WorldWideScience

Sample records for wet lab studies

  1. In silico and wet lab approaches to study transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hestand, Matthew Scott

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is a complicated process with multiple types of regulation, including binding of proteins termed transcription factors. This thesis looks at transcription factors and transcription factor binding site discovery through computational predictions and wet lab work to better elucidate

  2. WetLab-2: Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler Providing PCR Capability on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Macarena; Schonfeld, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The WetLab-2 system will provide sample preparation and qRT-PCR analysis on-board the ISS, a capability to enable using the ISS as a real laboratory. The system will be validated on SpX-7, and is planned for its first PI use on SpX-9.

  3. Jellyfish Bioactive Compounds: Methods for Wet-Lab Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazão, Bárbara; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-04-12

    The study of bioactive compounds from marine animals has provided, over time, an endless source of interesting molecules. Jellyfish are commonly targets of study due to their toxic proteins. However, there is a gap in reviewing successful wet-lab methods employed in these animals, which compromises the fast progress in the detection of related biomolecules. Here, we provide a compilation of the most effective wet-lab methodologies for jellyfish venom extraction prior to proteomic analysis-separation, identification and toxicity assays. This includes SDS-PAGE, 2DE, gel chromatography, HPLC, DEAE, LC-MS, MALDI, Western blot, hemolytic assay, antimicrobial assay and protease activity assay. For a more comprehensive approach, jellyfish toxicity studies should further consider transcriptome sequencing. We reviewed such methodologies and other genomic techniques used prior to the deep sequencing of transcripts, including RNA extraction, construction of cDNA libraries and RACE. Overall, we provide an overview of the most promising methods and their successful implementation for optimizing time and effort when studying jellyfish.

  4. Jellyfish Bioactive Compounds: Methods for Wet-Lab Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Frazão

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of bioactive compounds from marine animals has provided, over time, an endless source of interesting molecules. Jellyfish are commonly targets of study due to their toxic proteins. However, there is a gap in reviewing successful wet-lab methods employed in these animals, which compromises the fast progress in the detection of related biomolecules. Here, we provide a compilation of the most effective wet-lab methodologies for jellyfish venom extraction prior to proteomic analysis—separation, identification and toxicity assays. This includes SDS-PAGE, 2DE, gel chromatography, HPLC, DEAE, LC-MS, MALDI, Western blot, hemolytic assay, antimicrobial assay and protease activity assay. For a more comprehensive approach, jellyfish toxicity studies should further consider transcriptome sequencing. We reviewed such methodologies and other genomic techniques used prior to the deep sequencing of transcripts, including RNA extraction, construction of cDNA libraries and RACE. Overall, we provide an overview of the most promising methods and their successful implementation for optimizing time and effort when studying jellyfish.

  5. WetLab-2: Providing Quantitative PCR Capabilities on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Macarena; Jung, Jimmy Kar Chuen; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis David; Schonfeld, Julie; Tran, Luan Hoang

    2015-01-01

    The objective of NASA Ames Research Centers WetLab-2 Project is to place on the ISS a system capable of conducting gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of biological specimens sampled or cultured on orbit. The WetLab-2 system is capable of processing sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. The project has developed a RNA preparation module that can lyse cells and extract RNA of sufficient quality and quantity for use as templates in qRT-PCR reactions. Our protocol has the advantage that it uses non-toxic chemicals, alcohols or other organics. The resulting RNA is transferred into a pipette and then dispensed into reaction tubes that contain all lyophilized reagents needed to perform qRT-PCR reactions. These reaction tubes are mounted on rotors to centrifuge the liquid to the reaction window of the tube using a cordless drill. System operations require simple and limited crew actions including syringe pushes, valve turns and pipette dispenses. The resulting process takes less than 30 min to have tubes ready for loading into the qRT-PCR unit.The project has selected a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) qRT-PCR unit, the Cepheid SmartCycler, that will fly in its COTS configuration. The SmartCycler has a number of advantages including modular design (16 independent PCR modules), low power consumption, rapid thermal ramp times and four-color detection. The ability to detect up to four fluorescent channels will enable multiplex assays that can be used to normalize for RNA concentration and integrity, and to study multiple genes of interest in each module. The WetLab-2 system will have the capability to downlink data from the ISS to the ground after a completed run and to uplink new programs. The ability to conduct qRT-PCR on-orbit eliminates the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms or the concern of RNA degradation of fixed samples. The

  6. In Silico and Wet Lab Studies Reveal the Cholesterol Lowering Efficacy of Lauric Acid, a Medium Chain Fat of Coconut Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekshmi Sheela, Devi; Nazeem, Puthiyaveetil Abdulla; Narayanankutty, Arunaksharan; Manalil, Jeksy Jos; Raghavamenon, Achuthan C

    2016-12-01

    The coconut oil (CO) contains 91 % of saturated fatty acids in which 72 % are medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) like lauric, capric and caprylic acids. In contrast to animal fat, coconut oil has no cholesterol. Despite this fact, CO is sidelined among other vegetable oils due to the health hazards attributed to the saturated fatty acids. Though various medicinal effects of CO have been reported including the hypolipidemic activity, people are still confused in the consumption of this natural oil. In silico analyses and wet lab experiments have been carried out to identify the hypolipidemic properties of MCFAs and phenolic acids in CO by using different protein targets involved in cholesterol synthesis. The molecular docking studies were carried out using CDOCKER protocol in Accelery's Discovery Studio, by taking different proteins like HMG- CoA reductase and cholesterol esterase as targets and the different phytocompounds in coconut as ligands. Molecular docking highlighted the potential of lauric acid in inhibiting the protein targets involved in hyperlipidemics. Further, validation of in silico results was carried out through in vivo studies. The activity of key enzymes HMG- CoA reductase and lipoprotein lipase were found reduced in animals fed with lauric acid and CO.

  7. Nordic Study Labs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørnø, Rasmus Leth Vergmann; Hestbech, Astrid Margrethe; Gynther, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Denne rapport dokumenterer projektet Nordplus projektet The Nordic Study Lab. Projektet har haft til formål at udveksle eksisterende viden blandt projektdeltagerne om etablering og drift af distribueret uddannelse med særlig fokus på læringscentre. I løbet af en serie af studiebesøg har partnere...... med at skabe kvalificeret uddannelse på distancen. Nordic Study Labs projektet har afsløret et rigt reservoir af eksisterende erfaringer, med et stort transferpotentiale og både unikke og eksemplariske løsninger på uddannelses­ problematikker. Mange af de nordiske lande har mange års succesrige...

  8. How Do You Like Your Science, Wet or Dry? How Two Lab Experiences Influence Student Understanding of Science Concepts and Perceptions of Authentic Scientific Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Maureen; Knuth, Randy; Van Horne, Katie; Shouse, Andrew W.; Levias, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how two kinds of authentic research experiences related to smoking behavior--genotyping human DNA (wet lab) and using a database to test hypotheses about factors that affect smoking behavior (dry lab)--influence students' perceptions and understanding of scientific research and related science concepts. The study used pre and…

  9. Wet-lab tested microRNA assays for qPCR studies with SYBR®Green and DNA primers in pig tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Caroline M. Junker; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Córdoba, Sarai

    2014-01-01

    have previously developed two useful tools in the field of microRNA quantitative real time PCR (qPCR): 1) a very specific, sensitive and simple qPCR method based on DNA primers, MiR-specific qPCR; and 2) the free primer-design software miRprimer. The present study integrates in a publicly accessible...

  10. Effects of Implementing a Hybrid Wet Lab and Online Module Lab Curriculum into a General Chemistry Course: Impacts on Student Performance and Engagement with the Chemistry Triplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Stefan M.; Borda, Emily J.; Haupt, Justin

    2018-01-01

    Here, we describe the implementation a hybrid general chemistry teaching laboratory curriculum that replaces a portion of a course's traditional "wet lab" experiences with online virtual lab modules. These modules intentionally utilize representations on all three levels of the chemistry triplet-macroscopic, submicroscopic, and symbolic.…

  11. Promoting Undergraduate Surgical Education: Current Evidence and Students' Views on ESMSC International Wet Lab Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideris, Michail; Papalois, Apostolos; Theodoraki, Korina; Dimitropoulos, Ioannis; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Georgopoulou, Efstratia-Maria; Staikoglou, Nikolaos; Paparoidamis, Georgios; Pantelidis, Panteleimon; Tsagkaraki, Ismini; Karamaroudis, Stefanos; Potoupnis, Michael E; Tsiridis, Eleftherios; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Papagrigoriadis, Savvas; Papalois, Vassilios; Zografos, Georgios; Triantafyllou, Aggeliki; Tsoulfas, Georgios

    2017-04-01

    Undergraduate Surgical Education is becoming an essential element in the training of the future generation of safe and efficient surgeons. Essential Skills in the Management of Surgical Cases (ESMSC), is an international, joint applied surgical science and simulation-based learning wet lab course. We performed a review of the existing literature on the topic of undergraduate surgical education. Following that, we analyzed the feedback questionnaire received 480 from 2 recent series of ESMSC courses (May 2015, n = 49 and November 2015, n = 40), in order to evaluate European Union students' (UK, Germany, Greece) views on the ESMSC course, as well as on the undergraduate surgical education. Results Using a 10 point graded scale, the overall ESMSC concept was positively evaluated, with a mean score of 9.41 ± 0.72 (range: 8-10) and 8.94 ± 1.1 (range: 7-10). The majority of delegates from both series [9.86 ± 0.43 (range: 8-10) and 9.58 ± 0.91 (range: 6-10), respectively] believed that ESMSC should be incorporated in the undergraduate surgical curriculum. Comparison of responses from the UK to the Greek Medical Student, as well as the findings from the third and fourth year versus the fifth and sixth year Medical Students, revealed no statistically significant differences pertaining to any of the questions (p > 0.05). Current evidence in the literature supports the enhancement of surgical education through the systematic use of various modalities that provide Simulation-Based Training (SBT) hands-on experience, starting from the early undergraduate level. The findings of the present study are in agreement with these previous reports.

  12. Teaching expression proteomics: From the wet-lab to the laptop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Miguel C; Santos, Pedro M; Rodrigues, Catarina; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2009-09-01

    Expression proteomics has become, in recent years, a key genome-wide expression approach in fundamental and applied life sciences. This postgenomic technology aims the quantitative analysis of all the proteins or protein forms (the so-called proteome) of a given organism in a given environmental and genetic context. It is a challenge to provide effective training in this area due to its demanding laboratory procedures and laborious computational data analysis. However, the effective training of undergraduates and postgraduates in this field is highly recommended to prepare them for the challenges of postgenomic research and of medical, industrial and other economical activities. Since 2004, the area of Biological Sciences at the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering of Instituto Superior Técnico (IST) has been teaching Expression Proteomics to undergraduate and postgraduate students in three formats: 1) as modules of curricular units (CU), in particular of Functional Genomics and Bioinformatics (FGB), offered as a mandatory CU to IST Biological Engineering or Biotechnology Master courses students, or as an elective CU to other MSc courses with a biological component and to the MSc in Information Systems and Computer Engineering; the topic is also part of the PhD program in Biotechnology; 2) as mentored coaching, in which IST students integrate ongoing research programs at the Biological Sciences Research Group of IBB at IST; and 3) as intensive thematic courses open to the external community. In this article, educational programs and teaching methodologies and tools that we have been using are outlined, from the wet-lab to the laptop. The current role of quantitative proteomics in biological research, with emphasis on microbial stress response and on biomedical and biotechnological applications, is addressed, as a case-study, anchored on our group research activities. Copyright © 2009 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Development Status of the WetLab-2 Project: New Tools for On-orbit Real-time Quantitative Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jimmy; Parra, Macarena P.; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis; Chinn, Tori; Ricco, Antonio; Souza, Kenneth; Hyde, Liz; Rukhsana, Yousuf; Richey, C. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of NASA Ames Research Centers WetLab-2 Project is to place on the ISS a research platform to facilitate gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of biological specimens grown or cultured on orbit. The WetLab-2 equipment will be capable of processing multiple sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. In addition to the logistical benefits of in-situ sample processing and analysis, conducting qRT-PCR on-orbit eliminates the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms. The system can also validate terrestrial analyses of samples returned from ISS by providing quantitative on-orbit gene expression benchmarking prior to sample return. The ability to get on orbit data will provide investigators with the opportunity to adjust experimental parameters for subsequent trials based on the real-time data analysis without need for sample return and re-flight. Finally, WetLab-2 can be used for analysis of air, surface, water, and clinical samples to monitor environmental contaminants and crew health. The verification flight of the instrument is scheduled to launch on SpaceX-5 in Aug. 2014.Progress to date: The WetLab-2 project completed a thorough study of commercially available qRT-PCR systems and performed a downselect based on both scientific and engineering requirements. The selected instrument, the Cepheid SmartCycler, has advantages including modular design (16 independent PCR modules), low power consumption, and rapid ramp times. The SmartCycler has multiplex capabilities, assaying up to four genes of interest in each of the 16 modules. The WetLab-2 team is currently working with Cepheid to modify the unit for housing within an EXPRESS rack locker on the ISS. This will enable the downlink of data to the ground and provide uplink capabilities for programming, commanding, monitoring, and instrument maintenance. The project is

  14. WetLab-2: Tools for Conducting On-Orbit Quantitative Real-Time Gene Expression Analysis on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Macarena; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis; Jung, Jimmy; Schonfeld, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The objective of NASA Ames Research Centers WetLab-2 Project is to place on the ISS a research platform capable of conducting gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of biological specimens sampled or cultured on orbit. The project has selected a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) qRT-PCR system, the Cepheid SmartCycler and will fly it in its COTS configuration. The SmartCycler has a number of advantages including modular design (16 independent PCR modules), low power consumption, rapid ramp times and the ability to detect up to four separate fluorescent channels at one time enabling multiplex assays that can be used for normalization and to study multiple genes of interest in each module. The team is currently working with Cepheid to enable the downlink of data from the ISS to the ground and provide uplink capabilities for programming, commanding, monitoring, and instrument maintenance. The project has adapted commercial technology to design a module that can lyse cells and extract RNA of sufficient quality and quantity for use in qRT-PCR reactions while using a housekeeping gene to normalize RNA concentration and integrity. The WetLab-2 system is capable of processing multiple sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. The ability to conduct qRT-PCR on-orbit eliminates the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms or the concern of RNA degradation of fixed samples. The system can be used to validate terrestrial analyses of samples returned from ISS by providing on-orbit gene expression benchmarking prior to sample return. The ability to get on orbit data will provide investigators with the opportunity to adjust experiment parameters for subsequent trials based on the real-time data analysis without need for sample return and re-flight. Researchers will also be able to sample multigenerational changes in organisms. Finally, the system can be

  15. Study Labs Kortlægningsrapport UCSJ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørnø, Rasmus Leth Vergmann; Hestbech, Astrid Margrethe; Gynther, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Rapporten er en delleverance i det regionale forprojekt S​tudy Labs,​der udføres som et samarbejde mellem Holbæk, Odsherred og Kalundborg kommune og University College Sjælland (UCSJ). Samarbejdet er delvist medfinansieret af Region Sjælland. Rapporten behandler projektets etableringsfase...... for at nå de kommunale målsætninger. De potentielle målgrupper er blevet kortlagt. Samtidig er undersøgelser i brugergrupperne blevet gjort håndgribelige i form af Personaer. Kommunerne har, faciliteret af Educationlab, gennemført designworkshops og er fremkommet med designs for Study Labs, der som...

  16. Studying Robots Outside the Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blond, Lasse

    As more and more robots enter our social world there is a strong need for further field studies of human-robotic interaction. Based on a two-year ethnographic study of the implementation of the South Korean socially assistive robot in Danish elderly care this paper argues that empirical...... and ethnographic studies will enhance understandings of the dynamics of HRI. Furthermore, the paper emphasizes how users and the context of use matters to integration of robots, as it is shown how roboticists are unable to control how their designs are implemented in practice and that the sociality of social...... robots is inscribed by its users in social practice. This paper can be seen as a contribution to studies of long-term HRI. It presents the challenges of robot adaptation in practice and discusses the limitations of the present conceptual understanding of human-robotic relations. The ethnographic data...

  17. How Do You Like Your Science, Wet or Dry? How Two Lab Experiences Influence Student Understanding of Science Concepts and Perceptions of Authentic Scientific Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Maureen; Knuth, Randy; Van Horne, Katie; Shouse, Andrew W.; Levias, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how two kinds of authentic research experiences related to smoking behavior—genotyping human DNA (wet lab) and using a database to test hypotheses about factors that affect smoking behavior (dry lab)—influence students’ perceptions and understanding of scientific research and related science concepts. The study used pre and post surveys and a focus group protocol to compare students who conducted the research experiences in one of two sequences: genotyping before database and database before genotyping. Students rated the genotyping experiment to be more like real science than the database experiment, in spite of the fact that they associated more scientific tasks with the database experience than genotyping. Independent of the order of completing the labs, students showed gains in their understanding of science concepts after completion of the two experiences. There was little change in students’ attitudes toward science pre to post, as measured by the Scientific Attitude Inventory II. However, on the basis of their responses during focus groups, students developed more sophisticated views about the practices and nature of science after they had completed both research experiences, independent of the order in which they experienced them. PMID:28572181

  18. A comparative study on real lab and simulation lab in communication engineering from students' perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, B.; Woods, P. C.

    2013-05-01

    Over the years, rapid development in computer technology has engendered simulation-based laboratory (lab) in addition to the traditional hands-on (physical) lab. Many higher education institutions adopt simulation lab, replacing some existing physical lab experiments. The creation of new systems for conducting engineering lab activities has raised concerns among educators on the merits and shortcomings of both physical and simulation labs; at the same time, many arguments have been raised on the differences of both labs. Investigating the effectiveness of both labs is complicated, as there are multiple factors that should be considered. In view of this challenge, a study on students' perspectives on their experience related to key aspects on engineering laboratory exercise was conducted. In this study, the Visual Auditory Read and Kinetic model was utilised to measure the students' cognitive styles. The investigation was done through a survey among participants from Multimedia University, Malaysia. The findings revealed that there are significant differences for most of the aspects in physical and simulation labs.

  19. Presented at the 64th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Association for thoracic surgery: wet-lab training for thoracic surgery at the laboratory animal facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Masafumi; Mizuma, Masamichi; Maeda, Sumiko; Sakurada, Akira; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Endo, Chiaki; Okada, Yoshinori; Unno, Michiaki; Kasai, Noriyuki; Kondo, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the animal thoracic training program for the thoracic surgery at the laboratory animal facilities The training was provided for 78 surgical students under the direction of thoracic medical specialists. Students attended lectures and then performed venipuncture, injection, intubation, tracheostomy, surgical cut-down, and thoracic and abdominal surgical approaches. We estimated the detailed surgical skills in two groups (67 residents and 11 thoracic fellows). All students demonstrated satisfactory impressions after training. We found significant difference between the skills of residents and fellows with regard to the haemostasis and suturing techniques. Wet-lab training for thoracic surgery at the laboratory animal facilities is useful for surgical residents and thoracic fellows.

  20. Labs not in a lab: A case study of instructor and student perceptions of an online biology lab class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Jessica Boyce

    Distance learning is not a new phenomenon but with the advancement in technology, the different ways of delivering an education have increased. Today, many universities and colleges offer their students the option of taking courses online instead of sitting in a classroom on campus. In general students like online classes because they allow for flexibility, the comfort of sitting at home, and the potential to save money. Even though there are advantages to taking online classes, many students and instructors still debate the effectiveness and quality of education in a distant learning environment. Many universities and colleges are receiving pressure from students to offer more and more classes online. Research argues for both the advantages and disadvantages of online classes and stresses the importance of colleges and universities weighing both sides before deciding to adopt an online class. Certain classes may not be suitable for online instruction and not all instructors are suitable to teach online classes. The literature also reveals that there is a need for more research on online biology lab classes. With the lack of information on online biology labs needed by science educators who face the increasing demand for online biology labs, this case study hopes to provide insight into the use of online biology lab classes and the how students and an instructor at a community college in Virginia perceive their online biology lab experience as well as the effectiveness of the online labs.

  1. Study of polycaprolactone wet electrospinning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kostakova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wet electrospinning is a useful method for 3-dimensional structure control of nanofibrous materials. This innovative technology uses a liquid collector instead of the metal one commonly used for standard electrospinning. The article compares the internal structural features of polycaprolactone (PCL nanofibrous materials prepared by both technologies. We analyze the influence of different water/ethanol compositions used as a liquid collector on the morphology of the resultant polycaprolactone nanofibrous materials. Scanning electron micro-photographs have revealed a bimodal structure in the wet electrospun materials composed of micro and nanofibers uniformly distributed across the sample bulk. We have shown that the full-faced, twofold fiber distribution is due to the solvent composition and is induced and enhanced by increasing the ethanol weight ratio. Moreover, the comparison of fibrous layers morphology obtained by wet and dry spinning have revealed that beads that frequently appeared in dry spun materials are created by Plateau-Rayleigh instability of the fraction of thicker fibers. Theoretical conditions for spontaneous and complete immersion of cylindrical fibers into a liquid collector are also derived here.

  2. Respecifying lab ethnography an ethnomethodological study of experimental physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sormani, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Respecifying Lab Ethnography delivers the first ethnomethodological study of current experimental physics in action, describing the disciplinary orientation of lab work and exploring the discipline in its social order, formal stringency and skilful performance - in situ and in vivo. In bringing together two major strands of ethnomethodological inquiry, reflexive ethnography and video analysis, which have hitherto existed in parallel, Respecifying Lab Ethnography introduces a practice-based video analysis. In doing so, the book recasts conventional distinctions to shed fresh light on methodolog

  3. Eye Problems May Be Tied to Zika, Lab Study Suggests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 165947.html Eye Problems May Be Tied to Zika, Lab Study Suggests Work with monkeys indicates birth ... 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists exploring how the Zika virus passes from pregnant monkeys to their fetuses ...

  4. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Wetting and Multilayer Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldover, M. R.; Schmidt, J. W.; Cahn, J. W.; Kayser, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The recent work with partially miscible binary liquid mixtures has established that the structure of the liquid-vapor interface can undergo a first-order phase transition from incomplete to complete wetting of the vapor as the temperature is raised. A discontinuity in the change of interfacial tension as a function of temperature at the phase transition has been predicted to occur in many systems and to play an important role in the growth of uniform composites from alloy melts at monotectic points. These measurements are the first to establish the order of the transition. Studies of capillary rise in SF6 in a unique interferometer have led to the first measurements of the thickness of wetting layers (or equivalently, multilayer adsorbed films) on a solid surface near a liquid-vapor critical point. Instabilities in wetting layers were observed. A theory for the instabilities is being developed and will be checked by both static and dynamic optical experiments. The effect of gravity on the apparent thickness of interfaces (as measured by ellipsometry) is under study.

  5. Parametric study of closed wet cooling tower thermal performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasim, S. M.; Hayder, M. J.

    2017-08-01

    The present study involves experimental and theoretical analysis to evaluate the thermal performance of modified Closed Wet Cooling Tower (CWCT). The experimental study includes: design, manufacture and testing prototype of a modified counter flow forced draft CWCT. The modification based on addition packing to the conventional CWCT. A series of experiments was carried out at different operational parameters. In view of energy analysis, the thermal performance parameters of the tower are: cooling range, tower approach, cooling capacity, thermal efficiency, heat and mass transfer coefficients. The theoretical study included develops Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models to predicting various thermal performance parameters of the tower. Utilizing experimental data for training and testing, the models simulated by multi-layer back propagation algorithm for varying all operational parameters stated in experimental test.

  6. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-01-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an…

  7. Human Engineering Modeling and Performance Lab Study Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    The HEMAP (Human Engineering Modeling and Performance) Lab is a joint effort between the Industrial and Human Engineering group and the KAVE (Kennedy Advanced Visualiations Environment) group. The lab consists of sixteen camera system that is used to capture human motions and operational tasks, through te use of a Velcro suit equipped with sensors, and then simulate these tasks in an ergonomic software package know as Jac, The Jack software is able to identify the potential risk hazards.

  8. Study of wet blasting of components in nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, J

    1999-12-01

    This report looks at the method of wet blasting radioactive components in nuclear power stations. The wet blaster uses pearl shaped glass beads with the dimensions of 150-250 {mu}m mixed with water as blasting media. The improved design, providing outer operator's positions with proper radiation protection and more efficient blasting equipment has resulted in a lesser dose taken by the operators. The main reason to decontaminate components in nuclear power plants is to enable service on these components. On components like valves, pump shafts, pipes etc. oxides form and bind radiation. These components are normally situated at some distance from the reactor core and will mainly suffer from radiation from so called activation products. When a component is to be decontaminated it can be decontaminated to a radioactive level where it will be declassified. This report has found levels ranging from 150-1000 Bq/kg allowing declassification of radioactive materials.This difference is found between different countries and different organisations. The report also looks at the levels of waste generated using wet blasting. This is done by tracking the contamination to determine where it collects. It is either collected in the water treatment plant or collected in the blasting media. At Barsebaeck the waste levels, from de-contaminating nearly 800 components in one year, results in a waste volume of about 0,250 m{sup 3}. This waste consists of low and medium level waste and will cost about 3 600 EURO to store. The conclusions of the report are that wet blasting is an indispensable way to treat contaminated components in modern nuclear power plants. The wet blasting equipment can be improved by using a robot enabling the operators to remotely treat components from the outer operator's positions. There they will benefit from better radiation protection thus further reduce their taken dose. The wet blasting equipment could also be used to better control the levels of

  9. Preliminary genome-wide association study for wet-dry phenotype in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with genomic region underlying variation in the binomial reproductive trait 'wet-dry' in sheep. The wet-dry phenotype was used to represent the reproductive status of the ewes, divided into two categories, dry (ewes that did not lamb or ...

  10. Chemical and Physical Comparative Study of the Effect of Wet and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical and physical comparative effect of wet and dry beneficiation processes for purification of kaolin was studied. X-ray flourescence XRF and particle size analysis of kaolin clay before and after beneficiation were carried out. The Si/Al ratio of the raw kaolin which was 1.90 decreased by 1.6 and 17.9% after the wet ...

  11. A study on the effect of varying sequence of lab performance skills on lab performance of high school physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bournia-Petrou, Ethel A.

    The main goal of this investigation was to study how student rank in class, student gender and skill sequence affect high school students' performance on the lab skills involved in a laboratory-based inquiry task in physics. The focus of the investigation was the effect of skill sequence as determined by the particular task. The skills considered were: Hypothesis, Procedure, Planning, Data, Graph, Calculations and Conclusion. Three physics lab tasks based on the simple pendulum concept were administered to 282 Regents physics high school students. The reliability of the designed tasks was high. Student performance was evaluated on individual student written responses and a scoring rubric. The tasks had high discrimination power and were of moderate difficulty (65%). It was found that, student performance was weak on Conclusion (42%), Hypothesis (48%), and Procedure (51%), where the numbers in parentheses represent the mean as a percentage of the maximum possible score. Student performance was strong on Calculations (91%), Data (82%), Graph (74%) and Plan (68%). Out of all seven skills, Procedure had the strongest correlation (.73) with the overall task performance. Correlation analysis revealed some strong relationships among the seven skills which were grouped in two distinct clusters: Hypothesis, Procedure and Plan belong to one, and Data, Graph, Calculations, and Conclusion belong to the other. This distinction may indicate different mental processes at play within each skill cluster. The effect of student rank was not statistically significant according to the MANOVA results due to the large variation of rank levels among the participating schools. The effect of gender was significant on the entire test because of performance differences on Calculations and Graph, where male students performed better than female students. Skill sequence had a significant effect on the skills of Procedure, Plan, Data and Conclusion. Students are rather weak in proposing a

  12. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M. [Delphi Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of multi-component wastes. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials.

  13. The LUSI LAB project: a platform for multidisciplinary experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Adriano; Svensen, Henrik; Hensen, Christian; Scholz, Florian; Romeo, Giovanni; Hadi, Soffian; Husein, Alwi; Planke, Sverre; Akhmanov, Grigorii; Krueger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Lusi is a spectacular mud eruption that started in northeast Java the 29 of May 2006 following a 6.3 M earthquake. Nearly eight years later Lusi is still active. The Lusi Lab is an ERC-funded project to perform multidisciplinary studies using Lusi as a natural laboratory. This represents an unprecedented opportunity to study an ongoing active high-temperature mud eruption and to evaluate the role of seismicity, local faulting and the neighbouring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex on the long-lasting mud eruption. A multipurpose hexacopter has been designed and constructed to access and monitor the otherwise inaccessible Lusi crater and its mud-filled outskirts. The "Lusi drone" showed to be a powerful monitoring and sampling tool duringteh fieldwork in Dec. 2013. Videos and photogrammetry were acquired with various cameras. Designed tools allow the drone to measure and log temperature and to complete remote-controlled sampling of mud, water and gas from the erupting crater. A collection of evenly spaced mud samples has been taken along a transect that extends for 1100 m outside the crater. The incubation of these will be used for geomicrobiological studies and will help to shed light on the type of the ongoing hydrocarbon generation and degradation. A network of temperature loggers deployed around the crater aims to investigate a correlation between seismic activity and temperature variation of the erupted mud. Geochemical analyses indicate that the geochemistry of the crater water represents a geochemical anomaly when comparing with both basinal brines and volcano-hosted hot springs. A combination of high temperatures in the source region and fluid-rock interactions with silicates and carbonate-rich lithologies can explain the geochemistry. This is consistent with the result of gas analyses and with a deep-seated (>4 km) source region, possibly related to the presence of hot igneous intrusions from the volcanic arc.

  14. Transmission studies involving a wet fowl pox isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleazer, T H; Harrell, J S; Blalock, H G

    1983-01-01

    An isolate of fowl pox (FP) virus from a case of "wet" pox in commercial white leghorn (WL) pullets was used to expose WL cockerels via the comb-scratch (CS), eye-drop (ED), or laryngeal-swab (LS) route. Seven days postinoculation (PI), the groups challenged via CS had scabby proliferative pox lesions at the challenge site, the groups challenged via LS had slight dyspnea and rales, and 20% of the cockerels challenged via ED had mild conjunctivitis and lacrimation. By termination of the trial on day 21 PI, the CS-challenged groups had developed pronounced pox lesions. The LS-challenged groups showed severe dyspnea and rales with pronounced raised plaque-like lesions at the opening to the trachea and extending into the upper quarter of the trachea with heavy yellowish caseous exudate partly occluding the glottis. The ED-challenged groups had severe lacrimation and conjunctivitis and small pox lesions on the face, comb, and wattles; 12 of 18 had proliferative lesions on the oral mucosa in the area of the larynx. Forty-five percent of the LS-challenged groups died of suffocation. Pox virus was re-isolated from tissues in all treatment groups. Wet pox transmission appears to be possible via the LS and ED routes.

  15. A Comparison of the Degree of Student Satisfaction Using a Simulation or a Traditional Wet Lab to Teach Physical Properties of Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Philip G.; O'Bryan, Corliss A.; Killian, Susan A.; Beck, Dennis E.; Jarvis, Nathan; Clausen, Ed

    2015-01-01

    It is often difficult to offer food chemistry students traditional, hands-on laboratory experiences due to lack of funds for equipment, insufficient laboratory space, or the nature of distance education. A traditional wet laboratory exercise was developed to demonstrate the effects of the physical properties of ice formation when making…

  16. Further experimental studies in wet-brake friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staph, H.E.; Marbach, H.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes further experimental efforts to determine friction characteristics that define the chatter potential in wet-brake systems as used in tractors and other off-road applications. Changes and improvements to a bench facility described at the 1985 Off-Highway Conference are described. Of particular interest is the decision to examine the very low sliding velocity regime, particularly below 0.34 m/s sliding velocity. Interesting and informative data have been obtained by feeding the input of an accelerometer attached in effect to the caliper brake pads to a frequency analyzer. A spectrum of the energy developed by the vibrating pads over the frequency range of 0 to 250 Hz while the sliding velocity is increased from 0 to 0.85 m/s is obtained. Specifically, the area under the composite frequency curve from 70 to 125 Hz shows good correlation to the chatter propensity of the oil. The results of tests on several oils are described. The ultimate purpose of the research is to provide a relatively rapid screening test for evaluating brake oils for the John Deere-type qualification tests. The overall results emphasize the importance of a low ratio between the breakaway friction and the friction at moderate sliding velocities for low or no chatter.

  17. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

  18. Two Virtual Labs to Study Genetic Inheritance in the Fruit Fly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Herlands Cresiski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A comparative review of two virtual labs to study genetic inheritance in the fruit fly: Virtual Courseware for Inquiry-based Science Education - Drosophila and Virtual Genetics Laboratory II (UMass Boston.

  19. Authentic Leadership in Contemporary Slovenian Business Environment: Explanatory Case Study of HERMES SoftLab

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vlado Dimovski; Barbara Grah; Sandra Penger; Judita Peterlin

    2010-01-01

      Authentic Leadership in Contemporary Slovenian Business Environment: Explanatory Case Study of HERMES SoftLab The paper explores the authentic leadership in learning organization in Slovenian business environment...

  20. Flexible HVAC System for Lab or Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedan, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses an effort to design a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system flexible enough to accommodate an easy conversion of classrooms to laboratories and dry labs to wet labs. The design's energy efficiency and operations and maintenance are examined. (GR)

  1. Study of the comparative costs of five wet/dry cooling tower concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaloudek, F.R.; Allemann, R.T.; Faletti, D.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Parry, H.L.; Smith, G.C.; Tokarz, R.D.; Walter, R.A.

    1976-09-01

    The projected cost of five alternative dry/wet power plant heat rejection concepts was studied under conditions imposed by hypothetical use in association with the San Juan Plant Unit 3, a 550-MWe facility currently under construction near the ''Four Corners'' area of New Mexico. The five alternative concepts were: integrated dry/wet tower; separate dry and wet towers; metal fin-tube induced draft tower with deluge water augmentation; plastic heat exchanger tower with deluge water augmentation, and metal fin-tube/deluge augmentation tower with an intermediate ammonia evaporation-condensation condenser and the cooling tower. The integrated dry/wet tower concept, already chosen for service at San Juan Unit 3, was included for reference purposes. All concepts were conceptually designed and estimated using the same bases and employing uniform practices. Each concept was assumed to use all water allocated for consumptive use in Unit 3. The cost estimates obtained showed the following descending order of ''comparable capital cost'': separate dry/wet; metal fin-tube/deluge; integrated dry/wet; plastic tube/deluge; and metal fin-tube/deluge/ammonia. The results indicate that two of the advanced concepts considered, i.e., the plastic tube/deluge concept and the metal fin tube/deluge/ammonia concept, can possibly reduce the overall costs of dry/wet cooling under conditions imposed by the site considered. It was recommended that these two concepts receive additional attention by the ERDA Dry Cooling Tower Program and industry to further quantify their potential benefits and demonstrate their performance and reliability.

  2. Exploratory qualitative case study of lab-type activity interactions in an online graduate geoscience course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavarella, Veronica C.

    This exploratory qualitative case study investigated the use of lab-type activities in an online graduate geoscience course. Constructivism is the theoretical framework used to explain how learning happens in lab-type activity, and provided the goals to which successful learning in lab-type activity is compared. This study focused on the learner-instructor, learner-learner, and perceptions of the learner-content interactions that occurred related to lab-type activities in an online graduate geoscience course to determine: if the instructor appeared as a facilitator of the learning process in the interactions over the activities; if students engaged in discussion and reflection about the activities; if students perceived the activities as meaningful and authentic; and if students perceived using higher order thinking and prior knowledge while interacting with the content. Ten graduate students from three offerings of the course participated in this study, as well as the instructor and designer of the course content and lab-type activities. Data were collected through interviews, and observation and analysis of the lab-type activities, instructor feedback to students in their graded activities, and discussion that occurred between the instructor and students and among students about the lab-type activities in discussion forums. The nature of the instructor's interactions in discussion forums, in feedback to students on graded activities, and reported by students' in interviews supported that, in the learner-instructor interactions, the instructor of this course was a facilitator who guided and scaffolded the students towards successfully completing the activities. Students engaged in discussion and reflected on the activities, but most learner-learner interactions in discussion forums about the lab-type activities appeared to occur for the purpose of comparison of results, support, and empathy. Students' success at higher order thinking type questions in lab

  3. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: a sensor array for chemical analysis of the Martian soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounaves, Samuel P.; Lukow, Stefan R.; Comeau, Brian P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Grannan-Feldman, Sabrina M.; Manatt, Ken; West, Steven J.; Wen, Xiaowen; Frant, Martin; Gillette, Tim

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified for the now canceled MSP (Mars Surveyor Program) '01 Lander. The MECA package consisted of a microscope, electrometer, material patch plates, and a wet chemistry laboratory (WCL). The primary goal of MECA was to analyze the Martian soil (regolith) for possible hazards to future astronauts and to provide a better understanding of Martian regolith geochemistry. The purpose of the WCL was to analyze for a range of soluble ionic chemical species and electrochemical parameters. The heart of the WCL was a sensor array of electrochemically based ion-selective electrodes (ISE). After 20 months storage at -23 degrees C and subsequent extended freeze/thawing cycles, WCL sensors were evaluated to determine both their physical durability and analytical responses. A fractional factorial calibration of the sensors was used to obtain slope, intercept, and all necessary selectivity coefficients simultaneously for selected ISEs. This calibration was used to model five cation and three anion sensors. These data were subsequently used to determine concentrations of several ions in two soil leachate simulants (based on terrestrial seawater and hypothesized Mars brine) and four actual soil samples. The WCL results were compared to simulant and soil samples using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that flight qualification and prolonged low-temperature storage conditions had minimal effects on the sensors. In addition, the analytical optimization method provided quantitative and qualitative data that could be used to accurately identify the chemical composition of the simulants and soils. The WCL has the ability to provide data that can be used to "read" the chemical, geological, and climatic history of Mars, as well as the potential habitability of its regolith.

  4. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: a sensor array for chemical analysis of the Martian soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounaves, Samuel P; Lukow, Stefan R; Comeau, Brian P; Hecht, Michael H; Grannan-Feldman, Sabrina M; Manatt, Ken; West, Steven J; Wen, Xiaowen; Frant, Martin; Gillette, Tim

    2003-07-25

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified for the now canceled MSP (Mars Surveyor Program) '01 Lander. The MECA package consisted of a microscope, electrometer, material patch plates, and a wet chemistry laboratory (WCL). The primary goal of MECA was to analyze the Martian soil (regolith) for possible hazards to future astronauts and to provide a better understanding of Martian regolith geochemistry. The purpose of the WCL was to analyze for a range of soluble ionic chemical species and electrochemical parameters. The heart of the WCL was a sensor array of electrochemically based ion-selective electrodes (ISE). After 20 months storage at -23 degrees C and subsequent extended freeze/thawing cycles, WCL sensors were evaluated to determine both their physical durability and analytical responses. A fractional factorial calibration of the sensors was used to obtain slope, intercept, and all necessary selectivity coefficients simultaneously for selected ISEs. This calibration was used to model five cation and three anion sensors. These data were subsequently used to determine concentrations of several ions in two soil leachate simulants (based on terrestrial seawater and hypothesized Mars brine) and four actual soil samples. The WCL results were compared to simulant and soil samples using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that flight qualification and prolonged low-temperature storage conditions had minimal effects on the sensors. In addition, the analytical optimization method provided quantitative and qualitative data that could be used to accurately identify the chemical composition of the simulants and soils. The WCL has the ability to provide data that can be used to "read" the chemical, geological, and climatic history of Mars, as well as the potential habitability of its regolith.

  5. Improvement Study of Wet Nitrocellulose Membranes Using Optical Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariyadi SOETEDJO

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the improvement study of previous observation on the optical properties of the nitrocellulose membrane using a self-construction apparatus of reflectometer. The membrane was fixed on the modified cavity stage to minimize any reflection experienced by the interface of the nitrocellulose membrane and surface stage may happen at before. The measurement was done by illuminating the sample at an incident angle of 70° at s-polarization. The white light source was used for that characterization. The samples have been observed their optical reflection when the water molecules introduced respect to the evaporation time at ambient. From the investigation, the change of water content in the membrane could be observed through the change of optical spectroscopic reflection.

  6. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T.W.; Dooge, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this study is to develop a novel catalytic chemical oxidation process that can be used to effectively treat multi-component wastes with a minimum of pretreatment characterization, thus providing a versatile, non-combustion method which will destroy hazardous organic compounds while simultaneously containing and concentrating toxic and radioactive metals for recovery or disposal in a readily stabilized matrix. Although the DETOX{sup SM} process had been tested to a limited extent for potential application to mixed wastes, there had not been sufficient experience with the process to determine its range of application to multicomponent waste forms. The potential applications of the process needed to be better identified. Then, the process needed to be demonstrated on wastes and remediate types on a practical scale in order that data could be obtained on application range, equipment size, capital and operating costs, effectiveness, safety, reliability, permittability, and potential commercial applications of the process. The approach for the project was, therefore, to identify the potential range of applications of the process (Phase I), to choose demonstration sites and design a demonstration prototype (Phase II), to fabricate and shakedown the demonstration unit (Phase III), then finally to demonstrate the process on surrogate hazardous and mixed wastes, and on actual mixed wastes (Phase IV).

  7. Lab-on-a-chip technologies for single-molecule studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Chen, Danqi; Yue, Hongjun; French, Jarrod B; Rufo, Joseph; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-06-21

    Recent developments on various lab-on-a-chip techniques allow miniaturized and integrated devices to perform on-chip single-molecule studies. Fluidic-based platforms that utilize unique microscale fluidic behavior are capable of conducting single-molecule experiments with high sensitivities and throughputs, while biomolecular systems can be studied on-chip using techniques such as DNA curtains, magnetic tweezers, and solid-state nanopores. The advances of these on-chip single-molecule techniques lead to next-generation lab-on-a-chip devices, such as DNA transistors, and single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology for rapid and low-cost whole genome DNA sequencing. In this Focus article, we will discuss some recent successes in the development of lab-on-a-chip techniques for single-molecule studies and expound our thoughts on the near future of on-chip single-molecule studies.

  8. Effects of Solid Fraction on Droplet Wetting and Vapor Condensation: A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Liao, Quanwen; Liu, Wei; Liu, Zhichun

    2017-10-31

    Recently, numerous studies focused on the wetting process of droplets on various surfaces at a microscale level. However, there are a limited number of studies about the mechanism of condensation on patterned surfaces. The present study performed the dynamic wetting behavior of water droplets and condensation process of water molecules on substrates with different pillar structure parameters, through molecular dynamic simulation. The dynamic wetting results indicated that droplets exhibit Cassie state, PW state, and Wenzel state successively on textured surfaces with decreasing solid fraction. The droplets possess a higher static contact angle and a smaller spreading exponent on textured surfaces than those on smooth surfaces. The condensation processes, including the formation, growth, and coalescence of a nanodroplet, are simulated and quantitatively recorded, which are difficult to be observed by experiments. In addition, a wetting transition and a dewetting transition were observed and analyzed in condensation on textured surfaces. Combining these simulation results with previous theoretical and experimental studies will guide us to understand the hypostasis and mechanism of the condensation more clearly.

  9. Visibility of road markings on wet road surfaces : a literature study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The English version of B 14153 is presented. Road markings, notably lane markers, are often only poorly visible when the road is wet. This is particularly a problem at night on unlit roads. A study is made of whether a solution for this problem can be found on the basis of the known, published

  10. Evaluation of wet indices using standard precipitation index: A case study of Terengganu states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, M. F.; Rauf, U. F. Abdul; Din, W. R. Wan; Hussin, A. G.

    2017-09-01

    In line with the current climate conditions, the study of prolonged precipitation is imperative as it may predict the flood events in the future. In 2014, Terengganu is amongst the state in Peninsular Malaysia was affected by floods and it experienced three waves of floods during the monsoon seasons. In this research study, Standard Precipitation Index (SPI) is used to analyse the monthly precipitation data for two selected rain gauge stations in Terengganu over the period of forty-five years from 1970 to 2014. The objective of this study is to monitor the extreme wet conditions that eventually could cause the occurrence of floods. Comparisons were made using 3-month, 6-month, 24-month and 48-month time scales. SPI time series is calculated from precipitation index data for two rain-gauge stations in Terengganu. The shortest of time scales of SPI indicate the condition of moisture in short and medium terms, which is then used to estimate the seasonal precipitation. The longest time scales reveal patterns of long-term precipitation before the flood events. The result clearly shows that the annual trends of the wet events for longest periods are regularly experienced in wet conditions compare to drought conditions and predicted to have a higher probability of flood disaster. SK Kuala Telemong station has recorded the highest SPI values for the wet event in the entire periods, which the shortest time scales is 3.43 and longest term of time scales closer to three (2.90) in this analysis.

  11. Vision Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Vision Lab personnel perform research, development, testing and evaluation of eye protection and vision performance. The lab maintains and continues to develop...

  12. Value added or misattributed? A multi-institution study on the educational benefit of labs for reinforcing physics content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, N. G.; Olsen, Jack; Thomas, James L.; Wieman, Carl E.

    2017-06-01

    Instructional labs are widely seen as a unique, albeit expensive, way to teach scientific content. We measured the effectiveness of introductory lab courses at achieving this educational goal across nine different lab courses at three very different institutions. These institutions and courses encompassed a broad range of student populations and instructional styles. The nine courses studied had two key things in common: the labs aimed to reinforce the content presented in lectures, and the labs were optional. By comparing the performance of students who did and did not take the labs (with careful normalization for selection effects), we found universally and precisely no added value to learning course content from taking the labs as measured by course exam performance. This work should motivate institutions and departments to reexamine the goals and conduct of their lab courses, given their resource-intensive nature. We show why these results make sense when looking at the comparative mental processes of students involved in research and instructional labs, and offer alternative goals and instructional approaches that would make lab courses more educationally valuable.

  13. Web-based versus lab-based studies: A response to Kendall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, H.; Reips, U.-D.

    2008-01-01

    While in an earlier commentary (Honing & Ladinig, 2008) we stressed the potential of Web-delivered experiments for music perception research, the ongoing discussion on Web-based versus lab-based studies seems to circle around issues of method and control (Mehler, 1999; Kendall, 2008). We agree with

  14. Experimental and numerical study of MILD combustion in a lab-scale furnace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, X.; Tummers, M.J.; Roekaerts, D.J.E.M.; Scherer, Viktor; Fricker, Neil; Reis, Albino

    2017-01-01

    Mild combustion in a lab-scale furnace has been experimentally and numerically studied. The furnace was operated with Dutch natural gas (DNG) at 10 kW and at an equivalence ratio of 0.8. OH∗chemiluminescence images were taken to characterize the reaction zone. The chemiluminescence intensity is

  15. Studying the Binomial Distribution Using LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Danielle J.; Hammer, Nathan I.

    2015-01-01

    This undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory exercise introduces students to the study of probability distributions both experimentally and using computer simulations. Students perform the classic coin toss experiment individually and then pool all of their data together to study the effect of experimental sample size on the binomial…

  16. Hydraulic fracturing: insights from field, lab, and numerical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, S. D.; Johnson, S.; Fu, P.; Settgast, R. R.

    2011-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has become an increasingly important technique in stimulating reservoirs for gas, oil, and geothermal energy production. In use commercially since the 1950's, the technique has been widely lauded, when combined with other techniques, for enabling the development of shale gas resources in the United States, providing a valuable and extensive source of domestic energy. However, the technique has also drawn a degree of notoriety from high-profile incidents involving contamination of drinking water associated with gas extraction operations in the Marcellus shale region. This work highlights some of the insights on the behavior of subsurface hydraulic fracturing operations that have been derived from field and laboratory observations as well as from numerical simulations. The sensitivity of fracture extent and orientation to parameters such as matrix material heterogeneity, presence and distribution of discontinuities, and stress orientation is of particular interest, and we discuss this in the context of knowledge derived from both observation and simulation. The limitations of these studies will also be addressed in terms of resolution, uncertainty, and assumptions as well as the balance of fidelity to cost, both in computation time (for numerical studies) and equipment / operation cost (for observational studies). We also identify a number of current knowledge gaps and propose alternatives for addressing those gaps. We especially focus on the role of numerical studies for elucidating key concepts and system sensitivities. The problem is inherently multi-scale in both space and time as well as highly coupled hydromechanically, and, in several applications, thermally as well. We will summarize the developments to date in analyzing these systems and present an approach for advancing the capabilities of our models in the short- to long-term and how these advances can help provide solutions to reduce risk and improve efficiency of hydraulic fracturing

  17. Differential photoacoustic cell to study the wetting process during porous silicon formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German Espinosa-Arbelaez, Diego [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Edificio de Posgrado, Coyoacan, CP 04530, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Blvd Juriquilla 3001, Campus Juriquilla, CP 76230, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Velazquez-Hernandez, Ruben [Division de Investigacion y Posgrado, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Cerro de las Campanas, CP 76010, Queretaro, Qro (Mexico); Petricioli-Carranco, Julio; Quintero-Torres, Rafael; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario Enrique [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Blvd Juriquilla 3001, Campus Juriquilla, CP 76230, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    This paper shows the in-situ study of the wetting process in Silicon during anodization process using an electrochemical Differential photoacoustic Cell (DPC). The Photoacoustic amplitude and phase signals were obtained for samples in air, ethanol, ethanol/HF and finally air. According to these results ethanol is responsible for a mechanical contact reducing the superficial tension and ethanol/HF produce the removing of the SiO{sub x} and SiO{sub 2}species on the Silicon surface. It was found that the DPC is a powerful technique to study the wet surface before the formation of the porous silicon layer (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Effects of intronic mutations in the LDLR gene on pre-mRNA splicing: Comparison of wet-lab and bioinformatics analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holla, Øystein L.; Nakken, Sigve; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ranheim, Trine; Berge, Knut Erik; Defesche, Joep C.; Leren, Trond P.

    2009-01-01

    Screening for mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene has identified more than 1000 mutations as the cause of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). In addition, numerous intronic mutations with uncertain effects on pre-mRNA splicing have also been identified. In this study, we

  19. Wood Decomposition of Cyrilla racemiflora (Cyrillaceae) in Puerto Rican Dry and Wet Forests: A 13-year Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan A. Torres; Grizelle Gonzalez

    2005-01-01

    We studied the decomposition of Cyrilla racemiflora logs over a 13-yr period in tropical dry and wet forests in Puerto Rico. The mean mass loss, ratio of soft to hard wood, nutrient concentrations, and the diversity of wood-inhabiting organisms were greater in logs decomposing in the dry forest than in the wet forest. Termites were also more abundant in the logs...

  20. Study on road sign recognition in LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoiu, M.; Rat, C. L.; Panoiu, C.

    2016-02-01

    Road and traffic sign identification is a field of study that can be used to aid the development of in-car advisory systems. It uses computer vision and artificial intelligence to extract the road signs from outdoor images acquired by a camera in uncontrolled lighting conditions where they may be occluded by other objects, or may suffer from problems such as color fading, disorientation, variations in shape and size, etc. An automatic means of identifying traffic signs, in these conditions, can make a significant contribution to develop an Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) that continuously monitors the driver, the vehicle, and the road. Road and traffic signs are characterized by a number of features which make them recognizable from the environment. Road signs are located in standard positions and have standard shapes, standard colors, and known pictograms. These characteristics make them suitable for image identification. Traffic sign identification covers two problems: traffic sign detection and traffic sign recognition. Traffic sign detection is meant for the accurate localization of traffic signs in the image space, while traffic sign recognition handles the labeling of such detections into specific traffic sign types or subcategories [1].

  1. Geophysical techniques in the study of Hydrocarbon contamination: lab experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampaolo, Valeria; Rizzo, Enzo; Straface, Salvatore; Votta, Mario; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Remediation of sites contaminated by hydrocarbon, due to blow out, leakage from tank or pipe and oil spill, is an environmental problem because infiltrated oil can persist in the ground for a long time and the actual method are invasive and expansive . In the last years there was a growing interest in the use of geophysical methods for environmental monitoring (Greenhouse et al., 1993; Daily and Ramirez, 1995; Lendvay et al., 1998; Atekwana et al., 2000; Chambers et al., 2004; Song et al., 2005; French et al., 2009), and there have been several recent study that relate self-potential measurements to subsurface contaminants (Perry et al., 1996; Naudet et al., 2003; Naudet et al., 2004). Infact, this method is a valid tool for site characterization and monitoring because it is sensitive to contaminant chemistry and redox processes generated by bacteria during the biodegradation phase (Atekwana et al., 2004; Naudet and Revil, 2005). Therefore the goal of this investigation is to characterize underground contaminant distributions using minimally invasive geophysical methods (electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential), in combination with hydrochemical measurements, and to develop fundamental constitutive relations between soil physical and degradation activity parameters and geophysically measurable parameters, in order to improve site remediation efficiency. These tests have been realized at a PVC pool situated in the Hydrogeosite Laboratory of CNR-IMAA. The pool is completely filled with ~ 0.80 m3 of an homogeneous medium (quartz-rich sand with a medium-high hydraulic conductivity in the order of 10-5 m/s), to simulate the space and time dynamics of an artificial aquifer; besides it has been endowed of a sensors network at surface and in borehole, to measure self-potential and electrical resistivity. The experiments consist in geophysical measurements to monitor a simulated oil spill into sand-box following by water rain. The experiment was able to obtain

  2. Identification and functional characterization of four novel aldo/keto reductases in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 by integrating wet lab with in silico approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Chhavi; Yadav, Shivam; Rai, Shweta; Chatterjee, Antra; Sen, Sonia; Rai, Ruchi; Rai, L C

    2017-07-01

    Aldo/keto reductases (AKRs) constitute a multitasking protein family that catalyzes diverse metabolic transformations including detoxification of stress generated reactive aldehydes. Yet this important protein family is poorly understood particularly in cyanobacteria, the ecologically most diverse and significant group of micro-organisms. Present study is an attempt to characterize all putative AKRs of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. In silico analysis, it revealed the presence of at least four putative AKRs in Anabaena PCC7120 genome. All four proteins share less than 40% sequence identity with each other and also with the identified members of AKR superfamily and hence deserve to be assigned in new families. Dissimilarity in sequences is also reflected through their substrate specificity. While reduction of trans-2-nonenal, a LPO-derived reactive aldehyde was common across the four proteins, these proteins were found to be activated during heat, salt, Cd, As, and butachlor treatments, and their ectopic expression in Escherichia coli conferred tolerance to the above abiotic stresses. These findings affirm the role of AKRs in providing a broad tolerance to environmental stresses conceivably by detoxifying the stress-generated reactive aldehydes.

  3. The effect of traditional wet cupping on shoulder pain and neck pain: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Müzeyyen; Gökgöz, Nurcan; Dane, Şenol

    2016-05-01

    Wet cupping therapy (WCT) is a traditional complementary method recommended to decrease the symptoms of a lot of diseases and used in the treatment of pain syndromes. In this pilot study, the possible effects of wet cupping therapy on nonspecific neck and upper shoulder pain were investigated. Sixty one eligible volunteer participants with nonspecific neck and upper shoulder pain for at least 3 months were allocated. The Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) was used to assess pain scores. Pain scores were recorded before and after wet cupping therapy. The mean scores of neck pain in study group were 7.02 (SD = 1.8) before and 3.70 (SD = 2.2) after cupping therapy. The decrease of pain scores between pre- and post-test was statistically significant (p < 0.05). It can be stated that WCT has potential therapeutic effect in nonspecific neck and upper shoulder pain. Future full-scale randomized controlled trials will be needed to provide firm evidence of the effectiveness of this intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Estimation of Geographically Weighted Regression Case Study on Wet Land Paddy Productivities in Tulungagung Regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danang Ariyanto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Regression is a method connected independent variable and dependent variable with estimation parameter as an output. Principal problem in this method is its application in spatial data. Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR method used to solve the problem. GWR  is a regression technique that extends the traditional regression framework by allowing the estimation of local rather than global parameters. In other words, GWR runs a regression for each location, instead of a sole regression for the entire study area. The purpose of this research is to analyze the factors influencing wet land paddy productivities in Tulungagung Regency. The methods used in this research is  GWR using cross validation  bandwidth and weighted by adaptive Gaussian kernel fungtion.This research using  4 variables which are presumed affecting the wet land paddy productivities such as:  the rate of rainfall(X1, the average cost of fertilizer per hectare(X2, the average cost of pestisides per hectare(X3 and Allocation of subsidized NPK fertilizer of food crops sub-sector(X4. Based on the result, X1, X2, X3 and X4  has a different effect on each Distric. So, to improve the productivity of wet land paddy in Tulungagung Regency required a special policy based on the GWR model in each distric.

  5. Structural Modification of Cobalt Catalysts: Effect of Wetting Studied by X-Ray and Infrared Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodakov A.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of wetting on the structure and localisation of cobalt species on various supports (Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, HZSM-5 zeolite was studied using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with CO as a molecular probe, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. Aqueous impregnation to incipient wetness of reduced and passivated cobalt catalysts results, even in the absence of any promoter, in a considerable decrease in the concentration of Co crystalline phases and modifies the surface sites. The decrease in the concentration of Co3O4 crystallites was especially pronounced on silica supported catalysts prepared via impregnation of cobalt and on a mixture of Co3O4 and HZSM-5 zeolite. Saturation with water of the passivated Co/SiO2 sample results in an amorphous solid with a local structure close to that of Co2SiO4. For Co/Al2O3 and Co/TiO2 catalysts, the effect of wetting on the concentration of Co3O4 crystalline phase was considerably smaller.

  6. A Study on Wet and Dry Tensile Properties of Wood pulp/Lyocell Wetlace Nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinjiang; Deng, Chao; Qu, Benchen; Zhan, Qu; Jin, Xiangyu

    2017-10-01

    A new biodegradable wood pulp/Lyocell moist wipe had been developed, which made from wetlaid/spunlace(wetlace) technology. The dry and wet tensile curve characteristics were described and the relationship between dry and wet strength in both machine direction (MD) and cross-machine direction (CD) were investigated. The results indicate that the fabricated wetlace materials are composed of the entanglements and cohesions of wood pulp/Lyocell fibres. The modulus and tensile strength of the materials were obviously decreased in wet state, and the tensile curves in the dry and wet state both can be divided into two parts. It is noted that there exists a high linear correlation between the dry and wet strength in MD or CD. Meanwhile, the diminished amplitude of wet strength in CD is larger than that of wet strength in MD and the relationship fluctuation between the wet and dry strength in CD is significantly higher than that in MD.

  7. MarkoLAB: A simulator to study ionic channel's stochastic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Robson Rodrigues; Goroso, Daniel Gustavo; Bers, Donald M; Puglisi, José Luis

    2017-08-01

    Mathematical models of the cardiac cell have started to include markovian representations of the ionic channels instead of the traditional Hodgkin & Huxley formulations. There are many reasons for this: Markov models are not restricted to the idea of independent gates defining the channel, they allow more complex description with specific transitions between open, closed or inactivated states, and more importantly those states can be closely related to the underlying channel structure and conformational changes. We used the LabVIEW(®) and MATLAB(®) programs to implement the simulator MarkoLAB that allow a dynamical 3D representation of the markovian model of the channel. The Monte Carlo simulation was used to implement the stochastic transitions among states. The user can specify the voltage protocol by setting the holding potential, the step-to voltage and the duration of the stimuli. The most studied feature of a channel is the current flowing through it. This happens when the channel stays in the open state, but most of the time, as revealed by the low open probability values, the channel remains on the inactive or closed states. By focusing only when the channel enters or leaves the open state we are missing most of its activity. MarkoLAB proved to be quite useful to visualize the whole behavior of the channel and not only when the channel produces a current. Such dynamic representation provides more complete information about channel kinetics and will be a powerful tool to demonstrate the effect of gene mutations or drugs on the channel function. MarkoLAB provides an original way of visualizing the stochastic behavior of a channel. It clarifies concepts, such as recovery from inactivation, calcium- versus voltage-dependent inactivation, and tail currents. It is not restricted to ionic channels only but it can be extended to other transporters, such as exchangers and pumps. This program is intended as a didactical tool to illustrate the dynamical behavior of

  8. A new approach to standardize multicenter studies: mobile lab technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Lermen

    Full Text Available Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120-150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab in the project "Labor der Zukunft" (future's lab technology. This laboratory includes a 14.7 m(2 reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m(2 examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m(2 biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m(2 personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for

  9. A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Augmented Reality to Enhance the Use of Remote Labs in Electrical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejías Borrero, A.; Andújar Márquez, J. M.

    2012-10-01

    Lab practices are an essential part of teaching in Engineering. However, traditional laboratory lessons developed in classroom labs (CL) must be adapted to teaching and learning strategies that go far beyond the common concept of e-learning, in the sense that completely virtualized distance education disconnects teachers and students from the real world, which can generate specific problems in laboratory classes. Current proposals of virtual labs (VL) and remote labs (RL) do not either cover new needs properly or contribute remarkable improvement to traditional labs—except that they favor distance training. Therefore, online teaching and learning in lab practices demand a further step beyond current VL and RL. This paper poses a new reality and new teaching/learning concepts in the field of lab practices in engineering. The developed augmented reality-based lab system (augmented remote lab, ARL) enables teachers and students to work remotely (Internet/intranet) in current CL, including virtual elements which interact with real ones. An educational experience was conducted to assess the developed ARL with the participation of a group of 10 teachers and another group of 20 students. Both groups have completed lab practices of the contents in the subjects Digital Systems and Robotics and Industrial Automation, which belong to the second year of the new degree in Electronic Engineering (adapted to the European Space for Higher Education). The labs were carried out by means of three different possibilities: CL, VL and ARL. After completion, both groups were asked to fill in some questionnaires aimed at measuring the improvement contributed by ARL relative to CL and VL. Except in some specific questions, the opinion of teachers and students was rather similar and positive regarding the use and possibilities of ARL. Although the results are still preliminary and need further study, seems to conclude that ARL remarkably improves the possibilities of current VL and RL

  10. Pilot-scale field study for ammonia removal from lagoon biogas using an acid wet scrubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongjian; Wu, Xiao; Miller, Curtis; Zhu, Jun; Hadlocon, Lara Jane; Manuzon, Roderick; Zhao, Lingying

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic activities in swine slurry storage and treatment generate biogas containing gaseous ammonia component which is a chemical agent that can cause adverse environmental impacts when released to the atmosphere. The aim of this pilot plant study was to remove ammonia from biogas generated in a covered lagoon, using a sulfuric acid wet scrubber. The data showed that, on average, the biogas contained 43.7 ppm of ammonia and its concentration was found to be exponentially related to the air temperature inside the lagoon. When the air temperature rose to 35°C and the biogas ammonia concentration reached 90 ppm, the mass transfer of ammonia/ammonium from the deeper liquid body to the interface between the air and liquid became a limiting factor. The biogas velocity was critical in affecting ammonia removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. A biogas flow velocity of 8 to 12 mm s(-1) was recommended to achieve a removal efficiency of greater than 60%. Stepwise regression revealed that the biogas velocity and air temperature, not the inlet ammonia concentration in biogas, affected the ammonia removal efficiency. Overall, when 73 g L(-1) (or 0.75 M) sulfuric acid solution was used as the scrubber solution, removal efficiencies varied from 0% to 100% with an average of 55% over a 40-d measurement period. Mass balance calculation based on ammonium-nitrogen concentration in final scrubber liquid showed that about 21.3 g of ammonia was collected from a total volume of 1169 m(3) of biogas, while the scrubber solution should still maintain its ammonia absorbing ability until its concentration reaches up to 1 M. These results showed promising use of sulfuric acid wet scrubber for ammonia removal in the digester biogas.

  11. Brachialgia paraesthetica nocturna can be relieved by "wet cupping"--results of a randomised pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdtke, Rainer; Albrecht, Uwe; Stange, Rainer; Uehleke, Bernhard

    2006-12-01

    Centuries ago cupping was one of the most used medical therapies worldwide but it is now regarded as an antiquated and unsafe treatment. Nevertheless it is widely used especially in Germany and China. To investigate the effectiveness of "wet cupping" of a defined connective tissue area (over the Musculus trapezius) in patients suffering from brachialgia paresthetica nocturna. Monocenter, randomised, controlled, sequential clinical trial. Section of pain management at the District Hospital of Rüdersdorf, Germany. Brachialgia-patients of both sexes without age restictions were eligible if they suffered from chronical tonsillar irritations and showed pathologic indurations of the connective tissue area. The active group was "wet cupped" once, i.e. the skin first was scarified and then blood was drawn by applying vacuum cupping glasses. The control group was left untreated. Pre- to post-treatment change of brachialgia severeness, calculated from 1-week averages of the means of three subscales (pain, tingling and numbness), each assessed on a 0-10 numeric analogue scale. N=20 patients were randomised (13 women, median age 47 years). Treatment effects can be found in the active (-2.3+/-1.9 score points) but not in the control group (+0.5+/-1.0 points; p=0.002; triangle test). The results are supported by secondary outcome criteria. Adverse events were not documented in any patient. This study suggests short-term effects of a single wet cupping therapy, which remain at least for 1 week. As the trial lacks of an adequate and blinded placebo therapy the findings are potentially biased.

  12. A comparative study on performance of CBN inserts when turning steel under dry and wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah Bagaber, Salem; Razlan Yusoff, Ahmad

    2017-10-01

    Cutting fluids is the most unsustainable components of machining processes, it is negatively impacting on the environmental and additional energy required. Due to its high strength and corrosion resistance, the machinability of stainless steel has attracted considerable interest. This study aims to evaluate performance of cubic boron nitride (CBN) inserts for the machining parameters includes the power consumption and surface roughness. Due to the high single cutting-edge cost of CBN, the performance of significant is importance for hard finish turning. The present work also deals with a comparative study on power consumption and surface roughness under dry and flood conditions. Turning process of the stainless steel 316 was performed. A response surface methodology based box-behnken design (BBD) was utilized for statistical analysis. The optimum process parameters are determined as the overall performance index. The comparison study has been done between dry and wet stainless-steel cut in terms of minimum value of energy and surface roughness. The result shows the stainless still can be machined under dry condition with 18.57% improvement of power consumption and acceptable quality compare to the wet cutting. The CBN tools under dry cutting stainless steel can be used to reduce the environment impacts in terms of no cutting fluid use and less energy required which is effected in machining productivity and profit.

  13. A preliminary study of mental and physical practice on the kayak wet exit skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, M; Mahoney, C; Wardrop, J

    2001-06-01

    Outdoor activities and high-risk water sports often create anxiety in participants who feel concern about danger. Relaxation and imagery, often used to enhance training, can improve performance of skills in a variety of sports. The aim of this study was to establish whether Mental Practice, Physical Practice, Combined Mental and Physical Practice, or No Practice would affect the acquisition of skill for a kayak wet exit. 60 postprimary girls aged 11-16 yr., competent swimmers but without previous experience in kayaking, gave their informed consent to be in the study. Each participant was randomly assigned to one of the four experimental groups. Following their practice periods, each group performed three kayak wet exit attempts (unseen by others); these were videotaped for later analysis by an observer. The participant and an independent observer, who was blind to the allocation of practice group, then used a 6-point rating scale to assess each performance. Participants' and the observer's ratings were analysed by separate Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance which indicated a significant practice effect. Subsequent chi-squared tests indicated significantly different distributions of groups, showing Physical Practice superior to No Practice and Mental Practice. While physical practice remained effective in improving technique, combinations of mental and physical practice were better than no practice.

  14. Spectroscopic Study of L Hypernuclei with Electron Beams at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Satoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Gogami, Toshiyuki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Tang, Liguang [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The missing mass spectroscopy of L hypernuclei with the (e, e'K^+) reaction was started from 2000 at Jefferson Lab. In this fifteen years, various hypernuclei (A = 7 - 52) including hyperon (L, S^0) productions have been studied with newly developed experimental techniques. The (e, e'K^+) reaction spectroscopy of L hypernuclei features its capability of absolute missing mass calibration and production of new species of hypernuclei which are the isospin partners of well studied hypernuclei by (K^-, pi-) and (pi^+, K^+) reactions. In this paper, we will review how we established the (e, e'K^+) spectroscopic study of hypernuclei.

  15. A Data Mining Approach to Study the Impact of the Methodology Followed in Chemistry Lab Classes on the Weight Attributed by the Students to the Lab Work on Learning and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, M.; Esteves, L.; Neves, J.; Vicente, H.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the use of data mining tools in order to examine the influence of the methodology used in chemistry lab classes, on the weight attributed by the students to the lab work on learning and own motivation. The answer frequency analysis was unable to discriminate the opinions expressed by the respondents according to the type of the…

  16. Case-control study on the associations between lifestyle-behavioral risk factors and phlegm-wetness constitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanbo; Wang, Qi; Dai, Zhaoyu; Origasa, Hideki; Di, Jie; Wang, Yangyang; Lin, Lin; Fan, Chunpok

    2014-06-01

    To explore the relationships between different lifestyle-behavioral factors and phlegm-wetness type of Traditional Chinese Medicine constitution, so as to provide health management strategies for phlegm-wetness constitution. A case-control study was conducted with the cases selected from the database of Chinese constitution survey in 9 provinces or municipalities of China. 1380 cases met the diagnostic criteria of phlegm-wetness type were taken as the case group, and 1380 cases were randomly selected from gentleness type as the control group. Using Chi-square test to compare the differences of lifestyle-behavior composition in each group; single factor and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to compare the relationships of lifestyle-behavioral factors and phlegm-wetness type. There were statistically significant differences between phlegm-wetness type group and gentleness type group in lifestyle behaviors (dietary habits, tobacco and liquor consumptions, exercise habits, sleeping habits). The results of single factor logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the risk of phlegm-wetness constitution decreased significantly in light diet (odds ratio, OR = 0.68); The risk factors of phlegm-wetness type were fatty food intake (OR = 2.36), sleeping early and getting up late (OR = 1.87), tobacco smoking (OR = 1.83), barbecued food intake (OR = 1.68), alcohol drinking (OR = 1.63), salty food intake (OR = 1.44), sleeping erratically (OR = 1.43), less physical activities (OR = 1.42), sweet food intake (OR = 1.29), sleeping and getting up late (OR = 1.26), and pungent food intake (OR = 1.21), respectively. Regardless of the interaction among lifestyle-behavioral factors, the results of the multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the risk factors of phlegm-wetness type were sleeping early and getting up late (OR = 1.94), fatty food intake (OR = 1.80), tobacco smoking (OR = 1.50), sleeping erratically (OR = 1.50), barbecued food intake (OR = 1

  17. Beyond the Usability Lab Conducting Large-scale Online User Experience Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, William; Tullis, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Usability testing and user experience research typically take place in a controlled lab with small groups. While this type of testing is essential to user experience design, more companies are also looking to test large sample sizes to be able compare data according to specific user populations and see how their experiences differ across user groups. But few usability professionals have experience in setting up these studies, analyzing the data, and presenting it in effective ways.  Online usability testing offers the solution by allowing testers to elicit feedback simultaneously from 1,0

  18. Studies on the Effect of Wet Castor Leaf Feeding and Feeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was laid out in a randomized block design in three replications with a disease free laying per replication. Rearing of castor feeding silkworm by giving tender wet leaf daily twice at young age (1st and 2nd instars)) and matured wet castor plant leaf daily thrice for late age (3rd, 4th and 5th instars) silkworm ...

  19. Vapor cell based sodium laser guide star mechanism study lab-bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Li, Lihang; Luo, Ruiyao; Li, Lei; Ning, Yu; Xi, Fengjie; Xu, Xiaojun

    2016-07-01

    Sodium laser guide star (LGS) is the key for the success of modern adaptive optics (AO) supported large ground based telescopes, however, for many field applications, Sodium LGS's brightness is still a limited factor. Large amounts of theoretical efforts have been paid to optimize Sodium LGS exciting parameters, that is, to fully discover potential of harsh environment surrounding mesospheric extreme thin sodium atoms under resonant excitation, whether quantum or Monte Carlo based. But till to now, only limited proposals are demonstrated with on-sky test due to the high cost and engineering complexities. To bridge the gap between theoretical modeling and on-sky test, we built a magnetic field controllable sodium cell based lab-bench, which includes a small scale sum-frequency single mode 589nm laser, with added amplitude, polarization, and phase modulators. We could perform quantitative resonant fluorescence study under single, multi-frequency, side-band optical re-pumping exciting with different polarization, also we could perform optical field modulation to study Larmor precession which is considered as one of devils of Sodium LGS, and we have the ability to generate beams contain orbital angular moment. Our preliminary sodium cell based optical re-pumping experiments have shown excellent consistence with Bloch equation predicted results, other experimental results will also be presented in the report, and these results will give a direct support that sodium cell based lab-bench study could help a Sodium LGS scientists a lot before their on-sky test.

  20. Diagnosing the Nature of Land-Atmosphere Coupling: A Case Study of Dry/Wet Extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Kennedy, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of land surface and planetary boundary layer (PBL) temperature and moisture states and fluxes. In turn, these interactions regulate the strength of the connection between surface moisture and precipitation in a coupled system. To address deficiencies in numerical weather prediction and climate models due to improper treatment of L-A interactions, recent studies have focused on development of diagnostics to quantify the strength and accuracy of the land-PBL coupling at the process-level. In this study, a diagnosis of the nature and impacts oflocalland-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) during dry and wet extreme conditions is presented using a combination of models and observations during the summers of2006-7 in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. Specifically, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been coupled to NASA's Land Information System (LIS), which provides a flexible and high-resolution representation and initialization of land surface physics and states. A range of diagnostics exploring the links and feedbacks between soil moisture and precipitation are examined for the dry/wet regimes of this region, along with the behavior and accuracy of different land-PBL scheme couplings under these conditions. In addition, we examine the impact of improved specification ofland surface states, anomalies, and fluxes that are obtained through the use of a hew optimization and uncertainty module in LIS, on the L-A coupling in WRF forecasts. Results demonstrate how LoCo diagnostics can be applied to coupled model components in the context of their integrated impacts on the process-chain connecting the land surface to the PBL and support of hydrological anomalies.

  1. PD Lab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilow, Marcel; Entrop, Alexis Gerardus; Lichtenberg, Jos; Stoutjesdijk, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    PD Lab explores the applications of building sector related product development. PD lab investigates and tests digital production technologies like CNC milled wood connections. It will also act as a platform in its wider meaning to investigate the effects and influences of file to factory

  2. MetLab: An In Silico Experimental Design, Simulation and Analysis Tool for Viral Metagenomics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norling, Martin; Karlsson-Lindsjö, Oskar E; Gourlé, Hadrien; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Hayer, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomics, the sequence characterization of all genomes within a sample, is widely used as a virus discovery tool as well as a tool to study viral diversity of animals. Metagenomics can be considered to have three main steps; sample collection and preparation, sequencing and finally bioinformatics. Bioinformatic analysis of metagenomic datasets is in itself a complex process, involving few standardized methodologies, thereby hampering comparison of metagenomics studies between research groups. In this publication the new bioinformatics framework MetLab is presented, aimed at providing scientists with an integrated tool for experimental design and analysis of viral metagenomes. MetLab provides support in designing the metagenomics experiment by estimating the sequencing depth needed for the complete coverage of a species. This is achieved by applying a methodology to calculate the probability of coverage using an adaptation of Stevens' theorem. It also provides scientists with several pipelines aimed at simplifying the analysis of viral metagenomes, including; quality control, assembly and taxonomic binning. We also implement a tool for simulating metagenomics datasets from several sequencing platforms. The overall aim is to provide virologists with an easy to use tool for designing, simulating and analyzing viral metagenomes. The results presented here include a benchmark towards other existing software, with emphasis on detection of viruses as well as speed of applications. This is packaged, as comprehensive software, readily available for Linux and OSX users at https://github.com/norling/metlab.

  3. How does the wetting dynamics affect capillary trapping in heterogeneous soil: Neutron imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, Jan; Snehota, Michal; Trtik, Pavel; Vontobel, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The wetting dynamics of the water infiltration into a porous soil system has a strong influence on the amount of entrapped air inside the soil. Simultaneously, a higher volume of entrapped air obstructs a water flow in the medium. This effect is more noticeable in soils with preferential pathways because the soil matrix has a higher capillary forces and therefore the air is accumulated in preferential pathways. In the presented study, two experiments were conducted on the same sample. The first experiment was performed under the constant water level condition (CWL) and the second experiment was carried out under the constant water flux condition (CWF) at the top of the sample. The sample was composed of coarse and medium coarse fractions of sand and fine porous ceramics. Materials were packed into the quartz glass column of the inner diameter of 29 mm. The coarse sand represented a highly conductive region connected from the top to the bottom of the sample with the exception of three thin (2-3 mm) separation layers made up of the medium coarse sand. Three discs of fine ceramics formed slow flow regions. Infiltration experiments were monitored by neutron radiography at two different beamlines to produce two-dimensional (2D) projections. The CWL experiment was monitored at NEUTRA station with an acquisition time of 16 seconds per projection and the CWF experiment was visualized at BOA station with an acquisition time of 0.25 seconds per projection. Both stations are located at the Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland. The acquired radiograms of the dry sample were subtracted from all subsequent radiograms to determine the water thickness in projections. From series of corrected radiograms taken at the different angles three-dimensional (3D) image was reconstructed for steady state stage of the CWL experiment and for the entire CWF experiment. Then the series of 3D images mapped the wetting of the porous system over the corresponding phase of infiltration process. The

  4. Wet Grasslands as a Green Infrastructure for Ecological Sustainability: Wader Conservation in Southern Sweden as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Manton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biosphere Reserves aim at being role models for biodiversity conservation. This study focuses on the unsuccessful conservation of waders (Charadrii on wet grasslands in the Kristianstad Vattenrike Biosphere Reserve (KVBR in southern Sweden. Predation on nests and young has been proposed as one reason contributing to the decline of waders. We explored this hypothesis by comparing two landscapes, one with declining (KVBR and one with stable (Östergötland wader populations on managed wet grasslands in southern Sweden. Specifically, we tested three predictions linked to predation on wader nests and young, namely that (1 the relative abundance of avian predators and waders; (2 the avian predator abundance; and (3 the predation rate on artificial wader nests, should all be higher in declining versus stable populations. All predictions were clearly supported. Nevertheless, predation may not be the ultimate factor causing wader population declines. We discuss the cumulative effects of landscape change linked to increased food resources for predators, reduced wet grassland patch size and quality. Holistic analyses of multiple wet grassland landscapes as social-ecological systems as case studies, including processes such as predation and other factors affecting waders, is a promising avenue towards collaborative learning for wet grasslands as a functional green infrastructure. However, if governance and management approaches can be improved is questionable without considerable investment in both ecological and social systems.

  5. Young People Envision the Future of Their Local Area: An Explorative Study from the Wet Tropics, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet, Iris C.; Gooch, Margaret; Hickey, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    In this article we present the results from an exploratory study conducted in the Wet Tropics in Australia. The study was initiated as part of a larger research program to support the development of a water quality improvement plan. Seven schools were invited to participate in this study. Students were asked to develop visions for the future of…

  6. Advanced LabVIEW Labs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Eric D.

    1999-06-17

    In the world of computer-based data acquisition and control, the graphical interface program LabVIEW from National Instruments is so ubiquitous that in many ways it has almost become the laboratory standard. To date, there have been approximately fifteen books concerning LabVIEW, but Professor Essick's treatise takes on a completely different tack than all of the previous discussions. In the more standard treatments of the ways and wherefores of LabVIEW such as LabVIEW Graphical Programming: Practical Applications in Instrumentation and Control by Gary W. Johnson (McGraw Hill, NY 1997), the emphasis has been instructing the reader how to program LabVIEW to create a Virtual Instrument (VI) on the computer for interfacing to a particular instruments. LabVIEW is written in G a graphical programming language developed by National Instruments. In the past the emphasis has been on training the experimenter to learn G . Without going into details here, G incorporates the usual loops, arithmetic expressions, etc., found in many programming languages, but in an icon (graphical) environment. The net result being that LabVIEW contains all of the standard methods needed for interfacing to instruments, data acquisition, data analysis, graphics, and also methodology to incorporate programs written in other languages into LabVIEW. Historically, according to Professor Essick, he developed a series of experiments for an upper division laboratory course for computer-based instrumentation. His observation was that while many students had the necessary background in computer programming languages, there were students who had virtually no concept about writing a computer program let alone a computer- based interfacing program. Thus the beginnings of a concept for not only teaching computer- based instrumentation techniques, but aiso a method for the beginner to experience writing a com- puter program. Professor Essick saw LabVIEW as the perfect environment in which to teach

  7. Advanced LabVIEW Labs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Eric D.

    1999-06-17

    In the world of computer-based data acquisition and control, the graphical interface program LabVIEW from National Instruments is so ubiquitous that in many ways it has almost become the laboratory standard. To date, there have been approximately fifteen books concerning LabVIEW, but Professor Essick's treatise takes on a completely different tack than all of the previous discussions. In the more standard treatments of the ways and wherefores of LabVIEW such as LabVIEW Graphical Programming: Practical Applications in Instrumentation and Control by Gary W. Johnson (McGraw Hill, NY 1997), the emphasis has been instructing the reader how to program LabVIEW to create a Virtual Instrument (VI) on the computer for interfacing to a particular instruments. LabVIEW is written in "G" a graphical programming language developed by National Instruments. In the past the emphasis has been on training the experimenter to learn "G". Without going into details here, "G" incorporates the usual loops, arithmetic expressions, etc., found in many programming languages, but in an icon (graphical) environment. The net result being that LabVIEW contains all of the standard methods needed for interfacing to instruments, data acquisition, data analysis, graphics, and also methodology to incorporate programs written in other languages into LabVIEW. Historically, according to Professor Essick, he developed a series of experiments for an upper division laboratory course for computer-based instrumentation. His observation was that while many students had the necessary background in computer programming languages, there were students who had virtually no concept about writing a computer program let alone a computer- based interfacing program. Thus the beginnings of a concept for not only teaching computer- based instrumentation techniques, but aiso a method for the beginner to experience writing a com- puter program. Professor Essick saw LabVIEW as the "perfect environment in which to teach

  8. Sensitivity study of the wet deposition schemes in the modelling of the Fukushima accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quérel, Arnaud; Quélo, Denis; Roustan, Yelva; Mathieu, Anne; Kajino, Mizuo; Sekiyama, Thomas; Adachi, Kouji; Didier, Damien; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2016-04-01

    The Fukushima-Daiichi release of radioactivity is a relevant event to study the atmospheric dispersion modelling of radionuclides. Actually, the atmospheric deposition onto the ground may be studied through the map of measured Cs-137 established consecutively to the accident. The limits of detection were low enough to make the measurements possible as far as 250km from the nuclear power plant. This large scale deposition has been modelled with the Eulerian model ldX. However, several weeks of emissions in multiple weather conditions make it a real challenge. Besides, these measurements are accumulated deposition of Cs-137 over the whole period and do not inform of deposition mechanisms involved: in-cloud, below-cloud, dry deposition. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis is performed in order to understand wet deposition mechanisms. It has been shown in a previous study (Quérel et al, 2016) that the choice of the wet deposition scheme has a strong impact on the assessment of the deposition patterns. Nevertheless, a "best" scheme could not be highlighted as it depends on the selected criteria: the ranking differs according to the statistical indicators considered (correlation, figure of merit in space and factor 2). A possibility to explain the difficulty to discriminate between several schemes was the uncertainties in the modelling, resulting from the meteorological data for instance. Since the move of the plume is not properly modelled, the deposition processes are applied with an inaccurate activity in the air. In the framework of the SAKURA project, an MRI-IRSN collaboration, new meteorological fields at higher resolution (Sekiyama et al., 2013) were provided and allows to reconsider the previous study. An updated study including these new meteorology data is presented. In addition, a focus on several releases causing deposition in located areas during known period was done. This helps to better understand the mechanisms of deposition involved following the

  9. A Study of Cognitive Load for Enhancing Student’s Quantitative Literacy in Inquiry Lab Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuraeni, E.; Rahman, T.; Alifiani, D. P.; Khoerunnisa, R. S.

    2017-09-01

    Students often find it difficult to appreciate the relevance of the role of quantitative analysis and concept attainment in the science class. This study measured student cognitive load during the inquiry lab of the respiratory system to improve quantitative literacy. Participants in this study were 40 11th graders from senior high school in Indonesia. After students learned, their feelings about the degree of mental effort that it took to complete the learning tasks were measured by 28 self-report on a 4-point Likert scale. The Task Complexity Worksheet were used to asses processing quantitative information and paper based test were applied to assess participants’ concept achievements. The results showed that inquiry instructional induced a relatively low mental effort, high processing information and high concept achievments.

  10. A ten-week biochemistry lab project studying wild-type and mutant bacterial alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherow, D Scott

    2016-11-12

    This work describes a 10-week laboratory project studying wild-type and mutant bacterial alkaline phosphatase, in which students purify, quantitate, and perform kinetic assays on wild-type and selected mutants of the enzyme. Students also perform plasmid DNA purification, digestion, and gel analysis. In addition to simply learning important techniques, students acquire novel biochemical data in their kinetic analysis of mutant enzymes. The experiments are designed to build on students' work from week to week in a way that requires them to apply quantitative analysis and reasoning skills, reinforcing traditional textbook biochemical concepts. Students are assessed through lab reports focused on journal style writing, quantitative and conceptual question sheets, and traditional exams. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(6):555-564, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Study of wet precipitation and its chemical composition in South of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elba C. Teixeira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze the chemical composition of wet precipitation in samples collected at three stations in the Candiota region in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS. Samples were collected in 2004. Variables analyzed in wet precipitation were pH, conductivity, and concentration of Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2- F-, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, NH4+, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn, Pb, Ni, Cd, Co, and Cr. SO2 and NO2 distribution over the time were also evaluated. Results have showed that pH O objetivo deste estudo é analisar a composição química da precipitação úmida em amostras coletadas em três estações na região de Candiota no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul (RS Brasil. Amostras foram coletadas em 2004. Variáveis analisadas na precipitação úmida foram pH, condutividade e concentração de Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2- F-, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, NH4+, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn, Pb, Ni, Cd, Co e Cr. Distribuição no tempo de SO2 e NO2 também foi avaliada. Resultados mostraram que pH < 5,6 são encontrados em sua maioria no aeroporto de Candiota (85%, seguidos pelo Aceguá (72% e Três Lagoas (65%. Fator de Enriquecimento dos íons estudados na deposição úmida revelou maior enriquecimento de Ca2+ e SO4² em Três Lagoas. Análise Fatorial aplicada aos metais e íons maiores permitiu identificação de fontes maiores. Enquanto Cl-, Na+, Mg2+ são de origem marinha, SO4(2-, NO3-, NH4+, F- são provenientes de fontes antropogênicas. Exceto Fe e Mn originários de poeira do solo, os metais estudados mostraram ter influência antropogênica. A média da concentração de SO2 e NO2, bem como SO4(2- e NO3- na precipitação úmida na região de Candiota mostrou maiores concentrações durante os meses mais quentes.

  12. Dry and wet "deposition" studies of the degradation of cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Ramírez, S.

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of portland cement mortars with SO2 gaseous pollutant and artificial 'acid rain' solution has been examined using laboratory exposure chambers, with realistic presentation rates of pollutants. The mortar were previously carbonated to produce superficial carbonation. Two mortars with different w/c ratio and hence specific surface were prepared and exposed into the chambers. For dry deposition of SO2 pollutant gas, the important roles of water and water plus oxidant in increasing chemical reaction are readily revealed. Further, accessible porosity also increases reaction through increased times of reaction of pollutant with the mortars. Interestingly, in the absence of deliberate surface wetting, the presence of oxidant, ozone, leads to a reduction in the already limited extent of reaction. Wet deposition studies using artificial 'acid rain' solution result in gypsum formation, which is more extensive for mortars of increased w/c ratios.

    Se han realizado ensayos de laboratorio de simulación de los procesos ambientales de "deposición" seca y húmeda sobre morteros de cemento portland, estudiándose las reacciones que se producen con el contaminante SO2 ("deposición" seca y la disolución de 'lluvia acida' ("deposición" húmeda. Los morteros de cemento se carbonataron para favorecer la carbonatación superficial de los mismos. Se prepararon morteros con dos relaciones a/c con el fin de estudiar la influencia que la variable superficie específica tenía en el proceso de deterioro de dichos materiales. En los estudios de deposición seca con SO2 como gas agresivo se ha visto la importancia que el agua y el agua junto a un oxidante tienen en la reacción del contaminante con los componentes del mortero. La superficie específica Juega un papel importante, ya que al aumentar, aumenta la reacción con el contaminante. La reacción en presencia de oxidante, (SO2+O3

  13. Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in-field habitats: a case study from the Pevensey Levels, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, R. B.; Acreman, M. C.

    Historical drainage improvements have created complex hydrological regimes in many low-lying, wet coastal grassland areas. The manipulation of ditch water levels is a common management technique to maintain important in-stream and in-field habitats in such areas. However, in wet grasslands with low soil conductivities the water table in the centre of each field is not closely coupled to variations in ditch stage. Consequently rainfall and evaporation have a greater influence on the depth to water table and water table fluctuations within each field. In-field micro-topographic variations also lead to subtle variations in the hydrological regime and depth to water table that create a mosaic of different wetness conditions and habitats. The depth, duration, timing and frequency of flooding from accumulated rainfall, surface water and standing groundwater also influence the availability of suitable in-field habitats. Land drainage models are often used for studies of wet grasslands, but tend to be more complex and require more field variables than saturated zone models. This paper applies a 3D groundwater flow model, MODFLOW, to simulate groundwater levels within a single field in a wet coastal grassland underlain by a low permeability sequence and located in the central part of Pevensey Levels, Sussex, UK. At this scale, the influence of vertical leakage and regional groundwater flow within the deeper, more permeable part of the sequence is likely to be small. Whilst available data were not sufficient to attempt a full calibration, it was found that the sequence could be represented as a single, unconfined sequence having uniform hydraulic properties. The model also confirmed that evaporation and rainfall are the dominant components of the water balance. Provided certain information requirements are met, a distributed groundwater model, such as MODFLOW, can benefit situations where greater hydrological detail in space and time is required to represent complex and

  14. Experimental and numerical studies on the treatment of wet astronaut trash by forced-convection drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arquiza, J. M. R. Apollo; Morrow, Robert; Remiker, Ross; Hunter, Jean B.

    2017-09-01

    During long-term space missions, astronauts generate wet trash, including food containers with uneaten portions, moist hygiene wipes and wet paper towels. This waste produces two problems: the loss of water and the generation of odors and health hazards by microbial growth. These problems are solved by a closed-loop, forced-convection, heat-pump drying system which stops microbial activity by both pasteurization and desiccation, and recovers water in a gravity-independent porous media condensing heat exchanger. A transient, pseudo-homogeneous continuum model for the drying of wet ersatz trash was formulated for this system. The model is based on the conservation equations for energy and moisture applied to the air and solid phases and includes the unique trash characteristic of having both dry and wet solids. Experimentally determined heat and mass transfer coefficients, together with the moisture sorption equilibrium relationship for the wet material are used in the model. The resulting system of differential equations is solved by the finite-volume method as implemented by the commercial software COMSOL. Model simulations agreed well with experimental data under certain conditions. The validated model will be used in the optimization of the entire closed-loop system consisting of fan, air heater, dryer vessel, heat-pump condenser, and heat-recovery modules.

  15. A numerical study of liquid film distribution in wet natural gas pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X. Q.; Zhao, Y. L.; Xu, W. W.; Guan, X. R.; Wang, J. J.; Jin, Y. H.

    2016-05-01

    The software of FLUENT was used to simulate the gas-liquid turbulent flow in wet natural gas pipeline of the Puguang gas field. The RNG k- ɛ model was used to simulate the turbulent flow, the Mixture model was used to simulate gas-liquid mixed phase, and the Eulerian wall film model was used to simulate the formation and development of liquid film. The gas phase flow field characteristics, the distribution of the axial and circumferential film thickness, and the droplet distribution in the pipeline were studied when the gas Reynolds number is 7.72 × 106(10.8m/s). The results can be concluded as followed: Liquid film distributes unevenly along the circumferential direction and mostly distributes under the pipeline wall because of gravity. The impact of the dean vortex and centrifugal force in the straight section can also influence the liquid film distribution. The wall shear stress distributions in horizontal straight pipeline is concerned with liquid membrane volatility, and consistent with the film volatility period, the wall shear stress reached the maximum value in a certain position of wave front. The influence of the wall shear stress on the film fluctuation in inclined pipeline is weakened by gravity and other factors.

  16. Lab-on-a-brane: A novel physiologically relevant planar arterial model to study transendothelial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhwani, Karim Ismail

    The tremendous quality of life impact notwithstanding, cardiovascular diseases and Cancer add up to over US$ 700bn each year in financial costs alone. Aging and population growth are expected to further expand the problem space while drug research and development remain expensive. However, preclinical costs can be substantially mitigated by substituting animal models with in vitro devices that accurately model human cardiovascular transport. Here we present a novel physiologically relevant lab-on-a-brane that simulates in vivo pressure, flow, strain, and shear waveforms associated with normal and pathological conditions in large and small blood vessels for studying molecular transport across the endothelial monolayer. The device builds upon previously demonstrated integrated microfluidic loop design by: (a) introducing nanoscale pores in the substrate membrane to enable transmembrane molecular transport, (b) transforming the substrate membrane into a nanofibrous matrix for 3D smooth muscle cell (SMC) tissue culture, (c) integrating electrospinning fabrication methods, (d) engineering an invertible sandwich cell culture device architecture, and (e) devising a healthy co-culture mechanism for human arterial endothelial cell (HAEC) monolayer and multiple layers of human smooth muscle cells (HSMC) to accurately mimic arterial anatomy. Structural and mechanical characterization was conducted using confocal microscopy, SEM, stress/strain analysis, and infrared spectroscopy. Transport was characterized using FITC-Dextran hydraulic permeability protocol. Structure and transport characterization successfully demonstrate device viability as a physiologically relevant arterial mimic for testing transendothelial transport. Thus, our lab-on-a-brane provides a highly effective and efficient, yet considerably inexpensive, physiologically relevant alternative for pharmacokinetic evaluation; possibly reducing animals used in pre-clinical testing, clinical trials cost from false

  17. Numerical study of the effects of surface topography and chemistry on the wetting transition using the string method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanan, E-mail: ynzhang@suda.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Ren, Weiqing, E-mail: matrw@nus.edu.sg [Department of Mathematics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119076 (Singapore); Institute of High Performance Computing, Singapore 138632 (Singapore)

    2014-12-28

    Droplets on a solid surface patterned with microstructures can exhibit the composite Cassie-Baxter (CB) state or the wetted Wenzel state. The stability of the CB state is determined by the energy barrier separating it from the wetted state. In this work, we study the CB to Wenzel transition using the string method [E et al., J. Chem. Phys. 126, 164103 (2007); W. Ren and E. Vanden-Eijnden, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134105 (2013)]. We compute the transition states and energy barriers for a three-dimensional droplet on patterned surfaces. The liquid-vapor coexistence is modeled using the mean field theory. Numerical results are obtained for surfaces patterned with straight pillars and nails, respectively. It is found that on both type of surfaces, wetting occurs via infiltration of the liquid in a single groove. The reentrant geometry of nails creates large energy barrier for the wetting of the solid surface compared to straight pillars. We also study the effect of surface chemistry, pillar height, and inter-pillar spacing on the energy barrier and compare it with nails.

  18. Study on property and stability mechanism of LAB-AEO-4 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kaifei; Ge, Jijiang; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Guicai; Jiang, Ping

    2017-04-01

    The behaviors of binary blending systems of fatty alcohol polyoxyethylene ether (AEO-4) blended with the laurel amide betaine (LAB) was investigated at 80°C,the results indicated that the optimal ratio of the mixed system of LAB-AEO-4 was 5:2. The stability mechanism of LAB-AEO-4 system was analyzed from three aspects of dynamic surface tension,gas permeation rate and surface rheology.The results showed that the tension of mixed system was easier to achieve balance,the constant of gas permeation rate of the mixed system decreased by about 7% and the elastic modulus and dilational modulus increased by about 2 times compared with the single LAB system.

  19. Forest structure in low diversity tropical forests: a study of Hawaiian wet and dry forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Ostertag; F. Inman-Narahari; S. Cordell; C.P. Giardina; L. Sack

    2014-01-01

    The potential influence of diversity on ecosystem structure and function remains a topic of significant debate, especially for tropical forests where diversity can range widely. We used Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) methodology to establish forest dynamics plots in montane wet forest and lowland dry forest on Hawai‘i Island. We compared the species...

  20. Study of Transitions between Wetting States on Microcavity Arrays by Optical Transmission Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Emil; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard; Smistrup, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    this threshold, the transitions between the Cassie and the Cassie-impregnating states are reversible, whereas above this threshold, irreversible transitions to the Wenzel state start to occur. The transitions between the different wetting states can be explained by taking into account both the Young...

  1. TELECOM LAB

    CERN Multimedia

    IT-CS-TEL Section

    2001-01-01

    The Telecom Lab is moving from Building 104 to Building 31 S-026, with its entrance via the ramp on the side facing Restaurant n°2. The help desk will thus be closed to users on Tuesday 8 May. On May 9, the Lab will only be able to deal with problems of a technical nature at the new address and it will not be able to process any new subscription requests throughout the week from 7 to 11 May. We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause and thank you for your understanding.

  2. Studying the Aspects of Knowledge Creation in the LAB Studio Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari-Pekka Heikkinen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The organisations of higher education are constantly changing. Universities, colleges, private schools and online universities refine their pedagogical methods and learning models in a competitive market. This article is a study on whether one such model helps students to gain new knowledge. A study of the LAB studio model (LSM, which is a pedagogical model developing connections between working-life based problems and the recognition and development of business-related prototypes and start-up companies, is presented. The LSM, theoretically grounded in a constructivist view of learning with a project-based education at its core, has the key goal of educating entrepreneurial competences in higher education. Based on the case study, comprisinga literature review of knowledge creation and a survey, the qualitative results analysis suggests that LSM offers a promising support for knowledge creation. The results lead to the conclusion that LSM provides support especially for the various modes of the SECI model, such as socialisation and internalisation, and seems to support organisational knowledge creation aspects as well.

  3. Wet-snow avalanche interaction with a deflecting dam: field observations and numerical simulations in a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sovilla

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In avalanche-prone areas, deflecting dams are widely used to divert avalanches away from endangered objects. In recent years, their effectiveness has been questioned when several large and multiple avalanches have overrun such dams.

    In 2008, we were able to observe a large wet-snow avalanche, characterized by an high water content, that interacted with a deflecting dam and overflowed it at its lower end. To evaluate the dam's performance, we carried out an airborne laser scanning campaign immediately after the avalanche. This data, together with a video sequence made during the avalanche descent, provided a unique data set to study the dynamics of a wet dense snow avalanche and its flow behavior along a deflecting dam.

    To evaluate the effect of the complex flow field of the avalanche along the dam and to provide a basis for discussion of the residual risk, we performed numerical simulations using a two-dimensional dense snow avalanche dynamics model with entrainment.

    In comparison to dry dense snow avalanches, we found that wet-snow avalanches, with high water content, seem to be differently influenced by the local small-scale topography roughness. Rough terrain close to the dam deflected the flow to produce abrupt impacts with the dam. At the impact sites, instability waves were generated and increased the already large flow depths. The complex flow dynamics around the dam may produce large, local snow deposits. Furthermore, the high water content in the snow may decrease the avalanche internal friction angle, inducing wet-snow avalanches to spread further laterally than dry-snow avalanches.

    Based on our analysis, we made recommendations for designing deflecting dams and for residual risk analysis to take into account the effects of wet-snow avalanche flow.

  4. Living lab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieke Veerman; Tineke Kingma; Jacqueline van Alphen; Carolien Smits; Jan Jukema

    2017-01-01

    In Zwolle werken studenten en ouderen in co-creatie samen met andere partijen aan het ontwikkelen en implementeren van authentieke leeftijdsvriendelijke diensten. Daartoe heeft de opleiding Toegepaste Gerontologie van Hogeschool Windesheim samen met ouderen een living lab ontwikkeld. Het Living

  5. Study on wetting properties of periodical nanopatterns by a combinative technique of photolithography and laser interference lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yung-Lang

    2010-03-01

    This study presents the wetting properties, including hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and anisotropic behavior, of water droplets on the silicon wafer surface with periodical nanopatterns and hierarchical structures. This study fabricates one- and two-dimensional periodical nanopatterns using laser interference lithography (LIL). The fabrication of hierarchical structures was effectively achieved by combining photolithography and LIL techniques. Unlike conventional fabrication methods, the LIL technique is mainly used to control the large-area design of periodical nanopatterns in this study. The minimum feature size for each nanopattern is 100 nm. This study shows that the wetting behavior of one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and hierarchical patterns can be obtained, benefiting the development of surface engineering for microfluidic systems. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Vaginitis test - wet mount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wet prep - vaginitis; Vaginosis - wet mount; Trichomoniasis - wet mount; Vaginal candida - wet mount ... a rash, painful intercourse, or odor after intercourse. Trichomoniasis , a sexually transmitted disease. Vaginal yeast infection .

  7. A case study for efficient management of high throughput primary lab data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lange Matthias

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In modern life science research it is very important to have an efficient management of high throughput primary lab data. To realise such an efficient management, four main aspects have to be handled: (I long term storage, (II security, (III upload and (IV retrieval. Findings In this paper we define central requirements for a primary lab data management and discuss aspects of best practices to realise these requirements. As a proof of concept, we introduce a pipeline that has been implemented in order to manage primary lab data at the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK. It comprises: (I a data storage implementation including a Hierarchical Storage Management system, a relational Oracle Database Management System and a BFiler package to store primary lab data and their meta information, (II the Virtual Private Database (VPD implementation for the realisation of data security and the LIMS Light application to (III upload and (IV retrieve stored primary lab data. Conclusions With the LIMS Light system we have developed a primary data management system which provides an efficient storage system with a Hierarchical Storage Management System and an Oracle relational database. With our VPD Access Control Method we can guarantee the security of the stored primary data. Furthermore the system provides high performance upload and download and efficient retrieval of data.

  8. [Availability of resources for patients with wet age-related macular degeneration. Optimal study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaroli-Marano, R; Roura, M

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the availability of resources for patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD) in current clinical practice. Observational, cross-sectional and multicenter study. Eligible subjects were ≥ 18 years old, with primary/secondary active subfoveal AMD-related choroidal neovascularization diagnosed 12-18 months prior to inclusion in the study. A total of 266 patients were included (39 centers). The mean age (SD) was 76.1 (8.1) years, of whom 55.6% were female. According to the investigator assessment a median (Q1-Q3) of 20.0 (10.0-50.0) patients were visited weekly. A mean of 100.0 (45.0-250.0) were currently under treatment mainly performed in operating rooms (61.5%). Centers had 1.0 (1.0-2.0) operating rooms available for treatment 2.0 (2.0-5.0) days/week. In 74.4% they were located on different floors/buildings from ophthalmology services. Waiting time until visit was 40.0 (30.0-60.0) min, and duration of treatment was 20.0 (15.0-50.0) min. The time between request until medical visit was 20.0 (15.0-30.0) days, and from diagnosis to treatment was 7.0 (5.0-10.0) days. Clinicians considered there was insufficient staff for examinations (84.6%), and treatment (46.2%). About 30.8% and 20.5% mentioned lack of diagnostic tools, such as optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography. More resources for diagnosis and treatment of wAMD are required. These results, together with the current policy of reducing the budget in the Spanish Health System, could lead to possible delays in the diagnosis and treatment of wAMD. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental Study of Fatigue Damage Strength of Concrete Lining under Dry-Wet Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Dai, Jun; Zheng, Xuanrong; Zhang, Xinyan; Li, Ning

    2017-10-01

    The laboratory mortar test is used to simulate the actual force state of concrete lining in a dry-wet cycling environment of a high-temperature tunnel. The influence characteristics of temperature and the number of cycles on the lining concrete strength and strain are also explored. The test results suggest that the number of cycles has a great impact on the deterioration of the mechanical properties of the cement-based materials. During the early period, the higher the temperature, the more serious the loss of strength. As the number of cycle increases, the strength damage caused by dry-wet cycles gradually increases. Mortar test shows the fibbers have a good fatigue resistance. The quantitative results presented in this paper can be used as reference in similar projects.

  10. Raman scattering study of the phase transition in wet-spun films of lithium hyaluronate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineck, I.; Suleski, T. J.; Lee, S. A.; Rupprecht, A.

    2002-03-01

    Raman scattering experiments have been performed on wet-spun films of lithium hyaluronate as a function of relative humidity (RH). Near 84 percent RH several of the internal Raman modes, but not all, are observed to shift to different frequencies. These data indicate these modes are affected by the phase transition known to occur near this RH. The frequencies of the effected Raman modes return to their "normal" value after the phase transition has been passed.

  11. Unveiling the nucleon tensor charge at Jefferson Lab: A study of the SoLID case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Ye

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Future experiments at the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade, in particular, the Solenoidal Large Intensity Device (SoLID, aim at a very precise data set in the region where the partonic structure of the nucleon is dominated by the valence quarks. One of the main goals is to constrain the quark transversity distributions. We apply recent theoretical advances of the global QCD extraction of the transversity distributions to study the impact of future experimental data from the SoLID experiments. Especially, we develop a simple strategy based on the Hessian matrix analysis that allows one to estimate the uncertainties of the transversity quark distributions and their tensor charges extracted from SoLID data simulation. We find that the SoLID measurements with the proton and the effective neutron targets can improve the precision of the u- and d-quark transversity distributions up to one order of magnitude in the range 0.05

  12. Statistical gamma-ray decay studies at iThemba LABS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiedeking M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A program to study the γ-ray decay from the region of high-level density has been established at iThemba LABS, where a high-resolution gamma-ray detector array is used in conjunction with silicon particle-telescopes. Results from two recent projects are presented: 1 The 74Ge(α,α′γ reaction was used to investigate the Pygmy Dipole Resonance. The results were compared to (γ,γ′ data and indicate that the dipole states split into mixed isospin and relatively pure isovector excitations. 2 Data from the 95Mo(d,p reaction were used to develop a novel method for the determination of spins for low-lying discrete levels utilizing statistical γ-ray decay in the vicinity of the neutron separation energy. These results provide insight into the competition of (γ,n and (γ,γ′ reactions and highlights the need to correct for angular momentum barrier effects.

  13. Brief Online Training Enhances Competitive Performance: Findings of the BBC Lab UK Psychological Skills Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew M; Totterdell, Peter; MacDonald, Ian; Devonport, Tracey J; Friesen, Andrew P; Beedie, Christopher J; Stanley, Damian; Nevill, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In conjunction with BBC Lab UK, the present study developed 12 brief psychological skill interventions for online delivery. A protocol was designed that captured data via self-report measures, used video recordings to deliver interventions, involved a competitive concentration task against an individually matched computer opponent, and provided feedback on the effects of the interventions. Three psychological skills were used; imagery, self-talk, and if-then planning, with each skill directed to one of four different foci: outcome goal, process goal, instruction, or arousal-control. This resulted in 12 different intervention participant groups (randomly assigned) with a 13th group acting as a control. Participants (n = 44,742) completed a competitive task four times-practice, baseline, following an intervention, and again after repeating the intervention. Results revealed performance improved following practice with incremental effects for imagery-outcome, imagery-process, and self-talk-outcome and self-talk-process over the control group, with the same interventions increasing the intensity of effort invested, arousal and pleasant emotion. Arousal-control interventions associated with pleasant emotions, low arousal, and low effort invested in performance. Instructional interventions were not effective. Results offer support for the utility of online interventions in teaching psychological skills and suggest brief interventions that focus on increasing motivation, increased arousal, effort invested, and pleasant emotions were the most effective.

  14. Brief online training enhances competitive performance: Findings of the BBC Lab UK psychological skills intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Lane

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In conjunction with BBC Lab UK, the present study developed 12 brief psychological skill interventions for online delivery. A protocol was designed that captured data via self-report measures, used video recordings to deliver interventions, involved a competitive concentration task against an individually matched computer opponent, and provided feedback on the effects of the interventions. Three psychological skills were used; imagery, self-talk, and if-then planning, with each skill directed to one of four different foci: outcome goal, process goal, instruction, or arousal-control. This resulted in 12 different intervention participant groups (randomly assigned with a 13th group acting as a control. Participants (n = 44,742 completed a competitive task four times--practice, baseline, following an intervention, and again after repeating the intervention. Results revealed performance improved following practice with incremental effects for imagery-outcome, imagery-process, and self-talk over the control group, with the same interventions increasing the intensity of effort invested, and increasing arousal via pleasant emotions. Arousal-control interventions associated with pleasant emotions and low effort. Instructional interventions were not effective. Results offer support for the utility of online interventions in teaching psychological skills.

  15. Brief Online Training Enhances Competitive Performance: Findings of the BBC Lab UK Psychological Skills Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew M.; Totterdell, Peter; MacDonald, Ian; Devonport, Tracey J.; Friesen, Andrew P.; Beedie, Christopher J.; Stanley, Damian; Nevill, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In conjunction with BBC Lab UK, the present study developed 12 brief psychological skill interventions for online delivery. A protocol was designed that captured data via self-report measures, used video recordings to deliver interventions, involved a competitive concentration task against an individually matched computer opponent, and provided feedback on the effects of the interventions. Three psychological skills were used; imagery, self-talk, and if-then planning, with each skill directed to one of four different foci: outcome goal, process goal, instruction, or arousal-control. This resulted in 12 different intervention participant groups (randomly assigned) with a 13th group acting as a control. Participants (n = 44,742) completed a competitive task four times—practice, baseline, following an intervention, and again after repeating the intervention. Results revealed performance improved following practice with incremental effects for imagery-outcome, imagery-process, and self-talk-outcome and self-talk-process over the control group, with the same interventions increasing the intensity of effort invested, arousal and pleasant emotion. Arousal-control interventions associated with pleasant emotions, low arousal, and low effort invested in performance. Instructional interventions were not effective. Results offer support for the utility of online interventions in teaching psychological skills and suggest brief interventions that focus on increasing motivation, increased arousal, effort invested, and pleasant emotions were the most effective. PMID:27065904

  16. Performance of manual hyperinflation: a skills lab study among trained intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Frederique; Binnekade, Jan M; Middelhoek, Pauline; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of manual hyperinflation (MH) is to mobilize airway secretions and prevent sputum plugging in intubated and mechanically ventilated patients. With MH, the nurse applies a larger than normal breath with a slow inspiratory flow and, after an inspiratory pause, a high expiratory flow is created by completely releasing the resuscitation bag. This was a prospective observational study in a skills lab of a university hospital. Intensive care unit nurses performed MH procedures for an imaginary patient in three different compliance settings. Data were collected via direct video recordings and an air-flow analyzer. One hundred nurses participated. Video recordings demonstrated inappropriate performance of MH, reflected by the appearance of inspirations which were too rapid (53% of cases), absence of holds (60%), and absence of complete release of the resuscitation bag (78%). In the majority of cases the applied volumes were too large according to what was advised in the local guideline (80%). Peak inspiratory flow was 70 (range: 55-89) l/min for all compliance settings and peak expiratory flows were low: for over-compliant (46, range: 42-51), normal (51, range: 45-57), and noncompliant lungs (58, range: 52-64 l/min). Performance of MH by certified ICU nurses is far from appropriate. These results emphasize the necessity for clearer guidelines with explicit directions for this frequently applied procedure, if it is decided to practice it in the daily care of intubated and mechanically ventilated patients.

  17. Feasibility Study of Large Combined Function Magnets for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brindza P. D.; LeRose J. J.; Leung E. M.

    2005-05-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab has identified two new large spectrometers as Physics detectors for the project. The first is a 7.5 Gev/c 35 m-sr. spectrometer that requires a pair of identical Combined Function Superconducting Magnets (CFSM) that can simultaneously produce 1.5 T dipole fields and 4.5 T/m quadrupole fields inside a warm bore of 120 cm. The second is an 11 GeV/c 2 m-sr. spectrometer that requires a CFSM that simultaneously produces a dipole field of 4.0 T and a quadruple field of 3.0 T/m in a 60 cm warm bore. Magnetic designs using TOSCA 3D have been performed to realize the magnetic requirements, provide 3d fields for optics analysis and produce field and force information for the engineering feasibility of the magnets. A two-sector cos(theta)/cos(2theta) design with a low nominal current density, warm bore and warm iron design has been selected and analyzed. These low current densities are consistent with the limits for a cryostable winding. The current paper will summarize the requirement definition of these two magnets. The conceptual design arrived at during the feasibility study involving the choice of conductors, thermal and structural analyses will be presented. A discussion of the manufacturing approach and challenges will be provided.

  18. Enabling rapid behavioral ecotoxicity studies using an integrated lab-on-a-chip systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yushi; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-12-01

    Behavioral ecotoxicity tests are gaining an increasing recognition in environmental toxicology. Behavior of sensitive bioindicator species can change rapidly in response to an acute exposure to contaminants and thus has a much higher sensitivity as compared to conventional LC50 mortality tests. Furthermore, behavioral endpoints seems to be very good candidates to develop early-warning biomonitoring systems needed for rapid chemical risk assessment. Behavioral tests are non-invasive, fast, do not harm indicator organisms (behavioural changes are very rapid) and are thus fully compatible with 3R (Replacement - Reduction - Refinement) principle encouraging alternatives to conventional animal testing. These characteristics are essential when designing improved ecotoxicity tests for chemical risk assessment. In this work, we present a pilot development of miniaturized Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) devices for studying toxin avoidance behaviors of small aquatic crustaceans. As an investigative tool, LOCs represent a new direction that may miniaturize and revolutionize behavioral ecotoxicology. Specifically our innovative microfluidic prototype: (i) enables convening "caging" of specimens for real-time videomicroscopy; (ii) eliminates the evaporative water loss thus providing an opportunity for long-term behavioral studies; (iii) exploits laminar fluid flow under low Reynolds numbers to generate discrete domains and gradients enabling for the first time toxin avoidance studies on small aquatic crustaceans; (iv) integrates off-the-chip mechatronic interfaces and video analysis algorithms for single animal movement analysis. We provide evidence that by merging innovative bioelectronic and biomicrofluidic technologies we can deploy inexpensive and reliable systems for culture, electronic tracking and complex computational analysis of behavior of bioindicator organisms.

  19. Enamel Wetness Effects on Microshear Bond Strength of Different Bonding Agents (Adhesive Systems): An in vitro Comparative Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Mishra, Vinay K

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of enamel wetness on microshear bond strength using different adhesive systems. To evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on dry enamel; to evaluate microshear bond strength of three bonding agents on wet enamel; and to compare microshear bond strength of three different bonding agents on dry and wet enamel. Sixty extracted noncarious human premolars were selected for this study. Flat enamel surfaces of approximately 3 mm were obtained by grinding the buccal surfaces of premolars with water-cooled diamond disks. This study evaluated one etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Single Bond 2) and two self-etching adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Xeno-V). The specimens were divided into two groups (n = 30). Group I (dry) was air-dried for 30 seconds and in group II (wet) surfaces were blotted with absorbent paper to remove excess water. These groups were further divided into six subgroups (n = 10) according to the adhesives used. The resin composite, Filtek Z 250, was bonded to flat enamel surfaces that had been treated with one of the adhesives, following the manufacturer's instructions. After being stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours, bonded specimens were stressed in universal testing machine (Fig. 3) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were evaluated with one-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), t-test, and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests (a = 0.05). The two-way ANOVA and Tukey's Multiple Post hoc tests showed significant differences among adhesive systems, but wetness did not influence microshear bond strength (p = 0.1762). The one-way ANOVA and t-test showed that the all-in-one adhesive (Xeno-V) was the only material influenced by the presence of water on the enamel surface. Xeno-V showed significantly higher microshear bond strength when the enamel was kept wet. Single Bond 2 adhesive showed significantly higher microshear bond strength as compared with Xeno-V adhesive but no

  20. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... if low oxygen pressure or long reaction times were used. The reaction products derived from the experiment in which quinoline was mostly decomposed were studied with respect to biological degradation. The results showed that these products were highly digestible under activated sludge treatment....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  1. The Study on Virtual Medical Instrument based on LabVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengwei, Li; Limei, Zhang; Xiaoming, Hu

    2005-01-01

    With the increasing performance of computer, the virtual instrument technology has greatly advanced over the years, and then virtual medical instrument technology becomes available. This paper presents the virtual medical instrument, and then as an example, an application of a signal acquisition, processing and analysis system using LabVIEW is also given.

  2. A Study of the Literature on Lab-Based Instruction in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttick, Gillian; Drayton, Brian; Cohen, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the practitioner literature on lab-based instruction in biology in "The American Biology Teacher" between 2007 and 2012. We investigated what laboratory learning looks like in biology classrooms, what topics are addressed, what instructional methods and activities are described, and what is being learned about student…

  3. Effectiveness of lab-work learning environments in and out of school : A cluster randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itzek-Greulich, Heike; Flunger, Barbara|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412516322; Vollmer, Christian; Nagengast, Benjamin; Rehm, Markus; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The issue of how to increase student motivation and achievement in science subjects is considered to be a major challenge in modern school systems. Lab-work learning environments in which students get direct (hands-on) experience with science content that is related to their everyday lives are

  4. Forest structure in low-diversity tropical forests: a study of Hawaiian wet and dry forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostertag, Rebecca; Inman-Narahari, Faith; Cordell, Susan; Giardina, Christian P; Sack, Lawren

    2014-01-01

    The potential influence of diversity on ecosystem structure and function remains a topic of significant debate, especially for tropical forests where diversity can range widely. We used Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) methodology to establish forest dynamics plots in montane wet forest and lowland dry forest on Hawai'i Island. We compared the species diversity, tree density, basal area, biomass, and size class distributions between the two forest types. We then examined these variables across tropical forests within the CTFS network. Consistent with other island forests, the Hawai'i forests were characterized by low species richness and very high relative dominance. The two Hawai'i forests were floristically distinct, yet similar in species richness (15 vs. 21 species) and stem density (3078 vs. 3486/ha). While these forests were selected for their low invasive species cover relative to surrounding forests, both forests averaged 5->50% invasive species cover; ongoing removal will be necessary to reduce or prevent competitive impacts, especially from woody species. The montane wet forest had much larger trees, resulting in eightfold higher basal area and above-ground biomass. Across the CTFS network, the Hawaiian montane wet forest was similar to other tropical forests with respect to diameter distributions, density, and aboveground biomass, while the Hawai'i lowland dry forest was similar in density to tropical forests with much higher diversity. These findings suggest that forest structural variables can be similar across tropical forests independently of species richness. The inclusion of low-diversity Pacific Island forests in the CTFS network provides an ∼80-fold range in species richness (15-1182 species), six-fold variation in mean annual rainfall (835-5272 mm yr(-1)) and 1.8-fold variation in mean annual temperature (16.0-28.4°C). Thus, the Hawaiian forest plots expand the global forest plot network to enable testing of ecological theory for

  5. The Study of LeachateTreatment by Using Three Advanced Oxidation Process Based Wet air Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behroz Karimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300[degree sign] as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter.

  6. The study of leachate treatment by using three advanced oxidation process based wet air oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtari Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300° as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter.

  7. Studies on the synthesis of cerium activated yttrium aluminate phosphor by wet-chemical route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovici, Elisabeth-Jeanne; Stefan, Maria; Imre-Lucaci, Florica; Muresan, Laura; Bica, Ecaterina; Indrea, Emil; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian

    2009-08-01

    The synthesis of cerium activated yttrium aluminum garnet Y 3Al5O12:Ce by the wet-chemical synthesis route is reported. Y-Ce-Al precursors were prepared using the reagent simultaneous addition technique SimAdd from Y-Al-Ce nitrate mixture and urea and subsequently transformed into phosphor samples. The influence of the thermal synthesis regime and flux on the phosphor quality was investigated in order to obtain Y 3Al5O12:Ce fine powders with pure cubic structure and quite good photoluminescent properties. Attempts has been made at establishing a correlation between luminescent properties and morpho-structural parameters of powders.

  8. An experimental study of friction between wet and dry human skin and nonwoven fabrics

    OpenAIRE

    Falloon, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Many people who have urinary incontinence manage it with the use of absorbent hygiene products, such as pads. Long-term use of these products can lead to abrasion by friction between the topsheet (a nonwoven fabric) and the skin, and is exacerbated when the skin is wet. However, the nature and mechanisms of friction between skin and nonwovens are poorly understood, hindering progress to improve products. Most work on skin friction to date has involved the use of skin surrogates or real skin i...

  9. Analysis of wet granulation process with Plackett-Burman design--case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyna-Orlewicz, Krzysztof; Jachowicz, Renata

    2011-01-01

    According to Process Analytical Technology perspective, drug product quality should be ensured by manufacturing process design. Initial step of the process analysis is investigation of critical process parameters (CPPs). It is generally accepted to type the CPPs based on project team knowledge and experience [5]. This paper describes the use of Design of Experiments tool for selection of the CPPs. Seven factors of wet granulation process were investigated for criticality. Low and high levels of each factor represented maximal and minimal settings of wide operational ranges. Granulates were produced in line with Plackett-Burman experimental matrix, blended with extra-granular excipients and compressed into tablets. Semi-products and final products were tested. Out of specification result of any critical quality attribute was treated as critical failure. The high-shear granulation factors, i.e. quantity of binding solution, rotational speed of impeller and wet massing time were considered of critical importance. Operational ranges of the parameters were optimized. The process performance was confirmed in qualification trials.

  10. Experimental study of the efficiency of steam injection on wet-steam turbine stator blade cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomyakov, S. V.; Alexeev, R. A.; Gavrilov, I. Y.; Gribin, V. G.; Tishchenko, A. A.; Tishchenko, V. A.; Popov, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    Currently, in order to decrease the negative effects caused by the presence of a discrete phase in the flow path of steam turbines stages operating in wet-steam area, different technical solutions are apply. These methods reduce the number of coarse droplets and wetness of working medium. The implementation of erosion reduction methods requires modifying surfaces of flow path, which can significantly affect the efficiency of the steam turbine. For example application of intrachanel moisture removing and steam injection needs changes of the stator blades surfaces. This article is a part of researches cycle about the efficiency of steam injection on the stator blade surface as the main method of coarse liquid particles diameters reduction in the last stages of high-power steam turbines. The paper presents the results of the analysis and comparison of experimental research unmodified profile to the profile of the stator blade changed by injection slot. The comparison of the profile losses considered blades is present. The analysis of the experimental results showed the feasibility and efficiency of this method of coarse liquid particles diameters reduction in the last stages of high-power steam turbines.

  11. Workspace: LAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, Thomas; Lundsgaard, Christina; Nørskov, Eva-Carina

    2007-01-01

    På mange arbejdspladser viger man tilbage fra at inddrage medarbejderne når der igangsættes større forandringer. Workspace:lab er et bud på en inddragende udviklingsproces hvor dialog og eksperimenter står i centrum. Ved at samle såvel medarbejdere som ledelse og rådgivere på et mindre antal work...... workshops over en kortere tidsperiode skabes der energi og fremdrift i processen samtidig med at forløbet er kompakt og har klart definerede start- og slutpunkter....

  12. Arts and design as translational mechanisms for academic entrepreneurship: The metaLAB at Harvard case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simeone, Luca; Secundo, Giustina; Schiuma, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    role in connecting metaLAB to external stakeholders and in activating multiple value drivers. The adoption of arts- and design-based initiatives allows the translation of different needs and wants of stakeholders into shared meanings, but also supports emotional and cognitive engagement and creative...... and divergent viewpoints. This paper contributes to existing studies focusing on how arts-based initiatives can support organizations in exploiting their potential for organizational value creation....

  13. Forest structure in low-diversity tropical forests: a study of Hawaiian wet and dry forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ostertag

    Full Text Available The potential influence of diversity on ecosystem structure and function remains a topic of significant debate, especially for tropical forests where diversity can range widely. We used Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS methodology to establish forest dynamics plots in montane wet forest and lowland dry forest on Hawai'i Island. We compared the species diversity, tree density, basal area, biomass, and size class distributions between the two forest types. We then examined these variables across tropical forests within the CTFS network. Consistent with other island forests, the Hawai'i forests were characterized by low species richness and very high relative dominance. The two Hawai'i forests were floristically distinct, yet similar in species richness (15 vs. 21 species and stem density (3078 vs. 3486/ha. While these forests were selected for their low invasive species cover relative to surrounding forests, both forests averaged 5->50% invasive species cover; ongoing removal will be necessary to reduce or prevent competitive impacts, especially from woody species. The montane wet forest had much larger trees, resulting in eightfold higher basal area and above-ground biomass. Across the CTFS network, the Hawaiian montane wet forest was similar to other tropical forests with respect to diameter distributions, density, and aboveground biomass, while the Hawai'i lowland dry forest was similar in density to tropical forests with much higher diversity. These findings suggest that forest structural variables can be similar across tropical forests independently of species richness. The inclusion of low-diversity Pacific Island forests in the CTFS network provides an ∼80-fold range in species richness (15-1182 species, six-fold variation in mean annual rainfall (835-5272 mm yr(-1 and 1.8-fold variation in mean annual temperature (16.0-28.4°C. Thus, the Hawaiian forest plots expand the global forest plot network to enable testing of ecological

  14. Lab-on-a-chip devices for global health: past studies and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Curtis D; Linder, Vincent; Sia, Samuel K

    2007-01-01

    A rapidly emerging field in lab-on-a-chip (LOC) research is the development of devices to improve the health of people in developing countries. In this review, we identify diseases that are most in need of new health technologies, discuss special design criteria for LOC devices to be deployed in a variety of resource-poor settings, and review past research into LOC devices for global health. We focus mainly on diagnostics, the nearest-term application in this field.

  15. Hydrate formation during wet granulation studied by spectroscopic methods and multivariate analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna; Rantanen, Jukka; Karjalainen, Milja

    2002-01-01

    ) Raman spectroscopy was compared with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) in following hydrate formation of drugs during wet granulation (off-line). To perform an at-line process analysis, the effect of water addition was monitored by NIR spectroscopy and principal components analysis (PCA). The changes...... gave information related to the drug molecule itself. The XRPD confirmed the spectroscopic results. PCA with three principal components explained 99.9 of the spectral variation in the second derivative NIR spectra. CONCLUSIONS: Both CCD Raman and NIR spectroscopic methods can be applied to monitoring...... in the crystal arrangements were verified by using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). RESULTS: Hydrate formation of theophylline and caffeine could be followed by CCD Raman spectroscopy. The NIR and Raman spectroscopic results were consistent with each other. NIR revealed the state of water, and Raman spectroscopy...

  16. Characterizing the variability in chemical composition of flowback and produced waters - results from lab and field studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilke, Franziska D. H.; Schmid, Franziska E.; Zhu, Yaling; Lipińska, Olga; Konieczyńska, Monika

    2017-04-01

    The huge volumes and unknown composition of flowback and produced waters cause major public concerns about the environmental and social compatibility of hydraulic fracturing and the exploitation of gas from unconventional reservoirs. Flowback and produced waters contain not only residues of fracking additives but also chemical species that are dissolved from the target shales themselves. Shales are a heterogeneous mixture of minerals, organic matter, and formation water and little is actually understood about the fluid-rock interactions occurring during hydraulic fracturing of the shales and their effects on the chemical composition of flowback and produced water. To overcome this knowledge gap, interactions of different shales with different artificial stimulation fluids were studied in lab experiments under ambient and elevated temperature and pressure conditions. These lab experiments showed clearly that fluid-rock interactions change the chemical composition of the initial stimulation fluid and that geochemistry of the fractured shale is relevant for understanding flowback water composition. In addition, flowback water samples were taken after hydraulic fracturing of one horizontal well in Pomeranian region, Poland and investigated for their chemical composition. With this presentation, results from lab and field studies will be presented and compared to decipher possible controls on chemical compositions of flowback and produced water.

  17. A Positive Psychology Intervention in a Hindu Community: The Pilot Study of the Hero Lab Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Siddhi; Qureshi, Adil; Galiatsatos, Panagis

    2016-12-01

    India has high rates of mental health issues among its youth and low-income communities experience a disproportionate amount of depression and suicide. Positive psychology, the act of promoting well-being, could be used as a tool to promote wellness and help improve the mental health of youth living in slum areas of India. A pilot positively psychology program, "The Hero Lab", was conducted in a migratory slum in Worli, Mumbai, with trained Hindu community leaders implementing the interventions toward at-risk Hindu youth. The curriculum's impact showed statistical improvement (p positive psychology interventions may be an important tool in improving mental health in at-risk children.

  18. Study on structure and wetting characteristic of cattail fibers as natural materials for oil sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shengbin; Dong, Ting; Xu, Guangbiao; Wang, Fumei

    2016-12-01

    Cattail fiber is considered as one of the biomasses for oil sorption purposes. In this work, the unique structure and wetting characteristic, as well as the basic mechanisms governing oil uptake of cattail fibers were investigated. Cattail fibers grow in tufts with down-like structure consisting of root, stem, seed and several fibers. A single cattail fiber was bamboo-shaped exhibiting 4-dimensional open spaces with fineness varying between 10 and 17.5 μm, average length at 7.9 ± 1.2 mm. The skeleton of the fiber consists of lignocellulose coated by a hydrophobic wax coating with 45.41% of crystallinity. The exceptional chemical, physical and microstructural properties enable the cattail fiber to be highly hydrophobic and oleophilic. The water droplets could stand on the fibers' surfaces with the contact angles more than 130°, while oil droplets disappear quickly from the fibers' surfaces within several seconds. When used as the sorbent for oil, cattail fibers were found to absorb about 12 g of oil per gram of fibers and retained over 88% of absorbed oil even after 24 h dripping. The unique structure of cattail fibers played an important role in oil sorption. The result proposed that cattail fibers are a promising natural source for the production of oil absorbents.

  19. Preliminary study of Conbercept injected intravitreally for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the preliminary efficacy of conbercept injected intravitreally for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration(wAMD.METHODS:Seventeen wAMD patients(18 eyeswere selected to receive conbercept injection. All patients were given a single conbercept injection every month, 3 times. Before and after 1, 2, 3mo of the injection, the best corrected visual acuity(BCVA, intraocular pressure(IOP, measured by Non-contact tonometer, fundus photography, fundus fluorescein angiography(FFA, indocyanine green angiography(ICG, optical coherence tomography(OCTexamination and the complications incidence were compared.RESULTS:Three months after conbercept injection, the BCVA improved in 15 eyes(83%, stable in 3 eyes(17%. Before treatment, the average central macular thickness was 421.72±54.43μm, at 1 and 2 and 3mo after treatment, the average central macular thickness was 337.89±25.88μm, 293.56±26.87μm, 266.89±19.10μm respectively. There were significant differences compared with before and after injection(PCONCLUSION:Intravitreal injection conbercept for wAMD can significantly improve the visual function, reduce the macular edema and the leakage with higher safety and less complications. However the prolonged efficacy needs further observation.

  20. EuPRAXIA@SPARC_LAB Design study towards a compact FEL facility at LNF arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrario, M.; Anania, M.P.; Artioli, M.; Bacci, A.; Bartocci, S.; Bedogni, R.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Bisesto, F.; Brandi, F.; Brentegani, E.; Broggi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Campana, P.L.; Campogiani, G.; Cannaos, C.; Cantarella, S.; Cardelli, F.; Carpanese, M.; Castellano, M.; Castorina, G.; Catalan Lasheras, N.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Cimino, R.; Ciocci, F.; Cirrincione, D.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Clementi, R.; Coreno, M.; Corsini, R.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A.; Costa, G.; Curatolo, C.; Cuttone, G.; Dabagov, S.; Dattoli, G.; D'Auria, G.; Debrot, I.; Diomede, M.; Drago, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Mitri, S.; Di Pirro, G.; Esposito, A.; Faiferri, M.; Ficcadenti, L.; Filippi, F.; Frasciello, O.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Giannessi, L.; Giribono, A.; Gizzi, L.; Grudiev, A.; Guiducci, S.; Koester, P.; Incremona, S.; Iungo, F.; Labate, L.; Latina, A.; Licciardi, S.; Lollo, V.; Lupi, S.; Manca, R.; Marcelli, A.; Marini, M.; Marocchino, A.; Marongiu, M.; Martinelli, V.; Masciovecchio, C.; Mastino, C.; Michelotti, A.; Milardi, C.; Minicozzi, V.; Mira, F.; Morante, S.; Mostacci, A.; Nguyen, F.; Pagnutti, S.; Pellegrino, L.; Petralia, A.; Petrillo, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pioli, S.; Polese, D.; Pompili, R.; Pusceddu, F.; Ricci, A.; Ricci, R.; Rochow, R.; Romeo, S.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Rossetti Conti, M.; Rossi, A.R.; Rotundo, U.; Sabbatini, L.; Sabia, E.; Sans Plannell, O.; Schulte, D.; Scifo, J.; Scuderi, V.; Serafini, L.; Spataro, B.; Stecchi, A.; Stella, A.; Shpakov, V.; Stellato, F.; Turco, E.; Vaccarezza, C.; Vacchi, A.; Vannozzi, A.; Variola, A.; Vescovi, S.; Villa, F.; Wuensch, W.; Zigler, A.; Zobov, M.

    On the wake of the results obtained so far at the SPARC\\_LAB test-facility at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy), we are currently investigating the possibility to design and build a new multi-disciplinary user-facility, equipped with a soft X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) driven by a $\\sim$1 GeV high brightness linac based on plasma accelerator modules. This design study is performed in synergy with the EuPRAXIA design study. In this paper we report about the recent progresses in the on going design study of the new facility.

  1. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was

  2. The LUSI LAB project: a multidisciplinary study of focussed fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, A.

    2012-12-01

    The 29th of May 2006 several gas and mud eruption sites suddenly appeared along a fault in the NE of Java, Indonesia. Within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. To date Lusi is still active. This disaster has forced 50.000 people to be evacuated and an area of more than 7 km2 is covered by mud. The social impact of the eruption and its spectacular dimensions still attract the attention of international media reporting on the "largest mud eruption site on Earth". Our investigations revealed that the Watukosek fault system reactivated after the 27-05-2006 Yogyakarta earthquake allowing the release of overpressured fluids along the fault planes. Sampling results indicate that the main source of clay and fluids was traced from the overpressured units located at ~1500 m depth. Further, analyses and modelling indicate that Lusi gas was generated at high temperatures (>220°C) with maturity and isotopic characteristics corresponding to the oil-prone Eocene, Ngimbang shales situated at 4,400 m. Hydrocarbon, CO2 and helium analyses are consistent with a scenario of deep sited (>4000 m) magmatic intrusions and hydrothermal fluids responsible for the enhanced heat that altered source rocks and/or gas reservoirs. The neighbouring magmatic Arjuno complex and its fluid-pressure system combined with high seismic activity could have played a key role in the Lusi genesis and evolution. Despite the work done, still many unanswered questions remain. What lies beneath Lusi? If Lusi is not a mud volcano, how large is the connected hydrothermal system? How do the frequent seismic activity and the neighbouring Arjuno Welirang volcanic complex effect pulsating Lusi behaviour? What are the mechanisms triggering the eruption? How long will the eruption last? Are more eruptions like this one likely to occur? LUSI LAB is an ambitious project that aims to answer these questions and to perform a multidisciplinary study using

  3. Experimental study on the separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas using hollow fiber membrane contactors without wetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Shui-ping; Fang, Meng-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-Feng; Luo, Zhong-Yang; Cen, Ke-Fa [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wang, Shu-Yuan; Xu, Zhi-Kang [Institute of Polymer Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2007-05-15

    Experiments on CO{sub 2} removal from flue gas using polypropylene (PP) hollow fiber membrane contactors were conducted in this study. Absorbents including aqueous potassium glycinate (PG) solution, aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA) and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) were used to absorb CO{sub 2} in the experiments. Based on the wetting experimental results, aqueous PG solution can offer a higher surface tension than water, aqueous MEA and MDEA solutions. Aqueous PG solution has a lower potential of membrane wetting after a continuously steady operation for 40 h to maintain CO{sub 2} removal efficiency of about 90%. Under moderate operating conditions, effects of the temperature, flow rate, and concentration of absorbents, and the flow rate of flue gas as well as the volumetric concentration of carbon dioxide in the flue gas on the mass transfer rate of CO{sub 2} were studied on a pilot-scale test facility. Unlike conventional absorbents, the mass transfer decreases with an increasing liquid temperature when using aqueous PG solution. Results show that CO{sub 2} removal efficiency was above 90% and the mass transfer rate was above 2.0 mol/(m{sup 2} h) using the PG aqueous solution. It indicates that the hollow fiber membrane contactor has a great potential in the area of CO{sub 2} separation from flue gas when absorbent's concentration and liquid-gas pressure difference are designed elaborately. (author)

  4. A Big Bang Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  5. Ntal/Lab/Lat2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaki, Shoko; Jensen, Bettina M; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2007-01-01

    T cells. As demonstrated in monocytes and B cells, phosphorylated NTAL/LAB/LAT2 recruits signaling molecules such as Grb2, Gab1 and c-Cbl into receptor-signaling complexes. Although gene knock out and knock down studies have indicated that NTAL/LAB/LAT2 may function as both a positive and negative...

  6. An experimental study of heat pipe thermal management system with wet cooling method for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui; Gu, Junjie; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    An effective battery thermal management (BTM) system is required for lithium-ion batteries to ensure a desirable operating temperature range with minimal temperature gradient, and thus to guarantee their high efficiency, long lifetime and great safety. In this paper, a heat pipe and wet cooling combined BTM system is developed to handle the thermal surge of lithium-ion batteries during high rate operations. The proposed BTM system relies on ultra-thin heat pipes which can efficiently transfer the heat from the battery sides to the cooling ends where the water evaporation process can rapidly dissipate the heat. Two sized battery packs, 3 Ah and 8 Ah, with different lengths of cooling ends are used and tested through a series high-intensity discharges in this study to examine the cooling effects of the combined BTM system, and its performance is compared with other four types of heat pipe involved BTM systems and natural convection cooling method. A combination of natural convection, fan cooling and wet cooling methods is also introduced to the heat pipe BTM system, which is able to control the temperature of battery pack in an appropriate temperature range with the minimum cost of energy and water spray.

  7. A mesocosm study of the effects of wet-dry cycles on nutrient release from constructed wetlands in agricultural landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Allyson S; Jacinthe, Pierre-Andre

    2014-01-01

    Given the projection that wet-dry periods will be more frequent in the US Midwest, a study was conducted to understand the impact of these hydro-climatic alterations on nutrient dynamics in wetlands constructed on former croplands in the region. Soil cores were collected from two constructed wetlands and a wooded riparian area (surface: 0-20 cm; subsurface: 40-60 cm) downslope from an agricultural field. Cores were either kept moist or subjected to a 5-week drying treatment, after which all cores were flooded for 36 days. Initial nitrate flux was significantly (p NO3(-) released was rapidly denitrified (N2O flux: 18.9 mg N m(-2) per day), except in the subsurface soil cores in which processing of available N (N2O flux: 0.33 mg N m(-2) per day) was limited by low microbial activity (4 times lower CO2 production rate). The dry treatment also resulted in significantly (p wetlands subjected to wet-dry cycles.

  8. Simulation study based on the single-point temperature monitoring system of LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongling; Yang, Na; Liu, Shuping; Pan, Xiaohui; Wang, Wenjiang

    2014-12-01

    This paper takes LabVIEW2012 as a development platform, creating a J-type thermocouple sensor and the NI USB-6229 data acquisition card and other hardware emulation circuitry which combined with the PC designed a single-point temperature monitoring system. Through simulation experiments, the system has a collection interval, the sampling rate per channel sampling on the temperature limit set by the user function and it also has the function of real-time display the current temperature, the temperature limit alarm, maximum temperature, minimum temperature display and a temperature history data query. This system can be used for temperature monitoring of life, research, industrial control, environmental monitoring, biomedical, tobacco processing, greenhouse cultivation, livestock breeding and other fields, which has important significance and practical value.

  9. An experimental study on creep of partially molten granulite under high temperature and wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongsheng; Zhang, Huiting; Yao, Wenming; Dang, Jiaxiang; He, Changrong

    2017-05-01

    Samples of natural granulite were deformed in a gas medium apparatus to evaluate the flow strength of the lower crust. The sample consists of ∼52 vol% plagioclase, ∼40 vol% pyroxene, ∼3 vol% quartz, ∼5 vol% magnetite and ilmenite. Water content was ∼0.17 ± 0.05 wt% in the deformed samples. 40 creep tests were performed on 13 samples at 300 MPa confining pressure, temperatures of 900-1200 °C, and strain rates between 3.13 × 10-6 and 5 × 10-5/s, resulting in axial stresses of 12-764 MPa and the total strain up to 7.8-20.5%. At low temperatures of 900-1000 °C, the microstructural observations show that the granulite samples were deformed in semi-brittle deformation regime, mainly by dislocation glide and intragranular microcracking. At medium temperatures (MT) of 1050-1100 °C, deformation was observed to be dominated by grain boundary migration recrystallization, corresponding to stress exponent nMT of 5.7 ± 0.1, activation energies QMT of 525 ± 34 kJ/mol, log AMT of 1.3. At high temperatures (HT) of 1125-1150 °C, the samples was deformed mainly by grain boundary migration recrystallization accommodated by partial melting and metamorphic reactions characterized by neo-crystallization of fine-grained olivine, with nHT of 4.8 ± 0.1, QHT of 1392 ± 63 kJ/mol, and log AHT of 37.5. Partial melting at high temperatures of 1125-1200 °C, which induces grain boundaries slip and enhances diffusion, has a significant weakening effect on the rheology of granulite, with an estimated strain rate enhancement by 5 times at melt fraction of ∼2 vol%. Reaction from pyroxene to olivine may affect the flow law parameters and deformation mechanism. Based on our data, a wet and cool continental lower crust may still be in brittle deformation regime, whereas a hot lower crust may likely have a weak layer with plastic deformation.

  10. Novel Dry-Lab Training Method for Totally Endoscopic Coronary Anastomosis: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujihira, Kosuke; Yamada, Akira

    We describe our original dry-lab training system for nonrobotic and beating heart endoscopic coronary artery anastomosis. All the materials used for this training were commercially available. We selected a boxed machine, which can produce pulsatile movements of artificial vessels, and on its roof, we installed a two-dimensional home video camera and a monitor. A multiple-holed plate was placed in front of the machine, and through these holes, a trainee inserted endoscopic surgical instruments and anastomosed the artificial vessels by running fashion while watching the monitor. This training program has four stages. During the first stage, a trainee has to demonstrate mastery in conducting a conventional off-pump coronary artery anastomosis without assistance. The second stage is the "nonbeating" version, and the third stage is the "beating" version with the model mentioned previously. After a trainee gets accustomed to the third stage, the original artificial vessel is replaced with an extremely fragile one, and this is the fourth stage. Our trainee conducted one hundred fourth-stage anastomoses and each procedure was recorded with the video camera. We analyzed several factors from the videos and evaluated the efficacy of the training method. We compared the outcomes of the first 50 consecutive anastomoses with the following 50 ones and described the learning curves. The comparison showed a significant decrease in anastomotic time and vessel injury. We considered the quality of anastomosis acceptable after 47 anastomoses, and anastomotic time fell below 15 minutes at the 81st training at the fourth stage. Our dry-lab system might be an effective training method for endoscopic coronary anastomosis.

  11. The Study of Impacts of Water Transferring From Wet Regions To Dry Regions In Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motiee-Homayoun, Dr.; Ghomashchi, Dr.

    available. In this situation, water transformation from wet areas (with good water resources) to dried and desert regions of the country has been identified as a necessary and reasonable policy to tacklewater shortage. Mediterain climate and mountains in north, west and southwest regions of Iran grant a benefit of high level rate of rainfall, several deep and long rivers, and large capacity of groundwater resources in these areas. Existence of such rivers and water resources, especially a big river of Karoon in southwest, strengthens the goal of constructing hydraulic structures in order to transfer water fro m wet areas to central and eastern areas of the country. This goal has led to planning and implementing of several large and high cost projects. Experts of water affairs, believe that although drinking water supply is one of the most crucial missions of the government, it should also be noted that transformation huge amount of water from an area to another area, with a very long distant, undoubtedly, will cause significant environmental impacts in future. Therefore, decision making and implementing such strategic projects needs a very precise consideration and accurate cost-benefit analyzes. On the one hand, through a socio- economic approach, implementation of such big projects for water transferring requires a great amount of investment and a long period to complete, and benefit peoples. So in many cases multi-purpose and multi- dimensional projects should be considered carefully. On the other hand, water supply for some provinces is vital. In most identified areas, water scarcity is the main cause of urban decline, economic problems and finally loosing population because of emigration. Thus, fresh water should be supplied for these provinces at the earliest possible. This paper is an attempt to identify, define and explain the characteristics and specification of all projects for transferring in different parts of Iran. Generally, advantages and disadvantages of

  12. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-03-25

    The yield locus, tensile strength and fracture mechanisms of wet granular materials were studied. The yield locus of a wet material was shifted to the left of that of the dry specimen by a constant value equal to the compressive isostatic stress due to pendular bridges. for materials with straight yield loci, the shift was computed from the uniaxial tensile strength, either measured in a tensile strength tester or calculated from the correlation, and the angle of internal friction of the material. The predicted shift in the yield loci due to different moisture contents compare well with the measured shift in the yield loci of glass beads, crushed limestone, super D catalyst and Leslie coal. Measurement of the void fraction during the shear testing was critical to obtain the correct tensile strength theoretically or experimentally.

  13. Complementing Neurophysiology Education for Developing Countries via Cost-Effective Virtual Labs: Case Studies and Classroom Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, Shyam; Parasuram, Harilal; Medini, Chaitanya; Raman, Raghu; Nedungadi, Prema; Wiertelak, Eric; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Achuthan, Krishnashree; Nair, Bipin

    2014-01-01

    Classroom-level neuroscience experiments vary from detailed protocols involving chemical, physiological and imaging techniques to computer-based modeling. The application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is revolutionizing the current laboratory scenario in terms of active learning especially for distance education cases. Virtual web-based labs are an asset to educational institutions confronting economic issues in maintaining equipment, facilities and other conditions needed for good laboratory practice. To enhance education, we developed virtual laboratories in neuroscience and explored their first-level use in (Indian) University education in the context of developing countries. Besides using interactive animations and remotely-triggered experimental devices, a detailed mathematical simulator was implemented on a web-based software platform. In this study, we focused on the perceptions of technology adoption for a virtual neurophysiology laboratory as a new pedagogy tool for complementing college laboratory experience. The study analyses the effect of virtual labs on users assessing the relationship between cognitive, social and teaching presence. Combining feedback from learners and teachers, the study suggests enhanced motivation for students and improved teaching experience for instructors. PMID:24693260

  14. Complementing Neurophysiology Education for Developing Countries via Cost-Effective Virtual Labs: Case Studies and Classroom Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, Shyam; Parasuram, Harilal; Medini, Chaitanya; Raman, Raghu; Nedungadi, Prema; Wiertelak, Eric; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Achuthan, Krishnashree; Nair, Bipin

    2014-01-01

    Classroom-level neuroscience experiments vary from detailed protocols involving chemical, physiological and imaging techniques to computer-based modeling. The application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is revolutionizing the current laboratory scenario in terms of active learning especially for distance education cases. Virtual web-based labs are an asset to educational institutions confronting economic issues in maintaining equipment, facilities and other conditions needed for good laboratory practice. To enhance education, we developed virtual laboratories in neuroscience and explored their first-level use in (Indian) University education in the context of developing countries. Besides using interactive animations and remotely-triggered experimental devices, a detailed mathematical simulator was implemented on a web-based software platform. In this study, we focused on the perceptions of technology adoption for a virtual neurophysiology laboratory as a new pedagogy tool for complementing college laboratory experience. The study analyses the effect of virtual labs on users assessing the relationship between cognitive, social and teaching presence. Combining feedback from learners and teachers, the study suggests enhanced motivation for students and improved teaching experience for instructors.

  15. Three-dimensional localization of excitons in the InAs/GaAs wetting layer - magnetospectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babinski, A.; Golnik, A.; Kossacki, P.; Gaj, J.A. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw (Poland); Borysiuk, J. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Warszawa (Poland); Kret, S. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa (Poland); Raymond, S.; Wasilewski, Z.R. [Institute for Microstructural Sciences, NRC, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Potemski, M. [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, CNRS BP-166, Grenoble (France)

    2009-04-15

    Magnetospectroscopic studies of individual excitonic states confined in potential fluctuations in the InAs/GaAs wetting layer (WL) are presented. A neutral exciton and a trion emission have been identified. They split in magnetic field in two components of orthogonal circular polarizations. The respective Zeeman splitting changes linearly with magnetic field up to 10 T. A significant scatter of the effective excitonic g{sup *}-factor is observed, reflecting the distribution of sizes and compositions of potential fluctuations in the WL. The distribution affects also diamagnetic shift of the excitonic emission. The observed properties of the excitons are consistent with a picture of shallow quantum dots formed in the WL due to In composition fluctuations. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Infrared and swelling study of the hydration-induced phase transition of wet-spun hyaluronate films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, A. D.; Marlowe, R. L.; Lee, S. A.; Powell, J. W.; Rupprecht, A.

    1997-03-01

    The hydration properties of wet-spun films of hyaluronate (HA) with four different counterions (Li^+, Cs^+, Mg^2+, and Ca^2+) have been studied using optical microscopy, optical birefringence and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Small pieces of these films were found to be optically birefringent up to hydration levels near 90 % relative humidity (RH). All four kinds of films then became optically isotropic and display dramatic changes in size. These changes are consistent with the occurrence of an order-disorder (o-d) transition. IR spectroscopy of the backbone region (from 800 to 1000 cm-1) suggests that the Li^+, Cs^+ and Ca^2+ films are very similar. Two IR bands in this region are observed at low RH and show no dependence on hydration until the o-d transition. The IR spectra of CaHA show five bands in this region. These five bands are observed to 95 % RH.

  17. Role of excipients in hydrate formation kinetics of theophylline in wet masses studied by near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna C; Airaksinen, Sari; Karjalainen, Milja

    2004-01-01

    . Anhydrous theophylline was chosen as the hydrate-forming model drug compound and two excipients, silicified microcrystalline cellulose (SMCC) and alpha-lactose monohydrate, with different water absorbing properties, were used in formulation. An early stage of wet massing was studied with anhydrous...... theophylline and its 1:1 (w/w) mixtures with alpha-lactose monohydrate and SMCC with 0.1g/g of purified water. The changes in the state of water were monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy, and the conversion of the crystal structure was verified using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). SMCC decreased...... the hydrate formation rate by absorbing water, but did not inhibit it. The results suggest that alpha-lactose monohydrate slightly increased the hydrate formation rate in comparison with a mass comprising only anhydrous theophylline....

  18. A preliminary and qualitative study of resource ratio theory to nitrifying lab-scale bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Micol; Ofiţeru, Irina D; Beneduce, Luciano; Graham, David W; Head, Ian M; Curtis, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of microbial diversity in design would ideally require predictive theory that would relate operational parameters to the numbers and distribution of taxa. Resource ratio-theory (RRT) might be one such theory. Based on Monod kinetics, it explains diversity in function of resource-ratio and richness. However, to be usable in biological engineered system, the growth parameters of all the bacteria under consideration and the resource supply and diffusion parameters for all the relevant nutrients should be determined. This is challenging, but plausible, at least for low diversity groups with simple resource requirements like the ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). One of the major successes of RRT was its ability to explain the ‘paradox of enrichment’ which states that diversity first increases and then decreases with resource richness. Here, we demonstrate that this pattern can be seen in lab-scale-activated sludge reactors and parallel simulations that incorporate the principles of RRT in a floc-based system. High and low ammonia and oxygen were supplied to continuous flow bioreactors with resource conditions correlating with the composition and diversity of resident AOB communities based on AOB 16S rDNA clone libraries. Neither the experimental work nor the simulations are definitive proof for the application of RRT in this context. However, it is sufficient evidence that such approach might work and justify a more rigorous investigation. PMID:25874592

  19. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  20. Study of Double Spin Asymmetries in Inclusive ep Scattering at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hoyoung [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-01

    The spin structure of the proton has been investigated in the high Bjorken x and low momentum transfer Q2 region. We used Jefferson Lab's polarized electron beam, a polarized target, and a spectrometer to get both the parallel and perpendicular spin asymmetries Apar and Aperp. These asymmetries produced the physics asymmetries A_1 and A_2 and spin structure functions g_1 and g_2. We found Q2 dependences of the asymmetries at resonance region and higher-twist effects. Our result increases the available data on the proton spin structure, especially at resonance region with low Q2. Moreover, A_2 and g_2 data show clear Q2 evolution, comparing with RSS and SANE-BETA. Negative resonance in A_2 data needs to be examined by theory. It can be an indication of very negative transverse-longitudinal interference contribution at W ~ 1.3 GeV. Higher twist effect appears at the low Q2 of 1.9 GeV2, although it is less significant than lower Q2 data of RSS. Twist03 matrix element d_2 was calculated using our asymmetry fits evaluation at Q2 – 1.9 GeV2. D-bar_2 = -0.0087±0.0014 was obtained by integrating 0.47 ≤ x ≤ 0.87.

  1. Study on P-wave and S-wave velocity in dry and wet sandstones of Tushka region, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Kassab

    2015-03-01

    The derived equations can be used for the prediction of P-wave velocity of wet rock samples from the P-wave velocity of dry rock samples, and the S-wave velocity of wet rock samples can be predicted from the S-wave velocity of dry rock samples. A strong linear correlation between P-wave velocity and S-wave velocity of dry rock samples and between P-wave velocity and S-wave velocity of wet rock samples was found. The resulting linear equations can be used for the estimation of S-wave velocity from the P-wave velocity in the case of both dry and wet rock samples.

  2. CMAPS Study Wet Only Mercury in Precipitation Data Set from Chippiwa Lake and G.T. Graig Monitoring Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Total mercury in precipitation collected using ASPS automated wet-only instrument and analyzed by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. This dataset is...

  3. An Experimental Study on Strength Deterioration of Cement Mortars by Wetting-Drying Cycles in Sodium Sulfate Aqueous Solution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yasuhiko TAKAYA; Akihiro SEKIGUCHI; Chiaki OGUCHI

    2012-01-01

    ...) mortars for sulfate attack, wetting-drying experiment was carried out. The cylindrical specimens with a size of 35 mm in diameter and 70 mm in height and seawater and saturated sodium sulfate solution at 20...

  4. A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Augmented Reality to Enhance the Use of Remote Labs in Electrical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, A. Mejias; Marquez, J. M. Andujar

    2012-01-01

    Lab practices are an essential part of teaching in Engineering. However, traditional laboratory lessons developed in classroom labs (CL) must be adapted to teaching and learning strategies that go far beyond the common concept of e-learning, in the sense that completely virtualized distance education disconnects teachers and students from the real…

  5. Digital Social Science Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Michael; Lauersen, Christian Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    At the Faculty Library of Social Sciences (part of Copenhagen University Library) we are currently working intensely towards the establishment of a Digital Social Science Lab (DSSL). The purpose of the lab is to connect research, education and learning processes with the use of digital tools...... at the Faculty of Social Sciences. DSSL will host and facilitate an 80 m2 large mobile and intelligent study- and learning environment with a focus on academic events, teaching and collaboration. Besides the physical settings DSSL has two primary functions: 1. To implement relevant social scientific software...... and hardware at the disposal for students and staff at The Faculty of Social Sciences along with instruction and teaching in the different types of software, e.g. Stata, Nvivo, Atlas.ti, R Studio, Zotero and GIS-software. 2. To facilitate academic events focusing on use of digital tools and analytic software...

  6. The Potential of the Internet for Music Perception Research: A Comment on Lab-Based Versus Web-Based Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henkjan Honing

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available While the discussion on the integrity of data obtained from Web- delivered experiments is mainly about issues of method and control (Mehler, 1999; McGraw et al., 2000; Auditory, 2007, this comment stresses the potential that Web- based experiments might have for studies in music perception. It is argued that, due to some important advances in technology, Web-based experiments have become a reliable source for empirical research. Next to becoming a serious alternative to a certain class of lab-based experiments, Web-based experiments can potentially reach a much larger, more varied and intrinsically motivated participant pool. Nevertheless, an important challenge to Web-based experiments is to control for attention and to make sure that participants act as instructed; Interestingly, this is not essentially different from experiments that are performed in the laboratory. Some practical solutions to this challenge are proposed.

  7. A numerical and experimental study of acoustic micromixing in 3D microchannels for lab-on-a-chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, Susana O; Pinto, Vania C; Sousa, Paulo J; Lima, Rui; Miranda, Joao M; Minas, Graca

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports a numerical and experimental study of acoustic streaming and micromixing in polydimethylsiloxane microchannels. The mixing between two fluids flowing in microchannels was evaluated through the following conditions: (1) using a 28 μm thick β-poly(vinylidene fluoride) (β-PVDF) as a piezoelectric transducer actuated with a 24 Vpp and 40 MHz sinusoidal voltage; (2) using different flow rates. The results suggest that the mixing length increases as the flow rate increases and that the acoustic streaming phenomenon leads to a reduction on the mixing length. The good qualitative agreement between numerical and experimental results is a valuable indicator to predict the mixing performance of microfluidic devices, for improving biological fluid analysis in diagnosis lab-on-a-chip devices.

  8. A study on air bubble wetting: Role of surface wettability, surface tension, and ionic surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jijo Easo; Chidangil, Santhosh; George, Sajan D.

    2017-07-01

    Fabrication of hydrophobic/hydrophilic surfaces by biomimicking nature has attracted significant attention recently due to their potential usage in technologies, ranging from self-cleaning to DNA condensation. Despite the potential applications, compared to surfaces of tailored wettability, less attention has been paid towards development and understanding of air bubble adhesion and its dynamics on surfaces with varying wettability. In this manuscript, following the commonly used approach of oxygen plasma treatment, polydimethylsiloxane surfaces with tunable wettability are prepared. The role of plasma treatment conditions on the surface hydrophilicity and the consequent effect on adhesion dynamics of an underwater air bubble is explored for the first time. The ATR-FTIR spectroscopic analysis reveals that the change in hydrophilicity arises from the chemical modification of the surface, manifested as Si-OH vibrations in the spectra. The thickness of the formed thin liquid film at the surface responsible for the experimentally observed air bubble repellency is estimated from the augmented Young-Laplace equation. The concentration dependent studies using cationic as well as anionic surfactant elucidate that the reduced surface tension of the aqueous solution results in a stable thicker film and causes non-adherence of air bubble to the aerophilic surface. Furthermore, the study carried out to understand the combined effect of plasma treatment and surfactants reveals that even below critical micelle concentration, a negatively charged surface results in air bubble repellency for the anionic surfactant, whereas only enhanced air bubble contact angle is observed for the cationic surfactant.

  9. LabPush: a pilot study of providing remote clinics with laboratory results via short message service (SMS) in Swaziland, Africa - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wen-Rui; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Kuan-Chen; Li, Hsien-Chang; Iqbal, Usman; Nguyen, Phung-Anh; Huang, Chih-Wei; Yang, Hsuan-Chia; Lee, Peisan; Li, Mei-Hsuan; Hlatshwayo, Sharoon Lungile; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Jian, Wen-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Developing countries are confronting a steady growth in the prevalence of the infectious diseases. Mobile technologies are widely available and can play an important role in health care at the regional, community, and individual levels. Although labs usually able to accomplish the requested blood test and produce the results within two days after receiving the samples, but the time for the results to be delivered back to clinics is quite variable depending on how often the motorbike transport makes trips between the clinic and the lab. In this study, we seek to assess factors facilitating as well as factors hindering the adoption of mobile devices in the Swazi healthcare through evaluating the end-users of the LabPush system. A qualitative study with semi-structured and in-depth one on one interviews were conducted over two month period July-August 2012. Purposive sampling was used; participants were those operating and using the LabPush system at the remote clinics, at the national laboratory and the supervisors of users at Swaziland. Interview questions were focused on perceived of ease of use and usefulness of the system. All interviews were recorded and then transcribed. This study had aimed its primary focus on reducing TAT, prompt patient care, reducing bouncing of patients and defaulting of patients which were challenges that the clinicians have always had. Therefore, the results revealed several barriers and facilitators to the adoption of mobile device by healthcare providers in the Swaziland. The themes Shortens TAT, Technical support, Patient-centered care, Mindset, Improved communication, Missing Reports, Workload, Workflow, Security of smart phone, Human error and Ownership are sorted by facilitators to barriers. Thus the end-users perspective, prompt patient care, reduced bouncing of patients, technical support, better communication, willing participant and social influence were facilitators of the adoption m-health in the Swazi healthcare. Copyright

  10. Molecular Simulation Study of Montmorillonite in Contact with Variably Wet Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim

    2017-03-07

    We perform grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to study the detailed molecular mechanism of intercalation behavior of CO2 in Na-, Ca-, and Mg- montmorillonite exposed to variably hydrated supercritical CO2 at 323.15 K and 90 bar, The simulations indicate that the intercalation of CO2 strongly depends on the relative humidity (RH). The intercalation of CO2 in the dehydrated interlayer is inhibited, followed by the swelling of the interlayer region due to uptake of water and CO2 as the RH increases. In all of the hydrated clay samples, the amount of the intercalated CO2 generally decreases as a function of increasing RH, which is attributed mainly to the weakening of the interaction between CO2 and clay. At low RH values, Ca- and Mg- montmorillonite are relatively more efficient in capturing CO2. The amount of CO2 trapped in all clay samples shows similar values above RH of similar to 60%. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the diffusion coefficient of each species generally increases with increasing RH due to the associated expansion of the interlayer distance of the clay. For all the hydrated samples, the diffusion coefficients of CO2 and water in the interlayers are mostly comparable due to the fact that CO2 molecules are well solvated. The diffusion of CO2 in each hydration state is mostly independent of the type of cation in accordance with the fact that CO2 molecules hardly migrate into the first hydration shell of the interlayer cations.

  11. Nucleation of wetting films on cylindrical and spherical substrates: A numerical study by the string method

    KAUST Repository

    Qiu, Chunyin

    2009-09-25

    Using the mean-field diffuse-interface model for liquid-vapor system and employing the numerical string method, we study the critical nuclei involved in the prewetting transitions on curved substrates. We first introduce three distinct kinds of critical nuclei, namely, the disklike, bandlike, and layerlike ones, which respectively correspond to three possible growth modes of wettingfilms. We show the disklike growth mode to be the only mode for infinite planar substrates. We then turn to cylindrical and spherical substrates, the two simplest but most important geometries in the real world. We focus on the critical nuclei of finite size, through which the wettingfilms may be formed with finite thermodynamic probabilities. It is shown that the disklike growth mode is always the most probable for wettingfilmnucleation and growth as long as a disklike critical nucleus exists. It is also shown that on a cylindrical substrate, the disklike critical nucleus can no longer exist if the substrate radius is smaller than some critical value, comparable to the radius of the disklike critical nucleus on planar substrate. We find that on a cylindrical substrate whose radius is below the critical value, the nucleation and growth of a wettingfilm can only occur through the bandlike critical nucleus. It is worth emphasizing that the results concerning the bandlike and layerlike growth modes can only be obtained from the diffuse-interface model, beyond the macroscopic description based on the line and surface tensions.

  12. A composite reactor with wetted-wall column for mineral carbonation study in three-phase systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chen; Yao, Xizhi; Zhao, Liang; Teng, H. Henry

    2016-11-01

    Despite the availability of various reactors designed to study gas-liquid reactions, no appropriate devices are available to accurately investigate triple-phased mineral carbonation reactions involving CO2 gas, aqueous solutions (containing divalent cations), and carbonate minerals. This report presents a composite reactor that combines a modified conventional wetted-wall column, a pH control module, and an attachment to monitor precipitation reactions. Our test and calibration experiments show that the absorption column behaved largely in agreement with theoretical predictions and previous observations. Experimental confirmation of CO2 absorption in NaOH and ethanolamine supported the effectiveness of the column for gas-liquid interaction. A test run in the CO2-NH3-MgCl2 system carried out for real time investigation of the relevant carbonation reactions shows that the reactor's performance closely followed the expected reaction path reflected in pH change, the occurrence of precipitation, and the rate of NH3 addition, indicating the appropriateness of the composite device in studying triple-phase carbonation process.

  13. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Donner Lab Administrator Baird G. Whaley, August 15, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Baird G. Whaley, Donner Lab Administrator, was interviewed by representatives of US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). The purpose of the interview was to capture the remembrances of Mr. Whaley concerning what he could relate on activities at the Donner Lab that pertain to the OHRE responsibilities. Following a brief biographical sketch, Mr. Whaley relates his experiences in administration at the LAB including funding activities, staffing concerns, intralaboraory politics, and remembrances of John Lawrence, John Gofman, Cornelius Tobias, Jim Born, Alex Margolis, B.V.A. Low- Beer, and Ed Alpen. Further patient care procedures for Donner Clinic Research Programs were discussed.

  14. Deciphering Your Lab Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Deciphering Your Lab Report Share this page: Was this page helpful? The ... responsibility. You may encounter complex test results on lab reports and will need to recognize that there is ...

  15. Simulation studies of the influence of HCl absorption on the performance of a wet flue gas desulphurisation pilot plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; Nygaard, Helle; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    2002-01-01

    The mathematical model of Kiil et al, (Ind. Eng, Chem. Res. 37 (1998) 2792) for a wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) pilot plant was extended to include the simultaneous absorption of HCl. In contrast to earlier models for wet FGD plants, the inclusion of population balance equations...... gas concentration of SO2 on the degree of desulphurisation and the residual limestone level was found to be almost the same irrespective of HCl was present (100 ppmv) in the flue gas or not. The results presented are of importance in the analysis of the performance of wet FGD plants installed at power...... plants firing coals of varying Cl contents. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  16. The history of Rhoton's Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Toshio; Richard Lister, J; Matsushima, Ken; de Oliveira, Evandro; Timurkaynak, Erdener; Peace, David A; Kobayashi, Shigeaki

    2017-09-06

    The work performed in Dr. Rhoton's Lab, represented by over 500 publications on microneurosurgical anatomy, greatly contributed to improving the level of neurosurgical treatment throughout the world. The authors reviewed the development and activities of the Lab over 40 years. Dr. Albert L. Rhoton Jr., the founder of, and leader in, this field, displayed great creativity and ingenuity during his life. He devoted himself to perfecting his study methodology, employing high-definition photos and slides to enhance the quality of his published papers. He dedicated his life to the education of neurosurgeons. His "lab team," which included microneuroanatomy research fellows, medical illustrators, lab directors, and secretaries, worked together under his leadership to develop the methods and techniques of anatomical study to complete over 160 microneurosurgical anatomy projects. The medical illustrators adapted computer technologies and integrated art and science in the field of microneurosurgical anatomy. Dr. Rhoton's fellows established methods of injecting colors and pursued a series of projects to innovate surgical approaches and instruments over a 40-year period. They also continued to help Dr. Rhoton to conduct international educational activities after returning to their home countries. Rhoton's Lab became a world-renowned anatomical lab as well as a microsurgical training center and generated the knowledge necessary to perform accurate, gentle, and safe surgery for the sake of patients.

  17. A new advanced experimental setup for in-depth study of the interfacial reaction during reactive wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenznick, Sascha; Stratmann, Martin; Rohwerder, Michael

    2008-04-01

    Reactive wetting plays a crucial role in many technical processes, from soldering in microelectronics, production of metal/ceramic composites, to hot dip galvanizing in mass production of zinc coated steel sheet. In all these cases the wetting behavior of metal melts on different surfaces plays a crucial role in material joining and coating. In all these processes the formation of the interfacial reaction layer has to occur within as short a time as possible in order to ensure a fast overall production speed. As the interfacial layer determines the stability of the formed composites, detailed knowledge of its growth mechanisms is required for a directed process optimization. However, the investigation of the processes occurring at the buried interface between substrate and wetting phase is difficult, especially for the case of liquid metal wetting metallic or ceramic solid substrates at high temperatures. Here, a novel advanced technique for the investigation of high temperature wetting processes up to a temperature of 1100 K is presented. It is based on the sessile drop technique but, in addition, allows spinning off the droplet at any chosen wetting time, thus providing direct access to the interfacial reaction layer. Since the experimental setup is integrated into a UHV compatible reaction chamber, not only excellent control of the composition of the atmosphere is ensured, but also direct transfer to surface analytical tools such as scanning electron microscope or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis without intermediate exposure to air is realized. As will be shown for the case of hot dip galvanising of steel, this is an outstanding advance compared to existing methods.

  18. Changing Efficacy of Wet Cupping Therapy in Migraine with Lunar Phase: A Self-Controlled Interventional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benli, Ali Ramazan; Sunay, Didem

    2017-12-29

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of blood-letting with wet cupping therapy (WCT) in migraine treatment and to determine whether there was any difference according to the phase of the moon when the treatment was applied. MATERIAL AND METHODS This self-controlled study was conducted in Karabuk between 2014 and 2016. Patients who were diagnosed with migraine were enrolled in the study. Migraine disability assessment questionnaire (MIDAS), demographic characteristics, migraine attack frequency and duration, and family history was used to assess the severity of headache. WCT was applied in 3 sessions and the questionnaire was administered before and 3 months after the final WCT session. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used in pre-and posttreatment measurements, and the Chi-square test was used to check independence in two-way categorical tables. RESULTS A total of 85 patients were included. The reduction in MIDAS scores and number of migraine attacks was significantly greater in the WCT applications made in the first half of the month compared to those in the second half of the month. Although the reduction in visual analog scale (VAS) scores was greater in the second half of the month, it was also significant in the applications made in the first half of the month. CONCLUSIONS WCT was found to be an effective treatment of migraine. The effect on MIDAS, VAS, and the number of attacks was significantly better when the application was made in the second half of the month compared to those made in the first half.

  19. DEM Study of Wet Cohesive Particles in the Presence of Liquid Bridges in a Gas Fluidized Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurong He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified discrete element method (DEM was constructed by compositing an additional liquid-bridge module into the traditional soft-sphere interaction model. Simulations of particles with and without liquid bridges are conducted in a bubbling fluidized bed. The geometry of the simulated bed is the same as the one in Müller’s experiment (Müller et al., 2008. A comparison between the dry and the wet particular systems is carried out on the bubble behavior, the bed fluctuation, and the mixing process. The bubble in the dry system possesses a regular round shape and falling of scattered particles exists while the bubble boundary of the wet particles becomes rough with branches of agglomerates stretching into it. The mixing of the dry system is quicker than that of the wet system. Several interparticle liquid contents are applied in this work to find their influence on the kinetic characteristic of the wet particle flow. With an increase of liquid content, the mixing process costs more time to be completed. Symmetrical profiles of the velocity and granular temperature are found for two low liquid contents (0.001% and 0.01%, while it is antisymmetrical for the highest liquid content (0.1%.

  20. A Molecular Dynamics Study on Wetting Phenomena at a Solid Surface with a Nanometer-Scale Slit Pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Kunio; Shibahara, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are conducted for the liquid wetting phenomena on a solid surface with a nanometer-scale slit pore. All interactions between molecules or atoms are assumed to be 12-6 Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential in order to examine the fundamental mechanisms of the wetting phenomena qualitatively. The Lorentz-Berthelot combining rule is applied to obtain the standard parameters between fluid molecules and solid atoms, which are controlled by using relative parameters to change the interaction intensity. The energy of fluid molecules in the vicinity of the entrance of the slit pore is investigated in detail so as to elucidate the mechanism of the liquid wetting phenomena from a molecular energy point of view. The results show that the total energy per unit volume of fluid molecules in the vicinity of the solid surface inside the slit pore becomes lower than that of the bulk part of the liquid membrane which exists outside the slit pore when the wetting phenomena occur.

  1. Membrane-based wet electrostatic precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, David J; Shi, Liming; Kremer, Gregory; Stuart, Ben J; Reynolds, James; Caine, John

    2005-06-01

    Emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in both primary and secondary form, are difficult to capture in typical dry electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Wet (or water-based) ESPs are well suited for collection of acid aerosols and fine particulates because of greater corona power and virtually no re-entrainment. However, field disruptions because of spraying (misting) of water, formation of dry spots (channeling), and collector surface corrosion limit the applicability of current wet ESPs in the control of secondary PM2.5. Researchers at Ohio University have patented novel membrane collection surfaces to address these problems. Water-based cleaning in membrane collectors made of corrosion-resistant fibers is facilitated by capillary action between the fibers, maintaining an even distribution of water. This paper presents collection efficiency results of lab-scale and pilot-scale testing at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant for the membrane-based wet ESP. The data indicate that a membrane wet ESP was more effective at collecting fine particulates, acid aerosols, and oxidized mercury than the metal-plate wet ESP, even with approximately 15% less collecting area.

  2. Innovative High-Throughput SAXS Methodologies Based on Photonic Lab-on-a-Chip Sensors: Application to Macromolecular Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Isaac; Radajewski, Dimitri; Charton, Sophie; Phamvan, Nhat; Brennich, Martha; Pernot, Petra; Bonneté, Françoise; Teychené, Sébastien

    2017-06-02

    The relevance of coupling droplet-based Photonic Lab-on-a-Chip (PhLoC) platforms and Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) technique is here highlighted for the performance of high throughput investigations, related to the study of protein macromolecular interactions. With this configuration, minute amounts of sample are required to obtain reliable statistical data. The PhLoC platforms presented in this work are designed to allow and control an effective mixing of precise amounts of proteins, crystallization reagents and buffer in nanoliter volumes, and the subsequent generation of nanodroplets by means of a two-phase flow. Spectrophotometric sensing permits a fine control on droplet generation frequency and stability as well as on concentration conditions, and finally the droplet flow is synchronized to perform synchrotron radiation SAXS measurements in individual droplets (each one acting as an isolated microreactor) to probe protein interactions. With this configuration, droplet physic-chemical conditions can be reproducibly and finely tuned, and monitored without cross-contamination, allowing for the screening of a substantial number of saturation conditions with a small amount of biological material. The setup was tested and validated using lysozyme as a model of study. By means of SAXS experiments, the proteins gyration radius and structure envelope were calculated as a function of protein concentration. The obtained values were found to be in good agreement with previously reported data, but with a dramatic reduction of sample volume requirements compared to studies reported in the literature.

  3. Influence of Individual Values Dissimilarity in the Outcome of top Management Teams: a study in a management lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ramon D'Acosta Rivera

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Several studies relate organizational outcomes to the performance of top management teams (TMT. Some of these studies suggest that the process of strategic choice is influenced by the cognitive background and values of the executives in those teams, and have focused on the composition of TMT, using demographic variables as proxies for deep-level characteristics. The aim of this descriptive and exploratory study was to verify directly the influence of deep-level characteristics – the dissimilarities of TMT members’ individual values – on the team outcomes. This research was carried out using a quantitative method within a public university management lab environment located in the city of São Paulo, applying two value surveys validated in Brazil on TMT composed of Business Management and Accounting undergraduates submitted to a business game situation, resulting in a non-probabilistic sample formed of 32 teams comprising 186 students with valid responses. Through multiple linear regression technique, two statistically significant regression models were found. It was found that the improved performance of TMT occurs when members differ in the importance assigned to values related to openness to change and have similar appreciation of values related to rules and to security in life (conservation values and the pursuit of power (prestige, giving evidence that this can occur not only in a laboratory environment, but also in the business environment, where time pressures and competition are even more severe and, therefore, more subject to deep-level subjective characteristics.

  4. Understanding the Greenhouse Effect: Is Global Warming Real? An Integrated Lab-Lecture Case Study for Non-science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnivant, Frank M.; Moore, A.; Alfano, M. J.; Brzenk, R.; Buckley, P. T.; Newman, M. E.

    2000-12-01

    Numerous colleges and universities offer chemistry, geology, biology, and mathematics courses for students not majoring in science. However, these courses are often taught in a segmented format, spread over a four-year period, with separate lectures and laboratories, and in different departments. We are experimenting with a series of courses that combine a variety of disciplines into three courses that are taught in an integrated lab-lecture format using case studies and guided-inquiry teaching methods. We have developed a variety of modules for these courses. This article describes one case-study module that allows the student to evaluate data sets to study greenhouse gases and determine if global warming is real and due to anthropogenic activities. The exercise stresses hands-on activities and includes performing two laboratory exercises, the use of two computer programs, a mathematical exercise, an Internet and spreadsheet exercise, and interpretation of scientific data sets and figures. The entire module requires at least 18 contact hours.

  5. The physical origins of rapid soil CO2 release following wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus; Grahm, Lina; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    A rainfall event after an extended dry period is known to produce large spikes in CO2 release from soil, a phenomenon referred to as the "Birch effect". The Birch effect is commonly attributed to biological factors, such as the rapid activation of dormant microbial populations and stimulation of soil organic carbon turnover. Evidence suggests that CO2 emissions set in at time scales too short for microbial activation and growth (seconds to minutes after onset of wetting). We conducted controlled wetting experiments on sterilized soil in the lab showing CO2 efflux dynamics that are consistent in magnitude with those reported in field studies (up to 4 mmol m-2 s-1 per mm of precipitation). The explanation proposed is purely physical, involving desorption of CO2 from soil surfaces as it is replaced by the more polar water during wetting. We present experimental results and a CO2 adsorption and desorption model that lend credence to the notion that a large fraction of the early soil CO2 emission during wetting (minutes to an hour) is associated with physical processes independent of microbial activity. This suggests that a significant amount of atmospheric CO2 becomes bound to soil surfaces during dry seasons and is rapidly released at the onset of wet seasons world-wide, irrespective of the soil organic carbon cycle.

  6. Surface structure determines dynamic wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Junichiro; Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Cannon, James; Yue, Feng; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting, the spontaneous spreading process after droplet contacts a solid surface, is important in various engineering processes, such as in printing, coating, and lubrication. In the recent years, experiments and numerical simulations have greatly progressed the understanding in the dynamic wetting particularly on ``flat'' substrates. To gain further insight into the governing physics of the dynamic wetting, we perform droplet-wetting experiments on microstructured surfaces, just a few micrometers in size, with complementary numerical simulations, and investigate the dependence of the spreading rate on the microstructure geometries and fluid properties. We reveal that the influence of microstructures can be quantified in terms of a line friction coefficient for the energy dissipation rate at the contact line, and that this can be described in a simple formula in terms of the geometrical parameters of the roughness and the line-friction coefficient of the planar surface. The systematic study is also of practical importance since structures and roughness are omnipresent and their influence on spreading rate would give us additional degrees of freedom to control the dynamic wetting. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (J.W., J.C., and J.S) and Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (M.D.-Q. and G.A.).

  7. PREFACE: Wetting: introductory note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herminghaus, S.

    2005-03-01

    of very specific and quantitative predictions were put forward which were aimed at direct experimental tests of the developed concepts [9]. Experimentally, wetting phenomena proved to be a rather difficult field of research. While contact angles seem quite easy to measure, deeper insight can only be gained by assessing the physical properties of minute amounts of material, as provided by the molecularly thin wetting layers. At the same time, the variations in the chemical potential relevant for studying wetting transitions are very small, such that system stability sometimes poses hard to solve practical problems. As a consequence, layering transitions in cryogenic systems were among the first to be thoroughly studied [10] experimentally, since they require comparably moderate stability. First-order wetting transitions were not observed experimentally before the early nineties, either in (cryogenic) quantum systems [11,12] or in binary liquid mixtures [13,14]. The first observation of critical wetting, a continuous wetting transition, in 1996 [15] was a major breakthrough [16]. In the meantime, a detailed seminal paper by Pierre Gilles de Gennes published in 1985 [17] had spurred a large number of new research projects which were directed to wetting phenomena other than those related to phase transitions. More attention was paid to non-equilibrium physics, as it is at work when oil spreads over a surface, or a liquid coating beads off (`dewets') from its support and forms a pattern of many individual droplets. This turned out to be an extremely fruitful field of research, and was more readily complemented by experimental efforts than was the case with wetting transitions. It was encouraging to find effects analogous to layering (as mentioned above) in more common systems such as oil films spreading on a solid support [18,19]. Long standing riddles such as the divergence of dissipation at a moving contact line were now addressed both theoretically and experimentally

  8. Living Labs in South Africa: An analysis based on five case studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coetzee, H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available questionnaire, document study and interviews were used as the main data gathering methods. Main results include that LLs in LLiSA emphasize co-creation with communities, specifically rural communities, as opposed to European LLs’ collaboration with ‘users’ who...

  9. A Ten-Week Biochemistry Lab Project Studying Wild-Type and Mutant Bacterial Alkaline Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherow, D. Scott

    2016-01-01

    This work describes a 10-week laboratory project studying wild-type and mutant bacterial alkaline phosphatase, in which students purify, quantitate, and perform kinetic assays on wild-type and selected mutants of the enzyme. Students also perform plasmid DNA purification, digestion, and gel analysis. In addition to simply learning important…

  10. Kinetic study on the effect of temperature on biogas production using a lab scale batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepanraj, B; Sivasubramanian, V; Jayaraj, S

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, biogas production from food waste through anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 2l laboratory-scale batch reactor operating at different temperatures with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The reactors were operated with a solid concentration of 7.5% of total solids and pH 7. The food wastes used in this experiment were subjected to characterization studies before and after digestion. Modified Gompertz model and Logistic model were used for kinetic study of biogas production. The kinetic parameters, biogas yield potential of the substrate (B), the maximum biogas production rate (Rb) and the duration of lag phase (λ), coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE) were estimated in each case. The effect of temperature on biogas production was evaluated experimentally and compared with the results of kinetic study. The results demonstrated that the reactor with operating temperature of 50°C achieved maximum cumulative biogas production of 7556ml with better biodegradation efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Popcorn and sorghum studies by the USDA "Ag Lab" in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popcorn ears collected in milk stage from 2010-2012 were used in studies to compare expression of potential insect and ear mold resistance genes in different years, and relate the differences in expression to influences of weather, and levels of mycotoxins at harvest. The same hybrid was evaluated a...

  12. LAB STUDY ON REGENERATION OF SPENT DOWEX 21K 16-20 MESH ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN, J.B.

    2007-01-24

    Currently the effort to remove chromate from groundwater in the 100K and 100H Areas uses DOWEX 21K 16-20. This report addresses the procedure and results of a laboratory study for regeneration of the spent resin by sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid, or sodium sulfate to determine if onsite regeneration by the Effluent Treatment Facility is a feasible option.

  13. Effects of prompting in reflective learning tools: Findings from experimental field, lab, and online studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina eRenner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reflective learning is an important type of learning both in formal and informal situations—in school, higher education, at the workplace, and in everyday life. People may benefit from technical support for reflective learning, in particular when supporting each other by reflecting not only upon their own but also upon other people’s problems. We refer to this collective approach where people come together to think about experiences and find solutions to problems as collaborative reflection. We present three empirical studies about the effects of prompting in reflective learning tools in such situations where people reflect on others’ issues. In Study 1 we applied a three-stage within-group design in a field experiment, where 39 participants from two organizations received different types of prompts while they used a reflection app. We found that prompts that invited employees to write down possible solutions led to more comprehensive comments on their colleagues’ experiences. In Study 2 we used a three-stage between-group design in a laboratory experiment, where 78 university students were invited to take part in an experiment about the discussion of problems at work or academic studies in online forums. Here we found that short, abstract prompts showed no superiority to a situation without any prompts with respect to quantity or quality of contributions. Finally, Study 3 featured a two-stage between-group design in an online experiment, where 60 participants received either general reflection instructions or detailed instructions about how to reflect on other people’s problems. We could show that detailed reflection instructions supported people in producing more comprehensive comments that included more general advice. The results demonstrate that to increase activity and to improve quality of comments with prompting tools require detailed instructions and specific wording of the prompts.

  14. Online recruitment of cutting-edge users : A user experience study of Ericsson Labs developer portal

    OpenAIRE

    Abramowicz, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates how to reach and recruit cutting-edge users to user experience studies. The recruitment of cutting-edge users is difficult since these users usually are not registered in recruitment databases. Cutting-edge users are advanced, early-adopters of technology and sometimes referred to as opinion leaders. Telecom research projects performed at Ericsson Research involve products and services 2-3 years ahead of the market; early-adopters and cutting edge users are therefore ...

  15. Inside a secret software lab: an ethnographic study of a global software package producer

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, Christine Franziska

    2009-01-01

    This is an ethnographic study of the creation of a particular type of standard enterprise software package: Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems, which support wide-ranging organisational functions within large and medium sized enterprises. Drawing upon the Social Shaping of Technology perspective and recent related attempts to theorise the Biography of Artefacts, this thesis addresses the under-researched area of ERP system development and ERP system support. In provi...

  16. Whole-body strength training with Huber Motion Lab and traditional strength training in cardiac rehabilitation: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud, Thibaut; Labrunée, Marc; Besnier, Florent; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Pillard, Fabien; Rivière, Daniel; Richard, Lisa; Laroche, Davy; Sanguignol, Frédéric; Pathak, Atul; Gayda, Mathieu; Gremeaux, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Isometric strengthening has been rarely studied in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), mainly because of possible potential side effects and lack of appropriate and reliable devices. We aimed to compare 2 different modes of resistance training, an isometric mode with the Huber Motion Lab (HML) and traditional strength training (TST), in CHD patients undergoing a cardiac rehabilitation program. We randomly assigned 50 patients to HML or TST. Patients underwent complete blinded evaluation before and after the rehabilitation program, including testing for cardiopulmonary exercise, maximal isometric voluntary contraction, endothelial function and body composition. After 4 weeks of training (16 sessions), the groups did not differ in body composition, anthropometric characteristics, or endothelial function. With HML, peak power output (P=0.035), maximal heart rate (P<0.01) and gain of force measured in the chest press position (P<0.02) were greater after versus before training. Both protocols appeared to be well tolerated, safe and feasible for these CHD patients. A training protocol involving 6s phases of isometric contractions with 10s of passive recovery on an HML device could be safely implemented in rehabilitation programs for patients with CHD and improve functional outcomes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Tretinoin-loaded liposomal formulations: from lab to comparative clinical study in acne patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Salwa Abdel; Abdelmalak, Nevine Shawky; Badawi, Alia; Elbayoumy, Tahany; Sabry, Nermeen; El Ramly, Amany

    2016-05-01

    Topical tretinoin is the most commonly used retinoid for acne. However, its irritative potential on the applied area and the barrier properties of the stratum corneum limit its use. The objective of the present study was to formulate tretinoin liposomal gel to obtain a formula with lower skin irritation potential and greater clinical effect. A statistical 2(4) factorial design was adopted. Sixteen formulae prepared and were properly evaluated. A candidate formula (F13G) prepared with 0.025% tretinoin, phospholipid- cholesterol-dicetylphosphate (9:1:0.01) and incorporated in 1% carbopol gel was selected for skin irritation test. Clinical study was conducted on acne patients and compared to marketed product. All liposomes formulations were spherical in shape. The addition of cholesterol in the film hydration method significantly decreased the vesicle size, and increased the percentage of incorporation efficiency at (p acne patients revealed that F13G showed significantly higher efficacy when compared to marketed product (p < 0.05).

  18. MCP-PMT studies at the High-B test facility at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, Y.; Allison, L.; Cao, T.; Kalicy, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Park, K.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Zorn, C.

    2016-03-01

    Here we present preliminary results for the gain performance of commercially available 3-μm and 6-μm pore-size single-anode microchannel-plate photomultipliers (MCP PMTs) in magnetic fields up to 5 T and for various orientations of the sensor relative to the field direction. The measurements were performed at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA. Our results show that smaller-pore-size PMTs have better gain performance in magnetic fields. At various angles, the shape of the gain dependence on the strength of the magnetic field strongly depends on the type of the sensor. Also, for each sensor, the azimuthal dependence is strongly correlated with the polar angle. Overall, the sensors exhibit a reasonable performance up to 2 T, although that upper limit depends on the sensor, the applied high voltage, and the orientation of the sensor relative to the field. To optimize the operational and design parameters of MCP PMTs for performance in high magnetic fields, further measurements and simulation studies will be pursued. Our studies are part of an R&D for development of a Detector of Internally Reflected Cherenkov Light for the central detector of a future U.S. Electron Ion Collider.

  19. Studies Of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation And Longitudinal Space Charge In The Jefferson Lab FEL Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Li, Rui [JLAB; Tsai, C.-Y. [Virginia Polytechnic University

    2014-12-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL Driver provides an ideal test bed for studying a variety of beam dynamical effects. Recent studies focused on characterizing the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) with the goal of benchmarking measurements with simulation. Following measurements to characterize the beam, we quantitatively characterized energy extraction via CSR by measuring beam position at a dispersed location as a function of bunch compression. In addition to operating with the beam on the rising part of the linac RF waveform, measurements were also made while accelerating on the falling part. For each, the full compression point was moved along the backleg of the machine and the response of the beam (distribution, extracted energy) measured. Initial results of start-to-end simulations using a 1D CSR algorithm show remarkably good agreement with measurements. A subsequent experiment established lasing with the beam accelerated on the falling side of the RF waveform in conjunction with positive momentum compaction (R56) to compress the bunch. The success of this experiment motivated the design of a modified CEBAF-style arc with control of CSR and microbunching effects.

  20. From lab to field conditions: a pilot study on EEG methodology in applied sports sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, Kirsten; Cordes, Marjolijn; Lerch, Christiane; Koutsandréou, Flora; Schubert, Michael; Weiss, Michael; Baumeister, Jochen

    2011-12-01

    Although neurophysiological aspects have become more important in sports and exercise sciences in the last years, it was not possible to measure cortical activity during performance outside a laboratory due to equipment limits or movement artifacts in particular. With this pilot study we want to investigate whether Electroencephalography (EEG) data obtained in a laboratory golf putting performance differ from a suitable putting task under field conditions. Therefore, parameters of the working memory (frontal Theta and parietal Alpha 2 power) were recorded during these two conditions. Statistical calculations demonstrated a significant difference only for Theta power at F4 regarding the two putting conditions "field" and "laboratory". These findings support the idea that brain activity patterns obtained under laboratory conditions are comparable but not equivalent to those obtained under field conditions. Additionally, we were able to show that the EEG methodology seems to be a reliable tool to observe brain activity under field conditions in a golf putting task. However, considering the still existing problems of movement artifacts during EEG measurements, eligible sports and exercises are limited to those being relatively motionless during execution. Further studies are needed to confirm these pilot results.

  1. Teach Battery Technology with Class-Built Wet Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    With some simple metal samples and common household liquids, teachers can build wet cell batteries and use them to teach students about batteries and how they work. In this article, the author offers information that is derived from some simple experiments he conducted in his basement workshop and can easily be applied in the classroom or lab. He…

  2. Studies of nuclei using radioactive beams. [Space Astronomy Lab. , Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1989-07-01

    The 12 month period from May 1988 to July 1989 represents the first full year of our 18 month pilot program in nuclear structure research. In this period, research was initiated to develop a capability for radioactive secondary beams at Argonne National Laboratory using the Atlas and the new Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA), which is currently under construction. Two major new detector facilities are currently in the final stages of design and testing. The Large-Area, Scintillator Telescope (LAST) detector is fully operational and will be shipped to Argonne National Laboratory in August for fit-tests and in-beam calibrations. The first segments of a new sixteen-segment neutron multiplicity detector have been built and tested. The remaining segments are currently being constructed. Research was continued in the areas of (1) Coulomb excitation studies of rare earth and actinide nuclei; (2) In-beam, gamma-ray spectroscopy of nuclei in the mass 100 region, and (3) Advanced detector design. Several journal articles and abstracts were published or submitted for publication in the reporting period, and others are currently in preparation. Three graduate students participated in the program, one from the University of Florida and two from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.

  3. A lab-based study of subground passive cooling system for indoor temperature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chok, Mun-Hong; Chan, Chee-Ming

    2017-11-01

    Passive cooling is an alternative cooling technique which helps to reduce high energy consumption. Respectively, dredged marine soil (DMS) is either being dumped or disposed as waste materials. Dredging works had resulted high labor cost, therefore reuse DMS as to fill it along the coastal area. In this study, DMS chosen to examine the effectiveness of passive cooling system by model tests. Soil characterization were carried out according to BS1377: Part 2: 1990. Model were made into scale of 3 cm to 1 m. Heat exchange unit consists of three pipe designs namely, parallel, ramp and spiral. Preliminary tests including flow rate test and soil sample selection were done to select the best heat exchange unit to carry out the model test. Model test is classified into 2 conditions, day and night, each condition consists of 4 configurations which the temperature results are determined. The result shows that window left open and fan switched on (WO/FO) recorded the most effective cooling effects, from 29 °C to 27 °C with drop of 6.9 %.

  4. A pilot-scale study of wet torrefaction treatment for upgrading palm oil empty fruit bunches as clean solid fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusman, M. H.; Sastroredjo, P. N. E.; Prawisudha, P.; Hardianto, T.; Pasek, A. D.

    2017-05-01

    Less utilized empty fruit bunch (EFB) is seldom used as solid biofuel due to its high alkali content that potentially cause ash deposit called slagging and fouling. This phenomenon could harm biomass-fired power plant equipment. Some pre-treatment of EFB is needed to reduce EFB ash deposit potential. The effect of wet torrefaction pre-treatment in laboratory scale was successfully proven in decreasing slagging and fouling potential while increasing EFB calorific value that could fulfill clean solid fuel criteria. This research focuses on wet torrefaction process that conducted on a pilot scale with the capacity of 250 liters. It was found that wet torrefaction process can improve the product’s calorific value up to 9.41% while reduce its ash content down to 1.01% comparing to the raw EFB. The reduction of ash content also leads to the reduction of slagging and fouling tendency that presents in terms of alkali index. Alkali index is a quantitative method that can be calculated after obtaining metal oxides fraction on solid fuel. Metal oxides could be obtained by using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

  5. Fabrication and Prototyping Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Fabrication and Prototyping Lab for composite structures provides a wide variety of fabrication capabilities critical to enabling hands-on research and...

  6. Crystallization Formulation Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Crystallization Formulation Lab fills a critical need in the process development and optimization of current and new explosives and energetic formulations. The...

  7. USNA DIGITAL FORENSICS LAB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To enable Digital Forensics and Computer Security research and educational opportunities across majors and departments. Lab MissionEstablish and maintain a Digital...

  8. Magnetic Media Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This lab specializes in tape certification and performance characterization of high density digital tape and isprepared to support the certification of standard size...

  9. Evaluation of Factors Influencing Lab-Scale Studies to Determine Heavy Metal Removal by Six Sorbents for Stormwater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Huber

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For the development of decentralized treatment systems for road runoff, the determination of pollutant removal capacities is essential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of boundary conditions on the simultaneous removal of copper, nickel, and zinc by six sorbents used for urban stormwater treatment (i.e., granular activated alumina, anthracite, granular reactivated carbon, granular ferric hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and granular activated lignite. For batch experiments, capacities were determined at initial concentrations within the range of 2.5–180 mg/L with a rotary shaker. Further influences were investigated: the use of a horizontal shaker for concentrations of up to 1080 mg/L, a variation of the initial pH value (5 and 7, and the presence of a buffer. Furthermore, the influences of the filtration process on the capacities were studied. Kinetic experiments were conducted for contact times between 5 min and 120 min. Lab-scale column experiments with inflow concentrations of 2.5 mg/L (copper and nickel and 5.0 mg/L (zinc at an initial pH of 5 and a contact time of 11 min were performed for comparison. Selected experiments were subsequently carried out with changes in initial concentrations and contact time. One result is that it is essential to conduct batch experiments with the metals of interest. The capacities determined by column experiments deviated from batch experiments. Batch experiments under well-defined conditions can be used to evaluate different production batches. Column experiments give a more faithful capacity by considering realistic boundary conditions and should be preferred to determine efficiencies and service lives.

  10. Curricular Adaptations in Introductory Physics Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Ewell, Mary; Moore, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    When curricular materials are disseminated to new sites, there can be a tension between fidelity to the original intent of the developers and adaptation to local needs. In this case study we look at a lab activity that was initially developed for an introductory physics for the life sciences (IPLS) course at the University of Maryland, then implemented at George Mason University with significant adaptations. The goals of the two implementations were overlapping, but also differed in ways that are reflected in the two versions of the lab. We compare student lab report data from the two sites to examine the impacts of the adaptation on how students engaged with the lab.

  11. Basic Rules of Hygiene Protect Health Care and Lab Workers from Nasal Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus: An International Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra Saadatian-Elahi; Anne Tristan; Frédéric Laurent; Jean-Philippe Rasigade; Coralie Bouchiat; Anne-Gaëlle Ranc; Gérard Lina; Olivier Dauwalder; Jérôme Etienne; Michèle Bes; François Vandenesch

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition of nasal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonization by contaminated hands is likely an important determinant of its nasal carriage rate in health care and lab setting. The objective of our cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of nasal methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) or -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage among health care professionals (HCPs) attending an international symposium and to study the association between compliance with hygiene rules, individ...

  12. Wetting, Prewetting and Superfluidity

    OpenAIRE

    Taborek, P.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments on adsorption and wetting of quantum fluids (4He and 3He) on weakly binding alkali metal substrates are reviewed. Helium on weak substrates can undergo a variety of phase transitions including wetting, prewetting, layering, and liquid-vapor transitions. Another characteristic feature of weak substrates is the absence of an immobile quasi solid layer which is present on all conventional strong substrates. Both the absence of the immobile layer and the interaction with surface phase...

  13. Characteristics of wet work in nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungbauer, FHW; Steenstra, FB; Groothoff, JW; Coenraads, PJ

    Background objectives: Nursing is known for its high prevalence of hand dermatitis, mainly caused by the intense exposure to wet work in nursing activities. We aimed to study the characteristics of wet work exposure in nursing. Method: Trained observers monitored the duration and frequency of

  14. SAR-sensing of vegetation wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JJM; Klaassen, W

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this study is to measure rain induced forest canopy wetness. The approach used is ERS tandem mission C-band SAR backscatter change detection between successive dry and rainy days. The observed backscatter change is positively related with modelled canopy wetness change. It is therefore

  15. Validation study for using lab-on-chip technology for Coxiella burnetii multi-locus-VNTR-analysis (MLVA) typing: application for studying genotypic diversity of strains from domestic ruminants in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, Myriam; Rousset, Elodie; Yang, Elise; Thiéry, Richard; Sidi-Boumedine, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic bacterium of Q fever zoonosis, is still difficult to control. Ruminants are often carriers and involved in human epidemics. MLVA is a promising genotyping method for molecular epidemiology. Different techniques are used to resolve the MLVA band profiles such as electrophoresis on agarose gels, capillary electrophoresis or using the microfluidic Lab-on-Chip system. In this study, system based on microfluidics electrophoresis with Lab-on-Chip technology was assessed and applied on DNA field samples to investigate the genotypic diversity of C. burnetii strains circulating in France. The Lab-on-Chip technology was first compared to agarose gel electrophoresis. Subsequently, the set-up Lab-on-Chip technology was applied on 97 samples collected from ruminants in France using the 17 markers previously described. A discordance rate of 27% was observed between Lab-on-Chip and agarose gel electrophoresis. These discrepancies were checked and resolved by sequencing. The cluster analysis revealed classification based on host species and/or geographic origin criteria. Moreover, the circulation of different genotypic strains within the same farm was also observed. In this study, MLVA with Lab-on-Chip technology was shown to be more accurate, reproducible, user friendly and safer than gel electrophoresis. It also provides an extended data set from French ruminant C. burnetii circulating strains useful for epidemiological investigations. Finally, it raises some questions regarding the standardization and harmonization of C. burnetii MLVA genotyping. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. NOT Another Lab Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ende, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Ask students to name the aspects of science class they enjoy most, and working on labs will undoubtedly be mentioned. What often won't be included, however, is writing lab reports. For many students, the process of exploration and data collection is paramount, while the explanation and analysis of findings often takes a backseat. After all, if…

  17. Lab Report Blues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    For middle school students, writing a formal lab report can be challenging. For middle level teachers, reading students lab reports can be overwhelming. After grading report after report with incomplete procedures, incorrect graphs, and missing conclusions, the author's frustration level was at an all-time high. Ready to try anything, he thought,…

  18. Physics Labs with Flavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes my attempts to look deeper into the so-called "shoot for your grade" labs, started in the '90s, when I began applying my teaching experience in Russia to introductory physics labs at the College of Charleston and other higher education institutions in South Carolina. The term "shoot for your grade" became popular among…

  19. Influence of local calibration on the quality of online wet weather discharge monitoring: feedback from five international case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caradot, Nicolas; Sonnenberg, Hauke; Rouault, Pascale; Gruber, Günter; Hofer, Thomas; Torres, Andres; Pesci, Maria; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports about experiences gathered from five online monitoring campaigns in the sewer systems of Berlin (Germany), Graz (Austria), Lyon (France) and Bogota (Colombia) using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectrometers and turbidimeters. Online probes are useful for the measurement of highly dynamic processes, e.g. combined sewer overflows (CSO), storm events, and river impacts. The influence of local calibration on the quality of online chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements of wet weather discharges has been assessed. Results underline the need to establish local calibration functions for both UV-VIS spectrometers and turbidimeters. It is suggested that practitioners calibrate locally their probes using at least 15-20 samples. However, these samples should be collected over several events and cover most of the natural variability of the measured concentration. For this reason, the use of automatic peristaltic samplers in parallel to online monitoring is recommended with short representative sampling campaigns during wet weather discharges. Using reliable calibration functions, COD loads of CSO and storm events can be estimated with a relative uncertainty of approximately 20%. If no local calibration is established, concentrations and loads are estimated with a high error rate, questioning the reliability and meaning of the online measurement. Similar results have been obtained for total suspended solids measurements.

  20. Quality of urban runoff in wet and dry seasons: a case study in a semi-arid zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Hernández, Joyce; Lucho-Constantino, Carlos; Lizárraga-Mendiola, Liliana; Beltrán-Hernández, Rosa Icela; Coronel-Olivares, Claudia; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Gabriela

    2016-12-01

    Urban runoff (UR) is a promising new resource that may alleviate growing tensions in numerous arid and semi-arid regions of the world. However, it is precisely in these zones that the available UR quality characteristics are scarcer. This work aims to evaluate a wide set of parameters to establish a detailed approach to both the quality of UR in a midsized city in Central Mexico and the feasibility of using UR to recharge aquifers. UR from an institutional land use site was sampled during wet and dry seasons and assessed for suspended solids, organic matter, nutrients, microorganisms, metals, and persistent organic chemicals (i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH). The results were analyzed using multivariate statistical methods to identify relationships among the variables, the sampling sites and the seasons. The soil erosion and the leaching of materials due to the water flow through vegetated areas were identified as the most influencing factor on the quality of the site runoff in both dry and wet seasons. Additionally, data were more heterogeneous during the dry season, and higher pollutant concentrations were found both during the dry season and in more pervious zones. We consider UR a promising water source for recharging aquifers in arid and semi-arid zones if a program is implemented that can integrate an adequate runoff treatment system, soil protection, and other non-structural measures.

  1. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  2. Study of a novel cell lysis method with titanium dioxide for Lab-on-a-Chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weijie; Yeow, John T W

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a novel method is proposed and demonstrated to be able to lyse gram-negative (E. coli) bacteria cells for Lab-on-a-Chip applications. The proposed method incorporates using titanium dioxide particles as photocatalysts and a miniaturized UV LED array as an excitation light source to perform cell lysis on microchips. The experimental result demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed prototype device. The working device suggests an inexpensive, easy to be fabricated and effective way for microchip cell lysis. The miniaturized UV LED array and the microchip with a reaction chamber can be easily integrated with other functional components to form a customized whole Lab-on-a-Chip system.

  3. Wet air oxidation of seedcorn wastes containing pesticides and insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, M.; Schlaefer, O.; Onyeche, T.I.; Schroeder, C.; Bormann, H.; Schaefer, S. [CUTEC-Inst. GmbH (Clausthal Environment Technology Inst.), Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Wet air oxidation as an alternative treatment process to pyrolysis and combustion of seedcorn wastes was investigated in lab-scale experiments. Due to solid condition of the seed corn waste, the process has been adapted by repeated spraying of water on the seed corn bulk to avoid the production of sludge and its subsequent dewatering. Original seed corns from industrial production plants were used for a degradation kinetic study under smooth wet air oxidation conditions. The temperatures were between 80 and 150 C, the pressure from 1 to 4.5 bar and the pH at different values from 3 to 13. Degradation rates for five different compounds of pesticides and insecticides, namely Imidacloprid, Thiram, Hymexazol, Carbofuran and Tefluthrin were conducted. These compounds represent the recently used in agricultural seedcorn applications. The degradation rate depends linearly on temperature between 80 and 150 C. At 120 C the lowest degradation rate was found for Tefluthrin by 25 mg/h per L reaction volume while the highest degradation rate to be conducted was for Imidacloprid at 363 mg/h L. (orig.)

  4. Wet gas sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welker, T.F.

    1997-07-01

    The quality of gas has changed drastically in the past few years. Most gas is wet with hydrocarbons, water, and heavier contaminants that tend to condense if not handled properly. If a gas stream is contaminated with condensables, the sampling of that stream must be done in a manner that will ensure all of the components in the stream are introduced into the sample container as the composite. The sampling and handling of wet gas is extremely difficult under ideal conditions. There are no ideal conditions in the real world. The problems related to offshore operations and other wet gas systems, as well as the transportation of the sample, are additional problems that must be overcome if the analysis is to mean anything to the producer and gatherer. The sampling of wet gas systems is decidedly more difficult than sampling conventional dry gas systems. Wet gas systems were generally going to result in the measurement of one heating value at the inlet of the pipe and a drastic reduction in the heating value of the gas at the outlet end of the system. This is caused by the fallout or accumulation of the heavier products that, at the inlet, may be in the vapor state in the pipeline; hence, the high gravity and high BTU. But, in fact, because of pressure and temperature variances, these liquids condense and form a liquid that is actually running down the pipe as a stream or is accumulated in drips to be blown from the system. (author)

  5. Wetting Resistance of Commercial Membrane Distillation Membranes in Waste Streams Containing Surfactants and Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Eykens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Water management is becoming increasingly challenging and several technologies, including membrane distillation (MD are emerging. This technology is less affected by salinity compared to reverse osmosis and is able to treat brines up to saturation. The focus of MD research recently shifted from seawater desalination to industrial applications out of the scope of reverse osmosis. In many of these applications, surfactants or oil traces are present in the feed stream, lowering the surface tension and increasing the risk for membrane wetting. In this study, the technological boundaries of MD in the presence of surfactants are investigated using surface tension, contact angle and liquid entry pressure measurements together with lab-scale MD experiments to predict the wetting resistance of different membranes. Synthetic NaCl solutions mixed with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS were used as feed solution. The limiting surfactant concentration was found to be dependent on the surface chemistry of the membrane, and increased with increasing hydrophobicity and oleophobicity. Additionally, a hexadecane/SDS emulsion was prepared with a composition simulating produced water, a waste stream in the oil and gas sector. When hexadecane is present in the emulsion, oleophobic membranes are able to resist wetting, whereas polytetrafluoretheen (PTFE is gradually wetted by the feed liquid.

  6. Comparative study of CuO-CeO{sub 2} catalysts prepared by wet impregnation and deposition-precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurbani, A.; Ayastuy, J.L.; Gonzalez-Marcos, M.P.; Gutierrez-Ortiz, M.A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Bilbao 48080 (Spain); Unidad Asociada ' ' Tecnologias Quimicas para la Sostenibilidad Ambiental' ' , CSIC-UPV/EHU (Spain); Herrero, J.E.; Guil, J.M. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica ' ' Rocasolano' ' - CSIC, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Unidad Asociada ' ' Tecnologias Quimicas para la Sostenibilidad Ambiental' ' , CSIC-UPV/EHU (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    Two different preparation methods are used to synthesize wt. 7% CuO-CeO{sub 2} catalysts: a conventional wet impregnation method, and a deposition-precipitation (DP) method using Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as precipitating agent. Both samples are characterized by a series of techniques. CuO-CeO{sub 2} (Cu-Ce) prepared by DP shows a lower capacity to release the lattice oxygen to form CO{sub 2}. From CO-TPR results, it is demonstrated that this catalyst is not able to reduce copper clusters at low temperatures. Also, CO-TPD shows no CO{sub 2} formation. The activity results confirm the worse performance of Cu-Ce prepared by DP especially when oxygen is not in excess (PROX reaction with stoichometric oxygen). A copper particle size which is too small could create a stronger metal-support interaction, with lower Cu-Ce interface to react. (author)

  7. Study on a lab-scale hydrogen production by closed cycle thermo-chemical iodine-sulfur process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P.; Chen, S.Z.; Wang, L.J.; Yao, T.Y.; Xu, J.M. [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, P.O. Box 1021, Beijing (China)

    2010-10-15

    The Iodine-Sulfur (IS) thermo-chemical process for the production of hydrogen is one of the most promising approaches for use of the high temperature process heat supplied by high temperature reactor, which was developed in the Institute of nuclear and new energy technology (INET) of Tsinghua University, China, and INET initiated the fundamental studies on IS cycle since 2005. Based on the experiment results obtained by fundamental researches, a lab-scaled closed cycle loop (IS-10), which featured in electro-electrodialysis (EED) for hydriodic acid (HI) concentration, was designed and built at INET. The loop was composed of three sections, i.e., Bunsen section, HI section and sulfuric acid section. The closed cycle experiment on the loop was successfully carried out recently. In HI section, HI{sub x} produced by Bunsen reaction was continuously purified through reverse Bunsen reaction, concentrated by EED, and then HI solution was obtained by distillation. Finally HI was catalytically decomposed to H{sub 2} and I{sub 2} with the conversion of 20%. In sulfuric acid section, sulfuric acid was continuously purified, concentrated by distillation, and catalytically decomposed to SO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O with the conversion of 75%. In Bunsen section, water, including recycled water, reacted with I{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} recycled from HI section and sulfuric acid section to form two separated acids phases, thus to form a closed cycle. The closed cycle experiment lasted for 7 h with the hydrogen production rate of 10 NL/h, with Pt loaded on activated carbon and copper chromite used as the catalysts for HI and sulfuric acid decomposition, respectively. This paper summarizes the main features of IS-10 and the main results of the closed cycle experiment. So far IS-10 is the second reported facility on which closed experiment was carried out, and the first one with EED embedded to perform a closed cycle operation. (author)

  8. The sensitivity of Sphagnum to surface layer conditions in a re-wetted bog: a simulation study of water stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Schouwenaars

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of the water table in re-wetted bogs varies widely between different locations so that recolonising Sphagnum is vulnerable to water stress, especially when the water table is drawn down in summer. It is important to understand how physical site conditions influence the occurrence of water stress so that adequate management measures may be applied. In the work reported here, the respective roles of the hydrophysical properties of the uppermost peat layer and micro-scale site conditions are investigated using a Soil-Water-Atmosphere-Plant (SWAP model, which simulates water table fluctuations and soil moisture conditions. The variables are: (a cover and thickness of the Sphagnum layer, (b microtopography (presence of open water, (c hydrophysical properties of the uppermost soil layer and (d rate of downward seepage. Data for the model are derived from field observations, from published literature, and from laboratory determinations of moisture characteristic curves and saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (k–h–Θ relationships for peat. The simulation indicates that microtopography and the thickness of the moss layer are the dominant factors affecting groundwater behaviour and the risk of water stress. Sphagnum layers a few centimetres thick should be relatively well supplied with water from the underlying peat but as the Sphagnum carpet thickens, water movement through the unsaturated zone to the growing capitula will become increasingly difficult. Sphagnum layers appear to be most vulnerable to water stress when they are 5–15 cm thick. Beyond this thickness, water stored within the Sphagnum layer itself begins to offset the decline in the flux from below, and thus to reduce the dependence of the water supply to the stem tips on the maintenance of hydraulic continuity with the water table. The results obtained using the model underline the close interdependence between Sphagnum development and the accompanying

  9. Spatial distribution of electrons near the Fermi level in the metallic LaB6 through accurate X-ray charge density study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Hidetaka; Nishibori, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    Charge densities of iso-structural metal hexaborides, a transparent metal LaB6 and a semiconductor BaB6, have been determined using the d > 0.22 Å ultra-high resolution synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction data by a multipole refinement and a maximum entropy method (MEM). The quality of the experimental charge densities was evaluated by comparison with theoretical charge densities. The strong inter-octahedral and relatively weak intra-octahedral boron-boron bonds were observed in the charge densities. A difference of valence charge densities between LaB6 and BaB6 was calculated to reveal a small difference between isostructural metal and semiconductor. The weak electron lobes distributed around the inter B6 octahedral bond were observed in the difference density. We found the electron lobes are the conductive π-electrons in LaB6 from the comparison with the theoretical valence charge density. We successfully observed a spatial distribution of electrons near the Fermi level from the X-ray charge density study of the series of iso-structural solids.

  10. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Mishra, Himanshu; Bonn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measurin...

  11. LIDAR Research & Development Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The LIDAR Research and Development labs are used to investigate and improve LIDAR components such as laser sources, optical signal detectors and optical filters. The...

  12. Clothing Systems Design Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Clothing Systems Design Lab houses facilities for the design and rapid prototyping of military protective apparel.Other focuses include: creation of patterns and...

  13. The Udall Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Udall lab is interested in genome evolution and cotton genomics.The cotton genus ( Gossypium) is an extraordinarily diverse group with approximately 50 species...

  14. Laser Research Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laser Research lab is thecenter for the development of new laser sources, nonlinear optical materials, frequency conversion processes and laser-based sensors for...

  15. Living Lab ammattikorkeakoulussa

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Käyttäjälähtöinen Living Lab –toiminta muodostaa avoimen innovaatioympäristön ja pyrkii luomaan vuorovaikutusta tuotteiden ja palveluiden kehittäjien ja käyttäjien välille. Living Lab –toiminta soveltuu erittäin hyvin ammattikorkeakoulujen työelämälähtöiseen ja käytännönläheiseen tutkimus-, kehitys- ja innovaatiotoimintaan. Oman lisänsä Living Lab –tyyppiseen TKI-toimintaan tuokin juuri käyttäjälähtöisyys – Living Lab –toiminnassa korkeakouluvetoiseen kehittämistyöhön osallistuvat tuotteiden ...

  16. Removal of Hg{sup 0} from flue gases in wet FGD by catalytic oxidation with air - An experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrej Stergarsek; Milena Horvat; Peter Frkal; Jost Stergarsek [' Jozef Stefan' Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-11-15

    Research efforts are being focused on the development of mercury removal technologies, mainly directed to two alternative approaches: (I) the enhancement of homogeneous oxidation in the flue gases of Hg{sup 0} to water soluble Hg{sup 2+} by the addition of chlorides or bromides to the boiler or; (ii) the adsorption of Hg{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 0} on impregnated activated carbon (AC). A third option gaining more attention lately is based on the oxidation and retention of dissolved Hg{sup 0} in the wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) system. The experimental evidence of the present work showed that Hg{sup 0} present in the gaseous phase can be dissolved and oxidized to a high degree (70-90%) by air together with SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} in wet FGD solutions. Transition metals such as Fe{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} act as catalysts, chloride enhances the reaction, while some oxosulphur compounds, e.g. tetrathionate, inhibit the oxidation. A combination of several catalysts at a concentration of sulphite (SO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) below 100 mg L{sup -1} and an adequate redox potential of the solution can assure reasonable mercury removal even in the presence of oxidation inhibiting compounds. The main competitive reactions that govern final Hg{sup 0} removal in the FGD are as follows: (1) oxidation of Hg{sup 0} together with SO{sub 2} with air, enhanced by catalysts; (2) removal of catalysts by precipitation in the form of Fe(OH){sub 3} and eventually as MnO{sub 2} (to overcome this problem continuous addition of catalysts to the solution is required); (3) reduction of Fe{sup 3+} by tetrathionate to Fe{sup 2+} which (4) may reduce Hg{sup 2+} to Hg{sup 0} and probably (5) the complexation of Hg{sup 2+} by anions present which may play an important role in the mechanism by complexing the product(s) of the Hg{sup 0} oxidation reaction. 35 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Wetting of real surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward Yu

    2013-01-01

    The problem of wetting and drop dynamics on various surfaces is very interesting from both the scientificas well as thepractical viewpoint, and subject of intense research.The results are scattered across papers in journals, sothis workwill meet the need for a unifying, comprehensive work.

  18. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1999-03-30

    The elastic modulus E of wet granular material was found to be of the order of 0.25 MPa, this value does not compare well with the value predicted for a cubic array of spheres under Hertzian contact were the predicted values were in the order of 250 MPa . The strain-stress behavior of a wet granular media was measured using a split Parfitt tensile tester. In all cases the stress increases linearly with distance until the maximum uniaxial tensile stress is reached. The stress then decreases exponentially with distance after this maximum is reached. The linear region indicates that wet solids behave elastically for stresses below the tensile stresses and can store significant elastic energy. The elastic deformation cannot be explained by analyzing the behavior of individual capillary bridges and requires accounting for the deformation of the solids particles. The elastic modulus of the wet granular material remains unexplained. New information was found to support the experimental finding and a first theory to explain the very small elastic modulus is presented. A new model based on the used of the finite element method is being developed.

  19. The Wet Chaparral

    OpenAIRE

    Hope, Audrey Marie

    2017-01-01

    The Wet Chaparral: Poetry at Home (Out There) is an MFA thesis exhibition of new sculptures by Audrey Hope. The thesis paper describes the exhibition, discusses the artist’s personal and artistic motivations, and analyzes writings relevant to the work.

  20. Diagnosing the Nature of Land-Atmosphere Coupling: A Case Study of Dry/Wet Extremes in the U. S. Southern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanello, Joseph A. Jr.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kennedy, Aaron; Kumar, Sujay V.

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of land surface and planetary boundary layer (PBL) temperature and moisture states and fluxes. In turn, these interactions regulate the strength of the connection between surface moisture and precipitation in a coupled system. To address model deficiencies, recent studies have focused on development of diagnostics to quantify the strength and accuracy of the land- PBL coupling at the process-level. In this paper, a diagnosis of the nature and impacts of local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) during dry and wet extreme conditions is presented using a combination of models and observations during the summers of 2006 and 2007 in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. A range of diagnostics exploring the links and feedbacks between soil moisture and precipitation are applied to the dry/wet regimes exhibited in this region, and in the process a thorough evaluation of nine different land-PBL scheme couplings is conducted under the umbrella of a high-resolution regional modeling testbed. Results show that the sign and magnitude of errors in land surface energy balance components are sensitive to the choice of land surface model, regime type, and running mode. In addition, LoCo diagnostics show that the sensitivity of L-A coupling is stronger towards the land during dry conditions, while the PBL scheme coupling becomes more important during the wet regime. Results also demonstrate how LoCo diagnostics can be applied to any modeling system (e.g. reanalysis products) in the context of their integrated impacts on the process-chain connecting the land surface to the PBL and in support of hydrological anomalies.

  1. Different regimes of dynamic wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustav, Amberg; Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Shiomi, Junichiro; Physiochemical fluid mechanics Team; Maruyama-Chiashi Laboratory Team

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting, as observed when a droplet contacts a dry solid surface, is important in various engineering processes, such as printing, coating, and lubrication. Our overall aim is to investigate if and how the detailed properties of the solid surface influence the dynamics of wetting. Here we discuss how surface roughness influences the initial dynamic spreading of a partially wetting droplet by studying the spreading on a solid substrate patterned with microstructures just a few micrometers in size. This is complemented by matching numerical simulations. We present a parameter map, based on the properties of the liquid and the solid surface, which identifies qualitatively different spreading regimes, where the spreading speed is limited by either the liquid viscosity, the surface properties, or the liquid inertia. The peculiarities of the different spreading regimes are studied by detailed numerical simulations, in conjuction with experiments. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (J.W. and J.S) and Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (M.D.-Q. and G.A).

  2. Comparative study between energy efficient and conventional 15 kW induction machine using LabVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronan, P.L.; Ali, S.A.M. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Bedford Park, SA (Australia). School of Electrical Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Energy conservation in industry has become a large issue. This paper compares an energy efficient three phase induction motor to a conventional motor of the same cage size. LabVIEW, a graphical programming language, was used to perform the test. The energy saving motor uses a dual design, with a modified stator winding. The stator winding has two possible connections depending on the loading of the motor. Control is automatic using a microprocessor and SCR switches. Power losses are reduced and soft starting is performed without the introduction of harmonics. The paper presents measured power losses against load characteristics obtained using computer programming from each motor. This data along with assumed duty cycles is used to calculate energy saving. It was concluded that the dual mode induction motor is a very good design. When used continuously or with soft starting it becomes very energy efficient. The particular duty cycle used also effects the amount of energy saved over a period of time. LabVIEW was found to simplify the test process and enable a large number of data points to be taken in a short period of time with great accuracy provided the transducers used were reliable. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 4 refs.

  3. Technical Efficiency of Wet Season Melon Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananti Yekti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melon is one of high-value horticulture commodity which is cultivated widely in Kulon Progo regency. The nature of agricultural products is heavily dependent on the season, so it causes the prices of agricultural products always fluctuated every time. In wet season the price of agricultural products tends to be more expensive. Melon cultivation in wet season provide an opportunity to earn higher profits than in the dry season. The price of agricultural products tends to be more expensive in wet season, thus melon cultivation in wet season prospectively generate high profits. In order to achieve high profitability, melon farming has to be done efficiently. Objective of this study was to 1 determined the factors that influence melon production in wet season 2 measured technical efficiency of melon farming and 3 identified the factors that influanced technical efficiency. Data collected during April – June 2014. Location determined by multistage cluster sampling. 45 samples of farmers who cultivated melon during wet season obtained based on quota sampling technique. Technical efficiency was measured using Cobb-Douglas Stochastic Frontier. The result reveals that 1 land use, quantity of seed, K fertilizer contributed significantly increasing melon production, while N fertilizer decreased melon production significantly 2 technical efficiency indeces ranged from 0.40 to 0.99, with a mean of  0.77; 3 farmer’s experience gave significant influence to technical efficiency of melon farming in wet season.

  4. How Electronic Lab Notebooks can galvanise Research Data Management

    OpenAIRE

    Macneil, Rory

    2014-01-01

    The paper explains how electronic lab notebooks and data repositories are complementary responses to the scientific data problem. It is divided into four parts: 1. Description of the scientific data problem 2. Overview of (a) electronic lab notebooks and (b) data repositories 3. A case study of integrating an electronic lab notebook – RSpace – into an institutional data repository – Edinburgh DataShare 4. A look at the role electronic lab notebooks may play in the future

  5. LabVIEW 2010 Computer Vision Platform Based Virtual Instrument and Its Application for Pitting Corrosion Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogelio Ramos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A virtual instrumentation (VI system called VI localized corrosion image analyzer (LCIA based on LabVIEW 2010 was developed allowing rapid automatic and subjective error-free determination of the pits number on large sized corroded specimens. The VI LCIA controls synchronously the digital microscope image taking and its analysis, finally resulting in a map file containing the coordinates of the detected probable pits containing zones on the investigated specimen. The pits area, traverse length, and density are also determined by the VI using binary large objects (blobs analysis. The resulting map file can be used further by a scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET system for rapid (one pass “true/false” SVET check of the probable zones only passing through the pit’s centers avoiding thus the entire specimen scan. A complete SVET scan over the already proved “true” zones could determine the corrosion rate in any of the zones.

  6. LabVIEW 2010 Computer Vision Platform Based Virtual Instrument and Its Application for Pitting Corrosion Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Rogelio; Zlatev, Roumen; Valdez, Benjamin; Stoytcheva, Margarita; Carrillo, Mónica; García, Juan-Francisco

    2013-01-01

    A virtual instrumentation (VI) system called VI localized corrosion image analyzer (LCIA) based on LabVIEW 2010 was developed allowing rapid automatic and subjective error-free determination of the pits number on large sized corroded specimens. The VI LCIA controls synchronously the digital microscope image taking and its analysis, finally resulting in a map file containing the coordinates of the detected probable pits containing zones on the investigated specimen. The pits area, traverse length, and density are also determined by the VI using binary large objects (blobs) analysis. The resulting map file can be used further by a scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) system for rapid (one pass) "true/false" SVET check of the probable zones only passing through the pit's centers avoiding thus the entire specimen scan. A complete SVET scan over the already proved "true" zones could determine the corrosion rate in any of the zones.

  7. LabVIEW 2010 Computer Vision Platform Based Virtual Instrument and Its Application for Pitting Corrosion Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Rogelio; Zlatev, Roumen; Valdez, Benjamin; Stoytcheva, Margarita; Carrillo, Mónica; García, Juan-Francisco

    2013-01-01

    A virtual instrumentation (VI) system called VI localized corrosion image analyzer (LCIA) based on LabVIEW 2010 was developed allowing rapid automatic and subjective error-free determination of the pits number on large sized corroded specimens. The VI LCIA controls synchronously the digital microscope image taking and its analysis, finally resulting in a map file containing the coordinates of the detected probable pits containing zones on the investigated specimen. The pits area, traverse length, and density are also determined by the VI using binary large objects (blobs) analysis. The resulting map file can be used further by a scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) system for rapid (one pass) “true/false” SVET check of the probable zones only passing through the pit's centers avoiding thus the entire specimen scan. A complete SVET scan over the already proved “true” zones could determine the corrosion rate in any of the zones. PMID:23691434

  8. Wetting in Color

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Ian Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Colorimetric litmus tests such as pH paper have enjoyed wide commercial success due to their inexpensive production and exceptional ease of use. However, expansion of colorimetry to new sensing paradigms is challenging because macroscopic color changes are seldom coupled to arbitrary differences in the physical/chemical properties of a system. In this thesis I present in detail the development of Wetting in Color Technology, focusing primarily on its application as an inexpensive and highly...

  9. Study of extraction procedures for protein analysis in plankton samples by OFFGEL electrophoresis hyphenated with Lab-on-a-chip technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Otero, Natalia; Barciela-Alonso, Ma Carmen; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2013-10-15

    Extraction procedures for protein analysis from plankton samples were studied. OFFGEL electrophoresis combined with Lab-on-a-chip technology has been applied for protein analysis in plankton samples. BCR-414 (plankton) certified reference material from the European Commission was used to evaluate the protein extraction procedures. Three protein extraction procedures were studied: (1) by using Tris-HCl buffer containing a protease inhibitor cocktail, (2) urea/triton X-100 buffer extraction, and (3) using the phenol/sodium dodecyl sulphate method after different washing steps with 10% trichloroacetic acid/acetone solution and methanol. The pellet of proteins obtained was dried and then dissolved in the OFFGEL buffer. Proteins were separated according to their isoelectric points by OFFGEL electrophoresis. This separation was performed using 24 cm, pH 3-10 IPG Dry Strips. The proteins present in each liquid fraction (24 fractions) were separated according to their molecular weight using a microfluidic Lab-on-a-chip electrophoresis with the Protein 80 LabChip kit. This kit allows for the separation of proteins with a molecular weight ranging from 5 to 80 kDa. Taking into account the intensity and the number of the protein bands obtained, the protein extraction procedure using the phenol/sodium dodecyl sulphate after different wash steps with 10% trichloroacetic acid/acetone solution was selected. The developed method was applied for protein determination in a fresh marine plankton sample. The proteins found in this sample have a molecular weight ranging from 6.4 to 57.3 kDa, and the proteins with highest molecular weight were in the OFFGEL fractions with an isoelectric point ranging from 4.40 to 8.60. The concentration of proteins were calculated using external calibration with Bovine Serum Albumin, and the protein concentrations varied from 50.0 to 925.9 ng µL(-1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Biodegradation of wet-white leather

    OpenAIRE

    Ollé Otero, Lluís; Jorba Rafart, Montse; Font Vallès, Joaquim; Shendrik, Alexander; Bacardit Dalmases, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the physical, chemical and biological processes associated with the deterioration of wet-white leather. The samples of leather were exposed for eight months to outdoor weathering and then their properties were subsequently evaluated. The results indicate that resistance and dimensional stability of wet-white (THPS-syntan) leather is higher than that of chrometanned leather. The comparative work with chrome leather was described earlier.

  11. Thermal neutron diffusion cooling in wet quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdowicz, K. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: krzysztof.drozdowicz@ifj.edu.pl; Krynicka, E. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Crakcw (Poland); Dabrowska, J. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland)

    2007-07-15

    The thermal neutron diffusion parameters of a rock material depend on the rock matrix itself and on the water content. The effect has been studied in quartz by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the variable buckling experiment for nine series of samples. A hyperbolic dependence of the density-removed diffusion cooling coefficient on the water content shows a variability of this parameter by two orders of magnitude. The function obtained for wet quartz is compared with the analogous dependence for wet dolomite.

  12. OpenLabNotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Franz, Michael; Tan, Qihua

    2015-01-01

    the longevity of the providers. Turning towards free alternatives, however, raises questions about data protection, which are not sufficiently addressed by available solutions. To serve as legal documents, ELNs must prevent scientific fraud through technical means such as digital signatures. It would also......LabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively Closes the gap between research documentation and sample management...... be advantageous if an ELN was Integrated with a laboratory information management system to allow for a comprehensive documentation of experimental work including the location of samples that were used in a particular experiment. Here, we present OpenLabNotes, which adds state-of-the-art ELN capabilities to Open...

  13. LCOGT Imaging Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufts, Joseph R.; Lobdill, Rich; Haldeman, Benjamin J.; Haynes, Rachel; Hawkins, Eric; Burleson, Ben; Jahng, David

    2008-07-01

    The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) is an ambitious project to build and operate, within 5 years, a worldwide robotic network of 50 0.4, 1, and 2 m telescopes sharing identical instrumentation and optimized for precision photometry of time-varying sources. The telescopes, instrumentation, and software are all developed in house with two 2 m telescopes already installed. The LCOGT Imaging Lab is responsible for assembly and characterization of the network's cameras and instrumentation. In addition to a fully equipped CNC machine shop, two electronics labs, and a future optics lab, the Imaging Lab is designed from the ground up to be a superb environment for bare detectors, precision filters, and assembled instruments. At the heart of the lab is an ISO class 5 cleanroom with full ionization. Surrounding this, the class 7 main lab houses equipment for detector characterization including QE and CTE, and equipment for measuring transmission and reflection of optics. Although the first science cameras installed, two TEC cooled e2v 42-40 deep depletion based units and two CryoTiger cooled Fairchild Imaging CCD486-BI based units, are from outside manufacturers, their 18 position filter wheels and the remainder of the network's science cameras, controllers, and instrumentation will be built in house. Currently being designed, the first generation LCOGT cameras for the network's 1 m telescopes use existing CCD486-BI devices and an in-house controller. Additionally, the controller uses digital signal processing to optimize readout noise vs. speed, and all instrumentation uses embedded microprocessors for communication over ethernet.

  14. Guidelines for Urban Labs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholl, Christian; Agger Eriksen, Mette; Baerten, Nik

    2017-01-01

    These guidelines are intended for team members and managers of urban labs and, more generally, for civil servants and facilitators in cities working with experimental processes to tackle complex challenges. They aim to support the everyday practice of collaboratively experimenting and learning how...... local conditions. Hence, the following guidelines do not provide a single definitive answer on ways to organize and run an urban lab or its experimental activities, but rather they offer, through frameworks and examples, guidance for ways to act in relation to, and reflect on, key issues. We hope...

  15. OpenLabNotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Franz, Michael; Tan, Qihua

    2015-01-01

    the longevity of the providers. Turning towards free alternatives, however, raises questions about data protection, which are not sufficiently addressed by available solutions. To serve as legal documents, ELNs must prevent scientific fraud through technical means such as digital signatures. It would also......LabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively Closes the gap between research documentation and sample management...

  16. CDC Lab Values

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-02-02

    More than fifteen hundred scientists fill the lab benches at CDC, logging more than four million hours each year. CDC’s laboratories play a critical role in the agency’s ability to find, stop, and prevent disease outbreaks. This podcast provides a brief overview of what goes on inside CDC’s labs, and why this work makes a difference in American’s health.  Created: 2/2/2015 by Office of the Associate Director for Communication (OADC).   Date Released: 2/2/2015.

  17. Fifteen years experience: Egyptian metabolic lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekram M. Fateen

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: This study illustrates the experience of the reference metabolic lab in Egypt over 15 years. The lab began metabolic disorder screening by using simple diagnostic techniques like thin layer chromatography and colored tests in urine which by time updated and upgraded the methods to diagnose a wide range of disorders. This study shows the most common diagnosed inherited inborn errors of metabolism among the Egyptian population.

  18. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  19. Study of the heterogeneous reaction of O3 with CH3SCH3 using the wetted-wall flowtube technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barcellos da Rosa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the heterogeneous kinetics of the reaction of CH3SCH3 (dimethyl sulphide, DMS with O3 (ozone in aqueous solutions of different ionic strengths (0, 0.1 and 1.0M NaCl using the wetted-wall flowtube (WWFT technique. Henry's law coefficients of DMS on pure water and on different concentrations of NaCl (0.1M - 4.0M in the WWFT from UV spectrophotometric measurements of DMS in the gas phase, using a numerical transport model of phase exchange, were determined to be H ±s (M atm-1 = 2.16±0.5 at 274.4 K, 1.47±0.3 at 283.4 K, 0.72±0.2 at 291 K, 0.57±0.1 at 303.4 K and 0.33±0.1 at 313.4 K on water, on 1.0M NaCl to be H = 1.57±0.4 at 275.7 K, 0.8±0.2 at 291 K and on 4.0M NaCl to be H = 0.44±0.1 at 275.7 K and 0.16±0.04 at 291 K, showing a significant effect of ionic strength, m, on the solubility of DMS according to the equation ln (H/M atm-1 = 4061 T-1 - 0.052 m2 - 50.9 m T-1 - 14.0. At concentrations of DMS(liq above 50 mM, UV spectrophotometry of both O3(gas and DMS(gas enables us to observe simultaneously the reactive uptake of O3 on DMS solution and the gas-liquid equilibration of DMS along the WWFT. The uptake coefficient, g (gamma, of O3 on aqueous solutions of DMS, varying between 1 and 15·10-6, showed a square root-dependence on the aqueous DMS concentration (as expected for diffusive penetration into the surface film, where the reaction takes place in aqueous solution. The uptake coefficient was smaller on NaCl solution in accord with the lower solubility of O3. The heterogeneous reaction of O3(gas with DMS(liq was evaluated from the observations of the second order rate constant (kII for the homogeneous aqueous reaction O3(liq + DMS(liq using a numerical model of radial diffusion and reactive penetration, leading to kII ± D kII (in units of 108 M-1 s-1 = 4.1±1.2 at 291.0 K, 2.15±0.65 at 283.4 K and 1.8±0.5 at 274.4 K. Aside from the expected influence on solubility and aqueous-phase diffusion coefficient of both

  20. Study of wet-chemically-prepared hydrogen-terminated silicon (111) surfaces and a novel implementation of a high-resolution interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui

    This thesis summarizes my graduate study under the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Atom-Based Dimensional Metrology Project, in which we are developing methods for measuring sub-micrometer dimensions including directly counting atom spacings on a silicon-surface lattice. Atomically flat, hydrogen-terminated Si(111) surfaces are prepared using wet chemistry. The surface morphology after the wet-chemistry preparation was found to be dependent on both the initial etching time and wafer miscut. These two factors have been neglected in literature. To produce a morphology of uniform, long-range steps and terraces, the miscut angle has to be larger than a certain angle. The development and dynamics of the surface morphology was explained by preferential etching. A kinetic Monte-Carlo simulation was used to quantitatively study some of the key aspects of the surface-morphology evolution, such as step flow, pit expansion, and step-pit collision. The hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces prepared using wet-chemical etching method were used as substrates to create nanometer-scale patterns using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM)-probe-induced surface modification in both ultra-high vacuum (UHV) and low-vacuum environments. Patterns created in UHV have linewidths below 10 nm, while patterns created in low vacuum had a minimum linewidth of nominally 20 nm. The pattern created in a low vacuum environment was further processed using SF6 reactive-ion etching, resulting in patterns whose aspect ratio had increased more than 5 times. To enable accurate measurement of atom spacings, a Michelson interferometer of novel design was implemented in this research, based on the principle that during operation, the interference-fringe signal is locked at a zero point by tuning the laser frequency, thus transferring the displacement measurement into a laser-frequency measurement and greatly increasing the measurement resolution. The interferometer is designed to be

  1. Learning from an Ambient Assisted Living Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Kanstrup, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents methodological lessons learned from an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) lab exploring the use of intelligent beds in a nursing home. The living lab study was conducted over a period of three month. 20 intelligent beds were installed. Data was collected via self-registration, diar......This paper presents methodological lessons learned from an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) lab exploring the use of intelligent beds in a nursing home. The living lab study was conducted over a period of three month. 20 intelligent beds were installed. Data was collected via self......-registration, diaries, observations, interviews and workshops with residents, nurses, nursing assistants, management, building officers, and purchasers from the Municipality. The paper presents an analysis within the overall themes of technology, use, and care, which is discussed by use of the SWOT framework presenting...

  2. Writing Better Lab Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Rhiannon; Guarienti, Kristy; Brydon, Barbara; Robb, Jeanine; Royston, Ann; Painter, Heidi; Sutherland, Alex; Passmore, Cynthia; Smith, Martin H.

    2010-01-01

    As science teachers at a suburban California high school, the authors were concerned about the lab report conclusions written by their upper-level chemistry, biology, and ecology students--which were consistently of poor quality. Their work lacked inferences derived from data and support for their concluding statements. Working as part of a…

  3. Lab on paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Weian; van den Berg, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices, which are suited to portable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and on-site detection, hold great promise for improving global health, and other applications.1–8 While their importance and utility are widely acknowledged and extensive research has been conducted in the

  4. USDA gin lab updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are four USDA-ARS labs involved in cotton harvesting, processing & fiber quality research; The Southwestern Cotton Ginning Research Laboratory (Mesilla Park, NM); The Cotton Production and Processing Unit (Lubbock, TX); The Cotton Ginning Research Unit (Stoneville, MS); and The Cotton Structur...

  5. Camp Sea Lab Visit

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited On Wednesday July 8th, CAVR hosted 32 eight to thirteen year olds from California State Monterey Bay’s summer Camp SEA Lab. The students had the opportunity to interact with robotic dogs, an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), remotely operated vehicle (ROV), and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV).

  6. Surveying Lab II site

    CERN Document Server

    1974-01-01

    The network of survey reference points on the Lab II site was extended to meet the geodetic needs of the SPS and its North Experimental Area. The work was greatly eased by a geodolite, a measuring instrument on loan from the Fermi Laboratory, which uses a modulated laser beam. (See CERN Courier 14 (1974) p. 247.)

  7. Physics lab in spin

    CERN Multimedia

    Hawkes, N

    1999-01-01

    RAL is fostering commerical exploitation of its research and facilities in two main ways : spin-out companies exploit work done at the lab, spin-in companies work on site taking advantage of the facilities and the expertise available (1/2 page).

  8. Modifying Cookbook Labs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert, L.; Clough, Michael P.; Berg, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    Modifies an extended lab activity from a cookbook approach for determining the percent mass of water in copper sulfate pentahydrate crystals to one which incorporates students' prior knowledge, engenders active mental struggling with prior knowledge and new experiences, and encourages metacognition. (Contains 12 references.) (ASK)

  9. A lab-scale study of constructed wetlands with sugarcane bagasse and sand media for the treatment of textile wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Tanveer; Sun, Guangzhi

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the pollutant removal efficiencies of two lab-scale hybrid wetland systems treating a textile wastewater. The two systems had identical configurations, each consisting of a vertical flow (VF) and a horizontal flow (HF) wetland that were filled with organic sugarcane bagasse and sylhet sand as the main media. The systems were operated under high hydraulic loading (HL) (566-5660 mm/d), and inorganic nitrogen (254-508 gN/m(2) d) and organics loadings (9840-19680 g COD/m(2) d and 2154-4307 g BOD(5)/m(2) d). Simultaneous removals of BOD(5) (74-79%) and ammonia (59-66%) were obtained in the first stage VF wetlands, demonstrating the efficiency of the media for oxygen transfer to cope with the high pollutant loads. The organic carbon (C) content of sugarcane bagasse facilitated denitrification in the VF wetlands. Second stage HF wetlands provided efficient color removal under predominantly anaerobic condition. Overall, the wetland systems showed stable removal performances under high, and unsteady, pollutant loadings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Wetting in Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ian Bruce

    Colorimetric litmus tests such as pH paper have enjoyed wide commercial success due to their inexpensive production and exceptional ease of use. However, expansion of colorimetry to new sensing paradigms is challenging because macroscopic color changes are seldom coupled to arbitrary differences in the physical/chemical properties of a system. In this thesis I present in detail the development of Wetting in Color Technology, focusing primarily on its application as an inexpensive and highly selective colorimetric indicator for organic liquids. The technology exploits chemically-encoded inverse-opal photonic crystals to control the infiltration of fluids to liquid-specific spatial patterns, projecting minute differences in liquids' wettability to macroscopically distinct, easy-to-visualize structural color patterns. It is shown experimentally and corroborated with theoretical modeling using percolation theory that the high selectivity of wetting, upon-which the sensitivity of the indicator relies, is caused by the highly symmetric structure of our large-area, defect-free SiO2 inverse-opals. The regular structure also produces a bright iridescent color, which disappears when infiltrated with liquid - naturally coupling the optical and fluidic responses. Surface modification protocols are developed, requiring only silanization and selective oxidation, to facilitate the deterministic design of an indicator that differentiates a broad range of liquids. The resulting tunable, built-in horizontal and vertical chemistry gradients allow the wettability threshold to be tailored to specific liquids across a continuous range, and make the readout rely only on countable color differences. As wetting is a generic fluidic phenomenon, Wetting in Color technology could be suitable for applications in authentication or identification of unknown liquids across a broad range of industries. However, the generic nature of the response also ensures chemical non-specificity. It is shown

  11. Mold management of wetted carpet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kee-Hean; Dixit, Anupma; Lewis, Roger D; MacDonald Perkins, Maureen; Backer, Denis; Condoor, Sridhar; Emo, Brett; Yang, Mingan

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the growth and removal of fungi on wetted carpet using newly designed technologies that rely on physical principles of steam, heat, and fluid flow. Sixty samples of carpet were embedded with heat-treated house dust, followed by embedding, wearing with a hexapod, and wetting. Samples were inoculated using a liquid suspension of Cladosporium sphaerospermum prior to placement over a water-saturated foam pad. Incubation times were 24 hr, 7 days, and 30 days. Cleaning was performed using three methods; high-flow hot water extraction, hot water and detergent, and steam. Fungal loading increased from approximately 1500 colony forming units per area (CFU/cm(2)) in 24 hr to a maximum of approximately 10,200 CFU/cm(2) after 7 days with a slight decline to 9700 CFU/cm(2) after 30 days incubation. Statistically significant differences were found among all three methods for removal of fungi for all three time periods (p mold spore decline from wetted carpet after 24 hr and 30 days, and over 92% efficiency after 7 days. The alternative methods exhibited lower efficiencies with a decline over time, from a maximum of 82% and 81% at 24 hr down to 60% and 43% at 30 days for detergent-hot water and high-flow, hot water extraction, respectively. The net effect of the mold management study demonstrates that while steam has a consistent fungal removal rate, the detergent and high-flow, hot water methods decline in efficiency with increasing incubation time.

  12. Artists-in-Labs: Processes of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill

    This book verifies the need for the arts and the sciences to work together in order to develop more creative and conceptual approaches to innovation and presentation. By blending ethnographical case studies, scientific viewpoints and critical essays, the focus of this research inquiry is the lab context. For scientists, the lab context is one of the most important educational experiences. For contemporary artists, laboratories are inspiring spaces to investigate, share know-how transfer and search for new collaboration potentials.

  13. Evaluation of oral microbiology lab curriculum reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Min; Gao, Zhen Y; Wu, Xin Y; Jiang, Chen X; Du, Jia H

    2015-12-07

    According to the updated concept of oral microbiology, the School of Stomatology, Wuhan University, has carried out oral microbiology teaching reforms during the last 5 years. There was no lab curriculum before 2009 except for a theory course of oral microbiology. The school has implemented an innovative curriculum with oral medicine characteristics to strengthen understanding of knowledge, cultivate students' scientific interest and develop their potential, to cultivate the comprehensive ability of students. This study was designed to evaluate the oral microbiology lab curriculum by analyzing student performance and perceptions regarding the curriculum from 2009 to 2013. The lab curriculum adopted modalities for cooperative learning. Students collected dental plaque from each other and isolated the cariogenic bacteria with selective medium plates. Then they purified the enrichment culture medium and identified the cariogenic strains by Gram stain and biochemical tests. Both quantitative and qualitative data for 5 years were analysed in this study. Part One of the current study assessed student performance in the lab from 2009 to 2013. Part Two used qualitative means to assess students' perceptions by an open questionnaire. The 271 study students' grades on oral microbiology improved during the lab curriculum: "A" grades rose from 60.5 to 81.2 %, and "C" grades fell from 28.4 to 6.3 %. All students considered the lab curriculum to be interesting and helpful. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that the lab curriculum has strengthened students' grasp of important microbiology-related theory, cultivated their scientific interest, and developed their potential and comprehensive abilities. Our student performance and perception data support the continued use of the innovative teaching system. As an extension and complement of the theory course, the oral microbiology lab curriculum appears to improve the quality of oral medicine education and help to

  14. Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks; A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson l. Ward; Glendon W. Gee; John S. Selker; Clay Cooper

    2002-04-24

    The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts atypical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could for ce flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contract angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface

  15. Rapid Migration of Radionuclides Leaked from High-Level Water Tanks: A Study of Salinity Gradients, Wetted Path Geometry and Water Vapor Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson L. Ward; Glendon W. Gee; John S. Selker; Caly Cooper

    2002-04-24

    The basis of this study was the hypothesis that the physical and chemical properties of hypersaline tank waste could lead to wetting from instability and fingered flow following a tank leak. Thus, the goal of this project was to develop an understanding of the impacts of the properties of hypersaline fluids on transport through the unsaturated zone beneath Hanford's Tank Farms. There were three specific objectives (i) to develop an improved conceptualization of hypersaline fluid transport in laboratory (ii) to identify the degree to which field conditions mimic the flow processes observed in the laboratory and (iii) to provide a validation data set to establish the degree to which the conceptual models, embodied in a numerical simulator, could explain the observed field behavior. As hypothesized, high ionic strength solutions entering homogeneous pre-wetted porous media formed unstable wetting fronts a typical of low ionic strength infiltration. In the field, this mechanism could force flow in vertical flow paths, 5-15 cm in width, bypassing much of the media and leading to waste penetration to greater depths than would be predicted by current conceptual models. Preferential flow may lead to highly accelerated transport through large homogeneous units, and must be included in any conservative analysis of tank waste losses through coarse-textured units. However, numerical description of fingered flow using current techniques has been unreliable, thereby precluding tank-scale 3-D simulation of these processes. A new approach based on nonzero, hysteretic contact angles and fluid-dependent liquid entry has been developed for the continuum scale modeling of fingered flow. This approach has been coupled with and adaptive-grid finite-difference solver to permit the prediction of finger formation and persistence form sub centimeter scales to the filed scale using both scalar and vector processors. Although laboratory experiments demonstrated that elevated surface

  16. Virtual labs in Leonardo da Vinci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Nagy

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the problem of virtual lab capabilities in the e-learning. Using combination of web conferencing and "virtual labs" capabilities, a new quality distance learning teaching is now in preparation and will be included in the course teaching to produce interactive, online simulations for the natural gas engineering studies. The activities are designed to enhance the existing curriculum and to include online assessments. A special care is devoted to the security problem between a server and a client computer. Several examples of the virtual labs related to the PVT thermodynamics, fluid flow, the natural gas well-testing, and thev gas network flow are prepared and tested. A major challenge for the 'CELGAS' system is in managing the delicate balance between the student collaboration and the isolation. Students may be encouraged to collaborate and work with each other, simulating their exploration of the lab material.

  17. Special-study modules in a problem-based learning medical curriculum: an innovative laboratory research practice supporting introduction to research methodology in the undergraduate curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guner, Gül Akdogan; Cavdar, Zahide; Yener, Nilgün; Kume, Tuncay; Egrilmez, Mehtap Yuksel; Resmi, Halil

    2011-01-01

    We describe the organization of wet-lab special-study modules (SSMs) in the Central Research Laboratory of Dokuz Eylül Medical School, Izmir, Turkey with the aim of discussing the scientific, laboratory, and pedagogical aspects of this educational activity. A general introduction to the planning and functioning of these SSMs is given, along with specific examples. The wet-lab SSMs incorporate several innovative pedagogies: problem-based learning, research-based learning, practical laboratory education, team-based learning, and project-based learning. Oral and written evaluations show that the students find this activity rewarding. The wet-lab SSM model applied in the Research-Lab of Dokuz Eylül School of Medicine represents a format which is effective in training the students in research methodology, practical laboratory work, and independent learning.

  18. Healthy snacks at the checkout counter: a lab and field study on the impact of shelf arrangement and assortment structure on consumer choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Ellen; Otten, Kai; van Trijp, Hans C M

    2012-12-12

    The essence of nudging is to adapt the environment in which consumers make decisions to help them make better choices, without forcing certain outcomes upon them. To determine how consumers can effectively be guided to select healthier snacks, we examine the effect of manipulating the assortment structure and shelf layout of an impulse display including both healthy and unhealthy snacks near the checkout counter of a canteen. Both a lab and field study applied a two-factor experimental design manipulating snack offerings both in an on-screen choice environment and a natural environment (hospital staff restaurant). Shelf arrangement (i.e. accessibility) was altered by putting healthy snacks at higher shelves versus lower shelves. Assortment structure (i.e. availability) was altered by offering an assortment that either included 25% or 75% healthy snacks. Participants in the lab study (n = 158) made a choice from a shelf display. A brief survey following snack selection asked participants to evaluate the assortment and their choice. The field experiment took place in a hospital canteen. Daily sales data were collected for a period of four weeks. On completion of the field study, employees (n = 92) filled out a questionnaire about all four displays and rated their attractiveness, healthiness and perceived freedom of choice. The lab study showed a higher probability of healthy snack choice when 75% of the assortment consisted of healthy snacks compared to conditions with 25% healthy snack assortments, even though choices were not rated less satisfying or more restrictive. Regarding shelf display location of healthy snacks, no significant differences were observed. There was also no significant shelf arrangement by assortment structure interactive effect. The field study replicated these findings, in that this assortment structure led to higher sales of healthy snacks. Sales of unhealthy and total snacks were not impacted by manipulations (no main or interaction effects

  19. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolovratník Michal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  20. Wetting, superhydrophobicity, and icephobicity in biomimetic composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Vahid

    Recent developments in nano- and bio-technology require new materials. Among these new classes of materials which have emerged in the recent years are biomimetic materials, which mimic structure and properties of materials found in living nature. There are a large number of biological objects including bacteria, animals and plants with properties of interest for engineers. Among these properties is the ability of the lotus leaf and other natural materials to repel water, which has inspired researchers to prepare similar surfaces. The Lotus effect involving roughness-induced superhydrophobicity is a way to design nonwetting, self-cleaning, omniphobic, icephobic, and antifouling surfaces. The range of actual and potential applications of superhydrophobic surfaces is diverse including optical, building and architecture, textiles, solar panels, lab-on-a-chip, microfluidic devices, and applications requiring antifouling from biological and organic contaminants. In this thesis, in chapter one, we introduce the general concepts and definitions regarding the wetting properties of the surfaces. In chapter two, we develop novel models and conduct experiments on wetting of composite materials. To design sustainable superhydrophobic metal matrix composite (MMC) surfaces, we suggest using hydrophobic reinforcement in the bulk of the material, rather than only at its surface. We experimentally study the wetting properties of graphite-reinforced Al- and Cu-based composites and conclude that the Cu-based MMCs have the potential to be used in the future for the applications where the wear-resistant superhydrophobicity is required. In chapter three, we introduce hydrophobic coating at the surface of concrete materials making them waterproof to prevent material failure, because concretes and ceramics cannot stop water from seeping through them and forming cracks. We create water-repellant concretes with CA close to 160o using superhydrophobic coating. In chapter four, experimental

  1. In-Lab Upfront Use of Tirofiban May Reduce the Occurrence of No-Reflow During Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. A Pilot Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Igor Matos; Novaes, Gustavo Caires; Badran, André Vannucchi; Pavão, Rafael Brolio; Barbosa, Ricardo; Figueiredo, Geraldo Luiz de; Lima, Moysés de Oliveira; Haddad, Jorge Luiz; Schmidt, André; Marin, José Antônio

    2016-11-01

    Despite successful opening of culprit coronary artery, myocardial reperfusion does not always follows primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors are used in the treatment of no-reflow (NR), but their role to prevent it is unproven. To evaluate the effect of in-lab administration of tirofiban on the incidence of NR in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with PPCI. STEMI patients treated with PPCI were randomized (24 tirofiban and 34 placebo) in this double-blinded study to assess the impact of intravenous tirofiban on the incidence of NR after PPCI according to angiographic and electrocardiographic methods. End-points of the study were: TIMI-epicardial flow grade; myocardial blush grade (MBG); resolution of ST-elevation TIMI flow TIMI (grau), grau de fluxo miocárdico (MBG), resolução da elevação do segmento ST TIMI escala real que teste essa hipótese.

  2. DNA Microarrays in the Undergraduate Microbiology Lab: Experimentation and Handling Large Datasets in as Few as Six Weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kushner

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA microarrays have significantly impacted the study of gene expression on a genome-wide level but also have forced a more global consideration of research questions. As such, it has become critical to introduce undergraduate students to genomics approaches to research. A challenge with performing a DNA microarray experiment in the teaching lab is determining the time required for the study and how to handle the voluminous data generated. At an unexpectedly low cost, a 6-week, project-based lab module has been developed that provides 3 weeks for wet lab (hands-on work with the DNA microarrays and 3 weeks for dry lab (analyzing data, using databases to help with data analysis, and considering the meaning of data within the large dataset. Options exist for extending the number of weeks dedicated to the project, but 6 weeks is sufficient for providing an introduction to both experimental genomics and data analysis. Students indicate that being able to both perform array experiments and thoroughly analyze data enriches their understanding of genomics and the complexity of biological systems.

  3. A discrete element study of wet particle-particle interaction during granulation in a spout fluidized bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buijtenen, M.S.; Deen, N.G.; Heinrich, Stefan; Antonyuk, Sergiy; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we study the effect of the inter-particle interaction on the bed dynamics, by considering a variable restitution coefficient. The restitution coefficient is varied in time and space depending on the moisture content due to the particle-droplet interaction and evaporation. This study

  4. Elucidating the mysteries of wetting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Sackinger, Philip A.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Emerson, John Allen; Ash, Benjamin Jesse; Heine, David R.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Gorby, Allen D.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly every manufacturing and many technologies central to Sandia's business involve physical processes controlled by interfacial wetting. Interfacial forces, e.g. conjoining/disjoining pressure, electrostatics, and capillary condensation, are ubiquitous and can surpass and even dominate bulk inertial or viscous effects on a continuum level. Moreover, the statics and dynamics of three-phase contact lines exhibit a wide range of complex behavior, such as contact angle hysteresis due to surface roughness, surface reaction, or compositional heterogeneities. These thermodynamically and kinetically driven interactions are essential to the development of new materials and processes. A detailed understanding was developed for the factors controlling wettability in multicomponent systems from computational modeling tools, and experimental diagnostics for systems, and processes dominated by interfacial effects. Wettability probed by dynamic advancing and receding contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and direct determination of the capillary and disjoining forces. Molecular scale experiments determined the relationships between the fundamental interactions between molecular species and with the substrate. Atomistic simulations studied the equilibrium concentration profiles near the solid and vapor interfaces and tested the basic assumptions used in the continuum approaches. These simulations provide guidance in developing constitutive equations, which more accurately take into account the effects of surface induced phase separation and concentration gradients near the three-phase contact line. The development of these accurate models for dynamic multicomponent wetting allows improvement in science based engineering of manufacturing processes previously developed through costly trial and error by varying material formulation and geometry modification.

  5. Removal of atmospheric ethanol by wet deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, J. David; Willey, Joan D.; Thomas, Rachel K.; Mullaugh, Katherine M.; Avery, G. Brooks; Kieber, Robert J.; Mead, Ralph N.; Helms, John; Giubbina, Fernanda F.; Campos, M. Lucia A. M.; Cala, John

    2017-02-01

    The global wet deposition flux of ethanol is estimated to be 2.4 ± 1.6 Tg/yr with a conservative range of 0.2-4.6 Tg/yr based upon analyses of 219 wet deposition samples collected at 12 locations globally. This estimate calculated by using observed wet deposition ethanol concentrations is in agreement with previous models (1.4-5 Tg/yr) predicting the wet deposition sink using Henry's law coefficients and atmospheric ethanol concentrations. Wet deposition is estimated to remove between 6 and 17% of the total ethanol emitted to the atmosphere on an annual basis. The concentration of ethanol in marine rain (25 ± 6 nM) is an order of magnitude less than in the majority of terrestrial rains (345 ± 280 nM). Terrestrial rain samples collected in locations impacted by high local sources of biofuel usage and locations downwind from ethanol distilleries were an order of magnitude higher in ethanol concentration (3090 ± 448 nM) compared to rain collected in terrestrial locations not impacted by these sources. These results indicate that wet deposition of ethanol is heavily influenced by local sources. Results of this study are important because they suggest that as biofuel production and usage increase, the concentration of ethanol in the atmosphere will increase as well the wet deposition flux. Additional research constraining the sources, sinks, and atmospheric impacts of ethanol is necessary to better assist in the debate as whether or not to increase consumption of the alcohol as a biofuel.

  6. Wetting properties and performance test of modified rigid collector in wet electrostatic precipitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunyan; Chang, Jingcai; Meng, Zhen; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Jing; Cui, Lin; Ma, Chunyuan

    2016-10-01

    The fine particles are considered a significant pollution problem. The wet electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) have advantages of efficient collection of the fine particles with lower pressure drop and eliminating reentrainment. The wetting properties of the collector surfaces have significantly important effect on wet ESPs' stable and secure operation. The modified rigid collector (MRC) was modified by coating specific vinyl ester resin composites and loose glass fiber cloth over the conventional carbon steel in a certain way. The rigid collector surfaces before and after modification had been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and interface tensiometer. The effect of operating temperatures on the wetting properties of the rigid collector surfaces before and after modification was investigated. The temperature range was 40~90 °C, and the wetting properties contained liquid holdup, surface flow rate, film rate, average film thickness, and critical saturation time. The modified rigid collector surface exhibited excellent wetting properties at the operating temperatures. The fine particles collection performance compared among the MRC, the conventional rigid collector (CRC), and the flexible collector (FC) in the wet ESPs was investigated. The effects of the applied voltage, the water film, corona power, and the specific collecting area on the fine particles collection were evaluated. The modified rigid collector provided high fine particles collection effect with lower energy and water consumption. To improve the submicron particles collection efficiency and decrease energy and water consumption, the formation of uniform water film over the collector surfaces has been widely studied. The modified rigid collector was modified by coating specific vinyl ester resin composites and loose glass fiber cloth (ERGF) over the conventional carbon steel (CCS) in a certain way. The modified rigid collector surface exhibited excellent wetting properties. The wet

  7. Study on the antimicrobial activity of Ethanol Extract of Propolisagainst enterotoxigenic Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in lab prepared Ice-cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T A El-Bassiony

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of ethanol extract of propolis against enterotoxigenic strain of MRSA which inoculated into lab prepared ice cream. EEP was added to ice cream in 3 concentrations (150, 300 and 600 mg/L. The prepared ice cream was divided into 2 groups, one stored at freezer temp. at (-5˚C, while the other was kept in deep freezer temp. at (-20˚C. MRSA could not be counted from the 4th, 2nd and 1st week of storage at freezer temp, while at deep freezer temp. MRSA could not be enumerated from the 3rd, 1st week and 3rd day of storage in portions contained 150, 300 and 600mg/L EEP, respectively. [Vet. World 2012; 5(3.000: 155-159

  8. Pavement Marking Visibility Requirements During Wet Night Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Ronald B. (Ronald Bruce)

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of pavement markings in wet night conditions. Typically, performance will decrease in wet conditions. The degradation is a result of flooding of the marking optics and a change in the optical media, thereby reducing retroreflectivity and the visibility distance. Several technologies are available to improve the visibility of markings under wet conditions. This study used four technologies and evaluated them in a dynamic situation. In the experiment, veh...

  9. Double success for neutrino lab

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    "The Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy is celebrating two key developments in the field of neutrino physics. Number one is the first ever detection, by the OPERA experiement, of possible tau neutrino that has switched its identity from a muon neutrino as it travelled form its origins at CERN in Switzerland to the Italian lab. Number two is the successful start-up of the ICARUS detector, which, like OPERA, is designed to study neutrinos that "oscillate" between types" (0.5 pages)

  10. Innovative Educational Practice: Using Virtual Labs in the Secondary Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Satsky Kerr, PhD

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Two studies investigated the effectiveness of teaching science labs online to secondary students. Study 1 compared achievement among students instructed using hands-on Chemistry labs versus those instructed using virtual Chemistry labs (eLabs. Study 2 compared the same groups of students again while both teachers instructed using hands-on Chemistry labs to determine whether teacher or student characteristics may have affected Study 1’s findings. Participants were high school Chemistry students from a Central Texas Independent School District. Results indicated that: students learn science effectively online, schools may experience cost savings from delivering labs online, and students gain valuable technology skills needed later in college and in the workplace.

  11. Stability Studies on Dry Swabs and Wet Mailed Swabs for Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Aptima Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Jeanne; Clark, Carey B; Holden, Jeffrey; Hook, Edward W; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Schachter, Julius

    2017-03-01

    The Aptima Combo 2 (AC2) and Aptima CT (ACT) (Hologic Inc., San Diego, CA) are nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) that detect Chlamydia trachomatis AC2 also detects Neisseria gonorrhoeae Storage and temperature conditions may impact the utility of NAATs in some settings and screening programs. We evaluated specimen stability for use beyond the Aptima package insert specifications for temperature and duration of storage (between 2°C and 30°C and 60 days, respectively) in two studies: (i) dry C. trachomatis-seeded swabs were used with ACT after storage at 4°C, 23°C, or 36°C for up to 84 days and (ii) swabs seeded with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae and then placed in transport medium were tested with AC2, after being mailed via the U.S. Postal Service to three different sites. Prolonged storage of samples had no effect, and samples stored at 4°C, 23°C, and 36°C for up to 84 days yielded comparable ACT positivities, although there was a drop in signal intensity for virtually all specimens under all storage/shipping conditions after day 21. In the mailing study, 80%, 52% and 29% of seeded swabs were exposed to temperatures of >30°C during three rounds in transit, and 2% reached temperatures of >40°C. No evidence of signal degradation in the AC2 assay for detection of C. trachomatis or N. gonorrhoeae was observed, although some mailed swabs took more than 5 weeks to reach the laboratory site. These two studies support the potential use of swabs at temperatures above 36°C and storage beyond 60 days and provide confidence regarding this commercially available NAAT for testing of specimens after mailing. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Study on the influence of the decoking agent on the activity of limestone in wet flue gas desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianjun; Xu, Dongyang; Wu, Yunxia; Yu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Influence of the main components of decoking agent (magnesium nitrate, aluminum nitrate, copper nitrate, ammonium nitrate and actual decoking agent) on the activity of limestone is studied in laboratory by MET method. Results show that magnesium nitrate, ammonium nitrate and copper nitrate almost has no effect on the activity of limestone. With the concentration increasing, aluminum nitrate has an increasing inhibition on the dissolution of limestone. Fly ash has inhibition on dissolution of limestone due to the blockage of limestone pore by fly ash. The actual decoking agent has almost no effect on the limestone.

  13. Building construction materials effect in tropical wet and cold climates: A case study of office buildings in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modeste Kameni Nematchoua

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental study that was conducted in 15 office buildings in the humid and cold tropics during the working hours of the dry and rainy seasons in Cameroon. This was with the aim to study the effects that local and imported materials had on indoor air quality. To achieve this objective, the adaptive model approach has been selected. In accordance with the conditions of this model, all workers were kept in natural ventilation and, in accordance with the general procedure, a questionnaire was distributed to them, while variables, like air temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity were sampled. The results showed a clear agreement between expected behaviour, in accordance with the characteristics of building construction, and its real indoor ambience once they were statistically analysed. On the other hand, old buildings showed a higher percentage of relative humidity and a lower degree of indoor air temperature. Despite this, local thermal comfort indices and questionnaires showed adequate indoor ambience in each group of buildings, except when marble was used for external tiling. The effect of marble as an external coating helps to improve indoor ambience during the dry season. This is due to more indoor air and relative humidity being accumulated. At the same time, these ambiences are degraded when relative humidity is higher. Finally, these results should be taken cognisance of by architects and building designers in order to improve indoor environment, and overcome thermal discomfort in the Saharan area.

  14. Collecting Kinematic Data on a Ski Track with Optoelectronic Stereophotogrammetry: A Methodological Study Assessing the Feasibility of Bringing the Biomechanics Lab to the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    In the laboratory, optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry is one of the most commonly used motion capture systems; particularly, when position- or orientation-related analyses of human movements are intended. However, for many applied research questions, field experiments are indispensable, and it is not a priori clear whether optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric systems can be expected to perform similarly to in-lab experiments. This study aimed to assess the instrumental errors of kinematic data collected on a ski track using optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry, and to investigate the magnitudes of additional skiing-specific errors and soft tissue/suit artifacts. During a field experiment, the kinematic data of different static and dynamic tasks were captured by the use of 24 infrared-cameras. The distances between three passive markers attached to a rigid bar were stereophotogrammetrically reconstructed and, subsequently, were compared to the manufacturer-specified exact values. While at rest or skiing at low speed, the optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric system’s accuracy and precision for determining inter-marker distances were found to be comparable to those known for in-lab experiments (skiing conditions (i.e., high speeds, inclined/angulated postures and moderate snow spraying), additional errors were found to occur for distances between equipment-fixed markers (total measurement errors: 2.3 ± 2.2 mm). Moreover, for distances between skin-fixed markers, such as the anterior hip markers, additional artifacts were observed (total measurement errors: 8.3 ± 7.1 mm). In summary, these values can be considered sufficient for the detection of meaningful position- or orientation-related differences in alpine skiing. However, it must be emphasized that the use of optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry on a ski track is seriously constrained by limited practical usability, small-sized capture volumes and the occurrence of extensive snow spraying (which results in

  15. Dynamic wetting on anisotropic patterned surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do-Quang, Minh; Wang, Jiayu; Nita, Satoshi; Shiomi, Junichiro; Amberg, Gustav; Physiochemical fluid mechanics Team; Maruyama-Chiashi Laboratory Team

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting, as occurs when a droplet of a wetting liquid is brought in contact with a dry solid, is important in various engineering processes, such as printing, coating, and lubrication. Our overall aim is to investigate if and how the detailed properties of the solid surface influence the dynamics of wetting. We have recently quantified the hindering effect of fairly isotropic micron-sized patterns on the substrate. Here we will study highly anisotropic surfaces, such as parallel grooves, either perpendicular or parallel to an advancing contact line. This is done by detailed phase field simulations and experiments on structured silicon surfaces. The dynamic wetting behavior of drops on the grooved surfaces is governed by the combined interplay of the wetting line friction and the internal viscous dissipation. Influence of roughness is quantified in terms of the energy dissipation rate at the contact line using the experiment-simulation combined analysis. The energy dissipation of the contact line at the different part of the groove will be discussed. The performance of the model is assessed by comparing its predictions with the experimental data. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (J.W., S.N., and J.S) and Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (M.D.-Q. and G.A).

  16. Is Validation of Indigenous Ecological Knowledge a Disrespectful Process? A Case Study of Traditional Fishing Poisons and Invasive Fish Management from the Wet Tropics, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Gratani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growing recognition of the contribution that indigenous ecological knowledge (IEK can make to contemporary 'western' science-based natural resource management (NRM, integration of the two knowledge systems has not reached its full potential in Australia. One explanation is that there is an implicit requirement for IEK to be validated by western scientific knowledge (SK, which has stalled its application and perpetuated the primacy of SK over IEK. Consequently, there is little experience of IEK validation, indigenous peoples' perspectives of the process, and no formal frameworks to achieve mutual and equitable validation of both IEK and SK. In this paper we assess the opportunities and limitations of validation processes using a case study of traditional fishing poisons for invasive fish management in the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area of Australia. The study was conducted within a coresearch approach between the Aboriginal holders of the IEK, who are among the paper's authors, and science-based biologists. We jointly carried out scientific laboratory trials that demonstrated that fishing poisons are effective at immobilizing invasive tilapia. Retrospective interviews with indigenous coresearchers showed that they did not find the experience of validation disrespectful, but instead empowering and necessary for their IEK to be understood and appreciated by scientists and included in NRM. Based on our experiences and knowledge of socialization theory we present a framework for the potential future design of collaborative validation processes to facilitate the integration of IEK into mainstream NRM, and the acceptance of SK within indigenous communities in Australia.

  17. Predictive mapping of soil organic carbon in wet cultivated lands using classification-tree based models: the case study of Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mogens H; Bøcher, Peder K; Greve, Mette B; Larsen, René; McCloy, Keith

    2010-05-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is one of the most important carbon stocks globally and has large potential to affect global climate. Distribution patterns of SOC in Denmark constitute a nation-wide baseline for studies on soil carbon changes (with respect to Kyoto protocol). This paper predicts and maps the geographic distribution of SOC across Denmark using remote sensing (RS), geographic information systems (GISs) and decision-tree modeling (un-pruned and pruned classification trees). Seventeen parameters, i.e. parent material, soil type, landscape type, elevation, slope gradient, slope aspect, mean curvature, plan curvature, profile curvature, flow accumulation, specific catchment area, tangent slope, tangent curvature, steady-state wetness index, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Wetness Index (NDWI) and Soil Color Index (SCI) were generated to statistically explain SOC field measurements in the area of interest (Denmark). A large number of tree-based classification models (588) were developed using (i) all of the parameters, (ii) all Digital Elevation Model (DEM) parameters only, (iii) the primary DEM parameters only, (iv), the remote sensing (RS) indices only, (v) selected pairs of parameters, (vi) soil type, parent material and landscape type only, and (vii) the parameters having a high impact on SOC distribution in built pruned trees. The best constructed classification tree models (in the number of three) with the lowest misclassification error (ME) and the lowest number of nodes (N) as well are: (i) the tree (T1) combining all of the parameters (ME=29.5%; N=54); (ii) the tree (T2) based on the parent material, soil type and landscape type (ME=31.5%; N=14); and (iii) the tree (T3) constructed using parent material, soil type, landscape type, elevation, tangent slope and SCI (ME=30%; N=39). The produced SOC maps at 1:50,000 cartographic scale using these trees are highly matching with coincidence values equal to 90.5% (Map T1

  18. RemoteLabs Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Nils Crabeel; Betina Campos Neves; Benedita Malheiro

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a first step towards the implementation of a framework for remote experimentation of electric machines – the RemoteLabs platform. This project was focused on the development of two main modules: the user Web-based and the electric machines interfaces. The Web application provides the user with a front-end and interacts with the back-end – the user and experiment persistent data. The electric machines interface is implemented as a distributed client server application...

  19. Toimiva sairaala Living Lab

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Teknologiset innovaatiot ja niiden tehokas hyödyntäminen voivat auttaa terveydenhuollon organisaatioita lisäämään toiminnan tuottavuutta, palveluiden laatua sekä kuntalaisten hyvinvointia, johon muun muassa väestön ikääntyminen ne haastaa. Merkittävien tulosten saavuttamiseksi koulutuksen, tutkimuksen ja palvelujärjestelmän rakenteiden tulisi kuitenkin integroitua nykyistä vahvemmaksi kehittämistoiminnan ekosysteemiksi. Living Lab -kehittämisympäristöt ovat syntyneet vastaamaan tähän tarpeese...

  20. Hydrodynamics of a Multistage Wet Scrubber Incineration Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, M. M.; Manyele, S. V.; Raphael, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the hydrodynamics of the two stage counter-current cascade wet scrubbers used during incineration of medical waste. The dependence of the hydrodynamics on two main variables was studied: Inlet air flow rate and inlet liquid flow rate. This study introduces a new wet scrubber operating features, which are…

  1. Proteomic effects of wet cupping (Al-hijamah).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaiman, Amer A

    2018-01-01

    Wet cupping (Al-hijamah) is a therapeutic technique practiced worldwide as a part of the Unani system of medicine. It involves bloodletting from acupoints on a patient's skin to produce a therapeutic outcome. A thorough review of research articles on wet cupping with relevance to proteomics field that are indexed by Google Scholar, PubMed, and/or Science Direct databases was performed. Eight original research articles were summarized in this paper. Overall, wet cupping did not have a significant effect on C-reactive protein, Hsp-27, sister chromatid exchanges, and cell replication index. In contrast, wet cupping was found to produce higher oxygen saturation, eliminate lactate from subcutaneous tissues, remove blood containing higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide, and produce higher activity of myeloperoxidase. The proteomic effects of wet cupping therapy have not been adequately investigated. Thus, future studies on wet cupping that use systemic and sound protocols to avoid bias should be conducted.

  2. Wet-cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagil, Suleyman Murat; Celik, Huseyin Tugrul; Ciftci, Sefa; Kazanci, Fatmanur Hacievliyagil; Arslan, Muzeyyen; Erdamar, Nazan; Kesik, Yunus; Erdamar, Husamettin; Dane, Senol

    2014-12-01

    Wet-cupping therapy is one of the oldest known medical techniques. Although it is widely used in various conditions such as acute\\chronic inflammation, infectious diseases, and immune system disorders, its mechanism of action is not fully known. In this study, we investigated the oxidative status as the first step to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of wet cupping. Wet cupping therapy is implemented to 31 healthy volunteers. Venous blood samples and Wet cupping blood samples were taken concurrently. Serum nitricoxide, malondialdehyde levels and activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase were measured spectrophotometrically. Wet cupping blood had higher activity of myeloperoxidase, lower activity of superoxide dismutase, higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitricoxide compared to the venous blood. Wet cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tympanoplasty: does dry or wet temporalis fascia graft matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G B; Kumar, D; Aggarwal, K; Garg, S; Arora, R; Kumar, S

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the success rate of dry and wet temporalis fascia grafts in type I underlay tympanoplasty. A prospective, randomised study was conducted. One hundred adult patients (males and females) with chronic suppurative otitis media (mucosal type) were divided into 2 groups of 50 each: one group underwent dry graft tympanoplasty and the other underwent wet graft tympanoplasty. Fibroblast count was calculated in dry and wet grafts. The dry graft and wet graft groups had overall surgical success rates of 82 and 90 per cent, respectively; this finding was not statistically significant. A statistically significant high fibroblast count was observed in wet grafts, but it did not correlate with surgical success. A dry or wet temporalis fascia graft does not influence the outcome of tympanoplasty type I.

  4. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

  5. Coordinated Lab, Field, and Aerial Studies of the Painted Desert, AZ, as a Potential Analog Site for Phyllosilicates at Mawrth Vallis, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, N. K.; Noe Dobrea, E. Z.; Bishop, J. L.; Silver, E. A.

    2009-03-01

    One hypothesis for clay formation at Mawrth Vallis is an altered ash-fall, like bentonites in the Painted Desert, AZ. We compare lab, field, and aerial data to determine if silicate spectral features are accurately captured in aerial datasets.

  6. The method of neutron imaging as a tool for the study of the dynamics of water movement in wet aramid-based ballistic body armour panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifler, Felix A.; Lehmann, Eberhard H.; Frei, Gabriel; May, Hans; Rossi, René

    2006-07-01

    A new non-destructive method based on neutron imaging (neutron radiography) to determine the exact water content in aramid-based soft body armour panels is presented. While investigating the ballistic resistance of aramid-based body armour panels under a wet condition, it is important to precisely determine their water content and its chronological development. Using the presented method, the influence of water amount and location on impact testing as well as its time dependence was shown. In the ballistic panels used, spreading of water strongly depended on the kind of quilting. Very fast water migration could be observed when the panels were held vertically. Some first results regarding the water distribution in wet panels immediately after the impact are presented. On the basis of the presented results, requirements for a standard for testing the performance of ballistic panels in the wet state are deduced.

  7. Rigorous tests of gene-environment interactions in a lab study of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR), alcohol exposure, and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoParo, Devon; Johansson, Ada; Walum, Hasse; Westberg, Lars; Santtila, Pekka; Waldman, Irwin

    2016-07-01

    Naturalistic studies of gene-environment interactions (G X E) have been plagued by several limitations, including difficulty isolating specific environmental risk factors from other correlated aspects of the environment, gene-environment correlation (rGE ), and the use of a single genetic variant to represent the influence of a gene. We present results from 235 Finnish young men in two lab studies of aggression and alcohol challenge that attempt to redress these limitations of the extant G X E literature. Specifically, we use a latent variable modeling approach in an attempt to more fully account for genetic variation across the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and to robustly test its main effects on aggression and its interaction with alcohol exposure. We also modeled aggression as a latent variable comprising various indices, including the average and maximum levels of aggression, the earliest trial on which aggression was expressed, and the proportion of trials on which the minimum and maximum levels of aggression were expressed. The best fitting model for the genetic variation across OXTR included six factors derived from an exploratory factor analysis, roughly corresponding to six haplotype blocks. Aggression levels were higher on trials in which participants were administered alcohol, won, or were provoked. There was a significant main effect of OXTR on aggression across studies after controlling for covariates. The interaction of OXTR and alcohol was also significant across studies, such that OXTR had stronger effects on aggression in the alcohol administration condition. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Can smartphones be used to bring computer-based tasks from the lab to the field? A mobile experience-sampling method study about the pace of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Stefan; Lewetz, David; Reips, Ulf-Dietrich

    2017-12-06

    Researchers are increasingly using smartphones to collect scientific data. To date, most smartphone studies have collected questionnaire data or data from the built-in sensors. So far, few studies have analyzed whether smartphones can also be used to conduct computer-based tasks (CBTs). Using a mobile experience-sampling method study and a computer-based tapping task as examples (N = 246; twice a day for three weeks, 6,000+ measurements), we analyzed how well smartphones can be used to conduct a CBT. We assessed methodological aspects such as potential technologically induced problems, dropout, task noncompliance, and the accuracy of millisecond measurements. Overall, we found few problems: Dropout rate was low, and the time measurements were very accurate. Nevertheless, particularly at the beginning of the study, some participants did not comply with the task instructions, probably because they did not read the instructions before beginning the task. To summarize, the results suggest that smartphones can be used to transfer CBTs from the lab to the field, and that real-world variations across device manufacturers, OS types, and CPU load conditions did not substantially distort the results.

  9. ERLN Technical Support for Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Response Laboratory Network provides policies and guidance on lab and data requirements, Standardized Analytical Methods, and technical support for water and radiological sampling and analysis

  10. Aircraft Lighting and Transparency Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Lighting and Transparencies with Night Combat Lab performs radiometric and photometric measurements of cockpit lighting and displays. Evaluates the day,...

  11. Forced wetting and hydrodynamic assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Terence D.; Fernandez-Toledano, Juan-Carlos; Doyen, Guillaume; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Wetting is a prerequisite for coating a uniform layer of liquid onto a solid. Wetting failure and air entrainment set the ultimate limit to coating speed. It is well known in the coating art that this limit can be postponed by manipulating the coating flow to generate what has been termed "hydrodynamic assist," but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Experiments have shown that the conditions that postpone air entrainment also reduce the apparent dynamic contact angle, suggesting a direct link, but how the flow might affect the contact angle remains to be established. Here, we use molecular dynamics to compare the outcome of steady forced wetting with previous results for the spontaneous spreading of liquid drops and apply the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting to rationalize our findings and place them on a quantitative footing. The forced wetting simulations reveal significant slip at the solid-liquid interface and details of the flow immediately adjacent to the moving contact line. Our results confirm that the local, microscopic contact angle is dependent not simply only on the velocity of wetting but also on the nature of the flow that drives it. In particular, they support an earlier suggestion that during forced wetting, an intense shear stress in the vicinity of the contact line can assist surface tension forces in promoting dynamic wetting, thus reducing the velocity-dependence of the contact angle. Hydrodynamic assist then appears as a natural consequence of wetting that emerges when the contact line is driven by a strong and highly confined flow. Our theoretical approach also provides a self-consistent model of molecular slip at the solid-liquid interface that enables its magnitude to be estimated from dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the model predicts how hydrodynamic assist and slip may be influenced by liquid viscosity and solid-liquid interactions.

  12. Influencing factors on the emission of mercury from wet flue gas desulphurisation slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidel, Barna; Farr, Silvio; Brechtel, Kevin; Scheffknecht, Guenter [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Feuerungs- und Kraftwerkstechnik (IFK); Thorwarth, Harald [EnBW Kraftwerke AG, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the chemical reduction and reemission of absorbed HgCl{sub 2} from slurries of a lab-scale wet FGD system was investigated. The ambivalent effect of SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} concentration on Hg chemistry was revealed. Low concentrations of SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} below 0.1 mol/m{sup 3} increase stability of Hg{sup 2+} by formation of Hg{sup 2+} complexes with SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} ligands. At elevated concentrations of SO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, their potential as reducing agent surpasses their favourable complexing function, thus leading to increased formation and reemission of HgO. The effect of operational pH on complex stability depends on the concentration of the dominating ligand in the slurry. (orig.)

  13. Secondary organic aerosol formation in biomass-burning plumes: Theoretical analysis of lab studies and ambient plumes

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Qijing; Jathar, Shantanu H.; Kodros, John K.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Hatch, Lindsay E.; May, Andrew A.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has been shown to form in biomass-burning emissions in laboratory and field studies. However, there is significant variability among studies in mass enhancement, which could be due to differences in fuels, fire conditions, dilution, and/or limitations of laboratory experiments and observations. This study focuses on understanding processes affecting biomass-burning SOA formation in laboratory smog-chamber experiments and in ambient plumes. Vapor wall losses hav...

  14. Pregnancy Outcome in a Multi-Generational Rat Bioassay of Drinking Water Concentrates in the Four Lab Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    To address concerns raised by epidemiological studies, we conducted a multigenerational reproductive toxicity study in rats using a “whole” mixture of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). Raw water was concentrated ~130 fold, chlorinated, and provided as drinking water...

  15. Diagnosing the Local Land-Atmosphere Coupling (LoCo) in Models and Observations: A Study of Dry/Wet Extremes in the U. S. Southern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanello, J. A.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Kumar, S.; Dong, X.; Kennedy, A. D.

    2010-12-01

    Land-atmosphere interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture states. The degree of coupling between the land surface and PBL in numerical weather prediction and climate models remains largely unexplored and undiagnosed due to the complex interactions and feedbacks present across a range of scales. Further, uncoupled systems or experiments (e.g., the Project for Intercomparison of Land Parameterization Schemes, PILPS) may lead to inaccurate water and energy cycle process understanding by neglecting feedback processes such as PBL-top entrainment. In this study, a framework for diagnosing local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) is presented using a coupled mesoscale model with a suite of PBL and land surface model (LSM) options along with observations during the summers of 2006/7 in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. Specifically, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been coupled to NASA's Land Information System (LIS), which provides a flexible and high-resolution representation and initialization of land surface physics and states. A range of diagnostics exploring the links and feedbacks between soil moisture and precipitation are examined for the dry/wet extremes of this region, along with the sensitivity of PBL-LSM coupling to perturbations in soil moisture. As such, this methodology provides a potential pathway to study factors controlling local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) using the LIS-WRF system, which is serving as a testbed for LoCo experiments to evaluate coupling diagnostics within the community.

  16. The lab of fame

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    For a third time, CERN is organising the Swiss heat of Famelab, the world’s leading science communication competition that has already gathered over 5,000 young and talented scientists and engineers from all across the planet.   Besides their degrees, the scientists who participate in Famelab have another thing in common: their passion for communicating science. Coming from a variety of scientific fields, from medicine to particle physics and microbiology, the contestants have three minutes to present a science, technology, mathematics or engineering-based talk using only the props he or she can carry onto the stage; PowerPoint presentations are not permitted. The contestants are then judged by a panel of three judges who evaluate the content, clarity and charisma of their talks. What's unique about FameLab is the fact that content is an important aspect of the performance. At the end of their presentation, contestants are often questioned about the scientific relevance of...

  17. Wavelet-based study of valence?arousal model of emotions on EEG signals with LabVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Guzel Aydin, Seda; Kaya, Turgay; Guler, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    This paper illustrates the wavelet-based feature extraction for emotion assessment using electroencephalogram (EEG) signal through graphical coding design. Two-dimensional (valence?arousal) emotion model was studied. Different emotions (happy, joy, melancholy, and disgust) were studied for assessment. These emotions were stimulated by video clips. EEG signals obtained from four subjects were decomposed into five frequency bands (gamma, beta, alpha, theta, and delta) using ?db5? wavelet functi...

  18. Collecting Kinematic Data on a Ski Track with Optoelectronic Stereophotogrammetry: A Methodological Study Assessing the Feasibility of Bringing the Biomechanics Lab to the Field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Spörri

    Full Text Available In the laboratory, optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry is one of the most commonly used motion capture systems; particularly, when position- or orientation-related analyses of human movements are intended. However, for many applied research questions, field experiments are indispensable, and it is not a priori clear whether optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric systems can be expected to perform similarly to in-lab experiments. This study aimed to assess the instrumental errors of kinematic data collected on a ski track using optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry, and to investigate the magnitudes of additional skiing-specific errors and soft tissue/suit artifacts. During a field experiment, the kinematic data of different static and dynamic tasks were captured by the use of 24 infrared-cameras. The distances between three passive markers attached to a rigid bar were stereophotogrammetrically reconstructed and, subsequently, were compared to the manufacturer-specified exact values. While at rest or skiing at low speed, the optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric system's accuracy and precision for determining inter-marker distances were found to be comparable to those known for in-lab experiments (< 1 mm. However, when measuring a skier's kinematics under "typical" skiing conditions (i.e., high speeds, inclined/angulated postures and moderate snow spraying, additional errors were found to occur for distances between equipment-fixed markers (total measurement errors: 2.3 ± 2.2 mm. Moreover, for distances between skin-fixed markers, such as the anterior hip markers, additional artifacts were observed (total measurement errors: 8.3 ± 7.1 mm. In summary, these values can be considered sufficient for the detection of meaningful position- or orientation-related differences in alpine skiing. However, it must be emphasized that the use of optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry on a ski track is seriously constrained by limited practical usability, small

  19. VPPD Lab - The Chemical Product Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalakul, Sawitree; Hussain, Rehan; Elbashir, Nimir

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the development of a systematic model-based framework for product design, implemented in the new product design software called VPPD-Lab is presented. This framework employs its in-house knowledge-based system to design and evaluate chemical products. The built-in libraries...... is highlighted for the case study of tailor made design of jet-fuels. VPPD-Lab works in the same way as a typical process simulator. It enhances the future development of chemical product design....

  20. Promoting Equitable Biology Lab Instruction by Engaging All Students in a Broad Range of Science Practices: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strimaitis, Anna M.; Southerland, Sherry A.; Sampson, Victor; Enderle, Patrick; Grooms, Jonathon

    2017-01-01

    This study examines what students enrolled in the honors and general sections of a high school biology course offered at the same school learn when they have an opportunity to participate in a broad or narrow range of science practices during their laboratory experiences. The results of our analysis suggest that the students enrolled in the…

  1. Automating the Analysis of Problem-solving Activities in Learning Environments: the Co-Lab Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duque, R.; Bollen, Lars; Anjewierden, Anjo Allert; Bravo, C.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of problem-solving activities carried out by students in learning settings involves studying the students' actions and assessing the solutions they have created. This analysis constitutes an ideal starting point to support an automatic intervention in the student activity by means of

  2. Utilizing Mechanistic Cross-Linking Technology to Study Protein-Protein Interactions: An Experiment Designed for an Undergraduate Biochemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzel, Kara; Beld, Joris; Burkart, Michael D.; Charkoudian, Louise K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, mechanistic cross-linking probes have been used to study protein-protein interactions in natural product biosynthetic pathways. This approach is highly interdisciplinary, combining elements of protein biochemistry, organic chemistry, and computational docking. Herein, we described the development of an experiment to engage…

  3. Pilot Study Using the Augmented Reality Sandbox to Teach Topographic Maps and Surficial Processes in Introductory Geology Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Terri L.; Reed, Sarah; Hsi, Sherry; Woods, John A.; Woods, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Spatial thinking is often challenging for introductory geology students. A pilot study using the Augmented Reality sandbox (AR sandbox) suggests it can be a powerful tool for bridging the gap between two-dimensional (2D) representations and real landscapes, as well as enhancing the spatial thinking and modeling abilities of students. The AR…

  4. Sound Control in the Physic Lab in the Polyacryl Company and Studying the Noise Reduction by Means of Different Absorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harandi

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Studying noise effect at the workplace has more various aspects than other factors. So it is not surprising that its adverse impact on the physical and mental state of the society has been detected to some extent. There is a significant correlation between the hearing loss and the noise pollution of the workplaces. The most important ways to lessen and control the impact of noise are: substituting the noisy equipments with ones that produce less noise, correcting noise sources and isolating the sound source. In the current study we tried to control the noise level by using various sound absorbents and measured sound level by using these different substances. The results of these measurements have reported in the current article in details.

  5. Spatial and temporal variations in the occurrences of wet periods ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study highlights the hydro-climatic features of the five wet periods contributing in different percentages to the annual rainfall total over major river basins in India. Spatial and temporal variations in the parameters such as starting date, duration and rainfall intensity of these wet periods throughout India have been ...

  6. Spatial and temporal variations in the occurrences of wet periods ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study highlights the hydro-climatic features of the five wet periods contributing in different percentages to the annual rainfall total over major river basins in India.Spatial and temporal variations in the parameters such as starting date,duration and rainfall intensity of these wet periods throughout India have been ...

  7. Evaluation of wetting ability of five new saliva substitutes on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate & compare the wetting ability of five saliva substitutes & distilled water on heat-polymerized acrylic resin. Contact angle of the saliva substitute on denture base can be taken as an indicator of wettability. Good wetting of heat-polymerized acrylic resin is critical for optimum ...

  8. Comparative Batch and Column Evaluation of Thermal and Wet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: The efficiency of regenerated spent commercial activated carbon for synthetic dye removal was studied using thermal and wet ... Keywords: Activated Carbon, Methyl Red, Chromatography Capacity, Wet and Thermal Regeneration. INTRODUCTION ... processes in wastewater treatment. A number of techniques ...

  9. Wavelet-based study of valence-arousal model of emotions on EEG signals with LabVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzel Aydin, Seda; Kaya, Turgay; Guler, Hasan

    2016-06-01

    This paper illustrates the wavelet-based feature extraction for emotion assessment using electroencephalogram (EEG) signal through graphical coding design. Two-dimensional (valence-arousal) emotion model was studied. Different emotions (happy, joy, melancholy, and disgust) were studied for assessment. These emotions were stimulated by video clips. EEG signals obtained from four subjects were decomposed into five frequency bands (gamma, beta, alpha, theta, and delta) using "db5" wavelet function. Relative features were calculated to obtain further information. Impact of the emotions according to valence value was observed to be optimal on power spectral density of gamma band. The main objective of this work is not only to investigate the influence of the emotions on different frequency bands but also to overcome the difficulties in the text-based program. This work offers an alternative approach for emotion evaluation through EEG processing. There are a number of methods for emotion recognition such as wavelet transform-based, Fourier transform-based, and Hilbert-Huang transform-based methods. However, the majority of these methods have been applied with the text-based programming languages. In this study, we proposed and implemented an experimental feature extraction with graphics-based language, which provides great convenience in bioelectrical signal processing.

  10. Report from the banding lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Mr. Tautin reported on the seemingly everchanging structure of biological science units within the Interior Department. Current Congressional proposals would either change the name of the Bird Banding Lab's parent agency or make it part of the Geological Survey. The current Congress has not looked favorably on science budgets within the Interior Department, and the Banding Lab's budget is being squeezed ever tighter.

  11. GitLab repository management

    CERN Document Server

    Hethey, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A simple, easy to understand tutorial guide on how to build teams and efficiently use version control, using GitLab.If you are a system administrator in a company that writes software or are in charge of an infrastructure, this book will show you the most important features of GitLab, including how to speed up the overall process

  12. Studies on Bilateral Cochlear Implants at the University of Wisconsin’s Binaural Hearing and Speech Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovsky, Ruth Y.; Goupell, Matthew J.; Godar, Shelly; Grieco-Calub, Tina; Jones, Gary L.; Garadat, Soha N.; Agrawal, Smita; Kan, Alan; Todd, Ann; Hess, Christi; Misurelli, Sara

    2012-01-01

    This report highlights research projects relevant to binaural and spatial hearing in adults and children. In the past decade we have made progress in understanding the impact of bilateral cochlear implants (BiCIs) on performance in adults and children. However, BiCI users typically do not perform as well as normal hearing (NH) listeners. In this paper we describe the benefits from BiCIs compared with a single CI, focusing on measures of spatial hearing and speech understanding in noise. We highlight the fact that in BiCI listening the devices in the two ears are not coordinated, thus binaural spatial cues that are available to NH listeners are not available to BiCI users. Through the use of research processors that carefully control the stimulus delivered to each electrode in each ear, we are able to preserve binaural cues and deliver them with fidelity to BiCI users. Results from those studies are discussed as well, with a focus on the effect of age at onset of deafness and plasticity of binaural sensitivity. Our work with children has expanded both in number of subjects tested and age range included. We have now tested dozens of children ranging in age from 2-14 years. Our findings suggest that spatial hearing abilities emerge with bilateral experience. While we originally focused on studying performance in free-field, where real world listening experiments are conducted, more recently we have begun to conduct studies under carefully controlled binaural stimulation conditions with children as well. We have also studied language acquisition and speech perception and production in young CI users. Finally, a running theme of this research program is the systematic investigation of the numerous factors that contribute to spatial and binaural hearing in BiCI users. By using CI simulations (with vocoders) and studying NH listeners under degraded listening conditions, we are able to tease apart limitations due to the hardware/software of the CI systems from limitations

  13. A Comparative Evaluation of Dimensional Accuracy and Surface Detail Reproduction of Four Hydrophilic Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression Materials Tested Under Dry, Moist, and Wet Conditions-An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrath, Rahul; Lahori, Manesh; Agrawal, Manjari

    2014-12-01

    Vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression materials have application in a wide variety of situations in both fixed and removable prosthodontics. A major limitation of VPS impression materials is their hydrophobicity. There are two aspects of this problem, the wettability of the polymerized impression by dental gypsum materials and the ability of the unpolymerized material to wet intraoral tissues. To address this problem, manufacturers have added surfactants and labelled these new products as "hydrophilic vinyl polysiloxane." The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare dimensional accuracy and surface detail reproduction of four hydrophilic VPS impression materials, when used under dry, moist, and wet conditions. A total of 180 samples were made of stainless steel die similar to as described in ADA sp. no. 19. The die was scored with three horizontal and two vertical lines. Impressions were made under dry, moist and wet conditions. Dimensional accuracy was measured by comparing the length of the middle horizontal line in each impression to the same line on the metal die, by using Universal Length Measuring machine. A 2-way ANOVA was performed on the percentage change data for measured lengths of the 4 impression materials under the 3 conditions to evaluate dimensional accuracy. Surface detail was evaluated in two ways: (1) by use of criteria similar to ADA sp. no. 19 for detail reproduction, and (2) by use of a method that categorized the impressions as satisfactory or unsatisfactory based on their surface characteristics: presence of pits, voids, or roughness. Pearson X2 (α = 0.05) was used to compare surface detail reproduction results. Conditions (dry, moist, and wet) did not cause significant adverse effects on the dimensional accuracy of all the four material. With both surface detail analyses, dry, moist, and wet conditions had a significant effect on the detail reproduction of all the four materials (P detail results were obtained only under dry

  14. Synthesis of mesoporous bismuth-impregnated aluminum oxide for arsenic removal: Adsorption mechanism study and application to a lab-scale column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ningyuan; Qiao, Jun; Ye, Yanfang; Yan, Tingmei

    2018-04-01

    High mobility and toxicity of arsenic [As (III)] limit its removal from an aquatic environment and pose a threat to human health. In this work, batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption capacity of bismuth-impregnated aluminum oxide (BiAl). Continuous application of As (III) removal was achieved via a lab-scale column reactor. Bismuth impregnation decreased the specific surface area of aluminum oxide and affected its pore size distribution. However, because of its abundant and well-proportioned mesoporous character, it also enhanced its adsorption capacity through the surface complexation of As (III). Batch adsorption experiments demonstrated a suitable Freundlich model and a fitted pseudo-second-kinetic model for As (III) adsorption. The main mechanism was chemisorption with both bismuth and aluminum atoms; however, physisorption also contributed to arsenic adsorption at the initial stage of the reaction. The Adams-Bohart model better described the breakthrough curves than the Thomas model. BiAl exhibited efficient As (III) adsorption over a wide pH range and could be applied to As (III) removal from wastewater. A high As (III) removal efficiency (91.6%) was obtained at an initial As (III) concentration of 5 mg L -1 at a flow rate of 1 mL min -1 . This study indicates the potential for the practical application of BiAl in As (III) removal. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum Adiponectin Levels and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Nonoverweight and Overweight Portuguese Adolescents: The LabMed Physical Activity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinis-Sobrinho, César; Moreira, Carla; Abreu, Sandra; Lopes, Luís; Oliveira-Santos, José; Steene-Johannessen, Jostein; Mota, Jorge; Santos, Rute

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the independent associations between cardiorespiratory fitness and circulating adiponectin concentration in adolescents, controlling for several potential covariates. This is a cross-sectional study in Portuguese adolescents. A sample of 529 (267 girls) aged 12-18 years were included and categorized as overweight and nonoverweight. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed by 20 meters shuttle run test. We measured serum adiponectin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fasting glucose, insulin and HDL-cholesterol. After adjustment for age, sex, pubertal stage, adherence to the Mediterranean diet, socioeconomic status, body fat percentage, insulin resistance, HDL-cholesterol and C-reactive protein, regression analysis showed a significant inverse association between adiponectin and cardiorespiratory fitness in nonoverweight participants (B=-0.359; p < .042). Analysis of covariance showed a significant difference between the highest cardiorespiratory fitness Healthy zone (above healthy zone) and the Under and the Healthy cardiorespiratory fitness zones in nonoverweight adolescents (p = .03) (F (2, 339) = 3.156, p < .001). Paradoxically, serum adiponectin levels are inversely associated with cardiorespiratory fitness in nonoverweight, but not in overweight adolescents. In nonoverweight adolescents, those with highest levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (above healthy zone) presented lower levels of adiponectin compared with those in Under and Healthy cardiorespiratory fitness zones.

  16. Concentration, chlorination, and chemical analysis of drinking water for disinfection byproduct mixtures health effects research: U.S. EPA's Four Lab Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Jonathan G; Richardson, Susan D; Speth, Thomas F; Miltner, Richard J; Narotsky, Michael G; Hunter, E Sidney; Rice, Glenn E; Teuschler, Linda K; McDonald, Anthony; Parvez, Shahid; Krasner, Stuart W; Weinberg, Howard S; McKague, A Bruce; Parrett, Christopher J; Bodin, Nathalie; Chinn, Russell; Lee, Chih-Fen T; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's "Four Lab Study" involved participation of researchers from four national Laboratories and Centers of the Office of Research and Development along with collaborators from the water industry and academia. The study evaluated toxicological effects of complex disinfection byproduct (DBP) mixtures, with an emphasis on reproductive and developmental effects that have been associated with DBP exposures in some human epidemiologic studies. This paper describes a new procedure for producing chlorinated drinking water concentrate for animal toxicology experiments, comprehensive identification of >100 DBPs, and quantification of 75 priority and regulated DBPs. In the research reported herein, complex mixtures of DBPs were produced by concentrating a natural source water with reverse osmosis membranes, followed by addition of bromide and treatment with chlorine. By concentrating natural organic matter in the source water first and disinfecting with chlorine afterward, DBPs (including volatiles and semivolatiles) were formed and maintained in a water matrix suitable for animal studies. DBP levels in the chlorinated concentrate compared well to those from EPA's Information Collection Rule (ICR) and a nationwide study of priority unregulated DBPs when normalized by total organic carbon (TOC). DBPs were relatively stable over the course of the animal studies (125 days) with multiple chlorination events (every 5-14 days), and a significant portion of total organic halogen was accounted for through a comprehensive identification approach. DBPs quantified included regulated DBPs, priority unregulated DBPs, and additional DBPs targeted by the ICR. Many DBPs are reported for the first time, including previously undetected and unreported haloacids and haloamides. The new concentration procedure not only produced a concentrated drinking water suitable for animal experiments, but also provided a greater TOC concentration factor (136

  17. Lab-scale impact test to investigate the pipe-soil interaction and comparative study to evaluate structural responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Man Ryu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the dynamic response of a subsea pipeline under an impact load to determine the effect of the seabed soil. A laboratory-scale soil-based pipeline impact test was carried out to investigate the pipeline deformation/strain as well as the interaction with the soil-pipeline. In addition, an impact test was simulated using the finite element technique, and the calculated strain was compared with the experimental results. During the simulation, the pipeline was described based on an elasto-plastic analysis, and the soil was modeled using the Mohr-Coulomb fail-ure criterion. The results obtained were compared with ASME D31.8, and the differences between the analysis results and the rules were specifically investigated. Modified ASME formulae were proposed to calculate the precise structural behavior of a subsea pipeline under an impact load when considering sand- and clay-based seabed soils.

  18. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Severely Obese Adolescents: The Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsky, Marc P; Inge, Thomas H; Simmons, Mark; Jenkins, Todd M; Buncher, Ralph; Helmrath, Michael; Brandt, Mary L; Harmon, Carroll M; Courcoulas, Anita; Chen, Michael; Horlick, Mary; Daniels, Stephen R; Urbina, Elaine M

    2015-05-01

    Severe obesity is increasingly common in the adolescent population but, as of yet, very little information exists regarding cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks in this group. To assess the baseline prevalence and predictors of CVD risks among severely obese adolescents undergoing weight-loss surgery. A prospective cohort study was conducted from February 28, 2007, to December 30, 2011, at the following 5 adolescent weight-loss surgery centers in the United States: Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio; Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio; Texas Children's Hospital in Houston; University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Children's Hospital of Alabama in Birmingham. Consecutive patients aged 19 years or younger were offered enrollment in a long-term outcome study; the final analysis cohort consisted of 242 participants. This report examined the preoperative prevalence of CVD risk factors (ie, fasting hyperinsulinemia, elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, impaired fasting glucose levels, dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and diabetes mellitus) and associations between risk factors and body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Preoperative data were collected within 30 days preceding bariatric surgery. The mean (SD) age was 17 (1.6) years and median body mass index was 50.5. Cardiovascular disease risk factor prevalence was fasting hyperinsulinemia (74%), elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (75%), dyslipidemia (50%), elevated blood pressure (49%), impaired fasting glucose levels (26%), and diabetes mellitus (14%). The risk of impaired fasting glucose levels, elevated blood pressure, and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels increased by 15%, 10%, and 6%, respectively, per 5-unit increase in body mass index (P sex increase the relative risk of specific CVD risk factors

  19. Accretion Dynamics on Wet Granular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saingier, Guillaume; Sauret, Alban; Jop, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    Wet granular aggregates are common precursors of construction materials, food, and health care products. The physical mechanisms involved in the mixing of dry grains with a wet substrate are not well understood and difficult to control. Here, we study experimentally the accretion of dry grains on a wet granular substrate by measuring the growth dynamics of the wet aggregate. We show that this aggregate is fully saturated and its cohesion is ensured by the capillary depression at the air-liquid interface. The growth dynamics is controlled by the liquid fraction at the surface of the aggregate and exhibits two regimes. In the viscous regime, the growth dynamics is limited by the capillary-driven flow of liquid through the granular packing to the surface of the aggregate. In the capture regime, the capture probability depends on the availability of the liquid at the saturated interface, which is controlled by the hydrostatic depression in the material. We propose a model that rationalizes our observations and captures both dynamics based on the evolution of the capture probability with the hydrostatic depression.

  20. Cohesion and agglomeration of wet powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raux, Pascal S.; Biance, Anne-Laure

    2018-01-01

    Wet high-shear granulation consists in vigorously mixing grains and a liquid binder to create agglomerates of various sizes. The process results from a balance between cohesion of the wet granular agglomerates and fragmentation due to the high mixing. By performing a simple test with glass beads and various liquids, we first focus on the static cohesion of wet granular media. Contrary to previous works, we extend the study to larger values of the liquid fraction w . After the well-documented plateau, the cohesive strength increases again with w , a behavior we capture by a simple model. We then focus on the dynamical cohesion of the media and we design an agglomeration process that consists in vibrating a bead/liquid mixture at a large amplitude. The vibrations induce not only the fluidization of the wet granular material but also the formation of aggregates. As expected, their size is affected by the liquid content, the frequency, and the amplitude of the vibrations, similarly to high-shear granulation data. However, the number of beads in an agglomerate does not depend on the bead size, showing a self-similar mechanism of agglomeration. The role of the static cohesion strength in this dynamical process remains therefore ambiguous.

  1. Fipronil 1% pour-on: further studies of its effects against lab-reared Glossina palpalis gambiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawadogo, B; Rayaisse, J B; Adakal, H; Kabre, A T; Bauer, B

    2017-11-01

    In order to assess the residual effects of fipronil 1% on tsetse fly survival, male Glossina palpalis gambiensis were released on non-treated and treated cattle, with 0.1 ml of fipronil/kg b.w. as a pour-on formulation. In a second trial, the female fecundity performances were evaluated by feeding teneral females on the same cattle. These females were then mated and their production parameters monitored, as well as the survival of freshly emerged flies. Fipronil had a significant effect on tsetse fly survival (p fipronil was observed on the reproductive performance of females, i.e., as well as on fecundity (p = 0.948) and emergence rates (p = 0.743), or puparial weight (p = 0.422). This was also the case for the survival of young flies, with no difference observed between the two groups. After this study, it is confirmed that fipronil is highly effective against tsetse flies. Its efficacy in controlling ticks is already known but other externalities such as the control of biting insects add value to its use.

  2. Effect of increasing salinity on biogas production in waste landfills with leachate recirculation: A lab-scale model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Ogata

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of salinity on anaerobic waste degradation and microbial communities were investigated, in order to propose an appropriate leachate recirculation process in a waste landfill in a tropical region. A salt concentration of 21 mS cm−1 of electrical conductivity (EC did not affect waste degradation, but a salt concentration of 35 mS cm−1 of EC inhibited CH4 generation. A higher salt concentration of 80 mS cm−1 of EC inhibited not only CH4 and CO2 generation, but also degradation of organic compounds. The bacterial and archaeal community compositions were affected by high salinity. High salinity can exert selective pressure on bacterial communities, resulting in a change in bacterial community structure. Ammonium caused strong, dominant inhibition of biogas production in the salt concentration range of this study. Quality control, especially of ammonium levels, will be essential for the promotion of waste biodegradation in landfills with leachate recirculation.

  3. Muscular fitness and metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers in adolescents: Results from LabMed Physical Activity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinis-Sobrinho, C A; Moreira, C; Abreu, S; Lopes, L; Sardinha, L B; Oliveira-Santos, J; Oliveira, A; Mota, J; Santos, R

    2016-11-23

    This study aimed to evaluate the associations between muscular fitness and inflammatory biomarkers and to investigate the relationship between muscular fitness and selected clustered inflammatory biomarkers in adolescents. This is a cross-sectional analysis with 529 adolescents (267 girls) aged 12-18 years. Handgrip strength and standing long jump tests assessed MF. Continuous scores of clustered inflammatory biomarkers (sum of Z-scores of C-reactive protein [CRP], C3, C4, fibrinogen, and leptin); metabolic risk factor (MRF) score (sum of Z-scores of SBP, triglycerides, ratio total cholesterol [TC]/HDL, HOMA-IR, and waist circumference [WC]) were computed. Regression analyses showed an inverse association between muscular fitness score (β=-.204; Ppubertal stage, socioeconomic status, adherence to the Mediterranean diet, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), MRF score, and body fat. Analysis of covariance showed that adolescents with an adverse inflammatory profile with low levels of muscular fitness exhibit the poorest MRF score (F3,525 =6.461; Ppubertal stage, socioeconomic status, adherence to the Mediterranean diet, CRF, and body fatness. The inflammatory state seems to explain a significant part of the highest MRF score and in adolescents with high inflammatory status and low muscular strength. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A breakthrough biosorbent in removing heavy metals: Equilibrium, kinetic, thermodynamic and mechanism analyses in a lab-scale study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdolali, Atefeh [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Ngo, Huu Hao, E-mail: h.ngo@uts.edu.au [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Guo, Wenshan [Centre for Technology in Water and Wastewater, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Lu, Shaoyong [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Chen, Shiao-Shing; Nguyen, Nguyen Cong [Institute of Environmental Engineering and Management, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Sec. 3, Chung-Hsiao E. Rd, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Xinbo [Department of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Aquatic Science and Technology, Tianjin Chengjian University, Jinjing Road 26, Tianjin 300384 (China); Wang, Jie; Wu, Yun [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2016-01-15

    A breakthrough biosorbent namely multi-metal binding biosorbent (MMBB) made from a combination of tea wastes, maple leaves and mandarin peels, was prepared to evaluate their biosorptive potential for removal of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) from multi-metal aqueous solutions. FTIR and SEM were conducted, before and after biosorption, to explore the intensity and position of the available functional groups and changes in adsorbent surface morphology. Carboxylic, hydroxyl and amine groups were found to be the principal functional groups for the sorption of metals. MMBB exhibited best performance at pH 5.5 with maximum sorption capacities of 31.73, 41.06, 76.25 and 26.63 mg/g for Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II), respectively. Pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order models represented the kinetic experimental data in different initial metal concentrations very well. Among two-parameter adsorption isotherm models, the Langmuir equation gave a better fit of the equilibrium data. For Cu(II) and Zn(II), the Khan isotherm describes better biosorption conditions while for Cd(II) and Pb(II), the Sips model was found to provide the best correlation of the biosorption equilibrium data. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated feasible, spontaneous and exothermic biosorption process. Overall, this novel MMBB can effectively be utilized as an adsorbent to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. - Highlights: • A novel multi-metal binding biosorbent (MMBB) was studied. • The biosorption of Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} on MMBB was evaluated. • Hydroxyl, carbonyl and amine groups are involved in metal binding of MMBB. • Equilibrium data were presented and the best fitting models were identified. • The obtained results recommend this MMBB as potentially low-cost biosorbent.

  5. Study of inertial hydrodynamic focusing in sheath-driven flows for lab-on-a-chip flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Nishtha; Song, Peiyi; Yong, Ken-Tye; Tjin, Swee Chuan

    2017-05-01

    Miniature flow cytometer models enable fast and cost-effective management of diseases in vulnerable and low-end settings. The single-line focusing of cell or particle samples is achieved using hydrodynamic forces in the microfluidic channels. The two common configurations among them are the single-sheath and dual-sheath flows wherein the sample is directed through the main channel, and the surrounding sheath fluids are directed into the main channel through inlets on either side of the main channel. Most models predict the width of the focused sample stream based on hydrodynamic focusing in the low Reynolds number regime (Re << 1), where the viscous forces dominate the inertial forces. In this work, we present comparative analysis of particle focusing by single-sheath and dual-sheath configurations for focusing of micron-sized cells/particles in the range 2 to 20 μm in the higher Re (10 < Re < 80) laminar regime. A quantitative analysis of the relative focused stream width (wf/wch) as a function of flow rate ratio (FRR = Sample flow rate/Sheath flow rate) for the two configurations is presented. The particle tracing results are also compared with the experimental fluorescent microscopy results at various FRR. The deviations of the results from the theoretical predictions of hydrodynamic focusing at Re << 1, are explained analytically. These findings clearly outline the range of flow parameters and relative particle sizes that can be used for cytometry studies for a given channel geometry. This is a highly predictive modeling method as it provides substantial results of particle positions across the microchannel width according to their size and FRR for single-line focusing of particles. Such information is crucial for one to engineer miniaturized flow cytometry for screening of desired cells or particles.

  6. Cardiorespiratory fitness and inflammatory profile on cardiometabolic risk in adolescents from the LabMed Physical Activity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinis-Sobrinho, César A; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Moreira, Carla; Abreu, Sandra; Luís, Lopes; Oliveira-Santos, José; Mota, Jorge; Santos, Rute

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the combined effect of cardiorespiratory fitness and the clustered score of inflammatory biomarkers (InflaScore) on the cardiometabolic risk score in adolescents. This is a cross-sectional analysis with 529 adolescents (267 girls) aged 12-18 years. The shuttle run test was used to assess cardiorespiratory fitness. Continuous scores of clustered inflammatory biomarkers (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, complement factors C3 and C4, fibrinogen and leptin); cardiometabolic risk score (systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, ratio total cholesterol/HDL, HOMA-IR and waist circumference) were computed. Adolescents with a higher inflammatory profile had the highest cardiometabolic risk score; adolescents with high InflaScore and low fitness had the highest odds of having a high cardiometabolic risk (OR 16.5; 95% CI 7.8-34.5), followed by adolescents with a higher InflaScore but fit (OR 7.5; 95% CI 3.7-8.4), and then by adolescents with a low InflaScore and unfit (OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.6-8.4) when compared to those with low InflaScore and fit, after adjustments for age, sex, pubertal stage, adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern and socioeconomic status. The findings of our study suggest that the combination of high inflammatory state and low cardiorespiratory fitness is synergistically associated with a significantly higher cardiometabolic risk score and thus supports the relevance of early targeted interventions to promote physical activity and preservation as part of primordial prevention.

  7. Physiologic effect of repeated adrenaline (epinephrine) doses during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the cath lab setting: A randomised porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardig, Bjarne Madsen; Götberg, Michael; Rundgren, Malin; Götberg, Matthias; Zughaft, David; Kopotic, Robert; Wagner, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    This porcine study was designed to explore the effects of repetitive intravenous adrenaline doses on physiologic parameters during CPR. Thirty-six adult pigs were randomised to four injections of: adrenaline 0.02 mg(kgdose)(-1), adrenaline 0.03 mg(kgdose)(-1) or saline control. The effect on systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CePP), end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), arterial oxygen saturation via pulse oximetry (SpO2), cerebral tissue oximetry (SctO2), were analysed immediately prior to each injection and at peak arterial systolic pressure and arterial blood gases were analysed at baseline and after 15 min. In the group given 0.02 mg(kgdose)(-1), there were increases in all arterial blood pressures at all 4 pressure peaks but CePP only increased significantly after peak 1. A decrease in ETCO2 following peak 1 and 2 was observed. SctO2 and SpO2 were lowered following injection 2 and beyond. In the group given a 0.03 mg(kgdose)(-1), all ABP's increased at the first 4 pressure peaks but CePP only following 3 pressure peaks. Lower ETCO2, SctO2 and SpO2 were seen at peak 1 and beyond. In the two adrenaline groups, pH and Base Excess were lower and lactate levels higher compared to baseline as well as compared to the control. Repetitive intravenous adrenaline doses increased ABP's and to some extent also CePP, but significantly decreased organ and brain perfusion. The institutional protocol number: Malmö/Lund Committee for Animal Experiment Ethics, approval reference number: M 192-10. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamic wetting at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amberg, Gustav; Nakamura, Yoshinori; Carlson, Andreas; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2013-11-01

    Although the capillary spreading of a drop on a dry substrate is well studied, the physical mechanisms that govern the dynamics remain challenging. Here we study the dynamics of spreading of partially wetting nano-droplets, by combining molecular dynamics and continuum simulations. The latter accounts for all the relevant hydrodynamics, i.e. capillarity, inertia and viscous stresses. By coordinated continuum and molecular dynamics simulations, the macroscopic model parameters are extracted. For a Lennard-Jones fluid spreading on a planar surface, the liquid slip on the substrate is found to be crucial for the motion of the contact line. Evaluation of the different contributions to the energy transfer shows that the liquid slip generates dissipation of the same order as the bulk viscous dissipation or the energy transfer to kinetic energy. We also study the dynamics of spreading on a substrate with a periodic nanostructure. Here it is found that a nanostructure with a length scale commensurate with molecular size completely inhibits the liquid slip. This reduces the spreading speed by about 30%. This work is partially supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, the Swedish Research Council, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and the Sasakawa foundation.

  9. Electronics Lab Instructors' Approaches to Troubleshooting Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    In this exploratory qualitative study, we describe instructors' self-reported practices for teaching and assessing students' ability to troubleshoot in electronics lab courses. We collected audio data from interviews with 20 electronics instructors from 18 institutions that varied by size, selectivity, and other factors. In addition to describing…

  10. Wetting of silicone oil onto a cell-seeded substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongjie; Chan, Yau Kei; Chao, Youchuang; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2017-11-01

    Wetting behavior of solid substrates in three-phase systems containing two immiscible liquids are widely studied. There exist many three-phase systems in biological environments, such as droplet-based microfluidics or tamponade of silicone oil for eye surgery. However, few studies focus on wetting behavior of biological surfaces with cells. Here we investigate wetting of silicone oil onto cell-seeded PMMA sheet immersed in water. Using a simple parallel-plate cell, we show the effect of cell density, viscosity of silicone oil, morphology of silicone oil drops and interfacial tension on the wetting phenomenon. The dynamics of wetting is also observed by squeezing silicone oil drop using two parallel plates. Experimental results are explained based on disjoining pressure which is dependent on the interaction of biological surfaces and liquid used. These findings are useful for explaining emulsification of silicone oil in ophthalmological applications.

  11. Reducing unnecessary lab testing in the ICU with artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismondi, F; Celi, L A; Fialho, A S; Vieira, S M; Reti, S R; Sousa, J M C; Finkelstein, S N

    2013-05-01

    To reduce unnecessary lab testing by predicting when a proposed future lab test is likely to contribute information gain and thereby influence clinical management in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Recent studies have demonstrated that frequent laboratory testing does not necessarily relate to better outcomes. Data preprocessing, feature selection, and classification were performed and an artificial intelligence tool, fuzzy modeling, was used to identify lab tests that do not contribute an information gain. There were 11 input variables in total. Ten of these were derived from bedside monitor trends heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, temperature, blood pressure, and urine collections, as well as infusion products and transfusions. The final input variable was a previous value from one of the eight lab tests being predicted: calcium, PTT, hematocrit, fibrinogen, lactate, platelets, INR and hemoglobin. The outcome for each test was a binary framework defining whether a test result contributed information gain or not. Predictive modeling was applied to recognize unnecessary lab tests in a real world ICU database extract comprising 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Classification accuracy of necessary and unnecessary lab tests of greater than 80% was achieved for all eight lab tests. Sensitivity and specificity were satisfactory for all the outcomes. An average reduction of 50% of the lab tests was obtained. This is an improvement from previously reported similar studies with average performance 37% by [1-3]. Reducing frequent lab testing and the potential clinical and financial implications are an important issue in intensive care. In this work we present an artificial intelligence method to predict the benefit of proposed future laboratory tests. Using ICU data from 746 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, and eleven measurements, we demonstrate high accuracy in predicting the likely information to be gained from proposed future

  12. Thinking Outside the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colter, Tabitha

    2017-01-01

    As an undergraduate physics major who spent 2015 deep in a quantum optics lab at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, I knew my 2016 experience with the House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee would be a completely new challenge. I have long had a passion for the bridge of communication between the technical and non-technical worlds but it was only through my AIP Mather internship this summer that I was able to see that passion come to life in the realm of science policy. Suddenly, I went from squeezing political philosophy classes into my packed schedule to witnessing the political process first-hand. I was thrilled to find that the skills of critical thinking and communicating complex issues I have developed throughout my training as a physicist were directly applicable to my work in Congress. Overall, my experience this summer has given me insight into the inner workings of the federal policy process, deepened my appreciation for the work of government employees to keep Congressional members informed on the pressing current issues, and exposed me to a whole range of alternative careers within science. AIP and SPS

  13. Basic rules of hygiene protect health care and lab workers from nasal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus: an international cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra; Tristan, Anne; Laurent, Frédéric; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Bouchiat, Coralie; Ranc, Anne-Gaëlle; Lina, Gérard; Dauwalder, Olivier; Etienne, Jérôme; Bes, Michèle; Vandenesch, François

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition of nasal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonization by contaminated hands is likely an important determinant of its nasal carriage rate in health care and lab setting. The objective of our cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of nasal methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) or -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage among health care professionals (HCPs) attending an international symposium and to study the association between compliance with hygiene rules, individual-related parameters, and medical conditions with nasal S. aureus carriage in this population. After obtaining consent, two nasal swabs were collected. Nasal MSSA and MRSA carriage was measured by the: i) molecular approach targeting spa, mecA and mecA-orfX junction sequences, and ii) culture on selective S. aureus media combined with mecA molecular detection of isolated strains. Information on compliance with hygiene rules, demographic variables, sector of activity and long-term medication was collected by anonymous questionnaire. The participation rate was 32.3%. In total, 176 subjects from 34 countries were included in the analysis. S. aureus was isolated from the nasal swabs of 57 (32.4%) subjects, of whom 3 (5.3%) harbored MRSA strains. Overall, 123 subjects reported working in microbiology laboratories with direct manipulation of S. aureus, and 29 acknowledged regular contacts with patients. In this exposed population, hydro-alcoholic solutions appeared to have a significant protective effect against nasal S. aureus carriage (OR = 0.36; 95% CI: 0.15-0.85). Hospital work was associated with increased risk of nasal S. aureus carriage (OR = 2.38; 95% CI: 1.07-5.29). The results of this study showed that compliance with basic rules of hygiene, such as the use of hydro-alcoholic solutions, could reduce the risk of nasal S. aureus colonization. Hydro-alcoholic solution could interrupt auto-transmission of the pathogen, consequently decreasing the overall nasal

  14. Application of the in situ three channel WET Star fluorometer to characterize FDOM sources and determine water masses in the Nordic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczkowska, Anna; Kowalczuk, Piotr; Sagan, Slawomir; Zablocka, Monika; Stedmon, Colin; Granskog, Mats

    2017-04-01

    Water masses exchange between the Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic Ocean occurs in Nordic Seas and this process represents a crucial component of the northern hemisphere climate system. Nordic Seas are dominated by Atlantic Waters (AW) and Polar Waters (PW) and water formed in the mixing process or local modifications like precipitation and sea-ice melt. Classification of water masses only on the basis of temperature, salinity or density not take into account different sources of fresh water in the Nordic Seas. In this study we propose that measured signal from the in situ three channel WET Star fluorometer could be a useful tool for characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and refinement of water masses classification . Spectral properties of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter and Fluorescent Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM and FDOM) were characterized in different water masses along a section across the Fram Strait at 79°N as well as in the Nordic Seas in 2014 and 2015. Observations of CDOM and FDOM were carried out with use of in situ three channel WET Labs WET Star fluorometer and Excitation Emission Matrix spectra (EEMs) measured in the water samples. The WET Labs WET Star three channels in situ fluorometer was designed to measure emission of humic and protein-like FDOM fractions. Instruments output was calibrated against respective fluorescence intensity of EMMs measured with use of Aqualog fluorometer (Horiba Scientific) at excitation and emission ranges corresponding to in situ fluorometer channels. The correctness of the calibration was confirmed by empirical linear relationship between WET Star in situ fluorescence intensities and aCDOM(350) derived from water samples. Measured WET Star fluorometer signal enabled to asses distribution of different FDOM fractions in the Nordic Seas. The distribution of humic-like fluorescence intensity in the function of salinity revealed three distinct mixing curves: the first indicates mixing between surface PW

  15. Survival of Trichomonas vaginalis in wet preparation and on wet mount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Kevin A; Rabe, Lorna K; Meyn, Leslie A; Hillier, Sharon L

    2013-09-01

    Microscopy is an insensitive method for detection of Trichomonas vaginalis, but is widely used because it is both rapid and inexpensive. Diagnosis of trichomoniasis by microscopy requires that motile forms be identified in vaginal fluid samples. However, microscopy cannot always be performed immediately after sample collection. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of sample storage at room temperature on trichomonad motility. Vaginal swab samples from 77 women positive for T vaginalis infection were collected to determine the impact of storage on wet preparations (swabs in plastic tubes with saline) and wet mounts (samples placed onto a glass slide with a coverslip). Samples were read at 400× every 30 min for the first hour and then once per hour thereafter until there were no motile trichomonads observed. For wet preparations, motility was 100% at 30 min, 99% at 60 min and decreased by 3%-15% each subsequent hour, with samples having a lower density of trichomonads losing motility more quickly. Trichomonad motility diminished more rapidly in wet mounts compared with wet preparations, with a 20% decrement in motility in 60 min. These data suggest that vaginal fluid samples for diagnosis of trichomoniasis should be stored in saline rather than on microscope slides until they are examined under the microscope and samples should be evaluated by microscopy within an hour of collection. These findings also suggest that clinical sites which cannot perform microscopy within 1 h of sample collection should consider the use of other diagnostic tests.

  16. Spaceport Processing System Development Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Processing System Development Lab (SPSDL), developed and maintained by the Systems Hardware and Engineering Branch (NE-C4), is a development lab with its own private/restricted networks. A private/restricted network is a network with restricted or no communication with other networks. This allows users from different groups to work on their own projects in their own configured environment without interfering with others utilizing their resources in the lab. The different networks being used in the lab have no way to talk with each other due to the way they are configured, so how a user configures his software, operating system, or the equipment doesn't interfere or carry over on any of the other networks in the lab. The SPSDL is available for any project in KSC that is in need of a lab environment. My job in the SPSDL was to assist in maintaining the lab to make sure it's accessible for users. This includes, but is not limited to, making sure the computers in the lab are properly running and patched with updated hardware/software. In addition to this, I also was to assist users who had issues in utilizing the resources in the lab, which may include helping to configure a restricted network for their own environment. All of this was to ensure workers were able to use the SPSDL to work on their projects without difficulty which would in turn, benefit the work done throughout KSC. When I wasn't working in the SPSDL, I would instead help other coworkers with smaller tasks which included, but wasn't limited to, the proper disposal, moving of, or search for essential equipment. I also, during the free time I had, used NASA's resources to increase my knowledge and skills in a variety of subjects related to my major as a computer engineer, particularly in UNIX, Networking, and Embedded Systems.

  17. Using wet microalgae for direct biodiesel production via microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Yu, Tao; Li, Tao; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2013-03-01

    To address the large energy consumption of microalgae dewatering and to simplify the conventional two-step method (cellular lipid extraction and lipid transesterification) for biodiesel production, a novel process for the direct conversion of wet microalgae biomass into biodiesel by microwave irradiation is proposed. The influences of conventional thermal heating and microwave irradiation on biodiesel production from wet microalgae biomass were investigated. The effects of using the one-step (simultaneous lipid extraction and transesterification) and two-step methods were also studied. Approximately 77.5% of the wet microalgal cell walls were disrupted under microwave irradiation. The biodiesel production rate and yield from wet microalgae biomass obtained through the one-step process using microwave irradiation were 6-fold and 1.3-fold higher than those from wet microalgae obtained through the two-step process using conventional heating. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurisa-tion (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FGD plants is presented. The experimental work covers laboratory studies as well as pilot- and full-scale...... was found to decrease the rate of gas phase mass transport with up to 15 %, though the effect could not be correlated.A detailed model for a wet FGD pilot plant, based on the falling film principle, was devel-oped. All important rate determining steps, absorption of SO2, oxidation of HSO3-, dissolution...... - 333 K, pertinent for full-scale wet FGD packed towers. The possibility of co-firing straw and coal was investigated in a full-scale power plant. No ef-fects on the overall performance of the wet FGD plant were observed, though laboratory ex-periments with fine dust and fly ash from the full-scale...

  19. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra

    2016-11-28

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid \\'marbles\\' with molecularly thin graphene.

  20. Lab-on a-Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Helen Cole, the project manager for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development program, and Lisa Monaco, the project scientist for the program, insert a lab on a chip into the Caliper 42 which is specialized equipment that controls processes on commercial chips to support development of lab-on-a-chip applications. The system has special microscopes and imaging systems, so scientists can process and study different types of fluid, chemical, and medical tests conducted on chips. For example, researchers have examined fluorescent bacteria as it flows through the chips' fluid channels or microfluidic capillaries. Researchers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have been studying how the lab-on-a-chip technology can be used for microbial detection, water quality monitoring, and detecting biosignatures of past or present life on Mars. The Marshall Center team is also collaborating with scientists at other NASA centers and at universities to develop custom chip designs for not only space applications, but for many Earth applications, such as for detecting deadly microbes in heating and air systems. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  1. LabPush: a pilot study of providing remote clinics with laboratory results via short message service (SMS in Swaziland, Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Shan Jian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Turnaround time (TAT is an important indicator of laboratory performance. It is often difficult to achieve fast TAT for blood tests conducted at clinics in developing countries. This is because clinics where the patient is treated are often far away from the laboratory, and transporting blood samples and test results between the two locations creates significant delay. Recent efforts have sought to mitigate this problem by using Short Message Service (SMS to reduce TAT. Studies reporting the impact of this technique have not been published in scientific literature however. In this paper we present a study of LabPush, a system developed to test whether SMS delivery of HIV related laboratory results to clinics could shorten TAT time significantly. METHOD: LapPush was implemented in six clinics of the Kingdom of Swaziland. SMS results were sent out from the laboratory as a supplement to normal transport of paper results. Each clinic was equipped with a mobile phone to receive SMS results. The laboratory that processes the blood tests was equipped with a system for digital input of results, and transmission of results via SMS to the clinics. RESULTS: Laboratory results were received for 1041 different clinical cases. The total number of SMS records received (1032 was higher than that of paper records (965, indicating a higher loss rate for paper records. A statistical comparison of TAT for SMS and paper reports indicates a statistically significant improvement for SMS. Results were more positive for more rural clinics, and an urban clinic with high workload. CONCLUSION: SMS can be used to reduce TAT for blood tests taken at clinics in developing countries. Benefits are likely to be greater at clinics that are further away from laboratories, due to the difficulties this imposes on transport of paper records.

  2. A study of 3pi production in gammap → npi+pi+pi- and gammap → Delta++pi+pi-pi- with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaris, Aristeidis

    Apart from the mesons that the constituent quark model predicts, QCD allows for additional states beyond the qq¯ system. Previous experiments have performed partial wave analysis on pion- production data and claim observation of an exotic JPC = 1-+ state decaying via rhopi. The g12 experiment took place at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS spectrometer, a liquid hydrogen target was used and a tagged photon beam. By studying the reactions gamma p → npi+pi+pi - and gammap → Delta++pi +pi-pi-, the photoproduction of mesons decaying to 3pi was studied using two different but complimentary channels. Events are selected with low four-momentum transfer to the baryon, in order to enhance one pion exchange production. For both 3pi systems the data exhibit two intermediate decays, rhopi and f 2pi. For the gammap → npi +pi+pi- reaction over 600k events were acquired resulting in the largest 3 photoproduction dataset to date. The exotic JPC = 1-+ partial wave does not show resonant behavior and more so it is strongly consistent with a non-resonant non-interfering wave relative to a resonant pi 2(1670). Furthermore, the partial wave analysis shows production of the a2(1320) and pi2(1670) mesons. For the first time we report observation of a photoproduced a 1(1260) meson. For the gammap → Delta ++pi+pi-pi- reaction nearly 350k events were analyzed. A partial wave analysis was performed for the first time on this channel. The a 1(1260), a2(1320), and the pi2(1670) mesons were observed. Observation of the a1(1260) confirms the result first reported in gammap → npi+pi+pi- reaction.

  3. A Roadmap for Implementation of Blended Learning at the School Level: A Case Study of the iLearnNYC Lab Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Rob; Friend, Bruce; Powell, Allison

    2013-01-01

    This roadmap was designed to provide guidance to the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) school administrators in implementing blended learning programs in their own schools. Over the 2012-13 school year, the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL) worked with 8 NYCDOE Lab Schools, each with its own blended learning…

  4. NASA GeneLab Concept of Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Terri; Gibbs, Kristina; Rask, Jon; Coughlan, Joseph; Smith, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    NASA's GeneLab aims to greatly increase the number of scientists that are using data from space biology investigations on board ISS, emphasizing a systems biology approach to the science. When completed, GeneLab will provide the integrated software and hardware infrastructure, analytical tools and reference datasets for an assortment of model organisms. GeneLab will also provide an environment for scientists to collaborate thereby increasing the possibility for data to be reused for future experimentation. To maximize the value of data from life science experiments performed in space and to make the most advantageous use of the remaining ISS research window, GeneLab will apply an open access approach to conducting spaceflight experiments by generating, and sharing the datasets derived from these biological studies in space.Onboard the ISS, a wide variety of model organisms will be studied and returned to Earth for analysis. Laboratories on the ground will analyze these samples and provide genomic, transcriptomic, metabolomic and proteomic data. Upon receipt, NASA will conduct data quality control tasks and format raw data returned from the omics centers into standardized, annotated information sets that can be readily searched and linked to spaceflight metadata. Once prepared, the biological datasets, as well as any analysis completed, will be made public through the GeneLab Space Bioinformatics System webb as edportal. These efforts will support a collaborative research environment for spaceflight studies that will closely resemble environments created by the Department of Energy (DOE), National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and other institutions in additional areas of study, such as cancer and environmental biology. The results will allow for comparative analyses that will help scientists around the world take a major leap forward in understanding the effect of microgravity, radiation, and other aspects of the space environment on model organisms

  5. Comparative study of the effect of dry and wet ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe spice on the proximate and microbial safety of soybean beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adegbola Oladele Dauda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean beverage, most common nutritious local beverage in Nigeria and in the world, is a high protein beverage used as a dairy milk substitute with the limited utilization due to natural or ambient conditions that serve as growth medium for microorganisms. Hence, it has a short shelf life. This study examines the shelf life of soybean beverage preserved with the ginger spice (dried at 70 ˚C, 80 ˚C, 90 ˚C and 100 ˚C, and 2 g and 4 g of fresh/wet ginger respectively over 7-week period. The samples were (A: plain soybean beverage; B: 200 ml soybean beverage + 2 g of ginger dried at 100 ˚C; C: 200 ml soybean beverage + 2 g ginger dried at 90 ˚C; D: 200 ml soybean beverage + 2 g ginger dried at 80 ˚C; E: 200 ml soybean beverage + 2 g ginger dried at 70 ˚C; F: 200 ml soybean beverage + 2 g fresh ginger; and G: 200 ml soybean beverage + 4 g fresh ginger respectively. The proximate, pH, microbial and sensory analyses of samples ranged as follows: 87.35% - 90.83% for the moisture content; 0.58% - 0.65% ash content; 4.65% - 4.96% protein; 0.10%-0.26% fibre content; 2.06% - 2.98% crude fat and 1.68% - 4.17% carbohydrate, and pH values ranged from 6.2 - 6.5. Microbiological analysis over storage period showed that the control sample ranged from 0.4×106 -8.3×106 cfu/ml, and treated samples from 0.4×106 to 2.4×106 cfu/ml. Low values of the samples treated with dry ginger spice were preserved better than others, probably due to preservative and anti-microbial properties of the spice. Sensory evaluation, carried out by twenty-eight persons, showed that the sample E: (200 ml soymilk+ 2 g ginger dried at 70 ˚C was most preferred (with respect to taste, aroma and overall acceptability, while there was a significant difference in the appearance of the samples.

  6. Acceptance of an assistive robot in older adults: a mixed-method study of human–robot interaction over a 1-month period in the Living Lab setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Huei; Wrobel, Jérémy; Cornuet, Mélanie; Kerhervé, Hélène; Damnée, Souad; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in investigating acceptance of robots, which are increasingly being proposed as one form of assistive technology to support older adults, maintain their independence, and enhance their well-being. In the present study, we aimed to observe robot-acceptance in older adults, particularly subsequent to a 1-month direct experience with a robot. Subjects and methods Six older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and five cognitively intact healthy (CIH) older adults were recruited. Participants interacted with an assistive robot in the Living Lab once a week for 4 weeks. After being shown how to use the robot, participants performed tasks to simulate robot use in everyday life. Mixed methods, comprising a robot-acceptance questionnaire, semistructured interviews, usability-performance measures, and a focus group, were used. Results Both CIH and MCI subjects were able to learn how to use the robot. However, MCI subjects needed more time to perform tasks after a 1-week period of not using the robot. Both groups rated similarly on the robot-acceptance questionnaire. They showed low intention to use the robot, as well as negative attitudes toward and negative images of this device. They did not perceive it as useful in their daily life. However, they found it easy to use, amusing, and not threatening. In addition, social influence was perceived as powerful on robot adoption. Direct experience with the robot did not change the way the participants rated robots in their acceptance questionnaire. We identified several barriers to robot-acceptance, including older adults’ uneasiness with technology, feeling of stigmatization, and ethical/societal issues associated with robot use. Conclusion It is important to destigmatize images of assistive robots to facilitate their acceptance. Universal design aiming to increase the market for and production of products that are usable by everyone (to the greatest extent possible) might help to

  7. Anthropogenic waste indicators (AWIs), particularly PAHs and LABs, in Malaysian sediments: Application of aquatic environment for identifying anthropogenic pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Najat; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Halimoon, Normala; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Magam, Sami M; Kannan, Narayanan; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Ali, Masni Mohd; Keshavarzifard, Mehrzad; Vaezzadeh, Vahab; Alkhadher, Sadeq Abdullah Abdo; Al-Odaini, Najat Ahmed

    2016-01-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and linear alkylbenzenes (LABs) were used as anthropogenic markers of organic chemical pollution of sediments in the Selangor River, Peninsular Malaysia. This study was conducted on sediment samples from the beginning of the estuary to the upstream river during dry and rainy seasons. The concentrations of ƩPAHs and ƩLABs ranged from 203 to 964 and from 23 to 113 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw), respectively. In particular, the Selangor River was found to have higher sedimentary levels of PAHs and LABs during the wet season than in the dry season, which was primarily associated with the intensity of domestic wastewater discharge and high amounts of urban runoff washing the pollutants from the surrounding area. The concentrations of the toxic contaminants were determined according to the Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs). The PAH levels in the Selangor River did not exceed the SQGs, for example, the effects range low (ERL) value, indicating that they cannot exert adverse biological effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pollution hazard closes neutrino lab

    CERN Multimedia

    Jones, Nicola

    2003-01-01

    "A leading astrophysics laboratory in Italy has closed down all but one of its experiments over concerns that toxic polluants could leak form the underground lab into the local water supply" (0.5 page)

  9. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  10. Living lab Groningen Airport Eelde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philip Broeksma

    2015-01-01

    Het Living Lab Groningen Airport Eelde (LLGAE) wil realiseren dat partners uit overheid, onderzoek, onderwijs, ondernemers en omgeving in gezamenlijkheid en gelijkwaardigheid, werken aan innovatieve oplossingen, experimenten en opgaven in de ruimtelijke en economische context van Groningen Airport

  11. Sleep Lab Adaptation in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Typically Developing Children

    OpenAIRE

    Meredith Bessey; Jennifer Richards; Penny Corkum

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Research has shown inconsistencies across studies examining sleep problems in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is possible that these inconsistencies are due to sleep lab adaptation. The goal of the current study was to investigate the possibility that children with ADHD adapt differently to the sleep lab than do typically developing (TD) children. Patients and Methods. Actigraphy variables were compared between home and the sleep lab. Sleep lab ad...

  12. The characteristics of wet and dry spells for the diverse climate in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Li, Yanping; Shi, Xiaoping; Li, Jingjing

    2017-02-01

    Using a large precipitation dataset from 692 gauge stations across China for the period of 1960-2013, this study analyzed the characteristics of wet/dry spells related to four types of climate including arid, semiarid, semiarid to subhumid, and humid climate. A wet/dry spell is defined as the consecutive days with precipitation amount greater/less than a threshold. The frequency of wet/dry spells, the contributions of wet/dry spells with different lengths to the total number of wet/dry days and total precipitation amount were analyzed for different climate types. The wet/dry spells with the greatest contributions to the total wet/dry days or total precipitation amount vary with climate. For drier climate, long-duration dry spells contribute more to the total number of dry days, while short-duration wet spells contribute more to the total number of wet days and the total precipitation amount. The characteristics of wet/dry spells are closely related to local climate. Good regression relationships were obtained for the number of dry/wet spell versus spell length, and precipitation amount versus wet spell length. Although the correlation between precipitation amount and wet spell length has rarely been considered in stochastic precipitation generation, the relationships identified in this study justify the necessity of taking it into account.

  13. WRF/Chem study of dry and wet deposition of trifluoroacetic acid produced from the atmospheric degradation of a few short-lived HFCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazil, J.; McKeen, S. A.; Kim, S.; Ahmadov, R.; Grell, G. A.; Talukdar, R. K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) is the prevalent (used in >80% passenger cars and commercial vehicles worldwide) refrigerant in automobile air conditioning units (MACs). With an atmospheric lifetime of ~14 years and a global warming potential (GWP) of 1430 on a 100-year time horizon, HFC-134a does not meet current and expected requirements for MAC refrigerants in many parts of the world. Therefore, substitutes with lower GWP are being sought. One of the simplest way to achieve lower GWP is to use chemicals with shorter atmospheric lifetimes. In this work, we investigate the dry and wet deposition and the rainwater concentration of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) produced by the atmospheric oxidation of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (TFP) and 1,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropene (PFP). The WRF/Chem model was used to calculate dry and wet TFA deposition over the contiguous USA during the May-September 2006 period that would result from replacing HFC-134a in MACs with a 1:1 molar ratio mixture of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (TFP) and 1,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropene (PFP). The simulation is evaluated by comparing observations of precipitation and sulfate wet deposition at stations of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP). Simulated precipitation and sulfate wet deposition correlate well with the observations, but exhibit a positive bias for precipitation and a negative bias for sulfate wet deposition. Atmospheric lifetimes of TFP and PFP against oxidation by the hydroxyl radical OH, a prognostic species in WRF/Chem, are ~5 and ~4 days in the simulation, respectively. The model setup allows the attribution of dry and wet TFA deposition to individual source regions (California, Houston, Chicago, and the remaining contiguous USA in this work). TFA deposition is highest in the eastern USA because of numerous large sources and high precipitation in the region. West of the Continental Divide, TFA deposition is significantly lower, and its origin is dominated by emissions from

  14. Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehler, Ted

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds Coastline Community College has under development several virtual lab simulations and activities that range from biology, to language labs, to virtual discussion environments. Imagine a virtual world that students enter online, by logging onto their computer from home or anywhere they have web access. Upon entering this world they select a personalized identity represented by a digitized character (avatar) that can freely move about, interact with the environment, and communicate with other characters. In these virtual worlds, buildings, gathering places, conference rooms, labs, science rooms, and a variety of other “real world” elements are evident. When characters move about and encounter other people (players) they may freely communicate. They can examine things, manipulate objects, read signs, watch video clips, hear sounds, and jump to other locations. Goals of critical thinking, social interaction, peer collaboration, group support, and enhanced learning can be achieved in surprising new ways with this innovative approach to peer-to-peer communication in a virtual discussion world. In this presentation, short demos will be given of several online learning environments including a virtual biology lab, a marine science module, a Spanish lab, and a virtual discussion world. Coastline College has been a leader in the development of distance learning and media-based education for nearly 30 years and currently offers courses through PDA, Internet, DVD, CD-ROM, TV, and Videoconferencing technologies. Its distance learning program serves over 20,000 students every year. sponsor Jerry Meisner

  15. Flame Stabilization on Microscopic Scale of Wet Biogas with Microflame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Tamio; Fuchihata, Manabu; Mizuno, Satoru

    Harvesting, transportation, energy conversion and the high-efficient utilization, cascade method and market formation besides become with the indispensable element in order to utilize the biomass resource. There are two type biogases; it is gasified gas from dried biomass by partially combustion and wet biogas from wet biomass by methane fermentation, especially from the livestock excrement resources. This paper discusses an experimental study for flame stabilization on microscopic scale with wet biogas (mainly 0.6CH4+0.4CO2). In this study, the microflame with the wet biogas fuels are formed by the diffusion flame on the coppered straight pipes of inner diameter 0.02mm ˜ 1.5mm. This study is obtained stability mapping on microscopic scale of formed microflame by wet biogas fuels. The flame stability limit conditions on microscopic scale of wet biogas is drawn with blow off and extinction flame double limit lines. It is suggested that minimum mixing spatial scale change by the each mixing ratio of the wet biogas.

  16. Experimental Study of Effective Carrier Mobility of Multi-Fin-Type Double-Gate Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors with (111) Channel Surface Fabricated by Orientation-Dependent Wet Etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongxun; Sugimata, Etsuro; Ishii, Kenichi; Masahara, Meishoku; Endo, Kazuhiko; Matsukawa, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hiromi; O'uchi, Shinichi; Suzuki, Eiichi

    2006-04-01

    We present an experimental study of effective carrier mobility ( μ eff) of multi-fin-type double-gate metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (FinFETs) with a (111) channel surface fabricated by orientation-dependent wet etching. The peak values of the obtained μ eff of electrons and holes are approximately 300 and 160 cm2/(V s), respectively, which are close to those in (111) bulk metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Moreover, the effective electric field (Eeff) dependence of the μ eff of electrons and holes shows a good agreement with the mobility universal curves of (111) bulk MOSFETs. These results indicate that the quality and channel surface roughness of Si-fins by orientation-dependent wet etching are excellent. The obtained results of μ eff are very useful for the modeling and design of FinFET-complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuits and the developed wet etching technique is very attractive in the fabrication of ultrathin and high-quality Si-fin channels.

  17. Basic rules of hygiene protect health care and lab workers from nasal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus: an international cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Saadatian-Elahi

    Full Text Available Acquisition of nasal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus colonization by contaminated hands is likely an important determinant of its nasal carriage rate in health care and lab setting. The objective of our cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of nasal methicillin-sensitive (MSSA or -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA carriage among health care professionals (HCPs attending an international symposium and to study the association between compliance with hygiene rules, individual-related parameters, and medical conditions with nasal S. aureus carriage in this population. After obtaining consent, two nasal swabs were collected. Nasal MSSA and MRSA carriage was measured by the: i molecular approach targeting spa, mecA and mecA-orfX junction sequences, and ii culture on selective S. aureus media combined with mecA molecular detection of isolated strains. Information on compliance with hygiene rules, demographic variables, sector of activity and long-term medication was collected by anonymous questionnaire. The participation rate was 32.3%. In total, 176 subjects from 34 countries were included in the analysis. S. aureus was isolated from the nasal swabs of 57 (32.4% subjects, of whom 3 (5.3% harbored MRSA strains. Overall, 123 subjects reported working in microbiology laboratories with direct manipulation of S. aureus, and 29 acknowledged regular contacts with patients. In this exposed population, hydro-alcoholic solutions appeared to have a significant protective effect against nasal S. aureus carriage (OR = 0.36; 95% CI: 0.15-0.85. Hospital work was associated with increased risk of nasal S. aureus carriage (OR = 2.38; 95% CI: 1.07-5.29. The results of this study showed that compliance with basic rules of hygiene, such as the use of hydro-alcoholic solutions, could reduce the risk of nasal S. aureus colonization. Hydro-alcoholic solution could interrupt auto-transmission of the pathogen, consequently decreasing the overall

  18. Interactive, Online, Adsorption Lab to Support Discovery of the Scientific Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, K. C.; Ulery, A. L.; Chamberlin, B.; Dettmer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Science students require more than methods practice in lab activities; they must gain an understanding of the application of the scientific process through lab work. Large classes, time constraints, and funding may limit student access to science labs, denying students access to the types of experiential learning needed to motivate and develop new scientists. Interactive, discovery-based computer simulations and virtual labs provide an alternative, low-risk opportunity for learners to engage in lab processes and activities. Students can conduct experiments, collect data, draw conclusions, and even abort a session. We have developed an online virtual lab, through which students can interactively develop as scientists as they learn about scientific concepts, lab equipment, and proper lab techniques. Our first lab topic is adsorption of chemicals to soil, but the methodology is transferrable to other topics. In addition to learning the specific procedures involved in each lab, the online activities will prompt exploration and practice in key scientific and mathematical concepts, such as unit conversion, significant digits, assessing risks, evaluating bias, and assessing quantity and quality of data. These labs are not designed to replace traditional lab instruction, but to supplement instruction on challenging or particularly time-consuming concepts. To complement classroom instruction, students can engage in a lab experience outside the lab and over a shorter time period than often required with real-world adsorption studies. More importantly, students can reflect, discuss, review, and even fail at their lab experience as part of the process to see why natural processes and scientific approaches work the way they do. Our Media Productions team has completed a series of online digital labs available at virtuallabs.nmsu.edu and scienceofsoil.com, and these virtual labs are being integrated into coursework to evaluate changes in student learning.

  19. In-Lab Upfront Use of Tirofiban May Reduce the Occurrence of No-Reflow During Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention. A Pilot Randomized Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lago,Igor Matos; Novaes, Gustavo Caires; Badran, André Vannucchi; Pavão,Rafael Brolio; Barbosa, Ricardo; Figueiredo,Geraldo Luiz de; Lima Filho,Moysés de Oliveira; Haddad, Jorge Luiz; Schmidt, André; Marin Neto,José Antônio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite successful opening of culprit coronary artery, myocardial reperfusion does not always follows primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors are used in the treatment of no-reflow (NR), but their role to prevent it is unproven. Objective: To evaluate the effect of in-lab administration of tirofiban on the incidence of NR in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with PPCI. Methods: STEMI patients treated with PPC...

  20. Subcritical mineralization of sodium salt of dodecyl benzene sulfonate using sonication-wet oxidation (SONIWO) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhale, A D; Mahajani, V V

    2001-06-01

    Subcritical mineralization of sodium salt of dodecyl benzene sulfonate via hybrid process-sonication followed by wet oxidation (SONIWO) has been investigated. Sonication of the compound enhanced the rates and % COD reduction during wet oxidation. In this process, homogenous CuSO4 catalyst was found to be effective. In wet oxidation studies, phenol, hydroquinone, maleic acid, oxalic acid, propionic acid, and acetic acid were identified as intermediates. The global rate equations for wet oxidation in terms of COD reduction were developed.

  1. Are Africans, Europeans, and Asians different "races"? A guided-inquiry lab for introducing undergraduate students to genetic diversity and preparing them to study natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Steven T; Andrews, Tessa M; Leonard, Mary J; Snodgrass, Meagan

    2012-01-01

    Many students do not recognize that individual organisms within populations vary, and this may make it difficult for them to recognize the essential role variation plays in natural selection. Also, many students have weak scientific reasoning skills, and this makes it difficult for them to recognize misconceptions they might have. This paper describes a 2-h laboratory for college students that introduces them to genetic diversity and gives them practice using hypothetico-deductive reasoning. In brief, the lab presents students with DNA sequences from Africans, Europeans, and Asians, and asks students to determine whether people from each continent qualify as distinct "races." Comparison of the DNA sequences shows that people on each continent are not more similar to one another than to people on other continents, and therefore do not qualify as distinct races. Ninety-four percent of our students reported that the laboratory was interesting, and 79% reported that it was a valuable learning experience. We developed and used a survey to measure the extent to which students recognized variation and its significance within populations and showed that the lab increased student awareness of variation. We also showed that the lab improved the ability of students to construct hypothetico-deductive arguments.

  2. Undergraduate Student Construction and Interpretation of Graphs in Physics Lab Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Godfrey, T. J.; Mayhew, Nicholas T.; Wiegert, Craig C.

    2016-01-01

    Lab activities are an important element of an undergraduate physics course. In these lab activities, students construct and interpret graphs in order to connect the procedures of the lab with an understanding of the related physics concepts. This study investigated undergraduate students' construction and interpretation of graphs with best-fit…

  3. Can Graduate Teaching Assistants Teach Inquiry-Based Geology Labs Effectively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryker, Katherine; McConnell, David

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the implementation of teaching strategies by graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) in inquiry-based introductory geology labs at a large research university. We assess the degree of inquiry present in each Physical Geology lab and compare and contrast the instructional practices of new and experienced GTAs teaching these labs. We…

  4. Applying a Living Lab methodology to support innovation in education at a university in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronel Callaghan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Living Lab paradigm creates open and inter-disciplinary environments where participants can interrogate challenges and co-create solutions. A successful Living Lab context incorporates a clear focus/vision, strong leadership, self-sustainability, a strong sense of community-owned challenges and the potential for sustainable community development. This paper discusses and outlines the elements of Living Labs, and how these have played a role in the establishment of a new Education Living Lab at a University in South Africa. Core values, stakeholders and key success factors of Living Labs are discussed. This is followed by the description of a case study of the establishment process of a Living Lab. The newly established Living Lab already shows success with collaborations and innovation between communities, industry, academia, learners and schools. This is illustrated in an application of the discussions on the Mobile Learning focus area - the first active sub-focus area within the Education Living Lab.

  5. Status of chemistry lab safety in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Krishna Prasad; Neupane, Bhanu Bhakta; Giri, Basant

    2017-01-01

    Chemistry labs can become a dangerous environment for students as the lab exercises involve hazardous chemicals, glassware, and equipment. Approximately one hundred thousand students take chemistry laboratory classes annually in Nepal. We conducted a survey on chemical lab safety issues across Nepal. In this paper, we assess the safety policy and equipment, protocols and procedures followed, and waste disposal in chemistry teaching labs. Significant population of the respondents believed that there is no monitoring of the lab safety in their lab (p<0.001). Even though many labs do not allow food and beverages inside lab and have first aid kits, they lack some basic safety equipment. There is no institutional mechanism to dispose lab waste and chemical waste is disposed haphazardly. Majority of the respondents believed that the safety training should be a part of educational training (p = 0.001) and they would benefit from short course and/or workshop on lab safety (p<0.001).

  6. Acceptance of an assistive robot in older adults: a mixed-method study of human–robot interaction over a 1-month period in the Living Lab setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu YH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ya-Huei Wu,1,2 Jérémy Wrobel,1,2 Mélanie Cornuet,1,2 Hélène Kerhervé,1,2 Souad Damnée,1,2 Anne-Sophie Rigaud1,21Hôpital Broca, Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, 2Research Team 4468, Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, FranceBackground: There is growing interest in investigating acceptance of robots, which are increasingly being proposed as one form of assistive technology to support older adults, maintain their independence, and enhance their well-being. In the present study, we aimed to observe robot-acceptance in older adults, particularly subsequent to a 1-month direct experience with a robot.Subjects and methods: Six older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and five cognitively intact healthy (CIH older adults were recruited. Participants interacted with an assistive robot in the Living Lab once a week for 4 weeks. After being shown how to use the robot, participants performed tasks to simulate robot use in everyday life. Mixed methods, comprising a robot-acceptance questionnaire, semistructured interviews, usability-performance measures, and a focus group, were used.Results: Both CIH and MCI subjects were able to learn how to use the robot. However, MCI subjects needed more time to perform tasks after a 1-week period of not using the robot. Both groups rated similarly on the robot-acceptance questionnaire. They showed low intention to use the robot, as well as negative attitudes toward and negative images of this device. They did not perceive it as useful in their daily life. However, they found it easy to use, amusing, and not threatening. In addition, social influence was perceived as powerful on robot adoption. Direct experience with the robot did not change the way the participants rated robots in their acceptance questionnaire. We identified several barriers to robot-acceptance, including older adults’ uneasiness with technology, feeling of stigmatization, and ethical

  7. How Do Teachers Appropriate Learning Objects Through Critical Experiences? A Study of a Pilot In-School Collaborative Video Learning Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Lussi Borer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This two-year longitudinal study examined the collective and individual effects of a collaborative video learning lab (CVLL in a French lower-secondary high-poverty school. The CVLL was designed to: i determine the learning objects shared by the in-service teachers based on their actual teaching activities and ii encourage them to participate in a collaborative inquiry on their filmed activity regarding the selected shared learning object, with the goal of supporting them as they appropriate more efficient teaching practices..The participants were novice in-service teachers (n=2 and experienced teacher-facilitators (n=2. Data consisted of cross-analysis of video recordings (n=37 from i classroom teaching activity (n=11, ii CVLL sessions (n=6, and iii teachers’ observations and comments on both (n=20. The results revealed that novice and experienced teachers lived critical experiences in the CVLL regarding the shared learning object and show how they transformed their activity as teachers, mentors or facilitators. Questo studio longitudinale di due anni esamina gli effetti collettivi e individuali di un laboratorio di apprendimento collaborativo con video (CVLL in una scuola secondaria inferiore francese con alto grado di povertà. Il CVLL è stato progettato per: i determinare i learning object condivisi dai docenti in servizio in base alle loro reali attività di insegnamento e ii incoraggiarli a partecipare ad un’indagine collaborativa sulle attività videoregistrate concernenti il learning object condiviso selezionato, con l’obiettivo di sostenerli nel fare proprie pratiche di insegnamento più efficaci. I partecipanti sono insegnanti novizi in servizio (n=2 e insegnanti facilitatori esperti (n=2. I dati raccolti consistono in un’analisi incrociata delle registrazioni video (n=37, da i attività didattica in aula (n=11, ii sessioni CVLL (n=6, iii osservazioni e commenti degli insegnanti su entrambi (n=20. I risultati mostrano che gli

  8. Modeling Reactive Wetting when Inertial Effects are Dominant

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Daniel; Warren, James A.; Boettinger, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent experimental studies of molten metal droplets wetting high temperature reactive substrates have established that the majority of triple-line motion occurs when inertial effects are dominant. In light of these studies, this paper investigates wetting and spreading on reactive substrates when inertial effects are dominant using a thermodynamically derived, diffuse interface model of a binary, three-phase material. The liquid-vapor transition is modeled using a van der Waals diffuse inter...

  9. Electronics lab instructors' approaches to troubleshooting instruction

    CERN Document Server

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R

    2016-01-01

    In this exploratory qualitative study, we describe instructors' self-reported practices for teaching and assessing students' ability to troubleshoot in electronics lab courses. We collected audio data from interviews with 20 electronics instructors from 18 institutions that varied by size, selectivity, and other factors. In addition to describing participants' instructional practices, we characterize their perceptions about the role of troubleshooting in electronics, the importance of the ability to troubleshoot more generally, and what it means for students to be competent troubleshooters. One major finding of this work is that, while almost all instructors in our study said that troubleshooting is an important learning outcome for students in electronics lab courses, only half of instructors said they directly assessed students' ability to troubleshoot. Based on our findings, we argue that there is a need for research-based instructional materials that attend to both cognitive and non-cognitive aspects of t...

  10. Designing virtual science labs for the Islamic Academy of Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZahrani, Nada Saeed

    Science education is a basic part of the curriculum in modern day classrooms. Instructional approaches to science education can take many forms but hands-on application of theory via science laboratory activities for the learner is common. Not all schools have the resources to provide the laboratory environment necessary for hands-on application of science theory. Some settings rely on technology to provide a virtual laboratory experience instead. The Islamic Academy of Delaware (IAD), a typical community-based organization, was formed to support and meet the essential needs of the Muslim community of Delaware. IAD provides science education as part of the overall curriculum, but cannot provide laboratory activities as part of the science program. Virtual science labs may be a successful model for students at IAD. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of implementing virtual science labs at IAD and to develop an implementation plan for integrating the virtual labs. The literature has shown us that the lab experience is a valuable part of the science curriculum (NBPTS, 2013, Wolf, 2010, National Research Council, 1997 & 2012). The National Research Council (2012) stressed the inclusion of laboratory investigations in the science curriculum. The literature also supports the use of virtual labs as an effective substitute for classroom labs (Babateen, 2011; National Science Teachers Association, 2008). Pyatt and Simms (2011) found evidence that virtual labs were as good, if not better than physical lab experiences in some respects. Although not identical in experience to a live lab, the virtual lab has been shown to provide the student with an effective laboratory experience in situations where the live lab is not possible. The results of the IAD teacher interviews indicate that the teachers are well-prepared for, and supportive of, the implementation of virtual labs to improve the science education curriculum. The investigator believes that with the

  11. Wet water glass production plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant of a capacity of 75,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE, Italy, in 1997. and 1998, increasing detergent zeolite production, from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate dissolution plant. The main goal was increasing the detergent zeolite production. The technological cycle of NaOH was closed, and no effluents emitted, and there is no pollution (except for the filter cake. The wet water glass production process is fully automatized, and the product has uniform quality. The production process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start - up, and repairs. By installing additional process equipment (centrifugal pumps and heat exchangers technological bottlenecks were overcome, and by adjusting the operation of autoclaves, and water glass filters and also by optimizing the capacities of process equipment.

  12. Lab-on-fiber technology

    CERN Document Server

    Cusano, Andrea; Crescitelli, Alessio; Ricciardi, Armando

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on a research field that is rapidly emerging as one of the most promising ones for the global optics and photonics community: the "lab-on-fiber" technology. Inspired by the well-established 'lab on-a-chip' concept, this new technology essentially envisages novel and highly functionalized devices completely integrated into a single optical fiber for both communication and sensing applications.Based on the R&D experience of some of the world's leading authorities in the fields of optics, photonics, nanotechnology, and material science, this book provides a broad and accurate de

  13. Advance of Wetting Front in Silt Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahmood

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Under drip irrigation , the plant's root is concentrated inside the wetted bulb (region. Thus, the development of these roots and the plant production are greatly affected by the wetting pattern. Therefore, the wetting pattern of soil under drip irrigation must be taken into consideration in the design of drip irrigation system for both single dripping source or multi-overlapping wetting patterns of dripping water sources.2The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of initial water content of the soil and spacing between two adjacent dripping sources with different flow rate on the movement of the wetting front.This study included 16 tests for monitoring the advancement of the wetting front with time during and after the water application phase. The water advance and water distribution measurement are carried out for two cases of the soil profile: for the first case with initial volumetric water content of 4.08% and for the second case with initial volumetric water content of 12.24%. Two spacing between the emitter were tested 25cm and 50 cm using application flow rates of 0.606, 1.212, 1.818, and 2.424 cm3 /min/cm to show the combined effect of spacing and flow rate on the performance of two adjacent emitter.The study proposed a method for determining the spacing between the two emitting sources , the water application rate and watering time. The proposed method depends on a wetted zone whose depth is equal to the root zone depth with a values equals to the maximum vertical advance of the wetting front underneath the drip line at time when this depth is equal to the depth of wetting at mid­point between the drip line. the study revealed that both the vertical water advance in soil underneath the emitter and the horizontal advance of the wetting front is larger than those in the case of single emitter.Furthermore, the vertical water advance increases with the decrease spacing between the two drip lines. Also, the horizontal advance of the

  14. Hijama (Wet Cupping or Dry Cupping) for Diabetes Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Vakilinia, Seyed Reza; Bayat, Davood; Asghari, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is known as one of the most common diseases in the world and its treatment is one of the most important healthcare issues. Consequently, different treatment methods of complementary medicine and recent medicine have been used by scientific communities to control and predict the disease. This article considered the effects of dry cupping and wet cupping, based on traditional medicine and recent studies. Methods: At first, the benefits of dry cupping and wet cupping were ta...

  15. Measuring the Impact of Introductory Physics Labs on Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Wieman, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study showed that two lab courses, whose goals were exclusively to reinforce material developed in the lecture courses, do not have any impact on exam performance at the 1% level. In this study, we replicated this analysis with a modified version of one of these lab courses whose goals also included modeling, designing experiments, and analyzing and visualizing data. This modified course used the same sets of apparatus as the previous version, but changed the pre-lab and in-lab activities to focus on developing and testing models with data. The study evaluated the impact of these additional goals and activities. We found that they did not affect students' performance on the final exam.

  16. Electronics lab instructors' approaches to troubleshooting instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-06-01

    In this exploratory qualitative study, we describe instructors' self-reported practices for teaching and assessing students' ability to troubleshoot in electronics lab courses. We collected audio data from interviews with 20 electronics instructors from 18 institutions that varied by size, selectivity, and other factors. In addition to describing participants' instructional practices, we characterize their perceptions about the role of troubleshooting in electronics, the importance of the ability to troubleshoot more generally, and what it means for students to be competent troubleshooters. One major finding of this work is that, while almost all instructors in our study said that troubleshooting is an important learning outcome for students in electronics lab courses, only half of instructors said they directly assessed students' ability to troubleshoot. Based on our findings, we argue that there is a need for research-based instructional materials that attend to both cognitive and noncognitive aspects of troubleshooting proficiency. We also identify several areas for future investigation related to troubleshooting instruction in electronics lab courses.

  17. Electronics lab instructors’ approaches to troubleshooting instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri R. Dounas-Frazer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this exploratory qualitative study, we describe instructors’ self-reported practices for teaching and assessing students’ ability to troubleshoot in electronics lab courses. We collected audio data from interviews with 20 electronics instructors from 18 institutions that varied by size, selectivity, and other factors. In addition to describing participants’ instructional practices, we characterize their perceptions about the role of troubleshooting in electronics, the importance of the ability to troubleshoot more generally, and what it means for students to be competent troubleshooters. One major finding of this work is that, while almost all instructors in our study said that troubleshooting is an important learning outcome for students in electronics lab courses, only half of instructors said they directly assessed students’ ability to troubleshoot. Based on our findings, we argue that there is a need for research-based instructional materials that attend to both cognitive and noncognitive aspects of troubleshooting proficiency. We also identify several areas for future investigation related to troubleshooting instruction in electronics lab courses.

  18. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  19. Hijama (Wet Cupping or Dry Cupping) for Diabetes Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakilinia, Seyed Reza; Bayat, Davood; Asghari, Majid

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes is known as one of the most common diseases in the world and its treatment is one of the most important healthcare issues. Consequently, different treatment methods of complementary medicine and recent medicine have been used by scientific communities to control and predict the disease. This article considered the effects of dry cupping and wet cupping, based on traditional medicine and recent studies. At first, the benefits of dry cupping and wet cupping were taken from some original books of Iranian traditional medicine, such as Canon of Medicine, Kholasat-al-hekma, Tib-e-Akbari and Exir-e-Azam. Then, the information about scientific articles was obtained by studying some of the Iranian traditional medicine journals and searching through PubMed, SID and Google Scholar. In traditional medicine, Hijama is divided into two kinds, namely wet cupping (with sharat, with incision, and blood giving) and dry cupping (without sharat, without incision). Dry cupping causes organ blood absorption, organ warming, and loss of organ humidity. The texts of Iranian traditional medicine refer to the Ziabites disease that its symptoms are like diabetes. This disease is divided into two types including warm and cold ziabetes. The treatments that are recommended for both types are dry cupping for cold ziabetes and wet cupping for warm ziabetes. In addition, according to scientific studies, dry cupping and wet cupping have been recommended for diabetes treatment. Dry cupping and wet cupping can be introduced as the complementary treatment methods beside other treatment methods.

  20. Collapse of granular media subjected to wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Korchi Fatima Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the collapse of granular materials subjected to wetting action. For soils, the collapse potential depends on several parameters such as liquid limit, matric suction, compactness, initial water content and the amount of fine particles. The effect of grain size, which plays a key role in the rearrangement of grains, remains little studied and poorly understood. To investigate the capillary origin of the collapse phenomenon, we present an experimental study on macroscopic and local scales. Our results show the effect of grain size and water content on collapse.

  1. Reference-based pricing: an evidence-based solution for lab services shopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, L Doug; Bradley, Kent; Fu, Patricia Lin; Armata, Raegan; Parr, James B

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of reference-based pricing (RBP) on the percentage of lab services utilized by members that were at or below the reference price. Retrospective, quasi-experimental, matched, case-control pilot evaluation of an RBP benefit for lab services. The study group included employees of a multinational grocery chain covered by a national health insurance carrier and subject to RBP for lab services; it had access to an online lab shopping tool and was informed about the RBP benefit through employer communications. The reference group was covered by the same insurance carrier but not subject to RBP. The primary end point was lab compliance, defined as the percentage of lab claims with total charges at or below the reference price. Difference-in-difference regression estimation evaluated changes in lab compliance between the 2 groups. Higher compliance per lab claim was evident for the study group compared with the reference group (69% vs 57%; Ponline shopping tool was used by 7% of the matched-adjusted study group prior to obtaining lab services. Lab compliance was 76% for study group members using the online tool compared with 68% among nonusers who were subject to RBP (P<.01). RBP can promote cost-conscious selection of lab services. Access to facilities that offer services below the reference price and education about RBP improve compliance. Evaluation of the effect of RBP on higher-cost medical services, including radiology, outpatient specialty, and elective inpatient procedures, is needed.

  2. The Telecom Lab is moving

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    As of 2nd March 2009, the Telecom Lab will move to Building 58 R-017. The Telecom Lab is the central point for all support questions regarding CERN mobile phone services (provision of SIM cards, requests for modifications of subscriptions, diagnostics for mobile phone problems, etc.). The opening hours as well as the contact details for the Telecom Lab remain unchanged: New location: Building 58 R-017 Opening hours: Every week day, from 11 a.m. to 12 a.m. Phone number: 72480 Email address: labo.telecom@cern.ch This change has no impact on support requests for mobile services. Users can still submit their requests concerning mobile phone subscriptions using the usual EDH form (https://edh.cern.ch/Document/GSM). The automatic message sent to inform users of their SIM card availability will be updated to indicate the new Telecom Lab location. You can find all information related to CERN mobile phone services at the following link: http://cern.ch/gsm CS Section - IT/CS group

  3. Exclusive processes at Jefferson Lab

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Exclusive processes such as proton–proton elastic scattering, meson photoproduction, and deuteron photodisintegration have been pursued extensively at many laboratories over the years in the search for such a transition, particularly at Jefferson Lab in recent years, taking the advantage of the high luminosity capability of ...

  4. Human skin wetness perception: psychophysical and neurophysiological bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filingeri, Davide; Havenith, George

    2015-01-01

    The ability to perceive thermal changes in the surrounding environment is critical for survival. However, sensing temperature is not the only factor among the cutaneous sensations to contribute to thermoregulatory responses in humans. Sensing skin wetness (i.e. hygrosensation) is also critical both for behavioral and autonomic adaptations. Although much has been done to define the biophysical role of skin wetness in contributing to thermal homeostasis, little is known on the neurophysiological mechanisms underpinning the ability to sense skin wetness. Humans are not provided with skin humidity receptors (i.e., hygroreceptors) and psychophysical studies have identified potential sensory cues (i.e. thermal and mechanosensory) which could contribute to sensing wetness. Recently, a neurophysiological model of human wetness sensitivity has been developed. In helping clarifying the peripheral and central neural mechanisms involved in sensing skin wetness, this model has provided evidence for the existence of a specific human hygrosensation strategy, which is underpinned by perceptual learning via sensory experience. Remarkably, this strategy seems to be shared by other hygroreceptor-lacking animals. However, questions remain on whether these sensory mechanisms are underpinned by specific neuromolecular pathways in humans. Although the first study on human wetness perception dates back to more than 100 years, it is surprising that the neurophysiological bases of such an important sensory feature have only recently started to be unveiled. Hence, to provide an overview of the current knowledge on human hygrosensation, along with potential directions for future research, this review will examine the psychophysical and neurophysiological bases of human skin wetness perception. PMID:27227008

  5. Building a Cryogen Efficient Low Temperature Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John

    2015-03-01

    Over the past few years we have built a new low temperature laboratory at the University of Alberta to study quantum optomechanics and superfluids in confined geometries. With liquid helium at 11/liter in Alberta, helium consumption was a top concern, but so was vibration for optomechanics experiments and magnet stability for ultra-low temperature experiments. I will describe the wet system we have constructed, along with our automated helium recovery and delivery system. Currently our system runs, fully loaded with a sensitive optomechanics experiment at 9 mK, with a waste of one liquid liter equivalent per day of operation - with room for improvement. This may provide a model for both new laboratories and upgrades to existing wet systems.

  6. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 6, Field study conducted in fulfillment of Phase 3 titled. Use of FGD by-product gypsum enriched with magnesium hydroxide as a soil amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigham, J. M. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Soto, U. I. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Stehouwer, R. C. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Yibirin, H. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center

    1999-04-30

    A variety of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies have been developed to meet environmental restrictions imposed by the federal Clean Air Act and its amendments. These technologies include wet scrubber systems that dramatically reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Although such systems are effective, they also produce large volumes of sludge that must be dewatered, stabilized, and disposed of in landfills. Disposal is an expensive and environmentally questionable process for which suitable alternatives are needed. Wet scrubbing of flue gases with magnesium (Mg)-enhanced lime has the potential to become a leading FGD technology. When combined with aforced oxidation system, the wet sludges resulting from this process can be modified and refined to produce gypsum (CaS04∙2H2O) and magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] of sufficient purity for beneficial re-use in the construction (wallboard) and pharmaceutical industries. The pilot plant at the CINERGY Zimmer Station near Cincinnati can also produce gypsum by-products formulated to contain varying amounts of Mg(OH)2- Such materials may have value to the agriculture, forestry, and lawn-care industries as soil "conditioners", liming agents, and nutritional supplements capable of supplying calcium (Ca), Mg, and sulfur (S) for plant growth. This report describes three field studies designed to evaluate by-product gypsum and Mg-gypsum from the Zimmer Station power plant as amendments for improving the quality of mine spoils and agricultural soils that were unproductive because of phytotoxic levels of dissolved aluminum (Al) and low pH. The technical literature suggests that gypsum may be more effective than agricultural limestone for ameliorating Al toxicity below the immediate zone of application. Such considerations are important for deep-rooted plant species that attempt to utilize water and nutrients occurring at depth in the spoil/soil.

  7. Wet chemical preparation and isotope exchange process of H/D-terminated Si(111) and Si(110) studied by adsorbate vibrational analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Erina; Kang, Jungmin; Matsuda, Takuya; Yamada, Taro; Suto, Shozo

    2017-02-01

    A convenient procedure for preparing D-terminated Si(111)-(1×1) and Si(110)-(1×1) by wet chemical etching was developed and applied to the vibrational analysis of these surfaces by high-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Fully H-terminated Si(111)/(110) was first prepared in regular 40% NH4F/H2O solution, followed by immersion in saturated KF/D2O solution. HREELS revealed partially D-terminated H:Si(111)/(110) with the amount of deuterium termination depending on the immersion time. A series of various immersion times revealed the H/D exchange reaction kinetics, which are associated with the Si substrate etching processes on Si(111) (step-flow etching) and Si(110) (zipper reaction). The H-Si and D-Si stretching vibration frequencies as functions of the surface D fraction did not appear to change on Si(111), but on Si(110) the H-Si signal red shifted at a high D fraction. This is due to the adsorbate-adsorbate interaction, which is more intense on Si(110) because of the short nearest-neighbor distance of the adsorbates.

  8. Hydration and dehydration cycles in polymer electrolyte fuel cells operated with wet anode and dry cathode feed: A neutron imaging and modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Salaberri, P. A.; Sánchez, D. G.; Boillat, P.; Vera, M.; Friedrich, K. A.

    2017-08-01

    Proper water management plays an essential role in the performance and durability of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (PEFCs), but it is challenged by the variety of water transport phenomena that take place in these devices. Previous experimental work has shown the existence of fluctuations between low and high current density levels in PEFCs operated with wet hydrogen and dry air feed. The alternation between both performance states is accompanied by strong changes in the high frequency resistance, suggesting a cyclic hydration and dehydration of the membrane. This peculiar scenario is examined here considering liquid water distributions from neutron imaging and predictions from a 3D two-phase non-isothermal model. The results show that the hydration-dehydration cycles are triggered by the periodic condensation and shedding of liquid water at the anode inlet. The input of liquid water humidifies the anode channel and offsets the membrane dry-out induced by the dry air stream, thus leading to the high-performance state. When liquid water is flushed out of the anode channel, the dehydration process takes over, and the cell comes back to the low-performance state. The predicted amplitude of the current oscillations grows with decreasing hydrogen and increasing air flow rates, in agreement with previous experimental data.

  9. Teaching Expression Proteomics: From the Wet-Lab to the Laptop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Miguel C.; Santos, Pedro M.; Rodrigues, Catarina; Sa-Correia, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Expression proteomics has become, in recent years, a key genome-wide expression approach in fundamental and applied life sciences. This postgenomic technology aims the quantitative analysis of all the proteins or protein forms (the so-called proteome) of a given organism in a given environmental and genetic context. It is a challenge to provide…

  10. Comet composition and Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Biver, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Comet composition and properties provide information on chemical and physical processes that occurred in the early Solar system, 4.6 Gyr ago. The study of comets and of star-forming regions both help for a better understanding of the formation of planetary systems. A review of our present knowledge of cometary composition is presented. We also discuss laboratory studies that would be helpful for data analysis.

  11. Wet oxidation processes for water pollution remediation

    OpenAIRE

    García Molina, Verónica

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to test the efficiency of wet oxidation processes when treating several types of aqueous wastes. On one side its performance for the abatement of chloro-organic aromatic toxic pollutants, such as 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol has been studied. On the other hand, wastewater from pulp and paper mills, which has been reported to be an indirect source of entry of chlorophenols in the aquatic environment, has been investigated. More in detail, it has bee...

  12. Wet/Dry Vacuum Cleaner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Harold; Andampour, Jay; Kunitser, Craig; Thomas, Ike

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum cleaner collects and retains dust, wet debris, and liquids. Designed for housekeeping on Space Station Freedom, it functions equally well in normal Earth Gravity or in microgravity. Generates acoustic noise at comfortably low levels and includes circuitry that reduces electromagnetic interference to other electronic equipment. Draws materials into bag made of hydrophobic sheet with layers of hydrophilic super-absorbing pads at downstream end material. Hydrophilic material can gel many times its own weight of liquid. Blower also provides secondary airflow to cool its electronic components.

  13. Discrete Dynamics Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuensche, Andrew

    DDLab is interactive graphics software for creating, visualizing, and analyzing many aspects of Cellular Automata, Random Boolean Networks, and Discrete Dynamical Networks in general and studying their behavior, both from the time-series perspective — space-time patterns, and from the state-space perspective — attractor basins. DDLab is relevant to research, applications, and education in the fields of complexity, self-organization, emergent phenomena, chaos, collision-based computing, neural networks, content addressable memory, genetic regulatory networks, dynamical encryption, generative art and music, and the study of the abstract mathematical/physical/dynamical phenomena in their own right.

  14. Plant Biotech Lab Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tant, Carl

    This book provides laboratory experiments to enhance any food science/botany curriculum. Chapter 1, "Introduction," presents a survey of the techniques used in plant biotechnology laboratory procedures. Chapter 2, "Micronutrition," discusses media and nutritional requirements for tissue culture studies. Chapter 3, "Sterile Seeds," focuses on the…

  15. Reflecting on Lab Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jeffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    The National Science Education Standards (NSES) and the Biological Science Curriculum Study (BSCS) address the need for teachers to move classrooms toward an inquiry approach to learning. Currently, there is movement toward a new structure for science standards, the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). In this article, I will take the five…

  16. Growth and wetting of water droplet condensed between micron-sized particles and substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; An, Hongjie; Tan, Beng Hau; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-08-04

    We study heterogeneous condensation growth of water droplets on micron-sized particles resting on a level substrate. Through numerical simulations on equilibrium droplet profiles, we find multiple wetting states towards complete wetting of the particle. Specifically, a partially wetting droplet could undergo a spontaneous transition to complete wetting during condensation growth, for contact angles above a threshold minimum. In addition, we find a competitive wetting behavior between the particle and the substrate, and interestingly, a reversal of the wetting dependence on contact angles during late stages of droplet growth. Using quasi-steady assumption, we simulate a growing droplet under a constant condensation flux, and the results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. As a geometric approximation for particle clusters, we propose and validate a pancake model, and with it, show that a particle cluster has greater wetting tendency compared to a single particle. Together, our results indicate a strong interplay between contact angle, capillarity and geometry during condensation growth.

  17. GeoLab Sample Handling System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop  a robotic sample handling/ manipulator system for the GeoLab glovebox. This work leverages from earlier GeoLab work and a 2012 collaboration with a...

  18. Leveraging Living Lab Innovation Processes through Crowdsourcing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ståhlbröst, Anna; Lassinantti, Josefin

    2015-01-01

    .... In this article, we analyze how crowdsourcing can contribute to the different stages of innovation processes carried out in living labs and thus contribute to living labs by strengthening their core...

  19. FameLab competition

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Are you 18 to 35 years old and studying or working in science in Switzerland? Are you passionate about your job and keen on exciting public imagination with a vision of the 21st century of science? Then this competition is for you!   For more information, check out http://www.famelab.ch/ or http://famelab.org/ or write to info@famelab.ch. Read more about the Famelab competition in this Bulletin article.  

  20. Geobiology in the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    José López-Galindo, María

    2017-04-01

    Geobiology is, nowadays, one of the most important lines of research of USGS. It is the interdisciplinary study of the interactions of microorganisms and earth materials (including soil, sediment, the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, minerals, and rocks) (U.S. Geological Survey, 2007). A study about geobiolgical interactions between microorganisms and felsic rock surfaces was carried out in San Blas Secondary School with students, aged 16-17, as an enforcement of a part of this abstract author's thesis work, and developed in the Coruña University. The activity took place in the school laboratory as a complement of the theoretical Spanish curriculum about living things. After visiting a granitic area, near the famous Rio Tinto mining district, students collected different rock samples. They learned about bioweathering on igneous rocks, and how microorganisms can play an essential double role on rock surface: dissolution and mineral deposition. These organisms, living in hard and basic environments, are considered extremophiles (López-Galindo, 2013) which is an important translatable concept to the life beyond the Earth. Afterwards, students had the opportunity to grow these microorganisms under different conditions and examine them through a scholar microscope, comparing these images with SEM ones, taken in Central Services of Research Building in the Coruña University, to determine genus and species, when it was possible. An opportunity to study rare living things, an introduction to geobiology, hostile environments and different physical and chemical conditions out of Earth is hereafter offered, through these simple experiences, to other secondary teachers in the world. U.S. Geological Survey, 2007, Facing tomorrow's challenges—U.S. Geological Survey science in the decade 2007-2017: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1309, x + 70 p. López-Galindo, M.J. 2013, Bioweathering in Igneous Rocks. Siliceous Speleothems from a Geobiological Viewpoint. Doctoral Dissertation

  1. Health professionals' and service users' perspectives of shared care for monitoring wet age-related macular degeneration: a qualitative study alongside the ECHoES trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, D; Reeves, B C; Taylor, J; Chakravarthy, U; O'Reilly, D; Hogg, R E; Mills, N

    2015-04-21

    To explore the views of eye health professionals and service users on shared community and hospital care for wet or neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Using maximum variation sampling, 5 focus groups and 10 interviews were conducted with 23 service users and 24 eye health professionals from across the UK (consisting of 8 optometrists, 6 ophthalmologists, 6 commissioners, 2 public health representatives and 2 clinical eye care advisors to local Clinical Commissioning Groups). Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically using constant comparative techniques derived from grounded theory methodology. The needs and preferences of those with nAMD appear to be at odds with the current service being provided. There was enthusiasm among health professionals and service users about the possibility of shared care for nAMD as it was felt to have the potential to relieve hospital eye service burden and represent a more patient-centred option, but there were a number of perceived barriers to implementation. Some service users and ophthalmologists voiced concerns about optometrist competency and the potential for delays with referrals to secondary care if stable nAMD became active again. The health professionals were divided as to whether shared care was financially more efficient than the current model of care. Specialist training for optometrists, under the supervision of ophthalmologists, was deemed to be the most effective method of training and was perceived to have the potential to improve the communication and trust that shared care would require. While shared care is perceived to represent a promising model of nAMD care, voiced concerns suggest that there would need to be greater collaboration between ophthalmology and optometry, in terms of interprofessional trust and communication. ISRCTN07479761. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Special-Study Modules in a Problem-Based Learning Medical Curriculum: An Innovative Laboratory Research Practice Supporting Introduction to Research Methodology in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guner, Gul Akdogan; Cavdar, Zahide; Yener, Nilgun; Kume, Tuncay; Egrilmez, Mehtap Yuksel; Resmi, Halil

    2011-01-01

    We describe the organization of wet-lab special-study modules (SSMs) in the Central Research Laboratory of Dokuz Eylul Medical School, Izmir, Turkey with the aim of discussing the scientific, laboratory, and pedagogical aspects of this educational activity. A general introduction to the planning and functioning of these SSMs is given, along with…

  3. The Development of MSFC Usability Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yiwei; Richardson, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This conference poster reviews the development of the usability lab at Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of the lab was to integrate a fully functioning usability laboratory to provide a resource for future human factor assessments. and to implement preliminary usability testing on a MSFC website to validate the functionality of the lab.

  4. New Features in ADS Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Murray, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) has been working hard on updating its services and interfaces to better support our community's research needs. ADS Labs is a new interface built on the old tried-and-true ADS Abstract Databases, so all of ADS's content is available through it. In this presentation we highlight the new features that have been developed in ADS Labs over the last year: new recommendations, metrics, a citation tool and enhanced fulltext search. ADS Labs has long been providing article-level recommendations based on keyword similarity, co-readership and co-citation analysis of its corpus. We have now introduced personal recommendations, which provide a list of articles to be considered based on a individual user's readership history. A new metrics interface provides a summary of the basic impact indicators for a list of records. These include the total and normalized number of papers, citations, reads, and downloads. Also included are some of the popular indices such as the h, g and i10 index. The citation helper tool allows one to submit a set of records and obtain a list of top 10 papers which cite and/or are cited by papers in the original list (but which are not in it). The process closely resembles the network approach of establishing "friends of friends" via an analysis of the citation network. The full-text search service now covers more than 2.5 million documents, including all the major astronomy journals, as well as physics journals published by Springer, Elsevier, the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and all of the arXiv eprints. The full-text search interface interface allows users and librarians to dig deep and find words or phrases in the body of the indexed articles. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  5. Designing inquiry learning spaces for online labs in the Go-Lab platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Ton; Gillet, Dennis; Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Agogi, Ellinogermaniki; Zacharia, Zacharias

    2015-01-01

    The Go-Lab project (http://www.go-lab-project.eu/) aims to enable the integration of online labs through inquiry-based learning approaches into science classrooms. Through the use of an advanced plug and play technological solution the Go-Lab project opens up remote science laboratories, data

  6. Biodiesel production from wet microalgae feedstock using sequential wet extraction/transesterification and direct transesterification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Lung; Huang, Chien-Chang; Ho, Kao-Chia; Hsiao, Ping-Xuan; Wu, Meng-Shan; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-10-01

    Although producing biodiesel from microalgae seems promising, there is still a lack of technology for the quick and cost-effective conversion of biodiesel from wet microalgae. This study was aimed to develop a novel microalgal biodiesel producing method, consisting of an open system of microwave disruption, partial dewatering (via combination of methanol treatment and low-speed centrifugation), oil extraction, and transesterification without the pre-removal of the co-solvent, using Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 with 68.7 wt% water content as the feedstock. Direct transesterification with the disrupted wet microalgae was also conducted. The biomass content of the wet microalgae increased to 56.6 and 60.5 wt%, respectively, after microwave disruption and partial dewatering. About 96.2% oil recovery was achieved under the conditions of: extraction temperature, 45°C; hexane/methanol ratio, 3:1; extraction time, 80 min. Transesterification of the extracted oil reached 97.2% conversion within 15 min at 45°C and 6:1 solvent/methanol ratio with simultaneous Chlorophyll removal during the process. Nearly 100% biodiesel conversion was also obtained while conducting direct transesterification of the disrupted oil-bearing microalgal biomass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. LabVIEW 8 student edition

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Robert H

    2007-01-01

    For courses in Measurement and Instrumentation, Electrical Engineering lab, and Physics and Chemistry lab. This revised printing has been updated to include new LabVIEW 8.2 Student Edition. National Instruments' LabVIEW is the defacto industry standard for test, measurement, and automation software solutions. With the Student Edition of LabVIEW, students can design graphical programming solutions to their classroom problems and laboratory experiments with software that delivers the graphical programming capabilites of the LabVIEW professional version. . The Student Edition is also compatible with all National Instruments data acquisition and instrument control hardware. Note: The LabVIEW Student Edition is available to students, faculty, and staff for personal educational use only. It is not intended for research, institutional, or commercial use. For more information about these licensing options, please visit the National Instruments website at (http:www.ni.com/academic/)

  8. Correlation between dynamic wetting behavior and chemical components of thermally modified wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wang; Zhu, Yuan; Cao, Jinzhen, E-mail: caoj@bjfu.edu.cn; Sun, Wenjing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied the dynamic wetting behavior of thermally modified wood by wetting models. • We found lower wetting speed of water droplets on thermally modified wood surface. • Dynamic wetting behavior and surface chemical components show a strong correlation. - Abstract: In order to investigate the dynamic wetting behavior of thermally modified wood, Cathay poplar (Populus cathayana Rehd.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) samples were thermally modified in an oven at 160, 180, 200, 220 or 240 °C for 4 h in this study. The dynamic contact angles and droplet volumes of water droplets on modified and unmodified wood surfaces were measured by sessile drop method, and their changing rates (expression index: K value and wetting slope) calculated by wetting models were illustrated for mapping the dynamic wetting process. The surface chemical components were also measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis (XPS), thus the relationship between dynamic wetting behavior and chemical components of thermally modified wood were determined. The results indicated that thermal modification was capable of decreasing the dynamic wettability of wood, expressed in lowing spread and penetration speed of water droplets on wood surfaces. This change was more obvious with the increased heating temperature. The K values varied linearly with the chemical components parameter (mass loss, O/C ratio, and C{sub 1}/C{sub 2} ratio), indicating a strong correlation between dynamic wetting behavior and chemical components of thermally modified wood.

  9. The effect of surface water and wetting on gecko adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Sullivan, Timothy W; Niewiarowski, Peter H

    2012-09-01

    Despite profound interest in the mechanics and performance of the gecko adhesive system, relatively few studies have focused on performance under conditions that are ecologically relevant to the natural habitats of geckos. Because geckos are likely to encounter surfaces that are wet, we used shear force adhesion measurements to examine the effect of surface water and toe pad wetting on the whole-animal performance of a tropical-dwelling gecko (Gekko gecko). To test the effect of surface wetting, we measured the shear adhesive force of geckos on three substrate conditions: dry glass, glass misted with water droplets and glass fully submerged in water. We also investigated the effect of wetting on the adhesive toe pad by soaking the toe pads prior to testing. Finally, we tested for repeatability of the adhesive system in each wetting condition by measuring shear adhesion after each step a gecko made under treatment conditions. Wetted toe pads had significantly lower shear adhesive force in all treatments (0.86 ± 0.09 N) than the control (17.96 ± 3.42 N), as did full immersion in water (0.44 ± 0.03 N). Treatments with droplets of water distributed across the surface were more variable and did not differ from treatments where the surface was dry (4.72 ± 1.59 N misted glass; 9.76 ± 2.81 N dry glass), except after the gecko took multiple steps. These findings suggest that surface water and the wetting of a gecko's adhesive toe pads may have significant consequences for the ecology and behavior of geckos living in tropical environments.

  10. Differential wetting characterization of hair fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaynberg, Abe; Stuart, Mark; Wu, Xiang-Fa

    2012-01-01

    Surface wetting is one of the key properties of human hair used to indicate the extent of chemical/mechanical damage and the outcome of conditioning treatment. Characterization of hair wetting property is a challenging task due to the non-homogeneous nature of hair fibers and the requirement for sensitive equipment. Motivated by these considerations, we developed a new methodology, termed a differential wetting characterization (DWC), which would allow rapid and reliable characterization of the wetting property of hair fibers. This method is based on observation of a number of droplets suspended on a pair of parallel fibers stretched in a horizontal plane. The wetting behavior of the fibers can be deduced from the shape assumed by the droplets. When the wetting properties of the two hair fibers are identical, the droplets suspended between the fibers assume a symmetric configuration. In contrast, on the fibers with dissimilar wetting characteristics, the droplets will assume a skewed configuration towards a more hydrophilic fiber. This makes it possible to differentiate the hydrophobicities of the tested fibers. In this paper it is demonstrated that the proposed DWC method is capable of differentiating the changes in wetting property of hair surfaces in response to either chemical or physical treatment. Results of the paper indicate that the DWC method is applicable for broad wetting differentiation of various fibers.

  11. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  12. A New Integrated Lab-on-a-Chip System for Fast Dynamic Study of Mammalian Cells under Physiological Conditions in Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Ping Zeng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available For the quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism and its dynamics it is essential to achieve rapid sampling, fast quenching of metabolism and the removal of extracellular metabolites. Common manual sample preparation methods and protocols for cells are time-consuming and often lead to the loss of physiological conditions. In this work, we present a microchip-bioreactor setup which provides an integrated and rapid sample preparation of mammalian cells. The lab-on-a-chip system consists of five connected units that allow sample treatment, mixing and incubation of the cells, followed by cell separation and simultaneous exchange of media within seconds. This microsystem is directly integrated into a bioreactor for mammalian cell cultivation. By applying overpressure (2 bar onto the bioreactor, this setup allows pulsation free, defined, fast, and continuous sampling. Experiments evince that Chinese Hamster Ovary cells (CHO-K1 can be separated from the culture broth and transferred into a new medium efficiently. Furthermore, this setup permits the treatment of cells for a defined time (9 s or 18 s which can be utilized for pulse experiments, quenching of cell metabolism, and/or another defined chemical treatment. Proof of concept experiments were performed using glutamine containing medium for pulse experiments. Continuous sampling of cells showed a high reproducibility over a period of 18 h.

  13. A Case Study of Modern PLC and LabVIEW Controls: Power Supply Controls for the ORNL ITER ECH Test Stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Alan M [ORNL; Killough, Stephen M [ORNL; Bigelow, Tim S [ORNL; White, John A [ORNL; Munro Jr, John K [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Power Supply Controls are being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test transmission line components of the Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) system, with a focus on gyrotrons and waveguides, in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The control is performed by several Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC s) located near the different equipment. A technique of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) is presented to monitor, control, and log actions of the PLC s on a PC through use of Allen Bradley s Remote I/O communication interface coupled with an Open Process Control/Object Linking and Embedding [OLE] for Process Control (OPC) Server/Client architecture. The OPC data is then linked to a National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW system for monitoring and control. Details of the architecture and insight into applicability to other systems are presented in the rest of this paper. Future integration with an EPICS (Experimental Physics Industrial Control System) based mini-CODAC (Control, Data Access and Communication) SCADA system is under consideration, and integration considerations will be briefly introduced.

  14. Moving Real Exergaming Engines on the Web: The webFitForAll Case Study in an Active and Healthy Ageing Living Lab Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Evdokimos I; Bamparopoulos, Giorgos; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2017-05-01

    Exergames have been the subject of research and technology innovations for a number of years. Different devices and technologies have been utilized to train the body and the mind of senior people or different patient groups. In the past, we presented FitForAll, the protocol efficacy of which was proven through widely taken (controlled) pilots with more than 116 seniors for a period of two months. The current piece of work expands this and presents the first truly web exergaming platform, which is solely based on HTML5 and JavaScript without any browser plugin requirements. The adopted architecture (controller application communication framework) combines a unified solution for input devices such as MS Kinect and Wii Balance Βoard which may seamlessly be exploited through standard physical exercise protocols (American College of Sports Medicine guidelines) and accommodate high detail logging; this allows for proper pilot testing and usability evaluations in ecologically valid Living Lab environments. The latter type of setups is also used herein for evaluating the web application with more than a dozen of real elderly users following quantitative approaches.

  15. A New Integrated Lab-on-a-Chip System for Fast Dynamic Study of Mammalian Cells under Physiological Conditions in Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahnemann, Janina; Rajabi, Negar; Fuge, Grischa; Barradas, Oscar Platas; Müller, Jörg; Pörtner, Ralf; Zeng, An-Ping

    2013-05-27

    For the quantitative analysis of cellular metabolism and its dynamics it is essential to achieve rapid sampling, fast quenching of metabolism and the removal of extracellular metabolites. Common manual sample preparation methods and protocols for cells are time-consuming and often lead to the loss of physiological conditions. In this work, we present a microchip-bioreactor setup which provides an integrated and rapid sample preparation of mammalian cells. The lab-on-a-chip system consists of five connected units that allow sample treatment, mixing and incubation of the cells, followed by cell separation and simultaneous exchange of media within seconds. This microsystem is directly integrated into a bioreactor for mammalian cell cultivation. By applying overpressure (2 bar) onto the bioreactor, this setup allows pulsation free, defined, fast, and continuous sampling. Experiments evince that Chinese Hamster Ovary cells (CHO-K1) can be separated from the culture broth and transferred into a new medium efficiently. Furthermore, this setup permits the treatment of cells for a defined time (9 s or 18 s) which can be utilized for pulse experiments, quenching of cell metabolism, and/or another defined chemical treatment. Proof of concept experiments were performed using glutamine containing medium for pulse experiments. Continuous sampling of cells showed a high reproducibility over a period of 18 h.

  16. Lab-on-fiber optofluidic platform for in-situ study of therapeutic peptides and bacterial response (Rising Researcher Presentation) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fei; Yang, Fan; Liang, Junfeng

    2017-05-01

    Hospital acquired infections in indwelling device have become a life-threatening issue accompanied by the wide use of medical devices and implants. The infection process typically involves the attachment, growth and eventual assemblage of microbial cells into biofilms, with the latter exhibiting extremely higher antibiotic tolerance than planktonic bacteria. Surface constructed antimicrobial coatings offer a viable solution for bacteria responsive antibiotic strategy in medical devices such as catheter and stents. Therapeutic peptide has pioneered the field for their attractive pharmacological profile with broad antibacterial spectrum, great efficacy and long life-span. It has been a common practice to separately assess bacteria responses through commercially available activity assay kits after their exposure to antibiotic coatings, limiting the assessment of their activity in vitro with a discontinuous fashion. We developed and demonstrated an innovative all-optical lab-on-fiber optofluidic platform (LOFOP) to fill in this technical gap by allowing in situ measurement of the bacteria attachment in a continuous manner. This LOFOP allows for evaluation of drug release and resultant bacterial response by integrating glass capillary with lytic peptide-containing LbL-coated long period graing (LPG) as its core. S. aureus suspension is introduced through the assembled optofluidic platform with the capillary and the peptide-coated LPG. The efficacy of the peptide-containing coating is evaluated in situ by monitoring the attachment of bacteria and the ensuing development of biofilms using the LPG. LPG without antimicrobial coatings will be explored and compared as control.

  17. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Wet Flue Gas Desulphurisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurisa-tion (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FGD plants is presented. The experimental work covers laboratory studies as well as pilot- and full-scale exper......This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurisa-tion (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FGD plants is presented. The experimental work covers laboratory studies as well as pilot- and full...... degree of desulphuri-sation and absorber pH profile for the two limestone types using a holding tank pH of 5.5, but the residual limestone in the gypsum was significantly lower for the chalk. Furthermore, simulations showed that between 10 and 30 % of the limestone dissolves in the absorber de......-pending on the process conditions. A typical holding tank pH of 5-5.5 (also used in full-scale wet FGD packed towers) was found to be a reasonable compromise between residual lime-stone in the gypsum and the degree of desulphurisation. Simulations were only slightly sensi-tive to the temperature in the interval 313...

  18. Flotability and flotation separation of polymer materials modulated by wetting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Chong-qing; Fu, Jian-gang; Gu, Guo-hua

    2014-02-01

    The surface free energy, surface tension and contact angles were performed to investigate the properties of wetting agents. Adsorption of wetting agents changes wetting behavior of polymer resins. Flotability of polymer materials modulated by wetting agents was studied, and wetting agents change significantly flotability of polymer materials. The flotability decreases with increasing the concentration of wetting agents, and the wetting ability is lignin sulfonate (LS)>tannic acid (TA)>methylcellulose (MC)>triton X-100 (TX-100) (from strong to weak). There is significant difference in the flotability between polymer resins and plastics due to the presence of additives in the plastics. Flotation separation of two-component and multicomponent plastics was conducted based on the flotability modulated by wetting agents. The two-component mixtures can be efficiently separated using proper wetting agent through simple flotation flowsheet. The multicomponent plastic mixtures can be separated efficiently through multi-stage flotation using TA and LS as wetting agents, and the purity of separated component was above 94%, and the recovery was more than 93%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Study on Speciation Analysis and Ecological Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Surface Sediments in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia Sections of the Yellow River in Wet Season with HR-ICP-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-ling; Liu, Jing-jun; Zuo, Hang; Huang, Fang; Liu, Ying

    2015-04-01

    In order to continuously study the contents, pollution condition and potential ecological risk of heavy metals in surface sediments in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia sections of the Yellow River in wet seasons in different years, the speciation analysis of 9 kinds of heavy metals including Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, V, Co, Zn and Mn, pollution condition and potential ecological risk of heavy metals in surface sediments from 10 sampling sites like Baotoufuqiao (S2), Shizuishantaolezhen (S6) and Wujinxia (S9) in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia sections of the Yellow River in 2012 wet season were studied with BCR sequential extraction and high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) based on our previous works. The results implied that the order of heavy metals average contents in the 10 sediment samples were the same: Mn>V> Zn>Cr>Cu>Ni>Pb>Co>Cd. In the sediments, heavy metals mainly existed in the form of residual fraction, which indicated that the bioavailability or environmental impact was low. Results of geo-accumulation indices (Igeo) showed that Igeo(CD), was the largest among the heavy metals with the strongest pollution, while IGEO(Mn)was the smallest. Enrichment factor (EF) indicated that only Cd and Cu were enriched at some sampling sites. In S5, because EFcd reached 4. 69, Cd was affected by human activities obviously and the result was consistent with I. Potential ecological risk index (RI) implied that the RI values in S1, S2 and S5 were between 150 and 300, which belonged to moderate polluting degree, while others were less than 150, belonging to light pollution degree. The results of this paper could not only provide reliable experimental data and theoretical basis for the relevant departments, but also supply the technical support for constructing mathematics model of sediments-pollutants transport, systematically researching the migration and transformation rule of persistent toxic substances and environmental assessment in

  20. Digital media labs in libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Amanda L

    2014-01-01

    Families share stories with each other and veterans reconnect with their comrades, while teens edit music videos and then upload them to the web: all this and more can happen in the digital media lab (DML), a gathering of equipment with which people create digital content or convert content that is in analog formats. Enabling community members to create digital content was identified by The Edge Initiative, a national coalition of leading library and local government organizations, as a library technology benchmark. Surveying academic and public libraries in a variety of settings and sharing a

  1. Laser safety in the lab

    CERN Document Server

    Barat, Ken L

    2012-01-01

    There is no more challenging setting for laser use than a research environment. In almost every other setting the laser controls count on engineering controls, and human exposure is kept to a minimum. In research, however, the user often manipulates the optical layout and thereby places him or herself in peril, but this does not mean that accidents and injury are unavoidable. On the contrary, laser accidents can be avoided by following a number of simple approaches. [i]Laser Safety in the Lab[/i] provides the laser user and laser safety officer with practical guidelines from housekeeping to ey

  2. Remote Lab for Robotics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Jiménez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the development of a remote lab environment used to test and training sessions for robotics tasks. This environment is made up of the components and devices based on two robotic arms, a network link, Arduino card and Arduino shield for Ethernet, as well as an IP camera. The remote laboratory is implemented to perform remote control of the robotic arms with visual feedback by camera, of the robots actions, where, with a group of test users, it was possible to obtain performance ranges in tasks of telecontrol of up to 92%.

  3. Constructivist Multi-Access Lab Approach in Teaching FPGA Systems Design with LabVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Balid

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Embedded systems play vital role in modern applications [1]. They can be found in autos, washing machines, electrical appliances and even in toys. FPGAs are the most recent computing technology that is used in embedded systems. There is an increasing demand on FPGA based embedded systems, in particular, for applications that require rapid time responses. Engineering education curricula needs to respond to the increasing industrial demand of using FPGAs by introducing new syllabus for teaching and learning this subject. This paper describes the development of new course material for teaching FPGA-based embedded systems design by using ‘G’ Programming Language of LabVIEW. A general overview of FPGA role in engineering education is provided. A survey of available Hardware Programming Languages for FPGAs is presented. A survey about LabVIEW utilization in engineering education is investigated; this is followed by a motivation section of why to use LabVIEW graphical programming in teaching and its capabilities. Then, a section of choosing a suitable kit for the course is laid down. Later, constructivist closed-loop model the FPGA course has been proposed in accordance with [2-4; 80,86,89,92]. The paper is proposing a pedagogical framework for FPGA teaching; pedagogical evaluation will be conducted in future studies. The complete study has been done at the Faculty of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Aleppo University.

  4. Wetting of doped carbon nanotubes by water droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Demosthenous, E.; Walther, Jens Honore

    2005-01-01

    We study the wetting of doped single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes by water droplets using molecular dynamics simulations. Chemisorbed hydrogen is considered as a model of surface impurities. We study systems with varying densities of surface impurities and we observe increased wetting......, as compared to the pristine nanotube case, attributed to the surface dipole moment that changes the orientation of the interfacial water. We demonstrate that the nature of the impurity is important as here hydrogen induces the formation of an extended hydrogen bond network between the water molecules...

  5. Final Report: Wetted Cathodes for Low-Temperature Aluminum Smelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Craig W

    2002-09-30

    A low-temperature aluminum smelting process being developed differs from the Hall-Heroult process in several significant ways. The low-temperature process employs a more acidic electrolyte than cryolite, an alumina slurry, oxygen-generating metal anodes, and vertically suspended electrodes. Wetted and drained vertical cathodes are crucial to the new process. Such cathodes represent a significant portion of the capital costs projected for the new technology. Although studies exist of wetted cathode technology with Hall-Heoult cells, the differences make such a study desirable with the new process.

  6. Engineering students' experiences from physics group work in learning labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm Mellingsæter, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential for how the students experience the learning labs, and how do these aspects relate to the emergence of occurrences termed joint workspace, i.e. the maintenance of content-related dialogues within the group? Programme description: First year mechanical engineering students attended the learning labs as a compulsory part of the physics course. The student groups were instructed to solve physics problems using the interactive whiteboard and then submit their work as whiteboard files. Sample: One group of five male students was followed during their work in these learning labs through one term. Design and methods: Data were collected as video recordings and fieldwork observation. In this paper, a focus group interview with the students was the main source of analysis. The interpretations of the interview data were compared with the video material and the fieldwork observations. Results: The results show that the students' overall experience with the learning labs was positive. They did, however, point to internal aspects of conflicting common and personal goals, which led to a group-work dynamics that seemed to inhibit elaborate discussions and collaboration. The students also pointed to external aspects, such as a close temporal proximity between lectures and exercises, which also seemed to inhibit occurrences termed joint workspace. Conclusions: In order to increase the likelihood of a joint workspace throughout the term in the learning labs, careful considerations have to be made with regard to timing between lectures and exercises, but also with regard to raising the students' awareness about shared and personal goals.

  7. Defined wetting properties of optical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felde, Nadja; Coriand, Luisa; Schröder, Sven; Duparré, Angela; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Optical surfaces equipped with specific functional properties have attracted increasing importance over the last decades. In the light of cost reduction, hydrophobic self-cleaning behavior is aspired. On the other side, hydrophilic properties are interesting due to their anti-fog effect. It has become well known that such wetting states are significantly affected by the surface morphology. For optical surfaces, however, this fact poses a problem, as surface roughness can induce light scattering. The generation of optical surfaces with specific wetting properties, hence, requires a profound understanding of the relation between the wetting and the structural surface properties. Thus, our work concentrates on a reliable acquisition of roughness data over a wide spatial frequency range as well as on the comprehensive description of the wetting states, which is needed for the establishment of such correlations. We will present our advanced wetting analysis for nanorough optical surfaces, extended by a vibration-based procedure, which is mainly for understanding and tailoring the wetting behavior of various solid-liquid systems in research and industry. Utilizing the relationships between surface roughness and wetting, it will be demonstrated how different wetting states for hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity can be realized on optical surfaces with minimized scatter losses.

  8. 7 CFR 29.1083 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.1083 Section 29.1083 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1083 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing excessive moisture to the extent that it is in...

  9. 7 CFR 29.2570 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.2570 Section 29.2570 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2570 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3077 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.3077 Section 29.3077 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing excessive moisture to the extent that it is in an unsafe or...

  11. 7 CFR 29.2316 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.2316 Section 29.2316 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2316 Wet (W...

  12. 7 CFR 29.3567 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.3567 Section 29.3567 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3567 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing excessive moisture to the extent that it is in...

  13. Wet work in relation to occupational dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungbauer, Franciscus Henricus Wilhelmus

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the nature and the quantity of work-related skin exposure in occupations where ‘wet work’ is performed. Activities that cause one or both hands to become wet, in contact with detergents or other skin irritating substances or activities that need to be done with occlusive gloves

  14. Thermal Performance for Wet Cooling Tower with Different Layout Patterns of Fillings under Typical Crosswind Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermal-state model experimental study was performed in lab to investigate the thermal performance of a wet cooling tower with different kinds of filling layout patterns under windless and 0.4 m/s crosswind conditions. In this paper, the contrast analysis was focused on comparing a uniform layout pattern and one kind of optimal non-uniform layout pattern when the environmental crosswind speed is 0 m/s and 0.4 m/s. The experimental results proved that under windless conditions, the heat transfer coefficient and total heat rejection of circulating water for the optimal non-uniform layout pattern can enhance by approximately 40% and 28%, respectively, compared with the uniform layout pattern. It was also discovered that the optimal non-uniform pattern can dramatically relieve the influence of crosswind on the thermal performance of the tower when the crosswind speed is equal to 0.4 m/s. For the uniform layout pattern, the heat transfer coefficient under 0.4 m/s crosswind conditions decreased by 9.5% compared with the windless conditions, while that value lowered only by 2.0% for the optimal non-uniform layout pattern. It has been demonstrated that the optimal non-uniform layout pattern has the better thermal performance under 0.4 m/s crosswind condition.

  15. Treatment of biomass gasification wastewater using a combined wet air oxidation/activated sludge process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, C.J.; Petty, S.E.; Sklarew, D.S.

    1983-02-01

    A lab-scale treatability study for using thermal and biological oxidation to treat a biomass gasification wastewater (BGW) having a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 46,000 mg/l is described. Wet air oxidation (WA0) at 300/sup 0/C and 13.8 MPa (2000 psi) was used to initially treat the BGW and resulted in a COD reduction of 74%. This was followed by conventional activated sludge treatment using operating conditions typical of municipal sewage treatment plants. This resulted in an additional 95% COD removal. Overall COD reduction for the combined process was 99%. A detailed chemical analysis of the raw BGW and thermal and biological effluents was performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These results showed a 97% decrease in total extractable organics with WA0 and a 99.6% decrease for combined WA0 and activated sludge treatment. Components of the treated waters tended to be fewer in number and more highly oxidized. An experiment was conducted to determine the amount of COD reduction caused by volatilization during biological treatment. Unfortunately, this did not yield conclusive results. Treatment of BGW using WA0 followed by activated sludge appears to be very effective and investigations at a larger scale are recommended.

  16. Microbial development in distillers wet grains produced during fuel ethanol production from corn (Zea mays)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, R.M.; Rosentrater, K.A. [United States Dept. of Agriculture, Brookings, SD (United States). North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory

    2007-09-15

    The microbiology of post-production distillers wet grains (DWG) was investigated over a period of 9 days at an industrial ethanol plant. Samples of the DWG were physically and chemically characterized. Compositional analyses were conducted for protein, fiber, and fat. Fixed suspensions of DWG were dispersed and disrupted by sonication. Bacterial cells were enumerated under epifluorescent illumination. Solid media and standard dilution were used to enumerate total colony-forming units (CFU) of lactic-acid producing bacteria (LAB), and aerobic heterotrophic organisms. The DWG had a pH of approximately 4.4, a moisture content of 53.5 per cent, and 4 x 10{sup 5} total yeast cells. Thirteen morphologically distinct isolates were identified during the study, 10 of which were yeasts and molds from 6 different genera. Two of the yeasts were of the lactic-acid Pediococcus pentosaceus strain, and 1 of the yeasts was an aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. Results showed that the matrix of the DWG produced severe technical difficulties for several of the culture-independent community-level analyses. It was concluded that numbers of potentially beneficial bacteria appeared to increase over the time period relative to potential spoilage agents. Molds capable of producing mycotoxins colonized the DWG and grew to high densities over the 9 day period. 31 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  17. Modeling the early stages of reactive wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel; Warren, James A; Boettinger, William J

    2010-11-01

    Recent experimental studies of molten metal droplets wetting high-temperature reactive substrates have established that the majority of triple-line motion occurs when inertial effects are dominant. In light of these studies, this paper investigates wetting and spreading on reactive substrates when inertial effects are dominant using a thermodynamically derived diffuse interface model of a binary three-phase material. The liquid-vapor transition is modeled using a van der Waals diffuse interface approach, while the solid-fluid transition is modeled using a phase field approach. The results from the simulations demonstrate an O(t(-1/2)) spreading rate during the inertial regime and oscillations in the triple-line position when the metal droplet transitions from inertial to diffusive spreading. It is found that the spreading extent is reduced by enhancing dissolution by manipulating the initial liquid composition. The results from the model exhibit good qualitative and quantitative agreement with a number of recent experimental studies of high-temperature droplet spreading, particularly experiments of copper droplets spreading on silicon substrates. Analysis of the numerical data from the model suggests that the extent and rate of spreading are regulated by the spreading coefficient calculated from a force balance based on a plausible definition of the instantaneous interface energies. A number of contemporary publications have discussed the likely dissipation mechanism in spreading droplets. Thus, we examine the dissipation mechanism using the entropy-production field and determine that dissipation primarily occurs in the locality of the triple-line region during the inertial stage but extends along the solid-liquid interface region during the diffusive stage.

  18. Leaf surface traits and water storage retention affect photosynthetic responses to leaf surface wetness among wet tropical forest and semiarid savanna plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparecido, Luiza M T; Miller, Gretchen R; Cahill, Anthony T; Moore, Georgianne W

    2017-10-01

    While it is reasonable to predict that photosynthetic rates are inhibited while leaves are wet, leaf gas exchange measurements during wet conditions are challenging to obtain due to equipment limitations and the complexity of canopy-atmosphere interactions in forested environments. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate responses of seven tropical and three semiarid savanna plant species to simulated leaf wetness and test the hypotheses that (i) leaf wetness reduces photosynthetic rates (Anet), (ii) leaf traits explain different responses among species and (iii) leaves from wet environments are better adapted for wet leaf conditions than those from drier environments. The two sites were a tropical rainforest in northern Costa Rica with ~4200 mm annual rainfall and a savanna in central Texas with ~1100 mm. Gas exchange measurements were collected under dry and wet conditions on five sun-exposed leaf replicates from each species. Additional measurements included leaf wetness duration and stomatal density. We found that Anet responses varied greatly among species, but all plants maintained a baseline of activity under wet leaf conditions, suggesting that abaxial leaf Anet was a significant percentage of total leaf Anet for amphistomatous species. Among tropical species, Anet responses immediately after wetting ranged from -31% (Senna alata (L.) Roxb.) to +21% (Zamia skinneri Warsz. Ex. A. Dietr.), while all savanna species declined (up to -48%). After 10 min of drying, most species recovered Anet towards the observed status prior to wetting or surpassed it, with the exception of Quercus stellata Wangenh., a savanna species, which remained 13% below Anet dry. The combination of leaf wetness duration and leaf traits, such as stomatal density, trichomes or wax, most likely influenced Anet responses positively or negatively. There was also overlap between leaf traits and Anet responses of savanna and tropical plants. It is possible that these species converge

  19. Comparative Batch and Column Evaluation of Thermal and Wet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficiency of regenerated spent commercial activated carbon for synthetic dye removal was studied using thermal and wet oxidative regeneration methods. Two types of experiments were carried out, batch adsorption experiments and continous flow (fixed bed) column experiment to study the mechanism of dye removal ...

  20. Development of the Internet Watershed Educational Tool (InterWET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Parson

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Watershed educational and informational efforts have largely neglected to inform one important group of decision-makers: local government officials. The Internet Watershed Educational Tool (InterWET was developed to help inform local officials about water resources, using as a case study the Spring Creek Watershed in central Pennsylvania. Utilizing the "microworlds" concept, InterWET consists of a set of web pages that present water resource issues and components from different perspectives. Specifically, the components of surface runoff, groundwater flow, detached and delivered sediment, in-stream nutrients, and fish populations are presented from the perspectives of a researcher, a conservationist, and a local official. In addition to informing local officials, InterWET can also be used as a stand-alone informational resource or as part of larger watershed educational efforts.

  1. In situ transesterification of highly wet microalgae using hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bora; Im, Hanjin; Lee, Jae W

    2015-06-01

    This study addresses in situ transesterification of highly wet microalgae with hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a catalyst. In situ transesterification was performed by heating the mixture of wet algal cells, HCl, methanol, and solvent in one pot, resulting in the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield over 90% at 95°C. The effects of reaction variables of temperature, amounts of catalyst, reactant, and solvent, and type of solvents on the yield were investigated. Compared with the catalytic effect of H2SO4, in situ transesterification using HCl has benefits of being less affected by moisture levels that are as high as or above 80%, and requiring less amounts of catalyst and solvent. For an equimolar amount of catalyst, HCl showed 15wt.% higher FAME yield than H2SO4. This in situ transesterification using HCl as a catalyst would help to realize a feasible way to produce biodiesel from wet microalgae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Wetting and Spreading of Molten Volcanic Ash in Jet Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2017-04-20

    A major hazard to jet engines posed by volcanic ash is linked to the wetting and spreading of molten ash droplets on engine component surfaces. Here, using the sessile drop method, we study the evolution of the wettability and spreading of volcanic ash. We employ rapid temperature changes up to 1040-1450 °C, to replicate the heating conditions experienced by volcanic ash entering an operating jet engine. In this scenario, samples densify as particles coalesce under surface tension until they form a large system-sized droplet (containing remnant gas bubbles and crystals), which subsequently spreads on the surface. The data exhibit a transition from a heterogeneous to a homogeneous wetting regime above 1315 °C as crystals in the drops are dissolved in the melt. We infer that both viscosity and microstructural evolution are key controls on the attainment of equilibrium in the wetting of molten volcanic ash droplets.

  3. Some specificities of wetting by cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delabre, U; Richard, C; Cazabat, A M, E-mail: cazabat@lps.ens.f [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole Normale Superieure, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2009-11-18

    The present paper provides an up to date restatement of the wetting behaviour of the series of cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals (LCs) on usual substrates, i.e. oxidized silicon wafers, water and glycerol, at both the macroscopic and microscopic scale, in the nematic range of temperature. We show that on water the systems are close to a wetting transition, especially 5CB and 7CB. In that case, the wetting behaviour is controlled by the presence of impurities. On a mesoscopic scale, we observe for all our (thin LC film-substrate) systems an identical, complex, but well defined general scenario, not accounted for by the available models. In the last part, we present a study on line tension which results from the specific organization of LCs at the edge of the nematic film. We report preliminary results on two-dimensional film coalescence where this line tension plays a major role.

  4. Wetting dynamics beneath fluid drops impacting on hot surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harth, Kirsten; van Limbeek, Michiel A. J.; Shirota, Minori; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    Fluid droplets encountering a phase transition when they impact a target surface are involved in many applications, e.g., spray cooling or painting / coating, ink-jet and 3D printing, soldering, firefighting using sprinklers. Drop impact on hot plates is an emerging topic, involving a complex interplay of hydrodynamics, heat flux and the occurring phase transition, involving large spatial and temporal gradients. Whether and to what extent droplets touch the surface is of immense importance for the overall heat transfer. High-speed total internal reflection imaging allows us to discriminate wetted and vapor-covered regions of the substrate. We study the transient wetting behaviour of the plate by varying the latent heat of the droplet. The characteristic cooling time of the plate is not solely determined by the plate properties. In addition to current literature, we show that in those cases the wetting pattern is both spatially and temporally inhomogeneous.

  5. Liquid Metal Phagocytosis: Intermetallic Wetting Induced Particle Internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianbo; Zhao, Xi; Li, Jing; Zhou, Yuan; Liu, Jing

    2017-05-01

    A biomimetic cellular-eating phenomenon in gallium-based liquid metal to realize particle internalization in full-pH-range solutions is reported. The effect, which is called liquid metal phagocytosis, represents a wet-processing strategy to prepare various metallic liquid metal-particle mixtures through introducing excitations such as an electrical polarization, a dissolving medium, or a sacrificial metal. A nonwetting-to-wetting transition resulting from surface transition and the reactive nature of the intermetallic wetting between the two metallic phases are found to be primarily responsible for such particle-eating behavior. Theoretical study brings forward a physical picture to the problem, together with a generalized interpretation. The model developed here, which uses the macroscopic contact angle between the two metallic phases as a criterion to predict the particle internalization behavior, shows good consistency with experimental results.

  6. Tailoring the microstructure of particle-stabilized wet foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzenbach, Urs T; Studart, André R; Tervoort, Elena; Gauckler, Ludwig J

    2007-01-30

    Inorganic colloidal particles which are in situ hydrophobized upon adsorption of short-chain amphiphilic molecules can be used as foam stabilizers. In this study, we tailor the microstructure of particle-stabilized wet foams, namely, the foam air content, average bubble size, and bubble size distribution, by changing the composition of the initial colloidal suspension. Wet foams featuring average bubble sizes between 10 and 200 microm and air contents between 45% and 90% were obtained by adjusting the amphiphile and particle concentration, pH, ionic strength, and particle size in the initial suspension. The influence of these parameters on the bubble size was satisfactorily described in terms of a balance between the shear stress applied during mixing and the counteracting Laplace pressure of the air bubbles. This model, originally developed for oil droplets in emulsions, can therefore be used to deliberately tailor the microstructure of particle-stabilized wet foams.

  7. Study of {sup nat}Mg(d,d{sub 0}) reaction at detector angles between 90° and 170°, for the energy range E{sub d,lab}=1660–1990 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patronis, N., E-mail: npatronis@uoi.gr [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Aslanoglou, X. [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Axiotis, M. [Tandem Accelerator Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, Aghia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece); Georgiadou, A. [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kokkoris, M. [Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens (Greece); Lagoyannis, A. [Tandem Accelerator Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, Aghia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece); Misaelides, P. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Paneta, V. [Tandem Accelerator Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, Aghia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece); Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens (Greece)

    2014-10-15

    In the present work, the study of the {sup nat}Mg(d,d{sub 0}) is presented for the energy range E{sub d,lab} = 1660–1990 keV (in steps of 5 keV), for detector angles between 90° and 170°. Elastic scattering data for two forward angles (55° and 70°) were also obtained. In order to validate the obtained experimental results a thick Mg sample with Au evaporated on top was fabricated and benchmarking measurements were performed at various deuteron beam energies. The results of the present work are complementary to the recently published {sup 24}Mg(d,p{sub 0,1,2}) reaction cross section data, thus facilitating the simultaneous depth profiling study of magnesium by both the d-NRA and EBS techniques.

  8. Study of natMg(d,d0) reaction at detector angles between 90° and 170°, for the energy range Ed,lab=1660-1990 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patronis, N.; Aslanoglou, X.; Axiotis, M.; Georgiadou, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Lagoyannis, A.; Misaelides, P.; Paneta, V.

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, the study of the natMg(d,d0) is presented for the energy range Ed,lab = 1660-1990 keV (in steps of 5 keV), for detector angles between 90° and 170°. Elastic scattering data for two forward angles (55° and 70°) were also obtained. In order to validate the obtained experimental results a thick Mg sample with Au evaporated on top was fabricated and benchmarking measurements were performed at various deuteron beam energies. The results of the present work are complementary to the recently published 24Mg(d,p0,1,2) reaction cross section data, thus facilitating the simultaneous depth profiling study of magnesium by both the d-NRA and EBS techniques.

  9. 3D nanomolding for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchian, Bahador; Park, Sooyeon; Choi, Junseo; Amirsadeghi, Alborz; Lee, Jaejong; Park, Sunggook

    2012-11-21

    The ability to decorate microfluidic channel walls with additional micro/nanostructures becomes important as a means to modify the flow behavior, such as mixing and pressure drop, as well as to enhance the reactivity of bio-reactions to the surface in lab-on-a-chip applications. Despite the ability of mass production at low cost, conventional micro and nanomolding techniques are limited to the patterning of planar or slightly curved polymer substrates. Here we show a two-step molding technique, named 3D nanomolding, which allows the patterning of arbitrarily hierarchical multiscale structures, even nanostructures formed on the vertical sidewalls of microfluidic channels. In the first molding step, an ultra-thin intermediate polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) stamp is produced by spin-coating and curing PDMS prepolymer on a pre-nanopatterned poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate, which is followed by the second molding step using the primary PDMS stamp containing microstructures. Various hierarchical micro and nanostructures are demonstrated, which include a biomimetic superhydrophobic structure in a lotus leaf surface to modify the surface wetting property and microfluidic channels where the walls are patterned with nanostructures. Despite the presence of nanostructures on the top surface, 3D nanomolded microchannels could be sealed well with a nanopatterned PMMA cover plate using solvent bonding to form enclosed microfluidic devices. The results indicate that the 3D nanomolding technique is suitable for decorating microchannel walls for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  10. Analysis on dry-wet characteristics in the Zhujiang River Basin in recent 55 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jizhong; Wang, Yunpeng; Xiao, Jie

    2017-07-01

    Based on Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), this paper analysed the spatial distribution of dry-wet condition in the Zhujiang River Basin in 1961-2015, and studied the dry-wet climatic regionalization by Rotated Empirical Orthogonal Function (REOF). The results show most areas in the Zhujiang River Basin was in normal state of dry-wet condition and the whole basin can be divided into 7 dry-wet climate zones. The above conclusions reflect the dry-wet characteristics in the basin reasonably, which can provide a reference on prediction, monitoring and evaluation of some kinds of extreme climatic disasters such as floods and droughts inextricably linked with dry-wet condition.

  11. A CASE STUDY OF COCOA FA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LAB/∂INC, ∂LAB/∂EXT, ∂LAB/∂INS, ∂LAB/IMP, ∂LAB/∂SPA > 0; while. ∂LAB/∂WAG, ∂LAB/∂MEC, ∂LAB/HER, ∂LAB/∂EXP < 0. RESULTS. 1. The following technologies were adopted by the farmers in the study area: Rehabilitation techniques, mechanization, improved seedlings, fertilizer, improved spacing ...

  12. THERMAL TRANSFERS IN WET HYPERBARIC ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara STANCIU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The heat losses of human body are greater in underwater environment than in dry, normal atmosphere, due to the great heat capacity of water. Body temperature of divers in immersion was studied taking into account the pressure the divers are subjected to. The theoretic equation that describes the total heat transfer- at both levels: skin and respiratory system- was established, considering conduction, convection and respiratory gas heating and humidification. The body temperature of the divers was measured in a series of dives at different depths of immersion, conducted in the wet simulator of the Diving Center, in Constanta. The experimental results were in good accordance with the temperature predicted by the mathematical model.

  13. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  14. Topographical Anisotropy and Wetting of Ground Stainless Steel Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Bellmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic and physico-chemical methods were used for a comprehensive surface characterization of different mechanically modified stainless steel surfaces. The surfaces were analyzed using high-resolution confocal microscopy, resulting in detailed information about the topographic properties. In addition, static water contact angle measurements were carried out to characterize the surface heterogeneity of the samples. The effect of morphological anisotropy on water contact angle anisotropy was investigated. The correlation between topography and wetting was studied by means of a model of wetting proposed in the present work, that allows quantifying the air volume of the interface water drop-stainless steel surface.

  15. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  16. Improved LabVIEW Code Generation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evita Vavilina; Gatis Gaigals

    2016-01-01

    .... LabVIEW provides highly convenient environment for simulation development and also tools for generation of simulation environment that can include simulation itself and collection of simulation data...

  17. The Defining Characteristics of Urban Living Labs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kris Steen; Ellen van Bueren

    2017-01-01

    .... Globally, urban living labs have become a fashionable phenomenon to tackle this challenge, fostering the development and implementation of innovation, experimentation, and knowledge in urban, real...

  18. Effect of ethanol-wet-bonding technique on resin–enamel bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Kerim Ayar

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The ethanol-wet-bonding technique may increase the bond strength of commercial adhesives to enamel. The chemical composition of the adhesives can affect the bond strength of adhesives when bonding to acid-etched enamel, using the ethanol-wet-bonding technique. Some adhesive systems used in the present study may simultaneously be applied to enamel and dentin using ethanol-wet-bonding. Furthermore, deploying ethanol-wet-bonding for the tested commercial adhesives to enamel can increase the adhesion abilities of these adhesives to enamel.

  19. Sleep Lab Adaptation in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Typically Developing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Bessey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Research has shown inconsistencies across studies examining sleep problems in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. It is possible that these inconsistencies are due to sleep lab adaptation. The goal of the current study was to investigate the possibility that children with ADHD adapt differently to the sleep lab than do typically developing (TD children. Patients and Methods. Actigraphy variables were compared between home and the sleep lab. Sleep lab adaptation reports from the parent and child were compared between children with ADHD (n=25 and TD children (n=25. Results. Based on actigraphy, both groups had reduced sleep duration and reduced wake after sleep onset in the sleep lab compared to home. The only interaction effect was that TD children had increased sleep efficiency in the sleep lab compared to home. Conclusions. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that children with ADHD adjust to the sleep lab differently than their typically developing peers. However, both groups of children did sleep differently in the sleep lab compared to home, and this needs to be considered when generalizing research findings from a sleep lab environment to children’s sleep in general.

  20. Bed-wetting and its association with developmental milestones in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchette, Evelyne; Petit, Dominique; Paquet, Jean; Tremblay, Richard E; Boivin, Michel; Montplaisir, Jacques Y

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate the relationship between bed-wetting and various developmental milestones in a large and representative sample of young children. A randomized 3-level stratified survey design. Data were collected by questionnaires, and interviews were scheduled at home with the mother. A representative sample of children born from 1997 to 1998 in Quebec. A complete set of data on bed-wetting was obtained for 1666 children at the ages of 29, 41, and 53 months. Percentage of children who bed-wet and developmental factors associated with bed-wetting. Approximately 10% of the children were bed-wetting at the age of 53 months. Bed-wetting cessation occurred for most children studied between the ages of 29 and 41 months. Motor skills were achieved by fewer boys who bed-wet compared with boys who did not (had sat up without support for 10 minutes at 5 months, P = .05; and had started crawling at 5 months, Psleep variables. These findings show an association between bed-wetting and developmental milestones in early childhood. This study supports that bed-wetting could be indicative of a possible delay in the development of the central nervous system and could act as a noticeable indicator for parents and pediatricians.

  1. Wetting behavior on hybrid surfaces with hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Chun-Wei [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Alvarado, Jorge L., E-mail: Alvarado@entc.tamu.edu [Dept. of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Marsh, Charles P. [ERDC – Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, 2902 Newmark Dr., Champaign, IL 61826 (United States); Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Jones, Barclay G. [Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Collins, Michael K. [ERDC – Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, 2902 Newmark Dr., Champaign, IL 61826 (United States); Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-01-30

    Hybrid surfaces consisting of a micropillar array of hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites were designed and fabricated to understand the effects of their unique surface morphology and chemistry on droplet condensation. Droplet impingement experiments have revealed that hybrid surfaces exhibit high contact angles, which is characteristic of purely hydrophobic surfaces. However, little is known about the wetting behavior of droplets that nucleate and grow on hybrid surfaces during condensation. In fact, condensed droplets display a distinct wetting behavior during the droplet growth phase which cannot be reproduced by simply impinging droplets on hybrid surfaces. In this study, hybrid surfaces with three different spacing ratios were subjected to condensation tests using an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and a condensation cell under ambient conditions. For hybrid surfaces with spacing ratio below 2, droplets were observed to form on top and sides of the micropillars, where they grew, coalesced with adjacent droplets, and shed after reaching a given size. After shedding, the top surface remained partially dry, which allowed for immediate droplet growth. For hybrid surfaces with spacing ratio equal to 2, a different wetting behavior was observed, where droplets basically coalesced and formed a thin liquid film which was ultimately driven into the valleys of the microstructure. The liquid shedding process led to the renucleation of droplets primarily on top of the dry hydrophilic sites. To better understand the nature of droplet wetting on hybrid surfaces, a surface energy-based model was developed to predict the transition between the two observed wetting behaviors at different spacing ratios. The experimental and analytical results indicate that micropillar spacing ratio is the key factor for promoting different wetting behavior of condensed droplets on hybrid surfaces.

  2. Bed wetting in school children of Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithani, Shoaib; Zaidi, Zafar

    2005-01-01

    To estimate the frequency of primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) in Pakistani children and to examine the factors associated with it. A randomly selected cross-sectional study was conducted in five elementary schools, one in each of five districts of Karachi. The parents of 5000 children age between 3-13 years were asked to complete a questionnaire which included items about the frequency of daytime wetting and nocturnal enuresis, family history, urinary tract infection, parents and child's own concern about this problem and acquisition of treatments. Over all corrected response rate to the questionnaire was 69% (3395). Enuresis was present in 9.1% (308). There were 166 (53.9%) boys and 142 (46%) girls with a median age of 7 years. Only 54% (166) children sought help for their problem of which 26% consulted doctors, 16% visited homeopaths while 11% used hakeems and home remedies. Of the bed wetters, 30% were wet every night, 30% for more than three nights a week and 40% for less than three nights every week. Parents of 68.5% (211) children reported concern for the problem while 69.8% (215) children were also anxious about their enuresis. Among the concerned children group, 22% parents were not concerned about their child's problem. Family history of enuresis was present in 25.6% (79) children. The frequency of enuresis among the school going children in Karachi is 9.1% and is similar to that reported in European countries and other Asian countries including Korea and Taiwan. Enuresis causes concern to both parents and children, but only a small percentage of parents seek medical help for this problem.

  3. Famed lab seeks big grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Lillington, K

    2001-01-01

    DUBLIN, Ireland -- CERN, the famed Swiss high-energy particle physics lab, has a problem. It's about to start generating more data than any computer or network anywhere in the world is able to analyze. That prospect has led CERN to drive a major European project to create a vast "grid" research network of computers across Europe. When completed, the 10 million euro, Linux-based endeavor called DataGRID, will become a principal European computing resource for researchers of many disciplines. "I believe grid computing will revolutionize the way we compute, in much the same way as the World Wide Web and Internet changed the way we communicate," said John Ellis, a theoretical physicist and adviser to the director general of CERN.

  4. Rheology of dry, partially saturated and wet granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pakpour, M.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the rheology of dry, wet and partially saturated granular materials. Granular media, suspensions, emulsions, polymers and gels are ubiquitous in the chemical and materials processing industry, and despite their very different appearance, the rheology and

  5. Wet spinning of asymmetric hollow fibre membranes for gas separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Jacob Adriaan

    1988-01-01

    This thesis describes the spinning and characterizatin of hollow fibre membranes for gas separation. The type of fibres studied here are made by a wet spinning process. A homogeneous solution is prepared, consisting of a polymer in a suitable organic solvent, and extruded as a hollow fibre. Both the

  6. Wet season spatial occurrence of phytoplankton and zooplankton in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation into the spatial occurrence of wet season phytoplankton and zooplankton in Lagos lagoon, Nigeria was carried out in October, 2008 in 12 stations. A total of 36 species of phytoplankton from 21 genera, 20 zooplankton species from 17 genera and 10 juvenile forms were recorded for the study. The results ...

  7. Neuropeptide Y inhibits hippocampal seizures and wet dog shakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, D P; Madsen, T M; Larsen, P J

    1996-01-01

    effects in the dentate gyrus and subiculum, but also in areas to which epileptiform EEG activity spreads before reverberating. In addition, NPY strongly reduced seizure-related 'wet dog shakes' (WDS). This is consistent with previous studies showing that the dentate gyrus is essential for the generation...

  8. wet season spatial occurrence of phytoplankton and zooplankton in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Onyema (2007) on a tidal creek (Abule-elude creek) and Onyema. &Ojo (2008) on the lower Ogun river (Agboyi creek). The aim of this work is to investigate the spatial occurrence of phytoplankton and zooplankton in the wet season in relation to environmental characteristics. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The Study Area: ...

  9. Lab on a chip technologies for algae detection: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Allison; Rohrlack, Thomas; Bellouard, Yves

    2012-08-01

    Over the last few decades, lab on a chip technologies have emerged as powerful tools for high-accuracy diagnosis with minute quantities of liquid and as tools for exploring cell properties in general. In this paper, we present a review of the current status of this technology in the context of algae detection and monitoring. We start with an overview of the detection methods currently used for algae monitoring, followed by a review of lab on a chip devices for algae detection and classification, and then discuss a case study based on our own research activities. We conclude with a discussion on future challenges and motivations for algae-oriented lab on a chip technologies. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Promoting Metacognition in Introductory Calculus-based Physics Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grennell, Drew; Boudreaux, Andrew

    2010-10-01

    In the Western Washington University physics department, a project is underway to develop research-based laboratory curriculum for the introductory calculus-based course. Instructional goals not only include supporting students' conceptual understanding and reasoning ability, but also providing students with opportunities to engage in metacognition. For the latter, our approach has been to scaffold reflective thinking with guided questions. Specific instructional strategies include analysis of alternate reasoning presented in fictitious dialogues and comparison of students' initial ideas with their lab group's final, consensus understanding. Assessment of student metacognition includes pre- and post- course data from selected questions on the CLASS survey, analysis of written lab worksheets, and student opinion surveys. CLASS results are similar to a traditional physics course and analysis of lab sheets show that students struggle to engage in a metacognitive process. Future directions include video studies, as well as use of additional written assessments adapted from educational psychology.

  11. Variations of dryness/wetness across China: Changing properties, drought risks, and causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingzhong; Zhang, Qiang; Singh, Vijay P.; Shi, Peijun; Zheng, Yongjie

    2017-08-01

    Variations of wetness/dryness across China during 1949-2014 in both space and time were investigated using the grid climate data of Time-Series (TS) Version 3.23. The Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) was used to evaluate the wetness and dryness conditions. Results indicated that the regions that experienced a drying/wetting tendency are similar in area, and the regions dominated by a drying tendency are east of 100°E and the regions experiencing a wetting tendency are west of 100°E. A significant wetting tendency was observed in the northern parts of northwestern China, Qaidam Basin and northeastern parts of the Tibetan Plateau. Analysis of water vapor flux by air mass propagation indicated that dry regimes are attributed to continental air mass and wet regimes to oceanic air mass. Propagation of water vapor flux can thus explain the occurrence of wetness/dryness events in both space and time. The shortening of periodicity or increased frequency of wet and/or dry regimes implies intensifying and amplifying wet and dry regimes across China. The results of this study would be useful for the management of agricultural irrigation and water resources across China in a changing environment.

  12. Effect of wetting and drying on the bioavailability of organic compounds sequestered in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, J.C.; Quinones-Rivera, A.; Alexander, M. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1998-12-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether cycles of wetting and drying alter the availability of organic compounds that have aged in soil. Subjecting soil to wetting-and drying cycles during periods of aging <60 d decreased the biodegradability, extractability, and uptake by earthworms of phenanthrene and reduced the extractability of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) sequestered in soil compared with soil aged at constant moisture. The mineralization of sequestered DEHP was greater in soil that was wet and dried during a 41-d period of aging than in soil incubated at constant moisture. Wetting and drying soil during periods of aging of 100 or more days had no effect on the biodegradability or assimilation by Eisenia foetida of sequestered phenanthrene and DEHP. Subjecting soil containing previously sequestered phenanthrene to one, three, or four wetting-and-drying cycles increased the biodegradability of the compound. The extractability of sequestered phenanthrene was greater in soil that was wet and dried once after aging than in soil maintained at constant moisture, but three wetting-and-drying cycles did not affect extractability. The biodegradability of sequestered DEHP was unaffected by wetting and drying. The authors suggest that wetting and drying may be useful in the remediation of contaminated soils.

  13. LabWrite: Transforming Lab Reports from Busy Work to Meaningful Learning Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferzli, Miriam; Carter, Michael; Wiebe, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Lab reports are the dreaded assignments of the laboratory course. Students dislike them, because they can be tedious and time-consuming. Instructors dislike them, because they significantly increase the grading load. For this reason, lab reports are often omitted or replaced by alternatives such as responses to lab questions, fill-in-the-blank lab…

  14. Innovations in STEM education: the Go-Lab federation of online labs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Gillet, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The Go-Lab federation of online labs opens up virtual laboratories (simulation), remote laboratories (real equipment accessible at distance) and data sets from physical laboratory experiments (together called “online labs”) for large-scale use in education. In this way, Go-Lab enables inquiry-based

  15. Overview of the Living Labs for Information Retrieval Evaluation (LL4IR) CLEF Lab 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuth, A.; Balog, K.; Kelly, L.; Mothe, J.; Savoy, J.; Kamps, J.; Pinel-Sauvagnat, K.; Jones, G.J.F.; SanJuan, E.; Cappellato, L.; Ferro, N.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report on the first Living Labs for Information Retrieval Evaluation (LL4IR) CLEF Lab. Our main goal with the lab is to provide a benchmarking platform for researchers to evaluate their ranking systems in a live setting with real users in their natural task environments. For this

  16. Virtual Lab to Develop Achievement in Electronic Circuits for Hearing-Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladoh, S. M.; Elgamal, A. F.; Abas, H. A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to report and discuss the use of a virtual lab for developing achievement in electronic circuits for hearing-impaired students. Results from a number of studies have proved that the virtual lab allowed students to build and test a wide variety of electronic circuits. The present study was implemented to investigate the…

  17. Laboratório de estudos semióticos nas interações de cuidado Laboratorio de estudios semióticos en las interacciones de cuidado Semiotic studies lab for patient care interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce Maria Nunes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Este relato de experiência apresenta o Laboratório de Estudos Semióticos nas Interações de Cuidado (LESIC, implementado na Escola de Enfermagem da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS, em 2010, com o propósito de produzir atualizações didático-pedagógicas, embasadas na Teoria Semiótica da Escola de Paris, as quais possibilitam ampliar o conhecimento e as competências perceptivas, observacionais e interativas acerca da natureza e do domínio do cuidado humano.Este informe de experiencia tiene como objetivo presentar el Laboratorio de Estudios Semióticos en las Interacciones de Cuidado (LESIC, implementado en la Escuela de Enfermería de la Universidad Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS, Brasil, en el año de 2010, con el fin de proporcionar actualizaciones didácticas y pedagógicas, basadas en la Teoría Semiótica de la Escuela de París, que posibiliten ampliar el conocimiento y las competencias perceptiva observacionales/interactivas acerca de la naturaleza y dominio del cuidado humano.The aim of this experience report is to present the Semiotic Studies Lab for Patient Care Interactions (Laboratório de Estudos Semióticos nas Interações de Cuidado - LESIC. The lab was set up at the Nursing School of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS, Brazil, in 2010. It has the purpose of providing didactic and pedagogical updates, based on the Theory developed by the Paris School of Semiotics, that enable the increase of knowledge and interactive/observational skills regarding the nature and mastery of human care.

  18. Touch-enabled Programming for the Lab of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Zheng; Samuel, Arjmand

    2013-01-01

    Lab of Things (LoT, lab-of-things.com) is a research platform for interconnection, programming, and large scale deployment of devices and sensors. These devices and sensors can then be used for deployment of field studies in a variety of research areas including elderly care, energy management, and the like. LoT is built on top of HomeOS, a middle-ware component, making interconnection of a wide range of devices possible. LoT also provides cloud storage and remote monitoring capabilities. Tra...

  19. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/wet FGD system. Final report, Volume 2 of 2 - appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This volume contains the appendices for a coal-fired power plant toxic emissions study. Included are Process data log sheets from Coal Creek, Auditing information, Sampling protocol, Field sampling data sheets, Quality assurance/quality control, Analytical protocol, and Uncertainty analyses.

  20. Orodispersible films: Product transfer from lab-scale to continuous manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Yasmin; Breitkreutz, Joerg

    2018-01-15

    Orodispersible films have been described as new beneficial dosage forms for special patient populations. Due to various production settings, different requirements on film formulations are required for non- continuous and continuous manufacturing. In this study, a continuous coating machine was qualified in regards of the process conditions for film compositions and their effects on the formed films. To investigate differences between both manufacturing processes, various film formulations of hydrochlorothiazide and hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) or hydroxypropylmethycellulose (HPMC) as film formers were produced and the resulting films were characterized. The qualification of the continuously operating coating machine reveals no uniform heat distribution during drying. Coating solutions for continuous manufacturing should provide at least a dynamic viscosity of 1 Pa*s (wet film thickness of 500 μm, velocity of 15.9 cm/min). HPC films contain higher residuals of ethanol or acetone in bench-scale than in continuous production mode. Continuous production lead to lower drug content of the films. All continuously produced films disintegrate within less than 30 s. There are observed significant effects of the production process on the film characteristics. When transferring film manufacturing from lab-scale to continuous mode, film compositions, processing conditions and suitable characterization methods have to be carefully selected and adopted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.