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Sample records for westinghouse recycle fuels plant

  1. Verification test of advanced LWR fuel components of Westinghouse type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Lee, Young Ho

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this project is to independently conduct the performance test of the spacer grids and the cladding material of the 16x16 and 17x17 advanced fuels for Westinghouse type plants, and to improve the relevant test technology. Major works and results of the present research are as follows. 1. The design and structural features of the spacer grids were investigated, especially the finally determined I-spring was thoroughly analyzed in the point of the mechanical damage and characteristic. 2. As for the mechanical tests of the space grids, the characterization, the impact and the fretting wear tests were carried out. The block as well as the in-grid tests were conducted for the spring/dimple characterization, from which a simple method was developed that simulated the boundary conditions of the assembled grid straps. The impact tester was modified and improved to accommodate a full size grid assembly. The impact result showed that the grid assembly fulfilled the design criteria. As for the fretting wear tests, a sliding test under the room temperature air/water, a sliding/impact test under the room temperature air and a sliding/impact tests under the high temperature and pressure environments were carried out. To this end, a high temperature and pressure fretting wear tester was newly developed. The wear characteristic and the resistibility of the advanced grid spring/dimple were analyzed in detail. The test results were verified through comparing those with the test results by the Westinghouse company. 3. The properties and performance of the newly adopted material for the cladding, Low Sn Zirlo was investigated by a room and high temperature tensile tests and a corrosion tests under the environments of 360 .deg. C water, 400 steam and 360 .deg. C 70ppm LiOH. Through the present project, all the test equipment and technologies for the fuel components were procured, which will be used for future domestic development of a new fuel

  2. Overview of expert systems applications in Westinghouse Nuclear Fuel Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leech, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Expert system applications have been introduced in several nuclear fuel activities, including engineering and manufacturing. This technology has been successfully implemented on the manufacturing floors to provide on-line process control at zirconium tubing and fuel fabrication plants. This paper provides an overview of current applications at Westinghouse with respect to fuel fabrication, zirconium tubing, zirconium production, and core design

  3. Westinghouse fuel manufacturing systems: a step change in performance improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutyala, Meena

    2009-01-01

    Today's competitive electrical generation industry demands that nuclear power plant operators minimize total operating costs, including fuel cycle cost while maintaining flawless fuel performance. The mission of Westinghouse Nuclear Fuel is to be the industry's most responsive supplier of flawless, value added fuel products and services, as judged by our customers. As nuclear is fast becoming the choice of many countries, existing manufacturing plants and facilities are once again running at full capacity. In this context Westinghouse Nuclear Fuel is committed to deliver a step change in performance improvement worldwide through its manufacturing operations by the introduction of a set of fundamentals collectively named the 'Westinghouse Fuel Manufacturing System' (WFMS), whose key principles are discussed in this paper. (author)

  4. Standard Technical Specifications, Westinghouse plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Westinghouse Plants and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the Westinghouse Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. This document, Volume 3, contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  5. Standard Technical Specifications, Westinghouse Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Westinghouse Plants and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the Westinghouse Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. Volume 1 contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the unproved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS which contain information on safety limits, reactivity control systems, power distribution limits, and instrumentation

  6. Standard Technical Specifications, Westinghouse plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This NUREG contains improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Westinghouse Plants and documents the positions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on the Westinghouse Owners Group's proposed STS. This document is the result of extensive technical meetings and discussions among the NRC staff, the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, the NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the interim Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specification Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated February 6, 1987. The improved STS will be used as the basis for individual nuclear power plant licensees to develop improved plant-specific technical specifications. This report contains three volumes. This document, Volume 1, contains the Specifications for all chapters and sections of the improved STS. Volume 2 contains the Bases for Chapters 2.0 and 3.0, and Sections 3.1--3.3 of the improved STS. Volume 3 contains the Bases for Sections 3.4--3.9 of the improved STS

  7. Status of Westinghouse coal-fueled combustion turbine programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalzo, A.J.; Amos, D.J.; Bannister, R.L.; Garland, R.V.

    1992-01-01

    Developing clean, efficient, cost effective coal utilization technologies for future power generation is an essential part of our National Energy Strategy. Westinghouse is actively developing power plants utilizing advanced gasification, atmospheric fluidized beds (AFB), pressurized fluidized beds (PFB), and direct firing technology through programs sponsored by the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE). The DOE Office of Fossil Energy is sponsoring the Direct Coal-Fired Turbine program. This paper presents the status of current and potential Westinghouse Power Generation Business Unit advanced coal-fueled power generation programs as well as commercial plans

  8. Drop testing of the Westinghouse fresh nuclear fuel package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.; Sanders, C.F.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, the Westinghouse Columbia Fuel Fabrication Facility has been faced with increasing pressure from utilities that wished to take the fuel in their nuclear power plants to higher burnups. To help accommodate this trend, Westinghouse has determined that it needs the ability to increase the enrichment of the fresh fuel it delivers to its customers. One critical step in this process is to certify a new (Type A, fissile) fresh fuel package design that has the capability to transport fuel with a higher enrichment than was previously available. A prototype package was tested in support of the Safety Analysis Report of the Packaging. This paper provides detailed information on those tests and their results

  9. Current status of Westinghouse tubular solid oxide fuel cell program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W.G. [Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    In the last ten years the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) development program at Westinghouse has evolved from a focus on basic material science to the engineering of fully integrated electric power systems. Our endurance for this cell is 5 to 10 years. To date we have successfully operated at power for over six years. For power plants it is our goal to have operated before the end of this decade a MW class power plant. Progress toward these goals is described.

  10. Westinghouse ICF power plant study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucov, E.W.

    1980-10-01

    In this study, two different electric power plants for the production of about 1000 MWe which were based on a CO 2 laser driver and on a heavy ion driver have been developed and analyzed. The purposes of this study were: (1) to examine in a self consistent way the technological and institutional problems that need to be confronted and solved in order to produce commercially competitive electricity in the 2020 time frame from an inertial fusion reactor, and (2) to compare, on a common basis, the consequences of using two different drivers to initiate the DT fuel pellet explosions. Analytic descriptions of size/performance/cost relationships for each of the subsystems comprising the power plant have been combined into an overall computer code which models the entire plant. This overall model has been used to conduct trade studies which examine the consequences of varying critical design values around the reference point

  11. MHI - Westinghouse joint FBR tank plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.H.; Vijuk, R.M.; Aoki, I.; Messhil, T.

    1988-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems Division have combined their experience and capabilities to design a tank type fast breeder reactor plant. This tank type reactor has been refined and improved during the last three years to better compete in cost, safety, and operation with alternative power plants. This Mitsubishi/Westinghouse joint design offers economic advantages due to the use of steel structures, modular construction, nitrogen cells for the intermediate loops, reactor cavity air cooling and the use of the guard vessel as the containment vessel. Inherent characteristics in the reactor design provide protection to the public and the plant investment

  12. Mox fuels recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper will firstly emphasis that the first recycling of plutonium is already an industrial reality in France thanks to the high degree of performance of La Hague and MELOX COGEMA's plants. Secondly, recycling of spent Mixed OXide fuel, as a complete MOX fuel cycle, will be demonstrated through the ability of the existing plants and services which have been designed to proceed with such fuels. Each step of the MOX fuel cycle concept will be presented: transportation, reception and storage at La Hague and steps of spent MOX fuel reprocessing. (author)

  13. Westinghouse introduces new fuel for PWRs and BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, W L; McClintock, D C

    1985-09-01

    In response to utility demands for improved fuel performance, reduced fuel cycle costs, and enhanced operating margins, Westinghouse recently introduced advanced fuel assembly designs for both types of LWR - Vantage 5 for PWRs, and Quad+ for BWRs.

  14. Westinghouse AP600 advanced nuclear plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangloff, W.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the cooperative US Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Program and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Westinghouse AP600 team has developed a simplified, safe, and economic 600-megawatt plant to enter into a new era of nuclear power generation. Designed to satisfy the standards set by DOE and defined in the ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD), the Westinghouse AP600 is an elegant combination of innovative safety systems that rely on dependable natural forces and proven technologies. The Westinghouse AP600 design simplifies plant systems and significant operation, inspections, maintenance, and quality assurance requirements by greatly reducing the amount of valves, pumps, piping, HVAC ducting, and other complex components. The AP600 safety systems are predominantly passive, depending on the reliable natural forces of gravity, circulation, convection, evaporation, and condensation, instead of AC power supplies and motor-driven components. The AP600 provides a high degree of public safety and licensing certainty. It draws upon 40 years of experience in light water reactor components and technology, so no demonstration plant is required. During the AP600 design program, a comprehensive test program was carried out to verify plant components, passive safety systems components, and containment behavior. When the test program was completed at the end of 1994, the AP600 became the most thoroughly tested advanced reactor design ever reviewed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The test results confirmed the exceptional behavior of the passive systems and have been instrumental in facilitating code validations. Westinghouse received Final Design Approval from the NRC in September 1998. (author)

  15. Westinghouse Advances in Passive Plant Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H. J.; Manager, General; Gerstenhaber, E.

    1993-01-01

    On June 26, 1992, Westinghouse submitted the Ap600 Standard Safety Analysis Report and comprehensive PIRA results to the U. S. NRC for review as part of the Ap600 design certification program. This major milestone was met on time on a schedule set more than 3 years before submittal and is the result of the cooperative efforts of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Requirements Program, and the Westinghouse Ap600 design team. These efforts were initiated in 1985 to develop a 600 MW advanced light water reactor plant design based on specific technical requirements established to provide the safety, simplicity, reliability, and economics necessary for the next generation of nuclear power plants. The Ap600 design achieves the ALRR safety requirements through ample design margins, simplified safety systems based on natural driving forces, and on a human-engineered man-machine interface system. Extensive Probabilistic Risk evolution, have recently shown that even if none of the active defense-in-depth safety systems are available, the passive systems alone meet safety goals. Furthermore, many tests in an extensive test program have begun or have been completed. Early tests show that passive safety perform well and meet design expectations

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant with an anode recycle loop turbocharger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kazuo; Skiba, Tommy; Patel, Kirtikumar H.

    2015-07-14

    An anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) has a turbocharger turbine (102) secured in fluid communication with a compressed oxidant stream within an oxidant inlet line (218) downstream from a compressed oxidant supply (104), and the anode exhaust recycle turbocharger (100) also includes a turbocharger compressor (106) mechanically linked to the turbocharger turbine (102) and secured in fluid communication with a flow of anode exhaust passing through an anode exhaust recycle loop (238) of the solid oxide fuel cell power plant (200). All or a portion of compressed oxidant within an oxidant inlet line (218) drives the turbocharger turbine (102) to thereby compress the anode exhaust stream in the recycle loop (238). A high-temperature, automotive-type turbocharger (100) replaces a recycle loop blower-compressor (52).

  17. Performance of the Westinghouse WWER-1000 fuel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoglund, J.; Riznychenko, O.; Latorre, R.; Lashevych, P.

    2011-01-01

    In 2005 six (6) Westinghouse WWER-1000 Lead Test Assemblies (LTAs) were loaded in the South Ukraine Unit 3. This design has demonstrated full compatibility with resident fuel designs and all associated fuel handling and reactor components. Operations have further demonstrated adequacy of performance margins and the reliability requirements for multiple cycles of operation. The LTA's have now been discharged after completing the planned four cycles of operation and having reached an average assembly burnup in excess of 43 MWd/kgU. Post Irradiation Examinations were performed after completion of each cycle. The final LTA inspection program at end of Cycle 20 in 2010 yielded satisfactory results on all counts, and it was concluded that the 6 Westinghouse LTA's performed as expected during their operational regimes. Very good performance was demonstrated in the WWER-1000 reactor environment for the Zr-1%Nb as grid material, and ZIRLO fuel cladding and structural components. Control Rod Assemblies drop times and drag forces were all within the accepted values. The LTA program demonstrated that this fuel design is suitable for full core applications. However, the topic of fuel assembly distortion resistance was re-visited and Westinghouse therefore considered operational experience and design features from multiple development programs to enhance the basic Westinghouse WWER-1000 fuel design for Ukrainian reactors. The design now includes features that further mitigate assembly bow while at the same time improving the fuel cycle economy. This paper describes briefly the development of the Westinghouse WWER-1000 fuel design and how test results and operational experiences from multiple sources have been utilized to produce a most suitable fuel design. Early in 2011 a full region of the Westinghouse WWER-1000 design completed another full cycle of operation at South Ukraine Unit 3, all with excellent results. All 42 fuel assemblies were examined for visible damage or non

  18. Integrated Nuclear Recycle Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patodi, Anuj; Parashar, Abhishek; Samadhiya, Akshay K.; Ray, Saheli; Dey, Mitun; Singh, K.K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Recycle Board (NRB), Tarapur proposes to set up an 'Integrated Nuclear Recycle Plant' at Tarapur. This will be located in the premises of BARC facilities. The project location is at coastal town of Tarapur, 130 Km north of Mumbai. Project area cover of INRP is around 80 hectares. The plant will be designed to process spent fuel received from Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). This is the first large scale integrated plant of the country. INRP will process spent fuel obtained from indigenous nuclear power plants and perform left over nuclear waste disposal

  19. Uranium-236 in light water reactor spent fuel recycled to an enriching plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de la Garza, A.

    1977-01-01

    The introduction of 236 U to an enriching plant by recycling spent fuel uranium results in enriched products containing 236 U, a parasitic neutron absorber in reactor fuel. Convenient approximate methodology determines 235 236 U, and total uranium flowsheets with associated separative work requirements in enriching plant operations for use by investigators of the light water reactor fuel cycle not having recourse to specialized multicomponent cascade technology. Application of the methodology has been made to compensation of an enriching plant product for 236 U content and to the value at an enriching plant of spent fuel uranium. The approximate methodology was also confirmed with more exact calculations and with some experience with 236 U in an enriching plant

  20. Westinghouse accident tolerant fuel program. Current results and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Sumit; Xu, Peng; Lahoda, Edward; Hallstadius, Lars; Boylan, Frank [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Hopkins, SC (United States)

    2016-07-15

    This paper discusses the current status, results from initial tests, as well as the future direction of the Westinghouse's Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program. The current preliminary testing is addressed that is being performed on these samples at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) test reactor, initial results from these tests, as well as the technical learning from these test results. In the Westinghouse ATF approach, higher density pellets play a significant role in the development of an integrated fuel system.

  1. MOX fuel reprocessing and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the reprocessing of MOX fuel in UP2-800 plant at La Hague, and to the MOX successive reprocessing and recycling. 1. MOX fuel reprocessing. In a first step, the necessary modifications in UP2-800 to reprocess MOX fuel are set out. Early in the UP2-800 project, actions have been taken to reprocess MOX fuel without penalty. They consist in measures regarding: Dissolution; Radiological shieldings; Nuclear instrumentation; Criticality. 2. Mox successive reprocessing and recycling. The plutonium recycling in the LWR is now a reality and, as said before, the MOX fuel reprocessing is possible in UP2-800 plant at La Hague. The following actions in this field consist in verifying the MOX successive reprocessing and recycling possibilities. After irradiation, the fissile plutonium content of irradiated MOX fuel is decreased and, in this case, the re-use of plutonium in the LWR need an important increase of initial Pu enrichment inconsistent with the Safety reactor constraints. Cogema opted for reprocessing irradiated MOX fuel in dilution with the standard UO2 fuel in appropriate proportions (1 MOX for 4 UO2 fuel for instance) in order to save a fissile plutonium content compatible with MOX successive recycling (at least 3 recyclings) in LWR. (author). 2 figs

  2. Drop testing of the Westinghouse fresh nuclear fuel package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.; Sanders, C.F.

    1993-01-01

    The Westinghouse Columbia Fuel Fabrication Facility has decided to develop and certify a new fresh fuel package design (type A, fissile) that has the capability to transport more highly enriched fuel than was previously possible. A prototype package was tested in support of the Safety Analysis Report of the Packaging (SARP). This paper provides detailed information on the tests and test results. A first prototype test was carried out at the STF, and the design did not give the safety margin that Westinghouse wanted for their containers. The data from the test were used to redesign the connection between the clamping frame and the pressure pad, and the tests were reinitiated. Three packages were then tested at the STF. All packages met the acceptance criteria and acceleration information was obtained that provided an indication of the behavior of the cradle and strongback which holds the fuel assemblies and nuclear poison in place. (J.P.N.)

  3. Use of Pilot Plants for Developing Used Nuclear Fuel Recycling Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Chris; Arm, Stuart [EnergySolutions LLC (United States); Banfield, Zara; Jeapes, Andrew; Taylor, Richard [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    EnergySolutions and its teaming partners are working with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop processes, equipment and facilities for recycling used nuclear fuel (UNF). Recycling significantly reduces the volume of wastes that ultimately will be consigned to the National Geologic Repository, enables the re-use in new fuel of the valuable uranium and plutonium in the UNF, and allows the long-lived minor actinides to be treated separately so they do not become long term heat emitters in the Repository. A major requirement of any new UNF recycling facility is that pure plutonium is not separated anywhere in the process, so as to reduce the nuclear proliferation attractiveness of the facility. EnergySolutions and its team partner the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) have developed the NUEX process to achieve this and to handle appropriately the treatment of other species such as krypton, tritium, neptunium and technetium. NUEX is based on existing successful commercial UNF recycling processes deployed in the UK, France and imminently in Japan, but with a range of modifications to the flowsheet to keep some uranium with the plutonium at all times and to minimize aerial and liquid radioactive discharges. NNL's long-term experience in developing the recycling and associated facilities at the Sellafield site in the UK, and its current duties to support technically the operation of the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at Sellafield provides essential input to the design of the US NUEX-based facility. Development work for THORP and other first-of-kind nuclear plants employed miniature scale fully radioactive through large scale inactive pilot plants. The sequence of development work that we have found most successful is to (i) perform initial process development at small (typically 1/5000) scale in gloveboxes using trace active materials, (ii) demonstrate the processes at the same small scale with actual irradiated fuel in hot cells and (iii

  4. MHI-Westinghouse joint FBR tank plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.H.; Vijuk, R.M.; Aoki, I.; Meshii, T.

    1987-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems Division have combined their experience and capabilities to design a tank type fast breeder reactor plant. This tank type reactor has been refined and improved during the last three years to better compete in cost, satety, and operation with alternative power plants. This Mitsubishi/Westinghouse joint design offers economic advantages due to the use of steel structures, modular construction, nitrogen cells for the intermediate loops, reactor cavity air cooling and the use of the guard vessel as the containment vessel. Inherent characteristics in the reactor design provide protection to the public and the plant investment. (author)

  5. The Direct Internal Recycling concept to simplify the fuel cycle of a fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Christian; Giegerich, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The fusion fuel cycle is presented and its functions are discussed. • Tritium inventories are estimated for an early DEMO configuration. • The Direct Internal Recycling concept to reduce tritium inventories is described. • Concepts for its technical implementation are developed. -- Abstract: A new concept, the Direct Internal Recycling (DIR) concept, is proposed, which minimizes fuel cycle inventory by adding an additional short-cut between the pumped torus exhaust gas and the fuelling systems. The paper highlights quantitative modelling results derived from a simple fuel cycle spreadsheet which underline the potential benefits that can be achieved by implementation of the DIR concept into a fusion power plant. DIR requires a novel set-up of the torus exhaust pumping system, which replaces the batch-wise and cyclic operated cryogenic pumps by a continuous pumping solution and which offers at the same time an additional integral gas separation function. By that, hydrogen can be removed close to the divertor from all other gases and the main load to the fuel clean-up systems is a smaller, helium-rich gas stream. Candidate DIR relevant pump technology based on liquid metals (vapour diffusion and liquid ring pumps) and metal foils is discussed

  6. Japan's fuel recycling policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) has formulated Japanese nuclear fuel recycling plan for the next 20 years, based on the idea that the supply and demand of plutonium should be balanced mainly through the utilization of plutonium for LWRs. The plan was approved by AEC, and is to be incorporated in the 'Long term program for development and utilization of nuclear energy' up for revision next year. The report on 'Nuclear fuel recycling in Japan' by the committee is characterized by Japanese nuclear fuel recycling plan and the supply-demand situation for plutonium, the principle of the possession of plutonium not more than the demand in conformity with nuclear nonproliferation attitude, and the establishment of a domestic fabrication system of uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel. The total plutonium supply up to 2010 is estimated to be about 85 t, on the other hand, the demand will be 80-90 t. The treatment of plutonium is the key to the recycling and utilization of nuclear fuel. By around 2000, the private sector will commercialize the fabrication of the MOX fuel for LWRs at the annual rate of about 100 t. Commitment to nuclear nonproliferation, future nuclear fuel recycling program in Japan, MOX fuel fabrication system in Japan and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor balance of plant and supporting systems design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memmott, M. J.; Stansbury, C.; Taylor, C. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Twp. PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the second in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. It focuses, in particular, upon the supporting systems and the balance of plant (BOP) designs of the Westinghouse SMR. Several Westinghouse SMR systems are classified as safety, and are critical to the safe operation of the Westinghouse SMR. These include the protection and monitoring system (PMS), the passive core cooling system (PXS), and the spent fuel cooling system (SFS) including pools, valves, and piping. The Westinghouse SMR safety related systems include the instrumentation and controls (I and C) as well as redundant and physically separated safety trains with batteries, electrical systems, and switch gears. Several other incorporated systems are non-safety related, but provide functions for plant operations including defense-in-depth functions. These include the chemical volume control system (CVS), heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) systems, component cooling water system (CCS), normal residual heat removal system (RNS) and service water system (SWS). The integrated performance of the safety-related and non-safety related systems ensures the safe and efficient operation of the Westinghouse SMR through various conditions and transients. The turbine island consists of the turbine, electric generator, feedwater and steam systems, moisture separation systems, and the condensers. The BOP is designed to minimize assembly time, shipping challenges, and on-site testing requirements for all structures, systems, and components. (authors)

  8. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor balance of plant and supporting systems design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memmott, M. J.; Stansbury, C.; Taylor, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the second in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. It focuses, in particular, upon the supporting systems and the balance of plant (BOP) designs of the Westinghouse SMR. Several Westinghouse SMR systems are classified as safety, and are critical to the safe operation of the Westinghouse SMR. These include the protection and monitoring system (PMS), the passive core cooling system (PXS), and the spent fuel cooling system (SFS) including pools, valves, and piping. The Westinghouse SMR safety related systems include the instrumentation and controls (I and C) as well as redundant and physically separated safety trains with batteries, electrical systems, and switch gears. Several other incorporated systems are non-safety related, but provide functions for plant operations including defense-in-depth functions. These include the chemical volume control system (CVS), heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) systems, component cooling water system (CCS), normal residual heat removal system (RNS) and service water system (SWS). The integrated performance of the safety-related and non-safety related systems ensures the safe and efficient operation of the Westinghouse SMR through various conditions and transients. The turbine island consists of the turbine, electric generator, feedwater and steam systems, moisture separation systems, and the condensers. The BOP is designed to minimize assembly time, shipping challenges, and on-site testing requirements for all structures, systems, and components. (authors)

  9. Enhanced Westinghouse WWER-1000 fuel design for Ukraine reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dye, M.; Shah, H.

    2015-01-01

    Westinghouse has completed design, development, and region quantity delivery of an enhanced Westinghouse fuel assembly for WWER-1000 reactors to support continued safe reactor operations. The enhanced design builds on the successful performance of an earlier generation design which has operated in the South Ukraine 3 reactor for multiple cycles without any fuel rod failures. Incorporated design enhancements include a thicker spacer grid outer strap, an enhanced spacer grid outer strap profile to limit the risk for, and impact of, mechanical interaction/interference with coresident fuel, an all Alloy 718 grid structure for improved stability and strength, and improvements to the top and bottom nozzles. Capable of meeting increased lateral loads generated from using a higher axial trip limit for the refueling machine crane, the design was verified by extensive mechanical and thermalhydraulic testing, which included a newly developed fuel assembly-to-fuel assembly handling test rig to assess performance during bounding core loading and unloading conditions. Through these extensive design enhancements and comprehensive testing program, the enhanced WWER-1000 design provides additional performance, handling, and reliability margins for safe reactor operation. (authors)

  10. Performance of the Westinghouse WWER-1000 fuel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höglund, J.; Jansson, A.; Latorre, R.; Davis, D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, six (6) Westinghouse WWER-1000 Lead Test Assemblies (LTAs) were loaded in South Ukraine Unit 3 (SU3). The LTAs completed the planned four cycles of operation and reached an average assembly burnup in excess of 43 MWd/ kgU. Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) inspections were performed after completion of each cycle and it was concluded that the 6 Westinghouse LTAs performed as expected during their operational regimes. In 2010, a full region of 42 assemblies of an enhanced WWER-1000 fuel design for Ukrainian reactors, designated WFA, was loaded in SU3. The WFA includes features that further mitigate assembly bow while at the same time improving the fuel cycle economy. In 2015, 26 WFAs completed their planned four cycles of operation reaching an average assembly burnup in excess of 42 MWd/ kgU. Currently 36 WFAs continue operating their fourth cycle in SU3. In addition, South Ukraine Unit 2 (SU2) has been loaded with WFAs and 27 assemblies have completed two cycles of operation reaching an average assembly burnup above 24 MWd/kgU. PIE for the WFAs has been completed after each cycle of operation. All assemblies have been examined for visible damage or non-standard position of fuel assembly components during unloading and reloading. All WFAs have also been subject to the standard leak testing process, with all fuel rods found to be hermetically sealed and non-leaking. Each outage, six WFAs have been subject to a more extensive inspection program. In 2012, 2013, and 2015, the Westinghouse Fuel Inspection and Repair Equipment (FIRE) workstation were used for the SU3 inspections. Excellent irradiation fuel performance has been observed and measured on all WFAs. The fuel assembly growth, rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) drag forces, oxide thickness, total fuel rod-to-nozzle gap channel closure, and fuel assembly bow data were within the bounds of the Westinghouse experience database. Results and concluding remarks from the PIEs are provided in this paper. In

  11. Nuclear fuel recycling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.R.; Koch, A.K.; Krawczyk, A.

    1981-01-01

    A process is provided for recycling sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellets rejected during fuel manufacture and the swarf from pellet grinding. The scrap material is prepared mechanically by crushing and milling as a high solids content slurry, using scrap sintered UO 2 pellets as the grinding medium under an inert atmosophere

  12. Development of an advanced 16x165 Westinghouse type PWR fuel assembly for Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, M. L.; King, S. J.; Pulver, E. F.; Jeon, K.-L.; Esteves, R.; Kurincic, B.

    2004-01-01

    Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Company, Ltd. (KNFC), and Westinghouse Electric Company (Westinghouse) have jointly designed an advanced 16x16 Westinghouse type PWR fuel assembly. This advanced 16x16 Westinghouse type PWR fuel assembly, which will be implemented in both Kori Unit 2 (in Korea) and Angra Unit 1 (in Brazil) in January and March 2005, respectively, is an integral part of the utilities fuel management strategy. This same fuel design has also been developed for future use in Krsko Unit 1 (in Slovenia). In this paper we will describe the front-end nuclear fuel management activities utilized by the joint development team and describe how these activities played an integral part in defining the direction of the advanced 16x16 Westinghouse type PWR fuel assembly design. Additionally, this paper will describe how this design demonstrates improved margins under high duty plant operating conditions. The major reason for initiating this joint development program was to update the current 16x16 fuel assembly, which is also called 16STD. The current 16STD fuel assembly contains a non-optimized fuel rod diameter for the fuel rod pitch (i.e. 9.5 mm OD fuel rods at a 0.485 inch pitch), non-neutronic efficient components (i.e. Inconel Mid grids), no Intermediate Flow Mixer (IFM) grids, and other mechanical features. The advanced 16x16 fuel assembly is being designed for peak rod average burnups of up to 75 MWd/kgU and will use an optimized fuel rod diameter (i.e. 9.14 mm OD ZIRLO TM fuel rods), neutronic efficient components (i.e. ZIRLO TM Mid grids), ZIRLO TM Intermediate Flow Mixer (IFM) grids to improve Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) margin, and many other mechanical features that improve design margins. Nuclear design activities in the areas of fuel cycle cost and fuel management were performed in parallel to the fuel assembly design efforts. As the change in reactivity due to the change in the fuel rod diameter influences directly

  13. Material control and accountability aspects of safeguards for the USA 233U/Th fuel recycle plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.A. Jr.; McNeany, S.R.; Angelini, P.; Holder, N.D.; Abraham, L.

    1978-01-01

    The materials control and accountability aspects of the reprocessing and refabrication of a conceptual large-scale HTGR fuel recycle plant have been discussed. Two fuel cycles were considered. The traditional highly enriched uranium cycle uses an initial or makeup fuel element with a fissile enrichment of 93% 235 U. The more recent medium enriched uranium cycle uses initial or makeup fuel elements with a fissile enrichment less than 20% 235 U. In both cases, 233 U bred from the fertile thorium is recycled. Materials control and accountability in the plant will be by means of a real-time accountability method. Accountability data will be derived from monitoring of total material mass through the processes and a system of numerous assays, both destructive and nondestructive

  14. Overview of HTGR fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of HTGR fuel recycle is presented, with emphasis placed on reprocessing and fuel kernel refabrication. Overall recycle operations include (1) shipment and storage, (2) reprocessing, (3) refabrication, (4) waste handling, and (5) accountability and safeguards

  15. INEL design studies in support of the Westinghouse EPRI small plant study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtt, J.D.; Kullberg, C.M.

    1986-03-01

    In support of the design effort of a Westinghouse EPRI small plant study, several analyses were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. An analysis was performed to study fuel behavior under conditions of a limiting flow coastdown transient. Depressurization capabilities for the reactor coolant system were studied. The post-accident heat removal for the current containment design was studied. The results of all three studies are reported. 31 figs

  16. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 12: Fuel cells. [energy conversion efficiency of, for use in electric power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warde, C. J.; Ruka, R. J.; Isenberg, A. O.

    1976-01-01

    A parametric assessment of four fuel cell power systems -- based on phosphoric acid, potassium hydroxide, molten carbonate, and stabilized zirconia -- has shown that the most important parameters for electricity-cost reduction and/or efficiency improvement standpoints are fuel cell useful life and power density, use of a waste-heat recovery system, and fuel type. Typical capital costs, overall energy efficiencies (based on the heating value of the coal used to produce the power plant fuel), and electricity costs are: phosphoric acid $350-450/kWe, 24-29%, and 11.7 to 13.9 mills/MJ (42 to 50 mills/kWh); alkaline $450-700/kWe, 26-31%, and 12.8 to 16.9 mills/MJ (46 to 61 mills/kWh); molten carbonate $480-650/kWe, 32-46%, and 10.6 to 19.4 mills/MJ (38 to 70 mills/kWh), stabilized zirconia $420-950/kWe, 26-53%, and 9.7 to 16.9 mills/MJ (35 to 61 mills/kWh). Three types of fuel cell power plants -- solid electrolytic with steam bottoming, molten carbonate with steam bottoming, and solid electrolyte with an integrated coal gasifier -- are recommended for further study.

  17. Progress on Plant-Level Components for Nuclear Fuel Recycling: Commonality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Almeida, Valmor F.

    2011-01-01

    Progress made in developing a common mathematical modeling framework for plant-level components of a simulation toolkit for nuclear fuel recycling is summarized. This ongoing work is performed under the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, which has an element focusing on safeguards and separations (SafeSeps). One goal of this element is to develop a modeling and simulation toolkit for used nuclear fuel recycling. The primary function of the SafeSeps simulation toolkit is to enable the time-dependent coupling of separation modules and safeguards tools (either native or third-party supplied) that simulate and/or monitor the individual separation processes in a separations plant. The toolkit integration environment will offer an interface for the modules to register in the toolkit domain based on the commonality of diverse unit operations. This report discusses the source of this commonality from a combined mathematical modeling and software design perspectives, and it defines the initial basic concepts needed for development of application modules and their integrated form, that is, an application software. A unifying mathematical theory of chemical thermomechanical network transport for physicochemical systems is proposed and outlined as the basis for developing advanced modules. A program for developing this theory from the underlying first-principles continuum thermomechanics will be needed in future developments; accomplishment of this task will enable the development of a modern modeling approach for plant-level models. Rigorous, advanced modeling approaches at the plant-level can only proceed from the development of reduced (or low-order) models based on a solid continuum field theory foundation. Such development will pave the way for future programmatic activities on software verification, simulation validation, and model uncertainty quantification on a scientific basis; currently, no satisfactory foundation exists for

  18. Progress on Plant-Level Components for Nuclear Fuel Recycling: Commonality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Almeida, Valmor F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Progress made in developing a common mathematical modeling framework for plant-level components of a simulation toolkit for nuclear fuel recycling is summarized. This ongoing work is performed under the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, which has an element focusing on safeguards and separations (SafeSeps). One goal of this element is to develop a modeling and simulation toolkit for used nuclear fuel recycling. The primary function of the SafeSeps simulation toolkit is to enable the time-dependent coupling of separation modules and safeguards tools (either native or third-party supplied) that simulate and/or monitor the individual separation processes in a separations plant. The toolkit integration environment will offer an interface for the modules to register in the toolkit domain based on the commonality of diverse unit operations. This report discusses the source of this commonality from a combined mathematical modeling and software design perspectives, and it defines the initial basic concepts needed for development of application modules and their integrated form, that is, an application software. A unifying mathematical theory of chemical thermomechanical network transport for physicochemical systems is proposed and outlined as the basis for developing advanced modules. A program for developing this theory from the underlying first-principles continuum thermomechanics will be needed in future developments; accomplishment of this task will enable the development of a modern modeling approach for plant-level models. Rigorous, advanced modeling approaches at the plant-level can only proceed from the development of reduced (or low-order) models based on a solid continuum field theory foundation. Such development will pave the way for future programmatic activities on software verification, simulation validation, and model uncertainty quantification on a scientific basis; currently, no satisfactory foundation exists for

  19. Validating Westinghouse atom 16 x 16 and 18 x 18 PWR fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, S.; Gustafson, J.; Jourdain, P.; Lindstroem, L.; Hallstadius, L.; Hofling, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    Westinghouse Atom designs and fabricates PWR fuel for all major European fuel types: 17 x 17 standard (12 ft) and 17 x 17 XL (14 ft) for Westinghouse type PWRs, and 16 x 16 and 18 x 18 fuel for Siemens type PWRs. The W Atom PWR fuel designs are based on the extensive Westinghouse CE PWR fuel experience from combustion engineering type PWRs. The W atom designs utilise basic design features from the W CE fuel tradition, such as all-Zircaloy mid grids and the proven ( 6 rod years) Guardian TM debris catcher, which is integrated in the bottom Inconel grid. Several new features have been developed to meet with stringent European requirements originating from requirements on very high burnup, in combination with low-leakage core operating strategies and high coolant temperatures. The overall reliability of the Westinghouse Atom PWR fuel is very high; no fuel failure has been detected since 1997. (orig.)

  20. Westinghouse AP1000 advanced passive plant: design features and benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walls, S.J.; Cummins, W.E.

    2003-01-01

    The Westinghouse AP1000 Program is aimed at implementing the AP1000 plant to provide a further major improvement in plant economics while maintaining the passive safety advantages established by the AP600. An objective is to retain to the maximum extent possible the plant design of the AP600 so as to retain the licensing basis, cost estimate, construction schedule, modularization scheme, and the detailed design from the AP600 program. Westinghouse and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff have embarked on a program to complete Design Certification for the AP1000 by 2004. A pre-certification review phase was completed in March 2002 and was successful in establishing the applicability of the AP600 test program and AP600 safety analysis codes to the AP1000 Design Certification. On March 28, 2002, Westinghouse submitted to US NRC the AP1000 Design Control Document and Probabilistic Risk Assessment, thereby initiating the formal design certification review process. The results presented in these documents verify the safety performance of the API 000 and conformance with US NRC licensing requirements. Plans are being developed for implementation of a series of AP1000 plants in the US. Key factors in this planning are the economics of AP1000, and the associated business model for licensing, constructing and operating these new plants. Similarly plans are being developed to get the AP1000 design reviewed for use in the UK. Part of this planning has been to examine the AP1000 design relative to anticipated UK safety and licensing issues. (author)

  1. Development and application of special instrumentation for materials accountancy and process control in spent fuel recycle plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, P.A.; Gardner, N.; Merrill, N.H.; Whitehouse, K.R.

    1996-01-01

    Safe and optimum operations of spent fuel recycle plants rely on the availability of real time measurement systems at key points in the process. More than thirty types of special instrument systems have been developed and commissioned on the THORP reprocessing plant at Sellafield. These systems are compiled together with the associated information on measurement purpose, measurement technique and plant performance. A number of these measurement systems are of interest to support Safeguards arrangements on the plant. A more detailed overview of two such instrument systems respectively within the Head End and Product Finishing Stages of THORP is provided. The first of these is the Hulls Monitor, based on high resolution gamma spectrometry, as well as active and passive neutron measurements, of the basket of leached fuel cladding. This provides vital data for criticality assurance, nuclear material accountancy and inventory determination for ultimate disposal of the cladding waste. The second system is the Plutonium Inventory Monitoring System (PIMS) which employs passive neutron counting from a distributed array of neutron detectors within the Pu Finishing Line. This provides a near real time estimate of Pu inventories both during operations and at clean out of the Finishing Line. Both the Hulls Monitor and PIMS technologies are applicable to MOX Fuel recycle. Both systems enhance the control of fissile material in key areas of the recycle process which are of interest to the Safeguards authorities. (author)

  2. Piping benchmark problems for the Westinghouse AP600 Standardized Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J.; Wang, Y.K.

    1997-01-01

    To satisfy the need for verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for the Westinghouse AP600 Standardized Plant, three benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the AP600 standard design. It will be required that the combined license licensees demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set

  3. Tritium control by water recycle in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, N.E.; Ward, G.N.

    1975-06-01

    A preliminary study was made of the use of water recycle within a reprocessing plant to control the escape of tritium and to consolidate it for disposal. Tritium distribution was evaluated in the leacher, high-level, and low-level systems for seven different flowsheet conditions. Tritium retention efficiency was also evaluated for these flowsheet conditions. Impact of tritiated water recycle on the plant design and operation is assessed. It is concluded that tritium control by water recycle is feasible. Achievement of satisfactory retention efficiencies and economic volumes of solidified tritium waste will require extension of existing technology and development of new technology. Evaluation of potential abnormal conditions indicate that releases from upsets need not be excessive. Some increase in occupational exposure will occur because of the pervasiveness, persistence, and ease of uptake of tritiated water vapor. Incentives for tritium control by water recycle may prove marginal if this increased exposure to plant personnel is significant compared to the small reduction in exposure to the general public. Recommendations are presented for further studies

  4. A consortium approach to commercialized Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Allan

    Westinghouse is developing its tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) for a variety of applications in stationary power generation markets. By pressurizing a SOFC and integrating it with a gas turbine (GT), power systems with efficiencies as high as 70-75% can be obtained. The first such system will be tested in 1998. Because of their extraordinarily high efficiency (60-70%) even in small sizes the first SOFC products to be offered are expected to be integrated SOFC/GT power systems in the 1-7 MW range, for use in the emerging distributed generation (DG) market segment. Expansion into larger sizes will follow later. Because of their modularity, environmental friendliness and expected cost effectiveness, and because of a worldwide thrust towards utility deregulation, a ready market is forecasted for baseload distributed generation. Assuming Westinghouse can complete its technology development and reach its cost targets, the integrated SOFC/GT power system is seen as a product with tremendous potential in the emerging distributed generation market. While Westinghouse has been a leader in the development of power generation technology for over a century, it does not plan to manufacture small gas turbines. However, GTs small enough to integrate with SOFCs and address the 1-7 MW market are generally available from various manufacturers. Westinghouse will need access to a new set of customers as it brings baseload plants to the present small market mix of emergency and peaking power applications. Small cogeneration applications, already strong in some parts of the world, are also gaining ground everywhere. Small GT manufacturers already serve this market, and alliances and partnerships can enhance SOFC commercialization. Utilities also serve the DG market, especially those that have set up energy service companies and seek to grow beyond the legal and geographical confines of their current regulated business. Because fuel cells in general are a new product, because small

  5. Thermodynamic and exergoeconomic analysis of biogas fed solid oxide fuel cell power plants emphasizing on anode and cathode recycling: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehr, A.S.; Mahmoudi, S.M.S.; Yari, M.; Chitsaz, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Four biogas-fed solid oxide fuel cell power plants are proposed. • Performance of systems is compared with each other economically. • Efficiency of biogas fed fuel cell with anode–cathode recycling is the highest. • For current density of 6000 A/m"2 the optimum anode recycle ratio is around 0.25. • Unit product cost of biogas fed fuel cell with anode–cathode recycling is 19.07$/GJ. - Abstract: Four different configurations of natural gas and biogas fed solid oxide fuel cell are proposed and analyzed thermoeconomically, focusing on the influence of anode and/or cathode gas recycling. It is observed that the net output power is maximized at an optimum current density the value of which is lowered as the methane concentration in the biogas is decreased. Results indicate that when the current density is low, there is an optimum anode recycling ratio at which the thermal efficiency is maximized. In addition, an increase in the anode recycling ratio increases the unit product cost of the system while an increase in the cathode recycling ratio has a revers effect. For the same working conditions, the solid oxide fuel cell with anode and cathode recycling is superior to the other configurations and its thermal efficiency is calculated as 46.09% being 6.81% higher than that of the simple solid oxide fuel cell fed by natural gas. The unit product cost of the solid oxide fuel cell-anode and cathode recycling system is calculated as 19.07$/GJ which is about 35% lower than the corresponding value for the simple natural gas fed solid oxide fuel cell system.

  6. Radioactive waste shipments to Hanford retrievable storage from Westinghouse Advanced Reactors and Nuclear Fuels Divisions, Cheswick, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Weyns, M.I.; Dicenso, K.D.; DeLorenzo, D.S.

    1994-04-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) waste now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Sits in southeastern Washington State is to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Approximately 5.7 percent of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to WIPP was generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division (WARD) and the Westinghouse Nuclear Fuels Division (WNFD) in Cheswick, Pennsylvania and shipped to the Hanford Sits for storage. This report characterizes these radioactive solid wastes using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews

  7. Concept of the plant for the BN-800 fast reactor fuel recycling with application of pyro-process and vibro-packing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.V.; Skiba, O.V.; Mayorshin, A.A.; Demidova, L.S.; Kormilitzyna, L.A.; Ishunin, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    The conception of Plant was developed for MOX-fuel recycle at two BN-800 type fast reactors by pyrochemical reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel (INF) and production of vibro-pac fuel pins and SA. INF production process and stages of pyrochemical reprocessing were analyzed. Starting materials were chosen. Characteristics of irradiated SA and requirements for finished products were defined. Volumes of production were estimated. Procedure of waste management was defined. The following description was made: (1) general flow sheet of fuel recycling and partial schemes of single reprocessing; (2) composition of production process equipment; (3) arrangement of production process equipment; (4) lay out of Plant building and engineering communications. Principle economical assessments were made for production under design. (authors)

  8. Fuel management for the Beznau nuclear power plant in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, A.

    1988-01-01

    The Beznau nuclear power plant consists of two 350 MW(e) PWRs of Westinghouse design. A number of special features characterize the nuclear industry in Switzerland: there is no fuel cycle industry; nuclear materials must be moved through several countries before they arrive in our country, it is therefore important that agreements are in place between those countries and Switzerland; nearly all of the materials and services required have to be paid in foreign currencies; the interest rate in Switzerland is traditionally low. Aspects of fuel management at the Beznau plant discussed against this background are: the procurement of natural uranium, its conversion and enrichment; fuel fabrication, in-core management, reprocessing and plutonium recycling; and fuel cycle costs. (author)

  9. Pu-recycling in light water reactors: calculation of fuel burn-up data for the design of reprocessing plants as well as the influence on the demand of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasteiger, R.

    1977-02-01

    This report gives a detailed review on the composition of radionuclides in spent LWR fuel in the case of Pu-recycling. These calculations are necessary for the design of spent fuel reprocessing plants. Furthermore the influence of Pu-recycling on the demand of uranium for a single LWR as well as for a certain growing LWR-population is shown. (orig.) [de

  10. 76 FR 73720 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Westinghouse AP1000...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0272] Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power...) is issuing for public comment a draft NUREG, NUREG-2103, Revision 0, ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Westinghouse AP1000 Pressurized-Water Reactors. DATES: Submit...

  11. Impact of minor actinide recycling on sustainable fuel cycle options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidet, F.; Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.

    2017-11-01

    the repository performance. On the other hand, recycling minor actinides also results in an increase of the recycled fuel characteristics and therefore of the charged fuel. The radioactivity is slightly increased while the decay heat and radiotoxicities are very significantly increased. Despite these differences, the characteristics of the fuel at time of discharge remain similar whether minor actinides are recycled or not, with the exception of the inhalation radiotoxicity which is significantly larger with minor actinide recycling. After some cooling the characteristics of the discharged fuel become larger when minor actinides are recycled, potentially affecting the reprocessing plant requirements. Recycling minor actinides has a negative impact on the characteristics of the fresh fuel and will make it more challenging to fabricate fuel containing minor actinides.

  12. Effects of natural phenomena on the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Plutonium Fuels Development Laboratory at Cheswick, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    One aim of the analysis is to examine the plant with the objective of improving its ability to withstand adverse natural phenomena without loss of capability to protect the public. The relatively small risk to the public from the unlikely events discussed (earthquake, flood, tornado) would indicate that the public is not seriously threatened by the presence of the Westinghouse PFDL. Thus, it is the judgment of the staff that the benefits to be gained by substantial plant improvements to further mitigate against adverse natural phenomena are not cost effective

  13. Irradiation performance of HTGR recycle fissile fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.

    1976-08-01

    The irradiation performance of candidate HTGR recycle fissile fuel under accelerated testing conditions is reviewed. Failure modes for coated-particle fuels are described, and the performance of candidate recycle fissile fuels is discussed in terms of these failure modes. The bases on which UO 2 and (Th,U)O 2 were rejected as candidate recycle fissile fuels are outlined, along with the bases on which the weak-acid resin (WAR)-derived fissile fuel was selected as the reference recycle kernel. Comparisons are made relative to the irradiation behavior of WAR-derived fuels of varying stoichiometry and conclusions are drawn about the optimum stoichiometry and the range of acceptable values. Plans for future testing in support of specification development, confirmation of the results of accelerated testing by real-time experiments, and improvement in fuel performance and reliability are described

  14. Mixcore safety analysis approach used for introduction of Westinghouse fuel assemblies in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullayev, A.; Baidullin, V.; Maryochin, A.; Sleptsov, S.; Kulish, G.

    2008-01-01

    Six Westinghouse Lead Test Assemblies (LTA) were installed in 2005 and are currently operated in Unit 3 of the South Ukraine NPP (SUNPP) under the Ukraine Nuclear Fuel Qualification Project. At the early stages of the LTAs implementation in Ukraine, there was no experience of licensing of new fuel types, which explains the need to develop approaches for safety substantiation of LTAs. This presentation considers some approaches for performing of safety analysis of the design basis Initiating Events (IE) for the LTA fuel cycles. These approaches are non-standard in terms of the established practices for obtaining the regulatory authorities' permission for the core operation. The analysis was based on the results of the FA and reactor core thermal hydraulic and nuclear design

  15. Fuel cycle optimization. French industry experience with recycling, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    Treatment and recycling has been implemented in France from the very beginning of nuclear energy deployment. With the oil shocks in 1973 and 1979, very large scale industrial deployment of LWRs has then been conducted, with now 58 PWRs producing 80% of the total electricity. Modern large scale treatment and recycling facilities have been constructed in the same period: La Hauge treatment facilities and MELOX recycling plant. Important industrial feedback results from operation and optimization of fuel cycle backend facilities, which is summarized in the paper. Then are discussed perspectives with recycling. (author)

  16. Thorium utilization program progress report for January 1, 1974--June 30, 1975. [Reprocessing; refabrication; recycle fuel irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotts, A.L.; Kasten, P.R.

    1976-05-01

    Work was carried out on the following: HTGR reprocessing development and pilot plant, refabrication development and pilot plant, recycle fuel irradiations, engineering and economic studies, and conceptual design of a commercial recycle plant. (DLC)

  17. Plutonium recycle. In-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, F.; Berthet, A.; Le Bars, M.

    1985-01-01

    Plutonium recycle in France will concern a dozen of PWR 900 MWe controlled in gray mode till 1995. This paper presents the main characteristics of fuel management with plutonium recycle. The organization of management studies will be copied from this developed for classical management studies. Up these studies, a ''feasibility report'' aims at establishing at each stage of the fuel cycle, the impact of the utilization of fuel containing plutonium [fr

  18. Learning through delivery, Westinghouse AP1000 plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorgemans, J.; Hinman, R.D.; Steuck, C.M.; Greco, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    The AP1000 plant, which is a 1100 MWe class pressurized water reactor with passive safety features, is designed around a conventional 2 loop, 2 steam generator primary system configuration with 2 hot legs, 4 reactor coolant pumps directly mounted in the steam generator lower head and 4 cold legs. A particular feature of AP1000 is its modular construction to minimize the time and cost of construction. Modular construction allows activities to be run in parallel, it allows more activities to be performed in a controlled factory instead of in the field, and it provides a better level of quality. The AP1000 plant design includes 106 structural modules and 52 mechanical modules. Structural modules include all penetrations for piping, cable trays, HVAC duct runs, and all reinforcement for pipe, equipment hangers, and supports. Structural modules are shipped in sub-modules to support transportation by rail or truck or barge. Mechanical modules contain equipment such as pumps, tanks, heat exchangers, air-handling units, and filters along with interconnecting pipes, valves, instruments, wiring and support services. Modular construction requires strong coordination between engineering, supply chain and construction. A total of 8 AP1000 units are currently under construction in China and in the United States. The lessons learned and best practices of each new AP1000 construction are systematically incorporated into the standard design. (A.C.)

  19. Evaluation of selected parameters on exposure rates in Westinghouse designed nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    During the past ten years, Westinghouse under EPRI contract and independently, has performed research and evaluation of plant data to define the trends of ex-core component exposure rates and the effects of various parameters on the exposure rates. The effects of the parameters were evaluated using comparative analyses or empirical techniques. This paper updates the information presented at the Fourth Bournemouth Conference and the conclusions obtained from the effects of selected parameters namely, coolant chemistry, physical changes, use of enriched boric acid, and cobalt input on plant exposure rates. The trends of exposure rates and relationship to doses is also presented. (author)

  20. Implications of plutonium and americium recycling on MOX fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, A.; Pilate, S.; Maldague, Th.; La Fuente, A.; Evrard, G.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of the multiple recycling of plutonium in power reactors on the radiation dose rates is analyzed for the most critical stage in a MOX fuel fabrication plant. The limitation of the number of Pu recycling in light water reactors would rather stem from reactor core physics features. The case of recovering americium with plutonium is also considered and the necessary additions of shielding are evaluated. A comparison between the recycling of Pu in fast reactors and in light water reactors is presented. (author)

  1. Westinghouse experience over the past 10 years in negotiating and constructing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Reason for delays in delivery times for nuclear plant are discussed in the light of Westinghouse experience. Today the lead time for the construction of the plant is no longer dictated by the lead time of the nuclear steam supply system. The increased complexity of contract negotiations and of standards and specifications contributes to the delays. Site work is constantly subject to delays due to various labour problems. The main delays stem from regulatory authorities, environmentalists and political considerations. Lateness on the plant causes problems of warranty, storage of equipment and of finance. Westinghouse procedures for alleviating delays during erection are outlined. As the start-up schedule dictates erection, purchasing and design, it should be established as early as possible. A typical overall schedule for a PWR is outlined. It is concluded that completion of plant within schedule requires decisions on basic principles and sufficient detailed planning and organisational structures to be established before the start of the project followed by strong project management. The discussion following the conference is also recorded. (U.K.)

  2. On recycling of nuclear fuel in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In Japan, atomic energy has become to accomplish the important role in energy supply. Recently the interest in the protection of global environment heightened, and the anxiety on oil supply has been felt due to the circumstances in Mideast. Therefore, the importance of atomic energy as an energy source for hereafter increased, and the future plan of nuclear fuel recycling in Japan must be promoted on such viewpoint. At present in Japan, the construction of nuclear fuel cycle facilities is in progress in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture. The prototype FBR 'Monju' started the general functional test in May, this year. The transport of the plutonium reprocessed in U.K. and France to Japan will be carried out in near future. This report presents the concrete measures of nuclear fuel recycling in Japan from the long term viewpoint up to 2010. The necessity and meaning of nuclear fuel recycling in Japan, the effort related to nuclear nonproliferation, the plan of nuclear fuel recycling for hereafter in Japan, the organization of MOX fuel fabrication in Japan and abroad, the method of utilizing recovered uranium and the reprocessing of spent MOX fuel are described. (K.I.)

  3. Standard technical specifications, Westinghouse Plants: Bases (Sections 3.4--3.9). Volume 3, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This NUREG contains the improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Westinghouse plants. Revision 1 incorporates the cumulative changes to Revision 0, which was published in September 1992. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, specifically the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG), NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993 (58 FR 39132). Licensees are encouraged to upgrade their technical specifications consistent with those criteria and conforming, to the extent practical and consistent with the licensing basis for the facility, to Revision 1 to the improved STS. The Commission continues to place the highest priority on requests for complete conversions to the improved STS. Licensees adopting portions of the improved STS to existing technical specifications should adopt all related requirements, as applicable, to achieve a high degree of standardization and consistency

  4. Standard technical specifications, Westinghouse Plants: Bases (Sections 2.0--3.3). Volume 2, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This NUREG contains the improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS) for Westinghouse plants. Revision 1 incorporates the cumulative changes to Revision 0, which was published in September 1992. The changes reflected in Revision 1 resulted from the experience gained from license amendment applications to convert to these improved STS or to adopt partial improvements to existing technical specifications. This NUREG is the result of extensive public technical meetings and discussions between the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and various nuclear power plant licensees, Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) Owners Groups, specifically the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG), NSSS vendors, and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). The improved STS were developed based on the criteria in the Final Commission Policy Statement on Technical Specifications Improvements for Nuclear Power Reactors, dated July 22, 1993 (58 FR 39132). Licensees are encouraged to upgrade their technical specifications consistent with those criteria and conforming, to the extent practical and consistent with the licensing basis for the facility, to Revision 1 to the improved STS. The Commission continues to place the highest priority on requests for complete conversions to the improved STS. Licensees adopting portions of the improved STS to existing technical specifications should adopt all related requirements, as applicable, to achieve a high degree of standardization and consistency

  5. Assessment of ISLOCA risk: Methodology and application to a Westinghouse four-loop ice condenser plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, D.L.; Auflick, J.L.; Haney, L.N. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Inter-system loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs) have been identified as important contributors to offsite risk for some nuclear power plants. A methodology has been developed for identifying and evaluating plant-specific hardware designs, human factors issues, and accident consequence factors relevant to the estimation of ISLOCA core damage frequency and risk. This report presents a detailed description of the application of this analysis methodology to a Westinghouse four-loop ice condenser plant. This document also includes appendices A through I which provide: System descriptions; ISLOCA event trees; human reliability analysis; thermal hydraulic analysis; core uncovery timing calculations; calculation of system rupture probability; ISLOCA consequences analysis; uncertainty analysis; and component failure analysis.

  6. Assessment of ISLOCA risk: Methodology and application to a Westinghouse four-loop ice condenser plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.L.; Auflick, J.L.; Haney, L.N.

    1992-04-01

    Inter-system loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs) have been identified as important contributors to offsite risk for some nuclear power plants. A methodology has been developed for identifying and evaluating plant-specific hardware designs, human factors issues, and accident consequence factors relevant to the estimation of ISLOCA core damage frequency and risk. This report presents a detailed description of the application of this analysis methodology to a Westinghouse four-loop ice condenser plant. This document also includes appendices A through I which provide: System descriptions; ISLOCA event trees; human reliability analysis; thermal hydraulic analysis; core uncovery timing calculations; calculation of system rupture probability; ISLOCA consequences analysis; uncertainty analysis; and component failure analysis

  7. Westinghouse European trainee program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, G.

    2010-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company is proud of giving its employees the possibility to work and act globally. The company's European Trainee Program provides an opportunity to work within different fields of business within Westinghouse, participating in a wide range of projects and experiencing and learning from the different cultures of the company. In 2006 the first Trainee Program started with seven Swedish Trainees. During these eighteen months they worked 12 months in Sweden and then went off to six-month-assignments in France and in the US. In April 2008, the first European Trainee Program was launched with ten Trainees from four different countries: five from Sweden, two from Germany, two from Spain and one from Belgium. As with the previous program, its length was eighteen months. During the first year, the European Trainees had the opportunity to work in various areas within their country of hire, as well as to visit different Westinghouse headquarters in Europe and the US to learn more about the global business. Their kick-off session took place in Vaesteraas, Sweden in April 2008. During four days, the Trainees participated in group dynamic exercises as well as presentations of the business of Westinghouse abroad and in Sweden. Two of the most interesting parts of this session were the visits to the Fuel Factory and to the Field Services mock-ups. The second session took place in June 2008 in Monroeville, Pennsylvania (USA), where Westinghouse had its main headquarters, nowadays located in Cranberry, PA. During two weeks, the trainees got to know even more about Westinghouse through visits, lectures and forums for open discussions. The visits comprised for example the tubing factory at Blairsville, the Field Services main headquarters in Madison and the George Westinghouse Research and Technology Park near Pittsburgh. The meetings included presentations of each Westinghouse business unit, detailed information about future projects and round table discussions

  8. Radiotoxicity Characterization of Multi-Recycled Thorium Fuel - 12394

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, F.; Wenner, M. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Fiorina, C. [Polytechnic of Milano, Milan (Italy); Paul Sherrer Institute (Switzerland); Huang, M.; Petrovic, B. [Georgia Technology University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Krepel, J. [Paul Sherrer Institute (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    As described in companion papers, Westinghouse is proposing the implementation of a thorium based fuel cycle to burn the transuranic (TRU) contained in the used nuclear fuel. The potential of thorium as a TRU burner is described in another paper presented at this conference. This paper analyzes the long-term impact of thorium on the front-end and backend of the fuel cycle. This is accomplished by an assessment of the isotopic make-up of Th in a closed cycle and its impact on representative metrics, such as radiotoxicity, decay heat and gamma heat. The behavior in both thermal and fast neutron energy ranges has been investigated. Irradiation in a Th fuel PWR has been assumed as representative of the thermal range, while a Th fuel fast reactor (FR) has been employed to characterize the behavior in the high-energy range. A comparison with a U-fuel closed-cycle FR has been undertaken in an attempt of a more comprehensive evaluation of each cycle's long-term potential. As the Th fuel undergoes multiple cycles of irradiation, the isotopic composition of the recycled fuel changes. Minor Th isotopes are produced; U-232 and Pa-231 build up; the U vector gradually shifts towards increasing amounts of U-234, U-235 etc., eventually leading to the production of non negligible amounts of TRU isotopes, especially Pu-238. The impact of the recycled fuel isotopic makeup on the in-core behavior is mild, and for some aspects beneficial, i.e. the reactivity swing during irradiation is reduced as the fertile characteristics of the fuel increase. On the other hand, the front and the back-end of the fuel cycle are negatively affected due to the presence of Th-228 and U-232 and the build-up of higher actinides (Pu-238 etc.). The presence of U-232 can also be seen as advantageous as it represents an obstacle to potential proliferators. Notwithstanding the increase in the short-term radiotoxicity and decay heat in the multi-recycled fuel, the Th closed cycle has some potentially

  9. Westinghouse Electric Company experiences in chemistry on-line monitoring in Eastern European nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balavage, J.

    2001-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company has provided a number of Chemistry On-Line Monitoring (OLM) Systems to Nuclear Power Plants in Eastern Europe. Eleven systems were provided to the Temelin Nuclear Power Plant in the south of the Czech Republic. Four systems were provided to the Russian NPP at Novovoronezh. In addition, a system design was developed for primary side chemistry monitoring for units 5 and 6 of another eastern European VVER. The status of the Temelin OLM systems is discussed including updates to the Temelin designs, and the other Eastern European installations and designs are also described briefly. Some of the problems encountered and lessons learned from these projects are also discussed. (R.P.)

  10. Westinghouse Reference Safety Analysis Report, RESAR-414. License application, preliminary safety analysis report (RESAR-414) volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Westinghouse's standardized four-loop, single unit NSSS for a pressurized water reactor is described including the core, coolant system, ECCS, emergency boration, chemical and volume control, RHR system, boron recycle, fuel handling, spent fuel pool and associated instrumentation and controls. This reactor is applicable to a plant with a core power level of 3800 MW(t) and 1295 MW(e). The reactor is controlled by temperature coefficients of reactivity; control rod motion, and by a soluble neutron absorber-boric acid

  11. Signal validation of SPDS variables for Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering plants - an EPRI project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Signal validation in the context of this project is the process of combining information from multiple plant sensors to produce highly reliable information about plant conditions. High information reliability is achieved by the use of redundant sources of information and by the inherent detection, identification, and isolation of faulty signals. The signal validation methodology that has been developed in previous EPRI-sponsored projects has been enhanced and applied toward validation of critical safety-related SPDS signals in the Northeast Utilities Millstone 3 Westinghouse PWR plant and the Millstone 2 Combustion Engineering PWR plant. The designs were implemented in FORTRAN software and tested off-line using recorded plant sensor data, RETRAN-generated simulation data, and data to exercise software logic branches and the integration of software modules. Designs and software modules have been developed for 15 variables to support six PWR SPDS critical safety functions as required by a utility advisory group attached to the project. The signal validation process automates a task currently performed by plant operators and does so with consistent, verified logic regardless of operator stress and training level. The methodology uses a simple structure of generic software blocks, a modular implementation, and it performs effectively within the processor and memory constraints of modern plant process computers. The ability to detect and isolate sensor failures with greater sensitivity, robustness, and coverage of common-cause failures should ultimately lead to improved plant availability, efficiency, and productivity

  12. Core damage frequency prespectives for BWR 3/4 and Westinghouse 4-loop plants based on IPE results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.; Camp, S.; LaChance, J.; Mary Drouin

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the core damage frequency (CDF) insights gained by analyzing the results of the Individual Plant Examinations (IPES) for two groups of plants: boiling water reactor (BWR) 3/4 plants with Reactor Core Isolation Cooling systems, and Westinghouse 4-loop plants. Wide variability was observed for the plant CDFs and for the CDFs of the contributing accident classes. On average, transients-with loss of injection, station blackout sequences, and transients with loss of decay heat removal are important contributors for the BWR 3/4 plants, while transients, station blackout sequences, and loss-of-coolant accidents are important for the Westinghouse 4-loop plants. The key factors that contribute to the variability in the results are discussed. The results are often driven by plant-specific design and operational characteristics, but differences in modeling approaches are also important for some accident classes

  13. Plan for fully decontaminating and decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Fuel Laboratories at Cheswick, Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. This volume contains the following 3 attachments: (1) Plan for Fully Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Fuel Laboratories at Cheswick; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, PA; and (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities

  14. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3), Westinghouse Elevator Company Plant, Operable Unit 2, Cumberland Township, Adams County, Gettysburg, PA, March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This Record of Decision (ROD) presents the selected remedial action for Operable Unit 2 (Soils) at the Westinghouse Elevator Company Plant Site in Adams County, Pennsylvania. The selected remedy for the soils at the Westinghouse Elevator Plant is No Additional Action for this Operable Unit. The other alternatives evaluated would produce little or no environmental benefit at substantial cost.

  15. Need for Asian regional spent fuel recycle center (ARRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Energy demand is increasing rapidly in the Asia-Pacific region. From the viewpoint of preventing global warming, countries in the region are expected to introduce more nuclear power plants (NPPs) which do not emit greenhouse gases (GHGs). At the end of this century, the capacity for NPPs is estimated to reach around 1600 GWe and around 300,000 tons of uranium (TU) as spent fuel will be accumulated. The spent fuel from the NPPs should be reprocessed and fabricated into MOX fuel to decrease the amounts of radioactive wastes and future fuel recycling should be supported in the Asian Regional Spent Fuel Recycle Center (ARRC) under international regulation. The ARRC will include a reprocessing plant, an MOX fuel fabrication plant, a high-activity vitrified solid waste storage facility, and sea discharge pipes for extremely low activity liquid wastes etc. Furthermore, the ARRC should be operated as a component in an international organization scheme, an ASIATOM and it should accept the full scope of IAEA safeguards to verify the nonproliferation of nuclear materials. When the ARRC is designed, knowledge obtained through experiences in the Tokai and the Rokkasho reprocessing plants in Japan, which is a non-nuclear weapons country, will be used. (author)

  16. Design study on advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. Conceptual design study of recycle system using molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Y.; Kakehi, I.; Moro, T.; Higashi, T.; Tobe, K.; Kawamura, F.; Yonezawa, S.; Yoshiuji, T.

    1998-10-01

    Advanced recycle system engineering group of OEC (Oarai Engineering Center) has being carried out a design study of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system using molten salt (electro-metallurgical process). This system is aiming for improvements of fuel cycle economy and reduction of environmental burden (MA recycles, Minimum of radioactive waste disposal), and also improvement of safety and nuclear non-proliferation. This report describes results of the design study that has been continued since December 1996. (1) A design concept of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system, that is a module type recycles system of pyrochemical reprocessing and fuel re-fabrication was studied. The module system has advantage in balance of Pu recycle where modules are constructed in coincidence with the construction plan of nuclear power plants, and also has flexibility for technology progress. A demonstration system, minimum size of the above module, was studies. This system has capacity of 10 tHM/y and is able to demonstrate recycle technology of MOX fuel, metal fuel and nitride fuel. (2) Each process of the system, which are pyrochemical electrorefining system, cathode processor, de-cladding system, waste disposal system, etc., were studied. In this study, capacity of an electrorefiner was discussed, and vitrification experiment of molten salt using lead-boric acid glass was conducted. (3) A hot cell system and material handling system of the demonstration system was studied. A robot driven by linear motor was studied for the handling system, and an arrangement plan of the cell system was made. Criticality analysis in the cell system and investigation of material accountancy system of the recycle plant were also made. This design study will be continued in coincidence with design study of reactor and fuel, aiming to establish the concept of FBR recycle system. (author)

  17. Conceptual design of a spent LWR fuel recycle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, B.H.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose was to design a licensable facility, to make cost-benefit analyses of alternatives, and to aid in developing licensing criteria. The Savannah River Plant was taken to be the site for the recycle complex. The spent LWR fuel will be processed through the plant at the rate of 3000 metric tons of heavy metal per year. The following aspects of the complex are discussed: operation, maintenance, co-conversion (Coprecal), waste disposal, off-gas treatment, ventilation, safeguards, accounting, equipment and fuel fabrication. Differences between the co-processing case and the separated streams case are discussed. 44 figures

  18. The future fuel cycle plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paret, L.; Touron, E.

    2016-01-01

    The future fuel cycle plants will have to cope with both the fuel for PWR and the fuel for the new generation of fast reactors. Furthermore, the MOX fuel, that is not recycled in PWR reactors will have the possibility to be recycled in fast reactors of 4. generation. Recycling MOX fuels will imply to handle nuclear fuels with higher concentration of Pu than today. The design of the nuclear fuel for the future fast reactors will be similar to that of the Astrid prototype. In order to simplify the fabrication of UPuO_2 pellets, all the fabrication process will take place in a dedicated glove box. Enhanced reality and virtual reality technologies have been used to optimize the glove-box design in order to have a better recovery of radioactive dust and to ease routine operations and its future dismantling. As a fuel assembly will contain 120 kg of UPuO_2 fuel, it will no longer be possible to mount these assemblies by hand contrary to what was done for Superphenix reactor. A new shielded mounting line has to be designed. Another point is that additive manufacturing for the fabrication of very small parts with a complex design will be broadly used. (A.C.)

  19. TAO2000 V2 computer-assisted force feedback tele-manipulators used as maintenance and production tools at the AREVA NC-La Hague fuel recycling plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geffard, Franck; Garrec, Philippe; Piolain, Gerard; Brudieu, Marie-Anne; Thro, Jean-Francois; Coudray, Alain; Lelann, Eric

    2012-01-01

    During a 15-year joint research program, French Atomic Energy Agency Interactive Robotics Laboratory (CEA LIST) and AREVA have developed several remote operation devices, also called tele-robots. Some of them are now commonly used for maintenance operations at the AREVA NC (Nuclear Cycle) La Hague reprocessing plant. Since the first maintenance operation in 2005, several other successful interventions have been realized using the industrial MA23/RX170 tele-manipulation system. Moreover, since 2010, the through-the-wall tele-robot named MT200 TAO based on the slave arm of the MSM MT200 (La Calhene TM ), has been evaluated in an active production cell at the AREVA NC La Hague fuel recycling plant. Although these evaluations are ongoing, the positive results obtained have led to an update and industrialization program. All these developments are based on the same generic control platform, called TAO2000 V2. TAO2000 V2 is the second release of the CEA LIST core software platform dedicated to computer aided force-feedback tele-operation (TAO is the French acronym for computer aided tele-operation). This paper presents all these developments resulting from the joint research program CEA LIST/AREVA. The TAO2000 V2 controller is first detailed, and then two maintenance operations using the industrial robot RX170 are presented: the removal of the nuclear fuel dissolver wheel rollers and the cleanup of the dissolver wheel inter-bucket spaces. Finally, the new MT200 TAO system and its evaluations at the AREVA NC La Hague facilities are discussed. (authors)

  20. Quantification of severe accident source terms of a Westinghouse 3-loop plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Min; Ko, Y.-C.

    2008-01-01

    Integrated severe accident analysis codes are used to quantify the source terms of the representative sequences identified in PSA study. The characteristics of these source terms depend on the detail design of the plant and the accident scenario. A historical perspective of radioactive source term is provided. The grouping of radionuclides in different source terms or source term quantification tools based on TID-14844, NUREG-1465, and WASH-1400 is compared. The radionuclides release phenomena and models adopted in the integrated severe accident analysis codes of STCP and MAAP4 are described. In the present study, the severe accident source terms for risk quantification of Maanshan Nuclear Power Plant of Taiwan Power Company are quantified using MAAP 4.0.4 code. A methodology is developed to quantify the source terms of each source term category (STC) identified in the Level II PSA analysis of the plant. The characteristics of source terms obtained are compared with other source terms. The plant analyzed employs a Westinghouse designed 3-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) with large dry containment

  1. Implementation of the Westinghouse nuclear design system for incore fuel management analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, K.C.; Kichty, M.J.; Liu, Y.S.; Nguyen, T.Q.

    1990-01-01

    Development of the Westinghouse Advanced Nuclear Design System, which includes PHOENIX-P and ANC, has been continued to improve the efficiency, reliability, accuracy, and flexibility of models. The new codes ALPHA and PHIRE provide complete automation and interface functions for PHOENIX-P, ANC, and other codes. PHOENIX-P has been modified to generate data for ANC based on single or multi-assembly calculations. ANC has several enhancements, including improved pin power reconstruction, automated 2D model generation, and rod burnup prediction capability. The excellent performance of PHOENIX-P/ANC models is demonstrated by the results of over 30 models covering the range of Westinghouse designs. This Nuclear Design System is now the standard Westinghouse methodology for core design and analysis

  2. The Westinghouse AP1000 plant design: a generation III+ reactor with unique proven passive safety technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demetri, K. J.; Leipner, C. I.; Marshall, M. L.

    2015-09-01

    The AP1000 plant is an 1100-M We pressurized water reactor with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications and standardization that simplify construction, operation, maintenance, safety, and cost. The AP1000 plant is based on proven pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology, with an emphasis on safety features that rely solely on natural forces. These passive safety features are combined with simple, active, defense-in-depth systems used during normal plant operations which also provide the first level of defense against more probable events. This paper focuses on specific safety and licensing topics: the AP1000 plant robustness to be prepared for extreme events that may lead to catastrophic loss of infrastructure, such as the Fukushima Dai-ichi event, and the AP1000 plant compliance with the safety objectives for new plants. The first deployment of the AP1000 plant formally began in July 2007 when Westinghouse Electric Company and its consortium partner, the Shaw Group, signed contracts for four AP1000 units on coastal sites of Sanmen and Haiyang, China. Both sites have the planned ability to accommodate at least six AP1000 units; construction is largely concurrent for all four units. Additionally, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued combined licenses (COLs) to allow Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNC) and South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE and G) to construct and operate AP1000 plants. Within this paper, the various factors that contribute to an unparalleled level of design, construction, delivery, and licensing certainty for any new AP1000 plant projects are described. These include: 1) How the AP1000 plant design development and reviews undertaken in the United States, China and Europe increase licensing certainty. 2) How the AP1000 passive plant robustness against extreme events that result in large loss of infrastructure further contributes to the licensing certainty in a post

  3. The Westinghouse AP1000 plant design: a generation III+ reactor with unique proven passive safety technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demetri, K. J.; Leipner, C. I.; Marshall, M. L., E-mail: demetrkj@westinghouse.com [Westinghouse Electric Company, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The AP1000 plant is an 1100-M We pressurized water reactor with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications and standardization that simplify construction, operation, maintenance, safety, and cost. The AP1000 plant is based on proven pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology, with an emphasis on safety features that rely solely on natural forces. These passive safety features are combined with simple, active, defense-in-depth systems used during normal plant operations which also provide the first level of defense against more probable events. This paper focuses on specific safety and licensing topics: the AP1000 plant robustness to be prepared for extreme events that may lead to catastrophic loss of infrastructure, such as the Fukushima Dai-ichi event, and the AP1000 plant compliance with the safety objectives for new plants. The first deployment of the AP1000 plant formally began in July 2007 when Westinghouse Electric Company and its consortium partner, the Shaw Group, signed contracts for four AP1000 units on coastal sites of Sanmen and Haiyang, China. Both sites have the planned ability to accommodate at least six AP1000 units; construction is largely concurrent for all four units. Additionally, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued combined licenses (COLs) to allow Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNC) and South Carolina Electric and Gas Company (SCE and G) to construct and operate AP1000 plants. Within this paper, the various factors that contribute to an unparalleled level of design, construction, delivery, and licensing certainty for any new AP1000 plant projects are described. These include: 1) How the AP1000 plant design development and reviews undertaken in the United States, China and Europe increase licensing certainty. 2) How the AP1000 passive plant robustness against extreme events that result in large loss of infrastructure further contributes to the licensing certainty in a post

  4. A review of methods for immobilizing iodine-129 arising from a nuclear fuel recycle plant, with emphasis on waste-form chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.

    1990-07-01

    Possible methods for the separation and immobilization of iodine (mainly iodine-129) in a fuel recycle plant are reviewed, with special emphasis placed on the evaluation of waste forms. A distinction is drawn between waste forms selected by thermodynamic (solubility) or kinetic (dissolution rate) considerations. The most promising solubility-limited waste forms appear to be AgI (or AgI + AgCl) and a combination of Bi 2 O 3 and Bi 5 O 7 I. These materials use relatively scarce metals, Ag and Bi. They also have substantial chemical limitations, such as susceptibility to reductive dissolution and anion-displacement reactions; this calls for special care in the choice of a disposal site. All other organic iodides and iodates considered here and elsewhere appear to be still more limited in this respect. The most promising kinetically limited candidate waste form appears to be iodide-sodalite, but further information is needed on both the fabrication and leaching behaviour of this material. The possibility of disposal in a more soluble but isotopically dilute waste form, employing abundant raw materials, also warrants further consideration

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    for Solar Power Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries for Solar Power to someone by E -mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries for Solar Power on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehicles in Vermont Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Vermont to someone by E -mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in Vermont on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Recycled Cooking Oil Powers Biodiesel Vehicles in

  7. Light water reactor fuel reprocessing and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    This document was originally intended to provide the basis for an environmental impact statement to assist ERDA in making decisions with respect to possible LWR fuel reprocessing and recycling programs. Since the Administration has recently made a decision to indefinitely defer reprocessing, this environmental impact statement is no longer needed. Nevertheless, this document is issued as a report to assist the public in its consideration of nuclear power issues. The statement compares the various alternatives for the LWR fuel cycle. Costs and environmental effects are compared. Safeguards for plutonium from sabotage and theft are analyzed

  8. Application of CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 methodology to mixed cores with Westinghouse Optima2 fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Ming Yuan; Wheeler, John K.; Hoz, Carlos de la [Nuclear Fuels, Warrenville (United States)

    2008-10-15

    The first application of CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 methodology to Westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 reload cycle is described in this paper. The first Westinghouse Optima2 reload cycle in the U.S. is Exelon's Quad Cities Unit 2 Cycle 19 (Q2C19). The core contains fresh Optima2 fuel and once burned and twice burned GE14 fuel. Although the licensing analyses for the reload cycle are performed by Westinghouse with Westinghouse methodology, the core is monitored with AREVA's POWERPLEX-III core monitoring system that is based on the CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 (C4/B2) methodology. This necessitates the development of a core model based on the C4/B2 methodology for both reload design and operational support purposes. In addition, as expected, there are many differences between the two vendors' methodologies; they differ not only in modeling some of the physical details of the Optima2 bundles but also in the modeling capability of the computer codes. In order to have high confidence that the online core monitoring results during the cycle startup and operation will comply with the Technical Specifications requirements (e.g., thermal limits, shutdown margins), the reload core design generated by Westinghouse design methodology was confirmed by the C4/B2 model. The C4/B2 model also assures that timely operational support during the cycle can be provided. Since this is the first application of C4/B2 methodology to an Optima2 reload in the US, many issues in the lattice design, bundle design, and reload core design phases were encountered. Many modeling issues have to be considered in order to develop a successful C4/B2 core model for the Optima2/GE14 mixed core. Some of the modeling details and concerns and their resolutions are described. The Q2C19 design was successfully completed and the 2 year cycle successfully started up in April 2006 and shut down in March 2008. Some of the operating results are also presented.

  9. Application of CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 methodology to mixed cores with Westinghouse Optima2 fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Ming Yuan; Wheeler, John K.; Hoz, Carlos de la [Nuclear Fuels, Warrenville (United States)

    2008-10-15

    The first application of CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 methodology to Westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 reload cycle is described in this paper. The first Westinghouse Optima2 reload cycle in the U.S. is Exelon's Quad Cities Unit 2 Cycle 19 (Q2C19). The core contains fresh Optima2 fuel and once burned and twice burned GE14 fuel. Although the licensing analyses for the reload cycle are performed by Westinghouse with Westinghouse methodology, the core is monitored with AREVA's POWERPLEX-III core monitoring system that is based on the CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 (C4/B2) methodology. This necessitates the development of a core model based on the C4/B2 methodology for both reload design and operational support purposes. In addition, as expected, there are many differences between the two vendors' methodologies; they differ not only in modeling some of the physical details of the Optima2 bundles but also in the modeling capability of the computer codes. In order to have high confidence that the online core monitoring results during the cycle startup and operation will comply with the Technical Specifications requirements (e.g., thermal limits, shutdown margins), the reload core design generated by Westinghouse design methodology was confirmed by the C4/B2 model. The C4/B2 model also assures that timely operational support during the cycle can be provided. Since this is the first application of C4/B2 methodology to an Optima2 reload in the US, many issues in the lattice design, bundle design, and reload core design phases were encountered. Many modeling issues have to be considered in order to develop a successful C4/B2 core model for the Optima2/GE14 mixed core. Some of the modeling details and concerns and their resolutions are described. The Q2C19 design was successfully completed and the 2 year cycle successfully started up in April 2006 and shut down in March 2008. Some of the operating results are also presented.

  10. Application of CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 methodology to mixed cores with Westinghouse Optima2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Ming Yuan; Wheeler, John K.; Hoz, Carlos de la

    2008-01-01

    The first application of CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 methodology to Westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 reload cycle is described in this paper. The first Westinghouse Optima2 reload cycle in the U.S. is Exelon's Quad Cities Unit 2 Cycle 19 (Q2C19). The core contains fresh Optima2 fuel and once burned and twice burned GE14 fuel. Although the licensing analyses for the reload cycle are performed by Westinghouse with Westinghouse methodology, the core is monitored with AREVA's POWERPLEX-III core monitoring system that is based on the CASMO-4/MICROBURN-B2 (C4/B2) methodology. This necessitates the development of a core model based on the C4/B2 methodology for both reload design and operational support purposes. In addition, as expected, there are many differences between the two vendors' methodologies; they differ not only in modeling some of the physical details of the Optima2 bundles but also in the modeling capability of the computer codes. In order to have high confidence that the online core monitoring results during the cycle startup and operation will comply with the Technical Specifications requirements (e.g., thermal limits, shutdown margins), the reload core design generated by Westinghouse design methodology was confirmed by the C4/B2 model. The C4/B2 model also assures that timely operational support during the cycle can be provided. Since this is the first application of C4/B2 methodology to an Optima2 reload in the US, many issues in the lattice design, bundle design, and reload core design phases were encountered. Many modeling issues have to be considered in order to develop a successful C4/B2 core model for the Optima2/GE14 mixed core. Some of the modeling details and concerns and their resolutions are described. The Q2C19 design was successfully completed and the 2 year cycle successfully started up in April 2006 and shut down in March 2008. Some of the operating results are also presented

  11. WIMSD4 calculations of the Westinghouse 'EDASA' lattices with plutonium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.

    1977-03-01

    A series of Westinghouse critical PuO 2 /UO 2 pin-cell assemblies is analysed using the lattice code WIMSD4. The results are presented in terms of computed k-effective values, with comment on the choice of method for calculating high leakage systems and on the adequacy of WIMSD4 for evaluating plutonium enriched lattices. (author)

  12. Safety evaluation report on Westinghouse Electric Company ECCS evaluation model for plants equipped with upper head injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauben, G.N.; Wagner, N.H.; Israel, S.L.; McPherson, G.D.; Hodges, M.W.

    1978-04-01

    For plants which include an ice condenser containment concept, Westinghouse has planned an additional safety system known as the upper head injection (UHI) system to augment the emergency core cooling system. This system is comprised of additional accumulator tanks and piping arranged to supply cooling water to the top of the core during the blowdown period following a postulated large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The objective of UHI is to add to the core cooling provided by the conventional emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and so permit operation at linear heat rates comparable to those permitted in plants utilizing the dry containment concept. In this way, plants which include the UHI system would have greater operating flexibility while still meeting the acceptance criteria as defined in paragraph 50.46 of 10 CFR Part 50. This review is concerned with those changes to the Westinghouse ECCS evaluation model that have been proposed for the UHI-LOCA model

  13. Application of MSHIM core control strategy for westinghouse AP1000 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoue, Masaaki; Kawanishi, Tomohiro; Carlson, William R.; Morita, Toshio

    2003-01-01

    Westinghouse has developed a new core control strategy, in which two independently moving Rod Cluster Control Assembly (RCCA) groups are utilized for core control; one group for reactivity/temperature control, the other for axial power distribution (Axial Offset) control. This control procedure eliminates the need for Chemical Shim adjustments during power maneuvers, such as load follow, and is designated MSHIM (Mechanical Shim). This core control strategy is utilized in the AP1000. In the AP1000, it is possible to perform MSHIM load follow maneuvers for up to 95% of cycle life without changing the soluble boron concentration in the moderator. This core control strategy has been evaluated, via computer simulations, to provide appropriate margins to core and fuel design limits during normal operation maneuvers (including load follow operations) and also during anticipated Condition II accident transients. The primary benefits of MSHIM as a control strategy are as follows; Power change operation can be totally automated due to the elimination of boron concentration adjustments. Full load follow capability is achievable for up to more than 95% of cycle life. Load follow operations performed solely by mechanical devices results in a significant reduction in the boron system requirements and a significant reduction in daily effluent to be processed. (author)

  14. Recycling of MOX fuel for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Oh, Soo Youl

    1992-01-01

    The status and issues related to the thermal recycling of reprocessed nuclear fuels have been reviewed. It is focused on the use of reprecessed plutonium in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) for a light water reactor and the review on reprocessing and fabrication processes is beyond the scope. In spite of the difference in the nuclear characteristics between plutonium and uranium isotopes, the neutronics behavior in a core with MOX fuels is similar to that with normal uranium fuels. However, since the neutron spectrum is hardened in a core with MOX, the Doppler, viod, and moderator temperature coefficients become more negative and the control rod and boron worths are slightly reduced. Therefore, the safety will be evaluated carefully in addition to the core neutronics analysis. The MOX fuel rod behavior related to the rod performance such as the pellet to clad interaction and fission gas release is also similar to that of uranium rods, and no specific problem arises. Substituting MOX fuels for a portion of uranium fuels, it is estimated that the savings be about 25% in uranium ore and 10% in uranium enrichment service requirements. The use of MOX fuel in LWRs has been commercialized in European countries including Germany, France, Belgium, etc., and a demonstration program has been pursued in Japan for the commercial utilization in the late 1990s. Such a worldwide trend indicates that the utilization of MOX fuel in LWRs is a proven technology and meets economics criteria. (Author)

  15. Fuel recycling and 4. generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devezeaux de Lavergne, J.G.; Gauche, F.; Mathonniere, G.

    2012-01-01

    The 4. generation reactors meet the demand for sustainability of nuclear power through the saving of the natural resources, the minimization of the volume of wastes, a high safety standard and a high reliability. In the framework of the GIF (Generation 4. International Forum) France has decided to study the sodium-cooled fast reactor. Fast reactors have the capacity to recycle plutonium efficiently and to burn actinides. The long history of reprocessing-recycling of spent fuels in France is an asset. A prototype reactor named ASTRID could be entered into operation in 2020. This article presents the research program on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, gives the status of the ASTRID project and present the scenario of the progressive implementation of 4. generation reactors in the French reactor fleet. (A.C.)

  16. Safeguards and nonproliferation aspects of a dry fuel recycling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory undertook an independent assessment of the proliferation potentials and safeguardability of a dry fuel recycling technology, whereby spent pressurized-water reactor (PWR) fuels are used to fuel canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors. Objectives of this study included (1) the evaluation of presently available technologies that may be useful to safeguard technology options for dry fuel recycling (2) and identification of near-term and long-term research needs to develop process-specific safeguards requirements. The primary conclusion of this assessment is that like all other fuel cycle alternatives proposed in the past, the dry fuel recycle entails prolfferation risks and that there are no absolute technical fixes to eliminate such risks. This study further concludes that the proliferation risks of dry fuel recycling options are relatively minimal and presently known safeguards systems and technologies can be modified and/or adapted to meet the requirements of safeguarding such fuel recycle facilities

  17. Benefit analysis of reprocessing and recycling light water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The macro-economic impact of reprocessing and recycling fuel for nuclear power reactors is examined, and the impact of reprocessing on the conservation of natural uranium resources is assessed. The LWR fuel recycle is compared with a throwaway cycle, and it is concluded that fuel recycle is favorable on the basis of economics, as well as being highly desirable from the standpoint of utilization of uranium resources

  18. The Westinghouse Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor, AP1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schene, R.

    2009-01-01

    Featuring proven technology and innovative passive safety systems, the Westinghouse AP1000 pressurized water reactor can achieve competitive generation costs in the current electricity market without emitting harmful greenhouse gases and further harming the environment. Westinghouse Electric Company, the pioneer in nuclear energy once again sets a new industry standard with the AP1000. The AP1000 is a two-loop pressurized water reactor that uses simplified, innovative and effective approach to safety. With a gross power rating of 3415 megawatt thermal and a nominal net electrical output of 1117 megawatt electric, the AP1000 is ideal for new base load generation. The AP1000 is the safest and most economical nuclear power plant available in the worldwide commercial marketplace, and is the only Generation III+ reactor to receive a design certification from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Based on nearly 20 years of research and development, the AP1000 builds and improves upon the established technology of major components used in current Westinghouse designed plants. These components, including steam generators, digital instrumentation and controls, fuel, pressurizers, and reactor vessels, are currently in use around the world and have years of proven, reliable operating experience. Historically, Westinghouse plant designs and technology have forged the cutting edge technology of nuclear plant around the world. Today, nearly 50 percent of the world's 440 nuclear plants are based on Westinghouse technology. Westinghouse continues to be the nuclear industry's global leader. (author)

  19. Energy Return on Investment - Fuel Recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsey, W.; Simon, A.J.; Fratoni, M.; Smith, C.; Schwab, P.; Murray, P.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a methodology and requisite data to assess the potential Energy Return On Investment (EROI) for nuclear fuel cycle alternatives, and applies that methodology to a limited set of used fuel recycle scenarios. This paper is based on a study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a parallel evaluation by AREVA Federal Services LLC, both of which were sponsored by the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program. The focus of the LLNL effort was to develop a methodology that can be used by the FCT program for such analysis that is consistent with the broader energy modeling community, and the focus of the AREVA effort was to bring industrial experience and operational data into the analysis. This cooperative effort successfully combined expertise from the energy modeling community with expertise from the nuclear industry. Energy Return on Investment is one of many figures of merit on which investment in a new energy facility or process may be judged. EROI is the ratio of the energy delivered by a facility divided by the energy used to construct, operate and decommission that facility. While EROI is not the only criterion used to make an investment decision, it has been shown that, in technologically advanced societies, energy supplies must exceed a minimum EROI. Furthermore, technological history shows a trend towards higher EROI energy supplies. EROI calculations have been performed for many components of energy technology: oil wells, wind turbines, photovoltaic modules, biofuels, and nuclear reactors. This report represents the first standalone EROI analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing (or recycling) facilities.

  20. Survey report on the status of new energy in the U.S. On-site research centering on fuel cell, hydrogen energy, and wind energy (Westinghouse Electric Corporation); Beikoku shin energy jijo chosa hokokusho. Nenryo denchi, suiso furyoku energy wo chushin to suru jicchi chosa (Westinghouse Electric Corporation hen)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-02-01

    Under the auspices of the New Energy Foundation and the New Energy Industrial Forum technical development committee, a survey team is sent to the U.S. and conducts investigations there about fuel cells, hydrogen production, wind power generation, etc. Visited in the U.S. are the Advanced Energy System Division of the Westinghouse Electric Corporation. As for the phosphoric acid fuel cell, research and development is under way so that two 7.5MW demonstration plants will start service operation by 1987. As for the solid oxide fuel cell, a performance test has completed for a 15-cell model, and a life test is now under way. There is a plan to construct a 500kW plant in 1988. In the production of hydrogen by means of the sulfur hybrid decomposition process, a laboratory model with a capacity of 2L/min was built in 1978, and a life test is now under way for the constituent materials and catalysts. In the field of wind power, the Westinghouse Electric Corporation has developed a 200kW generator, which is now in operation in Mexico, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, and Hawaii. (NEDO)

  1. Multiple recycling of fuel in prototype fast breeder reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the FBR closed fuel cycle, possibility of multi-recycle has been recognized. In the present study, Pu-239 equivalence approach is used to demonstrate the feasibility of achieving near constant input inventory of Pu and near stable Pu isotopic composition after a few recycles of the same fuel of the prototype fast breeder ...

  2. Recycling : The advanced fuel cycle for existing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamorlette, Guy

    1994-01-01

    In 1993, the Installed capacity of the world's 427 nuclear power plants was over 335 GWe. Additional plants representing 67 GWe were under construction or on order. Taking construction schedules into consideration, their start-up will stretch out over a period of ten years. Nuclear power will therefore increase by 20% at best in ten years, transiting into a relatively modest 2% average annual growth rate. Of these units, about 80% are light water reactors, whether PWR, BWR, or WER. All of these reactors utilize enriched uranium oxide fuel clad with zirconium alloy. From a fuel perspective, these reactors form a pretty homogeneous group. During reactor residence, energy is supplied by fission of three-fourths of the Initial uranium 235, but also by plutonium fission, which is formed in the fuel as soon as it is Irradiated. The plutonium supplies 40% of the generated power. When the fuel is unloaded, it consists of four elements : fission products and structural materials, such as cladding and end-fittings, which are the reel waste, and residual plutonium and uranium, which are energy materials that can be recycled in accordance with French legislation applicable to both non-nuclear and nuclear industries : 'the purpose of this law is to... make use of waste by reusing, recycling or otherwise obtaining reusable material or energy from.'. The nuclear power industry has entered a phase in which most of its capital-intensive projects are behind it. Now, It must depose Itself to ensuring the competitiveness of nuclear energy compared to other sources of power generation, while protecting the environment and respecting safety regulations. Significant gains have been achieved by improving fuel performance : optimization of fuel design, utilization of less neutron-absorbent materials, and increases in fuel burn-up have made it possible to increase the amount of energy derived from one kilogram of natural uranium by more than 50%. Recycling of the fuel in light water reactor

  3. Feasibility study for adapting ITREC plant to reprocessing LMFBR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moccia, A.; Rolandi, G.

    1976-05-01

    The report evaluates the feasibility of adapting ITREC plant to the reprocessing LMFBR fuels, with the double purpose of: 1) recovering valuable Pu contained in these fuels and recycling it to the fabrication plant; 2) trying, on a pilot scale, the chemical process technology to be applied in a future industrial plant for reprocessing the fuel elements discharged from fast breeder power reactors

  4. Analysis of fuel options for the breakeven core configuration of the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauff, N.E.; Klim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Fiorina, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Franceschini, F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC., Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A trade-off study is performed to determine the impacts of various fuel forms on the core design and core physics characteristics of the sodium-cooled Toshiba- Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR). The fuel forms include oxide, nitride, and metallic forms of U and Th. The ARR core configuration is redesigned with driver and blanket regions in order to achieve breakeven fissile breeding performance with the various fuel types. State-of-the-art core physics tools are used for the analyses. In addition, a quasi-static reactivity balance approach is used for a preliminary comparison of the inherent safety performances of the various fuel options. Thorium-fueled cores exhibit lower breeding ratios and require larger blankets compared to the U-fueled cores, which is detrimental to core compactness and increases reprocessing and manufacturing requirements. The Th cores also exhibit higher reactivity swings through each cycle, which penalizes reactivity control and increases the number of control rods required. On the other hand, using Th leads to drastic reductions in void and coolant expansion coefficients of reactivity, with the potential for enhancing inherent core safety. Among the U-fueled ARR cores, metallic and nitride fuels result in higher breeding ratios due to their higher heavy metal densities. On the other hand, oxide fuels provide a softer spectrum, which increases the Doppler effect and reduces the positive sodium void worth. A lower fuel temperature is obtained with the metallic and nitride fuels due to their higher thermal conductivities and compatibility with sodium bonds. This is especially beneficial from an inherent safety point of view since it facilitates the reactor cool-down during loss of power removal transients. The advantages in terms of inherent safety of nitride and metallic fuels are maintained when using Th fuel. However, there is a lower relative increase in heavy metal density and in breeding ratio going from oxide to metallic

  5. Design study of advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. Conceptual study of recycle system using molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakehi, I.; Shirai, N.; Hatano, M.; Kajitani, M.; Yonezawa, S.; Kawai, T.; Kawamura, F.; Tobe, K.; Takahashi, K.

    1996-12-01

    For the purpose of developing the future nuclear fuel recycle system, the design study of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system is being conducted. This report describes intermediate accomplishments in the conceptual system study of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. Fundamental concepts of this system is the recycle system using molten salt which intend to break through the conventional concepts of purex and pellet fuel system. Contents of studies in this period are as follows, 1)feasibility study of the process by Cd-cathode for nitride fuel, 2)application study for the molten salt of low melting point (AlCl3+organic salt), 3)research for decladding (advantage of decladding by heat treatment), 4)behavior of FPs in electrorefining (behavior of iodine and volatile FP chlorides, FPs behavior in chlorination), 5)criticality analysis in electrorefiner, 6)drawing of off-gas flow diagram, 7)drawing of process machinery concept (cathode processor, vibration packing), 8)evaluation for the amounts of the high level radioactive wastes, 9)quality of the recycle fuels (FPs contamination of recycle fuel), 10)conceptual study of in-cell handling system, 11)meaning of the advanced nuclear fuel recycle system. The conceptual system study will be completed in describing concepts of the system and discussing issues for the developments. (author)

  6. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  7. Shield requirement estimation for pin storage room in fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanthi, M.M.; Keshavamurthy, R.S.; Sivashankaran, G.

    2012-01-01

    Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle Facility (FRFCF) is an upcoming project in Kalpakkam. It has the facility to recycle the fuel from PFBR. It is an integrated facility, consists of fuel reprocessing plant, fuel fabrication plant (FFP), core subassembly plant, Reprocessed Uranium plant (RUP) and waste management plant. The spent fuel from PFBR would be reprocessed in fuel reprocessing plant. The reprocessed fuel material would be sent to fuel fabrication plant. The main activity of fuel fabrication plant is the production of MOX fuel pins. The fuel fabrication plant has a fuel pin storage room. The shield requirement for the pin storage room has been estimated by Monte Carlo method. (author)

  8. Nuclear Fuel Leasing, Recycling and proliferation: Modeling a Global View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crozat, M P; Choi, J; Reis, V H; Hill, R

    2004-01-01

    On February 11, 2004, U.S. President George W. Bush, in a speech to the National Defense University stated: ''The world must create a safe, orderly system to field civilian nuclear plants without adding to the danger of weapons proliferation. The world's leading nuclear exporters should ensure that states have reliable access at reasonable cost to fuel for civilian reactors, so long as those states renounce enrichment and reprocessing. Enrichment and reprocessing are not necessary for nations seeking to harness nuclear energy for peaceful purposes.'' This concept would require nations to choose one of two paths for civilian nuclear development: those that only have reactors and those that contain one or more elements of the nuclear fuel cycle, including recycling. ''Fuel cycle'' states would enrich uranium, manufacture and lease fuel to ''reactor'' states and receive the reactor states' spent fuel. All parties would accede to stringent security and safeguard standards, embedded within a newly invigorated international regime. Reactor states would be relieved of the financial, environmental (and political) burden of enriching and manufacturing fuel and dealing with spent fuel. Fuel cycle states would potentially earn money on leasing the fuel and perhaps on sales of reactors to the reactor states. Such a leasing concept is especially interesting in scenarios which envision growth in nuclear power, and an important consideration for such a nuclear growth regime is the role of recycling of civilian spent fuel. Recycling holds promise for improved management of spent fuel and efficient utilization of resources, but continues to raise the specter of a world with uncontrolled nuclear weapons proliferation. If done effectively, a fuel-leasing concept could help create a political and economic foundation for significant growth of clean, carbon-free nuclear power while providing a mechanism for significant international cooperation to reduce proliferation concern. This

  9. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Programe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulyak, Nick

    2014-01-01

    -pressure, compact design that normally operates at a partial vacuum. This facilitates heat removal from the containment during LOCA events. This compact containment will be completely submerged in water during power operation providing a heat sink for postulated accidents which also aides the heat removal and provides an additional radionuclide filter. For protection against external threats, the containment vessel and plant safety systems are located below ground level. At a diameter of 32 feet, approximately 25 of the Westinghouse SMR containment vessels can fit within the envelope of the AP1000 containment building. The Westinghouse SMR NTSSS consists of an integral reactor vessel within a compact containment vessel. The core is located in the bottom of the reactor vessel and will be fueled by a derivative of the successful 17x17 Robust Fuel Assembly (RFA) product. An 89 assembly core with an active height of 2,4 m (8 feet) will provide a 24 month operating cycle with a power output of 800 MWt. Derived from the AP1000 plant and adapted to operate inside the reactor pressure vessel, 37 control rod drive mechanisms provide reactor shutdown and reactivity control capabilities. Eight seal less pumps provide a nominal reactor coolant flow of 100,000 gallons per minute. An innovative evolution of a straight tube steam generator produces a saturated mixture that is delivered to a steam separating drum located outside of the containment vessel. The steam generator along with the integral pressurizer is attached to the reactor vessel with a single closure flange located near the center of gravity of the reactor assembly and is designed to be removed during refueling operations. Like the AP1000 plant, the Westinghouse SMR relies on the natural forces of gravity and natural circulation to provide core and containment cooling during accident conditions. At approximately one fifth the net electrical output of the AP1000 plant, the Westinghouse SMR is designed to address infrastructure

  10. Energy Return on Investment from Recycling Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the Energy Return on Investment (EROI) from recycling an initial batch of 800 t/y of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through a Recycle Center under a number of different fuel cycle scenarios. The study assumed that apart from the original 800 t of UNF only depleted uranium was available as a feed. Therefore for each subsequent scenario only fuel that was derived from the previous fuel cycle scenario was considered. The scenarios represent a good cross section of the options available and the results contained in this paper and associated appendices will allow for other fuel cycle options to be considered.

  11. Westinghouse Hanford Company plan for certifying newly generated contact-handled transuranic waste for emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, R.M.; Sheehan, J.S.

    1992-07-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) currently manages an interim storage site for Westinghouse Hanford and non-Westinghouse Hanford-generated transuranic (TRU) waste and operates TRU waste generating facilities within the Hanford Site in Washington State. Approval has been received from the Waste Acceptance Criteria Certification Committee (WACCC) and Westinghouse Hanford TRU waste generating facilities to certify newly generated contact-handled TRU (CH-TRU) solid waste to meet the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). This document describes the plan for certifying newly generated CH-TRU solid waste to meet the WAC requirements for storage at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. Attached to this document are facility-specific certification plans for the Westinghouse Hanford TRU waste generators that have received WACCC approval. The certification plans describe operations that generate CH-TRU solid waste and the specific procedures by which these wastes will be certified and segregated from uncertified wastes at the generating facilities. All newly generated CH-TRU solid waste is being transferred to the Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF) and/or a controlled storage facility. These facilities will store the waste until the certified TRU waste can be sent to the WIPP site and the non-certified TRU waste can be sent to the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility. All non-certifiable TRU waste will be segregated and clearly identified

  12. Pneumatic transport system development: residuals and releases program at Westinghouse Cheswick site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larouere, P.J.; Shoulders, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Plutonium oxide and uranium oxide powders are processed within glove boxes or within confinement systems during the fabrication of mixed oxide (MOX) pellets for recycle fuel. The release of these powders to the glove box or to the confinement results in some airborne material that is deposited in the enclosure or is carried in the air streams to the effluent air filtration system. Release tests on simulated leaks in pneumatic transport equipment and release tests on simulated failures with powder blending equipment were conducted. A task to develop pneumatic transport for the movement of powders within an MOX fabrication plant has been underway at the Westinghouse Research Laboratories. While testing and evaluating selected pneumatic transport components on a full scale were in progress, it was deemed necessary that final verification of the technology would have to be performed with plutonium-bearing powders because of the marked differences in certain properties of plutonium from those of uranium oxides. A smaller was designed and constructed for the planned installation in glove boxes at the Westinghouse Plutonium Fuel Development Laboratory. However, prior to use with plutonium it was agreed that this system be set up and tested with uranium oxide powder. The test program conducted at the Westinghouse Cheswick site was divided into two major parts. The first of these examined the residuals left as a result of the pneumatic transport of nuclear fuel powders and verified the operability of this one-third scale system. The second part of the program studied the amount of powder released to the air when off-standard process procedures or maintenance operations were conducted on the pneumatic transport system. Air samplers located within the walk-in box housing the transport loop were used to measure the solids concentration in the air. From this information, the total amount of airborne powder was determined

  13. Development of recycling processes for clean rejected MOX fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khot, P.M.; Singh, G.; Shelke, B.K.; Surendra, B.; Yadav, M.K.; Mishra, A.K.; Afzal, Mohd.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dry and wet (MWDD) methods were developed for 100% recycling of CRO (0.4–44% PuO 2 ). • Dry method showed higher productivity and comparable powder/product characteristics. • MWDD batches demonstrated improved powder/product characteristics to that of virgin. • Second/multiple recycling is possible with MWDD with better powder/product characteristics. • MWDD batches prepared by little milling showed better macroscopic homogeneity to that of virgin. - Abstract: The dry and wet recycling processes have been developed for 100% recycling of Clean Reject Oxide (CRO) generated during the fabrication of MOX fuel, as CRO contains significant amount of plutonium. Plutonium being strategic material need to be circumvented from its proliferation issues related to its storage for long period. It was difficult to recycle CRO containing higher Pu content even with multiple oxidation and reduction steps. The mechanical recycling comprising of jaw crushing and sieving has been coupled with thermal pulverization for recycling CRO with higher Pu content in dry recycling technique. In wet recycling, MicroWave Direct Denitration (MWDD) technique has been developed for 100% recycling of CRO. The powder prepared by dry and wet (MWDD) recycling techniques was characterized by XRD and BET techniques and their effects on the pellets were evaluated. (U,21%Pu)O 2 pellets fabricated from virgin powder and MWDD were characterized using optical microscopy and α-autoradiography and the results obtained were compared

  14. Root cause of incomplete control rod insertions at Westinghouse reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, S.

    1997-01-01

    Within the past year, incomplete RCCA insertions have been observed on high burnup fuel assemblies at two Westinghouse PWRs. Initial tests at the Wolf Creek site indicated that the direct cause of the incomplete insertions observed at Wolf Creek was excessive fuel assembly thimble tube distortion. Westinghouse committed to the NRC to perform a root cause analysis by the end of August, 1996. The root cause analysis process used by Westinghouse included testing at ten sites to obtain drag, growth and other characteristics of high burnup fuel assemblies. It also included testing at the Westinghouse hot cell of two of the Wolf Creek incomplete insertion assemblies. A mechanical model was developed to calculate the response of fuel assemblies when subjected to compressive loads. Detailed manufacturing reviews were conducted to determine if this was a manufacturing related issue. In addition, a review of available worldwide experience was performed. Based on the above, it was concluded that the thimble tube distortion observed on the Wolf Creek incomplete insertion assemblies was caused by unusual fuel assembly growth over and above what would typically be expected as a result of irradiation exposure. It was determined that the unusual growth component is a combination of growth due to oxide accumulation and accelerated growth, and would only be expected in high temperature plants on fuel assemblies that see long residence times and high power duties

  15. Recycling as an option of used nuclear fuel management strategy for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiguer, M.; Casabianca, J.L.; Gros, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    As soon as the civil nuclear power age got underway, it became unthinkable to imagine generating nuclear electricity without recycling nuclear materials. In every country where this form of energy was being developed, construction programs involved not only power plants, but also fuel cycle facilities, notably dedicated to recovering and recycling nuclear material. Today, the nuclear renaissance coupled with growing concerns about energy security and public acceptance will provide a trigger for European nuclear countries to look back on three decades of Recycling used nuclear fuel excellent track record. In addition, back-end policy is more and more one of the major topics that nuclear countries and utilities have to face when managing existing as well as a new nuclear power plant. 'What will be done with the used fuel' is a key question, especially in terms of public acceptance. Countries that have previously postponed this topic now have to rethink the best solution for complete sustainable nuclear power. With several decades of experience and excellent feedback recycling has reached a maturity throughout all its supply chain and therefore constitutes the best response. The outcome is outstanding performance in reactors of recycled fuels and a robust, economical and optimized solution to ultimate waste management, in other words: - Recycling allows to significantly reduce the volume and toxicity of the ultimate waste to be interim stored and disposed of while enhancing proliferation resistance, - Recycling features competitive and predictable economics, - Recycling Used Nuclear Fuel supports the sustainable development of nuclear power allowing mitigating supply risks. All this helps to increase public support towards nuclear energy and insure the sustainable development of nuclear energy here and now. (authors)

  16. Safety recycling of reactor fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinlaender, W.

    Additionally to the measures, which descent from the conventional safety techniques, a series of supplementary protective measures have to be taken in connection with the Atomic Energy Law, the Radiation Protection Ordinance and the nuclear-technical practice, which in particular guarantee a safe enclosure and a safe residual heat rejection of the handled radioactive material and an avoidance of nuclear chain reactions. The most important plant malfunctions to be considered within the scope of the plant safety control according to the atomic law are, the radioactivity release due to mechanical damage of fuel elements, containment leakage, explosions in process equipment and/or vessels, burning of run out organic solvents, criticality malfunctions, and the already mentioned accidental failure of after-heat removal. If we let alone the extremely low probabilities for the occurrence of such accidents due to the selected methods, the layout of the equipment and by taking the required quality warranty measures into consideration, and infer such accidents in spite of this, the resulting radiation doses outside the plant are in all cases much lower than 5 rem, which is the design limit according to the regulations for radiation protection. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Cost benefit analysis of recycling nuclear fuel cycle in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jewhan; Chang, Soonheung

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has become an essential part of electricity generation to meet the continuous growth of electricity demand. The importance if nuclear waste management has been the main issue since the beginning of nuclear history. The recycling nuclear fuel cycle includes the fast reactor, which can burn the nuclear wastes, and the pyro-processing technology, which can reprocess the spent nuclear fuel. In this study, a methodology using Linear Programming (LP) is employed to evaluate the cost and benefits of introducing the recycling strategy and thus, to see the competitiveness of recycling fuel cycle. The LP optimization involves tradeoffs between the fast reactor capital cost with pyro-processing cost premiums and the total system uranium price with spent nuclear fuel management cost premiums. With the help of LP and sensitivity analysis, the effect of important parameters is presented as well as the target values for each cost and price of key factors

  18. Criticality and fire-fighting - Recent developments at Westinghouse, Springfields Fuels Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D. A.; Clemson, P. D.

    2009-01-01

    Fire-fighting advice in criticality-controlled areas has traditionally presented unique challenges to the nuclear industry, primarily because of the introduction of moderators / reflectors from water and foam and the potential rearrangement of materials. In an actual emergency, the decision to use water-based fire extinguishing methods is best influenced by a consensus between the criticality and fire specialists as part of the emergency planning process. A recent review of the fire-fighting arrangements at the site operated by Springfields Fuels Limited (SFL) in Preston in the United Kingdom has identified that more detailed guidance may be valuable relating to the specific areas and materials at risk, particularly to highlight the degree of risk and provide guidance on the risk of criticality if water-based fire extinguishing methods were deemed necessary. This has prompted consideration of a criticality 'Fire Tag' system, consisting of colour coded markers in the area (an immediate visual indicator of both the degree of risk and the appropriate fire-fighting response) and single sheet cards (specific guidance for the areas and materials at risk), with the process supported by appropriate training. The approach is currently being trialled on a small scale, and initial feedback from personnel has been positive. (authors)

  19. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor nuclear steam supply system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memmott, M. J.; Harkness, A. W.; Van Wyk, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 600 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Twp. PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the first in a series of four papers which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. Also described in this series are the key drivers influencing the design of the Westinghouse SMR and the unique passive safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. Several critical motivators contributed to the development and integration of the Westinghouse SMR design. These design driving motivators dictated the final configuration of the Westinghouse SMR to varying degrees, depending on the specific features under consideration. These design drivers include safety, economics, AP1000{sup R} reactor expertise and experience, research and development requirements, functionality of systems and components, size of the systems and vessels, simplicity of design, and licensing requirements. The Westinghouse SMR NSSS consists of an integral reactor vessel within a compact containment vessel. The core is located in the bottom of the reactor vessel and is composed of 89 modified Westinghouse 17x17 Robust Fuel Assemblies (RFA). These modified fuel assemblies have an active core length of only 2.4 m (8 ft) long, and the entirety of the core is encompassed by a radial reflector. The Westinghouse SMR core operates on a 24 month fuel cycle. The reactor vessel is approximately 24.4 m (80 ft) long and 3.7 m (12 ft) in diameter in order to facilitate standard rail shipping to the site. The reactor vessel houses hot and cold leg channels to facilitate coolant flow, control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM), instrumentation and cabling, an intermediate flange to separate flow and instrumentation and facilitate simpler refueling, a pressurizer, a straight tube, recirculating steam

  20. COGEMA's national advertising campaign concerning nuclear fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallot, Christine

    1999-01-01

    Goals of COGEMA's advertising campaign concerning nuclear fuel recycling are to: speak out in an area where COGEMA has legitimacy and is expected; and to take part in the discussion to support and defend an activity that is important for COGEMA. Targets are: back up opinion relays by reaching the general public; and back COGEMA personnel. The advertising strategy can be defined as follows: what is recommended for other industries (sorting and then recycling) is COGEMA's practice for spent fuel, with very significant advantages for the community in terms of economy and ecology

  1. Non-chemical water purification a Westinghouse/Wallenius product for nuclear power plant needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetberg, J.; Carlsson, M.

    2014-01-01

    . Westinghouse has together with Wallenius adapted this technology for the nuclear business. A product line based on the Wallenius AOT-technology have been established and verified

  2. Heterogeneous Recycle of Transuranics Fuels in Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, Edward; Taiwo, Temitope; Hill, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary physics evaluation of the impacts of heterogeneous recycle using Pu+Np driver and minor actinide target fuel assemblies in fast reactor cores has been performed by comparing results to those obtained for a reference homogeneous recycle core using driver assemblies containing grouped transuranic (TRU) fuel. Parametric studies are performed on the reference heterogeneous recycle core to evaluate the impacts of variations in the pre- and post-separation cooling times, target material type (uranium and non-uranium based), target amount and location, and other parameters on the system performance. This study focused on startup, single-pass cores for the purpose of quantifying impacts and also included comparisons to the option of simply storing the LWR spent nuclear fuel over a 50-year period. An evaluation of homogeneous recycle cores with elevated minor actinide contents is presented to illustrate the impact of using progressively higher TRU content on the core and transmutation performance, as a means of starting with known fuel technology with the aim of ultimately employing grouped TRU fuel in such cores. Reactivity coefficients and safety parameters are presented to indicate that the cores evaluated appear workable from a safety perspective, though more detailed safety and systems evaluations are required. (authors)

  3. Westinghouse support for Spanish nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebollo, R.

    1999-01-01

    One of the major commitments Westinghouse has with the nuclear industry is to provide to the utilities the support necessary to have their nuclear units operating at optimum levels of availability and safety. This article outlines the organization the Energy Systems Business Unit of Westinghouse has in place to fulfill this commitment and describes the evolution of the support Westinghouse is providing to the operation o f the Spanish Nuclear Power plants. (Author)

  4. Used fuel packing plant for CANDU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzies, I.; Thayer, B.; Bains, N., E-mail: imenzies@atsautomation.com [ATS Automation, Cambridge, ON (Canada); Murchison, A., E-mail: amurchison@nwmo.ca [NWMO, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Large forgings have been selected to containerize Light Water Reactor used nuclear fuel. CANDU fuel, which is significantly smaller in size, allows novel approaches for containerization. For example, by utilizing commercially available extruded ASME pipe a conceptual design of a Used Fuel Packing Plant for containerization of used CANDU fuel in a long lived metallic container has been developed. The design adopts a modular approach with multiple independent work cells to transfer and containerize the used fuel. Based on current technologies and concepts from proven industrial systems, the Used Fuel Packing Plant can assemble twelve used fuel containers per day considering conservative levels of process availability. (author)

  5. Experimental validation of CASMO-4E and CASMO-5M for radial fission rate distributions in a westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 BWR fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, P.; Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    Measured and calculated radial total fission rate distributions are compared for the three axial sections of a Westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 BWR fuel assembly, comprising 96, 92 and 84 fuel rods, respectively. The measurements were performed on a full-size fuel assembly in the PROTEUS zero-power experimental facility. The measured fission rates are compared to the results of the CASMO-4E and CASMO-5M fuel assembly codes. Detailed measured geometrical data were used in the models, and effects of the surrounding zones of the reactor were taken into account by correction factors derived from MCNPX calculations. The results of the calculations agree well with those of the experiments, with root-mean-square deviations between 1.2% and 1.5% and maximum deviations of 3-4%. The quality of the predictions by CASMO-4E and CASMO-5M is comparable. (authors)

  6. Quantifying Tc-99 contamination in a fuel fabrication plant - 59024

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbyshire, Carol; Burgess, Pete

    2012-01-01

    The Springfields facility manufactures nuclear fuel products for the UK's nuclear power stations and for international customers. Fuel manufacture is scheduled to continue into the future. In addition to fuel manufacture, Springfields is also undertaking decommissioning activities. Today it is run and operated by Springfields Fuels Limited, under the management of Westinghouse Electric UK Limited. The site has been operating since 1946 manufacturing nuclear fuel. As part of the decommissioning activities, there was a need was to quantify contamination in a large redundant building. This building had been used to process uranium derived from uranium ore concentrate but had also processed a limited quantity of recycled uranium. The major non-uranic contaminant was Tc-99. The aim was to be able to identify any areas where the bulk activity exceeded 0.4 Bq/g Tc-99 as this would preclude the demolition rubble being sent to the local disposal facility. The problems associated with this project were the presence of significant uranium contamination, the realisation that both the Tc-99 and the uranium had diffused into the brickwork to a significant depth and the relatively low beta energy of Tc-99. The uranium was accompanied by Pa-234m, an energetic beta emitter. The concentration/depth profile was determined for several areas on the plant for Tc-99 and for uranium. The radiochemical analysis was performed locally but the performance of the local laboratory was checked during the initial investigation by splitting samples three ways and having confirmation analyses performed by 2 other laboratories. The results showed surprisingly consistent concentration gradients for Tc-99 and for uranium across the samples. Using that information, the instrument response was calculated for Tc-99 using the observed diffusion gradient and averaged through the full 225 mm of brick wall, as agreed by the regulator. The Tc-99 and uranium contributions to the detector signal were separated

  7. Safety evaluation of a conceptual fuel recycle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodges, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual design integration study for an integrated Fuel Recycle Complex (FRC) has been completed. A safety evaluation of the radiation shielding, fire precautions, handling of nonradioactive hazardous materials, criticality hazards, operating errors, and the influence of natural phenomena on the FRC shows that all federal regulations are met or exceeded

  8. Nuclear fuel control in fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yoshitatsu

    1976-01-01

    The basic control problems of measuring uranium and of the environment inside and outside nuclear fuel fabrication plants are reviewed, excluding criticality prevention in case of submergence. The occurrence of loss scraps in fabrication and scrap-recycling, the measuring error, the uranium going cut of the system, the confirmation of the presence of lost uranium and the requirement of the measurement control for safeguard make the measurement control very complicated. The establishment of MBA (material balance area) and ICA (item control area) can make clearer the control of inventories, the control of loss scraps and the control of measuring points. Besides the above basic points, the following points are to be taken into account: 1) the method of confirmation of inventories, 2) the introduction of reliable NDT instruments for the rapid check system for enrichment and amount of uranium, 3) the introduction of real time system, and 4) the clarification of MUF analysis and its application to the reliability check of measurement control system. The environment control includes the controls of the uranium concentration in factory atmosphere, the surface contamination, the space dose rate, the uranium concentration in air and water discharged from factories, and the uranium in liquid wastes. The future problems are the practical restudy of measurement control under NPT, the definite plan of burglary protection and the realization of the disposal of solid wastes. (Iwakiri, K.)

  9. Device for sampling HTGR recycle fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchomel, R.R.; Lackey, W.J.

    1977-03-01

    Devices for sampling High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuel microspheres were evaluated. Analysis of samples obtained with each of two specially designed passive samplers were compared with data generated by more common techniques. A ten-stage two-way sampler was found to produce a representative sample with a constant batch-to-sample ratio

  10. Qualification of a Vitrified High Level Waste Product to Support Used Nuclear Fuel Recycling in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, P.; Bailly, F.; Strachan, D.; Senentz, G.; Veyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), AREVA formed the International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) consisting of recognized world-leading companies in the area of used nuclear fuel (UNF) recycling,. The INRA team, consisting of AREVA, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd (JNFL), Batelle Memorial Institute (BMI), URS Washington Division and Babcock and Wilcox (B and W), prepared a pre-conceptual design for an upgradable engineering-scale recycling plant with a nominal through put of 800 tHM/y. The pre-conceptual design of this leading-edge facility was based upon the extensive experience of the INRA team in recycling plant design and real world 'lessons learned' from actually building, commissioning, and operating recycling facilities in both France and Japan. The conceptual flowsheet, based upon the COEX TM separations process, separates the useful products for recycling into new fuel and sentences all the remaining fission products and minor actinides (MA) to the high level waste, (HLW) for vitrification. The proposed vitrified waste product will be similar to that currently produced in recycling plants in France. This wasteform has been qualified in France by conducting extensive studies and demonstrations. In the US, the qualification of vitrified glass products has been conducted by the US National Laboratories for the Defence Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP), and the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The vitrified waste product produced by recycling is sufficiently different from these current waste forms to warrant additional trials and studies. In this paper we review the differences in the vitrified waste forms previously qualified in the US with that produced from recycling of UNF in France. The lessons learned from qualifying a vitrified waste form in Europe is compared to the current US process for vitrified waste qualification including waste

  11. External costs of material recycling strategies for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallberg, B.; Aquilonius, K.; Lechon, Y.; Cabal, H.; Saez, R.M.; Schneider, T.; Lepicard, S.; Ward, D.; Hamacher, T.; Korhonen, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper is based on studies performed within the framework of the project Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF3). Several fusion power plant designs (SEAFP Models 1-6) were compared focusing on part of the plant's life cycle: environmental impact of recycling the materials. Recycling was considered for materials replaced during normal operation, as well as materials from decommissioning of the plant. Environmental impact was assessed and expressed as external cost normalised with the total electrical energy output during plant operation. The methodology used for this study has been developed by the Commission of the European Union within the frame of the ExternE project. External costs for recycling, normalised with the energy production during plant operation, are very low compared with those for other energy sources. Results indicate that a high degree of recycling is preferable, at least when considering external costs, because external costs of manufacturing of new materials and disposal costs are higher

  12. Development of a fissile particle for HTGR fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Lindemer, T.B.; Beatty, R.L.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1976-12-01

    Recycle fissile fuel particles for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) have been under development since the mid-1960s. Irradiation performance on early UO 2 and Th 0 . 8 U 0 . 2 O 2 kernels is described in this report, and the performance limitations associated with the dense oxide kernels are presented. The development of the new reference fuel kernel, the weak-acid-resin-derived (WAR) UO 2 --UC 2 , is discussed in detail, including an extensive section on the irradiation performance of this fuel in HFIR removable beryllium capsules HRB-7 through -10. The conclusion is reached that the irradiation performance of the WAR fissile fuel kernel is better than that of any coated particle fuel yet tested. Further, the present fissile kernel is adequate for steam cycle HTGRs as well as for many advanced applications such as gas turbine and process heat HTGRs

  13. Generation of floor response spectra for mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, D.F.; Murray, R.C.; Tokarz, F.J.

    1975-01-01

    Floor or amplified response spectra are generally used as input motion for seismic analysis of critical equipment and piping in nuclear power plants and related facilities. The floor spectra are normally the result of a time-history calculation of building response to ground shaking. However, alternate approximate methods have been suggested by both Kapur and Biggs. As part of a study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission horizontal floor response spectra were generated and compared by all three methods. The dynamic analyses were performed on a model of the Westinghouse Recycle Fuels Plant Manufacturing Building (MOFFP). Input to the time-history calculations was a synthesized accelerogram whose response spectrum is similar to that in Regulatory Guide 1.60. The response spectrum of the synthetic ground motion was used as input to the Kapur and Biggs methods. Calculations were performed for both hard (3500 fps) and soft (1500 fps) foundation soils. Results of comparison of the three methods indicate that although the approximate methods could easily be made acceptable from a safety standpoint, they would be overly conservative. The time-history method will yield floor spectra which are less uncertain and less conservative for a relatively modest additional effort. (auth)

  14. Melting of fuel element racks and their recycling as granulate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, U.; Kluth, T.; Kreh, R.

    1998-01-01

    In order to increase the storage capacity for spent fuel elements in the Spanish NPPs of Almaraz and Asco, the existing racks were replaced by compact one in 1991/1993. The 28 racks from Almaraz NPP were cut on site, packed in 200-I-drums and taken to intermediate storage. For the remaining 28 racks of Asco NPP, ENRESA preferred the melting alternative. To demonstrate the recycling path melting in Germany, a test campaign with six racks was performed in 1997. As a result of this test melt, the limits for Carla melting plant were modified to 200 Bq/g total, α, β, γ 100 Bq/g nuclear fuels, max. 3g/100 kg 2,000 Bq/g total Fe55, H 3 , C-14 and Ni63. After the test melt campaign, the German authorities licensed the import and treatment of the remaining 22 racks on the condition that the waste resulting from the melting process as well as the granules produced were taken back to Spain. The shipment from Asco via France to Germany has been carried out in F 20-ft-IPII containers in accordance with ADR. Size reduction to chargeable dimensions was carried out by a plasma burner and hydraulic shears. For melting, a 3.2 Mg medium frequency induction furnace, operated in a separate housing, was used. For granules production outside this housing, the liquid iron was cast into a 5Mg ladle and then, through a water jet, into the granulating basin. The total mass of 287,659 Kg of 28 fuel elements racks and components of the storage basin yielded 297,914 kg of iron granulate. Secondary waste from melting amounted to 9,920 kg, corresponding to 3.45% of the input mass. The granulating process produced 6,589 kg, corresponding to 2.28% of the total mass to be melted. Radiological analysis of samples taken from the melt and different waste components confirmed the main nuclides Co60, Cs134 and Cs137. Fe55 was highly overestimated by the preliminary analysis. (Author) 2 refs

  15. Towards Multi Fuel SOFC Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud; Clausen, Lasse Røngaard; Bang-Møller, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Complete Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) plants fed by several different fuels are suggested and analyzed. The plants sizes are about 10 kW which is suitable for single family house with needs for both electricity and heat. Alternative fuels such as, methanol, DME (Di-Methyl Ether) and ethanol...... are also considered and the results will be compared with the base plant fed by Natural Gas (NG). A single plant design will be suggested that can be fed with methanol, DME and ethanol whenever these fuels are available. It will be shown that the plant fed by ethanol will have slightly higher electrical...

  16. Feasibility Study on Nitrogen-15 Enrichment and Recycling System for Innovative FR Cycle System With Nitride Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki Inoue; Kiyoshi Ono; Tsuna-aki Fujioka; Koji Sato; Takeo Asaga

    2002-01-01

    Highly-isotopically-enriched nitrogen (HE-N 2 ; 15 N abundance 99.9%) is indispensable for a nitride fueled fast reactor (FR) cycle to minimize the effect of carbon-14 ( 14 C) generated mainly by 14 N(n,p) 14 C reaction in the core on environmental burden. Thus, the development of inexpensive 15 N enrichment and recycling technology is one of the key aspects for the commercialization of a nitride fueled FR cycle. Nitrogen isotope separation by the gas adsorption technique was experimentally confirmed in order to obtain its technological perspective. A conventional pressure swing adsorption technique, which is already commercialized for recovering the nitrogen gas from multi-composition gas-mixture, would be suitable for recovering in both reprocessing and fuel fabrication to recycle the HE-N 2 gas. A couple of the nitride fuel cycle system concepts including the reprocessing and fuel fabrication process flow diagrams with the HE-N 2 gas recycling were newly designed for both aqueous and non-aqueous (pyrochemical) nitride fuel recycle plants, and also the effect of the HE-N 2 gas recycling on the economics of each concept was evaluated. (authors)

  17. Fuel cycle model and the cost of a recycling thorium in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok; Park, Chang Je

    2005-01-01

    The dry process fuel technology has a high proliferation-resistance, which allows applications not only to the existing but also to the future nuclear fuel cycle systems. In this study, the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 recycling fuel cycle in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor was assessed for a fuel cycle cost evaluation. A series of parametric calculations were performed for the uranium fraction, enrichment of the initial uranium fuel, and the fission product removal rated of the recycled fuel. The fuel cycle cost was estimated by the levelized lifetime cost model provided by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency. Though it is feasible to recycle the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel in the CANDU reactor from the viewpoint of a mass balance, the recycling fuel cycle cost is much higher than the conventional natural uranium fuel cycle cost for most cases due to the high fuel fabrication cost. (author)

  18. The European experience in safeguarding nuclear fuel recycle processes and Pu stores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synetos, Sotiris

    2013-01-01

    Civil nuclear programs in the European Union member states have from their onset included fuel recycling as an option. The EURATOM Treaty gives to the European Commission the obligation to apply safeguards controls to all civil Nuclear Material in the European Union, and to facilitate the implementation of IAEA safeguards. The European Commission (EURATOM) has thus gained years of experience in safeguarding reprocessing plants, Pu storages, and MOX fuel fabrication plants and is currently participating in the development of approaches and measures for safeguarding long term repositories. The aim of this paper is to present the regulator's views and experience on safeguarding nuclear fuel recycle processes and Pu stores, which is based on the following principles: -) Early involvement of the control organizations in the design of the safeguards measures to be developed for a plant (currently referred to as Safeguards by Design); -) Early definition of a safeguards strategy including key measurement points; -) The design and development of plant specific Safeguards equipment, including an on site laboratory for sample analysis; -) The development by the operator of an appropriate Nuclear Material accountancy system to facilitate their declaration obligations; -) The introduction of an inspection regime allowing comprehensive controls under the restrictions imposed by financial and Human Resources limitations; -) Optimization of the inspection effort by using unattended measuring stations, containment and surveillance systems and secure remote transmission of data to the regulator's headquarters. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  19. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel recycle development. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Kasten, P.R.

    1978-09-01

    The status of the following tasks is reported: program management, studies and analysis, fuel processing, refabrication development, in-plant waste treatment, research general support, and major facilities including HTGR recycle reference facility, hot engineering test facility and cold prototype test facility-refabrication

  20. TASS code topical report. V.2 TASS code validation report for the non-LOCA transient analysis of the CE and Westinghouse type plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Suk K.; Chang, W. P.; Kim, K. D.; Lee, S. J.; Kim, H. C.; Yoon, H. Y.

    1997-02-01

    The development of TASS 1.0 code has been completed and validated its capability in applying for the licensing transient analyses of the CE and Westinghouse type operating reactors as well as the PWR plants under construction in Korea. The validation of the TASS 1.0 code has been achieved through the comparison calculations of the FSAR transients, loss of AC power transient plant data, load rejection and startup test data for the reference plants as well as the BETHSY loop steam generator tube rupture test data. TASS 1.0 calculation agrees well with the best FSAR transient and shows its capability in simulating plant transient analyses. (author). 12 refs., 32 tabs., 132 figs

  1. Recycling of concrete generated from Nuclear Power Plant dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Hideo; Nawa, Toyoharu; Ishikura, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    Reactor decommissioning required various technologies such as dismantling of facilities, decontamination, radioactivity measurement and recycling of dismantling wastes. This article discussed recycling of demolished concrete wastes. Dismantling of reactor building of large one unit of nuclear power plants would generate about 500 K tons of concrete wastes, about 98% of which was non-radioactive and could be used as base course material or backfill material after crushed to specified particle size. Since later part of 1990s, high quality recycled aggregate with specified limit of bone-dry density, water absorptivity and amount of fine aggregate had been developed from demolished concrete with 'Heat and rubbing method', 'Eccentric rotor method' and 'Screw grinding method' so as to separate cements attached to aggregate. Recycled aggregates were made from concrete debris with 'Jaw crusher' to particle size less than 40 mm and then particle size control or grinded by various grinding machines. Recycled fine aggregates made from crushing would have fragile site with cracks, air voids and bubbles. The author proposed quality improvement method to selectively separate fragile defects from recycled aggregates using weak grinding force, leaving attached pastes much and preventing fine particle generation as byproducts. This article outlined experiments to improve quality of recycled fine aggregates and their experimental results confirmed improvement of flow ability and compressive strength of mortal using recycled fine aggregates using 'Particle size selector' and 'Ball mill' so as to remove their fragile parts less than 2%. Mortal made from recycled fine aggregate could also prevent permeation of chloride ion. Recycled aggregate could be used for concrete instead of natural aggregate. (T. Tanaka)

  2. Automatic particle-size analysis of HTGR recycle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.E.; Pechin, W.H.

    1977-09-01

    An automatic particle-size analyzer was designed, fabricated, tested, and put into operation measuring and counting HTGR recycle fuel particles. The particle-size analyzer can be used for particles in all stages of fabrication, from the loaded, uncarbonized weak acid resin up to fully-coated Biso or Triso particles. The device handles microspheres in the range of 300 to 1000 μm at rates up to 2000 per minute, measuring the diameter of each particle to determine the size distribution of the sample, and simultaneously determining the total number of particles. 10 figures

  3. Addressing fuel recycling in solid oxide fuel cell systems fed by alternative fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    An innovative study on anode recirculation in solid oxide fuel cell systems with alternative fuels is carried out and investigated. Alternative fuels under study are ammonia, pure hydrogen, methanol, ethanol, DME and biogas from biomass gasification. It is shown that the amount of anode off......%. Furthermore, it is founded that for the case with methanol, ethanol and DME then at high utilization factors, low anode recirculation is recommended while at low utilization factors, high anode recirculation is recommended. If the plant is fed by biogas from biomass gasification then for each utilization...

  4. Nuclear Proliferation Risk Mitigation Approaches and Impacts in the Recycle of Used Nuclear Fuel in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesketh, K.; Gregg, R.; Phillips, Ch.

    2009-01-01

    EnergySolutions and its team partners, which include the UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL), are one of four industry teams to have received an award from the US Department of Energy to carry out design studies in support of the US Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). This team has developed a detailed scenario model for a future US nuclear fuel cycle based on a closed used nuclear fuel recycle as an alternative to the current once-though-and-store system. This scenario enables the uranium and plutonium in Light Water Reactor (LWR) used fuel from the current reactor fleet, and from a fleet of replacement LWRs, to be recycled as both Uranium Oxide and Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel using reprocessing plants that conform to the requirements of GNEP. There is also a provision for 'burning' in thermal reactors certain long-lived transuranics (Np, Am, Cm) formed into targets. The residual fission product waste, without these long-term heat emitters, will be vitrified and consigned to the US National Geologic repository. Later in the scenario a fleet of Advanced Recycle Reactors (ARR), based on sodium cooled fast reactor technology, are introduced to enable full transmutation of all transuranics and thus attain the GNEP sustainability goal. The recycle scenario avoids the need for the Yucca Mountain repository to receive unprocessed used nuclear fuel and is effective at prolonging its lifetime and delaying the need for a second repository. This paper explains the process by which EnergySolutions selected the U-Pu and U-Pu-Np MOX products and the technological requirements for the recycle plants and describes materials flow analysis that has been carried for the US nuclear fuel cycle scenario using NNL's ORION scenario modelling program. One of the prime requisites of GNEP is to ensure that the risk of proliferation is minimized and the paper describes NNL's approach to objectively assessing the proliferation risk of the scenario relative to that of a conventional recycle

  5. Final generic environmental statement on the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    An assessment is presented of the health, safety and environmental effects of the entire light water reactor fuel cycle, considering the comparative effects of three major alternatives: no recycle, recycle of uranium only, and recycle of both uranium and plutonium. The assessment covers the period from 1975 through the year 2000 and includes the cumulative effects for the entire period as well as projections for specific years. Topics discussed include: the light water reactor with plutonium recycle; mixed oxide fuel fabrication; reprocessing plant operations; supporting uranium fuel cycle; transportation of radioactive materials; radioactive waste management; storage of plutonium; radiological health assessment; extended spent fuel storage; and blending of plutonium and uranium at reprocessing plants

  6. Compost in plant microbial fuel cell for bioelectricity generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moqsud, M.A.; Yoshitake, J.; Bushra, Q.S.; Hyodo, M.; Omine, K.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of organic waste is an important topic in developing countries as well as developed countries. Compost from organic waste has been used for soil conditioner. In this study, an experiment has been carried out to produce green energy (bioelectricity) by using paddy plant microbial fuel cells

  7. Advances in nuclear fuel technology. 3. Development of advanced nuclear fuel recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arie, Kazuo; Abe, Tomoyuki; Arai, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    Fast breeder reactor (FBR) cycle technology has a technical characteristics flexibly easy to apply to diverse fuel compositions such as plutonium, minor actinides, and so on and fuel configurations. By using this characteristics, various feasibilities on effective application of uranium resources based on breeding of uranium of plutonium for original mission of FBR, contribution to radioactive wastes problems based on amounts reduction of transuranium elements (TRU) in high level radioactive wastes, upgrading of nuclear diffusion resistance, extremely upgrading of economical efficiency, and so on. In this paper, were introduced from these viewpoints, on practice strategy survey study on FBR cycle performed by cooperation of the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) with electric business companies and so on, and on technical development on advanced nuclear fuel recycle systems carried out at the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and so on. Here were explained under a vision on new type of fuels such as nitride fuels, metal fuels, and so on as well as oxide fuels, a new recycle system making possible to use actinides except uranium and plutonium, an 'advanced nuclear fuel cycle technology', containing improvement of conventional wet Purex method reprocessing technology, fuel manufacturing technology, and so on. (G.K.)

  8. Multiple recycle of REMIX fuel at VVER-1000 operation in closed fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, P. N.; Bobrov, E. A., E-mail: evgeniybobrov89@rambler.ru; Chibinyaev, A. V.; Teplov, P. S.; Dudnikov, A. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The basic features of loading the VVER-1000 core with a new variant of REMIX fuel (REgenerated MIXture of U–Pu oxides) are considered during its multiple recycle in a closed nuclear fuel cycle. The fuel composition is produced on the basis of the uranium–plutonium regenerate extracted at processing the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from a VVER-1000, depleted uranium, and the fissionable material: {sup 235}U as a part of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from warheads superfluous for defense purposes or {sup 233}U accumulated in thorium blankets of fusion (electronuclear) neutron sources or fast reactors. Production of such a fuel assumes no use of natural uranium in addition. When converting a part of the VVER-1000 reactors to the closed fuel cycle based on the REMIX technology, the consumption of natural uranium decreases considerably, and there is no substantial degradation of the isotopic composition of plutonium or change in the reactor-safety characteristics at the passage from recycle to recycle.

  9. Determination of enrichment of recycle uranium fuels for different burnup values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabunoglu, Okan H.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium (U) recovered from spent LWR fuels by reprocessing, which contains small amounts of U-236, is to be enriched before being re-irradiated as the recycle U. During the enrichment of recovered U in U-235, the mass fraction of U-236 also increases. Since the existence of U-236 in the recycle U has a negative effect on neutron economy, a greater enrichment of U-235 in the recycle U is required for reaching the same burnup as can be reached by the fresh U fuel. Two burnup values play the most important role in determining the enrichment of recycle U: (1) discharge burnup of spent fuel from which the recycle U is obtained and (2) desired discharge burnup of the recycle U fuel. A step-by-step procedure for calculating the enrichment of the recycle U as a function of these two burnup values is introduced. The computer codes MONTEBURNS and ORIGEN-S are made use of and a three-component (U-235, U-236, U-238) enrichment scheme is applied for calculating the amount of U-236 in producing the recycle U from the recovered U. As was aimed, the resulting expression is simple enough for quick/hand calculations of the enrichment of the recycle U for any given discharge burnup of spent fuel and for any desired discharge burnup of the recycle U fuel, most accurately within the range of 33,000-50,000 MWd/tonU

  10. Design of a PWR for long cycle and direct recycling of spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Nader M.A., E-mail: mnader73@yahoo.com

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Single-batch loading PWR with a new fuel assembly for 36 calendar months cycle was designed. • The new fuel assembly is constructed from a number of CANDU fuel bundles. • This design enables to recycle the spent fuel directly in CANDU reactors for high burnup. • Around 56 MWd/kgU burnup is achieved from fuel that has average enrichment of 4.8 w/o U-235 using this strategy. • Safety parameters such as the power distribution and CANDU coolant void reactivity were considered. - Abstract: In a previous work, a new design was proposed for the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assembly for direct use of the PWR spent fuel without processing. The proposed assembly has four zircaloy-4 tubes contains a number of 61-element CANDU fuel bundles (8 bundles per tube) stacked end to end. The space between the tubes contains 44 lower enriched UO{sub 2} fuel rods and 12 guide tubes. In this paper, this assembly is used to build a single batch loading 36-month PWR and the spent CANDU bundles are recycled in the on power refueling CANDU reactors. The Advanced PWR (APWR) is considered as a reference design. The average enrichment in the core is 4.76%w U-235. IFBA and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} as burnable poisons are used for controlling the excess reactivity and to flatten the power distribution. The calculations using MCNPX showed that the PWR will discharge the fuel with average burnup of 31.8 MWd/kgU after 1000 effective full power days. Assuming a 95 days plant outage, 36 calendar months can be achieved with a capacity factor of 91.3%. Good power distribution in the core is obtained during the cycle and the required critical boron concentration is less than 1750 ppm. Recycling of the discharged CANDU fuel bundles that represents 85% of the fuel in the assembly, in CANDU-6 or in 700 MWe Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR-700), an additional burnup of about 31 or 26 MWd/kgU burnup can be achieved, respectively. Averaging the fuel burnup on the all fuel in the PWR

  11. Westinghouse technologies and integration with Toshiba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Tetsuya; Tanazawa, Takeshi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2007-01-01

    With Westinghouse Electric Company (WEC) now a member of the Toshiba Group, Toshiba is capable of supplying both boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems. WEC is well experienced worldwide in the nuclear business and by integrating the technologies of both Toshiba and WEC. Toshiba will be able to provide a greater range of services in the global market. We will build a cooperative structure not only for the maintenance service and fuel businesses but also for the development of innovative reactors while aiming for global expansion with the AP 1000 PWR, the most advanced PWR in the nuclear power plant business. We will continue making efforts so as to be able to provide all types of products and services as one-stop solutions regardless of the type of reactor. (author)

  12. Multiple recycling of fuel in prototype fast breeder reactor in a closed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our previous study in this regard for the prototype fast breeder reactor ... This study aims at finding the feasibility of multiple recycling of PFBR fuel with external ...... maximum allowable Pu content in fuel based on chemistry/metallurgical ...

  13. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: (1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs; (2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs; (3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs; and (4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs

  14. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  15. Plant Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems Fed by Alternative Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Different plant design for several fuel types such as natural gas, methanol, ethanol, DME, ammonia and pure hydrogen are presented and analysed. Anode recirculation which is an important issue in SOFC plants are also explored and studied. It is shown that depending on type of the fuel whether fuel...... recycle increases plant efficiency only if fuel utilization factor is low. Other important issues such as why plant efficiency is lower when it is fed with hydrogen or biogas compared to when it is fed by other fuels such as methanol, ethanol, DME and ammonia will also be discussed and explained....... For example, plant efficiency of 45%, 54% and 50.5% can be achieved if the hydrogen, ethanol and methanol are used respectively....

  16. Spent fuel management in France: Reprocessing, conditioning, recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Montalembert, J.A. de

    1994-01-01

    The French energy policy has been based for 20 years on the development of nuclear power. The some 75% share of nuclear in the total electricity generation, representing an annual production of 317 TWh requires full fuel cycle control from the head-end to the waste management. This paper presents the RCR concept (Reprocessing, Conditioning, Recycling) with its industrial implementation. The long lasting experience acquired in reprocessing and MOX fuel fabrication leads to a comprehensive industrial organization with minimized impact on the environment and waste generation. Each 900 MWe PWR loaded with MOX fuel avoids piling up 2,500 m 3 per year of mine tailings. By the year 2000, less than 500 m 3 of high-level and long-lived waste will be annually produced at La Hague for the French program. The fuel cycle facilities and the associated MOX loading programs are ramping-up according to schedule. Thus, the RCR concept is a reality as well as a policy adopted in several countries. Last but not least, RCR represents a strong commitment to non-proliferation as it is the way to fully control and master the plutonium inventory

  17. Melvin Calvin: Fuels from Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, S.E.; Otvos, J.W.

    1998-11-24

    A logical extension of his early work on the path of carbon during photosynthesis, Calvin's studies on the production of hydrocarbons by plants introduced many in the scientific and agricultural worlds to the potential of renewable fuel and chemical feedstocks. He and his co-workers identified numerous candidate compounds from plants found in tropical and temperate climates from around the world. His travels and lectures concerning the development of alternative fuel supplies inspired laboratories worldwide to take up the investigation of plant-derived energy sources as an alternative to fossil fuels.

  18. Recycling of concrete waste generated from nuclear power plant dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Hideo; Nagase, Takahiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Nawa, Toyoharu

    2012-01-01

    Non-radioactive concrete waste generated from dismantling of a standard large nuclear power plant is estimated to be about 500,000 tons in weight. Using such waste as recycled aggregate within the enclosure of the plant requires a new manufacturing technology that generates a minimal amount of by-product powder. Recycled aggregate has brittle parts with defects such as cracks, pores, and voids in residual paste from original concrete. This study presents a method of selectively removing the defective parts during manufacture to improve the quality of the recycled fine aggregate. With this selective removal method used, the amount of by-product powder can be reduced by half as compared to that by a conventional method. The influences of the characteristics of the recycled fine aggregate on the flowability and strength of the mortar using recycled fine aggregate were evaluated by multiple linear regression analysis. The results clearly showed that the flowability was primarily affected by the filling fraction of recycled fine aggregate, while the compressive strength of mortar was primarily affected by the fraction of defects in the aggregate. It was also found that grains produced by a granulator have more irregularities in the surfaces than those produced by a ball mill, providing an increased mortar strength. Using these findings from this study, efforts are also being made to develop a mechanical technology that enables simultaneous processing of decontamination and recycling. The granulator under consideration is capable of grinding the surfaces of irregularly shaped particles and may be used successfully, under optimal conditions, for the surface decontamination of concrete waste contaminated with radioactive materials. (author)

  19. Nuclear fuel cycle waste recycling technology deverlopment - Radioactive metal waste recycling technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Moon, Jei Kwon; Jung, Chong Hun; Park, Sang Yoon

    1998-08-01

    With relation to recycling of the radioactive metal wastes which are generated during operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the following were described in this report. 1. Analysis of the state of the art on the radioactive metal waste recycling technologies. 2. Economical assessment on the radioactive metal waste recycling. 3. Process development for radioactive metal waste recycling, A. Decontamination technologies for radioactive metal waste recycling. B. Decontamination waste treatment technologies, C. Residual radioactivity evaluation technologies. (author). 238 refs., 60 tabs., 79 figs

  20. FINDING WAYS OF RECYCLING DUST OF ARC STEEL FURNACES AT THE BELARUSIAN METALLURGIC PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Demin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The first part examines the theoretical possibility of recycling dust of arc steel furnaces. The different modes of dust disposal depending on the task of recycling are discussed: recycling at minimal cost; recycling with a maximum extraction of iron; recycling with maximum extraction of zinc. The results of laboratory studies providing information on the technical feasibility of recycling dust formed at the Belarusian metallurgic plant are provided.

  1. Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paviet-Hartmann, P. [Idaho National Laboratory, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Riddle, C. [Idaho National Laboratory, Material and Fuel Complex, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6150 (United States); Campbell, K. [University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89144 (United States); Mausolf, E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Batelle Blvd, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The most widely used reductant to partition plutonium from uranium in the Purex process was ferrous sulfamate, other alternates were proposed such as hydrazine-stabilized ferrous nitrate or uranous nitrate, platinum catalyzed hydrogen, and hydrazine, hydroxylamine salts. New candidates to replace hydrazine or hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) are pursued worldwide. They may improve the performance of the industrial Purex process towards different operations such as de-extraction of plutonium and reduction of the amount of hydrazine which will limit the formation of hydrazoic acid. When looking at future recycling technologies using hydroxamic ligands, neither acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) nor formohydroxamic acid (FHA) seem promising because they hydrolyze to give hydroxylamine and the parent carboxylic acid. Hydroxyethylhydrazine, HOC{sub 2}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}H{sub 3} (HEH) is a promising non-salt-forming reductant of Np and Pu ions because it is selective to neptunium and plutonium ions at room temperature and at relatively low acidity, it could serve as a replacement of HAN or AHA for the development of a novel used nuclear fuel recycling process.

  2. Japanese status-quo and our activities in the field of nuclear fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sada, Masao; Imai, Osamu

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear energy is expected to take the place of current petroleum-base-energy in the near future. In order to effectively utilize the nuclear energy, nuclear fuel recycle system has to be established. The technology for reprocessing the spent fuel, which is a part of this recycle system, is very similar to the ones in chemical industry. Our company has been keeping its eyes on the field of such nuclear energy as one of the future promising businesses and recentrly established Nuclear Energy Department as a center for further expanding the business opportunity in the field of such spent fuel reprocessing as well as other fields of nuclear fuel recycle system. (author)

  3. International collaborations about fuel studies for reactor recycling of military quality plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, H.; Chaudat, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    In November 1992, an agreement was signed between the French and Russian governments to use in Russia and for pacific purposes the plutonium recovered from the Russian nuclear weapons dismantling. This plutonium will be transformed into mixed oxide fuels (MOX) for nuclear power production. The French Direction of Military Applications (DAM) of the CEA is the operator of the French-Russian AIDA program. The CEA Direction of Fuel Cycle (DCC) and Direction of Nuclear Reactors (DRN) are involved in the transformation of metallic plutonium into sinterable oxide powder for MOX fuel manufacturing. The Russian TOMOX (Treatment of MOX powder Metallic Objects) and DEMOX (MOX Demonstration) plants will produce the MOX fuel assemblies for the 4 VVER 1000 reactors of Balakovo and the fast BN 600 reactor. The second part of the program will involve the German Siemens and GRS companies for the safety studies of the reactors and fuel cycle plants. The paper gives also a brief analysis of the US policy concerning the military plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  4. The use of nuclear data in the field of nuclear fuel recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Julie-Fiona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AREVA NC La Hague facility is the first step of the nuclear fuel recycling process implemented in France. The processing of the used fuel is governed by high standards of criticality-safety, and strong expectations on the quality of end-products. From the received used fuel assemblies, the plutonium and the uranium are extracted for further energy production purposes within the years following the reprocessing. Furthermore, the ultimate waste – fission products and minor actinides on the one hand, and hulls and end-pieces on the other hand – is adequately packaged for long term disposal. The used fuel is therefore separated into very different materials, and time scales which come into account may be longer than in some other nuclear fields of activity. Given the variety of the handled nuclear materials, as well as the time scales at stake, the importance given to some radionuclides, and hence to the associated nuclear data, can also be specific to the AREVA NC La Hague plant. A study has thus been led to identify a list of the most important radionuclides for the AREVA NC La Hague plant applications, relying on the running constraints of the facility, and the end-products expectations. The activities at the AREVA NC La Hague plant are presented, and the methodology to extract the most important radionuclides for the reprocessing process is detailed.

  5. The use of nuclear data in the field of nuclear fuel recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Julie-Fiona; Launay, Agnès; Grassi, Gabriele; Binet, Christophe; Lelandais, Jacques; Lecampion, Erick

    2017-09-01

    AREVA NC La Hague facility is the first step of the nuclear fuel recycling process implemented in France. The processing of the used fuel is governed by high standards of criticality-safety, and strong expectations on the quality of end-products. From the received used fuel assemblies, the plutonium and the uranium are extracted for further energy production purposes within the years following the reprocessing. Furthermore, the ultimate waste - fission products and minor actinides on the one hand, and hulls and end-pieces on the other hand - is adequately packaged for long term disposal. The used fuel is therefore separated into very different materials, and time scales which come into account may be longer than in some other nuclear fields of activity. Given the variety of the handled nuclear materials, as well as the time scales at stake, the importance given to some radionuclides, and hence to the associated nuclear data, can also be specific to the AREVA NC La Hague plant. A study has thus been led to identify a list of the most important radionuclides for the AREVA NC La Hague plant applications, relying on the running constraints of the facility, and the end-products expectations. The activities at the AREVA NC La Hague plant are presented, and the methodology to extract the most important radionuclides for the reprocessing process is detailed.

  6. Post-remedial-action radiological survey of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pennsylvania, October 1-8, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The post-remedial-action radiological assessment conducted by the ANL Radiological Survey Group in October 1981, following decommissioning and decontamination efforts by Westinghouse personnel, indicated that except for the Advanced Fuels Laboratory exhaust ductwork and north wall, the interior surfaces of the Plutonium Laboratory and associated areas within Building 7 and the Advanced Fuels Laboratory within Building 8 were below both the ANSI Draft Standard N13.12 and NRC Guideline criteria for acceptable surface contamination levels. Hence, with the exceptions noted above, the interior surfaces of those areas within Buildings 7 and 8 that were included in the assessment are suitable for unrestricted use. Air samples collected at the involved areas within Buildings 7 and 8 indicated that the radon, thoron, and progeny concentrations within the air were well below the limits prescribed by the US Surgeon General, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of Energy. The Building 7 drain lines are contaminated with uranium, plutonium, and americium. Radiochemical analysis of water and dirt/sludge samples collected from accessible Low-Bay, High-Bay, Shower Room, and Sodium laboratory drains revealed uranium, plutonium, and americium contaminants. The Building 7 drain lines hence are unsuitable for release for unrestricted use in their present condition. Low levels of enriched uranium, plutonium, and americium were detected in an environmental soil coring near Building 8, indicating release or spillage due to Advanced Reactors Division activities or Nuclear Fuel Division activities undr NRC licensure. 60 Co contamination was detected within the Building 7 Shower Room and in soil corings from the environs of Building 7. All other radionuclide concentrations measured in soil corings and the storm sewer outfall sample collected from the environs about Buildings 7 and 8 were within the range of normally expected background concentrations

  7. Fuel self-sufficient and low proliferation risk multi-recycling of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, N. Z.; Hong, S. G.; Kim, T. H.; Greenspan, E.; Kastenberg, W. E.

    1998-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility study has been performed in search of promising nuclear energy systems which could make efficient use of the spent fuel from LWRs and be proliferation resistant. The energy considered consist of a dry process and a fuel-self-sufficient reactor which are synergistic. D 2 O, H 2 O and Pb (or Pb-Bi) are considered for the coolant. The most promising identified consists of Pb-cooled reactors with either an AIROX or an IFR-like reprocessing. H 2 O- (possibly mixed with D 2 O) cooled reactors can be designed to be fuel-self-sufficient and multi-recycle LWR spent fuel, provided they are accelerator driven. Moderator-free, D 2 O-cooled critical reactors can multi-recycle Th- 233 U fuel using IFR-type reprocessing; they are significantly more attractive than their thermal counterparts. H 2 O- (possibly mixed with D 2 O) cooled, accelerator-driven reactors appear attractive for converting Th into denatured 233 U using LWR spent fuel and the IFR process. The CANDU reactor technology appears highly synergistic with accelerator-driven systems. (author). 25 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  8. Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Catherine Riddle; Keri Campbell; Edward Mausolf

    2013-10-01

    Most of the aqueous processes developed, or under consideration worldwide for the recycling of used nuclear fuel (UNF) utilize the oxido-reduction properties of actinides to separate them from other radionuclides. Generally, after acid dissolution of the UNF, (essentially in nitric acid solution), actinides are separated from the raffinate by liquid-liquid extraction using specific solvents, associated along the process, with a particular reductant that will allow the separation to occur. For example, the industrial PUREX process utilizes hydroxylamine as a plutonium reductant. Hydroxylamine has numerous advantages: not only does it have the proper attributes to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III), but it is also a non-metallic chemical that is readily decomposed to innocuous products by heating. However, it has been observed that the presence of high nitric acid concentrations or impurities (such as metal ions) in hydroxylamine solutions increase the likelihood of the initiation of an autocatalytic reaction. Recently there has been some interest in the application of simple hydrophilic hydroxamic ligands such as acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) for the stripping of tetravalent actinides in the UREX process flowsheet. This approach is based on the high coordinating ability of hydroxamic acids with tetravalent actinides (Np and Pu) compared with hexavalent uranium. Thus, the use of AHA offers a route for controlling neptunium and plutonium in the UREX process by complexant based stripping of Np(IV) and Pu(IV) from the TBP solvent phase, while U(VI) ions are not affected by AHA and remain solvated in the TBP phase. In the European GANEX process, AHA is also used to form hydrophilic complexes with actinides and strip them from the organic phase into nitric acid. However, AHA does not decompose completely when treated with nitric acid and hampers nitric acid recycling. In lieu of using AHA in the UREX + process, formohydroxamic acid (FHA), although not commercially available, hold

  9. Westinghouse small modular reactor design and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinn, R.; Godfrey, M. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, Pennsilvania (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The AP1000 is currently under construction in both China and the US with the first one scheduled to come on line in late 2013. Nuclear power is a proven, safe, plentiful and clean source of power generation, and Westinghouse Electric Company, the pioneer and global leader in nuclear plant design and construction, is ready with the AP1000™ pressurized water reactor (PWR). The AP1000, based on the proven performance of Westinghouse-designed PWRs, is an advanced 1154 MWe nuclear power plant that uses the forces of nature and simplicity of design to enhance plant safety and operations and reduce construction costs.

  10. Policy in France regarding the back-end of the fuel cycle reprocessing/recycling route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloaguen, A.; Lenail, B.

    1991-01-01

    The decision taken in early 1970s to base the French power policy on the use of pressurized water reactors also included the strategy for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle based on reprocessing, waste conditioning for the final disposal in the most suitable form in terms of safety and plutonium recycling to fast breeder reactors. Twenty years have elapsed, and substantial development and investment have been made. New evidences have emerged especially regarding breeder development, and the initial choice has been proved to be sound. EDF and COGEMA, the French utility and fuel cycle companies, respectively, are working together in order to take the best advantage of past efforts. The good behavior of MOX fuel in EDF reactors and the excellent start of the UP3 reprocessing plant of La Hague, which was completed and commissioned in August, 1990, made EDF and COGEMA extremely confident for future decision. The French choice made in favor of fuel reprocessing the history of fuel reprocessing in France, the policy concerning the back end of nuclear fuel cycle of EDF, and the present consideration and circumstances on this matter are reported. (K.I.)

  11. Development of an innovative PWR for low cost fuel recycle and waste reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanagawa, Takashi; Onoue, Masaaki

    2001-01-01

    In order to bear long-term and stable energy supply, it is important for nuclear power generation to realize establishment of energy security controlling dependence on natural resources and reduction of long-life radioactive wastes such as minor actinide elements (MA) and so on. For this, establishment of fast breeder reproducible on its fuel and of fuel recycling is essential and construction of the fuel recycling capable of repeatedly recycling of plutonium (Pu) and MA with low cost is required. Here were proposed a fuel recycling system combining recycling type PWR with advanced recycling system under development for Na cooling fast breeder reactor as a candidate filling such conditions, to show its characteristics and effects after its introduction. By this system, some facilities to realize flexible and low cost fuel recycling, to reduce longer-life radioactive wastes due to recycling burning of Pu and MA, and to realize an electric power supplying system independent on natural resources due to fuel breeding feature, were shown. (G.K.)

  12. Design study on advanced nuclear fuel recycling system by pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Kakehi, Isao; Moro, Satoshi; Tobe, Kenji; Kawamura, Fumio; Higashi, Tatsuhiro; Yonezawa, Shigeaki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Yoshiuji, Takahiro

    1998-12-01

    The Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute is conducting research and development on the nuclear fuel recycling system, which will improve the economy, safety, and environmental impact of the nuclear fuel recycling system in the age of the FBR. The System Engineering Division in the O-arai Engineering Center has conducted a design study on an advanced nuclear fuel recycling system for FBRs by using pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology. The system is an economical and compact module-type system, and can be used for reprocessing oxide fuel and also new types of fuel (metal fuel and nitride fuel). This report describes the concept of this system and results of the design study. (author)

  13. Design study on advanced nuclear fuel recycling system by pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Kakehi, Isao; Moro, Satoshi; Tobe, Kenji; Kawamura, Fumio; Higashi, Tatsuhiro; Yonezawa, Shigeaki; Yoshiuji, Takahiro

    1998-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute is conducting research and development on the nuclear fuel recycling system, which will improve the economy, safety, and environmental impact of the nuclear fuel recycling system in the age of the FBR. The System Engineering Division in the O-arai Engineering Center has conducted a design study on an advanced nuclear fuel recycling system for FBRs by using pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology. The system is an economical and compact module-type system, and can be used for reprocessing oxide fuel and also new types of fuel (metal fuel and nitride fuel). This report describes the concept of this system and results of the design study. (author)

  14. Evaluation of fuel cycle scenarios on MOX fuel recycling in PWRs and SFRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlier, B.; Caron-Charles, M.; Van Den Durpel, L. [AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, Paris La Defense (France); Senentz, G. [AREVA, 33 rue La Lafayette, 75009 Paris (France); Serpantie, J.P. [AREVA, 10 rue Juliette Recamier, Lyon (France)

    2013-07-01

    Prospects on advanced fuel cycle scenario are considered for achieving a progressive integration of Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) technology within the current French Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear fleet, in a view to benefit from fissile material multi-recycling capability. A step by step process is envisioned, and emphasis is put on its potential implementation through the nuclear mass inventory calculations with the COSAC code. The overall time scale is not optimized. The first step, already implemented in several countries, the plutonium coming from the reprocessing of used Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels is recycled into a small number of LWRs. The second step is the progressive introduction of the first SFRs, in parallel with the continuation of step 1. This second step lets to prepare the optimized multi recycling of MOX fuel which is considered in step 3. Step 3 is characterized by the introduction of a greater number of SFR and MOX management between EPR reactors and SFRs. In the final step 4, all the fleet is formed with SFRs. This study assesses the viability of each step of the overall scenario. The switch from one step to the other one could result from different constrains related to issues such as resources, waste, experience feedback, public acceptance, country policy, etc.

  15. Gamma irradiation plants using reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckow, W.

    1976-11-01

    Recent irradiation plants utilizing fuel elements are described. Criteria for optimizing such plants, evaluation of the plants realized so far, and applications for the facilities are discussed. (author)

  16. Fires at storage sites of organic materials, waste fuels and recyclables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim; Alriksson, Stina; Kaczala, Fabio; Hogland, William

    2013-09-01

    During the last decade, the European Union has enforced the diversion of organic wastes and recyclables to waste management companies operating incineration plants, composting plants and recycling units instead of landfills. The temporary storage sites have been established as a buffer against fluctuations in energy demand throughout the year. Materials also need to be stored at temporary storage sites before recovery and recycling. However, regulations governing waste fuel storage and handling have not yet been developed, and, as a result, companies have engaged in risky practices that have resulted in a high number of fire incidents. In this study, a questionnaire survey was distributed to 249 of the 400 members of Avfall Sverige (Swedish Waste Management Association), which represents the waste management of 95% of the Swedish population. Information regarding 122 storage facilities owned by 69 companies was obtained; these facilities were responsible for the storage of 47% of the total treated waste (incineration + digestion + composting) in 2010 in Sweden. To identify factors related to fire frequency, the questionnaire covered the amounts of material handled and burnt per year, financial losses due to fires, storage duration, storage method and types of waste. The results show that 217 fire incidents corresponded to 170 kilotonnes of material burnt and cumulative losses of 49 million SEK (€4.3 million). Fire frequency and amount of material burnt per fire was found to be dependent upon type of management group (waste operator). Moreover, a correlation was found between fire frequency and material recycled during past years. Further investigations of financial aspects and externalities of fire incidents are recommended.

  17. The Ellweiler uranium plant - a demolition and recycling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mika, S.; Rohr, T.; Seehars, R.; Feser, A.

    1999-01-01

    The uranium plant at Ellweiler, district of Birkenfeld, was used for the production and storage of uranium concentrates. The owner of the Ellweiler uranium plant (UAE), Gewerkschaft Brunhilde GmbH, ceased processing uranium ore and recycling in 1989 and has been in liquidation since September 1991. The State of Rhineland-Palatinate, had safety measures adopted in a first step, getting the plant into a safe state by former plant personnel. The entire plant was demolished in a second step. The contract for demolishing the former uranium plant was awarded to ABB Reaktor as the general contractor in August 1996. Demolition work was carried out between April 1997 and May 1999. A total of approx. 7900 Mg of material was disposed of. At present, recultivation measures are being carried out. (orig.) [de

  18. Supplementing the energy and plant nutrient requirements through organic recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdi, S. S.; Misra, R. V.

    1980-03-15

    In context of dwindling non-renewable energy resources and increasing health hazards because of environmental pollution, recycling of organic residues obtained through various sources like crops, animals, and human beings is becoming increasingly important. The organic residues obtained as wastes through these sources can be recycled effectively to meet scarce resources of energy and the plant nutrients, so vitally needed for our day-to-day activities and for raising agricultural production. Agriculture is the main stay of the Indian economy. Considerable quantities of crop residues available from agriculture can be utilized to serve as a source of organic fertilizers which not only provide plant nutrients but also improve soil health. The country has a large animal and human population. The animal and human wastes can be successfully used for production of energy and organic fertilizer by routing through biogas system. There is a need to develop an integrated energy and nutrient supply program. An action program is outlined.

  19. An evaluation of the deployment of AIROX-recycled fuel in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahshan, S.N.; McGeehan, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical evaluation is made of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) in-core performance of recycled light water reactor fuel that has been Atomics International reduction oxidation (AIROX) reprocessed and reenriched with fissile materials. The neutronics performance is shown to lie within the neutronics performance of existing high-performance and high-burnup fuels. Three AIROX-recycled fuels are compared with a high-burnup virgin fuel and an equivalent mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. The AIROX-recycled fuel neutronics performance lies consistently between the virgin and the MOX fuel for both the pin power peaking and the reactivity response characteristics in PWRs. Among the attractive features of AIROX-recycled fuel is that it can optimize fissile and fertile fuel use, minimize final fuel disposal impact on the environment, and provide energy in the process of denaturing weapons-grade fissile materials. The fuel material performance may be anticipated from high-burnup virgin fuel and from MOX fuel performance. Recommendations for lead rod testing and for optimization of the AIROX-processing and resintering techniques are made

  20. Waste Estimates for a Future Recycling Plant in the US Based Upon AREVA Operating Experience - 13206

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foare, Genevieve; Meze, Florian [AREVA E and P, SGN - 1, rue des Herons, 78182 Montigny-le-Bretonneux (France); Bader, Sven; McGee, Don; Murray, Paul [AREVA Federal Services LLC, 7207 IBM Drive, Mail Code CLT- 1D, Charlotte NC 28262 (United States); Prud' homme, Pascal [AREVA NC SA - 1, place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense CEDEX (France)

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of process and secondary wastes produced by a recycling plant built in the U.S., which is composed of a used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing facility and a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility, are performed as part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored study [1]. In this study, a set of common inputs, assumptions, and constraints were identified to allow for comparison of these wastes between different industrial teams. AREVA produced a model of a reprocessing facility, an associated fuel fabrication facility, and waste treatment facilities to develop the results for this study. These facilities were divided into a number of discrete functional areas for which inlet and outlet flow streams were clearly identified to allow for an accurate determination of the radionuclide balance throughout the facility and the waste streams. AREVA relied primarily on its decades of experience and feedback from its La Hague (reprocessing) and MELOX (MOX fuel fabrication) commercial operating facilities in France to support this assessment. However, to perform these estimates for a U.S. facility with different regulatory requirements and to take advantage of some technological advancements, such as in the potential treatment of off-gases, some deviations from this experience were necessary. A summary of AREVA's approach and results for the recycling of 800 metric tonnes of initial heavy metal (MTIHM) of LWR UNF per year into MOX fuel under the assumptions and constraints identified for this DOE study are presented. (authors)

  1. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gug, JeongIn; Cacciola, David; Sobkowicz, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in higher heating value. Analysis of the post-processing water uptake and compressive strength showed a correlation between density and stability to both mechanical stress and humid environment. Proximate analysis indicated heating values comparable to coal. The results showed that mechanical and moisture uptake stability were improved when the moisture and air contents were optimized. Moreover, the briquette

  2. Proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

    1984-01-01

    The pool-type Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps: a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented

  3. A proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

    1984-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps -- a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented

  4. Westinghouse AP1000 licensing maturity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, T.; Vijuk, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    The Westinghouse AP1000 Program is aimed at making available a nuclear power plant that is economical in the U.S deregulated electrical power industry in the near-term. The AP1000 is two-loop 1000 MWe pressurizer water reactor (PWR). It is an up rated version of the AP600. The AP1000 uses passive safety systems to provide significant and measurable improvements in plant simplification, safety, reliability, investment protection and plant costs. The AP1000 uses proven technology, which builds on over 35 years of operating PWR experience. The AP1000 received Final Design Approval by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC) in September 2004. The AP1000 meets the US utility requirements. The AP1000 and its sister plant the AP600 have gone through a very through and complete licensing review. This paper describes the U.S. NRC review efforts of both the AP600 and the AP1000. The detail of the review and the independent calculations, evaluations and testing is discussed. The AP600 licensing documentation was submitted in 1992. The U.S. NRC granted Final Design Approval in 1999. During the intervening 7 years, the U.S. NRC asked thousands of questions, performed independent safety analysis, audited Westinghouse calculations and analysis, and performed independent testing. The more significant areas of discussion will be described. For the AP1000 Westinghouse first engaged the U.S. NRC in pre-certification discussions to define the extent of the review required, since the design is so similar to the AP600. The AP1000 licensing documentation was submitted in March 2002. The U.S. NRC granted Final Design Approval in September 2004. During the intervening 2 1/2 years, the U.S. NRC asked hundreds of questions, performed independent safety analysis, audited Westinghouse calculations and analysis, and performed independent testing. The more significant areas of discussion will be described. The implications of this review and approval on AP1000 applications in

  5. Numerical analysis on reduction of radioactive actinides by recycling of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balboa L, H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, human growth has reached unparalleled levels historically, this implies a need for more energy, and just in 2007 was consumed in the USA 4157 x 10 9 kWh of electricity and there were 6 x 10 9 metric tons of carbon dioxide, which causes a devastating effect on our environment. To this problem, a solution to the demand for non-fossil energy is nuclear energy, which is one of the least polluting and the cheapest among non-fossil energy; however, a problem remains unresolved the waste generation of nuclear fuels. In this work the option of a possible transmutation of actinides in a nuclear reactor of BWR was analyzed, an example of this are the nuclear reactors at the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant, which have generated spent fuel stored in pools awaiting a decision for final disposal or any other existing alternative. Assuming that the spent fuel was reprocessed to separate useful materials and actinides such as plutonium and uranium remaining, could take these actinides and to recycle them inside the same reactor that produced them, so il will be reduced the radiotoxicity of spent fuel. The main idea of this paper is to evaluate by means of numeric simulation (using the Core Management System (CMS)) the reduction of minor actinides in the case of being recycled in fresh fuel of the type BWR. The actinides were introduced hypothetically in the fuel pellets to 6% by weight, and then use a burned in the range of 0-65 G Wd/Tm, in order to have a better panorama of their behavior and thus know which it is the best choice for maximum reduction of actinides. Several cases were studied, that is to say were used as fuels; the UO 2 and MOX. Six different cases were also studied to see the behavior of actinides in different situations. The CMS platform calculation was used for the analysis of the cases presented. Favorable results were obtained, having decreased from a range of 35% to 65% of minor actinides initially introduced in the fuel rods, reducing the

  6. Recuperative aluminium recycling plant. A demonstration at J. McIntyre (Aluminium) Ltd. [Nottingham (GB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    Direct energy savings worth up to 470,000 pounds/year are being achieved by J McIntyre (Aluminium) Ltd in the United Kingdom as a result of the development of a recuperative aluminium recycling plant. The overall design incorporates a novel version of a closed-well furnace coupled with a radically improved design of dry hearth furnace. The plant not only treats clean scrap more efficiently than at present, but will also treat contaminated scrap which has not previously been recycled in an environmentally acceptable way. This is because the plant incorporates fume pyrolysis, afterburning of organics, recuperation and fume treatment. At 1987 prices the total installed plant cost was 1.3M.pounds. The direct energy saving at 1987 fuel prices was between 294,000 and 470,000pounds/year. Also, the improved melting technique has reduced metal lost as dross by 2 - 8% (420 -1,680 tonnes/year) when compared to other furnace operations. The improved metal recovery (1987 prices) was worth a further 400,000 pounds - 1,600,000 pounds. Taking median figures for the total fuel-plus-metal savings results in a payback on the project of only 14 months, some six months less than anticipated. Other consequential benefits which have also helped in reducing operating costs have been improvements in output per man, reductions in sickness and absenteeism, and reduced down-time for maintenance and repair. (author).

  7. Preliminary study on direct recycling of spent PWR fuel in PWR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waris, Abdul; Nuha; Novitriana; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary study on direct recycling of PWR spent fuel to support SUPEL (Straight Utilization of sPEnt LWR fuel in LWR system) scenario has been conducted. Several spent PWR fuel compositions in loaded PWR fuel has been evaluated to obtain the criticality of reactor. The reactor can achieve it criticality for U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel is at least 4.0 a% with the minimum fraction of the spent fuel in the core is 15.0 %. The neutron spectra become harder with the escalating of U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel as well as the amount of the spent fuel in the core.

  8. Plants for water recycling, oxygen regeneration and food production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    During long-duration space missions that require recycling and regeneration of life support materials the major human wastes to be converted to usable forms are CO2, hygiene water, urine and feces. A Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) relies on the air revitalization, water purification and food production capabilities of higher plants to rejuvenate human wastes and replenish the life support materials. The key processes in such a system are photosynthesis, whereby green plants utilize light energy to produce food and oxygen while removing CO2 from the atmosphere, and transpiration, the evaporation of water from the plant. CELSS research has emphasized the food production capacity and efforts to minimize the area/volume of higher plants required to satisfy all human life support needs. Plants are a dynamic system capable of being manipulated to favour the supply of individual products as desired. The size and energy required for a CELSS that provides virtually all human needs are determined by the food production capacity. Growing conditions maximizing food production do not maximize transpiration of water; conditions favoring transpiration and scaling to recycle only water significantly reduces the area, volume, and energy inputs per person. Likewise, system size can be adjusted to satisfy the air regeneration needs. Requirements of a waste management system supplying inputs to maintain maximum plant productivity are clear. The ability of plants to play an active role in waste processing and the consequence in terms of degraded plant performance are not well characterized. Plant-based life support systems represent the only potential for self sufficiency and food production in an extra-terrestrial habitat.

  9. Sustainable hydrocarbon fuels by recycling CO2 and H2O with renewable or nuclear energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Christopher R.; Ebbesen, Sune; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2011-01-01

    ) and biofuels have received the most attention, similar hydrocarbons can be produced without using fossil fuels or biomass. Using renewable and/or nuclear energy, carbon dioxide and water can be recycled into liquid hydrocarbon fuels in non-biological processes which remove oxygen from CO2 and H2O (the reverse...... of fuel combustion). Capture of CO2 from the atmosphere would enable a closed-loop carbon-neutral fuel cycle. This article critically reviews the many possible technological pathways for recycling CO2 into fuels using renewable or nuclear energy, considering three stages—CO2 capture, H2O and CO2...... by Fischer–Tropsch synthesis is identified as one of the most promising, feasible routes. An analysis of the energy balance and economics of this CO2 recycling process is presented. We estimate that the full system can feasibly operate at 70% electricity-to-liquid fuel efficiency (higher heating value basis...

  10. Thermophysical properties of the products of low-grade fuels thermal recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabakaev Roman B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the work is caused by reorientation of the modern power engineering to use of local low grade fuel resources. Some types of low grade fuels (peat, brown coal, sapropel, wood chips are considered in this work. Thermotechnical characteristics of the investigated fuels and products of their thermal recycling are determined. Thermal recycling process is accompanied by release of fuel dissociation heat (0.33-3.69 MJ/kg. The results of thermal low grade fuel recycling are solid carbonaceous product (semi-coke with a calorific value higher in 1.5-7 times than the value of natural fuels; pyrolysis resin with calorific value 29.4-36.8 MJ/kg; combustible gas with calorific value 15.16-19.06 MJ/m3.

  11. Multi-recycling of transuranic elements in a PWR assembly with reduced fuel rod diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, Alex, E-mail: acchamb@gmail.com; Ragusa, Jean C., E-mail: jean.ragusa@tamu.edu

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Study of multiple recycling passes of transuranic elements: (a) without exceeding 5 wt.% on U-235 enrichment; (b) using PWR fuel assemblies compatible with current reactor core internals. • Isotopic concentrations tend towards an equilibrium after 15 recycle passes, suggesting that thermal recycling may be continued beyond that point. • Radiotoxicity comparisons for once-through UOX, once-recycle MOX-Pu, and multiple recycle passes of MOX-PuNpAm and MOX-PuNpAmCm are presented. - Abstract: This paper examines the multi-recycling of transuranic (TRU) elements (Pu-Np-Am-Cm) in standard Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies. The original feed of TRU comes from legacy spent UOX fuel. For all subsequent recycling passes, TRU elements from the previous generation are employed, supplemented by TRU from legacy UOX fuel, as needed. The design criteria include: {sup 235}U enrichment requirements to remain below 5 w/o, TRU loading limits to avoid return to criticality under voided conditions, and assembly power peaking factors. In order to carry out multiple recycling passes within the design envelope, additional neutron moderation is required and achieved by reducing the fuel pellet diameter by about 13%, thus keeping the assembly design compatible with current PWR core internals. TRU transmutation rates and long-term ingestion radiotoxicity results are presented for 15 recycling passes and compared to standard UOX and MOX once-through cycles. The results also show that TRU fuel isotopics and radiotoxicity tend towards an equilibrium, enabling further additional recycling passes.

  12. Multi-recycling of transuranic elements in a PWR assembly with reduced fuel rod diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, Alex; Ragusa, Jean C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Study of multiple recycling passes of transuranic elements: (a) without exceeding 5 wt.% on U-235 enrichment; (b) using PWR fuel assemblies compatible with current reactor core internals. • Isotopic concentrations tend towards an equilibrium after 15 recycle passes, suggesting that thermal recycling may be continued beyond that point. • Radiotoxicity comparisons for once-through UOX, once-recycle MOX-Pu, and multiple recycle passes of MOX-PuNpAm and MOX-PuNpAmCm are presented. - Abstract: This paper examines the multi-recycling of transuranic (TRU) elements (Pu-Np-Am-Cm) in standard Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies. The original feed of TRU comes from legacy spent UOX fuel. For all subsequent recycling passes, TRU elements from the previous generation are employed, supplemented by TRU from legacy UOX fuel, as needed. The design criteria include: 235 U enrichment requirements to remain below 5 w/o, TRU loading limits to avoid return to criticality under voided conditions, and assembly power peaking factors. In order to carry out multiple recycling passes within the design envelope, additional neutron moderation is required and achieved by reducing the fuel pellet diameter by about 13%, thus keeping the assembly design compatible with current PWR core internals. TRU transmutation rates and long-term ingestion radiotoxicity results are presented for 15 recycling passes and compared to standard UOX and MOX once-through cycles. The results also show that TRU fuel isotopics and radiotoxicity tend towards an equilibrium, enabling further additional recycling passes

  13. Development of recycling techniques for nuclear power plant decommissioning waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Takeshi; Oguri, Daiichiro; Abe, Seiji; Ohnishi, Kazuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Recycling of concrete and metal waste will provide solution to reduce waste volume, contributing to save the natural resources and to protect the environment. Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation has developed techniques of concrete and metal recycling for decommissioning waste of commercial nuclear power plants. A process of radioactive concrete usage for mortar solidification was seen to reduce concrete waste volume by 2/3. A concrete reclamation process for high quality aggregate was confirmed that the reclaimed aggregate concrete is equivalent to ordinary concrete. Its byproduct powder was seen to be utilized various usage. A process of waste metal casting to use radioactive metal as filler could substantially decrease the waste metal volume when thinner containers are applied. A pyro-metallurgical separation process was seen to decrease cobalt concentration by 1/100. Some of these techniques are finished of demonstration tests for future decommissioning activity. (author)

  14. Disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in Westinghouse reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsaed, A.A.; Adams, M.

    1998-03-01

    The authors have studied the feasibility of using weapons-grade plutonium in the form of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing Westinghouse reactors. They have designed three transition Cycles from an all LEU core to a partial MOX core. They found that four-loop Westinghouse reactors such as the Vogtle power plant are capable of handling up to 45 percent weapons-grade MOX loading without any modifications. The authors have also designed two kinds of weapons-grade MOX assemblies with three enrichments per assembly and four total enrichments. Wet annular burnable absorber (WABA) rods were used in all the MOX feed assemblies, some burned MOX assemblies, and some LEU feed assemblies. Integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA) was used in the rest of the LEU feed assemblies. The average discharge burnup of MOX assemblies was over 47,000 MWD/MTM, which is more than enough to meet the open-quotes spent fuel standard.close quotes One unit is capable of consuming 0.462 MT of weapons-grade plutonium per year. Preliminary analyses showed that important reactor physics parameters for the three transitions cycles are comparable to those of LEU cores including boron levels, reactivity coefficients, peaking factors, and shutdown margins. Further transient analyses will need to be performed

  15. Study of the radiotoxicity of actinides recycling in boiling water reactors fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, J.L.; Guzman, J.R.; Martin-del-Campo, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the production and destruction, as well as the radiotoxicity of plutonium and minor actinides (MA) obtained from the multi-recycling of boiling water reactors (BWR) fuel are analyzed. A BWR MOX fuel assembly, with uranium (from enrichment tails), plutonium and minor actinides is designed and studied using the HELIOS code. The actinides mass and the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel are compared with those of the once-through or direct cycle. Other type of fuel assembly is also analyzed: an assembly with enriched uranium and minor actinides; without plutonium. For this study, the fuel remains in the reactor for four cycles, where each cycle is 18 months length, with a discharge burnup of 48 MWd/kg. After this time, the fuel is placed in the spent fuel pool to be cooled during 5 years. Afterwards, the fuel is recycled for the next fuel cycle; 2 years are considered for recycle and fuel fabrication. Two recycles are taken into account in this study. Regarding radiotoxicity, results show that in the period from the spent fuel discharge until 1000 years, the highest reduction in the radiotoxicity related to the direct cycle is obtained with a fuel composed of MA and enriched uranium. However, in the period after few thousands of years, the lowest radiotoxicity is obtained using the fuel with plutonium and MA. The reduction in the radiotoxicity of the spent fuel after one or two recycling in a BWR is however very small for the studied MOX assemblies, reaching a maximum reduction factor of 2.

  16. Research on plant of metal fuel fabrication using casting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senda, Yasuhide; Mori, Yukihide

    2003-12-01

    This document presents the plant concept of metal fuel fabrication system (38tHM/y) using casting process in electrolytic recycle, which based on recent studies of its equipment design and quality control system. And we estimate the cost of its construction and operation, including costs of maintenance, consumed hardware and management of waste. The content of this work is as follows. (1) Designing of fuel fabrication equipment: We make material flow diagrams of the fuel fabrication plant and rough designs of the injection casting furnace, demolder and inspection equipment. (2) Designing of resolution system of liquid waste, which comes from analytical process facility. Increased analytical items, we rearrange analytical process facility, estimate its chemicals and amount of waste. (3) Arrangement of equipments: We made a arrangement diagram of the metal fuel fabrication equipments in cells. (4) Estimation of cost data: We estimated cost to construct the facility and to operate it. (author)

  17. Preliminary concepts: coordinated safeguards for materials management in a thorium--uranium fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Shipley, J.P.

    1978-10-01

    This report addresses preliminary concepts for coordinated safeguards materials management in a typical generic thorium--uranium-fueled light-water reactor (LWR) fuels reprocessing plant. The reference facility is designed to recover thorium and uranium from first-generation (denatured 235 U) startup fuels, first-recycle and equilibrium (denatured 233 U) thorium--uranium LWR fuels, and to recover the plutonium generated in the 238 U denaturant as well. 12 figures, 3 tables

  18. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gug, JeongIn; Cacciola, David; Sobkowicz, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Briquetting was used to produce solid fuels from municipal solid waste and recycled plastics. • Optimal drying, processing temperature and pressure were found to produce stable briquettes. • Addition of waste plastics yielded heating values comparable with typical coal feedstocks. • This processing method improves utilization of paper and plastic diverted from landfills. - Abstract: Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in

  19. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gug, JeongIn, E-mail: Jeongin_gug@student.uml.edu; Cacciola, David, E-mail: david_cacciola@student.uml.edu; Sobkowicz, Margaret J., E-mail: Margaret_sobkowiczkline@uml.edu

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Briquetting was used to produce solid fuels from municipal solid waste and recycled plastics. • Optimal drying, processing temperature and pressure were found to produce stable briquettes. • Addition of waste plastics yielded heating values comparable with typical coal feedstocks. • This processing method improves utilization of paper and plastic diverted from landfills. - Abstract: Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in

  20. Recycle and reuse of materials and components from waste streams of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    All nuclear fuel cycle processes utilize a wide range of equipment and materials to produce the final products they are designed for. However, as at any other industrial facility, during operation of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, apart from the main products some byproducts, spent materials and waste are generated. A lot of these materials, byproducts or some components of waste have a potential value and may be recycled within the original process or reused outside either directly or after appropriate treatment. The issue of recycle and reuse of valuable material is important for all industries including the nuclear fuel cycle. The level of different materials involvement and opportunities for their recycle and reuse in nuclear industry are different at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle activity, generally increasing from the front end to the back end processes and decommissioning. Minimization of waste arisings and the practice of recycle and reuse can improve process economics and can minimize the potential environmental impact. Recognizing the importance of this subject, the International Atomic Energy Agency initiated the preparation of this report aiming to review and summarize the information on the existing recycling and reuse practice for both radioactive and non-radioactive components of waste streams at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This report analyses the existing options, approaches and developments in recycle and reuse in nuclear industry

  1. Evaluation of nuclear fuel reprocessing strategies. 2. LWR fuel storage, recycle economics and plutonium logistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, B.E.; Hadley, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part report intended as a critical review of certain issues involved with closing the Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cycle and establishing the basis for future transition to commercial breeder applications. The report is divided into four main sections consisting of (1) a review of the status of the LWR spent fuel management and storage problem; (2) an analysis of the economic incentives for instituting reprocessing and recycle in LWRs; (3) an analysis of the time-dependent aspects of plutonium economic value particularly as related to the LWR-breeder transition; and (4) an analysis of the time-dependent aspects of plutonium requirements and supply relative to this transition

  2. Possibilities and limits of pyrolysis for recycling plastic rich waste streams rejected from phones recycling plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, B M; de Marco, I; Adrados, A; López-Urionabarrenechea, A; Solar, J; Gastelu, N

    2016-11-01

    The possibilities and limits of pyrolysis as a means of recycling plastic rich fractions derived from discarded phones have been studied. Two plastic rich samples (⩾80wt% plastics) derived from landline and mobile phones provided by a Spanish recycling company, have been pyrolysed under N 2 in a 3.5dm 3 reactor at 500°C for 30min. The landline and mobile phones yielded 58 and 54.5wt% liquids, 16.7 and 12.6wt% gases and 28.3 and 32.4wt% solids respectively. The liquids were a complex mixture of organic products containing valuable chemicals (toluene, styrene, ethyl-benzene, etc.) and with high HHVs (34-38MJkg -1 ). The solids were composed of metals (mainly Cu, Zn, and Al) and char (≈50wt%). The gases consisted mainly of hydrocarbons and some CO, CO 2 and H 2 . The halogens (Cl, Br) of the original samples were mainly distributed between the gases and solids. The metals and char can be easily separated and the formers may be recycled, but the uses of the char will be restricted due to its Cl/Br content. The gases may provide the energy requirements of the processing plant, but HBr and HCl must be firstly eliminated. The liquids could have a potential use as energy or chemicals source, but the practical implementation of these applications will be no exempt of great problems that may become insurmountable (difficulty of economically recovering pure chemicals, contamination by volatile metals, etc.). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Westinghouse AP1000® PWR: Meeting Customer Commitments and Market Needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulyak, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company once again sets a new industry standard with the AP1000 reactor. Historically, Westinghouse plant designs and technology have forged the cutting edge of worldwide nuclear technology. Today, about 50 percent of the world's 440 nuclear plants are based on Westinghouse technology. The AP1000 is the safest and most economical nuclear power plant available in the worldwide commercial marketplace, and is the only Generation III+ reactor to receive Design Certification from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The AP1000 features proven technology, innovative passive safety systems and offers: Unequalled safety, Economic competitiveness, Improved and more efficient operations. The AP1000 builds and improves upon the established technology of major components used in current Westinghouse-designed plants with proven, reliable operating experience over the past 50 years. These components include: Steam generators, Digital instrumentation and controls, Fuel, Pressurizers, Reactor vessels. Simplification was a major design objective for the AP1000. The simplified plant design includes overall safely systems, normal operating systems, the control room, construction techniques, and instrumentation and control systems. The result is a plant that is easier and less expensive to build, operate and maintain. The AP1000 design saves money and time with an accelerated construction time period of approximately 36 months, from the pouring of first concrete to the loading of fuel. Also, the innovative AP1000 features: 50% fewer safety-related valves, 80% less safety-related piping, 85% less control cable, 35% fewer pumps , 45% less seismic building volume. Eight AP1000 units under construction worldwide-Four units in China-Four units in the United States. (author)

  4. Westinghouse Electric. Know-how and top technology from Germany support non-polluting, safe, cost-effective power supply worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company LLC is one the world's leading firms in the commercial nuclear power field with a staff of approx. 15,000, of whom approx. 5,000 work in Europe. As part of the Toshiba Group, Westinghouse supports power utilities in the Americas, Asia, and EMEA (Europe, Middle East, Africa) regions with a broad range of products and services in nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel, nuclear services, and nuclear automation. The German-based company, Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, has more than 500 persons at the locations of Mannheim; Hamburg; Baden, Switzerland; and Metz, France. For more than 40 years, it has been successfully operating in field services, plant engineering, waste management, and nuclear automation. The Mannheim head office works the nuclear markets in Germany, Switzerland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. Under global resource utilization and products schemes, staff from Germany is employed also in projects all over the world. Present construction of a large number of new plants of the AP1000 registered reactor line in China and USA as well as planning and licensing steps for the construction of new nuclear power plants in Europe constitute a major contribution by Westinghouse to the worldwide renaissance of nuclear power. As a partner of utilities, Westinghouse also upgrades existing plants by backfitting and modernizing components and systems, management of aging, safety analyses, non-destructive testing, replacement of safety and operations I and C etc. for plant life extension and safe, economically viable continued operation. (orig.)

  5. A proposal for an international program to develop dry recycle of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.

    1999-01-01

    The dry oxidation-reduction process (called OREOX for Oxidation Reduction of Oxide Fuel) being developed by Korea and Canada, in cooperation with IAEA and the US State Department, is limited to recycle of spent LWR fuel into CANDU reactors (DUPIC). When first conceived and demonstrated via irradiation of test elements by Atomics International in 1965, (the process was called AIROX at that time) a wider range of applications was intended, including recycle of spent LWR fuel into LWRs. Studies sponsored by DOE's Idaho Office in 1992 confirmed the applicability of this technology to regions containing LWR's only, and described the potential advantages of such recycle from an environmental, waste management and economic point of view, as compared to the direct disposal option. Recent analyses conducted by the author indicates that such dry recycle may be one of the few acceptable paths remaining for resolution of the US spent fuel storage dilemma that remains consistent with US non-proliferation policy. It is proposed that a new US program be established to develop AIROX dry recycle for use in the US, and this become part of an international cooperative program, including the current Canadian - Korean program, and possibly including participation of other countries wishing to pursue alternatives to the once through cycle, and wet reprocessing. With shared funding of major project elements, such international cooperation would accelerate the demonstration and commercial deployment of dry recycle technology, as compared to separate and independent programs in each country. (author)

  6. Implementation of the Westinghouse WRB-2 CHF correlation in VIPRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasmier, L.K.; Haksoo Kim

    1992-01-01

    As part of the reload transient and thermal-hydraulic methods development effort within Commonwealth Edison Company (CECo), the WRB-2 critical heat flux (CHF) correlation has been implemented into the VIPRE-01 thermal-hydraulic analysis code to support Westinghouse 17X17 Vantage 5 fuel. CECo is in the process of switching from Westinghouse optimized fuel assembly (OFA) fuel to Vantage 5 fuel at CECo's six pressurized water reactors. CECo performs the neutronic portion of the reload analysis using Westinghouse's ANC/PHOENIX. The transient and thermal-hydraulic analysis will be performed using the RETRAN and VIPRE codes once the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has completed their review of CECo methodology. Previously, CECo had implemented and received NRC approval to use the Westinghouse WRB-1 CHF correlation in the VIPRE-01 code to support 15X15 and 17X17 OFA fuel designs. Since the WRB-1 CHF correlation is not applicable for 17X17 Vantage 5 fuel, it was necessary to implement the WRB-2 CHF correlation in the VIPRE code. The WRB-2 correlation was developed by Westinghouse using a database applicable to 17X17 OFA and Vantage 5 fuel and the THINC thermal-hydraulic analysis code. At CECo, the WRB-2 correlation had been implemented into VIPRE-01/MOD-02. The results produced at CECo have been statistically compared to those produced by Westinghouse. Owen's method was used to determine the VIPRE/WRB-02 thermal limit. The thermal limit for 17X17 OFA and Vantage 5 fuel use in VIPRE/WRB-2 is in excellent agreement with the value calculated by Westinghouse using THINC/WRB-2

  7. Cost and availability of gadolinium for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.

    1985-06-01

    Gadolinium is currently planned for use as a soluble neutron poison in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants to prevent criticality of solutions of spent fuel. Gadolinium is relatively rare and expensive. The present study was undertaken therefore to estimate whether this material is likely to be available in quantities sufficient for fuel reprocessing and at reasonable prices. It was found that gadolinium, one of 16 rare earth elements, appears in the marketplace as a by-product and that its present supply is a function of the production rate of other more prevalent rare earths. The potential demand for gadolinium in a fuel reprocessing facility serving a future fast reactor industry amounts to only a small fraction of the supply. At the present rate of consumption, domestic supplies of rare earths containing gadolinium are adequate to meet national needs (including fuel reprocessing) for over 100 years. With access to foreign sources, US demands can be met well beyond the 21st century. It is concluded therefore that the supply of gadolinium will quite likely be more than adequate for reprocessing spent fuel for the early generation of fast reactors. The current price of 99.99% pure gadolinium oxide lies in the range $50/lb to $65/lb (1984 dollars). By the year 2020, in time for reprocessing spent fuel from an early generation of large fast reactors, the corresponding values are expected to lie in the $60/lb to $75/lb (1984 dollars) price range. This increase is modest and its economic impact on nuclear fuel reprocessing would be minor. The economic potential for recovering gadolinium from the wastes of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants (which use gadolinium neutron poison) was also investigated. The cost of recycled gadolinium was estimated at over twelve times the cost of fresh gadolinium, and thus recycle using current recovery technology is not economical. 15 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  8. PSA effect analysis of a design modification of the auxiliary feedwater system for a Westinghouse type plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Yeon Kyoung; Lee, Eun Chan

    2012-01-01

    The auxiliary feedwater system is an important system used to mitigate most accidents considered in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The reference plant has produced electric power for about thirty years. Due to age related deterioration and lack of parts, a turbine driven auxiliary feedwater pump (TD AFWP), some valves, and piping of the auxiliary feedwater system should be replaced. This change includes relocation of some valves, installation of valves for maintenance of the steam generator, and a new cross tie line. According to the design change, the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) has been revised. Therefore, this design modification affects the PSA. It is thus necessary to assess the improvement of plant safety. In this paper, the impact of the design change of the auxiliary feedwater system on the PSA is assessed. The results demonstrate that this modification considering the plant safety decreased the total CDF

  9. Calculation Of Recycle And Open Cycle Nuclear Fuel Cost Using Lagistase Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djoko Birmano, Moch

    2002-01-01

    . To be presented the calculation of recycle and open cycle nuclear fuel cost for LWR type that have net power of 600 MWe. This calculation using LEGECOST method developed by IAEA which have characteristics,where i.e. money is stated in constant money (no inflation),discount rate is equalized with interest rate and not consider tax and depreciation.As a conclusion is that open cycle nuclear fuel cost more advantage because it is cheaper than recycle nuclear fuel cost. This is caused that at present, reprocessing process disadvantage because it has not found yet more efficient and cheaper method, besides price of fresh uranium is still cheap. In future, the cost of recycle nuclear fuel cycle will be more competitive toward the cost of open nuclear fuel cycle if is found technology of reprocessing process that more advance, efficient and cheap. Increase of Pu use for reactor fuel especially MOX type will rise Pu price that finally will decrease the cost of recycle nuclear fuel cycle

  10. Preliminary LOCA analysis of the westinghouse small modular reactor using the WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2 thermal-hydraulics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J.; Kucukboyaci, V. N.; Nguyen, L.; Frepoli, C. [Westinghouse Electric Company, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (> 225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) with all primary components, including the steam generator and the pressurizer located inside the reactor vessel. The reactor core is based on a partial-height 17x17 fuel assembly design used in the AP1000{sup R} reactor core. The Westinghouse SMR utilizes passive safety systems and proven components from the AP1000 plant design with a compact containment that houses the integral reactor vessel and the passive safety systems. A preliminary loss of coolant accident (LOCA) analysis of the Westinghouse SMR has been performed using the WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2 code, simulating a transient caused by a double ended guillotine (DEG) break in the direct vessel injection (DVI) line. WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2 is a new generation Westinghouse LOCA thermal-hydraulics code evolving from the US NRC licensed WCOBRA/TRAC code. It is designed to simulate PWR LOCA events from the smallest break size to the largest break size (DEG cold leg). A significant number of fluid dynamics models and heat transfer models were developed or improved in WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2. A large number of separate effects and integral effects tests were performed for a rigorous code assessment and validation. WCOBRA/TRAC-TF2 was introduced into the Westinghouse SMR design phase to assist a quick and robust passive cooling system design and to identify thermal-hydraulic phenomena for the development of the SMR Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT). The LOCA analysis of the Westinghouse SMR demonstrates that the DEG DVI break LOCA is mitigated by the injection and venting from the Westinghouse SMR passive safety systems without core heat up, achieving long term core cooling. (authors)

  11. Recent advances in fuel product and manufacturing process development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slember, R.J.; Doshi, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses advancements in commercial nuclear fuel products and manufacturing made by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation in response to the commercial nuclear fuel industry's demand for high reliability, increased plant availability and improved operating flexibility. The features and benefits of Westinghouse's most advanced fuel products--VANTAGE 5 for PWR plants and QUAD+ for BWR plants--are described, as well as 'high performance' fuel concepts now under development for delivery in the late 1980s. The paper also disusses the importance of in-process quality control throughout manufacturing towards reducing product variability and improving fuel reliability. (author)

  12. Fuel optimization of Qinshan nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Zejun; Li Zhuoqun; Kong Deping; Xue Xincai; Wang Shiwei

    2010-01-01

    Based on the design practice of the fuel replacement of Qin Shan nuclear power plant, this document effectively analyzes the shortcomings of current replacement design of Qin Shan. To address these shortcomings, this document successfully implements the 300 MW fuel optimization program from fuel replacement. fuel improvement and experimentation ,and achieves great economic results. (authors)

  13. A methodology for calculating the levelized cost of electricity in nuclear power systems with fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Roo, Guillaume; Parsons, John E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we show how the traditional definition of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) can be extended to alternative nuclear fuel cycles in which elements of the fuel are recycled. In particular, we define the LCOE for a cycle with full actinide recycling in fast reactors in which elements of the fuel are reused an indefinite number of times. To our knowledge, ours is the first LCOE formula for this cycle. Others have approached the task of evaluating this cycle using an 'equilibrium cost' concept that is different from a levelized cost. We also show how the LCOE implies a unique price for the recycled elements. This price reflects the ultimate cost of waste disposal postponed through the recycling, as well as other costs in the cycle. We demonstrate the methodology by estimating the LCOE for three classic nuclear fuel cycles: (i) the traditional Once-Through Cycle, (ii) a Twice-Through Cycle, and (iii) a Fast Reactor Recycle. Given our chosen input parameters, we show that the 'equilibrium cost' is typically larger than the levelized cost, and we explain why.

  14. A comparative study on recycling spent fuels in gas-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok; Baxter, Alan

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates advanced Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) fuel cycle scenarios which are based on recycling spent nuclear fuel for the sustainability of nuclear energy. A 600 MWth GFR was used for the fuel cycle analysis, and the equilibrium core was searched with different fuel-to-matrix volume ratios such as 70/30 and 60/40. Two fuel cycle scenarios, i.e., a one-tier case combining a Light Water Reactor (LWR) and a GFR, and a two-tier case using an LWR, a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), and a GFR, were evaluated for mass flow and fuel cycle cost, and the results were compared to those of LWR once-through fuel cycle. The mass flow calculations showed that the natural uranium consumption can be reduced by more than 57% and 27% for the one-tier and two-tier cycles, respectively, when compared to the once-through fuel cycle. The transuranics (TRU) which pose a long-term problem in a high-level waste repository, can be significantly reduced in the multiple recycle operation of these options, resulting in more than 110 and 220 times reduction of TRU inventory to be geologically disposed for the one-tier and two-tier fuel cycles, respectively. The fuel cycle costs were estimated to be 9.4 and 8.6 USD/MWh for the one-tier fuel cycle when the GFR fuel-to-matrix volume ratio was 70/30 and 60/40, respectively. However the fuel cycle cost is reduced to 7.3 and 7.1 USD/MWh for the two-tier fuel cycle, which is even smaller than that of the once-through fuel cycle. In conclusion the GFR can provide alternative fuel cycle options to the once-through and other fast reactor fuel cycle options, by increasing the natural uranium utilization and reducing the fuel cycle cost.

  15. Recycling and transmutation of spent fuel as a sustainable option for the nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, Jose R.; Moreira, Joao M.L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the option of recycling and transmutation of radioactive waste against Once-through Fuel Cycle (OTC) based on uranium feed under the perspective of sustainability. We use a qualitative analysis to compare OTC with closed fuel cycles based on studies already performed such as the Red Impact Project and the comparative study on accelerator driven systems and fast reactors for advanced fuel cycles performed by the Nuclear Energy Agency. The results show that recycling and transmutation fuel cycles are more attractive than the OTC from the point of view of sustainability. The main conclusion is that the decision about the construction of a deep geological repository for spent fuel disposal must be reevaluated. (author)

  16. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste

  17. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, S.B. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Brown, R.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilcox, D.P. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., West Valley, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  18. Improved analysis on multiple recycling of fuel in prototype fast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-03

    Aug 3, 2011 ... ENDF/B-VII.0, and with the most recent specification of the fuel composition ... Fast breeder reactors; closed fuel cycle; fuel production and depletion; reprocessing .... set including self-shielding factors (SSF, i.e. self-shielded to ...

  19. ``Recycling'' Nuclear Power Plant Waste: Technical Difficulties and Proliferation Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Edwin

    2007-04-01

    One of the most vexing problems associated with nuclear energy is the inability to find a technically and politically viable solution for the disposal of long-lived radioactive waste. The U.S. plan to develop a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel at Yucca Mountain in Nevada is in jeopardy, as a result of managerial incompetence, political opposition and regulatory standards that may be impossible to meet. As a result, there is growing interest in technologies that are claimed to have the potential to drastically reduce the amount of waste that would require geologic burial and the length of time that the waste would require containment. A scenario for such a vision was presented in the December 2005 Scientific American. While details differ, these technologies share a common approach: they require chemical processing of spent fuel to extract plutonium and other long-lived actinide elements, which would then be ``recycled'' into fresh fuel for advanced reactors and ``transmuted'' into shorter-lived fission products. Such a scheme is the basis for the ``Global Nuclear Energy Partnership,'' a major program unveiled by the Department of Energy (DOE) in early 2006. This concept is not new, but has been studied for decades. Major obstacles include fundamental safety issues, engineering feasibility and cost. Perhaps the most important consideration in the post-9/11 era is that these technologies involve the separation of plutonium and other nuclear weapon-usable materials from highly radioactive fission products, providing opportunities for terrorists seeking to obtain nuclear weapons. While DOE claims that it will only utilize processes that do not produce ``separated plutonium,'' it has offered no evidence that such technologies would effectively deter theft. It is doubtful that DOE's scheme can be implemented without an unacceptable increase in the risk of nuclear terrorism.

  20. Alternative Fabrication of Recycling Fast Reactor Metal Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Jong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2015-01-01

    Metal fuels such as U-Zr/U-Pu-Zr alloys have been considered as a nuclear fuel for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) related to the closed fuel cycle for managing minor actinides and reducing a high radioactivity levels since the 1980s. In order to develop innovative fabrication method of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am, modified casting under inert atmosphere has been applied for metal fuel slugs for SFR. Alternative fabrication method of fuel slugs has been introduced to develop an improved fabrication process of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements. In this study, metal fuel slugs for SFR have been fabricated by modified casting method, and characterized to evaluate the feasibility of the alternative fabrication method. In order to prevent evaporation of volatile elements such as Am and improve quality of fuel slugs, alternative fabrication methods of metal fuel slugs have been studied in KAERI. U-10Zr-5Mn fuel slug containing volatile surrogate element Mn was soundly cast by modified injection casting under modest pressure. Evaporation of Mn during alternative casting could not be detected by chemical analysis. Mn element was most recovered with prevention of evaporation by alternative casting. Modified injection casting has been selected as an alternative fabrication method in KAERI, considering evaporation prevention, and proven benefits of high productivity, high yield, and good remote control

  1. Westinghouse experience in the transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Westinghouse experience with transfer of technical information is two-sided. First is our experience in learning, and the second is our experience in teaching others. Westinghouse conducts a special school to which government, academic and industry people are invited. There are many problems involved in all technology transfers; these include: keeping information current, making certain changes are compatible with the supplier's manufacturing capability and also suitable to the receiver, patent right and proprietary information. The building, testing and maintenance of the unit on the line - and then a succession of its sister plant is the basis for the Westinghouse leadership

  2. To Recycle or Not to Recycle? An Intergenerational Approach to Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taebi, B.; Kloosterman, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    AbstractThis paper approaches the choice between the open and closed nuclear fuel cycles as a matter of intergenerational justice, by revealing the value conflicts in the production of nuclear energy. The closed fuel cycle improve sustainability in terms of the supply certainty of uranium and

  3. Preliminary study on recycling of metallic waste from decommissioning of nuclear power plant for cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohe, Koichiro; Kato, Osamu; Saegusa, Toshiari

    1999-01-01

    Preliminary study was made on technology required to recycle of metallic waste from decommissioning for spent fuel storage cask and on quantity of the cask which can be produced by the metallic waste. The technical and institutional issues for the recycling were studied. The metallic waste from decommissioning may be technically used to a certain degree for manufacturing the casks. However, there were some technical issues to be solved. For example, the manufacturing factories should be established. The radioactive waste from the factories with radiation control should be handled and treated carefully. Quality of the cask should be properly controlled. The 'Clearance Levels' which allows to recycle decommissioning waste have been hardly enacted in Japan. Technical and economic evaluation on recycling of metallic waste from decommissioning for spent fuel storage cask should be conducted again after progress in recycling of radioactive waste of which radioactivity is below the 'Clearance Levels' in Japan. (author)

  4. Exposure to recycled uranium contaminants in gaseous diffusion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Jeri L.; Yiin, James H.; Tseng, Chih-Yu; Apostoaei, A. Iulian

    2017-01-01

    As part of an ongoing study of health effects in a pooled cohort of gaseous diffusion plant workers, organ dose from internal exposure to uranium was evaluated. Due to the introduction of recycled uranium into the plants, there was also potential for exposure to radiologically significant levels of "9"9Tc, "2"3"7Np and "2"3"8","2"3"9Pu. In the evaluation of dose response, these radionuclide exposures could confound the effect of internal uranium. Using urine bioassay data for study subjects reported in facility records, intakes and absorbed dose to bone surface, red bone marrow and kidneys were estimated as these organs were associated with a priori outcomes of interest. Additionally, "9"9Tc intakes and doses were calculated using a new systemic model for technetium and compared to intakes and doses calculated using the current model recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Organ absorbed doses for the transuranics were significant compared to uranium doses; however, "9"9Tc doses calculated using the new systemic model were significant as well. Use of the new model resulted in an increase in "9"9Tc-related absorbed organ dose of a factor of 8 (red bone marrow) to 30 (bone surface). (authors)

  5. Evaluation of the recycling costs, as a disposal form of the spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    At the moment there are 2 BWR reactors operating in the Nuclear Power station of Laguna Verde in Mexico. At the end of the programmed life of the reactors (40 years) its will have completed 26 operation cycles, with will have 6712 spent fuel assemblies will be in the pools of the power station. Up to now, the decision on the destination of the high level wastes (spent nuclear fuel) it has not been determined in Mexico, the same as in other countries, adopting a politics of 'to wait to see that it happens in the world', in this respect, in the world two practical alternatives exist, one is to store the fuel in repositories designed for that end, another is reprocess the fuel to recycle the plutonium contained in it, both solutions have their particular technical and economic problematic. In this work it is evaluated from the economic point of view the feasibility of having the spent fuel, using the one recycled fuel, for that which thinks about a consistent scenario of a BWR reactor in which the fuel discharged in each operation cycle is reprocessed and its are built fuel assemblies of the MOX type to replace partly to the conventional fuel. This scenario shows an alternative to the indefinite storage of the high level radioactive waste. The found results when comparing from the economic point of view both options, show that the one recycled, even with the current costs of the uranium it is of the order of 7% more expensive that the option of storing the fuel in repositories constructed for that purpose. However the volumes of spent fuel decrease in 66%. (Author)

  6. Design and optimization of a combined fuel reforming and solid oxide fuel cell system with anode off-gas recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Seok; Chung, J.N.; Chen, Yen-Cho

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this work, an analytical, parametric study is performed to evaluate the feasibility and performance of a combined fuel reforming and SOFC system. → Specifically the effects of adding the anode off-gas recycling and recirculation components and the CO 2 absorbent unit are investigated. → The AOG recycle ratio increases with increasing S/C ratio and the addition of AOG recycle eliminates the need for external water consumption. → The key finding is that for the SOFC operating at 900 deg. C with the steam to carbon ratio at 5 and no AOG recirculation, the system efficiency peaks. - Abstract: An energy conversion and management concept for a combined system of a solid oxide fuel cell coupled with a fuel reforming device is developed and analyzed by a thermodynamic and electrochemical model. The model is verified by an experiment and then used to evaluate the overall system performance and to further suggest an optimal design strategy. The unique feature of the system is the inclusion of the anode off-gas recycle that eliminates the need of external water consumption for practical applications. The system performance is evaluated as a function of the steam to carbon ratio, fuel cell temperature, anode off gas recycle ratio and CO 2 adsorption percentage. For most of the operating conditions investigated, the system efficiency starts at around 70% and then monotonically decreases to the average of 50% at the peak power density before dropping down to zero at the limiting current density point. From an engineering application point of view, the proposed combined fuel reforming and SOFC system with a range of efficiency between 50% and 70% is considered very attractive. It is suggested that the optimal system is the one where the SOFC operates around 900 deg. C with S/C ratio higher than 3, maximum CO 2 capture, and minimum AOG recirculation.

  7. Recycled iron fuels new production in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, Patrick A; Sigman, Daniel M; Mackey, Katherine R M

    2017-10-24

    Nitrate persists in eastern equatorial Pacific surface waters because phytoplankton growth fueled by nitrate (new production) is limited by iron. Nitrate isotope measurements provide a new constraint on the controls of surface nitrate concentration in this region and allow us to quantify the degree and temporal variability of nitrate consumption. Here we show that nitrate consumption in these waters cannot be fueled solely by the external supply of iron to these waters, which occurs by upwelling and dust deposition. Rather, a substantial fraction of nitrate consumption must be supported by the recycling of iron within surface waters. Given plausible iron recycling rates, seasonal variability in nitrate concentration on and off the equator can be explained by upwelling rate, with slower upwelling allowing for more cycles of iron regeneration and uptake. The efficiency of iron recycling in the equatorial Pacific implies the evolution of ecosystem-level mechanisms for retaining iron in surface ocean settings where it limits productivity.

  8. How Westinghouse is consolidating its international lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-12-01

    The second of a series of profiles of major industrial groups in the world's nuclear industry, examines the attitudes and objectives of some of the executives now responsible for directing the widespread and complex international nuclear business of the Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Against the background of new management thinking in the group, the article discusses the significance of the emphasis on plant standardization of reliability, and on productivity in manufacturing.

  9. Human plan of capital of Westinghouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, B.; Gutierrez Elso, J. E.

    2008-01-01

    After three decades of nuclear standstill, the Nuclear Renaissance resulted in a changing environment, Nuclear Companies should prepare and adapt to different challenges: the fast growing of the organization, the loss of talent to other more attractive industrial fields and the transfer and management of knowledge to young engineers that have not participated in the building of nuclear plants. In this article different Westinghouse initiatives in this respect are commented. (Author)

  10. Design requirements and performance requirements for reactor fuel recycle manipulator systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, J.G.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a new generation of remote handling devices for remote production work in support of reactor fuel recycle systems is discussed. These devices require greater mobility, speed and visual capability than remote handling systems used in research activities. An upgraded manipulator system proposed for a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuel refabrication facility is described. Design and performance criteria for the manipulators, cranes, and TV cameras in the proposed system are enumerated

  11. Proposal of a torus pumping and fuel recycling system for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perinic, D.; Mack, A.; Perinic, G.; Murdoch, D.

    1995-01-01

    A universal torus pumping and fuel recycling system is proposed for all operation modes of ITER. It comprises primary cryopumps and secondary fuel separating cryopumps located inside the cryostat and a common mechanical forepump station located outside the cryostat. In this paper two different primary cryopump options are compared. The results of Monte Carlo calculations of pumping probabilities for helium show a significant difference leading to a distinct preference for the concept of a co-pumping cryopump. (orig.)

  12. Inductive Double-Contingency Analysis of UO2 Powder Bulk Blending Operations at a Commercial Fuel Plant (U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skiles, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    An inductive double-contingency analysis (DCA) method developed by the criticality safety function at the Savannah River Site, was applied in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) of five major plant process systems at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation's Commercial Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant in Columbia, South Carolina (WEC-Cola.). The method emphasizes a thorough evaluation of the controls intended to provide barriers against criticality for postulated initiating events, and has been demonstrated effective at identifying common mode failure potential and interdependence among multiple controls. A description of the method and an example of its application is provided

  13. MELOX fuel fabrication plant: Operational feedback and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugelmann, D.; Greneche, D.

    2000-01-01

    As of December 1, 1998, 32 Europeans LWRs are loaded with MOX fuel. It clearly means that plutonium recycling in MOX fuels is a mature industry, with successful operational experience in fabrication plants in some European countries, especially in France. Indeed, the recycling of plutonium generated in LWRs is one of the objectives of the full Reprocessing-Conditioning-Recycling (RCR) strategy chosen by France in the 70's. The most impressive results of this strategy, is the fact that 31 of the 32 reactors are loaded with MOX fuels supplied by the COGEMA Group from the same efficient fabrication process, the MIMAS process, improved for the MELOX plant to become the A-MIMAS process. In France, 17 reactors are already loaded and 11 additional reactors are technically suited to do so. Indeed, the EDF MOX program plans to use MOX in 28 of its 57 reactors. An EDF 900 MWe reactor core contains 157 assemblies of 264 rods each. 52 fuel assemblies per year are necessary for a 'UO 2 3-batches-MOX 3-batches' core management. In this case, a third of the UO 2 and a third of the MOX assemblies are replaced yearly, that means 36 UO 2 fuel assemblies and 16 MOX fuel assemblies. Some MOX fuelled reactors have now switched from the previously described core management to a so-called 'hybrid core management'. In this case, a quarter of UO 2 assemblies is replaced yearly. The first EDF reactor loaded with MOX fuel was Saint-Laurent B1, in 1987. The in-core experience, based on several hundred assemblies loaded, with reloading on a 1/3 cycle basis, shows that there is no operational difference between UO 2 and MOX fuels, both in terms of performance and safety. MOX fueling of 900 MWe EDF's PWRs, with a limited in-core MOX ratio of 30%, has needed only minor adaptations, such as addition of control rods, modification of the boron concentration in the cooling system and precaution against radiation exposure, easy to set up (optimisation of the fresh MOX fuel handling process, remote

  14. Nuclear Fuel Recovery and Recycling Center. License application, PSAR, volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A summary of the location and major design features of the proposed Nuclear Fuel Recovery and Recycling Center is presented. The safety aspects of the proposed facilities and operations are summarized, taking into account possible normal and abnormal operating and environmental conditions. A chapter on site characteristics is included

  15. Nuclear Fuel Recovery and Recycling Center. License application, PSAR, volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Volume 3 comprises Chapter 5 which provides descriptive information on Nuclear Fuel Recovery and Recycling Center buildings and other facilities, including their locations. The design features discussed include those used to withstand environmental and accidental forces and to insure radiological protection

  16. Plant Characteristics of an Integrated Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cycle and a Steam Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    Plant characteristics of a system containing a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cycle on the top of a Rankine cycle were investigated. Natural gas (NG) was used as the fuel for the plant. A desulfurization reactor removes the sulfur content in the fuel, while a pre-reformer broke down the heavier...... recovery steam generator (HRSG). The remaining energy of the off-gases was recycled back to the topping cycle for further utilization. Several parameter studies were carried out to investigate the sensitivity of the suggested plant. It was shown that the operation temperature of the desulfurization unit...

  17. Recycling of copper used in fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty, C.B.A.; Butterworth, G.J.; Turner, A.D.; Junkison, A.J.

    1997-04-01

    One of the major safety and environmental advantages of fusion power is a limited waste management burden on future generations. In this connection, the ability to recycle end-of-service materials from fusion power plant is beneficial both in terms of the conservation of natural resources and the minimisation of the volumes of activated wastes. After 100 years, the residual activity of near-plasma copper components exceeds that permitted for free release or contact handling. The presence of silver as a common impurity in copper may exacerbate this problem, through generation of 108m Ag. Removal of the silver impurity in a separate refining step prior to use of the copper in a fusion plant obviates the problems associated with formation of 108m Ag. Two alternative desilveration processes have been demonstrated; one involving the segregation of silver as AgBr and the other the absorption of Ag + by ion exchange. The present study demonstrates that conventional electrorefining techniques can be adapted to recover used copper in a single refining stage, with sufficient decontamination to permit its reuse in fusion power plants or, with a second stage, unrestricted release. Shielding requirements for the processing of scrap copper in conventional hot cells indicate a decay storage period of 50-100 years. To maximise the cost of savings of reclamation over direct geological disposal, the activation products may be separated out and disposed of in a metallic form. A substantial reduction in the overall volume of active waste should thus be achievable, especially if supercompaction can be applied to the product. (Author)

  18. Recycling of copper used in fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, G.J.; Forty, C.B.A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the major safety and environmental advantages of fusion power is a limited waste management burden on future generations. In this connection, the ability to recycle end-of-service materials from fusion power plants is beneficial both in terms of the conservation of natural resources and the minimisation of the volume of activated wastes. After 100 years, the residual activity of near-plasma copper components exceeds that permitted for free release or contact handling. The presence of silver as a common impurity in copper may exacerbate this problem, through generation of 108m Ag. Removal of the silver impurity in a separate refining step prior to use of the copper in a fusion plant obviates the problems associated with formation of 108m Ag. Two alternative desilverisation processes have been demonstrated; one involving the segregation of silver as AgBr and the other the absorption of Ag + by ion exchange. The present study demonstrates that conventional electrorefining techniques can be adapted to recover used copper in a single refining stage, with sufficient decontamination to permit its reuse in fusion power plants or, with a second stage, unrestricted release. Shielding requirements for the processing of scrap copper in conventional hot cells indicate a decay storage period of 50-100 years. To maximise the cost savings of reclamation over direct geological disposal, the activation products may be separated out and disposed of in a metallic form. A substantial reduction in the overall volume of active waste should thus be achievable, especially if supercompaction can be applied to the product. (orig.)

  19. Recycling of impregnated wood and impregnating agents - combustion plant technology; Kyllaestetyn puutavaran ja kyllaestysaineiden kierraetys - polttolaitostekniikka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrjaenen, T.; Kangas, E. [Kestopuu Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2000-07-01

    purification systems cause extra investments. The emissions limits for combustion of impregnated wood are given in EU's Waste Incineration Directive. The amount of collected impregnated wood is sufficient for a 25 MW plant. Solid fuels fired gasification, grate firing and fluidized bed boilers suit best fir combustion of impregnated wood waste, gasification and fluidized beds being the best, because of the efficient combustion and low ash formation. Flue gas purification system is essential for incineration of impregnated wood. Chromium and copper, released in combustion, remain mainly in ash, but 60-90% of arsenic migrates in flue gases as small particles. By combining different technologies it is possible to obtain better recovery of impurities. One of the best methods is based on spraying of fluid in pre-cooling system into flue gases in order to cool the gases rapidly and to stop the reactions in the flue gases. After this the flue gases are pre-cleaned and cooled in a venturi scrubber. Fiber filters are recommended for dedusting of the flue gases. The formed ashes are recycled in Outokumpu Harjavalta metals copper smelter as raw material, which requires that the sintered material content of ash is low. The condensing waters of flue gas scrubbing can be used for preparation of copper/chromium/arsenic (CCA) concentrate.

  20. Impact of actinide recycle on nuclear fuel cycle health risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, G.E.

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this background paper is to summarize what is presently known about potential impacts on the impacts on the health risk of the nuclear fuel cycle form deployment of the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) 1 and Integral Fast Reactor (IF) 2 technology as an actinide burning system. In a companion paper the impact on waste repository risk is addressed in some detail. Therefore, this paper focuses on the remainder of the fuel cycle

  1. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 11: Advanced steam systems. [energy conversion efficiency for electric power plants using steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A parametric analysis was made of three types of advanced steam power plants that use coal in order to have a comparison of the cost of electricity produced by them a wide range of primary performance variables. Increasing the temperature and pressure of the steam above current industry levels resulted in increased energy costs because the cost of capital increased more than the fuel cost decreased. While the three plant types produced comparable energy cost levels, the pressurized fluidized bed boiler plant produced the lowest energy cost by the small margin of 0.69 mills/MJ (2.5 mills/kWh). It is recommended that this plant be designed in greater detail to determine its cost and performance more accurately than was possible in a broad parametric study and to ascertain problem areas which will require development effort. Also considered are pollution control measures such as scrubbers and separates for particulate emissions from stack gases.

  2. The reprocessing-recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides separation - Application to wastes management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    After its use in the reactor, the spent fuel still contains lot of recoverable material for an energetic use (uranium, plutonium), but also fission products and minor actinides which represent the residues of nuclear reactions. The reprocessing-recycling of the spent fuel, as it is performed in France, implies the chemical separation of these materials. The development and the industrial implementation of this separation process represent a major contribution of the French science and technology. The reprocessing-recycling allows a good management of nuclear wastes and a significant saving of fissile materials. With the recent spectacular rise of uranium prices, this process will become indispensable with the development of the next generation of fast neutron reactors. This book takes stock of the present and future variants of the chemical process used for the reprocessing of spent fuels. It describes the researches in progress and presents the stakes and recent results obtained by the CEA. content: the separation of actinides, a key factor for a sustainable nuclear energy; the actinides, a discovery of the 20. century; the radionuclides in nuclear fuels; the aquo ions of actinides; some redox properties of actinides; some complexing properties of actinide cations; general considerations about treatment processes; some characteristics of nuclear fuels in relation with their reprocessing; technical goals and specific constraints of the PUREX process; front-end operations of the PUREX process; separation and purification operations of the PUREX process; elaboration of finite products in the framework of the PUREX process; management and treatment of liquid effluents; solid wastes of the PUREX process; towards a joint management of uranium and plutonium: the COEX TM process; technical options of treatment and recycling techniques; the fuels of generation IV reactors; front-end treatment processes of advanced fuels; hydrometallurgical processes for future fuel cycles

  3. The differential radiological impact of plutonium recycle in the light-water reactor fuel cycle: effluent discharges during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouville, A.; Guetat, P.; Jones, J.A.; Kelly, G.N.; Legrand, J.; White, I.F.

    1980-01-01

    The radiological impact of a light-water reactor fuel cycle utilizing enriched uranium fuel may be altered by the recycle of plutonium. Differences in impact may arise during various operations in the fuel cycle: those which arise from effluents discharged during normal operation of the various installations comprising the fuel cycle are evaluated in this study. The differential radiological impact on the population of the European Communities (EC) of effluents discharged during the recycling of 10 tonnes of fissile plutonium metal is evaluated. The contributions from each stage of the fuel cycle, i.e. fuel fabrication, reactor operation and fuel reprocessing and conversion, are identified. Separate consideration is given to airborne and liquid effluents and account is taken of a wide range of environmental conditions, representative of the EC, in estimating the radiological impact. The recycle of plutonium is estimated to result in a reduction in the radiological impact from effluents of about 30% of that when using enriched uranium fuel

  4. Fuel-pellet-fabrication experience using direct-denitration-recycle-PuO2-coprecipitated mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Schaus, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The fuel pellet fabrication experience described in this paper involved three different feed powders: coprecipitated PuO 2 -UO 2 which was flash calcined in a fluidized bed; co-direct denitrated PuO 2 -UO 2 ; and direct denitrated LWR recycle PuO 2 which was mechanically blended with natural UO 2 . The objectives of this paper are twofold; first, to demonstrate that acceptable quality fuel pellets were fabricated using feed powders manufactured by processes other than the conventional oxalate process; and second, to highlight some pellet fabrication difficulties experienced with the direct denitration LWR recycle PuO 2 feed material, which did not produce acceptable pellets. The direct denitration LWR recycle PuO 2 was available as a by-product and was not specifically produced for use in fuel pellet fabrication. Nevertheless, its characteristics and pellet fabrication behavior serve to re-emphasize the importance of continued process development involving both powder suppliers and fuel fabricators to close the fuel cycle in the future

  5. Potential for the use of hydrochloric acid in fission reactor fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Bell, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The chemistry and the effects of the use of hydrochloric acid as the aqueous phase in fuel recycle are surveyed. Available data are sufficient to suggest that separations of actinides and fission products can be at least as good in an HCl-trialkyl amine system as in Purex. Advantages of the HCl system are simpler operations of the off-gas system, better separation of neptunium from uranium and plutonium, better control of oxidation states of the dissolved species, and simpler recycle of the acid. A possible advantage is the more complete dissolution of the fission products, leaving very little insoluble residue. Disadvantages include lack of development of methods for dissolution of oxide fuel in hydrochloric acid, the requirement for processing equipment constructed of titanium, possible complications in the waste-handling system, and the dissolution of much of the cladding in the case of stainless-steel clad fuel

  6. Radiological implications of plutonium recycle and the use of thorium fuels in power reactor operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, H. F.

    1976-01-15

    As economically attractive sources of natural uranium are gradually depleted attention will turn to recycling plutonium or to the use of thorium fuels. The radiological implications of these fuel cycles in terms of fuel handling and radioactive waste disposal are investigated in relation to a conventional /sup 235/U enriched oxide fuel. It is suggested that a comparative study of this nature may be an important aspect of the overall optimization of future fuel cycle strategies. It is shown that the use of thorium based fuels has distinct advantages in terms of neutron dose rates from irradiated fuels and long term proportional to decay heating commitment compared with conventional uranium/plutonium fuels. However, this introduces a ..gamma.. dose rate problem in the fabrication and handling of unirradiated /sup 233/U fuels. For both plutonium and thorium fuels these radiological problems increase during storage of the fuel prior to reactor irradiation. The novel health physics problems which arise in the handling and processing of thorium fuels are reviewed in an appendix.

  7. Analysis of transition to fuel cycle system with continuous recycling in fast and thermal reactors - 5060

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passereini, S.; Feng, B.; Fei, T.; Kim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Brown, N.R.; Cuadra, A.

    2015-01-01

    A recent Evaluation and Screening study of nuclear fuel cycle options identified a few groups of options as most promising. One of these most promising Evaluation Groups (EGs) is characterized by the continuous recycling of uranium (U) and transuranics (TRU) with natural uranium feed in both fast and thermal critical reactors. This evaluation group, designated as EG30, is represented by an example fuel cycle option that employs a two-technology, two-stage fuel cycle system. The first stage involves the continuous recycling of co-extracted U/TRU in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) with metallic fuel and breeding ratio greater than 1. The second stage involves the use of the surplus TRU in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel in Pressurized Water Reactors that are MOX-capable (MOX-PWRs). This paper presents and discusses preliminary fuel cycle analysis results from the fuel cycle codes VISION and DYMOND for the transition to this fuel cycle option from the current once-through cycle in the United States (U.S.) that consists of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) that only use conventional UO 2 fuel. The analyses in this paper are applicable for a constant 100 GWe capacity, roughly the size of the U.S. nuclear fleet. Two main strategies for the transition to EG30 were analyzed: 1) deploying both SFRs and MOX-PWRs in parallel or 2) deploying them in series with the SFR fleet first. With an estimated retirement schedule for the existing LWRs, an assumed reactor lifetime of 60 years, and no growth, the nuclear system fully transitions to the new fuel cycle within 100 years for both strategies without SFR fuel shortages. Compared to the once-through cycle, transition to the SFR/MOX-PWR fleet with continuous recycle was shown to offer significant reductions in uranium consumption and waste disposal requirements. In addition, these initial calculations revealed a few notable modeling and strategy questions regarding how recycled resources are allocated, reactors that can switch between

  8. Plutonium and minor actinides recycle in equilibrium fuel cycles of pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waris, A.; Sekimoto, H. [Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A study on plutonium and minor actinides (MA) recycle in equilibrium fuel cycles of pressurized water reactors (PWR) has been performed. The calculation results showed that the enrichment and the required amount of natural uranium decrease significantly with increasing number of confined plutonium and MA when uranium is discharged from the reactor. However, when uranium is totally confined, the enrichment becomes extremely high. The recycle of plutonium and MA together with discharging uranium can reduce the radio-toxicity of discharged heavy metal (HM) waste to become less than that of loaded uranium. (author)

  9. Waste management analysis for the nuclear fuel cycle. II. Recycle preparation for wastewater streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.M.; Navratil, J.D.; Plock, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    Recycle preparation methods were evaluated for secondary aqueous waste streams likely to be produced during reactor fuel fabrication and reprocessing. Adsorption, reverse osmosis, and ozonization methods were evaluated on a laboratory scale for their application to the treatment of wastewater. Activated carbon, macroreticular resins, and polyurethanes were tested to determine their relative capabilities for removing detergents and corrosive anions from wastewater. Conceptual flow sheets were constructed for purifying wastewater by reverse osmosis. In addition, the application of ozonization techniques for water recycle preparation was examined briefly

  10. Control device for the recycling flow rate in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, Naoshi; Shida, Toichi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the cavitation in a recycling pump even under the conditions where a recycling pump run-back is inhibited, thereby secure the safety of equipments. Constitution: An AND circuit is disposed to a recycling flow rate control system in a BWR type nuclear power plant that issues an output on the condition that a run-back signal is present together with a contact signal of a scoop pipe locking relay or a contact signal of a scoop pipe locking relay. Then, if a demand for the run-back operation of a nuclear reactor recycling pump is issued, the reactor recycling pump is forcedly tripped. Since the pump can always be tripped upon requirement of run-back even if there are some or other inhibitive factors, generation of the cavitation in recycling system equipments can be prevented thereby prevent the damages in the equipments. (Moriyama, K.)

  11. Edward C. Little Water Recycling Plant, El Segundo, CA: CA0063401

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joint EPA and Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board NPDES Permit and Waiver from Secondary Treatment for the West Basin Municipal Water District Edward C. Little Water Recycling Plant, El Segundo, CA: CA0063401

  12. Status report - expert knowledge of operators in fuel reprocessing plants, enrichment plants and fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preuss, W.; Kramer, J.; Wildberg, D.

    1987-01-01

    The necessary qualifications of the responsible personnel and the knowledge required by personnel otherwise employed in nuclear plants are among the requirements for licensing laid down in paragraph 7 of the German Atomic Energy Act. The formal regulations for nuclear power plants are not directly applicable to plants in the fuel cycle because of the differences in the technical processes and the plant and work organisation. The aim of the project was therefore to establish a possible need for regulations for the nuclear plants with respect to the qualification of the personnel, and to determine a starting point for the definition of the required qualifications. An extensive investigation was carried out in the Federal Republic of Germany into: the formal requirements for training; the plant and personnel organisation structures; the tasks carried out by the responsible and otherwise employed personnel; and the state of training. For this purpose plant owners and managers were interviewed and the literature and plant specific documentation (e.g. plant rules) were reviewed. On the basis of literature research, foreign practices were determined and used to make comparative evaluations. The status report is divided into three separate parts for the reprocessing, the uranium enrichment, and the manufacture of the fuel elements. On the basis of the situation for reprocessing plants (particularly that of the WAK) and fuel element manufacturing plants, the development of a common (not uniform) regulation for all the examined plants in the fuel cycle was recommended. The report gives concrete suggestions for the content of the regulations. (orig.) [de

  13. IAEA physical inventory verification procedures implemented at US and Canadian fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, J.; Wredberg, L.; Zobor, E.; Zuccaro-Labellarte, G.

    1988-01-01

    IAEA has implemented safeguards at three Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication plants in the USA during the period 1982 to 1987, and it is in the process of safeguarding a fourth plant from 01 January 1988. In Canada IAEA safeguards inspections were implemented at all Natural Uranium (NU) fuel fabrication plants form 1972 onwards, and there are, at present, three plants under safeguards. The direct responsibility for the implementation of safeguards inspections in the USA and Canada lies with the Division of Operations B (SGOB) within the IAEA Department of Safeguards. The senior staff that is at present directly engaged in the implementation activities has accumulated supervising inspection experience at about 50 Physical Inventory Verification (PIV) inspections at the Canadian and US fabrication plants during the period 1978 to 1987. This experience has been gained in close cooperation with the facility operators and with the support of the state authorities. The paper describes the latest PIV inspections at the Westinghouse Columbia plant and the Zircatec Precision Industries Inc. Port Hope plant. Furthermore, the paper describes the initial activities for the 1988 PIV inspection at the General Electric Wilmington plant including computerized book audit activities

  14. Transmutation Dynamics: Impacts of Multi-Recycling on Fuel Cycle Performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bays; S. Piet; M. Pope; G. Youinou; A. Dumontier; D. Hawn

    2009-09-01

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain continuous multi-recycle in either thermal or fast reactors. In Fiscal Year 2009, transmutaton work at INL provided important new insight, caveats, and tools on multi-recycle. Multi-recycle of MOX, even with all the transuranics, is possible provided continuous enrichment of the uranium phase to ~6.5% and also limitting the transuranic enrichment to slightly less than 8%. Multi-recycle of heterogeneous-IMF assemblies is possible with continuous enrichment of the UOX pins to ~4.95% and having =60 of the 264 fuel pins being inter-matrix. A new tool enables quick assessment of the impact of different cooling times on isotopic evolution. The effect of cooling time was found to be almost as controlling on higher mass actinide concentrations in fuel as the selection of thermal versus fast neutron spectra. A new dataset was built which provides on-the-fly estimates of gamma and neutron dose in MOX fuels as a function of the isotopic evolution. All studies this year focused on the impact of dynamic feedback due to choices made in option space. Both the equilibrium fuel cycle concentrations and the transient time to reach equilibrium for each isotope were evaluated over a range of reactor, reprocessing and cooling time combinations. New bounding cases and analysis methods for evaluating both reactor safety and radiation worker safety were established. This holistic collection of physics analyses and methods gives improved resolution of fuel cycle options, and impacts thereof, over that of previous ad-hoc and single-point analyses.

  15. Recycling of plutonium and uranium in water reactor fuel. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    The Technical Committee Meeting on Recycling of Plutonium and Uranium in Water Reactor Fuel was recommended by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT). Its aim was to obtain an overall picture of MOX fabrication capacity and technology, actual performance of this kind of fuel, and ways explored to dispose of the weapons grade plutonium. The subject of this meeting had been reviewed by the International Atomic Energy Agency every 5 to 6 years and for the first time the problem of weapons grade plutonium disposal was included. The papers presented provide a summary of experience on MOX fuel and ongoing research in this field in the participating countries. The meeting was hosted by British Nuclear Fuels plc, at Newby Bridge, United Kingdom, from 3 to 7 July 1995. Fifty-six participants from twelve countries or international organizations took part. Refs, figs, tabs

  16. Experience with Pu-recycle fuel for large light water reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, H.; Spierling, H.; Eickelpasch, N.; Stoll, W.

    1977-01-01

    In general, design and operational performance of Pu-bearing recycle fuel are quite similar to those of Uranium fuel. Up to Nov. 1976 153 Pu-bearing fuel assemblies with altogether 8000 fuel rods, fabricated by ALKEM, have been or are in operation in German power reactors. Their performance is very satisfactory. In the Obrigheim and in the Gundremmingen plant up to 20% of the core are made up of Pu-fuel. In either case all-Pu fuel assemblies are used, graded in their Pu-content for compatibility with the surrounding U-fuel. The physics calculations are accomplished with basically the same methods as applied for U-fuel. Theoretical investigations and physics measurements have shown that differences in reactivity balance can be minimized by proper loading patterns. In additional experiments at elevated temperature (KRITZ) the neutron physics methods were verified in greater detail. The main feature of fabrication of mixed oxide pellets is mechanical blending of natural UO 2 - and PuO 2 -powder before pressing green pellets, and a rather high degree of mechanisation in all fabrication steps including sintering, wet grinding, and rod filling operations. The Zircaloy cladding know-how, welding techniques, final surface treatment etc. were all taken from the large experience of KWU in the LWR fuel area. Several fuel assemblies have been examined in the spent fuel pools and in hot cell laboratories after a maximum burn-up of 30 GWd/t. The examinations revealed no significant differences compared to U-fuel. Fission gas release is somewhat higher, attributed to the inhomogeneous fissioning on the microscopic scale in the mechanically mixed oxide. For the same reason the rate of densification is reduced. No Pu-redistribution has been observed. β-scans ( 140 La) and isotopic analyses confirmed the adequate accuracy of the calculation methods. In order to investigate the thermo-mechanical behaviour especially under power ramping conditions in greater depth mixed oxide test

  17. Criticality safety training at Westinghouse Hanford Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, C.A.; Paglieri, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    In 1972 the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) established a comprehensive program to certify personnel who handle fissionable materials. As the quantity of fissionable material handled at WHC has increased so has the scope of training to assure that all employes perform their work in a safe manner. This paper describes training for personnel engaged in fuel fabrication and handling activities. Most of this training is provided by the Fissionable Material Handlers Certification Program. This program meets or exceeds all DOE requirements for training and has been attended by more than 475 employes. Since the program was instituted, the rate of occurrence of criticality safety limit violations has decreased by 50%

  18. Minimization of actinide waste by multi-recycling of thoriated fuels in the EPR reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttin A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The multi-recycling of innovative uranium/thorium oxide fuels for use in the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR has been investigated. If increasing quantities of 238U, the fertile isotope in standard UO2 fuel, are replaced by 232Th, then a greater yield of new fissile material (233U is produced during the cycle than would otherwise be the case. This leads to economies of natural uranium of around 45% if the uranium in the spent fuel is multi-recycled. In addition we show that minor actinide and plutonium waste inventories are reduced and hence waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are up to a factor of 20 lower after 103 years. Two innovative fuel types named S90 and S20, ThO2 mixed with 90% and 20% enriched UO2 respectively, are compared as an alternative to standard uranium oxide (UOX and uranium/plutonium mixed oxide (MOX fuels at the longest EPR fuel discharge burn-ups of 65 GWd/t. Fissile and waste inventories are examined, waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are extracted and safety feedback coefficients are calculated.

  19. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant phaseout/deactivation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.W.; Thompson, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The decision to cease all US Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing of nuclear fuels was made on April 28, 1992. This study provides insight into and a comparison of the management, technical, compliance, and safety strategies for deactivating the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. The purpose of this study is to ensure that lessons-learned and future plans are coordinated between the two facilities

  20. Evaluation of Spent Fuel Recycling Scenario using Pyro-SFR related System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Kyo; Kim, Sang Ji; Kim, Young Jin

    2014-01-01

    It is needed to validate whether the recycling scenario connecting pyro-processing and sodium-cooled fast reactor(SFR) is promising or not. The latest technologies of pyro-processing are applied to SFR and the recycling scenario is evaluated through the SFR's performance analysis. The analyzed SFR is KALIMER-600 TRU burner which purpose is to transmute transuranics (TRU). National policy of CANDU SF management has not been decided yet. However, the stored quantity of this SF is large enough not to be neglected. So this study includes additionally the recycling scenario of CANDU SF. Adopting the mass ratio of TRU and RE recovered in pyro-processing is 4 to 1 on PWR SF recycling, the sodium void reactivity is higher than design basis of metal fuel. So the current pyro-processing technology is may not be acceptable. If pyro-processing technology of CANDU SF is assumed to be the same as PWR's case, CANDU recycling scenario is acceptable. Transmutation performance is worse than PWR's, while the sodium void reactivity is within design limit

  1. An Evaluation on the Fluid Elastic Instability of the Fuel Rod for OPR1000 Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeong Koo; Jeon, Sang Yoon; Lee, Kyu Seok; Kim, Jeong Ha; Lee, Sang Jong [Reactor Core Technology Department, Korea Nuclear Fuel, 493, Deogjin, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    fuel rod were evaluated to assure that the natural frequencies of the each fuel rod span are not matched with the expected excitation frequencies. These evaluations would be insufficient to assure the integrity of the fuel rod from fuel rod vibration damage. The main objective of this study, therefore, is to evaluate FEI margin of the PLUS7TM fuel rod for OPR1000 plants considering fuel rod configuration change due to the in-reactor operation conditions for its whole life time. The PLUS7TM fuel is newly developed advanced fuel for OPR1000 plants and is now under operation in eight OPR1000 plants in Korea. For the evaluation, three kinds of fuel rod finite element analysis model have been suggested to represent whole fuel rod configuration changes due to the fuel cladding creep down, the fuel pellet swelling and spacer grid spring irradiation relaxation behavior. Using these models, modal analysis has been performed to get their mode shapes and natural frequencies. And then, FEI of the fuel rod has been evaluated based on the modal analysis results. In this evaluation, the stability criteria recommended by ASME code has been used, which gives a conservative criterion for avoiding FEI of the fuel rod. This evaluation has been performed by ROVIN code, which we have developed to perform the modal analysis and FEI evaluation at the same time. The modal analysis results obtained from ROVIN have been compared with those from the ANSYS and the test results. And the FEI results from ROVIN have been compared with those from conventional code used for Westinghouse type fuel based on the Connors' criteria. (authors)

  2. Plant-ants feed their host plant, but above all a fungal symbiont to recycle nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defossez, Emmanuel; Djiéto-Lordon, Champlain; McKey, Doyle; Selosse, Marc-André; Blatrix, Rumsaïs

    2011-05-07

    In ant-plant symbioses, plants provide symbiotic ants with food and specialized nesting cavities (called domatia). In many ant-plant symbioses, a fungal patch grows within each domatium. The symbiotic nature of the fungal association has been shown in the ant-plant Leonardoxa africana and its protective mutualist ant Petalomyrmex phylax. To decipher trophic fluxes among the three partners, food enriched in (13)C and (15)N was given to the ants and tracked in the different parts of the symbiosis up to 660 days later. The plant received a small, but significant, amount of nitrogen from the ants. However, the ants fed more intensively the fungus. The pattern of isotope enrichment in the system indicated an ant behaviour that functions specifically to feed the fungus. After 660 days, the introduced nitrogen was still present in the system and homogeneously distributed among ant, plant and fungal compartments, indicating efficient recycling within the symbiosis. Another experiment showed that the plant surface absorbed nutrients (in the form of simple molecules) whether or not it is coated by fungus. Our study provides arguments for a mutualistic status of the fungal associate and a framework for investigating the previously unsuspected complexity of food webs in ant-plant mutualisms.

  3. Available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozser, Sandor; Marshall, Frances M.; Adelfang, Pablo; Bradley, Edward [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Budu, Madalina Elena [SOSNY Research and Development Company, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chiguer, Mustapha [AREVA, Paris La Defense (France)

    2016-03-15

    International activities in the back end of the research reactor (RR) fuel cycle have so far been dominated by the programmes of acceptance of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) by the country where it was originally enriched. In the future inventories of LEU SNF will continue to be created and the back end solution of RR SNF remains a critical issue. The IAEA, based on the experience gained during the decade of international cooperation in supporting the objectives of the HEU take-back programmes, drew up a report presenting available reprocessing and recycling services for RR SNF. This paper gives an overview of the report, which will address all aspects of reprocessing and recycling services for RR SNF.

  4. Tailoring Vantage 5 (fuel) to suit each operator's need

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapin, D L; Secker, J R [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Philadelphia, PA (USA)

    1990-03-01

    By the end of 1989, Westinghouse Vantage 5 fuel had been reloaded into 36 nuclear power plants. The fuel offers a number of features operators can choose from to suit their own particular needs. Experience so far has shown the fuel to have performed well, with coolant activity levels remaining low. (author).

  5. PWR core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for thorium-uranium breeding recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, G.; Liu, C.; Si, S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade 233 U-Thorium (U 3 ThOX) FAs on the basis of reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade 233 U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U 3 ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U 3 ThOX mixed core, the well designed U 3 ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly 233 U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U 3 ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U 3 ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U 3 ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U 3 ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U 3 ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no visible impacts on neutronic characteristics compared

  6. Spent nuclear fuel recycling with plasma reduction and etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Ho

    2012-06-05

    A method of extracting uranium from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) particles is disclosed. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (containing oxides of uranium, oxides of fission products (FP) and oxides of transuranic (TRU) elements (including plutonium)) are subjected to a hydrogen plasma and a fluorine plasma. The hydrogen plasma reduces the uranium and plutonium oxides from their oxide state. The fluorine plasma etches the SNF metals to form UF6 and PuF4. During subjection of the SNF particles to the fluorine plasma, the temperature is maintained in the range of 1200-2000 deg K to: a) allow any PuF6 (gas) that is formed to decompose back to PuF4 (solid), and b) to maintain stability of the UF6. Uranium (in the form of gaseous UF6) is easily extracted and separated from the plutonium (in the form of solid PuF4). The use of plasmas instead of high temperature reactors or flames mitigates the high temperature corrosive atmosphere and the production of PuF6 (as a final product). Use of plasmas provide faster reaction rates, greater control over the individual electron and ion temperatures, and allow the use of CF4 or NF3 as the fluorine sources instead of F2 or HF.

  7. Process for recycling components of a PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Lawrence [Edison, NJ

    2012-02-28

    The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a PEM fuel cell can be recycled by contacting the MEA with a lower alkyl alcohol solvent which separates the membrane from the anode and cathode layers of the assembly. The resulting solution containing both the polymer membrane and supported noble metal catalysts can be heated under mild conditions to disperse the polymer membrane as particles and the supported noble metal catalysts and polymer membrane particles separated by known filtration means.

  8. Fuel handling system of nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulstich, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel handing system for nuclear reactor plants comprising a reactor vessel having an openable top and removable cover for refueling and containing therein, submerged in coolant water substantially filling the reactor vessel, a fuel core including a multiplicity of fuel bundles formed of groups of sealed tube elements enclosing fissionable fuel assembled into units. It comprises a fuel bundle handing platform moveable over the open top of the reactor vessel; a fuel bundle handing mast extendable downward from the platform with a lower end projecting into the open top reactor vessel to the fuel core submerged in water; a grapple head mounted on the lower end of the mast provided with grappling hook means for attaching to and transporting fuel bundles into and out from the fuel core; and a camera with a prismatic viewing head surrounded by a radioactive resisting quartz cylinder and enclosed within the grapple head which is provided with at least three windows with at least two windows provided with an angled surface for aiming the camera prismatic viewing head in different directions and thereby viewing the fuel bundles of the fuel core from different perspectives, and having a cable connecting the camera with a viewing monitor located above the reactor vessel for observing the fuel bundles of the fuel core and for enabling aiming of the camera prismatic viewing head through the windows by an operator

  9. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterinen, R.; Kallio, M.; Kirjalainen, T.; Kolsi, A.; Merta, M.

    1997-01-01

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  10. Introduction to Exxon nuclear fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Exxon Nuclear low-enriched uranium fuel fabrication plant in Richland, Washington produces fuel assemblies for both pressurized water and boiling water reactors. The Richland plant was the first US bulk-handling facility selected by the IAEA for inspection under the US-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. The plant was under IAEA inspection from March 1981 through October 1983. This text provides a written description of the plant layout, operation and process. The text also includes a one ton-a-day model (or reference) plant which was adapted from the Exxon Nuclear plant. The Model Plant provides a generic example of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) bulk-handling facility. The Model Plant is used to illustrate in a more quantitative way some of the key safeguards requirements for a bulk-handling facility

  11. Radiation shielding calculation for the MOX fuel fabrication plant Melox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.K.; Nimal, J.C.; Chiron, M.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation shielding calculation is an important engineering work in the design of the MOX fuel fabrication plant MELOX. Due to the recycle of plutonium and uranium from UO2 spent fuel reprocessing and the large capacity of production (120t HM/yr.), the shielding design requires more attention in this LWR fuel plant. In MELOX, besides several temporary storage facilities of massive fissile material, about one thousand radioactive sources with different geometries, forms, densities, quantities and Pu concentrations, are distributed through different workshops from the PuO 2 powder reception unit to the fuel assembly packing room. These sources, with or without close shield, stay temporarily in different locations, containers and glove boxes. In order to optimize the dimensions, the material and the cost of shield as well as to limit the calculation work in a reasonable engineer-hours, a calculation scheme for shielding design of MELOX is developed. This calculation scheme has been proved to be useful in consideration of the feedback from the evolutionary design and construction. The validated shielding calculations give a predictive but reliable radiation doses information. (authors). 2 figs., 10 refs

  12. Westinghouse Advanced Doped Pellet - Characteristics and irradiation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backman, K.; Hallstadius, L.; Roennberg, G.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: There are a number of trends in the nuclear power industry, which put additional requirements on the operational flexibility and reliability of nuclear fuel, for example power uprates and longer cycles in order to increase production, higher burnup levels in order to reduce the backend cost of the fuel cycle, and lower goals for activity release from power plant operation. These additional requirements can be addressed by increasing the fuel density, improving the FG retention, improving the PCI resistance and improving the post-failure performance. In order to achieve that, Westinghouse has developed ADOPT (Advanced Doped Pellet Technology) UO 2 fuel containing additions of chromium and aluminium oxides. The additives facilitate pellet densification during sintering, enlarge the pellet grain size, and increase the creep rate. The final manufactured doped pellets reach about 0.5 % higher density within a shorter sintering time and a five times larger grain size compared with standard UO 2 fuel pellets. Fuel rods with ADOPT pellets have been irradiated in several light water reactors (LWRs) since 1999, including two full SVEA Optima2 reloads in 2005. ADOPT pellets has been investigated in pool-side and hot cell Post Irradiation Examinations (PIEs), as well as in a ramp test and a fuel washout test in the Studsvik R2 test reactor. The investigations have identified three areas of improved operational behaviour: Reduced Fission Gas Release (FGR), improved Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI) performance thanks to increased pellet plasticity and higher resistance against post-failure degradation. The better FGR behaviour of ADOPT has been verified with a pool side FGR gamma measurement performed at 55 MWd/kgU, as well as transient tests in the Studsvik R2 reactor. Creep measurements performed on fresh pellets show that ADOPT has a higher creep rate which is beneficial for the PCI performance. ADOPT has also been part of a high power Halden test (IFA-677). The

  13. Analysis of a hot-leg small break loss-of-coolant accident in a three-loop westinghouse pressurized water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, C.E.; Chexal, V.K.; Clements, T.B.

    1985-01-01

    The RETRAN-02 computer code was used to perform a best-estimate analysis of a 7.52-cm-diam hotleg break in a three-loop Westinghouse pressurized water reactor. This break size produced a net primary coolant mass depletion through the early portion of the transient. The primary system started to refill only after the accumulator valves opened. As the primary system refilled, there were extreme temperature differentials around the system with cold, denser fluid collecting at the lower elevations and two-phase fluid at higher elevations

  14. Actinide recycle potential in the integral fast reactor (IFR) fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Till, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    In the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system -- reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. The use of metallic fuel in the IFR allows a radically improved fuel cycle technology. Based on the recent IFR process development, a preliminary assessment has been made to investigate the feasibility of further adapting pyrochemical processes to directly extract actinides from LWR spent fuel. The results of this assessment indicate very promising potential and two most promising flowsheet options have been identified for further research and development. This paper also summarizes current thinking on the rationale for actinide recycle, its ramifications on the geologic repository and the current high-level waste management plans, and the necessary development programs

  15. Human plan of capital of Westinghouse; Plan de capital humano de Westinghouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, B.; Gutierrez Elso, J. E.

    2008-07-01

    After three decades of nuclear standstill, the Nuclear Renaissance resulted in a changing environment, Nuclear Companies should prepare and adapt to different challenges: the fast growing of the organization, the loss of talent to other more attractive industrial fields and the transfer and management of knowledge to young engineers that have not participated in the building of nuclear plants. In this article different Westinghouse initiatives in this respect are commented. (Author)

  16. A Neutronic Feasibility Study on the Recycling of an Oxide Fuel in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok

    2006-06-15

    Neutronic feasibility was implemented for the recycling of a mixed oxide fuel in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) through a thermal/mechanical dry process, which is recognized as one of the most proliferation- resistant recycling processes. In order to assess the applicability of a simple dry process which is not capable of completely removing all the fission products from a spent fuel, sensitivity calculations were performed for the reactor physics parameters with a dependency on the fission product removal rate of the recycled spent fuel. The equilibrium core calculations were performed by the REBUS-3 code for a BN-600 core without blanket fuels and a modified core with an increased fuel volume fraction. The reactor performance parameters such as the transuranic content, breeding ratio, peak linear power, burnup reactivity swing and reactivity coefficients were calculated for an equilibrium core under a fixed fuel management scheme. The results showed that a recycling of the oxide fuel in the SFR is feasible if the fission products are removed by more than 70% through the dry process as far as the material balance is concerned. However the physics analysis also showed that some of the physics design parameters are slightly deteriorated. The results of this study indicate that the recycling characteristics can be improved if the dry process can remove more fission products, and the reactor configuration is further optimized or the spent fuel composition is adjusted.

  17. A Neutronic Feasibility Study on the Recycling of an Oxide Fuel in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok

    2006-06-01

    Neutronic feasibility was implemented for the recycling of a mixed oxide fuel in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) through a thermal/mechanical dry process, which is recognized as one of the most proliferation- resistant recycling processes. In order to assess the applicability of a simple dry process which is not capable of completely removing all the fission products from a spent fuel, sensitivity calculations were performed for the reactor physics parameters with a dependency on the fission product removal rate of the recycled spent fuel. The equilibrium core calculations were performed by the REBUS-3 code for a BN-600 core without blanket fuels and a modified core with an increased fuel volume fraction. The reactor performance parameters such as the transuranic content, breeding ratio, peak linear power, burnup reactivity swing and reactivity coefficients were calculated for an equilibrium core under a fixed fuel management scheme. The results showed that a recycling of the oxide fuel in the SFR is feasible if the fission products are removed by more than 70% through the dry process as far as the material balance is concerned. However the physics analysis also showed that some of the physics design parameters are slightly deteriorated. The results of this study indicate that the recycling characteristics can be improved if the dry process can remove more fission products, and the reactor configuration is further optimized or the spent fuel composition is adjusted

  18. Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Volume I. Demonstration plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The objective of this project is for Babcock Contractors Inc. (BCI) to provide process designs, and gasifier retort design for a fuel gas demonstration plant for Erie Mining Company at Hoyt Lake, Minnesota. The fuel gas produced will be used to supplement natural gas and fuel oil for iron ore pellet induration. The fuel gas demonstration plant will consist of five stirred, two-stage fixed-bed gasifier retorts capable of handling caking and non-caking coals, and provisions for the installation of a sixth retort. The process and unit design has been based on operation with caking coals; however, the retorts have been designed for easy conversion to handle non-caking coals. The demonstration unit has been designed to provide for expansion to a commercial plant (described in Commercial Plant Package) in an economical manner.

  19. Assessment of the TASS 1-D neutronics model for the westinghouse and ABB-CE type PWR reactivity induced transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.D.; Yoon, H.Y.; Um, K.S.; Kim, H.C.; Sim, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    Best estimate transient analysis code, TASS, has been developed for the normal and transient simulation of the Westinghouse and ABB-CE type PWRs. TASS thermal hydraulic model is based on the non-homogeneous, non-equilibrium two-phase continuity, energy and mixture momentum equations with constitutive relations for closure. Core neutronics model employs both the point kinetics and one-dimensional neutron diffusion model. Semi-implicit numerical scheme is used to solve the discretized finite difference equations. TASS one dimensional neutronics core model has been assessed through the reactivity induced transient analyses for the KORI-3, three loop Westinghouse PWR, and Younggwang-3 (YGN-3), two-loop ABB-CE PWR, nuclear power plants currently operating in Korea. The assessment showed that the TASS one dimensional neutronics core model can be applied for the Westinghouse and ABB-CE type PWRs to gain thermal margin which is necessary for a potential use of the high fuel burnup, extended fuel cycle, power upgrading and for the plant life extension

  20. Plutonium bearing oxide fuels for recycling in thermal reactors and fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    Programs carried out in the past two decades have established the technical feasibility of using plutonium as a fuel material in both water-cooled power reactors and sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors. The problem facing the technical community is basically one of demonstrating plutonium fuel recycle under strict conditions of public safety, accountability, personnel exposure, waste management, transportation and diversion or theft which are still evolving. In this paper only technical and economic aspects of high volume production and the demonstration program required are discussed. This paper discusses the role of mixed oxide fuels in light water reactors and the objectives of the LMFBR required for continual growth of nuclear power during the next century. The results of studies showing the impact of using plutonium on uranium requirements, power costs, and the market share of nuclear power are presented. The influence of doubling time and the introduction date of LMFBRs on the benefits to be derived by its commercial use are discussed. Advanced fuel development programs scoped to meet future commerical LMFBR fuel requirements are described. Programs designed to provide the basic technology required for using plutonium fuels in a manner which will satisfy all requirements for public acceptance are described. Included are the high exposure plutonium fabrication development program centered around the High Performance Fuels Laboratory being built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory and the program to confirm the technology required for the production of mixed oxide fuels for light water reactors which is being coordinated by Savannah River Laboratories

  1. Radiological impact of plutonium recycle in the fuel cycle of LWR type reactors: professional exposure during mormal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, I.F.; Kelly, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    The radiological impact of the fuel cycle of light water type reactors using enriched uranium may be changed by plutonium recycle. The impact on human population and on the persons professionally exposed may be different according to the different steps of the fuel cycle. This report analyses the differential radiological impact on the different types of personnel involed in the fuel cycle. Each step of the fuel cycle is separately studied (fuel fabrication, reactor operation, fuel reprocessing), as also the transport of the radioactive materials between the different steps. For the whole fuel cycle, one estimates that, with regard to the fuel cycle using enriched uranium, the plutonium recycle involves a small increase of the professional exposure

  2. Evaluation of sites for the location of WEEE recycling plants in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiruga, Dolores; Walther, Grit; González-Benito, Javier; Spengler, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    As a consequence of new European legal regulations for treatment of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), recycling plants have to be installed in Spain. In this context, this contribution describes a method for ranking of Spanish municipalities according to their appropriateness for the installation of these plants. In order to rank the alternatives, the discrete multi-criteria decision method PROMETHEE (Preference Ranking Organisation METHod for Enrichment Evaluations), combined with a surveys of experts, is applied. As existing plants are located in North and East Spain, a significant concentration of top ranking municipalities can be observed in South and Central Spain. The method does not present an optimal structure of the future recycling system, but provides a selection of good alternatives for potential locations of recycling plants.

  3. Actinide recycle potential in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Till, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    In the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) development program, the entire reactor system -- reactor, fuel cycle, and waste process is being developed and optimized at the same time as a single integral entity. The use of metallic fuel in the IFR allows a radically improved fuel cycle technology. Pyroprocessing, which utilizes high temperatures and molten salt and molten metal solvents, can be advantageously utilized for processing metal fuels because the product is metal suitable for fabrication into new fuel elements. The key step in the IFR process is electrorefining, which provides for recovery of the valuable fuel constituents, uranium and plutonium, and for removal of fission products. In the electrorefining operation, uranium and plutonium are selectively transported from an anode to a cathode, leaving impurity elements, mainly fission products, either in the anode compartment or in a molten salt electrolyte. A notable feature of the IFR process is that the actinide elements accompany plutonium through the process. This results in a major advantage in the high-level waste management, because these actinides are automatically recycled back into the reactor for in-situ burning. Based on the recent IFR process development, a preliminary assessment has also been made to investigate the feasibility of further adapting the pyrochemical processes to directly extract actinides from LWR spent fuel. The results of this assessment indicate very promising potential and two most promising flowsheet options have been identified for further research and development. This paper also summarizes current thinking on the rationale for actinide recycle, its ramifications on the geologic repository and the current high-level waste management plans, and the necessary development programs. 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozser, Sandor Miklos; Adelfang, Pablo; Bradley, Ed [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Budu, Madalina [SOSNY Research and Development Company, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chiguer, Mustapha [AREVA, Paris (France)

    2015-05-15

    International activities in the back-end of the research reactor (RR) fuel cycle have so far been dominated by the programmes of acceptance of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) by the country where it was originally enriched. These programmes will soon have achieved their goals and the SNF take-back programmes will cease. However, the needs of the nuclear community dictate that the majority of the research reactors continue to operate using low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in order to meet the varied mission objectives. As a result, inventories of LEU SNF will continue to be created and the back-end solution of RR SNF remains a critical issue. In view of this fact, the IAEA, based on the experience gained during the decade of international cooperation in supporting the objectives of the HEU take-back programmes, will draw up a report presenting available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent nuclear fuel. This paper gives an overview of the guiding document which will address all aspects of Reprocessing and Recycling Services for RR SNF, including an overview of solutions, decision making support, service suppliers, conditions (prerequisites, options, etc.), services offered by the managerial and logistics support providers with a focus on available transport packages and applicable transport modes.

  5. Nuclear recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinrad, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses two aspects of the economics of recycling nuclear fuel: the actual costs and savings of the recycling operation in terms of money spent, made, and saved; and the impact of the recycling on the future cost of uranium. The authors review the relevant physical and chemical processes involved in the recycling process. Recovery of uranium and plutonium is discussed. Fuel recycling in LWRs is examined and a table presents the costs of reprocessing and not reprocessing. The subject of plutonium in fast reactors is addressed. Safeguards and weapons proliferation are discussed

  6. Available Reprocessing and Recycling Services for Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The high enriched uranium (HEU) take back programmes will soon have achieved their goals. When there are no longer HEU inventories at research reactors and no commerce in HEU for research reactors, the primary driver for the take back programmes will cease. However, research reactors will continue to operate in order to meet their various mission objectives. As a result, inventories of low enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel will continue to be created during the research reactors' lifetime and, therefore, there is a need to develop national final disposition routes. This publication is designed to address the issues of available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent fuel and discusses the various back end management aspects of the research reactor fuel cycle.

  7. Analysis of boiling water reactors capacities for the 100% MOX fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoche, Dietrich

    1999-01-01

    The electro-nuclear park exploitation leads to plutonium production. The plutonium recycling in boiling water reactors performs a use possibility. The difference between the neutronic characteristics of the uranium and the plutonium need to evaluate the substitution impact of UOX fuel by MOX fuel on the reactor operating and safety. The analysis of the main points reached to the following conclusions: the reactivity coefficients are negative, during a cooling accident the re-divergence depends on the isotopic vector of the used plutonium, the efficiency lost of control cross resulting from the plutonium utilization can be compensate by the increase of the B 4C enrichment by 10 B and the change of the steel structure by an hafnium structure, the reactivity control in evolution can be obtained by the fuel poisoning (gadolinium, erbium) and the power map control by the plutonium content monitoring. (A.L.B.)

  8. Actinide recycling by pyro process for future nuclear fuel cycle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, T.

    2001-01-01

    Pyrometallurgical technology is one of the potential devices for the future nuclear fuel cycle. Not only economic advantage but also environmental safety and strong resistance for proliferation are required. So as to satisfy the requirements, actinide recycling applicable to LWR and FBR cycles by pyro-process has been developed over a ten-year period at the CRIEPI. The main technology is electrorefining for U and Pu separation and reductive extraction for TRU separation, which can be applied on oxide fuels through reduction process as well as metal fuels. The application of this technology for separation of TRU in HLLW through chlorination could contribute to the improvement of public acceptance with regard to geologic disposal. The main achievements are summarised as follows: - Elemental technologies such as electrorefining, reductive extraction, injection casting and salt waste treatment and solidification have been successfully developed with lots of experiments. - Fuel dissolution into molten salt and uranium recovery on solid cathode for electrorefining has been demonstrated at an engineering scale facility in Argonne National Laboratory using spent fuels and at the CRIEPI through uranium tests. - Single element tests using actinides showed Li reduction to be technically feasible; the subjects of technical feasibility on multi-element systems and on effective recycle of Li by electrolysis of Li 2 O remain to be addressed. - Concerning the treatment of HLLW for actinide separation, the conversion to chlorides through oxides has also been established through uranium tests. - It is confirmed that more than 99% of TRU nuclides can be recovered from high-level liquid waste by TRU tests. - Through these studies, the process flowsheets for reprocessing of metal and oxide fuels and for partitioning of TRU separation have been established. The subjects to be emphasised for further development are classified into three categories: process development (demonstration

  9. Recycling of nuclear matters. Myths and realities. Calculation of recycling rate of the plutonium and uranium produced by the French channel of spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeytaux, X.; Schneider, M.

    2000-05-01

    The recycling rate of plutonium and uranium are: from the whole of the plutonium separated from the spent fuel ( inferior to 1% of the nuclear matter content) attributed to France is under 50% (under 42 tons on 84 tons); from the whole of plutonium produced in the French reactors is less than 20% (42 tons on 224 tons); from the whole of the uranium separated from spent fuels attributed to France is about 10 % (1600 tons on 16000 tons); from the whole of the uranium contained in the spent fuel is slightly over 5%. (N.C.)

  10. Evaluation of disposal, recycling and clearance scenarios for managing ARIES radwaste after plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, L.

    2007-01-01

    The wealth of experience accumulated over the past 30-40 years of fusion power plant studies must be forged into a new strategy to reshape all aspects of handling the continual stream of radioactive materials during operation and after power plant decommissioning. With tighter environmental controls and the political difficulty of building new repositories worldwide, the disposal option could be replaced with more environmentally attractive scenarios, such as recycling and clearance. We applied the three scenarios to the most recent ARIES compact stellarator power plant. All ARIES-CS components qualify as Class A or C low-level waste, according to the US guidelines, and can potentially be recycled using conventional and advanced remote handling equipment. Approximately 80% of the total waste can be cleared for reuse within the nuclear industry or, preferably, released to the commercial market. This paper documents the recent developments in radwaste management of nuclear facilities and highlights the benefits and challenges of disposal, recycling and clearance

  11. CO{sub 2}-recycling by plants: how reliable is the carbon isotope estimation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegwolf, R T.W.; Saurer, M [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Koerner, C [Basel Univ., Basel (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    In the study of plant carbon relations, the amount of the respiratory losses from the soil was estimated, determining the gradient of the stable isotope {sup 13}C with increasing plant canopy height. According to the literature 8-26% of the CO{sub 2} released in the forests by soil and plant respiratory processes are reassimilated (recycled) by photosynthesis during the day. Our own measurements however, which we conducted in grass land showed diverging results from no indicating of carbon recycling, to a considerable {delta}{sup 13}C gradient suggesting a high carbon recycling rate. The role of other factors, such as air humidity and irradiation which influence the {delta}{sup 13}C in a canopy as well, are discussed. (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  12. Improving the Estimates of Waste from the Recycling of Used Nuclear Fuel - 13410

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Chris; Willis, William; Carter, Robert [EnergySolutions Federal EPC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States); Baker, Stephen [UK National Nuclear Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Estimates are presented of wastes arising from the reprocessing of 50 GWD/tonne, 5 year and 50 year cooled used nuclear fuel (UNF) from Light Water Reactors (LWRs), using the 'NUEX' solvent extraction process. NUEX is a fourth generation aqueous based reprocessing system, comprising shearing and dissolution in nitric acid of the UNF, separation of uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium using solvent extraction in a development of the PUREX process using tri-n-butyl phosphate in a kerosene diluent, purification of the plutonium and uranium-plutonium products, and conversion of them to uranium trioxide and mixed uranium-plutonium dioxides respectively. These products are suitable for use as new LWR uranium oxide and mixed oxide fuel, respectively. Each unit process is described and the wastes that it produces are identified and quantified. Quantification of the process wastes was achieved by use of a detailed process model developed using the Aspen Custom Modeler suite of software and based on both first principles equilibrium and rate data, plus practical experience and data from the industrial scale Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at the Sellafield nuclear site in the United Kingdom. By feeding this model with the known concentrations of all species in the incoming UNF, the species and their concentrations in all product and waste streams were produced as the output. By using these data, along with a defined set of assumptions, including regulatory requirements, it was possible to calculate the waste forms, their radioactivities, volumes and quantities. Quantification of secondary wastes, such as plant maintenance, housekeeping and clean-up wastes, was achieved by reviewing actual operating experience from THORP during its hot operation from 1994 to the present time. This work was carried out under a contract from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and, so as to enable DOE to make valid comparisons with other similar work, a number of

  13. Uranium Fuel Plant. Applicants environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    The Uranium Fuel Plant, located at the Cimarron Facility, was constructed in 1964 with operations commencing in 1965 in accordance with License No. SNM-928, Docket No. 70-925. The plant has been in continuous operation since the issuance of the initial license and currently possesses contracts extending through 1978, for the production of nuclear fuels. The Uranium Plant is operated in conjunction with the Plutonium Facility, each sharing common utilities and sanitary wastes disposal systems. The operation has had little or no detrimental ecological impact on the area. For the operation of the Uranium Fuel Fabrication Plant, initial equipment provided for the production of UO 2 , UF 4 , uranium metal and recovery of scrap materials. In 1968, the plant was expanded by increasing the UO 2 and pellet facilities by the installation of another complete production line for the production of fuel pellets. In 1969, fabrication facilities were added for the production of fuel elements. Equipment initially installed for the recovery of fully enriched scrap has not been used since the last work was done in 1970. Economically, the plant has benefited the Logan County area, with approximately 104 new jobs with an annual payroll of approximately $1.3 million. In addition, $142,000 is annually paid in taxes to state, local and federal governments, and local purchases amount to approximately $1.3 million. This was all in land that was previously used for pasture land, with a maximum value of approximately 37,000 dollars. Environmental effects of plant operation have been minimal. A monitoring and measurement program is maintained in order to ensure that the ecology of the immediate area is not affected by plant operations

  14. Treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinide partitioning - Application to waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abonneau, E.; Baron, P.; Berthon, C.; Berthon, L.; Beziat, A.; Bisel, I.; Bonin, L.; Bosse, E.; Boullis, B.; Broudic, J.C.; Charbonnel, M.C.; Chauvin, N.; Den Auwer, C.; Dinh, B.; Duhamet, J.; Escleine, J.M.; Grandjean, S.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaneux, D.; Guillaumont, D.; Hill, C.; Lacquement, J.; Masson, M.; Miguirditchian, M.; Moisy, P.; Pelletier, M.; Ravenet, A.; Rostaing, C.; Royet, V.; Ruas, A.; Simoni, E.; Sorel, C.; Vaudano, A.; Venault, L.; Warin, D.; Zaetta, A.; Pradel, P.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Forestier, A.; Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoob, P.; Vernaz, E.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.P.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    subsequent to its in-reactor dwell time, spent fuel still contains large amounts of materials that are recoverable, for value-added energy purposes (uranium, plutonium), together with fission products, and minor actinides, making up the residues from nuclear reactions. The treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel, as implemented in France, entail that such materials be chemically partitioned. The development of the process involved, and its deployment on an industrial scale stand as a high achievement of French science, and technology. Treatment and recycling allow both a satisfactory management of nuclear waste to be implemented, and substantial savings, in terms of fissile material. Bolstered of late as it has been, due to spectacularly skyrocketing uranium prices, this strategy is bound to become indispensable, with the advent of the next generation of fast reactors. This Monograph surveys the chemical process used for spent fuel treatment, and its variants, both current, and future. It outlines currently ongoing investigations, setting out the challenges involved, and recent results obtained by CEA. (authors)

  15. Treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel. Actinide partitioning - Application to waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abonneau, E.; Baron, P.; Berthon, C.; Berthon, L.; Beziat, A.; Bisel, I.; Bonin, L.; Bosse, E.; Boullis, B.; Broudic, J.C.; Charbonnel, M.C.; Chauvin, N.; Den Auwer, C.; Dinh, B.; Duhamet, J.; Escleine, J.M.; Grandjean, S.; Guilbaud, P.; Guillaneux, D.; Guillaumont, D.; Hill, C.; Lacquement, J.; Masson, M.; Miguirditchian, M.; Moisy, P.; Pelletier, M.; Ravenet, A.; Rostaing, C.; Royet, V.; Ruas, A.; Simoni, E.; Sorel, C.; Vaudano, A.; Venault, L.; Warin, D.; Zaetta, A.; Pradel, P.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Forestier, A.; Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoob, P.; Vernaz, E.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.P.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2008-07-01

    subsequent to its in-reactor dwell time, spent fuel still contains large amounts of materials that are recoverable, for value-added energy purposes (uranium, plutonium), together with fission products, and minor actinides, making up the residues from nuclear reactions. The treatment and recycling of spent nuclear fuel, as implemented in France, entail that such materials be chemically partitioned. The development of the process involved, and its deployment on an industrial scale stand as a high achievement of French science, and technology. Treatment and recycling allow both a satisfactory management of nuclear waste to be implemented, and substantial savings, in terms of fissile material. Bolstered of late as it has been, due to spectacularly skyrocketing uranium prices, this strategy is bound to become indispensable, with the advent of the next generation of fast reactors. This Monograph surveys the chemical process used for spent fuel treatment, and its variants, both current, and future. It outlines currently ongoing investigations, setting out the challenges involved, and recent results obtained by CEA. (authors)

  16. Recycling domains in plant cell morphogenesis: small GTPase effectors, plasma membrane signalling and the exocyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárský, Viktor; Potocký, Martin

    2010-04-01

    The Rho/Rop small GTPase regulatory module is central for initiating exocytotically ACDs (active cortical domains) in plant cell cortex, and a growing array of Rop regulators and effectors are being discovered in plants. Structural membrane phospholipids are important constituents of cells as well as signals, and phospholipid-modifying enzymes are well known effectors of small GTPases. We have shown that PLDs (phospholipases D) and their product, PA (phosphatidic acid), belong to the regulators of the secretory pathway in plants. We have also shown that specific NOXs (NADPH oxidases) producing ROS (reactive oxygen species) are involved in cell growth as exemplified by pollen tubes and root hairs. Most plant cells exhibit several distinct plasma membrane domains (ACDs), established and maintained by endocytosis/exocytosis-driven membrane protein recycling. We proposed recently the concept of a 'recycling domain' (RD), uniting the ACD and the connected endosomal recycling compartment (endosome), as a dynamic spatiotemporal entity. We have described a putative GTPase-effector complex exocyst involved in exocytic vesicle tethering in plants. Owing to the multiplicity of its Exo70 subunits, this complex, along with many RabA GTPases (putative recycling endosome organizers), may belong to core regulators of RD organization in plants.

  17. Improving yeast strains using recyclable integration cassettes, for the production of plant terpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Christopher B

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Terpenoids constitute a large family of natural products, attracting commercial interest for a variety of uses as flavours, fragrances, drugs and alternative fuels. Saccharomyces cerevisiae offers a versatile cell factory, as the precursors of terpenoid biosynthesis are naturally synthesized by the sterol biosynthetic pathway. Results S. cerevisiae wild type yeast cells, selected for their capacity to produce high sterol levels were targeted for improvement aiming to increase production. Recyclable integration cassettes were developed which enable the unlimited sequential integration of desirable genetic elements (promoters, genes, termination sequence at any desired locus in the yeast genome. The approach was applied on the yeast sterol biosynthetic pathway genes HMG2, ERG20 and IDI1 resulting in several-fold increase in plant monoterpene and sesquiterpene production. The improved strains were robust and could sustain high terpenoid production levels for an extended period. Simultaneous plasmid-driven co-expression of IDI1 and the HMG2 (K6R variant, in the improved strain background, maximized monoterpene production levels. Expression of two terpene synthase enzymes from the sage species Salvia fruticosa and S. pomifera (SfCinS1, SpP330 in the modified yeast cells identified a range of terpenoids which are also present in the plant essential oils. Co-expression of the putative interacting protein HSP90 with cineole synthase 1 (SfCinS1 also improved production levels, pointing to an additional means to improve production. Conclusions Using the developed molecular tools, new yeast strains were generated with increased capacity to produce plant terpenoids. The approach taken and the durability of the strains allow successive rounds of improvement to maximize yields.

  18. Recycling of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randl, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power was first exploited in the Federal Republic of Germany, the philosophy underlying the strategy of the nuclear fuel cycle has been to make optimum use of the resource potential of recovered uranium and plutonium within a closed fuel cycle. Apart from the weighty argument of reprocessing being an important step in the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, permitting their optimum ecological conditioning after the reprocessing step and subsequent storage underground, another argument that, no doubt, carried weight was the possibility of reducing the demand of power plants for natural uranium. In recent years, strategies of recycling have emerged for reprocessed uranium. If that energy potential, too, is to be exploited by thermal recycling, it is appropriate to choose a slightly different method of recycling from the one for plutonium. While the first generation of reprocessed uranium fuel recycled in the reactor cuts down natural uranium requirement by some 15%, the recycling of a second generation of reprocessed, once more enriched uranium fuel helps only to save a further three per cent of natural uranium. Uranium of the second generation already carries uranium-232 isotope, causing production disturbances, and uranium-236 isotope, causing disturbances of the neutron balance in the reactor, in such amounts as to make further fabrication of uranium fuel elements inexpedient, even after mixing with natural uranium feed. (orig./UA) [de

  19. A review of glass-ceramics for the immobilization of nuclear fuel recycle wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    This report reviews the status of the Canadian, German, U.S., Japanese, U.S.S.R. and Swedish programs for the development of glass-ceramic materials for immobilizing the high-level radioactive wastes arising from the recycling of used nuclear fuel. The progress made in these programs is described, with emphasis on the Canadian program for the development of sphene-based glass-ceramics. The general considerations of product performance and process feasibility for glass-ceramics as a category of waste form material are discussed. 137 refs

  20. Recycling versus Long-Term Storage of Nuclear Fuel: Economic Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yolanda Moratilla Soria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to compare the associated costs of long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel—open cycle strategy—with the associated cost of reprocessing and recycling strategy of spent fuel—closed cycle strategy—based on the current international studies. The analysis presents cost trends for both strategies. Also, to point out the fact that the total cost of spent nuclear fuel management (open cycle is impossible to establish at present, while the related costs of the closed cycle are stable and known, averting uncertainties.

  1. Feed-forward control of a solid oxide fuel cell system with anode offgas recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, Maxime; Brandenburger, Ralf; Friede, Wolfgang; Lapicque, François; Limbeck, Uwe; da Silva, Pedro

    2015-05-01

    In this work a combined heat and power unit (CHP unit) based on the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is analysed. This unit has a special feature: the anode offgas is partially recycled to the anode inlet. Thus it is possible to increase the electrical efficiency and the system can be operated without external water feeding. A feed-forward control concept which allows secure operating conditions of the CHP unit as well as a maximization of its electrical efficiency is introduced and validated experimentally. The control algorithm requires a limited number of measurement values and few deterministic relations for its description.

  2. A systems approach to the management of a contaminated metal recycle project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pincock, L.; Wahnachaffe, S.

    1994-01-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is working with private industry to recycle contaminated metal from the dismantling and decommissioning of Department of Energy sites and commercial reactors. The recycled metal could be used in many applications such as fabrication of canisters and waste boxes for the storage of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. Management of technical projects similar to this is difficult because these projects consist of a myriad of complex and interrelated issues ranging from technical feasibility to stakeholder acceptance. Systems Analysis provides a way to deal with many complex issues and supports effective decision making

  3. Holdup measurement for nuclear fuel manufacturing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.; Degen, M.; Cohen, I.; Gody, A.; Summers, R.; Bisset, P.; Shaub, E.; Holody, D.

    The assay of nuclear material holdup in fuel manufacturing plants is a laborious but often necessary part of completing the material balance. A range of instruments, standards, and a methodology for assaying holdup has been developed. The objectives of holdup measurement are ascertaining the amount, distribution, and how firmly fixed the SNM is. The purposes are reconciliation of material unbalance during or after a manufacturing campaign or plant decommissioning, to decide security requirements, or whether further recovery efforts are justified

  4. Waste management in MOX fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, V.

    1982-01-01

    After a short description of a MOX fuel fabrication plant's activities the waste arisings in such a plant are discussed according to nature, composition, Pu-content. Experience has shown that proper recording leads to a reduction of waste arisings by waste awareness. Aspects of the treatment of α-waste are given and a number of treatment processes are reviewed. Finally, the current waste management practice and the α-waste treatment facility under construction at ALKEM are outlined. (orig./RW)

  5. Nuclear safety in fuel-reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennies, H.H.; Koerting, K.

    1976-01-01

    The danger potential of nuclear power and fuel reprocessing plants in normal operation is compared. It becomes obvious that there are no basic differences. The analysis of possible accidents - blow-up of an evaporator for highly active wastes, zircaloy burning, cooling failure in self-heating process solutions, burning of a charged solvent, criticality accidents - shows that they are kept under control by the plant layout. (HP) [de

  6. Field test of short-notice random inspections for inventory-change verification at a low-enriched-uranium fuel-fabrication plant: Preliminary summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Moussalli, G.; Naegele, G.; Ikonomou, P.; Hosoya, M.; Scott, P.; Fager, J.; Sanders, C.; Colwell, D.; Joyner, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    An approach of short-notice random inspections (SNRIs) for inventory-change verification can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of international safeguards at natural or low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication plants. According to this approach, the plant operator declares the contents of nuclear material items before knowing if an inspection will occur to verify them. Additionally, items about which declarations are newly made should remain available for verification for an agreed time. This report details a six-month field test of the feasibility of such SNRIs which took place at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division. Westinghouse personnel made daily declarations about both feed and product items, uranium hexafluoride cylinders and finished fuel assemblies, using a custom-designed computer ''mailbox''. Safeguards inspectors from the IAEA conducted eight SNRIs to verify these declarations. Items from both strata were verified during the SNRIs by means of nondestructive assay equipment. The field test demonstrated the feasibility and practicality of key elements of the SNRI approach for a large LEU fuel fabrication plant

  7. Recycling of blast furnace sludge by briquetting with starch binder: Waste gas from thermal treatment utilizable as a fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobíková, Klára; Plachá, Daniela; Motyka, Oldřich; Gabor, Roman; Kutláková, Kateřina Mamulová; Vallová, Silvie; Seidlerová, Jana

    2016-02-01

    Steel plants generate significant amounts of wastes such as sludge, slag, and dust. Blast furnace sludge is a fine-grained waste characterized as hazardous and affecting the environment negatively. Briquetting is one of the possible ways of recycling of this waste while the formed briquettes serve as a feed material to the blast furnace. Several binders, both organic and inorganic, had been assessed, however, only the solid product had been analysed. The aim of this study was to assess the possibilities of briquetting using commonly available laundry starch as a binder while evaluating the possible utilization of the waste gas originating from the thermal treatment of the briquettes. Briquettes (100g) were formed with the admixture of starch (UNIPRET) and their mechanical properties were analysed. Consequently, they were subjected to thermal treatment of 900, 1000 and 1100°C with retention period of 40min during which was the waste gas collected and its content analysed using gas chromatography. Dependency of the concentration of the compounds forming the waste gas on the temperature used was determined using Principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation matrix. Starch was found to be a very good binder and reduction agent, it was confirmed that metallic iron was formed during the thermal treatment. Approximately 20l of waste gas was obtained from the treatment of one briquette; main compounds were methane and hydrogen rendering the waste gas utilizable as a fuel while the greatest yield was during the lowest temperatures. Preparation of blast furnace sludge briquettes using starch as a binder and their thermal treatment represents a suitable method for recycling of this type of metallurgical waste. Moreover, the composition of the resulting gas is favourable for its use as a fuel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of plant transient response on fuel management strategy at Virginia Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucheit, D.M.; Smith, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    Virginia Power has been performing in-house reload core design and safety analysis for several years. These analyses have been in support of North Anna units 1 and 2 and Surry units 1 and 2, all of which are three-loop pressurized water reactor plants designed and built by Westinghouse. Historically, Virginia Power first developed the capability to design and optimize its own core loading patterns in the early 1970's. This development effort was driven by the need to establish in-house control of the fuel management process, thereby ensuring that energy generation requirements are met in an economically optimum fashion. It soon became obvious that reload design and safety analysis processes are so integrally coupled that in order to perform the fuel management function in an effective manner, in-house capability in both areas needed to be developed. After reviewing the spectrum of economic, safety and operational constraints which affect the reload design and analysis process, an integrated model of the process is presented in flow chart format. This is followed by several specific examples which illustrate the interplay between sound fuel management practice and the assurance of plant safety using in-house analysis techniques

  9. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2008-09-30

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply

  10. Microwave based oxidation process for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, G., E-mail: gitendars@barctara.gov.in [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, 401 502 (India); Khot, P.M. [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, 401 502 (India); Kumar, Pradeep [Integrated Fuel Fabrication Facility (IFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400 085 (India); Bhatt, R.B.; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, Mohd [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur, 401 502 (India)

    2017-02-15

    This paper reports development of a process named MicroWave Direct Oxidation (MWDO) for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O{sub 2} mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pellets generated during fabrication of typical fast reactor fuels. MWDO is a two-stage, single-cycle process based on oxidative pulverisation of pellets using 2450 MHz microwave. The powder sinterability was evaluated by bulk density and BET specific surface area. The oxidised powders were analyzed for phases using XRD and stoichiometry by thermogravimetry. The sinterability was significantly enhanced by carrying out oxidation in higher oxygen partial pressure and by subjecting MOX to multiple micronisation-oxidation cycles. After three cycles, the recycled powder from (U,28%Pu)O{sub 2} resulted surface area >3 m{sup 2}/g and 100% re-used for MOX fabrication. The flow sheet was developed for maximum utilization of recycled powder describable by a parameter called Scrap Recycling Ratio (SRR). The process demonstrates smaller processing cycle, better powder properties and higher oxidative pulverisation over conventional method. - Highlights: • A process for recycling the off-specification (U,Pu)O{sub 2} sintered fuel pellets of fast reactors was demonstrated. • The method is a two-stage, single cycle process based on oxidative pulverization of MOX pellets using 2450 MHz microwave. • The process demonstrated utilization of recycled powder with SRR of 1.

  11. Physics of plutonium and americium recycling in PWR using advanced fuel concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourcade, E.

    2004-01-01

    PWR waste inventory management is considered in many countries including Frances as one of the main current issues. Pu and Am are the 2 main contents both in term of volume and long term radio-toxicity. Waiting for the Generation IV systems implementation (2035-2050), one of the mid-term solutions for their transmutation involves the use of advanced fuels in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). These have to require as little modification as possible of the core internals, the cooling system and fuel cycle facilities (fabrication and reprocessing). The first part of this paper deals with some neutronic characteristics of Pu and/or Am recycling. In a second part, 2 technical solutions MOX-HMR and APA-DUPLEX-84 are presented and the third part is devoted to the study of a few global strategies. The main neutronic parameters to be considered for Pu and Am recycling in PWR are void coefficient, Doppler coefficient, fraction of delayed neutrons and power distribution (especially for heterogeneous configurations). The modification of the moderation ratio, the opportunity to use inert matrices (targets), the optimisation of Uranium, Plutonium and Americium contents are the key parameters to play with. One of the solutions (APA-DUPLEX-84) presented here is a heterogeneous assembly with regular moderation ratio composed with both target fuel rods (Pu and Am embedded in an inert matrix) and standard UO 2 fuel rods. An EPR (European Pressurised Reactor) type reactor, loaded only with assemblies containing 84 peripheral targets, can reach an Americium consumption rate of (4.4; 23 kg/TWh) depending on the assembly concept. For Pu and Am inventories stabilisation, the theoretical fraction of reactors loaded with Pu + Am or Pu assemblies is about 60%. For Americium inventory stabilisation, the fraction decreases down to 16%, but Pu is produced at a rate of 18.5 Kg/TWh (-25% compared to one through UOX cycle)

  12. Westinghouse, DOE see apples, oranges in IG staffing report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-01-01

    The operator of the Energy Department's Savannah River weapons plant has at least 1,800 more employees than it needs, and could save $400 million over a five-year period by cutting its staff accordingly, a DOE inspector general study says. Most of the boat - 1,206 employees - was attributed to excessive numbers of managers, with the inspector general concluding that Westinghouse Savannah River Co. had roughly twice as many layers of management than two other DOE weapons contractors. The study also concluded that Westinghouse in fiscal year 1992 significantly understated its actual staffing levels in reports to DOE, failing to disclose 1,765 full-time employees or the equivalent hours worked. Through such underreporting Westinghouse was able to open-quotes circumvent staffing ceilings established by the department,close quotes the study added. Overall, DOE Inspector General John Layton said Westinghouse's staff levels substantially exceeded those needed for efficient operation of the South Carolina nuclear weapons facility. Layton based his analysis on efficiency standards attained by other DOE weapons plant contractors, such as Martin Marietta Energy Systems at DOE's Oak Ridge, Tenn., plant and EG ampersand G Rocky Flats, as well as widely utilized worker performance requirements used by the Navy and private sector companies that perform work similar to that done at Savannah River

  13. Update of operations with Westinghouse steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, D.D.; Fletcher, W.D.

    1978-01-01

    Westinghouse commercial steam generators in operation now number 112, of which 98 are tubed with Inconel 600, the remainder with stainless steel. The implementation of all volatile treatment (AVT) was reported. It was noted that several plants had exhibited some tube corrosion during their initial periods using AVT; this observation indicated that the transition from phosphate chemistry control to AVT may have been subject to certain residual effects due to incomplete removal of phosphated deposits. As inspection results from steam generators operated on AVT became more generally available with the passage of time, a pattern of results emerged that seemed to correlate with the operating experience with phosphate chemistry control. Specifically, all the plants that experienced corrosion problems had from 1 to 8 yr of operational history using phosphates, while those with less than a year's experience using phosphates tended to be less affected by corrosion problems

  14. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor passive safety system response to postulated events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M. C.; Wright, R. F.

    2012-01-01

    reduce the reactor pressure in a controlled manner to facilitate the passive injection. Long-term decay heat removal is accomplished using the passive heat removal systems augmented by heat transfer through the containment vessel to the environment. The passive injection systems are designed so that the fuel remains covered and effectively cooled throughout the event. Like during the frequent faults, the passive systems provide effective cooling without the need for ac power for seven days following the accident. Connections are available to add additional water to indefinitely cool the plant. The response of the safety systems of the Westinghouse SMR to various initiating faults has been examined. Among them, two accidents; an extended station blackout event, and a LOCA event have been evaluated to demonstrate how the plant will remain safe in the unlikely event that either should occur. (authors)

  15. Innovation and future in Westinghouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congedo, T.; Dulloo, A.; Goosen, J.; Llovet, R.

    2007-01-01

    For the past six years, Westinghouse has used a Road Map process to direct technology development in a way that integrates the efforts of our businesses to addresses the needs of our customers and respond to significant drivers in the evolving business environment. As the nuclear industry experiences a resurgence, it is ever more necessary that we increase our planning horizon to 10-15 years in the future so as to meet the expectations of our customers. In the Future Point process, driven by the methods of Design for Six Sigma (DFSS), Westinghouse considers multiple possible future scenarios to plan long term evolutionary and revolutionary development that can reliably create the major products and services of the future market. the products and services of the future stretch the imagination from what we provide today. However, the journey to these stretch targets prompts key development milestones that will help deliver ideas useful for nearer term products. (Author) 1 refs

  16. Selective absorption pilot plant for decontamination of fuel reprocessing plant off-gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, M.J.; Eby, R.S.; Huffstetler, V.C.

    1977-10-01

    A fluorocarbon-based selective absorption process for removing krypton-85, carbon-14, and radon-222 from the off-gas of conventional light water and advanced reactor fuel reprocessing plants is being developed at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant in conjunction with fuel recycle work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the Savannah River Laboratory. The process is characterized by an especially high tolerance for many other reprocessing plant off-gas components. This report presents detailed drawings and descriptions of the second generation development pilot plant as it has evolved after three years of operation. The test facility is designed on the basis of removing 99% of the feed gas krypton and 99.9% of the carbon and radon, and can handle a nominal 15 scfm (425 slm) of contaminated gas at pressures from 100 to 600 psig (7.0 to 42.2 kg/cm/sup 2/) and temperatures from minus 45 to plus 25/sup 0/F (-43 to -4/sup 0/C). Part of the development program is devoted to identifying flowsheet options and simplifications that lead to an even more economical and reliable process. Two of these applicative flowsheets are discussed.

  17. by recycled subirrigational supply of plant growth retardants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... an ebb and flow system on the growth and flowering of kalanchoe cultivar 'Gold Strike' was examined. Plants potted in 10 cm .... photoperiod during the first six weeks after pinching. .... stage and adverse influences on overall growth of the plants. ..... retardants on the growth and flowering in poinsettia. RDA.

  18. Actinide transmutation using inert matrix fuels versus recycle in a low conversion fast burner reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deinert, M.R.; Schneider, E.A.; Recktenwald, G.; Cady, K.B. [The Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C2200, Austin, 78712 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reducing the disposal burden of the long lived radioisotopes that are contained within spent uranium oxide fuel is essential for ensuring the sustainability of nuclear power. Because of their non-fertile matrices, inert matrix fuels (IMFs) could allow light-water reactors to achieve a significant burn down of plutonium and minor actinides that are that are currently produced as a byproduct of operating light-water reactors. However, the extent to which this is possible is not yet fully understood. We consider a ZrO{sub 2} based IMF with a high transuranic loading and show that the neutron fluence (and the subsequent fuel residence time required to achieve it) present a practical limit for the achievable actinide burnup. The accumulation of transuranics in spent uranium oxide fuel is a major obstacle for the sustainability of nuclear power. While commercial light-water reactors (LWR's) produce these isotopes, they can be used to transmute them. At present, the only viable option for doing this is to partly fuel reactors with mixed oxide fuel (MOX) made using recycled plutonium. However, because of parasitic neutron capture in the uranium matrix of MOX, considerable plutonium and minor actinides are also bred as the fuel is burned. A better option is to entrain the recycled isotopes in a non-fertile matrix such as ZrO{sub 2}. Inert matrices such as these were originally envisioned for burning plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons [1]. However, because they achieve a conversion ratio of zero, they have also been considered as a better alternative to MOX [2-6]. Plutonium and minor actinides dominate the long term heat and radiological outputs from spent nuclear fuel. Recent work has shown that that IMFs can be used to reduce these outputs by at least a factor of four, on a per unit of energy generated basis [6]. The degree of reduction is strongly dependent on IMF burnup. In principle, complete transmutation of the transuranics could be achieved though this

  19. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Issue 115, enhancement of the reliability of the Westinghouse Solid State Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdekas, D.L.

    1989-05-01

    Generic Issue 115 addresses a concern related to the reliability of the Westinghouse reactor protection system for plants using the Westinghouse Solid State Protection System (SSPS). Several options for improving the reliability of the Westinghouse reactor trip function for these plants and their effect on core damage frequency (CDF) and overall risk were evaluated. This regulatory analysis includes a quantitative assessment of the costs and benefits associated with the various options for enhancing the reliability of the Westinghouse SSPS and provides insights for consideration and industry initiatives. No new regulatory requirements are proposed. 25 refs., 11 tabs

  20. Recycling of cattle dung, biogas plant-effluent and water hyacinth in vermiculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, P.R.; Bai, R.K. [Madurai Kamaraj Univ. (India)

    1995-08-01

    The efficiency of recycling cattle dung, anaerobically digested cattle dung (biogas plant-effluent) and water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) by culture of the earthworm Megascolex sp. was studied. The growth of the earthworms was increased by 156, 148 and 119% in soil supplemented with water hyacinth, cattle dung and biogas plant-effluent, respectively. The growth rate of the earthworms was increased significantly by raw cattle dung and water hyacinth over that by biodigested slurry. (author)

  1. Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant-2, Tarapur: a benchmark in Indian PHWR spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Sanjay; Dubey, K.; Qureshi, F.T.; Lokeswar, S.P.

    2017-01-01

    Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant-2 (PREFRE-2) is latest operating spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in India. This plant has improved design based on latest technology and feedback provided by the earlier plants. The design of PREFRE-2 plant is in five cycles of solvent extraction using TBP as extractant. The plant is commissioned in year 2011 after regulatory clearances

  2. An analysis of the properties of levelized cost analysis of storage or recycling of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergueiro, Sophia M. C.; Ramos, Alexandre F., E-mail: alex.ramos@usp.br, E-mail: sophia.vergueiro@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Núcleo Interdisciplinar de Modelagem de Sistemas Complexos

    2017-07-01

    The demand for reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in the processes of electricity generation, plus the demand for firm energy matrices, make the nuclear matrix a central component to occupy the energy mix during the next hundred years. Increasing the share of nuclear power in electricity production in a multiple developing countries will lead to increased spent fuel production. Thus, the managing radioactive waste aiming to decide about storing or recycling it is a central issue to be addressed by environmental management and nuclear energy communities. In this manuscript we present our studies aiming to understand the levelized analysis of cost of electricity generation comparing storage or recycling of the spent fuel. (author)

  3. An analysis of the properties of levelized cost analysis of storage or recycling of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergueiro, Sophia M. C.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2017-01-01

    The demand for reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in the processes of electricity generation, plus the demand for firm energy matrices, make the nuclear matrix a central component to occupy the energy mix during the next hundred years. Increasing the share of nuclear power in electricity production in a multiple developing countries will lead to increased spent fuel production. Thus, the managing radioactive waste aiming to decide about storing or recycling it is a central issue to be addressed by environmental management and nuclear energy communities. In this manuscript we present our studies aiming to understand the levelized analysis of cost of electricity generation comparing storage or recycling of the spent fuel. (author)

  4. A UK perspective on recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.

    1991-01-01

    The United Kingdom, through the recycling of depleted uranium from Magnox reactors into Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel, has already recycled significant quantities of reprocessed material in reactors owned by Nuclear Electric plc and Scottish Nuclear Limited. This AGR fuel has been satisfactorily irradiated and discharged over a decade or more, and will be reprocessed in the new Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP), currently under construction in the UK. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) and the UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) have also been exploiting the potential of plutonium recycled in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, which they have been making since 1963. All of the UK nuclear companies are committed to further recycling of Magnox depleted uranium during the 1990s, and it is anticipated that oxide recycling will also become firmly established during the next decade. British Nuclear Fuels and Urenco Ltd, as the providers of fuel cycle services, are developing an infrastructure to close the fuel cycle for oxide nuclear fuel, using both the uranium and plutonium arising from reprocessing. (author)

  5. Fuel handling grapple for nuclear reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousar, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel handling system for nuclear reactor plants. It comprises: a reactor vessel having an openable top and removable cover and containing therein, submerged in water substantially filling the reactor vessel, a fuel core including a multiplicity of fuel bundles formed of groups of sealed tube elements enclosing fissionable fuel assembled into units, the fuel handling system consisting essentially of the combination of: a fuel bundle handling platform movable over the open top of the reactor vessel; a fuel bundle handling mast extendable downward from the platform with a lower end projecting into the open top reactor vessel to the fuel core submerged in water; a grapple head mounted on the lower end of the mast provided with grapple means comprising complementary hooks which pivot inward toward each other to securely grasp a bail handle of a nuclear reactor fuel bundle and pivot backward away from each other to release a bail handle; the grapple means having a hollow cylindrical support shaft fixed within the grapple head with hollow cylindrical sleeves rotatably mounted and fixed in longitudinal axial position on the support shaft and each sleeve having complementary hooks secured thereto whereby each hook pivots with the rotation of the sleeve secured thereto; and the hollow cylindrical support shaft being provided with complementary orifices on opposite sides of its hollow cylindrical and intermediate to the sleeves mounted thereon whereby the orifices on both sides of the hollow cylindrical support shaft are vertically aligned providing a direct in-line optical viewing path downward there-through and a remote operator positioned above the grapple means can observe from overhead the area immediately below the grapple hooks

  6. Program plan for research and development in support of LWR fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The ERDA program that is being planned to assist industry in the commercialization of the LWR fuel cycle will involve a range of activities, including joint programs with industry, R and D to provide technology, conceptual design of fuel recycle facilities, and environmental and economic assessments. A two-part program to begin in 1976 that is a portion of the overall ERDA plan is described. Responsibility for coordination and management of the tasks described in this document has been assigned to Du Pont as prime contractor to the ERDA Savannah River Operations Office. The first part of the program consists of the conceptual design of complete recycle facilities. The second part of the program, which will proceed concurrently, consists of supporting R and D activities, economic and environmental studies, and other studies to assist in the regulatory process. The R and D program will include both near-term activities in support of the conceptual design effort, and other activities aimed at general improvements in fuel cycle technology. The conceptual design will be used to develop current cost information for a complete reprocessing complex. The design will be based initially on current technology with provision for improvements as confirmatory information and advanced technology become available from the R and D program. The conceptual design and cost estimate will be developed by the Du Pont Atomic Energy Division. The R and D program and supporting studies will be directed at uncertainties in current technology as well as toward development of improved technology. It will include such R and D as might be appropriate for ERDA to undertake in support of joint programs with industry. The Savannah River Laboratory will have responsibility for coordinating the program

  7. Westinghouse power distribution monitoring experience at Duke Power's McGuire Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobmyer, L.R.; Cash, M.T.; Kitlan, M.S.; Impink, A.J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    In the evolution of the Westinghouse methodology of assuring safe core power distributions, emphasis was placed on analysis and not on continuous detailed core monitoring. Power distribution monitoring is currently achieved by periodic surveillances using the movable in-core detector system (MIDS) and by continuous observations of the two-section excore power range detectors. Control of the power distribution is regulated by limits on the indications from these systems, by limits on control rod insertion, and by operational constraints on the position indication systems. As more plants come on line and as more utilities take over the fuel design function for themselves, the desire for better core monitoring becomes evident. Also, the need and desire by the utilities to have more control over their operating margin has motivated the industry to offer and/or upgrade core monitoring systems. Westinghouse and Duke Power are participants in a joint development program to finalize the development of the core on-line surveillance monitoring and operations system (COSMOS). This final stage of development consists of prototype field trials at the McGuire Nuclear Plant. The purpose of the prototype program is to determine how well the design objectives are met and how to improve the system based on the operating experience at McGuire. Another purpose of this prototype program is to generate the necessary experience and information to develop a topical report for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to obtain a licensing basis for technical specification relaxation

  8. Field test of short-notice random inspections for inventory-change verification at a low-enriched-uranium fuel-fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Moussalli, G.; Naegele, G.

    1995-01-01

    An approach of short-notice random inspections (SNRIs) for inventory-change verification can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of international safeguards at natural or low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication plants. According to this approach, the plant operator declares the contents of nuclear material items before knowing if an inspection will occur to verify them. Additionally, items about which declarations are newly made should remain available for verification for an agreed time. Then a statistical inference can be made from verification results for items verified during SNRIs to the entire populations, i.e. the entire strata, even if inspectors were not present when many items were received or produced. A six-month field test of the feasibility of such SNRIs took place at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division during 1993. Westinghouse personnel made daily declarations about both feed and product items, uranium hexafluoride cylinders and finished fuel assemblies, using a custom-designed computer ''mailbox''. Safeguards inspectors from the IAEA conducted eight SNRIs to verify these declarations. They arrived unannounced at the plant, in most cases immediately after travel from Canada, where the IAEA maintains a regional office. Items from both strata were verified during the SNRIs by meant of nondestructive assay equipment

  9. Optimization of the recycle used oil and its fuel quality characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyitayo A. AFOLABI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of recycling of used engine oil with clay sample has been studied using Response Surface Methodology. Acid concentration, activation temperature and time were the independent variables considered in optimizing the recycling of used oil and six responses evaluated. The surface characterization of the clay samples was performed using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectra and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET analyses. The relationship between independent variables and response was described by a second order polynomial equation. Statistical testing of the model was performed with F-test to obtain the correlation between the experimental data and predicted results for all responses. The adequacy of the model equations were evaluated by the Adjusted and Predicted R2 coefficients observed to be close to each other for all the six responses. Data obtained from recycling used oil using clay sample showed the optimum condition as; activation temperature of 106.80oC, acid concentration of 3M and activation time of 180 minutes. A yield of 66.28% was obtained at optimum condition and characterized fuel qualities found close to fresh oil used as standard in this work. The surface area and adsorption capacity of raw clay and activated clay samples was observed to have increase from 19.8m2/g to 437.83m2/g and 1.41 mg/g to 8.64 mg/g respectively. This difference adequately described the improvement of the adsorption phenomena of the activated clay over raw clay samples.

  10. Controlling accumulation of fermentation inhibitors in biorefinery recycle water using microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnivetskaya Tatiana A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial fuel cells (MFC and microbial electrolysis cells are electrical devices that treat water using microorganisms and convert soluble organic matter into electricity and hydrogen, respectively. Emerging cellulosic biorefineries are expected to use large amounts of water during production of ethanol. Pretreatment of cellulosic biomass results in production of fermentation inhibitors which accumulate in process water and make the water recycle process difficult. Use of MFCs to remove the inhibitory sugar and lignin degradation products from recycle water is investigated in this study. Results Use of an MFC to reduce the levels of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, vanillic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxyacetophenone while simultaneously producing electricity is demonstrated here. An integrated MFC design approach was used which resulted in high power densities for the MFC, reaching up to 3700 mW/m2 (356 W/m3 net anode volume and a coulombic efficiency of 69%. The exoelectrogenic microbial consortium enriched in the anode was characterized using a 16S rRNA clone library method. A unique exoelectrogenic microbial consortium dominated by δ-Proteobacteria (50%, along with β-Proteobacteria (28%, α-Proteobacteria (14%, γ-Proteobacteria (6% and others was identified. The consortium demonstrated broad substrate specificity, ability to handle high inhibitor concentrations (5 to 20 mM with near complete removal, while maintaining long-term stability with respect to power production. Conclusion Use of MFCs for removing fermentation inhibitors has implications for: 1 enabling higher ethanol yields at high biomass loading in cellulosic ethanol biorefineries, 2 improved water recycle and 3 electricity production up to 25% of total biorefinery power needs.

  11. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 1: Introduction and summary and general assumptions. [energy conversion systems for electric power plants using coal - feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, D. T.

    1976-01-01

    Nine advanced energy conversion concepts using coal or coal-derived fuels are summarized. They are; (1) open-cycle gas turbines, (2) combined gas-steam turbine cycles, (3) closed-cycle gas turbines, (4) metal vapor Rankine topping, (5) open-cycle MHD; (6) closed-cycle MHD; (7) liquid-metal MHD; (8) advanced steam; and (9) fuel cell systems. The economics, natural resource requirements, and performance criteria for the nine concepts are discussed.

  12. Recycled tire crumb rubber anodes for sustainable power production in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heming; Davidson, Matthew; Zuo, Yi; Ren, Zhiyong

    One of the greatest challenges facing microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in large scale applications is the high cost of electrode material. We demonstrate here that recycled tire crumb rubber coated with graphite paint can be used instead of fine carbon materials as the MFC anode. The tire particles showed satisfactory conductivity after 2-4 layers of coating. The specific surface area of the coated rubber was over an order of magnitude greater than similar sized graphite granules. Power production in single chamber tire-anode air-cathode MFCs reached a maximum power density of 421 mW m -2, with a coulombic efficiency (CE) of 25.1%. The control graphite granule MFC achieved higher power density (528 mW m -2) but lower CE (15.6%). The light weight of tire particle could reduce clogging and maintenance cost but posts challenges in conductive connection. The use of recycled material as the MFC anodes brings a new perspective to MFC design and application and carries significant economic and environmental benefit potentials.

  13. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 6: Closed-cycle gas turbine systems. [energy conversion efficiency in electric power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, D. J.; Fentress, W. K.; Stahl, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Both recuperated and bottomed closed cycle gas turbine systems in electric power plants were studied. All systems used a pressurizing gas turbine coupled with a pressurized furnace to heat the helium for the closed cycle gas turbine. Steam and organic vapors are used as Rankine bottoming fluids. Although plant efficiencies of over 40% are calculated for some plants, the resultant cost of electricity was found to be 8.75 mills/MJ (31.5 mills/kWh). These plants do not appear practical for coal or oil fired plants.

  14. Remote maintenance system technology development for nuclear fuel cycle plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashihara, Hidechiyo

    1984-01-01

    The necessity of establishing the technology of remote maintenance, the kinds of maintenance techniques and the change, the image of a facility adopting remote maintenance canyon process, and the outline of the R and D plan to put remote maintenance canyon process in practical use are described. As the objects of development, there are twin arm type servo manipulator system, rack system, remote tube connectors, solution sampling system, inspection system for in-cell equipment, and large plugs for wall penetration. The outline of those are also reported. The development of new remote maintenance technology has been forwarded in the Tokai Works aiming at the application to a glass solidification pilot plant and a FBR fuel recycling test facility. The lowering of the rate of utilization of cells due to poor accessibility and the increase of radiation exposure of workers must be overcome to realize nuclear fuel cycle technology. The maintenance technology is classified into crane canyon method, direct maintenance cell method, remote maintenance cell method and remote maintenance canyon method, and those are described briefly. The development plan of remote maintenance technology is outlined. (Kako, I.)

  15. Fueling with edge recycling to high-density in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, A.W., E-mail: leonard@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Elder, J.D. [University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies, Toronto, Canada M3H 5T6 (Canada); Canik, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Groebner, R.J.; Osborne, T.H. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Pedestal fueling through edge recycling is examined with the interpretive OEDGE code for high-density discharges in DIII-D. A high current, high-density discharge is found to have a similar radial ion flux profile through the pedestal to a lower current, lower density discharge. The higher density discharge, however, has a greater density gradient indicating a pedestal particle diffusion coefficient that scales near linear with 1/I{sub p}. The time dependence of density profile is taken into account in the analysis of a discharge with low frequency ELMs. The time-dependent analysis indicates that the inferred neutral ionization source is inadequate to account for the increase in the density profile between ELMs, implying an inward density convection, or density pinch, near the top of the pedestal.

  16. Experience with thermal recycle of plutonium and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, O.; Schlosser, G.; Spielvogel, F.

    1985-01-01

    The Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) decided to close the fuel cycle by erecting the reprocessing plant WA350 at Wackersdorf. As long as the plutonium supply from reprocessing plants exceeds the plutonium demand of fast breeder reactors, recycling of plutonium in LWR's is a convenient solution by which a significant advanced uranium utilization is achieved. The demonstration of plutonium recycling performed to date in the FRG in BWR's and PWR's shows that thermal plutonium recycling on an industrial scale is feasible and that the usual levels of reliability and safety can be achieved in reactor operation. The recycling of reprocessed uranium is presently demonstrated in the FRG, too. As regards fuel cycle economy thermal recycling allows savings in natural uranium and separative work. Already under present cost conditions the fuel cycle costs for mixed oxide or enriched reprocessed uranium fuel assemblies are equal or even lower than for usual uranium fuel assemblies

  17. Plant characteristics of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell cycle and a steam cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    Plant characteristics of a system containing a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cycle on the top of a Rankine cycle were investigated. A desulfurization reactor removes the sulfur content in the fuel, while a pre-reformer broke down the heavier hydrocarbons in an adiabatic steam reformer (ASR). The pre-treated fuel then entered to the anode side of the SOFC. The remaining fuels after the SOFC stacks entered a catalytic burner for further combusting. The burned gases from the burner were then used to produce steam for the Rankine cycle in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The remaining energy of the off-gases was recycled back to the topping cycle for further utilization. Several parameter studies were carried out to investigate the sensitivity of the suggested plant. It was shown that the operation temperature of the desulfurization and the pre-reformer had no effect on the plant efficiency, which was also true when decreasing the anode temperature. However, increasing the cathode temperature had a significant effect on the plant efficiency. In addition, decreasing the SOFC utilization factor from 0.8 to 0.7, increases the plant efficiency by about 6%. An optimal plant efficiency of about 71% was achieved by optimizing the plant.

  18. Plant characteristics of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell cycle and a steam cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokni, Masoud [Technical University of Denmark, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Thermal Energy System, Building 402, 2800 Kgs, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2010-12-15

    Plant characteristics of a system containing a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cycle on the top of a Rankine cycle were investigated. A desulfurization reactor removes the sulfur content in the fuel, while a pre-reformer broke down the heavier hydrocarbons in an adiabatic steam reformer (ASR). The pre-treated fuel then entered to the anode side of the SOFC. The remaining fuels after the SOFC stacks entered a catalytic burner for further combusting. The burned gases from the burner were then used to produce steam for the Rankine cycle in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The remaining energy of the off-gases was recycled back to the topping cycle for further utilization. Several parameter studies were carried out to investigate the sensitivity of the suggested plant. It was shown that the operation temperature of the desulfurization and the pre-reformer had no effect on the plant efficiency, which was also true when decreasing the anode temperature. However, increasing the cathode temperature had a significant effect on the plant efficiency. In addition, decreasing the SOFC utilization factor from 0.8 to 0.7, increases the plant efficiency by about 6%. An optimal plant efficiency of about 71% was achieved by optimizing the plant. (author)

  19. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Mike [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This renewal application for a Recycled Water Reuse Permit is being submitted in accordance with the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.17 “Recycled Water Rules” and the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 for continuing the operation of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The permit expires March 16, 2015. The permit requires a renewal application to be submitted six months prior to the expiration date of the existing permit. For the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant, the renewal application must be submitted by September 16, 2014. The information in this application is consistent with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater and discussions with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality personnel.

  20. Recycling Carbon Dioxide into Sustainable Hydrocarbon Fuels: Electrolysis of Carbon Dioxide and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christopher Ronald

    Great quantities of hydrocarbon fuels will be needed for the foreseeable future, even if electricity based energy carriers begin to partially replace liquid hydrocarbons in the transportation sector. Fossil fuels and biomass are the most common feedstocks for production of hydrocarbon fuels. However, using renewable or nuclear energy, carbon dioxide and water can be recycled into sustainable hydrocarbon fuels in non-biological processes which remove oxygen from CO2 and H2O (the reverse of fuel combustion). Capture of CO2 from the atmosphere would enable a closed-loop carbon-neutral fuel cycle. The purpose of this work was to develop critical components of a system that recycles CO2 into liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The concept is examined at several scales, beginning with a broad scope analysis of large-scale sustainable energy systems and ultimately studying electrolysis of CO 2 and H2O in high temperature solid oxide cells as the heart of the energy conversion, in the form of three experimental studies. The contributions of these studies include discoveries about electrochemistry and materials that could significantly improve the overall energy use and economics of the CO2-to-fuels system. The broad scale study begins by assessing the sustainability and practicality of the various energy carriers that could replace petroleum-derived hydrocarbon fuels, including other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and storage of electricity on-board vehicles in batteries, ultracapacitors, and flywheels. Any energy carrier can store the energy of any energy source. This sets the context for CO2 recycling -- sustainable energy sources like solar and wind power can be used to provide the most energy-dense, convenient fuels which can be readily used in the existing infrastructure. The many ways to recycle CO2 into hydrocarbons, based on thermolysis, thermochemical loops, electrolysis, and photoelectrolysis of CO2 and/or H 2O, are critically reviewed. A process based on high temperature co

  1. Solvent extraction for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masui, Jinichi

    1986-01-01

    The purex process provides a solvent extraction method widely used for separating uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution containing spent fuel. The Tokai Works has adopted the purex process with TPB-n dodecane as the extraction agent and a mixer settler as the solvent extraction device. The present article outlines the solvent extraction process and discuss the features of various extraction devices. The chemical principle of the process is described and a procedure for calculating the number of steps for countercurrent equilibrium extraction is proposed. Discussion is also made on extraction processes for separating and purifying uranium and plutonium from fission products and on procedures for managing these processes. A small-sized high-performance high-reliability device is required for carrying out solvent extraction in reprocessing plants. Currently, mixer settler, pulse column and centrifugal contactor are mainly used in these plants. Here, mixer settler is comparted with pulse column with respect to their past achievements, design, radiation damage to solvent, operation halt, controllability and maintenance. Processes for co-extraction, partition, purification and solvent recycling are described. (Nogami, K.)

  2. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 5: Combined gas-steam turbine cycles. [energy conversion efficiency in electric power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, D. J.; Foster-Pegg, R. W.; Lee, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The energy conversion efficiency of gas-steam turbine cycles was investigated for selected combined cycle power plants. Results indicate that it is possible for combined cycle gas-steam turbine power plants to have efficiencies several point higher than conventional steam plants. Induction of low pressure steam into the steam turbine is shown to improve the plant efficiency. Post firing of the boiler of a high temperature combined cycle plant is found to increase net power but to worsen efficiency. A gas turbine pressure ratio of 12 to 1 was found to be close to optimum at all gas turbine inlet temperatures that were studied. The coal using combined cycle plant with an integrated low-Btu gasifier was calculated to have a plant efficiency of 43.6%, a capitalization of $497/kW, and a cost of electricity of 6.75 mills/MJ (24.3 mills/kwh). This combined cycle plant should be considered for base load power generation.

  3. Comparison of DNBR estimation methods in the Westinghouse and KWU reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, C.T.M.; Pontedeiro, A.C.

    1984-11-01

    A method for foreseeing departure from nucleate boiling phenomenon in Westinghouse reator cores (OTΔT- signal for reator shut down) is described. The results from investigations done with the OTΔT system and in the efficiency of different methods used in the Westinghouse and KWU nuclear power plants to estimate thermohydraulic conditions of the PWR reactor cores, are presented. The investigations were done, by support of computer codes. The modifications, purposed by Westinghouse, in the original project of Angra-1 OTΔT system are analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  4. A study on the criticality search of transuranium recycling BWR core by adjusting supplied fuel composition in equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Takeshi; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    There have been some difficulties in carrying out an extensive evaluation of the equilibrium state of Light Water Reactor (LWR) recycling operations keeping their fixed criticality condition using conventional design codes because of the complexity of their calculation model for practical fuel and core design and because of a large amount of calculation time. This study presents an efficient approach to secure the criticality in an equilibrium cycle by adjusting a supplied fuel composition. The criticality search is performed by the use of fuel importance obtained from the equation adjoint to a continuously fuel supplied core burnup equation. Using this method, some numerical analyses were carried out in order to evaluate the mixed oxide (MOX) fuel composition of equilibrium Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) cores satisfying the criticality requirement. The results showed the comprehensive and quantitative characteristics on the equilibrium cores confining transuraniums for different MOX fuel loading fractions and irradiating conditions

  5. A study on the criticality search of transuranium recycling BWR core by adjusting supplied fuel composition in equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Takeshi; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    There have been some difficulties in carrying out an extensive evaluation of the equilibrium state of Light Water Reactor (LWR) recycling operations keeping their fixed criticality condition using conventional design codes, because of the complexity of their calculational model for practical fuel and core design and because of a large amount of calculation time. This study presents an efficient approach to secure the criticality in an equilibrium cycle by adjusting a supplied fuel composition. The criticality search is performed by the use of fuel importance obtained from the equilibrium adjoint to a continuously fuel supplied core burnup equation. Using this method, some numerical analyses were carried out in order to evaluate the mixed oxide (MOX) fuel composition of equilibrium Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) cores satisfying the criticality requirement. The results showed the comprehensive and quantitative characteristics on the equilibrium cores confining transuranium for different MOX fuel loading fractions and irradiating conditions. (author)

  6. Systematic simulation of a tubular recycle reactor on the basis of pilot plant experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paar, H; Narodoslawsky, M; Moser, A [Technische Univ., Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Biotechnologie, Mikrobiologie und Abfalltechnologie

    1990-10-10

    Systematic simulatiom may decisively help in development and optimization of bioprocesses. By applying simulation techniques, optimal use can be made of experimental data, decreasing development costs and increasing the accuracy in predicting the behavior of an industrial scale plant. The procedure of the dialogue between simulation and experimental efforts will be exemplified in a case study. Alcoholic fermentation of glucose by zymomonas mobilis bacteria in a gasified turbular recycle reactor was studied first by systematic simulation, using a computer model based solely on literature data. On the base of the results of this simulation, a 0.013 m{sup 3} pilot plant reactor was constructed. The pilot plant experiments, too, were based on the results of the systematic simulation. Simulated and experimental data were well in agreement. The pilot plant experiments reiterated the trends and limits of the process as shown by the simulation results. Data from the pilot plant runs were then used to improve the simulation model. This improved model was subsequently used to simulate the performances of an industrial scale plant. The results of this simulation are presented. They show that the alcohol fermentation in a tubular recycle reactor is potentially advantageous to other reactor configurations, especially to continuous stirred tanks. (orig.).

  7. Competitiveness of biomass-fueled electrical power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce A. McCarl; Darius M. Adams; Ralph J. Alig; John T. Chmelik

    2000-01-01

    One way countries like the United States can comply with suggested rollbacks in greenhouse gas emissions is by employing power plants fueled with biomass. We examine the competitiveness of biomass-based fuel for electrical power as opposed to coal using a mathematical programming structure. We consider fueling power plants from milling residues, whole trees, logging...

  8. Control System Based on Anode Offgas Recycle for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanghong Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The conflicting operation objectives between rapid load following and the fuel depletion avoidance as well as the strong interactions between the thermal and electrical parameters make the SOFC system difficult to control. This study focuses on the design of the decoupling control for the thermal and electrical characteristics of the SOFC system through anode offgas recycling (AOR. The decoupling control system can independently manipulate the thermal and electrical parameters, which interact with one another in most cases, such as stack temperatures, burner temperature, system current, and system power. Under the decoupling control scheme, the AOR is taken as a manipulation variable. The burner controller maintains the burner temperature without being affected by abrupt power change. The stack temperature controller properly coordinates with the burner temperature controller to independently modulate the stack thermal parameters. For the electrical problems, the decoupling control scheme shows its superiority over the conventional controller in alleviating rapid load following and fuel depletion avoidance. System-level simulation under a power-changing case is performed to validate the control freedom between the thermal and electrical characteristics as well as the stability, efficiency, and robustness of the novel system control scheme.

  9. Nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear fuel makes the rounds: choosing a closed fuel cycle, nuclear fuel cycle processes, front-end of the fuel cycle: from crude ore to enriched uranium, back-end of the fuel cycle: the second life of nuclear fuel, and tomorrow: multiple recycling while generating increasingly less waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippon, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    France has opted for a policy of processing and recycling spent fuel. This option has already been deployed commercially since the 1990's, but will reach its full potential with the fourth generation. The CEA developed the processes in use today, and is pursuing research to improve, extend, and adapt these technologies to tomorrow's challenges. France has opted for a 'closed cycle' to recycle the reusable materials in spent fuel (uranium and plutonium) and optimise ultimate waste management. France has opted for a 'closed' nuclear fuel cycle. Spent fuel is processed to recover the reusable materials: uranium and plutonium. The remaining components (fission products and minor actinides) are the ultimate waste. This info-graphic shows the main steps in the fuel cycle currently implemented commercially in France. From the mine to the reactor, a vast industrial system ensures the conversion of uranium contained in the ore to obtain uranium oxide (UOX) fuel pellets. Selective extraction, purification, enrichment - key scientific and technical challenges for the teams in the Nuclear Energy Division (DEN). The back-end stages of the fuel cycle for recycling the reusable materials in spent fuel and conditioning the final waste-forms have reached maturity. CEA teams are pursuing their research in support of industry to optimise these processes. Multi-recycle plutonium, make even better use of uranium resources and, over the longer term, explore the possibility of transmuting the most highly radioactive waste: these are the challenges facing future nuclear systems. (authors)

  10. Reactor physics methods development at Westinghouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, E.; Mayhue, L.; Zhang, B.

    2007-01-01

    The current state of reactor physics methods development at Westinghouse is discussed. The focus is on the methods that have been or are under development within the NEXUS project which was launched a few years ago. The aim of this project is to merge and modernize the methods employed in the PWR and BWR steady-state reactor physics codes of Westinghouse. (author)

  11. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 10: Liquid-metal MHD systems. [energy conversion efficiency of electric power plants using liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, R. R.; Lippert, T. E.

    1976-01-01

    Electric Power Plant costs and efficiencies are presented for two basic liquid-metal cycles corresponding to 922 and 1089 K (1200 and 1500 F) for a commercial applications using direct coal firing. Sixteen plant designs are considered for which major component equipment were sized and costed. The design basis for each major component is discussed. Also described is the overall systems computer model that was developed to analyze the thermodynamics of the various cycle configurations that were considered.

  12. Chemical-cleaning process evaluation: Westinghouse steam generators. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, W.F.; Gockley, G.B.

    1983-04-01

    The Steam Generator Owners Group (SGOG)/Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Steam Generator Secondary Side Chemical Cleaning Program, under develpment since 1978, has resulted in a generic process for the removal of accumulated corrosion products and tube deposits in the tube support plate crevices. The SGOG/EPRI Project S150-3 was established to obtain an evaluation of the generic process in regard to its applicability to Westinghouse steam generators. The results of the evaluation form the basis for recommendations for transferring the generic process to a plant specific application and identify chemical cleaning corrosion guidelines for the materials in Westinghouse Steam Generators. The results of the evaluation, recommendations for plant-specific applications and corrosion guidelines for chemical cleaning are presented in this report

  13. Radiological considerations in the design of Reprocessing Uranium Plant (RUP) of Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle Facility (FRFCF), Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Rajagopal, V.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.

    2012-01-01

    A Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle Facility (FRFCF) being planned at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam is an integrated facility with head end and back end of fuel cycle plants co-located in a single place, to meet the refuelling needs of the prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR). Reprocessed uranium oxide plant (RUP) is one such plant in FRFCF to built to meet annual requirements of UO 2 for fabrication of fuel sub-assemblies (FSAs) and radial blanket sub-assemblies (RSAs) for PFBR. RUP receives reprocessed uranium oxide powder (U 3 O 8 ) from fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant (FRP) of FRFCF. Unlike natural uranium oxide plant, RUP has to handle reprocessed uranium oxide which is likely to have residual fission products activity in addition to traces of plutonium. As the fuel used for PFBR is recycled within these plants, formation of higher actinides in the case of plutonium and formation of higher levels of 232 U in the uranium product would be a radiological problem to be reckoned with. The paper discussed the impact of handling of multi-recycled reprocessed uranium in RUP and the radiological considerations

  14. Overview of the Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor building layout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronje, J. M. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Centurion (South Africa); Van Wyk, J. J.; Memmott, M. J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR), in which all of the components typically associated with the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear power plant are incorporated within a single reactor pressure vessel. This paper is the third in a series of four papers, which describe the design and functionality of the Westinghouse SMR. It focuses in particular upon the plant building layout and modular design of the Westinghouse SMR. In the development of small modular reactors, the building layout is an area where the safety of the plant can be improved by applying new design approaches. This paper will present an overview of the Westinghouse SMR building layout and indicate how the design features improve the safety and robustness of the plant. The Westinghouse SMR is designed with no shared systems between individual reactor units. The main buildings inside the security fence are the nuclear island, the rad-waste building, the annex building, and the turbine building. All safety related equipment is located in the nuclear island, which is a seismic class 1 building. To further enhance the safety and robustness of the design, the reactor, containment, and most of the safety related equipment are located below grade on the nuclear island. This reduces the possibility of severe damage from external threats or natural disasters. Two safety related ultimate heat sink (UHS) water tanks that are used for decay heat removal are located above grade, but are redundant and physically separated as far as possible for improved safety. The reactor and containment vessel are located below grade in the center of the nuclear island. The rad-waste and other radioactive systems are located on the bottom floors to limit the radiation exposure to personnel. The Westinghouse SMR safety trains are completely separated into four unconnected quadrants of the building, with access between quadrants only allowed

  15. Dynamic simulation of a direct carbonate fuel cell power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest, J.B. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Kush, A.K. [Fuel Cell Engineering, Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is commercializing a 2.85 MW Direct carbonate Fuel Cell (DFC) power plant. The commercialization sequence has already progressed through construction and operation of the first commercial-scale DFC power plant on a U.S. electric utility, the 2 MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP), and the completion of the early phases of a Commercial Plant design. A 400 kW fuel cell stack Test Facility is being built at Energy Research Corporation (ERC), FCE`s parent company, which will be capable of testing commercial-sized fuel cell stacks in an integrated plant configuration. Fluor Daniel, Inc. provided engineering, procurement, and construction services for SCDP and has jointly developed the Commercial Plant design with FCE, focusing on the balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment outside of the fuel cell modules. This paper provides a brief orientation to the dynamic simulation of a fuel cell power plant and the benefits offered.

  16. DESIGNAND EVALUATION OF TETRA-PAK CONTAINERS' RECYCLING PLANT ON A SMALLSCALE

    OpenAIRE

    Inche Mitma, Jorge; Vergiú Canto, Jorge|; Mavila Hinojoza, Daniel; Godoy Martínez, Manuel; Chung Pinzás, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    This study deals about the design and evaluation of Tetra Pak containers' recycling plant on a small scale. The basic Plant Engineering was found from the information gathered. Some aspects included were: product design, process design, equipment design and costs evaluation, with the aim of determining its technical, economical and environmental capability for its implementation. El estudio trata sobre el diseño y evaluación de una planta de reciclaje de envases tetra pak a pequeña escala....

  17. Environmental impact of radioactive releases from recycle of thorium-based fuel using current containment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennery, V.J.; Bomar, E.S.; Bond, W.D.; Morse, L.E.; Meyer, H.R.; Till, J.E.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    The analysis of thorium mining and milling suggests that the resulting doses should be similar to those from uranium operations. An absolute comparison cannot be made at this time, however, due to differences in some assumptions utilized by the various investigators and the lack in some cases of site-specific meteorology and population data at thorium resource sites in the western United States. A distinct difference resulting from the short half-life of 220 Rn (T/sub 1/2/ = 55.6 s) in the thorium decay chain compared to that for 222 Rn (T/sub 1/2/ = 3.82 d) in uranium decay was noted for emissions following mill shutdown. This effect is to make potential releases following thorium mill shutdown of lesser consequence than in the uranium case. Thorium tailings activity would also decrease relatively rapidly due to the comparatively short half-life (T/sub 1/2 = 5.75 y) of 228 Ra. Doses due to airborne releases from thorium-uranium carbide fuel refabrication are significantly less than that due to fuel reprocessing. Tritium is the principal contributor to reprocessing plant doses while carbon-14, 131 Cs, and 232 U account for most of the remaining dose. A tenfold increase in reprocessing plant CF for tritium reduces both individual and population doses by about 60%. For refabrication operations, a near linear dependence upon dose with 232 U content of the fuel was calculated between concentrations of 10 ppM and 5000 ppM. Comparison of (Th, U)C and (U, Pu)C showed little difference in dose commitment, but the presence of 232 U in the (Th, U) fuel causes a notable increase in the refabrication plant dose over that previously calculated for (U, Pu) type fuels

  18. Economic potential of fuel recycling options: A lifecycle cost analysis of future nuclear system transition in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Ruxing; Choi, Sungyeol; Il Ko, Won; Kim, Sungki

    2017-01-01

    In today's profit-driven market, how best to pursue advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies while maintaining the cost competitiveness of nuclear electricity is of crucial importance to determine the implementation of spent fuel reprocessing and recycling in China. In this study, a comprehensive techno-economic analysis is undertaken to evaluate the economic feasibility of ongoing national projects and the technical compatibility with China's future fuel cycle transition. We investigated the dynamic impacts of technical and economic uncertainties in the lifecycle of a nuclear system. The electricity generation costs associated with four potential fuel cycle transition scenarios were simulated by probabilistic and deterministic approaches and then compared in detail. The results showed that the total cost of a once-through system is lowest compared those of other advanced systems involving reprocessing and recycling. However, thanks to the consequential uncertainties caused by the further progress toward technology maturity, the economic potential of fuel recycling options was proven through a probabilistic uncertainty analysis. Furthermore, it is recommended that a compulsory executive of closed fuel cycle policy would pose some investment risk in the near term, though the execution of a series of R&D initiatives with a flexible roadmap would be valuable in the long run. - Highlights: • Real-time economic performance of the four scenarios of China's nuclear fuel cycle system transition until 2100. • Systematic assessments of techno-economic feasibility for ongoing national reprocessing projects. • Investigation the cost impact on nuclear electricity generation caused by uncertainties through probabilistic analysis. • Recommendation for sustainable implementation of fuel cycle R&D initiative ingrate with flexible roadmap in the long run.

  19. The fuel reprocessing plant at Wackersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, M.

    1986-01-01

    For a more systematic discussion about the fuel reprocessing plant at Wackersdorf, the colloquium tried to cover the most important questions put forward in the controversies: economic efficiency and energy-political needs; safety and ecological repercussions; inner safety and consequences for basic rights and the regional economic structure; majority decisions and participation of the population of the region. Elements of evaluation are the conservation of resources, health, economic efficiency, and citizens' rights of liberty. The related basic ethical questions are considered. The 18 contributions are individually recorded in the data base. (DG) [de

  20. Disposal of defense spent fuel and HLW from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermold, L.F.; Loo, H.H.; Klingler, R.D.; Herzog, J.D.; Knecht, D.A.

    1992-12-01

    Acid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage ate the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, with an emphasis on the description of HLW and spent fuels requiring repository disposal

  1. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 7: Metal vapor Rankine topping-steam bottoming cycles. [energy conversion efficiency in electric power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    Adding a metal vapor Rankine topper to a steam cycle was studied as a way to increase the mean temperature at which heat is added to the cycle to raise the efficiency of an electric power plant. Potassium and cesium topping fluids were considered. Pressurized fluidized bed or pressurized (with an integrated low-Btu gasifier) boilers were assumed. Included in the cycles was a pressurizing gas turbine with its associated recuperator, and a gas economizer and feedwater heater. One of the ternary systems studied shows plant efficiency of 42.3% with a plant capitalization of $66.7/kW and a cost of electricity of 8.19 mills/MJ (29.5 mills/kWh).

  2. Analysis of present water usage and management practice in nuclear recycle plants and potential ways to minimize environmental burden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, B.V.

    2008-01-01

    Water input and output balance along with its composition around Nuclear Recycle Plants (NRP) will give the environmental burden, however including intermediate steps required for its treatment or usage or to qualify for discharge to environment will give more holistic and real environmental burden. Major water uses in order of their consumption in one part of NRP called reprocessing plant are: 1. Production of steam mainly for evaporation and which is used in open loop. 2. For making process solution mainly 0.01N strip 1-2N scrub. 3. Wash and cleaning usage. To reduce the environmental burden of chemical and activity discharge through water, a large amount of water, fuel, chemical and capital investment in form of various system are used in general and at present NRP is no exception. Better processes and management practice could be evolved around proven method of recover and reuse near the source. Root cause of present large usage of water is in general and specifically NRP is extra safe approach in reuse. Recover quality can never meet fresh quality criteria and hence reuse is not permitted or avoided taking cover of some hypothetical scenario conditions. Thus a major contribution can come from more practical, realistic and objectively evolved management policy on reuse criteria or guidelines. In this situation, development effort and investment can be prioritized for development of recovery processes or proven or developed system get application in plant scale and benefit can start accruing in the form of reduced environmental burden

  3. Standardized Technical Specifications for Westinghouse PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This Standard Technical Specification (STS) has been structured for the broadest possible use on Westinghouse plants currently being reviewed for an Operating License. Accordingly, the document contains specifications applicable to plants (1) with either 3 or 4 loops and (2) with and without loop stop valves. In addition, four separate and discrete containment specification sections are provided for each of the following containment types: Atmospheric, Ice Condenser, Sub-Atmospheric, and Dual. Optional specifications are provided for those features and systems which may be included in individual plant designs but are not generic in their scope of application. Alternate specifications are provided in a limited number of cases to cover situations where alternate specification requirements are necessary on a generic basis because of design differences. The format of the STS addresses the categories required by 10 CFR 50 and consists of six sections covering the areas of: Definitions, Safety Limits and Limiting Safety System Settings, Limiting Conditions for Operation, Surveillance Requirements, Design Features, and Administrative Controls

  4. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 8: Open-cycle MHD. [energy conversion efficiency and design analysis of electric power plants employing magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, D. Q.

    1976-01-01

    Electric power plant costs and efficiencies are presented for three basic open-cycle MHD systems: (1) direct coal fired system, (2) a system with a separately fired air heater, and (3) a system burning low-Btu gas from an integrated gasifier. Power plant designs were developed corresponding to the basic cases with variation of major parameters for which major system components were sized and costed. Flow diagrams describing each design are presented. A discussion of the limitations of each design is made within the framework of the assumptions made.

  5. Simulator testing of the Westinghouse aware alarm management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrera, J P; Easter, J R; Roth, E M [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Over the last year, Westinghouse engineers and operators from the Beznau nuclear power station (KKB), owned by the Nordostschweizerische Krafwerke AG of Baden, Switzerland, have been installing and testing the Westinghouse AWARE Alarm Management System in Beznau/SNUPPS operator training simulator, owned and operated by the Westinghouse Electric Corp., in Waltz Mill, PA, USA. The testing has focused primarily on validating the trigger logic data base and on familiarizing the utility`s training department with the operation of the system in a real-time environment. Some of the tests have included plant process scenarios in which the computerized Emergency Procedures were available and used through the COMPRO (COMputerized PROcedures) System in conjunction with the AWARE System. While the results to date are qualitative from the perspective of system performance and improvement in message presentation, the tests have generally confirmed the expectations of the design. There is a large reduction in the number of messages that the control room staff must deal with during major process abnormalities, yet at times of relative minor disturbances, some additional messages are available which add clarification, e.g., ``Pump Trouble`` messages. The ``flow`` of an abnormality as it progresses from one part of the plant`s processes to another is quite visible. Timing of the messages and the lack of message avalanching is proving to give the operators additional time to respond to messages. Generally, the anxiety level to ``do something`` immediately upon a reactor trip appears to be reduced. (author). 8 refs.

  6. Westinghouse experience in using mechanical cutting for reactor vessel internals segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucau, Joseph; Fallstroem, Stefan; Segerud, Per; Kreitman, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Some commercial nuclear power plants have been permanently shut down to date and decommissioned using dismantling methods. Other operating plants have decided to undergo an upgrade process that includes replacement of reactor internals. In both cases, there is a need to perform a segmentation of the reactor vessel internals with proven methods for long term waste disposal. Westinghouse has developed several concepts to dismantle reactor internals based on safe and reliable techniques. Mechanical cutting has been used by Westinghouse since 1999 for both PWRs and BWRs and its process has been continuously improved over the years. Detailed planning is essential to a successful project, and typically a 'Segmentation and Packaging Plan' is prepared to document the effort. The usual method is to start at the end of the process, by evaluating the waste disposal requirements imposed by the waste disposal agency, what type and size of containers are available for the different disposal options, and working backwards to select the best cutting tools and finally the cut geometry required. These plans are made utilizing advanced 3-D CAD software to model the process. Another area where the modelling has proven invaluable is in determining the logistics of component placement and movement in the reactor cavity, which is typically very congested when all the internals are out of the reactor vessel in various stages of segmentation. The main objective of the segmentation and packaging plan is to determine the strategy for separating the highly activated components from the less activated material, so that they can be disposed of in the most cost effective manner. Usually, highly activated components cannot be shipped off-site, so they must be packaged such that they can be dry stored with the spent fuel in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Less activated components can be shipped to an off-site disposal site depending on space availability. Several of the

  7. Anolyte recycling enhanced bioelectricity generation of the buffer-free single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yueping; Chen, Jinli; Shi, Yugang; Li, Xiufen; Yang, Na; Wang, Xinhua

    2017-11-01

    Anolyte acidification is an inevitable restriction for the bioelectricity generation of buffer-free microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this work, acidification of the buffer-free KCl anolyte has been thoroughly eliminated through anolyte recycling. The accumulated HCO 3 - concentration in the recycled KCl anolyte was above 50mM, which played as natural buffer and elevated the anolyte pH to above 8. The maximum power density (P max ) increased from 322.9mWm -2 to 527.2mWm -2 , which is comparable with the phosphate buffered MFC. Besides Geobacter genus, the gradually increased anolyte pH and conductivity induced the growing of electrochemically active Geoalkalibacter genus, in the anode biofilm. Anolyte recycling is a feasible strategy to strengthen the self-buffering capacity of buffer-free MFCs, thoroughly eliminate the anolyte acidification and prominently enhance the electric power. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Roles of programmable logic controllers in fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Hrishikesh; Balakrishnan, V.P.; Pandya, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel charging facility is another application of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) in fuel reprocessing plants, that involves automatic operation of fuel cask dolly, charging motor, pneumatic doors, clutches, clamps, stepper motors and rod pushers in a pre-determined sequence. Block diagram of ACF system is given for underlining the scope of control and interlocks requirements involved for automation of the fuel charging system has been provided for the purpose at KARP Plant, Kalpakkam

  9. Microstructure of Concrete with Aggregates from Construction and Demolition Waste Recycling Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Miguel; Santos Silva, António; de Brito, Jorge; Evangelista, Luís

    2016-02-01

    This paper intends to analyze the microstructure of concrete with recycled aggregates (RA) from construction and demolition waste from various Portuguese recycling plants. To that effect, several scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were performed. Various concrete mixes were evaluated in order to analyze the influence of the RA's collection point and consequently of their composition on the mixes' characteristics. Afterward all the mixes were subjected to the capillary water absorption test in order to quantitatively evaluate their porosity. Results from the SEM/EDS analysis were compared with those from capillary water absorption test. The SEM/EDS analysis showed that the bond capacity of aggregates to the new cement paste is greatly influenced by the RA's nature. On the other hand, there was an increase in porosity with the incorporation of RA.

  10. Ion exchange media testing for processing recyclable and nonrecyclable liquids at Diablo Canyon Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, K.L.; Miller, C.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on several ion exchange materials tested for processing nonrecyclable and recyclable liquid wastes at Diablo Canyon Power Plant. These ion exchange materials include inorganic Durasil media, natural and synthetic zeolites, and various organic resins. Additional tests were performed using a polyelectrolyte pretreatment technique to enhance processing of liquid wastes by ion exchange. A 9:1 ratio of cation to anion resin, consisting of IRN-77 and Sybron A-642 was effective in decontaminating cesium and cobalt radionuclides for low conductivity nonrecyclable liquids. A mixture of zeolite and Durasil media was most effective in removing cesium and cobalt from nonrecyclable high conductivity liquids. The experimental Dow resins achieved the best results in decontaminating recyclable liquids and minimized the effluent levels of chlorides, sulfates, and silica

  11. Sludge, garbage may fuel California sewage plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieger, R B

    1977-01-01

    The combustion and pyrolysis of sewage sludge and refuse-derived fuel (RFD) in multiple-hearth furnaces were recommended as a means of generating energy to power the Central Contra Costa Sanitary District's 30 mgd wastewater treatment plant using an off-gas from the pyrolysis process. In a full-scale test, a furnace in Concord, once used for sewage sludge incineration, was operated under O/sub 2/-starved conditions by limiting air addition through the burners and air nozzles, resulting in partial combustion. Using temperature as the controlled variable, the process was regulated to form a fuel gas through composition of the organic feed matter. Just enough fuel gas was combusted to evaporate moisture in the feed solids and furnish heat for the decomposition process. During most of the testing the afterburner was maintained at a temperature > 1400/sup 0/F with pyrolysis gas. At this temperature, automatic ignition of the gas occurred. When the gas generated dropped to a low heat of combustion because of high feed moisture content, the afterburner burner was used to ignite the gas. Some test observations are discussed. Preparation of the solid waste for processing by the use of shredders, air classifiers, and magnetic separators is described.

  12. Fuel additive improves plant`s air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratch, K.

    1995-07-01

    Employees of a major pulp and paper manufacturer complained to the Michigan Department of Public Health that emissions from liquefied petroleum gas-powered fork-lifts used in one of the facility`s warehouses were making them ill. The new and tight building was locking in carbon monoxide emissions, according to the plant`s vehicle maintenance supervisor. Although LPG is a clean-burning fuel, it absorbs impurities from pipelines, resulting in emissions problems. After the company introduced a fuel additive to the LPG, employees` symptoms disappeared. According to the maintenance supervisor, there have been no complaints since the additive was introduced five years ago. A major US auto manufacturer also found the additive helpful in reducing carbon monoxide emissions from forklift trucks in a large parts warehouse to levels within OSHA limits. The carmaker conducted a test of 10 forklifts at its Toledo, Ohio, plant to determine the additive`s effectiveness. Trucks were equipped with new or rebuilt vaporizers, and their carburetors were adjusted for the lowest carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions levels prior to the test. According to Advanced Technology, five trucks were filled with LPG and treated with CGX-4, and five used fuel from the same stock but without the additive. All were operated 16 hours a day, six days a week without further tuning or adjusting. Carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions were measured at 30-, 45- and 65-day intervals. Test results show that all of the trucks using the additive maintained low levels of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions longer than trucks not using the additive.

  13. Retrofitting a spent fuel pool spray system for alternative cooling as a strategy for beyond design basis events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Christoph; Vujic, Zoran [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Due to requirements for nuclear power plants to withstand beyond design basis accidents, including events such as happened in 2011 in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, alternative cooling of spent fuel is needed. Alternative spent fuel cooling can be provided by a retrofitted spent fuel pool spray system based on the AP1000 plant design. As part of Krsko Nuclear Power Plant's Safety Upgrade Program, Krsko Nuclear Power Plant decided on, and Westinghouse successfully designed a retrofit of the AP1000 {sup registered} plant spent fuel pool spray system to provide alternative spent fuel cooling.

  14. Westinghouse AP1000 Electrical Generation Costs - Meeting Marketplace Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, C. Keith

    2002-01-01

    The re-emergence of nuclear power as a leading contender for new base-load electrical generation is not an occurrence of happenstance. The nuclear industry, in general, and Westinghouse, specifically, have worked diligently with the U.S. power companies and other nuclear industry participants around the world to develop future plant designs and project implementation models that address prior problem areas that led to reduced support for nuclear power. In no particular order, the issues that Westinghouse, as an engineering and equipment supply company, focused on were: safety, plant capital costs, construction schedule reductions, plant availability, and electric generation costs. An examination of the above criteria quickly led to the conclusion that as long as safety is not compromised, simplifying plant designs can lead to positive progress of the desired endpoints for the next and later generations of nuclear units. The distinction between next and later generations relates to the readiness of the plant design for construction implementation. In setting requirement priorities, one axiom is inviolate: There is no exception, nor will there be, to the Golden Rule of business. In the electric power generation industry, once safety goals are met, low generation cost is the requirement that rules, without exception. The emphasis in this paper on distinguishing between next and later generation reactors is based on the recognition that many designs have been purposed for future application, but few have been able to attain the design pedigree required to successfully meet the requirements for next generation nuclear units. One fact is evident: Another generation of noncompetitive nuclear plants will cripple the potential for nuclear to take its place as a major contributor to new electrical generation. Only two plant designs effectively meet the economic tests and demonstrate both unparalleled safety and design credibility due to extensive progress toward engineering

  15. Simulator testing of the Westinghouse aware alarm management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, J.P.; Easter, J.R.; Roth, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Over the last year, Westinghouse engineers and operators from the Beznau nuclear power station (KKB), owned by the Nordostschweizerische Krafwerke AG of Baden, Switzerland, have been installing and testing the Westinghouse AWARE Alarm Management System in Beznau/SNUPPS operator training simulator, owned and operated by the Westinghouse Electric Corp., in Waltz Mill, PA, USA. The testing has focused primarily on validating the trigger logic data base and on familiarizing the utility's training department with the operation of the system in a real-time environment. Some of the tests have included plant process scenarios in which the computerized Emergency Procedures were available and used through the COMPRO (COMputerized PROcedures) System in conjunction with the AWARE System. While the results to date are qualitative from the perspective of system performance and improvement in message presentation, the tests have generally confirmed the expectations of the design. There is a large reduction in the number of messages that the control room staff must deal with during major process abnormalities, yet at times of relative minor disturbances, some additional messages are available which add clarification, e.g., ''Pump Trouble'' messages. The ''flow'' of an abnormality as it progresses from one part of the plant's processes to another is quite visible. Timing of the messages and the lack of message avalanching is proving to give the operators additional time to respond to messages. Generally, the anxiety level to ''do something'' immediately upon a reactor trip appears to be reduced. (author). 8 refs

  16. Performance of candu-6 fuel bundles manufactured in romania nuclear fuel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailescu, A.; Barbu, A.; Din, F.; Dinuta, G.; Dumitru, I.; Musetoiu, A.; Serban, G.; Tomescu, A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the performance of nuclear fuel produced by Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti during 1995 - 2012 and irradiated in units U1 and U2 from Nuclear Power Plant (N.P.P.) Cernavoda and also present the Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti concern for providing technology to prevent the failure causes of fuel bundles in the reactor. This article presents Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti experience on tracking performance of nuclear fuel in reactor and strategy investigation of fuel bundles notified as suspicious and / or defectives both as fuel element and fuel bundle, it analyzes the possible defects that can occur at fuel bundle or fuel element and can lead to their failure in the reactor. Implementation of modern technologies has enabled optimization of manufacturing processes and hence better quality stability of achieving components (end caps, chamfered sheath), better verification of end cap - sheath welding. These technologies were qualified by Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti on automatic and Computer Numerical Control (C.N.C.) programming machines. A post-irradiation conclusive analysis which will take place later this year (2013) in Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (the action was initiated earlier this year by bringing a fuel bundle which has been reported defective by pool visual inspection) will provide additional information concerning potential damage causes of fuel bundles due to manufacturing processes. (authors)

  17. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 9: Closed-cycle MHD. [energy conversion efficiency of electric power plants using magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsu, T. C.

    1976-01-01

    A closed-cycle MHD system for an electric power plant was studied. It consists of 3 interlocking loops, an external heating loop, a closed-cycle cesium seeded argon nonequilibrium ionization MHD loop, and a steam bottomer. A MHD duct maximum temperature of 2366 K (3800 F), a pressure of 0.939 MPa (9.27 atm) and a Mach number of 0.9 are found to give a topping cycle efficiency of 59.3%; however when combined with an integrated gasifier and optimistic steam bottomer the coal to bus bar efficiency drops to 45.5%. A 1978 K (3100 F) cycle has an efficiency of 55.1% and a power plant efficiency of 42.2%. The high cost of the external heating loop components results in a cost of electricity of 21.41 mills/MJ (77.07 mills/kWh) for the high temperature system and 19.0 mills/MJ (68.5 mills/kWh) for the lower temperature system. It is, therefore, thought that this cycle may be more applicable to internally heated systems such as some futuristic high temperature gas cooled reactor.

  18. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels; Kloorattujen orgaanisten yhdisteiden muodostuminen kierraetyspolttoaineiden leijukerrospoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesterinen, R.; Kallio, M.; Kirjalainen, T.; Kolsi, A.; Merta, M. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  19. Review of Reliability Assessment of Westinghouse SSPS Using SPC by WEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H. T.; Chung, H. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company (WEC) has accomplished the reliability assessment of Westinghouse Solid State Protection System (SSPS) in KORI no. 2, 3, 4, and YGN no. 1, 2. In their studies, it is reported that creating a cost-effective plan for improving the reliability of the SSPS and at KORI no. 2, 3 and 4, and YGN no. 1, 2 should be needed while reducing their maintenance cost. In this paper, we reviewed the reliability assessment of Westinghouse SSPS analyzed in two performance standards, availability, and the maintenance expense using Statistic Process Control (SPC). As a result, it is concluded all plants have several failures reported but no effect on the system's availability, and the maintenance expense analysis did not reduce the current maintenance expense by 30%. Therefore, overall review for the reliability assessment is that a new strategy for cost-effective plan and/or upgrade approach for improving the reliability of the aging Westinghouse SSPS should be needed

  20. Hematite nuclear fuel cycle facility decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, K.

    2004-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company LLC ('Westinghouse') acquired a nuclear fuel processing plant at Hematite, Missouri ('Hematite', the 'Facility', or the 'Plant') in April 2000. The plant has subsequently been closed, and its operations have been relocated to a newer, larger facility. Westinghouse has announced plans to complete its clean-up, decommissioning, and license retirement in a safe, socially responsible, and environmentally sound manner as required by internal policies, as well as those of its parent company, British Nuclear Fuels plc. ('BNFL'). Preliminary investigations have revealed the presence of environmental contamination in various areas of the facility and grounds, including both radioactive contamination and various other substances related to the nuclear fuel processing operations. The disparity in regulatory requirements for radiological and nonradiological contaminants, the variety of historic and recent operations, and the number of previous owners working under various contractual arrangements for both governmental and private concerns has resulted in a complex project. This paper discusses Westinghouse's efforts to develop and implement a comprehensive decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) strategy for the facility and grounds. (author)

  1. Safety problems in fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaury, P.; Jouannaud, C.; Niezborala, F.

    1979-01-01

    The document first situates the reprocessing in the fuel cycle as a whole. It shows that a large reprocessing plant serves a significant number of reactors (50 for a plant of 1500 tonnes per annum). It then assesses the potential risks with respect to the environment as well as with respect to the operating personnel. The amounts of radioactive matter handled are very significant and their easily dispersible physical form represents very important risks. But the low potential energy likely to bring about this dispersion and the very severe and plentiful confinement arrangements are such that the radioactive risks are very small, both with respect to the environment and the operating personnel. The problems of the interventions for maintenance or repairs are mentioned. The intervention techniques in a radioactive environment are perfected, but they represent the main causes of operating personnel irradiation. The design principle applied in the new plants take this fact into account, involving a very significant effort to improve the reliability of the equipment and ensuring the provision of devices enabling the failing components to be replaced without causing irradiation of the personnel [fr

  2. Energy profit ratio on LWR by uranium recycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Osamu; Uno, Takeki; Matsushima, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Energy profit ratio is defined as the ratio of output energy/input system total energy. In case of electric power generation, input energy is a total for fuel such as uranium mining and enrichment, fuel transportation, build nuclear power plant, M and O and for disposal waste and decommission of reactor vessel. Output energy is the total electricity on LWR during the plant life. EPR on both PWR and BWR is high value using gas centrifuge enrichment compared other type of electric power generation such as a thermal power, a hydraulic power, a wind power and a photovoltaic power. How is the EPR on LWR by MOX? We need understanding the energy of reprocessing spent fuel, MOX fuel fabrication, low level waste disposal and high level radioactive glass disposal. As we show the material balance for two cases, the first is the case of long term storage and reprocessing before FBR, the second is the MOX fuel cycle on LWR plant. The MOX fuel recycle is better EPR value rather than the case of long term storage and reprocessing before FBR (LTSRBF). At the gaseous diffusion enrichment case, MOX fuel recycle has 15 to 18% higher EPR value than LTSRBF. At the gas centrifuge enrichment case the MOX fuel recycle has 17 to 18 higher EPR value than LTSRBF. MOX fuel recycle decreases the uranium mining and refine mass, enrichment separative work and the spent fuel interim storage. It tells us the MOX fuel recycle is good way from view of EPR. (author)

  3. Regenerative Heater Optimization for Steam Turbo-Generation Cycles of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants with a Comparison of Two Concepts for the Westinghouse International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, W.C.

    2002-01-01

    The intent of this study is to discuss some of the many factors involved in the development of the design and layout of a steam turbo-generation unit as part of a modular Generation IV nuclear power plant. Of the many factors involved in the design and layout, this research will cover feed water system layout and optimization issues. The research is arranged in hopes that it can be generalized to any Generation IV system which uses a steam powered turbo-generation unit. The research is done using the ORCENT-II heat balance codes and the Salisbury methodology to be reviewed herein. The Salisbury methodology is used on an original cycle design by Famiani for the Westinghouse IRIS and the effects due to parameter variation are studied. The vital parameters of the Salisbury methodology are the incremental heater surface capital cost (S) in $/ft 2 , the value of incremental power (I) in $/kW, and the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) in Btu/ft 2 -degrees Fahrenheit-hr. Each is varied in order to determine the effects on the cycles overall heat rate, output, as well as, the heater surface areas. The effects of each are shown. Then the methodology is then used to compare the optimized original Famiani design consisting of seven regenerative feedwater heaters with an optimized new cycle concept, INRC8, containing four regenerative heaters. The results are shown. It can be seen that a trade between the complexity of the seven stage regenerative Famiani cycle and the simplicity of the INRC8 cycle can be made. It is desired that this methodology can be used to show the ability to evaluate modularity through the value of size a complexity of the system as well as the performance. It also shows the effectiveness of the Salisbury methodology in the optimization of regenerative cycles for such an evaluation

  4. TRAC-PF1/MOD2 best-estimate analysis of a large-break LOCA in a 15 x 15 generic four-loop Westinghouse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spore, J.W.; Lin, J.C.; Schnurr, N.M.; White, J.R.; Cappiello, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a 15 x 15 generic four-loop Westinghouse nuclear power plant with both the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 and TRAC-PF1/MOD2 computer codes will be presented. The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) has been developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate simulations of real postulated transients in pressurized light-water reactors (LWRs) and for many related thermal-hydraulic facilities. The latest released version of TRAC is TRAC-PF1/MOD2. Significant improvements and enhancements over the MOD1 version were implemented in the MOD2 heat-transfer and constitutive models. One of the most significant improvements in the MOD2 code has been the implementation of the two-step numerics method in the three-dimensional components, which can significantly reduce run times for long, slow transients. A very important area of improvement has been in the reflood heat-transfer models. Developmental assessment results (i.e., code comparisons with experimental data) will be discussed for several separate-effects and integral test, including analysis of the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF), the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF), and the Loss-of-Fluid Test Facility (LOFT). The assessment results provide information on the anticipated accuracy for the best-estimate models in the MOD2 computer code. The MOD1 to MOD2 comparison will provide an estimate for the effect of improved heat-transfer models on predicted peak cladding temperatures

  5. A method for recovering and separating palladium, technetium, rhodium and ruthenium contained in solutions resulting from nuclear fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.H.

    1974-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for recovering and separating technetium and metals of the platinum group, i.e. palladium, rhodium and ruthenium existing as fission products. The method according to the invention is characterized by contacting a residuary acid aqueous solution provided by nuclear fuel recycling with successive carbon beds which have adsorbed different chelating agents specific for the metals to be recovered in order that said metals be selectively chelated and extracted from the solution. This method is suitable for recovering the above metals from solutions provided by reprocessing spent fuels [fr

  6. Recycling of nuclear fuel swarf at the fabrication of UO sub(2)-pellets and its influence on the irradiation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.S.; Lameiras, F.S.; Santos, A.M.M. dos

    1991-01-01

    From the fabrication of UO sub(2) pellets for light water reactor fuel rods, nuclear fuel scraps results in form of UO sub(2) grinding swarf and UO sub(2) sinter scraps oxidized to U sub(3)O sub(8) powder. Detailed investigations on five types of UO sub(2) pellets fabricated with different portions of this scrap kinds added to the UO sub(2) press powder showed that there is only a small influence of such scrap additions on the irradiation behavior, especially for the fission gas release. This allows to recycle the fabrication scrap in a simple and economic way. (author)

  7. Equipment specifications for an electrochemical fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemphill, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical reprocessing is a technique used to chemically separate and dissolve the components of spent nuclear fuel, in order to produce new metal fuel. There are several different variations to electrochemical reprocessing. These variations are accounted for by both the production of different types of spent nuclear fuel, as well as different states and organizations doing research in the field. For this electrochemical reprocessing plant, the spent fuel will be in the metallurgical form, a product of fast breeder reactors, which are used in many nuclear power plants. The equipment line for this process is divided into two main categories, the fuel refining equipment and the fuel fabrication equipment. The fuel refining equipment is responsible for separating out the plutonium and uranium together, while getting rid of the minor transuranic elements and fission products. The fuel fabrication equipment will then convert this plutonium and uranium mixture into readily usable metal fuel.

  8. Fuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    logo, Direct FuelCell and “DFC” are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. Applications •On-site self generation of combined heat... of FuelCell Energy, Inc. Fuels Resources for DFC • Natural Gas and LNG • Propane • Biogas (by Anaerobicnaerobic Digestion) - Municipal Waste...FUEL RESOURCES z NATURAL GAS z PROPANE z DFC H2 (50-60%) z ETHANOL zWASTE METHANE z BIOGAS z COAL GAS Diversity of Fuels plus High Efficiency

  9. Recovery of sodium hydroxide and silica from zirconium oxide plant effluent of Nuclear Fuel Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajpai, M.B.; Shenoi, M.R.K.; Keni, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    Sodium hydroxide (lye) and silica can be recovered in pure form from the alkaline sodium silicate waste of Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad. Electrolytic method was used to amalgamate the sodium present in an electrolyser with flowing mercury as cathode and nickel as anode. The amalgam is then denuded with water in a graphite packed tower to recover mercury for recycling to the electrolyser and sodium hydroxide lye. Sodium hydroxide lye can be recycled in the zirconium oxide plant. Silica is recovered from the spent electrolyte by ion exchange method using cation exchange resin. Both the process details are described in this paper, with experimental data useful for the scale up. The process converts waste to value products. (author)

  10. Recovery of sodium hydroxide and silica from zirconium oxide plant effluent of Nuclear Fuel Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajpai, M B; Shenoi, M R.K.; Keni, V S [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    Sodium hydroxide (lye) and silica can be recovered in pure form from the alkaline sodium silicate waste of Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad. Electrolytic method was used to amalgamate the sodium present in an electrolyser with flowing mercury as cathode and nickel as anode. The amalgam is then denuded with water in a graphite packed tower to recover mercury for recycling to the electrolyser and sodium hydroxide lye. Sodium hydroxide lye can be recycled in the zirconium oxide plant. Silica is recovered from the spent electrolyte by ion exchange method using cation exchange resin. Both the process details are described in this paper, with experimental data useful for the scale up. The process converts waste to value products. (author). 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Research of waste heat energy efficiency for absorption heat pump recycling thermal power plant circulating water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Liansheng; E, Zhijun; Wang, Kun; Wang, Ziyue; Li, Guohao; Qu, Bin

    2018-02-01

    The waste heat energy efficiency for absorption heat pump recycling thermal power plant circulating water has been analyzed. After the operation of heat pump, the influences on power generation and heat generation of unit were taken into account. In the light of the characteristics of heat pump in different operation stages, the energy efficiency of heat pump was evaluated comprehensively on both sides of benefits belonging to electricity and benefits belonging to heat, which adopted the method of contrast test. Thus, the reference of energy efficiency for same type projects was provided.

  12. Evaluation of concrete recycling system efficiency for ready-mix concrete plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Luiz de Brito Prado; Figueiredo, Antonio Domingues de

    2016-10-01

    The volume of waste generated annually in concrete plants is quite large and has important environmental and economic consequences. The use of fresh concrete recyclers is an interesting way for the reuse of aggregates and water in new concrete production. This paper presents a study carried out for over one year by one of the largest ready-mix concrete producers in Brazil. This study focused on the evaluation of two recyclers with distinct material separation systems, herein referred to as drum-type and rotary sieve-type equipment. They were evaluated through characterization and monitoring test programs to verify the behaviour of recovered materials (aggregates, water, and slurry). The applicability of the recovered materials (water and aggregates) was also evaluated in the laboratory and at an industrial scale. The results obtained with the two types of recyclers used were equivalent and showed no significant differences. The only exception was in terms of workability. The drum-type recycler generated fewer cases that required increased pumping pressure. The analysis concluded that the use of untreated slurry is unfeasible because of its intense negative effects on the strength and workability of concrete. The reclaimed water, pre-treated to ensure that its density is less than 1.03g/cm(3), can be used on an industrial scale without causing any harm to the concrete. The use of recovered aggregates consequently induces an increase in water demand and cement consumption to ensure the workability conditions of concrete that is proportional to the concrete strength level. Therefore, the viability of their use is restricted to concretes with characteristic strengths lower than 25MPa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fuel costs of a light water reactor with fissile material recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, J.

    1984-01-01

    In the light of the present prices of natural uranium and separative work and fabrication costs, savings can be achieved by reloading recycled fissile material. As in all recycling techniques, the product recovered cannot meet the whole new requirement. No excessive economic expectations should be associated with fissile material recycling in ligth water reactors. The main advantages of the procedure are the conservation of resources and the safety against proliferation. Besides, the original purpose of reprocessing should not be forgotten, i.e., in addition to the recycling of fissile material, to have a safe and easy method of secular disposal of high level waste (concentrated fission products). (orig.) [de

  14. Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant-1: a stepping stone in Indian PHWR spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Sanjay; Dubey, K.; Qureshi, F.T.; Lokeswar, S.P.

    2017-01-01

    India has low reserves of uranium and high reserves of thorium. In order to optimize resource utilization India has adopted a closed fuel cycle to ensure long-term energy security. The optimum resource utilization is feasible only by adopting reprocessing, conditioning and recycle options. It is very much imperative to view spent fuel as a vital resource material and not a waste to be disposed off. Thus, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing forms an integral part of the Indian Nuclear Energy Programme. Aqueous reprocessing based on PUREX technology is in use for more than 50 years and has reached a matured status

  15. Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use in Corps of Engineers Floating Plant Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 6- 11 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program Evaluation of Biodiesel Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use... Fuels to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use in Corps of Engineers Floating Plant Operations Michael Tubman and Timothy Welp Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory...sensitive emissions, increase use of renewable energy, and reduce the use of fossil fuels was conducted with funding from the U.S. Army Corps of

  16. The unrivalled expertise for Pu recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, W.; Pouilloux, M.

    1997-01-01

    Relying on the outstanding performances of the reprocessing facilities and the growing fabrication facilities, the in-reactor Pu recycling program in France and in other European countries is steadily implemented and has reached full-scale industrial operation. The RCR strategy -Reprocessing, Conditioning and Recycling- developed by COGEMA is now a well proven industrial reality. In 1997, plutonium recycling through MOX fuel is a mature industry, with successful operational experience and large-scale fabrication plants. In this field, COGEMA is the main actor, on operating simultaneously three complete multidesign fuel production plants: MELOX plant (in Marcoule), CADARACHE plant and DESSEL plant (in Belgium). Present MOX production capacity available to COGEMA fits 175 tHM per year and will be extended to reach about 325 tHM in the year 2000, that will represent 75% of the total MOX fabrication capacity in Europe. The industrial mastery and the high production level in MOX production assured by high technology processes confers COGEMA an unrivalled expertise for Pu recycling. This allows COGEMA to be a major actor in Pu-based fuels in the coming second nuclear era with advanced fuel cycles. The paper depicts the steps of the progressive advance of COGEMA to reach the Pu recycling expertise. (author)

  17. Experience and activities in the field of plutonium recycling in civilian nuclear power plants in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decressin, A.; Gambier, D.J.; Lehmann, J.-P.; Nietzold, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    The European Union industry has established a world-wide leadership position in manufacturing and exploiting plutonium bearing fuel (MOX). About 15 to 20 tons of plutonium have been manufactured in the MOX fuel fabrication plants of E.U. companies. The current capacity of about 60 tons of MOX fuel per year is being upgraded to reach 400 tons/year by the year 2000. As a result, the excess amounts of separated plutonium, presently stored in the European Union, should no longer raise but should steadily decrease to converge to zero. Studies by the European Commission have indicated that the best use at present of weapons-grade and reactor-grade plutonium is to burn it in operating and future planned nuclear reactors. Disposing of plutonium by blending it with fission products or immobilising it into synthetic matrices appears to be far from being an industrially viable option. Following this path would mean to continue storing the excess plutonium of both military and civilian origin for an unknown, but very long period of time. For these and other reasons, the European Commission is striving to foster international cooperation between the European Union companies, having a long industrial experience accumulated in the field of recycling plutonium, and, so far, the Russian Federation and the Newly Independent States. This cooperation is aiming at supporting projects that could be mutually beneficial to all parties involved. To meet this objective, several programmes have been established either bilaterally or multilaterally, in particular within the framework of the International Science and Technology Centre (I.S.T.C.) in Moscow. Some examples of such collaborations will be described. (author)

  18. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble

  19. A utility analysis of MOX recycling policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfaeffli, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The author presents the advantages of recycling of plutonium and uranium from spent reactor fuel assemblies as follows: natural uranium and enrichment savings, mixed oxide fuel (MOX) fuel assembly cost, MOX compatibility with plant operation, high burnups, spent MOX reprocessing, and non-proliferation aspects.Disadvantages of the recycling effort are noted as well: plutonium degradation with time, plutonium availability, in-core fuel management, administrative authorizations by the licensings authorities, US prior consent, and MOX fuel fabrication capacity. Putting the advantages and disadvantages in perspective, it is concluded that the recycling of MOX in light water reactors represents, under the current circumstances, the most appropriate way of making use of the available plutonium

  20. APWR - Mitsubishi, Japan/Westinghouse, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aeba, Y.; Weiss, E.H.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear power generated by light water reactors accounts for approximately 1/3 of Japan's power supply. Development of the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) was initiated by five PWR electric power companies (Hokkaido, Kansai, Shikoku, Kyushu and Japan Atomic Power), Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, and Westinghouse, with a view to providing a nuclear power source to meet future energy demand in Japan. The APWR was developed based on the results of the Improvement and Standardization Program, promoted by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, with reconsideration of the needs of age, such as construction cost reduction, enhanced safety and increased reliability. One of the important concepts of the APWR is its large power rating that decreases the construction cost per unit of electric generation capacity. Though the electric output was lower at the early stage of basic design than it is now, uprating to approximately 1530 MW is achieved based on the results of design progress and high efficiency improvements to the steam turbine and reactor coolant pumps. Furthermore, the APWR remarkably enhances reliability, safety operability and maintainability by introducing new technologies that include a radial reflector and advanced accumulators. The first APWR is planned to be built at Tsuruga No. 3 and No. 4 by the Japan Atomic Power Company and will be the largest commercial operation plant in the early 21st century. (author)

  1. Nuclear fuel reprocessing deactivation plan for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.W.

    1994-10-01

    The decision was announced on April 28, 1992 to cease all United States Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing of nuclear fuels. This decision leads to the deactivation of all fuels dissolution, solvent extraction, krypton gas recovery operations, and product denitration at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The reprocessing facilities will be converted to a safe and stable shutdown condition awaiting future alternate uses or decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). This ICPP Deactivation Plan includes the scope of work, schedule, costs, and associated staffing levels necessary to achieve a safe and orderly deactivation of reprocessing activities and the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). Deactivation activities primarily involve shutdown of operating systems and buildings, fissile and hazardous material removal, and related activities. A minimum required level of continued surveillance and maintenance is planned for each facility/process system to ensure necessary environmental, health, and safety margins are maintained and to support ongoing operations for ICPP facilities that are not being deactivated. Management of the ICPP was transferred from Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) to Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) on October 1, 1994 as part of the INEL consolidated contract. This revision of the deactivation plan (formerly the Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Phaseout Plan for the ICPP) is being published during the consolidation of the INEL site-wide contract and the information presented here is current as of October 31, 1994. LITCO has adopted the existing plans for the deactivation of ICPP reprocessing facilities and the plans developed under WINCO are still being actively pursued, although the change in management may result in changes which have not yet been identified. Accordingly, the contents of this plan are subject to revision

  2. Fuel handling and storage systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The scope of this Guide includes the design of handling and storage facilities for fuel assemblies from the receipt of fuel into the nuclear power plant until the fuel departs from that plant. The unirradiated fuel considered in this Guide is assumed not to exhibit any significant level of radiation so that it can be handled without shielding or cooling. This Guide also gives limited consideration to the handling and storage of certain core components. While the general design and safety principles are discussed in Section 2 of this Guide, more specific design requirements for the handling and storage of fuel are given in detailed sections which follow the general design and safety principles. Further useful information is to be found in the IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 189 ''Storage, Handling and Movement of Fuel and Related Components at Nuclear Power Plants'' and No. 198 ''Guide to the Safe Handling of Radioactive Wastes at Nuclear Power Plants''. However, the scope of the Guide does not include consideration of the following: (1) The various reactor physics questions associated with fuel and absorber loading and unloading into the core; (2) The design aspects of preparation of the reactor for fuel loading (such as the removal of the pressure vessel head for a light water reactor) and restoration after loading; (3) The design of shipping casks; (4) Fuel storage of a long-term nature exceeding the design lifetime of the nuclear power plant; (5) Unirradiated fuel containing plutonium

  3. Fuel cycle cost comparison of choices in U-235 recycle in the HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothstein, M.P.

    1976-07-01

    An analysis of alternative options for the recycle of discharged makeup U-235 (''residual'' makeup) in HTGRs shows that the three-particle system which has been the reference plan remains optimal. This result considers both the resource utilization and the handling costs attendant to the alternative strategies (primarily in the recycle facility and in waste disposal). Furthermore, this result appears to be true under all forseeable economic conditions. A simple risk assessment indicates that recycle cost (including reprocessing, refabrication, and related waste disposal) would have to double or triple in order for the alternative U-235 recycle schemes to become attractive. This induces some degree of confidence in the choice of staying with the reference cycle in spite of the large degree of uncertainty over recycle and its costs

  4. Integral approaches to wastewater treatment plant upgrading for odor prevention: Activated Sludge and Oxidized Ammonium Recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, José M; Kraakman, N J R; Lebrero, R; Muñoz, R

    2015-11-01

    Traditional physical/chemical end-of-the-pipe technologies for odor abatement are relatively expensive and present high environmental impacts. On the other hand, biotechnologies have recently emerged as cost-effective and environmentally friendly alternatives but are still limited by their investment costs and land requirements. A more desirable approach to odor control is the prevention of odorant formation before being released to the atmosphere, but limited information is available beyond good design and operational practices of the wastewater treatment process. The present paper reviews two widely applicable and economic alternatives for odor control, Activated Sludge Recycling (ASR) and Oxidized Ammonium Recycling (OAR), by discussing their fundamentals, key operating parameters and experience from the available pilot and field studies. Both technologies present high application potential using readily available plant by-products with a minimum plant upgrading, and low investment and operating costs, contributing to the sustainability and economic efficiency of odor control at wastewater treatment facilities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Typical IAEA operations at a fuel fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsy, S.

    1984-01-01

    The IAEA operations performed at a typical Fuel Fabrication Plant are explained. To make the analysis less general the case of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel Fabrication Plants is considered. Many of the conclusions drawn from this analysis could be extended to other types of fabrication plants. The safeguards objectives and goals at LEU Fuel Fabrication Plants are defined followed by a brief description of the fabrication process. The basic philosophy behind nuclear material stratification and the concept of Material Balance Areas (MBA's) and Key Measurement Points (KMP's) is explained. The Agency operations and verification methods used during physical inventory verifications are illustrated

  6. Postirradiation examination of Kori-1 nuclear power plant fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, S.G.; Kim, E.K.; Lee, K.S.; Min, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Full size fuels discharged from Kori-1 PWR nuclear power plant have been subjected to postirradiation examination. The fuels under investigation were irradiated for one- to four-reactor cycles. Nondestructive examination and dismantling of the fuel assemblies have been conducted in the pool of the postirradiation examination facility (PIEF) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institue. Subsequently nondestructive and destructive examinations of fuel rods have been performed in the hot cells of the PIEF. An evaluation of fuel burnup behaviors was based on the postirradiation examination data and the nominal design values. The results did not show any evidence of abnormalities in the fuel integrity. (orig.)

  7. Postirradiation examination of Kori-1 nuclear power plant fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung-Gy, Ro; Eun-Ka, Kim; Key-Soon, Lee; Duck-Kee, Min

    1994-05-01

    Full size fuels discharged from Kori-1 PWR nuclear power plant have been subjected to postirradiation examination. The fuels under investigation were irradiated for one- to four-reactor cycles. Nondestructive examination and dismantling of the fuel assemblies have been conducted in the pool of the postirradiation examination facility (PIEF) of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Subsequently nondestructive and destructive examinations of fuel rods have been performed in the hot cells of the PIEF. An evaluation of fuel burnup behaviors was based on the postirradiation examination data and the nominal design values. The results did not show any evidence of abnormalities in the fuel integrity.

  8. Viewpoint of utilities regarding fuel management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, C.; Moraw, G.; Schneeberger, M.; Szeless, A.

    1977-01-01

    The engagement of utilities in nuclear power requires them to engage in an increasing amount of fuel management activities in order to carry out all the tasks involved. Essentially, these activities involve two main areas: The procurement of all steps of the fuel cycle from the head to the back end; and in-core fuel management. A general survey of the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle is presented together with the related activities and responsibilities which have to be borne by the utilities. Today's increasing utility involvement in the nuclear fuel management is shown, as well as future fuel management trends. The fuel management activities of the utilities are analysed with respect to organizational, technical, safeguarding, and financial aspects. The active participation of the utilities in fuel management helps to achieve high availability and flexibility of the nuclear power plant during its whole life as well as safe waste isolation. This can be ensured by continuous optimization of all fuel management aspects of the power plant or, on a larger scale, of a power plant system, i.e. activities by utilities to minimize fuel-cycle effects on the environment, which include optimization of fuel behaviour, and radiation exposure to the public and personnel; and technical and economic evaluations by utilities of out- and in-core fuel management. (author)

  9. Phthalate esters contamination in soil and plants on agricultural land near an electronic waste recycling site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ting Ting; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yong Ming; Teng, Ying

    2013-08-01

    The accumulation of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in soil and plants in agricultural land near an electronic waste recycling site in east China has become a great threat to the neighboring environmental quality and human health. Soil and plant samples collected from land under different utilization, including fallow plots, vegetable plots, plots with alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) as green manure, fallow plots under long-term flooding and fallow plots under alternating wet and dry periods, together with plant samples from relative plots were analyzed for six PAE compounds nominated as prior pollutants by USEPA. In the determined samples, the concentrations of six target PAE pollutants ranged from 0.31-2.39 mg/kg in soil to 1.81-5.77 mg/kg in various plants (dry weight/DW), and their bioconcentration factors (BCFs) ranged from 5.8 to 17.9. Health risk assessments were conducted on target PAEs, known as typical environmental estrogen analogs, based on their accumulation in the edible parts of vegetables. Preliminary risk assessment to human health from soil and daily vegetable intake indicated that DEHP may present a high-exposure risk on all ages of the population in the area by soil ingestion or vegetable consumption. The potential damage that the target PAE compounds may pose to human health should be taken into account in further comprehensive risk assessments in e-waste recycling sites areas. Moreover, alfalfa removed substantial amounts of PAEs from the soil, and its use can be considered a good strategy for in situ remediation of PAEs.

  10. The pollution characteristics of odor, volatile organochlorinated compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from plastic waste recycling plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Chen, Mei-Lien; Chang, Keng-Fu; Chang, Fu-Kuei; Mao, I-Fang

    2009-02-01

    Plastic waste treatment trends toward recycling in many countries; however, the melting process in the facilities which adopt material recycling method for treating plastic waste may emit toxicants and cause sensory annoyance. The objectives of this study were to analyze the pollution characteristics of the emissions from the plastic waste recycling plants, particularly in harmful volatile organochlorinated compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), odor levels and critical odorants. Ten large recycling plants were selected for analysis of odor concentration (OC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PAHs inside and outside the plants using olfactometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detector, respectively. The olfactometric results showed that the melting processes used for treating polyethylene/polypropylene (PE/PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic waste significantly produced malodor, and the odor levels at downwind boundaries were 100-229 OC, which all exceeded Taiwan's EPA standard of 50 OC. Toluene, ethylbenzene, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, methyl methacrylate and acrolein accounted for most odors compared to numerous VOCs. Sixteen organochlorinated compounds were measured in the ambient air emitted from the PVC plastic waste recycling plant and total concentrations were 245-553 microg m(-3); most were vinyl chloride, chloroform and trichloroethylene. Concentrations of PAHs inside the PE/PP plant were 8.97-252.16 ng m(-3), in which the maximum level were 20-fold higher than the levels detected from boundaries. Most of these recycling plants simply used filter to treat the melting fumes, and this could not efficiently eliminate the gaseous compounds and malodor. Improved exhaust air pollution control were strongly recommended in these industries.

  11. Preparation for commissioning of nuclear plant with reference to British Nuclear Fuels Plc fuel handling plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamber, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The new Fuel Handling Plant at British Nuclear Fuels Sellafield is part of a Pound 550M complex which provides facilities for the receipt, storage and mechanical preparation of both Magnox and A.G.R. fuel. The plant is very large and complex with considerable use of computer based process control systems, providing for physical and nuclear safety. The preparation of such plant for active commissioning necessitates a great many physical checks and technical evaluations in support of its safety case. This paper describes arrangements for plant commissioning checks, against the regulatory framework and explains the physical preparations necessary for their timely accomplishment. (author)

  12. Preparation for commissioning of nuclear plant with reference to British Nuclear Fuels Plc fuel handling plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamber, D.

    1987-01-01

    The new Fuel Handing Plant at British Nuclear Fuels Sellafield is part of a Pound 550M complex which provides facilities for the receipt, storage and mechanical preparation of both magnox and A.G.R. fuel. The plant is very large and complex with considerable use of computer based process control systems, providing for physical and nuclear safety. The preparation of such plant for ''active'' commissioning necessitates a great many physical checks and technical evaluations in support of its safety case. This paper describes arrangements for plant commissioning checks, against the regulatory framework and explains the physical preparations necessary for their timely accomplishment. (author)

  13. TRAC analysis of an 80% pump-side, cold-leg, large-break loss-of-coolant accident for the Westinghouse AP600 advanced reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lime, J.F.; Boyack, B.E.

    1996-01-01

    An updated TRAC 80% pump-side, cold-leg, large-break (LB) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) has been calculated for the Westinghouse AP600 advanced reactor design. The updated calculation incorporates major code error corrections, model corrections, and plant design changes. The break size and location were calculated by Westinghouse to be the most severe LBLOCA for the AP600 design. The LBLOCA transient was calculated to 280 s, which is the time of in-containment refueling water-storage-tank injection. All fuel rods were quenched completely by 240 s. Peak cladding temperatures (PCTs) were well below the licensing limit of 1,478 K (2,200 F) but were very near the cladding oxidation temperature of 1,200 K (1,700 F). Transient event times and PCTs for the TRAC calculation were in reasonable agreement with those calculated by Westinghouse using their WCOBRA/TRAC code. However, there were significant differences in the detailed phenomena calculated by the two codes, particularly during the blowdown and refill periods. The reasons for these differences are still being investigated

  14. Investigation about the ecotown-enterprise for establishing recycling system of non-radioactive waste arising from power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hironaga, Michihiko; Nishiuchi, Tatsuo; Ozaki, Yukio; Yamamoto, Kimio

    2004-01-01

    About 95% of demolition wastes generated by decommissioning nuclear power plants are below the clearance level, i.e., the wastes can be dealt with as industrial wastes. On that case, rational processing, disposal, and reuse are expectable. However, even if the demolition waste is below a clearance level, it seems to be difficult to be immediately accepted in general society with the demolition wastes. Therefore, it is important to establish the technology for an effective recycle system of demolition wastes, and to reuse demolition wastes as much as possible, resulting in recognition of the value by the society. On the other hand, as for recycling of industrial waste, the recycling enterprise is promoted in the domestic self-governing body in response to the 'eco-town enterprise' which is recommended by the government. This report investigates the system and subjects of a 'eco-town enterprise' for recycling demolition wastes. (author)

  15. Study on high conversion type core of innovative water reactor for flexible fuel cycle (FLWR) for minor actinide (MA) recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Yuji; Nakano, Yoshihiro; Okubo, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    In order to ensure sustainable energy supplies in the future based on the well-established light water reactor (LWR) technologies, conceptual design studies have been performed on the innovative water reactor for flexible fuel cycle (FLWR) with the high conversion ratio core. For early introduction of FLWR without a serious technical gap from the LWR technologies, the conceptual design of the high conversion type one (HC-FLWR) was constructed to recycle reprocessed plutonium. Furthermore, an investigation of minor actinide (MA) recycling based on the HC-FLWR core concept has been performed and is presented in this paper. Because HC-FLWR is a near-term technology, it would be a good option in the future if HC-FLWR can recycle MAs. In order to recycle MAs in HC-FLWR, it has been found that the core design should be changed, because the loaded MA makes the void reactivity coefficient worse and decreases the discharge burn-up. To find a promising core design specification, the investigation on the core characteristics were performed using the results from parameter surveys with core burn-up calculations. The final core designs were established by coupled three dimensional neutronics and thermal-hydraulics core calculations. The major core specifications are as follows. The plutonium fissile (Puf) content is 13 wt%. The discharge burn-up is about 55 GWd/t. Around 2 wt% of Np or Am can be recycled. The MA conversion ratios are around unity. In particular, it has been found that loaded Np can be transmuted effectively in this core concept. Therefore, these concepts would be a good option to reduce environmental burdens.

  16. Corrosion product balances for the Ringhals PWR plants based on extensive fuel crud and water chemistry measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, K.; Wikmark, G.; Bengtsson, B.

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion product balance in a PWR plant is of great importance for the fuel performance as well as for the radiation field buildup. This balance is of special concern in connection to steam generator replacement (SGR) and power uprate projects. The Ringhals PWRs are all of Westinghouse design. Two of the plants have performed Steam Generator Replacement (SGR) to I-690 SG tubes and such a replacement is being planned in the third and last unit in 2011. Two of the units are in different phases of power uprate projects. The plants are all on 10-14-months cycles operating with medium to high fuel duty. Water chemistry is controlled by a pH300 in the range ∼7.2 to 7.4 from beginning of cycle to end of cycle (BOC-EOC) in the units with new SGs while kept at a coordinated pH of 7.2 in the one still using I-600. The maximum Li content has recently been increased to about 4.5 to 5 ppm in all units. In order to be able to improve the assessment of corrosion product balances in the plants, comprehensive fuel crud measurements were performed in 2007. Improved integrated reactor water sampling techniques have also been introduced in order to make accurate mass balances possible. The corrosion products covered in the study are the main constituents, Ni, Fe and Cr in the primary circuit Inconel and stainless steel, together with Co. The activated corrosion products, Co-58, Co-60, Cr-51, Fe-59 and Mn-54, are all mainly produced through neutron irradiation of the covered corrosion products. The main results of the corrosion product balances are presented. Observed differences between the plants, indicating significant impact of pH control and SG tube materials, are presented and discussed. The importance of accurate sampling techniques is especially addressed in this paper. (author)

  17. Progress and prospects for phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonville, L.J.; Scheffler, G.W.; Smith, M.J. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    International Fuel Cells (IFC) has developed the fuel cell power plant as a new, on-site power generation source. IFC`s commercial fuel cell product is the 200-kW PC25{trademark} power plant. To date over 100 PC25 units have been manufactured. Fleet operating time is in excess of one million hours. Individual units of the initial power plant model, the PC25 A, have operated for more than 30,000 hours. The first model {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} power plant has over 10,000 hours of operation. The manufacturing, application and operation of this power plant fleet has established a firm base for design and technology development in terms of a clear understanding of the requirements for power plant reliability and durability. This fleet provides the benchmark against which power plant improvements must be measured.

  18. Some aspects of nuclear fuel use at Ukrainian NPPs during last two years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilodid, Y.; Shevchenko, I.; Ieremenko, M.; Ovdiienko, I.

    2015-01-01

    For many years SSTC NRS actively participates in licensing of fuel reloading and in the implementation of new nuclear fuel types at the nuclear power plants in Ukraine. Results of the nuclear fuel use for last years are presented in the paper. The results are based on NPP documentation submitted for licensing to the regulating body of Ukraine and based on our estimations and independent calculations. The first part of the paper contains a brief characteristic of the fuel cycles at Ukrainian NPPs. Types of loaded fuel are described also. Experience of new fuel type implementation is presented (Westinghouse FA and TVSA-12 for WWER-1000 reactors). The next part of the paper presents a new regulatory document under development and further new fuel implementation (WWER-1000 reactors). The last part of the paper describes some issues with fuel use. (authors) Keywords: WWER, TVSA, TVSA-12, TVS-W, TVS-WR, Westinghouse, NPP

  19. Utilities' view on the fuel management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, C.; Moraw, G.; Schneeberger, M.; Szeless, A.

    1977-01-01

    Utilities engagement in nuclear power requires an increasing amount of fuel management activities by the utilities in order to meet all tasks involved. These activities comprise essentially two main areas: - activities to secure the procurement of all steps of the fuel cycle from the head to the back end; - activities related to the incore fuel managment. A general survey of the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle is presented together with the related activities and responsibilities which have to be realized by the utilities. Starting in the past, today's increasing utility involvement in the nuclear fuel management is shown, as well as future fuel management trends. The scope of utilities' fuel management activities is analyzed with respect to organizational aspects, technical aspects, safeguarding aspects, and financial aspects. Utilities taking active part in the fuel management serves to achieve high availability and flexibility of the nuclear power plant during the whole plant life as well as safe waste isolation. This can be assured by continuous optimization of all fuel management aspects of the power plant or on a larger scale of a power plant system, i.e., utility activities to minimize the effects of fuel cycle on the environment, which includes optimization of fuel behaviour, radiation exposure to public and personnel, and utility technical and economic evaluations of out- and incore fuel management. These activities of nuclear power producing utilities in the field of nuclear fuel cycle are together with a close cooperation with fuel industry as well as national and international authorities a necessary basis for the further utilization of nuclear power

  20. Evaluation of the rod ejection accident in Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors using spatial kinetics methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risher, D.H. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The consequences of a rod ejection accident are investigated in relation to the latest, high power density Westinghouse reactors. Limiting criteria are presented, based on experimental evidence, and if not exceeded these criteria will ensure that there will be no interference with core cooling capability, and radiation releases, if any, will be within the guidelines of 10CFR100. A basis is presented for the conservative selection of plant parameters to be used in the analysis, such that the analysis is applicable to a wide range of past, present, and future reactors. The calculational method employs a one-dimensional spatial kinetics computer code and a transient fuel heat transfer computer code to determine the hot spot fuel temperature versus time following a rod ejection. Using these computer codes, the most limiting hot channel factor (which does not cause the fuel damage limit criteria to be exceeded) has been determined as a function of the ejected rod worth. By this means, the limit criteria have been translated into ejected rod worths and hot channel factors which can be used effectively by the nuclear designer and safety analyst. The calculational method is shown to be conservative, compared to the results of a three-dimensional spatial kinetics analysis

  1. Nuclear fuel re-processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Yuko; Honda, Takashi; Shoji, Saburo; Kobayashi, Shiro; Furuya, Yasumasa

    1989-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel re-processing plant, high Si series stainless steels not always have sufficient corrosion resistance in a solution containing only nitric acid at medium or high concentration. Further, a method of blowing NOx gases may possibly promote the corrosion of equipment constituent materials remarkably. In view of the above, the corrosion promoting effect of nuclear fission products is suppressed without depositing corrosive metal ions as metals in the nitric acid solution. That is, a reducing atmosphere is formed by generating NOx by electrolytic reduction thereby preventing increase in the surface potential of stainless steels. Further, an anode is disposed in the nitric acid solution containing oxidative metal ions to establish an electrical conduction and separate them by way of partition membranes and a constant potential or constant current is applied while maintaining an ionic state so as not to deposit metals. Thus, equipments of re-processing facility can be protected from corrosion with no particular treatment for wastes as radioactive materials. (K.M.)

  2. The PBMR fuel plant: Proven technology in an advanced safety environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braehler, G.; Froschauer, K.; Welbers, P.; Boyes, D.

    2008-01-01

    The PBMR Fuel Plant (PFP), to be constructed at the Pelindaba site near Johannesburg will fuel the first South African Pebble Bed Modular Reactor. The qualification of the PBMR fuel shall be based on past experience with fuel which was produced in the German NUKEM/HOBEG plant and irradiated in the German AVR reactor. Accordingly, the PFP must produce the same fuel as the German plant did, and consequently, the design of the PFP has in essence to be a copy of the NUKEM/HOBEG plant. As a reminder this plant had been operated in accordance with the German regulatory rules which were defined in the years 1970/80. Since then, the requirements with regard to radiological protection, criticality safety and emission control have been significantly tightened, and of course the PFP must be designed in accordance with the most advanced international norms and standards. The implications which follow from these two potentially conflicting requirements, as defined above, are highlighted, and technical solutions are presented. Hence, the change from administrative criticality safety control to technical control, i.e. the application of safe geometry as far as possible. and the introduction of technical solutions for the remaining safe mass regime will be described. A lot of equipment in the Kernel area and in the recycling areas needed to be redesigned in safe geometry. The sensitive processes for Kernel Calcining, for the Coating and the Over-coating remain under safe mass regime, but the safety against criticality is completely independent from staff activities and based on technical measures. A new concept for safe storage of large volumes of Uranium-containing liquids has been developed. Also, the change from relatively open handling of Uranium to the application of containment enclosures wherever release of radioactivity into the room atmosphere is possible, will be addressed. This change required redesign of all process steps requiring the handling of dry Uranium oxides

  3. Westinghouse employs advanced robotics in a state-of-the-art LWR line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    To increase productivity while maintaining quality, Westinghouse's new Manufacturing Automation Process for oxide fuel features Integrated Dry Route conversion technology, a fully-integrated management information system, advanced robotics and enhanced materials handling practices. The new line is expected to begin operating in 1985. (author)

  4. Westinghouse employs advanced robotics in a state-of-the-art LWR line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-03-01

    To increase productivity while maintaining quality, Westinghouse's new Manufacturing Automation Process for oxide fuel features Integrated Dry Route conversion technology, a fully-integrated management information system, advanced robotics and enhanced materials handling practices. The new line is expected to begin operating in 1985.

  5. WEOD-S: Westinghouse expanded operating domain stability solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotander, C.; Blaisdell, J.; Anderson, D.; Kumar, V.; Stier, D.; Chu, E.

    2014-01-01

    As Extended Power up-rates (EPUs) are implemented in BWR plants, the flow window at full power decreases due to the extension of the rod line. It is thus desirable to raise load line limits to realize increased power generation at a wider flow range offering operational flexibility and fuel cycle efficiency. However, when load lines are raised, the power/flow operating map is changed in a direction that can cause core power instability at its lower left corner (high power/low flow) if a flow reduction transient (i.e. pump trip) occurs. Unstable operation of the reactor core can result in diverging neutron flux (and power) oscillations, and through the thermal hydraulic/neutronic feedback challenge the Safety Limit Minimum Critical Power Ratio (SLMCPR). In many BWRs the SLMCPR in a power oscillation event is already protected by a detect and suppress system. The methodology to determine the set point of this system, the DIVOM methodology (Delta CPR over Initial MCPR versus Oscillation Magnitude), is defined and applicable up to, but not beyond, the thermal hydraulic stability limit. The DIVOM methodology is used to determine the channel power oscillation magnitude that will challenge the SLMCPR. It is defined as the relationship between ΔCPR/ICPR and the Hot Channel Oscillation Magnitude (HCOM). The DIVOM calculations are typically performed at the end state following a design basis two pump trip from rated power and minimum flow. When approaching the thermal hydraulic (T/H) instability limit, the DIVOM curve can become chaotic and the DIVOM approach breaks down. At T/H-instability, small power fluctuations give rise to large flow oscillations and the non-linear dynamic properties emerge. The newly developed Westinghouse Expanded Operating Domain Stability (WEOD-S) solution proactively prevents entry into the regions of the power/flow map that are vulnerable to thermal hydraulic instability. This is achieved automatically, without any dependence on operator action

  6. Characterization of past and present solid waste streams from the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pottmeyer, J.A.; Weyns, M.I.; Lorenzo, D.S.; Vejvoda, E.J.; Duncan, D.R.

    1993-04-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic wastes, now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site, are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Over 7% of the transuranic waste to be retrieved for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant has been generated at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant. The purpose of this report is to characterize the radioactive solid wastes generated by PUREX using process knowledge, existing records, and oral history interviews. The PUREX Plant is currently operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy and is now in standby status while being prepared for permanent shutdown. The PUREX Plant is a collection of facilities that has been used primarily to separate plutonium for nuclear weapons from spent fuel that had been irradiated in the Hanford Site's defense reactors. Originally designed to reprocess aluminum-clad uranium fuel, the plant was modified to reprocess zirconium alloy clad fuel elements from the Hanford Site's N Reactor. PUREX has provided plutonium for research reactor development, safety programs, and defense. In addition, the PUREX was used to recover slightly enriched uranium for recycling into fuel for use in reactors that generate electricity and plutonium. Section 2.0 provides further details of the PUREX's physical plant and its operations. The PUREX Plant functions that generate solid waste are as follows: processing operations, laboratory analyses and supporting activities. The types and estimated quantities of waste resulting from these activities are discussed in detail

  7. Spent fuel storage for ISER plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Takasuke; Kimura, Yuzi

    1987-01-01

    ISER is an intrinsically safe reactor basing its safety only on physical laws, and uses a steel reactor vessel in order to be economical. For such a new type reactor, it is essentially important to be accepted by the society by showing that the reactor is more profitable than conventional reactors to the public in both technical and economic viewpoint. It is also important that the reactor raises no serious problem in the total fuel cycle. Reprocessing seems one of the major worldwide fuel cycle issues. Spent fuel storage is also one of the key technologies for fuel cycle back end. Various systems for ISER spent fuel storages are examined in the present report. Spent fuel specifications of ISER are similar to those of LWR and therefore, most of LWR spent fuel technologies are basically applicable to ISER spent fuel. Design requirements and examples of storage facilities are also discussed. Dry storage seems to be preferable for the relatively long cooling time spent fuel like ISER's one from economical viewpoint. Vault storage will possibly be the most advantageous for large storage capacity. Another point for discussion is the location and international collaboration for spent fuel storages: ISER expected to be a worldwide energy source and therefore, international spent fuel management seems to be fairly attractive way for an energy recipient country. (Nogami, K.)

  8. Considerations for handling failed fuel at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.T.; Cholister, R.J.

    1982-05-01

    The impact of failed fuel receipt on reprocessing operations is qualitatively described. It appears that extended storage of fuel, particularly with advanced storage techniques, will increase the quantity of failed fuel, the nature and possibly the configuration of the fuel. The receipt of failed fuel at the BNFP increases handling problems, waste volumes, and operator exposure. If it is necessary to impose special operating precautions to minimize this impact, a loss in plant throughput will result. Hence, ideally, the reprocessing plant operator would take every reasonable precaution so that no failed fuel is received. An alternative policy would be to require that failed fuel be placed in a sealed canister. In the latter case the canister must be compatible with the shipping cask and suitable for in-plant storage. A required inspection of bare fuel would be made at the reactor prior to shipping off-site. This would verify fuel integrity. These requirements are obviously idealistic. Due to the current uncertain status of reprocessing and the need to keep reactors operating, business or governmental policy may be enacted resulting in the receipt of a negotiated quantity of non-standard fuel (including failed fuel). In this situation, BNFP fuel receiving policy based soley on fuel cladding integrity would be difficult to enforce. There are certain areas where process incompatibility does exist and where a compromise would be virtually impossible, e.g., canned fuel for which material or dimensional conflicts exist. This fuel would have to be refused or the fuel would require recanning prior to shipment. In other cases, knowledge of the type and nature of the failure may be acceptable to the operator. A physical inspection of the fuel either before shipment or after the cask unloading operation would be warranted. In this manner, concerns with pool contamination can be identified and the assembly canned if deemed necessary

  9. Fuel performance experience at TVO nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrakka, E.T.

    1985-01-01

    TVO nuclear power plant consists of two BWR units of ASEA-ATOM design. The fuel performance experience extending through six cycles at TVO I and four cycles at TVO II is reported. The experience obtained so far is mainly based on ASEA-ATOM 8 x 8 fuel and has been satisfactory. Until autumn 1984 one leaking fuel assembly had been identified at TVO I and none at TVO II. Most of the problems encountered have been related to leaf spring screws and channel screws. The experience indicates that satisfactory fuel performance can be achieved when utilizing strict operational rules and proper control of fuel design and manufacture. (author)

  10. Westinghouse loading pattern search methodology for complex core designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.A.; Alsop, B.H.; Johansen, B.J.; Morita, T.

    1991-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor core designs have become more complex and must meet a plethora of design constraints. Trends have been toward longer cycles with increased discharge burnup, increased burnable absorber (BA) number, mixed BA types, reduced radial leakage, axially blanketed fuel, and multiple-batch feed fuel regions. Obtaining economical reload core loading patterns (LPs) that meet design criteria is a difficult task to do manually. Automated LP search tools are needed. An LP search tool cannot possibly perform an exhaustive search because of the sheer size of the combinatorial problem. On the other hand, evolving complexity of the design features and constraints often invalidates expert rules based on past design experiences. Westinghouse has developed a sophisticated loading pattern search methodology. This methodology is embodied in the LPOP code, which Westinghouse nuclear designers use extensively. The LPOP code generates a variety of LPs meeting design constraints and performs a two-cycle economic evaluation of the generated LPs. The designer selects the most appropriate patterns for fine tuning and evaluation by the design codes. This paper describes the major features of the LPOP methodology that are relevant to fulfilling the aforementioned requirements. Data and examples are also provided to demonstrate the performance of LPOP in meeting the complex design needs

  11. Capacity of burning and transmutation reactor and grouping in partitioning of HLW in self-consistent fuel recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamoto, A.; Mulyanto

    1993-01-01

    The concept of capacity of B/T reactor and grouping for partitioning of HLW has been developed in order to perform self-consistent fuel recycle. The concept of grouping of radionuclides is proposed herein, such as Group MA1 (MA below Cm), Group MA2 (Cm and higher MA), Group A ( 99 Te, 129 I, and 135 Cs), Group B ( 137 Cs and 90 Sr) and Group R (the partitioned remain of HLW). In this study P-T treatment were optimized for the in-core and out-core system, respectively. (author). 7 refs., 10 figs

  12. Reprocessing-recycling, or the application of the selective sorting and recycling policy to nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    In France, the reprocessing of spent fuels is the solution that has been retained for the management of the end-of-cycle. The sorting of the different components of spent fuels allows the recycling of uranium and plutonium for the further production of enriched uranium and mixed oxide fuels. This paper presents Cogema's advances in this domain (facilities and plants), the transfer of Cogema's reprocessing and recycling technologies in other countries (Japan, USA, Russia), the economical and environmental advantages of the recycling of spent fuels, the economical resources provided by this activity, and the cooperation with foreign countries for the reprocessing of their spent fuels at Cogema-La Hague. (J.S.)

  13. Westinghouse Hanford Company special nuclear material vault storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisch, R.R.

    1996-01-01

    Category 1 and 2 Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) require storage in vault or vault type rooms as specified in DOE orders 5633.3A and 6430.1A. All category 1 and 2 SNM in dry storage on the Hanford site that is managed by Westinghouse Hanford Co (WHC) is located in the 200 West Area at Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facilities. This document provides current and projected SNM vault inventories in terms of storage space filled and forecasts available space for possible future storage needs

  14. Requirements management at Westinghouse Electric Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Field studies and surveys made in various industry branches support the Westinghouse opinion that qualitative systems engineering and requirements management have a high value in the development of complex systems and products. Two key issues causing overspending and schedule delays in projects are underestimation of complexity and misunderstandings between the different sub-project teams. These issues often arise when a project jumps too early into detail design. Good requirements management practice before detail design helps the project teams avoid such issues. Westinghouse therefore puts great effort into requirements management. The requirements management methodology at Westinghouse rests primarily on four key cornerstones: 1 - Iterative team work when developing requirements specifications, 2 - Id number tags on requirements, 3 - Robust change routine, and 4 - Requirements Traceability Matrix. (authors)

  15. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-08-29

    The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble

  16. Evaluation of gasification and gas cleanup processes for use in molten carbonate fuel cell power plants. Final report. [Contains lists and evaluations of coal gasification and fuel gas desulfurization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonski, G.; Hamm, J.R.; Alvin, M.A.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Patel, P.

    1982-01-01

    This report satisfies the requirements for DOE Contract AC21-81MC16220 to: List coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems suitable for supplying fuel to molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) in industrial and utility power plants; extensively characterize those coal gas cleanup systems rejected by DOE's MCFC contractors for their power plant systems by virtue of the resources required for those systems to be commercially developed; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC tolerance for particulates on the anode (fuel gas) side of the MCFC; develop an analytical model to predict MCFC anode side tolerance for chemical species, including sulfides, halogens, and trace heavy metals; choose from the candidate gasifier/cleanup systems those most suitable for MCFC-based power plants; choose a reference wet cleanup system; provide parametric analyses of the coal gasifiers and gas cleanup systems when integrated into a power plant incorporating MCFC units with suitable gas expansion turbines, steam turbines, heat exchangers, and heat recovery steam generators, using the Westinghouse proprietary AHEAD computer model; provide efficiency, investment, cost of electricity, operability, and environmental effect rankings of the system; and provide a final report incorporating the results of all of the above tasks. Section 7 of this final report provides general conclusions.

  17. Field Demonstration of Fuel Crud Filtration System at Ulchin Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Duk-Won; Lee, Doo-Ho; Park, Jong-Youl; Choi, In-Kyu

    2007-01-01

    Crud deposited onto the fuel assemblies in nuclear power plants was not a serious problem until an upper core flux depression named Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) was found at Callaway, USA in 1989. Though the mechanism of an AOA is not completely understood, crud is believed to be a key component of initiating AOA. After the sufficient amount of corrosion products in the reactor cooling system are deposited on the fuel clad by a sub-cooled nucleate boiling, boron is adsorbed in the crud. Thus a measurable reduction in the neutron flux occurs which causes an AOA problem. A filtration system has been developed to remove the fuel crud from irradiated fuel assemblies for mitigating the axial offset anomaly under a technical cooperation agreement with DEI (Dominion Engineering Inc.). This filtration system with a fuel cleaning fixture was successfully demonstrated at Ulchin plant unit 2. Within several minutes, detachable crud deposits were effectively removed from the clad surfaces of the fuel assembly. Also, to characterize the crud particles for each fuel assembly, a small crud sampling device and radiation monitor devices were connected to the filtration system during the cleaning operation. In this study, we completed a functional test and demonstration of an ultrasonic fuel cleaning system by using four spent fuel assemblies. It took only 5 minutes to remove the fuel crud from each fuel assembly. In addition, collective dose rates indicated an average of 8 R/Hr per assembly

  18. Toshiba-Westinghouse, the new electronuclear giant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guezel, J.Ch.

    2006-01-01

    Toshiba, so far a minor actor of the world nuclear industry, won in summer 2005 in front of General Electric and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, the takeover bid launched by the public British organization BNFL which controls Westinghouse. In case of success of this operation, Toshiba will own a quarter of the world nuclear capacities and will become the first competitor of Areva. The main objective of Toshiba is to win market shares abroad thanks to the prospects offered by Westinghouse's technologies in particular in China which is one of the most targeted market today. Short paper. (J.S.)

  19. Wind power plants the fuel savers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbar, M.

    2006-01-01

    Wind is a converted from of solar energy. The Sun's radiation heats different parts of the earth at variable rates as the earth surfaces absorb or reflect at different rates. This in turn causes portions of the atmosphere to warm at varying levels. The hot air rises reducing atmospheric pressure at the earth's surface beneath, the cooler air rushes to replace it and in the process creates a momentum called wind. Air possesses mass and when it sets into motion, it contains the energy of that motion, called the Kinetic Energy. A part of the Kinetic Energy of the wind can be converted into other forms of energy i.e. mechanical force or electric power that can be used to perform work. The cost of electric energy from the wind system has dropped from the initial cost of 30 to 40 Cents per kWh to about 5 to 7 Cents/k Wh during the past 20 years. The costs are continually declining as the technology is advanced, the unit size is increased and larger plants are built. Wind power is now a viable, robust and fast growing industry. The cost of wind energy is expected to drop to 2 to 3 Cents / kWh during the next 5 to 10 years. Due to sky-rocketing prices of the fossil fuels, the competitive position of power generation technologies is rapidly changing. Wind energy is likely to emerge as the cheapest source of electric power generation in the global market in the near future. The current assessment of the global wind resources indicate that the wind energy potential is more than double the world's electricity needs. (author)

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of SOFC (solid oxide fuel cell)–Stirling hybrid plants using alternative fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    A novel hybrid power system (∼10 kW) for an average family home is proposed. The system investigated contains a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) on top of a Stirling engine. The off-gases produced in the SOFC cycle are fed to a bottoming Stirling engine, at which additional power is generated. Simulations of the proposed system were conducted using different fuels, which should facilitate the use of a variety of fuels depending on availability. Here, the results for natural gas (NG), ammonia, di-methyl ether (DME), methanol and ethanol are presented and analyzed. The system behavior is further investigated by comparing the effects of key factors, such as the utilization factor and the operating conditions under which these fuels are used. Moreover, the effect of using a methanator on the plant efficiency is also studied. The combined system improves the overall electrical efficiency relative to that of a stand-alone Stirling engine or SOFC plant. For the combined SOFC and Stirling configuration, the overall power production was increased by approximately 10% compared to that of a stand-alone SOFC plant. System efficiencies of approximately 60% are achieved, which is remarkable for such small plant sizes. Additionally, heat is also produced to heat the family home when necessary. - Highlights: • Integrating a solid oxide fuel with a Stirling engine • Design of multi-fuel hybrid plantsPlants running on alternative fuels; natural gas, methanol, ethanol, DME and ammonia • Thermodynamic analysis of hybrid SOFC–Stirling engine plants

  1. Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant applicability study. Volume III. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    Volume III suppliees supporting information to assist Congress in making a decision on the optimum utilization of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant. Included are applicable fuel cycle policies; properties of reference fuels; description and evaluation of alternative operational (flue cycle) modes; description and evaluation of safeguards systems and techniques; description and evaluation of spiking technology; waste and waste solidification evaluation; and Department of Energy programs relating to nonproliferation

  2. Description of a reference mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant (MOFFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    In order to evaluate the environment impact, due to the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Plants, work has been initiated to describe the general design and operating conditions of a reference Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Plant (MOFFP) for the 1990 time frame. The various reference data and basic assumptions for the reference MOFFP plant have been defined after discussion with experts. The data reported in this document are only made available to allow an evaluation of the environmental impact due to a reference MOFFP plant. These data have therefore not to be used as recommandation, standards, regulatory guides or requirements

  3. Fabrication of ORNL Fuel Irradiated in the Peach Bottom Reactor and Postirradiation Examination of Recycle Test Elements 7 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Jr. E.L.

    2001-01-01

    Seven full-sized Peach Bottom Reactor fuel elements were fabricated in a cooperative effort by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Gulf General Atomic (GGA) as part of the National HTGR Fuel Recycle Development Program. These elements contain bonded fuel rods and loose beds of particles made from several combinations of fertile and fissile particles of interest for present and future use in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The portion of the fuel prepared for these elements by ORNL is described in detail in this report, and it is in conjunction with the GGA report (GA-10109) a complete fabrication description of the test. In addition, this report describes the results obtained to date from postirradiation examination of the first two elements removed from the Peach Bottom Reactor, RTE-7 and -4. The fuel examined had relatively low exposure, up to about 1.5 x 10 21 neutrons/cm* fast (>0.18 MeV) fluence, compared with the peak anticipated HTGR fluence of 8.0 x 10 21 , but it has performed well at this exposure. Dimensional data indicate greater irradiation shrinkage than expected from accelerated test data to higher exposures. This suggests that either the method of extrapolation of the higher exposure data back to low exposure is faulty, or the behavior of the coated particles in the neutron spectrum characteristic of the accelerated tests does not adequately represent the behavior in an HTGR spectrum

  4. Best estimate probabilistic safety assessment results for the Westinghouse Advanced Loop Tester (WALT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guoqiang; Xu, Yiban; Oelrich, Robert L. Jr.; Byers, William A.; Young, Michael Y.; Karoutas, Zeses E.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear industry uses the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) technique to improve safety decision making and operation. The methodology evaluates the system reliability, which is defined as the probability of system success, and the postulated accident/problematic scenarios of systems for the nuclear power plants or other facilities. The best estimate probabilistic safety assessment (BE-PSA) method of evaluating system reliability and postulated problematic scenarios will produce more detailed results of interest, such as best estimated reliability analysis and detailed thermal hydraulic calculations using a sub-channel or Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code. The methodology is typically applied to reactors, but can also be applied to any system such as a test facility. In this paper, a BE-PSA method is introduced and used for evaluating the Westinghouse Advanced Loop Tester (WALT). The WALT test loop at the George Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (STC), which was completed in October 2005, is designed to be utilized to model the top grid span of a hot rod in a fuel assembly under the Pressurizer Water Reactor (PWR) normal operating conditions. In order to safely and successfully operate the WALT test loop and correctly use the WALT experimental data, it is beneficial to perform a probabilistic safety assessment and analyze the thermal hydraulic results for the WALT loop in detail. Since October 2005, a number of test runs have been performed on the WALT test facility designed and fabricated by Westinghouse Electric Company LLC. This paper briefly describes the BE-PSA method and performs BE-PSA for the WALT loop. Event trees linked with fault trees embedding thermal hydraulic analysis models, such as sub-channel and/or CFD models, were utilized in the analyses. Consequently, some selected useful experimental data and analysis results are presented for future guidance on WALT and/or other similar test facilities. For example, finding and

  5. Development of remote fuel pushing system in Reprocessing Plant, Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Munish; Coelho, G.; Kodilkar, S.S.; Mishra, A.K.; Bajpai, D.D.; Nair, M.K.T.

    1990-01-01

    Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant (PREFRE), Tarapur has been processing spent fuel arising from Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors for quite some time. The process adopted in the plant is purex process with chopleach head end treatment. The head end treatment involves loading of ten spent fuel bundles in the charging cask at a time in the fuel bay and aligning the cask with the transfer port and subsequently pushing all the ten bundles together into the fuel magazine. At present the fuel is pushed into the magazine manually. Since the ten bundles weigh approximately 200 Kg. and involves pushing of 9.4 meters length, the operation is carried out using stainless steel screwed pipes, in steps of five lengths. The entire operation requires a large number of trained skilled workers and is found to be tedious. To solve this problem a hydraulic cum pneumatic fuel pushing system has been designed, fabricated, tested and is in the process of installation in the fuel handling area. This paper describes various requirements, constraints and dimensional details arising in the incorporation of such a system to be back fitted in an existing plant, though many of these constraints can be avoided in future plants. Further, complete sequence of operations, technical specifications regarding the telescopic hydraulic power pack and associated controls incorporated in the system are highlighted. (author). 2 figs

  6. Hydrogen plant module (HPM) and vehicle fueled by same.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    The goal / objective of the project was to design and fabricate hydrogen plant module (HPM) that is capable of producing : hydrogen fuel onboard a vehicle and that obviates one or more of the present issues related to compressed hydrogen fuel : stora...

  7. LEU fuel element produced by the Egyptian fuel manufacturing pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, W.I.

    2000-01-01

    The Egyptian Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant, FMPP, is a Material Testing Reactor type (MTR) fuel element facility, for producing the specified fuel elements required for the Egyptian Second Research Reactor, ETRR-2. The plant uses uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 , 19.75% U 235 by wt) as a raw material which is processed through a series of the manufacturing, inspection and test plan to produce the final specified fuel elements. Radiological safety aspects during design, construction, operation, and all reasonably accepted steps should be taken to prevent or reduce the chance of accidents occurrence. (author)

  8. Plant growth and mineral recycle trade-offs in different scenarios for a CELSS. [Closed Ecological Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballou, E. V.; Wydeven, T.; Spitze, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    Data for hydroponic plant growth in a manned system test is combined with nutritional recommendations to suport trade-off calculations for closed and partially closed life support system scenarios. Published data are used as guidelines for the masses of mineral nutrients needed for higher plant production. The results of calculations based on various scenarios are presented for various combinations of plant growth chamber utilization and fraction of mineral recycle. Estimates are made of the masses of material needed to meet human nutritional requirements in the various scenarios. It appears that food production from a plant growth chamber with mineral recycle is favorable to reduction of the total launch weight in missions exceeding 3 years.

  9. Final generic environmental statement on the use of recycle plutonium in mixed oxide fuel in light water cooled reactors. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    This environmental statement assesses the impacts of the implementation of plutonium recycle in the LWR industry. It is based on assumptions that are intended to reflect conservatively an acceptable level of the application of current technology. It is not intended to be a representation of the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) philosophy. This generic environmental statement discusses the anticipated effects of recycling plutonium in light water nuclear power reactors. It is based on about 30 years of experience with the element in the context of a projected light water nuclear power industry that is already substantial. A background perspective on plutonium, its safety, and its recycling as a reactor fuel is presented

  10. Automated system for loading nuclear fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, J.L.

    1983-10-01

    A completely automatic and remotely controlled fuel pin fabrication system is being designed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The Pin Operations System will produce fuel pins for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). The system will assemble fuel pin components into cladding tubes in a controlled environment. After fuel loading, the pins are filled with helium, the tag gas capsules are inserted, and the top end cap welded. Following welding, the pins are surveyed to assure they are free of contamination and then the pins are helium leak tested

  11. Recycling used palm oil and used engine oil to produce white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-abbas, Mustafa Hamid; Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Sanagi, Mohd. Marsin

    2012-09-01

    Recycling waste materials produced in our daily life is considered as an additional resource of a wide range of materials and it conserves the environment. Used engine oil and used cooking oil are two oils disposed off in large quantities as a by-product of our daily life. This study aims at providing white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel from the disposed oils. Toxic organic materials suspected to be present in the used engine oil were separated using vacuum column chromatography to reduce the time needed for the separation process and to avoid solvent usage. The compounds separated were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and found to contain toxic aromatic carboxylic acids. Used cooking oils (thermally cracked from usage) were collected and separated by vacuum column chromatography. White bio oil produced was examined by GC-MS. The white bio oil consists of non-toxic hydrocarbons and is found to be a good alternative to white mineral oil which is significantly used in food industry, cosmetics and drugs with the risk of containing polycyclic aromatic compounds which are carcinogenic and toxic. Different portions of the used cooking oil and used engine were mixed to produce several blends for use as heavy oil fuels. White bio oil was used to produce bio petroleum diesel by blending it with petroleum diesel and kerosene. The bio petroleum diesel produced passed the PETRONAS flash point and viscosity specification test. The heat of combustion of the two blends of heavy fuel produced was measured and one of the blends was burned to demonstrate its burning ability. Higher heat of combustion was obtained from the blend containing greater proportion of used engine oil. This study has provided a successful recycled alternative for white bio oil, bio petroleum fuel and diesel which can be an energy source.

  12. Fuel reprocessing plant: No qualitative differences as compared to other sensitive process plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweinoch, J.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear power plants like the fuel reprocessing plant belong to the highly sensitive installations in respect of safety, but involve the same risks qualitatively as liquid-gas plants or chemical plants. Therefore no consequences for basic rights are discernible. The police can take adequate preventive measures. The regulations governing police action provide proper and sufficient warrants. (DG) [de

  13. Fuel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The technical and economic viability of the fast breeder reactor as an electricity generating system depends not only upon the reactor performance but also on a capability to recycle plutonium efficiently, reliably and economically through the reactor and fuel cycle facilities. Thus the fuel cycle is an integral and essential part of the system. Fuel cycle research and development has focused on demonstrating that the challenging technical requirements of processing plutonium fuel could be met and that the sometimes conflicting requirements of the fuel developer, fuel fabricator and fuel reprocessor could be reconciled. Pilot plant operation and development and design studies have established both the technical and economic feasibility of the fuel cycle but scope for further improvement exists through process intensification and flowsheet optimization. These objectives and the increasing processing demands made by the continuing improvement to fuel design and irradiation performance provide an incentive for continuing fuel cycle development work. (author)

  14. Uranium savings on a once through PWR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupo, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    A number of alternatives which have the greatest potential for near term savings with minimum plant and fuel modifications have been examined at Westinghouse as part of continued internal assessment and part of NASAP study conducted for DOE pertaining to uranium utilization in a once through PWR fuel cycle. The alternatives which could be retrofitted to existing reactors were examined in more detail in the evaluation since they would have the greater near term impact on U savings

  15. Remotex and servomanipulator needs in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Work on the conceptual design of a pilot-scale plant for reprocessing breeder reactor fuels is being performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The plant design will meet all current federal regulations for repocessing plants and will serve as prototype for future production plants. A unique future of the concept is the incorporation of totally remote operation and maintenance of the process equipment within a large barn-like hot cell. This approach, caled Remotex, utilizes servomanipulators coupled with television viewing to extend man's capabilities into the hostile cell environment. The Remotex concept provides significant improvements for fuel reprocessing plants and other nuclear facilities in the areas of safeguarding nuclear materials, reducing radiation exposure, improving plant availability, recovering from unplanned events, and plant decommissioning

  16. An unusual case of organophosphate intoxication of a worker in a plastic bottle recycling plant: an important reminder.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, C L; Chuang, H Y; Chang, C Y; Liu, S T; Wu, M T; Ho, C K

    2000-01-01

    A young man was sent to our emergency unit because he had suffered from vomiting and cold sweating for 2 days. At the time he was admitted, he had no acute abdominal pains or gastrointestinal symptoms, and a physical examination revealed nothing but a faster heart rate and moist, flushing skin. The patient had worked for 6 years at a plastic bottle-recycling factory, but none of his co-workers had the same symptoms. Nevertheless, because the plant also recycled pesticide bottles, we suspected...

  17. Express diagnostics of WWER fuel rods at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, S.; Amosov, S.; Sagalov, S.; Kostyuchenko, A.

    2009-01-01

    Higher safety and economical efficiency of nuclear power plants (NPP) call for a continuous design modification and technological development of fuel assemblies and fuel rods as well as optimization of their operating conditions. In doing so the efficiency of new fuel introduction depends on the completeness of irradiated fuel data in many respects as well as on the rapidity and cost of such data obtaining. Standard examination techniques of fuel assemblies (FA) and fuel rods (FR) intended for their use in hot cell conditions do not satisfy these requirements in full extent because fuel assemblies require preliminary cooling at NPP to provide their shipment to the research center. Expenditures for FA transportation, capacity of hot cells and expenditures for the examined fuel handling do not make it possible to obtain important information about the condition of fuel assemblies and fuel rods after their operation. In order to increase the comprehensiveness of primary data on fuel assemblies and fuel rods immediately after their removal from the reactor, inspection test facilities are widely used for these purposes. The inspection test facilities make it possible to perform nondestructive inspection of fuel in the NPP cooling pools. Moreover these test facilities can be used to repair failed fuel assemblies. The ultrasonic testing of failed fuel rods inside the fuel assembly was developed for stands of inspection and repair of TVSA WWER-1000 for the Kalinin NPP and Temelin NPP. This method was tested for eight leaking fuel assemblies WWER-440 and WWER-1000 with a burnup of ∼14 up to 38 MW·day/kgU. The ultrasonic testing proved its high degree of reliability and efficiency. The defectoscopy by means of the pulsed eddy-current method was adapted for the stand of inspection and repair of TVSA WWER-1000 for the Kalinin NPP. This method has been used at RIAR as an express testing method of FR claddings during the post-irradiation examinations of fuel assemblies WWER

  18. Fuel performance of licensed nuclear power plants through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobe, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    General aspects of fuel element design and specific design data for typical Pressurized and Boiling Water Reactors are presented. Based on a literature search, failure modes and specific failures incurred through December 31, 1974 are described, together with a discussion of those problems which have had a significant impact upon plant operation. The relationship between fuel element failures and the resultant coolant activity/radioactive gaseous effluents upon radiation exposure, plant availability and capacity factors, economic impact, and waste management, are discussed. An assessment was made regarding the generation, availability, and use of fuel performance data

  19. Licensing and advanced fuel designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, S.L.; Novendstern, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    For the past 15 years, Westinghouse has been actively involved in the development and licensing of fuel designs that contain major advanced features. These designs include the optimized fuel assembly, The VANTAGE 5 fuel assembly, the VANTAGE 5H, and most recently the VANTAGE+ fuel assembly. Each of these designs was supported by extensive experimental data, safety evaluations, and design efforts and required intensive interaction with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) during the review and approval process. This paper presents a description of the licensing approach and how it was utilized by the utilities to facilitate the licensing applications of the advanced fuel designs for their plants. The licensing approach described in this paper has been successfully applied to four major advanced fuel design changes ∼40 plant-specific applications, and >350 cycle-specific reloads in the past 15 years

  20. Quality assurance plan, Westinghouse Water Reactor Divisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-01

    The Quality Assurance Program used by Westinghouse Nuclear Energy Systems Water Reactor Divisions is described. The purpose of the program is to assure that the design, materials, and workmanship on Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) equipment meet applicable safety requirements, fulfill the requirements of the contracts with the applicants, and satisfy the applicable codes, standards, and regulatory requirements.

  1. Recyclable cross-linked anion exchange membrane for alkaline fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jianqiu; Liu, Yazhi; Ge, Qianqian; Yang, Zhengjin; Wu, Liang; Xu, Tongwen

    2018-01-01

    Cross-linking can effectively solve the conductivity-swelling dilemma in anion exchange membranes (AEMs) but will generate solid wastes. To address this, we developed an AEM cross-linked via disulfide bonds, bearing quaternary ammonium groups, which can be easily recycled. The membrane (RC-QPPO) with IEC of 1.78 mmol g-1, when cross-linked, showed enhanced mechanical properties and good hydroxide conductivity (24.6 mS cm-1 at 30 °C). Even at higher IEC value (2.13 mmol g-1), it still has low water uptake, low swelling ratio and delivers a peak power density of 150 mW cm-2 at 65 °C. Exploiting the formation of disulfide bonds from -SH groups, the membrane can be readily cross-linked in alkaline condition and recycled by reversibly breaking disulfide bonds with dithiothreitol (DTT). The recycled membrane solution can be directly utilized to cast a brand-new AEM. By washing away the residual DTT with water and exposure to air, it can be cross-linked again and this process is repeatable. During the recycling and cross-linking processes, the membrane showed a slight IEC decrease of 5% due to functional group degradation. The strategy presented here is promising in enhancing AEM properties and reducing the impact of artificial polymers on the environment.

  2. Modeling of a thermally integrated 10 kWe planar solid oxide fuel cell system with anode offgas recycling and internal reforming by discretization in flow direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Stefanie; Segarra, Ana Gallet; Horstmann, Peter; Carré, Maxime; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Lapicque, François; Friedrich, K. Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Combined heat and power production (CHP) based on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is a very promising technology to achieve high electrical efficiency to cover power demand by decentralized production. This paper presents a dynamic quasi 2D model of an SOFC system which consists of stack and balance of plant and includes thermal coupling between the single components. The model is implemented in Modelica® and validated with experimental data for the stack UI-characteristic and the thermal behavior. The good agreement between experimental and simulation results demonstrates the validity of the model. Different operating conditions and system configurations are tested, increasing the net electrical efficiency to 57% by implementing an anode offgas recycle rate of 65%. A sensitivity analysis of characteristic values of the system like fuel utilization, oxygen-to-carbon ratio and electrical efficiency for different natural gas compositions is carried out. The result shows that a control strategy adapted to variable natural gas composition and its energy content should be developed in order to optimize the operation of the system.

  3. Present status of fuel reprocessing plant in PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kenji

    1981-01-01

    In the fuel reprocessing plant of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, its hot test has now been completed. For starting its full-scale operation duly, the data are being collected on the operation performance and safety. The construction was started in June, 1971, and completed in October, 1974. In July, 1977, spent fuel was accepted in the plant, and the hot test was started. In September, the same year, the first fuel shearing was made. So far, a total of about 31 t U from both BWR and PWR plants has been processed, thus the hot test was entirely completed. The following matters are described: hot test and its results, research on Pu and U mixed extraction, utilization of product plutonium, development of safeguard technology, and repair work on the acid recovery evaporation tank. (J.P.N.)

  4. General criteria for the project of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Recommendations are presented establishing the general criteria for the project of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants to be licensed according to the legislation in effect. They apply to all the plant's systems, components and structures which are important to operation safety and to the public's health and safety. (F.E.) [pt

  5. Standard technical specifications for Westinghouse pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.C.

    1979-07-01

    This Standard Technical Specification (STS) has been structured for the broadest possible use on Westinghouse plants currently being reviewed for an Operating License. Accordingly, the document contains specifications applicable to plants with (1) either 3 or 4 loops and (2) with and without loop stop valves. In addition, four separate and discrete containment specification sections are provided for each of the following containment types: Atmospheric, Ice Condenser, Sub-Atmospheric, and Dual. Optional specifications are provided for those features and systems which may be included in individual plant designs but are not generic in their scope of application. Alternate specifications are provided in a limited number of cases to cover situations where alternate specification requirements are necessary on a generic basis because of design differences. This revision of the STS does not typically include requirements which may be added or revised as a result of the NRC staff's further review of the Three Mile Island incident

  6. Fuel elements for LWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roepenack, H.

    1977-01-01

    About five times more expensive than the fabrication of a fuel element is the enriched uranium contained therein; soon the monthly interest charges for the uranium value of a fuel element reload will account for five percent of the fabrication costs, and much more expensive than all this together can it be if reactor operation has to be interrupted because of damaged elements. Thus, quality assurance comes first. (orig.) [de

  7. Westinghouse-DOE integration: Meeting the challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, S.V.

    1992-01-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation (WEC) is in a unique position to affect national environmental management policy approaching the 21st Century. Westinghouse companies are management and operating contractors (MOC,s) at several environmentally pivotal government-owned, contractor operated (GOCO) facilities within the Department of Energy's (DOE's) nuclear defense complex. One way the WEC brings its companies together is by activating teams to solve specific DOE site problems. For example, one challenging issue at DOE facilities involves the environmentally responsible, final disposal of transuranic and high-level nuclear wastes (TRUs and HLWS). To address these disposal issues, the DOE supports two Westinghouse-based task forces: The TRU Waste Acceptance Criteria Certification Committee (WACCC) and the HLW Vitrification Committee. The WACCC is developing methods to characterize an estimated 176,287 cubic meters of retrievably stored TRUs generated at DOE production sites. Once characterized, TRUs could be safely deposited in the WIPP repository. The Westinghouse HLW Vitrification Committee is dedicated to assess appropriate methods to process an estimated 380,702 cubic meters of HLWs currently stored in underground storage tanks (USTs). As planned, this processing will involve segregating, and appropriately treating, low level waste (LLW) and HLW tank constituents for eventual disposal. The first unit designed to process these nuclear wastes is the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Initiated in 1973, the DWPF project is scheduled to begin operations in 1991 or 1992. Westinghouse companies are also working together to achieve appropriate environmental site restoration at DOE sites via the GOCO Environmental Restoration Committee

  8. Westinghouse AP 1000 program status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doehnert, B.

    2002-01-01

    The project 1000 is presented and features are discussed in the paper. Design maturity is characterized by 1300 man-year / $400 million design and testing effort, more than 12 000 design documents completed; 3D computer model developed. It includes structures, equipment, small / large pipe, cable trays, ducts etc. Licensing Maturity is determined by a very thorough and complete NRC review of AP600; 110 man-year effort (NRC) over 6 years, $30 million; independent, confirmatory plant analysis; independent, confirmatory plant testing (ROSA, OSU); over 7400 questions answered, no open items; over 380 meeting with NRC, 43 meetings with ACRS. NRC Design Certification is issued in December 1999. Reasons for developing AP 1000 and design changes are presented. Economic analysis shows an expectation for payback within 20 years. AP1000 provides 75% power uprate for 15% increment in capital cost. AP1000 meets new plant economic targets in the near term

  9. Seismic risk analysis for the Westinghouse Electric facility, Cheswick, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This report presents the results of a detailed seismic risk analysis of the Westinghouse Electric plutonium fuel development facility at Cheswick, Pennsylvania. This report focuses on earthquakes. The historical seismic record was established after a review of available literature, consultation with operators of local seismic arrays and examination of appropriate seismic data bases. Because of the aseismicity of the region around the site, an analysis different from the conventional closest approach in a tectonic province was adapted. Earthquakes as far from the site as 1,000 km were included, as were the possibility of earthquakes at the site. In addition, various uncertainties in the input were explicitly considered in the analysis. For example, allowance was made for both the uncertainty in predicting maximum possible earthquakes in the region and the effect of the dispersion of data about the best fit attenuation relation. The attenuation relationship is derived from two of the most recent, advanced studies relating earthquake intensity reports and acceleration. Results of the risk analysis, which include a Bayesian estimate of the uncertainties, are presented as return period accelerations. The best estimate curve indicates that the Westinghouse facility will experience 0.05 g every 220 years and 0.10 g every 1400 years. The accelerations are very insensitive to the details of the source region geometries or the historical earthquake statistics in each region and each of the source regions contributes almost equally to the cumulative risk at the site

  10. Safety aspects of LWR fuel reprocessing and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.; Leichsenring, C.H.; Herrmann, G.W.; Schueller, W.; Hagenberg, W.; Stoll, W.

    1977-01-01

    The paper is focused on the safety and the control of the consequences of credible accidents in LWR fuel reprocessing plants and in mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants. Each of these plants serve for many power reactor (about 50.000 Mwel) thus the contribution to the overall risk of nuclear energy is correspondingly low. Because of basic functional differences between reprocessing plants, fuel fabrication plants and nuclear power reactors, the structure and safety systems of these plants are different in many respects. The most important differences that influence safety systems are: (1) Both fuel reprocessing and fabrication plants do not have the high system pressure that is associated with power reactors. (2) A considerable amount of the radioactivity of the fuel, which is in the form of short-lived radionuclides has decayed. Therefore, fuel reprocessing plants and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants are designed with multiple confinement barriers for control of radioactive materials, but do not require the high-pressure containment systems that are used in LWR plants. The consequences of accidents which may lead to the dispersion of radioactive materials such as chemical explosions, nuclear excursions, fires and failure of cooling systems are considered. A reasonable high reliability of the multiple confinement approach can be assured by design. In fuel reprocessing plants, forced cooling is necessary only in systems where fission products are accumulated. However, the control of radioactive materials can be maintained during normal operation and during the above mentioned accidents, if the dissolver off-gas and vessel off-gas treatment systems provide for effective removal of radioactive iodine, radioactive particulates, nitrogen oxides, tritium and krypton 85. In addition, the following incidents in the dissolver off-gas system itself must be controlled: failures of iodine filters, hydrogen explosion in O 2 - and NOsub(x)-reduction component, decomposition of

  11. Spent fuel characterization program in Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloret, M.; Canencia, R.; Blanco, J.; POMAR, C.

    2010-01-01

    Jose Cabrera Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is a 14x14 PWR reactor built in 1964 in Spain (160 MWe). The commercial operation started in 1969 and finished in 2006. During year 2009, 377 fuel assemblies from cycles 11 to 29 have been stored in 12 containers HI-STORM 100, and positioned in an Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installation built near the NPP. The spent fuel characterization and classification is a critical and complex activity that could impact all the storage process. As every container has a number of positions for damaged fuel, the loading plans and the quantity of containers depends on the total fuels classified as damaged. The classification of the spent fuel in Jose Cabrera has been performed on the basis of the Interim Staff Guidance ISG-1 from USNRC, 'Damaged Fuel'. As the storage system should assure thermal limitations, criticality control, retrievability, confinement and shielding for radioactive protection, the criteria analyzed for every spent fuel have been the existence/non existence of fuel leaks; damage that could affect the criticality analysis (as missing fuel pins) and any situation that could affect the future retrievability, as defects on the top nozzle. The first classification was performed based upon existing core records. If there were no indication of operating leakers during the concerned cycles and the structural integrity was adequate, the fuel was classified as intact or undamaged. When operating records indicated a fuel leaker, an additional inspection by ultrasonic testing of all the fuel in the concerned cycle was performed to determine the fuel leakers. If the examination results indicated that the fuel has cladding cracks, it was classified as damaged fuel without considering if it was a gross breach or a hairline crack. Additionally, it was confirmed that the water chemistry specifications for spent fuel pool has been fulfilled. Finally, a visual inspection before dry cask storage was performed and foreign particles were

  12. Spent fuel characterization program in Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloret, M.; Canencia, R. [Product Engineering, Enusa Industrias Avanzadas S.A., Santiago Rusinol 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, J.; POMAR, C. [Direction of Nuclear Generation, Gas Natural SDG, Avda. San Luis 77, 28033 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Jose Cabrera Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is a 14x14 PWR reactor built in 1964 in Spain (160 MWe). The commercial operation started in 1969 and finished in 2006. During year 2009, 377 fuel assemblies from cycles 11 to 29 have been stored in 12 containers HI-STORM 100, and positioned in an Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installation built near the NPP. The spent fuel characterization and classification is a critical and complex activity that could impact all the storage process. As every container has a number of positions for damaged fuel, the loading plans and the quantity of containers depends on the total fuels classified as damaged. The classification of the spent fuel in Jose Cabrera has been performed on the basis of the Interim Staff Guidance ISG-1 from USNRC, 'Damaged Fuel'. As the storage system should assure thermal limitations, criticality control, retrievability, confinement and shielding for radioactive protection, the criteria analyzed for every spent fuel have been the existence/non existence of fuel leaks; damage that could affect the criticality analysis (as missing fuel pins) and any situation that could affect the future retrievability, as defects on the top nozzle. The first classification was performed based upon existing core records. If there were no indication of operating leakers during the concerned cycles and the structural integrity was adequate, the fuel was classified as intact or undamaged. When operating records indicated a fuel leaker, an additional inspection by ultrasonic testing of all the fuel in the concerned cycle was performed to determine the fuel leakers. If the examination results indicated that the fuel has cladding cracks, it was classified as damaged fuel without considering if it was a gross breach or a hairline crack. Additionally, it was confirmed that the water chemistry specifications for spent fuel pool has been fulfilled. Finally, a visual inspection before dry cask storage was performed and foreign particles

  13. A proposed framework of food waste collection and recycling for renewable biogas fuel production in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, Kok Sin; Lo, Irene M C

    2016-01-01

    Hong Kong is experiencing a pressing need for food waste management. Currently, approximately 3600 tonnes of food waste are disposed of at landfills in Hong Kong daily. The landfills in Hong Kong are expected to be exhausted by 2020. In the long run, unavoidable food waste should be sorted out from the other municipal solid waste (MSW) and then valorized into valuable resources. A simple sorting process involving less behavioural change of residents is, therefore, of paramount importance in order to encourage residents to sort the food waste from other MSW. In this paper, a sustainable framework of food waste collection and recycling for renewable biogas fuel production is proposed. For an efficient separation and collection system, an optic bag (i.e. green bag) can be used to pack the food waste, while the residual MSW can be packed in a common plastic bag. All the wastes are then sent to the refuse transfer stations in the conventional way (i.e. refuse collection vehicles). At the refuse transfer stations, the food waste is separated from the residual MSW using optic sensors which recognize the colours of the bags. The food waste in the optic bags is then delivered to the proposed Organic Waste Treatment Facilities, in which biogas is generated following the anaerobic digestion technology. The biogas can be further upgraded via gas upgrading units to a quality suitable for use as a vehicle biogas fuel. The use of biogas fuel from food waste has been widely practiced by some countries such as Sweden, France, and Norway. Hopefully, the proposed framework can provide the epitome of the waste-to-wealth concept for the sustainable collection and recycling of food waste in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Westinghouse approach - an I and C modernization program for WWERs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, C.L.; Wassel, W.W.; Novak, V.

    1993-01-01

    When entering into a design program that is a marriage between two designs it is very difficult to separate self imposed design criteria from the requirements of the program. Therefore, the criteria of and the requirements for the Westinghouse modernization program will be discussed as one. These are outlined below: 1) The OSART Mission that was conducted by the IAEA at the Temelin Plant in 1990 identified the need to provide a new comprehensive Safety Analysis to verify the various aspects of the WWER safety system design. This recommendation is one that Westinghouse will provide as part of the WWER I and C Modernization Program. The design, no matter how well proven or verified from a hardware design point of view, is only as good as the basis for the system design; 2) Minimize the impact on the civil design aspects of the plant where possible and where this requirements do not affect the safety features of the design; 3) Ensure compatibility of the design to meet the latest US NRC requirements and those of the implementing country, applicable to the systems functional and hardware designs. This is a Westinghouse standard corporate requirement for all nuclear plant and systems design whether they be foreign or domestic; 4) Provide the most modern, proven design for the I and C systems. Application of the Westinghouse Instrumentation and Control microprocessor based design to the WWER Modernization Program will provide the basis for upgrading plants to meet western standards. (author) 6 figs., 1 ref

  15. Irradiation experiments of recycled PuO2-UO2 fuels by SAXTON reactor, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumoto, Ryozo; Akutsu, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    Seventy two mixed oxide fuel rods made by PNC were irradiated in Saxton Core 3. This paper generally describes the fuel specifications, the power history of the fuel and the post-irradiation examination of the PNC fuel. The specifications of the 4.0 w/o and 5.0 w/o enriched PuO 2 fuel rods with zircaloy-4 cladding are presented in a table and a figure. The positions of PNC fuel rods in the Saxton reactor are shown in a figure. Sixty eight 5.0 w/o PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel rods were assembled in a 9 x 9 rod array together with zircaloy-4 bars, a flux thimble, and a Sb-Be source. The power history of the Saxton Core 3 and the irradiation history of the PNC fuel rods are summarized in tables. The peak power and burnup of each fuel rod and the axial power profile are also presented. The maximum linear power rate and burnup attained were 512W/cm and 8700 MWD/T, respectively. As for the post irradiation examination, the items of nondestructive test, destructive test, and cladding test are presented together with the working flow diagram of the examination. It is concluded that the performance of all fuel rods was safe and satisfactory throughout the power history. (Aoki, K.)

  16. Improved Retrieval Technique of pin-wise composition for spent fuel recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, YunSeo; Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee University , Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    New reutilization method which does not require fabrication processing was suggested and showed feasibility by Dr. Aung Tharn Daing. This new reutilization method is predict spent nuclear fuel pin composition, reconstruct new fuel assembly by spent nuclear pin, and directly reutilize in same PWR core. There are some limitation to predict spent nuclear fuel pin composition on his methodology such as spatial effect was not considered enough. This research suggests improving Dr. Aung Tharn Daing's retrieval technique of pin-wise composition. This new method classify fuel pin groups by its location effect in fuel assembly. Most of fuel pin composition along to burnup in fuel assembly is not highly dependent on location. However, compositions of few fuel pins where near water hole and corner of fuel assembly are quite different in same burnup. Required number of nuclide table is slightly increased from 3 to 6 for one fuel assembly with this new method. Despite of this little change, prediction of the pin-wise composition became more accurate. This new method guarantees two advantages than previous retrieving technique. First, accurate pin-wise isotope prediction is possible by considering location effect in a fuel assembly. Second, it requires much less nuclide tables than using full single assembly database. Retrieving technique of pin-wise composition can be applied on spent fuel management field useful. This technique can be used on direct use of spent fuel such as Dr. Aung Tharn Daing showed or applied on pin-wise waste management instead of conventional assembly-wise waste management.

  17. British Nuclear Fuels plc's effluent plant services building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.

    1990-01-01

    The new Effluent Plant Services building (EPSB) on the Sellafield Nine Acre Site was built by Costain Engineering Limited for British Nuclear Fuels Limited. The EPSB is dedicated to a new generation of nuclear waste treatment plants, aimed at reducing discharges into the Irish Sea and other environmental impacts by removing actinides from liquid effluents and decontaminating waste solvents. This article describes the design, construction and operation of the plant. (UK)

  18. The Westinghouse AP600 an advanced nuclear option for small or medium electricity grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H. J.; Novak, V.

    1996-01-01

    During the early days of commercial nuclear power, many countries looking to add nuclear power to their energy mix required large plants to meet the energy needs of rapidly growing populations and large industrial complexes. The majority of plants worldwide are in the range of 100 megawatts and beyond. During the 1970s, it became apparent that a smaller nuclear plants would appeal to utilities looking to add additional power capacity to existing grids, or to utilities in smaller countries which were seeking efficient, new nuclear generation capacity for the first time. For instance, the Westinghouse-designed 600 megawatt Krsko plant in Slovenia began operation in 1980, providing electricity to inhabitants of relatively small, yet industrial populations of Slovenia and Croatia. This plant design incorporated the best, proven technology available at that time, based on 20 years of Westinghouse PWR pioneering experience. Beginning in the early 1980s, Westinghouse began to build further upon that experience - in part through the advanced light water reactor programs established by the Electric Power Research institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - to design a simplified, advanced nuclear reactor in the 600 megawatt range. Originally, Westinghouse's development of its AP600 (advanced, passive 600-megawatt) plants was geared towards the needs of U.S. utilities which specified smaller, simplified nuclear options for the decades ahead. It soon became evident that the small and medium sized electricity grids of international markets could benefit from this new reactor. From the earliest days of Westinghouse's AP600 development, the corporation invited members of the international nuclear community to take part in the design, development and testing of the AP600 - with the goal of designing a reactor that would meet the diverse needs of an international industry composed of countries with similar, yet different, concerns. (author)

  19. Radioactive waste management plan for the PBMR (Pty) Ltd fuel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makgae, Mosidi E.

    2009-01-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Pty) Ltd Fuel Plant (PFP) radioactive waste management plan caters for waste from generation, processing through storage and possible disposal. Generally, the amount of waste that will be generated from the PFP is Low and Intermediate Level Waste. The waste management plan outlines all waste streams and the management options for each stream. It also discusses how the Plant has been designed to ensure radioactive waste minimisation through recycling, recovery, reuse, treatment before considering disposal. Compliance to the proposed plan will ensure compliance with national legislative requirements and international good practice. The national and the overall waste management objective is to ensure that all PFP wastes are managed appropriately by utilising processes that minimize, reduce, recover and recycle without exposing employees, the public and the environment to unacceptable impacts. Both International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Minerals and Energy (DME) principles act as a guide in the development of the strategy in order to ensure international best practice, legal compliance and ensuring that the impact of waste on employees, environment and the public is as low as reasonably achievable. The radioactive waste classification system stipulated in the Radioactive Waste Management Policy and Strategy 2005 will play an important role in classifying radioactive waste and ensuring that effective management is implemented for all waste streams, for example gaseous, liquid or solid wastes.

  20. Topfuel '95: Fuel for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    In early 1995, 425 nuclear power stations with an installed capacity of 360 263 MW were in operation in 30 countries of the world, and a total of 60 units with a capacity of 53 580 MWe were being cnstructed in 18 countries. The supply of nuclear fuels to these nuclear power stations was the central issue of the Topfuel '95 - Topical Meeting on Nuclear Fuel. More than 350 experts from 23 countries had been invited to Wuerzburg by the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft (KTG) and the European Nuclear Society (ENS). The conference was accompanied by an exhibition at which twelve inernational fuel cycle enterprises presented their products, processes, and problem solutions. The poster session in the hall of the Cogress Center Wuerzburg exhibited 42 contributions which are be discussed in the second part of the conference report. (orig./UA) [de

  1. Calculation of particulate dispersion in a design-basis tornadic storm from Westinghouse PFDL, Cheswick, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, D.W.

    1978-07-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model is used to calculate ground-level air concentration and deposition (due to precipitation scavenging) after a hypothetical tornado strike at the Westinghouse Plutonium Fuel Development Laboratory (PFDL) at Cheswick, Pennsylvania. Plutonium particles less than 20 μm in diameter are assumed to be lifted into the tornadic storm cell by the vortex. The rotational characteristics of the tornadic storm are embedded within the larger mesoscale flow of the storm system. The design-basis translational wind values are based on probabilities associated with existing records of tornado strikes in the vicinity of the plant site. Turbulence exchange coefficients are based on empirical values deduced from experimental data in severe storms and from theoretical assumptions obtained from the literature. The method of moments is used to incorporate subgrid-scale resolution of the concentration within a grid cell volume. This method is a quasi-Lagrangian scheme which minimizes numerical error associated with advection. In all case studies, the effects of updrafts and downdrafts, coupled with scavenging of the particulates by precipitation, account for most of the material being deposited within 20-45 km downwind of the plant site. Ground-level isopleths in the x-y plane show that most of the material is deposited behind and slightly to the left of the centerline trajectory of the storm. Approximately 5% of the material is dispersed into the stratosphere and anvil section of the storm

  2. Management of radioactive wastes from nuclear fuels and power plants in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, M.; Mayman, S.A.; Tammemagi, H.Y.; Gale, J.; Sanford, B.

    1977-05-01

    The nature of Canadian nuclear fuel and nuclear generating plant radioactive wastes is summarized. Principles of a scheme for disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes deep underground in isolation from man and the biosphere are outlined. The status of the development and construction program is indicated. We have demonstrated incorporation of fission products in solids that in the short term (17 years) dissolve more slowly than plutonium decays. Investigations of long-term stability are in hand. Additional capacity for storage of used fuel prior to reprocessing and disposal is required by 1986 and a preliminary design has been prepared for a pool facility to be located at a central fuel recycling and disposal complex. A demonstration of dry storage of fuel in concrete containers is in progress. The quantities of CANDU generating-station wastes and the principles and methods for managing them are summarized. A radioactive-waste operations site is being developed with several different types of surface storage, each with multiple barriers against leakage. A reactor decommissioning study has been completed. Estimated costs of the various waste management operations are summarized. (author)

  3. LEU and thorium fuel cycles for the high temperature reactor (once-through and recycle)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Sets of performance parameters, optimised for minimum costs within the bounds of current technical confidence, are presented for each of the four fuel cycle variants mentioned in the title. The overall cost of the HEU once-through system is found to be significantly more expensive than the other three which are similar. Data are presented on fissile material utilisation, on the isotopic composition of discharged fuel, and on fuel cycle costs. Comments are made on technical status, development needs, safety, environmental concerns including the storage and disposal of irradiated fuel, and on characteristics relevant to proliferation control

  4. Energy analysis of nuclear power plants and their fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, C.; Moraw, G.; Schneeberger, M.; Szeless, A.

    1977-01-01

    Energy analysis has become an increasingly feasible and practical additional method for evaluating the engineering, economic and environmental aspects of power producing systems. Energy analysis compares total direct and indirect energy investment into construction and operation of power plants with their lifetime energy output. Statically we have applied this method to nuclear power producing sytems and their fuel cycles. Results were adapted to countries with various levels of industrialization and resources. With dynamic energy analysis different scenarios have been investigated. For comparison purposes fossil fueled and solar power plants have also been analyzed. By static evaluation it has been shown that for all types of power plants the energy investment for construction is shortly after plant startup being repaid by energy output. Static analyses of nuclear and fossil fuels have indicated values of fuel concentrations below which more energy is required for their utilization than can be obtained from the plants they fuel. In a further step these global results were specifically modified to the economic situations of countries with various levels of industrialization. Also the influence of energy imports upon energy analysis has been discussed. By dynamic energy analyses the cumulative energy requirements for specific power plant construction programs have been compared with their total energy output. Investigations of this sort are extremely valuable not only for economic reasons but especially for their usefulness in showing the advantages and disadvantages of a specific power program with respect to its alternatives. Naturally the impact of these investigations on the fuel requirements is of importance especially because of the today so often cited ''valuable cumulated fossil fuel savings''

  5. Dynamical Simulation of Recycling and Particle Fueling in TJ-II Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Bruna, D.; Ferreira, J. A.; Tabares, F. L.; Castejon, F.; Guasp, J.

    2007-01-01

    With the aim of improving the calculation tools for transport analysis in TJ-II plasmas, in this work we analyze the simplified model for a kinetic equation that ASTRA uses to calculate the neutral particle distribution in the plasma. Next, we act on the boundary conditions for this kinetic equation (particularly on the neutral density in the plasma boundary) so we can simulate the recycling conditions for the TJ-II in a simple way. With the resulting transport models we can easily analyze the sensibility of these plasmas to the cold gas puffing depending on the recycling conditions. These transport models evidence the problem of density control in the TJ-II. Likewise, we estimate the importance of recycling in the plasmas heated by energetic neutral beam injection. The experimentally observed increments in density when the energetic neutrals are injected would respond, according to the calculations here presented, to a large increment of the neutrals influx that cannot be explained by the beam itself. (Author) 22 refs

  6. Feedback from Westinghouse experience on segmentation of reactor vessel internals - 59013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitman, Paul J.; Boucau, Joseph; Segerud, Per; Fallstroem, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    With more than 25 years of experience in the development of reactor vessel internals segmentation and packaging technology, Westinghouse has accumulated significant know-how in the reactor dismantling market. Building on tooling concepts and cutting methodologies developed decades ago for the successful removal of nuclear fuel from the damaged Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor (TMI-2), Westinghouse has continuously improved its approach to internals segmentation and packaging by incorporating lessons learned and best practices into each successive project. Westinghouse has developed several concepts to dismantle reactor internals based on safe and reliable techniques, including plasma arc cutting (PAC), abrasive water-jet cutting (AWJC), metal disintegration machining (MDM), or mechanical cutting. Westinghouse has applied its technology to all types of reactors covering Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's), Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's), Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR's) and sodium reactors. The primary challenges of a segmentation and packaging project are to separate the highly activated materials from the less-activated materials and package them into appropriate containers for disposal. Since space is almost always a limiting factor it is therefore important to plan and optimize the available room in the segmentation areas. The choice of the optimum cutting technology is important for a successful project implementation and depends on some specific constraints like disposal costs, project schedule, available areas or safety. Detailed 3-D modeling is the basis for tooling design and provides invaluable support in determining the optimum strategy for component cutting and disposal in waste containers, taking account of the radiological and packaging constraints. Westinghouse has also developed a variety of special handling tools, support fixtures, service bridges, water filtration systems, video-monitoring systems and customized rigging, all of which are required for a

  7. Fuel cell power plants for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, J. F.

    1983-02-01

    While the Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell has until recently not been considered competitive with such commercial and industrial energy systems as gas turbine generators and internal combustion engines, electrical current density improvements have markedly improved the capital cost/kW output rating performance of SPE systems. Recent studies of SPE fuel cell applicability to vehicular propulsion have indicated that with adequate development, a powerplant may be produced which will satisfy the performance, size and weight objectives required for viable electric vehicles, and that the cost for such a system would be competitive with alternative advanced power systems.

  8. Plant Design Nuclear Fuel Element Production Capacity Optimization to Support Nuclear Power Plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambang Galung Susanto

    2007-01-01

    The optimization production capacity for designing nuclear fuel element fabrication plant in Indonesia to support the nuclear power plant has been done. From calculation and by assuming that nuclear power plant to be built in Indonesia as much as 12 NPP and having capacity each 1000 MW, the optimum capacity for nuclear fuel element fabrication plant is 710 ton UO 2 /year. The optimum capacity production selected, has considered some aspects such as fraction batch (cycle, n = 3), length of cycle (18 months), discharge burn-up value (Bd) 35,000 up 50,000 MWD/ton U, enriched uranium to be used in the NPP (3.22 % to 4.51 %), future market development for fuel element, and the trend of capacity production selected by advances country to built nuclear fuel element fabrication plant type of PWR. (author)

  9. UREP: gateway to uranium recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rougeau, J.P.; Durret, L.F.

    1988-01-01

    The industrial experience accumulated in France on recycling makes their conversion service fully reliable technically and economically. Problems associated with chemical and radiochemical behavior have been solved satisfactorily in order to offer customers flexible options for their personal optimization. Economically, a price reduction by a significant factor (up to two) has been proposed by UREP as a firm commitment for the coming years. This is the result of technical experience coupled with favorable scaling effect for the large conversion plant proposed. It is believed that such a positive approach greatly helps customers in managing recycling of their material and generating savings in their fuel cycle economics. This flow of recycled uranium, on top of the 40000 t of natural uranium consumed each year, is a valuable asset available to those utilities which have selected the reprocessing route. 2 figs

  10. Workshop on instrumentation and analyses for a nuclear fuel reprocessing hot pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock, S.M.; Feldman, M.J.; Wymer, R.G.; Hoffman, D.

    1980-05-01

    In order to assist in the study of instrumentation and analytical needs for reprocessing plants, a workshop addressing these needs was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from May 5 to 7, 1980. The purpose of the workshop was to incorporate the knowledge of chemistry and of advanced measurement techniques held by the nuclear and radiochemical community into ideas for improved and new plant designs for both process control and inventory and safeguards measurements. The workshop was athended by experts in nuclear and radiochemistry, in fuel recycle plant design, and in instrumentation and analysis. ORNL was a particularly appropriate place to hold the workshop since the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) is centered there. Requirements for safeguarding the special nuclear materials involved in reprocessing, and for their timely measurement within the process, within the reprocessing facility, and at the facility boundaries are being studied. Because these requirements are becoming more numero