used to study optical properties of the as-prepared materials. The difference in particle size could apparently affect the composites' absorption of visible light around wavelength of 600 nm. Added LaB 6 particles with size of about 70 nm resulted in the best optical properties among these groups of composites. - Graphical abstract: 70 nm LaB 6 particles resulted in the best performance on absorption of VIS and NIR, which could not be apparently achieved by LaB 6 particles beyond nano-scale. Highlights: ► LaB 6 /PMMA composites were prepared using the method of in-situ polymerization. ► LaB 6 particles added in MMA prolonged the time needed for its pre-polymerization. ► Nanosized LaB 6 particles could obviously absorb much NIR but little VIS.

  15. Wetting of alkanes on water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, E.; Bonn, D.; Meunier, J.; Shahidzadeh, N. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231, Cedex 05 Paris (France); Broseta, D.; Ragil, K. [Institut Francais du Petrole, 1-4 avenue de Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil-Malmaison Cedex (France); Dobbs, H.; Indekeu, J.O. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Laboratorium voor Vaste-Stoffysica en Magnetisme, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2002-04-01

    The wetting behavior of oil on water (or brine) has important consequences for the transport properties of oil in water-containing porous reservoirs, and consequently for oil recovery. The equilibrium wetting behavior of model oils composed of pure alkanes or alkane mixtures on brine is reviewed in this paper. Intermediate between the partial wetting state, in which oil lenses coexist on water with a thin film of adsorbed alkane molecules, and the complete wetting state, in which a macroscopically thick oil layer covers the water, these systems display a third, novel wetting state, in which oil lenses coexist with a mesoscopic (a few-nanometers-thick) oil film. The nature and location of the transitions between these wetting regimes depend on oil and brine compositions, temperature and pressure.

  16. A Case Study in Competitive Technical and Market Intelligence Support and Lessons Learned for the uChemLab LDRD Grand Challenge Project; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SOUTHWELL, EDWIN T.; GARCIA, MARIE L.; MEYERS, CHARLES E.

    2001-01-01

    The(mu)ChemLab(trademark) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Grand Challenge project began in October 1996 and ended in September 2000. The technical managers of the(mu)ChemLab(trademark) project and the LDRD office, with the support of a consultant, conducted a competitive technical and market demand intelligence analysis of the(mu)ChemLab(trademark). The managers used this knowledge to make project decisions and course adjustments. CTI/MDI positively impacted the project's technology development, uncovered potential technology partnerships, and supported eventual industry partner contacts. CTI/MDI analysis is now seen as due diligence and the(mu)ChemLab(trademark) project is now the model for other Sandia LDRD Grand Challenge undertakings. This document describes the CTI/MDI analysis and captures the more important ''lessons learned'' of this Grand Challenge project, as reported by the project's management team

  17. A discrete element study of wet particle-particle interaction during granulation in a spout fluidized bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buijtenen, M.S.; Deen, N.G.; Heinrich, Stefan; Antonyuk, Sergiy; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we study the effect of the inter-particle interaction on the bed dynamics, by considering a variable restitution coefficient. The restitution coefficient is varied in time and space depending on the moisture content due to the particle-droplet interaction and evaporation. This study

  18. [Chances and Potential of a Modern Surgical Skills Lab as Substantial Practical Part of the Study of Human Medicine - "The Magdeburg Model"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatek, S; Altmann, S; Haß, H-J; Werwick, K; Winkler-Stuck, K; Zardo, P; von Daake, S; Baumann, B; Rahmanzadeh, A; Chiapponi, C; Reschke, K; Meyer, F

    2017-02-01

    Introduction: Surgical education of medical students within "skills labs" have not been standardised throughout Germany as yet; there is a substantial impact of available aspects such as personal and space at the various medical schools. Aim: The aim of this contribution is to illustrate the concept of a surgical skills lab in detail, including curricular teaching and integrated facultative courses at the Medical School, University of Magdeburg ("The Magdeburg Model") in the context of a new and reconstructed area for the skills lab at the Magdeburg's apprenticeship center for medical basic abilities (MAMBA). Method: We present an overview on the spectrum of curricular and facultative teaching activities within the surgical part of the skills lab. Student evaluation of this teaching concept is implemented using the programme "EvaSys" and evaluation forms adapted to the single courses. Results: By establishing MAMBA, the options for a practice-related surgical education have been substantially improved. Student evaluations of former courses presented within the skills lab and the chance of moving the skills lab into a more generous and reconstructed area led to a reorganisation of seminars and courses. New additional facultative courses held by student tutors have been introduced and have shown to be of great effect, in particular, because of their interdisciplinary character. Conclusion: Practice-related surgical education within a skills lab may have the potential to effectively prepare medical students for their professional life. In addition, it allows one to present and teach the most important basic skills in surgery, which need to be pursued by every student. An enthusiastic engagement of the Office for Student Affairs can be considered the crucial and indispensable link between clinical work and curricular as well as facultative teaching with regard to organisation and student evaluation. The practice-related teaching parts and contents at the surgical

  19. ERLN Technical Support for Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Response Laboratory Network provides policies and guidance on lab and data requirements, Standardized Analytical Methods, and technical support for water and radiological sampling and analysis

  20. Aircraft Lighting and Transparency Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Lighting and Transparencies with Night Combat Lab performs radiometric and photometric measurements of cockpit lighting and displays. Evaluates the day,...

  1. Wetting of cholesteric liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Nuno M; Figueirinhas Pereira, Maria Carolina; Bernardino, Nelson R; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2016-02-01

    We investigate theoretically the wetting properties of cholesteric liquid crystals at a planar substrate. If the properties of substrate and of the interface are such that the cholesteric layers are not distorted, the wetting properties are similar to those of a nematic liquid crystal. If, on the other hand, the anchoring conditions force the distortion of the liquid crystal layers the wetting properties are altered, the free cholesteric-isotropic interface is non-planar and there is a layer of topological defects close to the substrate. These deformations can either promote or hinder the wetting of the substrate by a cholesteric, depending on the properties of the cholesteric liquid crystal.

  2. Lab at Home: Hardware Kits for a Digital Design Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J. P.; Haim, F.

    2009-01-01

    An innovative laboratory methodology for an introductory digital design course is presented. Instead of having traditional lab experiences, where students have to come to school classrooms, a "lab at home" concept is proposed. Students perform real experiments in their own homes, using hardware kits specially developed for this purpose. They…

  3. RemoteLabs Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Crabeel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a first step towards the implementation of a framework for remote experimentation of electric machines – the RemoteLabs platform. This project was focused on the development of two main modules: the user Web-based and the electric machines interfaces. The Web application provides the user with a front-end and interacts with the back-end – the user and experiment persistent data. The electric machines interface is implemented as a distributed client server application where the clients, launched by the Web application, interact with the server modules located in platforms physically connected the electric machines drives. Users can register and authenticate, schedule, specify and run experiments and obtain results in the form of CSV, XML and PDF files. These functionalities were successfully tested with real data, but still without including the electric machines. This inclusion is part of another project scheduled to start soon.

  4. The lab of fame

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    For a third time, CERN is organising the Swiss heat of Famelab, the world’s leading science communication competition that has already gathered over 5,000 young and talented scientists and engineers from all across the planet.   Besides their degrees, the scientists who participate in Famelab have another thing in common: their passion for communicating science. Coming from a variety of scientific fields, from medicine to particle physics and microbiology, the contestants have three minutes to present a science, technology, mathematics or engineering-based talk using only the props he or she can carry onto the stage; PowerPoint presentations are not permitted. The contestants are then judged by a panel of three judges who evaluate the content, clarity and charisma of their talks. What's unique about FameLab is the fact that content is an important aspect of the performance. At the end of their presentation, contestants are often questioned about the scientific relevance of...

  5. Can smartphones be used to bring computer-based tasks from the lab to the field? A mobile experience-sampling method study about the pace of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Stefan; Lewetz, David; Reips, Ulf-Dietrich

    2017-12-06

    Researchers are increasingly using smartphones to collect scientific data. To date, most smartphone studies have collected questionnaire data or data from the built-in sensors. So far, few studies have analyzed whether smartphones can also be used to conduct computer-based tasks (CBTs). Using a mobile experience-sampling method study and a computer-based tapping task as examples (N = 246; twice a day for three weeks, 6,000+ measurements), we analyzed how well smartphones can be used to conduct a CBT. We assessed methodological aspects such as potential technologically induced problems, dropout, task noncompliance, and the accuracy of millisecond measurements. Overall, we found few problems: Dropout rate was low, and the time measurements were very accurate. Nevertheless, particularly at the beginning of the study, some participants did not comply with the task instructions, probably because they did not read the instructions before beginning the task. To summarize, the results suggest that smartphones can be used to transfer CBTs from the lab to the field, and that real-world variations across device manufacturers, OS types, and CPU load conditions did not substantially distort the results.

  6. A study of the wet deposit and foliar uptake of iodine and strontium on rye-grass and clover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeletti, Livio; Levi, Emilio; Commission of the European Communities, Ispra

    1977-12-01

    Foliar uptake of iodine and strontium by rye-grass and clover was studied as a function of aspersion intensities. At the same time, the contribution of root sorption to foliar uptake was measured. The effective half-lives of radionuclides of standing and harvested grass were also determined together with their uptake under the action of demineralized water aspersion [fr

  7. Follow-up Study of ITER Safety Analysis : Large In-vessel First Wall Pipe Break with Wet Confinement Bypass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Bo; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Previous researches have been analyzed risk assessments of fusion reactors that are dangerous in the severe accidents where the radioactive material released from confinement building to the environment. To simulate the severe accidents in ITER, a number of thermal hydraulics simulation codes were used. Before construction of the fusion reactor, to obtain ITER license about safety issue, MELCOR is chosen as one of the several codes to be used to perform ITER safety analyses. Qualification of the simulation code is to simulate the cooling system in ITER, the transport of radionuclides during design basis accidents (DBAs) including beyond design basis accidents (BDBAs). MELCOR is fully integrated code that models the accidents in Light Water Reactor (LWR). To analyze the accidents in ITER, MELCOR 1.8.2 version is modified. In the nuclear fusion system, the amount of released radioactive material is criteria for safety permission. Tritium (or tritiated water: HTO) and radioactive dust aerosol are the source of radioactive leakage. In the Generic Site Safety Report (GSSR) for the ITER plant, Table I lists the release guidelines for tritium and activation products for normal operation, incidents and accidents. Several accident analyses have been studied to know how much radioactive material could be released from the severe accidents. In the present work, The MELCOR input deck of large First Wall (FW) coolant leak (pipe break) is used to study and radioactive material leakage thorough bypass accident are studied to follow up the ITER safety analysis. In this research, follow-up study of the in-vessel inboard/inboard-outboard FW pipe break was analyzed to investigate the amount of leakage of radioactive aerosol. All of the accident cases released the lower amount of radioactive aerosol compared to the IAEA guide lines. In addition, the OBB pipe break made lower HTO aerosol leakage because of condensation of HTO and adsorption between coolant and aerosol.

  8. Changes in visual acuity in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration treated with intravitreal ranibizumab in daily clinical practice: the LUMIERE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Salomon Y; Mimoun, Gerard; Oubraham, Hassiba; Zourdani, Alain; Malbrel, Christian; Queré, Stephane; Schneider, Véronique

    2013-03-01

    To survey compliance with recommended intravitreal ranibizumab treatment protocols in daily clinical practice in France, with reference to outcomes. A retrospective, descriptive, observational study in patients with subfoveal wet age-related macular degeneration treated with ranibizumab. All historical data for the study period, including demographic, treatment, and disease details and visual acuity measurements (baseline, Month 3, and Month 12), were recorded retrospectively at least 12 months after the beginning of treatment. In 551 patients followed by 16 ophthalmologists, 12 months of intravitreal ranibizumab treatment induced a mean visual acuity gain of 3.2 ± 14.8 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study-equivalent letters. Fewer than 40% of patients received the recommended treatment of initial 3 monthly injections. More than 50% had to wait >8 days between diagnosis and treatment. At Month 3, visual acuity gain was greater in patients who had received recommended induction and in whom treatment was initiated quickly. At Month 12, the induction-related effect had largely disappeared but the time-to-treatment effect persisted. Patients had an average of 5.1 injections (2.6 during induction period). No patients were monitored monthly as stipulated in the guidelines. Although poor compliance with recommendations has been reflected in mediocre outcomes, there is evidence that practice is improving.

  9. The comparative study of contents of zinc and lead in ore samples of Namtu-Bawdwin Mine by wet analysis, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyaw-Soe,

    1990-05-01

    Lead-zinc ores taken from Namtu-Bawdwin area had been analyzed by wet processes in the Department of Chemistry, 1984. These ore samples have been analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method in the Department of Physics and X-ray diffraction method is also used to determine elements of lead and zinc compounds in these ore samples in the University`s Research Centre. In brief, we study comparatively the contents of lead and zinc and their compounds using the methods of wet processes, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction. (author).

  10. Bridging the gap between the home and the lab : a qualitative study of acceptance of an avatar feedback system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijten, P.A.M.; Kort, de Y.A.W.; Kosnar, P.; Bang, M.; Ragnemalm, E.L.

    2012-01-01

    The current study provides a first step in the design and development of a persuasive agent in the natural context of the household. We developed two persuasive probe studies: one paper-based probe and one email-based probe on the use, experience, and effectiveness of persuasive agents. Participants

  11. SuperFormLab: showing SuperFormLab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    bachelor program, followed by two years of master studies. The courses are offered equally to students from other design disciplines, e.g. industrial design. Teaching is mainly in English as the program is attended by a relatively large group of non-Danish students, who seek exactly this combination......3D-printing in clay and ceramic objects shaped by your own sounds and movements! Digital form transferred via CNC-milling to ornamental ceramic wall-cladding. Brave New World… Students and their teacher at SuperFormLab, the new ceramic workshop of the School of Design at the Royal Danish Academy...... of Fine Arts in Copenhagen, will be showing results of their investigations into the potential of combining digital technologies with ceramic materials. It is now possible to shape the most complex mathematical, virtual 3D objects through the use of advanced software-programs. And more than that – you can...

  12. Building construction materials effect in tropical wet and cold climates: A case study of office buildings in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modeste Kameni Nematchoua

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental study that was conducted in 15 office buildings in the humid and cold tropics during the working hours of the dry and rainy seasons in Cameroon. This was with the aim to study the effects that local and imported materials had on indoor air quality. To achieve this objective, the adaptive model approach has been selected. In accordance with the conditions of this model, all workers were kept in natural ventilation and, in accordance with the general procedure, a questionnaire was distributed to them, while variables, like air temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity were sampled. The results showed a clear agreement between expected behaviour, in accordance with the characteristics of building construction, and its real indoor ambience once they were statistically analysed. On the other hand, old buildings showed a higher percentage of relative humidity and a lower degree of indoor air temperature. Despite this, local thermal comfort indices and questionnaires showed adequate indoor ambience in each group of buildings, except when marble was used for external tiling. The effect of marble as an external coating helps to improve indoor ambience during the dry season. This is due to more indoor air and relative humidity being accumulated. At the same time, these ambiences are degraded when relative humidity is higher. Finally, these results should be taken cognisance of by architects and building designers in order to improve indoor environment, and overcome thermal discomfort in the Saharan area.

  13. Wet and wild: results from a pilot study assessing injuries among recreational water users in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikora, T J; Braham, R; Hill, C; Mills, C

    2011-06-01

    To identify, describe and compare injuries among three water sport activities: kite surfing (KS), personal watercraft (PWC) and towed water sports (TWS). The study was a cross sectional, online survey. The setting was on Perth, Western Australia's popular beaches and riverbanks. Main outcome measures were number of injuries and level of severity; level of exposure and protection measures. Overall, 43% reported at least one injury in the past 12 months, a rate of 22.3 injuries per 100 h. Kite surfers were more likely to report an injury than PWC or TWS. One-half of injuries occurred while on the water. Most injuries were caused by landing awkwardly (56%) and/or trying new tricks (41%). Despite 90% of respondents having used at least one personal protective equipment (PPE) item, half (49%) reported always using a personal floatation device. This study provided information on KS, PWC and TWS injuries as well as a range of safety behaviours. It is recommended that these results form the basis of further research to reduce injury rates and encourage the use of PPE items.

  14. "When you walk in the rain, you get wet": a qualitative study of Ghanaian immigrants' perspective on the epidemiological paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Sue A; Ahmed, Ramatu; Musah, Adam

    2015-02-01

    This study sought to understand the perceptions of Ghanaian immigrants of the health status and health trajectory of their community. We conducted focus groups and interviews with 63 primarily Ghanaian immigrants living in New York City. Nearly all participants observed that Ghanaians are generally healthy when they arrive in the US, but that their health declines over time. Participants identified four causes of this perceived deterioration: changes in health behaviors, increased stress, environmental exposures, and barriers to health care. Participants see themselves as being at risk for many health problems resulting from changes in lifestyle that follow immigration. Although some vulnerabilities are unique to their experience as immigrants, many of the risk factors they described are the same as those that affect other residents in the communities in which they live.

  15. A study of weather types at Athens and Thessaloniki and their relationship to circulation types for the cold-wet period, part II: discriminant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, C.; Maheras, P.; Arseni-Papadimititriou, A.; Kolyva-Machera, F.; Anagnostopoulou, C.

    2009-06-01

    A discriminant analysis is applied in order to determine the relationships between circulation types in the middle troposphere and prevailing weather types over two major Greek cities, Athens and Thessaloniki. In order to describe the synoptic conditions, an automatic classification scheme for the Greek region is used. For each circulation type identified (14 in total), several meteorological parameters at the 500 hPa level are calculated such as geopotential heights and their anomalies, temperature and relative vorticity. Weather group-types that reflect the conditions at the surface, were previously defined using a two-step cluster analysis. These types result from a combination of five meteorological parameters—maximum temperature, precipitation amount, relative humidity, wind velocity and sunshine duration. The study period is 43 years long (1958-2000) and is restricted to the cold and wet period of the year, from December until March. For Athens, six weather types are developed, whereas for Thessaloniki five are produced. By means of a stepwise discriminant analysis (DA) model, the most important variables from the 500 hPa level are found and are used to generate the necessary functions that can discriminate weather types over the two stations. The aim of the present study is first to discriminate weather types effectively and to identify the most important discriminating variables, and second, to connect these weather types to elements of the prevailing synoptic pattern, through mathematical functions provided by DA. The results of the evaluation of the aforementioned procedure are considered to be very satisfactory.

  16. Effect of the Wetting Agent Sodium Lauryl Sulfate on the Pharmacokinetics of Alectinib: Results From a Bioequivalence Study in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcos, Peter N; Parrott, Neil; Banken, Ludger; Timpe, Carsten; Lindenberg, Marc; Guerini, Elena; Dall, Georgina; Bogman, Katrijn; Sturm, Carolina; Zeaiter, Ali; Martin-Facklam, Meret; Phipps, Alex

    2017-05-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor alectinib is an effective treatment for ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer. This bioequivalence study evaluated the in vivo performance of test 3 formulations with the reduced wetting agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) content. This randomized, 4-period, 4-sequence, crossover study compared alectinib (600 mg) as 25%, 12.5%, and 3% SLS hard capsule formulations with the reference 50% SLS clinical formulation in healthy subjects under fasted conditions (n = 49), and following a high-fat meal (n = 48). Geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for C max , AUC 0-last , and AUC 0-∞ of alectinib, its major active metabolite, M4, and alectinib plus M4 were determined for the test formulations versus the reference formulation. Bioequivalence was concluded if the 90%CIs were within the 80% to 125% boundaries. The 25% SLS formulation demonstrated bioequivalence to the reference 50% SLS formulation for C max , AUC 0-last , and AUC 0-∞ of alectinib, M4, and alectinib plus M4 under both fasted and fed conditions. Further reductions in SLS content (12.5% and 3% SLS) did not meet the bioequivalence criteria. Cross-group comparisons showed an approximately 3-fold positive food effect. Reducing SLS to 25% resulted in a formulation that is bioequivalent to the current 50% SLS formulation used in alectinib pivotal trials. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  17. Energy Conservation Alternatives Study (ECAS): Conceptual Design and Implementation Assessment of a Utility Steam Plant with Conventional Furnace and Wet Lime Stack Gas Scrubbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dale H.

    1976-01-01

    A study was performed to estimate the technical/economic characteristics of a steam power plant (3500 pounds per square inch gauge, 1000 degrees Fahrenheit / 1000 degrees Fahrenheit) with a coal-burning radiant furnace and a wet lime stack gas scrubber to control sulfur emissions. Particulate emissions were controlled by an electrostatic precipitator operating at 300 degrees Fahrenheit. The stack gas from the scrubber was reheated from 125 degrees Fahrenheit to 250 degrees Fahrenheit as a base case, and from 125 degrees Fahrenheit to 175 degrees Fahrenheit as an alternate case. The study was performed on a basis consistent with the General Electric ECAS Phase II evaluation of advanced energy conversion systems for electric utility baseload applications using coal or coal-derived fuels. A conceptual design of the power plant was developed, including the on-site calcination of limestone to lime and the provision of sludge ponds to store the products of flue gas scrubbing. From this design, estimates were derived for power plant efficiency, capital cost, environmental intrusion characteristics, natural resource requirements, and cost of electricity at an assumed capacity factor of 65 percent. An implementation assessment was performed where factors affecting applicability of the conceptual design power plant in electric utility generation systems were appraised. At 250 degrees Fahrenheit and 175 degrees Fahrenheit stack gas temperatures respectively, the plants showed a cost of electricity of 39.8 and 37.0 mills per kilowatt-hours and overall plant efficiencies of 32 percent and 34 percent.

  18. GitLab repository management

    CERN Document Server

    Hethey, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A simple, easy to understand tutorial guide on how to build teams and efficiently use version control, using GitLab.If you are a system administrator in a company that writes software or are in charge of an infrastructure, this book will show you the most important features of GitLab, including how to speed up the overall process

  19. Report from the banding lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Mr. Tautin reported on the seemingly everchanging structure of biological science units within the Interior Department. Current Congressional proposals would either change the name of the Bird Banding Lab's parent agency or make it part of the Geological Survey. The current Congress has not looked favorably on science budgets within the Interior Department, and the Banding Lab's budget is being squeezed ever tighter.

  20. The functional subdivision of the visual brain: Is there a real illusion effect on action? A multi-lab replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopiske, Karl K; Bruno, Nicola; Hesse, Constanze; Schenk, Thomas; Franz, Volker H

    2016-06-01

    It has often been suggested that visual illusions affect perception but not actions such as grasping, as predicted by the "two-visual-systems" hypothesis of Milner and Goodale (1995, The Visual Brain in Action, Oxford University press). However, at least for the Ebbinghaus illusion, relevant studies seem to reveal a consistent illusion effect on grasping (Franz & Gegenfurtner, 2008. Grasping visual illusions: consistent data and no dissociation. Cognitive Neuropsychology). Two interpretations are possible: either grasping is not immune to illusions (arguing against dissociable processing mechanisms for vision-for-perception and vision-for-action), or some other factors modulate grasping in ways that mimic a vision-for perception effect in actions. It has been suggested that one such factor may be obstacle avoidance (Haffenden Schiff & Goodale, 2001. The dissociation between perception and action in the Ebbinghaus illusion: nonillusory effects of pictorial cues on grasp. Current Biology, 11, 177-181). In four different labs (total N = 144), we conducted an exact replication of previous studies suggesting obstacle avoidance mechanisms, implementing conditions that tested grasping as well as multiple perceptual tasks. This replication was supplemented by additional conditions to obtain more conclusive results. Our results confirm that grasping is affected by the Ebbinghaus illusion and demonstrate that this effect cannot be explained by obstacle avoidance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Wet Mars, Dry Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Brain, D. A.; Peticolas, L. M.; Yan, D.; Fricke, K. W.; Thrall, L.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetic fields of the large terrestrial planets, Venus, Earth, and Mars, are all vastly different from each other. These differences can tell us a lot about the interior structure, interior history, and even give us clues to the atmospheric history of these planets. This poster highlights the third in a series of presentations that target school-age audiences with the overall goal of helping the audience visualize planetary magnetic field and understand how they can impact the climatic evolution of a planet. Our first presentation, "Goldilocks and the Three Planets," targeted to elementary school age audiences, focuses on the differences in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars and the causes of the differences. The second presentation, "Lost on Mars (and Venus)," geared toward a middle school age audience, highlights the differences in the magnetic fields of these planets and what we can learn from these differences. Finally, in the third presentation, "Wet Mars, Dry Mars," targeted to high school age audiences and the focus of this poster, the emphasis is on the long term climatic affects of the presence or absence of a magnetic field using the contrasts between Earth and Mars. These presentations are given using visually engaging spherical displays in conjunction with hands-on activities and scientifically accurate 3D models of planetary magnetic fields. We will summarize the content of our presentations, discuss our lessons learned from evaluations, and show (pictures of) our hands-on activities and 3D models.

  2. Modeling phosphorus removal in wet ponds with filter zones containing sand or crushed concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderup, Melanie J.; Egemose, Sara; Hoffmann, Carl Christian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Generally, wet ponds are constructed only to reduce the hydraulic load of downstream receiving water bodies. Often most particulate matter will be retained, whereas dissolved nutrients mostly will be unaffected by the pond due to short retention times. A suite of lab-experiments have dem...

  3. The potential of the Internet for music perception research: A comment on lab-based versus Web-based studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, H.; Ladinig, O.

    2008-01-01

    While the discussion on the integrity of data obtained from Web-delivered experiments is mainly about issues of method and control (Mehler, 1999; McGraw et al., 2000; Auditory, 2007), this comment stresses the potential that Web-based experiments might have for studies in music perception. It is

  4. Pilot Study Using the Augmented Reality Sandbox to Teach Topographic Maps and Surficial Processes in Introductory Geology Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Terri L.; Reed, Sarah; Hsi, Sherry; Woods, John A.; Woods, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Spatial thinking is often challenging for introductory geology students. A pilot study using the Augmented Reality sandbox (AR sandbox) suggests it can be a powerful tool for bridging the gap between two-dimensional (2D) representations and real landscapes, as well as enhancing the spatial thinking and modeling abilities of students. The AR…

  5. Utilizing Mechanistic Cross-Linking Technology to Study Protein-Protein Interactions: An Experiment Designed for an Undergraduate Biochemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzel, Kara; Beld, Joris; Burkart, Michael D.; Charkoudian, Louise K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, mechanistic cross-linking probes have been used to study protein-protein interactions in natural product biosynthetic pathways. This approach is highly interdisciplinary, combining elements of protein biochemistry, organic chemistry, and computational docking. Herein, we described the development of an experiment to engage…

  6. Automating the Analysis of Problem-solving Activities in Learning Environments: the Co-Lab Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duque, R.; Bollen, Lars; Anjewierden, Anjo Allert; Bravo, C.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of problem-solving activities carried out by students in learning settings involves studying the students' actions and assessing the solutions they have created. This analysis constitutes an ideal starting point to support an automatic intervention in the student activity by means of

  7. Assessing the quality of anti-malarial drugs from Gabonese pharmacies using the MiniLab®: a field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Benjamin J.; Meerveld-Gerrits, Janneke; Kroon, Daniëlle; Mougoula, Judith; Vingerling, Rieke; Bache, Emmanuel; Boersma, Jimmy; van Vugt, Michèle; Agnandji, Selidji T.; Kaur, Harparkash; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies alluded to the alarming scale of poor anti-malarial drug quality in malaria-endemic countries, but also illustrated the major geographical gaps in data on anti-malarial drug quality from endemic countries. Data are particularly scarce from Central Africa, although it carries the

  8. Nonlocality and short-range wetting phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, A O; Romero-Enrique, J M; Lazarides, A

    2004-08-20

    We propose a nonlocal interfacial model for 3D short-range wetting at planar and nonplanar walls. The model is characterized by a binding-potential functional depending only on the bulk Ornstein-Zernike correlation function, which arises from different classes of tubelike fluctuations that connect the interface and the substrate. The theory provides a physical explanation for the origin of the effective position-dependent stiffness and binding potential in approximate local theories and also obeys the necessary classical wedge covariance relationship between wetting and wedge filling. Renormalization group and computer simulation studies reveal the strong nonperturbative influence of nonlocality at critical wetting, throwing light on long-standing theoretical problems regarding the order of the phase transition.

  9. Nonlocality and Short-Range Wetting Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, A. O.; Romero-Enrique, J. M.; Lazarides, A.

    2004-08-01

    We propose a nonlocal interfacial model for 3D short-range wetting at planar and nonplanar walls. The model is characterized by a binding-potential functional depending only on the bulk Ornstein-Zernike correlation function, which arises from different classes of tubelike fluctuations that connect the interface and the substrate. The theory provides a physical explanation for the origin of the effective position-dependent stiffness and binding potential in approximate local theories and also obeys the necessary classical wedge covariance relationship between wetting and wedge filling. Renormalization group and computer simulation studies reveal the strong nonperturbative influence of nonlocality at critical wetting, throwing light on long-standing theoretical problems regarding the order of the phase transition.

  10. Hydrodynamics of a Multistage Wet Scrubber Incineration Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, M. M.; Manyele, S. V.; Raphael, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the hydrodynamics of the two stage counter-current cascade wet scrubbers used during incineration of medical waste. The dependence of the hydrodynamics on two main variables was studied: Inlet air flow rate and inlet liquid flow rate. This study introduces a new wet scrubber operating features, which are…

  11. Proteomic effects of wet cupping (Al-hijamah).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaiman, Amer A

    2018-01-01

    Wet cupping (Al-hijamah) is a therapeutic technique practiced worldwide as a part of the Unani system of medicine. It involves bloodletting from acupoints on a patient's skin to produce a therapeutic outcome. A thorough review of research articles on wet cupping with relevance to proteomics field that are indexed by Google Scholar, PubMed, and/or Science Direct databases was performed. Eight original research articles were summarized in this paper. Overall, wet cupping did not have a significant effect on C-reactive protein, Hsp-27, sister chromatid exchanges, and cell replication index. In contrast, wet cupping was found to produce higher oxygen saturation, eliminate lactate from subcutaneous tissues, remove blood containing higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide, and produce higher activity of myeloperoxidase. The proteomic effects of wet cupping therapy have not been adequately investigated. Thus, future studies on wet cupping that use systemic and sound protocols to avoid bias should be conducted.

  12. Wet-cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagil, Suleyman Murat; Celik, Huseyin Tugrul; Ciftci, Sefa; Kazanci, Fatmanur Hacievliyagil; Arslan, Muzeyyen; Erdamar, Nazan; Kesik, Yunus; Erdamar, Husamettin; Dane, Senol

    2014-12-01

    Wet-cupping therapy is one of the oldest known medical techniques. Although it is widely used in various conditions such as acute\\chronic inflammation, infectious diseases, and immune system disorders, its mechanism of action is not fully known. In this study, we investigated the oxidative status as the first step to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of wet cupping. Wet cupping therapy is implemented to 31 healthy volunteers. Venous blood samples and Wet cupping blood samples were taken concurrently. Serum nitricoxide, malondialdehyde levels and activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase were measured spectrophotometrically. Wet cupping blood had higher activity of myeloperoxidase, lower activity of superoxide dismutase, higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitricoxide compared to the venous blood. Wet cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sound Control in the Physic Lab in the Polyacryl Company and Studying the Noise Reduction by Means of Different Absorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harandi

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Studying noise effect at the workplace has more various aspects than other factors. So it is not surprising that its adverse impact on the physical and mental state of the society has been detected to some extent. There is a significant correlation between the hearing loss and the noise pollution of the workplaces. The most important ways to lessen and control the impact of noise are: substituting the noisy equipments with ones that produce less noise, correcting noise sources and isolating the sound source. In the current study we tried to control the noise level by using various sound absorbents and measured sound level by using these different substances. The results of these measurements have reported in the current article in details.

  14. Wavelet-based study of valence-arousal model of emotions on EEG signals with LabVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzel Aydin, Seda; Kaya, Turgay; Guler, Hasan

    2016-06-01

    This paper illustrates the wavelet-based feature extraction for emotion assessment using electroencephalogram (EEG) signal through graphical coding design. Two-dimensional (valence-arousal) emotion model was studied. Different emotions (happy, joy, melancholy, and disgust) were studied for assessment. These emotions were stimulated by video clips. EEG signals obtained from four subjects were decomposed into five frequency bands (gamma, beta, alpha, theta, and delta) using "db5" wavelet function. Relative features were calculated to obtain further information. Impact of the emotions according to valence value was observed to be optimal on power spectral density of gamma band. The main objective of this work is not only to investigate the influence of the emotions on different frequency bands but also to overcome the difficulties in the text-based program. This work offers an alternative approach for emotion evaluation through EEG processing. There are a number of methods for emotion recognition such as wavelet transform-based, Fourier transform-based, and Hilbert-Huang transform-based methods. However, the majority of these methods have been applied with the text-based programming languages. In this study, we proposed and implemented an experimental feature extraction with graphics-based language, which provides great convenience in bioelectrical signal processing.

  15. Experimental studies on the nature of bonding of DNA/bipyridyl-(ethylenediamine)platinum(II) and DNA/netropsin complexes in solution and oriented wet-spun films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, R. L.; Szabo, A.; Lee, S. A.; Rupprecht, A.

    2002-03-01

    The stability of complexes of NaDNA with bipyridyl-(ethylenediamine)platinum(II) (abbreviated [(bipy)Pt(en)]) and with netropsin has been studied using two techniques: (i) ultraviolet melting experiments were done on NaDNA/[(bipy)Pt(en)], showing that the [(bipy)Pt(en)] ligand stabilizes the DNA double helix structure; and (ii) swelling measurements (via optical microscopy) as a function of relative humidity were done on wet-spun oriented films of NaDNA/[(bipy)Pt(en)] and of NaDNA/netropsin. The swelling data shows that an irreversible transition of the films occurs at high relative humidity, first for the NaDNA/netropsin, then for pure NaDNA, and lastly for the NaDNA/[(bipy)Pt(en)]. These results are indicative that the [(bipy)Pt(en)] complex stabilizes the intermolecular bonds which mediate the film swelling characteristics. A model is suggested for the binding of [(bipy)Pt(en)] to DNA to explain why the swelling experiments show this ligand as increasing the intermolecular bond strength between the DNA double helices, while netropsin decreases this degree of stabilization.

  16. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

  17. Pilot study of novel lab methodology and testing of platelet function in adolescent women with heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Anne D; Khader, Ayesha; Ngo, Anh T P; Boehnlein, Colin; McDavitt, Cara; Lattimore, Susan; Recht, Michael; McCarty, Owen J T; Haley, Kristina M

    2018-03-01

    BackgroundApproximately 40% of adolescent women experience heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB), and 10-62% of them have an underlying bleeding disorder (BD). Diagnosing a BD remains challenging because of limitations of available clinical platelet function assays. The aim of this study was to characterize platelet function in a population of adolescent women with HMB using small-volume whole-blood assays.MethodsAnticoagulated whole blood was used to assess platelet GPIIbIIIa activation, α-granule secretion, and aggregation in response to multiple agonists. Platelet adhesion on collagen or von Willebrand Factor (VWF) under static and shear flow was also assessed.ResultsFifteen participants with HMB were included in the study, of which eight were diagnosed with a clinically identifiable BD. Platelet activation was blunted in response to calcium ionophore in participants without a BD diagnosis compared with that in all other participants. Impaired GPIIbIIIa activation was observed in response to all GPCR agonists, except adenosine diphosphate (ADP), in participants with qualitative platelet disorders. Our assays detected platelet aggregation in the majority of participants with a BD in response to ADP, collagen-related peptide (CRP), thrombin receptor activator 6 (TRAP-6), or U46619. Platelet adhesion and aggregation on collagen and VWF was decreased for participants with VWD.ConclusionParticipants with and without BD exhibited aberrant platelet function in several assays in response to select agonists.

  18. The Effects of Psychotherapist's and Clients' Interpersonal Behaviors during a First Simulated Session: A Lab Study Investigating Client Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Moors

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of psychotherapists' behaviors during a first simulated therapy session on clients' satisfaction, including their intention to pursue or drop out from therapy. The importance of psychotherapists' warmth on clients' satisfaction was examined to check previous findings stressing this determining factor. Examining the role of warm behaviors is however insufficient according to the interpersonal perspective. We therefore tested the role of the psychotherapist's agentic behaviors since only a few studies provide contradictory results about the role of this interpersonal dimension on clients' satisfaction and how it is influenced by matching up client and therapist's profiles. To test our hypotheses and control for alternative therapy-related explanatory variables, we used different videos as experimental conditions manipulating the therapist's behaviors. Seventy-five participants had to imagine themselves as potential clients arriving for a first therapy session. They successively watched a role-playing therapist behaving according to five randomized interpersonal profiles. Results confirmed that warmth was a major dimension predicting client satisfaction. They revealed that agency was also a determinant of client satisfaction and that its effects depended on the client's own interpersonal agentic profile. Dominant clients were found to be more satisfied with the dominant psychotherapist than the submissive one while submissive clients preferred only the warm psychotherapist. These findings are discussed and suggest that therapists may need to be flexible and adapt their behaviors according to their client's interpersonal profile to increase their client satisfaction and decrease drop outs.

  19. Jefferson Lab E89-044 experiment: study of the quasi-elastic He3(e,e'p)d reaction in parallel kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penel-Nottaris, E.

    2004-07-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A E89-044 experiment has measured the He 3 (e,e'p) reaction cross-sections. The extraction of the longitudinal and transverse response functions for the two-body break-up He 3 (e,e'p)d reaction in parallel kinematics allows the study of the bound proton electromagnetic properties inside the He 3 nucleus and the involved nuclear mechanisms beyond plane waves approximations, for missing momenta of 0 and +- 300 MeV/c and transferred momenta from 0.8 to 4.1 GeV 2 . Preliminary cross-sections have been obtained after calibration of the experimental setup by fitting theoretical models averaged over the experimental phase-space using a Monte-Carlo simulation. The 8% systematic error on cross-sections is linked mainly to the absolute normalization of the target density: the elastic scattering data analysis will allow to reduce this error. The preliminary results show some disagreement with theoretical predictions for the forward angles kinematics around 0 MeV/c missing momenta and sensitivity to final state interactions and He 3 waves functions for missing momenta of 300 MeV/c. The longitudinal and transverse separation should constraint theoretical models more strongly. (author)

  20. Perioperative outcomes of adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery: the Teen-Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inge, Thomas H; Zeller, Meg H; Jenkins, Todd M; Helmrath, Michael; Brandt, Mary L; Michalsky, Marc P; Harmon, Carroll M; Courcoulas, Anita; Horlick, Mary; Xanthakos, Stavra A; Dolan, Larry; Mitsnefes, Mark; Barnett, Sean J; Buncher, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Severe obesity in childhood is a major health problem with few effective treatments. Weight-loss surgery (WLS) is being used to treat severely obese adolescents, although with very limited data regarding surgical safety for currently used, minimally invasive procedures. To assess the preoperative clinical characteristics and perioperative safety outcomes of severely obese adolescents undergoing WLS. This prospective, multisite observational study enrolled patients from February 28, 2007, through December 30, 2011. Consecutive patients aged 19 years or younger who were approved to undergo WLS (n = 277) were offered enrollment into the study at 5 academic referral centers in the United States; 13 declined participation and 22 did not undergo surgery after enrollment, thus the final analysis cohort consisted of 242 individuals. There were no withdrawals. This analysis examined preoperative anthropometrics, comorbid conditions, and major and minor complications occurring within 30 days of operation. All data were collected in a standardized fashion. Reoperations and hospital readmissions were adjudicated by independent reviewers to assess relatedness to the WLS procedure. The mean (SD) age of participants was 17.1 (1.6) years and the median body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) was 50.5. Fifty-one percent demonstrated 4 or more major comorbid conditions. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, vertical sleeve gastrectomy, and adjustable gastric banding were performed in 66%, 28%, and 6% of patients, respectively. There were no deaths during the initial hospitalization or within 30 days of operation; major complications (eg, reoperation) were seen in 19 patients (8%). Minor complications (eg, readmission for dehydration) were noted in 36 patients (15%). All reoperations and 85% of readmissions were related to WLS. In this series, adolescents with severe obesity presented with abundant comorbid conditions. We observed

  1. Lab-scale impact test to investigate the pipe-soil interaction and comparative study to evaluate structural responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Man Ryu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the dynamic response of a subsea pipeline under an impact load to determine the effect of the seabed soil. A laboratory-scale soil-based pipeline impact test was carried out to investigate the pipeline deformation/strain as well as the interaction with the soil-pipeline. In addition, an impact test was simulated using the finite element technique, and the calculated strain was compared with the experimental results. During the simulation, the pipeline was described based on an elasto-plastic analysis, and the soil was modeled using the Mohr-Coulomb fail-ure criterion. The results obtained were compared with ASME D31.8, and the differences between the analysis results and the rules were specifically investigated. Modified ASME formulae were proposed to calculate the precise structural behavior of a subsea pipeline under an impact load when considering sand- and clay-based seabed soils.

  2. Wetting Transition and Line Tension of Oil on Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, H.; Aratono, M.

    Wetting has attracted wide attention in the field of applied chemistry because of its crucial importance in industrial operations such as coating, painting, and lubrication. Here, we summarize our fundamental understandings of surfactant-assisted wetting transitions which we have found and studied for the last ten years. The difference between the surfactant-assisted wetting transitions and existing ones is discussed. Moreover, the relation between wetting transitions and the stability of the three-phase contact line is examined in terms of the line tension of oil lenses.

  3. The method of neutron imaging as a tool for the study of the dynamics of water movement in wet aramid-based ballistic body armour panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifler, Felix A.; Lehmann, Eberhard H.; Frei, Gabriel; May, Hans; Rossi, René

    2006-07-01

    A new non-destructive method based on neutron imaging (neutron radiography) to determine the exact water content in aramid-based soft body armour panels is presented. While investigating the ballistic resistance of aramid-based body armour panels under a wet condition, it is important to precisely determine their water content and its chronological development. Using the presented method, the influence of water amount and location on impact testing as well as its time dependence was shown. In the ballistic panels used, spreading of water strongly depended on the kind of quilting. Very fast water migration could be observed when the panels were held vertically. Some first results regarding the water distribution in wet panels immediately after the impact are presented. On the basis of the presented results, requirements for a standard for testing the performance of ballistic panels in the wet state are deduced.

  4. Virtual Reality Robotic Surgery Warm-Up Improves Task Performance in a Dry Lab Environment: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvay, Thomas S.; Brand, Timothy C.; White, Lee; Kowalewski, Timothy; Jonnadula, Saikiran; Mercer, Laina; Khorsand, Derek; Andros, Justin; Hannaford, Blake; Satava, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-operative simulation “warm-up” has been shown to improve performance and reduce errors in novice and experienced surgeons, yet existing studies have only investigated conventional laparoscopy. We hypothesized a brief virtual reality (VR) robotic warm-up would enhance robotic task performance and reduce errors. Study Design In a two-center randomized trial, fifty-one residents and experienced minimally invasive surgery faculty in General Surgery, Urology, and Gynecology underwent a validated robotic surgery proficiency curriculum on a VR robotic simulator and on the da Vinci surgical robot. Once successfully achieving performance benchmarks, surgeons were randomized to either receive a 3-5 minute VR simulator warm-up or read a leisure book for 10 minutes prior to performing similar and dissimilar (intracorporeal suturing) robotic surgery tasks. The primary outcomes compared were task time, tool path length, economy of motion, technical and cognitive errors. Results Task time (-29.29sec, p=0.001, 95%CI-47.03,-11.56), path length (-79.87mm, p=0.014, 95%CI -144.48,-15.25), and cognitive errors were reduced in the warm-up group compared to the control group for similar tasks. Global technical errors in intracorporeal suturing (0.32, p=0.020, 95%CI 0.06,0.59) were reduced after the dissimilar VR task. When surgeons were stratified by prior robotic and laparoscopic clinical experience, the more experienced surgeons(n=17) demonstrated significant improvements from warm-up in task time (-53.5sec, p=0.001, 95%CI -83.9,-23.0) and economy of motion (0.63mm/sec, p=0.007, 95%CI 0.18,1.09), whereas improvement in these metrics was not statistically significantly appreciated in the less experienced cohort(n=34). Conclusions We observed a significant performance improvement and error reduction rate among surgeons of varying experience after VR warm-up for basic robotic surgery tasks. In addition, the VR warm-up reduced errors on a more complex task (robotic

  5. Assessing the effusion rate of lava flows from their thermal radiated energy: theoretical study and lab-scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2010-12-01

    A quantitative monitoring of lava flow is required to manage a volcanic crisis, in order to assess where the flow will go, and when will it stop. As the spreading of lava flows is mainly controlled by its rheology and the eruptive mass flux, the key question is how to evaluate them during the eruption (rather than afterwards.) A relationship between the lava flow temperature and the eruption rate is likely to exist, based on the first-order argument that higher eruption rates should correspond to larger energy radiated by a lava flow. The semi-empirical formula developed by Harris and co-workers (e.g. Harris et al., 2007) is used to estimate lava flow rate from satellite observations. However, the complete theoretical bases of this technique, especially its domain of validity, remain to be firmly established. Here we propose a theoretical study of the cooling of a viscous axisymmetric gravity current fed at constant flux rate to investigate whether or not this approach can and/or should be refined and/or modify to better assess flow rates. Our study focuses on the influence of boundary conditions at the surface of the flow, where cooling can occur both by radiation and convection, and at the base of the flow. Dimensionless numbers are introduced to quantify the relative interplay between the model parameters, such as the lava flow rate and the efficiency of the various cooling processes (conduction, convection, radiation.) We obtain that the thermal evolution of the flow can be described as a two-stage evolution. After a transient phase of dynamic cooling, the flow reaches a steady state, characterized by a balance between surface and base cooling and heat advection in the flow, in which the surface temperature structure is constant. The duration of the transient phase and the radiated energy in the steady regime are shown to be a function of the dimensionless numbers. In the case of lava flows, we obtain that the steady state regime is reached after a few days. In

  6. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Severely Obese Adolescents: The Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsky, Marc P; Inge, Thomas H; Simmons, Mark; Jenkins, Todd M; Buncher, Ralph; Helmrath, Michael; Brandt, Mary L; Harmon, Carroll M; Courcoulas, Anita; Chen, Michael; Horlick, Mary; Daniels, Stephen R; Urbina, Elaine M

    2015-05-01

    Severe obesity is increasingly common in the adolescent population but, as of yet, very little information exists regarding cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks in this group. To assess the baseline prevalence and predictors of CVD risks among severely obese adolescents undergoing weight-loss surgery. A prospective cohort study was conducted from February 28, 2007, to December 30, 2011, at the following 5 adolescent weight-loss surgery centers in the United States: Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio; Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio; Texas Children's Hospital in Houston; University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Children's Hospital of Alabama in Birmingham. Consecutive patients aged 19 years or younger were offered enrollment in a long-term outcome study; the final analysis cohort consisted of 242 participants. This report examined the preoperative prevalence of CVD risk factors (ie, fasting hyperinsulinemia, elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, impaired fasting glucose levels, dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and diabetes mellitus) and associations between risk factors and body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Preoperative data were collected within 30 days preceding bariatric surgery. The mean (SD) age was 17 (1.6) years and median body mass index was 50.5. Cardiovascular disease risk factor prevalence was fasting hyperinsulinemia (74%), elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (75%), dyslipidemia (50%), elevated blood pressure (49%), impaired fasting glucose levels (26%), and diabetes mellitus (14%). The risk of impaired fasting glucose levels, elevated blood pressure, and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels increased by 15%, 10%, and 6%, respectively, per 5-unit increase in body mass index (P adolescent boys compared with adolescent girls. White individuals

  7. Effect of increasing salinity on biogas production in waste landfills with leachate recirculation: A lab-scale model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Ogata

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of salinity on anaerobic waste degradation and microbial communities were investigated, in order to propose an appropriate leachate recirculation process in a waste landfill in a tropical region. A salt concentration of 21 mS cm−1 of electrical conductivity (EC did not affect waste degradation, but a salt concentration of 35 mS cm−1 of EC inhibited CH4 generation. A higher salt concentration of 80 mS cm−1 of EC inhibited not only CH4 and CO2 generation, but also degradation of organic compounds. The bacterial and archaeal community compositions were affected by high salinity. High salinity can exert selective pressure on bacterial communities, resulting in a change in bacterial community structure. Ammonium caused strong, dominant inhibition of biogas production in the salt concentration range of this study. Quality control, especially of ammonium levels, will be essential for the promotion of waste biodegradation in landfills with leachate recirculation.

  8. Lab Scale Study of the Depletion of Mullite/Corundum-Based Refractories Trough Reaction with Scaffold Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stjernberg, J; Antti, M-L; Ion, J C; Lindblom, B

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying the depletion of mullite/corundum-based refractory bricks used in rotary kilns for iron ore pellet production, the reaction mechanisms between scaffold material and refractory bricks have been studied on the laboratory-scale. Alkali additions were used to enhance the reaction rates between the materials. The morphological changes and active chemical reactions at the refractory/scaffold material interface in the samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal analysis (TA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). No reaction products of alkali and hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ) were detected; however, alkali dissolves the mullite in the bricks. Phases such as nepheline (Na 2 O·Al 2 O 3 ·2SiO 2 ), kalsilite (K 2 O·Al 2 O 3 ·2SiO 2 ), leucite (K 2 O·Al 2 O 3 ·4SiO 2 ) and potassium β-alumina (K 2 O·11Al 2 O 3 ) were formed as a consequence of reactions between alkali and the bricks.

  9. Changes in Wetting Hysteresis During Bioremediation: Changes in fluid flow behavior monitored with low-frequency seismic attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wempe, W.; Spetzler, H.; Kittleson, C.; Pursley, J.

    2003-12-01

    We observed significant reduction in wetting hysteresis with time while a diesel-contaminated quartz crystal was dipped in and out of an oil-reducing bacteria solution. This wetting hysteresis is significantly greater than the wetting hysteresis when the diesel-contaminated quartz crystal is dipped in and out of (1) water, (2) diesel and (3) the bacterial food solution that does not contain bacteria. The reduction in wetting hysteresis of the bacteria solution on the quartz surface results from a reduction in the advancing contact angle formed at the air-liquid-quartz contact with time; the receding contact angle remains the same with time. Our results suggest that the bacteria solution moves across the quartz surface with less resistance after bioremediation has begun. These results imply that bioremediation may influence fluid flow behavior with time. For many fluid-solid systems there is a difference between the contact angle while a contact line advances and recedes across a solid surface; this difference is known as wetting hysteresis. Changes in wetting hysteresis can occur from changes in surface tension or the surface topography. Low contact angle values indicate that the liquid spreads or wets well, while high values indicate poor wetting or non-wetting. Contact angles are estimated in the lab by measuring the weight of the meniscus formed at the air-liquid-quartz interface and by knowing the fluid surface tension. In the lab, we have been able to use low-frequency seismic attenuation data to detect changes in the wetting characteristics of glass plates and of Berea sandstone. The accepted seismic attenuation mechanism is related to the loss of seismic energy due to the hysteresis of meniscus movement (wetting hysteresis) when a pore containing two fluids is stressed at very low frequencies (bioremediation progress using seismic attenuation data. We are measuring low-frequency seismic attenuation in the lab while flowing bacteria solution through Berea

  10. A breakthrough biosorbent in removing heavy metals: Equilibrium, kinetic, thermodynamic and mechanism analyses in a lab-scale study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdolali, Atefeh [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Ngo, Huu Hao, E-mail: h.ngo@uts.edu.au [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Guo, Wenshan [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Lu, Shaoyong [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Chen, Shiao-Shing; Nguyen, Nguyen Cong [Institute of Environmental Engineering and Management, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Rd, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Xinbo [Department of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Aquatic Science and Technology, Tianjin Chengjian University, Jinjing Road 26, Tianjin 300384 (China); Wang, Jie; Wu, Yun [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2016-01-15

    A breakthrough biosorbent namely multi-metal binding biosorbent (MMBB) made from a combination of tea wastes, maple leaves and mandarin peels, was prepared to evaluate their biosorptive potential for removal of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) from multi-metal aqueous solutions. FTIR and SEM were conducted, before and after biosorption, to explore the intensity and position of the available functional groups and changes in adsorbent surface morphology. Carboxylic, hydroxyl and amine groups were found to be the principal functional groups for the sorption of metals. MMBB exhibited best performance at pH 5.5 with maximum sorption capacities of 31.73, 41.06, 76.25 and 26.63 mg/g for Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II), respectively. Pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order models represented the kinetic experimental data in different initial metal concentrations very well. Among two-parameter adsorption isotherm models, the Langmuir equation gave a better fit of the equilibrium data. For Cu(II) and Zn(II), the Khan isotherm describes better biosorption conditions while for Cd(II) and Pb(II), the Sips model was found to provide the best correlation of the biosorption equilibrium data. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated feasible, spontaneous and exothermic biosorption process. Overall, this novel MMBB can effectively be utilized as an adsorbent to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. - Highlights: • A novel multi-metal binding biosorbent (MMBB) was studied. • The biosorption of Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} on MMBB was evaluated. • Hydroxyl, carbonyl and amine groups are involved in metal binding of MMBB. • Equilibrium data were presented and the best fitting models were identified. • The obtained results recommend this MMBB as potentially low-cost biosorbent.

  11. Physiologic effect of repeated adrenaline (epinephrine) doses during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the cath lab setting: A randomised porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardig, Bjarne Madsen; Götberg, Michael; Rundgren, Malin; Götberg, Matthias; Zughaft, David; Kopotic, Robert; Wagner, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    This porcine study was designed to explore the effects of repetitive intravenous adrenaline doses on physiologic parameters during CPR. Thirty-six adult pigs were randomised to four injections of: adrenaline 0.02 mg(kgdose)(-1), adrenaline 0.03 mg(kgdose)(-1) or saline control. The effect on systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CePP), end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), arterial oxygen saturation via pulse oximetry (SpO2), cerebral tissue oximetry (SctO2), were analysed immediately prior to each injection and at peak arterial systolic pressure and arterial blood gases were analysed at baseline and after 15 min. In the group given 0.02 mg(kgdose)(-1), there were increases in all arterial blood pressures at all 4 pressure peaks but CePP only increased significantly after peak 1. A decrease in ETCO2 following peak 1 and 2 was observed. SctO2 and SpO2 were lowered following injection 2 and beyond. In the group given a 0.03 mg(kgdose)(-1), all ABP's increased at the first 4 pressure peaks but CePP only following 3 pressure peaks. Lower ETCO2, SctO2 and SpO2 were seen at peak 1 and beyond. In the two adrenaline groups, pH and Base Excess were lower and lactate levels higher compared to baseline as well as compared to the control. Repetitive intravenous adrenaline doses increased ABP's and to some extent also CePP, but significantly decreased organ and brain perfusion. The institutional protocol number: Malmö/Lund Committee for Animal Experiment Ethics, approval reference number: M 192-10. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fifteen years experience: Egyptian metabolic lab | Fateen | Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Those patients were classified as: 722 patients (69.4%) with lysosomal storage disorders, 302 patients (29%) with amino acid disorders and 17 patients (1.6%) with galactosemia. Conclusion: This study illustrates the experience of the reference metabolic lab in Egypt over 15 years. The lab began metabolic disorder ...

  13. Reducing unnecessary lab testing in the ICU with artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismondi, F; Celi, L A; Fialho, A S; Vieira, S M; Reti, S R; Sousa, J M C; Finkelstein, S N

    2013-05-01

    To reduce unnecessary lab testing by predicting when a proposed future lab test is likely to contribute information gain and thereby influence clinical management in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Recent studies have demonstrated that frequent laboratory testing does not necessarily relate to better outcomes. Data preprocessing, feature selection, and classification were performed and an artificial intelligence tool, fuzzy modeling, was used to identify lab tests that do not contribute an information gain. There were 11 input variables in total. Ten of these were derived from bedside monitor trends heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, temperature, blood pressure, and urine collections, as well as infusion products and transfusions. The final input variable was a previous value from one of the eight lab tests being predicted: calcium, PTT, hematocrit, fibrinogen, lactate, platelets, INR and hemoglobin. The outcome for each test was a binary framework defining whether a test result contributed information gain or not. Predictive modeling was applied to recognize unnecessary lab tests in a real world ICU database extract comprising 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Classification accuracy of necessary and unnecessary lab tests of greater than 80% was achieved for all eight lab tests. Sensitivity and specificity were satisfactory for all the outcomes. An average reduction of 50% of the lab tests was obtained. This is an improvement from previously reported similar studies with average performance 37% by [1-3]. Reducing frequent lab testing and the potential clinical and financial implications are an important issue in intensive care. In this work we present an artificial intelligence method to predict the benefit of proposed future laboratory tests. Using ICU data from 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, and eleven measurements, we demonstrate high accuracy in predicting the likely information to be gained from proposed future

  14. Reducing unnecessary lab testing in the ICU with artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismondi, F.; Celi, L.A.; Fialho, A.S.; Vieira, S.M.; Reti, S.R.; Sousa, J.M.C.; Finkelstein, S.N.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To reduce unnecessary lab testing by predicting when a proposed future lab test is likely to contribute information gain and thereby influence clinical management in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Recent studies have demonstrated that frequent laboratory testing does not necessarily relate to better outcomes. Design Data preprocessing, feature selection, and classification were performed and an artificial intelligence tool, fuzzy modeling, was used to identify lab tests that do not contribute an information gain. There were 11 input variables in total. Ten of these were derived from bedside monitor trends heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, temperature, blood pressure, and urine collections, as well as infusion products and transfusions. The final input variable was a previous value from one of the eight lab tests being predicted: calcium, PTT, hematocrit, fibrinogen, lactate, platelets, INR and hemoglobin. The outcome for each test was a binary framework defining whether a test result contributed information gain or not. Patients Predictive modeling was applied to recognize unnecessary lab tests in a real world ICU database extract comprising 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Main results Classification accuracy of necessary and unnecessary lab tests of greater than 80% was achieved for all eight lab tests. Sensitivity and specificity were satisfactory for all the outcomes. An average reduction of 50% of the lab tests was obtained. This is an improvement from previously reported similar studies with average performance 37% by [1–3]. Conclusions Reducing frequent lab testing and the potential clinical and financial implications are an important issue in intensive care. In this work we present an artificial intelligence method to predict the benefit of proposed future laboratory tests. Using ICU data from 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, and eleven measurements, we demonstrate high accuracy in predicting the

  15. Critical Casimir forces and anomalous wetting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (3) With Dirichlet boundary conditions, the critical temperature in the film is sig- ... studies: new experiments should identify the origin of the L-dependence, and ... and complete wetting should occur as T approaches Tt. The above argument is ...

  16. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo S Caram; Natalie Foster

    1998-01-01

    The strain-stress behavior of a wet granular media was measured using a split Parfitt tensile tester. In all cases the stress increases linearly with distance until the maximum uniaxial tensile stress is reached. The stress then decreases exponentially with distance after this maximum is reached. The linear region indicates that wet solids behave elastically for stresses below the tensile stresses and can store significant elastic energy. The elastic deformation cannot be explained by analyzing the behavior of individual capillary bridges and may require accounting for the deformation of the solids particles. The elastic modulus of the wet granular material remains unexplained

  17. Group dynamic and its effect on classroom climate, achievement, and time in lab in the organic chemistry laboratory classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Rachael S.

    Despite the many studies on the benefits of cooperative learning, there is surprising little research into how the classroom as a whole changes when these cooperative groups are reassigned. In one section of CHEM 3011 in Fall 2013, students were allowed to pick their partner and kept the same partner all semester. In another section during the same semester, students were assigned a different partner for every wet lab and were allowed to pick their partners during the computer simulation labs. The students in both sections were given the "preferred" version of the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) at the beginning of the semester to elicit student preferences for the class environment, and the "actual" version of the SLEI and the Class Life Instrument at the end of the semester to determine what actually occurred during the semester. The students' interactions were recorded using an observational instrument developed specifically for this project. The students' responses to surveys, interactions, grades, and time in lab were analyzed for differences between the two sections. The results of this study will be discussed.

  18. LabPush: a pilot study of providing remote clinics with laboratory results via short message service (SMS in Swaziland, Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Shan Jian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Turnaround time (TAT is an important indicator of laboratory performance. It is often difficult to achieve fast TAT for blood tests conducted at clinics in developing countries. This is because clinics where the patient is treated are often far away from the laboratory, and transporting blood samples and test results between the two locations creates significant delay. Recent efforts have sought to mitigate this problem by using Short Message Service (SMS to reduce TAT. Studies reporting the impact of this technique have not been published in scientific literature however. In this paper we present a study of LabPush, a system developed to test whether SMS delivery of HIV related laboratory results to clinics could shorten TAT time significantly. METHOD: LapPush was implemented in six clinics of the Kingdom of Swaziland. SMS results were sent out from the laboratory as a supplement to normal transport of paper results. Each clinic was equipped with a mobile phone to receive SMS results. The laboratory that processes the blood tests was equipped with a system for digital input of results, and transmission of results via SMS to the clinics. RESULTS: Laboratory results were received for 1041 different clinical cases. The total number of SMS records received (1032 was higher than that of paper records (965, indicating a higher loss rate for paper records. A statistical comparison of TAT for SMS and paper reports indicates a statistically significant improvement for SMS. Results were more positive for more rural clinics, and an urban clinic with high workload. CONCLUSION: SMS can be used to reduce TAT for blood tests taken at clinics in developing countries. Benefits are likely to be greater at clinics that are further away from laboratories, due to the difficulties this imposes on transport of paper records.

  19. In-Lab Upfront Use of Tirofiban May Reduce the Occurrence of No-Reflow During Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. A Pilot Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Igor Matos; Novaes, Gustavo Caires; Badran, André Vannucchi; Pavão, Rafael Brolio; Barbosa, Ricardo; Figueiredo, Geraldo Luiz de; Lima, Moysés de Oliveira; Haddad, Jorge Luiz; Schmidt, André; Marin, José Antônio

    2016-11-01

    Despite successful opening of culprit coronary artery, myocardial reperfusion does not always follows primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors are used in the treatment of no-reflow (NR), but their role to prevent it is unproven. To evaluate the effect of in-lab administration of tirofiban on the incidence of NR in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with PPCI. STEMI patients treated with PPCI were randomized (24 tirofiban and 34 placebo) in this double-blinded study to assess the impact of intravenous tirofiban on the incidence of NR after PPCI according to angiographic and electrocardiographic methods. End-points of the study were: TIMI-epicardial flow grade; myocardial blush grade (MBG); resolution of ST-elevation grupos. A ocorrência de fluxo TIMI grupos tirofibana (25%) e placebo (35,3%). MBG ≤ 2 não ocorreu no grupo tirofibana, e foi detectado em 11,7% dos pacientes do grupo placebo (p=0,13). RST grupos tirofibana e placebo, respectivamente. NR grave (RST ≤ 30%) ocorreu em 0% x 26,5% (p=0,01) aos 90 minutos, e em 4,2% x 23,5% (p=0,06) em 24 horas nos grupos tirofibana e placebo, respectivamente. Este estudo piloto mostrou uma tendência de redução de NR associada ao uso, em laboratório, de tirofibana em pacientes com IAMCSST tratados com ICPP, e abre caminho para um estudo em escala real que teste essa hipótese.

  20. Reactive transport at the pore-scale: Geological Labs on Chip studies (GLoCs) for CO2 storage in saline aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaroual, M. M.; Lassin, A., Sr.; André, L., Sr.; Devau, N., Sr.; Leroy, P., Sr.

    2017-12-01

    The near well bore of CO2 injection in saline aquifer is the main sensitive part of the targeted carbone storage reservoirs. The recent development of microfluidics tools mimicking porous media of geological reservoirs allowed studying physical, physico-chemical and thermodynamic mechanisms. We used the GLoCs "Geological Labs on Chip" to study dynamic and reactive transport processes at the pore scale induced by the CO2 geological storage. The present work is a first attempt to reproduce, by reactive transport modeling, an experiment of calcium carbonate precipitation during the co-injection of two aqueous solutions in a GLoC device. For that purpose, a new kinetics model, based on the transition-state-theory and on surface complexation modeling, was developed to describe the co-precipitation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) and calcite. ACC precipitates and creates surface complexation sites from which calcite can nucleate and create new surface complexation sites. When the kinetics of calcite precipitation are fast enough, the consumption of matter leads to the dissolution of ACC. The modeling results were first compared to batch experiments (from the literature) and then applied with success to dynamic experiment observations carried out on a GLoC device (from the literature). On the other hand, we evaluated the solubility of CO2 in capillary waters that increases between 5 to 10 folds for reservoir conditions (200 bar and 100°C) compared to the bulk water. The GLoCs tools started to address an excellent and much finer degree of processes control (reactive transport processes, mixing effects, minerals precipitation and dissolution kinetics, etc.) thanks to in situ analysis and characterization techniques, allowing access in real time to relevant properties. Current investigations focus on key parameters influencing the flowing dynamics and trapping mechanisms (relative permeability, capillary conditions, kinetics of dissolution and precipitation of minerals).

  1. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  2. An Annotated Math Lab Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schussheim, Joan Yares

    1980-01-01

    A listing of mathematics laboratory material is organized as follows: learning kits, tape programs, manipulative learning materials, publications, math games, math lab library, and an alphabetized listing of publishers and/or companies offering materials. (MP)

  3. Pollution hazard closes neutrino lab

    CERN Multimedia

    Jones, Nicola

    2003-01-01

    "A leading astrophysics laboratory in Italy has closed down all but one of its experiments over concerns that toxic polluants could leak form the underground lab into the local water supply" (0.5 page)

  4. Common Systems Integration Lab (CSIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Common Systems Integration Lab (CSIL)supports the PMA-209 Air Combat Electronics Program Office. CSIL also supports development, test, integration and life cycle...

  5. Fracture resistance of prepared premolars restored with bonded new lab composite and all-ceramic inlay/onlay restorations: Laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafaie, Ramy Ahmed; Ibrahim Ali, Ashraf; Mahmoud, Salah Hasab

    2018-01-25

    To assess the influence of new light curing lab composite, lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic and yttrium-stabilized zirconia-based ceramic on the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars with class II inlay and onlay preparations. Seventy sound maxillary premolars were divided randomly into seven main groups. The first group was left intact (control group). The remaining six groups were prepared with inlay and onlay cavities and restored with lab composite (SR Nexco), lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press) and yttrium-stabilized zirconia-based ceramic (ICE Zirkon). The restorations were cemented with luting resin composite (Variolink N). All specimens were thermocycled 5000 cycles between 5°C ± 2°C and 55°C ± 2°C and were then cyclic loaded for 500 000 cycles. The specimens were subjected to a compressive load in a universal testing machine using a metal sphere until fracture occurred. The results were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post hoc tests. The level of significance was set at P  .05). However, statistically significant differences were found among the means of control group and the groups restored with lab composite inlays, lab composite onlays, pressable glass ceramic inlays and pressable glass ceramic onlays (P lab composite is used. Conversely, when a ceramic material being used, the prepared teeth for inlay and onlay restorations showed a comparable strength to the intact teeth especially zirconia ceramic. Premolar teeth restored with zirconia ceramic inlays and onlays exhibited fracture resistance comparable to intact teeth. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Wet-Bulb-Globe Temperature Data Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Hour Min Pressure Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Wind Cld amt Cld type Obscuration Quest RH Kestrel RH VPSc RH S1 WBGT Q WBGT...Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Wind Cld amt Cld type Obscuration Quest RH Kestrel RH VPSc RH S1 WBGT Q WBGT K2 WBGT GMT millibars deg F...Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Wind Cld amt Cld type Obscuration Quest RH Kestrel RH VPSc RH S1 WBGT Q WBGT K2 WBGT GMT millibars deg F deg F deg

  7. Acceptance of an assistive robot in older adults: a mixed-method study of human–robot interaction over a 1-month period in the Living Lab setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Huei; Wrobel, Jérémy; Cornuet, Mélanie; Kerhervé, Hélène; Damnée, Souad; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in investigating acceptance of robots, which are increasingly being proposed as one form of assistive technology to support older adults, maintain their independence, and enhance their well-being. In the present study, we aimed to observe robot-acceptance in older adults, particularly subsequent to a 1-month direct experience with a robot. Subjects and methods Six older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and five cognitively intact healthy (CIH) older adults were recruited. Participants interacted with an assistive robot in the Living Lab once a week for 4 weeks. After being shown how to use the robot, participants performed tasks to simulate robot use in everyday life. Mixed methods, comprising a robot-acceptance questionnaire, semistructured interviews, usability-performance measures, and a focus group, were used. Results Both CIH and MCI subjects were able to learn how to use the robot. However, MCI subjects needed more time to perform tasks after a 1-week period of not using the robot. Both groups rated similarly on the robot-acceptance questionnaire. They showed low intention to use the robot, as well as negative attitudes toward and negative images of this device. They did not perceive it as useful in their daily life. However, they found it easy to use, amusing, and not threatening. In addition, social influence was perceived as powerful on robot adoption. Direct experience with the robot did not change the way the participants rated robots in their acceptance questionnaire. We identified several barriers to robot-acceptance, including older adults’ uneasiness with technology, feeling of stigmatization, and ethical/societal issues associated with robot use. Conclusion It is important to destigmatize images of assistive robots to facilitate their acceptance. Universal design aiming to increase the market for and production of products that are usable by everyone (to the greatest extent possible) might help to

  8. Acceptance of an assistive robot in older adults: a mixed-method study of human-robot interaction over a 1-month period in the Living Lab setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Huei; Wrobel, Jérémy; Cornuet, Mélanie; Kerhervé, Hélène; Damnée, Souad; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in investigating acceptance of robots, which are increasingly being proposed as one form of assistive technology to support older adults, maintain their independence, and enhance their well-being. In the present study, we aimed to observe robot-acceptance in older adults, particularly subsequent to a 1-month direct experience with a robot. Six older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and five cognitively intact healthy (CIH) older adults were recruited. Participants interacted with an assistive robot in the Living Lab once a week for 4 weeks. After being shown how to use the robot, participants performed tasks to simulate robot use in everyday life. Mixed methods, comprising a robot-acceptance questionnaire, semistructured interviews, usability-performance measures, and a focus group, were used. Both CIH and MCI subjects were able to learn how to use the robot. However, MCI subjects needed more time to perform tasks after a 1-week period of not using the robot. Both groups rated similarly on the robot-acceptance questionnaire. They showed low intention to use the robot, as well as negative attitudes toward and negative images of this device. They did not perceive it as useful in their daily life. However, they found it easy to use, amusing, and not threatening. In addition, social influence was perceived as powerful on robot adoption. Direct experience with the robot did not change the way the participants rated robots in their acceptance questionnaire. We identified several barriers to robot-acceptance, including older adults' uneasiness with technology, feeling of stigmatization, and ethical/societal issues associated with robot use. It is important to destigmatize images of assistive robots to facilitate their acceptance. Universal design aiming to increase the market for and production of products that are usable by everyone (to the greatest extent possible) might help to destigmatize assistive devices.

  9. Characteristics of wetting temperature during spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsutake, Yuichi; Monde, Masanori; Hidaka, Shinichirou

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study has been done to elucidate the effects of mass flux and subcooling of liquid and thermal properties of solid on the wetting temperature during cooling of a hot block with spray. A water spray was impinged at one of the end surfaces of a cylindrical block initially heated at 400 or 500degC. The experimental condition was mass fluxes G=1-9 kg/m 2 s and degrees of subcooling ΔT sub =20, 50, 80 K. Three blocks of copper, brass and carbon steel were prepared. During spray cooling internal block temperature distribution and sputtering sound pressure level were recorded and the surface temperature and heat flux were evaluated with 2D inverse heat conducting analysis. Cooling process on cooling curves is divided into four regimes categorized by change in a flow situation and the sound level. The wetting temperature defined as the wall temperature at a minimum heat flux point was measured over an extensive experimental range. The wetting wall temperature was correlated well with the parameter of GΔT sub . The wetting wall temperature increases as GΔT sub increases and reaches a constant value depending on the material of the surface at higher region of GΔT sub . (author)

  10. Adsorption of chlorinated hydrocarbons from aqueous solutions by wetted and non-wetted synthetic sorbents:dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rexwinkel, G.; Rexwinkel, Glenn; Berkhout, J.T.A.M.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.

    2003-01-01

    In the present investigation the dynamics of the adsorption of several chlorinated hydrocarbons onto wetted and non-wetted synthetic sorbents was studied. A single particle model was developed to describe the adsorption behavior. The values of the mass transfer coefficient, needed to describe the

  11. Engineering and economic evaluation of wet/dry cooling towers for water conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, M.C.

    1976-11-01

    The results are presented of a design and cost study for wet/dry tower systems used in conjunction with 1000 MWe nuclear power plants to reject waste heat while conserving water. Design and cost information for wet/dry tower systems are presented, and these cooling system alternatives are compared with wet and dry tower systems to determine whether the wet/dry tower concept is an economically viable alternative. The wet/dry cooling tower concept investigated is one which combines physically separated wet towers and dry towers into an operational unit. In designing the wet/dry tower, a dry cooling tower is sized to carry the plant heat load at low ambient temperatures, and a separate wet tower is added to augment the heat rejection of the dry tower at higher ambient temperatures. These wet/dry towers are designed to operate with a conventional low back pressure turbine commercially available today. The component wet and dry towers are state-of-the-art designs. From this study it was concluded that: wet/dry cooling systems can be designed to provide a significant economic advantage over dry cooling yet closely matching the dry tower's ability to conserve water, a wet/dry system which saves as much as 99 percent of the make-up water required by a wet tower can maintain that economic advantage, and therefore, for power plant sites where water is in short supply, wet/dry cooling is the economic choice over dry cooling

  12. Contact angle and local wetting at contact line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ri; Shan, Yanguang

    2012-11-06

    This theoretical study was motivated by recent experiments and theoretical work that had suggested the dependence of the static contact angle on the local wetting at the triple-phase contact line. We revisit this topic because the static contact angle as a local wetting parameter is still not widely understood and clearly known. To further clarify the relationship of the static contact angle with wetting, two approaches are applied to derive a general equation for the static contact angle of a droplet on a composite surface composed of heterogeneous components. A global approach based on the free surface energy of a thermodynamic system containing the droplet and solid surface shows the static contact angle as a function of local surface chemistry and local wetting state at the contact line. A local approach, in which only local forces acting on the contact line are considered, results in the same equation. The fact that the local approach agrees with the global approach further demonstrates the static contact angle as a local wetting parameter. Additionally, the study also suggests that the wetting described by the Wenzel and Cassie equations is also the local wetting of the contact line rather than the global wetting of the droplet.

  13. Analysis on Wetting Deformation Properties of Silty Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinrong Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in water level that cause deformation and stability problems often occur in foundation pit engineering. Water damage is one of the main problems that will lead to disasters in foundation pit engineering. Research findings with regard to properties of wetting deformation due to water damage can be applied not only in foundation pit engineering, slope engineering, hydraulic engineering, and mining engineering but also in related issues in the field of theoretical research and practice. In this study, the characteristics of silty clay deformation after wetting are examined from the perspective of the effect of wetting on the side wall of foundation pit, and wetting experiments on silty clay of a selected area’s stratum located in Chongqing Municipality are conducted under different confining pressures and stress levels through a multi-function triaxial apparatus. Then, laws of silty clay wetting deformation are obtained, and the relationship between wetting stress level and wetting deformation amount is also figured out. The study reveals that the maximum values of wetting deformation under different confining pressures have appear at a particular stress level; therefore, the related measures should be taken to avoid this deformation in the process of construction.

  14. [Study on Content Determination of Lead and Arsenic in Four Traditional Tibetan Medicine Prescription Preparations by Wet Digestion Flow Injection-Hydride Generation-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhi-yuan; Du, Yu-zhi; Zhang, Ming; Yu, Ming-jie; Li, Cen; Yang, Hong-xia; Zhao, Jing; Xia, Zheng-hua; Wei, Li-xin

    2015-04-01

    Four common traditional tibetan medicine prescription preparations "Anzhijinghuasan, Dangzuo, Renqingchangjue and Rannasangpei" in tibetan areas were selected as study objects in the present study. The purpose was to try to establish a kind of wet digestion and flow injection-hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HAAS) associated analysis method for the content determinations of lead and arsenic in traditional tibetan medicine under optimized digestion and measurement conditions and determine their contents accurately. Under these optimum operating conditions, experimental results were as follows. The detection limits for lead and arsenic were 0.067 and 0.012 µg · mL(-1) respectively. The quantification limits for lead and arsenic were 0.22 and 0.041 µg · mL(-1) respectively. The linear ranges for lead and arsenic were 25-1,600 ng · mL(-1) (r = 0.9995) and 12.5-800 ng · mL(-1) (r = 0.9994) respectively. The degrees of precision(RSD) for lead and arsenic were 2.0% and 3.2% respectively. The recovery rates for lead and arsenic were 98.00%-99.98% and 96.67%-99.87% respectively. The content determination results of lead and arsenic in four traditional tibetan medicine prescription preparations were as fol- lows. The contents of lead and arsenic in Anzhijinghuasan are 0.63-0.67 µg · g(-1) and 0.32-0.33 µg · g(-1) in Anzhijinghua- san, 42.92-43.36 µg · g(-1) and 24.67-25.87 µg · g(-1) in Dangzuo, 1,611. 39-1,631.36 µg · g(-1) and 926.76-956.52 µg- g(-1) in Renqing Changjue, and 1,102.28-1,119.127 µg-g(-1) and 509.96-516.87 µg · g(-1) in Rannasangpei, respectively. This study established a method for content determination of lead and arsenic in traditional tibetan medicine, and determined the content levels of lead and arsenic in four tibetan medicine-prescription preparations accurately. In addition, these results also provide the basis for the safe and effective use of those medicines in clinic.

  15. Formation of InAs/GaAs quantum dots from a subcritical InAs wetting layer: A reflection high-energy electron diffraction and theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H. Z.; Usuki, T.; Nakata, Y.; Yokoyama, N.; Sasakura, H.; Muto, S.

    2006-01-01

    InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QD's) are formed by postgrowth annealing of an InAs wetting layer thinner than the critical thickness for the transition from two- (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) growth mode. Reflection high energy electron diffraction is used to monitor the QD formation. Based on a mean-field theory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 897 (1997)], the time evolution of total QD's volume, first increasing and finally saturating, is well explained by precursors forming during wetting layer growth and converting into nucleated QD's after growth stop. Both the saturation QD's volume and the QD nucleation rate depend exponentially on the InAs coverage. These behaviors and their temperature and InAs growth rate dependences are essentially understandable in the frame of the mean-field theory. Similar analysis to conventional QD growth suggests that the often observed significant mass transport from wetting layer to QD's can be ascribed to the precursors existing before 2D-3D growth mode transition

  16. Domain Adaptation Methods for Improving Lab-to-field Generalization of Cocaine Detection using Wearable ECG

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, Annamalai; Angarita, Gustavo; Gaiser, Edward; Malison, Robert; Ganesan, Deepak; Marlin, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile health research on illicit drug use detection typically involves a two-stage study design where data to learn detectors is first collected in lab-based trials, followed by a deployment to subjects in a free-living environment to assess detector performance. While recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of wearable sensors for illicit drug use detection in the lab setting, several key problems can limit lab-to-field generalization performance. For example, lab-based data collection...

  17. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Mishra, Himanshu; Bonn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid 'marbles' with molecularly thin graphene.

  18. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra

    2016-11-28

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid \\'marbles\\' with molecularly thin graphene.

  19. Can Graduate Teaching Assistants Teach Inquiry-Based Geology Labs Effectively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryker, Katherine; McConnell, David

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the implementation of teaching strategies by graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) in inquiry-based introductory geology labs at a large research university. We assess the degree of inquiry present in each Physical Geology lab and compare and contrast the instructional practices of new and experienced GTAs teaching these labs. We…

  20. Undergraduate Student Construction and Interpretation of Graphs in Physics Lab Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Godfrey, T. J.; Mayhew, Nicholas T.; Wiegert, Craig C.

    2016-01-01

    Lab activities are an important element of an undergraduate physics course. In these lab activities, students construct and interpret graphs in order to connect the procedures of the lab with an understanding of the related physics concepts. This study investigated undergraduate students' construction and interpretation of graphs with best-fit…

  1. Applying a Living Lab methodology to support innovation in education at a university in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronel Callaghan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Living Lab paradigm creates open and inter-disciplinary environments where participants can interrogate challenges and co-create solutions. A successful Living Lab context incorporates a clear focus/vision, strong leadership, self-sustainability, a strong sense of community-owned challenges and the potential for sustainable community development. This paper discusses and outlines the elements of Living Labs, and how these have played a role in the establishment of a new Education Living Lab at a University in South Africa. Core values, stakeholders and key success factors of Living Labs are discussed. This is followed by the description of a case study of the establishment process of a Living Lab. The newly established Living Lab already shows success with collaborations and innovation between communities, industry, academia, learners and schools. This is illustrated in an application of the discussions on the Mobile Learning focus area - the first active sub-focus area within the Education Living Lab.

  2. Wetting of the diamond surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.O.

    1987-01-01

    The surface conditions which lead to a wide variation in the wettability of diamond surfaces have been investigated using macroscopic surfaces to allow for the crystal anisotropy. A wetting balance method of calculating adhesion tension and hence contact angle has been used for diamonds having major faces near the [111] and [110] lattice planes. Three classes of behaviour have been identified. Surface analyses by Rutherford Backscattering of helium ions, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) have been used to define the role of the oxygen coverage of the surface in the transition I → O → H. Ferric ion has a hydrophilizing effect on the diamond surface, thought to be the consequence of attachment to the hydroxyl groups at the surface by a ligand mechanism. Other transition metal ions did not show this effect. The phenomenon of hydration of the surface, i.e. progressively more hydrophilic behaviour on prolonged exposure to liquid water, has been quantified. Imbibition or water penetration at microcracks are thought unlikely, and a water cluster build-up at hydrophilic sites is thought to be the best explanation. Dynamic studies indicate little dependence of the advancing contact angle on velocity for velocities up to 10 -4 m/s, and slight dependence of the receding contact angle. Hence advancing angles by this technique are similar to equilibrated contact angles found by optical techniques, but the receding angles are lower than found by other non-dynamic measurements

  3. Comparative study of the effect of dry and wet ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe spice on the proximate and microbial safety of soybean beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adegbola Oladele Dauda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean beverage, most common nutritious local beverage in Nigeria and in the world, is a high protein beverage used as a dairy milk substitute with the limited utilization due to natural or ambient conditions that serve as growth medium for microorganisms. Hence, it has a short shelf life. This study examines the shelf life of soybean beverage preserved with the ginger spice (dried at 70 ˚C, 80 ˚C, 90 ˚C and 100 ˚C, and 2 g and 4 g of fresh/wet ginger respectively over 7-week period. The samples were (A: plain soybean beverage; B: 200 ml soybean beverage + 2 g of ginger dried at 100 ˚C; C: 200 ml soybean beverage + 2 g ginger dried at 90 ˚C; D: 200 ml soybean beverage + 2 g ginger dried at 80 ˚C; E: 200 ml soybean beverage + 2 g ginger dried at 70 ˚C; F: 200 ml soybean beverage + 2 g fresh ginger; and G: 200 ml soybean beverage + 4 g fresh ginger respectively. The proximate, pH, microbial and sensory analyses of samples ranged as follows: 87.35% - 90.83% for the moisture content; 0.58% - 0.65% ash content; 4.65% - 4.96% protein; 0.10%-0.26% fibre content; 2.06% - 2.98% crude fat and 1.68% - 4.17% carbohydrate, and pH values ranged from 6.2 - 6.5. Microbiological analysis over storage period showed that the control sample ranged from 0.4×106 -8.3×106 cfu/ml, and treated samples from 0.4×106 to 2.4×106 cfu/ml. Low values of the samples treated with dry ginger spice were preserved better than others, probably due to preservative and anti-microbial properties of the spice. Sensory evaluation, carried out by twenty-eight persons, showed that the sample E: (200 ml soymilk+ 2 g ginger dried at 70 ˚C was most preferred (with respect to taste, aroma and overall acceptability, while there was a significant difference in the appearance of the samples.

  4. Acceptance of an assistive robot in older adults: a mixed-method study of human–robot interaction over a 1-month period in the Living Lab setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu YH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ya-Huei Wu,1,2 Jérémy Wrobel,1,2 Mélanie Cornuet,1,2 Hélène Kerhervé,1,2 Souad Damnée,1,2 Anne-Sophie Rigaud1,21Hôpital Broca, Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, 2Research Team 4468, Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, FranceBackground: There is growing interest in investigating acceptance of robots, which are increasingly being proposed as one form of assistive technology to support older adults, maintain their independence, and enhance their well-being. In the present study, we aimed to observe robot-acceptance in older adults, particularly subsequent to a 1-month direct experience with a robot.Subjects and methods: Six older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and five cognitively intact healthy (CIH older adults were recruited. Participants interacted with an assistive robot in the Living Lab once a week for 4 weeks. After being shown how to use the robot, participants performed tasks to simulate robot use in everyday life. Mixed methods, comprising a robot-acceptance questionnaire, semistructured interviews, usability-performance measures, and a focus group, were used.Results: Both CIH and MCI subjects were able to learn how to use the robot. However, MCI subjects needed more time to perform tasks after a 1-week period of not using the robot. Both groups rated similarly on the robot-acceptance questionnaire. They showed low intention to use the robot, as well as negative attitudes toward and negative images of this device. They did not perceive it as useful in their daily life. However, they found it easy to use, amusing, and not threatening. In addition, social influence was perceived as powerful on robot adoption. Direct experience with the robot did not change the way the participants rated robots in their acceptance questionnaire. We identified several barriers to robot-acceptance, including older adults’ uneasiness with technology, feeling of stigmatization, and ethical

  5. Designing virtual science labs for the Islamic Academy of Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZahrani, Nada Saeed

    Science education is a basic part of the curriculum in modern day classrooms. Instructional approaches to science education can take many forms but hands-on application of theory via science laboratory activities for the learner is common. Not all schools have the resources to provide the laboratory environment necessary for hands-on application of science theory. Some settings rely on technology to provide a virtual laboratory experience instead. The Islamic Academy of Delaware (IAD), a typical community-based organization, was formed to support and meet the essential needs of the Muslim community of Delaware. IAD provides science education as part of the overall curriculum, but cannot provide laboratory activities as part of the science program. Virtual science labs may be a successful model for students at IAD. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of implementing virtual science labs at IAD and to develop an implementation plan for integrating the virtual labs. The literature has shown us that the lab experience is a valuable part of the science curriculum (NBPTS, 2013, Wolf, 2010, National Research Council, 1997 & 2012). The National Research Council (2012) stressed the inclusion of laboratory investigations in the science curriculum. The literature also supports the use of virtual labs as an effective substitute for classroom labs (Babateen, 2011; National Science Teachers Association, 2008). Pyatt and Simms (2011) found evidence that virtual labs were as good, if not better than physical lab experiences in some respects. Although not identical in experience to a live lab, the virtual lab has been shown to provide the student with an effective laboratory experience in situations where the live lab is not possible. The results of the IAD teacher interviews indicate that the teachers are well-prepared for, and supportive of, the implementation of virtual labs to improve the science education curriculum. The investigator believes that with the

  6. EB curable wetting resins for magnetic media coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskin, L.; Ansel, R.E.; Murray, K.P.; Schmid, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic media industry is studying means to improve the recording density, durability, product uniformity and production efficiency and to reduce wetting agent migration in the magnetic film. The use of electron beam curable resin binders for magnetic coatings is one of the approaches being studied for this. This paper compares the wetting efficiencies of several electron beam curable systems with a conventional resin and a conventional wetting agent. In this study it has been demonstrated that EB resins can be designed to effect proper magnetic pigment dispersion

  7. Lab-on-fiber technology

    CERN Document Server

    Cusano, Andrea; Crescitelli, Alessio; Ricciardi, Armando

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on a research field that is rapidly emerging as one of the most promising ones for the global optics and photonics community: the "lab-on-fiber" technology. Inspired by the well-established 'lab on-a-chip' concept, this new technology essentially envisages novel and highly functionalized devices completely integrated into a single optical fiber for both communication and sensing applications.Based on the R&D experience of some of the world's leading authorities in the fields of optics, photonics, nanotechnology, and material science, this book provides a broad and accurate de

  8. An optical microscopy study of the swelling of wet-spun films of CsDNA as a function of hydration and CsCl concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenker, Megan; Marlowe, Robert; Lee, Scott; Rupprecht, Allan

    2005-03-01

    Highly oriented, wet-spun films of DNA expand in the direction perpendicular to the helical axis as the hydration of the film is increased. CsDNA films with a high CsCl content show an unexpected shrinkage at a relative humidity of 92%. Our most recent experiments have been to measure the perpendicular dimension of CsDNA as a function of both hydration and concentration of CsCl. Our preliminary results show that no shrinkage is observed at low contents of CsCl, showing that the CsCl plays an integral role in the shrinkage phenomenon.

  9. Electronics lab instructors' approaches to troubleshooting instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-06-01

    In this exploratory qualitative study, we describe instructors' self-reported practices for teaching and assessing students' ability to troubleshoot in electronics lab courses. We collected audio data from interviews with 20 electronics instructors from 18 institutions that varied by size, selectivity, and other factors. In addition to describing participants' instructional practices, we characterize their perceptions about the role of troubleshooting in electronics, the importance of the ability to troubleshoot more generally, and what it means for students to be competent troubleshooters. One major finding of this work is that, while almost all instructors in our study said that troubleshooting is an important learning outcome for students in electronics lab courses, only half of instructors said they directly assessed students' ability to troubleshoot. Based on our findings, we argue that there is a need for research-based instructional materials that attend to both cognitive and noncognitive aspects of troubleshooting proficiency. We also identify several areas for future investigation related to troubleshooting instruction in electronics lab courses.

  10. What's So Bad about Being Wet All Over: Investigating Leaf Surface Wetness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Carol A.

    1996-01-01

    Presents investigations of leaf surface wetness that provide ideal opportunities for students to explore the relationships between leaf form and function, to study surface conditions of leaves and plant physiology, and to make predictions about plant adaptation in different environments. Describes simple procedures for exploring questions related…

  11. Does Surface Roughness Amplify Wetting?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 18 (2014), s. 184703 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09914S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : density functional theory * wetting * roughness Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  12. Dynamics of Wetting of Ultra Hydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan; Kavehpour, Pirouz; Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Controlling the surface wettability of hydrophobic and super hydrophobic surfaces has extensive industrial applications ranging from coating, painting and printing technology and waterproof clothing to efficiency increase in power and water plants. This requires enhancing the knowledge about the dynamics of wetting on these hydrophobic surfaces. We have done experimental investigation on the dynamics of wetting on hydrophobic surfaces by looking deeply in to the dependency of the dynamic contact angles both advancing and receding on the velocity of the three-phase boundary (Solid/Liquid/Gas interface) using the Wilhelmy plate method with different ultra-hydrophobic surfaces. Several fluids with different surface tension and viscosity are used to study the effect of physical properties of liquids on the governing laws.

  13. Avoided critical behavior in dynamically forced wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeijer, Jacco H; Delon, Giles; Fermigier, Marc; Andreotti, Bruno

    2006-05-05

    A solid object can be coated by a nonwetting liquid since a receding contact line cannot exceed a critical speed. In this Letter we study the dynamical wetting transition at which a liquid film gets deposited by withdrawing a vertical plate out of a liquid reservoir. It has recently been predicted that this wetting transition is critical with diverging time scales and coincides with the disappearance of stationary menisci. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the transition is due to the formation of a solitary wave, well below the critical point. As a consequence, relaxation times remain finite at threshold. The structure of the liquid deposited on the plate involves a capillary ridge that does not trivially match the Landau-Levich film.

  14. A Simple, Successful Capacitor Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, William

    2011-01-01

    Capacitors are a fundamental component of modern electronics. They appear in myriad devices and in an enormous range of sizes. Although our students are taught the function and analysis of capacitors, few have the opportunity to use them in our labs.

  15. The Telecom Lab is moving

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    As of 2nd March 2009, the Telecom Lab will move to Building 58 R-017. The Telecom Lab is the central point for all support questions regarding CERN mobile phone services (provision of SIM cards, requests for modifications of subscriptions, diagnostics for mobile phone problems, etc.). The opening hours as well as the contact details for the Telecom Lab remain unchanged: New location: Building 58 R-017 Opening hours: Every week day, from 11 a.m. to 12 a.m. Phone number: 72480 Email address: labo.telecom@cern.ch This change has no impact on support requests for mobile services. Users can still submit their requests concerning mobile phone subscriptions using the usual EDH form (https://edh.cern.ch/Document/GSM). The automatic message sent to inform users of their SIM card availability will be updated to indicate the new Telecom Lab location. You can find all information related to CERN mobile phone services at the following link: http://cern.ch/gsm CS Section - IT/CS group

  16. Exposure to wet work in working Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegel, Tessa G; Nixon, Rosemary L; LaMontagne, Anthony D

    2012-02-01

    The Australian National Hazard Exposure Worker Surveillance (NHEWS) Survey 2008 was a cross-sectional survey undertaken by Safe Work Australia to inform the development of exposure prevention initiatives for occupational disease. This is a descriptive study of workplace exposures. To assess the occupational and demographic characteristics of workers reporting exposure to wet work. Computer-assisted telephone interviews were conducted with 4500 workers. Two wet work exposure outcomes (frequent washing of hands and duration of time spent at work with the hands immersed in liquids) were analysed. The response rate for the study was 42.3%. For hand-washing, 9.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.9-10.7] reported washing their hands more than 20 times per day. For immersion of hands in liquids, 4.5% (95% CI 3.9-5.1) reported immersion for more than 2 hr per day. Females were more likely to report exposure to frequent hand-washing than males [odds ratio (OR) 1.97, 95% CI 1.49-2.61]. Workers in the lowest occupational skill level jobs were more likely to report increased exposure to hands immersed in liquids than those in the highest (OR 6.41, 95% CI 3.78-10.88). Workers reporting skin exposure to chemicals were more likely to report exposure to hand-washing (OR 3.68, 95% CI 2.91-4.66) and immersion of the hands in liquids (OR 4.09, 95% CI 2.92-5.74). Specific groups of workers reported high levels of exposure to wet work. There were differences between the profiles of workers reporting frequent hand-washing and workers reporting increased duration of exposure to hands immersed in liquids. We also found a high correlation between wet work and chemical exposure. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Development and Interaction between LMS Services and Remote Labs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Castro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays there is a great number of universities and organizations working in e-learning and i-learning solutions. One of the most well-known is the learning management system or LMS that allows displaying theoretical content in an organized and controlled way. In some jobs and studies it is necessary for the student to get a practical knowledge as well as a theoretical one. To obtain this practical knowledge, the universities and organizations are developing Virtual, Remote and Web labs. At these moments the LMS and Web labs are working independently. We are studying a new architecture allowing the integration of the LMS with different Web labs. This architecture must allow the students, teachers and administrators to use the services of LMS and virtual lab’s features as if they were working with the same software.

  18. Reference-based pricing: an evidence-based solution for lab services shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, L Doug; Bradley, Kent; Fu, Patricia Lin; Armata, Raegan; Parr, James B

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of reference-based pricing (RBP) on the percentage of lab services utilized by members that were at or below the reference price. Retrospective, quasi-experimental, matched, case-control pilot evaluation of an RBP benefit for lab services. The study group included employees of a multinational grocery chain covered by a national health insurance carrier and subject to RBP for lab services; it had access to an online lab shopping tool and was informed about the RBP benefit through employer communications. The reference group was covered by the same insurance carrier but not subject to RBP. The primary end point was lab compliance, defined as the percentage of lab claims with total charges at or below the reference price. Difference-in-difference regression estimation evaluated changes in lab compliance between the 2 groups. Higher compliance per lab claim was evident for the study group compared with the reference group (69% vs 57%; Ponline shopping tool was used by 7% of the matched-adjusted study group prior to obtaining lab services. Lab compliance was 76% for study group members using the online tool compared with 68% among nonusers who were subject to RBP (P<.01). RBP can promote cost-conscious selection of lab services. Access to facilities that offer services below the reference price and education about RBP improve compliance. Evaluation of the effect of RBP on higher-cost medical services, including radiology, outpatient specialty, and elective inpatient procedures, is needed.

  19. Solving the Controversy on the Wetting Transparency of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donggyu; Pugno, Nicola M; Buehler, Markus J; Ryu, Seunghwa

    2015-10-26

    Since its discovery, the wetting transparency of graphene, the transmission of the substrate wetting property over graphene coating, has gained significant attention due to its versatility for potential applications. Yet, there have been debates on the interpretation and validity of the wetting transparency. Here, we present a theory taking two previously disregarded factors into account and elucidate the origin of the partial wetting transparency. We show that the liquid bulk modulus is crucial to accurately calculate the van der Waals interactions between the liquid and the surface, and that various wetting states on rough surfaces must be considered to understand a wide range of contact angle measurements that cannot be fitted with a theory considering the flat surface. In addition, we reveal that the wetting characteristic of the substrate almost vanishes when covered by any coating as thick as graphene double layers. Our findings reveal a more complete picture of the wetting transparency of graphene as well as other atomically thin coatings, and can be applied to study various surface engineering problems requiring wettability-tuning.

  20. Characteristics of Wet Deposition in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, A.; Arakaki, T.

    2017-12-01

    Acid deposition survey in Japan has started since 1991 by Japan Environmental Laboratories Association (JELA). The JELA has about 60 monitoring sites for wet deposition including remote, rural and urban area. The measured constituents of wet deposition are; precipitation, pH, electric conductivity, major Anions, and major Cations. From those data, we analyze spatial and temporal variations of wet deposition components in Japan. Among the 60 monitoring sites, 39 sampling sites were selected in this study, which have kept sampling continuously between 2003JFY and 2014JFY. All samples were collected by wet-only samplers. To analyze area characteristics, all the areas were divided into 6 regions; Northern part of Japan (NJ), Facing the Japan Sea (JS), Eastern part of Japan (EJ), Central part of Japan (CJ), Western part of Japan (WJ) and Southern West Islands (SW). NO3- and non-sea-salt-SO42- (nss-SO42-) are major components of rain acidification. Especially, between December and February (winter) the air mass from west affected the temporal variations of those acid components and the concentrations were higher in JS and WJ regions than those in other regions. Japanese ministry of the Environment reported that mixing ratio of NO2 in Japan has been less than 0.04ppm since 1976, and that of SO2 has been less than 0.02ppm since 1978. Their concentrations in Japan have remained flat or slowly decreased recently. However the temporal variations of NO3-/nss-SO42- ratio in winter in JS region were significantly increased on average at 2.2% y-1 from 2003JFY to 2014JFY. The results suggest that long-range transboundary air pollutants increased NO3- concentrations and NO3-/nss-SO42- ratio.

  1. Design Aspects of Wet Scrubber System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun-Chul; Bang, Young-suk; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Doo-Yong [FNC Technology Co. Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The water pool in the wet scrubber system has advantage to cope with decay heat based on the thermal hydraulic balance such as condensation and evaporation inside it. This study focuses on the design aspects of the wet scrubber system to estimate the required water pool mass during the mission time and size of the scrubbing tank including inner structures. The design of the wet scrubber system include the estimation of the required water mass during the mission time and sizing of the scrubber vessel to contain the water pool. The condensation due to the inlet steam and evaporation due to the steam and non-condensable gas superheat and decay heat from filtered fission products should be considered to estimate the water mass required to maintain its function during the mission time. On the other hand, the level swelling due to the noncondensable gas is another important design aspect on the sizing of the scrubber vessel and determination of the entry elevation of the filtration components such as the droplet separator or filter. The minimum water level based on the minimum collapsed water level should be higher than the exit of scrubber nozzle.

  2. Design Aspects of Wet Scrubber System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun-Chul; Bang, Young-suk; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Doo-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The water pool in the wet scrubber system has advantage to cope with decay heat based on the thermal hydraulic balance such as condensation and evaporation inside it. This study focuses on the design aspects of the wet scrubber system to estimate the required water pool mass during the mission time and size of the scrubbing tank including inner structures. The design of the wet scrubber system include the estimation of the required water mass during the mission time and sizing of the scrubber vessel to contain the water pool. The condensation due to the inlet steam and evaporation due to the steam and non-condensable gas superheat and decay heat from filtered fission products should be considered to estimate the water mass required to maintain its function during the mission time. On the other hand, the level swelling due to the noncondensable gas is another important design aspect on the sizing of the scrubber vessel and determination of the entry elevation of the filtration components such as the droplet separator or filter. The minimum water level based on the minimum collapsed water level should be higher than the exit of scrubber nozzle

  3. Nanoscale View of Dewetting and Coating on Partially Wetted Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yajun; Chen, Lei; Liu, Qiao; Yu, Jiapeng; Wang, Hao

    2016-05-19

    There remain significant gaps in our ability to predict dewetting and wetting despite the extensive study over the past century. An important reason is the absence of nanoscopic knowledge about the processes near the moving contact line. This experimental study for the first time obtained the liquid morphology within 10 nm of the contact line, which was receding at low speed (U dewetting far from a simple reverse of wetting. A complete scenario for dewetting and coating is provided.

  4. Discrete Dynamics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuensche, Andrew

    DDLab is interactive graphics software for creating, visualizing, and analyzing many aspects of Cellular Automata, Random Boolean Networks, and Discrete Dynamical Networks in general and studying their behavior, both from the time-series perspective — space-time patterns, and from the state-space perspective — attractor basins. DDLab is relevant to research, applications, and education in the fields of complexity, self-organization, emergent phenomena, chaos, collision-based computing, neural networks, content addressable memory, genetic regulatory networks, dynamical encryption, generative art and music, and the study of the abstract mathematical/physical/dynamical phenomena in their own right.

  5. Plant Biotech Lab Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tant, Carl

    This book provides laboratory experiments to enhance any food science/botany curriculum. Chapter 1, "Introduction," presents a survey of the techniques used in plant biotechnology laboratory procedures. Chapter 2, "Micronutrition," discusses media and nutritional requirements for tissue culture studies. Chapter 3, "Sterile Seeds," focuses on the…

  6. Linking lab and field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronje, P.B.

    1988-01-01

    The multitude of different supplements recommended for animals grazing natural pastures, which testifies to the need for a metabolic basis for supplementary feeding practices. The first approach to this problem was to simulate different feeding conditions in the laboratory, where the metabolic responses of body tissues to changes in the supply of purified nutrients could be studied using radioisotope techniques. The second step was to link these fundamental studies to field conditions. The results of these studies suggest that the efficiency of feed conversion and growth rates of ruminants grazing winter pastures in the highveld region of South Africa could be substantially improved by strategic supplementation with glucose precursors. Acetate clearance rate represents a valuable link in the process of applying information obtained from controlled laboratory experiments to field conditions. As this technique is inexpensive, quick and simple to carry out, it is ideally suited to application under field conditions where the use of isotopes is impractical. By providing a link with field conditions, it greatly extended the scope and practical application of isotope tracer techniques

  7. Geobiology in the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    José López-Galindo, María

    2017-04-01

    Geobiology is, nowadays, one of the most important lines of research of USGS. It is the interdisciplinary study of the interactions of microorganisms and earth materials (including soil, sediment, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, minerals, and rocks) (U.S. Geological Survey, 2007). A study about geobiolgical interactions between microorganisms and felsic rock surfaces was carried out in San Blas Secondary School with students, aged 16-17, as an enforcement of a part of this abstract author's thesis work, and developed in the Coruña University. The activity took place in the school laboratory as a complement of the theoretical Spanish curriculum about living things. After visiting a granitic area, near the famous Rio Tinto mining district, students collected different rock samples. They learned about bioweathering on igneous rocks, and how microorganisms can play an essential double role on rock surface: dissolution and mineral deposition. These organisms, living in hard and basic environments, are considered extremophiles (López-Galindo, 2013) which is an important translatable concept to the life beyond the Earth. Afterwards, students had the opportunity to grow these microorganisms under different conditions and examine them through a scholar microscope, comparing these images with SEM ones, taken in Central Services of Research Building in the Coruña University, to determine genus and species, when it was possible. An opportunity to study rare living things, an introduction to geobiology, hostile environments and different physical and chemical conditions out of Earth is hereafter offered, through these simple experiences, to other secondary teachers in the world. U.S. Geological Survey, 2007, Facing tomorrow's challenges—U.S. Geological Survey science in the decade 2007-2017: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1309, x + 70 p. López-Galindo, M.J. 2013, Bioweathering in Igneous Rocks. Siliceous Speleothems from a Geobiological Viewpoint. Doctoral Dissertation

  8. Studies of the composition, tribology and wetting behavior of silicon nitride films formed by pulsed reactive closed-field unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Zh.Q.; Yang, P.; Huang, N.; Wang, J.; Wen, F.; Leng, Y.X.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon nitride films were formed by pulsed reactive closed-field unbalanced magnetron sputtering of high purity Si targets in an Ar-N 2 mixture. The effects of N 2 fraction on the chemical composition, and tribological and wetting behaviors were investigated. The films deposited at a high N 2 fraction were consistently N-rich. The surface microstructure changed from continuous granular surrounded by tiny void regions to a homogeneous and dense microstructure, and densitied as the N 2 fraction is increased. The as-deposited films have a relatively low friction coefficient and better wear resistance than 316L stainless steel under dry sliding friction and experienced only abrasive wear. The decreased surface roughness and increased nitrogen incorporation in the film give rise to increased contact angle with double-stilled water from 24 deg. to 49.6 deg. To some extent, the silicon nitride films deposited are hydrophilic in nature

  9. Study of Ni Metallization in Macroporous Si Using Wet Chemistry for Radio Frequency Cross-Talk Isolation in Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Xu, Chengkun; Chong, Kyuchul; Tu, King-Ning; Xie, Ya-Hong

    2011-05-25

    A highly conductive moat or Faraday cage of through-the-wafer thickness in Si substrate was proposed to be effective in shielding electromagnetic interference thereby reducing radio frequency (RF) cross-talk in high performance mixed signal integrated circuits. Such a structure was realized by metallization of selected ultra-high-aspect-ratio macroporous regions that were electrochemically etched in p - Si substrates. The metallization process was conducted by means of wet chemistry in an alkaline aqueous solution containing Ni 2+ without reducing agent. It is found that at elevated temperature during immersion, Ni 2+ was rapidly reduced and deposited into macroporous Si and a conformal metallization of the macropore sidewalls was obtained in a way that the entire porous Si framework was converted to Ni. A conductive moat was as a result incorporated into p - Si substrate. The experimentally measured reduction of crosstalk in this structure is 5~18 dB at frequencies up to 35 GHz.

  10. Study of Ni Metallization in Macroporous Si Using Wet Chemistry for Radio Frequency Cross-Talk Isolation in Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Xu, Chengkun; Chong, Kyuchul; Tu, King-Ning; Xie, Ya-Hong

    2011-01-01

    A highly conductive moat or Faraday cage of through-the-wafer thickness in Si substrate was proposed to be effective in shielding electromagnetic interference thereby reducing radio frequency (RF) cross-talk in high performance mixed signal integrated circuits. Such a structure was realized by metallization of selected ultra-high-aspect-ratio macroporous regions that were electrochemically etched in p− Si substrates. The metallization process was conducted by means of wet chemistry in an alkaline aqueous solution containing Ni2+ without reducing agent. It is found that at elevated temperature during immersion, Ni2+ was rapidly reduced and deposited into macroporous Si and a conformal metallization of the macropore sidewalls was obtained in a way that the entire porous Si framework was converted to Ni. A conductive moat was as a result incorporated into p− Si substrate. The experimentally measured reduction of crosstalk in this structure is 5~18 dB at frequencies up to 35 GHz. PMID:28879960

  11. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Laboratory Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows four Wet Chemistry Laboratory units, part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument on board NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This image was taken before Phoenix's launch on August 4, 2007. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Formative Assessment Probes: Wet Jeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Page

    2015-01-01

    Picture a wet towel or a puddle of water on a hot, sunny day. An hour later, the towel is dry and the puddle no longer exists. What happened to the water? Where did it go? These are questions that reveal myriad interesting student ideas about evaporation and the water cycle--ideas that provide teachers with a treasure trove of data they can use to…

  13. Wet water glass production plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant of a capacity of 75,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE, Italy, in 1997. and 1998, increasing detergent zeolite production, from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate dissolution plant. The main goal was increasing the detergent zeolite production. The technological cycle of NaOH was closed, and no effluents emitted, and there is no pollution (except for the filter cake. The wet water glass production process is fully automatized, and the product has uniform quality. The production process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start - up, and repairs. By installing additional process equipment (centrifugal pumps and heat exchangers technological bottlenecks were overcome, and by adjusting the operation of autoclaves, and water glass filters and also by optimizing the capacities of process equipment.

  14. Adult Bed-Wetting: A Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult bed-wetting: A concern? My 24-year-old husband has started to wet the bed at ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  15. Advance of Wetting Front in Silt Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahmood

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Under drip irrigation , the plant's root is concentrated inside the wetted bulb (region. Thus, the development of these roots and the plant production are greatly affected by the wetting pattern. Therefore, the wetting pattern of soil under drip irrigation must be taken into consideration in the design of drip irrigation system for both single dripping source or multi-overlapping wetting patterns of dripping water sources.2The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of initial water content of the soil and spacing between two adjacent dripping sources with different flow rate on the movement of the wetting front.This study included 16 tests for monitoring the advancement of the wetting front with time during and after the water application phase. The water advance and water distribution measurement are carried out for two cases of the soil profile: for the first case with initial volumetric water content of 4.08% and for the second case with initial volumetric water content of 12.24%. Two spacing between the emitter were tested 25cm and 50 cm using application flow rates of 0.606, 1.212, 1.818, and 2.424 cm3 /min/cm to show the combined effect of spacing and flow rate on the performance of two adjacent emitter.The study proposed a method for determining the spacing between the two emitting sources , the water application rate and watering time. The proposed method depends on a wetted zone whose depth is equal to the root zone depth with a values equals to the maximum vertical advance of the wetting front underneath the drip line at time when this depth is equal to the depth of wetting at mid­point between the drip line. the study revealed that both the vertical water advance in soil underneath the emitter and the horizontal advance of the wetting front is larger than those in the case of single emitter.Furthermore, the vertical water advance increases with the decrease spacing between the two drip lines. Also, the horizontal advance of the

  16. Incorporating lab experience into computer security courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben Othmane, L.; Bhuse, V.; Lilien, L.T.

    2013-01-01

    We describe our experience with teaching computer security labs at two different universities. We report on the hardware and software lab setups, summarize lab assignments, present the challenges encountered, and discuss the lessons learned. We agree with and emphasize the viewpoint that security

  17. Safety Protocols at MAT Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadawale, A.; Chopade, S.; Chaudhury, K.; Pal, M.K.; Kushwah, N.; Shah, A.Y.; Kedarnath, G.; Priyadarsini, K.I.; Jain, V.K.

    2017-01-01

    MAT Lab of Chemistry Division, BARC (A Class 10000 Clean room laboratory) has been in operation since 2004 for process development of ultra-purification of several strategically important materials (Ga, As, Sb, In, CsI and Ge) and synthesis of their organometallic compounds. Of these, work related to purification of As, Sb, and In, has been discontinued. Due to high toxicity and pyrophoric nature of some of the compounds, stringent safety regulations were formulated and subsequently implemented by the division

  18. Designing inquiry learning spaces for online labs in the Go-Lab platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Ton; Gillet, Dennis; Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Agogi, Ellinogermaniki; Zacharia, Zacharias

    2015-01-01

    The Go-Lab project (http://www.go-lab-project.eu/) aims to enable the integration of online labs through inquiry-based learning approaches into science classrooms. Through the use of an advanced plug and play technological solution the Go-Lab project opens up remote science laboratories, data

  19. 49 CFR 173.159 - Batteries, wet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Batteries, wet. 173.159 Section 173.159... Batteries, wet. (a) Electric storage batteries, containing electrolyte acid or alkaline corrosive battery fluid (wet batteries), may not be packed with other materials except as provided in paragraphs (g) and...

  20. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  1. Wetting transitions: A functional renormalization-group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.S.; Huse, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    A linear functional renormalization group is introduced as a framework in which to treat various wetting transitions of films on substrates. A unified treatment of the wetting transition in three dimensions with short-range interactions is given. The results of Brezin, Halperin, and Leibler in their three different regimes are reproduced along with new results on the multicritical behavior connecting the various regimes. In addition, the critical behavior as the coexistence curve is approached at complete wetting is analyzed. Wetting in the presence of long-range substrate-film interactions that fall off as power laws is also studied. The possible effects of the nonlinear terms in the renormalization group are examined briefly and it appears that they do not alter the critical behavior found using the truncated linear renormalization group

  2. Human skin wetness perception: psychophysical and neurophysiological bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filingeri, Davide; Havenith, George

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perceive thermal changes in the surrounding environment is critical for survival. However, sensing temperature is not the only factor among the cutaneous sensations to contribute to thermoregulatory responses in humans. Sensing skin wetness (i.e. hygrosensation) is also critical both for behavioral and autonomic adaptations. Although much has been done to define the biophysical role of skin wetness in contributing to thermal homeostasis, little is known on the neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning the ability to sense skin wetness. Humans are not provided with skin humidity receptors (i.e., hygroreceptors) and psychophysical studies have identified potential sensory cues (i.e. thermal and mechanosensory) which could contribute to sensing wetness. Recently, a neurophysiological model of human wetness sensitivity has been developed. In helping clarifying the peripheral and central neural mechanisms involved in sensing skin wetness, this model has provided evidence for the existence of a specific human hygrosensation strategy, which is underpinned by perceptual learning via sensory experience. Remarkably, this strategy seems to be shared by other hygroreceptor-lacking animals. However, questions remain on whether these sensory mechanisms are underpinned by specific neuromolecular pathways in humans. Although the first study on human wetness perception dates back to more than 100 years, it is surprising that the neurophysiological bases of such an important sensory feature have only recently started to be unveiled. Hence, to provide an overview of the current knowledge on human hygrosensation, along with potential directions for future research, this review will examine the psychophysical and neurophysiological bases of human skin wetness perception. PMID:27227008

  3. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 6, Field study conducted in fulfillment of Phase 3 titled. Use of FGD by-product gypsum enriched with magnesium hydroxide as a soil amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigham, J. M. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Soto, U. I. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Stehouwer, R. C. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Yibirin, H. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center

    1999-04-30

    A variety of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies have been developed to meet environmental restrictions imposed by the federal Clean Air Act and its amendments. These technologies include wet scrubber systems that dramatically reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Although such systems are effective, they also produce large volumes of sludge that must be dewatered, stabilized, and disposed of in landfills. Disposal is an expensive and environmentally questionable process for which suitable alternatives are needed. Wet scrubbing of flue gases with magnesium (Mg)-enhanced lime has the potential to become a leading FGD technology. When combined with aforced oxidation system, the wet sludges resulting from this process can be modified and refined to produce gypsum (CaS04∙2H2O) and magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] of sufficient purity for beneficial re-use in the construction (wallboard) and pharmaceutical industries. The pilot plant at the CINERGY Zimmer Station near Cincinnati can also produce gypsum by-products formulated to contain varying amounts of Mg(OH)2- Such materials may have value to the agriculture, forestry, and lawn-care industries as soil "conditioners", liming agents, and nutritional supplements capable of supplying calcium (Ca), Mg, and sulfur (S) for plant growth. This report describes three field studies designed to evaluate by-product gypsum and Mg-gypsum from the Zimmer Station power plant as amendments for improving the quality of mine spoils and agricultural soils that were unproductive because of phytotoxic levels of dissolved aluminum (Al) and low pH. The technical literature suggests that gypsum may be more effective than agricultural limestone for ameliorating Al toxicity below the immediate zone of application. Such considerations are important for deep-rooted plant species that attempt to utilize water and nutrients occurring at depth in the spoil/soil.

  4. LabVIEW 8 student edition

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Robert H

    2007-01-01

    For courses in Measurement and Instrumentation, Electrical Engineering lab, and Physics and Chemistry lab. This revised printing has been updated to include new LabVIEW 8.2 Student Edition. National Instruments' LabVIEW is the defacto industry standard for test, measurement, and automation software solutions. With the Student Edition of LabVIEW, students can design graphical programming solutions to their classroom problems and laboratory experiments with software that delivers the graphical programming capabilites of the LabVIEW professional version. . The Student Edition is also compatible with all National Instruments data acquisition and instrument control hardware. Note: The LabVIEW Student Edition is available to students, faculty, and staff for personal educational use only. It is not intended for research, institutional, or commercial use. For more information about these licensing options, please visit the National Instruments website at (http:www.ni.com/academic/)

  5. Recent skyshine calculations at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtyarenko, P.

    1997-01-01

    New calculations of the skyshine dose distribution of neutrons and secondary photons have been performed at Jefferson Lab using the Monte Carlo method. The dose dependence on neutron energy, distance to the neutron source, polar angle of a source neutron, and azimuthal angle between the observation point and the momentum direction of a source neutron have been studied. The azimuthally asymmetric term in the skyshine dose distribution is shown to be important in the dose calculations around high-energy accelerator facilities. A parameterization formula and corresponding computer code have been developed which can be used for detailed calculations of the skyshine dose maps

  6. X-ray Studies of Regenerated Cellulose Fibers Wet Spun from Cotton Linter Pulp in NaOH/Thiourea Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen,X.; Burger, C.; Fang, D.; Ruan, D.; Zhang, L.; Hsiao, B.; Chu, B.

    2006-01-01

    Regenerated cellulose fibers were fabricated by dissolution of cotton linter pulp in NaOH (9.5 wt%) and thiourea (4.5 wt%) aqueous solution followed by wet-spinning and multi-roller drawing. The multi-roller drawing process involved three stages: coagulation (I), coagulation (II) and post-treatment (III). The crystalline structure and morphology of regenerated cellulose fiber was investigated by synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Results indicated that only the cellulose II crystal structure was found in regenerated cellulose fibers, proving that the cellulose crystals were completely transformed from cellulose I to II structure during spinning from NaOH/thiourea aqueous solution. The crystallinity, orientation and crystal size at each stage were determined from the WAXD analysis. Drawing of cellulose fibers in the coagulation (II) bath (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O) was found to generate higher orientation and crystallinity than drawing in the post-treatment (III). Although the post-treatment process also increased crystal orientation, it led to a decrease in crystallinity with notable reduction in the anisotropic fraction. Compared with commercial rayon fibers fabricated by the viscose process, the regenerated cellulose fibers exhibited higher crystallinity but lower crystal orientation. SAXS results revealed a clear scattering maximum along the meridian direction in all regenerated cellulose fibers, indicating the formation of lamellar structure during spinning.

  7. Hydration and dehydration cycles in polymer electrolyte fuel cells operated with wet anode and dry cathode feed: A neutron imaging and modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Salaberri, P. A.; Sánchez, D. G.; Boillat, P.; Vera, M.; Friedrich, K. A.

    2017-08-01

    Proper water management plays an essential role in the performance and durability of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (PEFCs), but it is challenged by the variety of water transport phenomena that take place in these devices. Previous experimental work has shown the existence of fluctuations between low and high current density levels in PEFCs operated with wet hydrogen and dry air feed. The alternation between both performance states is accompanied by strong changes in the high frequency resistance, suggesting a cyclic hydration and dehydration of the membrane. This peculiar scenario is examined here considering liquid water distributions from neutron imaging and predictions from a 3D two-phase non-isothermal model. The results show that the hydration-dehydration cycles are triggered by the periodic condensation and shedding of liquid water at the anode inlet. The input of liquid water humidifies the anode channel and offsets the membrane dry-out induced by the dry air stream, thus leading to the high-performance state. When liquid water is flushed out of the anode channel, the dehydration process takes over, and the cell comes back to the low-performance state. The predicted amplitude of the current oscillations grows with decreasing hydrogen and increasing air flow rates, in agreement with previous experimental data.

  8. Study of Ni Metallization in Macroporous Si Using Wet Chemistry for Radio Frequency Cross-Talk Isolation in Mixed Signal Integrated Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King-Ning Tu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A highly conductive moat or Faraday cage of through-the-wafer thickness in Si substrate was proposed to be effective in shielding electromagnetic interference thereby reducing radio frequency (RF cross-talk in high performance mixed signal integrated circuits. Such a structure was realized by metallization of selected ultra-high-aspect-ratio macroporous regions that were electrochemically etched in p− Si substrates. The metallization process was conducted by means of wet chemistry in an alkaline aqueous solution containing Ni2+ without reducing agent. It is found that at elevated temperature during immersion, Ni2+ was rapidly reduced and deposited into macroporous Si and a conformal metallization of the macropore sidewalls was obtained in a way that the entire porous Si framework was converted to Ni. A conductive moat was as a result incorporated into p− Si substrate. The experimentally measured reduction of crosstalk in this structure is 5~18 dB at frequencies up to 35 GHz.

  9. Structural and morphological study of Zn0.9Mn0.05Fe0.05O synthesized by sol-gel wet chemical precipitation route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S. K.; Dolia, S. N.; Choudhary, B. L.; Prashant, B. L.

    2018-04-01

    Transition metal substituted Zinc oxide (ZnO) has drawn a great deal of attention due to its excellent properties. Zn0.9Mn0.05Fe0.05O sample synthesized was by Sol-gel wet chemical precipitation route at temperature 350°C. The crystallinity and the structure of Zn0.9Mn0.05Fe0.05O was determined by X-ray diffraction by Cu-Kα radiations operated at 40kV and 35mA in the range of 20° to 80°. The pattern gets indexed in wurtzite (hexagonal) structure with lattice constants a=b=3.2525Å and c=5.2071Å and approves the single phase material with no impurity. The values of particle size assessed by Debye Scherer’s (DS) formula lie in the range of 13nm to 33nm indicating the nano-crystalline nature of the sample. The morphological analysis of the sample was performed by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. The observed size of Zn0.9Mn0.05Fe0.05O nanoparticles by TEM micrograph exhibits the similar trend with the size calculated by Debye-Scherer formula. TEM image show the irregular shape of the nanoparticles and particle size lies in the range of 10-35nm. Similar to SEM image, the slight agglomeration of the nanoparticles have been observed from TEM.

  10. Wetting properties of liquid lithium on lithium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krat, S.A., E-mail: stepan.krat@gmail.com [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Popkov, A.S. [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gasparyan, Yu. M.; Pisarev, A.A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fiflis, Peter; Szott, Matthew; Christenson, Michael; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David N. [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Contact angles of liquid lithium and Li{sub 3}N, Li{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were measured. • Liquid lithium wets lithium compounds at relatively low temperatures: Li{sub 3}N at 257 °C, Li{sub 2}O at 259 °C, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at 323 °C. • Li wets Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 3}N better than previously measured fusion-relevant materials (W, Mo, Ta, TZM, stainless steel). • Li wets Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} better than most previously measured fusion-relevant materials (W, Mo, Ta). - Abstract: Liquid metal plasma facing components (LMPFC) have shown a potential to supplant solid plasma facing components materials in the high heat flux regions of magnetic confinement fusion reactors due to the reduction or elimination of concerns over melting, wall damage, and erosion. To design a workable LMPFC, one must understand how liquid metal interacts with solid underlying structures. Wetting is an important factor in such interaction, several designs of LMPFC require liquid metal to wet the underlying solid structures. The wetting of lithium compounds (lithium nitride, oxide, and carbonate) by 200 °C liquid lithium at various surface temperature from 230 to 330 °C was studied by means of contact angle measurements. Wetting temperatures, defined as the temperature above which the contact angle is less than 90°, were measured. The wetting temperature was 257 °C for nitride, 259 °C for oxide, and 323 °C for carbonate. Surface tensions of solid lithium compounds were calculated from the contact angle measurements.

  11. Proteomic effects of wet cupping (Al-hijamah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer A. Almaiman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wet cupping (Al-hijamah is a therapeutic technique practiced worldwide as a part of the Unani system of medicine. It involves bloodletting from acupoints on a patient’s skin to produce a therapeutic outcome. A thorough review of research articles on wet cupping with relevance to proteomics field that are indexed by Google Scholar, PubMed, and/or Science Direct databases was performed. Eight original research articles were summarized in this paper. Overall, wet cupping did not have a significant effect on C-reactive protein, Hsp-27, sister chromatid exchanges, and cell replication index. In contrast, wet cupping was found to produce higher oxygen saturation, eliminate lactate from subcutaneous tissues, remove blood containing higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide, and produce higher activity of myeloperoxidase. The proteomic effects of wet cupping therapy have not been adequately investigated. Thus, future studies on wet cupping that use systemic and sound protocols to avoid bias should be conducted.

  12. A Wet Chemistry Laboratory Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This picture of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) cell is labeled with components responsible for mixing Martian soil with water from Earth, adding chemicals and measuring the solution chemistry. WCL is part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite on board the Phoenix lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1997-01-01

    The objective was to visualize the flow of granular materials in flat bottomed silo. This was done by for dry materials introducing mustard seeds and poppy seeds as tracer particles and imaging them using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The region sampled was a cylinder 25 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length. Eight slices containing 128*128 to 256*256 pixels were generated for each image. The size of the silo was limited by the size of the high resolution NMR imager available. Cross-sections of 150mm flat bottomed silos, with the tracer layers immobilized by a gel, showed similar qualitative patterns for both dry and wet granular solids

  14. Special-Study Modules in a Problem-Based Learning Medical Curriculum: An Innovative Laboratory Research Practice Supporting Introduction to Research Methodology in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guner, Gul Akdogan; Cavdar, Zahide; Yener, Nilgun; Kume, Tuncay; Egrilmez, Mehtap Yuksel; Resmi, Halil

    2011-01-01

    We describe the organization of wet-lab special-study modules (SSMs) in the Central Research Laboratory of Dokuz Eylul Medical School, Izmir, Turkey with the aim of discussing the scientific, laboratory, and pedagogical aspects of this educational activity. A general introduction to the planning and functioning of these SSMs is given, along with…

  15. Lab-on-fiber optofluidic platform for in-situ study of therapeutic peptides and bacterial response (Rising Researcher Presentation) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fei; Yang, Fan; Liang, Junfeng

    2017-05-01

    Hospital acquired infections in indwelling device have become a life-threatening issue accompanied by the wide use of medical devices and implants. The infection process typically involves the attachment, growth and eventual assemblage of microbial cells into biofilms, with the latter exhibiting extremely higher antibiotic tolerance than planktonic bacteria. Surface constructed antimicrobial coatings offer a viable solution for bacteria responsive antibiotic strategy in medical devices such as catheter and stents. Therapeutic peptide has pioneered the field for their attractive pharmacological profile with broad antibacterial spectrum, great efficacy and long life-span. It has been a common practice to separately assess bacteria responses through commercially available activity assay kits after their exposure to antibiotic coatings, limiting the assessment of their activity in vitro with a discontinuous fashion. We developed and demonstrated an innovative all-optical lab-on-fiber optofluidic platform (LOFOP) to fill in this technical gap by allowing in situ measurement of the bacteria attachment in a continuous manner. This LOFOP allows for evaluation of drug release and resultant bacterial response by integrating glass capillary with lytic peptide-containing LbL-coated long period graing (LPG) as its core. S. aureus suspension is introduced through the assembled optofluidic platform with the capillary and the peptide-coated LPG. The efficacy of the peptide-containing coating is evaluated in situ by monitoring the attachment of bacteria and the ensuing development of biofilms using the LPG. LPG without antimicrobial coatings will be explored and compared as control.

  16. Moving Real Exergaming Engines on the Web: The webFitForAll Case Study in an Active and Healthy Ageing Living Lab Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Evdokimos I; Bamparopoulos, Giorgos; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2017-05-01

    Exergames have been the subject of research and technology innovations for a number of years. Different devices and technologies have been utilized to train the body and the mind of senior people or different patient groups. In the past, we presented FitForAll, the protocol efficacy of which was proven through widely taken (controlled) pilots with more than 116 seniors for a period of two months. The current piece of work expands this and presents the first truly web exergaming platform, which is solely based on HTML5 and JavaScript without any browser plugin requirements. The adopted architecture (controller application communication framework) combines a unified solution for input devices such as MS Kinect and Wii Balance Βoard which may seamlessly be exploited through standard physical exercise protocols (American College of Sports Medicine guidelines) and accommodate high detail logging; this allows for proper pilot testing and usability evaluations in ecologically valid Living Lab environments. The latter type of setups is also used herein for evaluating the web application with more than a dozen of real elderly users following quantitative approaches.

  17. Environmentally friendly and breathable wet-laid hydroentangled nonwovens for personal hygiene care with excellent water absorbency and flushability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Liu, Wanjun; Zhang, Yinjiang; Huang, Chen; Zhao, Yi; Jin, Xiangyu

    2018-04-01

    Developing wet-laid papers with a good wet strength remains a longstanding challenge in the papermaking industry. In this study, hydroentanglement, a mechanical bonding technique is developed to consolidate the wet-laid fibre web. The results indicate that wet tensile strength, ductile stretching property, softness, air permeability and water absorbency of the wet-laid fibre web are significantly improved by hydroentanglement. In addition, the abrasion test shows that the dusting off rate of wet-laid fibre web can be effectively reduced through hydroentanglement. Moreover, the disintegration experiment proves that wet-laid hydroentangled nonwovens could be easily dispersed when compared with conventional carded hydroentangled nonwovens. Therefore, the new wet-laid hydroentangled nonwovens can maintain excellent performance in a wet state, showing a great potential for personal hygiene applications.

  18. Beyond Classroom, Lab, Studio and Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, J. L.; Brey, J. A.; DeMuynck, E.; Weglarz, T. C.

    2017-12-01

    When the arts work in tandem with the sciences, the insights of these disciplines can be easily shared and teaching and learning are enriched. Our shared experiences in classroom/lab/studio instruction and in art and science based exhibitions reward all involved. Our individual disciplines cover a wide range of content- Art, Biology, Geography, Geology- yet we connect on aspects that link to the others'. We easily move from lab to studio and back again as we teach—as do our students as they learn! Art and science education can take place outside labs and studios through study abroad, international workshops, museum or gallery spaces, and in forums like the National Academies' programs. We can reach our neighbors at local public gatherings, nature centers and libraries. Our reach is extended in printed publications and in conferences. We will describe some of our activities listed above, with special focus on exhibitions: "Layers: Places in Peril"; "small problems, BIG TROUBLE" and the in-progress "River Bookends: Headwaters, Delta and the Volume of Stories In Between". Through these, learning and edification take place between the show and gallery visitors and is extended via class visits and related assignments, field trips for child and adult learners, interviews, films and panel presentations. These exhibitions offer the important opportunities for exhibit- participating scientists to find common ground with each other about their varied work. We will highlight a recent collaborative show opening a new university-based environmental research center and the rewarding activities there with art and science students and professors. We will talk about the learning enhancement added through a project that brought together a physical geography and a painting class. We will explore how students shared the form and content of their research projects with each other and then, became the educators through paintings and text of their geoscience topics on gallery walls.

  19. Lab, Field, Gallery and Beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, Thomas; Koskinen, Ilpo; Redström, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Over the last ten years we have seen a growing number of researchers integrating design experiments in their research inquiries. Initially, this work borrowed heavily from neighboring fields, employing a dual strategy in which design experiments and their evaluation were largely treated as separate...... processes that were often carried out by different people. More recently, design researchers have developed several approaches that integrate design-specific work methods to research. This paper takes a methodological look at three such established approaches that we call Lab, Field, and Gallery. We...

  20. Laser safety in the lab

    CERN Document Server

    Barat, Ken L

    2012-01-01

    There is no more challenging setting for laser use than a research environment. In almost every other setting the laser controls count on engineering controls, and human exposure is kept to a minimum. In research, however, the user often manipulates the optical layout and thereby places him or herself in peril, but this does not mean that accidents and injury are unavoidable. On the contrary, laser accidents can be avoided by following a number of simple approaches. [i]Laser Safety in the Lab[/i] provides the laser user and laser safety officer with practical guidelines from housekeeping to ey

  1. Remote Lab for Robotics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Jiménez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of a remote lab environment used to test and training sessions for robotics tasks. This environment is made up of the components and devices based on two robotic arms, a network link, Arduino card and Arduino shield for Ethernet, as well as an IP camera. The remote laboratory is implemented to perform remote control of the robotic arms with visual feedback by camera, of the robots actions, where, with a group of test users, it was possible to obtain performance ranges in tasks of telecontrol of up to 92%.

  2. Digital media labs in libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Amanda L

    2014-01-01

    Families share stories with each other and veterans reconnect with their comrades, while teens edit music videos and then upload them to the web: all this and more can happen in the digital media lab (DML), a gathering of equipment with which people create digital content or convert content that is in analog formats. Enabling community members to create digital content was identified by The Edge Initiative, a national coalition of leading library and local government organizations, as a library technology benchmark. Surveying academic and public libraries in a variety of settings and sharing a

  3. Study of the influence of thermal treatment on the magnetic properties of lithium ferrite prepared by wet ball-milling using nitrates as raw material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, S. Soreto, E-mail: silvia.soreto@ua.pt; Graça, M.P.F., E-mail: mpfg@ua.pt; Costa, L.C., E-mail: kady@ua.pt; Valente, M.A., E-mail: mav@ua.pt

    2014-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The saturation magnetization increases with heat-treatment temperature until 1200 °C. • 1200 °C sample presents, at 5 K, a magnetic moment of 73 emu/g and 66 emu/g at 300 K. • Heat-treatment promotes the formation of lithium ferrate and hematite, decreasing the magnetic moment. - Abstract: Lithium ferrite (LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8}) is an attractive material for several potential technological applications. Critical to such attractiveness are its physical properties, such as high Curie temperature, square hysteresis loop and high magnetization. Knowing that the properties of these crystals depend on the preparation method and raw materials, in this work LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8} crystallites were obtained by controlled heat-treatments, between 200 and 1400 °C, of homogeneous Li{sub 2}O-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders prepared by wet ball-milling method and using lithium and iron nitrates as raw materials. LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8} crystal phase was formed through heat-treatments at temperatures above 500 °C. At higher temperatures the formation of lithium ferrate and hematite is promoted, leading to a decrease in the magnetic moment. Heat-treated the sample at 1200 °C results in the highest levels of magnetic saturation, presenting a magnetic moment of 73 emu/g at 5 K and 66 emu/g at 300 K, respectively.

  4. Combination of ozone feed and wet electrostatic precipitator. Experimental study of an innovative system to filter gaseous iodine and iodine containing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouëllo, Mélany; Hokkinen, Jouni; Kärkelä, Teemu; Auvinen, Ari

    2017-01-01

    Efficient mitigation systems capable of reducing as much as possible the radioactive discharge to the environment in a severe Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident are a necessity. Nuclear Power Plants are equipped with filtration systems which have been characterized for aerosol retention in a short term, but to a far lesser extent for the retention of volatile iodine or for the long-term behaviour of the system. After the Fukushima accident, one of the main concerns of the nuclear industry has been to verify the ability of filtration systems to mitigate the possible source term to the environment. Radiotoxic iodine has a significant contribution to a possible source term in a severe NPP accident. An innovative system has been developed at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd. to filter gaseous iodine and iodine containing particles (e.g. I x O y ). The system consists of a combination of an ozone feed and a modern wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP). The electrostatic precipitation (ESP) technique is widely used in the industry to filter out impurities (i.e. particles) in gases. The advantage of a WESP is that the impurities are removed from the system with a solution. They can thus directly be transported to a water container, such as the sump in a nuclear power plant. The addition of ozone feed at the inlet of the WESP allows the oxidation of gaseous iodine into particles. The efficiency of the system for the filtration of gaseous molecular iodine and methyl iodine has been tested and the subsequent observations are further discussed in this paper. The results showed that the combination of WESP together with ozone feed results in a good filtering efficiency against molecular iodine under air atmosphere and air/steam atmosphere. (author)

  5. Evidence for Kinetic Limitations as a Controlling Factor of Ge Pyramid Formation: a Study of Structural Features of Ge/Si(001) Wetting Layer Formed by Ge Deposition at Room Temperature Followed by Annealing at 600 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storozhevykh, Mikhail S; Arapkina, Larisa V; Yuryev, Vladimir A

    2015-12-01

    The article presents an experimental study of an issue of whether the formation of arrays of Ge quantum dots on the Si(001) surface is an equilibrium process or it is kinetically controlled. We deposited Ge on Si(001) at the room temperature and explored crystallization of the disordered Ge film as a result of annealing at 600 °C. The experiment has demonstrated that the Ge/Si(001) film formed in the conditions of an isolated system consists of the standard patched wetting layer and large droplike clusters of Ge rather than of huts or domes which appear when a film is grown in a flux of Ge atoms arriving on its surface. We conclude that the growth of the pyramids appearing at temperatures greater than 600 °C is controlled by kinetics rather than thermodynamic equilibrium whereas the wetting layer is an equilibrium structure. Primary 68.37.Ef; 68.55.Ac; 68.65.Hb; 81.07.Ta; 81.16.Dn.

  6. Jefferson Lab, a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunham, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab; formerly known as CEBAF), operates a 4 GeV, 200 microA continuous wave (CW) electron accelerator that re-circulates the beam five times through two superconducting 400 MeV linacs. Electrons can be extracted from any of the five recirculation passes and beam can be simultaneously delivered to the three experimental halls. As the commissioning stage nears completion, the accelerator is becoming a fully operational machine. Experiments in Hall C have been underway since November 1995 with beam powers of over 300 kW at various energies. Hall A has received beam for spectrometer commissioning, while Hall B is expected to receive its first beam in the fall of 1996. Accelerator availability of greater than 70% during physics runs and excellent beam quality have contributed to making Jefferson Lab a world class laboratory for accelerator-based electromagnetic nuclear physics. With the high performance of the superconducting RF cavities, machine upgrades to 6 GeV, and eventually 8 to 10 GeV are now in the planning stages. Operational and commissioning details concerning all aspects of the machine will be discussed

  7. Jefferson Lab, a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunham, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab; formerly known as CEBAF), operates a 4 GeV, 200 μA continuous wave (CW) electron accelerator that re-circulates the beam five times through two superconducting 400 MeV linacs. Electrons can be extracted from any of the five recirculation passes and beam can be simultaneously delivered to the three experimental halls. As the commissioning stage nears completion, the accelerator is becoming a fully operational machine. Experiments in Hall C have been underway since November 1995 with beam powers of over 300 kW at various energies. Hall A has received beam for spectrometer commissioning, while Hall B is expected to receive its first beam in the fall of 1996. Accelerator availability of greater than 70% during physics runs and excellent beam quality have contributed to making Jefferson Lab a world class laboratory for accelerator-based electromagnetic nuclear physics. With the high performance of the superconducting RF cavities, machine upgrades to 6 GeV, and eventually 8 to 10 GeV are now in the planning stages. Operational and commissioning details concerning all aspects of the machine will be discussed. (author)

  8. Quality of Lab Appliances in Orthodontic Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruzansky, D P; Park, J H

    Lab appliances are an integral part of orthodontics, from active treatment to retention. The quality and fit of an appliance can affect the treatment result and stability. This study aims to determine common points of failure in orthodontic appliances, and suggest methods to reduce this rate. A survey consisting of 23 questions was distributed to active members of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) via Survey Monkey. The most common appliance to need an adjustment was the wrap-around retainer, with the Hawley retainer as a close second. The least common appliance needing adjustment was the Essix/clear retainer. Respondents were asked which component of each appliance was most commonly responsible for an ill-fit. For Hawley and wrap-around retainers, clasps were the most common problem at 50%, whereas spring aligners had two components - clasps and labial bows, both at 38%. Ill-fitting Essix/clear retainers had gingival impingement (52%) closely followed by poor posterior seating (43%). Communication between the orthodontist and lab technician can be improved by establishing a quality assurance protocol for outgoing and incoming cases. The labial bow of Hawley's, wrap-arounds and spring aligners should be clearly demarcated on the casts. Impressions should be free of distortion and casts should be inspected for accuracy. Clear retainers and positioner should be trimmed to avoid gingival impingement. The type of clasp should be selected based on the anatomy of the teeth, and bands should be checked for accuracy of fit.

  9. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers

    OpenAIRE

    Roach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discoura...

  10. Thermodynamic and structural study of two-dimensional phase transitions within films of molecules physi-sorbed on graphite; the role of orientational order in wetting and roughening phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angerand, Francois

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional phase transitions within films physi-sorbed upon the basal face of graphite have been investigated using two experimental methods: volumetric measurements of adsorption isotherms and neutron diffraction. Our main objective was to study the role played by orientational order in these films, its influence on their thermodynamic and structural properties, and its significance in wetting and roughening phenomena, which are indirectly accessible from adsorption studies. A comparative study of the adsorption isotherms of two molecules having comparable dipole moments, NH 3 and C 2 H 3 F, discloses very dissimilar behaviours, due to the fact that hydrogen bonding is involved in the interaction between NH 3 , but not C 2 H 3 F, molecules. The impossibility of such a bond for the interaction of the adsorbate with the substrate results in a poor cohesion energy of the NH 3 ad-film in comparison with those of its bulk condensed phases. The situation is opposite for the film of C 2 H 3 F which behaves almost as a rare gas film. From multilayer adsorption isotherms of CO it is shown that graphite (0001) is perfectly wet by the plastic (orientationally disordered) crystal phase, β-CO, whereas it is incompletely wet by the low-temperature crystal phase α-CO, in which the molecules are orientationally ordered. The critical temperatures of two-dimensional condensation have been measured for the successive ad-layers, up to the fifth. They seem to converge towards a value of 65 K, which we consider as representing the temperature of the roughening transition of the (0001) face of β-CO. A neutron diffraction study of the monolayers of N 2 O and C(CD 3 ) 4 adsorbed on graphite has been carried out. For N 2 O our results suggest a structure more involved than conjectured. For C(CD 3 ) 4 we have evidence for a triple point at 178 K. The crystal monolayer has a compact hexagonal structure. (author) [fr

  11. Biodiesel production from wet microalgae feedstock using sequential wet extraction/transesterification and direct transesterification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Lung; Huang, Chien-Chang; Ho, Kao-Chia; Hsiao, Ping-Xuan; Wu, Meng-Shan; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-10-01

    Although producing biodiesel from microalgae seems promising, there is still a lack of technology for the quick and cost-effective conversion of biodiesel from wet microalgae. This study was aimed to develop a novel microalgal biodiesel producing method, consisting of an open system of microwave disruption, partial dewatering (via combination of methanol treatment and low-speed centrifugation), oil extraction, and transesterification without the pre-removal of the co-solvent, using Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 with 68.7 wt% water content as the feedstock. Direct transesterification with the disrupted wet microalgae was also conducted. The biomass content of the wet microalgae increased to 56.6 and 60.5 wt%, respectively, after microwave disruption and partial dewatering. About 96.2% oil recovery was achieved under the conditions of: extraction temperature, 45°C; hexane/methanol ratio, 3:1; extraction time, 80 min. Transesterification of the extracted oil reached 97.2% conversion within 15 min at 45°C and 6:1 solvent/methanol ratio with simultaneous Chlorophyll removal during the process. Nearly 100% biodiesel conversion was also obtained while conducting direct transesterification of the disrupted oil-bearing microalgal biomass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Wetting of flat gradient surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward

    2018-04-01

    Gradient, chemically modified, flat surfaces enable directed transport of droplets. Calculation of apparent contact angles inherent for gradient surfaces is challenging even for atomically flat ones. Wetting of gradient, flat solid surfaces is treated within the variational approach, under which the contact line is free to move along the substrate. Transversality conditions of the variational problem give rise to the generalized Young equation valid for gradient solid surfaces. The apparent (equilibrium) contact angle of a droplet, placed on a gradient surface depends on the radius of the contact line and the values of derivatives of interfacial tensions. The linear approximation of the problem is considered. It is demonstrated that the contact angle hysteresis is inevitable on gradient surfaces. Electrowetting of gradient surfaces is discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Wet motor geroter fuel pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiernicki, M.V.

    1987-05-05

    This patent describes a wet motor gerotor fuel pump for pumping fuel from a fuel source to an internal combustion which consists of: gerotor pump means comprising an inner pump gear, an outer pump gear, and second tang means located on one of the inner and outer pump gears. The second tang means further extends in a second radial direction radially offset from the first radial direction and forms a driving connection with the first tang means such that the fuel pump pumps fuel from the fuel source into the narrow conduit inlet chamber, through the gerotor pump means past the electric motor means into the outlet housing means substantially along the flow axis to the internal combustion engine.

  14. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  15. GeneLab: Open Science For Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galazka, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    The NASA GeneLab project capitalizes on multi-omic technologies to maximize the return on spaceflight experiments. The GeneLab project houses spaceflight and spaceflight-relevant multi-omics data in a publicly accessible data commons, and collaborates with NASA-funded principal investigators to maximize the omics data from spaceflight and spaceflight-relevant experiments. I will discuss the current status of GeneLab and give specific examples of how the GeneLab data system has been used to gain insight into how biology responds to spaceflight conditions.

  16. Mechanisms of wet oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    A research programme is currently under way at BNL and MEL to investigate the possible use of Hydrogen Peroxide with metal ion catalysts as a wet oxidation treatment system for CEGB organic radioactive wastes. The published literature relating to the kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and decomposition reactions of hydrogen peroxide is reviewed and the links with practical waste management by wet oxidation are examined. Alternative wet oxidation systems are described and the similarities to the CEGB research effort are noted. (author)

  17. Domain Adaptation Methods for Improving Lab-to-field Generalization of Cocaine Detection using Wearable ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Annamalai; Angarita, Gustavo; Gaiser, Edward; Malison, Robert; Ganesan, Deepak; Marlin, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile health research on illicit drug use detection typically involves a two-stage study design where data to learn detectors is first collected in lab-based trials, followed by a deployment to subjects in a free-living environment to assess detector performance. While recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of wearable sensors for illicit drug use detection in the lab setting, several key problems can limit lab-to-field generalization performance. For example, lab-based data collection often has low ecological validity, the ground-truth event labels collected in the lab may not be available at the same level of temporal granularity in the field, and there can be significant variability between subjects. In this paper, we present domain adaptation methods for assessing and mitigating potential sources of performance loss in lab-to-field generalization and apply them to the problem of cocaine use detection from wearable electrocardiogram sensor data. PMID:28090605

  18. Characterization of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) isolated from Indonesian shrimp paste (terasi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalia, U.; Sumardianto; Agustini, T. W.

    2018-02-01

    Shrimp paste was one of fermented products, popular as a taste enhancer in many dishes. The processing of shrimp paste was natural fermentation, depends on shrimp it self and the presence of salt. The salt inhibits the growth of undesirable microorganism and allows the salt-tolerant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to ferment the protein source to lactic acids. The objectives of this study were to characterize LAB isolated from Indonesian shrimp paste or "Terasi" with different times of fermentation (30, 60 and 90 days). Vitech analysis showed that there were four strains of the microorganism referred to as lactic acid bacteria (named: LABS1, LABS2, LABS3 and LABS4) with 95% sequence similarity. On the basis of biochemical, four isolates represented Lactobacillus, which the name Lactobacillus plantarum is proposed. L.plantarum was play role in resulting secondary metabolites, which gave umami flavor in shrimp paste.

  19. Virtual Labs in proteomics: new E-learning tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sandipan; Koshy, Nicole Rachel; Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-05-17

    Web-based educational resources have gained enormous popularity recently and are increasingly becoming a part of modern educational systems. Virtual Labs are E-learning platforms where learners can gain the experience of practical experimentation without any direct physical involvement on real bench work. They use computerized simulations, models, videos, animations and other instructional technologies to create interactive content. Proteomics being one of the most rapidly growing fields of the biological sciences is now an important part of college and university curriculums. Consequently, many E-learning programs have started incorporating the theoretical and practical aspects of different proteomic techniques as an element of their course work in the form of Video Lectures and Virtual Labs. To this end, recently we have developed a Virtual Proteomics Lab at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, which demonstrates different proteomics techniques, including basic and advanced gel and MS-based protein separation and identification techniques, bioinformatics tools and molecular docking methods, and their applications in different biological samples. This Tutorial will discuss the prominent Virtual Labs featuring proteomics content, including the Virtual Proteomics Lab of IIT-Bombay, and E-resources available for proteomics study that are striving to make proteomic techniques and concepts available and accessible to the student and research community. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 14). Details can be found at: http://www.proteomicstutorials.org/. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  1. Fabrication of bio-inspired nitinol alloy surface with tunable anisotropic wetting and high adhesive ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yan L; Zhao, Yue C; Yang, Cheng J; Wang, Fu J; Liu, Xian P; Jing, Xiu B

    2018-10-01

    In this paper, micro/nano-scale structures were fabricated on nitinol alloy (NiTi) to realize tunable anisotropic wetting and high adhesive capability. Laser texturing and silanization process are utilized to change the morphological and chemical properties of substrates. It is noted that these treated substrates exhibit the joint characteristics of anisotropic wetting and high adhesive capability. In order to investigate the influences of laser-texturing and silanization processes on NiTi, these surfaces were evaluated using scanning electron microscope (SEM), a white light confocal microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and goniometer. The relationship between water volume and anisotropic wetting was also established. From the experimental testing, we can obtain the following conclusions: (1) the anisotropic wetting characterized by the difference between the water contact angles (WCAs) in the vertical and parallel directions ranges from 0° to 20.3°, which is far more than the value of natural rice leaves. (2) the water sliding angles (WSAs) kept stable at 180°, successfully mimicking the adhesive ability of rose petals. (3) the silanization process could strengthen the hydrophobicity but weaken anisotropic wetting. These bio-inspired NiTi surfaces have a tremendous potential applications such as microfluidic devices, bio-mimetic materials fabrication and lab on chip. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Promoting Metacognition in Introductory Calculus-based Physics Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grennell, Drew; Boudreaux, Andrew

    2010-10-01

    In the Western Washington University physics department, a project is underway to develop research-based laboratory curriculum for the introductory calculus-based course. Instructional goals not only include supporting students' conceptual understanding and reasoning ability, but also providing students with opportunities to engage in metacognition. For the latter, our approach has been to scaffold reflective thinking with guided questions. Specific instructional strategies include analysis of alternate reasoning presented in fictitious dialogues and comparison of students' initial ideas with their lab group's final, consensus understanding. Assessment of student metacognition includes pre- and post- course data from selected questions on the CLASS survey, analysis of written lab worksheets, and student opinion surveys. CLASS results are similar to a traditional physics course and analysis of lab sheets show that students struggle to engage in a metacognitive process. Future directions include video studies, as well as use of additional written assessments adapted from educational psychology.

  3. Site Simulation of Solidified Peat: Lab Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durahim, N. H. Ab; Rahman, J. Abd; Tajuddin, S. F. Mohd; Mohamed, R. M. S. R.; Al-Gheethi, A. A.; Kassim, A. H. Mohd

    2018-04-01

    In the present research, the solidified peat on site simulation is conducted to obtain soil leaching from soil column study. Few raw materials used in testing such as Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Fly ash (FA) and bottom ash (BA) which containing in solidified peat (SP), fertilizer (F), and rainwater (RW) are also admixed in soil column in order to assess their effects. This research was conducted in two conditions which dry and wet condition. Distilled water used to represent rainfall during flushing process while rainwater used to gain leaching during dry and wet condition. The first testing made after leaching process done was Moisture Content (MC). Secondly, Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) will be conducted on SP to know the ability of SP strength. These MC and UCS were made before and after SP were applied in soil column. Hence, the both results were compared to see the reliability occur on SP. All leachate samples were tested using Absorption Atomic Spectroscopy (AAS), Ion Chromatography (IC) and Inductively-Coupled Plasma Spectrophotometry (ICP-MS) testing to know the anion and cation present in it.

  4. Innovations in STEM education: the Go-Lab federation of online labs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Gillet, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The Go-Lab federation of online labs opens up virtual laboratories (simulation), remote laboratories (real equipment accessible at distance) and data sets from physical laboratory experiments (together called “online labs”) for large-scale use in education. In this way, Go-Lab enables inquiry-based

  5. Experimental Study on Performance of EC-120 Wet-mixing Modified Asphalt Cementing Materials%EC-120温拌改性沥青胶结料性能试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周刚; 唐江; 谭昆华; 谭巍

    2012-01-01

    This paper carries out experimental study on rotational viscosity, normal performance indices and rheological properties, etc. of EC-120 organic viscosity reducing and wet-mixing modified asphalt, the experiment shows that EC-120 as an organic additive with the melting point at approximate 100 t is well compatible with asphalt and easy to prepare without problem of isolation. The experiment also shows EC-120 in wet-mixing modified asphalt can reduce high-temperature viscosity and increase medium and low-temperature viscosity of asphalt so as to decrease mixing and compacting temperature of asphalt mixtures; can reduce needle penetration and increase softening point and anti-rutting factor so as to improve high-temperature stability of asphalt remarkably; and will enable reduction of ductility, increase of fatigue factor, increase of creepage stiffness and reduction of deformation rate of wet-mixing modified asphalt, which slightly have negative influence on anti-fatigue and low-temperature cracking properties of asphalt.%对EC-120有机降粘温拌改性沥青进行旋转粘度、常规性能指标、流变特性等试验研究,试验表明,EC- 120作为一种熔点在100℃左右的有机添加剂,与沥青相容性好,制备容易,不存在离析问题.试验还表明在温拌改性沥青中,EC-120可降低沥青的高温粘度,提高中低温粘度,从而降低沥青混合料的拌和和压实温度;可降低沥青针入度,提高软化点和抗车辙因子,从而大幅改善沥青的高温稳定性;会使温拌改性沥青的延度降低,疲劳因子增大,蠕变劲度增大,变形速率减小,对沥青的抗疲劳和低温抗开裂性能略有消极影响.

  6. Wetting of doped carbon nanotubes by water droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Demosthenous, E.; Walther, Jens Honore

    2005-01-01

    We study the wetting of doped single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes by water droplets using molecular dynamics simulations. Chemisorbed hydrogen is considered as a model of surface impurities. We study systems with varying densities of surface impurities and we observe increased wetting......, as compared to the pristine nanotube case, attributed to the surface dipole moment that changes the orientation of the interfacial water. We demonstrate that the nature of the impurity is important as here hydrogen induces the formation of an extended hydrogen bond network between the water molecules...

  7. Wet Snow Mapping in Southern Ontario with Sentinel-1A Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Kelly, R. E. J.

    2017-12-01

    Wet snow is defined as snow with liquid water present in an ice-water mix. It is can be an indicator for the onset of the snowmelt period. Knowledge about the extent of wet snow area can be of great importance for the monitoring of seasonal snowmelt runoff with climate-induced changes in snowmelt duration having implications for operational hydrological and ecological applications. Spaceborne microwave remote sensing has been used to observe seasonal snow under all-weather conditions. Active microwave observations of snow at C-band are sensitive to wet snow due to the high dielectric contrast with non-wet snow surfaces and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is now openly available to identify and map the wet snow areas globally at relatively fine spatial resolutions ( 100m). In this study, a semi-automated workflow is developed from the change detection method of Nagler et al. (2016) using multi-temporal Sentinel-1A (S1A) dual-polarization observations of Southern Ontario. Weather station data and visible-infrared satellite observations are used to refine the wet snow area estimates. Wet snow information from National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (NOHRSC) is used to compare with the S1A estimates. A time series of wet snow maps shows the variations in backscatter from wet snow on a pixel basis. Different land cover types in Southern Ontario are assessed with respect to their impacts on wet snow estimates. While forests and complex land surfaces can impact the ability to map wet snow, the approach taken is robust and illustrates the strong sensitivity of the approach to wet snow backscattering characteristics. The results indicate the feasibility of the change detection method on non-mountainous large areas and address the usefulness of Sentinel-1A data for wet snow mapping.

  8. Wetting and dewetting of extracellular matrix and glycocalix models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Motomu; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schneider, Matthias F; Mathe, Gerald; Albersdoerfer, Antero; Neumaier, Klaus R; Purrucker, Oliver; Sackmann, Erich

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study wetting and dewetting of hydrated biopolymer layers mediating cell-cell and cell-tissue contacts, called the extracellular matrix and cell surface glycocalix, by the combination of various physical techniques. Here, the sum of the net effects of the various interfacial forces, which is referred to as the disjoining pressure, is used as a semi-quantitative measure to describe the thermodynamics of hydrated interlayers. The disjoining pressure can be measured by applying external forces to maintain the equilibrium distance between two parallel surfaces (in biology, two neighbouring plasma membranes). Using artificial models of the extracellular matrix and glycocalix, we describe stable cell-cell contacts in terms of the wetting (or spreading) of complex fluids on polymer surfaces. In fact, the adjustment of the wetting interaction via thin hydrating layers enables us to transform three-dimensional cell membranes into quasi-two-dimensional films on macroscopically large surfaces. Fine-tuning of local wetting conditions at the interface further allows for the selective wetting of native cell membranes on microstructured polysaccharide films, which has a large potential for individual detection of biological functions in confined geometries

  9. Thermal Performance for Wet Cooling Tower with Different Layout Patterns of Fillings under Typical Crosswind Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermal-state model experimental study was performed in lab to investigate the thermal performance of a wet cooling tower with different kinds of filling layout patterns under windless and 0.4 m/s crosswind conditions. In this paper, the contrast analysis was focused on comparing a uniform layout pattern and one kind of optimal non-uniform layout pattern when the environmental crosswind speed is 0 m/s and 0.4 m/s. The experimental results proved that under windless conditions, the heat transfer coefficient and total heat rejection of circulating water for the optimal non-uniform layout pattern can enhance by approximately 40% and 28%, respectively, compared with the uniform layout pattern. It was also discovered that the optimal non-uniform pattern can dramatically relieve the influence of crosswind on the thermal performance of the tower when the crosswind speed is equal to 0.4 m/s. For the uniform layout pattern, the heat transfer coefficient under 0.4 m/s crosswind conditions decreased by 9.5% compared with the windless conditions, while that value lowered only by 2.0% for the optimal non-uniform layout pattern. It has been demonstrated that the optimal non-uniform layout pattern has the better thermal performance under 0.4 m/s crosswind condition.

  10. Microbial development in distillers wet grains produced during fuel ethanol production from corn (Zea mays)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, R.M.; Rosentrater, K.A. [United States Dept. of Agriculture, Brookings, SD (United States). North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory

    2007-09-15

    The microbiology of post-production distillers wet grains (DWG) was investigated over a period of 9 days at an industrial ethanol plant. Samples of the DWG were physically and chemically characterized. Compositional analyses were conducted for protein, fiber, and fat. Fixed suspensions of DWG were dispersed and disrupted by sonication. Bacterial cells were enumerated under epifluorescent illumination. Solid media and standard dilution were used to enumerate total colony-forming units (CFU) of lactic-acid producing bacteria (LAB), and aerobic heterotrophic organisms. The DWG had a pH of approximately 4.4, a moisture content of 53.5 per cent, and 4 x 10{sup 5} total yeast cells. Thirteen morphologically distinct isolates were identified during the study, 10 of which were yeasts and molds from 6 different genera. Two of the yeasts were of the lactic-acid Pediococcus pentosaceus strain, and 1 of the yeasts was an aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. Results showed that the matrix of the DWG produced severe technical difficulties for several of the culture-independent community-level analyses. It was concluded that numbers of potentially beneficial bacteria appeared to increase over the time period relative to potential spoilage agents. Molds capable of producing mycotoxins colonized the DWG and grew to high densities over the 9 day period. 31 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  11. Hydrogel Beads: The New Slime Lab?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockway, Debra; Libera, Matthew; Welner, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    Creating slime fascinates students. Unfortunately, though intrigue is at its peak, the educational aspect of this activity is often minimal. This article describes a chemistry lab that closely relates to the slime lab and allows high school students to explore the concepts of chemical bonding, properties, and replacement reactions. It involves the…

  12. Innovation - A view from the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA Ag Lab in Peoria helps bridge the gap between agricultural producers and commercial manufacturers. In 2015, the Ag Lab, officially known as the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research (NCAUR), is celebrating 75 years of research in Peoria. T...

  13. mQoL smart lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Masi, Alexandre; Ciman, Matteo; Gustarini, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    serve quality research in all of them. In this paper, we present own "mQoL Smart Lab" for interdisciplinary research efforts on individuals' "Quality of Life" improvement. We present an evolution of our current in-house living lab platform enabling continuous, pervasive data collection from individuals...

  14. Programming Arduino with LabVIEW

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Marco

    2015-01-01

    If you already have some experience with LabVIEW and want to apply your skills to control physical objects and make measurements using the Arduino sensor, this book is for you. Prior knowledge of Arduino and LabVIEW is essential to fully understand the projects detailed in this book.

  15. Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion at Berkeley Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Directory Search Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion at Berkeley Lab Home Diversity & Inclusion Council Women Scientists & Engineers Council Employee Resource Groups -and culture of inclusion are key to attracting and engaging the brightest minds and furthering our

  16. Leaf Wetness within a Lily Canopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, A.F.G.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Klok, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    A wetness duration experiment was carried out within a lily field situated adjacent to coastal dunes in the Netherlands. A within-canopy model was applied to simulate leaf wetness in three layers, with equal leaf area indices, within the canopy. This simulation model is an extension of an existing

  17. Defined wetting properties of optical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felde, Nadja; Coriand, Luisa; Schröder, Sven; Duparré, Angela; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Optical surfaces equipped with specific functional properties have attracted increasing importance over the last decades. In the light of cost reduction, hydrophobic self-cleaning behavior is aspired. On the other side, hydrophilic properties are interesting due to their anti-fog effect. It has become well known that such wetting states are significantly affected by the surface morphology. For optical surfaces, however, this fact poses a problem, as surface roughness can induce light scattering. The generation of optical surfaces with specific wetting properties, hence, requires a profound understanding of the relation between the wetting and the structural surface properties. Thus, our work concentrates on a reliable acquisition of roughness data over a wide spatial frequency range as well as on the comprehensive description of the wetting states, which is needed for the establishment of such correlations. We will present our advanced wetting analysis for nanorough optical surfaces, extended by a vibration-based procedure, which is mainly for understanding and tailoring the wetting behavior of various solid-liquid systems in research and industry. Utilizing the relationships between surface roughness and wetting, it will be demonstrated how different wetting states for hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity can be realized on optical surfaces with minimized scatter losses.

  18. Water wizards : reshaping wet nature and society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleuten, van der E.B.A.; Disco, C.

    2004-01-01

    The article investigates how humans ‘networked’ wet nature and how this affected the shaping of Dutch society. First, it takes a grand view of Dutch history and describes how wet network building intertwined with the shaping of the Dutch landscape, its economy and its polity. Second, it investigates

  19. 7 CFR 29.2316 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.2316 Section 29.2316 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2316 Wet (W...

  20. 7 CFR 29.2570 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.2570 Section 29.2570 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2570 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing...