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Sample records for western italian alps

  1. Western Italian Alps Monthly Snowfall and Snow Cover Duration

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    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of snow observations for 18 stations in the western Italian Alps. Two types of data are included: monthly snowfall amounts and monthly snow...

  2. Western Italian Alps Monthly Snowfall and Snow Cover Duration, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of snow observations for 18 stations in the western Italian Alps. Two types of data are included: monthly snowfall amounts and monthly snow...

  3. Ecology of some mire and bog plant communities in the Western Italian Alps

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    Giorgio BUFFA

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available During a mire vegetation study, conducted mainly in the subalpine-alpine sector of the Western Italian Alps, the ecology of several plant communities and numerous moss species of this kind of vegetation was evaluated. The study area covered the Piedmontese sector of the Graian Alps, the eastern sector of the Aosta Valley as well as certain localities of the Pennine Alps, the Canavese district and the Maritime Alps. They have a rocky substratum representative of the various regional lithologies and include the main sectors characterised by the highest precipitation. Three hundred and twenty two relevées were made using the phytosociological method and the pH and the conductivity of the water table and its depth were measured directly. Cluster Analysis allowed a classification of the samples and the identification of various groups of plant communities. Ordination performed by DCA and CCA allowed us to identify the ecological features of the various plant communities by using the values of the main environmental parameters, measured directly in the field, and certain climatic parameters (altitude and mean annual precipitation available. The use of climatic parameters is an important result for identifying communities which show greater oceanicity, something that is underlined also by the presence of indicator species such as Sphagnum papillosum and S. subnitens. Furthermore the communities are arranged in a "poor-rich" gradient, and are also profoundly influenced by depth to water table which is inversely correlated to the pH. Therefore we find certain kinds of communities all with a very low water table and which are little affected by its chemistry. Other groups share the fact that the water table is outcropping or near the surface and are distinguishable for their pH values and conductivity. We discuss the different response of the bryophytes and vascular plants of these communities to the environmental parameters considered, in light of their

  4. Hydrogeological model and hydraulic behaviour of a large landslide in the Italian Western Alps

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    G. Pisani

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A study of the large, deep-seated Rosone landslide (Italian Western Alps is presented. A large amount of geological and geomechanical data has been collected in this area, due to the presence of various villages and man-made structures, and an automatic monitoring system was installed in December 2000. Since its installation, this system has been showing a continuous slow movement with periodical accelerations that can be correlated to heavy rainfall events. A hydrogeological model has been developed to study the influence of rainfall events on the pore pressure variations inside the rock slope. The structural characteristics, inclinometric and piezometric measurements, statigraphic and seismic profiles, geomorphologic information, water balance and chemical analyses of the main springs in the slope have been taken into account to consider this problem. A numerical hydraulic investigation, based on a continuum equivalent model of the landslide, has then been carried out using the FLAC3D computer code. Some preliminary results, which highlight the role of permeability and the porosity values of the rock mass on the pore pressure variations during heavy rainfall, are shown in the paper.

  5. Chloritoid-bearing assemblages in eclogitised metagabbros of the Lanzo peridotite body (western Italian Alps)

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    Kienast, J. R.; Pognante, U.

    1988-01-01

    Dykes of metagabbro from the Lanzo peridotite body in the western Italian Alps contain Mg-chloritoidtalc-garnet-Na-pyroxenes ± chlorite or Fe-chloritoid-glaucophane-garnet-Na-pyroxenes eclogitic assemblages of Cretaceous age. In these metagabbros the metamorphic equilibration is incomplete and controlled by local equilibrium conditions; here the chemical gradients, which document the magmatic microstructural domains and the diffusion patterns during metamorphism, survive the eclogitic crystallisation. Concentration of elements like Al, Mg and Fe near the boundaries between the magmatic domains favours the crystallisation, in reaction coronas, of Mg-rich chloritoid in Mg metagabbro and of Fe-rich chloritoid in FeTi metagabbro. Phase compatibilities in the Al 2O 3FeOMgO( ± SiO 2 ± H 2O) system suggest temperatures around 400-500°C at approximate pressures of 15-18 kbar for the eclogitic metamorphism of the Lanzo rocks. In spite of the difficulties and of the inaccuracies of these thermobarometric estimates, the inferred P- T values are in good agreement with determinations involving Na-pyroxenes and garnets.

  6. Marco Isaia, Mauro Paschetta, Enrico Lana, Paolo Pantini, Axel L. Schönhofer, Erhard Christian & Guido Bandino (2011: Aracnidi sotterranei delle Alpi Occidentali italiane/Subterranean Arachnids of the Western Italian Alps (Arachnida: Araneae, Opiliones, Palpigradi, Pseudoscorpiones

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    Zaenker, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available book review: Marco Isaia, Mauro Paschetta, Enrico Lana, Paolo Pantini, Axel L. Schönhofer, Erhard Christian & Guido Bandino (2011: Aracnidi sotterranei delle Alpi Occidentali italiane/Subterranean Arachnids of the Western Italian Alps (Arachnida: Araneae, Opiliones, Palpigradi, Pseudoscorpiones

  7. Assessment and selection of geomorphosites and trails in the Miage Glacier area (Western Italian alps).

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    Bollati, Irene; Smiraglia, Claudio; Pelfini, Manuela

    2013-04-01

    Glacial environments are considered geomorphosites because they exhibit all of the features that characterise sites of geomorphological interest. The Miage Glacier, in particular, is the most important debris-covered glacier of the Italian Alps, and it has been extensively studied since the 18th century because of its scientific features. In this area, the geomorphological and geological attributes are evaluated at 11 sites that have been individuated along the three main touristic trails, which allow an exploration of the surroundings of the glacial tongue and its two main lobes. Using a methodology previously tested in a fluvial environment, single sites and trails are quantitatively assessed to determine the most suitable trail for educational purposes. Hazards that could potentially affect the trails are considered in terms of both risk education and final selection of the most suitable trails for the various possible user groups. The richness of scientific data in this area should increase its importance as a geomorphosite by increasing the educational value of the Miage Glacier and the Veny Valley.

  8. Mapping Asbestos-Cement Roofing with Hyperspectral Remote Sensing over a Large Mountain Region of the Italian Western Alps

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    Federico Frassy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization estimates that 100 thousand people in the world die every year from asbestos-related cancers and more than 300 thousand European citizens are expected to die from asbestos-related mesothelioma by 2030. Both the European and the Italian legislations have banned the manufacture, importation, processing and distribution in commerce of asbestos-containing products and have recommended action plans for the safe removal of asbestos from public and private buildings. This paper describes the quantitative mapping of asbestos-cement covers over a large mountainous region of Italian Western Alps using the Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer sensor. A very large data set made up of 61 airborne transect strips covering 3263 km2 were processed to support the identification of buildings with asbestos-cement roofing, promoted by the Valle d’Aosta Autonomous Region with the support of the Regional Environmental Protection Agency. Results showed an overall mapping accuracy of 80%, in terms of asbestos-cement surface detected. The influence of topography on the classification’s accuracy suggested that even in high relief landscapes, the spatial resolution of data is the major source of errors and the smaller asbestos-cement covers were not detected or misclassified.

  9. Mapping Asbestos-Cement Roofing with Hyperspectral Remote Sensing over a Large Mountain Region of the Italian Western Alps

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    Frassy, Federico; Candiani, Gabriele; Rusmini, Marco; Maianti, Pieralberto; Marchesi, Andrea; Nodari, Francesco Rota; Via, Giorgio Dalla; Albonico, Carlo; Gianinetto, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that 100 thousand people in the world die every year from asbestos-related cancers and more than 300 thousand European citizens are expected to die from asbestos-related mesothelioma by 2030. Both the European and the Italian legislations have banned the manufacture, importation, processing and distribution in commerce of asbestos-containing products and have recommended action plans for the safe removal of asbestos from public and private buildings. This paper describes the quantitative mapping of asbestos-cement covers over a large mountainous region of Italian Western Alps using the Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer sensor. A very large data set made up of 61 airborne transect strips covering 3263 km2 were processed to support the identification of buildings with asbestos-cement roofing, promoted by the Valle d'Aosta Autonomous Region with the support of the Regional Environmental Protection Agency. Results showed an overall mapping accuracy of 80%, in terms of asbestos-cement surface detected. The influence of topography on the classification's accuracy suggested that even in high relief landscapes, the spatial resolution of data is the major source of errors and the smaller asbestos-cement covers were not detected or misclassified. PMID:25166502

  10. Relationships between botanical and chemical composition of forages: a multivariate approach to grasslands in the Western Italian Alps.

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    Ravetto Enri, Simone; Renna, Manuela; Probo, Massimiliano; Lussiana, Carola; Battaglini, Luca M; Lonati, Michele; Lombardi, Giampiero

    2017-03-01

    Plant composition of species-rich mountain grasslands can affect the sensorial and chemical attributes of dairy and meat products, with implications for human health. A multivariate approach was used to analyse the complex relationships between vegetation characteristics (botanical composition and plant community variables) and chemical composition (proximate constituents and fatty acid profile) in mesophilic and dry vegetation ecological groups, comprising six different semi-natural grassland types in the Western Italian Alps. Mesophilic and dry grasslands were comparable in terms of phenology, biodiversity indices and proportion of botanical families. The content of total fatty acids and that of the most abundant fatty acids (alpha-linolenic, linoleic and palmitic acids) were mainly associated to nutrient-rich plant species, belonging to the mesophilic grassland ecological group. Mesophilic grasslands showed also higher values of crude protein, lower values of fibre content and they were related to higher pastoral values of vegetation compared to dry grasslands. The proximate composition and fatty acid profile appeared mainly single species dependent rather than botanical family dependent. These findings highlight that forage from mesophilic grasslands can provide higher nutritive value for ruminants and may be associated to ruminant-derived food products with a healthier fatty acid profile. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Pleistocene permafrost features in soils in the South-western Italian Alps

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    D'Amico, Michele; Catoni, Marcella; Bonifacio, Eleonora; Zanini, Ermanno

    2015-04-01

    Because of extensive Pleistocenic glaciations which erased most of the previously existing soils, slope steepness and climatic conditions favoring soil erosion, most soils observed on the Alps (and in other mid-latitude mountain ranges) developed only during the Holocene. However, in few sites, particularly in the outermost sections of the Alpine range, Pleistocene glaciers covered only small and scattered surfaces because of the low altitude reached in the basins, and ancient soils could be preserved for long periods of time on particularly stable surfaces. In some cases, these soils retain good memories of past periglacial activity. We described and sampled soils on stable surfaces in the Upper Tanaro valley, Ligurian Alps (Southwestern Piemonte, Italy). The sampling sites were between 600 to 1600 m of altitude, under present day lower montane Castanea sativa/Ostrya carpinifolia forests, montane Fagus sylvatica and Pinus uncinata forests or montane heath/grazed grassland, on different quartzitic substrata. The surface morphology often showed strongly developed, fossil periglacial patterned ground forms, such as coarse stone circles on flat surfaces, or stone stripes on steeper slopes. The stone circles could be up to 5 m wide, while the sorted stripes could be as wide as 12-15 m. A strong lateral cryogenic textural sorting characterized the fine fraction too, with sand dominating close to the stone rims of the patterned ground features and silt and clay the central parts. The surface 60-120 cm of the soils were podzolized during the Holocene; as a result of the textural lateral sorting, the thickness of the podzolic E and Bs horizons varied widely across the patterns. The lower boundary of the Holocene Podzols was abrupt, and corresponded with dense layers with thick coarse laminar structure and illuvial silt accumulation (Cjj horizons). Dense Cjj diapiric inclusions were sometimes preserved in the central parts of the patterns. Where cover beds were developed

  12. Petrological outline of an area near Sparone (Orco Valley, Western Italian Alps)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnigh, L.D.

    1978-01-01

    Several rocktypes and their metamorphic mineral growth are described from an area on the western border of the Sesia-Lanzo Zone in the Orco Valley (NW Italy). It is argued that in some rocks (garnet-rich gneisses and micaceous gneisses) pre-Alpine metamorphic minerals are present, in other rocks

  13. Climbing walls as multitasking sites of geo(morpho)logical interests: Italian examples from the Western Alps and Sardinia

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    Bollati, Irene; Fossati, Maria; Panizza, Valeria; Pelfini, Manuela; Zanoletti, Enrico; Zucali, Michele

    2015-04-01

    Geosites and in particular geomorphosites have been recently more and more used as base for educational activities in Earth Sciences and to enhance the geodiversity of a territory. Their attributes acquire a greater value and become especially appreciable when associated with field and outdoor activities. Frequently rock walls represent key sites for geological and gemorphological researches due to the wide outcrops of rocks where mineralogical composition and structures are very evident as well as landforms deriving from the modeling of outcrops surfaces. Where the rock walls are equipped for climbing activities they may be considered open-air laboratories useful to get in touch with the different features of rocks that condition progression on climbing routes. Due to these two aspects, geohistorical importance and educational exemplarity contribute to the increase of the scientific value and, as a consequence, of the global value of these sites as geosites. Geomorphosites from climbing sites allow to realize educational projects with different goals: 1) Recent researches in the Western Italian Alps have been conducted to make a census of climbing rock cliffs along the Ossola Valley (Verbanio-Cusio-Ossola Province, Italy) and to operate a choice of the ones characterized by high educational value (considering easy accessibility, grades for experts and beginners and the good exposition of rock features), representativeness, geohistorical importance, high cultural and socio-economic values, in order to propose an educational project addressed to students of an Italian secondary school aimed at introducing the three great families of rocks (magmatic, metamorphic and sedimentary); 2) The Eclogitic Micaschist Complex of the Austroalpine Domain (Montestrutto climbing wall, Turin Province, Italy) has been investigated in order to i) reconstruct the deformation stages at local scales along the sport climbing wall and the relationships between geological elements and

  14. Fabrics produced mimetically during static metamorphism in retrogressed eclogites from the Zermatt-Saas zone, Western Italian Alps

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    McNamara, D. D.; Wheeler, J.; Pearce, M.; Prior, D. J.

    2012-11-01

    Lattice preferred orientations (LPOs) are commonly interpreted to form by dislocation creep. Consequently they are used to infer deformation at the metamorphic grade at which the minerals were stable, especially if those minerals show a shape fabric. Here we show that LPOs can occur through mimicry of a pre-existing LPO, so they formed statically, not during deformation. Omphacite and glaucophane LPOs occur in eclogite facies rocks from the Zermatt-Saas Unit of the Northwest Italian Alps. Barroisite grew during greenschist facies retrogression and has an LPO controlled significantly by the eclogite facies omphacite and glaucophane LPOs, rather than directly by deformation. Using spatially resolved lattice orientation data from the three key minerals, collected using electron backscatter diffraction, we deploy a new technique of interphase misorientation distribution analysis to prove this. Barroisite LPO develops by mimicry of omphacite (via a particular lattice orientation relationship) and by direct topotactic and epitactic replacement of glaucophane. LPO in turn influenced anisotropic grain growth, resulting in a barroisite grain shape fabric. Thus regional retrogression during exhumation of the Zermatt-Saas high-pressure rocks was, in large part, static, rather than dynamic as previously interpreted. In general the possibility of mimetic fabrics forming during metamorphic reactions must be borne in mind when interpreting direct structural observations and seismic anisotropy data in terms of deformation, in both crust and mantle.

  15. Magmatic/metasomatic amphibole in the mantle: evidence from the Balmuccia lherzolite massif, Ivrea zone, western Italian Alps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shervais, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Amphibole and mica are the most important alkali-rich phases stable under mantle P-T conditions, and constitute the primary source of the alkalis needed to form basaltic magmas. Yet, the origin and distribution of these phases in the upper mantle is poorly understood. The Balmuccia lherzolite massif is a small slice of subcontinental mantle in the western Alps that intruded granulite facies lower crust 250 m.y. ago, and was exposed during the Alpine orogeny. Amphibole (HB) ranging in composition from Ti-pargasite to kaersutite in a minor but widespread accessory phase in the lherzolite, in websterite and bronzite dikes of the Cr-Di suite, and in pyroxenite and gabbro dikes of the Al-Aug suite. Textural and compositional relations show that HB in the Cr-Di and Al-Aug suite dikes formed by crystallization of residual magma, or by reaction between this magma and earlier formed phases (primarily spinel). Hb also occurs in thin (1-2 cm) veins of hornblendite and pyroxene hornblendite, and in the HB-enriched wallrock adjacent to these veins. Similar Hb veins in the Lherz massif have been shown to form from an alkali and water-enriched residual magma derived by filter pressing of Al-Aug pyroxenites. This origin is not possible at Balmuccia because the Hb veins have higher Ti, Cr, K/Na and Mgnumbers than any accessory Hb in Al-Aug suite dikes. Fractionation trends in the veins are controlled by HB. This requires that the HB veins formed from a separate and distinct parent magma that metasomatically enriched the lherzolite on a local scale. However, remelting of the widespread pyroxenite dikes may constitute a more important source of alkalis than the rare HB-rich veins.

  16. Climate change and human disturbance can lead to local extinction of Alpine rock ptarmigan: new insight from the western Italian Alps.

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    Simona Imperio

    Full Text Available Alpine grouses are particularly vulnerable to climate change due to their adaptation to extreme conditions and to their relict distributions in the Alps where global warming has been particularly marked in the last half century. Grouses are also currently threatened by habitat modification and human disturbance, and an assessment of the impact of multiple stressors is needed to predict the fate of Alpine populations of these birds in the next decades. We estimated the effect of climate change and human disturbance on a rock ptarmigan population living in the western Italian Alps by combining an empirical population modelling approach and stochastic simulations of the population dynamics under the a1B climate scenario and two different disturbance scenarios, represented by the development of a ski resort, through 2050.The early appearance of snow-free ground in the previous spring had a favorable effect on the rock ptarmigan population, probably through a higher reproductive success. On the contrary, delayed snowfall in autumn had a negative effect possibly due to a mismatch in time to molt to white winter plumage which increases predation risk. The regional climate model PROTHEUS does not foresee any significant change in snowmelt date in the study area, while the start date of continuous snow cover is expected to be significantly delayed. The net effect in the stochastic projections is a more or less pronounced (depending on the model used decline in the studied population. The addition of extra-mortality due to collision with ski-lift wires led the population to fatal consequences in most projections. Should these results be confirmed by larger studies the conservation of Alpine populations would deserve more attention. To counterbalance the effects of climate change, the reduction of all causes of death should be pursued, through a strict preservation of the habitats in the present area of occurrence.

  17. Climate change and human disturbance can lead to local extinction of Alpine rock ptarmigan: new insight from the western Italian Alps.

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    Imperio, Simona; Bionda, Radames; Viterbi, Ramona; Provenzale, Antonello

    2013-01-01

    Alpine grouses are particularly vulnerable to climate change due to their adaptation to extreme conditions and to their relict distributions in the Alps where global warming has been particularly marked in the last half century. Grouses are also currently threatened by habitat modification and human disturbance, and an assessment of the impact of multiple stressors is needed to predict the fate of Alpine populations of these birds in the next decades. We estimated the effect of climate change and human disturbance on a rock ptarmigan population living in the western Italian Alps by combining an empirical population modelling approach and stochastic simulations of the population dynamics under the a1B climate scenario and two different disturbance scenarios, represented by the development of a ski resort, through 2050.The early appearance of snow-free ground in the previous spring had a favorable effect on the rock ptarmigan population, probably through a higher reproductive success. On the contrary, delayed snowfall in autumn had a negative effect possibly due to a mismatch in time to molt to white winter plumage which increases predation risk. The regional climate model PROTHEUS does not foresee any significant change in snowmelt date in the study area, while the start date of continuous snow cover is expected to be significantly delayed. The net effect in the stochastic projections is a more or less pronounced (depending on the model used) decline in the studied population. The addition of extra-mortality due to collision with ski-lift wires led the population to fatal consequences in most projections. Should these results be confirmed by larger studies the conservation of Alpine populations would deserve more attention. To counterbalance the effects of climate change, the reduction of all causes of death should be pursued, through a strict preservation of the habitats in the present area of occurrence.

  18. Autochthonous Linguistic Minorities in the Italian Alps:

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    Ernst Steinicke

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available More than any other area in Western Europe, the Alps, especially the Italian Alps, are home to great ethno-cultural diversity: there, no less than seven autochthonous linguistic minorities coexist side by side with the respective official majority. Now being considered an important cultural heritage by the state as well as by the regions, new legislation offers protection to all ‘linguistic-historic minorities’ in Italy. Our study shows, however, that it is quite difficult to maintain such groups, since it is largely unknown where exactly the minority areas are situated. Based on that, local actor groups in various communities take advantage of this lack of knowledge and declare themselves minority territories although they show no linguistic varieties. An important objective of this project is therefore to present a cartographic representation of this linguistic diversity. Subsequently, the contribution discusses case studies of distinct ethno-linguistic self-awareness. Even though with Law No. 482 a first important step was taken to preserve the linguistic minorities, their progressive decline by territorial and numerical criteria cannot be denied. Today, besides unfavorable bio-demographic factors and “diffuse ethnicity,” other causes are current demographic processes. In this framework the amenity migrants, those new immigrants who have discovered the mountains as a new, desirable settlement space, play a decisive role by reinforcing the assimilation process.Les Alpes, plus précisément les Alpes italiennes, plus que toute autre région d'Europe Occidentale, sont un lieu de grande diversité ethnoculturelle : pas moins de sept minorités linguistiques autochtones y coexistent, côte à côte avec la majorité officielle correspondante. Maintenant considérées comme un héritage culturel important par les états ainsi que par les régions, une nouvelle législation offre une protection à toutes les « minorités linguistiques

  19. The lynx in the Italian Alps

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    Bernardino Ragni

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lynx lynx has spontaneously recolonized the Italian Alps, coming from the populations created by reintroductions in neighbouring countries. The study period began in 1976 with a survey carried out by Ragni, and since 1987 it has continued with a detailed monitoring programme. The first evidence of the species dates back to 1980-1982. In this work the techniques of the naturalistic method have been used to investigate the distribution, evidence for reproduction, and estimate the population size. In the last 15 years the area used by the lynx has progressively increased. Six reproductions have been observed. The size of the population was estimated at about 21 individuals (Central-Eastern Alps. Within the time period considered, the illegal killing of two individuals was recorded. Additionally there is some information about six other poached lynx. Livestock damage has not been reported recently.

  20. G.I.S. technologies for data collection, management and visualization of large slope instabilities: two applications in the Western Italian Alps

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    Giardino, M.; Giordan, D.; Ambrogio, S.

    2004-04-01

    Large slope instabilities are gravitational phenomena whose main characteristics are the multi-km2 area extension and the complex geometrical, geomorphological and geomechanical settings. Several studies outlined their importance in spatial and temporal occurrence of natural hazards on wide mountain areas and their possible interaction in human activities. For the study of large slope instability and deep seated slope gravitational deformations in the Susa and Aosta Valleys (Western Italian Alps) a complete multiscale program (spatial and temporal) analysis has been performed, giving contributions to the reconstruction and settings of their possible evolution. A complex geodatabase has been created, including thematic elements from field-data collection (geomorphology, hydrology, lithology, structural geology) and instability events analysis from data archives and remote sensing images. To facilitate the management of a large amount of collected data a G.I.S. (Geographical Information System) has been developed, including two main levels of information: local and regional. Local information is mainly devoted to detailed geothematic mapping of single instability phenomena. Clot Brun case study is presented, where original and derived landslide features have been elaborated through arithmetical and statistical operations, in order to identify different instability zones and to assess displacements and state of activity through-time. Regional information collected for a landslide inventory of Aosta Valley (IFFI project) summarizes historical and remote sensing data, combined with metadata from local analysis, in order to assess spatial and temporal hazards. To avoid problems of data accuracy (quality and positioning) due to different source archives, a semi-automatic system for selection and validation of data has been created, based on their spatial characteristics (buffer analysis and control). G.I.S. technologies have been used to archive, manage and visualize

  1. Contrasting environmental memories by ancient soils on different parent rocks in the South-western Italian Alps

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    D'Amico, Michele; Catoni, Marcella; Bonifacio, Eleonora; Zanini, Ermanno

    2014-05-01

    Ancient soils (pre-Holocenic paleosols and vetusols) are uncommon on the Alps, because of the extensive Pleistocenic glaciations which erased most of the previously existing soils, the slope steepness and climatic conditions favoring soil erosion. However, in few sites, particularly in the outermost sections of the Alpine range, Pleistocene glaciers covered only small and scattered surfaces because of the low altitude reached in the basins, and ancient soils could be preserved for long periods of time on particularly stable surfaces. We described and sampled soils on 11 stable surfaces in the Upper Tanaro valley, Ligurian Alps (Southwestern Piemonte, Italy). The sampling sites were characterized by low steepness and elevation between 600 to 1600 m, under present day lower montane Castanea sativa/Ostrya carpinifolia forests, montane Fagus sylvatica and Pinus uncinata forests or montane heath/grazed grassland, on different substrata. In particular, we sampled soils developed on dolomite, limestone, quartzite, gneiss and shales. The soils were always well representative of the pedogenic trends active on the respective parent materials, i.e. the skeletal fraction in each soil was always composed of just one rock type, despite the proximity of lithological boundaries and the small dimensions of the different outcrops, often coexisting on the same stable surface. All the considered profiles showed signs of extremely long pedogenesis and/or different phases of intense pedogenesis interrupted by the deposition of periglacial cover beds in the steepest sites. Up to four phases of intense pedogenesis were recognized where cover beds were developed, presumably during cold Pleistocene phases, as present-day climate is not cold enough to create such periglacial morphologies. In such cases, each cover bed underwent similar pedogenesis, strongly dependent on the parent material: on quartzite, podzols with thick E horizons and well developed placic ones were formed in all phases

  2. Extraction faulting and out-of-sequence thrusting in collisional orogeny - An example from the Swiss-Italian Western Alps

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    Kirst, F.; Froitzheim, N.; Nagel, T.; Leiss, B.; Pleuger, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the Pennine Alps of Switzerland and Italy a stack of nappes derived from oceanic and continental units of the Piemont-Ligurian paleogeographic domain is exposed. From bottom to top these are the oceanic Zermatt-Saas and Combin zones and the continental Sesia/Dent Blanche nappe. Different Alpine peak pressures have been estimated for these units with the highest pressures of ca. 3.2 GPa in the Zermatt-Saas zone (Groppo et al., 2009), lower pressures of ca. 1.3 GPa in the Combin zone (Bousquet et al, 2008) and intermediate pressures of up to 2.0 GPa in the Sesia/Dent Blanche nappe (Lardeaux & Spalla, 1991). Therefore, a pressure gap of 1.9 GPa exists along the Combin Fault, the contact between the Zermatt-Saas and Combin zones, and a gap of 0.7 GPa along the Dent Blanche Basal Thrust which separates the Sesia/Dent Blanche nappe from the underlying Combin zone. Due to the difference in peak pressures, the Combin Fault has often been interpreted as a large top-SE normal fault accommodating exhumation of the underlying (ultra)high-pressure rocks (e.g. Reddy et al., 1999). However, there is structural evidence that the Combin Fault is in fact an extraction fault (Froitzheim et al., 2006) and that exhumation of Zermatt-Saas (ultra)high-pressure rocks was due to SE-directed extraction of the Sesia/Dent Blanche block originally located between the Zermatt-Saas and Combin zones. Therefore, the Dent Blanche Basal Thrust would represent a top-NW out-of-sequence thrust along which high-pressure rocks of the Sesia/Dent Blanche nappe were thrust over greenschist-facies rocks of the Combin zone. On the basis of the above-mentioned peak pressure estimates and our own structural observations we propose the following tectonic scenario: Initial nappe stacking resulted in a configuration with the Zermatt-Saas zone in the footwall of the Sesia/Dent Blanche nappe and the Combin zone as the structurally highest unit which was thrust over the Sesia/Dent Blanche nappe in the SE and the

  3. Bdelloid Rotifers from Lakes above 1700 m in Western Italian Alps, with Taxonomic Notes on Dissotrocha macrostyla

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    Fontaneto, Diego; Melone, Giulio

    2003-11-01

    Benthic and periphytic bdelloid communities from 16 alpine lakes from 1700 to 2850 m above sea level in Sesia Valley (Piedmont region, North-western Italy), sampled during summer 2001 and 2002, were analyzed. Seventeen species were identified from these species-poor communities, with 1 to 6 species each. Dissotrocha macrostyla and Philodina citrina were the most common species, present in 10 lakes while 9 species were collected from one lake only. New morphological details from S.E.M. pictures of Dissotrocha macrostyla revealed that Dissotrocha macrostyla tuberculata (Gosse, 1886) is only a seasonal morphotype. Its different appearance is due to the presence of locally distributed microscopic mucous bubbles (diameter 1.41 +/- 0.18 m) on the trunk surface, produced by the rotifer itself under stressful conditions.

  4. Seismicity of Eastern Alps and North western Dinaric Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertuncay, Deniz; Vicic, Blaž; Costa, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Our study region is placed on Adriatic Plate and the boundaries are Dinaric Orogenic Belt, Carnic, Tolmezzo and Julian Alps. The area has normal, reverse and strike slip faults which can generate big earthquakes such as 1976 Mw 6.5 Friuli Earthquake, 1998 and 2004 Bovec-Krn Earthquakes. The area is located between Austria, Slovenia and Italy. Our group, SEISRAM, has dense seismic station on the Italian part of the region and has access to get data from other countries on the region. We are monitoring the region with a good coverage by collaborating with other institutes on the Ce3RN project which we are also part of. We can detect lower than 0.5 Magnitude earthquakes. We use our database and other seismological centers to investigate the seismicity of the region between 1960 and 2016. Gutenberg - Richter magnitude frequency relationship is applied in order to get a knowledge about the seismicity of Friuli region. By using the database 'a' and 'b' values of the region are found. Same procedure is done for each fault line, separately. Magnitude of completeness for each fault are calculated. Calculation of earthquake probabilities for fixed periodic times for possible from magnitude 3 to magnitude 6 earthquakes. All calculations are done by using Matlab based ZMAP program.

  5. Nutrient flows in lowland dairy farms in the Italian Alps

    OpenAIRE

    Monica Bassanino; Dario Sacco; Annalisa Curtaz; Mauro Bassignana; Carlo Grignani

    2011-01-01

    A traditional dairy production system is still common today in the mountain environment of the Italian Alps, enhancing the economic valorisation of milk through the production of quality cheese such as Fontina PDO (Protected Designation of Origin), and favouring the agro-environmental management of marginal areas. This type of dairy system depends mainly on summer grazing: farmers set up the farm stock on the basis of the high-altitude grassland areas available. For the rest of the year, the ...

  6. Slope instabilities occurred at high elevation in the Italian Alps in 2016: regional landscape fragility and meteorological framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarle, Marta; Cat Berro, Daniele; Mercalli, Luca; Mortara, Giovanni; Nigrelli, Guido

    2017-04-01

    The Italian side of the Alps includes some of the most fascinating and, at the same time, fragile landscapes of the European Alps (e.g. the Mont Blanc Massif, the Matterhorn and the Dolomites). The relatively low latitude and the prevalence of the exposure to the South, together with a decrease of approximately 10% of the precipitation in the last 100 years, have exacerbated more than in other parts of the European Alps the consequences of climate warming on the cryosphere. It is a fact that many Italian ridges extend in the lower fringe of the permafrost and that glacier shrinkage since the end of the Little Ice Age has been dramatic, up to the almost complete deglaciation of most of the south-western and eastern Italian Alps. In view of this, and of the fact that 2016 has been declared as the warmest year on record globally, we analyze the natural instability events that occurred in 2016 in the Italian Alps at high elevation (> 1500 m a.s.l.). More than 20 events have been reported in the period March-October, mostly in the western and eastern Italian Alps. Rockfalls significantly outweigh other types of instabilities, but ice falls, glacial outburst floods and debris flows have also been documented. The properties and spatial occurrence of these instability processes will be discussed, as well as the synoptic meteorological context in which they developed, in order to contribute to the discussion on how ongoing environmental changes are influencing the response of glaciated and recently deglaciated slopes to meteorological forcing, and thus hazard occurrence.

  7. Debris flows in the eastern Italian Alps: seasonality and atmospheric circulation patterns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nikolopoulos, E. I; Borga, M; Marra, F; Crema, S; Marchi, L

    2015-01-01

    ... (eastern Italian Alps). Analysis is based on classification algorithms applied to a uniquely dense archive of debris flows and hourly rain gauge precipitation series covering the period 2000–2009...

  8. Climate anomalies associated with the occurrence of rockfalls at high-elevation in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranunzio, Roberta; Laio, Francesco; Chiarle, Marta; Nigrelli, Guido; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2016-09-01

    Climate change is seriously affecting the cryosphere in terms, for example, of permafrost thaw, alteration of rain / snow ratio, and glacier shrinkage. There is concern about the increasing number of rockfalls at high elevation in the last decades. Nevertheless, the exact role of climate parameters in slope instability at high elevation has not been fully explored yet. In this paper, we investigate 41 rockfalls listed in different sources (newspapers, technical reports, and CNR IRPI archive) in the elevation range 1500-4200 m a.s.l. in the Italian Alps between 1997 and 2013 in the absence of an evident trigger. We apply and improve an existing data-based statistical approach to detect the anomalies of climate parameters (temperature and precipitation) associated with rockfall occurrences. The identified climate anomalies have been related to the spatiotemporal distribution of the events. Rockfalls occurred in association with significant temperature anomalies in 83 % of our case studies. Temperature represents a key factor contributing to slope failure occurrence in different ways. As expected, warm temperatures accelerate snowmelt and permafrost thaw; however, surprisingly, negative anomalies are also often associated with slope failures. Interestingly, different regional patterns emerge from the data: higher-than-average temperatures are often associated with rockfalls in the Western Alps, while in the Eastern Alps slope failures are mainly associated with colder-than-average temperatures.

  9. Phenology in the Western Alps: first results of the PhenoALP project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonese, Edoardo; Tracol, Yann

    2010-05-01

    along altitudinal transects of artificial nest-boxes. Moreover a protocol for the monitoring of the reproductive phases of Rana temporaria has been defined and observations are done in some ponds along an elevation gradient. A third activity of the project aims to analyse the relations between the seasonal and interannual variability of plant phenology and productivity, assessed measuring CO2 fluxes. To achieve this goal, two eddy covariance towers have been installed in a larch forest (2150 m asl) and in an alpine grassland (2160 m asl) in sites where phenology is monitored by field observations and webcams. Associated with these activities, a great effort is made towards the involvement of educational institutions in the observations of the seasonal changes of alpine ecosystems. During 2010, five school complexes located in the Italian side of the Western Alps will be involved in the French monitoring network of phenology in the Alps: Phenoclim (http://www.crea.hautesavoie.net/eng/phenoclim/index.php).Italian project partners will train schools to start phenological observations.

  10. Nutrient flows in lowland dairy farms in the Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Bassanino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A traditional dairy production system is still common today in the mountain environment of the Italian Alps, enhancing the economic valorisation of milk through the production of quality cheese such as Fontina PDO (Protected Designation of Origin, and favouring the agro-environmental management of marginal areas. This type of dairy system depends mainly on summer grazing: farmers set up the farm stock on the basis of the high-altitude grassland areas available. For the rest of the year, the livestock is housed on the farm lowland, consequently reaching high stocking rates. Since grassland areas are limited in size here, animal feeding is largely based on acquired forages. In order to study the environmental sustainability of the lowland farm areas, agronomic management, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P farm-gate balances were calculated for 22 livestock farms in the Valle d’Aosta region. Lowland surfaces show a quite high variability, with an average value of 6.8 ha. An unbalanced stocking rate referred to the lowland is common showing an average value of 5.7 L.U. ha-1, but reaching a maximum of 26.8 L.U. ha-1. Lowland milk production is approximately 1700 kg per L.U. per year, but some farms could reach 3500 kg per L.U. The feed efficiency varies from 1.1 to 4.7 kg milk per kg feed, depending on the farm feeding strategy. The average N farm-gate balance is equal to 75 kg N ha-1. The two main input components are represented by purchased hay and feed, both showing the highest variability between farms. The output data also differ substantially between farms. The manure sold is the most important output component and represents 70% of the total output on average. The P farm gate balance surplus is equal to 6 kg ha-1, but more than 25% of the farms considered show a negative value. The surpluses calculated in this work can be compared with the values belonging to a distribution calculated for bovine farms under different management and

  11. The lynx in the Italian South-Eastern Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Molinari

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract From 1986 to May 1995 I collected records of signs of lynx presence in the region of Friuli Venezia Giulia. A series of regularly checked trail transects, explorative excursions, and the collection of second-hand observations led to a total of 150 records. They confirm lynx presence and allow an assessment of the situation. The first lynx are believed to have immigrated to the northern part of the study area from Austria. An increase and the distribution in the signs of presence show a south-westerly expansion. The trend in the Julian Alps and Pre-Alps is also increasing. Some interpretations of the status of this new population are made. The study area is in the far south-eastern Alps. This area is important as a corridor between the Alps and the Balkans, where a reintroduced lynx population exists which would be able to support the Alpine lynx population through dispersing lynx.

  12. Present status and distribution of the Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx in the Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Molinari

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To analyse the status and distribution of lynx in the Italian Alps from 1995 to 1999, all signs of lynx presence found were pooled, evaluated and interpreted with the same method. We distinguished three levels of reliability in accordance with the SCALP guidelines and the possibility to verify the collected data: Quality 1 (Q1 represent the hard facts, e.g. all reports of lynx killed, found dead or photographs and videos of lynx. Quality 2 (Q2 include all records of wild prey remains, livestock killed, tracks and scats confirmed by people who attended special courses, e.g. mainly game and forest wardens. Quality 3 (Q3 are all signs of presence reported by the general public as well as all sightings and vocalisations, e.g. mainly signs that cannot be verified. A total of 261 signs of lynx presence were recorded in the Italian Alps, of which 85 were Q2, the remaining were Q3 as no Q1 data was reported. The Q2 data was confined to four different areas whereas the Q3 data showed a scattered distribution in all the Alps. The dynamics in the Italian Alps during the past pentad was characterised by four main events: (1 the positive trend that had been observed in the north-east of Friuli V.G. (the Tarvisiano up until 1995 decreased, but (2 at the same time an increased number of data was reported from north-east of the Veneto (Province of Belluno. Consequently, in the south-eastern Alps more data were collected over a bigger area than in the previous pentad. (3 The lynx occurrence of unknown origin in the Trentino has gone extinct again. And (4 the suspected presence of lynx in the Val d'Aosta and in the northernmost Piemonte (Val d'Ossola was confirmed by Q2 data. In Italy, lynx still have not established a vital population even though suitable habitat is available from the south-western through to the eastern Alps. With the exception of the new occurrence in the province of Belluno, lynx occur only in areas bordering with

  13. The species of the genus Diamesa (Diptera, Chironomidae) known to occur in Italian Alps and Apennines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Matteo; Urbanelli, Sandra; Rossaro, Bruno

    2016-11-15

    Some rare species from Italian Alps, belonging to the genus Diamesa Meigen, 1835 (Diptera, Chironomidae) are here redescribed as adult males, because only old, incomplete descriptions are available for these taxa. Terminology of male genitalia is reviewed, diagnostic features are illustrated in detail, and notes on biology and geographical distribution of the examined species are provided. An identification key to the known adult males is presented.

  14. Debris flows in the eastern Italian Alps: seasonality and atmospheric circulation patterns

    OpenAIRE

    E. I. Nikolopoulos; M. Borga; Marra, F.; Crema, S.; Marchi, L.

    2015-01-01

    The work examines the seasonality and large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns associated with debris-flow occurrence in the Trentino–Alto Adige region (eastern Italian Alps). Analysis is based on classification algorithms applied to a uniquely dense archive of debris flows and hourly rain gauge precipitation series covering the period 2000–2009. Results highlight the seasonal and synoptic forcing patterns linked to debris flows in the study area. Summer and fall season ...

  15. Debris flow monitoring experience in the Cancia basin (Dolomites, Northeast Italian Alps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancanelli, Laura; Bernard, Martino; Gregoretti, Carlo; Berti, Matteo; Simoni, Alessandro; Lanzoni, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The monitoring campaign presented here aims to understand the dynamics of sediment transport processes in small head-water catchments of the Italian Alps and to evaluate the rainfall thresholds for debris flow triggering. The monitored basin of Cancia is located on the Eastern Italian Dolomites, in the Belluno Province. In particular, it is situated on the left side on the Boite river valley, next to the Borca di Cadore village, and is delimited by the western slope of the Mt. Antelao. The drainage area is 1.8 km2 while the elevation ranges from 2451 m a.s.l. to 880 m a.s.l., with a slope varying from 30-40° in the upper part to 10-15° in the lower part (fan area). The basin is characterized by a lithology very common in the Italian Alps, which consist of high permeability, poorly sorted rock debris, containing boulders up to 3-4 m in diameter, and include heterogeneous scree, alluvium and old debris flow deposits. The spatial distribution of sediment is characterized by: an upper part where prevails the presence of rocks, a medium part characterized by poorly sorted rock debris and fine sediment material, and a downstream part plenty of sediment material The Cancia basin is prone to stony debris flows, owing to the plenty availability of loose and coarse sediments and frequent convective events. In particular, the smaller grain sized material is provided by the erosion of lateral slope, while gravel, pebbles and cobbles are provided by the upper part of the basin, characterized by rocky material. The precipitation regime is marked by rainfalls of short duration and high intensity, usually occurring in the summer period. The debris flow channel has began to be surveyed in August 2009 to identify the debris flow generation area. At the beginning of July 2013 topographical surveys of the channel downstream the triggering area began in order to investigate the morphological evolution of the debris flow channel from 2013 until 2015. Moreover, at the beginning of

  16. The impact of overgrazing on dung beetle diversity in the Italian Maritime Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, Matteo; Rolando, Antonio; Palestrini, Claudia

    2011-10-01

    Dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) are undoubtedly the most typical and ecologically relevant insects of grazed alpine habitats because they provide valuable ecological services such as biological pest control and soil fertilization. Despite the great ecological contribution of these insects to pasture ecosystem functioning, little is known about their direct or indirect relationships with pastoral activities. The main aim of the study was to assess whether dung beetle diversity was influenced by different intensities of cattle grazing. Dung beetle communities of two adjacent alpine valleys within the Maritime Alps Natural Park (north-western Italian Alps), representing overgrazed and ungrazed pastures, were studied by pitfall trapping. A hierarchical design (three levels: valleys, transects, and replicates) was established for additive partitioning of γ-diversity and Indicator Species Analysis. Evenness and Shannon diversity were significantly higher at the ungrazed than at the overgrazed site because abundances were much more evenly distributed at the former than at the latter site (where one species was dominant over all the others). Dung beetle abundance and species richness of the overgrazed graminaceous pasture vegetation types were in most cases significantly lower than those of the ungrazed nongraminaceous vegetation type. In the additive partitioning of γ -diversity analysis relative to the whole study area, the randomization procedure indicated that the contribution of β to γ-diversity was significantly different from that expected by chance, suggesting that one or more environmental factors has intervened to change the partition of total diversity in the system considered. The analysis of the preferences and fidelity of species (Indicator Species Analysis) showed that only one species chose overgrazed pastures; all the others positively selected the ungrazed site, or the only ungrazed pasture vegetation type (Rumicetum alpini Beger) occurring at

  17. PHENOALP: a new project on phenology in the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonese, E.

    2009-04-01

    PHENOALP is a new EU co-funded Interreg Project under the operational programme for cross-border cooperation "Italy-France (Alps-ALCOTRA)" 2007 - 2013, aiming to get a better understanding of phenological changes in the Alps. The major goals of the project are: 1- The implementation of an observation network in the involved territories (i.e. the Aosta Valley and the Savoies in the Western Alps); 2- The definition of a common observation strategy and common protocols; 3- The involvement of local community members (e.g. through schools) in the observation activities as a way to increase the awareness on the issue of the effects of climate change. Project leader is the Environmental Protection Agency of Aosta Valley (ARPA Valle d'Aosta - IT) and the partners are the Research Center on High Altitude Ecosystem (CREA - FR), Mont Avic Regional Parc (IT), Bauges Massif Regional Natural Parc (FR) and the Protected Area Service of Aosta Valley (IT). Project activities are: 1. Pheno-plantes: definition of common observation protocols (e.g. field observation and webcams) of different alpine species (trees and herbaceous) and implementation of the observation network; analysis of the relations between climate and phenological events; application and evaluation of phenological models. 2. Pheno-detection: remote sensing of European larch and high elevation pastures with MODIS data; multitemporal analysis (2000-2011) of phenological variations in the Western Alps. 3. Pheno-flux: analysis of the relation between the seasonal and interannual variability of plant phenology and productivity, assessed measuring CO2 fluxes (eddy-covariance technique), radiometric indexes and phenological events at specific (European larch stand and alpine pastures) monitoring site. 4. Pheno-zoo: definition of common observation protocols for the phenology of animal taxa (birds, mammals, amphibians and insects) along altitudinal gradients; implementation of the observation network. 5. Inter

  18. New, rare or remarkable microfungi in the Italian Alps (Carnic Alps)--part I--ascomycotina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feige, G B; Ale-Agha, N; Jensen, M; Christiaans, B; Kricke, R

    2004-01-01

    During our observations in the SE part of the Carnic Alps in the year 2003 we were able to collect and identify 35 ascomycetes on trees and dead wood. Among these one can find numerous ascomycetes of different orders e.g. Pyrenomycetes, Loculoascomycetes and Discomycetes. Some species like Botryosphaeria ribis GROSENLUCHER & DUGGAR on Ribes alpinum L., Dothiora pyrenophora (FR.) FR. on Sorbus aucuparia L., Gemmamyces piceae (BORTH.) CASAGO. on Picea excelsa (LAM.) LINK, Glomerella montana (SACC.) v. ARX & E. MULLER on Sesleria caerulea (L.) ARD, Hymenoscyphus immutabilis (Fuck.) Dennis on Alnus incana (L.) Moench, Hysterographium fraxini (PERS. Ex. FR.) de Not. on Fraxinus ornus L., Lachnellula willkommii (Hartig) DENNIS [= Trichascyphella willkommii (Hartig) NANNF.] on Larix decidua MILL.,Leptosphaeria lycopodina (Mont.) SACC. on Lycopodium annotinum L., Mollisia adenostylidis REHM. on Adenostyles glabra (MILL.) DC., Pezicula cinnamomea (DC.)SACC. [ana: Cryptosporiopsis quercina PETRAK] on Quercus robur L., Pyrenopeziza petiolaris (A. & S. Ex FR.) NANNF. on Acer pseudoplatanus L., Tapesia rosae (PERS.) FUCKEL on Rosa canina L., are new for this area. All specimen are deposited in the Herbarium ESS Mycotheca Parva, Collection G.B. Feige/N. Ale-Agha.

  19. Climatic conditions associated to the occurrence of slope instabilities in the Italian Alps in year 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranunzio, Roberta; Chiarle, Marta; Laio, Francesco; Luino, Fabio; Nigrelli, Guido; Turconi, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Studies carried out in different parts of the world have shown that, in the mountain high-elevation sites, temperature can play a major role in the preparation and trigger of slope instabilities. However, the interplay with other climatic parameters (in particular precipitation) and the nature of the climate-driven processes that lead to the development of slope instability continue to be poorly understood. This understanding is crucial in order to define reliable scenarios of the evolution of slope instability under the expected climatic and environmental changes. The present work aims to contribute to shed light on these issues by analyzing with the statistical and probabilistic method developed by Paranunzio et al. (2016) the values of the climatic parameters associated to the most significant events of slope instability occurred at high elevation in the Italian Alps in 2016. The method allows to detect the anomalies in temperature and precipitation values that are associated to the development of these slope instabilities, providing the ground for discussion of possible causes and triggering mechanisms, also in the framework of ongoing climate change. Paranunzio R., Laio F., Chiarle M., Nigrelli G., Guzzetti F. (2016) - Climate anomalies associated to the occurrence of rockfalls at high-elevation in the Italian Alps. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 16, 2085-2106, DOI: 10.5194/nhess-16-2085-2016;

  20. An original methodology to compute SWE of mountainous regions: insight from the Italian Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfarra, Paola; Valt, Mauro

    2013-04-01

    In this work we present an original methodology for the evaluation of the Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) from regions covering an area of about 5000 km2. The methodology has been tuned and set up over the Italian Eastern Alps using MODIS satellite images (http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/realtime/) and data derived from the monitoring network of the local Snow Avalanche Services. The methodology includes: i) the identification of the Snow Covered Area (SCA) from satellite images; ii) the near real-time computation of the snow depth (Hs) mean values from the available monitoring networks; iii) the derivation of the mean snow density by season and by depth interval. Satellite image processing for the computation of the SCA has been tuned up specifically for the Eastern Alps region and includes the computation of the Normalised Difference Snow Index and a threshold value ad hoc for the investigated area; the use of a Decision Tree. The identification of the most effective (the best) threshold value is the most sensitive part of the image processing because this threshold depends on many factors such as the local physiographic setting, the altitude intervals, the shadows, and the vegetation. By comparing the obtained SCA map with the digital elevation model of the investigated region it is possible to derive the snow covered area by altitude intervals. Italian Snow Avalanche Services control networks for the monitoring of the Hs over their competence. Those networks are based on real time automatic measurement systems or snow field where manual measurement are daily performed every morning. From those measurements are then derived mean Hs values for altitude interval (every 300 m starting from 600 m elevation in the Eastern Italian Alps). The altitude intervals are chosen based on the physiographic setting and the local climate of the investigated region. Snow density values are derived from long time-series data base where measurements from the Italian Alps are

  1. Contribution to knowledge of the bryophyte flora of the western Alps (Italy, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabovljević M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study is a contribution to knowledge of the bryophyte flora of the Alps. The huge bryophyte collection made during 1997 in the Western Alps is presented. A total of 152 bryophyte species were recorded, including 113 mosses and 39 hepatics.

  2. Quality traits of saffron (Crocus sativus L. produced in the Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgi Annamaria

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Saffron (Crocus sativus L. is a perennial herbaceous geophyte in the Iridaceae family. It propagates vegetatively by corm. All saffron production processes are generally conducted by hand: from bulb implantation, harvesting of flowers to stigma separation. Saffron is the most expensive spice in the world because of the intensive hand labour required for production. The increasing interest in Crocus sativus cultivation and production in the Italian Alpine area could increase revenues for the rural farming economy. Twenty eight dried saffron samples were collected from different farmers of the Italian Alpine area (Lombardia, Trentino Alto Adige, Piemonte and Veneto between November 2015 and March 2016. Each sample was processed to determine their moisture content and amount of picrocrocin, crocins and safranal using the methods established by the International Organization for Standardization for saffron (ISO 3632 1,2:2010-2011. Over 82.1 % of the samples analyzed were ranked in the highest quality category of the ISO 3632. A high quality saffron product can be produced in the Italian Alpine area suggesting that this crop could serve as a sustainable source of economic revenues to diversified farms in the Alps.

  3. WOLF (CANIS LUPUS PREDATION ON DAIRY CATTLE IN EASTERN ITALIAN ALPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Faccioni

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural wolf recolonization of the Alps brings the challenge to reduce livestock losses and social conflicts. The uncommon impact of a wolf pack on the cattle farming systems of the “Lessinia”, in the eastern Italian Alps was examined in this study. Dairy cattle farming predominates there using summer pastures (June-September and grazing on lowland meadows out of summer. Grazing is organized with aim to minimize labour and costs. Animals are usually left unattended during the day and night in unprotected pastures. Since the return of the wolf in 2012, which formed a pack in 2013, attacks to livestock increased rapidly. Predations peaked during the summer, and they also were extended into the preceding and following months, especially during 2014. Cattle were the predominant species predated (79% of events and 71% of individual losses, with a strong selection towards young age classes. To prevent attacks, livestock should be grouped and kept protected by electric fences or in stables during the night, but this is in contrast with the freegrazing management that farmers have adopted for reducing costs. We suggest that management costs and introduction of protection measures changes should be taken into account for a future economic valorisation of the cattle farming sector.

  4. Eclogitic metatrondhjemites from metaophiolites of the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Silvana; Tartarotti, Paola; Meyzen, Chrstine; Benciolini, Luca; Toffolo, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Eclogitic metatrondhjemites from metaophiolites of the Western Alps Martin S.**, Tartarotti P.*, Meyzen C. **, Benciolini L.***, Toffolo L. ** *Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Milano ** Dipartimento di Geoscienze, Università di Padova *** Dipartimento di Chimica, Fisica e Ambiente, Università di Udine In the Urtier valley (southern Aosta Valley, Italy), the Piemonte metaophiolites mainly consist of serpentinized peridotites including pods and boudinaged layers of Fe-metagabbro and trondhjemite transposed in the main eclogitic foliation. The contact between serpentinized peridotites and Fe-metagabbro/trondhjemite is locally lined by chloriteschist and rodingite. The high pressure parageneses in the Fe-metagabbro are omphacite-garnet-rutile-glaucophane-phengite, and in the metatrondhjemite plagioclase-quartz-phengite-clinozoisite-epidote-garnet, respectively. Bulk-rock major and trace elements in addition to O isotope analyses were performed in both rock types. Fe-metagabbros are characterized by MgO wt% ranging between 6.11 and 9.63%, ∑REE= 20-101 ppm, (La/Yb)N = 0.22-0.91; trondhjemites have SiO2 43%, Al2O3 ranging between 21 and 24%, CaO ranging between 17 and 20%, ∑REE = 172 - 272 ppm, (La/Yb)N ranging between 7.78 and 13.70. The δ18O is 5.9 ‰ in a Fe-metagabbro sample and 7.4 ‰ in a trondhjemite sample, suggesting that these rocks have been affected by a weak oceanic low temperature alteration. The high CaO content may indicate a metasomatic process which could have occurred during the oceanic stage or at high pressure conditions.

  5. Source and origin of atmospheric trace elements entrapped in winter snow of the Italian Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, P.; Cozzi, G.; Torcini, S.; Cescon, P.; Barbante, C.

    2006-09-01

    Trace elements concentrations were determined in shallow snow samples from 21 sites in the Italian Eastern Alps in order to identify the sources of the contaminants present in the tropospheric winter boundary layer. The collection of superficial snow layers was carried out weekly at altitudes between 1000 and 3000 m next to meteorological stations, far away from villages, roads and ski slopes. Ultra clean procedures were adopted in order to avoid contamination of the snow during the different experimental phases. Trace elements (Ag, Ba, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mo, Mn, Pb, Sb, Ti, U, V and Zn) were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Sector Field Mass Spectrometer (ICP-SFMS). Ancillary parameters such as major ions (SO42-, NO3-, Ca2+;, Mg2+, KAlps, and higher at lower altitudes (Pre-Alps), the structure of the chemical content deposited by wet/dry mechanisms, resulted as rather uniform over the territory studied during the time considered. PCA shows that the chemical content of the snow is characterised by an anthropogenic component (V, Sb, Zn, Cd, Mo, Pb, Ag, Bi, SO42-, NO3-), mainly originating from the traffic in the adjacent Alpine valleys and the nearby heavily industrialised area of the Po Valley, a crustal component (Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn, U, Ti, Fe, Cr, Co, Cu and Ba) mainly from the geological carbonate background (Dolomites) of the Eastern Alps, and a marine component (Na+, Cl-) from the Mediterranean Sea. It is likely that transport and mixing of trace elements in the winter boundary layer occurred at a local (~10 km) and regional (~100 km) scale, and was due not only to the weak convection within the

  6. Ivrea mantle wedge and arc of the Western Alps (I): Geophysical evidence for the deep structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissling, Edi; Schmid, Stefan M.; Diehl, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    The construction of five crustal-scale profiles across the Western Alps and the Ivrea mantle wedge integrates up-to-date geological and geophysical information and reveals important along strike changes in the overall structure of the crust of the Western Alpine arc (Schmid et al. 2017). The 3D crustal model of the Western Alps represented by these cross sections is based on recent P-velocity local earthquake tomography that compliments the previously existing wealth of geophysical information about lithosphere structure in the region. As part of Adria mantle lithosphere exhibiting strong upward bending toward the plate boundary along the inner arc of the Western Alps, the well-known Ivrea body plays a crucial role in our tectonic model. Until recently, however, the detailed 3D geometry of this key structure was only poorly constrained. In this study we present a review of the many seismic data in the region and we document the construction of our 3D lithosphere model by principles of multidisciplinary seismic tomography. Reference: Stefan M. Schmid, Edi Kissling, Douwe J.J. van Hinsbergen, Giancarlo Molli (2017). Ivrea mantle wedge and arc of the Western Alps (2): Kinematic evolution of the Alps-Apennines orogenic system. Abstract Volume EGU 2017.

  7. Time constraints for post-LGM landscape response to deglaciation in Val Viola, Central Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Riccardo; Brardinoni, Francesco; Crosta, Giovanni Battista; Cola, Giuseppe; Mair, Volkmar

    2017-12-01

    Across the northern European Alps, a long tradition of Quaternary studies has constrained post-LGM (Last Glacial Maximum) landscape history. The same picture remains largely unknown for the southern portion of the orogen. In this work, starting from existing 10Be exposure dating of three boulders in Val Viola, Central Italian Alps, we present the first detailed, post-LGM reconstruction of landscape (i.e., glacial, periglacial and paraglacial) response south of the Alpine divide. We pursue this task through Schmidt-hammer exposure-age dating (SHD) at 34 sites including moraines, rock glaciers, protalus ramparts, rock avalanche deposits and talus cones. In addition, based on the mapping of preserved moraines and on the numerical SHD ages, we reconstruct the glacier extent of four different stadials, including Egesen I (13.1 ± 1.1 ka), Egesen II (12.3 ± 0.6 ka), Kartell (11.0 ± 1.4 ka) and Kromer (9.7 ± 1.4 ka), whose chronologies agree with available counterparts from north of the Alpine divide. Results show that Equilibrium Line Altitude depressions (ΔELAs) associated to Younger Dryas and Early Holocene stadials are smaller than documented at most available sites in the northern Alps. These findings not only support the hypothesis of a dominant north westerly atmospheric circulation during the Younger Dryas, but also suggest that this pattern could have lasted until the Early Holocene. SHD ages on rock glaciers and protalus ramparts indicate that favourable conditions to periglacial landform development occurred during the Younger Dryas (12.7 ± 1.1 ka), on the valley slopes above the glacier, as well as in newly de-glaciated areas, during the Early Holocene (10.7 ± 1.3 and 8.8 ± 1.8 ka). The currently active rock glacier started to develop before 3.7 ± 0.8 ka and can be associated to the Löbben oscillation. Four of the five rock avalanches dated in Val Viola cluster within the Early Holocene, in correspondence of an atmospheric warming phase. By contrast

  8. Conservation genetics of the yellow-bellied toad (Bombina variegata) and the common lizard (Zootoca vivipara) in the Italian Alps

    OpenAIRE

    Cornetti, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Global change is heavily affecting Alpine ecosystems in term of both climate warming and anthropization and its effects have been already demonstrated for many different taxa. However, understanding the genetic consequences on wild species caused by environmental modifications is complicated. In this thesis, I analyzed the genetic variation pattern in two vertebrate species whose distribution and persistence across the Italian Alps could be, or already have been, affected by changing climatic...

  9. Pressure variations in the Monte Rosa nappe, Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Cindy; Vaughan-Hammon, Joshua; Baumgartner, Lukas; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    The Monte Rosa nappe is part of the Penninic nappe stack of the Western Alps. It represents the southern-most European continental basement involved in the alpine orogeny. It consists of a pre-Variscan basement complex, made of mostly metapelites and paragneisses, which were intruded by a Permian-age granitic body (Pawlig, 2001). The nappe is heterogeneously deformed, with localized high strain domains separating low strain domains. The metamorphic record is tightly linked to deformation. Different thermodynamic data bases and approaches were used in the past to estimate the peak alpine metamorphic conditions. They range from 1.2 to 2.7 GPa and 490 to 650˚C, based on metagranite, metapelite, metamafic and whiteschist assemblages. The peak alpine metamorphic assemblage of zoisite, phengite and albite symplectites pseudomorphing magmatic plagioclase is preserved only in the less deformed portions of the nappe. Phengite, garnet and titanite coronas surrounding biotite, quartz and igneous K-feldspar make up the rest of the rock. The metagranite locally grades into 10 to 50 meters whiteschist bodies, consisting of talc-chloritoid-kyanite-phengite-quartz, which can contain carbonate and garnet. Their chemistry is interpreted as a metasomatic product of the late magmatic hydrothermal alteration of the granite, whereas their mineralogy results from the alpine high pressure metamorphism (Pawlig and Baumgartner, 2001; Luisier et al., 2015). We performed a phase petrology and textural study to consistently estimate peak alpine metamorphic conditions in the granite and the related whiteschists. Textural observations were used to select the best-preserved high-pressure metagranite samples. Inherited magmatic feldspar textures indicate that jadeite was never formed in these granites, confirmed independently by Si in phengite barometer (1.2 to 1.5 GPa). Note that the granite contains the phengite buffer assemblage of Massonne and Schreyer (1987). Thermodynamic calculations using

  10. Environmental drivers of phototrophic biofilms in an Alpine show cave (SW-Italian Alps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, E; Bona, F; Falasco, E; La Morgia, V; Badino, G; Isaia, M

    2015-12-01

    The proliferation of lampenflora is a major threat for the conservation of show caves, since phototrophic organisms cause physical, chemical and aesthetic damage to speleothems. In this paper we examine the environmental factors influencing the presence and the growth of the three main photosynthetic groups composing phototrophic biofilms in the Bossea show cave (SW-Italian Alps). The presence and the primary production of cyanobacteria, diatoms and green algae were detected with BenthoTorch®, an instrument for in situ measurement of chlorophyll a concentration that has never been used before in caves. By means of different techniques of regression analysis, we highlighted the response of the three photosynthetic groups to different environmental factors. Illuminance proved to be the main factor influencing positively both the probability of the presence and the productivity of the three groups. The presence of seeping water on the substrate and the distance from the cave entrance proved to play an important role in determining patterns of colonization. By means of GIS techniques, we provide thematic maps of the cave, providing a representation of pattern of the density of the three examined photosynthetic groups within different areas of the cave. The same approach may apply to other show caves, aiming at providing suggestions for the cave management (i.e. cleaning of the cave walls and positioning of artificial lights) and reduce impact caused by tourism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Catchment features controlling nitrogen dynamics in running waters above the tree line (central Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Balestrini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of nitrogen cycling in mountain areas has a long tradition, as it was applied to better understand and describe ecosystem functioning, as well as to quantify long-distance effects of human activities on remote environments. Nonetheless, very few studies, especially in Europe, have considered catchment features controlling nitrogen dynamics above the tree line with focus on running waters. In this study, relationships between some water chemistry descriptors – including nitrogen species and dissolved organic carbon (DOC – and catchment characteristics were evaluated for a range of sites located above the tree line (1950–2650 m a.s.l. at Val Masino, in the central Italian Alps. Land cover categories as well as elevation and slope were assessed at each site. Water samples were collected during the 2007 and 2008 snow free periods, with a nearly monthly frequency. In contrast to dissolved organic nitrogen, nitrate concentrations in running waters showed a spatial pattern strictly connected to the fractional extension of tundra and talus in each basin. Exponential models significantly described the relationships between maximum NO3 and the fraction of vegetated soil cover (negative relation and talus (positive relation, explaining almost 90% of nitrate variation in running waters. Similarly to nitrate but with an opposite behavior, DOC was positively correlated with vegetated soil cover and negatively correlated with talus. Therefore, land cover can be considered one of the most important factors affecting water quality in high-elevation catchments with contrasting effects on N and C pools.

  12. Environmental drivers of phototrophic biofilms in an Alpine show cave (SW-Italian Alps)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piano, E., E-mail: elena.piano@unito.it [Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Turin, Via Accademia Albertina 13, 10123 Turin (Italy); Bona, F.; Falasco, E. [Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Turin, Via Accademia Albertina 13, 10123 Turin (Italy); La Morgia, V. [ISPRA, via Ca' Fornacetta, 9, 40064 Ozzano dell' Emilia (Italy); Badino, G. [Department of Physics, University of Turin, Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Turin (Italy); Isaia, M. [Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Turin, Via Accademia Albertina 13, 10123 Turin (Italy)

    2015-12-01

    The proliferation of lampenflora is a major threat for the conservation of show caves, since phototrophic organisms cause physical, chemical and aesthetic damage to speleothems. In this paper we examine the environmental factors influencing the presence and the growth of the three main photosynthetic groups composing phototrophic biofilms in the Bossea show cave (SW-Italian Alps). The presence and the primary production of cyanobacteria, diatoms and green algae were detected with BenthoTorch®, an instrument for in situ measurement of chlorophyll a concentration that has never been used before in caves. By means of different techniques of regression analysis, we highlighted the response of the three photosynthetic groups to different environmental factors. Illuminance proved to be the main factor influencing positively both the probability of the presence and the productivity of the three groups. The presence of seeping water on the substrate and the distance from the cave entrance proved to play an important role in determining patterns of colonization. By means of GIS techniques, we provide thematic maps of the cave, providing a representation of pattern of the density of the three examined photosynthetic groups within different areas of the cave. The same approach may apply to other show caves, aiming at providing suggestions for the cave management (i.e. cleaning of the cave walls and positioning of artificial lights) and reduce impact caused by tourism. - Highlights: • We used a PAM fluorimeter on autotrophic biofilms in a show cave for the first time. • We modelled the environmental factors influencing phototrophic biofilms. • Illuminance, moisture and distance from the entrance proved to be significant. • We produced thematic maps illustrating our results. • We provide suggestions for cave management.

  13. Environmental impact of cow milk production in the central Italian Alps using Life Cycle Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara A. Penati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze environmental impact of cow milk production in an alpine area through a cradle-to-farm-gate Life Cycle Assessment and to identify farming strategies that can improve environmental sustainability without negatively affecting profitability. Data were collected from farmers in 28 dairy farms in an Italian alpine valley. The production of 1 kg of fat protein corrected milk (FPCM needed 3.18 m2 of land; land use on-farm was high because a large part of farm land consisted of pastures in the highland, used extensively during summer. Also the use of energy from non-renewable sources was high, 5.14 MJ kg FPCM-1 on average. Diesel for production and transportation of feed purchased off-farm was mainly used, especially concentrates which were entirely purchased. The average emission of greenhouse and acidification causing gases was 1.14 kg CO2-eq and 0.021 kg SO2-eq kg FPCM-1. Eutrophication was on average 0.077 kg of nitrate-eq kg FPCM-1. Farms with low producing cows had higher environmental impact per kg of milk and lower gross margin per cow compared to the others. Low stocking rate farms had the best results regarding acidification and eutrophication per kg FPCM. Farms with high feed self-sufficiency had significantly lower acidification potential than the others. Increasing milk yield per cow, by selection and feeding, and enhancing feed self-sufficiency, by higher forage production and quality and more exploitation of highland pastures, seem to be the best strategies to improve ecological performances of dairy farms in the Alps while maintaining their profitability.

  14. Drainage Basin Sensitivity to Climate Change in the Eastern Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathburn, S. L.; Comiti, F.; Brardinoni, F.; Sparacino, M.; Schook, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the past decades, increases in summer air temperatures generate glacial-melt floods with higher than normal magnitudes, increase the frequency of high intensity rainfall events, and lead to permafrost degradation of steep rocky slopes prone to mass wasting. Continued climatic warming has the potential to drastically increase the sediment supply to the channel network. A US-Italy collaboration is characterizing response domains for drainage basins undergoing deglaciation in the Italian Alps to develop sensitivity indices of changes in flow and sediment dynamics. Six glaciated basins 85-160 km2 in size within the upper Adige River Valley are analyzed. Three study basins have multi-year data on either the spatial distribution of mass wasting and sediment production or hydrology and sediment transport over snow and glacial melt, or both. The other three basins are tested for applicability of the sensitivity indices where field data are lacking. Preliminary results indicate basin lithology and degree of sediment connectivity are the dominant controls on drainage basin response. Four broadly applicable response domains incorporate metamorphic, sedimentary, or mixed bedrock lithology with high to low connectivity. The sensitivity indices for fluvial response are controlled by valley confinement and channel morphologic changes. A historic topographic map from 1858 provides qualitative channel geometry information at the end of the Little Ice Age and glacial extent for all basins. Aerial photographs from 1945, 1954, 1971, and lidar and imagery from 2005 or 2011, along with field verification quantify valley confinement, braiding index and sediment connectivity. Key controls on sediment delivery to channels include glacially-inherited topography and the distribution of glacigenic surficial materials. Sediment cascade modeling will identify sediment sources, pathways and sinks and provide a first order understanding of basin-scale response to climate change.

  15. Modeling four occurred debris flow events in the Dolomites area (North-Eastern Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreggio, Mauro; Gregoretti, Carlo; Degetto, Massimo; Bernard, Martino

    2016-04-01

    Four occurred debris flows in the Dolomites area (North-Eastern Italian Alps) are modeled by back-analysis. The four debris flows events are those occurred at Rio Lazer (Trento) on the 4th of November 1966, at Fiames (Belluno) on the 5th of July 2006, at Rovina di Cancia (Belluno) on the 18th of July 2009 and at Rio Val Molinara (Trento) on the 15th of August 2010. In all the events, runoff entrained sediments present on natural channels and formed a solid-liquid wave that routed downstream. The first event concerns the routing of debris flow on an inhabited fan. The second event the deviation of debris flow from the usual path due to an obstruction with the excavation of a channel in the scree and the downstream spreading in a wood. The third event concerns the routing of debris flow in a channel with an ending the reservoir, its overtopping and final spreading in the inhabited area. The fourth event concerns the routing of debris flow along the main channel downstream the initiation area until spreading just upstream a village. All the four occurred debris flows are simulated by modeling runoff that entrained debris flow for determining the solid-liquid hydrograph. The routing of the solid-liquid hydrograph is simulated by a bi-phase cell model based on the kinematic approach. The comparison between simulated and measured erosion and deposition depths is satisfactory. Nearly the same parameters for computing erosion and deposition were used for all the four occurred events. The maps of erosion and deposition depths are obtained by comparing the results of post-event surveys with the pre-event DEM. The post-event surveys were conducted by using different instruments (LiDAR and GPS) or the combination photos-single points depth measurements (in this last case it is possible obtaining the deposition/erosion depths by means of stereoscopy techniques).

  16. Debris flow monitoring in the Acquabona watershed on the Dolomites (Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, M.; Genevois, R.; LaHusen, R.; Simoni, A.; Tecca, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    In 1997 a field monitoring system was installed in Acquabona Creek in the Dolomites (Eastern Italian Alps) to observe the hydrologic conditions for debris flow occurrence and some dynamic properties of debris flow. The monitoring system consists of three remote stations: an upper one located at the head of a deeply-incised channel and two others located downstream. The system is equipped with sensors for measuring rainfall, pore pressures in the mobile channel bottom, ground vibrations, debris flow depth, total normal stress and fluid pore-pressure at the base of the flow. Two video cameras record events at the upper channel station and one video is installed at the lowermost station. During summer 1998, three debris flows (volumes from less than 1000 m3 up to 9000 m3) occurred at Acquabona. The following results were obtained from a preliminary analysis of the data: 1) All of the flows were triggered by rainfalls of less than 1 hour duration, with peak rainfall intensities ranging from 4.8 to 14.7 mm / 10 minute. 2) Debris flows initiated in several reaches of the channel, including the head of the talus slope. 3) The initial surges of the mature flows had a higher solid concentration and a lower velocity (up to 4 m/s) than succeeding, more dilute surges (more than 7 m/s). 4) Total normal stress and pore fluid pressures measured at the base of the flow (mean depth about 1.1 m) were similar (about 15 kPa), indicating a completely liquefied flow. 5) Peak flows entrained debris at a rate of about 6 m3/m of channel length and channel bed scouring was proportional to the local slope gradient and was still evident in the lower channel where the slope was 7??. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigating satellite precipitation uncertainties over a mountainous area in the eastern Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, V.; Nikolopoulos, E. I.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Borga, M., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate quantitative precipitation estimation over mountainous basins is of great importance because of their susceptibility to hazards such as flash floods, shallow landslides, and debris flows, triggered by heavy precipitation events. In situ observations over mountainous areas are limited, but currently available satellite precipitation products are able to provide precipitation estimates over those areas. However, uncertainties in satellite precipitation estimates still represent the main limitation in utilizing these products in hydrological applications. Therefore, quantifying the uncertainty in satellite precipitation products is necessary for enabling an improved use of those products. The study is conducted on the Trentino Alto-Adige region, located in the eastern Italian Alps. Rainfall observations for a 10-yr period (2000-2009) derived from a dense rain gauge network in the region are used as reference. A number of satellite precipitation error properties, typically used in error modeling, are investigated and include the probability of detection, false alarm rates, missed events, spatial correlation of the error, and hit biases are investigated as a function of seasonality, satellite precipitation algorithm, satellite rainfall rate, gauge density, and temporal resolution. Three widely used satellite-based precipitation products are employed: 1) the Climate Prediction Center morphing (CMORPH) product; 2) the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery Using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN); and 3) the TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) 3B42 near-real time product (3B42-RT). These products are the ones on which the new GPM level-3 precipitation product - IMERG - algorithm is based upon. Therefore, a better understanding of uncertainties associated with each single product is fundamental for improving error modeling of this merged satellite precipitation algorithm over complex terrain regions.

  18. Impact of transient climate change upon Grouse population dynamics in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirovano, Andrea; Bocchiola, Daniele

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the effect of short to medium term weather condition, and of transient global warming upon wildlife species life history is essential to predict the demographic consequences therein, and possibly develop adaptation strategies, especially in game species, where hunting mortality may play an important role in population dynamics. We carried out a preliminary investigation of observed impact of weather variables upon population dynamics indexes of three alpine Grouse species (i.e. Rock Ptarmigan, Lagopus Mutus, Black Grouse, Tetrao Tetrix, Rock Partridge, Alectoris Graeca), nested within central Italian Alps, based upon 15 years (1995-2009) of available censuses data, provided by the Sondrio Province authority. We used a set of climate variables already highlighted within recent literature for carrying considerable bearing on Grouse population dynamics, including e.g. temperature at hatching time and during winter, snow cover at nesting, and precipitation during nursing period. We then developed models of Grouses' population dynamics by explicitly driving population change according to their dependence upon the significant weather variables and population density and we evaluated objective indexes to assess the so obtained predictive power. Eventually, we develop projection of future local climate, based upon locally derived trends, and upon projections from GCMs (A2 IPCC storyline) already validated for the area, to project forward in time (until 2100 or so) the significant climatic variables, which we then use to force population dynamics models of the target species. The projected patterns obtained through this exercise are discussed and compared against those expected under stationary climate conditions at present, and preliminary conclusions are drawn.

  19. Retrograde mineral and fluid evolution in high-pressure metapelites (Schistes Lustres unit, Western Alps).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agard, Ph.; Goffe, B.; Touret, J.L.R.; Vidal, O.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid inclusions have been analysed in successive generations of syn-metamorphic segregations within low-grade, high-pressure, low-temperature (HP-LT) metapelites from the Western Alps. Fluid composition was then compared to mass transfer deduced from outcrop-scale retrograde mineral reactions. Two

  20. Operational particle matter (PM 10) monitoring using MODIS satellite data in South Tirol, Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, Anke; Emili, Emanuele; Li, Chengcai; Petitta, Marcello

    2010-05-01

    In this work we critical discuss the applicability of satellite based aerosol retrievals for operational particle matter (PM10) monitoring in mountain regions. In South Tirol, Italian Alps, the PM10 concentration is constantly monitored at 14 ground locations including background, urban and sub-urban measurement stations. MODIS satellite data is available in near real-time from the recently established satellite receiving station. Since July 2009, we test the production of daily PM maps for the Local Authorities of South Tirol using MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and in-situ data. Emili et al. (2009) has presented reasonable correlations between the NASA standard MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) normalized by the boundary layer height and daily PM10 at some ground location in the Swiss Alps. We apply here the same approach to compute PM10 for each ground stations in South Tirol. We have used two different MODIS AOD products: The standard 10 x 10 km2 NASA MODIS standard product and a 1 x 1 km2 MODIS AOD product generated via the algorithm of Li et al. (2005) for each ground station. We discuss uncertainties, highlight error sources and underline pros and cons of high-resolution AOD data for aerosol monitoring in mountain regions. First results indicate that the linear correlation for daily 2009 data varies strongly by the location between 0.3 and 0.8 for the NASA standard MODIS AOD product. We currently test the method to produce area-wide PM10 maps in South Tirol. As a first step we have established a relationship involving PM10, AOD and boundary layer height for each ground station in South Tirol using historic MODIS NASA AOD data. The linear regression coefficients are interpolated into a map, which is then used to obtain area-wide estimates of PM10 from AOD and boundary layer height (from ECMWF numerical model). Validation of these maps is performed on independent data. The total number of valid satellite AOD retrievals is a strongly

  1. Hydraulic structure of a fault zone at seismogenic depths (Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Southern Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Mittempergher, Silvia; Di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steve; Garofalo, Paolo; Vho, Alice

    2016-04-01

    The Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ, Italian Southern Alps) was exhumed from c. 8 km depth, where it was characterized by seismic activity (pseudotachylytes), but also by hydrous fluid flow (alteration halos and precipitation of hydrothermal minerals in veins and cataclasites). Thanks to glacier-polished outcrops exposing the fault zone over a continuous area > 1 km2, the fault zone architecture has been quantitatively described with an unprecedented detail (Bistacchi 2011, PAGEOPH; Smith 2013, JSG; Mittempergher 2016, this meeting), providing a rich dataset to generate 3D Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models and simulate the fault zone hydraulic properties. Based on field and microstructural evidence, we infer that the opening and closing of fractures resulted in a toggle-switch mechanism for fluid flow during the seismic cycle: higher permeability was obtained in the syn- to early post-seismic period, when the largest number of fractures was (re)opened by off-fault deformation, then permeability dropped due to hydrothermal mineral precipitation and fracture sealing. Since the fracture network that we observe now in the field is the result of the cumulative deformation history of the fault zone, which probably includes thousands of earthquakes, a fundamental parameter that cannot be directly evaluated in the field is the fraction of fractures-faults that were open immediately after a single earthquake. Postseismic permeability has been evaluated in a few cases in the world thanks to seismological evidences of fluid migration along active fault systems. Therefore, we were able to develop a parametric hydraulic model of the GLFZ and calibrate it, varying the fraction of faults/fractures that were open in the postseismic period, to obtain on one side realistic fluid flow and permeability values, and on the other side a flow pattern consistent with the observed alteration/mineralization pattern. The fraction of open fractures is very close to the percolation threshold

  2. Historical reconstruction of Plutonium contamination in the Swiss-Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrieli J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plutonium is present in the environment as a consequence of atmospheric nuclear tests carried out in the 1960s, nuclear weapons production and releases by the nuclear industry over the past 50 years. Approximately 6 tons of 239Pu have been released into the environment as a result of 541 atmospheric weapon tests Nuclear Pu fallout has been studied in various environmental archives, such as sediments, soil and herbarium grass. Mid-latitude ice cores have been studied as well, on Mont Blanc, the Western Alps and on Belukha Glacier, Siberian Altai. We present a Pu record obtained by analyzing 52 discrete samples of an alpine firn/ice core from Colle Gnifetti (M. Rosa, 4450 m a.s.l., dating from 1945 to 1991. The 239Pu signal was recorded directly, without preliminary cleaning or preconcentration steps, using an high resolution inductively plasma mass spectrometer equipped with a desolvation system. The 239Pu profile reflects the three main periods of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing: the earliest peak lasted from 1954/55 to 1958 and was caused by the first testing period reaching a maximum in 1958. Despite a temporary halt of testing in 1959/60, the Pu concentration decreased only by half with respect to the 1958 peak due to long atmospheric residence times. In 1961/62 Pu concentrations rapidly increased reaching a maximum in 1963. After the signing of the “Limited Test Ban Treaty” between USA and USSR in 1964, Pu deposition decreased very sharply reaching a minimum in 1967. The third period (1967-1975 is characterized by irregular Pu concentrations with smaller peaks which might be related to the deposition of Saharan dust contaminated by the French nuclear tests of the 1960s.

  3. Spaghetti Shakespeare: Johnny Hamlet and the Italian Western

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciraulo Darlena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Italian Western, Johnny Hamlet (1968, directed by Enzo G. Castellari, draws on the revenge story of Shakespeare’s tragedy Hamlet for plot and characterization. While international distributors of the film downplayed its connection to highbrow Shakespeare, they emphasized the movie’s violent content and action-packed revenge narrative, which was typical of the western all’italiana. Johnny Hamlet shares similarities with the brutally violent Django (1966, directed by Sergio Corbucci, whose avenging angel protagonist epitomizes the Spaghetti Western antihero. Although the filmmakers of Johnny Hamlet characterized Johnny as a vindicator, they also sought to develop the “broody” aspect of this gunfighter, one based on Shakespeare’s famously ruminating hero. Using innovative film techniques, Johnny Hamlet shows Johnny as a contemplative pistolero.

  4. Permian high-temperature metamorphism in the Western Alps (NW Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Barbara E.; Manzotti, Paola; von Niederhäusern, Brigitte; Engi, Martin; Darling, James R.; Giuntoli, Francesco; Lanari, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    During the late Palaeozoic, lithospheric thinning in part of the Alpine realm caused high-temperature low-to-medium pressure metamorphism and partial melting in the lower crust. Permian metamorphism and magmatism has extensively been recorded and dated in the Central, Eastern, and Southern Alps. However, Permian metamorphic ages in the Western Alps so far are constrained by very few and sparsely distributed data. The present study fills this gap. We present U/Pb ages of metamorphic zircon from several Adria-derived continental units now situated in the Western Alps, defining a range between 286 and 266 Ma. Trace element thermometry yields temperatures of 580-890 °C from Ti-in-zircon and 630-850 °C from Zr-in-rutile for Permian metamorphic rims. These temperature estimates, together with preserved mineral assemblages (garnet-prismatic sillimanite-biotite-plagioclase-quartz-K-feldspar-rutile), define pervasive upper-amphibolite to granulite facies conditions for Permian metamorphism. U/Pb ages from this study are similar to Permian ages reported for the Ivrea Zone in the Southern Alps and Austroalpine units in the Central and Eastern Alps. Regional comparison across the former Adriatic and European margin reveals a complex pattern of ages reported from late Palaeozoic magmatic and metamorphic rocks (and relics thereof): two late Variscan age groups ( 330 and 300 Ma) are followed seamlessly by a broad range of Permian ages (300-250 Ma). The former are associated with late-orogenic collapse; in samples from this study these are weakly represented. Clearly, dominant is the Permian group, which is related to crustal thinning, hinting to a possible initiation of continental rifting along a passive margin.

  5. STRATIGRAPHY OF RHAETIAN TO LOWER SINEMURIAN CARBONATE PLATFORMS IN WESTERN LOMBARDY (SOUTHERN ALPS, ITALY: PALEOGEOGRAPHIC IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLAVIO JADOUL

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A stratigraphical revision of the Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic succession of the western Southern Alps (Varese area leads to the introduction of one new lithostratigraphical unit: the ?upper Hettangian-lower Sinemurian Alpe Perino Limestone and the recognition, also in the western Lombardy, of the Rhaetian Zu Limestone, consisting of subtidal cycles, with inner platform facies at the base (Campo dei Fiori Dolomite. These formations represent lagoonal-peritidal to subtidal carbonate depositional systems. A locally angular unconformity between the Rhaetian (or the lower Hettangian and the upper Hettangian-Sinemurian formations, characterised by ‘terra rossa’ paleosols and pedogenetic carbonate breccias, can be correlated through all of the investigated profiles. The Lower Jurassic paleogeography of the western Lombardy Basin was characterised by an emerged area from Hettangian until earliest Sinemurian times in a warm humid paleoclimate. The Alpe Perino Limestone represents a small peritidal to subtidal carbonate platform developed only in a shallow-water gulf of the M. Nudo area. The platform was surrounded by a wide emerged area (island or peninsula ?, in the west to southeast, and by open subtidal and basinal environments, in the east to northeast (M. Generoso basin.

  6. Predicting debris flow occurrence in Eastern Italian Alps based on hydrological and geomorphological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulos, Efthymios I.; Borga, Marco; Destro, Elisa; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    located in the Upper Adige region, Eastern Italian Alps. Analysis involved eight debris-flow triggering storms for which high-quality radar-rainfall fields and a detailed debris flow record (with a total of 87 occurrences) is available. Results show that in all cases examined TI exhibits significant skill in predicting debris flow occurrence. However, sensitivity analysis of the results on the channel width scaling functions, the grain size and peak flow estimation uncertainty revealed considerable variability in the results. This suggests that successful application of TI as a predictor in a warning system requires local adjustment of the channel width law and grain size parameters while characterization of uncertainty in hydrologic model predictions should also be considered. Berti, M., Simoni, A., 2005: Experimental evidences and numerical modelling of debris flow initiated by channel runoff. Landslides, 2 (3), 171-182. Gregoretti, C. and G. Dalla Fontana, 2008: The triggering of debris flow due to channel-bed failure in some alpine headwater basins of the Dolomites: analyses of critical runoff. Hydrol. Process. 22, 2248-2263. Tognacca C., Bezzola G.R., Minor H.E., 2000: Threshold criterion fo debrisflow initiation due to channel bed failure. In Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Debris Flow Hazards Mitigation Taipei,August, Wiezczorek, Naeser (eds): 89-97.

  7. Mid- and late Holocene human impact recorded by the Coltrondo peat bog (NE Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segnana, Michela; Poto, Luisa; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Martino, Matteo; Oeggl, Klaus; Barbante, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Peat bogs are ideal archives for the study of environmental changes, whether these are natural or human induced. Indeed, receiving water and nutrients exclusively from dry and wet atmospheric depositions, they are among the most suitable matrices for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. The present study is focused on the Eastern sector of the Italian Alps, where we sampled the Coltrondo peat bog, in the Comelico area (ca. 1800 m a.s.l.) The knowledge of the human history in this area is rather scarce: the only pieces of archaeological evidence found in this area dates back to the Mesolithic and the absence of later archaeological finds makes it difficult to reconstruct the human settlement in the valley. With the main aim to obtain information about the human settlement in that area we selected a multi-proxy approach, combining the study of biotic and abiotic sedimentary components archived in the 7900 years-peat bog record. Pollen analysis is performed along the core registering human impacts on the area from ca. 2500 cal BP, when land-use changes are well evidenced by the presence of human-related pollen and non-pollen palynomorphs (NPPs), as well as by the increase in micro-charcoal particles. Periods of increased human impact are recorded at the end of the Middle Ages and later, at the end of the 19th century. The analysis of trace elements, such as lead, is performed by means of ICP-MS technique and its enrichment factor (EF) is calculated. A first slight increase of Pb EF during Roman Times is possibly related to mining activities carried out by the Romans. Mining activities carried out in the area are registered during the Middle Ages, while the advent of the industrialization in the 20th century is marked by the highest EF values registered on the top of the core. To help and support the interpretation of geochemical data, lead isotopes ratios are also measured using ICP-MS to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic sources of lead. The 206Pb/207Pb

  8. Assessing water resources under climate change in high-altitude catchments: a methodology and an application in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aili, T.; Soncini, A.; Bianchi, A.; Diolaiuti, G.; D'Agata, C.; Bocchiola, D.

    2018-01-01

    Assessment of the future water resources in the Italian Alps under climate change is required, but the hydrological cycle of the high-altitude catchments therein is poorly studied and little understood. Hydrological monitoring and modeling in the Alps is difficult, given the lack of first hand, site specific data. Here, we present a method to model the hydrological cycle of poorly monitored high-altitude catchments in the Alps, and to project forward water resources availability under climate change. Our method builds on extensive experience recently and includes (i) gathering data of climate, of cryospheric variables, and of hydrological fluxes sparsely available; (ii) robust physically based glacio-hydrological modeling; and (iii) using glacio-hydrological projections from GCM models. We apply the method in the Mallero River, in the central (Retiche) Alps of Italy. The Mallero river covers 321 km2, with altitude between 310 and 4015 m a.s.l., and it has 27 km2 of ice cover. The glaciers included in the catchment underwent large mass loss recently, thus Mallero is largely paradigmatic of the present situation of Alpine rivers. We set up a spatially explicit glacio-hydrological model, describing the cryospheric evolution and the hydrology of the area during a control run CR, from 1981 to 2007. We then gather climate projections until 2100 from three Global Climate Models of the IPCC AR5 under RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5. We project forward flow statistics, flow components (rainfall, snow melt, ice melt), ice cover, and volume for two reference decades, namely 2045-2054 and 2090-2099. We foresee reduction of the ice bodies from - 62 to - 98% in volume (year 2100 vs year 1981), and subsequent large reduction of ice melt contribution to stream flows (from - 61 to - 88%, 2100 vs CR). Snow melt, now covering 47% of the stream flows yearly, would also be largely reduced (from - 19 to - 56%, 2100 vs CR). The stream flows will decrease on average at 2100 (from + 1 to - 25

  9. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of eclogites and associated rocks from the Eastern Sesia zone (Western Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmons, J.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope analyses have been made of mineral separates from eclogites, glaucophanites and glaucophane schists from the eastern Sesia zone (Italian Western Alps). Regularities in (1) hydrogen isotope compositions, (2) order of 18O enrichment among coexisting minerals, and (3) ?? 18O (quartz-rutile) and ?? 18O (quartz-phengite) imply attainment of a high degree of isotopic equilibrium. However, some scattering of ??18O values of individual minerals indicates that the eclogitic assemblage did not form in the presence of a thoroughly pervasive fluid. Minerals from an eclogitic lens enclosed in marble have ??18O values distinctly different from those measured in the other rocks. The ??18O values are high in comparison with other type C eclogites of the world, and it is proposed that the fluid present during the high pressure metamorphism has to a large extent been inherited from the precursor rocks of amphibolite facies. An average formation temperature of 540 ?? C is inferred from the oxygen isotope fractionations between quartz and rutile and between quartz and white mica. This temperature is in accordance with petrologic considerations and implies subduction of the precursor rocks into the upper mantle to achieve the high pressures required. ?? 1978 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Climate change will seriously impact bird species dwelling above the treeline: A prospective study for the Italian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarini, Alessandro; Alatalo, Juha M; Gustin, Marco

    2017-07-15

    High mountain systems are predicted to be especially vulnerable to the impact of climate change, with the climatically-constrained tree limit rapidly shifted upslope. In turn, the impact of upward treeline migration on mountain-dwelling bird species is expected to significantly reduce habitat suitability. We developed the first projection of the expected climate-driven rise of the whole treeline (19,256km) of the Italian Alps. The study area extends over 20,700km2, ranging over 550km in longitude and 320km in latitude. We then investigated how much the expected treeline rise will induce a) shrinking and shifting of the elevation range and b) loss in suitable habitat for the flagship species rock ptarmigan, an alpine bird species dwelling above the treeline and, similarly to many other alpine species, highly vulnerable to treeline rise. We also investigated the potential gain in suitable habitat for rock ptarmigan due to the climate-driven upshift in the uppermost thermal limit. At lower altitudes (1500-1600m a.s.l.), the average expected upshift in the current treeline resulted in 195, 274 and 354m over the short (2010-2039), medium (2040-2069) and long term (2070-2099) respectively. Above 2400m a.s.l., it was less than 30m even in the long term. Overall, during the three climate periods the extent of suitable habitat for rock ptarmigan above the current treeline is projected to decrease by 28.12%, 38.43% and 49.11% respectively. In contrast, the expected gain in suitable habitat due to the shift in the uppermost thermal limit will be severely restrained by the limited surface extension in the top portion of the Italian Alps. The presented approach can promote similar studies elsewhere in the globe, providing a regional perspective to the projection of climate change impact on bird species dwelling above the treeline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Groundwater-driven temperature changes at thermal springs in response to recent glaciation: Bormio hydrothermal system, Central Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Giorgio; Magri, Fabien; Frattini, Paolo; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Riva, Federico

    2017-11-01

    Thermal springs are widespread in the European Alps, with hundreds of geothermal sites known and exploited. The thermal circulation and fluid outflows were examined in the area around Bormio (Central Italian Alps), where ten geothermal springs discharge from dolomite bodies located close to the regional Zebrù thrust. Water is heated in deep circulation systems and upwells vigorously at a temperature of about 40 °C. Heat and fluid transport is explored by steady and transient three-dimensional finite-element simulations taking into account the effect of the last glaciation, which in the study area was recognized to end around 11,000-12,000 years ago. The full regional model (ca. 700 km2) is discretized with a highly refined triangular finite-element planar grid. Numerical simulations suggest a reactivation of the system following the end of the Last Glacial Maximum. Results correctly simulate the observed discharge rate of ca. 2,400 L/min and the spring temperatures after ca. 13,000 years from deglaciation, and show a complete cooling of the aquifer within a period of approximately 50,000 years. Groundwater flow and temperature patterns suggest that thermal water flows through a deep system crossing both sedimentary and metamorphic lithotypes along a fracture network associated with the thrust system. This example gives insights into the influences of deep alpine structures and glaciations on groundwater circulation that control the development of many hydrothermal systems not necessarily associated with convective heat flow.

  12. Understanding Land Cover Changes in the Italian Alps and Romanian Carpathians Combining Remote Sensing and Stakeholder Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žiga Malek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, socio-economic changes in Europe have had a significant effect on land cover changes, but it is unclear how this has affected mountain areas. We focus on two mountain areas: the eastern Italian Alps and the Romanian Curvature Carpathians. We classified land cover from Earth observation data after 1989 by using applied remote sensing techniques. We also analyzed socio-economic data and conducted semi-structured interviews with local stakeholders. In Italy, most of the land conversion processes followed long-term trends. In Romania, they took off with the sudden political changes after 1989. In both areas, forest expansion was the biggest, but potentially not the most consequential change. More consequential changes were urbanization in Italy and small-scale deforestation in Romania, since both increased the risk of hydro-meteorological hazards. Stakeholders’ views were an added value to the spatial analysis and vice versa. For example, stakeholders’ explanations resolved the seeming contradiction of decreased economic activity and increased urbanization (Italian site, as a consequence of secondary home building. Furthermore, spatial analysis revealed that urbanization in Romania was less significant with regard to consequences for the wider human-environment system than many stakeholders thought.

  13. Rainfall thresholds for the activation of shallow landslides in the Italian Alps: the role of environmental conditioning factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, M. R.; Viero, A.; Turconi, L.; Brunetti, M. T.; Peruccacci, S.; Melillo, M.; Luino, F.; Deganutti, A. M.; Guzzetti, F.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the role exerted by selected environmental factors in the activation of rainfall-triggered shallow landslides and to identify site-specific rainfall thresholds. The study concerns the Italian Alps. The region is exposed to widespread slope instability phenomena due to its geological, morphological and climatic features. Furthermore, the high level of anthropization that characterizes wide portions of the territory increases the associated risk. Hence, the analysis of potential predisposing factors influencing landslides triggering is worthwhile to improve the current prediction skills and to enhance the preparedness and the response to these natural hazards. During the last years, the Italian National Research Council's Research Institute for Hydro-geological Protection (CNR-IRPI) has contributed to the analysis of triggering conditions for rainfall-induced landslides in the framework of a national project. The project, funded by the National Department for Civil Protection (DPC), focuses on the identification of the empirical rainfall thresholds for the activation of shallow landslides in Italy. The first outcomes of the project reveal a certain variability of the pluviometric conditions responsible for the mass movements activation, when different environmental settings are compared. This variability is probably related to the action of local environmental factors, such as lithology, climatic regime or soil characteristics. Based on this hypothesis, the present study aims to identify separated domains within the Italian Alps, where different triggering conditions exist and different countermeasures are needed for risk prevention. For this purpose, we collected information concerning 511 landslides activated in the period 2000-2012 and reconstructed 453 rainfall events supposed to be responsible for the activations. Then, we selected a set of thematic maps to represent the hypothesised landslide conditioning factors

  14. Using forensic microsatellites to decipher the genetic structure of linguistic and geographic isolates: A survey in the eastern Italian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montinaro, Francesco; Boschi, Ilaria; Trombetta, Federica; Merigioli, Sara; Anagnostou, Paolo; Battaggia, Cinzia; Capocasa, Marco; Crivellaro, Federica; Destro Bisol, Giovanni; Coia, Valentina

    2012-12-01

    The study of geographically and/or linguistically isolated populations could represent a potential area of interaction between population and forensic genetics. These investigations may be useful to evaluate the suitability of loci which have been selected using forensic criteria for bio-anthropological studies. At the same time, they give us an opportunity to evaluate the efficiency of forensic tools for parentage testing in groups with peculiar allele frequency profiles. Within the frame of a long-term project concerning Italian linguistic isolates, we studied 15 microsatellite loci (Identifiler kit) comprising the CODIS panel in 11 populations from the north-eastern Italian Alps (Veneto, Trentino and Friuli Venezia Giulia regions). All our analyses of inter-population differentiation highlight the genetic distinctiveness of most Alpine populations comparing them either to each other or with large and non-isolated Italian populations. Interestingly, we brought to light some aspects of population genetic structure which cannot be detected using unilinear polymorphisms. In fact, the analysis of genotypic disequilibrium between loci detected signals of population substructure when all the individuals of Alpine populations are pooled in a single group. Furthermore, despite the relatively low number of loci analyzed, genetic differentiation among Alpine populations was detected at individual level using a Bayesian method to cluster multilocus genotypes. Among the various populations studied, the four linguistic minorities (Fassa Valley, Luserna, Sappada and Sauris) showed the most pronounced diversity and signatures of a peculiar genetic ancestry. Finally, we show that database replacement may affect estimates of probability of paternity even when the local database is replaced by another based on populations which share a common genetic background but which differ in their demographic history. These findings point to the importance of considering the demographic and

  15. Translation Sociology and Social Capital in Rural Development Initiatives. A Case Study from the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Natalia; Struffi, Lauro

    2009-01-01

    This article analyses the results of a European "research and demonstration" project promoting multifunctional and sustainable agriculture in Alpine regions through a participatory approach. It focuses in particular on initiatives undertaken by a local farmers group in the Italian Alpine area of Val di Sole, the purpose being to draw…

  16. Quality traits of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) produced in the Italian Alps

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgi Annamaria; Pentimalli Daniela; Giupponi Luca; Panseri Sara

    2017-01-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) is a perennial herbaceous geophyte in the Iridaceae family. It propagates vegetatively by corm. All saffron production processes are generally conducted by hand: from bulb implantation, harvesting of flowers to stigma separation. Saffron is the most expensive spice in the world because of the intensive hand labour required for production. The increasing interest in Crocus sativus cultivation and production in the Italian Alpine area could increase revenues for the ...

  17. Procedures for the documentation of historical debris flows: application to the Chieppena Torrent (Italian alps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Marco

    2007-09-01

    The reconstruction of triggering conditions, geomorphic effects, and damage produced by historical floods and debris flows significantly contributes to hazard assessment, allowing improved risk mitigation measures to be defined. Methods for the analysis of historical floods and debris flows vary greatly according to the type and quality of available data, which in turn are influenced by the time the events occurred. For floods and debris flows occurring in the Alps a few decades ago (between about 1950 and 1980), the documentation is usually better than for previous periods but, unlike events of most recent years, quantitative data are usually scanty and the description of the events does not aim to identify processes according to current terminology and classifications. The potential, and also the limitations of historical information available for the reconstruction of historical debris flows in the Alps have been explored by analyzing a high-magnitude debris flow that occurred on November 4, 1966 in the Chieppena Torrent (northeastern Italy). Reconstruction of the event was based on the use of written documentation, terrestrial and aerial photographs, and geomorphological maps. The analysis aimed to define the temporal development of phenomena, recognizing the type of flow processes and assessing some basic flow variables, such as volume, channel-debris yield rate, erosion depth, total distance traveled, and runout distance on the alluvial fan. The historical development of torrent hydraulic works, both before and after the debris flow of November 1966, was also analyzed with regard to the technical solutions adopted and their performance.

  18. Lithospheric architecture of the South-Western Alps revealed by multiparameter teleseismic full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, S.; Monteiller, V.; Operto, S.; Nolet, G.; Paul, A.; Zhao, L.

    2018-02-01

    The Western Alps, although being intensively investigated, remains elusive when it comes to determining its lithospheric structure. New inferences on the latter are important for the understanding of processes and mechanisms of orogeny needed to unravel the dynamic evolution of the Alps. This situation led to the deployment of the CIFALPS temporary experiment, conducted to address the lack of seismological data amenable to high-resolution seismic imaging of the crust and the upper mantle. We perform a 3-D isotropic full-waveform inversion (FWI) of nine teleseismic events recorded by the CIFALPS experiment to infer 3-D models of both density and P- and S-wave velocities of the Alpine lithosphere. Here, by FWI is meant the inversion of the full seismograms including phase and amplitude effects within a time window following the first arrival up to a frequency of 0.2 Hz. We show that the application of the FWI at the lithospheric scale is able to generate images of the lithosphere with unprecedented resolution and can furnish a reliable density model of the upper lithosphere. In the shallowest part of the crust, we retrieve the shape of the fast/dense Ivrea body anomaly and detect the low velocities of the Po and SE France sedimentary basins. The geometry of the Ivrea body as revealed by our density model is consistent with the Bouguer anomaly. A sharp Moho transition is followed from the external part (30 km depth) to the internal part of the Alps (70-80 km depth), giving clear evidence of a continental subduction event during the formation of the Alpine Belt. A low-velocity zone in the lower lithosphere of the S-wave velocity model supports the hypothesis of a slab detachment in the western part of the Alps that is followed by asthenospheric upwelling. The application of FWI to teleseismic data helps to fill the gap of resolution between traditional imaging techniques, and enables integrated interpretations of both upper and lower lithospheric structures.

  19. Hydrogeomorphic processes and torrent control works on a large alluvial fan in the eastern Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, L.; Cavalli, M.; D'Agostino, V.

    2010-03-01

    Alluvial fans are often present at the outlet of small drainage basins in alpine valleys; their formation is due to sediment transport associated with flash floods and debris flows. Alluvial fans are preferred sites for human settlements and are frequently crossed by transport routes. In order to reduce the risk for economic activities located on or near the fan and prevent loss of lives due to floods and debris flows, torrent control works have been extensively carried out on many alpine alluvial fans. Hazard management on alluvial fans in alpine regions is dependent upon reliable procedures to evaluate variations in the frequency and severity of hydrogeomorphic processes and the long-term performance of the torrent training works. An integrated approach to the analysis of hydrogeomorphic processes and their interactions with torrent control works has been applied to a large alluvial fan in the southern Carnic Alps (northeastern Italy). Study methods encompass field observations, interpretation of aerial photographs, analysis of historical documents, and numerical modelling of debris flows. The overall performance of control works implemented in the early decades of 20th century was satisfactory, and a reduction of hazardous events was recognised from features observed in the field and in aerial photographs, as well as from the analysis of historical records. The 2-D simulation of debris flows confirms these findings, indicating that debris flow deposition would not affect urban areas or main roads, even in the case of a high-magnitude event. Present issues in the management of the studied alluvial fan are representative of situations frequently found in the European Alps and deal with the need for maintenance of the control structures and the pressures for land use changes aimed at the economic exploitation of the fan surface.

  20. Hydrogeomorphic processes and torrent control works on a large alluvial fan in the eastern Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Marchi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alluvial fans are often present at the outlet of small drainage basins in alpine valleys; their formation is due to sediment transport associated with flash floods and debris flows. Alluvial fans are preferred sites for human settlements and are frequently crossed by transport routes. In order to reduce the risk for economic activities located on or near the fan and prevent loss of lives due to floods and debris flows, torrent control works have been extensively carried out on many alpine alluvial fans. Hazard management on alluvial fans in alpine regions is dependent upon reliable procedures to evaluate variations in the frequency and severity of hydrogeomorphic processes and the long-term performance of the torrent training works. An integrated approach to the analysis of hydrogeomorphic processes and their interactions with torrent control works has been applied to a large alluvial fan in the southern Carnic Alps (northeastern Italy. Study methods encompass field observations, interpretation of aerial photographs, analysis of historical documents, and numerical modelling of debris flows. The overall performance of control works implemented in the early decades of 20th century was satisfactory, and a reduction of hazardous events was recognised from features observed in the field and in aerial photographs, as well as from the analysis of historical records. The 2-D simulation of debris flows confirms these findings, indicating that debris flow deposition would not affect urban areas or main roads, even in the case of a high-magnitude event. Present issues in the management of the studied alluvial fan are representative of situations frequently found in the European Alps and deal with the need for maintenance of the control structures and the pressures for land use changes aimed at the economic exploitation of the fan surface.

  1. Local and General Monitoring of Forni Glacier (italian Alps) Using Multi-Platform Structure-From Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaioni, M.; Corti, M.; Diolaiuti, G.; Fugazza, D.; Cernuschi, M.

    2017-09-01

    Experts from the University of Milan have been investigating Forni Glacier in the Italian alps for decades, resulting in the archive of a cumbersome mass of observed data. While the analysis of archive maps, medium resolution satellite images and DEM's may provide an overview of the long-term processes, the application of close-range sensing techniques offers the unprecedented opportunity to operate a 4D reconstruction of the glacier geometry at both global and local levels. In the latest years the availability of high-resolution DEM's from stereo-photogrammetry (2007) and UAV-photogrammetry (2014 and 2016) has allowed an improved analysis of the glacier ice-mass balance within time. During summer 2016 a methodology to record the local disruption processes has been investigated. The presence of vertical and sub-vertical surfaces has motivated the use of Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry from ground-based stations, which yielded results comparable to the ones achieved using a long-range terrestrial laser scanner. This technique may be assumed as benchmarking for accuracy assessment, but is more difficult to be operated in high-mountain areas. Nevertheless, the measurement of GCP's for the terrestrial photogrammetric project has revealed to be a complex task, involving the need of a total station a GNSS. The effect of network geometry on the final output has also been investigated for SfM-Photogrammetry, considering the severe limitations implied in the Alpine environment.

  2. Plant species selection by goats foraging on montane semi-natural grasslands and grazable forestlands in the Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Iussig

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The interest for goats rearing has increased during last decades on the Italian Alps. However, feeding preferences by grazing goats have not undergone detailed investigation in extensive montane grazing systems. Our study aimed to assess plant species selection by integrating vegetation surveys with animal GPS tracking under two contrasting alpine vegetation communities: a semi-natural grassland (SG and a grazable forestland (GF. Goats selected a high array of plant species (56 and 47 species in the SG and GF, respectively, but most of their diet was composed by a few species (ten species accounted for 95% and 91% of the total species intake in the SG and GF, respectively. The selection by goats seemed to be more species-dependent rather than functional group-dependent. Goats appeared to be less selective within a homogeneous herbaceous grassland, because they selected plant species proportionally to their abundance (P=0.05. Conversely, in a heterogeneous and stratified grazable forestland they showed a more pronounced preference for most of the browse species, regardless of species abundance. Plant species selection was positively correlated with species height in both vegetation communities (i.e., implementation of different stocking rates and densities could be an important tool in modifying diet selection, promoting the consumption of particular plant species and thus managing the dynamics of plant communities in alpine environments.

  3. LOCAL AND GENERAL MONITORING OF FORNI GLACIER (ITALIAN ALPS USING MULTI-PLATFORM STRUCTURE-FROM-MOTION PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scaioni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Experts from the University of Milan have been investigating Forni Glacier in the Italian alps for decades, resulting in the archive of a cumbersome mass of observed data. While the analysis of archive maps, medium resolution satellite images and DEM’s may provide an overview of the long-term processes, the application of close-range sensing techniques offers the unprecedented opportunity to operate a 4D reconstruction of the glacier geometry at both global and local levels. In the latest years the availability of high-resolution DEM's from stereo-photogrammetry (2007 and UAV-photogrammetry (2014 and 2016 has allowed an improved analysis of the glacier ice-mass balance within time. During summer 2016 a methodology to record the local disruption processes has been investigated. The presence of vertical and sub-vertical surfaces has motivated the use of Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry from ground-based stations, which yielded results comparable to the ones achieved using a long-range terrestrial laser scanner. This technique may be assumed as benchmarking for accuracy assessment, but is more difficult to be operated in high-mountain areas. Nevertheless, the measurement of GCP’s for the terrestrial photogrammetric project has revealed to be a complex task, involving the need of a total station a GNSS. The effect of network geometry on the final output has also been investigated for SfM-Photogrammetry, considering the severe limitations implied in the Alpine environment.

  4. Relating safety, productivity and company type for motor-manual logging operations in the Italian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montorselli, Niccolò Brachetti; Lombardini, Carolina; Magagnotti, Natascia; Marchi, Enrico; Neri, Francesco; Picchi, Gianni; Spinelli, Raffaele

    2010-11-01

    The study compared the performance of four different logging crews with respect to productivity, organization and safety. To this purpose, the authors developed a data collection method capable of providing a quantitative analysis of risk-taking behavior. Four crews were tested under the same working conditions, representative of close-to-nature alpine forestry. Motor-manual working methods were applied, since these methods are still prevalent in the specific study area, despite the growing popularity of mechanical processors. Crews from public companies showed a significantly lower frequency of risk-taking behavior. The best safety performance was offered by the only (public) crew that had been administered formal safety training. The study seems to deny the common prejudice that safety practice is inversely proportional to productivity. Instead, productivity is increased by introducing more efficient working methods and equipment. The quantitative analysis of risk-taking behavior developed in this study can be applied to a number of industrial fields besides forestry. Characterizing risk-taking behavior for a given case may eventually lead to the development of custom-made training programmes, which may address problem areas while avoiding that the message is weakened by the inclusion of redundant information. In the specific case of logging crews in the central Alps, the study suggests that current training courses may be weak on ergonomics, and advocates a staged training programme, focusing first on accident reduction and then expanding to the prevention of chronic illness. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Deformation pattern of the Western Alps from two decades of campaign and permanent GNSS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpersdorf, Andrea; Pinget, Lucas; Vernant, Philippe; Sue, Christian; Déprez, Aline

    2017-04-01

    Since the permanent GNSS stations in the Western Alps have exceeded 10 years of measurements, their individual horizontal velocities converge to amplitudes of less than 0.3 mm/yr with respect to stable Europe. Facing these small displacement rates, the availability of a velocity field based on GNSS campaign data over 22 years and several independent velocity solutions based on up to 16 years of permanent GNSS data is the opportunity to search for persistent (and therefore reliable) deformation patterns in the Western Alps for a tectonic interpretation. The velocities of 15 campaign stations compare within 0.16/0.20/1.32 mm/yr on the N/E/U components to nearby permanent stations. Two independent velocity solutions of permanent GNSS data calculated in double differences (GAMIT software) and PPP mode (CSRS software) can be superposed within 0.15 mm/yr on the horizontal components and 0.44 mm/yr on the vertical. While individual velocities are still too uncertain to be interpreted, a global deformation pattern based on the combination of campaign and permanent stations confirms EW extension as observed by a preliminary GNSS solution from 2002 and by regional campaign networks in the inner W-Alps. However, the observed amplitudes are now 10 times smaller than the ones published in the 2000's (0.6 nanostrain/yr over a zone large of 150 km, 2.6 nanostrain/yr over the inner 50 km of the belt). The analysis of both campaign and permanent GNSS velocities on profiles across the belt highlights zones of extension in the center of the belt (12.5 - 15.3 nanostrain/yr in the northern and central part, 3.1-3.3 nanostrain/yr in the southern part), but also some compression along the eastern and western border of the belt (2.6-8.1 and 1.3-1.5 nanostrain/yr in the northern and central part, and in the south, respectively). This result is confirmed and strengthened by the comparison of the double difference and the PPP solution. This contrasted geodetic deformation pattern is largely

  6. Genetic Diversity of Walnut (Juglans Regia L. in the Eastern Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Vischi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Juglans regia L. is distributed primarily across temperate and subtropical regions of the Northern Hemisphere. During the last glaciation, the species survived in refugial areas that in Europe included the Balkans and the Italian peninsula, two areas joined by a corridor represented by the Friuli Venezia Giulia region, where two germplasm reservoirs met and likely intercrossed during re-colonization after the last glaciation. In this work, two hundred and fifteen wild accessions native to the area were sampled, georeferenced, and genotyped with 20 microsatellite loci selected from the literature. The local accessions of this study displayed moderate genetic diversity with 80 alleles identified. The number of alleles/loci was 4.0 (4.7 alleles for the genomic SSRs (Simple Sequence Repeats and 2.7 alleles per EST (Expressed Sequence Tag-derived SSR, on average. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA revealed that most of the molecular diversity was between individuals (nearly 98% of variation explained. The model-based clustering algorithms implemented either in STRUCTURE and GENELAND software revealed two clusters: The first one encompassed most of the samples and showed a great genetic admixture throughout the five sampling areas defined on the base of orographic characteristics of the region. The second cluster represented a small island with three samples traced back to an introduction from Russia at the beginning of the 20th century.

  7. Reconstruction of glacier fluctuations in the Mont-Blanc massif, western Alps: a multi-­-method approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Benjamin; Valla, Pierre G.; King, Georgina E.; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Christl, Marcus; Herman, Frederic

    2017-04-01

    , mineralogical properties and environmental conditions. Premilary OSL results from rock slices show increasing exposure age (i.e., deeper bleaching of the OSL signal) with sample elevation. Moreover, our results reveal that the bleaching of the OSL signal is occuring within the first 1-3 cm below the rock surface, potentially offering high resolution to date the latest exposure following short-lived glacier fluctuations. REFERENCES Coutterand S., Buoncristani J-.-F. (2006), Pal.og.ographie du dernier maximum glaciaire du Pléistocene récent de la région du Massif du Mont Blanc, France, Quaternaire, 17, (1), 2006, p. 35-.-4. Gosse, J.C, and F.M. Phillips (2001). Terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides: theory and application. Quaternary Science Reviews, 20, 1475-1560. Le Roy, M., Nicolussi, K., Deline, P.,Astrade, L., Edouard, J-L., Miramont, C., Arnaud, F. (2015), Calendar dated glacier variations in the western European Alps during the Neoglacial: the Mer de Glace record, Mont Blanc massif, Quaternary Science Review 108 (2015) 1-22, doi:10.1016. Sohbati, R., Murray A., Jain M., Buylaert J.-P., and Thomsen K. (2011), Investigating the resetting of OSL signals in rock surfaces, Geochronometria, 38 (3), 249_258, doi:10.2478/s13386-011-0029-2. Vincent, C., Harter M., Gilbert A., Berthier D., Six D., (2014). Future fluctuations of Mer de Glace, French Alps, assessed using a parameterized model calibrated with past thickness changes. Annals of Glaciology, 55, 15-24. Wirsig C., Zasadni J., Christl M., Akçar N., Ivy-Ochs S. (2016), Dating the onset of LGM ice surface lowering in the High Alps. Quaternary Science Reviews 143 37-50.

  8. Interactions between geomorphology and vegetation in the Western Swiss Alps: first investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaccone, Elisa; Mariéthoz, Grégoire; Lambiel, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    The influence of earth surface processes can modify the microhabitat conditions and the species richness, composition and distribution patterns of plant communities. It is therefore important to understand how geomorphology affects the distribution of plant species to predict future vegetation evolution in a context of climate change. To better analyse the influence of geomorphology on vegetation growth in the alpine periglacial belt, we are studying various geomorphological processes (e.g. cryoturbation and solifluction), permafrost, nivation and ground surface characteristics at three focus sites of the Vaud Alps (Western Swiss Alps). The sites are located at an altitude range comprised between 2000 and 2600 m a.s.l. The geomorphology is characterized mainly by the presence of small glaciers, large moraine deposits, rock glaciers and debris slopes. Monitoring of the ground surface temperatures, permafrost mapping, vegetation survey and drone flights have been carried out to investigate in detail the environmental variables. Initial results show a heterogeneous vegetation cover depending on time since deglaciation, debris size, ground stability and soil age. Debris pioneer species are present on moraines, rock glaciers and debris slope; grassland are developed in zones not affected by LIA glacier advances or other interfering processes such as avalanches. The high-resolution images obtained from drone flights (5 cm/pixel) allow a detailed study of the granulometry. In order to use such geomorphological information on a wider area of interest, the local data acquired on focus sites have to be spatialized to a regional scale. This is accomplished by developing an approach based on remote sensing and multiple-point geostatistics that performs a semi-automated geomorphological mapping (SAGM). The SAGM is based on a training image composed by a geomorphological map yet existent, an orthophoto, the slope, the aspect, the curvature, the granulometry classification and

  9. Monitoring Glacial and Periglacial Environments in the Ortles-Cevedale (Eastern Italian Alps) Using the Sfm-Mvs Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarolli, P.; Piermattei, L.; Carturan, L.; de Blasi, F.; Dalla Fontana, G.; Vettore, A.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the development of a new photogrammetric technique, called Structure from Motion (SfM), has generated a great interest in the field of glaciology, as well as in glacial and periglacial geomorphology. This technique, coupled with dense image matching algorithms such as multi-view stereo (MVS), allows to obtain high resolution three-dimensional models of the surface employing sequences of overlapping images shot with common uncalibrated digital cameras. This study investigates the potential of the SfM-MVS approach in reconstructing the surface of a glacier and a neighbouring rock glacier located in Alta Val de La Mare (Ortles-Cevedale, Eastern Italian Alps). The photos were taken from the ground using a consumer-grade SLR camera and processed using the computer vision-based software package Agisoft PhotoScan in order to generate the 3D models. A contemporaneous DTM surveyed by LiDAR provided high-resolution terrain information which was used to locate the GCPs needed to georeference the photogrammetric 3D model. The LiDAR DTM was also used as a reference for estimating the accuracy of the photogrammetric DTMs. The results highlight that from a series of digital images taken from the ground it is possible to reconstruct the surface of both glaciers and rock glaciers, with good accuracy. The effectiveness of the photogrammetric method was also evaluated in light of the different substrata (fresh snow, old snow, firn, ice and debris) which were present at the moment of surveys, and of spatial characteristics as the distance from the camera and the terrain gradient. The new digital photogrammetric methods proved to be well suited for low-budget research and application in remote areas, thus becoming potential alternatives to the efficient but also expensive and logistically-demanding LiDAR technologies for the evaluation of the glacier mass balance with the geodetic method, and for the assessment of the surface displacement of rock glaciers.

  10. Participatory Scenario Development to Address Potential Impacts of Land Use Change: An Example from the Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žiga Malek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes to land use such as the removal of natural vegetation and expansion of urban areas can result in degradation of the landscape and an increase in hydro-meteorological risk. This has led to higher interest by decision-makers and scientists in the future consequences of these drivers. Scenario development can be a useful tool for addressing the high uncertainty regarding modeling future land use changes. Scenarios are not exact forecasts, but images of plausible futures. When studying future land dynamics, emphasis should be given to areas experiencing high rates of socioeconomic change. We have focused on the eastern Italian Alps, which face increasing pressure from tourism development. Identified drivers of local land use change are mostly external and difficult to quantify. This area, characterized by a traditional Alpine landscape, is subject to high levels of hydro-meteorological risk, another reason to study potential future land use changes. We tested a scenario generation method based on existing decisions and assumptions about future tourism development. We aimed to develop a framework leading to plausible scenarios that can overcome data inaccessibility and address external drivers. We combined qualitative methods, such as stakeholder interviews and cognitive mapping, with geospatial methods, such as geographic information systems, geostatistics, and environmental modeling. We involved stakeholders from the beginning to support the steps of generating data, understanding the system of land use change, and developing a land use change model for scenario development. In this way, we generated spatio-temporal scenarios that can assist future spatial planning and improve preparedness for possible undesirable development.

  11. Effects of slope exposure on soil physico-chemical and microbiological properties along an altitudinal climosequence in the Italian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardelli, Tommaso; Gómez-Brandón, María; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Fornasier, Flavio; Arfaioli, Paola; Francioli, Davide; Egli, Markus; Sartori, Giacomo; Insam, Heribert; Pietramellara, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Due to their sensitivity to changing environmental conditions sub- and alpine soils are often monitored in the context of climate change, usually, however, neglecting slope exposure. Therefore, we set up a climosequence-approach to study the effect of exposure and, in general, climate, on the microbial biomass and microbial diversity and activity, comprising five pairs of north (N)- and south (S)-facing sites along an altitudinal gradient ranging from 1200 to 2400m a.s.l. in the Italian Alps (Trentino Alto Adige, Italy). Soil physico-chemical properties were related to microbiological properties (microbial biomass: double strand DNA yield vs. substrate-induced respiration; diversity of bacterial, fungal and archaeal communities: genetic fingerprinting DGGE vs. real-time PCR; microbial activity: basal respiration vs. multiple hydrolytic enzyme assays) to monitor shifts in the diversity and activity of microbial communities as a function of slope exposure and to evaluate the most determinant chemical parameters shaping the soil microbiota. The exposure-effect on several hydrolytic key-enzymes was enzyme-specific: e.g. acid phosphomonoesterase potential activity was more pronounced at the N-facing slope while the activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase, pyrophosphate-phosphodiesterase and arylsulfatase were higher at the S-facing slope. Furthermore, this exposure-effect was domain-specific: bacteria (S>N, altitude-independent); fungi (N~S); and archaea (N>S; altitude-dependent). Additionally, the abiotic parameters shaping the community composition were in general depending on soil depth. Our multidisciplinary approach allowed us to survey the exposure and altitudinal effects on soil physico-chemical and microbiological properties and thus unravel the complex multiple edaphic factor-effects on soil microbiota in mountain ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Integrating expert opinion with modelling for quantitative multi-hazard risk assessment in the Eastern Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lixia; van Westen, Cees J.; Hussin, Haydar; Ciurean, Roxana L.; Turkington, Thea; Chavarro-Rincon, Diana; Shrestha, Dhruba P.

    2016-11-01

    Extreme rainfall events are the main triggering causes for hydro-meteorological hazards in mountainous areas, where development is often constrained by the limited space suitable for construction. In these areas, hazard and risk assessments are fundamental for risk mitigation, especially for preventive planning, risk communication and emergency preparedness. Multi-hazard risk assessment in mountainous areas at local and regional scales remain a major challenge because of lack of data related to past events and causal factors, and the interactions between different types of hazards. The lack of data leads to a high level of uncertainty in the application of quantitative methods for hazard and risk assessment. Therefore, a systematic approach is required to combine these quantitative methods with expert-based assumptions and decisions. In this study, a quantitative multi-hazard risk assessment was carried out in the Fella River valley, prone to debris flows and flood in the north-eastern Italian Alps. The main steps include data collection and development of inventory maps, definition of hazard scenarios, hazard assessment in terms of temporal and spatial probability calculation and intensity modelling, elements-at-risk mapping, estimation of asset values and the number of people, physical vulnerability assessment, the generation of risk curves and annual risk calculation. To compare the risk for each type of hazard, risk curves were generated for debris flows, river floods and flash floods. Uncertainties were expressed as minimum, average and maximum values of temporal and spatial probability, replacement costs of assets, population numbers, and physical vulnerability. These result in minimum, average and maximum risk curves. To validate this approach, a back analysis was conducted using the extreme hydro-meteorological event that occurred in August 2003 in the Fella River valley. The results show a good performance when compared to the historical damage reports.

  13. Long-term monitoring of soil microbiological activities in two forest sites in South tyrol in the italian alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margesin, Rosa; Minerbi, Stefano; Schinner, Franz

    2014-09-17

    We monitored microbiological properties in two forest sites over a period of 17 years (1993-2010) within the International Cooperative Programme on Integrated Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Ecosystems (ICP IM). The two study sites were located in South Tyrol in the Italian Alps at altitudes of 1,737 m a.s.l. (subalpine site IT01) and 570 m a.s.l. (submontane site IT02). Soil samples were collected in the late spring and autumn of 1993, 2000, and 2010, and were characterized by measuring respiration, key enzyme activities involved in the C, N, P, and S cycles and litter degradation, and the abundance of viable bacterial and fungal populations. Over the study period, an increase in mean annual air temperatures at both sites (+0.6°C and +0.8°C at IT01 and IT02, respectively) was calculated from trendlines. Significantly lower mean annual air temperatures, higher temperature fluctuations, and higher annual precipitation rates were observed at site IT01 than at site IT02. Subalpine site IT01 was characterized by significantly lower microbial activity (respiration, enzymes) and abundance than those at submontane site IT02. The year of sampling had a significant effect on all the parameters investigated, except for nitrification. Fungal abundance decreased consistently over the study period, while no consistent trend was noted among the other parameters investigated. Season only affected a few of the measured microbiological parameters: respiration and bacterial numbers were significantly higher in the spring than in the autumn, while the opposite was noted for xylanase and phosphatase activities. Soil fungi contributed essentially to xylanase and protease activities, while soil bacteria were mainly involved in degradation processes that required the activity of sulfatase.

  14. Subduction / exhumation dynamics: Petrochronology in the Glacier-Rafray slice (Western Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, Marco; Lanari, Pierre; Engi, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Petrochronology is the combination of in situ age-dating, geothermobarometry and structural geology and aims to unravel Pressure-Temperature-deformation-time (P-T-ɛ-t) paths. To link P-T conditions to deformation stages is daily business for metamorphic petrologists, but recent micro-mapping techniques (XMapTools program) provide an additional tool to achieve this goal. Absolute age is often difficult to assess in metamorphic rocks, as it is challenging to link specific P-T conditions to most of the mineral chronometers. Allanite is a common accessory phase in high-P metamorphic rocks and is a potential target to determine Th(-U)/Pb ages. Allanite from a leucocratic gneiss of the Glacier-Rafray slice in the western Alps consists of several chemically different zones: one major zone can be linked to a first high-P phengite generation. To determine the age of this high-P growth zone we used La-ICP-MS in situ techniques, which allowed us to date an appropriate growth rim per grain. Even so particular care was required when evaluating the isotope signals laser ablation leads to the excavation of a volume, which potentially can be chemically and/or age-zoned. We have developed a new method to track changes in the plasma during the ablation. This method aims to identify discrete age zones. La-ICP-MS spectra have been modeled so as to reproduce the shape of the spectra measured. These results indicate that high-P allanite first grew in equilibrium with phengite at 84 ± 4 Ma, whereas a second growth event occurred at ~40 Ma. A final epidotic rim grew at greenschist facies conditions, but this stage could not be dated. These findings have implications for our interpretation of several units in the Western Alps: In the Sesia Zone (former Adriatic margin), the earliest high-P metamorphism occurred at 85 Ma (Regis et al., 2014), precisely as the first high-P peak we discovered in the Glacier-Rafray slice. Austroalpine klippen such as this are commonly seen as extensional

  15. Earthquakes in Barcelonnette (western French Alps, 2003-2015): where are the faults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palis, Edouard; Larroque, Christophe; Lebourg, Thomas; Jomard, Hervé; Flamand, Aurélie; Courboulex, Françoise; Vidal, Maurin; Robert, Pierre-Louis

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive description of the instrumental seismicity in the Western Alps highlights several hundred of low to moderate magnitude earthquakes each year. The seismicity is diffuse and rarely related to known faults. The distribution of the epicenters follows the arcuate shape of the belt and the focal depths are shallow (3.5-events attest to mainly normal faulting along NW-SE to N-S fault planes. Therefore this region appears clearly as an anomaly in comparison to the seismic pattern of the western Alps. In terms of seismic hazard, determining the origin of these swarms is of major concern and one of the main questions is to determine if higher magnitude events are possible along the faults activated during these swarms. We try to answer two questions: are regional faults identifiable from subsurface geophysics and did some of these faults produced large earthquakes during the Quaternary? We focus our attention on the 2012-2014 epicentral area. This area is characterized by a gentle slope extending from 1400m of elevation at the Parpaillon River up to 2900m on the surrounding summits. The slope displays creeping landforms developed during the late glacial period and the little ice age, overlying upper-cretaceous deposits (calcareous sandstone, so-called "flyschs à Helminthoides"). A 2150m-long Electrical Resistivity Tomography Profile was performed to image the first hundreds meters depth. To do so, we used 4 electrical lines of 72 electrodes (10m spacing). We did the acquisitions using 2 array types: dipole-dipole and pole-dipole. Both arrays are sensitive to vertical structures and are well suitable for faults detection at depth. Our objective is to detect if faults extends through the epicentral area and if faults scarps, possibly resulting of a postglacial activity are hidden by the recent periglacial deposits and colluviums. From a preliminary analysis, the ERT imagery of the shallow 200m help us to identify: (1) the geometry of the surficial glacial and

  16. Geothermobarometry in albite-garnet orthogneisses: A case study from the Gran Paradiso nappe (Western Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Elisabeth; Ballèvre, Michel

    1990-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to estimate syntectonic P- T conditions within albite- and garnet-bearing orthogneisses. These rocks are generally characterized by the assemblage quartz + albite + biotite + phengite + CaFe-garnet + epidote + titanite. Garnet contains up to 55 mole per cent of grossular. K-feldspar is a relict magmatic phase. P- T conditions are estimated using several independent methods. First, it is shown that exchange reactions based on the FeMg partitioning between garnet and biotite or garnet and phengite cannot be used to estimate temperatures in these rocks, due to the high grossular content of garnet. Second, maximum and minimum pressures are constrained, respectively, by the occurrence of albite instead of jadeite + quartz and by the assemblage phengite + biotite + quartz. Third, phase equilibria in albite- and garnet-bearing metagranites are modelled in the system K 2OCaOFeOAl 2O 3SiO 2H 2O. Equilibrium curves are calculated for the observed phase compositions. Uncertainties in P- T estimates mainly result from the choice of appropriate non-ideal solution models for the garnet. An application is developed for granites from the Gran Paradiso nappe (Western Alps). These granites show an heterogeneous deformation of Alpine age expressed by mylonitic shear zones cutting across weakly deformed domains. Estimated P- T conditions for the synkinematic assemblages are 10-16 kbar at 550±50°C.

  17. Driving factors for torrential mass-movements occurrence in the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Davide; Cremonini, Roberto; Asprea, Irene; Marco, Federica

    2016-02-01

    To understand the behaviour of torrential processes in the alpine environment, the conditions mainly responsiblefor the occurrence of these phenomena have to be identified and distinguished(classified) aspredisposing and triggering factors. In this regard, this study is aimed to understanding which factors lead to the occurrence of a given torrential processes in alpine catchments in the Western Alps, where information on past events are exhaustive and characterized by a long historical series. More than 769 documented torrential eventsoccurred from 1728 to 2015 within 78 catchments. Datasets concerning climate, geology and morphology, land use and the presence of historical landslide activity have been elaborated as input for multivariate statistical analysis to characterize the behaviour of the catchments. The results pinpoint the factors that mainly drive the type of torrential dominant process occurring in a given catchment, its occurrence probability, and its frequency. This study has demonstrated that catchments characterized by a significant percentage of outcropping rocks show a greater occurrence of torrential processes, especially hyperconcentrated flows and debris flows; on the contrary highly vegetated catchments are typically subject to water flows. This result can be a useful tool for the evaluation of hazards related to this specific phenomenon, making it possible to predict the most likely torrential processes that can be generated in a specific basin, given the characteristics of outcropping rock and vegetation cover.

  18. Driving factors for torrential mass-movements occurrence in the Western Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide eTiranti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To understand the behaviour of torrential processes in the alpine environment, the conditions mainly responsiblefor the occurrence of these phenomena have to be identified and distinguished(classified aspredisposing and triggering factors. In this regard, this study is aimed to understanding which factors lead to the occurrence of a given torrential processes in alpine catchments in the Western Alps, where information on past events are exhaustive and characterized by a long historical series. More than 769 documented torrential eventsoccurred from 1728 to 2015 within 78 catchments. Datasets concerning climate, geology and morphology, land use and the presence of historical landslide activity have been elaborated as input for multivariate statistical analysis to characterize the behaviour of the catchments. The results pinpoint the factors that mainly drive the type of torrential dominant process occurring in a given catchment, its occurrence probability, and its frequency. This study has demonstrated that catchments characterized by a significant percentage of outcropping rocks show a greater occurrence of torrential processes, especially hyperconcentrated flows and debris flows; on the contrary highly vegetated catchments are typically subject to water flows. This result can be a useful tool for the evaluation of hazards related to this specific phenomenon, making it possible to predict the most likely torrential processes that can be generated in a specific basin, given the characteristics of outcropping rock and vegetation cover.

  19. Large-scale hydraulic structure of a seismogenic fault at 10 km depth (Gole Larghe Fault Zone, Italian Southern Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steve; Mittempergher, Silvia; Garofalo, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The definition of hydraulic properties of fault zones is a major issue in structural geology, seismology, and in several applications (hydrocarbons, hydrogeology, CO2 sequestration, etc.). The permeability of fault rocks can be measured in laboratory experiments, but its upscaling to large-scale structures is not straightforward. For instance, typical permeability of fine-grained fault rock samples is in the 10-18-10-20 m2 range, but, according to seismological estimates, the large-scale permeability of active fault zones can be as high as 10-10 m2. Solving this issue is difficult because in-situ measurements of large-scale permeability have been carried out just at relatively shallow depths - mainly in oil wells and exceptionally in active tectonic settings (e.g. SAFOD at 3 km), whilst deeper experiments have been performed only in the stable continental crust (e.g. KTB at 9 km). In this study, we apply discrete fracture-network (DFN) modelling techniques developed for shallow aquifers (mainly in nuclear waste storage projects like Yucca Mountain) and in the oil industry, in order to model the hydraulic structure of the Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ, Italian Southern Alps). This fault, now exposed in world-class glacier-polished outcrops, has been exhumed from ca. 8 km, where it was characterized by a well-documented seismic activity, but also by hydrous fluid flow evidenced by alteration halos and precipitation of hydrothermal minerals in veins and along cataclasites. The GLFZ does not show a classical seal structure that in other fault zones corresponds to a core zone characterized by fine-grained fault rocks. However, permeability is heterogeneous and the permeability tensor is strongly anisotropic due to fracture preferential orientation. We will show with numerical experiments that this hydraulic structure results in a channelized fluid flow (which is consistent with the observed hydrothermal alteration pattern). This results in a counterintuitive situation

  20. Deciphering the driving forces of erosion rates on millennial to million‐year timescales in glacially impacted landscapes: An example from the Western Alps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glotzbach, C; Beek, P; Carcaillet, J; Delunel, R

    2013-01-01

    .... Here we study the driving forces of millennial to Myr‐scale erosion rates in the French Western Alps, as estimated from in situ produced cosmogenic 10 Be and a newly developed approach integrating detrital and bedrock apatite fission...

  1. Geomorphic Features Revealed by the Acquisition, Processing and Interpretation of HIgh-Resolution Seismic Reflection Profiles across a Large Debris-Flow Fan (Vinschgau/Val Venosta, Italian Alps)

    OpenAIRE

    Maraio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Researches concerning the Quaternary sedimentary dynamics in the European Alps have become of increasing interest in the late decades, producing a large volume of literature. This thesis uses high-resolution seismic reflection data and seismic stratigraphic methods to examine the formation and evolution of a major alluvial/glacial fan in the eastern Italian Alps. Alluvial fan environments, often pose significant challenges for high-resolution seismic exploration, due to high heterogeneity of ...

  2. Weakening climatic signal since mid-20th century in European larch tree-ring chronologies at different altitudes from the Adamello-Presanella Massif (Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Anna; Leonelli, Giovanni; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Pelfini, Manuela; Baroni, Carlo

    2012-05-01

    Tree rings from temperature-limited environments are highly sensitive climate proxies, widely used to reconstruct past climate parameters for periods prior to the availability of instrumental data and to analyse the effect of recent global warming on tree growth. An analysis of the climatic signal in five high-elevation tree-ring width chronologies of European larch (Larix decidua Mill.) from the tops of five different glacial valleys in the Italian Central Alps revealed that they contain a strong summer-temperature signal and that tree-ring growth is especially influenced by June temperatures. However, a moving correlation function analysis revealed a recent loss of the June temperature signal in the tree-ring chronologies. This signal reduction primarily involves the two lowest-altitude chronologies. It is probable that the observed increasing importance of late-summer temperature for tree-ring growth over the past 50 yr is an effect of the lengthening growing season and of the variations in the climate/tree-ring relationship over time. All the chronologies considered, especially those at the highest altitudes, show an increasing negative influence of June precipitation on tree-ring growth. The climatic signal recorded in tree-ring chronologies from the Italian Central Alps varies over time and is also differentially influenced by climatic parameters according to site elevation.

  3. Influence of topographic and climatological characteristics on rock glacier creep rates in the Western Austrian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, E.; Abermann, J.; Krainer, K.; Sailer, R.; Spross, M.; Stötter, J.

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technologies and data analysis tools resulted in detailed monitoring activities of rock glacier surface kinetics. In combination with geophysical methods and numerical modeling the remotely sensed data led to an increased process understanding of rock glacier creep dynamics. However, the number of studies where such method combinations are carried out is limited to a rather small number of rock glaciers. With our study we aim to contribute to an improved understanding on the significance of topographic and climatological variables on rock glacier creep rates. Therefore, creep rates of 347 intact rock glaciers in the Western Austrian Alps (Tyrol) are calculated. According to the new Tyrolean rock glacier inventory 200 of them are active and 147 inactive. In contrast to other studies, where often a few rock glaciers are investigated in detail, the 347 rock glaciers represent all rock glaciers within the study area of 887 sqkm. For the calculation of creep rates, the Open Source image-correlation software IMCORR is used and implemented into an automated work-flow. Input data for the image correlation are shaded relief raster maps with 0.5 m spatial resolution, which were obtained form airborne laser scanning data acquisition campaigns carried out in 2006 and 2010. By comparing the calculated creep rates with results from differential global positioning system data, an absolute accuracy of 0.30 m (standard deviation) could be determined. Thus, reliable interpretations can be made for creep rates > 0.30 m between 2006 and 2010. In such cases, statistical correlations between the rock glacier creep rates and topographic parameters of the rock glacier, e. g. surface gradient, thickness, length, area, elevation, aspect, potential solar radiation and surface roughness (also indicator for geological properties), as well as climatological parameters, e. g. temperature are calculated. Spatial descriptive statistics on the calculated creep

  4. From the Western Alps across Central Europe: Postglacial recolonisation of the tufa stream specialist Rhyacophila pubescens (Insecta, Trichoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haase Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dispersal rates, i.e. the effective number of dispersing individuals per unit time, are the product of dispersal capacity, i.e. a species physiological potential for dispersal, dispersal behaviour, i.e. the decision to leave a habitat patch in favour of another, and connectivity of occupied habitat. Thus, dispersal of species that are highly specialised to a certain habitat is limited by habitat availability. Species inhabiting very stable environments may also adopt a sedentary life-style. Both factors should lead to strong genetic differentiation in highly specialised species inhabiting stable environments. These two factors apply to our model species Rhyacophila pubescens a highly specialised freshwater insect that occurs in tufa springs, a very stable habitat. Results We examined the genetic population structure and phylogeography using range-wide mtCOI sequence and AFLP data from 333 individuals of R. pubescens. We inferred the location of Pleistocene refugia and postglacial colonisation routes of R. pubescens, and examined ongoing local differentiation. Our results indicate intraregional differentiation with a high number of locally endemic haplotypes, that we attributed to habitat specificity and low dispersal rates of R. pubescens. We observed high levels of genetic diversity south of the Alps and genetic impoverishment north of the Alps. Estimates of migrants placed the refugium and the source of the colonisation in the Dauphiné Alps (SW Alps. Conclusions This is the first example of an aquatic insect with a colonisation route along the western margin of the Alps to the Central European highlands. The study also shows that specialisation to a stable environment may have promoted a behavioural shift to decreased dispersal rates, leading to stronger local population differentiation than in less specialised aquatic insects. Alternatively, the occurrence of highly specialised tufa spring habitats may have been more

  5. 3D FEM modeling of fold nappe formation in the Western Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Tscharner, M.; Schmalholz, S.

    2012-04-01

    Fold nappes are recumbent folds with amplitudes exceeding 10 km and have been presumably formed by heterogeneous simple shear. They often exhibit a constant sense of shearing and a non-linear increase of shear strain towards their overturned limb. The fold axes of the Morcles fold nappe in western Switzerland plunges to the ENE whereas the fold axes in the more eastern Doldenhorn nappe plunges to the WSW. These opposite plunge directions characterize the Wildstrubel depression (Rawil depression, Ramsay, 1981). The Morcles nappe is mainly the result of layer contraction and shearing (Ramsay, 1981). During the compression the massive limestones were more competent than the surrounding marls and shales, which led to the buckling characteristics of the Morcles nappe, especially in the north-dipping normal limb. There are still no 3D numerical studies which investigate the fundamental dynamics of the formation of the large-scale 3D structure including the Morcles and Doldenhorn fold nappes and the related Wildstrubel depression. Such studies require a numerical algorithm that can accurately track material interfaces for large differences in material properties (e.g. between limestone and shale) and for large deformations. We present a numerical algorithm based on the finite element method (FEM) which can simulate 3D fluid flow for a power-law viscous rheology. Our FEM code combines a numerical marker technique and a deformable Lagrangian mesh with re-meshing (Poliakov and Podladchikov, 1992) and is used to study the formation of 3D fold nappes similar to the ones in the Western Swiss Alps. The numerical method requires the interpolation of material properties to the integration points because the layer interface can lie within a finite element. To guarantee accuracy the number of integration points in the finite elements is increased considerably. The interpolation is only performed during several re-meshing steps when the deformed Lagrangian mesh is too distorted

  6. CODA-DERIVED SOURCE SPECTRA, MOMENT MAGNITUDES, AND ENERGY-MOMENT SCALING IN THE WESTERN ALPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morasca, P; Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Walter, W

    2004-02-03

    A stable estimate of the earthquake source spectra in the western Alps is obtained using an empirical method based on coda envelope amplitude measurements described by Mayeda et al. (2003) for events ranging between M{sub W} {approx} 1.0 to {approx}5.0. We calibrated path corrections for consecutive narrow frequency bands ranging between 0.2 and 25.0-Hz using a simple 1-D model for 5 three-component stations of the Regional Seismic network of Northwestern Italy (RSNI). The 1-D assumption performs well, even though the region is characterized by a complex structural setting involving strong lateral variations in the Moho depth. For frequencies less than 1.0-Hz, we tied our dimensionless, distance-corrected coda amplitudes to an absolute scale in units of dyne-cm by using independent moment magnitudes from long-period waveform modeling for 3 moderate magnitude events in the region. For the higher frequencies, we used small events as empirical Green's functions, with corner frequencies above 25.0-Hz. For each station, the procedure yields frequency-dependent corrections that account for site effects, including those related to f{sub max}, as well as those related to S-to-coda transfer function effects. After the calibration was completed, the corrections were applied to the entire data-set composed of 957 events. Our findings using the coda-derived source spectra are summarized as follows: (1) We derived stable estimates of seismic moment, M{sub 0}, (and hence M{sub W}) as well as radiated S-wave energy, (E{sub S}), from waveforms recorded by as few as one station, for events that were too small to be waveform modeled (i.e., events less than M{sub W} {approx}3.5); (2) The source spectra were used to derive an equivalent local magnitude, M{sub L(coda)}, that is in excellent agreement with the network averaged values using direct S-waves; (3) Scaled energy, {tilde e} = E{sub R}/M{sub 0}, where E{sub R}, the radiated seismic energy, is comparable to results from

  7. The Dora-Maira Unit (Italian Cottian Alps): a reservoir of ornamental stones locally and worldwide employed since Roman age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Alessandro; Cadoppi, Paola; Antonella Dino, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    The Dora-Maira is a geological unit belonging to the Penninic Domain of the Western Alps (NW Italy), which covers over 1000 km2 from the Susa to the Maira valleys, in the inner part of the Cottian Alps. It consists of different superposed complexes made of micaschists, fine-grained gneisses, quartzites, impure and dolomitic marbles, metabasites and various types of orthogneisses deriving from metamorphic transformation, during alpine orogeny, of a Palaeozoic upper continental crust and its Mesozoic carbonate cover. Thanks to the presence of different varieties of rocks, the Dora-Maira Unit can be considered as a reservoir of ornamental stones, locally employed, since Roman age, for military and religious buildings. Furthermore, these materials were used in Piedmont region for the construction of important historical palaces (17th and 18th centuries). Several varieties of gneisses, quartzites and marbles, exploited in the past and up to now, come from the Paleozoic basement. The most famous variety of gneiss is the so called "Luserna stone", a leucocratic gneiss characterized by a mylonitic fabric deriving from highly differentiated granitoids of Permian age. The first traces of Luserna Stone exploitation arise to the medieval age in the Pellice Valley). This material was widely employed in Turin, from Savoia kingdom period up to know. The very peculiar and precious application of Luserna stone were: Royal Palace and Venaria Reale Palace, Mole Antonelliana. Recently, it has been employed for the construction of Turin Metro stations (launched in 2006). Other varieties of orthogneisses, not yet exploited, are: Borgone and Vaie Stones, Villarfocchiardo and Cumiana Stones. They were used for the realization of the columns characterising the façade of several churches in Turin and in the piers of different bridges over the Po River. Another gneiss variety, with dioritic composition, is the Malanaggio Stone employed in the Fenestrelle Fortress. As for the palaeozoic

  8. EVIDENCE OF A "MID-CARNIAN" TRANSGRESSION IN THE WESTERN SOUTHERN ALPS (LOMBARDY, ITALY: STRATIGRAPHIC AND PALEOGEOGRAPHIC IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FABRIZIO BERRA

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available A "mid-Carnian" transgressive succession, developed between the Breno carbonate platform and the semiarid coastal carbonates-sabkhas facies of the S. Giovanni Bianco Fm., is recorded in the northern Bergamasc Alps. This episode is characterized by the presence of two stratigraphic markers:  a Dark grey shales and siltstones ("Black Pelites", considered previously as the northern closure of the Gorno-Lower S. Giovanni Bianco Fms., but re-interpreted as the western pinch-out of the Lozio Shale depositional system. The Early Carnian Lozio Shale was deposited first in the Valle di Scalve-Lozio trough and later covered the carbonate platform (Breno Fm..b Fossiliferous, open subtidal limestones, marls and burrowed marly limestones ("Bioclastic Horizon" of the northern Bergamasc Alps. The spreading of shales and siltstones represents the first transgressive stage of the last Carnian sequence in Lombardy, after the "mid- Carnian" (Julian substage regional carbonate platform crisis (top of the Valcamonica Breno Fm.. The "Bioclastic Horizon" records the mfs represented by normal, open marine facies, identified and correlated throughout the Bergamasc Alps. Different petrographic and chemical characters between the Lozio Shale - "Black Pelites" and the Gorno-San Giovanni Bianco Fms. suggest different source areas: the former units are characterized by clasts derived from a metamorphic-intrusive area (placed northward and westward, whereas the latter units are characterized by prevailing volcaniclastic material. A climatic change (from arid to relatively humid conditions may be invoked to explain the crisis of the "mid-Carnian" carbonate platforms in the western Southern Alps and the regional spreading of fine-grained terrigenous material. 

  9. Application and testing of a GIS-based sediment connectivity model in the Venosta valley (Eastern Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Marco; Goldin, Beatrice; Crema, Stefano; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    Sediment connectivity plays a significant role in geomorphic systems since it reflects the potential of sediment, deriving from soil erosion and remobilization of storages, to be transferred within or between landscape compartments. Understanding sediment movement and delivery to given areas of interest or sinks (e.g. channel network, urbanized area, catchment outlet) is an important issue for efficient management strategies. Thanks to the availability of high-resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) different methods for mapping connectivity have been developed, but few examples of their application over large areas are available so far. In this study, a GIS-based model of sediment connectivity developed following the approach of Borselli et al. (2008) with ad hoc refinements devised to adapt the model to mountain catchments using high-resolution DTMs (Cavalli et al., 2013), has been applied to the upper and middle sectors of the Venosta Valley (1096 km2) in the Eastern Italian Alps. The output of the model is a topography-based index aiming at evaluating the potential connection between hillslopes and features acting as targets (e.g. catchment outlet, roads) or storage areas (sinks, retention basin) for transported sediment. The index is composed by an upslope and a downslope component. The first represents the forcing for downward routing of the sediment potentially available upslope and the latter considers the flow path length that a sediment particle has to travel to reach the nearest target or sink. In both components, two weighting factors are used: the slope and a proxy of the impedance to sediment fluxes. In the application to the Venosta valley two different impedance factors were tested: one based on the surface roughness and one derived from tabled values of hydraulic roughness (Manning's n). The main objective of the study is to test the applicability of the model to a regional context which encompasses areas with a large variability in topography and

  10. Photometric transit search for planets around cool stars from the western Italian Alps: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbe, P.; Damasso, M.; Sozzetti, A.; Toso, G.; Perdoncin, M.; Calcidese, P.; Bernagozzi, A.; Bertolini, E.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Smart, R. L.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results of a year-long photometric monitoring campaign of a sample of 23 nearby (d red) noise in our data degrades the precision by a factor of ˜1.3 with respect to a pure white noise regime. Based on a detailed stellar variability analysis (i) we detected no transit-like events (an expected result, given the sample size); (ii) we determined photometric rotation periods of ˜0.47 and ˜0.22 d for LHS 3445 and GJ 1167A, respectively; (iii) these values agree with the large projected rotational velocities (˜25 and ˜33 km s-1, respectively) inferred for both stars based on the analysis of archival spectra; (iv) the estimated inclinations of the stellar rotation axes for LHS 3445 and GJ 1167A are consistent with those derived using a simple spot model; and (v) short-term, low-amplitude flaring events were recorded for LHS 3445 and LHS 2686. Finally, based on simulations of transit signals of given period and amplitude injected in the actual (nightly reduced) photometric data for our sample, we derive a relationship between transit detection probability and phase coverage. We find that, using the Box-fitting Least Squares search algorithm, even when the phase coverage approaches 100 per cent, there is a limit to the detection probability of ≈90 per cent. Around programme stars with phase coverage > 50 per cent, we would have had >80 per cent chances of detecting planets with P 0.5 per cent, corresponding to minimum detectable radii in the range ˜1.0-2.2 R⊕. These findings are illustrative of our high readiness level ahead of the main survey start.

  11. Rapid rates of soil production in the western Southern Alps, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, I. J.; Almond, P. C.; Eger, A.; Stone, J. O.; Malcolm, B.; Montgomery, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Quantifying rates of soil production is necessary for determining the relative magnitude of the processes that drive the evolution of mountain topography and for assessing proposed links among tectonic uplift, erosion, weathering, and global biogeochemical cycles. However, little is known about the role soil production plays in the denudation of rapidly uplifting mountains. We addressed this problem by sampling soil and river sediment from five catchments in the rapidly uplifting and high rainfall portion of the western Southern Alps, New Zealand. Soils were sampled from ridgetops with subalpine forest and dense alpine shrubland vegetation. Results from 11 measurements of in situ-produced 10Be in soils from three catchments show that rock is rapidly converted to soil, with the highest measured rate approaching 2 mm yr-1. Soil production rates at two of the ridgetops decline exponentially as soil depth increases, consistent with previously proposed soil production functions. The third site exhibits an ambiguous soil production rate-depth relationship. The y-intercepts, or maximum predicted soil production rate where the soil depth is equal to zero, at the sites with well-defined soil production functions are 7-9 times greater than those in other tectonically-active mountains and 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than values from drier and more tectonically-quiescent landscapes, indicating that rock can be converted to soil at substantially higher rates than previously recognized. The maximum predicted soil production rate values are 1.5 to 2.5 times lower than watershed-scale denudation rates inferred from in situ 10Be concentrations in stream sediment, indicating that soil production rates approach, but do not reach catchment-averaged values, which also reflect denudation by bedrock landslides. Ongoing work on additional samples will lead to a refinement of the soil production functions and provide rates for two additional sites. In-progress measurement of zirconium

  12. Little Ice Age mapping as a tool for identifying hazard in the paraglacial environment: The case study of Trentino (Eastern Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoner, Thomas; Carton, Alberto; Seppi, Roberto; Carturan, Luca; Baroni, Carlo; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Zumiani, Matteo

    2017-10-01

    The Little Ice Age (LIA) is a well-recognized climatic event during which the glaciers in the Alps advanced and reached their maximum Holocene extent. During their retreat following the LIA, the glaciers left large areas of loose or poorly consolidated glacial deposits in their forelands, which are subject to paraglacial reworking and may represent potential hazards for human infrastructures. In this study, we present a regional scale mapping of the LIA and post-LIA glacial deposits and a reconstruction of the maximum LIA extents of glaciers in the same area. This work is motivated by a local law requiring the classification of areas subject to natural hazards in Trentino (Italian Alps). Results highlight that glaciers shrunk by 63% from the LIA maximum, leaving 30 km2 of unconsolidated deposits, which are subject to geomorphic paraglacial processes. Potentially hazardous consequences can occur, in particular, during high-magnitude instantaneous events, causing debris and mud flows, mass wasting from debris-covered ice, and floods from small moraine-dammed lakes.

  13. Reduced genetic diversity, increased isolation and multiple introductions of invasive giant hogweed in the western Swiss Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, P; Le Lay, G; Goudet, J; Guisan, A; Jahodová, S; Besnard, G

    2009-07-01

    The giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) has successfully invaded 19 European countries as well as parts of North America. It has become a problematic species due to its ability to displace native flora and to cause public health hazards. Applying population genetics to species invasion can help reconstruct invasion history and may promote more efficient management practice. We thus analysed levels of genetic variation and population genetic structure of H. mantegazzianum in an invaded area of the western Swiss Alps as well as in its native range (the Caucasus), using eight nuclear microsatellite loci together with plastid DNA markers and sequences. On both nuclear and plastid genomes, native populations exhibited significantly higher levels of genetic diversity compared to invasive populations, confirming an important founder event during the invasion process. Invasive populations were also significantly more differentiated than native populations. Bayesian clustering analysis identified five clusters in the native range that corresponded to geographically and ecologically separated groups. In the invaded range, 10 clusters occurred. Unlike native populations, invasive clusters were characterized by a mosaic pattern in the landscape, possibly caused by anthropogenic dispersal of the species via roads and direct collection for ornamental purposes. Lastly, our analyses revealed four main divergent groups in the western Swiss Alps, likely as a consequence of multiple independent establishments of H. mantegazzianum.

  14. Reconstruction of glacier fluctuations in the Western Alps since the LGM using OSL surface exposure dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Benjamin; King, Georgina; Valla, Pierre; Herman, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    applied to periglacial environments appears to be a promising method to high-resolution reconstruction (both spatial and temporal) of ice-extent fluctuations over the LGM. REFERENCES Sohbati, R., Murray A., Jain M., Buylaert J.-P., and Thomsen K. (2011), Investigating the resetting of OSL signals in rock surfaces, Geochronometria, 38 (3), 249_258, doi:10.2478/s13386-011-0029-2. Le Roy, M., Nicolussi, K., Deline, P.,Astrade, L., Edouard, J-L., Miramont, C., Arnaud, F. (2015), Calendar dated glacier variations in the western European Alps during the Neoglacial: the Mer de Glace record, Mont Blanc massif, Quaternary Science Review 108 (2015) 1-22, doi:10.1016. Coutterand S., Buoncristani J-.-F. (2006), Pal.og.ographie du dernier maximum glaciaire du Pléistocene récent de la région du Massif du Mont Blanc, France, Quaternaire, 17, (1), 2006, p. 35-.-4.

  15. The Late Miocene to recent erosion pattern of the Alpine foreland basin reflects Eurasian slab-unloading beneath the western Alps rather than global climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Anke; Schlunegger, Fritz; Baran, Ramona

    2014-05-01

    It has been proposed that mountainous erosion increased globally around 5 Ma in response to global climate change, mainly because this increase coincides with a cooling trend indicated by global isotopic data (e.g., Herman et al. 2013). The Alps have played a prominent role in this debate. Published sedimentary budgets for the western and eastern Alps for the past 35 Ma show a substantial increase in the erosion of the Alps at c. 5 Ma (e.g., Kuhlemann, 2000). This temporal coincidence was used to call for a climate driver, mainly because this increase was not accompanied by tectonic convergence across the Alps during this time period. However, several authors emphasized the importance of lithospheric-scale processes beneath the Alps, which could also explain the increase in erosion rates through surface uplift. To provide a new perspective on this debate, we synthesized a spatial gradient map of erosion rates for the Alps and the entire Alpine foreland basin. Our data base consists of published (1) apatite fission-track (AFT) cooling ages for the Alps (e.g., Vernon et al. 2008; Luth and Willingshofer 2008; Wölfler et al. 2012; (2) AFT ages from wells from the Swiss foreland basin (e.g., Cederbom et al. 2011), and (3) stratigraphic data from industry wells in the German and Austrian foreland basin (e.g., Lemcke 1974; Genser et al. 2007). We focus our analysis on the shape and scale of the areas undergoing erosion since 5 Ma. Our synthesis of published denudation rate data for the past 5 Million years reveals that erosion of the Alpine foreland basin is highest in front of the western Alps (between 2 and 0.6 km), and decreases eastward over a distance of 700 km to the Austrian foreland basin (c. 200 m). For the western Alps, the compilation of apatite-fission-track ages yields erosion rates > 0.6 km/Ma, while erosion rates for the eastern foreland basin and the adjacent eastern Alps are slab along the Eurasian-Adriatic plate boundary. This mechanism triggered large

  16. Processing and preliminary results of NFP/PNR20 seismic reflection profiles from the Western Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levato, L.; Pruniaux, B.; Burri, M.; Escher, A.; Olivier, R.; Sellami, S.; Wagner, J.-J.

    1993-03-01

    Results of near-vertical seismic reflection profiling conducted in the western Swiss Alps are presented. All profiles were recorded using both high-fold Vibroseis and high-energy but low-fold dynamite sources, yielding two independent data sets. The Vibroseis seismic sections provide markedly superior resolution of upper crustal units down to the top of the crystalline basement. On these sections, high-impedance contrasts within the nappes are the source of strong reflections, and the basal thrust of the Penninic nappes (Penninic front) delineates a lateral change in reflection character. By comparison, the dynamite sections provide generally higher-quality images of the deep crust. In particular, they show prominent bands of strong reflections in the lower crust and a well-defined reflection Moho deepening from ~ 12 s (about 36 km) in the north to ~ 16 s (about 48 km) in the south. It is concluded that both types of data are required to resolve accurately shallow and deep structures in the Swiss Alps. Preliminary results of the dynamite survey from the most recently recorded line support proposals that shortening of the basement in the external domain has occurred, in agreement with interpretations of the ECORS-CROP seismic reflection line further south.

  17. 6-kyr record of flood frequency and intensity in the western Mediterranean Alps - Interplay of solar and temperature forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Sabatier; Bruno, Wilhelm; Francesco, Ficetola Gentile; Fanny, Moiroux; Jérôme, Poulenard; Anne-Lise, Develle; Adeline, Bichet; Wentao, Chen; Cécile, Pignol; Jean-Louis, Reyss; Ludovic, Gielly; Manon, Bajard; Yves, Perrette; Emmanuel, Malet; Pierre, Taberlet; Fabien, Arnaud

    2017-08-01

    The high-resolution sedimentological and geochemical analysis of a sediment sequence from Lake Savine (Western Mediterranean Alps, France) led to the identification of 220 event layers for the last 6000 years. 200 were triggered by flood events and 20 by underwater mass movements possibly related to earthquakes that occurred in 5 clusters of increase seismicity. Because human activity could influence the flood chronicle, the presence of pastures was reconstructed through ancient DNA, which suggested that the flood chronicle was mainly driven by hydroclimate variability. Weather reanalysis of historical floods allow to identify that mesoscale precipitation events called ;East Return; events were the main triggers of floods recorded in Lake Savine. The first part of this palaeoflood record (6-4 kyr BP) was characterized by increases in flood frequency and intensity in phase with Northern Alpine palaeoflood records. By contrast, the second part of the record (i.e., since 4 kyr BP) was phased with Southern Alpine palaeoflood records. These results suggest a palaeohydrological transition at approximately 4 kyr BP, as has been previously described for the Mediterranean region. This may have resulted in a change of flood-prone hydro-meteorological processes, i.e., in the balance between occurrence and intensity of local convective climatic phenomena and their influence on Mediterranean mesoscale precipitation events in this part of the Alps. At a centennial timescale, increases in flood frequency and intensity corresponded to periods of solar minima, affecting climate through atmospheric changes in the Euro-Atlantic sector.

  18. Water, lithium and trace element compositions of olivine from Lanzo South replacive mantle dunites (Western Alps): New constraints into melt migration processes at cold thermal regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Alessio; Tribuzio, Riccardo; Ottolini, Luisa; Hamada, Morihisa

    2017-10-01

    Replacive mantle dunites are considered to be shallow pathways for extraction of mantle melts from their source region. Dunites offer a unique possibility to unravel the compositional variability of the melts produced in the upper mantle, before mixing and crystal fractionation modify their original signature. This study includes a quantification of H2O, Li and trace elements (Ni, Mn, Co, Sc, V, Ti, Zr, Y and HREE) in olivine from large replacive dunite bodies (>20 m) within a mantle section exposed in the Western Italian Alps (Lanzo South ophiolite). On the basis of olivine, clinopyroxene and spinel compositions, these dunites were previously interpreted to be formed by melts with a MORB signature. Variations in Ni, Mn, Co and Ca contents in olivine from different dunite bodies suggested formation by different melt batches. The variable H2O and Li contents of these olivines agree with this idea. Compared to olivine from residual peridotites and olivine phenocrysts in MORB (both having H2O 1 ppm), the Lanzo South dunite olivine has high H2O (18-40 ppm) and low Li (0.35-0.83 ppm) contents. Geochemical modelling suggests that the dunite-forming melts were produced by low melting degrees of a mixed garnet-pyroxenite-peridotite mantle source, with a contribution of a garnet pyroxenite component variable from 20 to 80%. The Lanzo dunites experienced migration of melts geochemically enriched and mainly produced in the lowermost part of the melting region. Extraction of enriched melts through dunite channels are probably characteristic of cold thermal regimes, where low temperatures and a thick mantle lithosphere inhibit mixing with melts produced at shallower depths.

  19. Surface and thickness variations of Brenva Glacier tongue (Mont Blanc, Italian Alps) in the second half of the 20th century by historical maps and aerial photogrammetry comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    D Agata, C.; Zanutta, A.; Muzzu Martis, D.; Mancini, F.; Smiraglia, C.

    2003-04-01

    Aim of this contribution is the evaluation of volumetric and surface variations of Brenva Glacier (Mont Blanc, Italian Alps) during the second half of the 20th century, by GIS-based processing of maps and aerial photogrammetry technique. Brenva Glacier is a typical debris covered glacier, located in a valley on the S-E side of the Mont Blanc. The glacier covers a surface of 7 kmq and shows a length of 7,6 km at maximum. The glacier snout reaches 1415 m a.s.l., which is the lowest glacier terminus of the Italian Alps. To evaluate glacier variations different historical maps were used: 1) The 1959 Map, at the scale 1:5.000, by EIRA (Ente Italiano Rilievi Aerofotogrammetrici, Firenze), from terrestrial photogrammetric survey, published in the Bollettino del Comitato Glaciologico Italiano, 2, n. 19, 1971. 2) The 1971 Map, at the scale 1:5.000, from aerial photogrammetry (Alifoto, Torino) published in the Bollettino del Comitato Glaciologico Italiano, 2, n. 20, 1972. 3) The 1988 Map, at the scale 1:10.000, (Region Aosta Valley, Regional Technical Map) from 1983 aerial photogrammetric survey. 4) The 1999 Map, at the scale 1:10.000, (Region Aosta Valley, Regional Technical Map) from 1991 aerial photogrammetry survey. For the same purpose the following aereal photographs were used: 1) The 1975 image, CGR (Italian General Company aerial Surveys) flight RAVDA (Administrative Autonomous Region Aosta Valley), at the scale 1:17.000. 2) The 1991 image, CGR (Italian General Company aerial Surveys) flight RAVDA (Administrative Autonomous Region Aosta Valley), at the scale 1:17.000. Aerial imageries have been acquired over a long period from 1975 to 1991. The black and white images were scanned at suitable resolution if compared with the imagery scale and several models, representing the glacier tongue area, oriented using the inner and outer orientation parameters delivered with the images, were produced. The digital photogrammetric system, after orientation and matching, produces

  20. Area and volume loss of the glaciers in the Ortles-Cevedale group (Eastern Italian Alps: controls and imbalance of the remaining glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Carturan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A widespread loss of glacier area and volume has been observed in the European Alps since the 1980s. In addition to differences among various regions of the Alps, different responses to climate change characterize neighboring glaciers within the same region. In this study we describe the glacier changes in the Ortles-Cevedale group, the largest glacierized area in the Italian Alps. We analyze the spatial variability, the drivers, and the main factors controlling the current loss of ice in this region, by comparing mean elevation changes derived from two digital terrain models (DTMs, along with glacier extents and snow-covered areas derived from Landsat images acquired in 1987 and 2009, to various topographic factors. Glacier outlines were obtained using the band ratio method with manual corrections. Snow was classified from a near-infrared image after topographic correction. The total glacierized area shrank by 23.4 ± 3% in this period, with no significant changes in the mean altitude of the glaciers. In 2009 the snowline was 240 m higher than in the 1960s and 1970s. From the snow-covered area at the end of summer 2009, which fairly represents the extent and local variability of the accumulation areas in the 2000s, we estimate that approximately 50% of the remaining glacier surfaces have to melt away to re-establish balanced mass budgets with present climatic conditions. The average geodetic mass budget rate, calculated for 112 ice bodies by differencing two DTMs, ranged from −0.18 ± 0.04 to −1.43 ± 0.09 m w.e. a−1, averaging −0.69 ± 0.12 m w.e. a−1. The correlation analysis of mass budgets vs. topographic variables emphasized the important role of hypsometry in controlling the area and volume loss of larger glaciers, whereas a higher variability characterizes smaller glaciers, which is likely due to the higher importance of local topo-climatic conditions.

  1. Detrital zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic constraints on the terrigenous sediments of the Western Alps and their paleogeographic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Yang; Lin, Wei; Faure, Michel; Wang, Qingchen

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Detrital zircons from Cretaceous micaschist, Late Eocene-Earliest Oligocene sandstone and Early Oligocene siltstone of the Western Alps fall into three main separable age clusters at 610-540 Ma, 490-430 Ma, and 340-280 Ma that correspond to the Cadomian (Neoproterozoic), Ordovician and Variscan (Carboniferous) events widespread in Western and Central Europe. Hf isotopic results indicate that these three magmatic and tectonic episodes did not give rise to significant pr...

  2. Multi temporal LiDAR-DTMs as a tool for modelling a complex landslide: a case study in the Rotolon catchment (Eastern Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, G.; Cavalli, M.; Crema, S.; Frigerio, S.; Luna, B. Quan; Mantovani, M.; Marcato, G.; Schenato, L.; Pasuto, A.

    2014-10-01

    The geomorphological change detection through the comparison of repeated topographic surveys is a recent approach that benefits greatly from the latest developments in topographical data acquisition techniques. Among them, airborne LiDAR makes the monitoring of geomorphological changes a more reliable and accurate approach for natural hazard and risk management. In this study, two LiDAR-DTMs (2 m resolution) were acquired just before and after a complex 340 000 m3 landslide event (4 November 2010) that generated a debris flow in the channel of the Rotolon catchment (Eastern Italian Alps). The analysis of these data was used to set up the initial condition for the application of a dynamic model. The comparison between the pre- and post-event DTMs allowed to identify erosion and depositional areas and the volume of the landslide. The knowledge of the phenomenon dynamics was the base of a sound back-analysis of the event with the 3-D numerical model DAN3D. This particular code was selected for its capability to modify the rheology and the parameters of the moving mass during run-out, as actually observed along the path of the 2010 debris flow. Nowadays some portions of Mt. Rotolon flank are still moving and show signs of detachment. The same soil parameters used in the back-analysis model could be used to simulate the run-out for possible future landslides allowing to generate reliable risk scenarios useful for awareness of civil defense and strategy on emergency plans.

  3. Snow Precipitation and Snow Cover Climatic Variability for the Period 1971–2009 in the Southwestern Italian Alps: The 2008–2009 Snow Season Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Fratianni

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Snow cover greatly influences the climate in the Alpine region and is one of the most relevant parameters for the climate change analysis. Nevertheless, snow precipitation variability is a relatively underexplored field of research because of the lack of long-term, continuous and homogeneous time series. After a historical research aiming to recover continuous records, three high quality time series of snow precipitation and snow depth recorded in the southwestern Italian Alps were analyzed. The comparison between the climatological indices over the 30 years reference period 1971–2000 and the decade 2000–2009 outlined a general decrease in the amount of snow precipitation, and a shift in the seasonal distribution of the snow precipitation in the most recent period. In the analysis of the last decade snow seasons characteristics, the attention was focused on the heavy snowfalls that occurred in Piedmont during the 2008–2009 snow season: MODerate resolution Imager Spectroradiometer (MODIS snow cover products were used to evaluate snow cover extension at different times during the snow season, and the results were set in relation to the temperatures.

  4. Linking permafrost distribution, glacial retreat and colluvial sediment dynamics in the Saldur River basin, Eastern Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brardinoni, Francesco; Sosio, Rosanna; Scotti, Riccardo; Cavalli, Marco; Comiti, Francesco; Mair, Volkmar

    2014-05-01

    In the last three decades generalized atmospheric temperature rise has produced rapid glacial retreat and permafrost degradation in high mountain environments of the European Alps. While it is widely recognized that these changes can impart general instability to mountain slopes (i.e., several projects have documented single case studies of high magnitude-low frequency, catastrophic slope failures), to our knowledge, there appears to be little empirical data available for investigating the spatial distribution of mass-wasting intensity through time in high mountain areas in relation to permafrost degradation and deglaciation patterns. This is a critical shortcoming. Understanding and quantifying the influence of similar transient conditions on mass-wasting processes holds critical long-term implications on the overall sediment flux reshaping mountain landscapes (e.g., post-LGM landscape evolution), as well as more practical short-term applications on water quality issues, damage control/prevention to infrastructure, and reservoir siltation, to mention some. In this contribution we present an integrated approach that aims to: (i) document the spatial distribution of mass-wasting activity and sediment production in the Saldur River basin (97 km^2); (ii) detect causal linkages between mass-wasting intensity, the potential spatial distribution of discontinuous permafrost, and patterns of glacier retreat; and (iii) identify source-to-sink colluvial sedimentary pathways as modulated by the spatial organization of glacial and periglacial landforms. To these ends, we map rock glaciers, protalus ramparts and moraines, and compile a field- and air photo-based multi-temporal (1959-2012) inventory of colluvial sediment sources. We then combine these data with two historical datasets of debris flow and landslide events (both implemented and maintained by the Autonomous Province of Bolzano) and analyse mass-wasting spatial distribution and intensity in relation to proximity of

  5. OSTRACODS ACROSS THE PERMIAN-TRIASSIC BOUNDARY IN WESTERN TETHYS: THE BULLA PARASTRATOTYPE (SOUTHERN ALPS, ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYLVIE CRASQUIN

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the ostracod fauna of the parastratotype of the Permian-Triassic boundary at Bulla in the Southern Alps produced 62 species belonging to 31 genera. They are all discussed and figured. This paper presents results of the first description of ostracods from this important site. One genus, Bairdiacratia n. gen., and 13 species are new: Glyptopleurina pasinii n. sp., Knoxiella ventrospinosa n. sp., Knightina bullaensis n. sp., Bairdia ortiseiensis n. sp., B. cheni n. sp., B. (Rectobairdia kershawi n. sp., Bairdiacratia qinglai n.gen. n. sp., B. tergilata n. gen. n. sp., Microcheilinella lata n. sp., Parabythocythere chongpani n. sp., Cavellina bellerophonella n. sp., C. alpina n. sp. and C. triassica n. sp. The palaeocecological analysis of each unit is produced. The unconformity-paraconformity U1 is clearly reflected in the ostracod assemblages and is marked by a drop in diversity and abundance of specimens. It was followed by a change in the ostracod faunal composition. The Bulla Member displays maximum ostracod diversity and abundance linked with the trangressive trend reported for this period. The unconformity-paraconformity U2, at the boundary between the Bellerophon and Werfen formations (Bulla and Lower Tesero members is the main extinction level for ostracods. The Lower Tesero, Lower Mazzin and Upper Tesero members have very poor faunas. The lower part of the Upper Mazzin Mb. is characterized by an uneven burst of diversity before the great period of taxonomic paucity observed during the late Griesbachian all over the world. 

  6. Possible future lakes resulting from continued glacier shrinkage in the Aosta Valley Region (Western Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Cristina; Machguth, Horst; Huggel, Christian; Godio, Alberto; Perotti, Luigi; Giardino, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Aosta Valley (NW-Alps, Italy) is the region with the largest glaciarized area of Italy (133.73 km2). Like the other alpine regions it has shown a significant glacier retreat starting from the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA, ca. 1850 AD), by losing about 60% of its glaciarized area. As a direct consequence of glacier shrinkage, within glacially-sculpted landscapes, glacier-bed overdeepenings become exposed, offering suitable conditions for glacier lakes formation. In the Aosta Valley region, about 200 glacier lakes have been recognized in different time periods within LIA maximum extent boundaries, mainly dammed by bedrock landforms. With respect to human activities, glacier lakes represent both opportunities (e.g. Miage lake for tourism) and risks (e.g. outburst flood of the Gran Croux lake above Cogne in August 2016) in such a densely populated and developed region. The objective of this contribution is to assess locations of possible future glacier lakes in the Aosta Valley by using the GlabTop2 model (Glacier Bed Topography model version 2). Understanding where future lakes will appear is of fundamental importance for the identification of potential hazards and the interpretation of conditioning factors and dynamics. We first assessed ice thickness and consequently glacier bed topography over large glaciated areas of the region, by using both glaciers outlines related to 1999 (provided by the GlaRiskAlp project) and the regional DEM of 1990 (provided by the Aosta Valley Region) as input data. We performed several runs by varying different input parameters (e,g.: pixel size and basal shear stress). Then we compared modelled results on selected test glaciers (Rutor and Grand Etrèt) with available GPR data. As a validation, we also carried out a GPR survey during summer 2016 on the central area of Indren Glacier (Monte Rosa massif) where GlabTop2 shows the presence of a possible subglacial overdeepening morphology. We found that ice thickness and consequently the

  7. Virtual tours as a new teaching tool in geoscience: an example from the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Antoine; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Nomade, Jérome

    2013-04-01

    , these panorama can be linked together to travel from place to place. Last, but not least, the display of any type of information (video of the last year teachers' explanation, close up of a structure, graphic plot, text content, interpreted geological sections etc.) can be integrated in the virtual tour. From this, it is easy to build a full educational virtual tour that can include the information provided in the field book, and even become the field book itself. These virtual tours can be used with any device (laptop, tablet, smartphone...), hence have the potential become key players in field teaching. Finally, these virtual tours can help physically impaired students to complete their geological curriculum with the indispensable field experience they would not have had otherwise. Here we present an example of such a virtual tour build in 2012 across the European Alps during the 1st International Field Course organized by Grenoble University, ETH Zürich and Milano University. This virtual tour covers the Grimsel Pass Aar Massif Hercynian Basement (granite, shear zone and the underground NAGRA test site), the Zermatt area (two continents and two oceans packed together), the Aiguille du Midi incredible overview on most of the W-Alps, and the back limb of the Nappe de Morcles and its relation with the surrounding blocks. Link to the virtual tour: http://www.alpesphoto.com/temp/visites/Suisse/build/virtualtour.swf

  8. Evaluating tourist perception of environmental changes as a contribution to managing natural resources in glacierized areas: a case study of the Forni glacier (Stelvio National Park, Italian Alps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, Valentina; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Smiraglia, Claudio; Pasquale, Vera; Pelfini, Manuela

    2012-12-01

    Climate change effects are noticeably evident above the timberline where glacier and permafrost processes and mass movements drive the surface evolution. In particular, the cryosphere shrinkage is deeply changing the features and characteristics of several glacierized mountain areas of the world, and these modifications can also affect the landscape perception of tourists and mountaineers. On the one hand glacier retreat is increasing the interest of tourists and visitors in areas witnessing clear climate change impacts; on the other hand cryosphere shrinkage can impact the touristic appeal of mountain territories which, diminishing their ice and snow coverage, are also losing part of their aesthetic value. Then, to promote glacierized areas in a changing climate and to prepare exhaustive and actual proposals for sustainable tourism, it is important to deepen our knowledge about landscape perception of tourists and mountaineers and their awareness of the ongoing environmental modifications. Here we present the results from a pilot study we performed in summer 2009 on a representative glacierized area of the Alps, the Forni Valley (Stelvio National Park, Lombardy, Italy), a valley shaped by Forni, the largest Italian valley glacier. During the 2009 summer season we asked tourists visiting the Forni Valley to complete a questionnaire. This study was aimed at both describing the features and characteristics of tourists and mountaineers visiting this Alpine zone in summer and evaluating their landscape perception and their ability to recognize climate change impacts and evidence. Our results suggest that the dissemination strategies in a natural protected area have to take into account not only the main landscape features but also the sites where the information will be given. In particular considering the peculiarities of the huts located in the area, such as their different accessibility and the fact that they are included or not in a mountaineering network like that

  9. Evaluating Tourist Perception of Environmental Changes as a Contribution to Managing Natural Resources in Glacierized Areas: A Case Study of the Forni Glacier (Stelvio National Park, Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, Valentina; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Smiraglia, Claudio; Pasquale, Vera; Pelfini, Manuela

    2012-12-01

    Climate change effects are noticeably evident above the timberline where glacier and permafrost processes and mass movements drive the surface evolution. In particular, the cryosphere shrinkage is deeply changing the features and characteristics of several glacierized mountain areas of the world, and these modifications can also affect the landscape perception of tourists and mountaineers. On the one hand glacier retreat is increasing the interest of tourists and visitors in areas witnessing clear climate change impacts; on the other hand cryosphere shrinkage can impact the touristic appeal of mountain territories which, diminishing their ice and snow coverage, are also losing part of their aesthetic value. Then, to promote glacierized areas in a changing climate and to prepare exhaustive and actual proposals for sustainable tourism, it is important to deepen our knowledge about landscape perception of tourists and mountaineers and their awareness of the ongoing environmental modifications. Here we present the results from a pilot study we performed in summer 2009 on a representative glacierized area of the Alps, the Forni Valley (Stelvio National Park, Lombardy, Italy), a valley shaped by Forni, the largest Italian valley glacier. During the 2009 summer season we asked tourists visiting the Forni Valley to complete a questionnaire. This study was aimed at both describing the features and characteristics of tourists and mountaineers visiting this Alpine zone in summer and evaluating their landscape perception and their ability to recognize climate change impacts and evidence. Our results suggest that the dissemination strategies in a natural protected area have to take into account not only the main landscape features but also the sites where the information will be given. In particular considering the peculiarities of the huts located in the area, such as their different accessibility and the fact that they are included or not in a mountaineering network like that

  10. Characterization of Modern and Fossil Mineral Dust Transported to High Altitude in the Western Alps: Saharan Sources and Transport Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Thevenon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust aerosols recently collected at the high-altitude Jungfraujoch research station (N, E; 3580 m a.s.l. were compared to mineral dust deposited at the Colle Gnifetti glacier (N, E; 4455 m a.s.l. over the last millennium. Radiogenic isotope signatures and backward trajectories analyses indicate that major dust sources are situated in the north-central to north-western part of the Saharan desert. Less radiogenic Sr isotopic compositions of PM10 aerosols and of mineral particles deposited during periods of low dust transfer likely result from the enhancement of the background chemically-weathered Saharan source. Saharan dust mobilization and transport were relatively reduced during the second part of the Little Ice Age (ca. 1690–1870 except within the greatest Saharan dust event deposited around 1770. After ca. 1870, sustained dust deposition suggests that increased mineral dust transport over the Alps during the last century could be due to stronger spring/summer North Atlantic southwesterlies and drier winters in North Africa. On the other hand, increasing carbonaceous particle emissions from fossil fuel combustion combined to a higher lead enrichment factor point to concomitant anthropogenic sources of particulate pollutants reaching high-altitude European glaciers during the last century.

  11. Designing and assessing weather-based financial hedging contracts to mitigate water conflicts at the river basin scale. A case study in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellagamba, Laura; Denaro, Simona; Kern, Jordan; Giuliani, Matteo; Castelletti, Andrea; Characklis, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Growing water demands and more frequent and severe droughts are increasingly challenging water management in many regions worldwide, exacerbating water disputes and reducing the space for negotiated agreements at the catchment scale. In the lack of a centralized controller, the design and deployment of coordination and/or regulatory mechanisms is a way to improve system-wide efficiency while preserving the distributed nature of the decision making setting, and facilitating cooperation among institutionally independent decision-makers. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in index-based insurance contracts as mechanisms for sharing hydro-meteorological risk in complex and heterogeneous decision making context (e.g. multiple stakeholders and institutionally independent decision makers). In this study, we explore the potential for index-based insurance contracts to mitigate the conflict in a water system characterized by (political) power asymmetry between hydropower companies upstream and farmers downstream. The Lake Como basin in the Italian Alps is considered as a case study. We generated alternative regulatory mechanisms in the form of minimum release constraints to the hydropower facilities, and designed an insurance contract for hedging against hydropower relative revenue losses. The fundamental step in designing this type of insurance contracts is the identification of a suitable index, which triggers the payouts as well as the payout function, defined by strike level and slope (e.g., euros/index unit). A portfolio of index-based contracts was designed for the case study and evaluated in terms of revenue floor, basis risk and revenue fluctuation around the mean, both with and without insurance. Over the long term, the insurance proved to be capable to keep the minimum revenue above a specified level while providing a greater certainty on the revenue trend. This result shows the possibility to augment farmer's supply with little loss for hydropower

  12. Recent changes in rainfall characteristics and their influence on thresholds for debris flow triggering in the Dolomitic area of Cortina d'Ampezzo, north-eastern Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Floris

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we examine variations in climate characteristics near the area of Cortina d'Ampezzo (Dolomites, Eastern Italian Alps, with particular reference to the possible implications for debris-flow occurrence. The study area is prone to debris-flow release in response to summer high-intensity short-duration rainfalls and, therefore, it is of the utmost importance to investigate the potential increase in debris-flow triggering rainfall events. The critical rainfall threshold is agreed to be a crucial triggering factor for debris-flows. Data from a monitoring system, placed in a catchment near Cortina (Acquabona, show that debris-flows were triggered by rainfalls with peak rainfall intensities ranging from 4.9 to 17.4 mm/10 min.

    The analyses of meteorological data, collected from 1921 to 1994 at several stations in the study area, show a negative trend of annual rainfall, a considerable variation in the monthly rainfall distribution, and an increase in the temperature range, possibly related to global climate changes. Moreover, high-intensity and short-duration rainfall events, derived from data collected from 1990 and 2008, show an increase in exceptional rainfall events. The results obtained in a peak-over-threshold framework, applied to the rainfall data measured at the Faloria rain gauge station from 1990 to 2008, clearly show that the interarrival time of over-threshold events computed for different threshold values decreased in the last decade. This suggests that local climatic changes might produce an increase in the frequency of rainfall events, potentially triggering debris flows in the study area.

  13. Multi-temporal LiDAR-DTMs as a tool for modelling a complex landslide: a case study in the Rotolon catchment (eastern Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, G.; Cavalli, M.; Crema, S.; Frigerio, S.; Luna, B. Quan; Mantovani, M.; Marcato, G.; Schenato, L.; Pasuto, A.

    2015-04-01

    The geomorphological change detection through the comparison of repeated topographic surveys is a recent approach that benefits greatly from the latest developments in topographical data acquisition techniques. Among them, airborne LiDAR makes the monitoring of geomorphological changes a more reliable and accurate approach for natural hazard and risk management. In this study, two LiDAR digital terrain models (DTMs) (2 m resolution) were acquired just before and after a complex 340 000 m3 landslide event (4 November 2010) that generated a debris flow in the channel of the Rotolon catchment (eastern Italian Alps). The analysis of these data was used to set up the initial condition for the application of a dynamic model. The comparison between the pre- and post-event DTMs allowed us to identify erosion and depositional areas and the volume of the landslide. The knowledge of the phenomenon dynamics was the base of a sound back analysis of the event with the 3-D numerical model DAN3D. This particular code was selected for its capability to modify the rheology and the parameters of the moving mass during run-out, as actually observed along the path of the 2010 debris flow. Nowadays some portions of Mt. Rotolon flank are still moving and show signs of detachment. The same soil parameters used in the back-analysis model could be used to simulate the run-out for possible future landslides, allowing us to generate reliable risk scenarios useful for awareness of civil defense and strategy of emergency plans.

  14. Lithospheric structure of the Western Alps as seen by full-waveform inversion of CIFALPS teleseismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, Stephen; Monteiller, Vadim; Operto, Stéphane; Nolet, Guust; Paul, Anne; Zhao, Liang

    2017-04-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a powerful but constitutionally intensive technique that aims to recover 3D multiparameter images of the subsurface by minimising the waveform difference between the full recorded and modelled seismograms. This method has recently been adapted and successfully applied in lithospheric settings by tackling teleseismic waveform modelling with hybrid methods. For each event, a global scale simulation is performed once and for all to store the wavefield solutions on the edges of the lithospheric target. Then, for each modelling involved in the FWI process, these global scale solutions are injected within the lithospheric medium from the boundaries. We present the results of the application of teleseismic FWI to the data acquired by the CIFALPS experiment that was conducted in the Western Alps to gain new insights its lithospheric structure and geodynamic evolution of the alpine range. Nine teleseismic events were inverted to infer 3D models of density, P-wave velocity and S-wave velocity of the crust and the upper-mantle down to 200 km depth. Our models show clear evidences of continental subduction during the alpine orogeny. They outline a dipping European Moho down to 75 km depth and finely delineate the geometry of the Ivrea body at the suture between European and Adriatic plates. Deeper, in the mantle a slow S-wave velocity anomaly might indicate the location of the European slab detachment. Overall, FWI models give access to new seismic images that fill the resolution gap between smooth tomographic model and sharp receiver function images of the lithosphere and enable integrated interpretations of crustal and upper-mantle structures.

  15. Monitoring of a debris-covered and avalanche-fed glacier in the Eastern Italian Alps using ground-based SfM-MVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Livia; Carturan, Luca; Cazorzi, Federico; Colucci, Renato R.; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo; Forte, Emanuele

    2015-04-01

    The Montasio Occidentale glacier is a 0.07 km2 wide, avalanche-fed glacier located at very low-altitude (1860-2050 m a.s.l.) in the Eastern Italian Alps. The glacier is still active and shows a detectable mass transfer from the accumulation area to the lower ablation area, which is covered by a thick debris mantle. Geometric changes and mass balance have been monitored starting in 2010, combining glaciological methods and high-resolution geodetic surveying with a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). The TLS technique has proved to be very effective in determining the volume change of this glacier, but presents several limitations as high costs, high level of specialized training and low portability. On the other hand, the recent improvements in close-range photogrammetric techniques like the Structure from Motion (SfM), combined with dense image matching algorithms as Multi View Stereo (MVS), make them competitive for high quality 3D models production. The purpose of this work was to apply ground-based photogrammetric surveys for the monitoring of the annual mass balance and surface processes of Montasio Occidentale glacier. A consumer-grade SLR camera and the SfM-MVS software PhotoScan were used to detect the changes in the surface topography of the glacier from 2012 to 2014. Different data acquisition settings were tested, in order to optimize the quality and the spatial coverage of the 3D glacier model. The accuracy of the image-based 3D models was estimated in stable areas outside the glacier, using the TLS 3D model as reference. A ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey was carried out in 2014, simultaneously to the photogrammetric survey, that was used to compare the snow height estimations obtained by photogrammetry with those obtained by geophysics. The achieved results indicate that the resolution and accuracy of the 3D models generated by the SfM-MVS technique are comparable with those obtained from TLS surveys. Consequently, almost identical volumetric changes

  16. Comparison between weather radar and rain gauges data of precipitations that triggered debris flows in the Dolomites (North Eastern Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Martino; Gregoretti, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    High intensity and short duration (usually 15-30 minutes) rainfalls are able to generate sudden and abundant runoff in rocky cliffs that can entrain large quantities of sediments and originate debris flow phenomena. A rain gauge network has been set up in two different areas of Dolomites (North Eastern Italian Alps) far each other about 15 km: Fiames (Cortina d'Ampezzo) and Rovina di Cancia (Borca di Cadore). The first network is composed of 9 rain gauges in an area of 1 km2, while the second is composed of 6 rain gauges in an area of 2 km2. In both the areas, the rain gauges are positioned both upstream and downstream the initiation areas of the occurring debris flows. Another single rain gauge is positioned close to the initiation area of Rudavoi debris flow (Auronzo di Cadore) and is far about 5 km from the Fiames rain gauges network. All the rain gauges sample precipitation depth at 5 minutes intervals. In the years 2009-2015 records of rainfalls that triggered 22 debris flows were taken. In most cases, the recorded rainfalls show an higher variability both along distance (200-500 m) and along altitude (200-600 m). Precipitation data recorded by the rain gauges are then compared with those estimated by means of a C-Band weather radar about 70 km away from there, to verify the possible interchangeability of the two measurement systems. Rainfall depths estimated by radar are provided with the temporal interval of the rain gauges (5 minutes) but with a different spatial scale (500 x 500 m raster resolution). To avoid the observation scale gap between the different techniques, in addition to standard comparisons between point gauge and radar rainfall measures, mean areal precipitations were derived from rain gauge network and compared with radar data. Results seem to demonstrate that radar tends to underestimate precipitation evaluated from rain gauges network, both on different measurement scales and on mean spatial data. On average, underestimation regards both

  17. Linking geomorphology and high resolution seismic imaging for defining the evolution of a formerly glaciated valley in Vinschgau/Val Venosta, Eastern Italian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraio, Stefano; Bruno, Pier Paolo; Brardinoni, Francesco; Picotti, Vincenzo; Cucato, Maurizio; Morelli, Corrado; Mair, Volkmar

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the sedimentary architecture of Quaternary valley fills, in relation to past climate changes, represents an essential condition for estimating the evolution of the contemporary mountain landscape. Mountain drainage basins are considered as systems that are largely affected by environmental changes, during glacial-interglacial transitions and consequently represent natural archives that record the main processes depending on climate variations. In this paper, we aim to reconstruct the post-Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) evolution of a cross-sectional transect of the Venosta Valley (Eastern Italian Alps), with a special focus on the confluences between the Adige River and its tributaries Gadria-Strimm and Lasa streams. We acquired and processed four high-resolution dense, wide-aperture seismic profiles to obtain seismic data of quality and resolution adequate to 1) study the internal architecture of the debris-flow fans; 2) delineate the morphology of the bedrock valley bottom and the associated sedimentary fills above it; and 3) evaluate the geometric relationships between the debris-flow fans and the hosting valley fills. We integrated the results of the high-resolution seismic imaging with existing speleothem and radiocarbon dating, and with four newly acquired sedimentary cores and about twenty new radiocarbon dates. The new set of radiocarbon ages, allowed us to define timelines across the seismic imaging, and consequently across the stratigraphic profiles to calculate average sedimentation rates between the dated samples, within each core. Our results show that the onset of paraglacial sediment evacuation from the three tributary systems was primarily controlled by basin aspect, a proxy for incoming solar radiation that typically affects the timing and pace of deglaciation. We further show that the debris-flow sediment flux associated with the formation of the Gadria fan, the best-constrained tributary system in the study area, describes a primary

  18. From digital mapping to GIS-based 3D visualization of geological maps: example from the Western Alps geological units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestro, Gianni; Cassulo, Roberto; Festa, Andrea; Fioraso, Gianfranco; Nicolò, Gabriele; Perotti, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Collection of field geological data and sharing of geological maps are nowadays greatly enhanced by using digital tools and IT (Information Technology) applications. Portable hardware allows accurate GPS localization of data and homogeneous storing of information in field databases, whereas GIS (Geographic Information Systems) applications enable generalization of field data and realization of geological map databases. A further step in the digital processing of geological map information consists of building virtual visualization by means of GIS-based 3D viewers, that allow projection and draping of significant geological features over photo-realistic terrain models. Digital fieldwork activities carried out by the Authors in the Western Alps, together with building of geological map databases and related 3D visualizations, are an example of application of the above described digital technologies. Digital geological mapping was performed by means of a GIS mobile software loaded on a rugged handheld device, and lithological, structural and geomorphological features with their attributes were stored in different layers that form the field database. The latter was then generalized through usual map processing steps such as outcrops interpolation, characterization of geological boundaries and selection of meaningful punctual observations. This map databases was used for building virtual visualizations through a GIS-based 3D-viewer that loaded detailed DTM (resolution of 5 meters) and aerial images. 3D visualizations were focused on projection and draping of significant stratigraphic contacts (e.g. contacts that separate different Quaternary deposits) and tectonic contacts (i.e. exhumation-related contacts that dismembered original ophiolite sequences). In our experience digital geological mapping and related databases ensured homogeneous data storing and effective sharing of information, and allowed subsequent building of 3D GIS-based visualizations. The latters gave

  19. Relative geobarometry from high-pressure rocks of quartzofeldspathic composition from the Sesia Zone, Western Alps, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koons, P. O.

    1986-07-01

    In the Sesia Zone of the Western Alps, Italy, early Alpine blueschist to eclogite facies metamorphism of rocks of quartzofeldspathic composition has produced the same high-pressure assemblage of; quartz, Na-pyroxene, Na-amphibole, paragonite, phengite, zoisite, garnet, magnetite, sphene and Fe-sulphide (=the QFS assemblage) over an area (> 150 km2. Relative gradients in pressure and temperature over this region are reflected in the variations in mineral chemistries of the individual phases of the quartzofeldspathic assemblage through continuous reactions. Mineralogical discontinuities do not occur in the QFS assemblage of this region. Increases in the Jadeite content of the pyroxenes ( X Jd 0.48 to X Jd 0.93) and in the glaucophane content of the amphiboles ( X Gl 0.89 to X Gl 0.96) occur from the southwest to the northeast of the region studied. Analysis of coexisting garnets and pyroxenes indicate that the compositional variation of amphiboles and pyroxenes is associated with a decrease in the grossular component of the coexisting garnet. Zoned pyroxenes and garnets, together with the regional trends in mineral chemistries suggest that the evolution of the QFS assemblage with increasing pressure may be modelled by pressure-sensitive continuous reactions in which amphibole, zoisite and the more jadeitic pyroxene constitute the high-pressure assemblage. Chemographic constraints permit the positioning in pressure/temperature space of the compositional isopleths of those model continuous reactions involving these phases which meet the textural and chemical criteria observed in the natural assemblages. The low dP/dT slope (-20 bars/° C) of these isopleths causes the continuous reactions to be useful for geobarometric calculations at pressures above the absolute breakdown of albite to jadeite plus quartz. In addition the pseudobinary loops for the other continuous reactions which are potentially useful geobarometers and involve either the NaAlCa-1Mg-1 exchange or the

  20. Soils evolution and treeline fluctuations under late Holocene climatic changes: an integrated approach from Valle d'Aosta (Western European Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroli, Anna; Leonelli, Giovanni; Verrecchia, Eric P.; Sebag, David; Pozzi, Emanuele D.; Pelfini, Manuela; Maggi, Valter; Trombino, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The treeline ecotone, defined as the transition belt in mountain vegetation between the closed forest (timberline) and the alpine grasslands, is one of the most distinctive features of mountain environments and it is widely considered as a climatic boundary. Treeline altitudinal fluctuations may be considered to assess past and ongoing climatic and environmental changes. Although the ecological dynamics of the alpine treeline ecotone is mainly influenced by climate, especially by soil temperature, climatic parameters are not the only factors that influence the treeline position. In fact, the treeline altitude may be locally influenced by environmental factors, geomorphological processes, soil development, and human activities. This study aims at the reconstruction of late Holocene soil evolution and environmental changes at the treeline on the SW slope of the Becca di Viou Mountain in Valle d'Aosta (Western Italian Alps). First, we performed a detailed reconstruction of the treeline altitudinal dynamics. In addition, field (including air and soil temperatures) and laboratory (of both mineral and organic compounds) characterizations have been performed along two transects of seven soil profiles developing at an altitude ranging from 2100 m a.s.l. (closed forest) to 2400 m a.s.l. (treeline ecotone), in order to understand the relationships between colonization by trees and soil development under the ongoing climate change. The upward shift of the treeline was assessed analyzing tree age distribution along the slope by means of a tree-ring based approach. The reconstruction of the treeline altitudinal dynamics (based on years at which the trees reached 2 m in height) at the study site reveals an upward shift of 115 m over the period 1901-2000, reaching the altitude of 2515 m a.s.l. in 2008. The recent treeline shift and the acceleration of tree colonization rates in the alpine belt can be mainly attributed to a climatic input, and particularly to an increasing

  1. Candoglia Marble and the "Veneranda Fabbrica del Duomo di Milano": a resource for Global Heritage Stone Designation in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Alessandro; Castelli, Daniele; Corbetta, Elio; Antonella Dino, Giovanna

    2015-04-01

    Alpine marbles have been widely used in the past for celebrated, both indoor and outdoor, applications. Among them, the Candoglia Marble, a worldwide known and appreciated georesource, and its "bastard brother" from the nearby Ornavasso area were and are exploited in the Verbano-Cusio-Ossola quarry basin of Northwestern Italian Alps. They crop out as lenses (up to 30 m in thickness) interlayered within high-grade paragneisses of the Ivrea Zone, a section of deep continental crust that experienced amphibolite- to granulite-facies metamorphism of Palaeozoic age. The Candoglia and Ornavasso Marbles are pinkish to greyish, coarse-grained (> 3 mm), calcitic marbles with frequent, cm-thick, dark-greenish silicate layers containing diopside and tremolite; minor minerals include quartz, epidote, sulphides, Ba-feldspar, barite and, occasionally, phlogopite. First record of quarrying activities in the area arises to the Roman age (Ornavasso quarrying area). Both the Ornavasso and Candoglia Marbles were widely employed in local construction (San Nicola Church and Torre della Guardia at Ornavasso, Madonna di Campagna Church at Verbania, San Giovanni in Montorfano Church), but they became famous thanks to their application for the "Duomo di Milano" since the fourteenth century. At the beginning, the building stones employed for the construction of the Gothic style, Duomo di Milano were quarried in the Ornavasso area, but in a short time, the Candoglia quarry (property of the so-called "Veneranda Fabbrica del Duomo" that incessantly takes care of the Cathedral Church from 1387 A.D.) became the main quarry for the construction and maintenance of the Cathedral. The Candoglia quarry developed during the centuries, from open pit small quarries to a unique underground quarry, characterised by a very peculiar quarrying activities (subvertical bench characterized by strong lateral forces, which have to be contrasted and monitored). The Candoglia Marble was preferred to Carrara marbles

  2. Petrochronological investigations to unravel the tectono-metamorphic history of Alpine subduction (Briançonnais, Queyras, Western Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanari, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The study of the tectonic and metamorphic history of the Alpine metamorphic belt involving oceanic and continental subduction processes requires knowledge of detailed Pressure-Temperature-time-deformation (P-T-t-ɛ) paths recorded by different tectono-metamorphic units across the belt. This task is particularly challenging in low-grade rocks, e.g. metapelites, (a) for thermobarometry, and (b) for geochronology. Metapelites at greenschist facies metamorphic conditions show a narrow spectrum of metamorphic minerals, notably quartz, chlorite and K-white mica, in addition to commonly detrital relics inherited from previous metamorphic rocks. To obtain reliable P-T estimates, a multi-method approach is required, which usefully combines Raman study of Carbonaceous Material (RSCM), chemical analysis in standardized X-ray maps, and multi-equilibrium inverse thermodynamic modelling of chlorite and white mica. In order to be able to link each assemblage to a specific metamorphic stage and determine the time scales and rates of metamorphism, it is critical to use in situ dating techniques. In this study, high-resolution geochronology was conducted including single-grain 40Ar/39Ar dating (step heating), where possible in combination with U-Th-Pb age-dating of allanite by LA-ICP-MS analysis. In the French western Alps, the Briançonnais zone is a remnant of the continental subduction wedge, while the Liguro-Piedmontais zone is a fossil oceanic subduction wedge. Metapelites from these two complexes were investigated to constrain the individual P-T-t paths recorded in each tectonic slice. This study focussed on deciphering four tectono-metamorphic units in the Briançonnais zone: (B1) The Internal basement; (B2) the Lower and (B3) Upper Zone Houillère; (B4) the Mesozoic Nappe Stack. These continental units recorded green-schist Alpine metamorphic conditions. In the Liguro-Piedmontais zone, five tectono-metamorphic units are identified: (LP1) the Péouvou; (LP2) Saint-Véran; (LP

  3. The initial superposition of oceanic and continental units in the southern Western Alps: constraints on geometrical restoration and kinematics of the continental subduction wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Thierry; Schwartz, Stéphane; Matthews, Steve; Malusa, Marco; Jouvent, Marine

    2017-04-01

    The tectonic contact separating continental and oceanic units is preserved at outcrop in many locations within the Western Alps. The contact has experienced prolonged and progressive deformation during Oligocene collision and subsequent 'extrusive' contraction which is approximately westerly-directed (Dumont et al., 2012). Despite variable metamorphic grade, this tectonic contact displays a relative consistency of tectonostratigraphic and structural characteristics. Removal of the Oligocene and younger deformation is a critical requirement to allow assessment of the kinematic evolution during the Eocene continental subduction phase. The best preserved relationships are observed near the base of the Helminthoid Flysch nappes, in the footwall of the Penninic thrust, or in the external part of the Briançonnais zone. Here, the oceanic units are composed of detached Cretaceous sediments, but they are underlain locally by an olistostrome containing basaltic clasts. Further to the east, the internal boundary of the Briançonnais zone s.l. (including the 'Prepiedmont units'), is frequently marked by breccia or megabreccia, but is strongly affected by blueschist-facies metamorphism and by approximately easterly directed backfolding and backthrusting. At one locality, there is compelling evidence that the oceanic and continental units were already tectonically stacked and metamorphosed (together) 32Ma ago. Some megabreccias of mixed continental/oceanic provenance can be interpreted as a metamorphic equivalent of the external olistostrome, products of the initial pulses of tectonic stacking. The overlying units are composed dominantly of metasediments, containing distributed ophiolitic megaboudins (Tricart & Schwartz, 2006). Further east again, the tectonic contact separates the Dora-Maira continental basement from the Mt. Viso units which are predominantly composed of oceanic lithosphere. Both the Dora-Maira and Mt. Viso units are eclogitic, but the HP peak is apparently

  4. Near field earthquake sources scenarios and related tsunamis on the French-Italian Riviera (Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larroque, Christophe; Ioualalen, Mansour; Scotti, Oona

    2014-05-01

    The large system of thrust faults recently evidenced at the foot of the northern Ligurian margin accommodates the inversion of this ancient passive margin since at least 5 Ma (Messinian times). At depth, these faults are certainly connected to a major northward dipping thrust that accounts for the major part of the seismicity in the northern Ligurian Sea. The deformations of the Quaternary sediments along the faults attest to a compressive tectonic regime consistent with the focal mechanisms of earthquakes. The major event in the area (the Ligurian earthquake, 1887/02/23, Mw 6.7-6.9 and the related tsunami) could result from the activation of part of the Ligurian thrust. Starting from the Ligurian earthquake source characteristics (strike: N55°E, dip: 16°N, length: 35 km, width: 17 km, co-seismic slip: 1.5 m, focal depth: 15 km, Mw 6.9), we have built an exhaustive set of earthquake scenarios involving the 80 km long Ligurian thrust. (1) Two of these earthquake scenarios ruptured respectively the eastern (offshore Imperia) and western (offshore Nice) part of the Ligurian thrust. (2) As these scenarios must scan the range of potential events in accordance with the geology, a second group of scenarios tests an 80 km long rupture of the entire Ligurian thrust with different strikes (N55°E and N70°E) and different widths of the faulting surface (17 km and 27 km) and then co-seismic slips of 2 m and 3.3 m, respectively. As the Ligurian coast is a densely populated and industrial area, the vulnerability is high. We want to stress here that we are more concerned with tsunamis triggered by local earthquakes. This is because, considering their arrival times (a few minutes), the risk prevention cannot be handled by existing tsunami warning system. For all scenarios we evaluate the tsunami coastal impact. The spatial distribution of the maximum wave height (MWH) is provided with a tentative identification of the processes that are responsible for it. The predictions

  5. Sedimentary connection between rock glaciers and torrential channels: definition, inventory and quantification from a test area in the south-western Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummert, Mario; Barboux, Chloé; Delaloye, Reynald

    2017-04-01

    order to validate these estimations, the resulting sediment transfer rates are compared to transfer rates calculated from repeated terrestrial LiDAR surveys on selected study cases. This contribution presents results from the application of this methodology in a test study area in the south-western Swiss Alps. The methodology reveals itself suitable to identify rock glaciers connected to the torrential network. For each of the detected rock glaciers, an estimation of the sediment yield is proposed. The transfer rates range from tens of cubic meters per year for some slow moving and/or partially connected landforms, to several thousands of cubic meters per year. References: Delaloye R. (2004). Contribution à l'étude du pergélisol de montagne en zone marginale. GeoFocus vol. 10, Thèse, Département de Géosciences/Géographie, Université de Fribourg. Delaloye, R., Lambiel, C., Gärtner-Roer, I. (2010). Overview of rock glacier kinematics research in the Swiss Alps. Seasonal rhythm, interannual variations and trends over several decades. Geogr. Helv., 65: 2, 135-145. Delaloye, R., Morard, S., Barboux, C., Abbet, D., Gruber, V., Riedo, M. & Gachet, S. (2013). Rapidly moving rock glaciers in Mattertal. In: Graf, C. (Eds). Mattertal - ein Tal in Bewegung. Publikation zur Jahrestagung der Schweizerischen Geomorphologischen Gesellschaft 29. Juni - 1. Juli 2011, St. Niklaus, Birmensdorf, Eidg. Forschungsanstalt WSL, 113 - 124. Gärtner-Roer, I. (2012). Sediment transfer rates of two active rockglaciers in the Swiss Alps. Geomorphology, 167-168, 45-50. Lugon, R. & Stoffel, M. (2010). Rock glacier dynamics and magnitude-frequency relations of debris flows in a high-elevation watershed : Ritigraben, Swiss Alps. Global and Planetary Change, 73, 202-210.

  6. Paleoflood activity and climate change over the last 2000 years recorded by high altitude alpine lake sediments in Western French Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouinat, Laurent; Sabatier, Pierre; Develle, Anne-Lise; Giguet-Covex, Charline; Poulenard, Jérôme; Doyen, Elise; Crouzet, Christian; Malet, Emmanuel; Reyss, Jean-Louis; Arnaud, Fabien

    2015-04-01

    Extreme precipitation events can trigger floods that may have serious human and economic consequences. The flood represents extreme rainfall event, which in high altitude mountain regions are mostly triggered alternatively by local convective summer storms or, less frequently, by regional widespread rainfall event. The former's precipitation pattern comes from Mediterranean Sea fluxes, dominant in the south; instead of the latter coming from the Atlantic Ocean, dominant in the north of the French Alps. The aim of the study is then to explore which regime dominates in Western French Alps. Paleoflood chronicle is a way to understand past continental climate through the variability of both frequency and intensity. In this study we explore the paleoflood activity as recorded by sediments of the small alpine lake Muzelle (2200 m.a.s.l.) located in the western French Alps. Lake Muzelle catchment area is 5 km² -around 4 % being glacier covered- and is drained by one main stream. Lake Muzelle is 18.8 meters deep and is ice-covered during 7-8 months each year. Moreover, the watershed is being used for pastoral activity for several centuries. In this study, we use sedimentological analysis as well high resolution XRF core scanner geochemistry to identify turbidites interpreted as flood deposits. 256 turbidites were documented in the sediment sequence. Sr/Ti geochemical ratio is used to identify the coarsest grain size fraction of the flood deposit and the thickness of each deposit was measured. Dating was carried out using short-lived-radio-elements (210Pb, 137Cs, 241Am), historical events as well as nine 14C dates and paleomagnetic declination to constrain the age model over the last 2000 years. The study includes also palynological and sediment DNA analysis to understand past human activity on the watershed. As a result, the 31 years frequency shows a stable period from 0 to 1100 AD. Between 1100 and1200 AD the flood frequency presents a brutal increase with a relatively

  7. Wolf survival and population trend using non-invasive capture-recapture techniques in the Western Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca Marucco; Daniel H. Pletscher; Luigi Boitani; Michael K. Schwartz; Kristy L. Pilgrim; Jean-Dominique Lebreton

    2009-01-01

    Population abundance and related parameters need to be assessed to implement effective wildlife management. These essential parameters are often very hard to obtain for rare, wide-ranging and elusive species, particularly those listed as endangered or threatened (IUCN 2001). In Italy, wolves Canis lupus Linnaeus 1758, now a fully protected species in Western Europe,...

  8. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Italian version of the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder index (WOOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Katia; Cerciello, Simone; Morris, Brent Joseph; Visonà, Enrico; Merolla, Giovanni; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    The Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder index (WOOS) has been introduced as a disease-specific quality of life measurement in patients with glenohumeral arthritis. The aim of the present study was to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the English version of the WOOS to Italian and to assess its validity, reliability and responsiveness in patients with glenohumeral joint osteoarthritis treated conservatively. The adaptation process was carried out following the simplified Guillemin criteria. The English version was translated into Italian by two bilingual orthopaedic surgeons and then translated back into English by two different bilingual orthopaedic surgeons. The original version was compared with the back-translation. The questionnaire was prospectively administered to 30 patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis at baseline and again after 5 days for retest reliability. After 6 months of conservative treatment, the responsiveness of the questionnaire was assessed in a subsample of 20 patients. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. The interclass correlation coefficient between test and retest of the WOOS was 0.99 (P < 0.001). Pearson's correlation coefficient between the WOOS and disability of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) preoperatively was 0.73 (P < 0.01) and the correlation between the changes of score for the WOOS and DASH was 0.75 (P < 0.01). There were no floor or ceiling effects. Responsiveness, calculated by standardized response mean, was 1.1 and effect size was 1.3. The Italian version of the WOOS questionnaire has shown to be equivalent to its English version and demonstrated good validity, reliability and responsiveness to conservative treatment of glenohumeral osteoarthritis. Level II.

  9. Calendar-dated glacier variations in the western European Alps during the Neoglacial: the Mer de Glace record, Mont Blanc massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Melaine; Nicolussi, Kurt; Deline, Philip; Astrade, Laurent; Edouard, Jean-Louis; Miramont, Cécile; Arnaud, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Holocene glacier records from the western European Alps are still sparse, although a number of sites are well suited to constraining pre- and early- Little Ice Age (LIA) glacier advances. The present study provides the first dendrochronologically-based and calendar-dated Neoglacial glacier chronology for the Mont Blanc massif, French Alps. It is based on the analysis of over 240 glacially buried Pinus cembra subfossil logs and wood remains found either embedded-in-till or as detrital material in the Mer de Glace right lateral moraine. Only a few of the samples were found to be 'formally in situ' but we show that some logs were 'virtually in situ' (not rooted but showing little or no evidence of reworking) and could be used to accurately reconstruct past glacier margin behavior in space and time. Uncertainties regarding the other samples may relate to original growth location and/or to outer wood decay. The resulting dates (followed by a '+') were therefore considered maximum-limiting ages for glacier advances. The main burial events - interpreted as glacier advances - occurred between ca 1655+ and 1544+ BC, between ca 1230+ and 1105+ BC, between ca 1013+ and 962+/937+ BC, at ca 802-777 BC, after 608+ BC, between 312 and 337 AD, between ca 485+ AD and 606+ AD, between 1120 and 1178 AD, between ca 1248 and 1278+/1296 AD, and after 1352+ AD. These advances predate the late LIA maxima known from historical sources. The magnitude of the advances gradually increased to culminate in three near-Neoglacial maxima during the 7th, 12th and 13th centuries AD, followed by a first LIA/Neoglacial maximum in the second half of the 14th century AD. The pattern of Neoglacial events described here is coherent with Central and Eastern Alpine glacier chronologies. This indicates marked synchronicity of late Holocene glacier variability and forcing at a regional scale, although occasional differences could be detected between 'Western' and 'Eastern' records. The Mer de Glace record also

  10. Discovery of a landscape-wide drape of late-glacial aeolian silt in the western Northern Calcareous Alps (Austria): First results and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gild, Charlotte; Geitner, Clemens; Sanders, Diethard

    2018-01-01

    Aeolian deposits record palaeoenvironmental conditions and may coin soil properties. Whereas periglacial loess is extensively investigated for 200 years, the study of the intramontane wind-blown deposits of the Alps has just stuttered along. Herein, we describe a drape of polymictic siliciclastic silt interpreted as an aeolian deposit that veneers extensive areas in the western Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA), from kames terraces near valley floors up to last-glacial nunataks. The NCA - part of the Eastern Alps mountain range - consist mainly of Triassic carbonate rocks; these are overlain by deposits of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and its deglacial-paraglacial aftermath (e.g., glacial tills, fluvio-lacustrine successions, alluvial fans, scree slopes) - and a regional drape of polymictic silt newly described herein. The drape is typically a few decimeters in thickness and slightly modified by soil formation; it consists mainly of well-sorted silt of quartz, feldspars, phyllosilicates (muscovite, chlorite, biotite), amphiboles and, rarely, calcite or dolomite. The drape is unrelated to the substrate: it overlies carbonate bedrock and - in lateral continuity - abandoned deposystems such as colluvial slopes of redeposited till, kames, alluvial fans, scree slopes, and rock avalanche deposits. The drape was spotted from near the present valley floors up to LGM nunataks, over a vertical range of some 2000 m; it is also present in catchments of the NCA that were not overridden by far-travelled ice streams and that lack metamorphic rock fragments. Two OSL quartz ages of the drape from two distinct locations (18.77 ± 1.55 ka; 17.81 ± 1.68 ka) fall into the early Alpine late-glacial interval shortly after the collapse of pleniglacial ice streams; this fits with geological and geomorphological evidence, respectively, that the drape should be of early late-glacial age, and that it accumulated during a specific interval of time. In the NCA, localized minor deposition of

  11. Microseismic activity analysis for the study of the rupture mechanisms in unstable rock masses (Matterhorn, North-western Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitrano, D.; Arattano, M.; Chiarle, M.; Mortara, G.; Occhiena, C.; Pirulli, M.; Scavia, C.

    2009-04-01

    Rockfalls are very frequent events in alpine areas and can endanger human lifes and activities. Since high mountains have been affected by an increasing number of these phenomena in the last years, a possible correlation with the effects of climate changes can be hypothesized. The permafrost degradation, causing the thaw of the ice that fills the rock discontinuities, is then investigated among possible causes of rockfalls. Therefore the monitoring of potential rock instabilities in high mountain in relation with permafrost degradation has been carried out in the frame of the Interreg IIIA ALCOTRA "PERMAdataROC" project. Within the project, a monitoring network has been installed in 2007 on the Italian side of the Matterhorn peak, close to the J. A. Carrel refuge (3829 m a.s.l.). This site is an important destination for climbers going to the Matterhorn peak and is frequently affected by rockfall events. The monitoring network consists of a set of 5 triaxial geophones, to record the existing microseismic activity, and one thermometer, to analyze the temperature trend. A preliminary data processing has concerned the classification of the recorded signals, the identification of the most important microseismic events and the analysis of their distribution in time. As far as this last aspect is concerned, first interpretations have evidenced a possible correlation between the temperature trend and the event concentrations, during particular thermal sequences. The research is still in progress and it is expected that a longer recording period of seismic events and temperatures will help to understand if the microseismic activity is mainly concentrated in some periods of the year, in some parts of the slope and if it is produced by superficial or deep events. A concentration of superficial events in some parts of the slope, together with a structural analysis of those portions, could help to focus on the areas that can be more unstable. While, their correlation with

  12. A Bi-hemispheric perspective on the last glacial termination from the Southern Alps of New Zealand and the Altai Mountains of western Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, P.; Putnam, A. E.; Schaefer, J. M.; Denton, G.; Putnam, D.; Barrell, D.; Schwartz, R.; Sambuu, O.

    2016-12-01

    The last glacial termination ( 18,000 - 11,000 yrs ago) represents the last great global warming and the last time CO2 rose by a substantial amount before the industrial period. Understanding the processes that drove this glacial to interglacial transition will help refine the global climate system sensitivity to CO2 and will place ongoing global warming into a paleoclimatic context. Here, we test possible drivers of the last glacial termination by comparing chronologies of mountain glacier recession in the middle latitudes of both polar hemispheres. Extra-polar mountain glaciers are highly sensitive to changes in atmospheric temperature. Thus glacier landforms, such as moraine ridges constructed along glacier margins, afford quantitative insight into past climate conditions. We present 10Be surface-exposure chronologies and glacial geomorphologic maps of mountain glacier recession since the Last Glacial Maximum in the Southern Alps of New Zealand (44°S, 170°E) and in the Altai Mountains of western Mongolia (49°N, 88°E). On the basis of these chronologies from opposing hemispheres, we will evaluate the relative roles of rising atmospheric CO2, local insolation forcing, and ocean-atmosphere reorganizations in driving the warming that ended the last ice age.

  13. Estimating forest aboveground biomass by low density lidar data in mixed broad-leaved forests in the Italian Pre-Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Montagnoli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Estimation of forest biomass on the regional and global scale is of great importance. Many studies have demonstrated that lidar is an accurate tool for estimating forest aboveground biomass. However, results vary with forest types, terrain conditions and the quality of the lidar data. Methods: In this study, we investigated the utility of low density lidar data (<2 points∙m−2 for estimating forest aboveground biomass in the mountainous forests of northern Italy. As a study site we selected a 4 km2 area in the Valsassina mountains in Lombardy Region. The site is characterized by mixed and broad-leaved forests with variable stand densities and tree species compositions, being representative for the entire Pre-Alps region in terms of type of forest and geomorphology. We measured and determined tree height, DBH and tree species for 27 randomly located circular plots (radius =10 m in May 2008. We used allometric equations to calculate total aboveground tree biomass and subsequently plot-level aboveground biomass (mg∙ha−1. Lidar data were collected in June 2004. Results: Our results indicate that low density lidar data can be used to estimate forest aboveground biomass with acceptable accuracies. The best height results show a R2 = 0.87 from final model and the root mean square error (RMSE 1.02 m (8.3% of the mean. The best biomass model explained 59% of the variance in the field biomass. Leave-one-out cross validation yielded an RMSE of 30.6 mg∙ha−1 (20.9% of the mean. Conclusions: Low-density lidar data can be used to develop a forest aboveground biomass model from plot-level lidar height measurements with acceptable accuracies. In order to monitoring the National Forest Inventory, and respond to Kyoto protocol requirements, this analysis might be applied to a larger area. Keywords: LiDAR; Allometric equations; Plant height; Mixed forest

  14. Community Participation, Natural Resource Management and the Creation of Innovative Tourism Products: Evidence from Italian Networks of Reserves in the Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Martini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses value co-creation and social innovation focusing on a new approach to the management of Natura 2000 areas: the Networks of Reserves (NoRs. NoRs have been set up in Trentino (an Italian alpine area to create an ecological network within the territory, with a particular focus on the socio-economic dimensions of nature conservation and with a bottom-up approach. The research investigates the role of NoRs by using a quali-quantitative approach to analyse the attitudes and awareness of private stakeholders, public actors and local communities. In-depth interviews with NoRs coordinators and key players in tourism organizations were carried out. 167 online questionnaires were sent out to local stakeholders. The research investigates community participation and stakeholder engagement in NoRs’ projects and activities, whether and how socio-economic development has occurred, and whether and how innovative sustainable tourism offers have been created. It confirms the role of NoRs in relation to the conservation and valorisation of natural resources through the stimulation of activities such as environmental interpretation and education. The research demonstrates the effectiveness of bottom-up processes for the co-creation of sustainable tourism offers and the fostering of social innovation. NoRs have proved to be successful in overcoming the major impediments to the functioning of the Natura 2000 network highlighted in the literature.

  15. Evidence for brittle deformation events at eclogite-facies P-T conditions (example of the Mt. Emilius klippe, Western Alps)

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    Hertgen, Solenn; Yamato, Philippe; Morales, Luiz F. G.; Angiboust, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Eclogitic rocks are crucial for the understanding of tectonic processes as they provide key constraints on both the P-T-t evolutions and the deformation modes sustained by rocks in subduction zones. Here we focus on eclogitised and deformed mafic bodies that are exposed within granulites from the continental basement slice of the Mt. Emilius klippe (Western Alps, Italy). These eclogites exhibit highly deformed garnetite and clinopyroxenite layers. In some places, these deformed rocks (up to mylonitic grade) can be found as clasts within meter-thick brecciated fault rocks that formed close to the lawsonite-eclogite facies peak P-T conditions. Garnet-rich layers are dominated by brittle features, whereas deformation within clinopyroxene-rich layers is accommodated by both creep and fracturing. We present a petro-structural study of these eclogites, that allows to track the brittle deformation history associated with chemical evolution. Based on these data, we propose a new tectono-metamorphic model for these rocks, related to the alpine eclogitic stage. This model is consistent with the coexistence of both ductile and brittle features that developed at similar P-T conditions (i.e., at P 2.15-2.40 GPa and T 500-550 °C), and closely associated with fluid circulations. Our study demonstrates that crustal material, buried along the subduction interface at HP-LT conditions, can record several successive brittle events in places where deformation is classically envisioned as ductile. We suggest, based on our observations, that strain-rate increase along plate interface shear zones may trigger fracturing and fluid infiltration which in turn enables brittle-ductile instabilities along these deformation networks.

  16. Crystallization and deformation of amphiboles, and cummingtonite-forming reactions in the garbenschists of the Western Tauern Window (Eastern Alps, northeast Italy-western Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Blanckenburg, F.; Morteani, G.

    1989-08-01

    A detailed microscopic study of the amphiboles crystallized during the late Alpine metamorphism in the hornblende garbenschists of the western Tauern Window reveals sevesal stages of crystallization (Cr 1-Cr 3) and deformation (D 1-D 3). During the first stage of crystallization (Cr 1) poikiloblastic green hornblende of tschermakitic composition overgrew a matrix showing a strong s 1 foliation. A slight tendency towards increasing Tschermak's and edenite exchange, with glaucophane component decreasing towards the rim, suggests amphibole growth during heating and decompression. This prograde metamorphism leads to simultaneous formation of cummingtonite and hornblende in 3 out of 16 studied samples. The cummingtonite-forming reactions are discussed. Both hornblende and cummingtonite show microcracks forming s 2, which is oblique to s 1. s 2 is missing in quartz and feldspar and also in some cases in the rims of the hornblende, but is traceable through trails of fluid inclusions. The last deformational event (D 3) is a tensional one producing s 3 as large cracks in the amphiboles. Correlation of deformation and exchange components with published P- T paths suggests growth of amphibole cores at amphibolite-facies conditions. Hornblende and cummingtonite rims formed at decreasing pressures but still rising temperatures. s 2 microcracks are due to tectonic deformation (D 2) while the s 3 extensional cracks were formed by ductile thinning (D 3) at rising temperatures, as revealed by the mineral parageneses found in the cracks. This paper presents the petrological framework for detailed geochronological investigations giving the time calibration of the P- T path of the Alpine metamorphism of the Western Tauern Window.

  17. Seismic anisotropy in localized shear zones versus distributed tectonic fabrics: examples from geologic and seismic observations in western North America and the European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Kevin H.; Schulte-Pelkum, Vera; Condit, Cailey; Leydier, Thomas; Goncalves, Philippe; Raju, Anissha; Brownlee, Sarah; Orlandini, Omero F.

    2017-04-01

    Modern methods for detecting seismic anisotropy offer an array of promising tools for imaging deep crustal deformation but also present challenges, especially with respect to potential biases in both the detection methods themselves as well as in competing processes for localized versus distributed deformation. We address some of these issues from the geophysical perspective by employing azimuthally dependent amplitude and polarity variations in teleseismic receiver functions combined with a compilation of published rock elasticity tensors from middle and deep crustal rocks, and from the geological perspective through studies of shear zone deformation processes. Examples are highlighted at regional and outcrop scales from western North America and the European Alps. First, in regional patterns, strikes of seismically detected fabric from receiver functions in California show a strong alignment with current strike-slip motion between the Pacific and North American plates, with high signal strength near faults and from depths below the brittle-ductile transition suggesting these faults have deep ductile roots. In contrast, despite NE-striking shear zones being the most prominent features portrayed on Proterozoic tectonic maps of the southwestern USA, receiver function anisotropy from the central Rocky Mountain region appears to more prominently reflect broadly distributed Proterozoic fabric domains that preceded late-stage localized shear zones. Possible causes for the discrepancy fall into two categories: those that involve a) bias in seismic sampling and/or b) deformation processes that lead to either weaker anisotropy in the shear zones compared to adjacent domains or to a symmetry that is different from that conventionally assumed. Most of these explanations imply that the seismically sampled domains contain important structural information that is distinct from the shear zones. The second set of examples stem from studies of outcrop-scale shear zones in upper

  18. Complicated secondary textures in zircon record evolution of the host granitic rocks: Studies from Western Tauern Window and Ötztal-Stubai Crystalline Complex (Eastern Alps, Western Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Elizaveta; Harlov, Daniel; Klötzli, Urs

    2017-07-01

    Samples of metamorphosed and deformed granitic rocks were collected from two Alpine complexes with well-constrained metamorphic history: Western Tauern Window and Ötztal-Stubai Crystalline Complex. Zircon grains from these samples were investigated in situ by a combination of scanning electron microscope techniques, cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and Raman spectroscopy. The aims were: to describe and interpret complicated secondary textures and microstructures in zircon; based on cross-cutting relationships between secondary microstructures, reconstruct the sequence of processes, affecting zircon crystals; link the evolution of zircon with the history of the host rocks. The results indicate that zircon in the sampled granitic rocks forms growth twins and multi-grain aggregates, which are unusual for this mineral. Moreover, various secondary textures have been found in the sampled zircon, often cross-cutting each other in a single crystal. These include: distorted oscillatory CL zoning with inner zones forming inward-penetrating, CL-bright embayments, which are the evidence of dry recrystallization via annealing/lattice recovery; CL mosaicism with no preservation of growth zoning, but abundant nano- and micro-scale pores and mineral inclusions, which are the evidence of recrystallization by coupled dissolution-reprecipitation and/or leaching; embayed zircon boundaries filled with apatite, monazite, epidote and mylonitic matrix, indicating mineral-fluid reactions resulting in zircon dissolution and fragmentation; overgrowth CL-dark rims, which contain nano-pores and point to transport and precipitation of dissolved zircon matter. We conclude that zircon in our meta-granites is sensitive to metamorphism/deformation events, and was reactive with metamorphic fluids. Additionally, we have found evidence of crystal-plastic deformation in the form of low angle boundaries and bent grain tips, which is a result of shearing and ductile deformation of the host rock. We

  19. Shortening of the European Dauphinois margin (Oisans Massif, Western Alps): New insights from RSCM maximum temperature estimates and 40Ar/39Ar in situ dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanger, M.; Augier, R.; Bellahsen, N.; Jolivet, L.; Monié, P.; Baudin, T.; Beyssac, O.

    2015-01-01

    The Oisans Massif, located in the external zones of the western Alps, experienced significant shortening during the Alpine collision. While a series of major top-to-the west shear zones was recently described, the general low grade of the metamorphism has not attracted much petrological and geochronological studies. This paper provides combined temperature and age constraints on the evolution of the Oisans Massif. Temperature was estimated with the Raman Spectrometry of Carbonaceous Material (RSCM) method and chlorite geothermometry. Maximum temperature reached by the Mesozoic cover (Tmax) from Grenoble to the Galibier pass (E-W) and from Saint Jean de Maurienne to Embrun (N-S) yielded almost constant ca. 330 °C temperatures all through the Massif. Temperatures however strongly decrease either westward towards the top of the Vercors sedimentary sequence or eastward towards the Penninic Frontal Thrust. Age constraints were retrieved using 40Ar/39Ar in situ analyses performed on variously strained samples from Alpine shear zones. Over strain gradients, incipient Alpine recrystallizations progressively develop at the expense of former Variscan parageneses. A combined textural and EPMA approach permitted to identify newly formed chlorite and phengite that unequivocally grew in response to deformation or to low grade metamorphism. Chlorites recorded temperatures from ca. 350-150 °C during the activity of shear zones. In parallel, 40Ar/39Ar in situ experiments enabled dating deformation using both synkinematic phengites crystallized below the closure temperature of white-micas and former Variscan muscovite whose isotopic system have been, at least partially re-opened. Activity of top-to-the-west shear zones responsible for the shortening and thickening of the Oisans massif thus occurred between 34 and 33 and 25 Ma. Integrating these new age-constraints, Tmax estimates, and published geological data on the Oisans Massif and neighbouring areas allow proposing a new

  20. Eclogite from the ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic unit at Lago di Cignana, Western Alps: A process-oriented transmission electron microscope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Wolfgang Friedrich; Compagnoni, Roberto

    2009-05-01

    In the Western Alps, the ocean-derived Lago di Cignana Unit of the Piemonte Zone has experienced ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism. We have studied the minerals of two eclogite samples from this unit using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to characterise their microstructures. These microstructures are the result of deformation, phase transformation and reactions and allow conclusions on the processes that had generated them. The goal of this process-oriented paper is to contribute to the knowledge of the formation and exhumation of ultrahigh pressure eclogites. In our TEM-study we found omphacite, amphibole (barroisite, glaucophane, hornblende), clinozoisite, garnet, albite, and thin layers of chlorite and mica in amphibole. The omphacite is well-ordered and has the space-group P2/n. We observed antiphase domains (APDs), dislocations that are organised in small-angle grain boundaries, and - very rare - crystallographic shear planes parallel to (010) and (110). Deformation twin lamellae on (100) have not been observed. Most interesting is the first observation of faults parallel to (110) in a natural omphacite. They are due to deformation. Chain multiplicity faults are common in the amphibole grains. In one case, the orientation of crystallographic shear planes was not only parallel to (010), but also parallel to (130) and (- 110). Clinozoisite showed deformation twin lamellae on (100) with widths of a few nm up to about 50 nm. Dislocations organised into a small-angle grain boundary have been found, which have not been described before. The garnet is almost free of dislocations. While there are differences regarding the deformation microstructures from the UHP Lago di Cignana eclogite and other HP occurrences, it is unlikely that these are due to higher pressures. It is much more likely that the whole formation and exhumation history of the different geological units and the individual positions of the collected rocks within them are reflected in

  1. An high-quality record of the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) in the central western Tethys: the Forada section (Southern Alps, northeastern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusberti, L.; Agnini, C.; Backman, J.; Consolaro, C.; Fornaciari, E.; Rio, D.; Tateo, F.; Grandesso, P.

    2003-04-01

    At the Palaeocene/Eocene (P/E) boundary, some 55 Ma, a major transient global warming ("Palaeocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum"; PETM) affected the Earth system with significant biotic and abiotic changes. In particular, the hallmark of the PETM is a strong and complex negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE), that has been related to a huge and catastrophic release of methane from marine gas hydrates. Because the PETM might represent an analogue in the past of the present anthropogenic accelerated emission of greenhouse gases, it has attracted a good deal of interest with both data collecting and modelling efforts. However, as stated by Röhl and coworkers, "understanding the complete sequence of events that caused the PETM and elucidating the detailed nature of the environmental changes that took place will ultimately require high-quality records from a range of different latitudes and depths and from all of the major ocean basins". In this paper we document the occurrence of an expanded record of the PETM in the Vallone Bellunese area (Southern Alps, NE Italy), representative of bathyal depths of the central western Tethys, where the available records are scarce and condensed. We have carried out fieldwork along with paleontological (calcareous nannofossils, planktic and benthic foraminifera), mineralogical and geochemical (major elements, trace elements, stable carbon isotopes) analyses, that show that in the eastern flank of the Vallone Bellunese the PETM is well recorded. It is easily recognized in the field because it corresponds to a 2--3 meters thick package of reddish clays and marls (Clay Marly Unit, CMU) inserted in the calcareous-marly sediments of the "Scaglia Rossa" Formation. The CMU is widely traceable in the region and nicely matches the lithologic anomaly observed worldwide at the P/E boundary. We have reconstructed a composite section (the Forada section), extended from the latest Maastrichtian to the lowermost Eocene (NP10), that contains an

  2. The II Italian Corps Deployment on the Western Front during the First World War (April 1918-May 1919)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    experience of the Italian Armed Forces. In the last two centuries , significant origins of wars fought with allies are: 1. Common enemies, as with the Italian...the Allied powers due to the Bolshevik revolution in Russia , which finally led to the signing of an armistice between the Central Powers and Russia ...to close this gap, the Army command committed one of its reserve unit, the 14th Division. The initial order gave command of this division to V Corps

  3. P wave anisotropic tomography of the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Dapeng; Xu, Yixian

    2017-06-01

    The first tomographic images of P wave azimuthal and radial anisotropies in the crust and upper mantle beneath the Alps are determined by joint inversions of arrival time data of local earthquakes and teleseismic events. Our results show the south dipping European plate with a high-velocity (high-V) anomaly beneath the western central Alps and the north dipping Adriatic plate with a high-V anomaly beneath the Eastern Alps, indicating that the subduction polarity changes along the strike of the Alps. The P wave azimuthal anisotropy is characterized by mountain chain-parallel fast-velocity directions (FVDs) in the western central Alps and NE-SW FVDs in the Eastern Alps, which may be caused by mantle flow induced by the slab subductions. Our results reveal a negative radial anisotropy (i.e., Vph Vph > Vpv) in the low-velocity mantle wedge, which may reflect the subvertical plate subduction and its induced mantle flow. The results of anisotropic tomography provide important new information on the complex mantle structure and dynamics of the Alps and adjacent regions.

  4. Recent findings regarding non-native or poorly known diatom taxa in north-western Italian rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Falasco

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms of the major rivers of North-Western Italy were investigated to highlight the presence of species of particular ecological interest but not as yet recorded. The survey area included streams belonging to seven different hydroecoregions (HERs with a wide range of physical characteristics. Between 2008 and 2010, 200 samples were taken for the study of the diatom community composition, while a larger set of samples was examined to determine the presence or absence of the nuisance diatom species Didymosphenia geminata (Lyngbye Schmidt. A specific field study was performed in two rivers characterized by persistent blooms of this species to evaluate the effects of its proliferation on the benthic communities. D. geminata was present in almost 20% of the samples. From a comparison with published data, we can confirm that D. geminata has recently been expanding its ecological range, as it has been found also in mesotrophic lowlands water. In some instances the formation of massive proliferation has been recorded. The calculation of autecological values confirmed its preference for oligotrophic waters with low mineral content and organic loading, although with a wider ecological amplitude than recorded in the first studies on this species. Another four taxa of particular interest were detected: Achnanthidium subhudsonis (Hustedt Kobayasi (in 15 sites, Cymbella tropica Krammer (11 sites, Mayamaea cahabaensis Morales and Manoylov (2 sites and Reimeria uniseriata Sala, Guerrero and Ferrario (18 sites. The first three species must be considered new records for Northern Italy. A. subhudsonis and C. tropica reached up to 20% relative abundance. From the analysis of their distribution and autecological values, we can assert that A. subhudsonis and M. cahabaensis show a preference for high values of nitrogen, this latter preferring also quite high values of total phosphorus. C. tropica prefers intermediate values of nitrogen nutrients and R. uniseriata is

  5. Mature vs. Active Deep-Seated Landslides: A Comparison Through Two Case Histories in the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Piane, Luca; Perello, Paolo; Baietto, Alessandro; Giorza, Alessandra; Musso, Alessia; Gabriele, Piercarlo; Baster, Ira

    2016-06-01

    Two case histories are presented, concerning the still poorly known alpine deep-seated gravitational slope deformations (DSD) located nearby Lanzada (central Italian Alps), and Sarre (north-western Italian Alps). The Lanzada DSD is a constantly monitored, juvenile, and active phenomenon, partly affecting an existing hydropower plant. Its well-developed landforms allow a precise field characterization of the instability-affected area. The Sarre DSD is a mature, strongly remodeled phenomenon, where the only hazard factor is represented by secondary instability processes at the base of the slope. In this case, the remodeling imposed the adoption of complementary analytical techniques to support the field work. The two presented studies had to be adapted to external factors, namely (a) available information, (b) geological and geomorphological setting, and (c) final scope of the work. The Lanzada case essentially relied upon accurate field work; the Sarre case was mostly based on digital image and DTM processing. In both cases a sound field structural analysis formed the necessary background to understand the mechanisms leading to instability. A back-analysis of the differences between the study methods adopted in the two cases is finally presented, leading to suggestions for further investigations and design.

  6. Swiss ethnoveterinary knowledge on medicinal plants - a within-country comparison of Italian speaking regions with north-western German speaking regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Maria; Zbinden, Mirjam; Vogl, Christan R; Ivemeyer, Silvia; Meier, Beat; Amorena, Michele; Maeschli, Ariane; Hamburger, Matthias; Walkenhorst, Michael

    2017-01-03

    Ethnoveterinary knowledge in Europe may play an important role as a basis for sustainable treatment options for livestock. Aims of our study were (a) to compare the ethnoveterinary practices of two culturally and sociodemographically different regions of Switzerland, (b) to compare results with earlier ethnoveterinary studies conducted in Switzerland and in adjacent Italian regions and, (c) to evaluate possible reasons for regional differences in European ethnoveterinary medicine. 25 interviews were conducted in 2014 in all Italian speaking regions (ItR) of Switzerland, and 31 interviews were held in five north-western German speaking Cantons (GeC). Semi-structured questionnaires were used to collect detailed information regarding plant species, mode of preparation, dosage, route of administration, category of use, origin of knowledge, frequency of use, and satisfaction with outcomes of the treatments. A total of 162 homemade remedies in ItR and 219 in GeC were reported, out of which 125 and 145, respectively, were reported to contain only one plant species (homemade single species herbal remedy report, HSHR). 44 ItR and 43 GeC plant species were reported to treat livestock, of which only a half were used in both regions. For each HSHR, we classified the treatment intention of all use reports (UR), leading to a total of 205 and 219 UR in ItR and GeC respectively. While cattle were the most often treated livestock species in both study regions, in ItR 40% of UR were administered to small ruminants. Main indications in both regions were gastrointestinal diseases and skin afflictions, but in ItR a high number of URs were reported as antiparasitics. URs were mainly handed down from the past generation, but in GeC the source of knowledge for 20% of URs were from courses. Regarding the used plant species, ItR showed a higher concordance with Swiss than Italian studies, but with some differences to all regions. A total of 22 (14 ItR; 8 GeC) plant species in this study

  7. New Zealand's Southern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The rugged Southern Alps extend some 650 kilometers along the western side of New Zealand's South Island. The mountains are often obscured by clouds, which is probably why the Maoris called New Zealand 'Aotearoa', the long white cloud. The higher peaks are snow-covered all year round. Westerly winds bring clouds that drop over 500 centimeters of rain annually on luxuriant rain forest along the west coast. The drier eastern seaboard is home to the majority of the island's population.This pair of MISR images is from April 13, 2000 (Terra orbit 1712). The upper image is a natural color view from the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. It is presented at a resolution of 550 meters per pixel. The lower image is a stereo anaglyph generated from the instrument's 46-degree and 26-degree forward-viewing cameras, and is presented at 275-meter per pixel resolution to show the portion of the image containing the Southern Alps in greater detail. Viewing the anaglyph in 3-D requires the use of red/blue glasses with the red filter over your left eye. To facilitate stereoscopic viewing, both images have been oriented with north at the left.The tallest mountain in the Southern Alps is Mt. Cook, at an elevation of 3754 meters. Its snow-covered peak is visible to the left of center in each of these MISR images. From the high peaks, glaciers have gouged long, slender mountain lakes and coastal fiords. Immediately to the southeast of Mt. Cook (to the right in these images), the glacial pale-blue water of Lake Pukaki stands out. Further to the south in adjacent valleys you can easily see Lakes Hawea and Wanaka, between which (though not visible here) is the Haast Pass Road, the most southerly of the few links between the east and west coast road systems. Further to the south is the prominent 'S' shape of Lake Wakatipu, 83 kilometers long, on the northern shore of which is Queenstown, the principal resort town of the island. The remote and spectacular Fiordland National Park

  8. Orff-Schulwerk as a Pedagogical Tool for the Effective Teaching of Italian to Upper Primary Students in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Annamaria; Lummis, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of songs and music in the Languages classroom is common practice. Research literature contains positive statements about music as a cognitive, linguistic and affective enhancer. Music and Languages risk becoming marginalised in the Western Australian curriculum due to curriculum pressures. Reduction of time in these learning areas could…

  9. Trans-Alps neutrinos

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "A beam of neutrinos manufactured at CERN shot through the Alps for the first time on 18 August. The beam will feed two neutrino oscillation experiments 730km away at the Gran Sasso National Laobratory near Rome, Italy." (1 page)

  10. ALP - blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003470.htm ALP - blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... include the liver, bile ducts, and bone. A blood test can be done to measure the level of ...

  11. A millennial-long record of warm season precipitation and flood frequency for the North-western Alps inferred from varved lake sediments: implications for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Benjamin; Szidat, Sönke; Grosjean, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The recent warming of the global climate is well recognized. However, does a warmer climate also mean a moister climate? Does dry get drier and wet get wetter? There are important questions as they relate to changes in the water cycle and impacts the water resources as well as the frequency and intensity of storms and floods in the near future. In Europe, regional climate models do not show consistent and robust results for future hydroclimatic changes and how extreme events will evolve in response to future climate change. Paleo-hydroclimatic data from natural archives are one of the few means to assess such changes in the longer context. Here, we present an annually-resolved record of warm season (MJJA) precipitation and summer flood frequency from the varved (annually laminated) sediments of proglacial Lake Oeschinen (46°30‧N-7°44‧E, 1580 m, NW Swiss Alps) back to AD 884. These data sets are inferred from the thickness of annual sediment deposits and the occurrence of flood event layers in the sediments. The chronology of the sediment record is based on multiple varve counts and validated with historical floods chronicled in written documents (back to the 14th century) and 14C AMS dates. The precipitation record shows pronounced interannual to centennial variability with humid warm season phases between AD 920-950, AD 1100-1180, AD 1300-1400, AD 1590-1650, AD 1700-1790, AD 1820-1880, and AD 1960-2008. Driest conditions are reconstructed for AD 960-1080, AD 1250-1300 and for AD 1880-1900. Our precipitation record is consistent with the few multi-centennial warm-season precipitation records available for Europe. We did not find a persistent relationship between warm-season precipitation and temperature. In contrast, results show that the relation between precipitation and temperature has oscillated between positive correlations (warmer gets wetter, cooler gets drier) and negative correlations (warmer gets drier, cooler gets wetter) with a highly significant

  12. ALP-RISK, a smartphone app for collecting data on geomorphic phenomena at high altitude in the Mont Blanc region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Deline, Philip

    2014-05-01

    A network of observers (mountain guides, hut keepers and mountaineers) has been created from 2005 for the Mont Blanc massif in order to acquire data on rockfall in permafrost-affected rock walls. This network, fully operational since 2007, is based on observation sheets or oral communications and has documented nearly 350 events with volume between 100 and 45,000 m3. Their analysis confirmed and helped to better understand the role of the permafrost degradation as main triggering factor. To i) reinforce this network, ii) facilitate its observation work and iii) develop it as well in space (the whole Mont Blanc region, or eventually the whole western Alps) as in a thematic point of view (all glacial and periglacial brutal phenomena), the Alp-Risk app has been created in the framework of the Alcotra PrévRisk Mont-Blanc project. The latter (2011-13) has been developed to improve the prevention of individual and collective natural hazards around the Mont Blanc massif. The app was created for I-Phones and Androids in three languages (French, English and Italian) and allows, as intuitively and quickly as possible, transmitting data on natural hazards in high mountain (snow and ice avalanche, landslides and rockfalls, landslides, moraine destabilization, water pocket outburst flood, torrential flood, and others) to both practitioners (observations available directly on the app via an interface web), scientists, and possibly local managers. Alp-Risk thus constitutes a new step for participatory science in the Mont Blanc region.

  13. Detecting human presence at the border of the Northeastern Italian Pre-Alps. 14C dating at Rio Secco cave as expression of the first Gravettian and the late mousterian in the Northern Adriatic Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahra Talamo

    Full Text Available In the northern Adriatic regions, which include the Venetian region and the Dalmatian coast, late Neanderthal settlements are recorded in few sites and even more ephemeral are remains of the Mid-Upper Palaeolithic occupations. A contribution to reconstruct the human presence during this time range has been produced from a recently investigated cave, Rio Secco, located in the northern Adriatic region at the foot of the Carnic Pre-Alps. Chronometric data make Rio Secco a key site in the context of recording occupation by late Neanderthals and regarding the diffusion of the Mid-Upper Palaeolithic culture in a particular district at the border of the alpine region. As for the Gravettian, its diffusion in Italy is a subject of on-going research and the aim of this paper is to provide new information on the timing of this process in Italy. In the southern end of the Peninsula the first occupation dates to around 28,000 14C BP, whereas our results on Gravettian layer range from 29,390 to 28,995 14C years BP. At the present state of knowledge, the emergence of the Gravettian in eastern Italy is contemporaneous with several sites in Central Europe and the chronological dates support the hypothesis that the Swabian Gravettian probably dispersed from eastern Austria.

  14. Changes in glacier equilibrium-line altitude in the western Alps from 1984 to 2010: evaluation by remote sensing and modeling of the morpho-topographic and climate controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rabatel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present time series of equilibrium-line altitude (ELA measured from the end-of-summer snow line altitude computed using satellite images, for 43 glaciers in the western Alps over the 1984–2010 period. More than 120 satellite images acquired by Landsat, SPOT and ASTER were used. In parallel, changes in climate variables, summer cumulative positive degree days (CPDD and winter precipitation, were analyzed over the same time period using 22 weather stations located inside and around the study area. Assuming a continuous linear trend over the study period: (1 the average ELA of the 43 glaciers increased by about 170 m; (2 summer CPDD increased by about 150 PDD at 3000 m a.s.l.; and (3 winter precipitation remained rather stationary. Summer CPDD showed homogeneous spatial and temporal variability; winter precipitation showed homogeneous temporal variability, but some stations showed a slightly different spatial pattern. Regarding ELAs, temporal variability between the 43 glaciers was also homogeneous, but spatially, glaciers in the southern part of the study area differed from glaciers in the northern part, mainly due to a different precipitation pattern. A sensitivity analysis of the ELAs to climate and morpho-topographic variables (elevation, aspect, latitude highlighted the following: (1 the average ELA over the study period of each glacier is strongly controlled by morpho-topographic variables; and (2 the interannual variability of the ELA is strongly controlled by climate variables, with the observed increasing trend mainly driven by increasing temperatures, even if significant nonlinear, low-frequency fluctuations appear to be driven by winter precipitation anomalies. Finally, we used an expansion of Lliboutry's approach to reconstruct fluctuations in the ELA of any glacier of the study area with respect to morpho-topographic and climate variables, by quantifying their respective weight and the related uncertainties in a consistent manner

  15. Climate change impacts on mass movements--case studies from the European Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, M; Tiranti, D; Huggel, C

    2014-09-15

    This paper addresses the current knowledge on climate change impacts on mass movement activity in mountain environments by illustrating characteristic cases of debris flows, rock slope failures and landslides from the French, Italian, and Swiss Alps. It is expected that events are likely to occur less frequently during summer, whereas the anticipated increase of rainfall in spring and fall could likely alter debris-flow activity during the shoulder seasons (March, April, November, and December). The magnitude of debris flows could become larger due to larger amounts of sediment delivered to the channels and as a result of the predicted increase in heavy precipitation events. At the same time, however, debris-flow volumes in high-mountain areas will depend chiefly on the stability and/or movement rates of permafrost bodies, and destabilized rock glaciers could lead to debris flows without historic precedents in the future. The frequency of rock slope failures is likely to increase, as excessively warm air temperatures, glacier shrinkage, as well as permafrost warming and thawing will affect and reduce rock slope stability in the direction that adversely affects rock slope stability. Changes in landslide activity in the French and Western Italian Alps will likely depend on differences in elevation. Above 1500 m asl, the projected decrease in snow season duration in future winters and springs will likely affect the frequency, number and seasonality of landslide reactivations. In Piemonte, for instance, 21st century landslides have been demonstrated to occur more frequently in early spring and to be triggered by moderate rainfalls, but also to occur in smaller numbers. On the contrary, and in line with recent observations, events in autumn, characterized by a large spatial density of landslide occurrences might become more scarce in the Piemonte region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Urbanization and depopulation in the Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzing, W; Perlik, M; Dekleva, M

    1996-11-01

    Demographic developments in the European Alpine region are analyzed over the period 1870-1990. The region is defined as including parts of Germany, France, Italy, Liechtenstein, Austria, Switzerland, and Slovenia. "Studies of growth, stagnation, decline, commune size, and altitude in almost 6,000 communes are presented on three colored maps.... It is apparent that two highly divergent processes are at work and, accordingly, statistical mean values reveal little of importance. Approximately one-half of Alpine Europe is undergoing general economic and demographic growth and has experienced significant increase in population since the end of the agricultural era. This development has taken place primarily in low-lying valleys and basins and in areas bordering the Alps that have good access to transport routes. Tourism is not as widespread as generally assumed and is usually characterized by a punctate pattern. Only in the western part of the Eastern Alps does tourism account for widespread population growth at higher altitudes; elsewhere the Alps have not been affected by modern development and the economy and population are declining, with some areas in danger of becoming completely abandoned. The results challenge the earlier concept of the Alps as a rural region, once populated by peasants, where tourism now plays a major role." (EXCERPT)

  17. ALPS: A Linear Program Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, Donald C.; Viterna, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    ALPS is a computer program which can be used to solve general linear program (optimization) problems. ALPS was designed for those who have minimal linear programming (LP) knowledge and features a menu-driven scheme to guide the user through the process of creating and solving LP formulations. Once created, the problems can be edited and stored in standard DOS ASCII files to provide portability to various word processors or even other linear programming packages. Unlike many math-oriented LP solvers, ALPS contains an LP parser that reads through the LP formulation and reports several types of errors to the user. ALPS provides a large amount of solution data which is often useful in problem solving. In addition to pure linear programs, ALPS can solve for integer, mixed integer, and binary type problems. Pure linear programs are solved with the revised simplex method. Integer or mixed integer programs are solved initially with the revised simplex, and the completed using the branch-and-bound technique. Binary programs are solved with the method of implicit enumeration. This manual describes how to use ALPS to create, edit, and solve linear programming problems. Instructions for installing ALPS on a PC compatible computer are included in the appendices along with a general introduction to linear programming. A programmers guide is also included for assistance in modifying and maintaining the program.

  18. Italian Modernities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn; Forlenza, Rosario

    assumptions that have substituted for thought and that have perpetuated prejudices both within and outside Italy’s borders. Grounded in meticulous historical and ethnological research, Italian Modernities deserves as wide an audience as its scholarship is deep.” (Michael Herzfeld, Ernest E. Monrad Professor...

  19. ALPS - A LINEAR PROGRAM SOLVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viterna, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Linear programming is a widely-used engineering and management tool. Scheduling, resource allocation, and production planning are all well-known applications of linear programs (LP's). Most LP's are too large to be solved by hand, so over the decades many computer codes for solving LP's have been developed. ALPS, A Linear Program Solver, is a full-featured LP analysis program. ALPS can solve plain linear programs as well as more complicated mixed integer and pure integer programs. ALPS also contains an efficient solution technique for pure binary (0-1 integer) programs. One of the many weaknesses of LP solvers is the lack of interaction with the user. ALPS is a menu-driven program with no special commands or keywords to learn. In addition, ALPS contains a full-screen editor to enter and maintain the LP formulation. These formulations can be written to and read from plain ASCII files for portability. For those less experienced in LP formulation, ALPS contains a problem "parser" which checks the formulation for errors. ALPS creates fully formatted, readable reports that can be sent to a printer or output file. ALPS is written entirely in IBM's APL2/PC product, Version 1.01. The APL2 workspace containing all the ALPS code can be run on any APL2/PC system (AT or 386). On a 32-bit system, this configuration can take advantage of all extended memory. The user can also examine and modify the ALPS code. The APL2 workspace has also been "packed" to be run on any DOS system (without APL2) as a stand-alone "EXE" file, but has limited memory capacity on a 640K system. A numeric coprocessor (80X87) is optional but recommended. The standard distribution medium for ALPS is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. IBM, IBM PC and IBM APL2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  20. Climate warming and the recent treeline shift in the European alps: the role of geomorphological factors in high-altitude sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonelli, Giovanni; Pelfini, Manuela; di Cella, Umberto Morra; Garavaglia, Valentina

    2011-05-01

    Global warming and the stronger regional temperature trends recently recorded over the European Alps have triggered several biological and physical dynamics in high-altitude environments. We defined the present treeline altitude in three valleys of a region in the western Italian Alps and reconstructed the past treeline position for the last three centuries in a nearly undisturbed site by means of a dendrochronological approach. We found that the treeline altitude in this region is mainly controlled by human impacts and geomorphological factors. The reconstruction of the altitudinal dynamics at the study site reveals that the treeline shifted upwards of 115 m over the period 1901-2000, reaching the altitude of 2505 m in 2000 and 2515 m in 2008. The recent treeline shift and the acceleration of tree colonization rates in the alpine belt can be mainly ascribed to the climatic input. However, we point out the increasing role of geomorphological factors in controlling the future treeline position and colonization patterns in high mountains.

  1. Angelo Sismonda (1807–1878), pioneer of geological mapping in the Alps of Savoy and the Piedmont: a bibliography

    CERN Document Server

    Hollier, John; Basaglia, Tullio; Hollier, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Angelo Sismonda (Ange Sismonda) was an Italian mineralogist and geologist based in Turin during the Risorgimento who produced pioneering maps of the Alps in the Kingdom of Sardinia. Well known during his lifetime, he is now mentioned only in passing by historians and no comprehensive bibliography of his work exists. To render his work more accessible, we present a short biography and a bibliography.

  2. Slab detachment under the Eastern Alps seen by seismic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qorbani, Ehsan; Bianchi, Irene; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-01-01

    We analyze seismic anisotropy for the Eastern Alpine region by inspecting shear-wave splitting from SKS and SKKS phases. The Eastern Alpine region is characterized by a breakdown of the clear mountain-chain-parallel fast orientation pattern that has been previously documented for the Western Alps and for the western part of the Eastern Alps. The main interest of this paper is a more detailed analysis of the anisotropic character of the Eastern Alps, and the transition to the Carpathian-Pannonian region. SK(K)S splitting measurements reveal a rather remarkable lateral change in the anisotropy pattern from the west to the east of the Eastern Alps with a transition area at about 12°E. We also model the backazimuthal variation of the measurements by a vertical change of anisotropy. We find that the eastern part of the study area is characterized by the presence of two layers of anisotropy, where the deeper layer has characteristics similar to those of the Central Alps, in particular SW-NE fast orientations of anisotropic axes. We attribute the deeper layer to a detached slab from the European plate. Comparison with tomographic studies of the area indicates that the detached slab might possibly connect with the lithosphere that is still in place to the west of our study area, and may also connect with the slab graveyard to the East, at the depth of the upper mantle transition zone. On the other hand, the upper layer has NW-SE fast orientations coinciding with a low-velocity layer which is found above a more-or-less eastward dipping high-velocity body. The anisotropy of the upper layer shows large-scale NW-SE fast orientation, which is consistent with the presence of asthenospheric flow above the detached slab foundering into the deeper mantle.

  3. Military-geographic evaluation of the Julian Alps area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonimir Bratun

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The Julian Alps have been of military significance since Roman times in a military geographic sense because of its valleys, mountain passes and lines of defence on mountain ridges. They became especially important in the 19th and 20th century. The largest mountain front in World War I was located there,and evidence of that front is still visible today. The border between Italy and Yugoslavia in the heart of the Julian Alps was clearly a line of demarcation along the Soča and Sava watersheds and was reinforced with fortification, obstacles and trenches. During the Cold War, there was an ideological line of demarcation along the western edge of the Julian Alps as well. Military strategy in that area included the use of military geographic approaches in both westerly and easterly directions. After the geopolitical changes of 1991, the Julian Alps no longer had same military geographic significance in terms of Slovenian national security. Today other military activities are more important: training under mountains conditions for NATO soldiers, non-commissioned and commissioned officers takes place in the Pokljuka region and on the Triglav mountain chain. Military facilities have been taken on significance in the terms of tourism as well.

  4. Present status and distribution of the Lynx in the Swiss Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Molinari-Jobin

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To evaluate the population trend of lynx in the Swiss Alps, we analysed the spatial and numerical development of signs of presence found from 1995 to 1999 and compared them with previous years. Three sources of information on the presence of lynx are available: (1 reports of lynx killed or found dead; (2 records of livestock killed by lynx; (3 records of wild prey remains, tracks, scats, sightings, and vocalisations. We distinguished three levels of reliability: Quality 1 represent the hard facts, e.g. all reports of lynx killed or found dead, photographs of lynx as well as young orphaned lynx caught in the wild and taken into captivity. Quality 2 include all records of livestock killed, wild prey remains, tracks and scats reported by people who have attended special courses, e.g. mainly game wardens. Quality 3 are all wild prey remains and tracks reported by the general public as well as all sightings, scats and vocalisations, e.g. signs that cannot be verified. More than 1600 signs of presence were recorded in the Swiss Alps in this 5-year-period. A high number of quality 1 and 2 records showed that (1 the lynx population in the north-western Swiss Alps increased from 1994 to 1999, that (2 there is a moderate presence of the species in the central and south-western parts and (3 none or hardly any lynx are found in the eastern Alps of Switzerland. Based on a radio-telemetry study and the number of quality 2 data, we were able to estimate the number of lynx in the Swiss Alps at 70 individuals. To counterpart the uneven distribution of lynx in Switzerland, lynx are being translocated from the north-western Alps to the eastern Swiss Alps, as the expansion of the Swiss lynx population is crucial for the conservation of the lynx in the whole Alps.

  5. Vojaškogeografsko vrednotenje območja Julijskih Alp = Military-geographic evaluation of the Julian Alps area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonimir Bratun

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The Julian Alps have been ofmilitary significance since Roman times in a military geographic sensebecause of its valleys, mountain passes and lines of defence on mountainridges. They became especially important in the 19th and 20th century. Thelargest mountain front in World War I was located there,and evidence ofthat front is still visible today. The border between Italy and Yugoslaviain the heart of the Julian Alps was clearly a line of demarcation along theSoča and Sava watersheds and was reinforced with fortification, obstaclesand trenches. During the Cold War, there was an ideological line ofdemarcation along the western edge of the Julian Alps as well. Militarystrategy in that area included the use of military geographic approaches inboth westerly and easterly directions. After the geopolitical changes of1991, the Julian Alps no longer had same military geographic significancein terms of Slovenian national security. Today other military activitiesare more important: training under mountains conditions for NATO soldiers,non-commissioned and commissioned officers takes place in the Pokljukaregion and on the Triglav mountain chain. Military facilities have beentaken on significance in the terms of tourism as well.

  6. Minorités linguistiques autochtones des Alpes italiennes 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernst Steinicke

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Les Alpes, plus précisément les Alpes italiennes, plus que toute autre région d'Europe Occidentale, sont un lieu de grande diversité ethnoculturelle : pas moins de sept minorités linguistiques autochtones y coexistent, côte à côte avec la majorité officielle correspondante. Maintenant considérées comme un héritage culturel important par les états ainsi que par les régions, une nouvelle législation offre une protection à toutes les « minorités linguistiques historiques » en Italie. Notre étude montre, cependant, qu'il est très difficile de maintenir de tels groupes, car on ne sait pas vraiment où se situent exactement les zones de ces minorités. Partant de là, des groupes d'acteurs locaux, dans de nombreuses communautés, tirent partie de ce manque de connaissance et se déclarent territoires de minorité bien qu'ils ne présentent aucune variante linguistique. Un des objectifs importants de ce projet est, donc, d'établir une représentation cartographique de cette diversité linguistique. Ce document, par conséquent, traite d'études de cas de conscience ethnolinguistique distincte. Même si la Loi n° 482 a été un premier pas important pour la préservation des minorités linguistiques, leur déclin progressif, selon les critères territoriaux et numériques, ne peut pas être nié. Aujourd'hui, outre des facteurs biodémographiques défavorables et une « ethnicité diffuse », les processus démographiques en cours constituent d'autres causes. Dans ce cadre, les migrants d'agrément, ces nouveaux immigrants qui ont découvert les montagnes comme un nouvel espace d'installation recherché, jouent un rôle décisif en renforçant le processus d'assimilation.More than any other area in Western Europe, the Alps, especially the Italian Alps, are home to great ethno-cultural diversity: there, no less than seven autochthonous linguistic minorities coexist side by side with the respective official majority. Now being

  7. No erosional control on the lateral growth of the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, C. L.; Berger, A.

    2009-04-01

    of the deformation front of the Jura Mountains (Nivière and Winter, 2000; Giamboni et al., 2004; Madritsch et al., 2008), the westward shift of the Chaines Subalpines (Lickorisch and Ford, 1998) on the western side of the orogen, and the southward migration of the active front in the eastern sector of the Southern Alps (Benedetti et al., 2000). The reduced erosional efficiency of the orogen, which started at 17 Ma and continued until the Messinian (Kuhlemann, 2000) also did not coincide to a phase of lateral growth of the orogen. Out-of sequence thrusting in the Southern Alps (Schönborn, 1992) reduced the width of the chain well before the Messinian crisis, i.e. during the phase of fading erosion efficiency. Therefore, erosion does not seem to have been the prime control on the changes of width of the orogen. Alternatively, the effect of erosion on the lateral growth of the orogen can be tested by comparing the timing and the type of shifts of the active deformation front from different parts of the orogen. If climate changes are inferred to control changes in the erosional efficiency of the Alps (Willett et al., 2006), the tectonic response to a given change of climate is expected to be coeval and of similar type in all parts of the chain. This is especially true for an orogen as small as the Alps, whose different portions are all affected by the same climatic conditions. However, the mode of exhumation of the Eastern Alps is very different than that of the Western and Central Alps. The exhumation front progressively shifted towards the foreland in the latter case, whereas it remained focused in the axial zone of the orogen in the former case (Rosenberg and Berger, 2009). As a consequence, a broad metamorphic belt, with cooling ages younging from the axial zone towards the foreland formed in the western Alps, and a narrow metamorphic belt with cooling ages younging towards the axial zone of the orogen formed in the Eastern Alps. These first-order differences

  8. Late Cretaceous to Miocene cooling patterns in the Eastern Alps reflecting tectonic interactions of the Alps-Adria-Carpathian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelder, Inge; Willingshofer, Ernst; Schuster, Ralf; Andriessen, Paul; Sokoutis, Dimitrios

    2017-04-01

    New structural and thermochronological (Rb-Sr biotite and zircon and apatite fission track) data constrain the deformation and exhumation history of the eastern most Alps and highlight distinct differences compared to the western Eastern Alps, including the Tauern Window. The new data has been collected along and in the surroundings of the Mur-Mürz fault (MMF), an area that hitherto had a scarce availability of low and medium temperature thermochronological data but is a key area to understand and quantify the influence of processes, such as Pannonian back-arc extension, on the Eastern Alps evolution. The obtained cooling ages document rapid (ca. 15°C/Ma) and diachronous exhumation during the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene with an eastward youngening of cooling ages across a greenschist facies normal shear zone. We interpret this cooling pattern as a post-metamorphic exhumation occurring during Campanian-Maastrichtian synorogenic extension that is characterized by an east directed migration. We suggest that oblique subduction of the Alpine Tethys or slab roll-back driven processes during final closure of the Neotethys could both be mechanisms that drive this eastward migration. Subsequently, the eastern most Alps reflect Eocene to Oligocene slow cooling (ca. 2°C/Ma) suggesting that the region was unaffected by significant crustal thickening or erosion which strongly contrasts with the units exposed in the Tauern Window and surrounding Austroalpine units. The slow cooling continued far into the Miocene and is contemporaneous with early Miocene kinematics that reflect a pre-extrusion NW-SE contraction followed by syn-extrusion NE-SW to NNE-SSW contraction recorded by middle Miocene strike-slip faulting. Field kinematics and cooling ages located on opposite sides of the MMF suggest that lateral extrusion in the eastern most Alps is not associated with significant vertical motions but is rather restricted to lateral motions along dispersed strike-slip faults. This

  9. ALPES: an advanced logic programming environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ruggieri

    1988-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a software programming environment for an extended Prolog language, called ALPES. The purpose of ALPES is to enable a logic programming paradigm to become a software engineering tool to design, develop and prototype traditional software systems, as well as artificial intelligence applications. The key structuring concepts for programs, as well as for the system architecture as a whole are those of contexts, processes and communication. The software design and development methodologies induced by the use of the Alpes-Prolog language have been incrementally used to develop the environment itself. This research was conducted under the Esprit projects P973 (ALPES.

  10. Status of the ALPS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehret, Klaus

    2008-12-19

    The ALPS experiment at DESY searches for light particles which are coupling very weakly to photons. Primary physics goal is the search for axion like particles in a photon regeneration experiment. Central part of the experimental setup is a five Tesla strong superconducting HERA dipole magnet. During two operation periods in the years 2007 and 2008 we have collected first data and explored the sensitivity of the setup. A Fabry Perot laser cavity is being set up in order to increase the sensitivity by more than one order of magnitude. (orig.)

  11. Status of the ALPS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ehret, K

    2008-01-01

    The ALPS experiment at DESY searches for light particles which are coupling very weakly to photons. Primary physics goal is the search for axion like particles in a photon regeneration experiment. Central part of the experimental setup is a five Tesla strong superconducting HERA dipole magnet. During two operation periods in the years 2007 and 2008 we have collected first data and explored the sensitivity of the setup. A Fabry Perot laser cavity is being set up in order to increase the sensitivity by more than one order of magnitude.

  12. Dating the onset of LGM ice surface lowering in the High Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsig, Christian; Zasadni, Jerzy; Christl, Marcus; Akçar, Naki; Ivy-Ochs, Susan

    2016-07-01

    The general chronological outline of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the Alps is well known after more than two centuries of ice age research in Europe. Current studies focus on resolving the details of the deglaciation process after the LGM. Particularly few data in this context are available from the High Alps. Here we report chronological constraints on the onset of deglaciation in two different study areas from the Western and Eastern Alps: the Mont Blanc (Italy) and Zillertal Alps (Austria). We sampled 32 bedrock and boulder surfaces from high elevation ridges beneath the glacial trimline. The oldest 10Be exposure ages of ∼18.5 ka correspond to the initiation of lowering of the LGM ice surface. Identical ages from both study areas suggest synchronous decay of the LGM glaciers in the accumulation zones of the Western and Eastern Alps. Thus, the High Alpine ice surface lowered roughly synchronously to the downwasting of the glacier tongues in the forelands that was completed 19-18 ka. In both study areas, ages of numerous samples that are consistently 2-3 ka younger than 18.5 ka suggest the persistance of remnant ice patches at high elevations in the Lateglacial accumulation zones approximately until the Bølling-Allerød interstadial.

  13. Out of the alps: the biogeography of a disjunctly distributed mountain butterfly, the almond-eyed ringlet Erebia alberganus (Lepidoptera, Satyrinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louy, Dirk; Habel, Jan Christian; Ulrich, Werner; Schmitt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Many studies on the biogeography of thermophilic and arctic-alpine species were performed during the past. Only little is known about species with intermediate characteristics. We analyzed the molecular biogeography of the butterfly Erebia alberganus (30 populations, representing 1106 individuals), sampled over the Alps, Apennines (Italy), and the Stara Planina (Bulgaria) using allozyme electrophoresis (17 loci). Genetic analyses revealed 3 major splits, with the strongest between the Stara Planina populations and all other populations, and a weaker split between the Alps and the Apennines. Individuals from the Apennines were genetically nested within the Alps group. The Alps cluster was segregated into 3 groups: the Southwestern, Western/Central, and Eastern Alps. The genetic diversities were highest for the Alps populations and significantly lower in the 2 isolates (Apennines, Stara Planina). The remarkable genetic split between Stara Planina and all other populations and the genetic distinctiveness of the former cluster might be interpreted as an ancient colonization event of this Balkan mountain range. The Apennines populations derive from a more recent expansion out of the Southwestern Alps. After surviving the Würm ice age most probably in the central Apennines, accompanied by genetic modification of some of these populations, northward expansion might have started from the western parts of the central Apennines reaching the northern Apennines during the early postglacial. The subtle genetic differentiation found among the Alps populations probably reflects 3 geographically disjunct Würm glacial centers located at the western slopes of the Southwestern Alps, at the southern slopes of the Central Alps, and in the Southeastern Alps.

  14. Italian information geographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paradiso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A range of papers focusing on Italian cases of ICTs use and changes in society are presented here in this NETCOM issue. A national research group on Geography of Information Society was founded in 2007 and hosted by the Italian Geographical Society later evolved in a specialty group within AgeI, the Association of Italian Geographers. This issue brings together papers from members of the Italian specialty group along the general theme of Internet mediation in everyday life. A pre...

  15. Health Information in Italian (Italiano)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → Italian (Italiano) URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/italian.html Health Information in Italian (Italiano) To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  16. Skiability conditions in several skiing complexes on Piedmontese and Dolomitic Alps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazzini, M.; Billi, P. [Dipt. di Scienze della Terra, Univ. di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Fratianni, S.; Biancotti, A. [Dipt. di Scienze della Terra, Univ. di Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2004-06-01

    Nivo-meteorological data from six daily recording stations located in the Italian Alps (three in the Piedmont Region, to the West, and three in the Dolomites, to the East), operating since 1991 and representative for quite large areas, have been analysed in order to point out nivometric regimes. The data gathered were also used to infer time and space distribution of parameters (thickness of snow cover, wind intensity, air humidity, amount of liquid precipitation and daily minimum, average and maximum air temperature) affecting skiability, and therefore influencing the touristic potential of alpine area. (orig.)

  17. Claude Raffestin's Italian travels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minca, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is focused on the contribution that French Swiss geographer Claude Raffestin has made to Italian geography studies and, more generally, on his role in linking Italian geography to social theory and philosophy. It also explores the adoption of, and the engagement with, his ideas by a

  18. Rock glaciers, Bernese Alps, western Switzerland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This inventory has been established from the results of the interpretation of aerial photographs and field work between 1992 and 1994. The area investigated covers...

  19. Crust-mantle decoupling in the Alps, Carpathians, Dinarides and Hellenides - the next targets of AlpArray?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Mark R.; Kissling, Eduard; Spakman, Wim; Ustaszewski, Kamil; Le Breton, Eline; Giese, Joerg

    2017-04-01

    The junctions of the Alps, Carpathians, Dinarides and Hellenides have disparate subsurface and surface structures that indicate decoupling of the crust and lithospheric mantle during Adria-Europe convergence. The complexity of subsurface structures at these orogenic junctions make them inviting targets for the next generation of integrated seismological-structural studies. Travel-time and receiver-function tomography at the Alps-Carpathians junction suggest that the NE-dipping "Lippitsch" positive anomaly beneath the Eastern Alps may connect eastward to a subvertical positive anomaly reaching down to the Mantle Transition Zone beneath the Pannonian Basin. The length of this slab-like anomaly exceeds known Neogene shortening in the overlying crust which is masked by Miocene Pannonian upper-plate extension. This suggests that either Neogene N-S shortening in the eastern Alps, western Carpathians and northern Dinarides has been underestimated and/or that this anomaly is an amalgam of subduction of both European and Adriatic lithospheres; these may have melded during a Miocene switch in subduction polarity beneath the eastern Alps. Neogene crustal deformation north of the Periadriatic Fault in the Tauern Window (Austria) involved north-directed crustal wedging and eastward orogenic escape, whereas south of this fault deformation involved large (≤ 130°) clockwise block rotations, S-directed thrusting and overturned Eocene Dinaric thrusts (Medvenica mountains, northern Croatia). Most global P-wave tomographic models indicate no Adriatic slab anomaly in the northern Dinarides and only a short (≤ 150 km long) NE-dipping anomaly in the southern Dinarides. The short length probably reflects the obliquity of Neogene Adria-Europe convergence, whereas the lack of an anomaly may be due to thermal erosion during asthenospheric flow since late Paleogene slab delamination or breakoff. At the Dinarides-Hellenides junction, the NE-dipping Adriatic slab has retreated SW

  20. Hydrous melts weaken the mantle, crystallization of pargasite and phlogopite does not: Insights from a petrostructural study of the Finero peridotites, southern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasi, Andréa; Langone, Antonio; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Zanetti, Alberto; Vauchez, Alain

    2017-11-01

    This study reports petrostructural observations in the pargasite and phlogopite-bearing Finero peridotite massif (Italian Western Alps), which suggest that the pervasive foliation in this massif was formed by deformation concomitant with percolation of hydrous Si-rich melts: (1) diffuse contacts, but systematic parallelism between the pyroxenitic layers and the foliation of the peridotite (2) strong shape and crystal preferred orientations (SPO and CPO), but subhedral or interstitial shapes and weak intracrystalline deformation of the hydrous phases, (3) CPO, but interstitial shapes of the pyroxenes, (4) very coarse olivine grain sizes, which are correlated to the olivine abundance, and (5) elongated shapes, but weak intracrystalline deformation, and extremely weak and highly variable CPO of olivine. The pervasive deformation of the Finero peridotite occurred therefore under conditions that allowed coexistence of H2O-CO2-bearing melts, pargasite, and spinel, that is, temperatures of 980-1080 °C and pressures dislocation creep to the deformation. The associated increase of the peridotites' strength leads to onset of strain localization. The latter is not correlated to the local abundance in pargasite or phlogopite, implying that crystallization of amphiboles or phlogopite, even at concentrations of 25 vol.%, does not produce rheological weakening in the upper mantle.

  1. Modelling last glacial cycle ice dynamics in the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguinot, Julien; Jouvet, Guillaume; Huss, Matthias; Funk, Martin; Preusser, Frank

    2017-04-01

    The European Alps, cradle of pioneer glacial studies, are one of the regions where geological markers of past glaciations are most abundant and well-studied. Such conditions make the region ideal for testing numerical glacier models based on approximated ice flow physics against field-based reconstructions, and vice-versa. Here, we use the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) to model the entire last glacial cycle (120-0 ka) in the Alps, with a horizontal resolution of 1 km. Climate forcing is derived using present-day climate data from WorldClim and the ERA-Interim reanalysis, and time-dependent temperature offsets from multiple paleo-climate proxies, among which only the EPICA ice core record yields glacial extent during marine oxygen isotope stages 4 (69-62 ka) and 2 (34-18 ka) in agreement to geological reconstructions. Despite the low variability of this Antarctic-based climate forcing, our simulation depicts a highly dynamic ice cap, showing that alpine glaciers may have advanced many times over the foreland during the last glacial cycle. Cumulative basal sliding, a proxy for glacial erosion, is modelled to be highest in the deep valleys of the western Alps. Finally, the Last Glacial Maximum advance, often considered synchronous, is here modelled as a time-transgressive event, with some glacier lobes reaching their maximum as early as 27 ka, and some as late as 21 ka. Modelled ice thickness is about 900 m higher than observed trimline elevations, yet our simulation predicts little erosion at high elevation due to cold ice conditions.

  2. Younger Dryas equilibrium line altitudes and precipitation patterns in the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschner, Hanns; Moran, Andrew; Ivy-Ochs, Susan

    2016-04-01

    Moraine systems of the "Egesen Stadial" are widespread and easily identifiable features in the Alps. Absolute dating with terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclides shows that the maximum extent was reached during the early Younger Dryas (YD), probably as a reaction to the intense climatic downturn subsequent to Lateglacial Interstadial. In recent years, several new studies and the availability of high-quality laser-scan hillshades and orthophotos allowed a significant extension of the database of YD glaciers as "palaeoprecipitation gauges" to large hitherto unmapped regions in the Austrian and Swiss Alps. The equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of the glaciers and its lowering relative to the Little Ice Age ELA (dELA) shows a distinct and systematic spatial pattern. Along the northern slope of the Alps, dELAs are usually large (around 400 m and perhaps even more), while dELAs range around 200 m in the well sheltered areas of the central Alps, e.g. in the Engadine and in western Tyrol. Both stochastic glacier-climate models (e.g. Ohmura et al. 1992) and the heat- and mass balance equation (Kuhn 1981) allow the reconstruction of precipitation change under the assumption of a spatially constant summer temperature depression, which in turn can be estimated from biological proxies. This allows to draw the spatial pattern of precipitation change with considerable detail. Precipitation change is clearly controlled by the local relief like high mountain chains, deeply incised and long valleys and mountain passes. Generally the contrast between the northern fringe of the Alps and the interior was more pronounced than today. Climate in the Northern and and Northwestern Alps was rather wet with precipitation totals eventually exceeding modern annual sums. The central Alps received 20 - 30% less precipitation than today, mainly due to reduced winter precipitation. In the southern Alps, still scarce spatial information points to precipitation sums which were approximately similar to

  3. Goethe's Italian Journey and the geological landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coratza, Paola; Panizza, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Over 220 years ago Johann Wolfgang von Goethe undertook a nearly two-years long and fascinating journey to Italy, a destination dreamed for a long time by the great German writer. During his journey from Alps to Sicily Goethe reflects on landscape, geology, morphology of "Il Bel Paese", sometimes providing detailed descriptions and acute observations concerning the great and enduring laws by which the earth and all within it are governed. He was an observer, with the eye of the geologist and landscape painter, as he himself stated, and therefore he had a 360 degree focus on all parts of the territory. From the Brenner Pass to Sicily, Goethe reflects on landscape, contrasting morphologies, the genesis of territories, providing detailed descriptions useful for reconstructing the conditions of the territory and crops of the late 18th century. His diary is a description of the impressions he received from the country and its people, mingled with reflections upon art, science and literature. Goethe studied mineralogical and geological phenomena and drew up notes on the life of the people, the climate and the plants. On various scientific occasions and, in particular, within the framework of the Italian Association "Geologia & Turismo", of the Working Group "Geomorphosites" of the International Association of Geomorphologists and the International Year of Planet Earth, the opportunity to re-examine Goethe's travels in Italy from a geological viewpoint was recognised. In the present paper an attempt was made to reproduce the geotourism itinerary ante litteram of the writer to Italy, one of the most important tourist destination worldwide, thanks to its rich cultural and natural heritage and the outstanding aesthetic qualities of the complex natural landscape. This project was essentially conceived with a twofold purpose. First of all, an attempt was made to reproduce the journey of a great writer, as an example of description of landscape perceived and described as

  4. A magnetotelluric feasibility study of the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, O.; Weckmann, U.

    2016-12-01

    The Alps are a famous and extensive mountain range system in central Europe. The mountains were formed as the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collided and they have been a prime target for geological and geophysical investigations since the beginning of modern geosciences. Consequently, the Alps have been investigated with active and passive seismological methods and extensive sets of potential field data exist. Hardly anything is known, however, about the deep electrical conductivity structure, as it has been notoriously difficult to acquire magnetotelluric (MT) data in the Alps. The Alps are densely populated and a lot of infrastructure for tourism has been built over the years. MT measurements, which rely on natural variations of the electromagnetic background fields, are severely hampered by this man-made noise. Here, we report on a feasibility study to acquire MT data in the Alps, where all stations are deployed outside the valleys, on high mountain ranges and alpine pastures. Overall we recorded MT data at 7 stations, along an approximately north-south profile centred on Mayrhofen in the Austrian Alps. The average station spacing was 5 kilometers. The data were processed using robust remote-reference processing and the results clearly show that MT measurements are feasible. We used Mare2DEM for 2D inversion to include a somewhat realistic topography. The 2D section indicates moderate resistivity for the top 2 - 5 km, consistent with the regional geology, which suggests (meta-) sedimentary sequences. From depths of 5 km and below resistivities exceed 5,000 Ohmm. This means we can sense very deep with MT but also, that we should be cautious with an interpretation of this short profile. The data also clearly indicate 3D effects. We therefore propose to deploy an array of stations covering the entire Alps in USArray style, e.g. with a station spacing of approximately 50 km, to derive a 3D model of the deep electrical resistivity structure of the Alps. Such a

  5. Vegetation changes and timberline fluctuations in the Central Alps as indicators of holocene climatic oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, L.; Tinner, W. [Univ. of Bern (Switzerland)

    1997-11-01

    Pollen and plant-macrofossil data are presented for two lakes near the timberline in the Italian (Lago Basso, 2250 m) and Swiss Central Alps (Gouille Rion, 2343 m). The reforestation at both sites started at 9700-9500 BP with Pinus cembra, Larix decidua, and Betula. The timberline reached its highest elevation between 8700 and 5000 BP and retreated after 5000 BP, due to a mid-Holocene climatic change and increasing human impact since about 3500 BP (Bronze Age). The expansion of Picea abies at Lago Basso between ca. 7500 and 6200 BP was probably favored by cold phases accompanied by increased oceanicity, whereas in the area of Gouille Rion, where spruce expanded rather late (between 4500 and 3500 BP), human influence equality might have been important. The mass expansion of Alnus viridis between ca. 5000 and 3500 BP probably can be related to both climatic change and human activity at timberline. During the early and middle Holocene a series of timberline fluctuations is recorded as declines in pollen and macrofossil concentrations of the major tree species, and as increases in nonarboreal pollen in the pollen percentage diagram of Gouille Rion. Most of the periods of low timberline can be correlated by radiocarbon dating the climatic changes in the Alps as indicated by glacier advances in combination with palynological records, solifluction, and dendroclimatical data. Lago Basso and Gouille Rion are the only sites in the Alps showing complete palaeobotanical records of cold phases between 10,000 and 2000 BP with very good time control. The altitudinal range of the Holocene treeline fluctuations caused by climate most likely was not more than 100 to 150 m. A possible correlation of a cold period at ca. 7500-6500 BP (Misox oscillation) in the Alps is made with paleoecological data from North American and Scandinavia and a climate signal in the GRIP ice core from central Greenland 8200 yr ago (ca. 7400 yr uncal. BP).

  6. Crustal structure of the Eastern Alps and their foreland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grad, M.; Brückl, E.; Majdanski, M.

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this paper concerns the seismic modelling of the crustal structure in the transition zone from the Bohemian Massif, across the Molasse basin and the Eastern Alps to the Southern Alps, mainly on the territory of Austria. The CEL10/Alp04 profile crosses the triple point of the Europe...

  7. Italian and Italian American Identity: A Visual Approach | Krase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This essay is a brief exploration of the related concepts of Italian Ethnicity and Italian Ethnic Identity via a Visual Sociological study of two geographically different venues — Italian American neighbourhoods in the United States and neighbourhoods in Rome, Italy. By studying the Vernacular Landscape (Jackson, 1984) via ...

  8. A GRASS GIS module to obtain an estimation of glacier behavior under climate change: A pilot study on Italian glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strigaro, Daniele; Moretti, Massimiliano; Mattavelli, Matteo; Frigerio, Ivan; Amicis, Mattia De; Maggi, Valter

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to integrate the Minimal Glacier Model in a Geographic Information System Python module in order to obtain spatial simulations of glacier retreat and to assess the future scenarios with a spatial representation. The Minimal Glacier Models are a simple yet effective way of estimating glacier response to climate fluctuations. This module can be useful for the scientific and glaciological community in order to evaluate glacier behavior, driven by climate forcing. The module, called r.glacio.model, is developed in a GRASS GIS (GRASS Development Team, 2016) environment using Python programming language combined with different libraries as GDAL, OGR, CSV, math, etc. The module is applied and validated on the Rutor glacier, a glacier in the south-western region of the Italian Alps. This glacier is very large in size and features rather regular and lively dynamics. The simulation is calibrated by reconstructing the 3-dimensional dynamics flow line and analyzing the difference between the simulated flow line length variations and the observed glacier fronts coming from ortophotos and DEMs. These simulations are driven by the past mass balance record. Afterwards, the future assessment is estimated by using climatic drivers provided by a set of General Circulation Models participating in the Climate Model Inter-comparison Project 5 effort. The approach devised in r.glacio.model can be applied to most alpine glaciers to obtain a first-order spatial representation of glacier behavior under climate change.

  9. Paleogeographic significance of Upper Triassic basinal succession of the Tamar Valley, northern Julian Alps (Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gale Luka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Julian Alps (western Slovenia structurally belong to the eastern Southern Alps. The Upper Triassic succession mostly consists of shallow water platform carbonates of the Dolomia Principale-Dachstein Limestone system and a deep water succession of the Slovenian Basin outcropping in the southern foothills of the Julian Alps. In addition to the Slovenian Basin, a few other intraplatform basins were present, but they remain poorly researched and virtually ignored in the existing paleogeographic reconstructions of the eastern Southern Alps. Herein, we describe a deepening-upward succession from the Tamar Valley (north-western Slovenia, belonging to the Upper Triassic Tarvisio Basin. The lower, Julian-Tuvalian part of the section comprises peritidal to shallow subtidal carbonates (Conzen Dolomite and Portella Dolomite, and an intermediate carbonate-siliciclastic unit, reflecting increased terrigenous input and storm-influenced deposition (Julian-lowermost Tuvalian shallow-water marlstone and marly limestone of the Tor Formation. Above the drowning unconformity at the top of the Portella Dolomite, Tuvalian well-bedded dolomite with claystone intercalations follows (Carnitza Formation. The latter gradually passes into the uppermost Tuvalian–lowermost Rhaetian bedded dolomite with chert and slump breccias, deposited on a slope and/or at the toe-of-slope (Bača Dolomite. Finally, basinal thin-bedded bituminous limestone and marlstone of Rhaetian age follow (Frauenkogel Formation. The upper part of the Frauenkogel Formation contains meter-scale platform-derived limestone blocks, which are signs of platform progradation. The Tarvisio Basin may have extended as far as the present Santo Stefano di Cadore area, representing a notable paleogeographic unit at the western Neotethys margin.

  10. The Italian Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Negri

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This pamphlet casts a polemical eye on the panorama of twentieth-century Italian philosophical culture and declares that only three figures stand as exceptions to a pervasive political and intellectual capitulation: Antonio Gramsci, Mario Tronti and Luisa Muraro. Negri argues that the two key post-war contributions to an Italian political ontology, the workerism of Tronti and the feminism of Muraro, start from the identification of the principal forms of exploitation, capitalism and patriarchy, to develop a potent thinking of singularity and creative difference. He concludes that they provide the basis for a political philosophy of the multitude that can at last move beyond postmodernity.

  11. Italian in the Modern World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Elvira, Ed.

    This booklet of 15 reprinted letters sent in response to a query concerning the actual use of Italian in the United States designates various areas of professional application. Some reference to current Italian publications is included. It is hoped that these letters will help promote the study of Italian in American schools. (RL)

  12. Response of Italian ryegrass seed crop to spring nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) cv. Tetraflorum was sown with different nitrogen application rates and it was tested under the agroecological conditions of Western Serbia. Four-year field experiments were carried out from 2002 to 2006 and the biometric characteristics of generative tillers, seed yield and shoot dry ...

  13. Italian Minister visits CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Passing through Geneva, the Italian Deputy Minister for Productive Activities, Dr. Adolfo Urso, came to visit the SM18 hall where LHC magnets are tested. From left to right: Adolfo Urso, Deputy Minister for Productive Activities, CERN's Roberto Saban, Director General Luciano Maiani, Mario Gerbino, Director General of the Ministry and Lucio Rossi, LHC Main Magnet and Superconductors Group Leader.

  14. Italian Bombs & Fuzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1948-06-01

    document states that the practice of galvanising aircraft bombs has ceased, and that a protective coat of paint is now used instead. These colourings...that the Italians are still in possession of large stocks of galvanised bombs. SECTION I CHEMICAL WARFARE BOMBS No. C.W. bombs have yet been

  15. Alp7/TACC-Alp14/TOG generates long-lived, fast-growing MTs by an unconventional mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussmann, Frauke; Drummond, Douglas R; Peet, Daniel R; Martin, Douglas S; Cross, Robert A

    2016-02-11

    Alp14 is a TOG-family microtubule polymerase from S. pombe that tracks plus ends and accelerates their growth. To interrogate its mechanism, we reconstituted dynamically unstable single isoform S. pombe microtubules with full length Alp14/TOG and Alp7, the TACC-family binding partner of Alp14. We find that Alp14 can drive microtubule plus end growth at GTP-tubulin concentrations at least 10-fold below the usual critical concentration, at the expense of increased catastrophe. This reveals Alp14 to be a highly unusual enzyme that biases the equilibrium for the reaction that it catalyses. Alp7/TACC enhances the effectiveness of Alp14, by increasing its occupancy. Consistent with this, we show in live cells that Alp7 deletion produces very similar MT dynamics defects to Alp14 deletion. The ability of Alp7/14 to accelerate and bias GTP-tubulin exchange at microtubule plus ends allows it to generate long-lived, fast-growing microtubules at very low cellular free tubulin concentrations.

  16. Luminescence dating of glaciofluvial deposits linked to the penultimate glaciation in the Eastern Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Lukas; Lüthgens, Christopher; Lomax, Johanna; Fiebig, Markus

    2015-01-30

    During the penultimate glaciation vast areas of the Alps were glaciated, with piedmont glaciers protruding into the foreland. In the easternmost part of the northward draining valleys of the Alps, the glaciers did not reach the foreland, but formed valley glaciers confined by the mountainous terrain. This also applies to the Ybbs valley, where samples for luminescence dating out of glaciofluvial gravel accumulations were taken at three locations along the present day river course. In a highly dynamic depositional environment, such as a glacier-fed river system, incomplete resetting of the luminescence signal is possible, in particular when transport distances are short. In such cases, quartz usually is the preferred mineral over feldspar, especially if dose rates are low and may theoretically allow obtaining quartz ages beyond 150 ka. Because previous research has shown, and as corroborated within this study, quartz from the research area exhibits analytical problems in the high age range. Therefore luminescence properties of coarse grain (100-200 μm) quartz and in addition K-rich feldspar were investigated with the aim to reconstruct the chronology of the glacial processes within the Ybbs catchment area. Issues of incomplete bleaching were pIRIR225 encountered and addressed by comparing quartz OSL, fading corrected K feldspar IR50 and pIRIR225 to identify reliable ages. Depositional ages based on quartz OSL and feldspar pIRIR225 signals revealed deposition of ice marginal kame terraces and glaciofluvial foreland terraces during late to middle MIS 6. In combination with results from previous studies, we could reconstruct the valley evolution during the Riss glaciation. Newly gained luminescence ages of the deglaciation in the easternmost Alps coincide with OSL dated deglaciation events in the Western Alps, indicating that climatic change along the north side of the Alps happened simultaneously.

  17. Projected bounds on ALPs from Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Day, Francesca; Jennings, Nicholas; Krippendorf, Sven; Muia, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    Galaxy clusters represent excellent laboratories to search for axion-like particles (ALPs). They contain magnetic fields which can induce quasi-sinusoidal oscillations in the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei situated in or behind them. Due to its excellent energy resolution, the X-ray Integral Field Unit instrument on board the Athena X-ray Observatory will be far more sensitive to ALP-induced modulations than current detectors. As a first analysis of the sensitivity of Athena to the ALP-photon coupling gaγγ, we simulate observations of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275 (hosting the radio source 3C 84) in the Perseus cluster using the SIXTE simulation software. We estimate that for a 200 ks exposure, a non-observation of spectral modulations will constrain gaγγ ≲ 1.5 × 10- 13GeV- 1 for ma ≲ 10- 12eV, representing an order of magnitude improvement over constraints derived using the current generation of satellites.

  18. Postglacial recolonizations, watershed crossings and human translocations shape the distribution of chub lineages around the Swiss Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouskov, Alexandre; Vorburger, Christoph

    2016-09-09

    Distributions of European fish species were shaped by glaciations and the geological history of river networks until human activities partially abrogated the restrictions of biogeographical regions. The nearby origins of the Rhine, Rhone, Danube and Po rivers in the Swiss Alps allow the examination of historical and human-influenced patterns in fish genetic structure over a small geographic scale. We investigated these patterns in the widespread European chub (Squalius cephalus) from the Rhone, Rhine and Danube catchments and its proposed southern sister species Italian chub (Squalius squalus) from the Po catchment. A phylogenetic tree constructed from mitochondrial Cytochrome b and COI sequences was consistent with earlier work in that it showed a separation of European chub and Italian chub, which was also reflected in microsatellite allele frequencies, morphological traits and shape differences quantified by geometric morphometrics. A new finding was that the predominant mitochondrial haplotype of European chub from the Rhine and Rhone catchments was also discovered in some individuals from Swiss populations of the Italian chub, presumably as a result of human translocation. Consistent with postglacial recolonizations from multiple refugia along the major rivers, the nuclear genetic structure of the European chub largely reflected drainage structure, but it was modified by watershed crossings between Rhine and Rhone near Lake Geneva as well as between Danube and Rhine near Lake Constance. Our study adds new insights into the cyprinid colonization history of central Europe by showing that multiple processes shaped the distribution of different chub lineages around the Swiss Alps. Interestingly, we find evidence that cross-catchment migration has been mediated by unusual geological events such as drainage captures or watershed crossings facilitated by retreating glaciers, as well as evidence that human transport has interfered with the historical distribution of

  19. Polymerization Dynamics of the Prophage-Encoded Actin-Like Protein AlpC Is Influenced by the DNA-Binding Adapter AlpA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Forde

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 prophage CGP3 encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC that was shown to be involved in viral DNA transport and efficient viral DNA replication. AlpC binds to an adapter, AlpA that in turn binds to specific DNA sequences, termed alpS sites. Thus, the AlpAC system is similar to the known plasmid segregation system ParMRS. So far it is unclear how the AlpACS system mediates DNA transport and, whether AlpA and AlpC functionally interact. We show here that AlpA modulates AlpC filamentation dynamics in a dual way. Unbound AlpA stimulates AlpC filament disassembly, while AlpA bound to alpS sites allows for AlpC filament formation. Based on these results we propose a simple search and capture model that explains DNA segregation by viral AlpACS DNA segregation system.

  20. Oral Tradition of Italian-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Lucia Chiavola

    The assimilation of Italians into American culture led to the loss of the Italian language, and an oral tradition of Italian peasants in which Italian feminist philosophy was grounded. The legends, parables, and proverbs told by these Italian women challenged the teachings of Catholicism, perpetuating an underground religious tradition which…

  1. First-principles study on phases of AlP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruike; Zhu, Chuanshuai; Wei, Qun; Zhang, Dongyun

    2017-11-01

    Four potential novel phases of AlP (Pmn21-AlP, Pbam-AlP, Pbca-AlP and bct-AlP) are proposed in this study and the stabilities are verified by the enthalpy, independent elastic constants and phonon dispersion spectra. The electronic and mechanical properties of ten AlP phases are studied and the electronic properties are calculated by hybrid functional. All the ten phases possess the properties of semiconductor. Pmn21-AlP and Pbam-AlP have electronic advantages over wz-AlP and zb-AlP at 0 GPa for their direct band gaps. Our calculated band gaps are 3.22, 3.27, 3.47, 3.04, 2.57, 0.62, 1.38, 3.34, 2.09 and 2.71 eV for Pmn21-AlP, Pbam-AlP, Pbca-AlP, bct-AlP, cI24-AlP, hR18-AlP, oC12-AlP, wz-AlP, zb-AlP, and Cmcm-AlP, respectively. Additionally, Pmn21-AlP, Pbam-AlP, Pbca-AlP, bct-AlP, cI24-AlP, hR18-AlP, wz-AlP, and Cmcm-AlP behave in a ductile manner, and oC12-AlP and zb-AlP behave in a brittle manner.

  2. A key to larvae of species belonging to the genus Diamesa from Alps and Apennines (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Rossaro

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A key to species belonging to the genus Diamesa Meigen, 1835 (Diptera, Chironomidae from the Alps and Apennines (Italy is presented using characters observable in the fourth-instar larva. The larvae are separated on the basis of qualitative and quantitative characters. At present fifteen species from the Italian Alps are described in all three life stages, but only twelve species groups can be separated as larvae. The separation is based on the length and thickness of anal setae, antennal ratio, head capsule color and few other characters of the labrum and mentum. The shape of mental and mandibular teeth is still a valid taxonomic character, but unfortunately these characters can be rarely used because teeth are often excessively worn in samples collected in the field. Quantitative characters show variability within each species, differing according to the duration of larval development and must be used with caution. The species groups which can be separated in the larval stage are: the dampfi group, which includes D. dampfi and D. permacra, the latitarsis group including D. modesta and D. latitarsis, the zernyi group including D. zernyi and D. vaillanti. The species within each of these groups at present cannot be separated. D. starmachi, D. steinboecki, D. goetghebueri, D. bertrami, D. aberrata, D. incallida, D. cinerella, D. tonsa and D. insignipes can be separated from all the other known species in larval stage.

  3. Multidisciplinary approach to the Clot Brun large slope instability (Susa Valley, Italian NW-Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, M.; Fontan, D.; Ambrogio, S.; Dematteis, A.; Nervo, B.; Walkate, J.; Fratianni, S.

    2003-04-01

    The Clot Brun slope is affected by a large deep-seated gravitational deformation and by other correlated and non-correlated minor gravitational instabilities (rock falls and debris flows). The activation of the slope instabilities may involve several lifelines along the Susa Valley (motorway, railway, hydro-electrical tunnel, ...) as well as some small villages with sites of historical and architectural interest. In order to develope effective protection measures of the affected structures, a multidisciplinary study of the Clot Brun large slope has been carried out including geomorphology, structural geology, hydrogeology and pedology through the application of up-to-date scientific methodologies (geomorphological mapping of the surface deformation markers, structural geology analisys carried out with climbing technics, pedological profile studies along the main active sectors of the slope, 3D computer modelling of the deformed rock masses and general slope characteristics). The data have been collected in modular form and organized in a geo-database. Output geothematic maps have been produced both at 1:10000 and 1:5000 scales. GIS methodologies have been applied for the analisys and interpretation of long-term slope dynamics and to evaluate possible impulsive instability, failure and related hazards.

  4. Distribution of mustelids in Adamello-Brenta Park and surroundings areas (Central Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Pedrini

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The survey, conducted in 1991-93 on a study area of 1085 km², has permitted to define the distribution maps according to 6.4x5.5 km grid of the following species: Meles meles, Mustela erminea, Mustela nivalis, Martes foina and Martes martes. Mustela putorius and Lutra lutra, recorded since 1960 and 1970 respectively, were not checked. From the analysis of 201 records (sightings, signs of presence, animals found dead and skins, we found that the badger, weasel and stone marten selected middle-low altitude (since 1000 m a.s.l., the pine marten and stoat the middle-high altitude. The former species frequented mainly agricultural lands of bottom of the valley with built-up areas, the latter ones occurred mainly in forest habitat of secluded valleys (the pine marten, and in stony ground and alpine prairies (the stoat. The badger was the most diffuse species, the pine marten the least one. On a total of 46 grids of the study area, 32.6% presented three mustelid species, 17.4% five species. The badger and the stone marten were the species with the greatest overlapping range (61.7% of the grids, the weasel and the stoat with the smallest one (23.4% of the grids. Riassunto Distribuzione dei Mustelidi nel Parco Adamello-Brenta e aree limitrofe (Trentino, Alpi centrali - L'indagine, condotta nel 1991-93, ha interessato un'area di 1085 km² e ha permesso di definire le mappe di distribuzione, secondo una griglia di 6,4x5,5 km desunta dalla Carta Topografica generale (scala 1:10000 edita dalla Provincia Autonoma di Trento, di cinque specie: Meles meles, Mustela erminea, Mustela nivalis, Martes foina e Martes martes. La presenza di Mustela putorius e di Lutra lutra, accertata fino intorno agli anni '60 e '70 rispettivamente, non è stata invece confermata. Dall'analisi di 201 segnalazioni (osservazioni dirette, segni di presenza, animali trovati morti o imbalsamati è stato rilevato che le fasce altitudinali medio-basse (fino a 1000 m sono selezionate da tasso, donnola e faina che frequentano soprattutto ambienti coltivati di fondovalle con presenza di centri abitati, quelle medio-alte da martora e ermellino che utilizzano rispettivamente comprensori forestali delle vallate interne e ambienti con presenza di versanti detritici, praterie alpine e malghe. La specie più diffusa è risultata il tasso, quella meno diffusa la martora. Il 32,6% delle 46 griglie, in cui è stata suddivisa l'area di studio, mostra la presenza di 3 specie, il 17,4% di 5 specie. I1 tasso e la faina sono risultate le specie con maggior sovrapposizione di areale di distribuzione (61,7% delle griglie, la donnola e l'ermellino quelle con minor sovrapposizione (23,4% delle griglie.

  5. Massive production of abiotic methane during subduction evidenced in metamorphosed ophicarbonates from the Italian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Martinez, Isabelle; Elmaleh, Agnès; Compagnoni, Roberto; Chaduteau, Carine; Ferraris, Cristiano; Esteve, Imène

    2017-02-22

    Alteration of ultramafic rocks plays a major role in the production of hydrocarbons and organic compounds via abiotic processes on Earth and beyond and contributes to the redistribution of C between solid and fluid reservoirs over geological cycles. Abiotic methanogenesis in ultramafic rocks is well documented at shallow conditions, whereas natural evidence at greater depths is scarce. Here we provide evidence for intense high-pressure abiotic methanogenesis by reduction of subducted ophicarbonates. Protracted (≥0.5-1 Ma), probably episodic infiltration of reduced fluids in the ophicarbonates and methanogenesis occurred from at least ∼40 km depth to ∼15-20 km depth. Textural, petrological and isotopic data indicate that methane reached saturation triggering the precipitation of graphitic C accompanied by dissolution of the precursor antigorite. Continuous infiltration of external reducing fluids caused additional methane production by interaction with the newly formed graphite. Alteration of high-pressure carbonate-bearing ultramafic rocks may represent an important source of abiotic methane, with strong implications for the mobility of deep C reservoirs.

  6. Sediment delivery in debris-flow torrents: two case studies in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Gabriele; Vincenzo, D'Agostino

    2013-04-01

    Flood-risk mitigation strategy is moving from fixed, structural and costly mitigation measures to more effective proactive solutions. This change is driven both by Flood Directive 2007/60/EC and limitations of financial resources and it requires a deep knowledge of the involved processes. In mountain catchments debris flow and debris floods are the most important sources of hazard and their impact on the fan areas is heavily conditioned by the sediment dynamics along the 'transport' reaches of the torrents. Last advances show how many cases of erosion and deposition within the transport reach greatly affect the total volume that is delivered to the fan as well the overall dynamics of the debris flow/flood event. Due to logistic and practical constraints this intermediate phase of the process has been scarcely investigated and the complex behavior of the sediment budgeting in torrent-streams is emerging. The objective of this work consists of collecting information on the evolution of the debris-flow sediment budget along Alpine torrents in order to provide novel data about erosive, depositional and recharging processes under different geological conditions. Two high frequency debris-flow catchments have been selected: the Rio Rudan basin in the geological setting of the Dolomites (near Cortina d'Ampezzo, Veneto Region, Italy) and the metamorphic dominated catchment of the Rio Gadria (near Lasa, Trentino Alto Adige, Italy), which has been recently instrumented (EU project Monitor II). Periodical field monitoring has been carried out since summer 2011. 25 cross sections have been observed in the Rio Rudan catchment along a 480 m torrent reach (slope of 36%) where additional sediment entrainment after debris-flow initiation takes place. 20 cross sections have been selected in the upper Rio Gadria basin and more precisely in two reaches close to debris-flow triggerring areas. Other 31 cross sections have been also monitored of the Rio Gadria main channel covering a stream length of 1.4 km downstream of the source areas. Topographical survey of these cross sections have been repeated periodically regardless the occurrence of rainstorm events, so directly detecting morphological changes and tracks of new flow depths on the banks. To monitor the recharging rates from the hillslopes surrounding the channel, some sediment traps have been also installed in the Rio Rudan and in the Rio Gadria (8 and 6 sediment traps respectively). Thanks to the time comparison of the cross sections under observation a sediment budget was conducted both for successive flood events and/or for silent periods. This budget has been related to morphological, geometric and flow dependent variables in order to detect the forcing and, in case it exists, a trend of the phenomena. The debris recharge of the channels from the directly connected sediment source areas resulted lowly dependent on the rain storms causing debris flows, and more related with the year rainfall, local bank instabilities and failures, which might be amplified by the channel bed moisture before/after the debris-flow occurrence.

  7. Millimeter wave spectroscopic measurements of stratospheric and mesospheric constituents over the Italian Alps: stratospheric ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Romaniello

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of rotational lines emitted by middle atmospheric trace gases have been carried out from the Alpine station of Testa Grigia (45.9°N, 7.7°E, elev. 3500 m by means of a Ground-Based Millimeter-wave Spectrometer (GBMS. Observations of species such as O3, HNO3, CO, N2O, HCN, and HDO took place during 4 winter periods, from February 2004 to March 2007, for a total of 116 days of measurements grouped in about 18 field campaigns. By studying the pressure-broadened shape of emission lines the vertical distribution of the observed constituents is retrieved within an altitude range of ?17-75 km, constrained by the 600 MHz pass band and the 65 kHz spectral resolution of the back-end spectrometer. This work discusses the behavior of stratospheric O3 during the entire period of operation at Testa Grigia. Mid-latitude O3 columnar content as estimated using GBMS measurements can vary by large amounts over a period of very few days, with the largest variations observed in December 2005, February 2006, and March 2006, confirming that the northern winter of 2005-2006 was characterized by a particularly intense planetary wave activity. The largest rapid variation from maximum to minimum O3 column values over Testa Grigia took place in December 2006 and reached a relative value of 72% with respect to the average column content for that period. During most GBMS observation times much of the variability is concentrated in the column below 20 km, with tropospheric weather systems and advection of tropical tropospheric air into the lower stratosphere over Testa Grigia having a large impact on the observed variations in column contents. Nonetheless, a wide variability is also found in middle stratospheric GBMS O3 measurements, as expected for mid-latitude ozone. We find that O3 mixing ratios at ?32 km are very well correlated with the solar illumination experienced by air masses over the previous ?15 days, showing that already at 32 km altitude ozone photochemistry dominates over transport processes. The correlation of lower stratospheric ozone concentrations with potential vorticity as an indicator of transport is instead not as clear-cut, due to very complex mixing processes that characterize stratospheric air at mid-latitudes. Correlations of O3 over Testa Grigia with stratospheric tracers such as N2O and HCN, also observed by means of the GBMS, are planned for the future, in order to better characterize lower stratospheric dynamics and therefore lower stratospheric ozone concentrations at mid-latitudes.

  8. Particulate Matter (PM 10) Monitoring in South Tyrol, Italian Alps Using MODIS Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzalaff, A.; Castelli, M.; Emili, E.; Bolzacchini, E.; Ferrero, L.; Ferrini, B.; Cappelletti, D.; Scardazza, F.; Perrone, M. G.; Sangiorgi, G.; Petitta, M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the European Academy (EURAC) and the Autonomous Province of Bolzano started a research project to monitor air quality in South Tyrol: Near real- time satellite data from the MODIS sensor and in-situ measurements from a state-of-the-art measurement network with 15 ground stations are integrated to produce daily air quality products. In this work, we discuss the applicability of satellite based aerosol retrievals for PM10 monitoring in a mountainous region. We present two different PM10 products generated at EURAC for the region of South Tyrol (satellite based PM10 maps and assimilated PM10 maps) and we describe the corresponding retrieval methods. Using in-situ PM10 data from 2007 and 2008 from all stations in South Tyrol, we found correlations between the NASA standard MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and in situ PM10 which are significant lower than correlations reported from other regions. In our study, a physical model which considers boundary layer height estimates from NWP data, has shown best agreement with observed ground PM10 (average correlation 0.49). The 2-σ (95% probability) interval for the predicted PM values is rather large (average 45 μg/m3). To better understand the origin of such high uncertainties and to verify our assumptions, we have conducted balloon soundings at one test-site in South Tyrol during a 10 days field campaign in winter 2010. The site is situated within an Alpine Valley. Vertical aerosol properties have been investigated up to four times per day, from ground level up to 800m height. Beside standard meteorological parameters, we have measured the aerosol number size distribution in ambient relative humidity conditions and dry air as well as the black carbon content.

  9. The geological manifestation of earthquake swarms: Evidence from the Adamello Batholith in the Southern Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, E. D.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Di Toro, G.; Bistacchi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Earthquake swarms are often characterised by clusters of seismic events with highly variable earthquake focal mechanisms, irrespective of whether or not they are associated with a main shock event. Our current understanding of how such multiple seismic events manifest themselves in the geological record is based largely on the Hill (1977) and Sibson (1996) 'fracture mesh' models. Whilst these simple models are theoretically sound for homogeneous isotropic rock masses, they do not account for the effects of variably oriented pre-existing mechanical anisotropies and how these may lead to a more complex fracture evolution and geologic strain. Interconnected networks of faults and veins filled with zeolites and other hydrothermal minerals are widespread in many orogenic terrains, including deformed granitic plutons and regions of metamorphic basement. Typically the fracture fills formed late in the tectonic history, at relatively low temperatures (e.g. stress loading and reactivation of widely distributed pre-existing structures (contacts, joints, shear zone fabrics, faults). The differing orientations of the pre-existing structures relative to the far-field and near-field stresses lead to the simultaneous development of interlinked reverse, strike-slip and extensional faults. The kinematic complexity and cyclic nature of the hydraulically-induced fracturing provides compelling evidence that the mineralised fracture systems represent a geologic manifestation of foreshock-aftershock swarm development. Our proposal highlights the key role of crustal fluids during earthquake swarm development and the inherent geometrical complexities that may result from the reactivation of pre-existing anisotropies in rocks.

  10. Hydraulically-induced earthquake swarms: Geological evidence from the Adamello Batholith in the Southern Italian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Eddie; Holdsworth, Bob; DiToro, Giulio; Bistacchi, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Earthquake swarms are often characterised by clusters of seismic events with highly variable earthquake focal mechanisms, irrespective of whether or not they are associated with a main shock event. Our current understanding of how such events manifest themselves in the geological record is based largely on the Hill (1977) and Sibson (1996) 'fracture mesh' models. Whilst these simple models are theoretically sound for homogeneous isotropic rock masses, they do not account for the effects of variably oriented pre-existing mechanical anisotropies and how these may lead to a more complex fracture evolution and geologic strain. Interconnected networks of faults and veins filled with zeolites and other hydrothermal minerals are widespread in many orogenic terrains, including deformed granitic plutons and regions of metamorphic basement. Typically the fracture fills formed late in the tectonic history, at relatively low temperatures (e.g. stress loading and reactivation of widely distributed pre-existing structures (contacts, joints, shear zone fabrics, faults). The differing orientations of the pre-existing structures relative to the far-field and near-field stresses lead to the simultaneous development of interlinked reverse, strike-slip and extensional faults. The kinematic complexity and cyclic nature of the hydraulically-induced fracturing provides compelling evidence that the mineralised fracture systems represent a geologic manifestation of foreshock-aftershock swarm development. Our proposal highlights the key role of crustal fluids during earthquake swarm development and the inherent geometrical complexities that may result from the reactivation of pre-existing anisotropies in rocks.

  11. Large outbreaks of Ips acuminatus in Scots pine stands of the Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Ambros E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, many Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris stands have been severely attacked by the bark beetle Ips acuminatus (Coleoptera Curculionidae Scolytinae. In the outbreak area of San Vito di Cadore (Eastern Dolomites, the number of attacked trees since 2005 and both the emergence of bark beetles and natural enemies have been assessed. The investigated forests showed dozens of easily recognizable infestation spots with size ranging from about 20-30 trees (small spots up to 300 trees (large spots. These infested spots evolved quickly, while new ones appeared within a radius of few hundreds of meters. During the last 5 years (2006-2010 we sampled branches from small and large spots and lodged them into emergence cages: adults of I. acuminatus as well as natural enemies were collected weekly, identified and counted. At the same time, a monitoring program of the surveyed pine stands was carried out to check the enlargement of old spots and the appearance of new ones. Voltinism and phenology of I. acuminatus were investigated by pheromone traps baited with different lures (Austrian vs. Spanish lures. The effects of a sanitation felling of about 4500 infested trees, carried out by the Regional Forest Service in autumn 2007 on I. acuminatus population were also assessed. Throughout the whole sampling area I. acuminatus resulted bivoltine, with the highest density attained during the first generation. However, a part of the population still evidenced a monovoltine behaviour. The realized sanitation felling strongly reduced both breeding sites and the number of infested trees observed during the following year. Moreover the pheromone-baited traps gave useful information about changes in bark beetle population density; the trapping efficiency of Spanish lure resulted clearly higher than the Austrian one. Finally, the recorded parasitism may have a role in outbreak dynamics as it was significantly higher during the second host generation, in both small and large spots.

  12. Effects on floods of recent afforestation and urbanisation in the Mella River (Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzi, R.; Bochicchio, M.; Bacchi, B.

    River floods are influenced by factors such as the duration, intensity and spacial distribution of precipitation and the land-use as well as the morphological characteristics of the river basin. While the characteristics of the precipitation are tied to the climatology of the region and can change only over the long term, anthropogenic land use changes exhibit a more pronounced dynamic. However, the consequences of such changes on the increment in flood volumes and their frequency must be estimated objectively. To quantify the effects of the urbanisation on the flood volumes and peaks in the Mella river basin, 311 km2 in size, changes in land use in the past 50 years have been compared using two land use maps; the first was based on aerial photographs taken in 1954 and the second on photointerpretation and surveys in 1994. The comparison showed an increase in the forested areas in the upper part of the basin as the use of wood for fuel had declined and an increase in urban development in the valley bottom. Correspondingly, cultivated areas decreased in size. The consequence of these changes is that surface runoff, simulated with a distributed hydrological model, changes insignificantly at the catchment scale, but with slightly reduced flood peaks and volumes in today’s conditions.

  13. Effects on floods of recent afforestation and urbanisation in the Mella River (Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ranzi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available River floods are influenced by factors such as the duration, intensity and spacial distribution of precipitation and the land-use as well as the morphological characteristics of the river basin. While the characteristics of the precipitation are tied to the climatology of the region and can change only over the long term, anthropogenic land use changes exhibit a more pronounced dynamic. However, the consequences of such changes on the increment in flood volumes and their frequency must be estimated objectively. To quantify the effects of the urbanisation on the flood volumes and peaks in the Mella river basin, 311 km2 in size, changes in land use in the past 50 years have been compared using two land use maps; the first was based on aerial photographs taken in 1954 and the second on photointerpretation and surveys in 1994. The comparison showed an increase in the forested areas in the upper part of the basin as the use of wood for fuel had declined and an increase in urban development in the valley bottom. Correspondingly, cultivated areas decreased in size. The consequence of these changes is that surface runoff, simulated with a distributed hydrological model, changes insignificantly at the catchment scale, but with slightly reduced flood peaks and volumes in today’s conditions. Keywords: floods, land use changes, afforestation, urbanisation

  14. Climate anomalies associated with the occurrence of rockfalls at high-elevation in the Italian Alps

    OpenAIRE

    Paranunzio, Roberta; LAIO Francesco; Chiarle, Marta; Nigrelli, Guido; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is seriously affecting the cryosphere in terms, for example, of permafrost thaw, alteration of rain ∕ snow ratio, and glacier shrinkage. There is concern about the increasing number of rockfalls at high elevation in the last decades. Nevertheless, the exact role of climate parameters in slope instability at high elevation has not been fully explored yet. In this paper, we investigate 41 rockfalls listed in different sources (newspapers, technical...

  15. Distribution and biometry of native and alien crayfish in Trentino (Italian Alps

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    Sonia Endrizzi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To fill the existing gaps in the knowledge of the crayfish species distribution in Trentino region (North-East Italy, we surveyed fourteen lakes, six ponds and sixty-nine creeks and streams in 2010-2012. We recorded four populations of the invasive alien species Orconectes limosus in four lakes and twenty of the native Austropotamobius pallipes complex from four lakes, three ponds and thirteen creeks; three of these populations went extinct during the three years of our survey. Crayfish populations were monitored in spring, summer and early autumn, to assess the distribution, density and seasonal dynamics of the two species. Statistical analysis of morphometric data showed differences in body size and growth rates among sampling sites, possibly related to local environmental factors, with higher growth rates in males of both species; A. pallipes grew faster in creeks than in lakes. The extinction of twenty-two native populations of A. pallipes complex in the last century was likely due to habitat modifications, in particular to the loss of riparian habitat, in few cases to overfishing, and, more recently, to the spread of alien species and the related transmission of their parasite Aphanomyces astaci. Some populations of A. pallipes complex were infested with the parasite Thelohania sp., and only one population with ectosymbiotic Branchiobdellida. In Trentino, small creeks with well developed riparian vegetation and good hydromorphological conditions, flowing through mountain slopes, can represent potential refuge and recruitment areas for of A. pallipes complex, without significant management intervention, although a sustainable management of piedmont water bodies would allow preserving or increasing the number and density of the relict populations.

  16. Distribution and biometry of native and alien crayfish in Trentino (Italian Alps)

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Endrizzi; Maria Cristina Bruno; Bruno Maiolini

    2013-01-01

    To fill the existing gaps in the knowledge of the crayfish species distribution in Trentino region (North-East Italy), we surveyed fourteen lakes, six ponds and sixty-nine creeks and streams in 2010-2012. We recorded four populations of the invasive alien species Orconectes limosus in four lakes and twenty of the native Austropotamobius pallipes complex from four lakes, three ponds and thirteen creeks; three of these populations went extinct during the three years of our survey. Crayfish popu...

  17. Seasonal River Discharge Forecasting Using Support Vector Regression: A Case Study in the Italian Alps

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    Mattia Callegari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we analyze the performance of a monthly river discharge forecasting model with a Support Vector Regression (SVR technique in a European alpine area. We considered as predictors the discharges of the antecedent months, snow-covered area (SCA, and meteorological and climatic variables for 14 catchments in South Tyrol (Northern Italy, as well as the long-term average discharge of the month of prediction, also regarded as a benchmark. Forecasts at a six-month lead time tend to perform no better than the benchmark, with an average 33% relative root mean square error (RMSE% on test samples. However, at one month lead time, RMSE% was 22%, a non-negligible improvement over the benchmark; moreover, the SVR model reduces the frequency of higher errors associated with anomalous months. Predictions with a lead time of three months show an intermediate performance between those at one and six months lead time. Among the considered predictors, SCA alone reduces RMSE% to 6% and 5% compared to using monthly discharges only, for a lead time equal to one and three months, respectively, whereas meteorological parameters bring only minor improvements. The model also outperformed a simpler linear autoregressive model, and yielded the lowest volume error in forecasting with one month lead time, while at longer lead times the differences compared to the benchmarks are negligible. Our results suggest that although an SVR model may deliver better forecasts than its simpler linear alternatives, long lead-time hydrological forecasting in Alpine catchments remains a challenge. Catchment state variables may play a bigger role than catchment input variables; hence a focus on characterizing seasonal catchment storage—Rather than seasonal weather forecasting—Could be key for improving our predictive capacity.

  18. Picturing Color in Italian Cinema

    OpenAIRE

    Valladares, Luis Avy

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation examines the engagement of post-1989 Italian cinema with (im)migration from the global south and multiculturalism in Italy within Europe. Focusing on a selection of films from 1990 to 2010, I argue that Italian cinema of immigration is constructed and maintained through constant erasures of Italian histories and desires. As films of social engagement, cinema of immigration is about the “here” and the “now,” namely Italian problems after the end of the Cold War. However, it ...

  19. Un oltremare diffuso. Il navegar sardesco fra Mediterraneo di Ponente, echi dell'Impero e italianismi / “Un oltremare diffuso” (A spread overseas. The Sardinian navigation between the western Mediterranean Sea, empire echoes and Italianisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vittoria Spissu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available I retabli sardi tra Quattro e Cinquecento documentano la stratificazione di influenze che giungono da Valencia, Barcellona, Maiorca e Napoli. Tra le sollecitazioni importate vi sono stilemi flandro-iberici e forme gotico-catalane, alle quali subentrano timidamente singolari italianismi e aggiornamenti alla maniera moderna. Caso eccezionale è il Maestro di Ozieri, in quanto sfugge apparentemente alla dimensione delle rotte mediterranee che partono dai consolidati centri-guida. L'isola, definita spesso crocevia e crogiolo di idee pur sempre provenienti da mondi contigui, diviene approdo per la sintesi di una cultura eterogenea, germanico-fiamminga, che dialoga con il raffaellismo meridionale, in alcuni momenti di sperimentale compromesso. In uno sguardo più ampio si potrà comprendere come il percorso del Maestro di Ozieri si inscriva invece appieno nella prospettiva di un “Mediterraneo allargato” al Nord Europa, secondo l'effettiva configurazione dell'Impero di Carlo V. Sardinian retablos of the late XVth and early XVIth century document the layering of influences coming from Valencia, Barcelona, Mallorca and Naples. Among the foreign inputs there are Flemish-Iberian stylistic elements and Gothic-Catalan shapes, mildly joined by singular Italianisms and knowledge of the Modern Manner. An exceptional case is the Master of Ozieri, who seems to evade the routes connecting established Mediterranean hubs. The island of Sardinia, which is often defined a crossroads and melting-pot of ideas—though such ideas would come from neighbouring regions—eventually becomes the landfall made by a German-Flemish culture that in some cases dialogues with Southern Raphaelism trough experimental compromise. By enlarging the field of view, one is provided the perspective of a broader Mediterranean area including Northern Europe, which is proper of Charles V’s empire’s extent and encompasses the Master of Ozieri’s path.

  20. Orogen-scale anticline revealed in the Southern Alps of New Zealand by structural thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renjie; Brandon, Mark

    2017-04-01

    A dense set of cooling ages from the Southern Alps reveals an orogen-scale anticline of cooling-age isosurfaces (isochrones) and provides an interesting example of structural thermochronology, where isochrones are used as structural markers. The isochrone concept is an integral aspect of the age-elevation method, but the latter implicitly assumes that all isochrones are horizontal. Our experience in New Zeland and elsewhere is that isochrones are commonly tilted after formation. We use a more general approach that solves for orientation of the isochrone surfaces, and also the slope of the age-elevation trend, where "elevation" is measured normal to the isochrone surfaces. In New Zealand, collision and convergence between the Pacific and Australian plates have resulted in the formation and continuing growth of the Southern Alps, a prototypical orogenic wedge. In the western side, the Southern Alps is bounded by the Alpine fault, along with deeply exhumed rocks from depths up to 25 km. There are 150 apatite and 200 zircon fission-track (AFT, ZFT) ages that cover the vast region of the South Island of New Zealand from Lake Summer to Lake Wanaka. The AFT ages range from Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 2010, doi: 10.1016/j.epsl.2010.05.022). We use a least-squares method to solve for a best-fit sequence of dipping isochrone surfaces. The solution specifies the strike, dip and spacing of the parallel isochrones, the last of which indicates the velocity of the isochrones passing through the closure depth. We find that the calculation of the entire dataset failed to yield reasonable results, implying nonplanar structures at the regional scale. Using subsets of data, we observed three distinct zones of isochrones from E to W across the South Island. 1) The large area east of the Southern Alps in the central South Island contains ZFT isochrones that dip shallowly (tilted to the east as they were advected through the large east-dipping retroshear zone that underlies the

  1. End of the "Little Ice Age" in the Alps not forced by industrial black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigl, Michael; Osmont, Dimtri; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Barbante, Carlo; Schwikowski, Margit

    2016-04-01

    Light absorbing aerosols present in the atmosphere and cryosphere play an important role in the climate system. Their presence in ambient air and snow changes radiative properties of these media, thus contributing to increased atmospheric warming and snowmelt. High spatio-temporal variability of aerosol concentrations in these media and a shortage of long-term observations contribute to large uncertainties in properly assigning the climate effects of these aerosols through time. Glaciers in the European Alps began to retreat abruptly from their mid-19th century maximum, marking what appeared to be the end of the Little Ice Age. Radiative forcing by increasing deposition of industrial black carbon to snow has been suggested as the main driver of the abrupt glacier retreats in the Alps (Painter et al. 2012). Basis for this hypothesis were model simulations using ice-core measurements of elemental carbon at low temporal resolution from two ice cores in the Alps. Here we present sub-annually resolved, well replicated ice-core measurements of refractory black carbon (rBC; using a SP2 soot photometer), mineral dust (Fe, Ca), biomass burning (NH4, K) and distinctive industrial pollution tracers (Bi, Pb, SO4) from an ice core in the Alps covering the past 250 years. These reconstructions allow to precisely compare the timing of observed acceleration of glacier melt in the mid-19th century with that of the increase of soot deposition on ice-sheets caused by the industrialization of Western Europe. Our study suggests that at the time when European rBC emission rates started to significantly increase Alpine glaciers have already experienced more than 70% of their total 19th century length reduction. Industrial BC emissions can therefore not been considered as the primary forcing of the rapid deglaciation at the end of the Little Ice Age in the Alps. References: Painter, T. H., M. G. Flanner, G. Kaser, B. Marzeion, R. A. VanCuren, and W. Abdalati (2013), End of the Little Ice

  2. Younger dryas age advance of franz josef glacier in the southern alps of new zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, G H; Hendy, C H

    1994-06-03

    A corrected radiocarbon age of 11,050 +/- 14 years before present for an advance of the Franz Josef Glacier to the Waiho Loop terminal moraine on the western flank of New Zealand's Southern Alps shows that glacier advance on a South Pacific island was synchronous with initiation of the Younger Dryas in the North Atlantic region. Hence, cooling at the beginning of the Younger Dryas probably reflects global rather than regional forcing. The source for Younger Dryas climatic cooling may thus lie in the atmosphere rather than in a North Atlantic thermohaline switch.

  3. Funding fears spark Italian protests

    CERN Multimedia

    Abbott, A

    2001-01-01

    150 Italian scientists took part in a symbolic funeral in Milan for Italian research. Scientists are worried that the new government will reduce support for basic research. Rumours that budgets will be cut are being confirmed and last week the government rejected the 3-year plan of the National Research Council, which had proposed an expansion of staff (1/2 page).

  4. QUANTIFICATION OF GLACIAL EROSION IN THE ALPS USING VERY LOW-TEMPERATURE THERMOCHRONOLOGY (OSL & AHe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagnac, J.; Herman, F.; Rhodes, E. J.; Fellin, M.; Jaiswal, M.; Schwenninger, J.; Reverman, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    The impact of glaciations on the topography of the Alps is still unclear: Long-term denudation rate determined by low-T thermochronology are in the range of 0.2 to 1 mm/yr, and increased during the Plio-Quaternary by 3 fold (Vernon et al., 2008). Such an increase is also documented by peri-alpine sediment budget (Kuhleman, 2000), with a similar increase in sediment yields since 5-3 Ma. This increase was considered as evidence of a climatically-driven surface process change, attributed to increased precipitation (Cederbom et al., 2004) and erosion by glacial processes (Champagnac et al., 2007). The timing of the onset of intense glacial erosion as well as its rates are still ambiguous. The glacial erosion seems to have accelerated around 0.9 Ma as suggested by the ten fold increase of incision rates of a valley in the Central Alps (Häuselmann et al., 2007), and by information about vegetation and sedimentologic changes (Muttoni et al., 2003). There is however no direct quantification of topographic change during the Plio-Quaternary. We present here how we use OSL-thermochronology, a new thermochronometer of exceptionally low closure temperature (about 30°-40°C) (Herman et al subm.), new {U-Th}/He on apatites data, and a glacial erosion model (Herman and Braun 2008) to estimate topographic changes in the Alps in response to glaciations. Because of their low closure temperature, OSL and AHe thermochronology enables quantification of events of less than 1 Ma at very small wavelength of the topography. We collected two vertical profiles, one in the Zermatt Valley (Valais) and one in Maurienne Valley (Savoy). We infer from these results changes in topography, date and quantify relief creation under glacial-interglacial cycles. Cederbom, C.E, et al., Climate induced rebound and exhumation of the European Alps. Geology 32, 709-712 (2000). Champagnac, J.-D., et al., Quaternary erosion-induced isostatic rebound in the western Alps. Geology 35, 195-198 (2007). Ha

  5. Organochlorine compounds in ice melt water from Italian Alpine rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Sara; Negrelli, Christian; Finizio, Antonio; Flora, Onelio; Vighi, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Organochlorine chemicals (OCs) (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes, hexachlorocyclohexanes, and hexachlorobenzene) were measured in ice melt water from five glaciers in the Italian Alps. Even though the data collected may not be sufficient for a precise description of persistent organic pollutant release patterns from glacier melting, they have, however, highlighted the potential for surface water contamination. Concentrations were of the same order of magnitude in all glacial streams, indicating comparable contamination levels in different glaciers of the alpine region. OC levels in nonglacial springs sampled in the same areas are usually lower. Even if differences during the melting season (from spring to autumn) have been identified, a regular seasonal pattern in OC concentrations was not observed. Risk for the aquatic environment is excluded through direct water exposure, but it is likely to occur through biomagnification and secondary poisoning exposure.

  6. The Ortles ice cores: uncovering an extended climate archive from the Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreossi, Giuliano; Barbante, Carlo; Bertò, Michele; Carturan, Luca; De Blasi, Fabrizio; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Gabrielli, Paolo; Seppi, Roberto; Spolaor, Andrea; Stenni, Barbara; Zanoner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    During the last half century, oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope content of ice cores has been extensively used for air temperature reconstructions. The most suitable glaciers of the Alpine area, most exclusively in the Western Alps, have been utilized for ice coring for more than four decades. The paleoclimatic potential of the Eastern Alps is still largely unexploited and was scarcely utilized in the past mainly because of the lower elevation (compared to Western Alps) and hence the difficulty to find glaciers in cold conditions. The warming temperature trend appears to be particularly pronounced in the Alps, threatening the preservation of the glaciated areas and creating a sense of urgency in retrieving climatic archives before it is too late. In autumn 2011, four deep cores were drilled on Mt Ortles, South Tyrol, Italy, at 3859 m a.s.l. An extensive reconstructed temperature record for the Ortles summit, based on the surrounding meteorological station data, is available for the last 150 years, while an automatic weather station had been operating from 2011 to 2015 in proximity of the drilling site. The new ice core chronology, based on 210Pb, tritium, beta emissions analysis and 14C measurements of the particulate organic carbon, indicates that the bottom ice is 7000 years old, making it the second most extended glaciological archive ever retrieved in the Alps. The three equally long ice cores have been analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes throughout their length, and the goal is to create an Ortles stacked record for d18O and dD and compare the isotopic data to instrumental temperatures and to other Alpine records. Since 2008, several snow pits were dug in proximity of the drilling site during summer, when the temperature can often exceed the melting point. The isotopic profiles of the 2015 snow pit, dug at the end of an exceptionally warm summer, show how the isotope signal is now affected by the post-depositional processes that have occurred

  7. Visit of the Italian President

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "CERN stands as the demonstration of the great results that science can achieve [...] when it succeeds in getting all the main players in international scientific cooperation involved," stated the President of the Italian Republic, Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, in front of an overcrowded and enthusiastic Main Auditorium. The President visited CERN on 2nd December, and met the CERN directorate as well as the Italians at CERN. With about 1500 Italians working at CERN, which is one sixth of the total personnel, they are the second largest nationality at CERN. The Italian President visited the CMS assembly hall and the LHC superconducting magnet test hall before meeting the CERN community, in particular Italian personnel, in the main auditorium. There he emphasised the role of CERN as a transnational model for research which not only achieved great results in science but is also a powerful vehicle for progress in other fields. President Ciampi visits the LHC superconducting test hall together with Luciano Maiani and Lu...

  8. Lynx distribution in the French Alps (1995-1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Stahl

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract From 1995 to 1999, 69 data were recorded on lynx presence in the French Alps, in an area of 3,636 km². Lynx presence was recorded in the major forested regions of the pré-Alpes (Chablais, Glière/Aravis, Bauges, Chartreuse, Vercors, Diois/Beauchène, in the Chamonix and Maurienne valleys and the Briançon region, but no large continuous area of presence was shown. Lynx have probably been permanently present in certain locations during the past years, but the presence of a large lynx population in the Alps is improbable in the northern French Alps. In the future, we recommend that habitat suitability for lynx in the northern French-Alps should be assessed, together with possibilities of connection between alpine regions and possible bias in the monitoring system.

  9. Geotourist itineraries along the Italian territory: examples of mapping the geoheritage in different geomorphological and historical contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizza, Valeria; Brandolini, Pierluigi; Laureti, Lamberto; Nesci, Olivia; Russo, Filippo; Savelli, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    within the Mediterranean region. The Cinque Terre are has been recognized since 1997 as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO and are currently affected by high geomorphological risk. - the territory of the town of Bosa, north-western Sardinia (Italy). From a geological point of view the area is characterized by the outcropping of the Oligo-Miocene volcanic sequence related to the rotational tectonic. The geomorphological survey allowed the reconstruction of the Quaternary evolution and the assessment of the geomorphological heritage. The itinerary proposed wants to promote, by means of a geo-tourist map, the geomorphological heritage in its relationship with the rich cultural context and give all information for a correct and conscious fruition of the landscape. - the vacant railway tract Avellino-Rocchetta S. Antonio (Campania region, Italy): an inland area of the southern Italian Apennine. Here the great diversity of landforms give rise to a rich variety of landscapes, strictly linked with the long archaeological and cultural history, protected, in part, by the institution of regional Parks and other kind of protected areas. - abandoned or deactivated old mines in the Eastern Italian Alps, in order to promote their recovery for tourist or didactic purposes. The aim of the proposed itinerary is to organize its specific fruition as well as the preservation of their environmental and historic heritage.

  10. Anomalous directional behaviour of the real parts of the induction arrows in the Eastern Alps: tectonic and palaeogeographic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Schnegg

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The electromagnetic induction pattern in the Eastern Alps is characterised by a (continuous large-scale zone on which the real parts of the induction arrows show anomalous directional behaviour. This zone extends from the Penninic Domain of Eastern Switzerland (Graubünden probably into the Carpathian ranges. A coarse mesh of a Magnetotelluric (MT and Geomagnetic Deep Sounding (GDS station in the Alps of Graubünden and Valais (Western Switzerland indicates that this electromagnetic anomaly is restricted to the Mesozoic sediments of the North Penninic Bündnerschiefer-facies that begins in Eastern Switzerland and extends towards the east beneath Austroalpine, South Penninic and Southalpine units. Striking similarities in position and arrangement between this zone and the magnetic signature in the Eastern Alps are found. The analysis of the GDS data with the method of the Hypothetical Event Analysis (HEA shows that current channelling affects the electromagnetic fields in this zone and causes the anomalous direction of induction arrows. Based on the combined interpretation of GDS data from the Eastern Alps and West Hungary together with our recent data from Switzerland, the following geological implications are discussed: i a spatial decoupling of induction processes from the upper to the lower crust; ii a lower crustal conductive structure caused by the indentation of the Northern Adriatic promontory or terrane; iii the eastward continuation of the Bündnerschiefer-facies at least to the tectonic window of Rechnitz.

  11. Galaxy Clusters as Tele-ALP-scopes

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Axion-like particles have good theoretical motivation and are characterized by conversion to photons in astrophysical magnetic fields. Galaxy clusters are the most efficient convertors of axion-like particles to photons in the universe. I discuss the physics and phenomenology of ALPs, and describe their astrophysical implications, with particular reference to the recently observed 3.5 keV X-ray line that is a candidate for a dark matter decay line. I discuss interpretations of this line in terms of dark matter decaying to an axion-like particle, that then converts to a photon in cluster magnetic fields, and describe the compatibility of this scenario with data and the different phenomenology for cool-core and non-cool-core clusters.

  12. Italian musicians in Greece during the nineteenth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanou Ekaterini

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In Greece, the monophonic chant of the Orthodox church and its neumatic notation have been transmitted as a popular tradition up to the first decades of the 20th century. The transformation of Greek musical tradition to a Western type of urban culture and the introduction of harmony, staff notation and western instruments and performance practices in the country began in the 19th century. Italian musicians played a central role in that process. A large number of them lived and worked on the Ionian Islands. Those Italian musicians have left a considerable number of transcriptions and original compositions. Quite a different cultural background existed in Athens. Education was in most cases connected to the church - the institution that during the four centuries of Turkish occupation kept Greeks united and nationally conscious. The neumatic notation was used for all music sung by the people, music of both western and eastern origin. The assimilation of staff notation and harmony was accelerated in the last quarter of the 19th century. At the beginning of the 20th century in Athens a violent cultural clash was provoked by the reformers of music education all of them belonging to German culture. The clash ended with the displacement of the Italian and Greek musicians from the Ionian Islands working at the time in Athens, and the defamation of their fundamental work in music education.

  13. An Xrootd Italian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccali, T.; Donvito, G.; Diacono, D.; Marzulli, G.; Pompili, A.; Della Ricca, G.; Mazzoni, E.; Argiro, S.; Gregori, D.; Grandi, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Lista, L.; Fabozzi, F.; Barone, L. M.; Santocchia, A.; Riahi, H.; Tricomi, A.; Sgaravatto, M.; Maron, G.

    2014-06-01

    The Italian community in CMS has built a geographically distributed network in which all the data stored in the Italian region are available to all the users for their everyday work. This activity involves at different level all the CMS centers: the Tier1 at CNAF, all the four Tier2s (Bari, Rome, Legnaro and Pisa), and few Tier3s (Trieste, Perugia, Torino, Catania, Napoli, ...). The federation uses the new network connections as provided by GARR, our NREN (National Research and Education Network), which provides a minimum of 10 Gbit/s to all the sites via the GARR-X[2] project. The federation is currently based on Xrootd[1] technology, and on a Redirector aimed to seamlessly connect all the sites, giving the logical view of a single entity. A special configuration has been put in place for the Tier1, CNAF, where ad-hoc Xrootd changes have been implemented in order to protect the tape system from excessive stress, by not allowing WAN connections to access tape only files, on a file-by-file basis. In order to improve the overall performance while reading files, both in terms of bandwidth and latency, a hierarchy of xrootd redirectors has been implemented. The solution implemented provides a dedicated Redirector where all the INFN sites are registered, without considering their status (T1, T2, or T3 sites). An interesting use case were able to cover via the federation are disk-less Tier3s. The caching solution allows to operate a local storage with minimal human intervention: transfers are automatically done on a single file basis, and the cache is maintained operational by automatic removal of old files.

  14. Fission track ages and Exhumation mechanisms of the Tauern Window, Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Audrey; Rosenberg, Claudio; Garcia, Sebastian

    2010-05-01

    The Tauern Window (TW) is a thermal and structural dome which exposes Penninic basement, its cover units as well as parts of the overlying Austroalpine basement in the central part of the Eastern Alps. The peak of metamorphism was attained approximately at 30Ma (Selverstone et .al, 1992), followed by cooling and exhumation throughout Miocene time. Most of the tertiary exhumation of the Eastern Alps was localized in the TW, from Early Oligocene to late Miocene time. A current debate centers on the exhumation mechanisms of Penninic rocks in the core of the TW, namely to assess whether orogen-parallel extension (e.g., Selverstone, 1988) or a combination of folding and erosion (eg., Rosenberg et al., 2004) with subordinate extension were the controlling processes. E-W extension is well documented at the western (Brenner Fault) and eastern (Katschberg Fault) margins of the window (e.g., Behrmann, 1988; Selverstone, 1988; Genser and Neubauer, 1989). In contrast, upright folding dominates the internal structure of the dome, and in particular along its western part, where fold amplitudes, mostly eroded during folding, attained up to 10 km. This study attempts to assess the relative importance of folding and erosion and of orogen-parallel extension during exhumation by analyzing the spatial and temporal cooling patterns of apatite and zircon fission track ages. The compilation of published apatite and zircon fission track ages indicates a concentric younging of both the apatite and zircon ages toward the core of the TW. The concentric isochrones follow the map trace of the axial planes of the upright folds of the western and eastern TW. This cooling pattern is in contrast to the one expected by a process of extensional unroofing, which in map view would results in isochrons parallel to the extensional faults and progressively younging towards them (e.g., Foster et al., 2001). We therefore propose that folding and erosion were primarily responsible for exhuming the Penninic

  15. Rock glacier inventory, Hautes Alpes Calcaires, Switzerland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hautes Alpes Calcaires is a limestone range in the northern part of the Rhone Valley (Switzerland). It is characterized by a transitional climate between the wet...

  16. Impact of Po Valley emissions on the highest glacier of the Eastern European Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gabrieli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In June 2009, we conducted the first extensive glaciological survey of Alto dell'Ortles, the uppermost glacier of Mt. Ortles (3905 m a.s.l., the highest summit of the Eastern European Alps. This section of the Alps is located in a rain shadow and is characterized by the lowest precipitation rate in the entire Alpine arc. Mt. Ortles offers a unique opportunity to test deposition mechanisms of chemical species that until now were studied only in the climatically-different western sector. We analyzed snow samples collected on Alto dell'Ortles from a 4.5 m snow-pit at 3830 m a.s.l., and we determined a large suite of trace elements and ionic compounds that comprise the atmospheric deposition over the past two years.

    Trace element concentrations measured in snow samples are extremely low with mean concentrations at pg g−1 levels. Only Al and Fe present median values of 1.8 and 3.3 ng g−1, with maximum concentrations of 21 and 25 ng g−1. The median crustal enrichment factor (EFc values for Be, Rb, Sr, Ba, U, Li, Al, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ga and V are lower than 10 suggesting that these elements originated mainly from soil and mineral aerosol. EFc higher than 100 are reported for Zn (118, Ag (135, Bi (185, Sb (401 and Cd (514, demonstrating the predominance of non-crustal depositions and suggesting an anthropogenic origin.

    Our data show that the physical stratigraphy and the chemical signals of several species were well preserved in the uppermost snow of the Alto dell'Ortles glacier. A clear seasonality emerges from the data as the summer snow is more affected by anthropogenic and marine contributions while the winter aerosol flux is dominated by crustal sources. For trace elements, the largest mean EFc seasonal variations are displayed by V (with a factor of 3.8, Sb (3.3, Cu (3.3, Pb (2.9, Bi (2.8, Cd (2.1, Zn (1.9, Ni (1.8, Ag (1.8, As (1.7 and Co (1.6.

    When trace species ratios in local

  17. Automated Laser Paint Stripping (ALPS) update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovoi, Paul

    1993-03-01

    To date, the DoD has played a major role in funding a number of paint stripping programs. Some technologies have proven less effective than contemplated. Others are still in the validation phase. Paint stripping is one of the hottest issues being addressed by the finishing industry since the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has mandated that chemical stripping using methylene chloride/phenolic type strippers be stopped. The DoD and commercial aircraft companies are hard-pressed to find an alternative. Automated laser paint stripping has been identified as a technique for removing coatings from aircraft surfaces. International Technical Associates (InTA) was awarded a Navy contract for an automated laser paint stripping system (ALPS) that will remove paint from metallic and composite substrates. For the program, which will validate laser paint stripping, InTA will design, build, test, and install a system for fighter-sized aircraft at both the Norfolk and North Island (San Diego) Aviation Depots.

  18. Bioactivation of titanium dioxide scaffolds by ALP-functionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sengottuvelan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional TiO2 scaffolds are receiving renewed attention for bone tissue engineering (TE due to their biocompatibility and attractive mechanical properties. However the bioactivity of these scaffolds is comparatively lower than that of bioactive glass or hydroxyapatite (HA scaffolds. One strategy to improve bioactivity is to functionalize the surface of the scaffolds using biomolecules. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP was chosen in this study due to its important role in the bone mineralization process. The current study investigated the ALP functionalization of 3D titanium dioxide scaffolds using self-polymerization of dopamine. Robust titanium scaffolds (compressive strength∼2.7 ± 0.3 MPa were produced via foam replica method. Enzyme grafting was performed by dip-coating in polydopamine/ALP solution. The presence of ALP was indirectly confirmed by contact angle measurements and enzymatic activity study. The influence of the enzyme on the bioactivity, e.g. hydroxyapatite formation on the scaffold surface, was measured in simulated body fluid (SBF. After 28 days in SBF, 5 mg ALP coated titania scaffolds exhibited increased hydroxyapatite formation. It was thus confirmed that ALP enhances the bioactivity of titania scaffolds, converting an inert bioceramic in an attractive bioactive system for bone TE.

  19. Towns in the Alps: Urbanization Processes, Economic Structure, and Demarcation of European Functional Urban Areas (EFUAs) in the Alps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manfred Perlik; Paul Messerli; Werner Bätzing

    2001-01-01

    .... Instead, it is necessary to demarcate urbanized zones according to functional criteria. This article presents a demarcation of urbanized zones in the Alps based on the French method of European functional urban areas (EFUAs...

  20. Cephalocteinae Mulsant et Rey, 1866 (Hemiptera, Heteroptera), a subfamily of Cydnidae new for the Italian fauna: first record of Cephalocteus scarabaeoides (Fabricius, 1807) from Sardinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancello, Luca; Cillo, Davide; Bazzato, Erika

    2016-01-25

    Cephalocteus scarabaeoides is recorded from the south-western coast of Sardinia, in sandy habitat (marine dunes near the beach), for the first time. The species and the subfamily are new for the Italian fauna.

  1. Secular painting in the Ionian islands and Italian art: Aspects of a multi-faceted relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aphrodite Kouria

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of Italian art, especially Venetian, was decisive to the secularisation of art in the Ionian Islands and the shaping of the so-called Ionian School, in the context of a broader Western influence affecting all aspects of life and culture, especially on the islands of Zakynthos and Corfu. Italian influences, mainly of Renaissance, Mannerism and Baroque art, can be identified both on the iconographic and the stylistic level of artworks, with theoretical support. This article explores facets of the dialogue of secular painting in the Ionian with Italian art in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, focussing on works and artists that highlight significant aspects of this multilayered phenomenon and also through secondary channels that expand the horizon of analysis. Procession paintings, with their various connotations, and portraiture, which flourished in secular Ionian art, offer the most interesting material as regards the selection, reception and management of Italian models and points of reference.

  2. Accelerating climate change impacts on alpine glacier forefield ecosystems in the European Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannone, Nicoletta; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; Guglielmin, Mauro; Smiraglia, Claudio

    2008-04-01

    In the European Alps the increase in air temperature was more than twice the increase in global mean temperature over the last 50 years. The abiotic (glacial) and the biotic components (plants and vegetation) of the mountain environment are showing ample evidence of climate change impacts. In the Alps most small glaciers (80% of total glacial coverage and an important contribution to water resources) could disappear in the next decades. Recently climate change was demonstrated to affect higher levels of ecological systems, with vegetation exhibiting surface area changes, indicating that alpine and nival vegetation may be able to respond in a fast and flexible way in response to 1-2 degrees C warming. We analyzed the glacier evolution (terminus fluctuations, mass balances, surface area variations), local climate, and vegetation succession on the forefield of Sforzellina Glacier (Upper Valtellina, central Italian Alps) over the past three decades. We aimed to quantify the impacts of climate change on coupled biotic and abiotic components of high alpine ecosystems, to verify if an acceleration was occurring on them during the last decade (i.e., 1996-2006) and to assess whether new specific strategies were adopted for plant colonization and development. All the glaciological data indicate that a glacial retreat and shrinkage occurred and was much stronger after 2002 than during the last 35 years. Vegetation started to colonize surfaces deglaciated for only one year, with a rate at least four times greater than that reported in the literature for the establishment of scattered individuals and about two times greater for the well-established discontinuous early-successional community. The colonization strategy changed: the first colonizers are early-successional, scree slopes, and perennial clonal species with high phenotypic plasticity rather than pioneer and snowbed species. This impressive acceleration coincided with only slight local summer warming (approximately -0

  3. New genetic evidence supports isolation and drift in the Ladin communities of the South Tyrolean Alps but not an ancient origin in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mark G; Barnes, Ian; Weale, Michael E; Jones, Abigail L; Forster, Peter; Bradman, Neil; Pramstaller, Peter P

    2008-01-01

    The Alps are one of the most significant geographical barriers in Europe and several isolated Swiss and Italian valleys retain the distinctive Ladin and Romansch languages, alongside the modern majority of Italian and German languages. Linguistically, Ladin belongs to the Romance languages, but some studies on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation have suggested a major Middle Eastern component to their genealogical origin. Furthermore, an observed high degree of within-population diversity has been interpreted as reflecting long-standing differentiation from other European populations and the absence of a major bottleneck in Ladin population history. To explore these issues further, we examined Y chromosome and mtDNA variation in two samples of Ladin speakers, two samples of German speakers and one sample of metropolitan Italian speakers. Our results (1) indicate reduced diversity in the Ladin-speaking and isolated German-speaking populations when compared to a sample of metropolitan Italian speakers, (2) fail to identify haplotypes that are rare in other European populations that other researchers have identified, and (3) indicate different Middle Eastern components to Ladin ancestry in different localities. These new results, in combination with Bayesian estimation of demographic parameters of interest (population size, population growth rate, and Palaeolithic/Neolithic admixture proportions) and phylogeographic analysis, suggest that the Ladin groups under study are small genetically isolated populations (subject to strong genetic drift), having a predominantly European ancestry, and in one locality, may have a greater Palaeolithic component to that ancestry than their neighbours.

  4. End of the Little Ice Age in the Alps forced by industrial black carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Thomas H; Flanner, Mark G; Kaser, Georg; Marzeion, Ben; VanCuren, Richard A; Abdalati, Waleed

    2013-09-17

    Glaciers in the European Alps began to retreat abruptly from their mid-19th century maximum, marking what appeared to be the end of the Little Ice Age. Alpine temperature and precipitation records suggest that glaciers should instead have continued to grow until circa 1910. Radiative forcing by increasing deposition of industrial black carbon to snow may represent the driver of the abrupt glacier retreats in the Alps that began in the mid-19th century. Ice cores indicate that black carbon concentrations increased abruptly in the mid-19th century and largely continued to increase into the 20th century, consistent with known increases in black carbon emissions from the industrialization of Western Europe. Inferred annual surface radiative forcings increased stepwise to 13-17 W⋅m(-2) between 1850 and 1880, and to 9-22 W⋅m(-2) in the early 1900s, with snowmelt season (April/May/June) forcings reaching greater than 35 W⋅m(-2) by the early 1900s. These snowmelt season radiative forcings would have resulted in additional annual snow melting of as much as 0.9 m water equivalent across the melt season. Simulations of glacier mass balances with radiative forcing-equivalent changes in atmospheric temperatures result in conservative estimates of accumulating negative mass balances of magnitude -15 m water equivalent by 1900 and -30 m water equivalent by 1930, magnitudes and timing consistent with the observed retreat. These results suggest a possible physical explanation for the abrupt retreat of glaciers in the Alps in the mid-19th century that is consistent with existing temperature and precipitation records and reconstructions.

  5. [Italian Thesaurus of Bioethics, TIB].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarini, Claudia; Poltronieri, Elisabetta

    2004-01-01

    The article aims at illustrating the characteristics and functions of a monolingual thesaurus, focusing on the Italian Thesaurus of Bioethics (Thesaurus Italiano di Bioetica, TIB) the controlled vocabulary used to index and retrieve documents within SIBIL (Italian Online Bioethics Information System). TIB includes controlled terms (descriptors) translated from the Bioethics Thesaurus adopted by the Kennedy Institute of Ethics of the Georgetown University of Washington and revised according to the Italian context of study and scientific debate in the field of bioethics. The overall amount of TIB terms consists in over 1600 headings. Methods to link thesaurus terms hierarchically, by association and by showing synonyms as recommended in ISO standards are applied with reference to descriptors drawn from TIB. Future plans to make the English version of TIB available online within European networks are also illustrated, aiming at spreading information relating to bioethics at an international level.

  6. Atmospheric CO2 Consumption in Uplifting Mountain Ranges: New Insight From the New Zealand Southern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, A. D.; Blum, J. D.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2004-12-01

    Rates of physical erosion and chemical weathering in uplifting mountain ranges are generally higher than the rates observed in tectonically stable regions. This observation has led to the hypothesis that orogenic events lead to global cooling over geologic time scales by accelerating the rate of atmospheric CO2 drawdown from silicate weathering. However, recent studies of rivers draining the rapidly uplifting Himalaya Mountains have demonstrated that much of the chemical weathering flux is dominated by carbonate dissolution, which does not influence long-term atmospheric CO2 levels. To examine if carbonate weathering dominates in other orogenic environments, we have undertaken investigations of rivers draining the New Zealand Southern Alps, which present a largely unexplored setting for systematically examining tectonic controls on the carbon cycle. In particular, we quantified rates of physical erosion and both silicate and carbonate weathering across a gradient of variable uplift rates but constant bedrock composition. We also compared the findings to global mean values as well as to data for major world rivers in other tectonic and climatic settings. Rapid uplift in the western Southern Alps elevates mechanical erosion rates by a factor of ~13 relative to those on the tectonically stable eastern side. Similarly, the average chemical weathering rate is ~5 times higher on the western compared to eastern side of the mountain range. However, because the proportion of stream-water Ca2+ and Mg2+ from the weathering of trace hydrothermal calcite increases as the rate of mechanical erosion increases, the long-term atmospheric CO2 consumption rate on the western side is only ~2 times higher than that on the eastern side and only ~1.5 times higher than the global mean value. These data demonstrate that tectonic uplift in the New Zealand Southern Alps accelerates physical erosion and chemical weathering rates but does not greatly enhance the rate of long-term atmospheric

  7. Is Western Marxism Western? The Cases of Gramsci and Tosaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Chino

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to show that two eminent Marxists in the 1930s, the Italian Antonio Gramsci and the Japanese Tosaka Jun, shared three important characteristics of so-called Western Marxism: the methodological development of Marxism, the focus on the superstructure, and the pessimism about the impossibility of immediate revolution. Showing that Gramsci and Tosaka shared these characteristics enables us to revisit the framework of “Western Marxism,” which confusingly consists of both theoretical characteristics and geographical criteria. Looking at Gramsci and Tosaka on the same plane allows us to revisit Marxist thought different from the orthodox Marxism in Soviet Russia, and not strictly as a Western, but as a part of potentially global movement of thought.

  8. Italo Calvino e le Fiabe italiane

    OpenAIRE

    HAVRDOVÁ, Radana

    2016-01-01

    The thesis is focused on the topic Italo Calvino and Italian Falktales referring to the collection Sulla fiaba. This thesis presents the life and lifework of Italo Calvino, describes the studying of the Italian falktales, explains the influence of Ariosto at Calvino's production. My thesis devotes to the situation on the Italian territory and analyses the tales contained in the collection Fiabe italiane, in detail refers to the animals which appear in the tales from Tuscany, Sicily, Venice an...

  9. 1 ITALIAN COLONISATION & LIBYAN RESISTANCE THE AL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    Libya: Markaz Jihad al-Libyan Studies Centre, 1992. Allen, B. “Professor Malvezzi's Book on Italian Colonial Policy”. Journal of the Royal African Society, 34.137, (1935): 428. Andall, J. “Italian Colonisation: Historical Perspectives. Introduction” Journal of Modern Italian Studies, 8.3, (2003): 371. Andall, J. Legacy & Memory.

  10. Italian/Italiano. Resource Guides for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jenny

    This resource guide, intended for current prospective teachers of Italian, is designed as a source of information and inspiration for Italian instructors at all educational levels. The first of the guide's 11 chapters provides a brief general introduction to this book. Chapter 2 looks at the status of and rationale for Italian language instruction…

  11. A Handbook for Teachers of Italian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Anthony, Ed.

    This handbook for teachers of Italian consists of a collection of 16 essays by noted professionals in the field of Italian instruction: (1) "Fundamentals of Language Learning and Language Instruction," by A. Papalia; (2) "Linguistic Methodology and the Teacher of Italian," by R.J. Di Pietro; (3) "Preparation for Language Teaching," by F.J. Bosco;…

  12. Status and distribution of the lynx in the German Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Kaczensky

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The lynx (Lynx lynx had been eradicated in the German Alps by the middle of the 19th century. Since the early 1970s there have been several attempts to initiate the re-introduction of lynx into the German Alps, but none of the projects could be carried out because of the still very controversial attitudes towards the species, and because of competition between institutions. Natural re-colonization of the German Alps by lynx can be expected sooner or later from Switzerland or Austria. Although lynx are already present in some parts of Germany outside the Alps, neither an organized monitoring system nor compensation regulations for losses of livestock exist. For a successful comeback of lynx into Germany, including the German Alps, more efforts than a year-round protection by the federal hunting law is needed. Initiative management actions and intensive public education are necessary to obtain and secure public acceptance of the lynx.

  13. Approaches to managing cytopenias in Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Koneti eRao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS is a rare disorder frequently due to mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6 gene. Unlike most of the self limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to their disease and its treatments.

  14. Ophiolitic detritus in Kimmeridgian resedimented limestones and its provenance from an eroded obducted ophiolitic nappe stack south of the Northern Calcareous Alps (Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawlick Hans-Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The causes for the Middle to Late Jurassic tectonic processes in the Northern Calcareous Alps are still controversially discussed. There are several contrasting models for these processes, formerly designated “Jurassic gravitational tectonics”. Whereas in the Dinarides or the Western Carpathians Jurassic ophiolite obduction and a Jurassic mountain building process with nappe thrusting is widely accepted, equivalent processes are still questioned for the Eastern Alps. For the Northern Calcareous Alps, an Early Cretaceous nappe thrusting process is widely favoured instead of a Jurassic one, obviously all other Jurassic features are nearly identical in the Northern Calcareous Alps, the Western Carpathians and the Dinarides. In contrast, the Jurassic basin evolutionary processes, as best documented in the Northern Calcareous Alps, were in recent times adopted to explain the Jurassic tectonic processes in the Carpathians and Dinarides. Whereas in the Western Carpathians Neotethys oceanic material is incorporated in the mélanges and in the Dinarides huge ophiolite nappes are preserved above the Jurassic basin fills and mélanges, Jurassic ophiolites or ophiolitic remains are not clearly documented in the Northern Calcareous Alps. Here we present chrome spinel analyses of ophiolitic detritic material from Kimmeridgian allodapic limestones in the central Northern Calcareous Alps. The Kimmeridgian age is proven by the occurrence of the benthic foraminifera Protopeneroplis striata and Labyrinthina mirabilis, the dasycladalean algae Salpingoporella pygmea, and the alga incertae sedis Pseudolithocodium carpathicum. From the geochemical composition the analysed spinels are pleonastes and show a dominance of Al-chromites (Fe3+–Cr3+–Al3+ diagram. In the Mg/(Mg+ Fe2+ vs. Cr/(Cr+ Al diagram they can be classified as type II ophiolites and in the TiO2 vs. Al2O3 diagram they plot into the SSZ peridotite field. All together this points to a harzburgite

  15. Seasonal accumulation of persistent organic pollutants on a high altitude glacier in the Eastern Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchgeorg, T; Dreyer, A; Gabrielli, P; Gabrieli, J; Thompson, L G; Barbante, C; Ebinghaus, R

    2016-11-01

    The seasonal accumulations of perfluorinated substances (PFAS), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were measured in a 10 m shallow firn core from a high altitude glacier at Mt. Ortles (Italy, 3830 m above sea level) in South Tyrol in the Italian Eastern Alps. The most abundant persistent organic pollutants of each group were perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) (for PFASs); BDE 47, BDE 99, BDE 209 (for PBDEs) and phenanthrene (PHE), fluoranthene (FLA) and pyrene (PYR) (for PAHs). All compounds show different extents of seasonality, with higher accumulation during summer time compared to winter. This seasonal difference mainly reflects meteorological conditions with a low and stable atmospheric boundary layer in winter and strong convective activity in summer, transformation processes during the transport of chemicals and/or post-depositional alterations. Change in the composition of the water-soluble PFCAs demonstrates the influence of meltwater percolation through the firn layers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Italian telematics initiatives and achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinciroli, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    Depending on their legislation, the European countries have different telematics initiatives and different scenarios. Cultural roots cause differences even within a country or a region, and different organisational structures can cause further problems. With regard to the Italian telematics approach, the author intends to explain the basis and the main achievements in Italy and especially in the Lombaria region.

  17. Receiver function analysis using AlpArray stations in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dániel, Kalmár; Bálint, Süle; István, Bondár

    2017-04-01

    The AlpArray temporary seismic network, together with the permanent stations of the Hungarian National Seismological Network provid an unprecedented density and resolution to study the Eastern Alps - Pannonian basin transition zone. Previous receiver functions studies .(Hetényi et al., 2007, 2015) in the region used a much smaller station density and shorter time period than the present paper. In the analysis we used data from 48 permanent and temporary AlpArray stations in Hungary and neighbouring countries. We present our methodology (P-wave receiver function analysis, H-K grid search and cross-correlation matrix methods), the pitfalls in processing, and finally our result, the detailed Moho map of the region.

  18. Rapid soil production and weathering in the Southern Alps, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Isaac J; Almond, Peter C; Eger, Andre; Stone, John O; Montgomery, David R; Malcolm, Brendon

    2014-02-07

    Evaluating conflicting theories about the influence of mountains on carbon dioxide cycling and climate requires understanding weathering fluxes from tectonically uplifting landscapes. The lack of soil production and weathering rate measurements in Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountains has made it difficult to determine whether weathering rates increase or decline in response to rapid erosion. Beryllium-10 concentrations in soils from the western Southern Alps, New Zealand, demonstrate that soil is produced from bedrock more rapidly than previously recognized, at rates up to 2.5 millimeters per year. Weathering intensity data further indicate that soil chemical denudation rates increase proportionally with erosion rates. These high weathering rates support the view that mountains play a key role in global-scale chemical weathering and thus have potentially important implications for the global carbon cycle.

  19. Biostratigraphy of Late Cretaceous pelagic limestones from surroundigns of Bovec in the Julian Alps (Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajka Radoičić

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In the western part of Julian Alps in many places small erosion remains of Late Cretaceous pelagic, light grey and reddish limestones and marls (scaglia are preserved. These limestones and marls that contain very numerous globotruncanas overlie southwest of Bovec after a hiatus the Lower Jurassic Pliensbachian oolitic and biospariotic limestone. Between the two limestones appears an angular disconformity. Total thickness of the Upper Cretaceous limestone and marl is 8.80 m. The lower 6.20 m of the column were sampled in detail. In the scarcely 6.20 m thick section three globotruncana zones were established: Helvetotruncana helvetica (3-5 cm, Dicarinella concavata (120 cm and Dicarinella asymetrica (490 cm. The H. helvetica zone is not developed in its entire thickness owing to the hiatus below. Deposition of the Late Cretaceous pelagic limestones started in Turonian and lasted into Campanian. The considered beds in Bovec basin are overlain by Campanian-Maastrichtian flysch beds.

  20. Military-geographic evaluation of the Julian Alps area

    OpenAIRE

    Zvonimir Bratun

    1999-01-01

    The Julian Alps have been of military significance since Roman times in a military geographic sense because of its valleys, mountain passes and lines of defence on mountain ridges. They became especially important in the 19th and 20th century. The largest mountain front in World War I was located there,and evidence of that front is still visible today. The border between Italy and Yugoslavia in the heart of the Julian Alps was clearly a line of demarcation along the Soča and Sava watersheds a...

  1. Crustal structure and active tectonics in the Eastern Alps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brückl, E.; Behm, M.; Decker, K.

    2010-01-01

    and underthusting of AD mantle below PA from southwest to northeast. The Moho fragmentation correlates well with major upper crustal structures and is supported by gravity, seismic, and geodetic data. An analysis of crustal thickening suggests that active convergence is associated with continued thrusting...... and lateral extrusion in the central Eastern Alps and thickening of the Adriatic indenter under the Southern Alps. According to the velocity relations at the triple junction, PA moves relative to EU and AD along ENE and SE striking faults, mainly by strike slip. An eastward directed extensional component...

  2. 10Be exposure dating of the timing of Neoglacial glacier advances in the Ecrins-Pelvoux massif, southern French Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Melaine; Deline, Philip; Carcaillet, Julien; Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Ermini, Magali; Aster Team

    2017-12-01

    Alpine glacier variations are known to be reliable proxies of Holocene climate. Here, we present a terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN)-based glacier chronology relying on 24 new 10Be exposure ages, which constrain maximum Neoglacial positions of four small to mid-sized glaciers (Rateau, Lautaret, Bonnepierre and Etages) in the Ecrins-Pelvoux massif, southern French Alps. Glacier advances, marked by (mainly lateral) moraine ridges that are located slightly outboard of the Little Ice Age (LIA, c. 1250-1860 AD) maximum positions, were dated to 4.25 ± 0.44 ka, 3.66 ± 0.09 ka, 2.09 ± 0.10 ka, c. 1.31 ± 0.17 ka and to 0.92 ± 0.02 ka. The '4.2 ka advance', albeit constrained by rather scattered dates, is to our knowledge exposure-dated here for the first time in the Alps. It is considered as one of the first major Neoglacial advance in the western Alps, in agreement with other regional paleoclimatological proxies. We further review Alpine and Northern Hemisphere mid-to-high latitude evidence for climate change and glacier activity concomitant with the '4.2 ka event'. The '2.1 ka advance' was not extensively dated in the Alps and is thought to represent a prominent advance in early Roman times. Other Neoglacial advances dated here match the timing of previously described Alpine Neoglacial events. Our results also suggest that a Neoglacial maximum occurred at Etages Glacier 0.9 ka ago, i.e. during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA, c. 850-1250 AD). At Rateau Glacier, discordant results are thought to reflect exhumation and snow cover of the shortest moraine boulders. Overall, this study highlights the need to combine several sites to develop robust Neoglacial glacier chronologies in order to take into account the variability in moraine deposition pattern and landform obliteration and conservation.

  3. Decrease of glacier area in the Stubai Alps and the Ötztal Alps between 1991 and 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Sabine

    2017-04-01

    The mountain area of the Stubai and Ötztal Alps is part of the European Alps in Austria just at the border to Italy. It is a well-known skiing and mountaineering area and several known peaks and glaciers are located there. Therefore, it is well studied and glacier area is inventoried for many different time steps available via the GLIMS webpage. Since the last decades, severe decrease of glacier area and volume are monitored in this area as in several other parts of the European Alps. This study focuses on the last 25 years and compares glacier area development of several time steps. Data from the GLIMS database as data mapped from remote sensing products (Landsat 7 and 8) is used. Climate and climate forcing variables as temperature and precipitation are analyzed to especially explain rapidly changes in glacier area.

  4. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) in a child from consanguineous parents: a dominant or recessive disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van der Burg (Mirjam); R. de Groot (Ronald); W.M. Comans-Bitter; J.C. den Hollander (Jan); H. Hooijkaas (Herbert); H.J. Neijens (Herman); R.M.F. Berger (Rolf); A.P. Oranje (Arnold); A.W. Langerak (Anton); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAutoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by autoimmune features and lymphoproliferations and is generally caused by defective Fas-mediated apoptosis. This report describes a child with clinical features of ALPS without detectable Fas

  5. Garnet cannibalism provides clues to extensive hydration of lower crustal fragments in a subduction channel (Sesia Zone, Northwestern Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntoli, Francesco; Lanari, Pierre; Engi, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The extent to which granulites are transformed to eclogites is thought to impose critical limits on the subduction of continental lower crust. Although it is seldom possible to document such densification processes in detail, the transformation is believed to depend on fluid access and deformation. Remarkably complex garnet porphyroblasts are widespread in eclogite facies micaschists in central parts of the Sesia Zone (Western Italian Alps). They occur in polydeformed samples in assemblages involving phengite+quartz+rutile ±paragonite, Na-amphibole, Na-pyroxene, chloritoid. Detailed study of textural and compositional types reveals a rich inventory of growth and partial resorption zones in garnet. These reflect several stages of the polycyclic metamorphic evolution. A most critical observation is that the relict garnet cores indicate growth at 900 °C and 0.9 GPa. This part of the Eclogitic Micaschist Complex thus derived from granulite facies metapelites of Permian age. These dry rocks must have been extensively hydrated during Cretaceous subduction, and garnet records the conditions of these processes. Garnet from micaschist containing rutile, epidote, paragonite and phengite were investigated in detail. Two types of garnet crystals are found in many thin sections: mm-size porphyroclasts and smaller atoll garnets, some 100 µm in diameter. X-ray maps of the porphyroclasts show complex zoning in garnet: a late Paleozoic HT-LP porphyroclastic core is overgrown by several layers of HP-LT Alpine garnet, these show evidence of growth at the expense of earlier garnet generations. Textures indicate 1-2 stages of resorption, with garnet cores that were fractured and then sealed by garnet veins, rimmed by multiple Alpine overgrowth rims with lobate edges. Garnet rim 1 forms peninsula and embayment structures at the expense of the core. Rim 2 surrounds rim 1, both internally and externally, and seems to have grown mainly at the expense of the core. Rim 3 grew mainly at

  6. Distribution of the lynx in the French Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Stahl

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The European lynx disappeared from the French Alps around the beginning of the 20th century. The recovery in France is due to the re-introduction in Switzerland between 1971 and 1976. From 1974 to 1994, there were 70 records. The first records were recorded in Chablais. More regular records were around the Aravis mountains. Over 20 years, a southward expansion of about 200 km has been observed but no continuous distribution area has been shown by the survey. Observations remained scattered, probably because of low observation effort in many areas. Different possibilities for connections with the Jura populations seemed to exist in the French Alps. Bauges, Chartreuse and even Salève could have been reached by individuals originating from the Jura or from the northern Alps. If the presence of the lynx south of Grenoble in the Vercors and in the Hautes Alpes département is confirmed, expansion of the population over the whole south-east of France would be possible.

  7. Australian Alps: Kosciuszko, Alpine and Namadgi National Parks (Second Edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Porter

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: Australian Alps: Kosciuszko, Alpine and Namadgi National Parks (Second Edition By Deidre Slattery. Clayton South, Australia: CSIRO Publishing, 2015. xvii + 302 pp. AU$ 45.00, US$ 35.95. ISBN 978-1-486-30171-3.

  8. The Geology of the Bergamasc Alps Lombardia Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitter, de L.U.; Sitter-Koomans, de C.M.

    1949-01-01

    In the Bergamasc Alps we have observed one major unconformity between the Basement rock and the overlying Permian. The total absence of any recognisable Palaeozoic sedimentary rocks accentuates this unconformity, and moreover this enormous hiatus makes the dating of any Palaeozoic event impossible.

  9. Monochroa bronzella sp. n. from the southwestern Alps (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsholt, Ole; Nel, Jacques; Fournier, François

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Monochroa bronzella sp. n. is described from the southwestern Alps (France, Italy). It is closely related to M. nomadella (Zeller, 1868), with which it was hitherto confused. Literature records of M. nomadella from France and northwestern Italy refer to M. bronzella sp. n. The two speci...

  10. Adapting the ALP Model for Student and Institutional Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sides, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing adoption of accelerated models of learning comes the necessary step of adapting these models to fit the unique needs of the student population at each individual institution. One such college adapted the ALP (Accelerated Learning Program) model and made specific changes to the target population, structure and scheduling, and…

  11. Traditional phytotherapy of the Albanians of Lepushe, Nothern Albanian Alps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieroni, A.; Dibra, B.; Grishaj, G.; Grishaj, I.; Maçai, S.G.

    2005-01-01

    An ethnobotanical and ethnopharmacognostic survey has been carried out in one of the most isolated mountainous area in Europe: the village of Lepushe and its surrounding territory, in the Northern Albanian Alps. Approximately 70 botanical taxa and 160 preparations, mainly derived from plants, but

  12. 13 CFR 120.841 - Qualifications for the ALP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... impacts performance measures, and other performance related measurements and information (such as... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualifications for the ALP. 120.841 Section 120.841 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS...

  13. The Italian Dementia National Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Di Fiandra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Italian Dementia National Plan was formulated in October 2014 by the Italian Ministry of Health in close cooperation with the regions, the National Institute of Health and the three major national associations of patients and carers. The main purpose of this strategy was to provide directive indications for promoting and improving interventions in the dementia field, not limiting to specialist and therapeutic actions, but particularly focusing on the support of patients and families throughout the pathways of care. Four main objectives are indicated: 1 promote health- and social-care interventions and policies; 2 create/strengthen the integrated network of services for dementia based on an integrated approach; 3 implement strategies for promoting appropriateness and quality of care; and 4 improve the quality of life of persons with dementia and their families by supporting empowerment and stigma reduction. These objectives and the pertaining actions are described in the present paper.

  14. First paleoseismological assessment of active deformation along the eastern front of the southern Alps (NE Italy, Friuli). Insights on the 1511 earthquake causative fault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcucci, Emanuela; Eliana Poli, Maria; Galadini, Fabrizio; Paiero, Giovanni; Scardia, Giancarlo; Zanferrari, Adriano

    2014-05-01

    seismic event, which is one of the largest events that struck Northern Italy in the past millennium, has been tentatively attributed to the activation of Idrija fault system (Fizko et al., 2005). However, no paleoseismological evidence of this has been provided to date, the damage distribution of this event suggests its seismogenic source to be located at the easternmost portion of the Julian Prealps, and our investigations indicate that the ESC has been probably involved in the seismotectonic framework of the 1511 seismic event. The present study provides information useful for updating and improving the knowledge on active faulting of the NE sector of the ESC and provides geological insights, substantiated by paleoseismological investigations performed for the first time along the front of the ESC, about one of the most problematic seismotectonic issues of Northern Italy, i.e. the 1511 earthquake. References Galadini et al. (2005). Seismogenic sources potentially responsible for earthquakes with M≥6 in the eastern Southern Alps (Thiene-Udine sector, NE Italy). G. J. I, 161, 739-762. Locati et al. (2011). DBMI11, the 2011 version of the Italian Macroseismic Database. Milano, Bologna, http://emidius.mi.ingv.it/DBMI11 Fitzko et al. (2005). Constrains on the location and mechanism of the 1511 Western-Slovenia earthquake from active tectonics and modeling of macroseismic data. Tectonophysis, 404, 77-90.

  15. Western Sufism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedgwick, Mark

    Western Sufism is sometimes dismissed as a relatively recent "new age" phenomenon, but in this book, Mark Sedgwick argues that it actually has very deep roots, both in the Muslim world and in the West. In fact, although the first significant Western Sufi organization was not established until 1915...... to the internet, Mark Sedgwick demonstrates that the phenomenon of Western Sufism not only draws on centuries of intercultural transfers, but is also part of a long-established relationship between Western thought and Islam that can be productive, not confrontational....

  16. Language Policy and Planning: The Case of Italian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Italian Sign Language (LIS) is the name of the language used by the Italian Deaf community. The acronym LIS derives from Lingua italiana dei segni ("Italian language of signs"), although nowadays Italians refers to LIS as Lingua dei segni italiana, reflecting the more appropriate phrasing "Italian sign language." Historically,…

  17. Comment diffuser les savoirs à travers les Alpes ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Pfefferkorn

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available CIPRA’s Future in the Alps Project aims at showcasing examples of successful implementation and successful projects in the Alps, and making available to others the extensive pool of experience and practical knowledge that lies in these projects. But how to transfer knowledge in an area of some 14 million inhabitants with several linguistic and cultural regions in which thousands of projects are carried out each year, that all kinds of players who work and life in completely different contexts are able to learn and benefit from one another? How do you go about something like that?Le projet « Avenir dans les Alpes » de la CIPRA (Commission Internationale pour la Protection des Alpes a pour objectif de présenter des exemples de réalisations et de projets réussis dans les Alpes, et de mettre à disposition du public l’ensemble de l’expérience et des connaissances pratiques acquises dans le cadre de ces projets. Cependant, comment transférer les savoirs dans une zone comptant quelque 14 millions d’habitants, composée de plusieurs régions linguistiques et culturelles dans lesquelles des milliers de projets sont menés à bien chaque année, et dont tous les acteurs, qui travaillent et vivent dans des contextes complètement différents, sont capables d’apprendre et de tirer profit les uns des autres ? Comment aborder ce genre de cas ?

  18. Somatotype of elite Italian gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massidda, Myosotis; Toselli, Stefania; Brasili, Patricia; Calò, Carla M

    2013-09-01

    The somatotyping method is especially helpful in sports in which the body could directly influence the biomechanics of movements and the performance's results. The purpose of this study was to determine the somatotype of elite Italian gymnasts and to compare it in terms of competition levels. The sample comprised 64 elite gymnasts (42 females (F), somatotype 1.4-4.4-3.2; and 22 males (M), somatotype 1.6-6.3-2.1) belonging to the Italian National Artistic Gymnastic Team (2007) at different competition levels: Allieve, Junior, and Senior. Mean whole somatotypes, by competition levels, were not significantly different in both sexes (Female gymnasts: Allieve, 1.3-4.6-3.3; Junior, 1.3-4.2-3.6; Senior, 1.7-4.2-2.7; Male gymnasts: Junior, 1.5-6.3-2.5; Senior, 1.7-6.3-1.6). Male Junior gymnasts exhibited greater ectomorphy than Senior athletes (F1,20 = 7.75, p somatotype of Italian elite gymnasts and their strong homogeneity, evident also from the low values of somatotype attitudinal mean (SAM). The results emphasize the need for a specific somatotype to reach an elite level in sport and the need to integrate the somatotype analysis between the scientific instruments for selecting talent also in artistic gymnastics.

  19. Meteorological wind energy potential in the Alps using ERA40 and wind measurement sites in the Tyrolean Alps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draxl, Caroline; Mayr, Georg J.

    2011-01-01

    The peculiarities of meteorological wind potential in alpine settings compared to flatland and offshore sites are studied. Four data sources are used: Global reanalysis ERA40 from ECMWF, long-term stations in the Tyrolean Alps, spatially dense measurements near the best site and Doppler sodar wind...

  20. Italian Journal of Animal Science - Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Russo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The publication of the first issue of the Italian Journal of Animal Science marks two important events for the Associazione Scientifica di Produzione Animale -ASPA- (Italian Scientific Association of Animal Production: the birth of a new scientific journal in English and the end of the publication in Italian of the remarkable journal Zootecnica e Nutrizione Animale, which was started in 1975, as the official organ of the Association.

  1. Monitoring seasonal dust depositions on snow in a high-altitude site of the European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mauro, Biagio; Filippa, Gianluca; Pogliotti, Paolo; Galvagno, Marta; Morra di Cella, Umberto; Cremonese, Edoardo; Isabellon, Michel; Rossini, Micol; Garzonio, Roberto; Gramegna, Gianluca; Colombo, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The seasonal input of mineral dust from Saharan desert impacts the optical properties of snow in the European Alps. The albedo reduction may alter the melting dynamics of the snowpack, resulting in earlier snow melts. In this contribution, we evaluate the impact of dust depositions on snowpack melting dynamics in a high-altitude site (2160 m) in the northwestern Italian Alps (Aosta Valley, IT). In particular, we focus on the two following specific objectives: i) to assess the potential of a spectral index derived from digital camera images to identify the occurrence of dust deposition events; ii) to evaluate the impact of dust depositions on snow melting based on the comparison between observed snow height and the potential snow height simulated with a hydrological model not accounting for melting caused by snow impurities. The experimental site is equipped with instruments that measure snow albedo (Kipp and Zonen cnr4 net radiometer), snow height (SR50A, Campbell Scientific, Inc), air temperature (HMP45, Vaisala Inc.) and surface temperature (SI-111, Apogee Instr. Inc.). Furthermore, a Nikon digital camera (model d5000) is installed at the site. The camera collects images in JPEG format and features a resolution of 12.3 megapixels, with three color channels (namely Red, Green and Blue). Data were collected from 10 am to 5 pm, with an hourly temporal resolution. Data from 2013 to 2016 are presented here. The seasonality and timing of dust depositions were determined using two atmospheric transport models: the NAAPS and the BSC-DREAM8 model. Dust depositions were compared with time series of the Snow Darkening Index (SDI) calculated from the channels of the digital camera, combining the Red and Green channels as a normalized difference. SDI time series were extracted from the repeated images using the Phenopix R package (https://r-forge.r-project.org/projects/phenopix/). The impact of dust deposition on snow melt was evaluated by comparing the observed snow height

  2. Nutritional habits in Italian university students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teleman, Adele Anna; de Waure, Chiara; Soffiani, Valentina; Poscia, Andrea; Di Pietro, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    .... We analyzed data collected from Italian university students regarding consumption of fruits, vegetables, fast-foods, sweets, energizing drinks, and coffee, average number of eating episodes per day...

  3. Organizatonal Communication Issues in Italian Multinational Corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaria, Ruggero

    2000-01-01

    Provides a brief historical reconstruction of management communication in Italian companies. Suggests that dealing with communication technologies, communication professionals, and intercultural communication represent three future challenges. (NH)

  4. Ontogeny, immunocytochemical localization, and biochemical properties of the pregnancy-associated uterine elastase/cathepsin-G protease inhibitor, antileukoproteinase (ALP): monospecific antibodies to a synthetic peptide recognize native ALP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmen, R C; Michel, F J; Fliss, A E; Smith, L C; Fliss, M F

    1992-04-01

    Expression of the mRNA encoding the elastase/cathepsin-G protease inhibitor, antileukoproteinase (ALP), is highest in pig uterus during mid- and late pregnancy, suggesting a stage of pregnancy-dependent role for ALP in feto-maternal interactions. To elucidate a function for ALP in these events, immunogenic probes were developed to localize sites of ALP expression in the environment of the developing fetus. Monospecific antibodies raised against a 16-mer synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 21-36 (ALP 16P) of the deduced amino acid sequence of pig uterine ALP were generated by active immunization of sheep. ALP 16P conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin elicited high titer antibodies that were specific to ALP. The antipeptide antibodies were used to characterize pig uterine ALP from allantoic fluids. Uterine ALP has an approximate mol wt of 14,000 and a pI of 8.2 and exhibits elastase inhibitor activity. Amino-terminal amino acid sequencing of uterine ALP indicated the sequence AENALKGGACPPRKIVQC, which has 44% identity with the corresponding region in human bronchial ALP. RIA for ALP, developed using ALP 16P as standard and iodinated tracer, demonstrated the presence of immunoreactive ALP in early, mid-, and late pregnant endometrium and myometrium, placenta, allantoic fluids, fetal cord blood, and fetal liver. ALP was undetectable in the maternal circulation. The ALP levels in endometrium, allantoic fluids, and fetal cord blood changed with the stage of pregnancy; however, ALP content in placenta, myometrium, and fetal liver, although different among tissues, remained invariant during gestation. By immunocytochemical analyses, ALP was localized in the glandular epithelium of the uterus, in placenta, and in fetal liver, consistent with the presence of immunoreactive ALP as measured by RIA. The localization of uterine ALP in placenta and its corresponding transport to fetal circulation provide strong evidence to support a physiological function for the

  5. Gender in Italian-German Bilinguals: A Comparison with German L2 Learners of Italian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    This study compares mastery of gender assignment and agreement in Italian by adult Italian-German bilinguals who have acquired two languages simultaneously (2L1), and by adult German highly proficient second language learners (L2ers) of Italian. Our data show that incompleteness in bilingual acquisition and in second language (L2) acquisition…

  6. Late orogenic vertical movements within the arc of the SW Alps and Ligurian Alps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertotti, G.V.; Mosca, P.

    2009-01-01

    Mainly on the basis of seismic data, we reconstruct magnitude and timing of Miocene to Present vertical movements in the region of the Savigliano basin, an up to 4 km thick succession of Neogene to Quaternary sediments accumulated inside the Alpine arc at the western termination of the Po Plain. We

  7. Constraints on the Miocene landscape evolution of the Eastern Alps from the Kalkspitze region, Niedere Tauern (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dertnig, Florian; Stüwe, Kurt; Woodhead, Jon; Stuart, Finlay M.; Spötl, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    In order to unravel aspects of the Miocene landscape evolution of the eastern European Alps, we present geomorphic and isotopic data from the western Niedere Tauern region (Austria). The region is critical for such interpretations, because it is one of the few regions along the topographic axis of the Eastern Alps where the highest peaks (up to 2500 m a.s.l.) are dominated by limestone. As such, the region contains a record of Miocene landscape-forming events that survived the Pleistocene glaciations, not preserved elsewhere in the central Eastern Alps. This record includes karst caves, karstified planation surfaces and crystalline fluvial pebbles (Augenstein Formation) preserved on planation surfaces and in karst caves. Caves in the region occur in three distinct levels that correlate with well-known cave levels in the Northern Calcareous Alps, although they are somewhat higher in the Niedere Tauern. In part, these cave elevations also correlate with three planation surfaces and knickpoints of major streams draining the region, testifying their pre-glacial origin. We report details of a karst cave (Durchgangshöhle) from the highest cave level located at 2340 m a.s.l. In this cave, allochthonous fluvial gravels are present, overgrown by speleothems. One speleothem yielded an early middle Pleistocene U-Pb age (682 ± 17 ka). We regard this as a minimum age for the erosion of the fluvial cave deposits during Marine Isotope Stages 17 or 16. Carbon and oxygen isotope data of these speleothems imply a climate that is consistent with this interpretation. Cosmogenic 21Ne data of fluvial quartz clasts collected from the surface on plateaus of the Northern Calcareous Alps suggest minimum exposure durations of 115 and 262 ka. They probably reflect successive exposure since removal of the sediment cover of the Oligocene Augenstein Formation during the Pleistocene. While our geochronological data fail to record aspects of the earlier Miocene uplift history, they are

  8. The Italian National Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The Italian National Seismic Network is composed by about 400 stations, mainly broadband, installed in the Country and in the surrounding regions. About 110 stations feature also collocated strong motion instruments. The Centro Nazionale Terremoti, (National Earthquake Center), CNT, has installed and operates most of these stations, although a considerable number of stations contributing to the INGV surveillance has been installed and is maintained by other INGV sections (Napoli, Catania, Bologna, Milano) or even other Italian or European Institutions. The important technological upgrades carried out in the last years has allowed for significant improvements of the seismic monitoring of Italy and of the Euro-Mediterranean Countries. The adopted data transmission systems include satellite, wireless connections and wired lines. The Seedlink protocol has been adopted for data transmission. INGV is a primary node of EIDA (European Integrated Data Archive) for archiving and distributing, continuous, quality checked data. The data acquisition system was designed to accomplish, in near-real-time, automatic earthquake detection and hypocenter and magnitude determination (moment tensors, shake maps, etc.). Database archiving of all parametric results are closely linked to the existing procedures of the INGV seismic monitoring environment. Overall, the Italian earthquake surveillance service provides, in quasi real-time, hypocenter parameters which are then revised routinely by the analysts of the Bollettino Sismico Nazionale. The results are published on the web page http://cnt.rm.ingv.it/ and are publicly available to both the scientific community and the the general public. This presentation will describe the various activities and resulting products of the Centro Nazionale Terremoti. spanning from data acquisition to archiving, distribution and specialised products.

  9. Competition Advocacy: the Italian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Rebecchini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Competition advocacy is considered, together with enforcement, the core business of an antitrust authority. Broadly speaking there are at least three main tasks regularly performed by most, if not all, antitrust agencies that are amenable to the advocacy function: addressing laws and regulations in order to remove unnecessary impediments to competition; engaging in sector enquiries to understand markets behavior and identify critical issues; explaining the benefits of open competitive markets to the public opinion. This article examines these three main tasks and outlines the challenges for competition agencies, with references to the experience of the Italian Competition Authority (ICA and the initiatives undertaken at international level.

  10. What's new in ALPS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebrich, Babette; Collaboration: ALPS-II collaboration

    2013-09-15

    This proceedings contribution gives a brief experimental update of the 'Any light particle search (ALPS) -II' at DESY which will be sensitive to sub-eV, very weakly coupled particles beyond the Standard Model. First data on hidden sector photon parameter space through photon-hidden photon oscillations in vacuum is expected in 2014. Axion-like particle search (implying the installation of superconducting HERA magnets) could be realized in 2017.

  11. Lichenized and lichenicolous fungi from the Albanian Alps (Kosovo, Montenegro)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Eva A.; Hafellner, Josef; Stešević, Danijela; Geci, Fehmi; Mayrhofer, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    396 taxa (381 species) of lichenized and 45 species of lichenicolous fungi from the upper montane, subalpine and alpine belts of the Albanian Alps (= Prokletije Mountain Range, Bjeshkët e Nemuna) are presented. 92 lichenized and 26 lichenicolous fungi are new to Montenegro, 165 lichenized and 24 lichenicolous fungi are new to Kosovo, and 25 lichenized fungi (23 species) are new for the Balkan Peninsula. PMID:26869727

  12. Soil erosion in the Alps : causes and risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Meusburger, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The issue of soil erosion in the Alps has long been neglected due to the low economic value of the agricultural land. However, soil stability is a key parameter which affects ecosystem services like slope stability, water budgets (drinking water reservoirs as well as flood prevention), vegetation productivity, ecosystem biodiversity and nutrient production. In alpine regions, spatial estimates on soil erosion are difficult to derive because the highly heterogeneous biogeophysical structure im...

  13. BSM photon interaction for ALPS-II and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebrich, Babette

    2012-12-15

    High-intensity photon beams can provide for a viable probe for many particles of Standard Model extensions. This workshop contribution briefly reviews the status of the second stage of the Any Light Particle Search (ALPS-II) at DESY, an experiment of the light-shining-through-a-wall type, as well as an idea to test asymptotically safe quantum gravity in a photon-scattering experiment.

  14. Syllabic Effects in Italian Lexical Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliapietra, Lara; Fanari, R.; Collina, S.; Tabossi, P.

    2009-01-01

    Two cross-modal priming experiments tested whether lexical access is constrained by syllabic structure in Italian. Results extend the available Italian data on the processing of stressed syllables showing that syllabic information restricts the set of candidates to those structurally consistent with the intended word (Experiment 1). Lexical…

  15. Physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of Italian salami ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Julliane

    2015-07-01

    Jul 1, 2015 ... The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the inclusion of different levels of pequi. (Caryocar Brasiliense, Cambess) pulp in the processing of Italian salami made of lamb for the evaluation of their physicochemical and microbiological characteristics. Six formulations of Italian salamis were ...

  16. Assessing the Cost Efficiency of Italian Universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agasisti, Tommaso; Salerno, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    This study uses Data Envelopment Analysis to evaluate the cost efficiency of 52 Italian public universities. In addition to being one of the first such cost studies of the Italian system, it explicitly takes into account the internal cost structure of institutions’ education programs; a task not

  17. The Role of Linguistics in Italian Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinder, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the presence and significance of linguistics in Italian departments at universities in Australia and worldwide against the background of multiculturalism, the politicization of the Italian population in Australia, and the emergence of Italy as a major economic and political power. Argues that the boundary lines between linguistics and…

  18. Physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of Italian salami ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the inclusion of different levels of pequi (Caryocar Brasiliense, Cambess) pulp in the processing of Italian salami made of lamb for the evaluation of their physicochemical and microbiological characteristics. Six formulations of Italian salamis were processed: no pequi ...

  19. Role of the Helicobacter pylori outer-membrane proteins AlpA and AlpB in colonization of the guinea pig stomach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Jonge (Robert); Z. Durrani; S.G. Rijpkema; E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); J.G. Kusters (Johannes)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori expresses several putative outer-membrane proteins (OMPs), but the role of individual OMPs in colonization of the stomach by H. pylori is still poorly understood. The role of four such OMPs (AlpA, AlpB, OipA and HopZ) in a

  20. Snow Precipitation Measured by Gauges: Systematic Error Estimation and Data Series Correction in the Central Italian Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Grossi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation measurements by rain gauges are usually affected by a systematic underestimation, which can be larger in case of snowfall. The wind, disturbing the trajectory of the falling water droplets or snowflakes above the rain gauge, is the major source of error, but when tipping-bucket recording gauges are used, the induced evaporation due to the heating device must also be taken into account. Manual measurements of fresh snow water equivalent (SWE were taken in Alpine areas of Valtellina and Vallecamonica, in Northern Italy, and compared with daily precipitation and melted snow measured by manual precipitation gauges and by mechanical and electronic heated tipping-bucket recording gauges without any wind-shield: all of these gauges underestimated the SWE in a range between 15% and 66%. In some experimental monitoring sites, instead, electronic weighing storage gauges with Alter-type wind-shields are coupled with snow pillows data: daily SWE measurements from these instruments are in good agreement. In order to correct the historical data series of precipitation affected by systematic errors in snowfall measurements, a simple ‘at-site’ and instrument-dependent model was first developed that applies a correction factor as a function of daily air temperature, which is an index of the solid/liquid precipitation type. The threshold air temperatures were estimated through a statistical analysis of snow field observations. The correction model applied to daily observations led to 5–37% total annual precipitation increments, growing with altitude (1740 ÷ 2190 m above sea level, a.s.l. and wind exposure. A second ‘climatological‘ correction model based on daily air temperature and wind speed was proposed, leading to errors only slightly higher than those obtained for the at-site corrections.

  1. Effect of farming system changes on life cycle assessment indicators for dairy farms in the Italian Alps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penati, C.; Sandrucci, A.; Tamburini, A.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In some Alpine areas dairy farming is going through a process of intensification with significant changes in farming systems. The aim of this study was to investigate environmental performance of a sample of 31 dairy farms in an Alpine area of Lombardy with different levels of intensification. A

  2. Modeling the water-energy nexus under changing energy market and climate conditions: a case study in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaro, Simona; Anghileri, Daniela; Castelletti, Andrea; Fumagalli, Elena; Giuliani, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and growing population are expected to severely affect freshwater availability by the end of 21th century. Many river basins, especially in the Mediterranean region, are likely to become more prone to periods of reduced water supply, risking considerable impacts on the society, the environment, and the economy, thus emphasizing the need to rethink the way water resources are distributed, managed, and used at the regional and river basin scale. This paradigm shift will be essential to cope with the undergoing global change, characterized by growing water demands and by increasingly uncertain hydrologic regimes. Most of the literature traditionally focused on predicting the impacts of climate change on water resources, while our understanding of the human footprint on the hydrological cycle is limited. For example, changes in the operation of the Alpine hydropower reservoirs induced by socio-economic drivers (e.g., development of renewable energy) have been already observed over the last few years and have produced relevant impacts on multiple water uses due to the altered distribution of water volumes in time and space. Modeling human decisions as well as the links between society and environmental systems becomes key to develop reliable projections on the co-evolution of the coupled human-water systems and deliver robust adaptation strategies. This work contributes a preliminary model-based analysis of the behaviour of hydropower operators under changing energy market and climate conditions. The proposed approach is developed for the San Giacomo-Cancano reservoir system located in the Lake Como catchment. The identification of the current operating policy is supported by input variable selection methods to select the most relevant hydrological and market based drivers to explain the observed release time series. The identified model is then simulated under a set of future scenarios, accounting for both climate and socio-economic change (e.g., expansion of the electric vehicle sector, load balancing from renewable energy), to eventually estimate the impacts on the multi-sector services involved (i.e., hydropower, flood protection, irrigation supply). Preliminary results show that the magnitude of the socio-economic change impacts is comparable with the one induced by climate change.

  3. Multi-scale debris flow vulnerability assessment and direct loss estimation of buildings in the Eastern Italian Alps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciurean, R.L.; Hussin, H.Y.; van Westen, C.J.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Nicolet, P.; Chen, L.; Frigerio, S.; Glade, T.

    2017-01-01

    Vulnerability assessment, as a component of the consequence analysis, represents a fundamental stage in the risk assessment process because it relates the hazard intensity to the characteristics of the built environment that make it susceptible to damage and loss. The objective of this work is to

  4. Using of the Boolean Stochastic Generation method to target field investigations: the Mortisa landslide (eastern Italian Alps) case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Giulia; Marcato, Gianluca; Gottardi, Guido; Borgatti, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    When designing the geotechnical model of a landslide the information to define the soil profile within the slope is usually inferred from a small amount of data. This is particularly true for large landslides where the study area is vast and the variability of terrains is high. In this framework, a method allowing the best locations for further field investigation campaigns to be identified would be extremely useful. The Boolean Stochastic Generation method (BoSG), which randomly generates different soil distributions of two definite soil types in both 2D and 3D models, is a newly developed algorithm that can guide in this process. In this work the method has been applied to the Mortisa landslide case study, which is located in the Cortina d'Ampezzo valley (Veneto, Italy), part of the Dolomites UNESCO World Heritage list. The mudslide is 3.5 km long, stretching from 1750 to 1300 m a.s.l., and is located in a highly antrophized area where is damaging some buildings and a national road with its almost continuous movements. In fact, from year 2008, GNSS surveys recorded rates of displacements reaching 1.2 m/year in the most active parts of the landslide; the movements occur on a slip surfaces are located between 20 and 50 m below the surface. From the borecores some wooden samples were extracted allowing to reconstruct the sequence of events that led to the development of the present-day Mortisa slope. Interdigitated layers of gravel in a silty clay matrix originated from subsequent earth and debris flows events since the Lateglacial compose the landslide body, a condition that is particularly apt to be investigated with BoSG. A BoSG run for the Mortisa landslide was performed calculating 1200 soil configurations and using laboratory test parameters for the silty-clay matrix. The results were stacked in a tridimensional matrix in order to calculate the mean and the standard deviation (SD) of displacements for each element of the model mesh. In this way maps of the SD and of the mean values were generated. The SD map indicates the best location for additional boreholes since the uncertainty on the dynamic of the whole landslide would be greatly reduced by knowing the local soil distribution in key areas. The mean map is a control of expected deformation and it can be useful in the estimation of the life span of an inclinometer in specific locations. The possibility to determine the areas where further soil investigations would be more significant could be a useful tool for both researchers and practitioners. The results of new investigations could be then used to update the stratigraphy for a further BoSG run in the framework of Bayesian updating techniques.

  5. Contamination of Alpine snow and ice at Colle Gnifetti, Swiss/Italian Alps, from nuclear weapons tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrieli, Jacopo; Cozzi, Giulio; Vallelonga, Paul; Schwikowski, Margit; Sigl, Michael; Eickenberg, Jost; Wacker, Lukas; Boutron, Claude; Gäggeler, Heinz; Cescon, Paolo; Barbante, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Plutonium is present in the environment as a consequence of atmospheric nuclear tests, nuclear weapons production and industrial releases over the past 50 years. To study temporal trends, a high resolution Pu record was obtained by analyzing 52 discrete samples of an alpine firn/ice core from Colle Gnifetti (Monte Rosa, 4450 m a.s.l.), dating from 1945 to 1990. The 239Pu signal was recorded directly, without decontamination or preconcentration steps, using an Inductively Coupled Plasma - Sector Field Mass Spectrometer (ICP-SFMS) equipped with an high efficiency sample introduction system, thus requiring much less sample preparation than previously reported methods. The 239Pu profile reflects the three main periods of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing: the earliest peak lasted from 1954/55 to 1958 and was caused by the first testing period reaching a maximum in 1958. Despite a temporary halt of testing in 1959/60, the Pu concentration decreased only by half with respect to the 1958 peak due to long atmospheric residence times. In 1961/62 Pu concentrations rapidly increased reaching a maximum in 1963, which was about 40% more intense than the 1958 peak. After the signing of the "Limited Test Ban Treaty" between USA and USSR in 1964, Pu deposition decreased very sharply reaching a minimum in 1967. The third period (1967-1975) is characterized by irregular Pu concentrations with smaller peaks (about 20-30% of the 1964 peak) which might be related to the deposition of Saharan dust contaminated by the French nuclear tests of the 1960s. The data presented are in very good agreement with Pu profiles previously obtained from the Col du Dome ice core (by multi-collector ICP-MS) and Belukha ice core (by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, AMS). Although a semi-quantitative method was employed here, the results are quantitatively comparable to previously published results.

  6. Modernization and tradition in the recent history of italian fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, M L

    1967-06-01

    The secular decline of Italian fertility, started in the last decade of the nineteenth century, came to an end in the early 1950'sand has recovered slightly in the last fifteen years. Italian experience seems to follow, with a twenty-year lag, the experience of the more advanced western European populations. At present, with an average of 2.5 children per marriage, Italian fertility is very close to the French and to the average European level.At the regional level, two contrasting patterns can be detected. On one side stands the very low fertility of the North and of the Center, mostly below replacement in the last thirty years;on the other, the still high fertility of the South.In the North and in the Center, where the decline started earlier, fertility has fallen well below replacement level in the last thirty years. In the South, where the decline started in the late 1920's and early 1930's, a large family system still prevails, and the spreading of voluntary control faces barriers setup by a long historyof cultural isolation,attachment to tradition and religion. In the last 15 years, however, the gap has narrowed slowly, more because of an upturn of fertility in the North and in the Center than because of the decline in the South.Another interesting feature of Italian fertility is low class differentials: the fertility of the most prolific segment (farmers, farm laborers) is only 20 percent higher than the fertility of the less prolific professional groups. Finally, Italian experience provides an interesting example of the changing relationship linking the economic level of the population and fertility changes; in 1931-51 a negative correlation linked the changes in fertility to the economic level of the region, while in 1951-61 and 1961-66 a very high and positive correlation can be observed.As for the future trends in fertility, two factors may have an important role. In the first place, on the one hand, the economic policy of the government, aiming at

  7. Dating emplacement and evolution of the orogenic magmatism in the internal Western Alps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Thomsen, Tonny B.; Ovtcharova, Maria

    2012-01-01

    by relics of two different pyroxenes as well as the texture of allanite. Hornblende barometry indicates pressures of similar to 0.46 GPa consistent with the presence of magmatic epidote. Field relationships between the two Plutons, the volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the Biella Volcanic Suite...

  8. Fossil oceanic core complexes recognized in the blueschist metaophiolites of Western Alps and Corsica

    OpenAIRE

    Lagabrielle, Yves; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Ildefonse, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Tethyan ophiolites show an apparent poorly organized association of ultramafic andmafic rocks. By contrast tothe complete mantle-crustal sections of Semail-type ophiolite sheets, Tethyan ophiolites are characterized by asmaller amount of mafic rocks (gabbros and basalts), by the absence of any sheeted dyke complex and by thefrequent occurrence of oceanic sediments stratigraphically overlying mantle-derived peridotites and associatedgabbroic intrusions. Therefore, they ...

  9. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Warm summers and moderate winter precipitation boost Rhododendron ferrugineum L. growth in the Taillefer massif (French Alps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francon, L; Corona, C; Roussel, E; Lopez Saez, J; Stoffel, M

    2017-05-15

    Rhododendron ferrugineum L. is a widespread dwarf shrub species growing in high-elevation, alpine environments of the Western European Alps. For this reason, analysis of its growth rings offers unique opportunities to push current dendrochronological networks into extreme environments and way beyond the treeline. Given that different species of the same genus have been successfully used in tree-ring investigations, notably in the Himalayas where Rhododendron spp. has proven to be a reliable climate proxy, this study aims at (i) evaluating the dendroclimatological potential of R. ferrugineum and at (ii) determining the major limiting climate factor driving its growth. To this end, 154 cross-sections from 36 R. ferrugineum individuals have been sampled above local treelines and at elevations from 1800 to 2100masl on northwest-facing slopes of the Taillefer massif (French Alps). We illustrate a 195-year-long standard chronology based on growth-ring records from 24 R. ferrugineum individuals, and document that the series is well-replicated for almost one century (1920-2015) with an Expressed Population Signal (EPS) >0.85. Analyses using partial and moving 3-months correlation functions further highlight that growth of R. ferrugineum is governed by temperatures during the growing season (May-July), with increasingly higher air temperatures favoring wider rings, a phenomenon which is well known from dwarf shrubs growing in circum-arctic tundra ecosystems. Similarly, the negative effect of January-February precipitation on radial growth of R. ferrugineum, already observed in the Alps on juniper shrubs, is interpreted as a result of shortened growing seasons following snowy winters. We conclude that the strong and unequivocal signals recorded in the fairly long R. ferrugineum chronologies can indeed be used for climate-growth studies as well as for the reconstruction of climatic fluctuations in Alpine regions beyond the upper limits of present-day forests. Copyright

  11. Authentic Italian food as Mamma used to make it!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Halberg; d'Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to explore how Italian restaurants define authentic Italian culinary experiences and how these experiences are designed and rendered to the restaurants’ guests.......The purpose of this investigation is to explore how Italian restaurants define authentic Italian culinary experiences and how these experiences are designed and rendered to the restaurants’ guests....

  12. Soil-stratigraphic techniques in the study of soil and landform evolution across the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, P. J.; Basher, L. R.

    1990-09-01

    The Southern Alps lie along the convergent Pacific-Indian plate boundary. Geomorphically distinct eastern, axial and western regions reflect the east-west gradient in tectonic uplift (1 to 10 mm a -1) and precipitation (600 to 10,000 mm a -1). The eastern region is divided into front-ange and basin-and-range subregions. Soil-sequence studies on terraces established temporal contrasts in pedogenesis within and between eastern and western regions encompassing Entisols, Inceptisols and Spodosols. On Late Pleistocene and early Holocene terraces Dystrochrepts are persistent soils in the eastern region and Aquods in the western region. These soil sequences are used in the interpretation of relative soil age, stratigraphy and erosion history in hill and mountain drainage basins of the eastern and western regions. In the subhumid to humid eastern front-range subregion, simple soil forms occur as catenary sequences, and there is little evidence of erosion following the destruction of forests in the last millenium. Mollisols are dominant in the subhumid, and Dystrochrepts in humid areas, respectively. Soil-debris mantle regoliths date from the early Holocene and are still developing on slopes. The soil pattern on mountain slopes in the humid, eastern basin-and-range subregion is a complex array of simple, eroded, composite and compound soils. This pattern has resulted from erosion following forest destruction within the last millenium. The oldest surface or buried forest soils are Dystrochrepts dating from the Late Pleistocene to early Holocene. Wind erosion of these low-fertility soils contributes to the loessial sediments in which younger soils have formed. In the western region, soil patterns and soil stratigraphy indicate continous instability with a complex pattern of highly leached, shallow Orthents and bedrock outcrops on slopes. The soils are eroded from slopes within 2 ka. These contrasts in soil development and erosion periodicity in the eastern and western regions

  13. Low-grade metamorphism in the eastern Southern Alps: Distribution, conditions, timing and implications for the tectonics of the Alps and NW Dinarides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Franz; Heberer, Bianca; Genser, Johann; Friedl, Getrude

    2014-05-01

    Based on 40Ar/39Ar dating of newly-grown syntectonic metamorphic white mica (sericite), we recognize for the first time the timing of Alpine low-grade metamorphism in the eastern part of the Southalpine unit: (1) A Silurian phyllite of Seeberg inlier located to the south of the Periadriatic fault yields a plateau age at c. 75 Ma suggesting a Late Cretaceous age of previously recognized low-grade (Rantitsch & Rainer, 2003) metamorphism. (2) Within the Tolmin nappe, four sericite plateau ages of mainly Middle Triassic volcanics are at c. 51 Ma (Early Eocene). The Late Cretaceous age in the Seeberg inlier is considered to record ductile deformation during formation of a retro-wedge related to the Eo-Alpine orogeny in the Austroalpine units in the Eastern Alps exposed north of the future Periadriatic fault. The Eocene age at the boundary of very low-grade to low-grade metamorphism in the Tolmin nappe (Rainer et al., 2009) relates to the emplacement of the Southalpine nappe complex onto the Dinarides and is contemporaneous with the initial ductile deformation in the Dinarides during Adria-directed shortening and formation of a siliciclastic flysch belt in front of the SW-directed growing fold-thrust belt (Placer, 2008). Similar rare Late Cretaceous and dominant Eocene ages within post-Variscan units are virtually more widespread in the Southalpine unit and Dinarides as considered before. These regions include the Collio basin (Feijth, 2002) and the Eder unit (Läufer et al., 1996) in the western and central Southern Alps, in the internal NW Dinarides (Borojević Šoštarić et al., 2012) and the Mid Bosnian Schist Mountains (Pamić et al., 2004) and Lim Paleozoic unit in the central Dinarides (Ilic et al., submitted). Consequently, the Southalpine unit and Dinarides were affected by two stages of metamorphism, Late Cretaceous (ca. 80 to 75 Ma) and Eocene (ca. 51 - 40 Ma), both stages are related to back-thrusting. The ages of metamorphism are different from those in the

  14. Sultan Alp Arslan’ın Liderlik Vasıfları

    OpenAIRE

    KESİK, Muharrem

    2014-01-01

    Sultan Alp Arslan of the Great Seljuk State is one of the foremost rulers of Turkish and World history. During his reign as sultan from 1063 to 1072, Alp Arslan achieved many successes but doutless the most important one was his victory at the Battle of Manzikert in 1071. Although there were many factors that aided the sultan in gaining this victory, here is where Alp Arslan demonstrated most clearly his political and military qualities. These superior characteristics played a ...

  15. ALICE honours two Italian suppliers

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    During the ALICE week held in Bologna from 19 to 23 June, the Collaboration recognized two of its top suppliers. From left to right: Robert Terpin (MIPOT), Pier Luigi Bellutti (ITC), Andrea Zanotti, President of ITC, Luciano Bosisio (Trieste University), Gennady Zinovjev (Kiev), Catherine Decosse (CERN), Lodovico Riccati, ALICE Collaboration Board Chair (INFN Torino), Paolo Giubellino (INFN Torino), Mario Zen, Director of ITC, Maurizio Boscardin (ITC), Paolo Tonella (ITC), Jurgen Schukraft, ALICE Spokesperson (CERN), Giacomo Vito Margagliotti (Trieste University), Nevio Grion (INFN Trieste), Marco Bregant (INFN Trieste). Front row from left to right: Paolo Traverso (ITC), Federico Carminati, ALICE Computing Project Leader (CERN), and Jean-Robert Lutz, ITS-SSD Project leader (IPHC Strasbourg). It is in the picturesque city of Bologna that the ALICE Collaboration has rewarded two Italian suppliers, Istituto Trentino di Cultura ITC-irst (Trento) and MIPOT (Cormons), both involved in the construction of the Sili...

  16. Energy efficiency: The Italian situation and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerici, Alessandro; Beccarello, Massimo; Gallanti, Massimo

    2010-09-15

    The paper reports the results of a study led by Confindustria (Italian Federation of Industrial Associations) on the Italian situation with respect to energy efficiency policies and their effective implementations. The study is being continuously updated with the contributions of ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development) and ERSE (previously CESI Ricerca) and highlights the obtainable savings through efficient technologies now already available for applications in the final uses of energy for both the industrial, commercial and domestic sectors.

  17. The snowline climate of the Alps 1961-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantel, M.; Maurer, C.; Mayer, D.

    2012-12-01

    We study the probability for snow cover at a climate station. Connecting stations with the same probability yields the corresponding snow line (a figure between zero and unity). The climatological snow lines in the Alps are implicit in the state function of snow duration. This function, specified by just five parameters, depends upon the mountain temperature, a linear combination of the mean temperature over Europe and the 3D-coordinates of the stations. The influence of external parameters other than temperature (like snowfall, melting processes, station exposition) is treated as stochastic. The five state function parameters are gained for both winter (DJF) and summer (JJA) through a fit algorithm from routine snow depth observations in 1961-2010 in Austria and Switzerland. Any desired snow line is defined by a linear surface with a characteristic value of the mountain temperature. The snow line appears when there is a cut between the surface and the orography. Temperature sensitivity of snow cover duration, analytically derived from the state function, is extreme at the median snow line (snow probability 0.50). Alpine-wide mean altitude of the median snow line is 793(+ / -36)m in winter and 3.083(+ / -1.121)m in summer. The snowline field slopes gently from west to east across the Alps (downward in winter, upward in summer) and oscillates up and down with the seasons. The sensitivity of the median snowline altitude to European temperature over the five decades of Alpine data is 166 (±5) m/°C in winter and 123 (±18) m/°C in summer. Global warming causes the snow lines to shift upward with time; in parallel, the area of the Alps that is at least 50 % snow covered in winter shrinks by -7.0 (±4.1) %/10 years.

  18. A bioinformatic analysis of the Alp8 family

    OpenAIRE

    Wooton, Jesse Meredith

    2009-01-01

    The majority of bacterial actins reside on mobile genetic elements. As of yet, the only known function of any of these genes is plasmid partitioning, and it has been assumed that all plasmid borne actins participate in this process. In this project, I conduct a bioinformatic analysis of one such actin family--the Alp8 family--and suggest an entirely new function. Based on an analysis of their genetic context and their conserved conjugative apparatuses with which they appear to have evolved in...

  19. Pedogeographic and vegetational geographic characteristics of the Julian Alps__

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franc Lovrenčak

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The article shows soils and vegetation as elements of the alpine landscape of the Julian Alps by way of two examples - i.e. in the Planica valley as well as in the southern and northern part of the Bohinj lake. These two factors influenced the appearance of the typical natural units. These units, however - due to various positions and shapes - take the form of belts which in the Planica valley stretch from the south to the north and along the Bohinj lake from the west to east.

  20. Influence of Prescribed Herbal and Western Medicine on Patients with Abnormal Liver Function Tests: A Retrospective Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ah-Ram; Yim, Je-Min; Kim, Won-Il

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and the efficacy of Korean herbal, western and combination medicine use in patients with abnormal liver function tests. Methods: We investigated nerve disease patients with abnormal liver function tests who were treated with Korean herbal, western and combination medicine at Dong-Eui University Oriental Hospital from January 2011 to August 2011. We compared aspartic aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total bilirubin (T-bil) levels before and after taking medicine and excluded patients who had liver-related disease when admitted. Results: AST and ALT were decreased significantly in patients who had taken herbal, western medicine. AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken combination medicine. Compare to herbal medicine, AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken western medicine, and ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken combination medicine. There were no significant differences between western and combination medicine. Conclusions: This study suggests that prescribed Korean herbal medicine, at least, does not injure liver function for patients’, moreover, it was shown to be effective in patients with abnormal liver function tests. PMID:25780634

  1. Influence of prescribed herbal and Western medicine on patients with abnormal liver function tests: a retrospective quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ah-Ram; Yim, Je-Min; Kim, Won-Il

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and the efficacy of Korean herbal, western and combination medicine use in patients with abnormal liver function tests. We investigated nerve disease patients with abnormal liver function tests who were treated with Korean herbal, western and combination medicine at Dong-Eui University Oriental Hospital from January 2011 to August 2011. We compared aspartic aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total bilirubin (T-bil) levels before and after taking medicine and excluded patients who had liver-related disease when admitted. AST and ALT were decreased significantly in patients who had taken herbal, western medicine. AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken combination medicine. Compare to herbal medicine, AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken western medicine, and ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken combination medicine. There were no significant differences between western and combination medicine. This study suggests that prescribed Korean herbal medicine, at least, does not injure liver function for patients', moreover, it was shown to be effective in patients with abnormal liver function tests.

  2. Influence of Prescribed Herbal and Western Medicine on Patients with Abnormal Liver Function Tests: A Retrospective Quasi-Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ah-Ram

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and the efficacy of Korean herbal, western and combination medicine use in patients with abnormal liver function tests. Methods: We investigated nerve disease patients with abnor-mal liver function tests who were treated with Korean herbal, western and combination medicine at Dong-Eui University Oriental Hospital from January 2011 to August 2011. We co-mpared aspartic aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotran-sferase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and total bilirubin (T-bil levels before and after taking medicine and excluded patients who had liver-related disease when admitted. Results: AST and ALT were decreased significantly in patients who had taken herbal, western medicine. AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken comb-ination medicine. Compare to herbal medicine, AST, ALT and ALP were decreased significantly in patients who had taken western medicine, and ALT and ALP were decreased signifi-cantly in patients who had taken combination medicine. There were no significant differences between western and combin-ation medicine. Conclusions: This study suggests that prescribed Korean herbal medicine, at least, does not injure liver function for patients’, moreover, it was shown to be effective in patients with abnormal liver function tests.

  3. The history of Italian psychiatry during Fascism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazzi, Andrea; Testa, Luana; Del Missier, Giovanni; Dario, Mariopaolo; Stocco, Ester

    2011-09-01

    Specific features characterized Italian psychiatry during Fascism (1922-45), distinguishing it from Nazi psychiatry and giving rise to different operational outcomes, so we have investigated the state of Italian psychiatry during this period. We review the historical situation that preceded it and describe the social and health policies that Fascism introduced following new legislative and regulatory acts. We examine the preventive and therapeutic role played by psychiatry (the electric shock was an Italian invention) and, thanks to the Enciclopedia Italiano published during those years, we are able to highlight psychiatry's relationship to psychology, psychoanalysis, philosophy and religion. The shortcomings of Italian psychiatric research and practice are also seen in terms of what the State failed to do rather than what it did.

  4. Alomar and Marinetti: Catalan and Italian Futurism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak de Perez de la Dehesa, Lil

    1972-01-01

    Suggests that a lecture on Futurism delivered in Catalan at the Ateneo in Barcelona on June 18, 1904, by Gabriel Alomar probably was the greatest influence on F. T. Marinetti and Italian Futurism. (DS)

  5. Online Italian fandoms of American TV shows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Benecchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has changed media fandom in two main ways: it helps fans connect with each other despite physical distance, leading to the formation of international fan communities; and it helps fans connect with the creators of the TV show, deepening the relationship between TV producers and international fandoms. To assess whether Italian fan communities active online are indeed part of transnational online communities and whether the Internet has actually altered their relationship with the creators of the original text they are devoted to, qualitative analysis and narrative interviews of 26 Italian fans of American TV shows were conducted to explore the fan-producer relationship. Results indicated that the online Italian fans surveyed preferred to stay local, rather than using geography-leveling online tools. Further, the sampled Italian fans' relationships with the show runners were mediated or even absent.

  6. Migration and work in postwar Australia: mortality profile comparisons between Australian and Italian workers exposed to blue asbestos at Wittenoom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Alison; Merler, Enzo; Peters, Susan; Jayasinghe, Nimashi; Bressan, Vittoria; Franklin, Peter; Brims, Fraser; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Musk, Arthur W

    2018-01-01

    Three hundred and thirty thousand Italians arrived in Australia between 1945 and 1966, many on assisted passage schemes where the worker agreed to a 2-year unskilled employment contract. Italians were the largest of 52 migrant groups employed at the Wittenoom blue asbestos mining and milling operation. We compare mortality from asbestos-related diseases among Italian and Australian workers employed at Wittenoom. A cohort of 6500 male workers was established from employment records and followed up at state and national mortality and cancer registries. SMRs were calculated to compare mortality with the Western Australian male population. Time-varying Cox proportional hazards models compared the risk of mesothelioma between Australian and Italian workers. 1031 Italians and 3465 Australians worked at Wittenoom between 1943 and 1966. Duration of employment was longer for the Italian workers, although the concentration of exposure was similar. The mesothelioma mortality rate per 100 000 was higher in Italians (184, 95% CI 148 to 229) than Australians (128, 95% CI 111 to 149). The risk of mesothelioma was greater than twofold (HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.43 to 3.60) in Italians at the lowest asbestos exposure category (asbestos and subsequently a greater rate of malignant mesothelioma than Australian workers. Poor working conditions and disparities between native and foreign-born workers has had a detrimental and differential impact on the long-term health of the workforce. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Zooplankton of 15 lakes in the Southern Central Alps: comparison of recent and past (pre-ca 1850 AD communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele ARMIRAGLIO

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of a study on modern zooplankton community as well as on Cladocera sub-fossil remains from 15 high altitude lakes in the Italian Central-Southern Alps, aimed at investigating changes after 19th Century industrialisation. Present-day communities were compared to those of the pre-industrial period (approximately pre-1850 AD. Numerical analysis suggests a relationship between environmental variables, such as pH or total phosphorus, and the cladoceran community structure. However, as found in previous studies, another important environmental variable not included in numerical analysis, is presence or absence of fish. Arctodiaptomus alpinus was not found at pH levels lower than 6.21, while Daphnia lacked from lakes where fish were regularly introduced. Daphnia re-colonised the today fish-less Lago Paione Inferiore, whereas in the past, with a regular introduction of fish, only rotifers and a few Cyclops were found. The re-colonisation is interpreted by regarding the three Paione lakes as parts of a cascade system, where a transport from the upper Lago Paione Superiore to the lower Lago Paione Inferiore can take place, and the sediments represent a kind of an "egg bank".

  8. Great landslide events in Italian artificial reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Panizzo, A.; P. De Girolamo; M. Risio; Maistri, A.; Petaccia, A.

    2005-01-01

    The empirical formulations to forecast landslide generated water waves, recently defined in the framework of a research program funded by the Italian National Dam Office RID (Registro Italiano Dighe), are here used to study three real cases of subaerial landslides which fell down italian artificial reservoirs. It is well known that impulse water waves generated by landslides constitute a very dangerous menace for human communities living in the shoreline of the artificial...

  9. Sweet chestnut cultures in the Southern Alps – conservation and regional development. eco.mont (Journal on Protected Mountain Areas Research)|eco.mont Vol. 2 No. 1 2 1|

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Sweet chestnut cultures are a major component of the vegetation in many large protected areas of the Southern Alps. Since Roman times, vast areas of Southern and Western Europe have been covered by groves and coppices of sweet chestnut trees (Castanea sativa MILL.). Having replaced the original broadleaved forest, they used to play a vital role in traditional agriculture. Chestnut cultivation was even more important in terms of producing a substitute for cereals (bread) than for the productio...

  10. The Italian Way to Carsharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Laurino

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Carsharing (CS is increasing its role worldwide as an alternative transport mode, often more sustainable than private transport with self-owned vehicles. We first focus on the main characteristics of those services and on the impacts they generated, starting from the analysis of  the literature on this topic. CS initiatives are growing everywhere, however numbers are still minor and impacts are still far from a level that can deliver significant aggregate benefits. This paper studies the existing Italian carsharing experiences, trying to understand its strengths, that have allowed its development, but also possible limits and weaknesses. The presence of a national coordination structure (Iniziativa Carsharing - ICS, unique in Europe and created to boost local initiatives providing standardisation and interoperability, surely helped the development of the system. Some initiatives have been successful in terms of membership (in particular Milan, Venice and Turin, but others have been discontinued. Italian users’ characteristics are similar to the ones of users abroad: the majority of users are well educated male, living in small households having one or no cars and using public transport every day. At present, Italian drivers generally still show a scarce propensity to share their cars, considered more as “goods” than as “services”. A case study in Milan, the first and most successful initiative in Italy, shows a significant increase in CS membership after the implementation of a city charging scheme (“Ecopass” at first, then “Area C”. Moving shared cars from garages to “on the street parking” has proved successful too. The usage of the service has changed in time: users have increased (+151% more than runs (+137% – 2006 to 2009, while average length and duration of each run have decreased (-30% and -43% respectively, 2006 to 2010. Milan’s initiative also put s into practice many incentives for users that likely

  11. Italian citizenship and the descendants of Italian citizens emigrated in Colombia. Removing a social injustice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Castellari

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Law is often the source of social discriminations, but, at the same time, it can be thekey to delete these social discriminations. The authors try to give an example of thisphenomenon, by analyzing the impact of the Italian citizenship’s rules over the descendantsof the Italian citizens emigrated abroad and, especially, in South America.Indeed, according to the former Italian law, only fathers could transmit iure sanguinisthe citizenship to their children: moreover, women automatically lost theItalian citizenship if they get a foreign citizenship by concluding a marriage witha foreign husband.These rules hardly discriminate the Italian women emigrated abroad and, especially,their descendants who were prevented to get the Italian’s citizenship.These discriminatory rules were finally deleted by the Italian Constitutional Courtin the Seventies and in the Eighties: however, the effects of those rules still persisted,since the decision of the Constitutional Court could not overcome the temporal limit of the entry into force of the Constitution (01.01.1948 and, therefore, could not“cover” the discriminatory facts occurred before that date.Finally in 2009, the Italian Supreme Court, by extending the effects ratione temporisof the decisions of the Constitutional Court, “reopened the doors” of the Italiancitizenship to a huge number of Italian citizenship born from Italian women beforethe 01.01.1948.Therefore, the authors focus on the social impact of this decision for all the potentialItalian citizens living in South America and try to assess its juridical effects overthe Italian law.

  12. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OF WHITEWATER SPORTS IN THE SOUTHERN ALPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BERNARD MASSIERA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to better understand how certain sports tourism professionals have overcome the economic crisis, this paper focuses on how they have innovated on technical, managerial and marketing levels. Analyzing these strategies in the sector of “recreational white-water sports tourism” appears as a way to prospect.Design/methodology/approach: The offer of white-water sports tourism does not fall under tradition forms of organization known to work in the tourism sector. Since the end of the nineties its mode of development seems to have enabled this sector to avoid undergoing the economic crisis. The methodology, based on interviews withentrepreneurs in the sector of white-water sports tourism in the Southern Alps, addresses their managerial strategies and strategic modes of operation in the development of their businesses. The aim is to explore the managerial factors that have resulted in both economic and environmental sustainability. The concept of sustainable development is employed to understand how these entrepreneurial activities are embedded in the social, economic and natural environments of the Southern Alps valleys. Findings: The investigation shows that, rather than focusing on business strategy, professionals in this sector focus primarily on community relations. The supply of white-water sports tourism is presented in a lattice form which develops as a community. The modes of development of this sector, far from corresponding to standard business rationale, amount to a form of sustainable development which may explain the relative success of sport tourism in this period of crisis.

  13. Tritium labelled 1-0-octadecyl-2-0-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ALP) and 1-S-hexadecyl-2-0-ethyl-rac-thioglycero-3-phosphocholine (Thio-ALP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrick, S.D.; Surles, J.R.; Morris-Natschke, S.; Piantadosi, C.; Modest, E.J.

    1989-03-01

    The phospholipids, ALP and Thio-ALP, are non-hydrolyzable analogues of platelet activating factor (PAF). Interest in ALP and thio-ALP centers upon their activity as potential antineoplastic agents. A variety of mechanisms of action have been attributed to these compounds including inhibition of a phospholipid cofactor of a phospholipid sensitive Ca/sup +2/-dependent protein kinase. Thio-ALP is at least as active as a growth inhibitor of the HL-60 promyelocytic leukemic cell line as is ALP-the most active reference analogue reported in the literature and is approximately twice as active against the BG-1 and BG-3 human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. To aid in further biochemical studies, we report the synthesis of high specific activity tritium labelled ALP and thio-ALP. These products were obtained by palladium catalyzed reduction of 1-0-octadecenyl and 1-S-hexadecenyl precursors with carrier-free tritium gas. (author).

  14. Contrasting cooling and exhumation histories of tectonic blocks in the eastern part of the Eastern Alps and its possible relationships with lithospheric dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfler, Andreas; Glotzbach, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    In the European Alps two fundamental changes in the lithospheric structure controlled the geodynamic evolution of the orogen: (1) Late Eocene to Early Oligocene rupturing of the European slab and (2) Early Miocene change in subduction polarity between the Western and Eastern Alps. In particular, the eastern part of the Eastern Alps is a key area which will provide both, information about the surface response to the Eocene/Oligocene slab breakoff and the response to a proposed isostatic rebound due to slab detachment of the European lithosphere in the Miocene (Handy et al., 2015). The eastern part of the Eastern Alps is characterized by fault-bounded blocks with different thermochronological ages, mean elevations and hillslope angles, indicating a variable spatial and temporal evolution throughout the Cenozoic era. The topographic pattern of the study area can be described in terms of (1) high relief with a rugged surface and steep slopes in the Niedere Tauern and (2) lower relief and distinctly smoother topography in the Seckauer Tauern, the Gurktal, Saualpe and Koralpe blocks. Generally, tectonic blocks with higher relief and rugged topography display the youngest apatite fission track (AFT) and apatite (U-Th)/He data (AHe); the Niedere Tauern concurs with middle Miocene AFT and late Miocene/Pliocene AHe ages (Wölfler et al., 2016). The other tectonic blocks generally show Eocene to Oligocene AFT ages (Wölfler et al., 2016 and references therein) and Oligocene to early Miocene AHe ages (Legrain et al., 2014, own preliminary work). New AFT and AHe data from the Gurktal block and Seckauer Tauern indicate that substantial parts of the study area where at near-surface conditions since the Eocene and Oligocene. Thermal history models suggest fast cooling through the AFT and AHe closure temperatures in the Oligocene as a possible response to slab breakoff that was followed by thermal stagnation until the present. In contrast, the neighboring Niedere Tauern experienced

  15. Germline FAS gene mutation in a case of ALPS and NLP Hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Anke; Maggio, Ewerton; Diepstra, A; de Jong, Doetje; van Krieken, J; Poppema, S

    2002-01-01

    FAS germline mutations have been associated with the development of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). Occurrence of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has been reported in 2 families with ALPS. In both families an uncle of the index patient developed HL. A 15-year-old boy with autoommune

  16. Pronominal Objects in English-Italian and Spanish-Italian Bilingual Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serratrice, Ludovica; Sorace, Antonella; Filiaci, Francesca; Baldo, Michela

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the role of typological relatedness, language of the community, and age, in predicting similarities and differences between English-Italian, Spanish-Italian bilingual children and their monolingual child and adult counterparts in the acceptability of pre- and postverbal object pronouns in [[plus or minus]focus] contexts in…

  17. Temperature reconstruction from the length fluctuations of small glaciers in the eastern Alps (northeastern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecchetto, Stefano; Serandrei-Barbero, Rossana; Donnici, Sandra

    2017-07-01

    In this study, a linear model computing the air temperature fluctuations from the measured glacier snout fluctuations has been applied, for the first time, to three small glaciers in the western Tauern Alps (eastern Alps) in the period 1929-2011. The considered glaciers, with areas between 0.2 and 1.3 km^2, are characterized by relevant time variations of their morphology, length and slope. The model requires the knowledge of two parameters: the glacier climate sensitivity C_s and the glacier response time τ, both depending on the glacier morphological characteristics and on the precipitation. Applied to the glaciers assuming C_s and τ as in the original formulation, it underestimates the temperature increase of {≈ } 1.8°C derived over the whole period from the in situ data. Given the characteristics of these small glaciers, these parameters have been recalibrated by means of a non-linear least-square regression using an independent set of glaciers. Their mean value is of about 210 m/K and 3.8 years respectively. With the recalibrated values of the new glacier climate sensitivity C^*_s and response time τ ^*, the temperature fluctuations derived by the model reproduce well those obtained from the observed temperatures computed over the hydrological year, with linear correlations between 0.8 and 0.9. The increase of the modeled mean temperature over the whole period fits in with that derived from observed temperature. Considering that the length fluctuations of these small glaciers affect significantly their slope and length, we tested the impact in the model of a time dependent formulation of C_s and τ: the results indicate slight improvements both in the values of the correlation between the reconstructed and the observed temperature fluctuations and in the global temperature increase. Given the above value of climate sensitivity, the large retreat of the small alpine glaciers threatens their survival within a few decades, but the morphological changes in

  18. One microplate - three orogens: Alps, Dinarides, Apennines and the role of the Adriatic plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustaszewski, Kamil; Le Breton, Eline; Balling, Philipp; Handy, Mark R.; Molli, Giancarlo; Tomljenović, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    The motion of the Adriatic microplate with respect to the Eurasian and African plates is responsible for the Mesozoic to present tectonic evolution of the Alps, Carpathians, the Dinarides and Hellenides as well as the Apennines. The classical approach for reconstructing plate motions is to assume that tectonic plates are rigid, then apply Euler's theorem to describe their rotation on an ideally spherical Earth by stepwise restorations of magnetic anomalies and fracture zones in oceanic basins. However, this approach is inadequate for reconstructing the motion of Mediterranean microplates like Adria, which, at present, is surrounded by convergent margins and whose oceanic portions have by now been entirely subducted. Most constraints on the motion of the Adriatic microplate come either from palaeomagnetics or from shortening estimates in the Alps, i.e., its northern margin. This approach renders plate tectonic reconstructions prone to numerous errors, yielding inadmissible misfits in the Ionian Sea between southern Italy and northern Greece. At the same time, Adria's western and eastern margins in the Apennines and in the Dinarides have hitherto not been appropriately considered for improving constraints on the motion of Adria. This presentation presents new results of ongoing collaborative research that aims at improving the relative motion path for the Adriatic microplate for the Cenozoic by additionally quantifying and restoring the amount of shortening and extension in a set of geophysical-geological transects from the Tyrrhenian Sea, the Apennines and the Dinarides. Already now, our approach yields an improved motion path for the Adriatic microplate for the last 20 Ma, which minimizes misfits in previous reconstructions. The currently largest challenge in our reconstructions is to reconcile amount and age of shortening in the Dinarides fold-and-thrust belt. For one thing, we see good agreement between the cross-sectional length of subducted material (c. 135 km

  19. Alps, Carpathians and Dinarides-Hellenides: about plates, micro-plates and delaminated crustal blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Before the onset of Europe-Africa continental collision in the Dinarides-Hellenides (around 60Ma) and in the Alps and Western Carpathians (around 35 Ma), and at a large scale, the dynamics of orogenic processes in the Mediterranean Alpine chains were governed by Europe-Africa plate convergence leading to the disappearance of large parts of intervening oceanic lithosphere, i.e. the northern branch of Neotethys along the Sava-Izmir-Ankara suture and Alpine Tethys along the Valais-Magura suture (Schmid et al. 2008). In spite of this, two major problems concerning the pre-collisional stage are still poorly understood: (1) by now we only start to understand geometry, kinematics and dynamics of the along-strike changes in the polarity of subduction between Alps-Carpathians and Dinarides-Hellenides, and (2) it is not clear yet during exactly which episodes and to what extent intervening rifted continental fragments such as, for example, Iberia-Briançonnais, Tisza, Dacia, Adria-Taurides moved independently as micro-plates, and during which episodes they remained firmly attached to Europa or Africa from which they broke away. As Europe-Africa plate convergence slowed down well below 1 cm/yr at around 30 Ma ago these pre-collisional processes driven by plate convergence on a global scale gave way to more local processes of combined roll-back and crustal delamination in the Pannonian basin of the Carpathian embayment and in the Aegean (as well as in the Western Mediterranean, not discussed in this contribution). In the case of the Carpathian embayment E-directed roll back totally unrelated to Europe-Africa N-S-directed convergence, started at around 20 Ma ago, due to the presence relict oceanic lithosphere in the future Pannonian basin that remained un-subducted during collision. Due to total delamination of the crust from the eastward rolling back European mantle lithosphere the anticlockwise rotating ALCAPA crustal block, consisting of Eastern Alps and Western Carpathian

  20. Linguistic and Cognitive Skills in Sardinian-Italian Bilingual Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraffa, Maria; Beveridge, Madeleine; Sorace, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a study which tested receptive Italian grammatical competence and general cognitive abilities in bilingual Italian-Sardinian children and age-matched monolingual Italian children attending the first and second year of primary school in the Nuoro province of Sardinia, where Sardinian is still widely spoken. The results show that across age groups the performance of Sardinian-Italian bilingual children is in most cases indistinguishable from that of monolingual Italian children, in terms of both Italian language skills and general cognitive abilities. However, where there are differences, these emerge gradually over time and are mostly in favor of bilingual children.

  1. Risk assessment of mountain infrastructure destabilization in the French Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvillard, Pierre-Allain; Ravanel, Ludovic; Deline, Philip

    2015-04-01

    In the current context of imbalance of geosystems in connection with the rising air temperature for several decades, high mountain environments are especially affected by the shrinkage of glaciers and the permafrost degradation which can trigger slope movements in the rock slopes (rockfall, rock avalanches) or in superficial deposits (slides, rock glacier rupture, thermokarst). These processes generate a risk of direct destabilization for high mountain infrastructure (huts, cable-cars...) in addition to indirect risks for people and infrastructure located on the path of moving rock masses. We here focus on the direct risk of infrastructure destabilization due to permafrost degradation and/or glacier shrinkage in the French Alps. To help preventing these risks, an inventory of all the infrastructure was carried out with a GIS using different data layers among which the Alpine Permafrost Index Map and inventories of the French Alps glaciers in 2006-2009, 1967-1971 and at the end of the Little Ice Age. 1769 infrastructures have been identified in areas likely characterized by permafrost and/or possibly affected by glacier shrinkage. An index of risk of destabilization has been built to identify and to rank infrastructure at risk. This theoretical risk index includes a characterization of hazards and a diagnosis of the vulnerability. The value of hazard is dependent on passive factors (topography, lithology, geomorphological context...) and on so-considered active factors (thermal state of the permafrost, and changing constraints on slopes related to glacier shrinkage). The diagnosis of vulnerability has meanwhile been established by combining the level of potential damage to the exposed elements with their operational and financial values. The combination of hazard and vulnerability determines a degree of risk of infrastructure destabilization (from low to very high). Field work and several inventories of infrastructure damages were used to validate it. The

  2. 21st Century Climate Change in the European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobiet, Andreas; Kotlarski, Sven; Stoffel, Markus; Heinrich, Georg; Rajczak, Jan; Beniston, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The Alps are particularly sensitive to global warming and warmed twice as much as the global average in the recent past. In addition, the Alps and its surroundings are a densly populated areas where society is affected by climate change in many ways, which calls for reliable estimates of future climate change. However, the complex Alpine region poses considerable challenges to climate models, which translate to uncertainties in future climate projections. Against this background, the present study reviews the state-of-knowledge about 21st century climate change in the Alps based on existing literature and additional analyses. It will be demonstrated that considerable and accelerating changes are not only to be expected with regard to temperature, but also precipitation, global radiation, relative humidity, and closely related impacts like floods, droughts, snow cover, and natural hazards will be effected by global warming. Under the A1B emission scenario, about 0.25 °C warming per decade until the mid of the 21st century and accelerated 0.36 °C warming per decade in the second half of the century is expected. Warming will most probably be associated with changes in the seasonality of precipitation, global radiation, and relative humidity. More intense precipitation extremes and flooding potential are particularly expected in the colder part of the year. The conditions of currently record breaking warm or hot winter or summer seasons, respectively, may become normal at the end of the 21st century, and there is indication for droughts to become more severe in the future. Snow cover is expected to drastically decrease below 1500 - 2000 m and natural hazards related to glacier and permafrost retreat are expected to become more frequent. Such changes in climatic variables and related quantities will have considerable impact on ecosystems and society and will challenge their adaptive capabilities. Acknowledgements: This study has been initiated and is partly funded by

  3. Medical ethnobotany of the Albanian Alps in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethnobotanical studies are crucial in South-Eastern Europe for fostering local development and also for investigating the dynamics of Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK) related to plants in one of the most crucial European hotspots for biocultural diversity. The current medico-ethnobotanical survey was conducted in rural alpine communities in Kosovo. The aims of the study were twofold: 1) to document the state of TEK of medicinal plants in these communities; 2) to compare these findings with that of similar field studies previously conducted among local populations inhabiting the Montenegrin and Albanian side of the same Alpine range. Methods Field research was conducted in 36 villages on the Kosovar side of the Albanian Alps. Snowball sampling techniques were used to recruit 91 elderly informants (≥ 50 years-old) for participation in semi-structured interviews and structured surveys regarding the use of the local flora for medicinal and food purposes. Standard ethnobotanical methods were employed and prior informed consent was obtained for all study participants. Results and Conclusion The uses of 98 plants species belonging to 39 families were recorded; the most quoted botanical families were Rosaceae, Asteraceae, and Lamiaceae. Mainly decoctions and infusions were quoted as folk medicinal preparations and the most common uses referred to gastrointestinal and respiratory disorders, as well as illnesses of the uro-genital system. Among the most uncommon medicinal taxa quoted by the informants, Carduus nutans L., Echinops bannaticus Rochel ex Schrad., and Orlaya grandiflora Hoffm. may merit phytochemical and phytopharmacological investigations. Comparison of the data with other ethnobotanical field studies recently conducted on the Albanian and Montenegrin sides of the same Alps has shown a remarkable link between the medical ethnobotany of Montenegrin and Kosovar side of the Albanian Alps. Moreover, folk uses of the most quoted wild medicinal

  4. Mass Movement Inventories for Climate Research in the European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J.; Harrison, S.; Reinhardt, L.

    2013-12-01

    Climate influences landscape evolution through physical processes which affect the form of a landscape through myriad small- to large-scale mechanisms. These can manifest through mass movements and rockfalls which present an important geomorphological hazard in Alpine regions; threatening life, infrastructure and property. Modelling has shown that the response of mass movements to temperature and precipitation triggers vary over a number of timescales. Heavy rainfall events on shorter timescales (ranging from minutes to days) can exceed critical ground- and pore-water levels resulting in mass movement initiation (Iverson, 2000), whereas longer precipitation trends act as precursors to larger events. Extreme temperatures, such as the summer of 2003 which was characterised by 'exceptional rockfall' (Gruber et al., 2004, p. 1) and extreme permafrost thaw in the European Alps, illustrate how short-term extreme increases in temperature can cause widespread destabilisation (Chemanda et al., 2005). Freeze-thaw action on seasonal timescales can greatly exaggerate mechanical weathering (Abele, 1997; Chigira, 2002), whilst increases in temperature (resulting from sub-annual to longer term changes) reduce both cohesive and tensile strength within slopes (Chemanda et al., 2005) leading to rock degradation. Differences in topography and geology in the region mean that the impacts of climate change are likely to vary in space and time and analysis of these is therefore required to understand the spatial patterns of mass movements through time. Here we present the development of a new regional mass movement inventory (RI) for the French and Swiss Alps. Our aim is to provide a substantial spatial picture of rockfalls and landsliding in the region through time. We discuss methods by which to improve existing inventories including the use of scaling relationships (Larsen et al., 2010) to calculate area based on a given volume for similar types of mass movement. We show that based on

  5. Medical ethnobotany of the Albanian Alps in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Behxhet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethnobotanical studies are crucial in South-Eastern Europe for fostering local development and also for investigating the dynamics of Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK related to plants in one of the most crucial European hotspots for biocultural diversity. The current medico-ethnobotanical survey was conducted in rural alpine communities in Kosovo. The aims of the study were twofold: 1 to document the state of TEK of medicinal plants in these communities; 2 to compare these findings with that of similar field studies previously conducted among local populations inhabiting the Montenegrin and Albanian side of the same Alpine range. Methods Field research was conducted in 36 villages on the Kosovar side of the Albanian Alps. Snowball sampling techniques were used to recruit 91 elderly informants (≥ 50 years-old for participation in semi-structured interviews and structured surveys regarding the use of the local flora for medicinal and food purposes. Standard ethnobotanical methods were employed and prior informed consent was obtained for all study participants. Results and Conclusion The uses of 98 plants species belonging to 39 families were recorded; the most quoted botanical families were Rosaceae, Asteraceae, and Lamiaceae. Mainly decoctions and infusions were quoted as folk medicinal preparations and the most common uses referred to gastrointestinal and respiratory disorders, as well as illnesses of the uro-genital system. Among the most uncommon medicinal taxa quoted by the informants, Carduus nutans L., Echinops bannaticus Rochel ex Schrad., and Orlaya grandiflora Hoffm. may merit phytochemical and phytopharmacological investigations. Comparison of the data with other ethnobotanical field studies recently conducted on the Albanian and Montenegrin sides of the same Alps has shown a remarkable link between the medical ethnobotany of Montenegrin and Kosovar side of the Albanian Alps. Moreover, folk uses of the

  6. Application of terrestrial photogrammetry for the mass balance calculation on Montasio Occidentale Glacier (Julian Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Livia; Carturan, Luca; Calligaro, Simone; Blasone, Giacomo; Guarnieri, Alberto; Tarolli, Paolo; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo; Vettore, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) of glaciated terrain are commonly used to measure changes in geometry and hence infer the mass balance of glaciers. Different tools and methods exist to obtain information about the 3D geometry of terrain. Recent improvements on the quality and performance of digital cameras for close-range photogrammetry, and the development of automatic digital photogrammetric processing makes the 'structure from motion' photogrammetric technique (SfM) competitive for high quality 3D models production, compared to efficient but also expensive and logistically-demanding survey technologies such as airborn and terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). The purpose of this work is to test the SfM approach, using a consumer-grade SLR camera and the low-cost computer vision-based software package Agisoft Photoscan (Agisoft LLC), to monitor the mass balance of Montasio Occidentale glacier, a 0.07km2, low-altitude, debris-covered glacier located in the Eastern Italian Alps. The quality of the 3D models produced by the SfM process has been assessed by comparison with digital terrain models obtained through TLS surveys carried out at the same dates. TLS technique has indeed proved to be very effective in determining the volume change of this glacier in the last years. Our results shows that the photogrammetric approach can produce point cloud densities comparable to those derived from TLS measurements. Furthermore, the horizontal and vertical accuracies are also of the same order of magnitude as for TLS (centimetric to decimetric). The effect of different landscape characteristics (e.g. distance from the camera or terrain gradient) and of different substrata (rock, debris, ice, snow and firn) was also evaluated in terms of SfM reconstruction's accuracy vs. TLS. Given the good results obtained on the Montasio Occidentale glacier, it can be concluded that the terrestrial photogrammetry, with the advantageous features of portability, ease of use and above all low costs

  7. Permian magmatism, Permian detachment faulting, and Alpine thrusting in the Orobic Anticline, southern Alps, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Florian; Froitzheim, Niko; Geisler-Wierwille, Thorsten; Schlöder, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    Lombardo. It is therefore an Alpine structure. (4) Several south-directed Alpine thrusts duplicate the lithostratigraphy, including the detachment, and are related to the Orobic thrust further north. They also offset the Biandino Fault. U-Pb zircon ages measured with LA-ICP-MS (work in progress) will further clarify the temporal relations between the intrusions, volcanics, and the shear zones. Froitzheim, N., Derks, J.F., Walter, J.M. & Sciunnach, D. 2008. Evolution of an Early Permian extensional detachment fault from synintrusive, mylonitic flow to brittle faulting (Grassi Detachment Fault, Orobic Anticline, southern Alps, Italy) Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 298; 69-82. doi:10.1144/SP298.4 Thöni, M., Mottana, A., Delitala, M. C., De Capitani, L. & Liborio, G. 1992. The Val Biandino composite pluton: A late Hercynian intrusion into the South-Alpine metamorphic basement of the Alps (Italy). Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie-Monatshefte, 12, 545-554. Sciunnach, D. 2001. Early Permian palaeofaults at the western boundary of the Collio Basin (Valsassina, Lombardy). Natura Bresciana. Annuario del Museo Civico di Scienze Naturali, Brescia, Monografia, 25, 37-43.

  8. Survey of Italian human milk banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nisi, Giuseppe; Moro, Guido E; Arslanoglu, Sertac; Ambruzzi, Amalia M; Biasini, Augusto; Profeti, Claudio; Tonetto, Paola; Bertino, Enrico

    2015-05-01

    At present, the Italian Association of Donor Human Milk Banks (Associazione Italiana Banche del Latte Umano Donato, AIBLUD) consists of 31 milk banks, whose management is based on Italian Guidelines. In 2013, AIBLUD performed a systematic survey to collect data on the activities of banks operating in Italy in the years previous to this date. The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the operational procedures of Italian Human Milk Banks in order to identify both areas of strength and room for improvement. A questionnaire was utilized to obtain national data from the 28 banks active in the year 2012 in order to evaluate the number of donors, volume of human milk collected, and other information relating to the period 2007 to 2012. In all, 89% of the banks (25/28) responded to the survey. Data received primarily concerned the number of donors, volume of milk collected, and average amount of milk from each donor in the period 2007 to 2012. It was evident that in 2012 human milk banks collected a higher volume of milk than in 2007. Further, the average amount of milk from each donor was higher. Most of the milk banks were following the Italian Guidelines for traceability, control of donors, bacteriological checks, method of pasteurization, storage, thawing, type of containers, and utilization of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points system. This survey identified both areas of strength and room for improvement in the Italian human milk banks. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Climate change and geomorphological hazards in the eastern European Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiler, Margreth; Knight, Jasper; Harrison, Stephan

    2010-05-28

    Climate and environmental changes associated with anthropogenic global warming are being increasingly identified in the European Alps, as seen by changes in long-term high-alpine temperature, precipitation, glacier cover and permafrost. In turn, these changes impact on land-surface stability, and lead to increased frequency and magnitude of natural mountain hazards, including rock falls, debris flows, landslides, avalanches and floods. These hazards also impact on infrastructure, and socio-economic and cultural activities in mountain regions. This paper presents two case studies (2003 heatwave, 2005 floods) that demonstrate some of the interlinkages between physical processes and human activity in climatically sensitive alpine regions that are responding to ongoing climate change. Based on this evidence, we outline future implications of climate change on mountain environments and its impact on hazards and hazard management in paraglacial mountain systems.

  10. A laboratory simulation of mesoscale flow interaction with the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, E.; Longhetto, A.; Briatore, L.; Chabert d'Hieres, G.; Didelle, H.; Giraud, C.; Gleizon, P.

    2002-02-01

    A series of laboratory experiments, aimed at the simulation of some aspects of Alpine lee cyclogenesis has been carried out in the rotating tank of the Coriolis Laboratory of LEGI-IMG in Grenoble. Dynamic and thermodynamic processes, typical of baroclinic development triggered by the orography, were simulated. The background flow simulating the basic state of the atmosphere consisted of a stream of intermediate density fluid introduced at the interface between two fluid layers. The structure of the intermediate current was established by mixing fluid obtained from the upper layer of fresh water with fluid removed from the heavier salty layer below. The dynamical similarity parameters are the Rossby ( Ro), Burger ( Bu) and Ekman ( Ek) numbers, although this last, owing to its small values, need not be matched between model and prototype, since viscous effects are not important for small time scales. The flow in both the prototype and laboratory simulation is characterized by hydrostatics; this requires ( Ro2δ2/ Bu)≪1 (where δ= H/ L is the aspect ratio of the obstacle) which is clearly satisfied, in the atmosphere and oceans, and for the laboratory experiment. A range of experiments for various Rossby and Burger numbers were conducted which delimited the region of parameter space for which background flows akin to that found to the northwest of the Alps prior to baroclinic cyclogenesis events, were observed. One such experiment was carried out by placing a model of the Alps at the appropriate place in the flow field. The subsequent motion in the laboratory was observed and dye tracer motions were used to obtain the approximate particle trajectories. The density field was also analyzed to provide the geopotential field of the simulated atmosphere. Using standard transformations from the similarity analysis, the laboratory observations were related to the prototype atmosphere. The flow and the geopotential fields gave results compatible with the particular

  11. Brooks Range and eastern Alps: a tectonic comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helwig, J.A.

    1985-04-01

    A comparison of the tectonic evolution of the Brooks Range (BR) and the Eastern Alps (EA) reveals a remarkable parallelism. Both of these Mesozoic-Cenozoic orogenic belts are underlain by sialic crust formed in an earlier Paleozoic orogenic cycle. The old basement is revealed in major tectonic windows: the Tauern Fenster (EA) and the Doonerak Window-Schwatka Mountains (BR) - which are unconformably overlapped by transgressive, neritic marine clastic to carbonate successions - the Permo-Triassic through Hochstegenkalk sequence (EA), and the Kekiktuk-Kayak-Lisburne sequence (BR). These successions are passive-margin sequences that pass southward, in palinspastically restored cross sections, to synchronous deep-water facies deposited on ophiolitic basement - Bunderschiefer on Triassic-Jurassic ophiolites (EA) and Kuna facies or Etivluk sequence on upper Paleozoic ophiolites (BR). Onset of subduction-collision is marked by olistostromal facies - Cretaceous wildflysch (EA) and Jura-Cretaceous Okpikruak Formation (BR) - and the development of major flysch-molasse successions in the foreland basins of the collisional fold and thrust belts. Important major contrasts between these two mountain ranges reside in their colliding blocks and their post-orogenic histories. Alpine orogenesis was driven by continent-continent collision, closing out a young, narrow ocean, whereas Brooks Range deformation appears to have originated by arc-continent collision, closing out an older, broad (.)ocean. Younger Cenozoic deformation is extensional and strike-slip in the Eastern Alps, producing disjunctive basins, but Cenozoic deformation in the Brooks Range is diverse and includes compression in the east and extension in the far west.

  12. FloodAlp! Frequency and climatic forcing of Holocene floods in the Central Alps - a project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Stefanie B.; Glur, Lukas; Gilli, Adrian; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2014-05-01

    For a better assessment of the future Alpine flood hazard in the face of climate warming, an improvement of our understanding of the occurrence of floods in the past is important. The goal of the FloodAlp! project is thus to reconstruct the Holocene flood history of the Central Alps and to investigate the controlling climatic forcing, in particular regarding the flood occurrence during warmer and cooler climatic periods. 15 lake-sediment records served as flood archives, providing an Alpine transect from northeastern Switzerland to northern Italy covering a wide range in altitude (197 to 2065 m asl). The established flood catalog comprises over 4500 flood deposits, which are composed of terrestrial material mobilized by high fluvial runoff in the catchment areas. As the most important result, we found that during the past 10 kyrs the occurrence of Alpine floods was enhanced during cool climatic periods. Evidence is given by comparing our paleoflood record to independent reconstructions of air temperature and solar activity. This relation is explained by the latitudinal position of Atlantic and Mediterranean storm tracks, which generally shift southward during periods of low temperature/solar activity. In addition, we observe periods of enhanced flood occurrence in the Southern compared to the Northern Alps (most distinct from 4.2 to 2.4 kyr BP and during the Little Ice Age), suggesting a pronounced southward position of the storm tracks and/or blocking over the northern North Atlantic. Since such a setting resembles a negative NAO state, we interpret the South-Alpine flood frequency as a qualitative record of variations in a paleo-NAO pattern during the Holocene. This paleoclimatic evidence of a decreased Alpine flood frequency during warmer periods is most likely also applicable to warmer climatic conditions in the future. However, this result does not consider the intensity of the catalogued events. Studies addressing this issue are currently undertaken. Our

  13. Scientists, bioethics and democracy: the Italian case and its meanings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbellini, Gilberto

    2007-01-01

    In June 2005, Italy held a referendum on repealing the law on medically assisted fertilization (Law 40/2004), which limits access to artificial reproduction to infertile couples, and prohibits the donation of gametes, the cryopreservation of embryos, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PDG), and research on human embryos. The referendum was invalidated, and the law remained unchanged. The Italian political e bioethical debate on assisted reproduction was manipulated by the Catholic Church, which distorted scientific data and issues at stake with the help of Catholic politicians and bioethicists. What happened in Italy shows that some perverse socio‐cultural e political mechanisms are spreading the absurd and anti‐historical view that scientific and technological advancements are threatening democracy and personal freedom. Scientists should not only contrast the political attempts at limiting freedom of scientific research, but also tell politicians, humanists and citizens that the invention of Western science with its view of scientific community as an “open society”, contributed and still contributes, through scientific education, to the construction and maintaining of the moral and political values underlying Western democracies. PMID:17526686

  14. Exploring American and Italian consumer preferences for Californian and Italian red wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torri, Luisa; Noble, Ann Curtis; Heymann, Hildegarde

    2013-06-01

    To increase the market share of Californian wines in other countries, wine preferences need to be explored in potential markets. This work studied the preferences of American and Italian consumers for red wines produced in California and Italy, focusing on wines made from the same varieties in each location. Descriptive analysis and consumer preference tests were performed. Americans scored each of the Californian wines significantly higher in preference than the Italian wines. In contrast, the Italian consumer preference scores for many Italian and Californian wines overlapped. By external preference mapping of the American consumer segments, the ideal flavour of one cluster was closest to the Californian Zinfandel, Merlot and Syrah, which had the 'most balanced' flavour profiles. Another cluster of Italians also preferred the Californian wines. In addition, one Italian cluster was driven by a dislike of the leather, band-aid and medicinal aromas of the Italian Merlot and Refosco. The results provided information that can contribute to wine marketing research necessary for successfully exporting Californian red wines to Italy and vice versa. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Lost in Translation? Comparing British, Japanese, and Italian Children’s Theory-of-Mind Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Hughes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Findings from cross-cultural theory-of-mind studies highlight potential measurement effects and both general (e.g., East-West and specific (e.g., pedagogical experiences cultural contrasts. We compared theory-of-mind scores for children from UK and Italy (two Western countries that differ in age of school entry and Japan (a Far-Eastern country in which children, like their Italian counterparts, start school later than British children. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to data from 268 age-gender- and verbal ability-matched 5- to 6-year olds. Key findings were that (i all 8 indicators loaded onto a single latent factor; and (ii this latent factor explained significant variance in each group, with just one indicator showing differential item functioning. Supporting the importance of pedagogical experiences, British children outperformed both their Italian and Japanese counterparts.

  16. Italian singer Annalisa at CERN for a week of filming

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    CERN welcomed Italian singer-songwriter Annalisa for a week-long visit to the Laboratory to shoot an Italian television production about the Laboratory.   Annalisa in the CERN Control Centre.   The Italian artist has a degree in physics from the University of Turin, Italy. She is a singer and songwriter, famous for her successful participation in the Italian talent show, Amici di Maria De Filippi. She has recorded four albums as solo artist and has participated twice in the Sanremo Music Festival, the most important Italian song contest. She has also received numerous Italian music awards, and has earned international recognition. Thanks to her knowledge of physics and her great influence with the Italian youth, Annalisa was selected to host an Italian television production about CERN aimed at young people. 

  17. The quest for an intermediate-scale accidental axion and further ALPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, A.G.; Nishi, C.C. [Univ. Federal do ABC - UFABC, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Machado, A.C.B. [Teorica-Univ. Estadual Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Ringwald, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Vaudrevange, P. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Excellence Cluster Universe

    2014-03-15

    The recent detection of the cosmic microwave background polarimeter experiment BICEP2 of tensor fluctuations in the B-mode power spectrum basically excludes all plausible axion models where its decay constant is above 10{sup 13} GeV. Moreover, there are strong theoretical, astrophysical, and cosmological motivations for models involving, in addition to the axion, also axion-like particles (ALPs), with decay constants in the intermediate scale range, between 10{sup 9} GeV and 10{sup 13} GeV. Here, we present a general analysis of models with an axion and further ALPs and derive bounds on the relative size of the axion and ALP photon (and electron) coupling. We discuss what we can learn from measurements of the axion and ALP photon couplings about the fundamental parameters of the underlying ultraviolet completion of the theory. For the latter we consider extensions of the Standard Model in which the axion and the ALP(s) appear as pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons from the breaking of global chiral U(1) (Peccei-Quinn (PQ)) symmetries, occuring accidentally as low energy remnants from exact discrete symmetries. In such models, the axion and the further ALP are protected from disastrous explicit symmetry breaking effects due to Planck-scale suppressed operators. The scenarios considered exploit heavy right handed neutrinos getting their mass via PQ symmetry breaking and thus explain the small mass of the active neutrinos via a seesaw relation between the electroweak and an intermediate PQ symmetry breaking scale. We show some models that can accommodate simultaneously an axion dark matter candidate, an ALP explaining the anomalous transparency of the universe for γ-rays, and an ALP explaining the recently reported 3.55 keV gamma line from galaxies and clusters of galaxies, if the respective decay constants are of intermediate scale.

  18. Soils evolution and treeline fluctuations under late Holocene climatic changes: a case study from Upper Valtellina (European Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroli, Anna; Leonelli, Giovanni; Pelfini, Manuela; Trombino, Luca

    2016-04-01

    High-altitude areas in the European Alps have been widely investigated through time for reconstructing the Holocene climate fluctuations, by analyzing both biological and abiological indicators. In high-altitude areas the ongoing temperature increase caused some effects in the natural environments such as the upward shift of the vegetation belts and, in particular, of the treeline. In fact, the treeline is considered a sensitive climate indicator; in high-altitude areas, the vegetation growth and dynamics are strongly influenced not only by climate but also by abiotic factors, like geomorphological processes and soil development. The aim of this study is the reconstruction of late Holocene soil evolution and environmental changes at the treeline on the SW slope of the Monte Confinale in the Upper Valtellina, Central Italian Alps. We performed a detailed reconstruction of the treeline altitudinal dynamics together with the field and laboratory characterization of a transect of nine soil profiles developing at an altitude ranging from 1800 m a.s.l. (closed forest) to 2600 m a.s.l. (species line), in order to understand the relationship between colonization by arboreal vegetation and soil development. The upward shift of the treeline was assessed analyzing tree age distribution on the slope by means of a tree-ring based approach. The treeline elevation over time (based on the years in which the trees reached 2 m in height) increased from 2505 m a.s.l. (period 1990-1999) to 2531 m (period 2000-2009) to 2545 m (in 2013) with a rate of upward shift of up to 2.6 m/y in the period 2000-2009. The investigated soils showed a decreasing development with increasing altitude, in fact at higher altitude we found less developed soils (i.e. Ranker), on the contrary in the forest area (about 2000 m a.s.l.) we found a more developed soil (i.e. Podzol). Moreover, the soil development may also be affected by the conditions of the slope, characterized by broad alpine grasslands that

  19. Italian Validation of Homophobia Scale (HS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Ciocca, PsyD, PhD

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: The Italian validation of the HS revealed the use of this self‐report test to have good psychometric properties. This study offers a new tool to assess homophobia. In this regard, the HS can be introduced into the clinical praxis and into programs for the prevention of homophobic behavior. Ciocca G, Capuano N, Tuziak B, Mollaioli D, Limoncin E, Valsecchi D, Carosa E, Gravina GL, Gianfrilli D, Lenzi A, and Jannini EA. Italian validation of Homophobia Scale (HS. Sex Med 2015;3:213–218.

  20. Extrasolar planet observational studies: the Italian contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, R.; Desidera, S.; Claudi, R.

    We review the Italian contribution to observationals studies of extrasolar planets. Various techniques are used, including high precision radial velocities, transits, time delays, and direct imaging. Italian groups participate to some of the most interesting projects of the next decade, including imaging, photometry and astrometry. We will focus our attention on a few of these projects, including results obtained with SARG at TNG, those expected from OmegaTrans at VST, SPHERE at VLT and EPICS at E-ELT, with the PLATO satellite, and with GAIA.

  1. Italian in the Linguistic Landscape of Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    This article looks at the presence of Italian in the linguistic landscape (LL) of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Rather surprisingly, Italian is quite visible, and it might even be the most used European language after English. After a general introduction on the Italian language and Malaysia, including the latter's LL, the article goes on to outline the…

  2. Evidence of genetic distinction and long-term population decline in wolves (Canis lupus) in the Italian Apennines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchini, V; Galov, A; Randi, E

    2004-03-01

    Historical information suggests the occurrence of an extensive human-caused contraction in the distribution range of wolves (Canis lupus) during the last few centuries in Europe. Wolves disappeared from the Alps in the 1920s, and thereafter continued to decline in peninsular Italy until the 1970s, when approximately 100 individuals survived, isolated in the central Apennines. In this study we performed a coalescent analysis of multilocus DNA markers to infer patterns and timing of historical population changes in wolves surviving in the Apennines. This population showed a unique mitochondrial DNA control-region haplotype, the absence of private alleles and lower heterozygosity at microsatellite loci, as compared to other wolf populations. Multivariate, clustering and Bayesian assignment procedures consistently assigned all the wolf genotypes sampled in Italy to a single group, supporting their genetic distinction. Bottleneck tests showed evidences of population decline in the Italian wolves, but not in other populations. Results of a Bayesian coalescent model indicate that wolves in Italy underwent a 100- to 1000-fold population contraction over the past 2000-10,000 years. The population decline was stronger and longer in peninsular Italy than elsewhere in Europe, suggesting that wolves have apparently been genetically isolated for thousands of generations south of the Alps. Ice caps covering the Alps at the Last Glacial Maximum (c. 18,000 years before present), and the wide expansion of the Po River, which cut the alluvial plains throughout the Holocene, might have provided effective geographical barriers to wolf dispersal. More recently, the admixture of Alpine and Apennine wolf populations could have been prevented by deforestation, which was already widespread in the fifteenth century in northern Italy. This study suggests that, despite the high potential rates of dispersal and gene flow, local wolf populations may not have mixed for long periods of time.

  3. Topographic evolution of a continental indenter: The eastern Southern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robl, Jörg; Heberer, Bianca; Prasicek, Günther; Neubauer, Franz; Hergarten, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    The topographic evolution of the eastern Southern Alps (ESA) is controlled by the Late Oligocene - Early Miocene indentation of the Adriatic microplate into an overthickened orogenic wedge emplaced on top of the European plate. Rivers follow topographic gradients that evolve during continental collision and in turn incise into bedrock counteracting the formation of topography. In principle, erosional surface processes tend to establish a topographic steady state so that an interpretation of topographic metrics in terms of the latest tectonic history should be straightforward. However, a series of complications impede deciphering the topographic record of the ESA. The Pleistocene glaciations locally excavated alpine valleys and perturbed fluvial drainages. The Late Miocene desiccation of the Mediterranean Sea and the uplift of the northern Molasse Basin led to significant base level changes in the far field of the ESA and the Eastern Alps (EA), respectively. Among this multitude of mechanisms, the processes that dominate the current topographic evolution of the ESA and the ESA-EA drainage divide have not been identified and a number of questions regarding the interaction of crustal deformation, erosion and climate in shaping the present-day topography remain. We demonstrate the expected topographic effects of each mechanism in a 1-dimensional model and compare them with observed channel metrics. Modern uplift rates are largely consistent with long-term exhumation in the ESA and with variations in the normalized steepness index (ksn) indicating a stable uplift and erosion pattern since Miocene times. We find that ksn increases with uplift rate and declines from the indenter tip in the northwest to the foreland basin in the southeast. The number and magnitude of knickpoints and the distortion in longitudinal channel profiles similarly decrease towards the east. Most knickpoints probably evolved during Pleistocene glaciation cycles, but may represent the incrementally

  4. Finite strain patterns and their significance in Permian rocks of the Alpes Maritimes (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddans, A. W. B.; Henry, B.; Kligfield, R.; Lowrie, W.; Hirt, A.; Percevault, M. N.

    More finite strain data has been obtained from autochthonous Permian mudstones of the Alpes Maritimes, S.E. France. These new data were computed from field measurements of green spots on all available sections, deformed mudcracks and from the quantitative correlation between magnetic susceptibility anisotropy and finite strain in these rocks. Previously published finite strain data and the new results are presented on a series of structural maps and cross-sections for the Dôme de Barrot, the Tinée and Vionène region and the Roya region. As in previous studies difficulties arise in explaining the apparently variable extension parallel with the 100°, subhorizontal bedding-cleavage intersection: either this is real or there were large volume changes during the tectonic deformation. Study of quartz fibres, developed in deformed mudcracks in the Tinée valley, suggest that early in the tectonic history incremental stretching directions were parallel with the bedding—cleavage intersection, while later they were down-dip in the 100° trending cleavage. Since these Permian rocks have remained stuck to the Argentera basement they also record displacements and deformations in the basement. The early 100°, subhorizontal stretching is consistent with NW-SE dextral, strike-slip basement faulting, while later, down-dip stretching in the cleavage is consistent with contraction faults in the basement. This information and new palaeomagnetic data on the same samples are combined with recent geophysical evidence and regional tectonic studies, to provide a new precision to the tectonic history of this part of the Western Alpine External Zone.

  5. Two early Holocene rock avalanches in the Bernese Alps (Rinderhorn, Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grämiger, Lorenz M.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Vockenhuber, Christof; Aaron, Jordan; Hajdas, Irka; Ivy-Ochs, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Large rock avalanches constitute a critical process modulating the evolution of alpine landscapes; however, the relatively infrequent occurrence of these high-magnitude events makes identifying underlying process controls challenging. Here we describe two rock avalanches in the Rinderhorn area of the Bernese Alps, Switzerland, providing new mapping of rock avalanche source areas and deposits, refined volume estimates for each event, runout modeling back-analyses, and absolute age constraint from cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating. Results reveal that the Daubensee rock avalanche released 4 million m3 of limestone sliding from the western crest of the Rinderhorn. Debris ran out across a Lateglacial moraine before reaching the valley bottom and spreading, leaving thin (on average 7 m) deposits across a broad area. The runout resulted in a Fahrböschung angle of 21°. Part of the deposit now lies beneath Lake Daubensee. The Klein Rinderhorn rock avalanche released 37 million m3 of limestone along a dip-slope sliding plane, with a maximum runout distance of 4.3 km and estimated Fahrböschung angle of 14°. Deposits bulked to 47 million m3 running up the opposing slope, with distinct hummocky morphology in the proximal area and a distal longitudinal flow ridge. These deposits were later modified and partly obscured by ice avalanches from the nearby Altels peak. Cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating revealed nearly coincident ages for both rock avalanches of 9.8 ± 0.5 ka. The large lag time between local deglaciation and failure suggests that the events were not directly triggered by deglaciation. Rather, the concurrent exposure ages, also coinciding with the nearby Kander valley rock avalanche as well as paleoseismic records from nearby lakes, strongly suggest seismic triggering.

  6. Climate-controlled variations in scree production, Southern Alps, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, T. C.; Roering, Joshua J.

    2005-09-01

    The interaction of fluvial, glacial, and hillslope processes controls the development of mountain belts and their response to tectonic and climatic forcing. Studies on the contribution of hillslope processes to mountain erosion have focused on bedrock landslides, as they have a profound and readily observed impact on sediment yield and slope morphology. Despite the ubiquity of scree (or talus) mantled slopes in mountainous terrain, the role of frequent, low-magnitude (rockfall events is seldom addressed in the context of landscape evolution. Here we quantify the contribution of rockfall erosion across an 80 by 40 km transect in the Southern Alps, New Zealand, by analyzing the spatial extent of scree slopes mapped from aerial photographs and estimating long-term (10 15 k.y.) rockfall erosion rates from the accumulation of slope deposits below bedrock headwalls and in debris and alluvial fans. Along the rapidly uplifting, high-rainfall western margin, where high rates of bedrock landsliding have been previously documented, scree-mantled slopes are sparse. Rainfall decreases exponentially east of the Main Divide, and the proportion of slopes mantled by scree increases monotonically, attaining a maximum value of 70%. The systematic distribution of scree deposits cannot be attributed to lithologic variation, seismicity, or the legacy of glaciation. Instead, climate may serve as a primary control on scree production, as nearly 70% of the mapped scree deposits in our transect are confined to a narrow elevation range of 1200 1600 m above sea level (masl). Our analysis of altitudinal controls on annual temperature variations indicates that scree production via frost-cracking processes may be maximized between elevations of 1600 and 2300 masl, as higher elevations are subject to persistent permafrost which obviates the frost-cracking process. Rates of rockfall erosion near the rapidly uplifting Main Divide are low (<0.1 mm/yr), whereas rates in the scree-dominated eastern

  7. Ziwundaschg - 10Be dating an Older Dryas cirque glacier moraine in the middle of the Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Andrew; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kerschner, Hanns

    2017-04-01

    Alpine glacier extents during the Oldest Dryas period (>14.7 ka) are still largely unknown. Moraines from that period are comparatively rare and usually attributed to the "Gschnitz Stadial", which marks the alpine glacier reaction to the first part of Heinrich event 1. In many valleys, in the absence of clear geomorphological evidence, estimates for the glacier extent during that period range between large dendritic valley glacier systems with a well defined, albeit unknown glacier end on the one hand and numerous local valley and cirque glaciers on the other hand. In this context well dated local glacier extents may play an important role, as they provide boundary conditions for the altitude of the equilibrium line (an important palaeoclimatic parameter) and thus limit possible speculations about glacier extents in their vicinity. "Ziwundaschg" is the place name for a cirque in the western Ötztal Mountains near the upper Inn valley and Reschenpass. It is situated more or less in the centre of the Eastern Alps. The cirque floor is at an altitude of about 2000 m and the highest mountains in the back of the cirque are around 2750 m. They were not glacierized during the Little Ice Age, and even a glacierization during the Younger Dryas cold phase was likely limited to a few small ice patches. Further down at the cirque floor, a beautifully developed end moraine with lateral moraines is preserved. 10Be ages from boulders on the moraine cluster around the transition from the Oldest Dryas to the Bølling Interstadial, suggesting moraine stabilization due to the rapid warming at that time. The ELA of the glacier was at about 2200 m a.s.l., roughly 600 - 650 m lower than during the LIA. This value can be taken as representative for the mountain ranges in its vicinity and can form the basis for estimates of glacier extent during the early Lateglacial period in the central Eastern Alps.

  8. A new detrital mica 40Ar/39Ar dating approach for provenance and exhumation of the Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemignani, L.; Sun, Xilin; Braun, J.; van Gerve, T. D.; Wijbrans, J. R.

    2017-08-01

    Detrital thermochronology can be used as a tool to quantitatively constrain exhumation rates and its spatial variability from active mountain belts. Commonly used methods for this purpose assume a steady state relationship between tectonic uplift and erosion. However, this assumption does not account for the transitory response of a dynamic orogenic system to changes in the boundary conditions. We propose a different approach that uses the observed detrital age distributions as "markers" of the past exhumation and of the present-day erosion and mixing occurring in a river system. In this paper, we present new 40Ar/39Ar biotite and white mica age distributions for 19 modern river sands from the Eastern Alps north of the Periadriatic line. The results present three main clusters of ages at 0.5-50, 60-120, and 250-350 Ma that record the main orogenic phases in this sector of the Alps. We have applied two numerical methods to the cooling ages to (a) linearly compute the spatial variability of the relative present-day erosion of a set of four detrital mineral samples from drainage basins along the Inn River and (b) quantify the rates of the cooling and erosion in the Tauern Window during Paleocene-Miocene time of the Alpine orogeny. Our results suggest a 0.34-0.84 mm/yr range of exhumation rates for the Tauern Window since the Miocene. Our estimates of exhumation rates of the western Tauern Window are higher than those for the eastern Tauern Window, which is consistent with the previous studies.

  9. Longer growing seasons and warm summers boost Rhododendron ferrugineum L. growth in the Taillefer massif (French Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francon, Loïc; Corona, Christophe; Roussel, Erwan; Lopez Saez, Jerome; Stoffel, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Rhododendron ferrugineum L. is an important and widespread dwarf shrub species growing in high-elevation, alpine environments of the Western European Alps. As such, it is likely to offer unique opportunities which would allow pushing current dendrochronological networks into extreme environments and way beyond the upper survival limit of trees. Given that different species of the same genus have been successfully used in tree-ring investigations, notably in the Himalayas where Rhododendron sp. has proven to be a reliable climate proxy, this study aims at (i) evaluating the dendroclimatological potential of the widely distributed R. ferrugineum and at (ii) determining the major limiting climate factor driving species growth and the formation of rings. To this end, 154 cross-sections from 36 R. ferrugineum individuals have been sampled above local treelines and at elevations comprised between 1800 and 2100 m asl on NW-facing slopes of the Taillefer massif (French Alps). We illustrate a 195-year-long standard chronology based on growth-ring records selected from 24 individuals, and document that the series is well-replicated for almost one century (1920-2015) with an Expressed Population Signal (EPS) >0.85. Analysis using partial and seasonal correlation functions further highlight that growth of Rhododendron is governed by temperatures during the growing season (May-July), with increasingly higher air temperatures favoring larger ring widths, a phenomenon which is well known from dwarf shrubs growing in circum-arctic tundra ecosystems. Similarly, the negative effect of January-February precipitation on radial growth of R. ferrugineum, rarely observed in the Arctic, is interpreted as a result of reduced growing seasons following snowy winters. We conclude that the strong and unequivocal signals recorded in the fairly long R. ferrugineum chronologies presented here can indeed be used for climate-growth studies as well as for the reconstruction of climatic fluctuations

  10. Plant-wax D/H ratios in the southern European Alps record multiple aspects of climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Stefanie B.; Sessions, Alex L.

    2016-09-01

    We present a Younger Dryas-Holocene record of the hydrogen isotopic composition of sedimentary plant waxes (δDwax) from the southern European Alps (Lake Ghirla, N-Italy) to investigate its sensitivity to climatic forcing variations in this mid-latitude region (45°N). A modern altitudinal transect of δD values of river water and leaf waxes in the Lake Ghirla catchment is used to test present-day climate sensitivity of δDwax. While we find that altitudinal effects on δDwax are minor at our study site, temperature, precipitation amount, and evapotranspiration all appear to influence δDwax to varying extents. In the lake-sediment record, δDwax values vary between -134 and -180‰ over the past 13 kyr. The long-term Holocene pattern of δDwax parallels the trend of decreasing temperature and is thus likely forced by the decline of northern hemisphere summer insolation. Shorter-term fluctuations, in contrast, may reflect both temperature and moisture-source changes. During the cool Younger Dryas and Little Ice Age (LIA) periods we observe unexpectedly high δDwax values relative to those before and after. We suggest that a change towards a more D-enriched moisture source is required during these intervals. In fact, a shift from northern N-Atlantic to southern N-Atlantic/western Mediterranean Sea sources would be consistent with a southward migration of the Westerlies with climate cooling. Prominent δDwax fluctuations in the early and middle Holocene are negative and potentially associated with temperature declines. In the late Holocene (Alps does contain climatic information, it is a complicated record that would require additional constraints to be robustly interpreted. This also has important implications for other water-isotope-based proxy records of precipitation and hydro-climate from this region, such as cave speleothems.

  11. Modeling Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Production in the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraxner, Florian; Leduc, Sylvain; Kindermann, Georg; Fuss, Sabine; Pietsch, Stephan; Lakyda, Ivan; Serrano Leon, Hernan; Shchepashchenko, Dmitry; Shvidenko, Anatoly

    2016-04-01

    Sustainability of bioenergy is often indicated by the neutrality of emissions at the conversion site while the feedstock production site is assumed to be carbon neutral. Recent research shows that sustainability of bioenergy systems starts with feedstock management. Even if sustainable forest management is applied, different management types can impact ecosystem services substantially. This study examines different sustainable forest management systems together with an optimal planning of green-field bioenergy plants in the Alps. Two models - the biophysical global forest model (G4M) and a techno-economic engineering model for optimizing renewable energy systems (BeWhere) are implemented. G4M is applied in a forward looking manner in order to provide information on the forest under different management scenarios: (1) managing the forest for maximizing the carbon sequestration; or (2) managing the forest for maximizing the harvestable wood amount for bioenergy production. The results from the forest modelling are then picked up by the engineering model BeWhere, which optimizes the bioenergy production in terms of energy demand (power and heat demand by population) and supply (wood harvesting potentials), feedstock harvesting and transport costs, the location and capacity of the bioenergy plant as well as the energy distribution logistics with respect to heat and electricity (e.g. considering existing grids for electricity or district heating etc.). First results highlight the importance of considering ecosystem services under different scenarios and in a geographically explicit manner. While aiming at producing the same amount of bioenergy under both forest management scenarios, it turns out that in scenario (1) a substantially larger area (distributed across the Alps) will need to be used for producing (and harvesting) the necessary amount of feedstock than under scenario (2). This result clearly shows that scenario (2) has to be seen as an "intensification

  12. Spatial and temporal patterns of wildfires in the Northern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heel, Michael; Sass, Oliver; Friedmann, Arne; Wetzel, Karl-Friedrich

    2010-05-01

    Wildfires in the northern Alps are rare compared to e.g. the Mediterranean region. However, fires occurring on the dry, south-exposed slopes of the inner-alpine valleys can constitute a significant disturbance of the ecosystems in the sub-alpine belt. We reconstructed the younger regional wildfire history (last few centuries) of a part of the the Northern Limestone Alps using chronicles, forestry and fire brigade records as well as historical pictures (postcards, aerial photos etc.), local names and interviews with local people. The long-term fire frequency was investigated using mire drillings, charcoal in soils and dendrochronology. In the surrounding of the Karwendel, Wetterstein and Mieminger Mountains we have identified c. 400 forest fires to date. The earliest detected fire dates to more than 2900 years; the largest one (in 1705) affected an area of several thousand hectares. Approximately 90% of the fires are man-made (negligence, arson, railway) which explains the concentration on the south-exposed slopes of the densely populated Inn valley. Most of the larger fires take place in the altitudinal belt between 1400 and 1900 m a.s.l.; apart from very few exceptions, they are restricted to southerly orientations. Locally, mean recurrence intervals of 200-300 years occur which is similar to e.g. boreal forests in Canada. We observed a strong seasonality with 40% of the fires occurring in spring and 30% in summer. There is a weak correlation with the weather conditions in the one or two weeks before the fire with dry periods promoting wildfire ignition and burnt area size; however, there are many exceptions from the rule. The 1940ies stands out for more than twice as much fires than in all other decades which is both due to climatic and anthropogenic causes. Today, there is an apparent trend towards more frequent and smaller fires. The frequency is biased by the multitude of available documentation today (e.g. websites of fire brigades), while the decreasing size

  13. Derivation in the Advanced Course of Italian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizmuller-Zocco, Jana

    1985-01-01

    Suggests that one method to help advanced language students acquire new vocabulary is to study word formation and derivation. Suggests ways in which this can be done in the teaching of Italian. Discusses the process of derivation from three perspectives: (1) contrastive analysis, (2) lexical fields, and (3) etymology. (SED)

  14. Gold Rush to China for Italian Machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Italy exported two billion worth of textile machines in 2006, 46% of which went to Asia.China paid 365 million Euro to become the largest importer of ltaly’s machines in Aisa.China, a country that sustains Italian interest in coming,is the country where the investment in textile machines is growing...

  15. Management and control in Italian public companies

    OpenAIRE

    Wooldridge, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Article by Dr Frank Wooldridge considering law reforms which have impacted on management structures in Italian public companies. Published in Amicus Curiae - Journal of the Society for Advanced Legal Studies. The Journal is produced by the Society for Advanced Legal Studies at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London.

  16. Italian Crime Fiction: A Barbarian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Weller

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a means of analysing the differences between Detective Fiction and Crime Fiction, in terms of multi genre content, concentrating especially on the development of Italian works in these fields. It also provides a shortened case study, analysing The Hound of the Baskervilles in this way.

  17. Informatics Education in Italian Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellettini, Carlo; Lonati, Violetta; Malchiodi, Dario; Monga, Mattia; Morpurgo, Anna; Torelli, Mauro; Zecca, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the state of informatics education in the Italian secondary schools, highlighting how the learning objectives set up by the Ministry of Education are difficult to meet, due to the fact that the subject is often taught by teachers not holding an informatics degree, the lack of suitable teaching material and the expectations…

  18. Geminates’ demarcating function from Latin to Italian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie SAFFI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to show that from a diachronic or synchronic point of view, in Romance languages, especially Italian, geminates, complementary phenomenon of the intensity stress, are involved in the construction of the word with a demarcating function. They separate the components of the word when it is necessary for the proper conduct of the construction of meaning.

  19. The Italian Restaurant Project: Lessons of Restructuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Mary Ellen

    1995-01-01

    Project learning, with community and school staff assistance, helped a fifth-grade class transform the school lunchroom and their own behavior. A $2,500 Alcoa grant spearheaded an Italian restaurant project. Children served on five committees: public relations and advertising, management, art and design, planning and budgeting, and research. The…

  20. Italian Universities and the Social Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuliger, Rogert

    1975-01-01

    Noting that the key issue in Italian educational politics is the over-supply of students and under-supply of both professors and facilities within the universities of Italy, the author discusses present efforts at reform in light of the social, economic, and political factors affecting the situation. (JT)

  1. Morphological Development in Italian: Connotation and Denotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Elizabeth; Rankin, Jane

    1979-01-01

    Reports on research on the acquisition of adjectives vs inflectional endings in Italian children. Patterns resulting from a longitudinal study involving two children and an experiment involving 84 children are compared to patterns of adults participating in the latter experiment. (Author/AM)

  2. High genetic differentiation in the alpine plant Campanula alpina Jacq. (Campanulaceae): evidence for glacial survival in several Carpathian regions and long-term isolation between the Carpathians and the Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronikier, M; Cieślak, E; Korbecka, G

    2008-04-01

    A survey of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) variation was conducted to elucidate the phylogeography of Campanula alpina, a key species of silicicolous alpine grasslands in the Carpathians with a disjunct distribution in the Eastern European Alps. The Carpathians experienced a different glacial history from the Alps: local glaciers were present only in the highest massifs, while alpine habitats extended over larger areas related to their present distribution in this region. We asked: (i) whether in the Carpathians a high-mountain plant exhibits a complex phylogeographical structure or rather signatures of recent migrations, and (ii) whether the disjunct part of the species' distribution in the Alps resulted from a recent colonization from the Carpathians or from a restricted expansion from separate Eastern Alpine refugia. Our study revealed a clear phylogeographical pattern in AFLPs supported by congruent groups of distinct cpDNA haplotypes. Highest genetic differentiation was observed between the Alps and the Carpathians, indicating a long-term isolation between populations from these two mountain ranges. Further genetic division within the Carpathians suggests that current species' distribution is composed of several groups which have been isolated from each other for a long period. One genetic break separates Western from Southeastern Carpathian material, which is in line with a classical biogeographical boundary. A further, strongly supported genetic group was identified at the southwestern edge of the Carpathian arch. In the Eastern Alps, genetic traces of glacial survival in separate refugial areas in the calcareous northern part and the siliceous central part were found.

  3. Italian and Russian Verse: Two Cultures and Two Mentalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Garzonio

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Italian and Russian Verse: Two Cultures and Two Mentalities The present text was given as a talk at Stanford University in 2003. Here the author presents a comparative analysis of Russian and Italian versification and pays attention to the cultural contacts between these two poetical traditions in an effort to define the role played by Italian patterns in Russian verse. In this perspective the author offers a history of Russian poetical translation of Italian texts pointing out the different opinions of Russian poets about the “musicality” of Italian verse. The combined influence of language and culture in modelling different Russian poetical forms in a chronological perspective is underlined.

  4. Air Force ALP AEF Initiative Wing-Level Cluster Development and Demonstration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stute, Nicholas

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the results for the Air Force ALP AEF Initiative Wing-Level Cluster Development and Demonstration task jointly sponsored by the Logistics Readiness Branch...

  5. Toward Improved Species Niche Modelling: Arnica montana in the Alps as a Case Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilberto Parolo; Graziano Rossi; Alessandro Ferrarini

    2008-01-01

    .... In this study, we used the recent Maxent algorithm for modelling the niche of Arnica montana within a Site of Community Importance in the Alps, with the ultimate aim of providing a rigorous evidence...

  6. Stratigraphic evidence of a Middle Pleistocene climate-driven flexural uplift in the Alps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scardia, Giancarlo; De Franco, Roberto; Muttoni, Giovanni; Rogledi, Sergio; Caielli, Grazia; Carcano, Cipriano; Sciunnach, Dario; Piccin, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This interdisciplinary study on the subsurface stratigraphy of the Po Plain (northern Italy) brings new evidence in support of a climate-driven erosional unloading of the Alps since the Middle Pleistocene...

  7. Epigondolella abneptis and E. spatulata in the Lower Norian in the central Kamnik Alps, Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Ramovš

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Epigondolella abneptis (Huckriede, 1958 and E. spatulata (Hayashi, 1968from the Lower Norian (Upper Triassic deeper marine micritic limestones with chert nodules and lenses in the locality Sleme, central Kamnik Alps, are presented.

  8. The Advanced Locking Plate System (ALPS): a retrospective evaluation in 71 small animal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Tomás G; Kalchofner, Karin; Scherrer, Nicole; Kircher, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate use of the Advanced Locking Plate System (ALPS) in dogs and cats and report outcome. Retrospective case series. Dogs (n = 29) and cats (n = 42). The medical records (April 2007-April 2010) of dogs and cats treated with ALPS were reviewed evaluated. Data retrieved included signalment, indication for surgery, complications, and outcome. ALPS was used for 54 fractures, 12 tarsal or carpal ligament injuries and in 6 cases, to prevent or treat fractures during total hip replacement. Complications needing revision surgery occurred in 4 cases (5.5%): fixation failure was identified in 3 (2 fracture-fixations, 1 pancarpal arthrodesis), and a fracture occurred through a screw hole. The most common complication after tarsal arthrodesis was suture dehiscence. All cases had healed by study end. ALPS offers a reliable alternative for fracture treatment and some other orthopedic conditions in small animals. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  9. Detecting an infrared photon within an hour. Transition-edge detector at ALPS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyling-Eschweiler, Jan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Horns, Dieter [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik; Collaboration: ALPS-II collaboration

    2013-09-15

    An essential design requirement of the ALPS-II experiment is the efficient detection of single photons with a very low instrumental background of 10 {mu}Hz. In 2011 the ALPS collaboration started to set up a TES detector (Transition-Edge Sensor) for ALPS-II, the second phase of the experiment. Since mid of 2013 the setup is ready for characterization in the ALPS laboratory: an ADR cryostat (Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator) as millikelvin environment, a low noise SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) with electronics for read-out and a fiber-coupled high-efficient TES for near-infrared photons as sensor. First measurements have shown a good discrimination between noise and 1064 nm signals.

  10. Exploration of the South-Eastern Alps lithosphere with 3D refraction seismics project Alp 2002 – data acquisition in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Gosar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Using combined seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection method project Alp 2002 explored the contact zone between South-Eastern Alps, Dinarides and Pannonian basin. In a network of 12 profiles of 4100 km total length, which are spread over seven countries,1055 portable seismographs were deployed and 31 strong (300 kg explosions fired. In Slovenia 127 seismographs were deployed along five profiles totalling 575 km and two explosions fired near Vojnik and Gradin. The collected data will allow construction of athree-dimensional model of the lithosphere and will contribute to the understanding of the tectonics and geodynamics at the junction of European, Adriatic and Tisza plates.

  11. Molecular and Phenotypic Descriptions of Cystodermella cinnabarina from Western Himalaya: A New Genus for Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Razaq

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystodermella cinnabarina is reported here for the first time from the moist temperate forests of western Himalaya and is the first collection of a Cystodermella from Pakistan. This species is redescribed here using morphological and molecular data. The phylogenetic analysis which is based on internal transcribed spacers (ITS showed that the Pakistani collection clustered distinctly with similar European sequences in the Cystodermella clade. The Italian and north European sequences of this species clustered in two separate subclades and the Pakistani sequences closely matched the Italian sequences. It is evident that the Pakistani population has a very close evolutionary affinity with the Italian individuals rather than those from northern Europe. The species is distributed in Europe, in North America, and now in the western Himalaya of Asia.

  12. ALPS SKIING AS RECREATIONAL ACTIVITY – DESINGED TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Međedović

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available There is a great use of skiing if we are watching it as recreation, all kind of people can satisfy their necessities, such as breathing fresh air, sun, using your free time in a right way to increase success in your work and working activities. Recreation centers gave various posiibilities for Alps skiing and other similar activities. Working programms in a form of shorten skiing course as recreation is a very old techniques. This fall is demonstrated throw programms contents of a group of skking teachers working in Kopaonick, it is analised value of carves thniqe on earlier thhniqe, it is perceived skiing uniform, they made people fell more safe and stable during a skiing. Reasrching with questionnaire as reasrching instrument on a sample of 50 skiing teachers they came to this results, which will be represented in work, and which firstly investigate positions of body in carving and traditional tehniques, it also points out instructor’s attitude of a structure shortened skiing course.

  13. Advanced Large Area Plastic Scintillator Project (ALPS): Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, David V.; Reeder, Paul L.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Alzheimer, James M.; Crowell, Shannon L.; Sliger, William A.

    2008-02-05

    The advanced Large-Area Plastic Scintillator (ALPS) Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated possible technological avenues for substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in gamma-ray detection via large-area plastic scintillators. The three predominant themes of these investigations comprised the following: * Maximizing light collection efficiency from a single large-area sheet of plastic scintillator, and optimizing hardware event trigger definition to retain detection efficiency while exploiting the power of coincidence to suppress single-PMT "dark current" background; * Utilizing anti-Compton vetoing and supplementary spectral information from a co-located secondary, or "Back" detector, to both (1) minimize Compton background in the low-energy portion of the "Front" scintillator's pulse-height spectrum, and (2) sharpen the statistical accuracy of the front detector's low-energy response prediction as impelmented in suitable energy-windowing algorithms; and * Investigating alternative materials to enhance the intrinsic gamma-ray detection efficiency of plastic-based sensors.

  14. Three centuries of insect outbreaks across the European Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büntgen, Ulf; Frank, David; Liebhold, Andrew; Johnson, Derek; Carrer, Marco; Urbinati, Carlo; Grabner, Michael; Nicolussi, Kurt; Levanic, Tom; Esper, Jan

    2009-06-01

    Knowledge of the persistence of regular larch budmoth outbreaks is limited in space and time. Although dendrochronological methods have been used to reconstruct insect outbreaks, their presence may be obscured by climatic influences. More than 5000 tree-ring series from 70 larch host and 73 spruce nonhost sites within the European Alps and Tatra Mountains were compiled. Site-specific assessment of growth-climate responses and the application of six larch budmoth detection methods considering host, nonhost and instrumental time-series revealed spatiotemporal patterns of insect defoliation across the Alpine arc. Annual maps of reconstructed defoliation showed historical persistence of cyclic outbreaks at the site level, recurring c. every 8-9 yr. Larch budmoth outbreaks occurred independently of rising temperatures from the Little Ice Age until recent warmth. Although no collapse in outbreak periodicity was recorded at the local scale, synchronized Alpine-wide defoliation has ceased during recent decades. Our study demonstrates the persistence of recurring insect outbreaks during AD 1700-2000 and emphasizes that a widely distributed tree-ring network and novel analysis methods can contribute towards an understanding of the changes in outbreak amplitude, synchrony and climate dependence.

  15. Process type identification in torrential catchments in the eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, M.; Scheidl, C.; Eisl, J.; Spangl, B.; Hübl, J.

    2015-03-01

    Torrential hazards are omnipresent in the alpine regions, as it frequently causes damage to infrastructures. In some cases, even people's lives are endangered. The classification of these processes takes place according to factors like sediment concentration and flow behaviour and ranges from fluvial process types, including water floods and fluvial sediment transport processes, to fluvial mass movements such as debris flows. Following the hypothesis of this study, a context exists between basic geomorphological disposition parameters and potential dominant flow process types in a steep headwater catchment. Thus, examined catchments were selected based on a historical event documentation of torrential events in the Austrian Alps. In total, 84 catchments could be analysed, and 11 different morphometric parameters were considered. To predict the dominant torrential process type within a catchment, a naive Bayes classifier, a decision tree model, and a multinomial regression model was trained against the compiled geomorphological disposition parameters. All models as well as their combination were compared. Based on bootstrapping and complexity, we present the classification model with the lowest prediction error for our data that might help to identify the most likely torrential process within a considered catchment.

  16. Debris-flow runout susceptibility mapping for the French Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Alexandre; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Remaître, Alexandre

    2014-05-01

    Debris-flows are one of the most important gravity-driven hazards in mountainous areas mainly due to their high velocity and long travel distance. Estimation of potential initiation areas and delineation of the down-slope endangered zones possibly affected by debris-flow deposits are crucial. The objective of this work is to propose a first delineation of debris flow susceptibility for the French Alps by combining information from a debris flow catalogue and runout analyses with a large scale debris flow model. The landslide source areas are estimated from statistics of recorded events in catchments and the dominant lithology, landcover and slope conditions observed in the catchments. The runout areas are estimated from a probabilistic approach using multiple flow routing algorithms and the angle of reach concept. Since the reliability of such an approach is closely linked to the accuracy of the topography, a digital elevation model at 25m resolution is used. The susceptibility analysis is carried out for each catchment and the reliability of the results (i.e. number of pixels as sources, etc.) is assessed by comparison with the landslide catalogues. Results indicate the most susceptible catchments where further detailed assessments are needed at smaller spatial scales.

  17. Statistically extrapolated nowcasting of summertime precipitation over the Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Bica, Benedikt; Tüchler, Lukas; Kann, Alexander; Wang, Yong

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a new multiple linear regression (MLR) approach to updating the hourly, extrapolated precipitation forecasts generated by the INCA (Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis) system for the Eastern Alps. The generalized form of the model approximates the updated precipitation forecast as a linear response to combinations of predictors selected through a backward elimination algorithm from a pool of predictors. The predictors comprise the raw output of the extrapolated precipitation forecast, the latest radar observations, the convective analysis, and the precipitation analysis. For every MLR model, bias and distribution correction procedures are designed to further correct the systematic regression errors. Applications of the MLR models to a verification dataset containing two months of qualified samples, and to one-month gridded data, are performed and evaluated. Generally, MLR yields slight, but definite, improvements in the intensity accuracy of forecasts during the late evening to morning period, and significantly improves the forecasts for large thresholds. The structure-amplitude-location scores, used to evaluate the performance of the MLR approach, based on its simulation of morphological features, indicate that MLR typically reduces the overestimation of amplitudes and generates similar horizontal structures in precipitation patterns and slightly degraded location forecasts, when compared with the extrapolated nowcasting.

  18. An inventory of glacial lakes in the Austrian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckel, Johannes; Otto, Jan-Christoph; Keuschnig, Markus; Götz, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    The formation of lakes is one of the consequences of glacier retreat due to climate change in mountain areas. Numerous lakes have formed in the past few decades in many mountain regions around the globe. Some of these lakes came into focus due to catastrophic hazard events especially in the Himalayas and the Andes. Glacial lake development and lifetime is controlled by the complex interplay of glacier dynamics, geomorphological process activity and geological boundary conditions. Besides the hazard potential new lakes in formerly glaciated areas will significantly contribute to a new landscape setting and to changing geomorphologic, hydrologic and ecologic conditions at higher alpine altitudes. We present an inventory of high alpine lakes in the Austrian Alps located above an altitude of 1700 m asl. Most of these lakes are assumed to be of glacial origin, but other causes for development, like mass movements are considered as well. The inventory is a central part of the project FUTURELAKES that aims at modelling the potential development of glacial lakes in Austria (we refer to the presentation by Helfricht et al. during the conference for more details on the modelling part). Lake inventory data will serve as one basis for model validation since modelling is performed on different time steps using glacier inventory data. The purpose of the lake inventory is to get new insights into boundary conditions for lake formation and evolution by analysing existing lake settings. Based on these information the project seeks to establish a model of lake sedimentation after glacier retreat in order to assess the potential lifetime of the new lakes in Austria. Lakes with a minimum size of 1000 m² were mapped using multiple aerial imagery sources. The dataset contains information on location, geometry, dam type, and status of sedimentation for each lake. Additionally, various geologic, geomorphic and morphometric parameters describe the lake catchments. Lake data is related to

  19. Fallout Radionuclides as Tracers in Southern Alps Sediment Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, A. E.; Karanovic, Z.; Dibb, J. E.

    2005-12-01

    The primary geologic processes shaping the landscape are physical and chemical weathering and the transport of solids by erosion. As part of our studies on the coupling between physical erosion and chemical weathering, we have determined depositional and erosional processes in New Zealand's tectonically active, rapidly uplifting Southern Alps, specifically focusing on the Hokitika River watershed. The South Island watersheds we are studying are subject to extreme orographic precipitation (as high as 7-12 m annually) and high landslide frequency, but have modest topography due to the rapid erosion. In concert with our studies of chemical weathering and physical erosion, we have used the atmospherically-delivered radionuclides of 7Be, 137Cs and 210Pbexcess to determine the relative magnitude of particle residence time in the high elevation Cropp and Whitcombe subwatersheds and the rates of sedimentation. One- and two-box modeling with 7Be and 210Pbexcess was used to determine soil and sediment residence times. Residence time of fine suspended particles is short and particles can travel the length of the river during a single storm, probably due to the short duration, high-intensity rainfalls which produce rapidly moving, steep flood waves. The readily detected peak of 137Cs activity in Cropp terrace and Hokitika gorge soils yielded sedimentation rates of 0.06-0.12 cm yr-1. At the Cropp terrace, inventory models of 210Pbexcess yield soil accumulation rates significantly less than those determined using the 137Cs activity peak. We attribute the differences to overestimation of 210Pbexcess in surface soils and to contrasting fallout fluxes, geochemical behavior and radionuclide contents of sedimenting materials. Total inventories of 210Pbexcess in soils greatly exceed the expected direct atmospheric deposition, suggesting that lateral transport of this nuclide occurs within the watershed. At the Hokitika gorge, all nuclides studied yielded similar sedimentation rates

  20. Post-glacial rock avalanche causing epigenetic gorge incision (Strassberg gorge, Eastern Alps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Diethard

    2015-04-01

    In the western part of the Eastern Alps, the Strassberg gorge 1.5 km in length and down to 100 m in depth shows a marked asymmetry in height of its right/left brinklines. The gorge is incised into Upper Triassic dolostones, and parallels an older valley filled with Quaternary deposits. Upstream, the valley-fill consists of (a) glacial till (Last Glacial Maximum, LGM), overlain by (b) a rock avalanche deposit (RAD) at least a few tens of meters thick, and (c) alluvial deposits shed over the RAD (except for projecting boulders); the RAD is locally also downlapped by scree slopes. Downstream, the valley-fill consists of glacio-fluvial deposits overlain by LGM till and, on top, the RAD. The rock avalanche defaced from the west slope of mount Hohe Munde (2662 m asl), and consists exclusively of clasts of Wetterstein Limestone (Triassic p. p.). Rock avalanche defacement was tied to a system of NW-SE trending strike-slip faults (Telfs fault zone). The rock avalanche descended before the old valley was significantly cleared of glaciofluvial/glacial deposits of the LGM. On a plateau west of the present bedrock gorge, LGM till is veneered over a large area by RAD; the till and the RAD both were later involved in slumping. The RAD covers a total planview area of ~3.7 square kilometers. The fahrböschung of the rock avalanche is reconstructed between 16°-14.5°. In its proximal part, the rock avalanche propagated by dynamic fragmentation; in the distal part, propagation was by sheet-like 'plug flow', perhaps in part over a snow cover. The filling of the old valley by the RAD led to: (a) formation and filling of a small intramontane basin directly upstream, and (b) incision of the present Strassberg gorge along a course westward-parallel to the old valley. Mean rates of bedrock incision required to form the deepest reach of the present canyon range from 1 cm/a (since 10 ka) to 0.7 cm/a (since 15 ka). In the considered area, talus breccias of pre-LGM age locally show zones of

  1. Italian students win a trip to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The six winners of the Progetto Lauree Scientifiche came to CERN to discover the LHC experiments. Six Italian high-school students visited CERN last week as part of a biennial project sponsored by the Italian Research ministry, the University of Ferrara and INFN. A total of 160 enthusiastic students took part in the project, which aims to introduce and foster interest in higher levels of science and technology. The Progetto Lauree Scientifiche prize was awarded to these students for their excellent grades in an examination covering various areas of physics, including laser, solid and particle physics. The winners spent six days at CERN touring the Laboratory and seeing first-hand the various aspects of research in one of the leading European centres, as well as the excitement of the particle physics adventure.

  2. Great landslide events in Italian artificial reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Panizzo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The empirical formulations to forecast landslide generated water waves, recently defined in the framework of a research program funded by the Italian National Dam Office RID (Registro Italiano Dighe, are here used to study three real cases of subaerial landslides which fell down italian artificial reservoirs. It is well known that impulse water waves generated by landslides constitute a very dangerous menace for human communities living in the shoreline of the artificial basin or downstream the dam. In 1963, the menace became tragedy, when a 270 millions m3 landslide fell down the Vajont reservoir (Italy, generated an impulse wave which destroyed the city of Longarone, and killed 2000 people. The paper is aimed at presenting the very satisfactorily reproduction of the events at hand by using forecasting formulations.  

  3. Great landslide events in Italian artificial reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizzo, A.; de Girolamo, P.; di Risio, M.; Maistri, A.; Petaccia, A.

    2005-09-01

    The empirical formulations to forecast landslide generated water waves, recently defined in the framework of a research program funded by the Italian National Dam Office RID (Registro Italiano Dighe), are here used to study three real cases of subaerial landslides which fell down italian artificial reservoirs. It is well known that impulse water waves generated by landslides constitute a very dangerous menace for human communities living in the shoreline of the artificial basin or downstream the dam. In 1963, the menace became tragedy, when a 270 millions m3 landslide fell down the Vajont reservoir (Italy), generated an impulse wave which destroyed the city of Longarone, and killed 2000 people. The paper is aimed at presenting the very satisfactorily reproduction of the events at hand by using forecasting formulations.

  4. The Italian Registry of kernicterus and hyperbilirubinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratesi, Simone; Dani, Carlo; Raimondi, Francesco; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2012-10-01

    to monitor the incidence of cases of kernicterus and severe hyperbilirubinemia in Italy over time, and to describe each single registered event with sufficient information in order to identify one or more possible failures in the management of jaundice. the Task Force on hyperbilirubinemia of the Italian Society of Neonatology will draw up national guidelines for management of jaundice in the newborn and a national registry of kernicterus and hyperbilirubinemia for newborns with a gestational age greater than 34. the choice of the inclusion criteria for the registry and the minimum information necessary to describe each single event registered are reported and will be discussed at the national congress of the Italian Society of Neonatology next October 2012.

  5. 22nd Italian Workshop on Neural Nets

    CERN Document Server

    Bassis, Simone; Esposito, Anna; Morabito, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    This volume collects a selection of contributions which has been presented at the 22nd Italian Workshop on Neural Networks, the yearly meeting of the Italian Society for Neural Networks (SIREN). The conference was held in Italy, Vietri sul Mare (Salerno), during May 17-19, 2012. The annual meeting of SIREN is sponsored by International Neural Network Society (INNS), European Neural Network Society (ENNS) and IEEE Computational Intelligence Society (CIS). The book – as well as the workshop-  is organized in three main components, two special sessions and a group of regular sessions featuring different aspects and point of views of artificial neural networks and natural intelligence, also including applications of present compelling interest.

  6. Reaching and abandoning the furthest ice extent during the Last Glacial Maximum in the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Wirsig, Christian; Zasadni, Jerzy; Hippe, Kristina; Christl, Marcus; Akçar, Naki; Schluechter, Christian

    2016-04-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in the European Alps (late Würm) local ice caps and extensive ice fields in the high Alps fed huge outlet glaciers that occupied the main valleys and extended onto the forelands as piedmont lobes. Records from numerous sites suggest advance of glaciers beyond the mountain front by around 30 ka (Ivy-Ochs 2015 and references therein). Reaching of the maximum extent occurred by about 27-26 ka, as exemplified by dates from the Rhein glacier area (Keller and Krayss, 2005). Abandonment of the outermost moraines at sites north and south of the Alps was underway by about 24 ka. In the high Alps, systems of transection glaciers with transfluences over many of the Alpine passes dominated, for example, at Grimsel Pass in the Central Alps (Switzerland). 10Be exposure ages of 23 ± 1 ka for glacially sculpted bedrock located just a few meters below the LGM trimline in the Haslital near Grimsel Pass suggest a pulse of ice surface lowering at about the same time that the foreland moraines were being abandoned (Wirsig et al., 2016). Widespread ice surface lowering in the high Alps was underway by no later than 18 ka. Thereafter, glaciers oscillated at stillstand and minor re-advance positions on the northern forelands for several thousand years forming the LGM stadial moraines. Final recession back within the mountain front took place by 19-18 ka. Recalculation to a common basis of all published 10Be exposure dates for boulders situated on LGM moraines suggests a strong degree of synchrony for the timing of onset of ice decay both north and south of the Alps. Ivy-Ochs, S., 2015, Cuadernos de investigación geográfica 41: 295-315. Keller, O., Krayss, E., 2005, Vierteljahrschr. Naturforsch. Gesell. Zürich 150: 69-85. Wirsig, C. et al., 2016, J. Quat. Sci. 31: 46-59.

  7. Sensitivity and Specificity of Plasma ALT, ALP, and Bile Acids for Hepatitis in Labrador Retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, K; Burgener, I A; Rothuizen, J; van den Ingh, T S G A M; Penning, L C; Spee, B; Fieten, H

    2017-07-01

    Biochemical indicators for diagnosing liver disease are plasma alanine aminotransferase activity (ALT), alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), and bile acid concentration (BA). To determine the sensitivity and specificity of ALT, ALP, and BA for detecting primary hepatitis (PH) in clinically healthy Labrador retrievers and investigate whether ALT and ALP can discriminate between dogs with PH and nonspecific reactive hepatitis (RH). 191 clinically healthy and 51 clinically ill Labrador retrievers with hepatic histopathology. Retrospective study. Medical records were reviewed for ALT, ALP, preprandial BA, liver histopathology, and hepatic copper concentrations. In 64% (122/191) of the clinically healthy Labrador retrievers, hepatic histology revealed inflammatory infiltrates. This frequency might be biased because part of them was included as first-line relatives of dogs with copper-associated hepatitis. Sensitivity of ALT, ALP, and BA in this population for detecting acute hepatitis was 45, 15, and 15%, respectively. For chronic hepatitis, sensitivity was 71, 35, and 13%, respectively. Specificity of ALT, ALP, and BA was >90% for AH, CH, and RH. When increased liver enzymes were present, median ALT was significantly higher in PH cases (312 U/L, range 38-1,369) compared to RH cases (91 U/L, range 39-139) (P dogs with a PH and a RH (P = .361). Histopathologic abnormalities in the liver were present in the majority of apparent clinically healthy Labrador retrievers. The sensitivity of ALT, ALP, and BA for detecting acute and chronic hepatitis in this population was low. More sensitive biomarkers are needed for early detection of liver disease in apparent clinically healthy dogs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Italian something. Intervista a Franco Berardi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Berardi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this interview is to analyze, on the one side, the relationship between Franco Berardi’s thought and the most significant moments in his intellectual profile, with its permanent exchange with the political, intellectual and artistic milieu. On the other side, it is taken into account the relationship between Berardi’s thought and that group of theories and critical reflections that are currently known as Italian Theory.

  9. Verso una IDT federata delle Regioni Italiane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Salvemini

    2013-06-01

    REGIONALI” al quale si rimanda per la completa trattazione e gli approfondimenti. In the article an innovative patchwork model for integration of sub-national SDIs within national SDI is discussed according to the feasability study that the union of Italian Regions carried out in 2013 spring. Multi scale and innovative policies for SDIs management are discussed and essential information of national SDI evolution are explained.

  10. Italian print magazines and subscription discounts

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Mangani

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the antecedents of subscription discounts of Italian print magazines. Drawing on previous empirical work on the theme, I formulate six research hypotheses regarding demand and supply factors that may affect subscription pricing. The two-sidedness of magazine industry is considered implicitly in the empirical analysis. The empirical observations show that the issue frequency, economies of scope deriving from publishing multiple titles, intra-category competition and content ...

  11. First mycological investigations on italian bats.

    OpenAIRE

    Voyron, Samuele; Lazzari, Alexandra; Riccucci, Marco; Calvini, Mara; Varese, Giovanna Cristina

    2010-01-01

    To ascertain the occurrence of White-nose syndrome or similar mycotic diseases in Italian bats, fifteen bat carcasses (Myotis capaccini, Miniopterus schreibersii, Myotis sp., Pipistrellus sp.) found in a cave in southern Italy, two dead bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros) collected in a cave in Piedmont, and three living bats (Tadarida teniotis, Hypsugo savii and Pipistrellus nathusii) sampled in Turin (NW Italy) were analysed. Fortysix fungal strains, belonging to 15 species, were isolated in pu...

  12. An econometric study of an Italian bank

    OpenAIRE

    Gritti, Paola; Foss, Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    We empirically address how customer satisfaction and loyalty in the banking industry may affect profitability. This helps to identify the strategy and competencies necessary to benefit from customer relationships which are important sources for improved performance in the banking. We do this by analyzing data collected on 2,105 customers of 118 branches of one of the biggest banks of an Italian banking group. We find that customer satisfaction impacts loyalty, which in turn has a direct effec...

  13. Italian market between hopes and fear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbero, Cristina

    2011-07-01

    The Italian PV market is in turmoil due to the announced cutbacks in subsidies. After an exceptional 2010, with historic results, the market is now facing a dramatic slowdown. According to unconfirmed rumours, some large companies have already cancelled their participation in the Verona Solarexpo, the most important expo for green energy in Italy, which will take place from May 4 to 6, 2011. (orig.)

  14. Nutritional habits in Italian university students

    OpenAIRE

    Adele Anna Teleman; Chiara de Waure; Valentina Soffiani; Andrea Poscia; Maria Luisa Di Pietro

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dietary habits have been indicated by research as key elements in both disease pathogenesis and prevention and health promotion. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed data collected from Italian university students regarding consumption of fruits, vegetables, fast-foods, sweets, energizing drinks, and coffee, average number of eating episodes per day and regularity of breakfast habits. RESULTS: 44% of the university student population eats in average at least 1 portion of fruit per...

  15. TWO NEW ITALIAN CEUTORHYNCHUS (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Colonnelli

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Are described and illustrated two new Italian species of Ceutorhynchus. The first of them, C. apenninus n. sp. from central Italy, collected on the montane crucifer Isatis allionii P. W. Ball., is close to C. peyerimhoffi Hustache from Spain, Italy and Algeria, also living on Isatis. The second, C. magnanoi n. sp. from southern Italy is very close to the French C. matthiolae Hoffmann, and was collected of Matthiola like the species from southern France.

  16. Pharmacovigilance and the Italian Medicines Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimpinella, Giuseppe; Tartaglia, Loriana

    2013-01-01

    The new European Union (EU) regulations on pharmacovigilance require that the national systems are strengthened in order to fit the new requirements. The Italian Pharmacovigilance System, coordinated by the Italian Medicines Agency (AIFA), is made by local and regional structures. In 2007, a program for funding active pharmacovigilance projects in the Italian Regions was established by the National law. The AIFA is responsible for the preparation of guidelines aimed at the identification of research areas and for the approval of the projects submitted by the regions. In April 2012, the AIFA started a program of visits at the regional pharmacovigilance centers (RPCs), aimed at monitoring their performances, evaluating the quality of the activities in order to understand the main differences and discrepancies and with a view to start a program of harmonization of the procedures in place. The outcome of the visits program highlighted major differences among the quality management systems of the various centers; hence, AIFA has decided to launch an initiative to promote in the next months the harmonization of procedures. The synergy among AIFA, regional structures, RPCs, and local structure responsible for pharmacovigilance is needed in order to establish a robust pharmacovigilance system working in full compliance with the provisions of the new EU legislation. PMID:24347980

  17. Genetics and biotechnologies in Italian mass media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mini Silvio

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available S everal researchers operating in the sociological field have recently theorised that genetics and biotechnologies are at the core of the public perception of science. The present study aims at verifying empirically whether or not this is mirrored in Italian mass media, as well as at analysing the topics most frequently present in Italian newspapers and the economic and editorial reasons behind the results of editorial choices. Besides, it provides statistics about the major Italian newspapers published in the last third of 2002. This period has been chosen because some important news was published in December: it consequently offered the chance to carry out a long-term analysis as well as a study of the most important differences - in content and editorial lay-out - between scientific articles which are published in the appropriate sections inside the newspaper and those which make the front page. Ours are going to be purely quantitative considerations; but, from the point of view of the content, the data are sufficient to identify various narrative currents. These currents could be the object of further research on the frames used to contextualize the news and the reasons (anthropological, socio-cultural and editorial for the way they are used by editorial staffs.

  18. Old italian reference systems and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiocchi, Valerio; Lelo, Keti

    2010-05-01

    The history of geodetic systems used in Italy from the end of the XIX century to the beginning of the XXth century is complex and, in the past, this has led some researcher to misinterpretations. For this reason an explanation of geodetic systems used in Italy in this period is reported in this paper. Towards the end of the XIXth century, the " Ufficio Tecnico del Corpo di Stato Maggiore" (first nucleus of the future IGM) was entrusted to unify the geodetic reference systems of the Italian pre-union states to produce a unique Italian Datum for the whole national territory. At the same time, the "Ufficio del Catasto" (National Cadastre Office), for its purposes, began the production of a cartography in projection Cassini-Soldner representing only the thematic layer of its interest: the delimitations of properties. Although officially the Datums used in those years are the same both for cadastre and IGM (Genoa, Monte Mario, Castanea delle Furie), in many cases temporary orientations were used on cadastral maps and the values of first, second and third order vertexes do not coincide with those definitive ones used by the IGM. This ambiguity led frequently to misinterpretation and errors to georeferenciation of present and historic Italian cartography

  19. Itineraries and specificities of Italian medical anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppilli, Tullio

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the birth (or rebirth) of Italian medical anthropology around the middle of the 1950s, and its subsequent complex development up to the present. During this fairly long process, the author played a role that was probably of some importance, that of both a direct witness and active participant. Here these developments are briefly reviewed, in an attempt to single out some of the stimuli and the most significant occasions that have happened, their theoretical and methodological reference points, the main lines of research that have been tackled along the way, as well as the 'social demand' and the 'social use' that have integrated and oriented the practice of the new discipline within the horizon of some of the more general problems of Italian society. In outlining here the profile of and the various events in Italian medical anthropology, this paper takes into account the fact that, although a medical anthropology with that name and the disciplinary set-up that are now internationally attributed to it began in Italy only in the mid-1950s, important lines of research to which we would today attach that name had been undertaken long ago.

  20. Residential construction cost: An Italian survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesi, Rubina; Marella, Giuliano

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports data describing development projects for new buildings according to construction costs in North-East Italy. A survey was carried out on local companies undertaking new residential development projects in two Italian regions (Veneto and Lombardy). The aim of this survey was to record new real estate construction projects, collecting both technical and socio-economic cost features. It is extremely difficult to collect such data for the Italian real estate construction sector, due to its lack of transparency, so that the novelty for the Italian scenario is the dataset itself. Another interest perspective of this survey is that socio-economic characteristics were also recorded; they are often studied in urban economics, but are usually related to property purchase prices and values, not to construction costs. The data come from an analysis of Canesi and Marella regarding the relationship between the trend of construction costs and the socio-economic conditions of the reference setting, such as the mean years of schooling of the workforce, housing market trends, and average per capita income.

  1. Residential construction cost: An Italian survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Canesi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports data describing development projects for new buildings according to construction costs in North-East Italy. A survey was carried out on local companies undertaking new residential development projects in two Italian regions (Veneto and Lombardy. The aim of this survey was to record new real estate construction projects, collecting both technical and socio-economic cost features. It is extremely difficult to collect such data for the Italian real estate construction sector, due to its lack of transparency, so that the novelty for the Italian scenario is the dataset itself. Another interest perspective of this survey is that socio-economic characteristics were also recorded; they are often studied in urban economics, but are usually related to property purchase prices and values, not to construction costs. The data come from an analysis of Canesi and Marella regarding the relationship between the trend of construction costs and the socio-economic conditions of the reference setting, such as the mean years of schooling of the workforce, housing market trends, and average per capita income.

  2. Italian quality assurance in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giovanni; Agnetti, Germana; Bosio, Roberto; De Luca, Pasquale; Erlicher, Arcadio; Morganti, Carla; Neri, Giovanni; Re, Edoardo; Semisa, Domenico; Fioritti, Angelo

    2014-06-01

    Since the radical changes in Italian mental health law in the 1970s, quality assurance models have gained consensus as the most suitable service assessment tool. In the 1990s, the whole Italian National Health System changed into a corporate model, and an accreditation system was implemented.The Italian Association for Quality and Accreditation in Mental Health (Associazione Italiana per la Qualità e l'Accreditamento in Salute Mentale [QUASM]) was founded in 1984, and since then, it offers consultation and support for Mental Health Departments and Regional Governments to help them to develop psychiatric programs, self-evaluation, educational programs, and professional peer-model accreditation. The QUASM accreditation manual has now gone through several revisions, the last in 2008. Until 2008, QUASM was successful in promoting quality and facilitating both institutional and professional accreditation. However, radical changes triggered by financial crisis have jeopardized quality assurance implementation. Nowadays, the challenge for QUASM is to maintain quality and accreditation geared to excellence against prevailing leveling trends.

  3. The New Modern Mediterranean Diet Italian Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, V; Germani, A; Capuzzo Dolcetta, E; Donini, L M; Del Balzo, V

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have established the health benefits associated with the adherence to the MD (Mediterranean Diet), mainly in relation to reducing the risk of developing the non communicable diseases. The MD is a sustainable diet model that respects the environment, promotes the bio-diversity, the local cultural heritages, the social interaction and economic aspects. The pyramid is a graphical representation designed to represent the frequencies of consumption and portion sizes of each food according to the Mediterranean model and tradition. The pyramid was developed taking into account the LARN (Reference Intake of nutrients and energy for Italian Population) and the Italian Guidelines for a healthy diet. The frequency of consumption and the portion size recommended are located at the different level of the pyramid. At the base of the pyramid there are the foods that should be consumed every meal and some concepts typical of the Mediterranean culture. In the middle there are foods that should be consumed daily and at the top of the pyramid the foods consumed on a weekly basis. The new modern MD Italian Pyramid is an important tool to promote the MD and improve the adherence to the MD dietary pattern.

  4. Italian Validation of Homophobia Scale (HS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, Giacomo; Capuano, Nicolina; Tuziak, Bogdan; Mollaioli, Daniele; Limoncin, Erika; Valsecchi, Diana; Carosa, Eleonora; Gravina, Giovanni L; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Lenzi, Andrea; Jannini, Emmanuele A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Homophobia Scale (HS) is a valid tool to assess homophobia. This test is self-reporting, composed of 25 items, which assesses a total score and three factors linked to homophobia: behavior/negative affect, affect/behavioral aggression, and negative cognition. Aim The aim of this study was to validate the HS in the Italian context. Methods An Italian translation of the HS was carried out by two bilingual people, after which an English native translated the test back into the English language. A psychologist and sexologist checked the translated items from a clinical point of view. We recruited 100 subjects aged18–65 for the Italian validation of the HS. The Pearson coefficient and Cronbach's α coefficient were performed to test the test–retest reliability and internal consistency. Main Outcome Measures A sociodemographic questionnaire including the main information as age, geographic distribution, partnership status, education, religious orientation, and sex orientation was administrated together with the translated version of HS. Results The analysis of the internal consistency showed an overall Cronbach's α coefficient of 0.92. In the four domains, the Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.90 in behavior/negative affect, 0.94 in affect/behavioral aggression, and 0.92 in negative cognition, whereas in the total score was 0.86. The test–retest reliability showed the following results: the HS total score was r = 0.93 (P homophobic behavior. PMID:26468384

  5. Ionizing radiations in Italian health care structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fizzano, M.R.; Frusteri, L. [Technical Advisory Dept. for Risk Assessment and Prevention, Italian Workers Compensation Authority, Rome (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The Council of the European Union has completely renewed the framework regarding radiation protection by adopting some directives: Directive 97/43 EURATOM lays down the general principles of the radiation protection of individuals undergoing exposure to ionising radiations related to medical exposures, as a supplement of Directive 96/29 EURATOM laying down the basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionising radiations.The incorporation into Italian legislation of the European Community directives on the improvement of health and safety at work has promoted a vast effort in order to revise the surveillance approach in many facilities, including hospitals. In Italy, safety law is referred to every workplace; anyway the use of ionising radiations is ruled by specific laws. So in the health care structures it is necessary integrating both the laws and this process is often difficult to carry on. The Italian Legislative Decree 230/95, one the main laws that aim to protect workers against ionising radiations, introduced Directive 96/29/EURATOM. This Decree asks that a doctor and a technical expert analyse the workplace and classify area and workers in according to dose of ionising radiation established by law. The Italian Legislative Decree 626/94 asks that risk analysis in general is made by doctor and specialist in risk. So, in case of risk from ionising radiation, all these figures have to cooperate in order to make an evaluation risk document. (N.C.)

  6. Acer-Fraxinus dominated woods of the Italian peninsula: a floristic and phytogeographical analysis

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    Claudia Angiolini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Forest communities dominated by noble broad-leaved trees (maple, lime and ash in Europe are of elevated scientific and con­servation interest for the European Union. In this paper, we first present a synthesis of the maple and ash forests in peninsular Italy. By classifying these forests, we distinguish seven main groups for the territory, which only broadly match the syntaxa proposed in the literature. The variability of the Apennine data is then analysed floristically and phytogeographically (using chorological components in a central-southern European context, using numerical classification, INSPAN, and direct ordination of several synoptic tables. These analyses allow us to identify six different groups of European Acer-Fraxinus communities. Canonical Vari­ates Analysis (CVA of the geographical components confirms the existence of distinct phytogeographical groups. In particular, we highlight the clear distinction between central European (including the Alps and southern European coenoses. Among the latter there was a clear floristic and chorological distinction between Balkan and Apennine groups. These results reflect the biogeographical subdivisions of Europe, but do not support the syntaxonomical schemes proposed by other authors, which are based only on floristic-ecological information or (recently use a smaller data set of Italian relevés. This study also shows that syntaxonomical schemes above the association level should pay more attention to phytogeographical aspects rather than focus on floristic-ecological information alone, in order to propose models that are of value on a geographical scale.

  7. Open letter to the Italian Ministry of University and Research

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    O'Grady K

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Open letter to the Minister of Italian University. The government should get advice from the best Italian scientists for the necessary reform of the Italian University, with special concern to crucial processes as the appointment of new professors and academic evaluation. The current government proposal for a random draw of evaluation committees in charge for the appointment of new professors is considered as a wrong solution and harmful tool for dealing with such a crucial process.

  8. A Benchmark Analysis of Italian Seaports Using Data Envelopment Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Pestana Barros

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses data envelopment analysis to evaluate the performance of Italian seaports from 2002 to 2003, combining operational and financial variables. The paper evaluates how close the Italian seaports are to the frontier of best practices. Moreover, the paper also tests for the role played by size, containerisation and labour in the efficiency of the seaports analysed. The general conclusion is that the Italians seaports examined display relatively high efficiency. However, there are al...

  9. Representation of the serial killer on the Italian Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, P; Bastianoni, P; Melotti, G

    2001-10-01

    The representation of serial killers was examined from the analysis of 317 Web pages in the Italian language to study how the psychological profiles of serial killers are described on the Italian Internet. The correspondence analysis of the content of these Web pages shows that in Italy the serial killer is associated with words such as "monster" and "horror," which suggest and imply psychological perversion and aberrant acts. These traits are peculiar for the Italian scenario.

  10. Defective anti-polysaccharide response and splenic marginal zone disorganization in ALPS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neven, Bénédicte; Bruneau, Julie; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Meyts, Isabelle; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Moens, Leen; Lanzarotti, Nina; Weller, Sandra; Amiranoff, Denise; Florkin, Benoit; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Leverger, Guy; Ferster, Alice; Chantrain, Christophe; Blanche, Stéphane; Picard, Capucine; Molina, Thierry Jo; Brousse, Nicole; Durandy, Anne; Rizzi, Marta; Bossuyt, Xavier; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frederic

    2014-09-04

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) caused by impaired FAS-mediated apoptosis of lymphocytes is characterized by lymphoproliferation, autoimmunity, but also an increased risk of invasive bacterial infection, notably following splenectomy. We surveyed a cohort of 100 ALPS patients (including 33 splenectomized) and found that 12 (10 splenectomized) had experienced 23 invasive bacterial infections mainly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. This vulnerability was associated with evidence of defective B-cell function characterized by low serum immunoglobulin (Ig) M, low IgM antibody production in response to S pneumoniae following nonconjugated immunization, and low blood memory B-cells counts (including marginal zone [MZ] B-cell counts). This immunodeficiency strongly correlated with intensity of lymphoproliferation. Spleen sections from 9 ALPS patients revealed double-negative T-cell (DN-T) infiltration of the MZ, which was depleted of B cells. MZ in ALPS patients contained an abnormally thick layer of MAdCAM-1((+)) stromal cells and an excess of DN-Ts. DN-Ts were shown to express MAdCAM-1 ligand, the α4β7 integrin. These observations suggest that accumulating DN-Ts are trapped within stromal cell meshwork and interfere with correct localization of MZ B cells. Similar observations were made in spleens of fas-deficient mice. Our data revealed an unexpected mechanism by which ALPS results in anti-polysaccharide IgM antibody production-specific defect. Splenectomy should be avoided. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Hydrological and meteorological aspects of floods in the Alps: an overview

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    Baldassare Bacchi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This introductory paper presents and summarises recent research on meteorological and hydrological aspects of floods in the Alps. The research activities were part of the international research project RAPHAEL (Runoff and Atmospheric Processes for flood HAzard forEcasting and controL together with experiments within the Special Observing Period-SOP conducted in autumn 1999 for the Mesoscale Alpine Programme —MAP. The investigations were based on both field experiments and numerical simulations, using meteorological and hydrological models, of ten major floods that occurred in the past decade in the European Alps. The two basins investigated were the Ticino (6599 km2 at the Lago Maggiore outlet on the southern side of the Alps and the Ammer catchment (709 km2 in the Bavarian Alps. These catchments and their sub-catchments cover an appropriate range of spatial scales with which to investigate and test in an operational context the potential of both mesoscale meteorological and distributed hydrological models for flood forecasting. From the data analyses and model simulations described in this Special Issue, the major sources of uncertainties for flood forecasts in mid-size mountain basins are outlined and the accuracy flood forecasts is assessed. Keywords: floods, mountain hydrology, meteorological models, Alps

  12. Adjacent Lone Pair (ALP) Effect: A Computational Approach for Its Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huaiyu; Wu, Wei; Ahmed, Basil M; Mezei, Gellert; Mo, Yirong

    2016-05-23

    The adjacent lone pair (ALP) effect is an experimental phenomenon in certain nitrogenous heterocyclic systems exhibiting the preference of the products with lone pairs separated over other isomers with lone pairs adjacent. A theoretical elucidation of the ALP effect requires the decomposition of intramolecular energy terms and the isolation of lone pair-lone pair interactions. Here we used the block-localized wavefunction (BLW) method within the ab initio valence bond (VB) theory to derive the strictly localized orbitals which are used to accommodate one-atom centered lone pairs and two-atom centered σ or π bonds. As such, interactions among electron pairs can be directly derived. Two-electron integrals between adjacent lone pairs do not support the view that the lone pair-lone pair repulsion is responsible for the ALP effect. Instead, the disabling of π conjugation greatly diminishes the ALP effect, indicating that the reduction of π conjugation in deprotonated forms with two σ lone pairs adjacent is one of the major causes for the ALP effect. Further electrostatic potential analysis and intramolecular energy decomposition confirm that the other key factor is the favorable electrostatic attraction within the isomers with lone pairs separated. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. TCF1 deficiency ameliorates autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS)-like phenotypes of lpr/lpr mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X; Yu, B; Cai, W; Huang, Z

    2017-06-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an incurable disease, which is characterized by non-malignant autoimmune lymphoproliferation. TCF1 is a key effector in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway, regulating the development, activation and function of T cells. In this study, we aimed to explore the potential role of TCF1 in the development of ALPS-like phenotypes of lpr/lpr mice. We acquired TCF1-/- lpr/lpr double mutant mice by crossing TCF1 deficiency mice with lpr/lpr mice. Splenocyte compositions, serum cytokines levels, antidsDNA antibody production and kidney pathology were examined in the TCF1-/- lpr/lpr mice. With these examinations, we revealed that TCF1 deficiency relieved most manifestations of ALPS-like phenotype, which were caused by Fas mutation in TCF1-/- lpr/lpr mice. Splenocyte total numbers and compositions were downregulated to the similar levels with wildtype mice. TE and TEM cells were decreased in TCF1-/- lpr/lpr compared with lpr/lpr mice. The levels of autoantibodies and proinflammatory factors in serum, and the histopathology changes and the relative mRNA levels of proinflammatory factors in kidney all displayed parallel tendency in TCF1-/- lpr/lpr mice. Our study demonstrated that TCF1 deficiency ameliorated the ALPS-like phenotypes of TCF1-/- lpr/lpr mice, which might indicate a potential therapeutic direction for ALPS. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  14. Noun-Noun Compounds in Italian Sports Column as a Proof of Tendencies in Modern Italian

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    Anna Szemberska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The compounding is a fundamental process of word formation and its importance to our understanding of language is crucial. The study of compounds for the last few years has been at the centre of attention in such areas of linguistics as computational approaches, psycholinguistics and language acquisition. Linguists advanced hypotheses not only regarding the construction of compounds, but also where they fit into the model of grammar. The paper attempts to answer some basic questions pertaining to lexical creativity in nominal compounding in Italian sports column. These include the definition of the concept, the types of noun-noun compounds in Modern Italian and a brief comparison of these types.

  15. Awareness of Phonological Segments and Reading Ability in Italian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Giuseppe; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of Italian and English-speaking children's (N=200) segmentation abilities indicated that the discrepancies between the language groups reflected the children's phonologic and orthographic differences. (CB)

  16. Holocene Erosion Patterns in European Alps Viewed from Lake Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, F.; Poulenard, J.; Giguet-Covex, C.; Wilhelm, B.; Revillon, S.; Jenny, J. P.; Revel, M.; Enters, D.; Bajard, M.; Fouinat, L.; Doyen, E.; Simonneau, A.; Chapron, E.; Vannière, B.; Sabatier, P.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we review the scientific efforts that were led over the last decades to reconstruct erosion from continuous alpine lake sediment records. Whereas most available geological records of Holocene terrigenous input focused in climate we propose a regional approach without any a priori regarding erosion forcing factors. In that aim, we integrated a set of sediment sequences from various environment along an altitudinal gradient from 200 up to 2400m asl in Northern French Alps. Altogether our data point climate change as one of the main factor of erosion variability. In particular, the last two cold spells that occurred during the early middle age (Dark Age) and between the 14th and the 20th century AD (Little Ice Age) appear to be outstanding compared to any other periods of enhanced erosion along the Holocene. The climatic forcing of those erosion phases is supported by an increase in the contribution of glacier-eroded material at a regional scale. However, at local scales, our data point the growing importance, since at least the mid Bronze Age (ca. 3500 cal. BP) of human activities as a major erosion factor. This influence peaked during the late Iron Age and Antiquity periods (200 BC - 400 AD) when we record a regional generalised period of enhanced erosion in response to the development of pasturing activities. Thanks to provenance and weathering markers, we evidenced a strong relationship between the changes in ecosystems, soil development and erosion patterns. We hence showed the vegetal colonisation of bared soil led to a period of intense weathering while new soils were under formation between 11,000 and 8,000 cal. BP. Soils then knew an optimum until the onset of the Neoglacial at ca. 4,500 cal. BP prior to decline under both climate and human pressures. Altogether our data point the complexity of processes that affected the Earth critical zone along the Holocene and especially since humans became a major geologic agent. However, we highlight the

  17. Revised interpretation of Mueller Glacier moraines, Southern Alps, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznichenko, Natalya; Davies, Tim; Winkler, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    A sequence of moraine ridges on the Mueller Glacier foreland, Southern Alps, New Zealand has previously formed part of a database used to develop a local/regional palaeoclimate chronology; however, it is possible that factors other than climate may have caused or influenced these moraine formations. Rock avalanches that deposit large volumes of rock debris on glacier ablation zones can affect glacier behaviour and cause moraine formation that does not necessarily reflect a climatically-driven advance (Reznichenko et al., 2011). Therefore, prior to the correlation of dated moraines with regional climate alterations, it is required to determine the genesis of these features. In previous studies the possible formation of some Mueller moraines by large-scale mass movements has been neglected that could have resulted in wrong assumptions of moraine positions having been entirely forced by climate change. The presence of modern rock avalanche deposits on glaciers in the Aoraki/Mt. Cook area indicates the probable contribution of supraglacial rock avalanches to the formation of these moraines in the past. This argument was recently supported by the presence of rock-avalanche-indicating agglomerates found in the sediment from two Mueller Glacier moraine ridges (Reznichenko et al., 2012). Previous interpretations of these ridges are inconsistent and are usually attributed to reflecting several glacial climatic-driven advances. In current research presented morphological and sedimentological analysis evidence that this feature is a single moraine (the "Mueller Memorial Moraine") formed following supraglacial transport of a large volume of rock avalanche debris to the glacier snout. Because a moraine formed by this process has no necessary association with a climate event, this finding raises concerns about the palaeoclimatic significance of this moraine; and, by implication, of other moraines in similar situations. References Reznichenko, N.V., Davies, T.R. and Alexander, D

  18. Management of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Two Important Italian Political Leaders: A Paradigm of Ethical and Technological Evolution of Neurosurgery During the Past Half-Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longatti, Pierluigi; Giombelli, Ermanno; Pavesi, Giacomo; Carteri, Alessandro; Feletti, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    For a curious and extraordinary coincidence, 5 of the 7 most relevant leaders of the Italian Communist Party (Partito Comunista Italiano, which was established in 1921, has been the biggest Communist Party in Western Countries) suffered a cerebral stroke. Cerebrovascular diseases afflicted also Stalin and Lenin, and a number of Presidents of the United States. We present the stories of 2 important Italian political leaders who shared both the leadership role of the major left Italian Party and the dramatic experience of a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Retracing their medical incidents, separated by 50 years of history, we show how a fatal medical disease has become neurosurgical and successfully cured thanks to the advances of neurosurgery, neuroradiology, and hospital organization. A neurologic disease that was disgraceful 50 years ago has lost any disquieting and embarrassing significance in the present time to the light of evolution of vascular neurosurgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of Italian FDI in Southeast Europe's international integration. A focus on investors from the Marche region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Cutrini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Southeast European countries have experienced significant economic integration into the world economy since 2000, through international capital flows and especially foreign direct investment (FDI. The work sheds light on recent trends in Italy-Western Balkans economic integration through FDI and other non-equity modes (NEMs. The methodology applied is based on country-level analysis, enriched by a case study approach. Main trends, characteristics and motivation of investments in the area are investigated. Based on this evidence, we suggest that the phenomenon of Italian integration in the Western Balkans is broader than official statistics would indicate, since Italian firms often set up subsidiaries through various non-equity arrangements. The surge in FDI in the area is recent, therefore it is not surprising that the main determinants are cost reductions and new market opportunities. What is interesting in this context is that local entrepreneurs regard efficiency-seeking investments as profitable only if they are connected to market-seeking goals. We find evidence also of localized industrial development stimulated by the entry of Italian firms, which is activating subcontracting relationships with existing companies in the host region. Further and in depth studies are needed to investigate the phenomenon

  20. Hydrogeological and geochemical overview of the karst aquifers in the Apuan Alps (Northwestern Tuscany, Italy

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    Matia Menichini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Apuan Alps, in north-western Tuscany (Italy, have a very complex geological structure. For this reason karst springs show very different behaviours according to the geological setting of aquifer systems. More than 80 springs are fed by carbonate aquifers; flow rates (Q range from 10 to 1600 L/s, in average, temperatures range from 8 to 15 °C. Deep and very slow groundwater flow feed some low-thermal springs (20-30 °C. Major karst springs (Q > 100 L/s are concentrated in two altimetry ranges, one from 200 to 300 m a.s.l. in the seaward side (SW-NW and a second one from 500 to 600 m a.s.l. on the inner (NE-SE side of the mountain range. Most of the springs are the final destination of large karst systems developed in meta-dolomite and marbles characterized by a very rapid flow. Some springs have a regular regime and are fed by bathyphreatic systems in metamorphic rocks or by carbonate aquifers with a major contribution of fissured drainage in non-metamorphic rocks. Large physical-chemical variations, both in space and time, are observed as a consequence of lithological heterogeneity, mixing processes and hydrodynamic conditions. Most waters are of the Ca-HCO3 type, but Ca-SO4 and Na-Cl facies are also present. A wide range of electrical conductivity is recorded, with values between 0.1 μS/cm and 10 μS/cm. Significant differences in the average isotopic signature (e.g. δ18O from -5.5 to -8.5‰ of the “base-flow” are registered due to the variability of hydrogeological basins dimension and their distribution in terms of altitude range and side. In some cases, springs with similar chemical features and located close to each other, point out very different isotopes signature, thus highlighting complicated flow path of groundwater. Furthermore, different seasonal evolutions of isotopic signatures are registered.

  1. Evidence for preferences of Italian patients for physician attire

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    Sotgiu G

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Giovanni Sotgiu1, Paolo Nieddu2, Laura Mameli2, Enrico Sorrentino2, Pietro Pirina3, Alberto Porcu4, Stefano Madeddu1, Manuela Idini1, Maddalena Di Martino1, Giuseppe Delitala2, Ida Mura1, Maria Pina Dore21Epidemiology and Medical Statistics Unit, Department of Biomedical Sciences, 2Clinica Medica, 3Pneumologia, 4Chirurgia dell’Obesità, University of Sassari, Sassari, ItalyBackground: The relationship between patient and physician is a complex interaction that includes multiple factors. The objective of this study was to explore Italian patients’ preferences regarding physician appearance.Methods: A questionnaire was developed to survey patients in different medical and surgical settings; each subject was asked to choose one picture of either a male or female physician from a selection of different attires (professional, casual, surgical scrubs, trendy, and careless. Patients were also surveyed about issues such as the presence of a name tag, hair length, trousers on women, amount of makeup, presence of tattoos, and body piercing. Statistical analysis was performed using a Chi-square test.Results: A total of 765 questionnaires (534 completed from patients waiting for an internal medicine visit and 231 for other subspecialties were completed. The majority (45% of patients preferred the gastroenterologist to wear a surgical scrub with a white coat. For the other specialists, patients accepted either scrubs or formal dress under a white coat (P ≤ 0.05, with a name tag. Trendy attire was preferred by nine patients (1.1%. The entire sample judged it inappropriate for clinicians to have long hair, visible tattoos, body piercing, and, for women, to wear trousers and use excessive makeup.Conclusion: This is the first study conducted in Italy regarding physician attire. As in other Western countries, Italian patients favor physicians in professional attire with a white coat. Wearing professional dress is part of “etiquette based medicine” and

  2. Projected bounds on ALP-photon coupling from simulated ATHENA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, N.; Day, F.; Conlon, J.; Muia, F.; Krippendorf, S.

    2017-10-01

    ALPs (Axion-Like Particles) are light pseudo-scalars that are a well motivated extension of the Standard Model. These particles couple to photons in the presence of a magnetic field, and ultralight ALPs are converted particularly efficiently in galaxy clusters. At X-ray energies this coupling will induce quasi-sinusoidal oscillations in the spectrum of any object in or behind the cluster, allowing us to place bounds on this interaction from observations of AGNs in galaxy clusters. The X-IFU instrument on ATHENA will represent a huge leap forward in our ability to constrain ALP-photon interactions in this way, due to its predicted energy resolution of 2.5 eV. In this talk I will present bounds derived from simulated Athena data and discuss how different design configurations will affect these bounds.

  3. Climats et premiers peuplements des Alpes du Nord françaises : des derniers chasseurs aux premiers paysans (15 000 à 5 000 ans av. JC. Climate and early settlements of the French Northern Alps: From the last hunters to the first farmers (15 000 to 5 000 BC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Bintz

    2011-10-01

    part are discussed the issues of chronology and palaeoenvironment revealed in particular by studies of animal associations and of vegetal environments.The episodes of prehistoric settlement are presented in a second part. It discusses the terms of the transition from last hunter-gatherers (Magdalenian, Azilian and Mesolithic to first agro-pastoralists in the Neolithic.In the third part is presented the evolution of major cultural trends across the Western Alps. A map clearly shows the progressive appropriation of the Western Alps from the peripheral regions.

  4. Changes of forest cover and disturbance regimes in the mountain forests of the Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebi, P; Seidl, R; Motta, R; Fuhr, M; Firm, D; Krumm, F; Conedera, M; Ginzler, C; Wohlgemuth, T; Kulakowski, D

    2017-03-15

    Natural disturbances, such as avalanches, snow breakage, insect outbreaks, windthrow or fires shape mountain forests globally. However, in many regions over the past centuries human activities have strongly influenced forest dynamics, especially following natural disturbances, thus limiting our understanding of natural ecological processes, particularly in densely-settled regions. In this contribution we briefly review the current understanding of changes in forest cover, forest structure, and disturbance regimes in the mountain forests across the European Alps over the past millennia. We also quantify changes in forest cover across the entire Alps based on inventory data over the past century. Finally, using the Swiss Alps as an example, we analyze in-depth changes in forest cover and forest structure and their effect on patterns of fire and wind disturbances, based on digital historic maps from 1880, modern forest cover maps, inventory data on current forest structure, topographical data, and spatially explicit data on disturbances. This multifaceted approach presents a long-term and detailed picture of the dynamics of mountain forest ecosystems in the Alps. During pre-industrial times, natural disturbances were reduced by fire suppression and land-use, which included extraction of large amounts of biomass that decreased total forest cover. More recently, forest cover has increased again across the entire Alps (on average +4% per decade over the past 25-115 years). Live tree volume (+10% per decade) and dead tree volume (mean +59% per decade) have increased over the last 15-40 years in all regions for which data were available. In the Swiss Alps secondary forests that established after 1880 constitute approximately 43% of the forest cover. Compared to forests established previously, post-1880 forests are situated primarily on steep slopes (>30°), have lower biomass, a more aggregated forest structure (primarily stem-exclusion stage), and have been more strongly

  5. Rainfall triggering soil slips in the southern Apuan Alps (Tuscany, Italy

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    R. Giannecchini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Apuan Alps are characterized by frequent heavy rainfall. In several cases this triggered many shallow landslides (soil slips. With the aim of contributing to the landslide hazard evaluation of the southern Apuan Alps (upper Versilian area, a detailed analysis of the main pluviometric events was carried out. Data recorded at the main raingauge of the area from 1975 to 2002 were analysed and compared with the occurrence of soil slips, in order to examine the relationship between soil slip initiation and rainfall. Some thresholds for soil slip-debris flow activity in terms of mean intensity, duration and mean annual precipitation (MAP were defined for the study area.

  6. A Hannibal's Treck Across The Alps: Geomorphological Analysis Of Sites Of Geoarchaeologicals Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, William C.; Kalm, Volli; Dirszowsky, Randy W.; Milner, Michael W.; Sodhi, Rana; Beukens, Roelf; Dorn, Ron; Tricart, Pierre; Schwartz, Stéphane; Chamorro-Perez, Eva; Boccia, Sal; Barendregt, René W.; Krinsley, D. H.; Seaquist, E. R.; Merrick, David; Kapran, Barbara

    A ~2200 year-old question related to Hannibal's invasion route across the Alps into Italia, has been argued by classicists without recovery of material evidence. A comparison of topographical descriptions in the ancient literature with environmental parameters in the Alps, attempted here for the first time, provides a database against which various pathways can be assessed. Identification of sites using geological, geomorphological, astronomical, chemical and petrological methods leads to the exclusion of certain transit points and targeting of others where geoarchaeological excavation might yield important evidence related to the military culture of ancient Carthage.

  7. Italian Validation of Homophobia Scale (HS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, Giacomo; Capuano, Nicolina; Tuziak, Bogdan; Mollaioli, Daniele; Limoncin, Erika; Valsecchi, Diana; Carosa, Eleonora; Gravina, Giovanni L; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Lenzi, Andrea; Jannini, Emmanuele A

    2015-09-01

    The Homophobia Scale (HS) is a valid tool to assess homophobia. This test is self-reporting, composed of 25 items, which assesses a total score and three factors linked to homophobia: behavior/negative affect, affect/behavioral aggression, and negative cognition. The aim of this study was to validate the HS in the Italian context. An Italian translation of the HS was carried out by two bilingual people, after which an English native translated the test back into the English language. A psychologist and sexologist checked the translated items from a clinical point of view. We recruited 100 subjects aged18-65 for the Italian validation of the HS. The Pearson coefficient and Cronbach's α coefficient were performed to test the test-retest reliability and internal consistency. A sociodemographic questionnaire including the main information as age, geographic distribution, partnership status, education, religious orientation, and sex orientation was administrated together with the translated version of HS. The analysis of the internal consistency showed an overall Cronbach's α coefficient of 0.92. In the four domains, the Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.90 in behavior/negative affect, 0.94 in affect/behavioral aggression, and 0.92 in negative cognition, whereas in the total score was 0.86. The test-retest reliability showed the following results: the HS total score was r = 0.93 (P homophobia. In this regard, the HS can be introduced into the clinical praxis and into programs for the prevention of homophobic behavior.

  8. Patient safety culture: an Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnasco, Annamaria; Tibaldi, Laura; Chirone, Paola; Chiaranda, Clara; Panzone, Maria Stella; Tangolo, Domenico; Aleo, Giuseppe; Lazzarino, Luciana; Sasso, Loredana

    2011-04-01

    To understand what level of awareness health professionals working in a hospital of Northern Italy had of the patient safety culture by using the Italian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire and also validate its use in this setting. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was developed by the Agency for Health Research and Quality in 2008 and validated by several studies. Therefore, we decided to test the Italian version of this tool to see if it could be used effectively to measure and appraise patient safety culture also in Italy. Survey. To check the validity of the questionnaire, we applied the continued comparison and the global data treatment methods. Of the 1008 questionnaires we administered, 724 (71%) were returned. The majority of the questions were answered (mean 98, SD 3·4%). From a Chi-square test on the consistency of the answers, we found that six of the 12 perspectives we explored had a high level of significance, whereas in the other six, the differences in the answers were just casual. The Italian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire allowed us to assess health professionals' awareness of patient safety culture and thus validate the effectiveness of this tool. The findings of our survey could be useful to design an objective tool that would allow the five health professional groups involved in the study (directors/coordinators, physicians, nurses/midwives, physiotherapists and technicians) gain a better knowledge of the patient safety culture and thus improve the quality of clinical practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Italian high altitude laboratories: past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo, A; Ponchia, A; Pecchio, O; Losano, G; Cerretelli, P

    2000-01-01

    Italy is a mountainous country with a total of 88 huts and bivouacs at altitudes higher than 3,000 m. Starting in the 19th century a great deal of research in high altitude pathophysiology has been carried out in Italy and many Italian physicians have been involved in mountain medicine. Most of the Italian research has been carried out at two locations: the scientific laboratories "Angelo Mosso" on Monte Rosa (Capanna Regina Margherita and Laboratorio Angelo Mosso), and the "Pyramid" in Nepal. The Capanna Regina Margherita, located on the top of Punta Gnifetti (Monte Rosa, 4,559 m), was inaugurated in 1893. With the support of Queen Margherita of Savoy, an Observatory for scientific studies was built beside this hut in 1894. In 1980 the hut was completely rebuilt by the Italian Alpine Club. The Istituto Angelo Mosso at Col d'Olen, at the base of Monte Rosa (at 2,900 m) was inaugurated in 1907. The high altitude laboratory named the "Pyramid" was built in 1990. Made of glass and aluminium, this pyramid-shaped structure is situated in Nepal at 5,050 m. The scientific laboratories "Angelo Mosso" on Monte Rosa (mainly the Capanna Regina Margherita) and the Pyramid form a nucleus for high altitude research: the former is especially devoted to research regarding acute mountain sickness and the response to subacute hypoxia, whereas the latter is a unique facility for research responses to chronic hypoxia, the effect of exposure to very high altitude, and the study of the resident population living in the Himalayas for at least 25,000 years.

  10. [We, the Italian physicians, and statins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbio, M

    2001-11-01

    After marketing withdrawal of cerivastatin physicians asked several questions regarding the efficacy and safety of statins, the real risk of myopathy, the compared efficacy of all the statins, the reasons why severe adverse events could happen despite several long-term randomized controlled trials, the approval from regulatory agencies. This is the position statement of the Italian Federation of Cardiology. Synthetic answers to previous questions are addressed and few suggestions to avoid that similar conditions should occur again. Finally, the appropriate prescription of statins is recommended.

  11. The Italian Economic Miracle In Coeval Cinema

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Adamo

    2013-01-01

    This essay explores the subject of the aversion of intellectuals to the market economy through a study of the Italian cinema of the early 1960s. The impact of Italy's ‘economic miracle’ on coeval cinema can hardly be overemphasized. Not only it inspired well-known art films, such as Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita and Michelangelo Antonioni's L'Eclisse, but it also played an inspirational role on the popular genre of the Commedia all'italiana, featuring as a context in Dino Risi’s Il Sorpass...

  12. Italian research on the Antarctic atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rafanelli

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work after a short introduction on the structure of Programma Nazionale di Ricerche in Antartide, the different researches on atmospheric physics developed by Italian scientists are presented. The international activities are described, with particular attention both to APE experiment and the setting up of the new base in Dome-C. The results obtained are also discussed and the new projects proposed by SCAR or other international bodies are recalled. The reduction of funds and fall in young people interested in scientifi c studies represent the main problems for the future work.

  13. Ledenik pod Skuto kot pokazatelj podnebnih sprememb v slovenskem delu Alp = The Skuta glacier as an indicator of climate changes in Slovenian part of the Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miha Pavšek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Anton Melik Geographical Institute SRC SASA provide the regular annual measurementsof Triglav and Skuta glaciers for more than six decades. Both glaciers show a permanentretreat. Last measurements undoubtedly confirm the importance of the glacier shady positionat the foothills of the surrounding walls. Comparison of glacier characteristics with somemeteorological data helps us to recognize the influence of climate changes on this, mostsoutheastern lying glaciers in the Alps.

  14. 3D modelling of the Austroalpine-Penninic collisional wedge of the NW Alps: dataset management and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monopoli, Bruno; Bistacchi, Andrea; Bertolo, Davide; Dal Piaz, Giovanni; Gouffon, Yves; Massironi, Matteo; Sartori, Mario; Vittorio Dal Piaz, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    We know since the beginning of the 20th century, thanks to mapping and structural studies by the Italian Regio Servizio Geologico (Franchi et al., 1908) and Argand's work (1909; 1911; 1916), that the Austroalpine-Penninic collisional wedge of the NW Alps is spectacularly exposed across the Aosta Valley and Valais ranges (Italy and Switzerland). In the 150th anniversary of the first ascent to Ruskin's "most noble cliff in Europe" - the Cervino/Matterhorn (Whymper, July 14th 1865), first described in a geological profile by Giordano (1869) and in a detailed map by Gerlach (1869; 1871), we have seen the conclusion of very detailed mapping projects carried out in the last years over the two regions, with collaborative efforts across the Italy-Switzerland border, constellated by 4000 m-high peaks. These projects have pictured with an unprecedented detail (up to 1:10.000 scale) the geology of this complex region, resulting from pre-Alpine events, Alpine subduction- and collision-related ductile deformations, and finally late-Alpine brittle deformations from the Oligocene to the Present. Based on this dataset, we use up-to-date technology and software to undertake a 3D modelling study aimed at: i) reconstructing the 3D geometry of the principal tectonic units, ii) detecting and unravelling problems and incongruences in the 2D geometrical models, iii) modelling the kinematics of the Oligocene and Miocene brittle fault network using 2D and 3D balancing and palinspastic restoration techniques. In this contribution we mainly discuss the prerequisites of the project. Common geomodelling paradigms (mainly developed for the hydrocarbon industry) cannot be applied in this project due to (i) the little scale, (ii) the source of the data - fieldwork, and (iii) the polyphase ductile and brittle deformations in the metamorphic nappe stack. Our goals at the moment are to model the post-metamorphic fault network and the boundaries of the principal tectonic units, which will be

  15. Snow cover stability patterns in the Eastern European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterer, C.; Schweizer, J.

    2009-04-01

    Information on snowpack instability is highly relevant when assessing avalanche danger. However, manual snowpack observations including stability tests are usually sparse - in time and space, and their results are spatially variable. The amount of variation depends on the scale of investigation. To find distinct patterns of instability at a supra-regional scale we derived stability information from manual snow profile data collected in parts of the Eastern European Alps and analyzed it. The data consisted of over 1600 snow profiles recorded in Bavaria (Germany), South Tyrol (Italy), Tyrol (Austria) and Grisons (Switzerland) during the winters of 2005/2006 (N = 976) and 2006/2007 (N = 676). Due to differences in recording standards it was not possible to classify the profiles in regard to stability using well established stability interpretations. Therefore, a new stability index was developed based on the structural instability index. This stability index is solely based on manual snowpack data such as grain type, grain size, hand hardness and layer depth. Threshold values for the new stability index were determined using a training data set consisting of 477 snow profiles for which both the structural instability index and a manual stability interpretation were available. Persistent weak layers within the snowpack, i.e. faceted crystals, depth hoar and surface hoar, were nearly always present. The new stability index detected general instabilities such as a weak basal snowpack layers which generally form during cold and dry periods early in the winter season. Storm snow instabilities which typically persist for only a few days were not well detected with the new stability index. Profiles were analyzed in two-week intervals and stability patterns were identified visually. This interval was chosen based on the numbers of profiles which were available for a given time interval. A shorter interval would have resulted in an undersized number of profiles. On average

  16. Unravelling detailed kinematics of DSGSD morphostructures (Moosfluh, Swiss Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, Simon; Glueer, Franziska; Manconi, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Great Aletsch Glacier (Swiss Alps) is experiencing a remarkable retreat with rates in the order of 50 meters every year. In the current glacier tongue area, where several pre-existing landslides have been partially or completely unloaded from the glacier ice mass during the last 150 years, various types of landslide reactions (in terms of type, size and velocity) can be reconstructed and observed. In particular, a deep-seated gravitational slope instability located in the area called "Moosfluh" has shown during the past 20 years evidences of slow but progressive increase of surface displacement. The moving mass of the Moosfluh DSGSD affects an area of about 2 km2 and entails a volume estimated in the order of 150-200 Mm3. This DSGSD in gneissic rocks affects the entire slope and extents several 100 meters beyond the ridge separating the Aletsch from the Rhone valley. The slope morphology is complex and many ridges and depressions striking parallel to the slope have been observed and mapped in the past. Some of these ridges correspond to glacial trim lines, and could be dated as Egesen and Little Ice Age glacial re-advance stages. Other slope parallel structures were explained as up- and down-hill facing scarps, i.e. internal rupture planes, and most uphill facing scarps oriented parallel to the Alpine foliation were interpreted as toppling phenomena. However, most these structural and kinematic interpretations remained hypotheses, as all morphostructures were covered by soil and vegetation and no borehole displacement data were available, excluding direct verification of morphostructural interpretations. This is in fact a typical situation for many Alpine DSGSD, where observed phenomena developed slowly over long periods of time and can have many different structural and kinematic origins. In late summer 2016, an unusual acceleration of the Moosfluh DSGSD was observed in the central part of the landslide. Compared to previous years, when annual ground

  17. An Italian Social Learning Experience in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieri, Michelle; Diamantini, Davide; Paini, Germano

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on an experience of social learning realized in six Italian high schools in the 2012-2013 academic year. In this experience we used ThinkTag Smart, a new learning platform, to train 400 students. After an introduction concerning Information and Communication Technologies in Italian schools, this contribution will describe the…

  18. Occupational Gender Stereotypes and Problem-Solving in Italian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginevra, Maria Cristina; Nota, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The first purpose of the study was to establish how Italian adolescents perceive jobs in the newly emerging economy sectors as well as more traditional jobs from gender-stereotyped and gender-segregated perspectives. The second purpose was to verify the role of problem-solving and gender in gender-role stereotyping. A total of 217 Italian high…

  19. Performance responses of lambs of various ages to Italian ryegrass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum cv. Midmar) is often fertilized with high levels of nitrogen (N) in order to ensure maximum dry matter (DM) yields. This practice also increases the N content of herbage. This study was conducted to determine whether differences in the nitrogen (N) content of Italian ryegrass.

  20. Collective Training & Thinking in JAMD : The Italian JPOWX Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, L.R.M.A.; Schavemaker-Piva, O.; Meijer, Y.G.S.; Nuvoloni, P.; Cioli, C.; Manca, R.; Argiolas, G.

    2009-01-01

    Mission Training through Distributed Simulation (MTDS) has established itself as a powerful tool for collective training in the military domain. This potential has been recognized by the Italian Joint Forces Command and has led to the Italian participation in the 10th edition of Exercise Joint

  1. Titulus Scuola: the new file classification schema for Italian schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Penzo Doria

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the new file classification schema national for Italian schools, produced by the Italian Directorate General of Archives of the Ministry for Cultural Heritage, within the project Titulus Scuola. This classification schema represents the starting point for a standard documental system, aimed at the digital administration.

  2. Strategic Management Accounting in Universities: The Italian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agasisti, Tommaso; Arnaboldi, Michela; Azzone, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of management accounting in four major Italian universities, which have been struggling to build their strategy in a context of significant change. Following many OECD countries the Italian government has been changing its higher education system by giving more autonomy to universities. These changes pose a…

  3. Italian schools in Minas Gerais: organization, curriculum and social relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa Gomes Rodrigues

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Current research discusses the organization of Italian schools (private or linked to charities by their circumstances and curricula. The immigration phenomenon in Minas Gerais brought a large population of Italian immigrants on whose experience several schools were founded in some towns of the state of Minas Gerais,Brazil. Current essay investigates the common and differentiating factors of Italian Schools in the state? Documentary sources were analyzed on the organization of the following schools: Italian School linked to the Italian Beneficent Association in Belo Horizonte, and the schools Regina Margherita and Umberto Primo in Juiz de For a. The Umberto Primo school was associated to the Italian Society Umberto Primo and the Italian school Dante Alighieri was associated to the Società Dante Alighieri in Ouro Fino andUmbertoPrimoSchool in Nova Lima, linked to the Società Italiana of this town between 1899 and 1911. Current analysis contributes towards the clarification of similarities and differentiations on the organization of Italian Schools, and, inevitably, to the understanding of the schooling of immigrants in Minas Gerais.

  4. Analysis Regarding the Growing Presence of Italian Firms in Romania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stefano Valdemarin

    2015-01-01

    .... From the point of view of Italian firms, we have also analyzed the shifting paradigm of internationalization from a Vertical Foreign Direct Investment model to a Horizontal Foreign Direct Investment model. This paper can be useful for managers and entrepreneurs who are oriented towards investing in Romania following the path of Italian firms.

  5. At